WorldWideScience

Sample records for therapeutics recapitulating development

  1. Can injured adult CNS axons regenerate by recapitulating development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Brett J; Bradke, Frank

    2017-10-01

    In the adult mammalian central nervous system (CNS), neurons typically fail to regenerate their axons after injury. During development, by contrast, neurons extend axons effectively. A variety of intracellular mechanisms mediate this difference, including changes in gene expression, the ability to form a growth cone, differences in mitochondrial function/axonal transport and the efficacy of synaptic transmission. In turn, these intracellular processes are linked to extracellular differences between the developing and adult CNS. During development, the extracellular environment directs axon growth and circuit formation. In adulthood, by contrast, extracellular factors, such as myelin and the extracellular matrix, restrict axon growth. Here, we discuss whether the reactivation of developmental processes can elicit axon regeneration in the injured CNS. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Genome reactivation after the silence in mitosis: recapitulating mechanisms of development?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaret, Kenneth S

    2014-04-28

    Transcription is silenced during mitosis and reactivated at mitotic exit. The dynamics and identities of "bookmarking" transcription factors and chromatin marks that mediate reactivation often recapitulate those observed during cell identity establishment in development. Thus, features of postmitotic gene reactivation can provide insights into mechanisms of developmental cell fate establishment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Embryonic stem cell-derived embryoid bodies development in collagen gels recapitulates sprouting angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feraud, O; Cao, Y; Vittet, D

    2001-12-01

    The formation of new blood vessels proceeds by both vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. The development of models, which fully recapitulate spatio-temporal events involved during these processes, are crucial to fully understand their mechanisms of regulation. In vitro differentiation of murine embryonic stem (ES) cells has been shown to be a useful tool to investigate factors and genes potentially involved in vasculogenesis (Hirashima et al, 1999; Risau et al, 1988; Vittet et al, 1996; Wang et al, 1992; Wartenberg et al, 1998). We asked here whether this model system can also recapitulate angiogenesis, which may offer new means to study mechanisms involved in this process. ES-derived embryoid bodies (EBs) obtained after 11 days of differentiation, in which a primitive vascular network had formed, were then subcultured into a type I collagen matrix. In the presence of angiogenic growth factors, EBs rapidly developed branching pseudopods. Whole mount immunostainings with a PECAM antibody revealed that more than 75% EBs displayed, within a few days, a large number of endothelial outgrowths that can give tube-like structures with concomitant differentiation of alpha-smooth muscle actin positive cells, thus evoking sprouting angiogenesis. High expression levels of flk1 (VEGFR2), flt1 (VEGFR1), tie-1, and tie-2 are also found, indicating that budding endothelial cells displayed an angiogenic phenotype. The endothelial sprouting response was specifically induced by angiogenic factors with a major contribution of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Known angiostatic agents, such as platelet factor 4 (PF4), angiostatin, and endostatin inhibited the formation of endothelial sprouts induced by angiogenic factors. Moreover, consistent with the in vivo phenotype, VE-cadherin deficient EBs failed to develop angiogenesis in this model. ES cell differentiation can then recapitulate, in addition to vasculogenesis, the early stages of sprouting angiogenesis. This model system

  4. Recapitulation of Human Retinal Development from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generates Transplantable Populations of Cone Photoreceptors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anai Gonzalez-Cordero

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Transplantation of rod photoreceptors, derived either from neonatal retinae or pluripotent stem cells (PSCs, can restore rod-mediated visual function in murine models of inherited blindness. However, humans depend more upon cone photoreceptors that are required for daylight, color, and high-acuity vision. Indeed, macular retinopathies involving loss of cones are leading causes of blindness. An essential step for developing stem cell-based therapies for maculopathies is the ability to generate transplantable human cones from renewable sources. Here, we report a modified 2D/3D protocol for generating hPSC-derived neural retinal vesicles with well-formed ONL-like structures containing cones and rods bearing inner segments and connecting cilia, nascent outer segments, and presynaptic structures. This differentiation system recapitulates human photoreceptor development, allowing the isolation and transplantation of a pure population of stage-matched cones. Purified human long/medium cones survive and become incorporated within the adult mouse retina, supporting the potential of photoreceptor transplantation for treating retinal degeneration.

  5. Recapitulating cortical development with organoid culture in vitro and modeling abnormal spindle-like (ASPM related primary microcephaly disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The development of a cerebral organoid culture in vitro offers an opportunity to generate human brain-like organs to investigate mechanisms of human disease that are specific to the neurogenesis of radial glial (RG and outer radial glial (oRG cells in the ventricular zone (VZ and subventricular zone (SVZ of the developing neocortex. Modeling neuronal progenitors and the organization that produces mature subcortical neuron subtypes during early stages of development is essential for studying human brain developmental diseases. Several previous efforts have shown to grow neural organoid in culture dishes successfully, however we demonstrate a new paradigm that recapitulates neocortical development process with VZ, OSVZ formation and the lamination organization of cortical layer structure. In addition, using patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs with dysfunction of the Aspm gene from a primary microcephaly patient, we demonstrate neurogenesis defects result in defective neuronal activity in patient organoids, suggesting a new strategy to study human developmental diseases in central nerve system.

  6. Recapitulation of Human Retinal Development from Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Generates Transplantable Populations of Cone Photoreceptors

    OpenAIRE

    Anai Gonzalez-Cordero; Kamil Kruczek; Arifa Naeem; Milan Fernando; Magdalena Kloc; Joana Ribeiro; Debbie Goh; Yanai Duran; Samuel J.I. Blackford; Laura Abelleira-Hervas; Robert D. Sampson; Ian O. Shum; Matthew J. Branch; Peter J. Gardner; Jane C. Sowden

    2017-01-01

    Summary Transplantation of rod photoreceptors, derived either from neonatal retinae or pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), can restore rod-mediated visual function in murine models of inherited blindness. However, humans depend more upon cone photoreceptors that are required for daylight, color, and high-acuity vision. Indeed, macular retinopathies involving loss of cones are leading causes of blindness. An essential step for developing stem cell-based therapies for maculopathies is the ability to...

  7. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990's when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine) receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A 2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y 12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y 12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y 2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  8. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Burnstock

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990’s when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  9. Pipette-based Method to Study Embryoid Body Formation Derived from Mouse and Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Partially Recapitulating Early Embryonic Development Under Simulated Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinde, Vaibhav; Brungs, Sonja; Hescheler, Jürgen; Hemmersbach, Ruth; Sachinidis, Agapios

    2016-06-01

    The in vitro differentiation of pluripotent stem cells partially recapitulates early in vivo embryonic development. More recently, embryonic development under the influence of microgravity has become a primary focus of space life sciences. In order to integrate the technique of pluripotent stem cell differentiation with simulated microgravity approaches, the 2-D clinostat compatible pipette-based method was experimentally investigated and adapted for investigating stem cell differentiation processes under simulated microgravity conditions. In order to keep residual accelerations as low as possible during clinorotation, while also guaranteeing enough material for further analysis, stem cells were exposed in 1-mL pipettes with a diameter of 3.5 mm. The differentiation of mouse and human pluripotent stem cells inside the pipettes resulted in the formation of embryoid bodies at normal gravity (1 g) after 24 h and 3 days. Differentiation of the mouse pluripotent stem cells on a 2-D pipette-clinostat for 3 days also resulted in the formation of embryoid bodies. Interestingly, the expression of myosin heavy chain was downregulated when cultivation was continued for an additional 7 days at normal gravity. This paper describes the techniques for culturing and differentiation of pluripotent stem cells and exposure to simulated microgravity during culturing or differentiation on a 2-D pipette clinostat. The implementation of these methodologies along with -omics technologies will contribute to understand the mechanisms regulating how microgravity influences early embryonic development.

  10. Fukutin-related protein is essential for mouse muscle, brain and eye development and mutation recapitulates the wide clinical spectrums of dystroglycanopathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yiumo Michael; Keramaris-Vrantsis, Elizabeth; Lidov, Hart G; Norton, James H; Zinchenko, Natalia; Gruber, Helen E; Thresher, Randy; Blake, Derek J; Ashar, Jignya; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey; Lu, Qi L

    2010-10-15

    Mutations in fukutin-related protein (FKRP) cause a common subset of muscular dystrophies characterized by aberrant glycosylation of alpha-dystroglycan (α-DG), collectively known as dystroglycanopathies. The clinical variations associated with FKRP mutations range from mild limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I with predominantly muscle phenotypes to severe Walker-Warburg syndrome and muscle-eye-brain disease with striking structural brain and eye defects. In the present study, we have generated animal models and demonstrated that ablation of FKRP functions is embryonic lethal and that the homozygous-null embryos die before reaching E12.5. The homozygous knock-in mouse carrying the missense P448L mutation almost completely lacks functional glycosylation of α-DG in muscles and brain, validating the essential role of FKRP in the functional glycosylation of α-DG. However, the knock-in mouse survives and develops a wide range of structural abnormalities in the central nervous system, characteristics of neuronal migration defects. The brain and eye defects are highly reminiscent of the phenotypes seen in severe dystroglycanopathy patients. In addition, skeletal muscles develop progressive muscular dystrophy. Our results confirm that post-translational modifications of α-DG are essential for normal development of the brain and eyes. In addition, both the mutation itself and the levels of FKRP expression are equally critical for the survival of the animals. The exceptionally wide clinical spectrums recapitulated in the P448L mice also suggest the involvement of other factors in the disease progression. The mutant mouse represents a valuable model to further elucidate the functions of FKRP and develop therapies for FKRP-related muscular dystrophies.

  11. New therapeutic developments in lipidology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... on the market, but attempts to influence atherosclerosis by new mechanisms have unfortunately generally been unsuccessful so far. This article briefly reviews selected developments that may be of interest to the non-specialist practitioner. Lipid-modifying medications. The statin family has grown with the ...

  12. Development of Antibody Therapeutics against Flaviviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyan; Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang

    2017-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of Zika virus (ZIKV) highlight the urgent need to develop efficacious interventions against flaviviruses, many of which cause devastating epidemics around the world. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have been at the forefront of treatment for cancer and a wide array of other diseases due to their specificity and potency. While mammalian cell-produced mAbs have shown promise as therapeutic candidates against several flaviviruses, their eventual approval for human application still faces several challenges including their potential risk of predisposing treated patients to more severe secondary infection by a heterologous flavivirus through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The high cost associated with mAb production in mammalian cell cultures also poses a challenge for the feasible application of these drugs to the developing world where the majority of flavivirus infection occurs. Here, we review the current therapeutic mAb candidates against various flaviviruses including West Nile (WNV), Dengue virus (DENV), and ZIKV. The progress of using plants for developing safer and more economical mAb therapeutics against flaviviruses is discussed within the context of their expression, characterization, downstream processing, neutralization, and in vivo efficacy. The progress of using plant glycoengineering to address ADE, the major impediment of flavivirus therapeutic development, is highlighted. These advancements suggest that plant-based systems are excellent alternatives for addressing the remaining challenges of mAb therapeutic development against flavivirus and may facilitate the eventual commercialization of these drug candidates. PMID:29295568

  13. Developing patient rapport, trust and therapeutic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bob

    2017-08-09

    Rapport is established at the first meeting between the patient and nurse, and is developed throughout the therapeutic relationship. However, challenges can arise during this process. Initially, nurses can establish trust with the patient through the questions they ask, however, as care progresses, the nurse will be required to demonstrate a commitment to maintaining the patient's psychological well-being. When the therapeutic relationship ends, the nurse should assist the patient to assess progress and plan the next stage of recovery. This article provides three reflective exercises using case study examples to demonstrate how rapport is developed and sustained. Evidence is provided to identify why challenges arise in the therapeutic relationship and how the nurse can ensure they provide care that the patient regards as genuine.

  14. [Therapeutic problems in disorders of sex development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajszczak, Katarzyna; Słowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    The compatibility between genetic, gonadal, genital, somatic and psychic sex should be present for the proper sexual development. If there is no such compatibility, disorders of sex development (DSD) appear. Medical procedure in such cases leads to many problems which mainly come from the lack of sufficient knowledge about the pathophysiology of the disorders. The main difficulties met by diagnostic and therapeutic team are: determination of the official sex, prediction of gender identity, hormonal activity of gonads and fertility, as well as the decision to undertake surgical procedures involving the genitals and gonads. Disorders of sex development lead also to psychological problems of patients and their families, because they disturb the proper social functioning. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  15. Pig models on intestinal development and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lanmei; Yang, Huansheng; Li, Jianzhong; Li, Yali; Ding, Xueqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2017-12-01

    The gastrointestinal tract plays a vital role in nutrient supply, digestion, and absorption, and has a crucial impact on the entire organism. Much attention is being paid to utilize animal models to study the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases in response to intestinal development and health. The piglet has a body size similar to that of the human and is an omnivorous animal with comparable anatomy, nutritional requirements, and digestive and associated inflammatory processes, and displays similarities to the human intestinal microbial ecosystem, which make piglets more appropriate as an animal model for human than other non-primate animals. Therefore, the objective of this review is to summarize key attributes of the piglet model with which to study human intestinal development and intestinal health through probing into the etiology of several gastrointestinal diseases, thus providing a theoretical and hopefully practical, basis for further studies on mammalian nutrition, health, and disease, and therapeutics. Given the comparable nutritional requirements and strikingly similar brain developmental patterns between young piglets and humans, the piglet has been used as an important translational model for studying neurodevelopmental outcomes influenced by pediatric nutrition. Because of similarities in anatomy and physiology between pigs and mankind, more emphasises are put on how to use the piglet model for human organ transplantation research.

  16. Developing therapeutic rapport: a training validation study.

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    Norfolk, Tim; Birdi, Kamaljit; Patterson, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centred consulting is at the heart of modern medicine, and training programmes now routinely highlight a range of communication skills that enhance the doctor-patient relationship. The present pilot study focuses on the central role played by empathic skills in developing rapport and shared understanding, as captured in a new model developed by the authors. The specific aim of the study was to evaluate the potential of a short-term training programme using this model to improve rapport-related behaviour in general practitioner (GP) trainees. In a quasi-experimental study, 37 GP trainees from schemes in central England (the training group) participated in a training programme based around a new model of therapeutic rapport, with pre- and post-training analysis of relevant knowledge-based, affective and behavioural outcomes. A control group of ten GP trainees, from schemes in a comparable UK medical deanery, took no part in the training programme but were involved in all pre- and post-training analyses. The training group demonstrated significant increases in rapport-related knowledge and all three affective dimensions (attitudes, confidence and motivation); there was a similar finding in terms of 'positive engagement' and all expert-rated aspects of rapport-related behaviours. The control group showed no comparable improvement in any area, and recorded a significant drop in demonstration of positive engagement behaviours. The significant improvement in rapport-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviour after training, and the lack of any comparable change in the control group, gives some support to the suggestion that the module (and the model that underpinned it) may have triggered such an impact independent of ongoing experience or other educational activities.

  17. Developing therapeutic vaccines against Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Thomas; Drummond, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia worldwide. It is characterized by an imbalance between the production and clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) and tau proteins. In AD these normal proteins accumulate, leading to aggregation and a conformational change forming oligomeric and fibrillary species with a high β-sheet content. Active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches result in dramatic reduction of Aβ pathology in AD animal models. However, there is much more limited evidence in human studies of significant clinical benefits from these strategies and it is becoming apparent that they may only be effective very early in AD. Vaccination targeting only tau pathology has shown benefits in some mouse studies but human studies are limited. Greater therapeutic efficacy for the next generation of vaccine approaches will likely benefit from specifically targeting the most toxic species of Aβ and tau, ideally simultaneously.

  18. Basic/Translational Development of Forthcoming Opioid- and Nonopioid-Targeted Pain Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick; Yekkirala, Ajay; Yaksh, Tony L

    2017-11-01

    Opioids represent an efficacious therapeutic modality for some, but not all pain states. Singular reliance on opioid therapy for pain management has limitations, and abuse potential has deleterious consequences for patient and society. Our understanding of pain biology has yielded insights and opportunities for alternatives to conventional opioid agonists. The aim is to have efficacious therapies, with acceptable side effect profiles and minimal abuse potential, which is to say an absence of reinforcing activity in the absence of a pain state. The present work provides a nonexclusive overview of current drug targets and potential future directions of research and development. We discuss channel activators and blockers, including sodium channel blockers, potassium channel activators, and calcium channel blockers; glutamate receptor-targeted agents, including N-methyl-D-aspartate, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid, and metabotropic receptors. Furthermore, we discuss therapeutics targeted at γ-aminobutyric acid, α2-adrenergic, and opioid receptors. We also considered antagonists of angiotensin 2 and Toll receptors and agonists/antagonists of adenosine, purine receptors, and cannabinoids. Novel targets considered are those focusing on lipid mediators and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Of interest is development of novel targeting strategies, which produce long-term alterations in pain signaling, including viral transfection and toxins. We consider issues in the development of druggable molecules, including preclinical screening. While there are examples of successful translation, mechanistically promising preclinical candidates may unexpectedly fail during clinical trials because the preclinical models may not recapitulate the particular human pain condition being addressed. Molecular target characterization can diminish the disconnect between preclinical and humans' targets, which should assist in developing nonaddictive analgesics.

  19. Prion Protein-Specific Antibodies-Development, Modes of Action and Therapeutics Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihana Lenac Rovis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases or Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs are lethal neurodegenerative disorders involving the misfolding of the host encoded cellular prion protein, PrPC. This physiological form of the protein is expressed throughout the body, and it reaches the highest levels in the central nervous system where the pathology occurs. The conversion into the pathogenic isoform denoted as prion or PrPSc is the key event in prion disorders. Prominent candidates for the treatment of prion diseases are antibodies and their derivatives. Anti-PrPC antibodies are able to clear PrPSc from cell culture of infected cells. Furthermore, application of anti-PrPC antibodies suppresses prion replication in experimental animal models. Major drawbacks of immunotherapy are immune tolerance, the risks of neurotoxic side effects, limited ability of compounds to cross the blood-brain barrier and their unfavorable pharmacokinetic. The focus of this review is to recapitulate the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms for antibody mediated anti-prion activity. Although relevant for designing immunotherapeutic tools, the characterization of key antibody parameters shaping the molecular mechanism of the PrPC to PrPSc conversion remains elusive. Moreover, this review illustrates the various attempts towards the development of anti-PrP antibody compounds and discusses therapeutic candidates that modulate PrP expression.

  20. Cerebral Organoids Recapitulate Epigenomic Signatures of the Human Fetal Brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chongyuan Luo

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Organoids derived from human pluripotent stem cells recapitulate the early three-dimensional organization of the human brain, but whether they establish the epigenomic and transcriptional programs essential for brain development is unknown. We compared epigenomic and regulatory features in cerebral organoids and human fetal brain, using genome-wide, base resolution DNA methylome and transcriptome sequencing. Transcriptomic dynamics in organoids faithfully modeled gene expression trajectories in early-to-mid human fetal brains. We found that early non-CG methylation accumulation at super-enhancers in both fetal brain and organoids marks forthcoming transcriptional repression in the fully developed brain. Demethylated regions (74% of 35,627 identified during organoid differentiation overlapped with fetal brain regulatory elements. Interestingly, pericentromeric repeats showed widespread demethylation in multiple types of in vitro human neural differentiation models but not in fetal brain. Our study reveals that organoids recapitulate many epigenomic features of mid-fetal human brain and also identified novel non-CG methylation signatures of brain development.

  1. Mucociliary and cough clearance as a biomarker for therapeutic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, William D; Daviskas, Evangelia; Hasani, Amir

    2010-01-01

    or therapeutic evaluation presented details of their methodologies. Attendees participating in the workshop discussions included those interested in the physiology of MCC/CC, some of who use in vitro or animal methods for its study, pharmaceutical companies developing muco-active therapies, and many who were......A workshop/symposium on “Mucociliary and Cough Clearance (MCC/CC) as a Biomarker for Therapeutic Development” was held on October 21–22, 2008, in Research Triangle Park, NC, to discuss the methods for measurement of MCC/CC and how they may be optimized for assessing new therapies designed...

  2. Pathway-specific engineered mouse allograft models functionally recapitulate human serous epithelial ovarian cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludmila Szabova

    Full Text Available The high mortality rate from ovarian cancers can be attributed to late-stage diagnosis and lack of effective treatment. Despite enormous effort to develop better targeted therapies, platinum-based chemotherapy still remains the standard of care for ovarian cancer patients, and resistance occurs at a high rate. One of the rate limiting factors for translation of new drug discoveries into clinical treatments has been the lack of suitable preclinical cancer models with high predictive value. We previously generated genetically engineered mouse (GEM models based on perturbation of Tp53 and Rb with or without Brca1 or Brca2 that develop serous epithelial ovarian cancer (SEOC closely resembling the human disease on histologic and molecular levels. Here, we describe an adaptation of these GEM models to orthotopic allografts that uniformly develop tumors with short latency and are ideally suited for routine preclinical studies. Ovarian tumors deficient in Brca1 respond to treatment with cisplatin and olaparib, a PARP inhibitor, whereas Brca1-wild type tumors are non-responsive to treatment, recapitulating the relative sensitivities observed in patients. These mouse models provide the opportunity for evaluation of effective therapeutics, including prediction of differential responses in Brca1-wild type and Brca1-deficient tumors and development of relevant biomarkers.

  3. Challenges in development of nanoparticle-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Neil

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has been increasingly applied to the area of drug development. Nanoparticle-based therapeutics can confer the ability to overcome biological barriers, effectively deliver hydrophobic drugs and biologics, and preferentially target sites of disease. However, despite these potential advantages, only a relatively small number of nanoparticle-based medicines have been approved for clinical use, with numerous challenges and hurdles at different stages of development. The complexity of nanoparticles as multi-component three dimensional constructs requires careful design and engineering, detailed orthogonal analysis methods, and reproducible scale-up and manufacturing process to achieve a consistent product with the intended physicochemical characteristics, biological behaviors, and pharmacological profiles. The safety and efficacy of nanomedicines can be influenced by minor variations in multiple parameters and need to be carefully examined in preclinical and clinical studies, particularly in context of the biodistribution, targeting to intended sites, and potential immune toxicities. Overall, nanomedicines may present additional development and regulatory considerations compared with conventional medicines, and while there is generally a lack of regulatory standards in the examination of nanoparticle-based medicines as a unique category of therapeutic agents, efforts are being made in this direction. This review summarizes challenges likely to be encountered during the development and approval of nanoparticle-based therapeutics, and discusses potential strategies for drug developers and regulatory agencies to accelerate the growth of this important field.

  4. Disclosure and the development of trust in the therapeutic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, Darla

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT This essay describes my personal path towards becoming an openly lesbian therapist, the internalized homophobia that interfered with this evolution, and the impact of this process on my patients. I then explore the interplay between when and how the therapist and/or the patient disclose in therapy, the link between homophobia and shame to the fear of disclosure, and the subsequent development of a more trusting therapeutic relationship that results from disclosure.

  5. Melanoma genetics and the development of rational therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Yakov; Khavari, Paul A; Adams, Amy E

    2005-04-01

    Melanoma is a cancer of the neural crest-derived cells that provide pigmentation to skin and other tissues. Over the past 4 decades, the incidence of melanoma has increased more rapidly than that of any other malignancy in the United States. No current treatments substantially enhance patient survival once metastasis has occurred. This review focuses on recent insights into melanoma genetics and new therapeutic approaches being developed based on these advances.

  6. Challenges in the development of therapeutics for narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Sarah Wurts; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2017-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder that afflicts 1 in 2000 individuals and is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy-a sudden loss of muscle tone triggered by positive emotions. Features of narcolepsy include dysregulation of arousal state boundaries as well as autonomic and metabolic disturbances. Disruption of neurotransmission through the hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) system, usually by degeneration of the HCRT-producing neurons in the posterior hypothalamus, results in narcolepsy. The cause of Hcrt neurodegeneration is unknown but thought to be related to autoimmune processes. Current treatments for narcolepsy are symptomatic, including wake-promoting therapeutics that increase presynaptic dopamine release and anticataplectic agents that activate monoaminergic neurotransmission. Sodium oxybate is the only medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration that alleviates both sleep/wake disturbances and cataplexy. Development of therapeutics for narcolepsy has been challenged by historical misunderstanding of the disease, its many disparate symptoms and, until recently, its unknown etiology. Animal models have been essential to elucidating the neuropathology underlying narcolepsy. These models have also aided understanding the neurobiology of the Hcrt system, mechanisms of cataplexy, and the pharmacology of narcolepsy medications. Transgenic rodent models will be critical in the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of narcolepsy, particularly efforts directed to overcome challenges in the development of hypocretin replacement therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate.

  8. A recapitulative three-dimensional model of breast carcinoma requires perfusion for multi-week growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kayla F Goliwas

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast carcinomas are complex, three-dimensional tissues composed of cancer epithelial cells and stromal components, including fibroblasts and extracellular matrix. In vitro models that more faithfully recapitulate this dimensionality and stromal microenvironment should more accurately elucidate the processes driving carcinogenesis, tumor progression, and therapeutic response. Herein, novel in vitro breast carcinoma surrogates, distinguished by a relevant dimensionality and stromal microenvironment, are described and characterized. A perfusion bioreactor system was used to deliver medium to surrogates containing engineered microchannels and the effects of perfusion, medium composition, and the method of cell incorporation and density of initial cell seeding on the growth and morphology of surrogates were assessed. Perfused surrogates demonstrated significantly greater cell density and proliferation and were more histologically recapitulative of human breast carcinoma than surrogates maintained without perfusion. Although other parameters of the surrogate system, such as medium composition and cell seeding density, affected cell growth, perfusion was the most influential parameter.

  9. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  10. Current Status of Dengue Therapeutics Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Jenny G H; Ooi, Eng Eong; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2017-03-01

    Dengue is a significant global health problem. Even though a vaccine against dengue is now available, which is a notable achievement, its long-term protective efficacy against each of the 4 dengue virus serotypes remains to be definitively determined. Consequently, drugs directed at the viral targets or critical host mechanisms that can be used safely as prophylaxis or treatment to effectively ameliorate disease or reduce disease severity and fatalities are still needed to reduce the burden of dengue. This review will provide a brief account of the status of therapeutics research and development for dengue. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  11. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  12. Huntington Disease: Linking Pathogenesis to the Development of Experimental Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Tiago A; Sampaio, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG trinucleotide expansion in the huntingtin gene. At present, the HD field is experiencing exciting times with the assessment for the first time in human subjects of interventions aimed at core disease mechanisms. Out of a portfolio of interventions that claim a potential disease-modifying effect in HD, the target huntingtin has more robust validation. In this review, we discuss the spectrum of huntingtin-lowering therapies that are currently being considered. We provide a critical appraisal of the validation of huntingtin as a drug target, describing the advantages, challenges, and limitations of the proposed therapeutic interventions. The development of these new therapies relies strongly on the knowledge of HD pathogenesis and the ability to translate this knowledge into validated pharmacodynamic biomarkers. Altogether, the goal is to support a rational drug development that is ethical and cost-effective. Among the pharmacodynamic biomarkers under development, the quantification of mutant huntingtin in the cerebral spinal fluid and PET imaging targeting huntingtin or phosphodiesterase 10A deserve special attention. Huntingtin-lowering therapeutics are eagerly awaited as the first interventions that may be able to change the course of HD in a meaningful way.

  13. Biomarkers in mood disorders research: developing new and improved therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARK J. NICIU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Recently, surrogate neurobiological biomarkers that correlate with target engagement and therapeutic response have been developed and tested in early phase studies of mood disorders. Objective The identification of biomarkers could help develop personalized psychiatric treatments that may impact public health. Methods These biomarkers, which are associated with clinical response post-treatment, can be directly validated using multimodal approaches including genetic tools, proteomics/metabolomics, peripheral measures, neuroimaging, biostatistical predictors, and clinical predictors. Results To date, early phase biomarker studies have sought to identify measures that can serve as “biosignatures”, or biological patterns of clinical response. These studies have also sought to identify clinical predictors and surrogate outcomes associated with pathophysiological domains consistently described in the National Institute of Mental Health’s (NIMH new Research Domain Criteria (RDoC. Using the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA antagonist ketamine as an example, we identified changes in several domains (clinical, cognitive, and neurophysiological that predicted ketamine’s rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in individuals with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD or bipolar depression. Discussion These approaches may ultimately provide clues into the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders and may have enormous impact Backon the development of novel therapeutics.

  14. Organoid technology for brain and therapeutics research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi; Wang, Shu-Na; Xu, Tian-Ying; Miao, Zhu-Wei; Su, Ding-Feng; Miao, Chao-Yu

    2017-10-01

    Brain is one of the most complex organs in human. The current brain research is mainly based on the animal models and traditional cell culture. However, the inherent species differences between humans and animals as well as the gap between organ level and cell level make it difficult to study human brain development and associated disorders through traditional technologies. Recently, the brain organoids derived from pluripotent stem cells have been reported to recapitulate many key features of human brain in vivo, for example recapitulating the zone of putative outer radial glia cells. Brain organoids offer a new platform for scientists to study brain development, neurological diseases, drug discovery and personalized medicine, regenerative medicine, and so on. Here, we discuss the progress, applications, advantages, limitations, and prospects of brain organoid technology in neurosciences and related therapeutics. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Development and therapeutic application of internally emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    This project is concerned with developing the potential of alpha-emitting radionuclides as agents for radiotherapy. Among the available α-emitters, astatine-211 appears most promising for testing the efficacy of α-emitters for therapeutic applications because: (1) it has some chemical similarities to iodine, an element that can readily be incorporated into numerous proteins and peptides; (2) it has a half life that is long enough to permit chemical manipulation yet short enough to minimize destruction of healthy cells; and (3) α-emission is associated with 100% of its decays. If appropriate biological carriers can be labeled with an alpha emitter such as 211 At, they could be of great utility in several areas of therapeutic medicine where elimination of specific cell populations is desired. While previous attempts to astatinate proteins using standard iodination techniques have been unsuccessful, effective labeling of proteins with astatine by first synthesizing an aryl astatide and then coupling this compound to the protein via an acylation has been achieved. Undergoing current investigation are several different aryl astatide-followed-by-acylation approaches including an astatinated Bolton-Hunter type reagent using concanavalin A (ConA) and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) as model compounds

  16. Development and evaluation of an electronic drug and therapeutics bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Christopher P

    2002-10-01

    To describe the development, implementation, and initial evaluation of a paperless drug and therapeutics bulletin that is distributed by electronic mail from the pharmacy department of an Australian teaching hospital. A standardized format for the bulletin was designed and approved in February 2001. The aim of the bulletin is to facilitate the timely dissemination of concise, factual information about issues of current interest in therapeutics, drug safety, and the cost-effective use of medicines. A simple and attractive graphic design was chosen, and the hospital's clinical pharmacists and drug information staff developed an initial bank of content during the period immediately preceding the launch. The bulletin is presented as a 1-page, read-only file in Word for Windows format and was initially distributed by electronic mail to all users of the hospital's computerized communication network. As the popularity of the bulletin increased, healthcare practitioners from outside of the hospital began to request permission for inclusion on the circulation list, and the content was frequently forwarded by E-mail to workers in other hospitals and community-based settings. The bulletin is now distributed to pharmacists around Australia via 2 separate moderated discussion lists, one of which provides an archive site for previous editions. Healthcare workers in Singapore, the US, Canada, and New Zealand also receive the bulletin, which is now also abstracted by a major Australian pharmacy journal. A readership survey (also electronically distributed) was used to seek feedback after the publication of the first 12 editions. Readers indicated a high level of satisfaction with the content, format, and frequency of distribution of the materials. Although the concept and execution of this project was relatively simple, an extensive literature review did not reveal any previously published reports describing this type of approach to the distribution of a pharmacy bulletin. The

  17. Recapitulation of the forward nuclear auxin response pathway in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pierre-Jerome, Edith; Jang, Seunghee S; Havens, Kyle A; Nemhauser, Jennifer L; Klavins, Eric

    2014-07-01

    Auxin influences nearly every aspect of plant biology through a simple signaling pathway; however, it remains unclear how much of the diversity in auxin effects is explained by variation in the core signaling components and which properties of these components may contribute to diversification in response dynamics. Here, we recapitulated the entire Arabidopsis thaliana forward nuclear auxin signal transduction pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to test whether signaling module composition enables tuning of the dynamic response. Sensitivity analysis guided by a small mathematical model revealed the centrality of auxin/indole-3-acetic acid (Aux/IAA) transcriptional corepressors in controlling response dynamics and highlighted the strong influence of natural variation in Aux/IAA degradation rates on circuit performance. When the basic auxin response circuit was expanded to include multiple Aux/IAAs, we found that dominance relationships between coexpressed Aux/IAAs were sufficient to generate distinct response modules similar to those seen during plant development. Our work provides a new method for dissecting auxin signaling and demonstrates the key role of Aux/IAAs in tuning auxin response dynamics.

  18. Current developments in pharmacological therapeutics for chronic constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhuan Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic constipation is a common gastrointestinal disease severely affecting the patient׳s quality of life. The traditional treatment of constipation is the use of laxatives. Recently, several new drugs including lubiprostone, linaclotide and prucalopride have been approved for treatment of chronic constipation. However, a significant unmet medical need still remains, particularly among those patients achieving poor results by current therapies. The 5-HT4 receptor modulators velusetrag and naronapride, the guanylate cyclase C agonist plecanatide and the ileal bile acid transporter inhibitor elobixibat are recognized as the most promising drugs under investigation. Herein, we give a comprehensive review on the pharmacological therapeutics for the treatment of chronic constipation, with the purpose of reflecting the drug development trends in this field.

  19. Challenges and opportunities in developing respiratory syncytial virus therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Eric A F; DeVincenzo, John P; Boeckh, Michael; Bont, Louis; Crowe, James E; Griffiths, Paul; Hayden, Frederick G; Hodinka, Richard L; Smyth, Rosalind L; Spencer, Keith; Thirstrup, Steffen; Walsh, Edward E; Whitley, Richard J

    2015-03-15

    Two meetings, one sponsored by the Wellcome Trust in 2012 and the other by the Global Virology Foundation in 2013, assembled academic, public health and pharmaceutical industry experts to assess the challenges and opportunities for developing antivirals for the treatment of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. The practicalities of clinical trials and establishing reliable outcome measures in different target groups were discussed in the context of the regulatory pathways that could accelerate the translation of promising compounds into licensed agents. RSV drug development is hampered by the perceptions of a relatively small and fragmented market that may discourage major pharmaceutical company investment. Conversely, the public health need is far too large for RSV to be designated an orphan or neglected disease. Recent advances in understanding RSV epidemiology, improved point-of-care diagnostics, and identification of candidate antiviral drugs argue that the major obstacles to drug development can and will be overcome. Further progress will depend on studies of disease pathogenesis and knowledge provided from controlled clinical trials of these new therapeutic agents. The use of combinations of inhibitors that have different mechanisms of action may be necessary to increase antiviral potency and reduce the risk of resistance emergence. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  20. Radioisotopes for Therapy and Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolajczak, R.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years there has been a rapid expansion in the use of radionuclides for therapeutic purposes. The potential usefulness of a particular radioisotope depends on many factors: physical data (half-life, energy of beta-particles, gamma ray emissions), production method including separation, labeling and targeting properties of a radionuclide carrier molecule. Depending on the production mode, the radioisotope can be obtained in the pure form (without any carrier) or in the form of the mixture of isotopes, containing also the stable forms. The specific activity is than defined as radioactivity of a certain radioisotope in this mixture. Several beta-emitting radionuclides for targeted radionuclide therapy can be produced in the nuclear reactors, including generator systems, and the list of other potentially useful isotopes is not yet closed. Among the radionuclides used for cancer therapy, 131 I, 90 Y, 188 Re, 166 Ho and 153 Sm have found applications in a number of clinical procedures and have been used for cancer therapy, bone pain palliation, radiosynovectomy, intravascular radiation therapy and other disorders. Extensive research in the field of radiopharmaceuticals and nuclear medicine practices have lead to the identification of other radionuclides including 177 Lu, 161 Tb, 67 Cu, 47 Sc with promising radionuclide physical and chemical properties, which still need to be explored. The latter two are of interest due to their positron emitting 'twins' i.e. 64 Cu and 44 Sc, which can be used for diagnostic imaging and therapy follow up using the same carrier molecules. On the other hand various techniques have been developed in order to improve the therapeutic effect such as the isotope cocktail approach, loco-regional administration, pre-targeting or combination with chemotherapy, providing new therapy options. The most popular in last years were carrier-free 90 Y and 177L u as well as carrier-added 177 Lu used for labeling of peptides specific to somatostatin

  1. Mucociliary and cough clearance as a biomarker for therapeutic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, William D; Daviskas, Evangelia; Hasani, Amir

    2010-01-01

    A workshop/symposium on “Mucociliary and Cough Clearance (MCC/CC) as a Biomarker for Therapeutic Development” was held on October 21–22, 2008, in Research Triangle Park, NC, to discuss the methods for measurement of MCC/CC and how they may be optimized for assessing new therapies designed...

  2. A proposal to use iterative, small clinical trials to optimize therapeutic HIV vaccine immunogens to launch therapeutic HIV vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Stuart Z

    2015-01-01

    The HIV cure agenda has rekindled interest in the development of a therapeutic HIV vaccine. An iterative clinical trial strategy that proved successful for the development of effective cancer chemotherapies in the 1960s may be applicable to the development of a CD8 T lymphocyte-based therapeutic HIV vaccine. However, while cancer chemotherapy development could begin with iterative clinical trials to improve the use of active drugs, the first step in therapeutic HIV vaccine design should be discovery of immunogen constructs with potential for activity and their optimization to meet the challenges of HIV-1 sequence diversity and human polymorphism in T cell antigen presentation. A strategy for doing this is discussed in this article. The proposed strategy relies on a major commitment by funding organizations to fund organized and coordinated manufacture and clinical testing of a series of first- and second-generation constructs to test basic concepts in product design. This is presented as an alternative to funding a more traditional competition among private manufacturers and product champions of individual, already designed products.

  3. The pig as a large preclinical model for therapeutic human anti-cancer vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Welner, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Development of therapeutic cancer vaccines has largely been based on rodent models and the majority failed to establish therapeutic responses in clinical trials. We therefore used pigs as a large animal model for human cancer vaccine development due to the large similarity between the porcine...

  4. Affinity-tuning leukocyte integrin for development of safe therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Spencer

    Much attention has been given to the molecular and cellular pathways linking inflammation with cancer and the local tumor environment to identify new target molecules that could lead to improved diagnosis and treatment. Among the many molecular players involved in the complex response, central to the induction of inflammation is intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, which is of particular interest for its highly sensitive and localized expression in response to inflammatory signals. ICAM-1, which has been implicated to play a critical role in tumor progression in various types of cancer, has also been linked to cancer metastases, where ICAM-1 facilitates the spread of metastatic cancer cells to secondary sites. This unique expression profile of ICAM-1 throughout solid tumor microenvironment makes ICAM-1 an intriguing molecular target, which holds great potential as an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool. Herein, we have engineered the ligand binding domain, or the inserted (I) domain of a leukocyte integrin, to exhibit a wide range of monovalent affinities to the natural ligand, ICAM-1. Using the resulting I domain variants, we have created drug and gene delivery nanoparticles, as well as targeted immunotherapeutics that have the ability to bind and migrate to inflammatory sites prevalent in tumors and the associated microenvironment. Through the delivery of diagnostic agents, chemotherapeutics, and immunotherapeutics, the following chapters demonstrate that the affinity enhancements achieved by directed evolution bring the affinity of I domains into the range optimal for numerous applications.

  5. Heterotypic mouse models of canine osteosarcoma recapitulate tumor heterogeneity and biological behavior

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milcah C. Scott

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Osteosarcoma (OS is a heterogeneous and rare disease with a disproportionate impact because it mainly affects children and adolescents. Lamentably, more than half of patients with OS succumb to metastatic disease. Clarification of the etiology of the disease, development of better strategies to manage progression, and methods to guide personalized treatments are among the unmet health needs for OS patients. Progress in managing the disease has been hindered by the extreme heterogeneity of OS; thus, better models that accurately recapitulate the natural heterogeneity of the disease are needed. For this study, we used cell lines derived from two spontaneous canine OS tumors with distinctly different biological behavior (OS-1 and OS-2 for heterotypic in vivo modeling that recapitulates the heterogeneous biology and behavior of this disease. Both cell lines demonstrated stability of the transcriptome when grown as orthotopic xenografts in athymic nude mice. Consistent with the behavior of the original tumors, OS-2 xenografts grew more rapidly at the primary site and had greater propensity to disseminate to lung and establish microscopic metastasis. Moreover, OS-2 promoted formation of a different tumor-associated stromal environment than OS-1 xenografts. OS-2-derived tumors comprised a larger percentage of the xenograft tumors than OS-1-derived tumors. In addition, a robust pro-inflammatory population dominated the stromal cell infiltrates in OS-2 xenografts, whereas a mesenchymal population with a gene signature reflecting myogenic signaling dominated those in the OS-1 xenografts. Our studies show that canine OS cell lines maintain intrinsic features of the tumors from which they were derived and recapitulate the heterogeneous biology and behavior of bone cancer in mouse models. This system provides a resource to understand essential interactions between tumor cells and the stromal environment that drive the progression and metastatic propensity of

  6. Multiple congenital malformations of Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome are recapitulated in Fgfrl1 null mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catela, Catarina; Bilbao-Cortes, Daniel; Slonimsky, Esfir; Kratsios, Paschalis; Rosenthal, Nadia; Te Welscher, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Wolf-Hirschhorn syndrome (WHS) is caused by deletions in the short arm of chromosome 4 (4p) and occurs in about one per 20,000 births. Patients with WHS display a set of highly variable characteristics including craniofacial dysgenesis, mental retardation, speech problems, congenital heart defects, short stature and a variety of skeletal anomalies. Analysis of patients with 4p deletions has identified two WHS critical regions (WHSCRs); however, deletions targeting mouse WHSCRs do not recapitulate the classical WHS defects, and the genes contributing to WHS have not been conclusively established. Recently, the human FGFRL1 gene, encoding a putative fibroblast growth factor (FGF) decoy receptor, has been implicated in the craniofacial phenotype of a WHS patient. Here, we report that targeted deletion of the mouse Fgfrl1 gene recapitulates a broad array of WHS phenotypes, including abnormal craniofacial development, axial and appendicular skeletal anomalies, and congenital heart defects. Fgfrl1 null mutants also display a transient foetal anaemia and a fully penetrant diaphragm defect, causing prenatal and perinatal lethality. Together, these data support a wider role for Fgfrl1 in development, implicate FGFRL1 insufficiency in WHS, and provide a novel animal model to dissect the complex aetiology of this human disease.

  7. Advanced Development of Antiviral Prophylactics and Therapeutics (ADAPT) - Research Area 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-17

    designing lead series analogs to optimize antiviral activity, Prosetta has initiated design of analogs based on the structural properties believed or...1-Mar-2011 - 31-May-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Final Rep01i: Advanced Development of Antiviral Prophylactics and Therapeutics...Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Advanced Development of Antiviral Prophylactics and Therapeutics (ADAPT

  8. Late-Developing Supernumerary Premolars: Analysis of Different Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Paduano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case series describes the different potential approaches to late-developing supernumerary premolars (LDSP. LDSP are supernumerary teeth (ST formed after the eruption of the permanent dentition; usually they develop in the premolar region of the upper and lower jaw. The choice to extract or to monitor the LDSP depends on many factors and has to be carefully planned due to the several risks that either the monitoring or the extraction could provoke. These four cases of LDSP showed different treatment plan alternatives derived from a scrupulous assessment of the clinical and radiographic information.

  9. Challenges and Opportunities in Developing Respiratory Syncytial Virus Therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simoes, Eric A. F.; DeVincenzo, John P.; Boeckh, Michael; Bont, LJ; Crowe, James E.; Griffiths, Paul; Hayden, Frederick G.; Hodinka, Richard L.; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Spencer, Keith; Thirstrup, Steffen; Walsh, Edward E.; Whitley, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Two meetings, one sponsored by the Wellcome Trust in 2012 and the other by the Global Virology Foundation in 2013, assembled academic, public health and pharmaceutical industry experts to assess the challenges and opportunities for developing antivirals for the treatment of respiratory syncytial

  10. Development of a peptide conjugate vaccine for inducing therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Amelia; Castagnoli, Riccardo; De Sando, Elisabetta; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2017-04-01

    Given the multifaceted effector functions of IgE in immediate hypersensitivity, late-phase reactions, regulation of IgE receptor expression and immune modulation, IgE antibodies have long represented an attractive target for therapeutic agents in asthma and other allergic diseases. Effective pharmacologic blockade of the binding of IgE to its receptors has become one of most innovative therapeutic strategies in the field of allergic diseases in the last 10 years. Areas covered: The latest strategies targeting IgE include the development of a therapeutic vaccine, able to trigger our own immune systems to produce therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies, potentially providing a further step forward in the treatment of allergic diseases. The aim of this review is to discuss the discovery strategy, preclinical and early clinical development of a peptide conjugate vaccine for inducing therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies. Expert opinion: Outside the area of development of humanized anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies, the research field of therapeutic IgE-targeted vaccines holds potential benefits for the treatment of allergic diseases. However, most of the experimental observations in animal models have not yet been translated into new treatments and evidence of human efficacy and safety of this new therapeutic strategy are still lacking.

  11. Fostering child development with therapeutic dog: Case study

    OpenAIRE

    Kobešćak, Sanja; Selaković, Tea; Katalenić, Lucija

    2014-01-01

    During the last 20 years research and implementation of programs with service dogs in education, therapies and other process experienced intensive development. Croatian Guide Dog and Mobility Association is implementing a program of including therapy dogs in families of children with disability. In children with cerebral palsy additional diffi culties are often present, such as problems with sense, perception, cognition, communication and behaviour, epilepsy, and secondary muscular skeletal p...

  12. Development of Novel Therapeutics for Neglected Tropical Disease Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    geralc.baldeviano.fn@mail.mil 14. ABSTRACT Infections caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania include cutaneous (CL), mucosal (ML) and...forms of leishmaniasis including CL involves multiple injections of antimonial drugs (GlucantimeTM or PentostamTM) for 20 days or more. Therefore...under development do not offer new alternatives because they are either reformulations or combinations of existing drugs . Hence, there is pressing

  13. An industry update: the latest developments in therapeutic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Oliver C

    2018-02-01

    The present industry update covers the period 1 October-31 October 2017, with information sourced from company press releases, regulatory and patent agencies as well as scientific literature. While the corporate news in October was traditionally dominated by the announcement of the third quarter results, with most of them showing market and revenue growth but also an increasing number of initial public offerings after years of slower financial development, we also saw trends continuing toward an increasing number of convergences of drugs with nanotechnology, devices and 21st century information technology. Whether it is using E Ink's 'Smart Patch', AstraZeneca's autoinjector, Elektrofi's Elektroject suspensions or NanOlogy's NanoPac, there is an ever increasing number of combinations dof devices, drugs and applications reaching, more and more the clinic and the market. Controlled release is another feature increasingly addressed by many of the above innovations. For example, the drug-loaded x-ray imageable microscopic beads that have been developed by researchers at UCL Cancer Institute (London, UK) take this one step further in order to pursue local, controlled and in situ validated local delivery.

  14. Development of Acne therapeutic hydrogel patches by radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Younmook; Nho, Youngchang; Gwon, Huijeong; Park, Jongseok; Kim, Jinkyu; Kim, Yongsoo

    2012-04-01

    In this project, hydrogel patches containing herbal extracts mixture were developed by radiation technology for acne treatment. Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), one of the anaerobic bacterium, is the cause of inflammatory acne. To find novel mediation for inflammation of P. acnes, we confirmed the anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of several herbal extracts against P. acnes. The water extracts from five dried herbs, Phellodendron amurense Rupr., Paeonia lactiflora Pallas., Houttuynia cordata Thumb., Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., were mixed into biocompatible polymers and irradiated by using gamma-ray to prepare hydrogels. The hydrogels containing herbal extracts mixture initiated to decrease the growth of P. acnes and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6, in experiment with human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with heat-killed P. acnes at 1 mg/ml of mixture concentration

  15. Development of Acne therapeutic hydrogel patches by radiation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Younmook; Nho, Youngchang; Gwon, Huijeong; Park, Jongseok; Kim, Jinkyu; Kim, Yongsoo

    2012-04-15

    In this project, hydrogel patches containing herbal extracts mixture were developed by radiation technology for acne treatment. Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), one of the anaerobic bacterium, is the cause of inflammatory acne. To find novel mediation for inflammation of P. acnes, we confirmed the anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of several herbal extracts against P. acnes. The water extracts from five dried herbs, Phellodendron amurense Rupr., Paeonia lactiflora Pallas., Houttuynia cordata Thumb., Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., were mixed into biocompatible polymers and irradiated by using gamma-ray to prepare hydrogels. The hydrogels containing herbal extracts mixture initiated to decrease the growth of P. acnes and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-{alpha}, IL-8, IL-1{beta} and IL-6, in experiment with human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with heat-killed P. acnes at 1 mg/ml of mixture concentration.

  16. Developing Rapport and Therapeutic Alliance During Telemental Health Sessions with Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Felissa; Glueck, Dehra

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the special considerations for building rapport and establishing a therapeutic alliance when conducting mental health evaluations for children and adolescents via videoconferencing. The authors review the literature and describe their experience in conducting mental health evaluations, developing rapport, and establishing a therapeutic alliance during telemental health practice. Clinical need and shortages of clinicians with expertise in evaluating mental conditions for children and adolescents in underserved communities have stimulated the rapid expansion of telemental health programs while the research base continues to develop. The emerging evidence base and clinical experience suggest that teleclinicians can, and do, build rapport and establish a therapeutic alliance during telemental health sessions with youth and families. Families may be more accepting of telemental health approaches than clinicians. The impact that technology, equipment, site staff, community supports, cultural identification, and teleclinicians' characteristics have on building rapport and establishing a therapeutic alliance should be considered when establishing a telemental health service. Staff at the patient site and referring providers have a valuable role in supporting the therapeutic alliance between telemental health providers and their patients, and ultimately supporting the success of a telemental health program. Teleclinicians are creative in transcending the videoconferencing technology to evaluate patients using guideline-based care. Further research is needed to determine how clinicians build rapport and establish a therapeutic alliance during telemental health sessions, and whether the therapeutic alliance is associated with the accuracy of evaluation and outcomes.

  17. Clinical challenges of chronic wounds: searching for an optimal animal model to recapitulate their complexity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Nunan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The efficient healing of a skin wound is something that most of us take for granted but is essential for surviving day-to-day knocks and cuts, and is absolutely relied on clinically whenever a patient receives surgical intervention. However, the management of a chronic wound – defined as a barrier defect that has not healed in 3 months – has become a major therapeutic challenge throughout the Western world, and it is a problem that will only escalate with the increasing incidence of conditions that impede wound healing, such as diabetes, obesity and vascular disorders. Despite being clinically and molecularly heterogeneous, all chronic wounds are generally assigned to one of three major clinical categories: leg ulcers, diabetic foot ulcers or pressure ulcers. Although we have gleaned much knowledge about the fundamental cellular and molecular mechanisms that underpin healthy, acute wound healing from various animal models, we have learned much less about chronic wound repair pathology from these models. This might largely be because the animal models being used in this field of research have failed to recapitulate the clinical features of chronic wounds. In this Clinical Puzzle article, we discuss the clinical complexity of chronic wounds and describe the best currently available models for investigating chronic wound pathology. We also assess how such models could be optimised to become more useful tools for uncovering pathological mechanisms and potential therapeutic treatments.

  18. Development of an evidence vase for therapeutic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    A prime objective of the World Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Council is the promotion of innovative clinical practice of safe, efficacious radionuclide therapy throughout the world. The evidence for safety and efficacy will emerge from global observational studies performed using standard protocols with uniformly defined end points. Observational studies have several advantages over randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including lower cost, greater timeliness and a broader range of patients. Observational studies and RCTs can produce similar estimates of the effects of treatment and meta- analyses of observational studies produce results that are similar to meta-analyses of randomised trials. RCTs have the disadvantage of excluding of patients who might benefit from treatment, low recruitment rates resulting in delays in obtaining definitive results and the danger of unjustified extrapolation of these results to different populations. Evidence from trials is most applicable in clinical practice, when the design and the outcomes chosen are directly relevant to real patients, the trials are undertaken against a background of standard medical care, patients in trials are broadly representative of patients in the real world and evidence from trials is integrated with individual patient characteristics for meaningful risk-benefit assessment. Despite the need for high-quality clinical trials, few patients participate in them. Less than 5% of eligible patients participate in most cancer trials and almost none are from developing countries. How do we in fact determine the truth in clinical medicine, given that the conclusions of the 'gold-standard' RCT may not be replicable when the outcomes are examined in everyday practice? Ethical standards, patient selection criteria and low participation rates often create RCT study groups that differ from the general population and extrapolation of results may not always be valid. Observational studies have been characterised as all

  19. Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0238 TITLE: Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL...of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Oxygen-rich environments can create pro- mutagenic DNA lesions such as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) that can be misreplicated during translesion DNA synthesis

  20. Novel diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides for the development of innovative radiopharmaceuticals

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose the exploration of novel radionuclides with diagnostic or therapeutic properties from ISOLDE. Access to such unique isotopes will enable the fundamental research in radiopharmaceutical science towards superior treatment, e.g. in nuclear oncology. The systematic investigation of the biological response to the different characteristics of the decay radiation will be performed for a better understanding of therapeutic effects. The development of alternative diagnostic tools will be applied for the management and optimization of radionuclide therapy.

  1. Mouse Models Recapitulating Human Adrenocortical Tumors: What is lacking?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felicia Leccia

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Adrenal cortex tumors are divided into benign forms such as primary hyperplasias and adrenocortical adenomas (ACAs, and malignant forms or adrenocortical carcinomas (ACCs. Primary hyperplasias are rare causes of ACTH-independent hypercortisolism. ACAs are the most common type of adrenal gland tumors and they are rarely functional, i.e producing steroids. When functional, adenomas result in endocrine disorders such as Cushing’s syndrome (hypercortisolism or Conn’s syndrome (hyperaldosteronism. In contrast, ACCs are extremely rare but highly aggressive tumors that may also lead to hypersecreting syndromes. Genetic analyses of patients with sporadic or familial forms of adrenocortical tumors led to the identification of potentially causative genes, most of them being involved in PKA, Wnt/β-catenin and P53 signaling pathways. Development of mouse models is a crucial step to firmly establish the functional significance of candidate genes, to dissect mechanisms leading to tumors and endocrine disorders and in fine to provide in vivo tools for therapeutic screens. In this article we will provide an overview on the existing mouse models (xenografted and genetically engineered of adrenocortical tumors by focusing on the role of PKA and Wnt/β-catenin pathways in this context. We will discuss the advantages and limitations of models that have been developed heretofore and we will point out necessary improvements in the development of next generation mouse models of adrenal diseases.

  2. Field migration rates of tidal meanders recapitulate fluvial morphodynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Alvise; Lanzoni, Stefano; Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Marani, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea; D'Alpaos, Andrea

    2018-02-13

    The majority of tidal channels display marked meandering features. Despite their importance in oil-reservoir formation and tidal landscape morphology, questions remain on whether tidal-meander dynamics could be understood in terms of fluvial processes and theory. Key differences suggest otherwise, like the periodic reversal of landscape-forming tidal flows and the widely accepted empirical notion that tidal meanders are stable landscape features, in stark contrast with their migrating fluvial counterparts. On the contrary, here we show that, once properly normalized, observed migration rates of tidal and fluvial meanders are remarkably similar. Key to normalization is the role of tidal channel width that responds to the strong spatial gradients of landscape-forming flow rates and tidal prisms. We find that migration dynamics of tidal meanders agree with nonlinear theories for river meander evolution. Our results challenge the conventional view of tidal channels as stable landscape features and suggest that meandering tidal channels recapitulate many fluvial counterparts owing to large gradients of tidal prisms across meander wavelengths. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  3. Field migration rates of tidal meanders recapitulate fluvial morphodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finotello, Alvise; Lanzoni, Stefano; Ghinassi, Massimiliano; Marani, Marco; Rinaldo, Andrea; D'Alpaos, Andrea

    2018-02-01

    The majority of tidal channels display marked meandering features. Despite their importance in oil-reservoir formation and tidal landscape morphology, questions remain on whether tidal-meander dynamics could be understood in terms of fluvial processes and theory. Key differences suggest otherwise, like the periodic reversal of landscape-forming tidal flows and the widely accepted empirical notion that tidal meanders are stable landscape features, in stark contrast with their migrating fluvial counterparts. On the contrary, here we show that, once properly normalized, observed migration rates of tidal and fluvial meanders are remarkably similar. Key to normalization is the role of tidal channel width that responds to the strong spatial gradients of landscape-forming flow rates and tidal prisms. We find that migration dynamics of tidal meanders agree with nonlinear theories for river meander evolution. Our results challenge the conventional view of tidal channels as stable landscape features and suggest that meandering tidal channels recapitulate many fluvial counterparts owing to large gradients of tidal prisms across meander wavelengths.

  4. Recent advances in (therapeutic protein drug development [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Daniel Lagassé

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic protein drugs are an important class of medicines serving patients most in need of novel therapies. Recently approved recombinant protein therapeutics have been developed to treat a wide variety of clinical indications, including cancers, autoimmunity/inflammation, exposure to infectious agents, and genetic disorders. The latest advances in protein-engineering technologies have allowed drug developers and manufacturers to fine-tune and exploit desirable functional characteristics of proteins of interest while maintaining (and in some cases enhancing product safety or efficacy or both. In this review, we highlight the emerging trends and approaches in protein drug development by using examples of therapeutic proteins approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over the previous five years (2011–2016, namely January 1, 2011, through August 31, 2016.

  5. Development of nutrition standards and therapeutic diet specifications for public hospitals in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter; Hazlewood, Tanya; Pang, Glen

    2014-09-01

    In New South Wales (NSW), a new suite of nutrition standards for menus and specifications for therapeutic diets to be used in hospitals has been developed. These standards were required to facilitate centralised menu planning and food production, with the move to management of most hospital food services by HealthShare NSW, a state-wide business unit of NSW Health. The standards also aim to improve communication between health professionals, particularly with the increasing use of computerised meal-ordering systems. Nutrition standards have been developed for adult, paediatric and mental health inpatients, and specifications for 147 different adult and paediatric therapeutic diets. There is still significant variation in the nutrition standards for nutrition and therapeutic diets in hospitals across the Australian states, and a move to a more nationally harmonised approach would be welcome. Further research is required to examine the impact of these standards on operating efficiency and patient care outcomes.

  6. Chemical polyglycosylation and nanolitre detection enables single-molecule recapitulation of bacterial sugar export

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Lingbing; Almond, Andrew; Bayley, Hagan; Davis, Benjamin G.

    2016-05-01

    The outermost protective layer of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria is composed of bacterial capsular polysaccharides. Insights into the interactions between the capsular polysaccharide and its transporter and the mechanism of sugar export would not only increase our understanding of this key process, but would also help in the design of novel therapeutics to block capsular polysaccharide export. Here, we report a nanolitre detection system that makes use of the bilayer interface between two droplets, and we use this system to study single-molecule recapitulation of sugar export. A synthetic strategy of polyglycosylation based on tetrasaccharide monomers enables ready synthetic access to extended fragments of K30 oligosaccharides and polysaccharides. Examination of the interactions between the Escherichia coli sugar transporter Wza and very small amounts of fragments of the K30 capsular polysaccharide substrate reveal the translocation of smaller but not larger fragments. We also observe capture events that occur only on the intracellular side of Wza, which would complement coordinated feeding by adjunct biosynthetic machinery.

  7. Estradiol partially recapitulates murine pituitary cell cycle response to pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toledano, Yoel; Zonis, Svetlana; Ren, Song-Guang; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Chesnokova, Vera; Melmed, Shlomo

    2012-10-01

    Because pregnancy and estrogens both induce pituitary lactotroph hyperplasia, we assessed the expression of pituitary cell cycle regulators in two models of murine pituitary hyperplasia. Female mice were assessed during nonpregnancy, pregnancy, day of delivery, and postpartum. We also implanted estradiol (E(2)) pellets in female mice and studied them for 2.5 months. Pituitary weight in female mice increased 2-fold after E(2) administration and 1.4-fold at day of delivery, compared with placebo-treated or nonpregnant females. Pituitary proliferation, as assessed by proliferating cell nuclear antigen and/or Ki-67 staining, increased dramatically during both mid-late pregnancy and E(2) administration, and lactotroph hyperplasia was also observed. Pregnancy induced pituitary cell cycle proliferative and inhibitory responses at the G(1)/S checkpoint. Differential cell cycle regulator expression included cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, p21(Cip1), p27(Kip1), and cyclin D1. Pituitary cell cycle responses to E(2) administration partially recapitulated those effects observed at mid-late pregnancy, coincident with elevated circulating mouse E(2), including increased expression of proliferating cell nuclear antigen, Ki-67, p15(INK4b), and p21(Cip1). Nuclear localization of pituitary p21(Cip1) was demonstrated at mid-late pregnancy but not during E(2) administration, suggesting a cell cycle inhibitory role for p21(Cip1) in pregnancy, yet a possible proproliferative role during E(2) administration. Most observed cell cycle protein alterations were reversed postpartum. Murine pituitary meets the demand for prolactin during lactation associated with induction of both cell proliferative and inhibitory pathways, mediated, at least partially, by estradiol.

  8. Development of new therapeutic methods of lung cancer through team approach study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Ho; Zo, Jae Ill; Baek, Hee Jong; Jung, Jin Haeng; Lee, Jae Cheol; Ryoo, Baek Yeol; Kim, Mi Sook; Choi, Du Hwan; Park, Sun Young; Lee, Hae Young

    2000-12-01

    The aims of this study were to make the lung cancer clinics in Korea Cancer Center Hospital, and to establish new therapeutic methods of lung cancer for increasing the cure rate and survival rate of patients. Also another purpose of this study was to establish a common treatment method in our hospital. All patients who were operated in Korea Cancer Center Hospital from 1987 due to lung cancer were followed up and evaluated. And we have been studied the effect of postoperative adjuvant therapy in stage I, II, IIIA non-small cell lung cancer patients from 1989 with the phase three study form. Follow-up examinations were scheduled in these patients and interim analysis was made. Also we have been studied the effect of chemo-therapeutic agents in small cell lung cancer patients from 1997 with the phase two study form. We evaluated the results of this study. Some important results of this study were as follows. 1. The new therapeutic method (surgery + MVP chemotherapy) was superior to the standard therapeutic one in stage I Non-small cell lung cancer patients. So, we have to change the standard method of treatment in stage I NSCLC. 2. Also, this new therapeutic method made a good result in stage II NSCLC patients. And this result was reported in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 3. However, this new therapeutic method was not superior to the standard treatment method (surgery only) in stage IIIA NSCLC patients. So, we must develop new chemo-therapeutic agents in the future for advanced NSCLC patients. 4. In the results of the randomized phase II studies about small cell lung cancer, there was no difference in survival between Etoposide + Carboplatin + Ifosfamide + Cisplatin group and Etoposide + Carboplatin + Ifosfamide + Cisplatin + Tamoxifen group in both the limited and extended types of small cell lung cancer patients.

  9. The value of non-human primates in the development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Meer, P.J.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34153790X; Kooijman, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/322905788; Van Der Laan, J.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374879966; Moors, E.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/20241664X; Schellekens, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068406762

    2011-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is increasingly focusing on the development of biological therapeutics. These molecules generally cause no off-target toxicity and are highly species specific. Therefore, non-human primates (NHPs) are often the only relevant species in which to conduct regulatory safety

  10. The Medicinal Chemistry of Therapeutic Peptides: Recent Developments in Synthesis and Design Optimizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Anutthaman; Anandamma, Sasikala K; Kalesh, Karunakaran A

    2017-10-12

    Peptide therapeutics have made tremendous progress in the past decade. Many of the inherent weaknesses of peptides which hampered their development as therapeutics are now more or less effectively tackled with recent scientific and technological advancements in integrated drug discovery settings. These include recent developments in synthetic organic chemistry, high-throughput recombinant production strategies, high-resolution analytical methods, high-throughput screening options, ingenious drug delivery strategies and novel formulation preparations. Here, we will briefly describe the key methodologies and strategies used in the therapeutic peptide development processes with select examples of the most recent developments in the field. The aim of this review is to highlight the viable options a medicinal chemist may consider in order to improve a specific pharmacological property of interest in a peptide lead entity and thereby rationally assess the therapeutic potential this class of molecules possesses while they are traditionally (and incorrectly) considered 'undruggable'. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. 77 FR 62521 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... interleukin-10 (IL-10) inhibitor as a dual-biologic therapy to treat metastatic breast cancer, or ii) incorporating a p53 isoform antisense oligonucleotide as a single biologic therapy to treat T- cell lymphoma... Exclusive License: The Development of Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer and T...

  12. Development of the Fibulin-3 protein therapeutics of non small cell lung cancer stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kugchan; Jung, Il Lae; Kim, Seo Yeon; Choi, Su Im; Lee, Jae Ha

    2013-09-15

    This study focuses on developing an efficient bioprocess for large-scale production of fibulin-3 using Chinese Hamster Ovary cell expression system and evaluating its therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer. The specific aims are as follows: Isolation and establishment of CSCs using FACS based on cell surface markers and high ALDH1 activity. Identification and characterization of lung cancer stem cells that acquire features of CSC upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Evaluation of the fibulin-3 effects on the stem traits and signaling pathways required for the generation and maintenance of CSCs. In vivo validation of fivulin-3 for tumor prognosis and therapeutic efficacy against lung cancer using animal model.

  13. Novel mouse model recapitulates genome and transcriptome alterations in human colorectal carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeil, Nicole E; Padilla-Nash, Hesed M; Buishand, Floryne O; Hue, Yue; Ried, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    Human colorectal carcinomas are defined by a nonrandom distribution of genomic imbalances that are characteristic for this disease. Often, these imbalances affect entire chromosomes. Understanding the role of these aneuploidies for carcinogenesis is of utmost importance. Currently, established transgenic mice do not recapitulate the pathognonomic genome aberration profile of human colorectal carcinomas. We have developed a novel model based on the spontaneous transformation of murine colon epithelial cells. During this process, cells progress through stages of pre-immortalization, immortalization and, finally, transformation, and result in tumors when injected into immunocompromised mice. We analyzed our model for genome and transcriptome alterations using ArrayCGH, spectral karyotyping (SKY), and array based gene expression profiling. ArrayCGH revealed a recurrent pattern of genomic imbalances. These results were confirmed by SKY. Comparing these imbalances with orthologous maps of human chromosomes revealed a remarkable overlap. We observed focal deletions of the tumor suppressor genes Trp53 and Cdkn2a/p16. High-level focal genomic amplification included the locus harboring the oncogene Mdm2, which was confirmed by FISH in the form of double minute chromosomes. Array-based global gene expression revealed distinct differences between the sequential steps of spontaneous transformation. Gene expression changes showed significant similarities with human colorectal carcinomas. Pathways most prominently affected included genes involved in chromosomal instability and in epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Our novel mouse model therefore recapitulates the most prominent genome and transcriptome alterations in human colorectal cancer, and might serve as a valuable tool for understanding the dynamic process of tumorigenesis, and for preclinical drug testing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Zika Virus: Recent Advances towards the Development of Vaccines and Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Monica A

    2017-06-13

    Zika is a rapidly emerging public health threat. Although clinical infection is frequently mild, significant neurological manifestations have been demonstrated in infants born to Zika virus (ZIKV) infected mothers. Due to the substantial ramifications of intrauterine infection, effective counter-measures are urgently needed. In order to develop effective anti-ZIKV vaccines and therapeutics, improved animal models and a better understanding of immunological correlates of protection against ZIKV are required. This review will summarize what is currently known about ZIKV, the clinical manifestations and epidemiology of Zika as well as, the development of animal models to study ZIKV infection, host immune responses against ZIKV, and the current state of development of vaccines and therapeutics against ZIKV.

  15. Zika Virus: Recent Advances towards the Development of Vaccines and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Monica A.

    2017-01-01

    Zika is a rapidly emerging public health threat. Although clinical infection is frequently mild, significant neurological manifestations have been demonstrated in infants born to Zika virus (ZIKV) infected mothers. Due to the substantial ramifications of intrauterine infection, effective counter-measures are urgently needed. In order to develop effective anti-ZIKV vaccines and therapeutics, improved animal models and a better understanding of immunological correlates of protection against ZIKV are required. This review will summarize what is currently known about ZIKV, the clinical manifestations and epidemiology of Zika as well as, the development of animal models to study ZIKV infection, host immune responses against ZIKV, and the current state of development of vaccines and therapeutics against ZIKV. PMID:28608813

  16. A novel humanized mouse model of Huntington disease for preclinical development of therapeutics targeting mutant huntingtin alleles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Southwell, Amber L; Skotte, Niels H; Villanueva, Erika B; Østergaard, Michael E; Gu, Xiaofeng; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Kay, Chris; Cheung, Daphne; Xie, Yuanyun; Waltl, Sabine; Dal Cengio, Louisa; Findlay-Black, Hailey; Doty, Crystal N; Petoukhov, Eugenia; Iworima, Diepiriye; Slama, Ramy; Ooi, Jolene; Pouladi, Mahmoud A; Yang, X William; Swayze, Eric E; Seth, Punit P; Hayden, Michael R

    2017-03-15

    Huntington disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disease caused by a mutation in the huntingtin (HTT) gene. HTT is a large protein, interacts with many partners and is involved in many cellular pathways, which are perturbed in HD. Therapies targeting HTT directly are likely to provide the most global benefit. Thus there is a need for preclinical models of HD recapitulating human HTT genetics. We previously generated a humanized mouse model of HD, Hu97/18, by intercrossing BACHD and YAC18 mice with knockout of the endogenous mouse HD homolog (Hdh). Hu97/18 mice recapitulate the genetics of HD, having two full-length, genomic human HTT transgenes heterozygous for the HD mutation and polymorphisms associated with HD in populations of Caucasian descent. We have now generated a companion model, Hu128/21, by intercrossing YAC128 and BAC21 mice on the Hdh-/- background. Hu128/21 mice have two full-length, genomic human HTT transgenes heterozygous for the HD mutation and polymorphisms associated with HD in populations of East Asian descent and in a minority of patients from other ethnic groups. Hu128/21 mice display a wide variety of HD-like phenotypes that are similar to YAC128 mice. Additionally, both transgenes in Hu128/21 mice match the human HTT exon 1 reference sequence. Conversely, the BACHD transgene carries a floxed, synthetic exon 1 sequence. Hu128/21 mice will be useful for investigations of human HTT that cannot be addressed in Hu97/18 mice, for developing therapies targeted to exon 1, and for preclinical screening of personalized HTT lowering therapies in HD patients of East Asian descent. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Lactate as an early predictor of psychomotor development in neonates with asphyxia receiving therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackova, Renata; Salounova, Dana; Kantor, Lumir

    2017-12-04

    This prospective study aimed to evaluate the relationship between persistently elevated lactate values in the arterial blood of newborns with grade II and III hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (treated with therapeutic hypothermia) and psychomotor development at 24 months. 51 neonates of gestational age from 36 to 41 weeks receiving therapeutic hypothermia for moderate to severe hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy had arterial blood lactate levels regularly analysed. At 24 months the infants' psychomotor development was evaluated and they were divided into two groups - those where the outcome was favourable (i.e. normal psychomotor development) and adverse (severe motor or sensory impairment or death). The lactate dynamics over time were retrospectively evaluated from the data collected, with the normal upper limit set at 4 mmol/L. Of the 51 affected neonates, 7 died over the course of the study. 34 of the remaining 44 infants demonstrated normal psychomotor findings at 2 years old, with adverse findings in 10 cases. Although both groups experienced significant reductions in lactate over time, there were statistically significant differences between them regarding currently measured lactate levels. Absolute lactate values and their development over time can be a used as an auxiliary factor in making early estimates of the long-term outcome for newborns with neonatal asphyxia being treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

  18. Aquatic environment as an occupational therapeutic scenario for the development of body scheme in Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrystiane Maria Veras Pôrto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effect of aquatic environment while an occupational therapeutic scenario in the development of body scheme of a child with Down Syndrome, considering the therapeutic properties of water. Description of the case: An interventionist research, with a qualitative and descriptive approach, conducted in an adapted pool of the Núcleo de Atenção Médica Integrada (NAMI of Fortaleza University (UNIFOR, Ceara, during the period of March to May, 2005. The subject of the study was a female child, aged 10 years old, diagnosed with Down Syndrome. Data collection had as instruments an interview guide for anamnesis, an evaluation form of psychomotor development, besides a field diary to record clinical observations during the sessions. This information was organized and analyzed based on clinical reasoning of occupational therapists and then described as a case study. We observed an evolution in the development of skills related to body scheme, such as the perception of fine parts of her own body, as well as large parts in someone else’s body, the imitation of positions, finishing with more active participation in activities of daily living. Final Considerations: We verified the effectiveness of occupational therapeutic activities conducted in aquatic environment for the development of the body scheme of the child in the study. This may be useful for conducting further research on the subject – whose literature is scarce – and contributing to the crescent update of occupational therapy practices.

  19. Development of therapeutic antibodies to G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels: Opportunities, challenges and their therapeutic potential in respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Finch, Donna K; Mustelin, Tomas; Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2017-01-01

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics continues to be a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Therapeutic drug targets such as soluble cytokines, growth factors and single transmembrane spanning receptors have been successfully targeted by recombinant monoclonal antibodies and the development of new product candidates continues. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important disease targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to the complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these important regulators of cell function. Given this opportunity, a significant effort has been applied to address the challenges of targeting these complex molecules and a number of targets are linked to the pathophysiology of respiratory diseases. In this review, we provide a summary of the importance of GPCRs and ion channels involved in respiratory disease and discuss advantages offered by antibodies as therapeutics at these targets. We highlight some recent GPCRs and ion channels linked to respiratory disease mechanisms and describe in detail recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional antibodies against challenging membrane protein targets such as GPCRs and ion channels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The Function and Therapeutic Potential of Long Non-coding RNAs in Cardiovascular Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa P.C. Gomes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The popularization of genome-wide analyses and RNA sequencing led to the discovery that a large part of the human genome, while effectively transcribed, does not encode proteins. Long non-coding RNAs have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression in both normal and disease states. Studies of long non-coding RNAs expressed in the heart, in combination with gene association studies, revealed that these molecules are regulated during cardiovascular development and disease. Some long non-coding RNAs have been functionally implicated in cardiac pathophysiology and constitute potential therapeutic targets. Here, we review the current knowledge of the function of long non-coding RNAs in the cardiovascular system, with an emphasis on cardiovascular development and biology, focusing on hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, ischemia, and heart failure. We discuss potential therapeutic implications and the challenges of long non-coding RNA research, with directions for future research and translational focus.

  1. EMT/MET at the Crossroad of Stemness, Regeneration and Oncogenesis: The Ying-Yang Equilibrium Recapitulated in Cell Spheroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elvira Forte

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT is an essential trans-differentiation process, which plays a critical role in embryonic development, wound healing, tissue regeneration, organ fibrosis, and cancer progression. It is the fundamental mechanism by which epithelial cells lose many of their characteristics while acquiring features typical of mesenchymal cells, such as migratory capacity and invasiveness. Depending on the contest, EMT is complemented and balanced by the reverse process, the mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition (MET. In the saving economy of the living organisms, the same (Ying-Yang tool is integrated as a physiological strategy in embryonic development, as well as in the course of reparative or disease processes, prominently fibrosis, tumor invasion and metastasis. These mechanisms and their related signaling (e.g., TGF-β and BMPs have been effectively studied in vitro by tissue-derived cell spheroids models. These three-dimensional (3D cell culture systems, whose phenotype has been shown to be strongly dependent on TGF-β-regulated EMT/MET processes, present the advantage of recapitulating in vitro the hypoxic in vivo micro-environment of tissue stem cell niches and their formation. These spheroids, therefore, nicely reproduce the finely regulated Ying-Yang equilibrium, which, together with other mechanisms, can be determinant in cell fate decisions in many pathophysiological scenarios, such as differentiation, fibrosis, regeneration, and oncogenesis. In this review, current progress in the knowledge of signaling pathways affecting EMT/MET and stemness regulation will be outlined by comparing data obtained from cellular spheroids systems, as ex vivo niches of stem cells derived from normal and tumoral tissues. The mechanistic correspondence in vivo and the possible pharmacological perspective will be also explored, focusing especially on the TGF-β-related networks, as well as others, such as SNAI1, PTEN, and EGR1. This

  2. [The prospects for the development of therapeutic and health-promoting tourism in Gorny Altai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhabarova, N K; Iakovenko, É S; Sidorina, N G; Firsova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The present balneological survey made it possible to identify the promising areas with a high potential for the health resort, recreational and touristic activities including the foothill, low-mountain, mid-mountain valleys and hollows of Northern, Northwestern, Central and Eastern bioclimatic provinces of Mountainous Altai. Recommendations have been proposed for the development of therapeutic and health-improving tourism in the Shebalinsk, Ust'-Kansk and Ulagansk districts of the Altai Republic.

  3. Therapeutic Ultrasound Research And Development From An Industrial And Commercial Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seip, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to share the challenges and opportunities as viewed from an industrial and commercial perspective that one encounters when performing therapeutic ultrasound research, development, manufacturing, and sales activities. Research in therapeutic ultrasound has become an active field in the last decade, spurred by technological advances in the areas of transducer materials, control electronics, treatment monitoring techniques, an ever increasing number of clinical applications, and private and governmental funding opportunities. The development of devices and methods utilizing therapeutic ultrasound to cure or manage disease is being pursued by startup companies and large established companies alike, driven by the promise of profiting at many levels from this new and disruptive technology. Widespread penetration within the clinical community remains elusive, with current approaches focusing on very specific applications and niche markets. Challenges include difficulties in securing capital to develop the technology and undertake costly clinical trials, a regulatory landscape that varies from country to country, resistance from established practitioners, and difficulties in assembling a team with the right mix of technological savvy and business expertise. Success is possible and increasing, however, as evidenced by several companies, initiatives, and products with measurable benefits to the patient, clinician, and companies alike.

  4. Helping Oxytocin Deliver: Considerations in the Development of Oxytocin-Based Therapeutics for Brain Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eMacdonald

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Concerns regarding a drought in psychopharmacology have risen from many quarters. From one perspective, the wellspring of bedrock medications for anxiety disorders, depression, and schizophrenia was serendipitously discovered over thirty year ago, the swell of pharmaceutical investment in drug discovery has receded, and the pipeline’s flow of medications with unique mechanisms of action (i.e. glutamatergic agents, CRF antagonists has slowed to a trickle. Might oxytocin (OT-based therapeutics be an oasis? Though a large basic science literature and a slowly increasing number of studies in human diseases support this hope, the bulk of extant OT studies in humans are single-dose studies on normals, and do not directly relate to improvements in human brain-based diseases. Instead, these studies have left us with a field pregnant with therapeutic possibilities, but barren of definitive treatments. In this clinically-oriented review, we discuss the extant OT literature with an eye toward helping OT deliver on its promise as a therapeutic agent. To this end, we identify ten key questions that we believe future OT research should address. From this overview, several conclusions are clear: 1 the OT system represents an extremely promising target for novel CNS drug development; 2 there is a pressing need for rigorous, randomized controlled clinical trials targeting actual patients; and 3 in order to inform the design and execution of these vital trials, we need further translational studies addressing the questions posed in this review. Looking forward, we extend a cautious hope that the next decade of OT research will birth oxytocin-targetted therapeutics that can truly deliver on this system’s therapeutic potential.

  5. The development of the therapeutic alliance and the emergence of alliance ruptures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Coutinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study evaluated the development of the therapeutic alliance and the emergence of alliance ruptures, in a sample of patients with different diagnosis and different therapeutic outcome. Design: We examined the longitudinal data of 38 therapeutic dyads receiving cognitive-behavioural therapy, including dropouts as well as successful and unsuccessful cases. The sample included cases with Axis I and Axis II disorders. Method: At the end of each session, patients evaluated the alliance using the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI. Six judges trained in the observation of alliance rupture markers with an observational system of ruptures, rated 201 videotaped sessions. Longitudinal statistical models were applied to the data. Results: We found that the pattern of alliance development of successful cases was different from the unsuccessful and dropouts cases. In addition on average, patients with personality disorders began therapy with a lower WAI score that decreased over time, whereas patients with Axis-I disorders began therapy with a higher WAI score that increased over time.

  6. Development of next generation cardiovascular therapeutics through bio-assisted nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Rajesh; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2017-09-26

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) rank, next to cancer and stroke, among the deadliest diseases in the world. Among the major CVDs, acute myocardial infarction is a life-threatening disorder resulting from permanent damage to the left ventricular cardiac tissue. The major coronary arteries that supply blood to the functional left ventricle become blocked due to thrombotic plaque occlusion. During myocardial ischemia, oxidative stress and free radicals destroy healthy cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells, followed by degradation of the extracellular matrix, which results in ventricular wall-thinning and dilation. To protect the left ventricle from further damage and to rescue ischemic cardiac tissue, specially designed scaffolds consisting of biological material and nanomaterials have been developed. At the preclinical level, scaffolds loaded with growth factors and cells have been shown to regenerate ischemic tissue into healthy, functional myocardium. In this review, different therapeutic strategies currently available to treat the disease conditions at various stages are discussed, with special emphasis on biomaterials. Recent advancements in cardiovascular therapeutics using graphene and exosomal nanovesicles are discussed in detail. In addition, future directions for the development of next-generation cardiovascular therapeutics with biological and non-biological materials through nano-assisted technology are explored. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Design, development and successful application of safe and effective HIV therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalaka, Jeremiah O A

    2005-01-01

    It is generally held that HIV, the causative agent of the rampaging global HIV/AIDS pandemic, is incurable and uniformly fatal. Since the discovery and isolation of the virus over two decades ago, global efforts at producing preventive and curative vaccines against it have so far resulted in failure. Working single-handedly with only his family's meagre resources and against the tide of universally accepted dogmas on HIV/AIDS, the author designed, developed and applied new HIV therapeutic and preventive vaccines in Nigeria, and has been using them on willing HIV-infected and normal persons respectively with their informed and written consent since their development. In many cases, the therapeutic vaccine produced rapid improvement not only in the symptoms and signs attributable to HIV infection, but also in various laboratory parameters with a sustained seroconversion to HIV antibody negative status in a number of the patients. In those HIV-infected patients with concomitant hepatitis B (HBV) and/or C (HCV) infection(s), the therapeutic vaccine has resulted in maintained seroconversion to negative (normal) for the HBsAg and HCV antibodies also. No significant adverse or side effect has been observed yet with the use of these vaccines. The vaccines do not cause the production of any detectable levels of stigmatizing anti-HIV antibodies. It is postulated that the vaccines elicit effective but selective cell-mediated cytotoxic immune responses against HIV, HBV and HCV-infected cells.

  8. Disregarding familiarity during recollection attempts: content-specific recapitulation as a retrieval orientation strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Stephen J; Gallo, David A

    2015-01-01

    People can use a content-specific recapitulation strategy to trigger memories (i.e., mentally reinstating encoding conditions), but how people deploy this strategy is unclear. Is recapitulation naturally used to guide all recollection attempts, or is it only used selectively, after retrieving incomplete information that requires additional monitoring? According to a retrieval orientation model, people use recapitulation whenever they search memory for specific information, regardless of what information might come to mind. In contrast, according to a postretrieval monitoring model, people selectively engage recapitulation only after retrieving ambiguous information in order to evaluate this information and guide additional retrieval attempts. We tested between these models using a criterial recollection task, and by manipulating the strength of ambiguous information associated with to-be-rejected foils (i.e., familiarity or noncriterial information). Replicating prior work, foil rejections were greater when people attempted to recollect targets studied at a semantic level (deep test) compared to an orthographic level (shallow test), implicating more accurate retrieval monitoring. To investigate the role of a recapitulation strategy in this monitoring process, a final test assessed memory for the foils that were earlier processed on these recollection tests. Performance on this foil recognition test suggested that people had engaged in more elaborative content-specific recapitulation when initially tested for deep compared to shallow recollections, and critically, this elaboration effect did not interact with the experimental manipulation of foil strength. These results support the retrieval orientation model, whereby a recapitulation strategy was used to orient retrieval toward specific information during every recollection attempt. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  9. Helping oxytocin deliver: considerations in the development of oxytocin-based therapeutics for brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, K; Feifel, D

    2013-01-01

    Concerns regarding a drought in psychopharmacology have risen from many quarters. From one perspective, the wellspring of bedrock medications for anxiety disorders, depression, and schizophrenia was serendipitously discovered over 30 year ago, the swell of pharmaceutical investment in drug discovery has receded, and the pipeline's flow of medications with unique mechanisms of action (i.e., glutamatergic agents, CRF antagonists) has slowed to a trickle. Might oxytocin (OT)-based therapeutics be an oasis? Though a large basic science literature and a slowly increasing number of studies in human diseases support this hope, the bulk of extant OT studies in humans are single-dose studies on normals, and do not directly relate to improvements in human brain-based diseases. Instead, these studies have left us with a field pregnant with therapeutic possibilities, but barren of definitive treatments. In this clinically oriented review, we discuss the extant OT literature with an eye toward helping OT deliver on its promise as a therapeutic agent. To this end, we identify 10 key questions that we believe future OT research should address. From this overview, several conclusions are clear: (1) the OT system represents an extremely promising target for novel CNS drug development; (2) there is a pressing need for rigorous, randomized controlled clinical trials targeting actual patients; and (3) in order to inform the design and execution of these vital trials, we need further translational studies addressing the questions posed in this review. Looking forward, we extend a cautious hope that the next decade of OT research will birth OT-targeted treatments that can truly deliver on this system's therapeutic potential.

  10. Development of Novel Therapeutic Agents by Inhibition of Oncogenic MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh-Duc Nguyen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRs, miRNAs are regulatory small noncoding RNAs, with their roles already confirmed to be important for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression affecting cell physiology and disease development. Upregulation of a cancer-causing miRNA, known as oncogenic miRNA, has been found in many types of cancers and, therefore, represents a potential new class of targets for therapeutic inhibition. Several strategies have been developed in recent years to inhibit oncogenic miRNAs. Among them is a direct approach that targets mature oncogenic miRNA with an antisense sequence known as antimiR, which could be an oligonucleotide or miRNA sponge. In contrast, an indirect approach is to block the biogenesis of miRNA by genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system or a small molecule inhibitor. The development of these inhibitors is straightforward but involves significant scientific and therapeutic challenges that need to be resolved. In this review, we summarize recent relevant studies on the development of miRNA inhibitors against cancer.

  11. A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry: Individual Development, Psychology, and Social Reparation. Psychoanalysis, Education and Social Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Todd O.

    2012-01-01

    A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry develops a poetry pedagogy that offers significant benefits to students by helping them to achieve a sense of renewal (a deeper awareness of self and potentials) and reparation (a realistic, but positive and proactive worldview). Todd O. Williams offers a thorough examination of the therapeutic potential…

  12. Development of Therapeutics That Induce Mitochondrial Biogenesis for the Treatment of Acute and Chronic Degenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert B; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2016-12-08

    Mitochondria have various roles in cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Because mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with many acute and chronic degenerative diseases, mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) is a therapeutic target for treating such diseases. Here, we review the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in acute and chronic degenerative diseases and the cellular signaling pathways by which MB is induced. We then review existing work describing the development and application of drugs that induce MB in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we discuss natural products and modulators of transcription factors, kinases, cyclic nucleotides, and G protein-coupled receptors.

  13. Preclinical platform of retinoblastoma xenografts recapitulating human disease and molecular markers of dissemination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual-Pasto, Guillem; Olaciregui, Nagore G; Vila-Ubach, Monica; Paco, Sonia; Monterrubio, Carles; Rodriguez, Eva; Winter, Ursula; Batalla-Vilacis, Mireia; Catala, Jaume; Salvador, Hector; Parareda, Andreu; Schaiquevich, Paula; Suñol, Mariona; Mora, Jaume; Lavarino, Cinzia; de Torres, Carmen; Chantada, Guillermo L; Carcaboso, Angel M

    2016-09-28

    Translational research in retinoblastoma - a pediatric tumor that originates during the development of the retina - would be improved by the creation of new patient-derived models. Using tumor samples from enucleated eyes we established a new battery of preclinical models that grow in vitro in serum-free medium and in vivo in immunodeficient mice. To examine whether the new xenografts recapitulate human disease and disseminate from the retina to the central nervous system, we evaluated their histology and the presence of molecular markers of dissemination that are used in the clinical setting to detect extraocular metastases. We evaluated GD2 synthase and CRX as such markers and generated a Taqman real-time quantitative PCR method to measure CRX mRNA for rapid, sensitive and specific quantification of local and metastatic tumor burden. This approach was able to detect 1 human retinoblastoma cell in 100.000 mouse brain cells. Our research adds novel preclinical tools for the discovery of new retinoblastoma treatments for clinical translation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Advanced biomaterials and microengineering technologies to recapitulate the stepwise process of cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peela, Nitish; Truong, Danh; Saini, Harpinder; Chu, Hunghao; Mashaghi, Samaneh; Ham, Stephanie L; Singh, Sunil; Tavana, Hossein; Mosadegh, Bobak; Nikkhah, Mehdi

    2017-07-01

    Cancer is one of the leading causes of death globally according to the World Health Organization. Although improved treatments and early diagnoses have reduced cancer related mortalities, metastatic disease remains a major clinical challenge. The local tumor microenvironment plays a significant role in cancer metastasis, where tumor cells respond and adapt to a plethora of biochemical and biophysical signals from stromal cells and extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Due to these complexities, there is a critical need to understand molecular mechanisms underlying cancer metastasis to facilitate the discovery of more effective therapies. In the past few years, the integration of advanced biomaterials and microengineering approaches has initiated the development of innovative platform technologies for cancer research. These technologies enable the creation of biomimetic in vitro models with physiologically relevant (i.e. in vivo-like) characteristics to conduct studies ranging from fundamental cancer biology to high-throughput drug screening. In this review article, we discuss the biological significance of each step of the metastatic cascade and provide a broad overview on recent progress to recapitulate these stages using advanced biomaterials and microengineered technologies. In each section, we will highlight the advantages and shortcomings of each approach and provide our perspectives on future directions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Targeting Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α in a New Orthotopic Model of Glioblastoma Recapitulating the Hypoxic Tumor Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigim, Fares; Cavanaugh, Jill; Patel, Anoop P; Curry, William T; Esaki, Shin-ichi; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Chi, Andrew S; Louis, David N; Martuza, Robert L; Rabkin, Samuel D; Wakimoto, Hiroaki

    2015-07-01

    Tissue hypoxia and necrosis represent pathophysiologic and histologic hallmarks of glioblastoma (GBM). Although hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) plays crucial roles in the malignant phenotypes of GBM, developing HIF-1α-targeted agents has been hampered by the lack of a suitable preclinical model that recapitulates the complex biology of clinical GBM. We present a new GBM model, MGG123, which was established from a recurrent human GBM. Orthotopic xenografting of stem-like MGG123 cells reproducibly generated lethal tumors that were characterized by foci of palisading necrosis, hypervascularity, and robust stem cell marker expression. Perinecrotic neoplastic cells distinctively express HIF-1α and are proliferative in both xenografts and the patient tissue. The xenografts contain scattered hypoxic foci that were consistently greater than 50 μm distant from blood vessels, indicating intratumoral heterogeneity of oxygenation. Hypoxia enhanced HIF-1α expression in cultured MGG123 cells, which was abrogated by the HIF-1α inhibitors digoxin or ouabain. In vivo, treatment of orthotopic MGG123 xenografts with digoxin decreased HIF-1α expression, vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA levels, and CD34-positive vasculature within the tumors, and extended survival of mice bearing the aggressive MGG123 GBM. This preclinical tumor model faithfully recapitulates the GBM-relevant hypoxic microenvironment and stemness and is a suitable platform for studying disease biology and developing hypoxia-targeted agents.

  16. DISC1 pathway in brain development: exploring therapeutic targets for major psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKamiya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic risk factors for major psychiatric disorders play key roles in neurodevelopment. Thus, exploring the molecular pathways of risk genes is important not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying brain development, but also to decipher how genetic disturbances affect brain maturation and functioning relevant to major mental illnesses. During the last decade, there has been significant progress in determining the mechanisms whereby risk genes impact brain development. Nonetheless, given that the majority of psychiatric disorders have etiological complexities encompassing multiple risk genes and environmental factors, the biological mechanisms of these diseases remain poorly understood. How can we move forward in our research for discovery of the biological markers and novel therapeutic targets for major mental disorders? Here we review recent progress in the neurobiology of Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1, a major risk gene for major mental disorders, with a particular focus on its roles in cerebral cortex development. Convergent findings implicate DISC1 as part of a large, multi-step pathway implicated in various cellular processes and signal transduction. We discuss links between the DISC1 pathway and environmental factors, such as immune/inflammatory responses, which may suggest novel therapeutic targets. Existing treatments for major mental disorders are hampered by a limited number of pharmacological targets. Consequently, elucidation of the DISC1 pathway, and its association with neuropsychiatric disorders, may offer hope for novel treatment interventions.

  17. Development of Quorum-Based Anti-Virulence Therapeutics Targeting Gram-Negative Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Shan Yew

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing is a cell density-dependent signaling phenomenon used by bacteria for coordination of population-wide phenotypes, such as expression of virulence genes, antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation. Lately, disruption of bacterial communication has emerged as an anti-virulence strategy with enormous therapeutic potential given the increasing incidences of drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria. The quorum quenching therapeutic approach promises a lower risk of resistance development, since interference with virulence generally does not affect the growth and fitness of the bacteria and, hence, does not exert an associated selection pressure for drug-resistant strains. With better understanding of bacterial communication networks and mechanisms, many quorum quenching methods have been developed against various clinically significant bacterial pathogens. In particular, Gram-negative bacteria are an important group of pathogens, because, collectively, they are responsible for the majority of hospital-acquired infections. Here, we discuss the current understanding of existing quorum sensing mechanisms and present important inhibitory strategies that have been developed against this group of pathogenic bacteria.

  18. Report of the 2. research coordination meeting on development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this CRP are to evaluate various generator and concentration technologies for 188 W- 188 Re, 99 Mo- 99 mTc and 90 Sr- 90 Y generators, to optimize generator fabrication and use, to standardize quality control techniques for the eluted radionuclides and to provide standardized procedures to participating laboratories. The following issues will be addressed during the CRP. - Development of reproducible methodologies for the preparation of 188 W- 188 Re, 99 Mo- 99 mTc and 90 Sr- 90 Y generators. - Development and evaluation of chromatography adsorbents (Zr/Ti composites) having higher binding capacities and demonstration of their utility in the preparation of column generators for 188 Re and 99 mTc. - Comparison and optimization of technologies for post elution concentration of 188 Re and 99 mTc in order to improve the radioactive concentration. - Development of quality control techniques and specifications for generator eluted therapeutic radionuclides

  19. Recent legal developments and the authority of the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirlow, Esme; Faunce, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Recent legal developments have highlighted the need for greater support from the Federal Government for the authority of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) to ensure, by pre-approval assessments and post-approval regulation, the safety of listed medicines in Australia. One of these developments concerns the impact of ongoing civil litigation in Australian courts led by Pan Pharmaceuticals stakeholders to recover compensation from the government for the losses they incurred following the TGA's post-listing shut-down of that pharmaceutical manufacturing company in 2003. Another factor is the recently announced governmental policy to outsource to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) safety assessments of foreign drug manufacturers whose products will be used in Australia.

  20. Progress in AQP Research and New Developments in Therapeutic Approaches to Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E. Previch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral edema often manifests after the development of cerebrovascular disease, particularly in the case of stroke, both ischemic and hemorrhagic. Without clinical intervention, the influx of water into brain tissues leads to increased intracranial pressure, cerebral herniation, and ultimately death. Strategies to manage the development of edema constitute a major unmet therapeutic need. However, despite its major clinical significance, the mechanisms underlying cerebral water transport and edema formation remain elusive. Aquaporins (AQPs are a class of water channel proteins which have been implicated in the regulation of water homeostasis and cerebral edema formation, and thus represent a promising target for alleviating stroke-induced cerebral edema. This review examines the significance of relevant AQPs in stroke injury and subsequently explores neuroprotective strategies aimed at modulating AQP expression, with a particular focus on AQP4, the most abundant AQP in the central nervous system.

  1. Progress in AQP Research and New Developments in Therapeutic Approaches to Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previch, Lauren E.; Ma, Linlin; Wright, Joshua C.; Singh, Sunpreet; Geng, Xiaokun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral edema often manifests after the development of cerebrovascular disease, particularly in the case of stroke, both ischemic and hemorrhagic. Without clinical intervention, the influx of water into brain tissues leads to increased intracranial pressure, cerebral herniation, and ultimately death. Strategies to manage the development of edema constitute a major unmet therapeutic need. However, despite its major clinical significance, the mechanisms underlying cerebral water transport and edema formation remain elusive. Aquaporins (AQPs) are a class of water channel proteins which have been implicated in the regulation of water homeostasis and cerebral edema formation, and thus represent a promising target for alleviating stroke-induced cerebral edema. This review examines the significance of relevant AQPs in stroke injury and subsequently explores neuroprotective strategies aimed at modulating AQP expression, with a particular focus on AQP4, the most abundant AQP in the central nervous system. PMID:27438832

  2. Development of gastroenterology and hepatology in Iran: Part II- advances in research and therapeutic modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberifiroozi, Mehdi; Mir-Madjlessi, Seid-Hossein

    2009-09-01

    Following the establishment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Fellowship Programs in 1987, significant developments in research and health care delivery have been achieved. The number of published articles has increased significantly and now more than 10 approved research centers are involved in several longitudinal and population based studies in GI epidemiology, viral hepatitis and GI oncology around the country. Before 1987 less than 50 gastroenterologists were working in the country, but now more than 300 gastroenterologists are involved in public and private health care delivery systems. Advanced diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic procedures and complex surgical procedures such as liver transplantation are a routine now. These achievements are indicative of hard work and determination of dedicated physicians after the Islamic Revolution, and the support of governmental and non-governmental sectors. The future prospect of development in the discipline of gastroenterology and hepatology in Iran seems to be very encouraging.

  3. Recent Advances in Developing Inhibitors for Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylases and Their Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs are members of the 2-oxoglutarate dependent non-heme iron dioxygenases. Due to their physiological roles in regulation of HIF-1α stability, many efforts have been focused on searching for selective PHD inhibitors to control HIF-1α levels for therapeutic applications. In this review, we first describe the structure of PHD2 as a molecular basis for structure-based drug design (SBDD and various experimental methods developed for measuring PHD activity. We further discuss the current status of the development of PHD inhibitors enabled by combining SBDD approaches with high-throughput screening. Finally, we highlight the clinical implications of small molecule PHD inhibitors.

  4. Development and Implementation of an Advanced Therapeutic Communication Course: An Interprofessional Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwind, Jasna K; McCay, Elizabeth; Metersky, Kateryna; Martin, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Interprofessional education and practice have been gaining recognition during the past decade. However, little has been written on person-centered care (PCC) within interprofessional practice and how it could be taught to interprofessional learners. A key element of PCC is therapeutic communication. Consequently, a group of interprofessional faculty innovated a graduate-level elective course on advanced therapeutic communication where interprofessional learners together explore PCC within interprofessional care. The course curriculum is underpinned by mindfulness in education, nonviolent communication, and reflective writing. Various teaching- learning strategies, including creative self-expression, are also used. The created competencies and conceptual framework may be used by other educators in creating a similar interprofessional course. Interprofessional learners gained a deeper and broader understanding of PCC in interprofessional care. On the basis of this undertaking, the faculty gained a deeper appreciation for interprofessional collaboration in the development of innovative educational methodologies that advance interprofessional teamwork in education and professional practice. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(10):592-597.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Quercetin as an Emerging Anti-Melanoma Agent: A four-focus area therapeutic development strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoey Harris

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Replacing current refractory treatments for melanoma with new prevention and therapeutic approaches is crucial in order to successfully treat this aggressive cancer form. Melanoma develops from neural crest cells, which express tyrosinase -- a key enzyme in the pigmentation pathway. The tyrosinase enzyme is highly active in melanoma cells and metabolizes polyphenolic compounds; tyrosinase expression thus makes a feasible a target for polyphenol-based therapies. For example, quercetin (3,3′,4′,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone is a highly ubiquitous and well-classified dietary polyphenol found in various fruits, vegetables and other plant products including onions, broccoli, kale, oranges, blueberries, apples, and tea. Quercetin has demonstrated anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity in various cancer cell types. Quercetin is readily metabolized by tyrosinase into various compounds that promote anti-cancer activity; additionally, given that tyrosinase expression increases during tumorigenesis, and its activity is associated with pigmentation changes in both early- and late-stage melanocytic lesions, it suggests that quercetin can be used to target melanoma. In this review we explore the potential of Quercetin as an anti-melanoma agent utilizing and extrapolating on evidence from previous in vitro studies in various human malignant cell lines and propose a four-focus area strategy to develop quercetin as a targeted anti-melanoma compound for use as either a preventative or therapeutic agent. The four areas of focus include utilizing quercetin to i modulate cellular bioreduction potential and associated signaling cascades, ii affect transcription of relevant genes, iii regulate epigenetic processes, and iv develop effective combination therapies and delivery modalities/protocols. In general, quercetin could be used to exploit tyrosinase activity to prevent, and/or treat, melanoma with minimal additional side effects.

  6. Early developability screen of therapeutic antibody candidates using Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoisier, Alexandra; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies represent one of the fastest growing segments in the pharmaceutical market. They are used in a broad range of disease fields, such as autoimmune diseases, cancer, inflammation and infectious diseases. The growth of the segment has necessitated development of new analytical platforms for faster and better antibody selection and characterization. Early quality control and risk assessment of biophysical parameters help prevent failure in later stages of antibody development, and thus can reduce costs and save time. Critical parameters such as aggregation, conformational stability, colloidal stability and hydrophilicity, are measured during the early phase of antibody generation and guide the selection process of the best lead candidates in terms of technical developability. We report on the use of a novel instrument (ActiPix/Viscosizer) for measuring both the hydrodynamic radius and the absolute viscosity of antibodies based on Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging. The looped microcapillary-based method combines low sample consumption, fast throughput and high precision compared to other conventional methods. From a random panel of 130 antibodies in the early selection process, we identified some with large hydrodynamic radius outside the normal distribution and others with non-Gaussian Taylor dispersion profiles. The antibodies with such abnormal properties were confirmed later in the selection process to show poor developability profiles. Moreover, combining these results with those of the viscosity measurements at high antibody concentrations allows screening, with limited amounts of materials, candidates with potential issues in pre-formulation development.

  7. Dengue Virus Tropism in Humanized Mice Recapitulates Human Dengue Fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota, Javier; Rico-Hesse, Rebeca

    2011-01-01

    Animal models of dengue virus disease have been very difficult to develop because of the virus' specificity for infection and replication in certain human cells. We developed a model of dengue fever in immunodeficient mice transplanted with human stem cells from umbilical cord blood. These mice show measurable signs of dengue disease as in humans (fever, viremia, erythema and thrombocytopenia), and after infection with the most virulent strain of dengue serotype 2, humanized mice showed infection in human cells in bone marrow, spleen and blood. Cytokines and chemokines were secreted by these human cells into the mouse bloodstream. We demonstrated that the pathology of dengue virus infection in these mice follows that reported in human patients, making this the first valid and relevant model for studying dengue fever pathogenesis in humans. PMID:21695193

  8. Translational control of TWIST1 expression in MCF-10A cell lines recapitulating breast cancer progression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nairismägi, Maarja-Liisa; Vislovukh, Andrii; Meng, Q

    2012-01-01

    TWIST1 is a highly conserved basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that promotes epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT). Its misregulation has been observed in various types of tumors. Using the MCF-10A-series of cell lines that recapitulate the early stages of breast cancer formation...

  9. Mice long-term high-fat diet feeding recapitulates human cardiovascular alterations: an animal model to study the early phases of diabetic cardiomyopathy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián D Calligaris

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND/AIM: Hypercaloric diet ingestion and sedentary lifestyle result in obesity. Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of clinical features secondary to obesity, considered as a pre-diabetic condition and recognized as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. To better understand the relationship between obesity, metabolic syndrome and cardiovascular disease as well as for the development of novel therapeutic strategies, animal models that reproduce the etiology, course and outcomes of these pathologies are required. The aim of this work was to characterize the long-term effects of high-fat diet-induced obesity on the mice cardiovascular system, in order to make available a new animal model for diabetic cardiomyopathy. METHODS/RESULTS: Male C57BL/6 mice were fed with a standardized high-fat diet (obese or regular diet (normal for 16 months. Metabolic syndrome was evaluated testing plasma glucose, triglycerides, cholesterol, insulin, and glucose tolerance. Arterial pressure was measured using a sphygmomanometer (non invasive method and by hemodynamic parameters (invasive method. Cardiac anatomy was described based on echocardiography and histological studies. Cardiac function was assessed by cardiac catheterization under a stress test. Cardiac remodelling and metabolic biomarkers were assessed by RT-qPCR and immunoblotting. As of month eight, the obese mice were overweight, hyperglycaemic, insulin resistant, hyperinsulinemic and hypercholesterolemic. At month 16, they also presented normal arterial pressure but altered vascular reactivity (vasoconstriction, and cardiac contractility reserve reduction, heart mass increase, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiac fibrosis, and heart metabolic compensations. By contrast, the normal mice remained healthy throughout the study. CONCLUSIONS: Mice fed with a high-fat diet for prolonged time recapitulates the etiology, course and outcomes of the early phases of human diabetic cardiomyopathy.

  10. Design and Development of a Bilateral Therapeutic Hand Device for Stroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhlaquor Rahman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The major cause of disability is stroke. It is the second highest cause of death after coronary heart disease in Australia. In this paper, a post stroke therapeutic device has been designed and developed for hand motor function rehabilitation that a stroke survivor can use for bilateral movement practice. A prototype of the device was fabricated that can fully flex and extend metacarpophalangeal (MCP, proximal interphalangeal (PIP and distal interphalangeal (DIP joints of the fingers, and interphalangeal (IP, metacarpophalangeal (MCP and trapeziometacarpal (IM joints of the thumb of the left hand (impaired hand, based on movements of the right hand's (healthy hand fingers. Out of 21 degrees of freedom (DOFs of hand fingers, the prototype of the hand exoskeleton allowed fifteen degrees of freedom (DOFs, with three degrees of freedom (DOFs for each finger and three degrees of freedom (DOFs for the thumb. In addition, testing of the device on a healthy subject was conducted to validate the design requirements.

  11. Emerging Strategies for Developing Next-Generation Protein Therapeutics for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintzing, James R; Filsinger Interrante, Maria V; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2016-12-01

    Protein-based therapeutics have been revolutionizing the oncology space since they first appeared in the clinic two decades ago. Unlike traditional small-molecule chemotherapeutics, protein biologics promote active targeting of cancer cells by binding to cell-surface receptors and other markers specifically associated with or overexpressed on tumors versus healthy tissue. While the first approved cancer biologics were monoclonal antibodies, the burgeoning field of protein engineering is spawning research on an expanded range of protein formats and modifications that allow tuning of properties such as target-binding affinity, serum half-life, stability, and immunogenicity. In this review we highlight some of these strategies and provide examples of modified and engineered proteins under development as preclinical and clinical-stage drug candidates for the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Recent Developments in Synthetic Carbohydrate-Based Diagnostics, Vaccines, and Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2015-07-20

    Glycans are everywhere in biological systems, being involved in many cellular events with important implications for medical purposes. Building upon a detailed understanding of the functional roles of carbohydrates in molecular recognition processes and disease states, glycans are increasingly being considered as key players in pharmacological research. On the basis of the important progress recently made in glycochemistry, glycobiology, and glycomedicine, we provide a complete overview of successful applications and future perspectives of carbohydrates in the biopharmaceutical and medical fields. This review highlights the development of carbohydrate-based diagnostics, exemplified by glycan imaging techniques and microarray platforms, synthetic oligosaccharide vaccines against infectious diseases (e.g., HIV) and cancer, and finally carbohydrate-derived therapeutics, including glycomimetic drugs and glycoproteins. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Rational design of highly potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins: Implication for developing antiviral therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ling; Gao, George F.; Tien Po

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant protein containing one heptad-repeat 1 (HR1) segment and one HR2 segment of the HIV-1 gp41 (HR1-HR2) has been shown to fold into thermally stable six-helix bundle, representing the fusogenic core of gp41. In this study, we have used the fusogenic core as a scaffold to design HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins by linking another HR1 to the C terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR121) or additional HR2 to the N terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR212). Both recombinant proteins could be abundantly and solubly expressed and easily purified, exhibiting high stability and potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 fusion with IC 50 values of 16.2 ± 2.8 and 2.8 ± 0.63 nM, respectively. These suggest that these rationally designed proteins can be further developed as novel anti-HIV-1 therapeutics

  14. Pre-clinical therapeutic development of a series of metalloporphyrins for Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Li-Ping; Huang, Jie; Fulton, Ruth; Pearson-Smith, Jennifer N.; Day, Brian J.; Patel, Manisha

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are a well-defined therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease (PD) and pharmacological agents that catalytically scavenge reactive species are promising neuroprotective strategies for treatment. Metalloporphyrins are synthetic catalytic antioxidants that mimic the body's own antioxidant enzymes i.e. superoxide dismutases and catalase. The goal of this study was to determine if newly designed metalloporphyrins have enhanced pharmacodynamics including oral bioavailability, longer plasma elimination half-lives, penetrate the blood brain barrier, and show promise for PD treatment. Three metalloporphyrins (AEOL 11216, AEOL 11203 and AEOL 11114) were identified in this study as potential candidates for further pre-clinical development. Each of these compounds demonstrated blood brain barrier permeability by the i.p. route and two of three compounds (AEOL 11203 and AEOL 11114) were orally bioavailable. All of these compounds protected against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced neurotoxicity, including dopamine depletion in the striatum, dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantial nigra, and increased oxidative/nitrative stress indices (glutathione disulfide and 3-nitrotyrosine) in the ventral midbrain of the mice without inhibiting MPTP metabolism. Daily therapeutic dosing of these metalloporphyrins were well tolerated without accumulation of brain manganese levels or behavioral alterations assessed by open field and rotarod tests. The study identified two orally active metalloporphyrins and one injectable metalloporphyrin as clinical candidates for further development in PD. - Highlights: • A series of metalloporphyrins were optimized in a mouse model of parkinsonism. • Two novel orally active, brain permeable antioxidant metalloporphyrins were identified. • The identified metalloporphyrins were well tolerated.

  15. Acute development of collateral circulation and therapeutic prospects in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasawa, Eri; Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    In acute ischemic stroke, collateral circulation plays an important role in maintaining blood flow to the tissue that is at risk of progressing into ischemia, and in increasing the successful recanalization rate without hemorrhagic transformation. We have reported that well-developed collateral circulation is associated with smaller infarct volume and better long-term neurological outcome, and it disappears promptly once the effective recanalization is achieved. Contrary to the belief that collateral vessels develop over time in chronic stenotic condition, there exists a phenomenon that collateral circulation develops immediately in acute stenosis or occlusion of the arteries and it seems to be triggered by fluid shear stress, which occurs between the territories of stenotic/occluded arteries and those fed by surrounding intact arteries. We believe that this acute development of collateral circulation is a target of novel therapeutics in ischemic stroke and refer our recent attempt in enhancing collateral circulation by modulating sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1, which is a known shear-stress mechanosensing protein.

  16. Acute development of collateral circulation and therapeutic prospects in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Iwasawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In acute ischemic stroke, collateral circulation plays an important role in maintaining blood flow to the tissue that is at risk of progressing into ischemia, and in increasing the successful recanalization rate without hemorrhagic transformation. We have reported that well-developed collateral circulation is associated with smaller infarct volume and better long-term neurological outcome, and it disappears promptly once the effective recanalization is achieved. Contrary to the belief that collateral vessels develop over time in chronic stenotic condition, there exists a phenomenon that collateral circulation develops immediately in acute stenosis or occlusion of the arteries and it seems to be triggered by fluid shear stress, which occurs between the territories of stenotic/occluded arteries and those fed by surrounding intact arteries. We believe that this acute development of collateral circulation is a target of novel therapeutics in ischemic stroke and refer our recent attempt in enhancing collateral circulation by modulating sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1, which is a known shear-stress mechanosensing protein.

  17. The Incredible, Embryological Egg: Calcium and Strontium Isotopes Recapitulate Ontogeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, G. W.; Skulan, J. L.

    2011-12-01

    Embryological development reflects evolutionary history. Understanding the processes of fetal growth is important for curing human birth defects and predicting damage to ecosystems from environmental insults. Tracing enzymatic and hormonal gradients during development, and correlating them to genetic cues dominate modern embryology. Previous work done tracing the mass transfer of elements has generally been limited to isotope spikes in vitro. Natural mass-dependent Ca and Sr isotopic ratios and radiogenic Sr isotopes have the potential to reveal both source and biochemical mechanism information about processes in vivo, but have not previously been extensively explored. The process when a hen lays a fertilized egg that becomes a chick includes formation and dissolution of calcium phosphate (bone) and calcium carbonate (shell). Skulan and DePaolo (1999) showed that chickens have 2% δ44/42Ca between a hen's bones and an egg white; this span represents more than 80% of the entire range of natural Ca isotope variation and illustrates there is significant variation to investigate. A striking feature of archosaurian development that also occurs in many mammals, including humans, is mass transfer of calcium from mother to embryo. The yolk of the domestic hen matures over 7-9 days, but the albumen, shell membranes and shell form in less than 20 hours. Domestic laying hens are at the physiological limit of egg production and selective breeding is no longer an effective method of increasing egg production. 60-75% of the shell's ~1.5 g of calcium comes from dietary sources, while 25-40% comes from the hen's medullary bone. Medullary bone is spicules formed in the marrow of long bones, and is a store of dietary calcium rapidly available for eggshell secretion. During in ovo development, the embryo's skeleton is formed from calcium in the yolk and by bulk dissolution of the eggshell's inner aspect via carbonic anhydrase in a process that has an effect on bone density similar to

  18. [Development and evaluation of a therapeutic community model in Japan: Use of an encounter group method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikitsuchi, Emi; Okazaki, Shigeto; Yamasaki, Akiyoshi; Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a therapeutic community (TC) model in the Drug Addiction Rehabilitation Center (DARC), the rehabilitation facility group managed by recovered drug users in Japan, and to evaluate the effectiveness of the model. The TC model is a drug-free self-help program that is significant for its use of the peer community to facilitate social and psychological change in individuals. Although the TC model has been developed around the world in a variety of settings, its use in Japan is not well known. We introduced the therapy group with an encounter group method representing the TC model at the Kawasaki DARC, and conducted pre- and post-evaluations using the modified Self-Actualization Scale (SEAS2000). Results showed that the scores of the subscale "sobering of self-affirmation" were remarkably high among those who experienced encounter groups for six months. However, the scores of the subscale "release from biased view" declined among the users at the DARC who have experienced encounter group. for a short-term, while .the scores increased among those who have a medium-term and a long-term experience. These results suggest that the encounter group may be effective especially for the medium- and long-term users in the DARC. The development of a more effective TC model is required.

  19. Challenges and considerations for development of therapeutic proteins in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wei, Xiaohui; Bajaj, Gaurav; Barrett, Jeffrey S; Meibohm, Bernd; Joshi, Amita; Gupta, Manish

    2015-03-01

    Target specificity and generally good tolerability of therapeutic proteins (TPs) present desirable treatment opportunities for pediatric patients. However, little is known on the ontogeny of processes related to the pharmacokinetics (PK) and disposition of TPs. The science, regulatory requirements and strategy of developing TPs for children are evolving. Our current review of TPs, (with focus on monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins) that were approved for pediatric use indicates that dose-selection for pediatric pivotal studies is often based on adult PK information alone. This approach might not be sufficient if more complex PK properties than simple linear PK are present. Body weight-based dosing for pediatric patients directly scaled down from adult dosing can lead to under-exposure in young pediatric patients who are usually in the lowest body-weight range. Tiered-fixed dosing can be reasonably effective for TPs in achieving comparable exposure in children over a wide age range. The uniqueness of the pediatric population, the practical challenges in conducting clinical studies in this population, as well as regulations from health authorities warrant including pharmacometrics as an integral component of pediatric drug development. We propose a framework distinct from previous proposals, to guide clinical pharmacology strategy for pediatric drug development specifically for TPs. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  20. Optimizing real time fMRI neurofeedback for therapeutic discovery and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, L.E.; Garrison, K.A.; Ghosh, S.; Wighton, P.; Hanlon, C.A.; Gilman, J.M.; Greer, S.; Turk-Browne, N.B.; deBettencourt, M.T.; Scheinost, D.; Craddock, C.; Thompson, T.; Calderon, V.; Bauer, C.C.; George, M.; Breiter, H.C.; Whitfield-Gabrieli, S.; Gabrieli, J.D.; LaConte, S.M.; Hirshberg, L.; Brewer, J.A.; Hampson, M.; Van Der Kouwe, A.; Mackey, S.; Evins, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    While reducing the burden of brain disorders remains a top priority of organizations like the World Health Organization and National Institutes of Health, the development of novel, safe and effective treatments for brain disorders has been slow. In this paper, we describe the state of the science for an emerging technology, real time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI) neurofeedback, in clinical neurotherapeutics. We review the scientific potential of rtfMRI and outline research strategies to optimize the development and application of rtfMRI neurofeedback as a next generation therapeutic tool. We propose that rtfMRI can be used to address a broad range of clinical problems by improving our understanding of brain–behavior relationships in order to develop more specific and effective interventions for individuals with brain disorders. We focus on the use of rtfMRI neurofeedback as a clinical neurotherapeutic tool to drive plasticity in brain function, cognition, and behavior. Our overall goal is for rtfMRI to advance personalized assessment and intervention approaches to enhance resilience and reduce morbidity by correcting maladaptive patterns of brain function in those with brain disorders. PMID:25161891

  1. Optimized nonclinical safety assessment strategies supporting clinical development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Frank R; Cauvin, Annick; Tibbitts, Jay; Wolfreys, Alison

    2014-05-01

    An increasing number of immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and IgG Fc fusion proteins are either approved or in early-to-late stage clinical trials for the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions, autoimmune diseases and organ transplant rejection. The exquisite specificity of mAbs, in combination with their multi-functional properties, high potency, long half-life (permitting intermittent dosing and prolonged pharamcological effects), and general lack of off-target toxicity makes them ideal therapeutics. Dosing with mAbs for these severe and debilitating but often non life-threatening diseases is usually prolonged, for several months or years, and not only affects adults, including sensitive populations such as woman of child-bearing potential (WoCBP) and the elderly, but also children. Immunosuppression is usually a therapeutic goal of these mAbs and when administered to patients whose treatment program often involves other immunosuppressive therapies, there is an inherent risk for frank immunosuppression and reduced host defence which when prolonged increases the risk of infection and cancer. In addition when mAbs interact with the immune system they can induce other adverse immune-mediated drug reactions such as infusion reactions, cytokine release syndrome, anaphylaxis, immune-complex-mediated pathology and autoimmunity. An overview of the nonclinical safety assessment and risk mitigation strategies utilized to characterize these immunomodulatory mAbs and Fc fusion proteins to support first-in human (FIH) studies and futher clinical development in inflammatory disease indications is provided. Specific emphasis is placed on the design of studies to qualify animal species for toxicology studies, early studies to investigate safety and define PK/PD relationships, FIH-enabling and chronic toxicology studies, immunotoxicity, developmental, reproductive and juvenile toxicity studies and studies to determine the potential for immunosuppression and

  2. The Progressive BSSG Rat Model of Parkinson's: Recapitulating Multiple Key Features of the Human Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jackalina M Van Kampen

    Full Text Available The development of effective neuroprotective therapies for Parkinson's disease (PD has been severely hindered by the notable lack of an appropriate animal model for preclinical screening. Indeed, most models currently available are either acute in nature or fail to recapitulate all characteristic features of the disease. Here, we present a novel progressive model of PD, with behavioural and cellular features that closely approximate those observed in patients. Chronic exposure to dietary phytosterol glucosides has been found to be neurotoxic. When fed to rats, β-sitosterol β-d-glucoside (BSSG triggers the progressive development of parkinsonism, with clinical signs and histopathology beginning to appear following cessation of exposure to the neurotoxic insult and continuing to develop over several months. Here, we characterize the progressive nature of this model, its non-motor features, the anatomical spread of synucleinopathy, and response to levodopa administration. In Sprague Dawley rats, chronic BSSG feeding for 4 months triggered the progressive development of a parkinsonian phenotype and pathological events that evolved slowly over time, with neuronal loss beginning only after toxin exposure was terminated. At approximately 3 months following initiation of BSSG exposure, animals displayed the early emergence of an olfactory deficit, in the absence of significant dopaminergic nigral cell loss or locomotor deficits. Locomotor deficits developed gradually over time, initially appearing as locomotor asymmetry and developing into akinesia/bradykinesia, which was reversed by levodopa treatment. Late-stage cognitive impairment was observed in the form of spatial working memory deficits, as assessed by the radial arm maze. In addition to the progressive loss of TH+ cells in the substantia nigra, the appearance of proteinase K-resistant intracellular α-synuclein aggregates was also observed to develop progressively, appearing first in the

  3. Integration of systems biology with organs-on-chips to humanize therapeutic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edington, Collin D.; Cirit, Murat; Chen, Wen Li Kelly; Clark, Amanda M.; Wells, Alan; Trumper, David L.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2017-02-01

    "Mice are not little people" - a refrain becoming louder as the gaps between animal models and human disease become more apparent. At the same time, three emerging approaches are headed toward integration: powerful systems biology analysis of cell-cell and intracellular signaling networks in patient-derived samples; 3D tissue engineered models of human organ systems, often made from stem cells; and micro-fluidic and meso-fluidic devices that enable living systems to be sustained, perturbed and analyzed for weeks in culture. Integration of these rapidly moving fields has the potential to revolutionize development of therapeutics for complex, chronic diseases, including those that have weak genetic bases and substantial contributions from gene-environment interactions. Technical challenges in modeling complex diseases with "organs on chips" approaches include the need for relatively large tissue masses and organ-organ cross talk to capture systemic effects, such that current microfluidic formats often fail to capture the required scale and complexity for interconnected systems. These constraints drive development of new strategies for designing in vitro models, including perfusing organ models, as well as "mesofluidic" pumping and circulation in platforms connecting several organ systems, to achieve the appropriate physiological relevance.

  4. Back to basics: the untreated rabbit reticulocyte lysate as a competitive system to recapitulate cap/poly(A) synergy and the selective advantage of IRES-driven translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto Rifo, Ricardo; Ricci, Emiliano P; Décimo, Didier; Moncorgé, Olivier; Ohlmann, Théophile

    2007-01-01

    Translation of most eukaryotic mRNAs involves the synergistic action between the 5' cap structure and the 3' poly(A) tail at the initiation step. The poly(A) tail has also been shown to stimulate translation of picornavirus internal ribosome entry sites (IRES)-directed translation. These effects have been attributed principally to interactions between eIF4G and poly(A)-binding protein (PABP) but also to the participation of PABP in other steps during translation initiation. As the rabbit reticulocyte lysate (RRL) does not recapitulate this cap/poly(A) synergy, several systems based on cellular cell-free extracts have been developed to study the effects of poly(A) tail in vitro but they generally exhibit low translational efficiency. Here, we describe that the non-nuclease-treated RRL (untreated RRL) is able to recapitulate the effects of poly(A) tail on translation in vitro. In this system, translation of a capped/polyadenylated RNA was specifically inhibited by either Paip2 or poly(rA), whereas translation directed by HCV IRES remained unaffected. Moreover, cleavage of eIF4G by FMDV L protease strongly stimulated translation directed by the EMCV IRES, thus recapitulating the competitive advantage that the proteolytic processing of eIF4G confers to IRES-driven RNAs.

  5. Therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Hong, Young Don; Lee, So Young

    2006-01-01

    Since the development of sophisticated molecular carriers such as octereotides for peptide receptor targeting and monoclonal antibodies against various associated with specific tumor types, radionuclide therapy (RNT) employing open sources of therapeutic agents is promising modality for treatment of tumors. Furthermore, the emerging of new therapeutic regimes and new approaches for tumor treatment using radionuclide are anticipated in near future. In targeted radiotherapy using peptides and other receptor based carrier molecules, the use of radionuclide with high specific activity in formulating the radiopharmaceutical is essential in order to deliver sufficient number of radionuclides to the target site without saturating the target. In order to develop effective radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic applications, it is crucial to carefully consider the choice of appropriate radionuclides as well as the carrier moiety with suitable pharmacokinetic properties that could result in good in vivo localization and desired excretion. Up to date, only a limited number of radionuclides have been applied in radiopharmaceutical development due to the constraints in compliance with their physical half-life, decay characteristics, cost and availability in therapeutic applications. In this review article, we intend to provide with the improved understanding of the factors of importance of appropriate radionuclide for therapy with respect to their physical properties and therapeutic applications

  6. New Insights to Clathrin and Adaptor Protein 2 for the Design and Development of Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebbe Toftgaard Poulsen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP has been extensively studied for its role as the precursor of the β-amyloid protein (Aβ in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, our understanding of the normal function of APP is still patchy. Emerging evidence indicates that a dysfunction in APP trafficking and degradation can be responsible for neuronal deficits and progressive degeneration in humans. We recently reported that the Y682 mutation in the 682YENPTY687 domain of APP affects its binding to specific adaptor proteins and leads to its anomalous trafficking, to defects in the autophagy machinery and to neuronal degeneration. In order to identify adaptors that influence APP function, we performed pull-down experiments followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS on hippocampal tissue extracts of three month-old mice incubated with either the 682YENPTY687 peptide, its mutated form, 682GENPTY687 or its phosphorylated form, 682pYENPTY687. Our experiments resulted in the identification of two proteins involved in APP internalization and trafficking: Clathrin heavy chain (hc and its Adaptor Protein 2 (AP-2. Overall our results consolidate and refine the importance of Y682 in APP normal functions from an animal model of premature aging and dementia. Additionally, they open the perspective to consider Clathrin hc and AP-2 as potential targets for the design and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  7. Development of a Biofeedback Therapeutic Exercise Supporting Manipulator for Lower Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yosuke; Hisada, Takashi; Komada, Satoshi; Hirai, Junji

    Although equipments that support physical therapy have been developed, there are few types of equipment to improve quality of physical therapy. This paper proposes a new concept of robotic biofeedback exercise equipment that displays human muscle force during training. The concept tries to have therapeutic value through grasping of condition for trainee during exercise and giving an incentive to perform training. The equipment is not only for convalescent patients but also for athletes and healthy persons with a physical trouble. The manipulator is designed to support lower limb rehabilitation of knee and hip joints in sagittal plane, where a 3-degrees-of-freedom manipulator is adopted in order to realize low height equipment. Since the manipulator has redundant degree of freedom, collision avoidance is performed by a controller based on acceleration control by disturbance observer. Moreover, simultaneous isokinetic movement for knee and hip joints that has an adjustment capability of maximum speed and time constant is realized in order to perform safe training by isokinetic muscular contraction. Desired motion is realized experimentally by the proposed manipulator.

  8. Engineered Bovine Antibodies in the Development of Novel Therapeutics, Immunomodulators and Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Koti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Some bovine antibodies across all classes are unique, such as the CDR3 of the variable heavy-domain (VH CDR3, which is exceptionally long (up to 66 amino acids, unlike most conventional antibodies where the VH CDR3 loops range from 10 to 25 amino acids. The exceptionally long VH CDR3 is encoded by unusually long germline IGHD genes together with insertion of novel “a” nucleotide rich conserved short nucleotide sequence (CSNS specifically at the IGH V-D junction. Such an exceptionally long VH CDR3 confers unique “knob and stalk” structural architecture where the knob, formed by intra-VH CDR3 disulfide bridges, is separated by 20 Å solvent exposed stalk composed of anti-parallel beta strands. The substitution of the knob with cytokines, such as, erythropoietin and granulocyte colony stimulating factor 3 (granulocyte colony stimulating factor, results in expression of functional fusion proteins with enhanced pharmacokinetics. The beta stranded stalk can be substituted with other rigid structures, for example, repeat alpha helices to form coiled-coil that mimics the beta-stranded stalk and, thus, opens opportunities for insertion of this structure in the CDRs of antibodies across species. Given the versatility of such a structural platform in bovine antibody VH CDR3, it provides the opportunity for the development of new generation of diagnostics, therapeutics, vaccines and immunomodulating drugs.

  9. The Potential of Frog Skin-Derived Peptides for Development into Therapeutically-Valuable Immunomodulatory Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Jelena M; Jovanovic, Ivan P; Radosavljevic, Gordana D; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa N; Conlon, J Michael; Lukic, Miodrag L

    2017-12-13

    The aim of this article is to review the immunoregulatory actions of frog skin-derived peptides in order to assess their potential as candidates for immunomodulatory or anti-inflammatory therapy. Frog skin peptides with demonstrable immunomodulatory properties have been isolated from skin secretions of a range of species belonging to the families Alytidae, Ascaphidae, Discoglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Pipidae and Ranidae. Their effects upon production of inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines by target cells have been evaluated ex vivo and effects upon cytokine expression and immune cell activity have been studied in vivo by flow cytometry after injection into mice. The naturally-occurring peptides and/or their synthetic analogues show complex and variable actions on the production of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, IL-23, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-17), pleiotropic (IL-4 and IL-6) and immunosuppressive (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines by peripheral and spleen cells, peritoneal cells and/or isolated macrophages. The effects of frenatin 2.1S include enhancement of the activation state and homing capacity of Th1-type lymphocytes and NK cells in the mouse peritoneal cavity, as well as the promotion of their tumoricidal capacities. Overall, the diverse effects of frog skin-derived peptides on the immune system indicate their potential for development into therapeutic agents.

  10. The Potential of Frog Skin-Derived Peptides for Development into Therapeutically-Valuable Immunomodulatory Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena M. Pantic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review the immunoregulatory actions of frog skin-derived peptides in order to assess their potential as candidates for immunomodulatory or anti-inflammatory therapy. Frog skin peptides with demonstrable immunomodulatory properties have been isolated from skin secretions of a range of species belonging to the families Alytidae, Ascaphidae, Discoglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Pipidae and Ranidae. Their effects upon production of inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines by target cells have been evaluated ex vivo and effects upon cytokine expression and immune cell activity have been studied in vivo by flow cytometry after injection into mice. The naturally-occurring peptides and/or their synthetic analogues show complex and variable actions on the production of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, IL-23, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-17, pleiotropic (IL-4 and IL-6 and immunosuppressive (IL-10 and TGF-β cytokines by peripheral and spleen cells, peritoneal cells and/or isolated macrophages. The effects of frenatin 2.1S include enhancement of the activation state and homing capacity of Th1-type lymphocytes and NK cells in the mouse peritoneal cavity, as well as the promotion of their tumoricidal capacities. Overall, the diverse effects of frog skin-derived peptides on the immune system indicate their potential for development into therapeutic agents.

  11. Click Reactions in Chemistry of Triterpenes - Advances Towards Development of Potential Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Jan; Borkova, Lucie; Urban, Milan

    2018-02-13

    Triterpenoids are natural compounds with a large variety of biological activities such as anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, antiparazitic, antiinflammatory and others. Despite their low toxicity and simple availability from the natural resources, their clinical use is still severely limited by their higher IC50 and worse pharmacological properties than in the currently used therapeutics. This fact encouraged a number of researchers to develop new terpenic derivatives more suitable for the potential clinical use. This review summarizes a new approach to improve both, the activity and ADME-Tox properties by connecting active terpenes to another modifying molecules using click reactions. Within the past few years, this synthetic approach was well explored yielding a lot of great improvements of the parent compounds along with some less successful attempts. A large quantity of the new compounds presented here are superior in both activity and ADME-Tox properties to their parents. This review should serve the researchers who need to promote their hit triterpenic structures towards their clinical use and it is intended as a guide for the chemical synthesis of better drug candidates. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  12. The history of the development of buprenorphine as an addiction therapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Nancy D; Lovell, Anne M

    2012-02-01

    This paper traces the early 21st century success of the agonist-antagonist buprenorphine and the combination drug buprenorphine with naloxone within the broader quest to develop addiction therapeutics that began in the 1920s as the search for a nonaddictive analgesic. Drawing on archival research, document analysis, and interviews with contemporary actors, this paper situates the social organization of laboratory-based and clinical research within the domestic and international confluence of several issues, including research ethics, drug regulation, public attitudes, tensions around definitions of drug addiction, and the evolving roles of the pharmaceutical industry. The fervor that drove the champions of buprenorphine must be understood in relation to (1) the material work of research and pharmaceutical manufacturing; (2) the symbolic role of buprenorphine as a solution to numerous problems with addiction treatment evident by the mid-1970s; the destigmatization and individualization of addicts as patients; and (3) the complex configurations of public and private partnerships. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  13. Key factors influencing ADME properties of therapeutic proteins: A need for ADME characterization in drug discovery and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbitts, Jay; Canter, David; Graff, Ryan; Smith, Alison; Khawli, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    abstract Protein therapeutics represent a diverse array of biologics including antibodies, fusion proteins, and therapeutic replacement enzymes. Since their inception, they have revolutionized the treatment of a wide range of diseases including respiratory, vascular, autoimmune, inflammatory, infectious, and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as cancer. While in vivo pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and efficacy studies are routinely carried out for protein therapeutics, studies that identify key factors governing their absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties have not been fully investigated. Thorough characterization and in-depth study of their ADME properties are critical in order to support drug discovery and development processes for the production of safer and more effective biotherapeutics. In this review, we discuss the main factors affecting the ADME characteristics of these large macromolecular therapies. We also give an overview of the current tools, technologies, and approaches available to investigate key factors that influence the ADME of recombinant biotherapeutic drugs, and demonstrate how ADME studies will facilitate their future development. PMID:26636901

  14. [AN OVERALL SOUND PROCESS] Altered Dynamics and Instrumentation at the Onset of Recapitulation in the Nineteenth-Century Symphony

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Craig Cannon

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In standard sonata form, the onset of recapitulation exactly quotes the beginning of the exposition, preserving both “structural” parameters (melody, rhythm, harmony, key, as well as “secondary” ones (dynamics, instrumentation, register, tempo. In practice, however, composers may alter any aspect of the main theme upon its return. Most analysis of such recapitulatory alteration has focused on structural change, with other parameters receiving relatively little attention. This paper examines composers’ handling of two secondary parameters—dynamic markings and instrumental density—at the beginnings of recapitulations in the nineteenth-century symphonic repertoire. In order to analyse a large number of works, a system of classifications for recapitulatory alterations is necessary. The alterations fall into four broad types: “similar” recapitulations have few or no changes to dynamics and instrumentation, “intensified” recapitulations are louder or more fully orchestrated than the beginning of the exposition, “attenuated” recapitulations have quieter dynamics or sparser orchestration, and “contradictory” recapitulations have alterations to dynamics and instrumentation that work in opposite directions. After explaining this classification system in detail, with examples from specific symphonies, the paper then gives the results of an analytical survey of 483 sonata-form movements from 282 symphonies dating from the years 1800 to 1899. Similar and intensified recapitulations are most common, with preferences changing over time. Until about the 1840s, similar recapitulations were most common, but from around the 1860s on, intensified returns became the default choice. Attenuated and contradictory recapitulations, by contrast, are very rare throughout the century.

  15. Audit of therapeutic interventions in inpatient children using two scores: are they evidence-based in developing countries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chalco Juan P

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The evidence base of clinical interventions in paediatric hospitals of developing countries has not been formally assessed. We performed this study to determine the proportion of evidence-based therapeutic interventions in a paediatric referral hospital of a developing country Methods The medical records of 167 patients admitted in one-month period were revised. Primary diagnosis and primary therapeutic interventions were determined for each patient. A systematic search was performed to assess the level of evidence for each intervention. Therapeutic interventions were classified using the Ellis score and the Oxford Centre for Evidence Based Medicine Levels of Evidence Results Any dehydration due to diarrhoea (59 cases and pneumonia (42 cases were the most frequent diagnoses. Based on Ellis score, level I evidence supported the primary therapeutic intervention in 21%, level II in 73% and level III in 6% cases. Using the Oxford classification 16%, 8%, 1% and 75% therapeutic interventions corresponded to grades A, B, C, and D recommendations, respectively. Overall, according to Ellis score, 94% interventions were evidence based. However, out of the total, 75% interventions were based on expert opinion or basic sciences. Most children with mild to moderate dehydration (52 cases were inappropriately treated with slow intravenous fluids, and most children with non-complicated community acquired pneumonia (42 cases received intravenous antibiotics Conclusions Most interventions were inappropriate, despite the availability of effective therapy for several of them. Diarrhoeal dehydration and community acquired pneumonia were the most common diagnoses and were inappropriately managed. Existing effective interventions for dehydration and pneumonia need to be put into practice at referral hospitals of developing countries. For the remaining problems, there is the need to conduct appropriate clinical studies. Caution must be taken when

  16. Control of oxygen tension recapitulates zone-specific functions in human liver microphysiology systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee-Montiel, Felipe T; George, Subin M; Gough, Albert H; Sharma, Anup D; Wu, Juanfang; DeBiasio, Richard; Vernetti, Lawrence A; Taylor, D Lansing

    2017-10-01

    developed and present a method for computationally modeling and measuring oxygen that can easily be implemented in all MPS models. We have applied this method in a liver MPS in which we are then able to control oxygenation in separate devices and demonstrate that zonation-dependent hepatocyte functions in the MPS recapitulate what is known about in vivo liver physiology. We believe that this advance allows a deep experimental investigation on the role of zonation in liver metabolism and disease. In addition, modeling and measuring oxygen tension will be required as investigators migrate from PDMS to plastic and glass devices.

  17. Developing a therapeutic relationship with a blind client with a severe intellectual disability and persistent challenging behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterkenburg, P.S.; Janssen, C.G.C.; Schuengel, C.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose. A blind, severely intellectually impaired boy aged 17 with Down syndrome and persistent serious challenging behavior received attachment-based behavior modification treatment. The aim was to study the effect of the treatment and the development of the therapeutic attachment relationship.

  18. Glyco-engineering strategies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy for the treatment of lysosomal storage diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Doo-Byoung

    2015-08-01

    Lysosomal storage diseases (LSDs) are a group of inherent diseases characterized by massive accumulation of undigested compounds in lysosomes, which is caused by genetic defects resulting in the deficiency of a lysosomal hydrolase. Currently, enzyme replacement therapy has been successfully used for treatment of 7 LSDs with 10 approved therapeutic enzymes whereas new approaches such as pharmacological chaperones and gene therapy still await evaluation in clinical trials. While therapeutic enzymes for Gaucher disease have N-glycans with terminal mannose residues for targeting to macrophages, the others require N-glycans containing mannose-6-phosphates that are recognized by mannose-6-phosphate receptors on the plasma membrane for cellular uptake and targeting to lysosomes. Due to the fact that efficient lysosomal delivery of therapeutic enzymes is essential for the clearance of accumulated compounds, the suitable glycan structure and its high content are key factors for efficient therapeutic efficacy. Therefore, glycan remodeling strategies to improve lysosomal targeting and tissue distribution have been highlighted. This review describes the glycan structures that are important for lysosomal targeting and provides information on recent glyco-engineering technologies for the development of therapeutic enzymes with improved efficacy.

  19. Development of a compassion-focused and contextual behavioural environment and validation of the Therapeutic Environment Scales (TESS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Miles, Sarah; Naismith, Iona; Pieta, Maria; Gilbert, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Aims and method The aims of the study were to develop a scale sensitive enough to measure the interpersonal processes within a therapeutic environment, and to explore whether the new scale was sensitive enough to detect differences between settings, including a community based on compassionate mind and contextual behaviourism. The Therapeutic Environment Scales (TESS) were validated with 81 participants in three different settings: a specialist service for anxiety disorders, a specialist in-patient ward and a psychodynamic therapeutic community. Results TESS was found to be reliable and valid. Significant differences were seen between the services on the dimensions of compassion, belongingness, feeling safe, positive reinforcement of members' acts of courage, extinction and accommodation of unhelpful behaviours, inconsistency and high expressed emotion. These processes were over time associated with improved outcomes on a specialist service for anxiety disorders. Clinical implications The TESS offers a first step in exploring important interpersonal relationships in therapeutic environments and communities. An environment based on a compassionate mind and contextual behaviourism offers promise for the running of a therapeutic community.

  20. Radionuclides for therapeutic applications: Biological and medical aspects (present status, development and expectations)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wambersie, A.; Gahbauer, R.A.

    2002-01-01

    Different multidisciplinary therapeutic strategies and technical approaches are used today in cancer therapy. Among the techniques involving ionizing radiation, therapeutic applications of radioactive nuclides deserve a particular interest ; some clinical indications are well established, while several others are now being investigated, and some of them are promising. The efficacy of radionuclides in therapy often depends on technical factors such as specific activity, purity, chemical presentation, availability, etc. These factors are closely related, at least partly, to the production methods. This justifies the organization of the present Consultant's meeting by the IAEA. Brief information on cancer, its socio-economic aspects, and some data concerning cure rate are presented first

  1. Hemodialysis: a therapeutic option for severe attacks of acute intermittent porphyria in developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prabahar, Murugesan R; Manorajan, Rajendran; Sathiyakumar, Devasahayam; Soundararajan, Periyasamy; Jayakumar, Matcha

    2008-01-01

    Acute intermittent prophyria (AIP) is an autosomal dominant disease that results from a defect in the enzyme porphobilinogen deaminase. Acute intermittent porphyria is the most common of hepatic porphyrias and can tax the therapeutic capabilities of the physician to the limit. Motor weakness is a major feature of an acute attack, and flaccid paralysis of all extremities can occur rapidly, within a matter of days. The acute attacks may be life threatening. Hematin (Heme Arginate) should be given early during an acute attack to prevent neurologic sequel. Hemodialysis and hemoperfusion have been tried in the treatment of acute attacks of AIP with success. As hematin is not available in India, a severe acute attack of AIP in a patient was managed with hemodialysis successfully. Later, hematin was imported and provided to the patient. An 18-year-old girl was admitted to our hospital with recurrent abdominal pain and 2 episodes of convulsions. She had undergone an appendectomy earlier at another hospital for abdominal pain. On evaluation, she had hyponatremia, episodic abnormal behavior, generalized muscle pain, hypertension, and sinus tachycardia. In view of the above clinical picture, a clinical diagnosis of acute intermittent porphyria was made. Her 24-hr urinary porphobilinogen was 90.8 mg/day (<2 mg-normal) and alpha amino levalunic acid was 108.8 mg/day (1-7 mg-normal), consistent with the diagnosis. Her hyponatremia was corrected. Arrangements were made to import hematin and she was managed with dextrose infusion. Meanwhile, she developed flaccid quardriparesis with urinary incontinence and bulbar palsy. Her brain MRI was normal. Her nerve conduction study was suggestive of motor radiculoneuropathy. Specific treatment for severe porphyric crisis was planned. She failed to improve with dextrose infusion alone. As hematin was not readily available in the country, other therapeutic options were considered. As few case reports of AIP being successfully treated with

  2. Evaluation of the Therapeutic Potential of a CNP Analog in a Fgfr3 Mouse Model Recapitulating Achondroplasia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorget, Florence; Kaci, Nabil; Peng, Jeff; Benoist-Lasselin, Catherine; Mugniery, Emilie; Oppeneer, Todd; Wendt, Dan J.; Bell, Sean M.; Bullens, Sherry; Bunting, Stuart; Tsuruda, Laurie S.; O'Neill, Charles A.; Di Rocco, Federico; Munnich, Arnold; Legeai-Mallet, Laurence

    2012-01-01

    Achondroplasia (ACH), the most common form of dwarfism, is an inherited autosomal-dominant chondrodysplasia caused by a gain-of-function mutation in fibroblast-growth-factor-receptor 3 (FGFR3). C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) antagonizes FGFR3 downstream signaling by inhibiting the pathway of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Here, we report the pharmacological activity of a 39 amino acid CNP analog (BMN 111) with an extended plasma half-life due to its resistance to neutral-endopeptidase (NEP) digestion. In ACH human growth-plate chondrocytes, we demonstrated a decrease in the phosphorylation of extracellular-signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2, confirming that this CNP analog inhibits fibroblast-growth-factor-mediated MAPK activation. Concomitantly, we analyzed the phenotype of Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice and showed the presence of ACH-related clinical features in this mouse model. We found that in Fgfr3Y367C/+ mice, treatment with this CNP analog led to a significant recovery of bone growth. We observed an increase in the axial and appendicular skeleton lengths, and improvements in dwarfism-related clinical features included flattening of the skull, reduced crossbite, straightening of the tibias and femurs, and correction of the growth-plate defect. Thus, our results provide the proof of concept that BMN 111, a NEP-resistant CNP analog, might benefit individuals with ACH and hypochondroplasia. PMID:23200862

  3. Therapeutic misconception in research subjects: development and validation of a measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelbaum, Paul S; Anatchkova, Milena; Albert, Karen; Dunn, Laura B; Lidz, Charles W

    2012-12-01

    Therapeutic misconception (TM), which occurs when research subjects fail to appreciate the distinction between the imperatives of clinical research and ordinary treatment, may undercut the process of obtaining meaningful consent to clinical research participation. Previous studies have found that TM is widespread, but progress in addressing TM has been stymied by the absence of a validated method for assessing its presence. The goal of this study was to develop and validate a theoretically grounded measure of TM, assess its diagnostic accuracy, and test previous findings regarding TM's prevalence. A total of 220 participants were recruited from clinical trials at four academic medical centers in the United States. Participants completed a 28-item Likert-type questionnaire to assess the presence of beliefs associated with TM, and a semistructured TM interview designed to elicit their perceptions of the nature of the clinical trial in which they were participating. Data from the questionnaires were subjected to factor analysis, and items with poor factor loadings were excluded. This resulted in a 10-item scale, with three strongly correlated factors and excellent internal consistency; the fit indices of the model across 10 training sets were consistent with the original results, suggesting a stable factor solution. The scale was validated against the TM interview, with significantly higher scores among subjects coded as displaying evidence of TM. Receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis based on a 10-fold internal cross-validation yielded area under the ROC (AUC) = 0.682 for any evidence of TM. When sensitivity (0.72) and specificity (0.61) were both optimized, positive predictive value was 0.65 and negative predictive value was 0.68, with a positive likelihood ratio of 1.89 and a negative likelihood ratio of 0.47. In all, 50.5% (n = 101) of the participants manifested evidence of TM on the TM interview, a somewhat lower rate than in most previous studies. The

  4. MicroRNA silencing in primates: towards development of novel therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Andreas; Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) comprise an abundant class of small noncoding RNAs that act as important posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. Accumulating evidence showing that aberrantly expressed miRNAs play important roles in human cancers underscores them as potential targets for therapeutic...

  5. [Development of new problem-based learning to promote problem-solving ability in therapeutics at Meijo University].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katoh, Miki; Ohtsu, Fumiko; Nagamatsu, Tadashi; Nadai, Masayuki

    2010-12-01

    Pharmacy students in the six-year education system are expected to combine their knowledge obtained from many lectures and to develop problem-solving abilities in therapeutics. These two expectations are considered to be difficult in the conventional education system. Therefore we introduced a new problem-based learning (PBL) method in the class on "pharmacotherapeutics," which was held in the first semester of the fourth year. In the PBL modules, students studied the etiology, pathology, and appropriate drug therapeutics of a given disease and obtained the knowledge and skills necessary for monitoring patients during treatment. We conducted 12 PBL modules, and students studied one case per module, each lasting a week. To encourage constructive group work and to generate original input formats to provide students with a problem-solving road map, we developed new systems including a class review and portfolio. The new PBL method also included lectures on the overview of each disease and the therapeutic agents (action mechanism, physical properties, pharmacokinetics, and monitoring of the efficacy and adverse reactions). By integrating their knowledge and skills, we hope that the students will be able to acquire problem-solving abilities in therapeutics when they become pharmacists.

  6. Developing equations to predict surface dose and therapeutic interval in bolused electron fields: A Monte Carlo Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabbari, Nasrollah; Khalkhali, Hamid Reza

    2017-07-01

    In this research, we aim to investigate the influence of different materials, as a bolus, on the low-energy electron beam dose distributions and to develop equations for predicting surface dose based on bolus thickness, as well as the therapeutic interval based on surface dose. All the Monte Carlo (MC) calculations and measurements were conducted on a Siemens PRIMUS linac. Based on EGSnrc MC code, BEAMnrc system was used to model a Siemens linac and generate phase-space files for three electron beams (6, 8, and 10 MeV). The particles were transported from the phase-space files to the bolus materials and the simulated water phantom using DOSXYZnrc. Various materials with different thicknesses were examined as a bolus, and appropriate equations were determined for each material and electron beam. The comparison of percent depth dose (PDD) curves and beam profiles, using MC, with the measured data demonstrated that the calculated values properly matched with the measurements. The results indicated that the use of bolus materials with the density of higher than soft tissue can increase both surface dose and therapeutic interval simultaneously. This finding arises from the fact that the required bolus thickness for achieving the therapeutic surface dose decreases in the case of high-density materials. Two series of prediction equations were proposed for predicting the surface dose based on bolus thickness and the therapeutic interval based on surface dose. These equations are able to calculate properly the bolus thickness required for producing a therapeutic surface dose (above 90%) for any therapeutic interval.

  7. Prophylactic and Therapeutic Vaccination against Hepatitis C Virus (HCV: Developments and Future Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian E. Major

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies in patients and chimpanzees that spontaneously clear Hepatitis C Virus (HCV have demonstrated that natural immunity to the virus is induced during primary infections and that this immunity can be cross protective. These discoveries led to optimism regarding prophylactic HCV vaccines and a number of studies in the chimpanzee model have been performed, all of which resulted in modified infections after challenge but did not always prevent persistence of the virus. Therapeutic vaccine strategies have also been pursued in an effort to reduce the costs and side effects associated with anti-viral drug treatment. This review summarizes the studies performed thus far in both patients and chimpanzees for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination, assesses the progress made and future perspectives.

  8. Developing a Novel Therapeutic Strategy Targeting Kallikrein-4 to Inhibit Prostate Cancer Growth and Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    Kallikrein-related peptidase 4 (KLK4) is a rational therapeutic target for prostate cancer (PCa) as it is up-regulated in both localised and bone...both localised and bone metastatic cancerous tissue, and is an independent biomarker discriminating between benign and malignant prostate tissue [1,2...cellular function . siKLK4(A), siKLK4(B) and siControl are currently being conjugated onto HBP-peptide by collaborators from AIBN. siRNA sequences are

  9. Developments in stem cell research and therapeutic cloning: Islamic ethical positions, a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fadel, Hossam E

    2012-03-01

    Stem cell research is very promising. The use of human embryos has been confronted with objections based on ethical and religious positions. The recent production of reprogrammed adult (induced pluripotent) cells does not - in the opinion of scientists - reduce the need to continue human embryonic stem cell research. So the debate continues. Islam always encouraged scientific research, particularly research directed toward finding cures for human disease. Based on the expectation of potential benefits, Islamic teachings permit and support human embryonic stem cell research. The majority of Muslim scholars also support therapeutic cloning. This permissibility is conditional on the use of supernumerary early pre-embryos which are obtained during infertility treatment in vitro fertilization (IVF) clinics. The early pre-embryos are considered in Islamic jurisprudence as worthy of respect but do not have the full sanctity offered to the embryo after implantation in the uterus and especially after ensoulment. In this paper the Islamic positions regarding human embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning are reviewed in some detail, whereas positions in other religious traditions are mentioned only briefly. The status of human embryonic stem cell research and therapeutic cloning in different countries, including the USA and especially in Muslim countries, is discussed. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Influenza A virus infection in zebrafish recapitulates mammalian infection and sensitivity to anti-influenza drug treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristin A. Gabor

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Seasonal influenza virus infections cause annual epidemics and sporadic pandemics. These present a global health concern, resulting in substantial morbidity, mortality and economic burdens. Prevention and treatment of influenza illness is difficult due to the high mutation rate of the virus, the emergence of new virus strains and increasing antiviral resistance. Animal models of influenza infection are crucial to our gaining a better understanding of the pathogenesis of and host response to influenza infection, and for screening antiviral compounds. However, the current animal models used for influenza research are not amenable to visualization of host-pathogen interactions or high-throughput drug screening. The zebrafish is widely recognized as a valuable model system for infectious disease research and therapeutic drug testing. Here, we describe a zebrafish model for human influenza A virus (IAV infection and show that zebrafish embryos are susceptible to challenge with both influenza A strains APR8 and X-31 (Aichi. Influenza-infected zebrafish show an increase in viral burden and mortality over time. The expression of innate antiviral genes, the gross pathology and the histopathology in infected zebrafish recapitulate clinical symptoms of influenza infections in humans. This is the first time that zebrafish embryos have been infected with a fluorescent IAV in order to visualize infection in a live vertebrate host, revealing a pattern of vascular endothelial infection. Treatment of infected zebrafish with a known anti-influenza compound, Zanamivir, reduced mortality and the expression of a fluorescent viral gene product, demonstrating the validity of this model to screen for potential antiviral drugs. The zebrafish model system has provided invaluable insights into host-pathogen interactions for a range of infectious diseases. Here, we demonstrate a novel use of this species for IAV research. This model has great potential to advance our

  11. Recapitulation of Extracellular LAMININ Environment Maintains Stemness of Satellite Cells In Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kana Ishii

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Satellite cells function as precursor cells in mature skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration. In healthy tissue, these cells are maintained in a state of quiescence by a microenvironment formed by myofibers and basement membrane in which LAMININs (LMs form a major component. In the present study, we evaluated the satellite cell microenvironment in vivo and found that these cells are encapsulated by LMα2–5. We sought to recapitulate this satellite cell niche in vitro by culturing satellite cells in the presence of recombinant LM-E8 fragments. We show that treatment with LM-E8 promotes proliferation of satellite cells in an undifferentiated state, through reduced phosphorylation of JNK and p38. On transplantation into injured muscle tissue, satellite cells cultured with LM-E8 promoted the regeneration of skeletal muscle. These findings represent an efficient method of culturing satellite cells for use in transplantation through the recapitulation of the satellite cell niche using recombinant LM-E8 fragments. : In this study, examination of the satellite cell microenvironment in vivo revealed that these cells are encapsulated by LMα2–5. We find that reconstitution of the satellite cell niche with recombinant LM-E8 fragments promotes the proliferation and maintains satellite cells in an undifferentiated state. Keywords: Laminin, muscle stem cell, cell transplantation therapy, regeneration, muscle satellite cell, LM-E8

  12. Re-engaging with the past: recapitulation of encoding operations during retrieval

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa eMorcom

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Recollection of events is accompanied by selective reactivation of cortical regions which responded to specific sensory and cognitive dimensions of the original events. This reactivation is thought to reflect the reinstatement of stored memory representations and therefore to reflect memory content, but it may also reveal processes which support both encoding and retrieval. The present study used event-related functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI to investigate whether regions selectively engaged in encoding face and scene context with studied words are also re-engaged when the context is later retrieved. As predicted, encoding face and scene context with visually presented words elicited activity in distinct, context-selective regions. Retrieval of face and scene context also re-engaged some of the regions which had shown successful encoding effects. However, this recapitulation of encoding activity did not show the same context selectivity observed at encoding. Successful retrieval of both face and scene context re-engaged regions which had been associated with encoding of the other type of context, as well as those associated with encoding the same type of context. This recapitulation may reflect retrieval attempts which are not context-selective, but use shared retrieval cues to re-engage encoding operations in service of recollection.

  13. Recapitulation of Extracellular LAMININ Environment Maintains Stemness of Satellite Cells In Vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Kana; Sakurai, Hidetoshi; Suzuki, Nobuharu; Mabuchi, Yo; Sekiya, Ichiro; Sekiguchi, Kiyotoshi; Akazawa, Chihiro

    2018-02-13

    Satellite cells function as precursor cells in mature skeletal muscle homeostasis and regeneration. In healthy tissue, these cells are maintained in a state of quiescence by a microenvironment formed by myofibers and basement membrane in which LAMININs (LMs) form a major component. In the present study, we evaluated the satellite cell microenvironment in vivo and found that these cells are encapsulated by LMα2-5. We sought to recapitulate this satellite cell niche in vitro by culturing satellite cells in the presence of recombinant LM-E8 fragments. We show that treatment with LM-E8 promotes proliferation of satellite cells in an undifferentiated state, through reduced phosphorylation of JNK and p38. On transplantation into injured muscle tissue, satellite cells cultured with LM-E8 promoted the regeneration of skeletal muscle. These findings represent an efficient method of culturing satellite cells for use in transplantation through the recapitulation of the satellite cell niche using recombinant LM-E8 fragments. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Potential and development of inhaled RNAi therapeutics for the treatment of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Dede K W; Chow, Michael Y T; Casettari, Luca; Gonzalez-Juarrero, Mercedes; Lam, Jenny K W

    2016-07-01

    Tuberculosis (TB), caused by the infection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), continues to pose a serious threat to public health, and the situation is worsening with the rapid emergence of multidrug resistant (MDR) TB. Current TB regimens require long duration of treatment, and their toxic side effects often lead to poor adherence and low success rates. There is an urgent need for shorter and more effective treatment for TB. In recent years, RNA interference (RNAi) has become a powerful tool for studying gene function by silencing the target genes. The survival of Mtb in host macrophages involves the attenuation of the antimicrobial responses mounted by the host cells. RNAi technology has helped to improve our understanding of how these bacilli interferes with the bactericidal effect and host immunity during TB infection. It has been suggested that the host-directed intervention by modulation of host pathways can be employed as a novel and effective therapy against TB. This therapeutic approach could be achieved by RNAi, which holds enormous potential beyond a laboratory to the clinic. RNAi therapy targeting TB is being investigated for enhancing host antibacterial capacity or improving drug efficacy on drug resistance strains while minimizing the associated adverse effects. One of the key challenges of RNAi therapeutics arises from the delivery of the RNAi molecules into the target cells, and inhalation could serve as a direct administration route for the treatment of pulmonary TB in a non-invasive manner. However, there are still major obstacles that need to be overcome. This review focuses on the RNAi candidates that are currently explored for the treatment of TB and discusses the major barriers of pulmonary RNAi delivery. From this, we hope to stimulate further studies of local RNAi therapeutics for pulmonary TB treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Characterization of a novel mouse model of multiple myeloma and its use in preclinical therapeutic assessment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosemary A Fryer

    Full Text Available To aid preclinical development of novel therapeutics for myeloma, an in vivo model which recapitulates the human condition is required. An important feature of such a model is the interaction of myeloma cells with the bone marrow microenvironment, as this interaction modulates tumour activity and protects against drug-induced apoptosis. Therefore NOD/SCIDγc(null mice were injected intra-tibially with luciferase-tagged myeloma cells. Disease progression was monitored by weekly bioluminescent imaging (BLI and measurement of paraprotein levels. Results were compared with magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and histology. Assessment of model suitability for preclinical drug testing was investigated using bortezomib, melphalan and two novel agents. Cells engrafted at week 3, with a significant increase in BLI radiance occurring between weeks 5 and 7. This was accompanied by an increase in paraprotein secretion, MRI-derived tumour volume and CD138 positive cells within the bone marrow. Treatment with known anti-myeloma agents or novel agents significantly attenuated the increase in all disease markers. In addition, intra-tibial implantation of primary patient plasma cells resulted in development of myeloma within bone marrow. In conclusion, using both myeloma cell lines and primary patient cells, we have developed a model which recapitulates human myeloma by ensuring the key interaction of tumour cells with the microenvironment.

  16. Immunosuppressive mechanisms in cancer: consequences for the development of therapeutic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Stefanie; Geldmacher, Astrid; Sharav, Tumenjargal; Losch, Florian; Walden, Peter

    2009-05-26

    Recent investigations revealed strong immunosuppressive mechanisms in tumors that may block anti-tumor T cells and be responsible for failures of immunotherapies. Current attempts to overcome this immunosuppression include blockade of co-inhibitory factors on T cells. Reports from the respective trials indicate that the strategy can improve efficacy of therapeutic vaccination, but at the cost of severe inflammatory and autoimmune reactions. We tried to circumvent tumor-associated immunosuppression by mimotope vaccination to broaden reactive anti-tumor T cell repertoires to include T cells that have not been rendered anergic by the tumor. Initial clinical observations suggest that this strategy bears considerable promise.

  17. Discovery of dormancy associated antigens of Mycobacterium tuberculosis : novel targets for the development of post-exposure or therapeutic tuberculosis vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lin, May Young

    2009-01-01

    The growing number of tuberculosis (TB) casualties urges development of not only more effective drugs and preventive vaccines but also development of post-exposure/therapeutic TB vaccines. Post-exposure/therapeutic TB vaccines are needed since 2 billion people worldwide harbor a latent Mycobacterium

  18. Recapitulation of tumor heterogeneity and molecular signatures in a 3D brain cancer model with decreased sensitivity to histone deacetylase inhibition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart J Smith

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Physiologically relevant pre-clinical ex vivo models recapitulating CNS tumor micro-environmental complexity will aid development of biologically-targeted agents. We present comprehensive characterization of tumor aggregates generated using the 3D Rotary Cell Culture System (RCCS. METHODS: CNS cancer cell lines were grown in conventional 2D cultures and the RCCS and comparison with a cohort of 53 pediatric high grade gliomas conducted by genome wide gene expression and microRNA arrays, coupled with immunohistochemistry, ex vivo magnetic resonance spectroscopy and drug sensitivity evaluation using the histone deacetylase inhibitor, Vorinostat. RESULTS: Macroscopic RCCS aggregates recapitulated the heterogeneous morphology of brain tumors with a distinct proliferating rim, necrotic core and oxygen tension gradient. Gene expression and microRNA analyses revealed significant differences with 3D expression intermediate to 2D cultures and primary brain tumors. Metabolic profiling revealed differential profiles, with an increase in tumor specific metabolites in 3D. To evaluate the potential of the RCCS as a drug testing tool, we determined the efficacy of Vorinostat against aggregates of U87 and KNS42 glioblastoma cells. Both lines demonstrated markedly reduced sensitivity when assaying in 3D culture conditions compared to classical 2D drug screen approaches. CONCLUSIONS: Our comprehensive characterization demonstrates that 3D RCCS culture of high grade brain tumor cells has profound effects on the genetic, epigenetic and metabolic profiles of cultured cells, with these cells residing as an intermediate phenotype between that of 2D cultures and primary tumors. There is a discrepancy between 2D culture and tumor molecular profiles, and RCCS partially re-capitulates tissue specific features, allowing drug testing in a more relevant ex vivo system.

  19. A Human Neural Crest Stem Cell-Derived Dopaminergic Neuronal Model Recapitulates Biochemical Abnormalities in GBA1 Mutation Carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi-Yu Yang

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Numerically the most important risk factor for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD is the presence of mutations in the glucocerebrosidase GBA1 gene. In vitro and in vivo studies show that GBA1 mutations reduce glucocerebrosidase (GCase activity and are associated with increased α-synuclein levels, reflecting similar changes seen in idiopathic PD brain. We have developed a neural crest stem cell-derived dopaminergic neuronal model that recapitulates biochemical abnormalities in GBA1 mutation-associated PD. Cells showed reduced GCase protein and activity, impaired macroautophagy, and increased α-synuclein levels. Advantages of this approach include easy access to stem cells, no requirement to reprogram, and retention of the intact host genome. Treatment with a GCase chaperone increased GCase protein levels and activity, rescued the autophagic defects, and decreased α-synuclein levels. These results provide the basis for further investigation of GCase chaperones or similar drugs to slow the progression of PD.

  20. Developing a Therapeutic Range of Adalimumab Serum Concentrations in Management of Psoriasis: A Step Toward Personalized Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menting, Stef P; Coussens, Emma; Pouw, Mieke F; van den Reek, Juul M P A; Temmerman, Linda; Boonen, Hugo; de Jong, Elke M G J; Spuls, Phyllis I; Lambert, Jo

    2015-06-01

    Adalimumab has proven to be effective in suppressing psoriasis disease activity and is administered in a standard dose. To establish a therapeutic range for adalimumab trough levels in the treatment of plaque-type psoriasis, leading to a more personalized treatment. A multicenter, prospective, observational, daily practice cohort study conducted at an academic hospital with affiliated secondary care hospitals in Belgium (cohort 1) and 2 academic hospitals in the Netherlands (cohort 2). Both cohorts included adult patients treated with adalimumab for plaque-type psoriasis. Cohort 1 comprised 73 patients who were being treated with adalimumab for more than 24 weeks until 401 weeks. In cohort 2 (n = 62), serum samples were obtained between weeks 24 and 52 of treatment. Before the start of adalimumab therapy and at time of serum sampling, Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) scores were determined. Adalimumab trough level and PASI score at the time of serum sampling to determine the receiver-operator characteristics analyses and concentration effect curve. By means of receiver-operator characteristics analyses with an area under the curve of 0.756 (SD, 0.046; 95% CI, 0.666-0.847) and a sensitivity of 78% and a specificity of 70%, 3.51 mg/L was established as the lower margin for the therapeutic range. By means of a concentration effect curve, 7 mg/L was established as the upper margin. One-third of patients had an adalimumab trough concentration exceeding 7 mg/L. A therapeutic range of adalimumab trough levels of 3.51 mg/L to 7.00 mg/L, which corresponds to an optimal clinical effect, was identified. In one-third of patients, it was observed that trough concentrations exceeded the therapeutic window. Based on the established range, a therapeutic algorithm for adalimumab treatment for patients with psoriasis can be developed and validated in a prospective patient cohort. By identifying this range, a step has been taken toward a more rational use of biological

  1. Recent Perspectives on Genome, Transmission, Clinical Manifestation, Diagnosis, Therapeutic Strategies, Vaccine Developments, and Challenges of Zika Virus Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Apoorva Shankar

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the potential threats to public health microbiology in 21st century is the increased mortality rate caused by Zika virus (ZIKV, a mosquito-borne flavivirus. The severity of ZIKV infection urged World Health Organization (WHO to declare this virus as a global concern. The limited knowledge on the structure, virulent factors, and replication mechanism of the virus posed as hindrance for vaccine development. Several vector and non-vector-borne mode of transmission are observed for spreading the disease. The similarities of the virus with other flaviviruses such as dengue and West Nile virus are worrisome; hence, there is high scope to undertake ZIKV research that probably provide insight for novel therapeutic intervention. Thus, this review focuses on the recent aspect of ZIKV research which includes the outbreak, genome structure, multiplication and propagation of the virus, current animal models, clinical manifestations, available treatment options (probable vaccines and therapeutics, and the recent advancements in computational drug discovery pipelines, challenges and limitation to undertake ZIKV research. The review suggests that the infection due to ZIKV became one of the universal concerns and an interdisciplinary environment of in vitro cellular assays, genomics, proteomics, and computational biology approaches probably contribute insights for screening of novel molecular targets for drug design. The review tried to provide cutting edge knowledge in ZIKV research with future insights required for the development of novel therapeutic remedies to curtail ZIKV infection.

  2. Discovery and development of anticancer agents from marine sponges: perspectives based on a chemistry-experimental therapeutics collaborative program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valeriote, Frederick A; Tenney, Karen; Media, Joseph; Pietraszkiewicz, Halina; Edelstein, Matthew; Johnson, Tyler A; Amagata, Taro; Crews, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    A collaborative program was initiated in 1990 between the natural product chemistry laboratory of Dr. Phillip Crews at the University of California Santa Cruz and the experimental therapeutics laboratory of Dr. Fred Valeriote at the Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit. The program focused on the discovery and development of anticancer drugs from sponge extracts. A novel in vitro disk diffusion, solid tumor selective assay was used to examine 2,036 extracts from 683 individual sponges. The bioassay-directed fractionation discovery component led to the identification of active pure compounds from many of these sponges. In most cases, pure compound was prepared in sufficient quantities to both chemically identify the active compound(s) as well as pursue one or more of the biological development components. The latter included IC50, clonogenic survival-concentration exposure, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and therapeutic assessment studies. Solid tumor selective compounds included fascaplysin and 10-bromofascaplysin (Fascaplysinopsis), neoamphimedine, 5-methoxyneoamphimedine and alpkinidine (Xestospongia), makaluvamine C and makaluvamine H (Zyzzya), psymberin (Psammocinia and Ircinia), and ethylplakortide Z and ethyldidehydroplakortide Z (Plakortis). These compounds or analogs thereof continue to have therapeutic potential.

  3. From Blue to Green: The Development and Implementation of a Therapeutic Horticulture Program for Residents of a Battered Women's Shelter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renzetti, Claire M; Follingstad, Diane R

    2015-01-01

    The delivery of therapeutic services to clients is influenced by service providers' understanding of the "fit" of a specific program with their service mandate as well as their perceptions of the potential benefits of the program. This article discusses the development and implementation of a therapeutic horticulture (TH) program at a battered women's shelter that serves 17 counties in Central Kentucky. Through semistructured interviews, we gauge the shelter staff's perceptions of the relationship of the TH program to the shelter's overall mission; their sense of the program's benefits for residents, for the shelter as a community organization, and for themselves; and their concerns about the TH program. We consider how these findings may impact future programming at the shelter, and we discuss plans for further evaluation of the TH program in terms of its impact on shelter residents' long-term outcomes.

  4. Implications of microRNAs in Colorectal Cancer Development, Diagnosis, Prognosis and Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haiyan eZhai

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are a class of non-coding small RNAs with critical regulatory functions as post-transcriptional regulators. Due to the fundamental importance and broad impact of miRNAs on multiple genes and pathways, dysregulated miRNAs have been associated with human diseases, including cancer. Colorectal cancer (CRC is among the most deadly diseases, and miRNAs offer a new frontier for target discovery and novel biomarkers for both diagnosis and prognosis. In this review, we summarize the recent advancement of miRNA research in CRC, in particular, the roles of miRNAs in colorectal cancer stem cells, EMT, chemoresistance, therapeutics, diagnosis and prognosis.

  5. In silico selection of therapeutic antibodies for development: Viscosity, clearance, and chemical stability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vikas K.; Patapoff, Thomas W.; Kabakoff, Bruce; Pai, Satyan; Hilario, Eric; Zhang, Boyan; Li, Charlene; Borisov, Oleg; Kelley, Robert F.; Chorny, Ilya; Zhou, Joe Z.; Dill, Ken A.; Swartz, Trevor E.

    2014-01-01

    For mAbs to be viable therapeutics, they must be formulated to have low viscosity, be chemically stable, and have normal in vivo clearance rates. We explored these properties by observing correlations of up to 60 different antibodies of the IgG1 isotype. Unexpectedly, we observe significant correlations with simple physical properties obtainable from antibody sequences and by molecular dynamics simulations of individual antibody molecules. mAbs viscosities increase strongly with hydrophobicity and charge dipole distribution and decrease with net charge. Fast clearance correlates with high hydrophobicities of certain complementarity determining regions and with high positive or high negative net charge. Chemical degradation from tryptophan oxidation correlates with the average solvent exposure time of tryptophan residues. Aspartic acid isomerization rates can be predicted from solvent exposure and flexibility as determined by molecular dynamics simulations. These studies should aid in more rapid screening and selection of mAb candidates during early discovery. PMID:25512516

  6. Cultivating imagination: development and pilot test of a therapeutic use of an immersive virtual reality CAVE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Patricia Flatley; Nicolalde, F Daniel; Ponto, Kevin; Kinneberg, Megan; Freese, Vito; Paz, Dana

    2013-01-01

    As informatics applications grow from being data collection tools to platforms for action, the boundary between what constitutes informatics applications and therapeutic interventions begins to blur. Emerging computer-driven technologies such as virtual reality (VR) and mHealth apps may serve as clinical interventions. As part of a larger project intended to provide complements to cognitive behavioral approaches to health behavior change, an interactive scenario was designed to permit unstructured play inside an immersive 6-sided VR CAVE. In this pilot study we examined the technical and functional performance of the CAVE scenario, human tolerance of immersive CAVE experiences, and explored human imagination and the manner in which activity in the CAVE scenarios varied by an individual's level of imagination. Nine adult volunteers participated in a pilot-and-feasibility study. Participants tolerated 15 minute long exposure to the scenarios, and navigated through the virtual world. Relationship between personal characteristics and behaviors are reported and explored.

  7. Development of new therapeutic methods of lung cancer through team approach study (II)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zo, Jae Ill; Park, Jong Ho; Baek, Hee Jong

    1999-12-01

    The aims of this study were to make the lung cancer clinics in Korea Cancer Center Hospital, and to establish new therapeutic methods of lung cancer for increasing the cure rate and survival rate of patients. Also another purpose of this study was to establish a common treatment method in our hospital. All patients who were operated in Korea Cancer Center Hospital from 1987 due to lung cancer were followed up and evaluated. And we have been studied the effect of postoperative adjuvant therapy in stage 1, 2, 3A non-small cell lung cancer patients from 1989 with the phase three study form. Follow-up examinations were scheduled in these patients and interim analysis was made. Also we have been studied the effect of chemotherapeutic agents in small cell lung cancer patients from 1997 with the phase two study form. We evaluated the results of this study

  8. Discovering and Developing Successful Cardiovascular Therapeutics: A Conversation With James N. Topper, MD, PhD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topper, James N; Rutherford, John D

    2016-11-15

    Dr James (also known as Jamie) N. Topper, MD, PhD, serves as Managing General Partner at Frazier Healthcare Partners, where he leads the Life Science Venture practice. In 2011, and 2016, he was named to the Midas List of leading venture capitalists, and, in 2013, he was recognized by Forbes as one of the top 10 healthcare investors. He has >25 years of experience working with entrepreneurs to found and build successful therapeutics-focused companies. Dr Topper holds a BS from the University of Michigan. He received an MD and PhD (in biophysics) from Stanford University School of Medicine. He completed postgraduate training in internal medicine and cardiovascular disease at the Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston and is board certified in both disciplines. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  9. Development of a versatile oncolytic virus platform for local intra-tumoural expression of therapeutic transgenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, Nalini; Illingworth, Sam; Kodialbail, Prithvi; Patel, Ashvin; Calderon, Hugo; Lear, Rochelle; Fisher, Kerry D; Champion, Brian R; Brown, Alice C N

    2017-01-01

    Oncolytic viruses which infect and kill tumour cells can also be genetically modified to express therapeutic genes that augment their anti-cancer activities. Modifying oncolytic viruses to produce effective cancer therapies is challenging as encoding transgenes often attenuates virus activity or prevents systemic delivery in patients due to the risk of off-target expression of transgenes in healthy tissues. To overcome these issues we aimed to generate a readily modifiable virus platform using the oncolytic adenovirus, enadenotucirev. Enadenotucirev replicates in human tumour cells but not cells from healthy tissues and can be delivered intravenously because it is stable in human blood. Here, the enadenotucirev genome was used to generate plasmids into which synthesised transgene cassettes could be directly cloned in a single step reaction. The platform enabled generation of panels of reporter viruses to identify cloning sites and transgene cassette designs where transgene expression could be linked to the virus life cycle. It was demonstrated using these viruses that encoded transgene proteins could be successfully expressed in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo. The expression of transgenes did not impact either the oncolytic activity or selective properties of the virus. The effectiveness of this approach as a drug delivery platform for complex therapeutics was demonstrated by inserting multiple genes in the virus genome to encode full length anti-VEGF antibodies. Functional antibody could be synthesised and secreted from infected tumour cells without impacting the activity of the virus particle in terms of oncolytic potency, manufacturing yields or selectivity for tumour cells. In vivo, viral particles could be efficaciously delivered intravenously to disseminated orthotopic tumours.

  10. Development of a versatile oncolytic virus platform for local intra-tumoural expression of therapeutic transgenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nalini Marino

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses which infect and kill tumour cells can also be genetically modified to express therapeutic genes that augment their anti-cancer activities. Modifying oncolytic viruses to produce effective cancer therapies is challenging as encoding transgenes often attenuates virus activity or prevents systemic delivery in patients due to the risk of off-target expression of transgenes in healthy tissues. To overcome these issues we aimed to generate a readily modifiable virus platform using the oncolytic adenovirus, enadenotucirev. Enadenotucirev replicates in human tumour cells but not cells from healthy tissues and can be delivered intravenously because it is stable in human blood. Here, the enadenotucirev genome was used to generate plasmids into which synthesised transgene cassettes could be directly cloned in a single step reaction. The platform enabled generation of panels of reporter viruses to identify cloning sites and transgene cassette designs where transgene expression could be linked to the virus life cycle. It was demonstrated using these viruses that encoded transgene proteins could be successfully expressed in tumour cells in vitro and tumours in vivo. The expression of transgenes did not impact either the oncolytic activity or selective properties of the virus. The effectiveness of this approach as a drug delivery platform for complex therapeutics was demonstrated by inserting multiple genes in the virus genome to encode full length anti-VEGF antibodies. Functional antibody could be synthesised and secreted from infected tumour cells without impacting the activity of the virus particle in terms of oncolytic potency, manufacturing yields or selectivity for tumour cells. In vivo, viral particles could be efficaciously delivered intravenously to disseminated orthotopic tumours.

  11. [Therapeutic education in pediatric dentistry: analysis of obstacles and levers to the development of programmes in France in 2016].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquillier, Thomas; Trentesaux, Thomas; Gagnayre, Rémi

    2017-01-01

    Over recent years, therapeutic patient education has become part of dental medicine. Management of early childhood caries, known to be a very common chronic disease, has evolved to include an educational dimension. The objective of this study was to identify the levers and barriers to the development of formalized therapeutic education programmes and alternatives. A comprehensive exploratory qualitative study was conducted between November 2015 and June 2016 on a targeted sample of 15 people aware of the problem of TPE in dentistry. The study showed that TPE training in dentistry is underdeveloped, despite its numerous benefits: change of the healthcare professional's approach, implementation of structured educational programmes, development of research, etc. There are many obstacles to the development of TPE programmes: insufficient resources, rigid legislation or lack of knowledge of TPE practices. The dental profession is an obstacle itself because of its lack of understanding and variable degrees of integration the medical community. There are multiple levers, but the main ones are changing attitudes of the profession and the provision of resources to develop TPE. Although alternatives to TPE programmes exist (accompanying measures, short educational strategies, connected health), they cannot replace TPE. More educational strategies must be developed in the field of dentistry. However, the framework of TPE must be adapted to the profession to ensure good uptake.

  12. Theory-guided Therapeutic Function of Music to facilitate emotion regulation development in preschool-aged children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly eSena Moore

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Emotion regulation is an umbrella term to describe interactive, goal-dependent explicit and implicit processes that are intended to help an individual manage and shift an emotional experience. The primary window for appropriate emotion regulation development occurs during the infant, toddler, and preschool years. Atypical emotion regulation development is considered a risk factor for mental health problems and has been implicated as a primary mechanism underlying childhood pathologies. Current treatments are predominantly verbal- and behavioral-based and lack the opportunity to practice in-the-moment management of emotionally charged situations. There is also an absence of caregiver-child interaction in these treatment strategies. Based on behavioral and neural support for music as a therapeutic mechanism, the incorporation of intentional music experiences, facilitated by a music therapist, may be one way to address these limitations. Musical Contour Regulation Facilitation is an interactive therapist-child music-based intervention for emotion regulation development practice in preschoolers. The Musical Contour Regulation Facilitation intervention uses the deliberate contour and temporal structure of a music therapy session to mirror the changing flow of the caregiver-child interaction through the alternation of high arousal and low arousal music experiences. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Therapeutic Function of Music, a theory-based description of the structural characteristics for a music-based stimulus to musically facilitate developmentally appropriate high arousal and low arousal in-the-moment emotion regulation experiences. The Therapeutic Function of Music analysis is based on a review of the music theory, music neuroscience, and music development literature and provides a preliminary model of the structural characteristics of the music as a core component of the Musical Contour Regulation Facilitation intervention.

  13. The Genetics of Mexico Recapitulates Native American Substructure and Affects Biomedical Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno-Estrada, Andrés; Gignoux, Christopher R.; Fernández-López, Juan Carlos; Zakharia, Fouad; Sikora, Martin; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Sandoval, Karla; Eng, Celeste; Romero-Hidalgo, Sandra; Ortiz-Tello, Patricia; Robles, Victoria; Kenny, Eimear E.; Nuño-Arana, Ismael; Barquera-Lozano, Rodrigo; Macín-Pérez, Gastón; Granados-Arriola, Julio; Huntsman, Scott; Galanter, Joshua M.; Via, Marc; Ford, Jean G.; Chapela, Rocío; Rodriguez-Cintron, William; Rodríguez-Santana, Jose R.; Romieu, Isabelle; Sienra-Monge, Juan José; Navarro, Blanca del Rio; London, Stephanie J.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés; Garcia-Herrera, Rodrigo; Estrada, Karol; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Carnevale, Alessandra; Soberón, Xavier; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Rangel-Villalobos, Héctor; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Burchard, Esteban Gonzalez; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2014-01-01

    Mexico harbors great cultural and ethnic diversity, yet fine-scale patterns of human genome-wide variation from this region remain largely uncharacterized. We studied genomic variation within Mexico from over 1,000 individuals representing 20 indigenous and 11 mestizo populations. We found striking genetic stratification among indigenous populations within Mexico at varying degrees of geographic isolation. Some groups were as differentiated as Europeans are from East Asians. Pre-Columbian genetic substructure is recapitulated in the indigenous ancestry of admixed mestizo individuals across the country. Furthermore, two independently phenotyped cohorts of Mexicans and Mexican Americans showed a significant association between sub-continental ancestry and lung function. Thus, accounting for fine-scale ancestry patterns is critical for medical and population genetic studies within Mexico, in Mexican-descent populations, and likely in many other populations worldwide. PMID:24926019

  14. Extrachromosomal recombination substrates recapitulate beyond 12/23 restricted VDJ recombination in nonlymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, David; Bassing, Craig H; Fugmann, Sebastian D; Cheng, Hwei-Ling; Schatz, David G; Alt, Frederick W

    2003-01-01

    V(D)J recombination occurs efficiently only between gene segments flanked by recombination signals (RSs) containing 12 and 23 base pair spacers (the 12/23 rule). A further limitation "beyond the 12/23 rule" (B12/23) exists at the TCRbeta locus and ensures Dbeta usage. Herein, we show that extrachromosomal V(D)J recombination substrates recapitulate B12/23 restriction in nonlymphoid cells. We further demonstrate that the Vbeta coding flank, the 12-RS heptamer/nonamer, and the 23-RS spacer each can significantly influence B12/23 restriction. Finally, purified core RAG1 and RAG2 proteins (together with HMG2) also reproduce B12/23 restriction in a cell-free system. Our findings indicate that B12/23 restriction of V(D)J recombination is cemented at the level of interactions between the RAG proteins and TCRbeta RS sequences.

  15. Prolonged application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Excessive mechanical loading of articular cartilage producing hydrostatic stress, tensile strain and fluid flow leads to irreversible cartilage erosion and osteoarthritic (OA disease. Since application of high fluid shear to chondrocytes recapitulates some of the earmarks of OA, we aimed to screen the gene expression profiles of shear-activated chondrocytes and assess potential similarities with OA chondrocytes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a cDNA microarray technology, we screened the differentially-regulated genes in human T/C-28a2 chondrocytes subjected to high fluid shear (20 dyn/cm(2 for 48 h and 72 h relative to static controls. Confirmation of the expression patterns of select genes was obtained by qRT-PCR. Using significance analysis of microarrays with a 5% false discovery rate, 71 and 60 non-redundant transcripts were identified to be ≥2-fold up-regulated and ≤0.6-fold down-regulated, respectively, in sheared chondrocytes. Published data sets indicate that 42 of these genes, which are related to extracellular matrix/degradation, cell proliferation/differentiation, inflammation and cell survival/death, are differentially-regulated in OA chondrocytes. In view of the pivotal role of cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2 in the pathogenesis and/or progression of OA in vivo and regulation of shear-induced inflammation and apoptosis in vitro, we identified a collection of genes that are either up- or down-regulated by shear-induced COX-2. COX-2 and L-prostaglandin D synthase (L-PGDS induce reactive oxygen species production, and negatively regulate genes of the histone and cell cycle families, which may play a critical role in chondrocyte death. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Prolonged application of high fluid shear stress to chondrocytes recapitulates gene expression profiles associated with osteoarthritis. Our data suggest a potential link between exposure of chondrocytes/cartilage to abnormal mechanical loading and the pathogenesis

  16. Neurogenesis in Huntington's disease: can studying adult neurogenesis lead to the development of new therapeutic strategies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil-Mohapel, Joana; Simpson, Jessica M; Ghilan, Mohamed; Christie, Brian R

    2011-08-11

    Huntington's disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative disorder caused by an unstable expansion of CAG repeats in the HD gene. The symptoms include cognitive dysfunction and severe motor impairments. The neuropathology is characterized by neuronal loss mainly in the striatum and cortex, although other regions including the hippocampus are also affected. In this review we discuss the different mouse models of HD, and how the process of neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and the subventricular zone (SVZ) is affected in each. Deficits in adult hippocampal neurogenesis have been repeatedly shown in different genetic models of HD, raising the possibility that an impairment of the neurogenic process might underlie some of the cognitive deficits associated with this neurodegenerative disorder. On the other hand, an increase in SVZ neurogenesis has been observed in human HD brains while no differences in SVZ cell proliferation have been detected in the mouse models. In this review we will discuss the discrepancies between these findings as well as the several mechanisms that might contribute to a dysregulation of adult neurogenesis in HD. Finally, we will provide an overview of the various therapeutic strategies aimed at stimulating the endogenous neurogenic capacity that have been tested in HD genetic models. Ultimately, the insights obtained from these and future studies will greatly improve our understanding of the cognitive impairment characteristic of HD. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular control of HIV-1 postintegration latency: implications for the development of new therapeutic strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van Lint Carine

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The persistence of HIV-1 latent reservoirs represents a major barrier to virus eradication in infected patients under HAART since interruption of the treatment inevitably leads to a rebound of plasma viremia. Latency establishes early after infection notably (but not only in resting memory CD4+ T cells and involves numerous host and viral trans-acting proteins, as well as processes such as transcriptional interference, RNA silencing, epigenetic modifications and chromatin organization. In order to eliminate latent reservoirs, new strategies are envisaged and consist of reactivating HIV-1 transcription in latently-infected cells, while maintaining HAART in order to prevent de novo infection. The difficulty lies in the fact that a single residual latently-infected cell can in theory rekindle the infection. Here, we review our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the establishment and maintenance of HIV-1 latency and in the transcriptional reactivation from latency. We highlight the potential of new therapeutic strategies based on this understanding of latency. Combinations of various compounds used simultaneously allow for the targeting of transcriptional repression at multiple levels and can facilitate the escape from latency and the clearance of viral reservoirs. We describe the current advantages and limitations of immune T-cell activators, inducers of the NF-κB signaling pathway, and inhibitors of deacetylases and histone- and DNA- methyltransferases, used alone or in combinations. While a solution will not be achieved by tomorrow, the battle against HIV-1 latent reservoirs is well- underway.

  18. Essential Oils Loaded in Nanosystems: A Developing Strategy for a Successful Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rita Bilia

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential oils are complex blends of a variety of volatile molecules such as terpenoids, phenol-derived aromatic components, and aliphatic components having a strong interest in pharmaceutical, sanitary, cosmetic, agricultural, and food industries. Since the middle ages, essential oils have been widely used for bactericidal, virucidal, fungicidal, antiparasitical, insecticidal, and other medicinal properties such as analgesic, sedative, anti-inflammatory, spasmolytic, and locally anaesthetic remedies. In this review their nanoencapsulation in drug delivery systems has been proposed for their capability of decreasing volatility, improving the stability, water solubility, and efficacy of essential oil-based formulations, by maintenance of therapeutic efficacy. Two categories of nanocarriers can be proposed: polymeric nanoparticulate formulations, extensively studied with significant improvement of the essential oil antimicrobial activity, and lipid carriers, including liposomes, solid lipid nanoparticles, nanostructured lipid particles, and nano- and microemulsions. Furthermore, molecular complexes such as cyclodextrin inclusion complexes also represent a valid strategy to increase water solubility and stability and bioavailability and decrease volatility of essential oils.

  19. Development and Evaluation of Mouth Dissolving Films of Amlodipine Besylate for Enhanced Therapeutic Efficacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. M. Maheswari

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The present investigation was undertaken with an objective of formulating mouth dissolving films (MDFs of Amlodipine Besylate (AMLO to enhance convenience and compliance of the elderly and pediatric patients for better therapeutic efficacy. Film formers like hydroxy propyl methyl cellulose (HPMC and methyl cellulose (MC along with film modifiers like poly vinyl pyrrolidone K30 (PVP K30, and sodium lauryl sulphate (SLS as solubilizing agents were evaluated. The prepared MDFs were evaluated for in vitro dissolution characteristics, in vitro disintegration time, and their physicomechanical properties. All the prepared MDFs showed good mechanical properties like tensile strength, folding endurance, and % elongation. MDFs were evaluated by means of FTIR, SEM, and X-RD studies. MDFs with 7.5% (w/w of HPMC E3 gave better dissolution properties when compared to HPMC E5, HPMC E15, and MC. MDFs with PVP K30 and SLS gave superior dissolution properties when compared to MDFs without PVP K30 and SLS. The dissolution properties of MDFs with PVP K30 were superior when compared to MDFs with SLS. In the case of F3 containing 7.5% of HPMC E3 and 0.04% of PVP K30, complete and faster release was observed within 60 sec when compared to other formulations. Release kinetics data reveals diffusion is the release mechanism.

  20. MHC class I antigen presentation and implications for developing a new generation of therapeutic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comber, Joseph D; Philip, Ramila

    2014-05-01

    Major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) presented peptide epitopes provide a 'window' into the changes occurring in a cell. Conventionally, these peptides are generated by proteolysis of endogenously synthesized proteins in the cytosol, loaded onto MHC-I molecules, and presented on the cell surface for surveillance by CD8(+) T cells. MHC-I restricted processing and presentation alerts the immune system to any infectious or tumorigenic processes unfolding intracellularly and provides potential targets for a cytotoxic T cell response. Therefore, therapeutic vaccines based on MHC-I presented peptide epitopes could, theoretically, induce CD8(+) T cell responses that have tangible clinical impacts on tumor eradication and patient survival. Three major methods have been used to identify MHC-I restricted epitopes for inclusion in peptide-based vaccines for cancer: genetic, motif prediction and, more recently, immunoproteomic analysis. Although the first two methods are capable of identifying T cell stimulatory epitopes, these have significant disadvantages and may not accurately represent epitopes presented by a tumor cell. In contrast, immunoproteomic methods can overcome these disadvantages and identify naturally processed and presented tumor associated epitopes that induce more clinically relevant tumor specific cytotoxic T cell responses. In this review, we discuss the importance of using the naturally presented MHC-I peptide repertoire in formulating peptide vaccines, the recent application of peptide-based vaccines in a variety of cancers, and highlight the pros and cons of the current state of peptide vaccines.

  1. Harnessing the fruits of nature for the development of multi-targeted cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Fazlul H; Li, Yiwei

    2009-11-01

    Cancer cells exhibit deregulation in multiple cellular signaling pathways. Therefore, treatments using specific agents that target only one pathway usually fail in cancer therapy. The combination treatments using chemotherapeutic agents with distinct molecular mechanisms are considered more promising for higher efficacy; however, using multiple agents contributes to added toxicity. Emerging evidence has shown that some "natural products" such as isoflavones, indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its in vivo dimeric product 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), and curcumin among many others, have growth inhibitory and apoptosis inducing effects on human and animal cancer cells mediated by targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways in vitro without causing unwanted toxicity in normal cells. Therefore, these non-toxic "natural products" from natural resources could be useful in combination with conventional chemotherapeutic agents for the treatment of human malignancies with lower toxicity and higher efficacy. In fact, recently increasing evidence from pre-clinical in vivo studies and clinical trials have shown some success in support of the use of rational design of multi-targeted therapies for the treatment of cancers using conventional chemotherapeutic agents in combination with "natural products". These studies have provided promising results and further opened-up newer avenues for cancer therapy. In this review article, we have succinctly summarized the known effects of "natural products" especially by focusing on isoflavones, indole-3-carbinol (I3C) and its in vivo dimeric product 3,3'-diindolylmethane (DIM), and curcumin, and provided a comprehensive view on the molecular mechanisms underlying the principle of cancer therapy using combination of "natural products" with conventional therapeutics.

  2. Development of a potent invigorator of immune responses endowed with both preventive and therapeutic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talwar GP

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Gursaran P Talwar,1 Jagdish C Gupta,1 Abu S Mustafa,2 Hemanta K Kar,3 Kiran Katoch,4 Shreemanta K Parida,5 Prabhakara P Reddi,6 Niyaz Ahmed,7 Vikram Saini,8 Somesh Gupta9 1Talwar Research Foundation, New Delhi, India; 2Department of Microbiology, Kuwait University, Kuwait; 3Department of Dermatology, Paras Hospital, Gurgaon, 4National JALMA Institute of Leprosy and Other Mycobacterial Diseases, Agra, India; 5German Centre of Infection, Justus Liebig University, Giessen, Germany; 6Department of Comparative Biosciences, University of Illinois Urbana Champaign, IL, USA; 7Department of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, University of Hyderabad, Hyderabad, India; 8Department of Microbiology, University of Alabama, Birmingham, AL, USA; 9Department of Dermatology and Venereology, All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi, India Abstract: This article reviews briefly the making of an immunoprophylactic-cum-immunotherapeutic vaccine against leprosy. The vaccine is based on cultivable, heat-killed atypical mycobacteria, whose gene sequence is now known. It has been named Mycobacterium indicus pranii. It has received the approval of the Drug Controller General of India and the US Food and Drug Administration. Besides leprosy, M. indicus pranii has found utility in the treatment of category II (“difficult to treat” tuberculosis. It also heals ugly anogenital warts. It has preventive and therapeutic action against SP2/O myelomas. It is proving to be a potent adjuvant for enhancing antibody titers of a recombinant vaccine against human chorionic gonadotropin, with the potential of preventing pregnancy without derangement of ovulation and menstrual regularity in sexually active women. Keywords: leprosy, tuberculosis, anogenital warts, myeloma, adjuvant

  3. Characterizing viscoelasticity of unhydrolyzed chicken sternal cartilage extract suspensions: Towards development of injectable therapeutics formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hama, Brian; Mahajan, Gautam; Kothapalli, Chandrasekhar

    2017-08-01

    Exogenous delivery of cartilage extract is being explored as a promising candidate for knee arthritis treatment as it biomimics native cartilage tissue characteristics. In this study, we report on the rheological characterization of aqueous suspensions constituted from a powdered form of unhydrolyzed chicken sternum extract. The effect of particle size (as-received vs. milled), suspension fluid (water vs. PBS), and temperature (37°C vs. 4°C), on the viscoelastic properties of the sternum extract based particulate suspensions were evaluated. Results showed that these suspensions exhibit shear-thinning characteristics as shear rate (γ̇) increases, while viscosity (η), storage (G'), and loss (G″) moduli of the suspensions increased with increasing particulate loading (ϕ: 2.5-10wt%). Reducing the as-received particle size by milling decreased G', G, and η of the suspensions and increased the influence of ϕ on these properties, possibly due to improved particle packing. Replacing water with PBS had no significant effect on the rheological properties, but temperature reduction from 37°C to 4°C increased G', G", and η of the suspensions and lowered the impact of powder loading on viscoelastic properties. The suspension's time-dependent response was typical of viscoelastic materials, characterized by an asymptotical approach to a final stress (stress relaxation) or strain (creep). Results were fit to a power-law model for creep, a general relaxation model for exponential decay in stress, Carreau-Yasuda models for flow curves, and a two-parameter Liu model to identify the maximum powder loading (ϕ m ). Among the various forces involved in particle-particle interactions within these suspensions, electrostatic forces appeared to dominate the most. Such characterization of the viscoelastic nature of these suspensions would help in formulating stable injectable cartilage extract based therapeutics for in vivo applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All

  4. Genomics and systems biology - How relevant are the developments to veterinary pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutics?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Witkamp, R.F.

    2005-01-01

    This review discusses some of the recent developments in genomics and its current and future relevance for veterinary pharmacology and toxicology. With the rapid progress made in this field several new approaches in pharmacological and toxicological research have developed and drug discovery and

  5. Utilizing redox-mediated Bergman cyclization toward the development of dual-action metalloenediyne therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindahl, Sarah E; Park, Hyunsoo; Pink, Maren; Zaleski, Jeffrey M

    2013-03-13

    resulting cisplatin-like byproduct represents an intriguing new strategy for potential dual-threat metalloenediyne therapeutics.

  6. Development, modelling, optimisation and scale-up of chromatographic purification of a therapeutic protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mollerup, Jørgen; Hansen, Thomas Budde; Kidal, Steffen

    2007-01-01

    optimisation of a purification step necessitate simulations and thus models of the adsorption isotherm. A model for ion-exchange is reviewed and the strategy for estimation of model parameters is reported. Examples are shown where computer simulations are used for development and optimisation......Development of a chromatographic purification step proceeds through a number of stages. High-throughput screening techniques are used to identify suitable resins. This technique is also suitable for the design of a capture step and some intermediate chromatographic steps, but development and true...

  7. Accelerating the development of therapeutic strategies for drug-resistant tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vjecha, Michael J; Tiberi, Simon; Zumla, Alimuddin

    2018-03-23

    Recent progress in the discovery, development and evaluation of new drugs and combination regimens for drug-resistant tuberculosis through greater collaboration between industry, donors and academia provides renewed hope for overcoming the challenges in tuberculosis treatment.

  8. Novel therapeutic targets in osteoarthritis: Narrative review on knock-out genes involved in disease development in mouse animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronesi, Francesca; Della Bella, Elena; Cepollaro, Simona; Brogini, Silvia; Martini, Lucia; Fini, Milena

    2016-05-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) can affect every joint, especially the knee. Given the complexity of this pathology, OA is difficult to treat with current therapies, which only relieve pain and inflammation and are not capable of restoring tissues once OA has started. Currently, researchers focus on finding a therapeutic strategy that may help to arrest disease progression. The present narrative review gives an overview of the genes involved in the development and progression of OA, assessing in vivo studies performed in knock-out mice affected by OA, to suggest new therapeutic strategies. The article search was performed on the PubMed database and www.webofknowledge.com website with the following keywords: "knee osteoarthritis" AND "knockout mice". The included studies were in English and published from 2005 to 2015. Additional papers were found within the references of the selected articles. In the 55 analyzed in vivo studies, genes mainly affected chondrocyte homeostasis, inflammatory processes, extracellular matrix and the relationship between obesity and OA. Genes are defined as inducing, preventing and not influencing OA. This review shows that joint homeostasis depends on a variety of genetic factors, and preventing or restoring the loss of a gene encoding for protective proteins, or inhibiting the expression of proteins that induce OA, might be a potential therapeutic approach. However, conclusions cannot be drawn because of the wide variability concerning the technique used for OA induction, the role of the genes, the method for tissue evaluations and the lack of assessments of all joint tissues. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Lawrence A

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques. (amum lecture)

  10. Theory-guided Therapeutic Function of Music to facilitate emotion regulation development in preschool-aged children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sena Moore, Kimberly; Hanson-Abromeit, Deanna

    2015-01-01

    Emotion regulation (ER) is an umbrella term to describe interactive, goal-dependent explicit, and implicit processes that are intended to help an individual manage and shift an emotional experience. The primary window for appropriate ER development occurs during the infant, toddler, and preschool years. Atypical ER development is considered a risk factor for mental health problems and has been implicated as a primary mechanism underlying childhood pathologies. Current treatments are predominantly verbal- and behavioral-based and lack the opportunity to practice in-the-moment management of emotionally charged situations. There is also an absence of caregiver–child interaction in these treatment strategies. Based on behavioral and neural support for music as a therapeutic mechanism, the incorporation of intentional music experiences, facilitated by a music therapist, may be one way to address these limitations. Musical Contour Regulation Facilitation (MCRF) is an interactive therapist-child music-based intervention for ER development practice in preschoolers. The MCRF intervention uses the deliberate contour and temporal structure of a music therapy session to mirror the changing flow of the caregiver–child interaction through the alternation of high arousal and low arousal music experiences. The purpose of this paper is to describe the Therapeutic Function of Music (TFM), a theory-based description of the structural characteristics for a music-based stimulus to musically facilitate developmentally appropriate high arousal and low arousal in-the-moment ER experiences. The TFM analysis is based on a review of the music theory, music neuroscience, and music development literature and provides a preliminary model of the structural characteristics of the music as a core component of the MCRF intervention. PMID:26528171

  11. Old and new therapeutics for Rheumatoid Arthritis: in vivo models and drug development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sardar, Samra; Andersson, Åsa

    2016-01-01

    of in vivo models during development of anti-rheumatic drugs; from Methotrexate to various antibody treatments, to novel drugs that are, or have recently been, in clinical trials. For novel drugs, we have explored websites for clinical trials. Although one Rheumatoid Arthritis in vivo model cannot mirror...

  12. 78 FR 28630 - Pfizer Therapeutic Research, Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development Division, Formerly Known as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ..., Comparative Medicine Department, Including On-Site Leased From Charles River Laboratories and Execupharm, Inc... & Development Division, Comparative Medicine Department, including on-site leased workers from Charles River..., including on-site leased workers from Charles River Laboratories and ExecuPharm, Inc., Groton, Connecticut...

  13. Report of an autopsyzed case of Kaposi sarcoma developed in therapeutically irradiated region

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanahashi, Yoshio; Sato, Akihiko

    1975-01-01

    A case of Kaposi sarcoma developed in the right gluteal region of 57 year-old woman was reported in the present paper. The patient received surgical excision of uterine cervical cancer and also gastric cancer in the different time in her past history. Post-operative radiotherapy following uterine excision consisted of 3,350 to 3,650 R of respective 180 kV of X-ray and 60 Co. The mass developed in the region irradiated during the past deep therapy, and showed resistance to Linac irradiation and bleomycin. The masses which seemed to be the same with that in the skin developed in the both lung, and bleomycin administered was not effective. In addition, a mass developed in the right inguinal lymphnode which was considered to be the metastasis from cervical cancer, and was wholly excised. The patient died from pneumonia one year after the manifestation of Kaposi sarcoma. This case was very extraordinary because of the triplicated tumors, i.e., gastric cancer, uterine cervical cancer, and Kaposi sarcoma. The nature of Kaposi sarcoma was discussed from our experience and literature. Kaposi sarcoma in our case, was suggested to be a radiation-induced tumor, and the mechanism of occurrence was considered to be that of multi-centric tumor. (Tsukamoto, Y.)

  14. Development and biological evaluation of {sup 90}Y-BPAMD as a novel bone seeking therapeutic agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiei, Ali; Shamsaei, Mojtaba [Amir Kabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Energy Engineering and Physics Dept.; Yousefnia, Hassan; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Jalilian, Amir Reza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Enayati, Razieh [Islamic Azad Univ. (IAU), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Engineering

    2016-07-01

    Nowadays, the bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals play an important role in the treatment of the bone-related pathologies. Whereas various phosphonate ligands have already been identified, a DOTA-based bisphosphonate, 4-{[(bis(phosphonomethyl))carbamoyl]methyl}-7,10-bis(carboxymethyl) -1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododec-1-yl (BPAMD) with better characteristics has recently been synthesized. In this study, {sup 90}Y-BPAMD was developed with radiochemical purity >98% and the specific activity of 3.52 TBq/mmol in the optimized conditions as a new bone-seeking therapeutic agent. The complex demonstrated significant stability at room temperature and in human serum even after 48 h. At even low amount of hydroxyapatite (5 mg), more than 90% binding to hydroxyapatite was observed. Biodistribution studies after injection of the complex into the Syrian rats showed major accumulation of the labelled compound in the bone tissue and an insignificant uptake in the other organs all the times after injection. Generally, {sup 90}Y-BPAMD demonstrated interesting characteristics compared to the other {sup 90}Y bone-seeking agents and even {sup 166}Ho-BPAMD, and can be considered as a new bone-seeking candidate for therapeutic applications.

  15. Developing therapeutic 'arrows' with the precision of William Tell: the time has come for targeted therapies in kidney disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundel, Peter; Greka, Anna

    2015-07-01

    A core mission for modern medicine is the development of precision therapeutics. Cancer therapies have been at the leading edge of this effort, while nephrology has lagged on the path to precision medicine. Breaking the stalemate, recent work revealed CD80 (B7-1) as a candidate for targeted therapy in the treatment of resistant nephrotic syndrome. This review aims to summarize the current state of our understanding of podocyte CD80 biology, its therapeutic implications and the challenges that lie ahead in essential future validation studies. The CD80 targeting agent abatacept (CTLA4-Ig), approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis, was shown to induce remission of nephrotic range proteinuria in four patients with recurrence of disease posttransplant and one patient with primary, treatment resistant nephrotic syndrome. The concept of 'CD80-positive' proteinuric kidney disease due to podocyte CD80 staining in patient kidney biopsies was introduced as a molecular biomarker to define disease and guide treatment. The mechanism of action of CTLA4-Ig in podocytes was shown to centre on β1 integrin activation in a T-cell independent fashion. Subsequent work revealed a putative role for podocyte CD80 in diabetic kidney disease. These studies have direct implications for patient care, and intense interest has focused on validating these findings in upcoming clinical trials.

  16. A Quadrupole Dalton-based multi-attribute method for product characterization, process development, and quality control of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weichen; Jimenez, Rod Brian; Mowery, Rachel; Luo, Haibin; Cao, Mingyan; Agarwal, Nitin; Ramos, Irina; Wang, Xiangyang; Wang, Jihong

    2017-10-01

    During manufacturing and storage process, therapeutic proteins are subject to various post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as isomerization, deamidation, oxidation, disulfide bond modifications and glycosylation. Certain PTMs may affect bioactivity, stability or pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics profile and are therefore classified as potential critical quality attributes (pCQAs). Identifying, monitoring and controlling these PTMs are usually key elements of the Quality by Design (QbD) approach. Traditionally, multiple analytical methods are utilized for these purposes, which is time consuming and costly. In recent years, multi-attribute monitoring methods have been developed in the biopharmaceutical industry. However, these methods combine high-end mass spectrometry with complicated data analysis software, which could pose difficulty when implementing in a quality control (QC) environment. Here we report a multi-attribute method (MAM) using a Quadrupole Dalton (QDa) mass detector to selectively monitor and quantitate PTMs in a therapeutic monoclonal antibody. The result output from the QDa-based MAM is straightforward and automatic. Evaluation results indicate this method provides comparable results to the traditional assays. To ensure future application in the QC environment, this method was qualified according to the International Conference on Harmonization (ICH) guideline and applied in the characterization of drug substance and stability samples. The QDa-based MAM is shown to be an extremely useful tool for product and process characterization studies that facilitates facile understanding of process impact on multiple quality attributes, while being QC friendly and cost-effective.

  17. The newer, 'atypical' antipsychotic drugs--their development and current therapeutic use.

    OpenAIRE

    Kendrick, T

    1999-01-01

    General practitioners (GPs) need to become more aware of a new generation of antipsychotic drugs that are 'atypical' in that, unlike traditional neuroleptics, they do not cause extrapyramidal side-effects; they may also be more effective against both the positive and negative symptoms of schizophrenia by their actions on various neurotransmitter pathways in the brain. This is a non-systematic review of the development of these new drugs and outlines how they are currently being used. It inclu...

  18. Respiratory flows during early childhood: Computational models to examine therapeutic aerosols in the developing airways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenenbaum-Katan, Janna; Hofemeier, Philipp; Sznitman, Josué; Janna Tenenbaum-Katan Team

    2015-11-01

    Inhalation therapy is the cornerstone of early-childhood respiratory treatments, as well as a rising potential for systemic drug delivery and pulmonary vaccination. As such, indispensable understanding of respiratory flow phenomena, coupled with particle transport at the deep regions of children's lungs is necessary to attain efficient targeting of aerosol therapy. However, fundamental research of pulmonary transport is overwhelmingly focused on adults. In our study, we have developed an anatomically-inspired computational model of representing pulmonary acinar regions at several age points during a child's development. Our numerical simulations examine respiratory flows and particle deposition maps within the acinar model, accounting for varying age dependant anatomical considerations and ventilation patterns. Resulting deposition maps of aerosols alter with age, such findings might suggest that medication protocols of inhalation therapy in young children should be considered to be accordingly amended with the child's development. Additionally to understanding basic scientific concepts of age effects on aerosol deposition, our research can potentially contribute practical guidelines to therapy protocols, and its' necessary modifications with age. We acknowledge the support of the ISF and the Israeli ministry of Science.

  19. Automated small‐scale protein purification and analysis for accelerated development of protein therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeSaout, Xavier; Costioli, Matteo; Jordan, Lynn; Lambert, Jeremy; Beighley, Ross; Provencher, Laurel; McGuire, Kevin; Verlinden, Nico; Barry, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    Small‐scale protein purification presents opportunities for accelerated process development of biotherapeutic molecules. Miniaturization of purification conditions reduces time and allows for parallel processing of samples, thus offering increased statistical significance and greater breadth of variables. The ability of the miniaturized platform to be predictive of larger scale purification schemes is of critical importance. The PerkinElmer JANUS BioTx Pro and Pro‐Plus workstations were developed as intuitive, flexible, and automated devices capable of performing parallel small‐scale analytical protein purification. Preprogrammed methods automate a variety of commercially available ion exchange and affinity chromatography solutions, including miniaturized chromatography columns, resin‐packed pipette tips, and resin‐filled microtiter vacuum filtration plates. Here, we present a comparison of microscale chromatography versus standard fast protein LC (FPLC) methods for process optimization. In this study, we evaluated the capabilities of the JANUS BioTx Pro‐Plus robotic platform for miniaturized chromatographic purification of proteins with the GE ӒKTA Express system. We were able to demonstrate predictive analysis similar to that of larger scale purification platforms, while offering advantages in speed and number of samples processed. This approach is predictive of scale‐up conditions, resulting in shorter biotherapeutic development cycles and less consumed material than traditional FPLC methods, thus reducing time‐to‐market from discovery to manufacturing. PMID:27774045

  20. Sensory education program development, application and its therapeutic effect in children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Hae-Kyung

    2014-01-01

    There has recently been Increased interest in the emotional intelligence (EQ) of elementary school students, which is recognized as a more important value than IQ (intelligence quotient) for predict of their success in school or later life. However, there are few sensory education programs, available to improve the EQ of elementary school student's in Korea. This study was conducted to develop an educational program that reflects the characteristics and contents of traditional rice culture and verify the effects of those programs on the EQ of children. The program was developed based on the ADDIE (Analysis, Design, Development, Implementation and Evaluation) model and participants were elementary school students in 3rd and 4th grade (n = 120) in Cheonan, Korea. Descriptive statistics and paired t-tests were used. EQ scores pertaining to the basic sense group, culture group, and food group were significantly improved after the sensory educational program(P education contributed to improving elementary school children's Emotional Intelligence (EI) and their actual understanding about Korean traditional rice culture. PMID:24611113

  1. In vitro recapitulation of functional microvessels for the study of endothelial shear response, nitric oxide and [Ca2+]i.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Li

    Full Text Available Microfluidic technologies enable in vitro studies to closely simulate in vivo microvessel environment with complexity. Such method overcomes certain constrains of the statically cultured endothelial monolayers and enables the cells grow under physiological range of shear flow with geometry similar to microvessels in vivo. However, there are still existing knowledge gaps and lack of convincing evidence to demonstrate and quantify key biological features of the microfluidic microvessels. In this paper, using advanced micromanufacturing and microfluidic technologies, we presented an engineered microvessel model that mimicked the dimensions and network structures of in vivo microvessels with a long-term and continuous perfusion capability, as well as high-resolution and real-time imaging capability. Through direct comparisons with studies conducted in intact microvessels, our results demonstrated that the cultured microvessels formed under perfused conditions recapitulated certain key features of the microvessels in vivo. In particular, primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells were successfully cultured the entire inner surfaces of the microchannel network with well-developed junctions indicated by VE-cadherin staining. The morphological and proliferative responses of endothelial cells to shear stresses were quantified under different flow conditions which was simulated with three-dimensional shear dependent numerical flow model. Furthermore, we successfully measured agonist-induced changes in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and nitric oxide production at individual endothelial cell levels using fluorescence imaging. The results were comparable to those derived from individually perfused intact venules. With in vivo validation of its functionalities, our microfluidic model demonstrates a great potential for biological applications and bridges the gaps between in vitro and in vivo microvascular research.

  2. Stroke survivors talk while doing: development of a therapeutic framework for continued rehabilitation of hand function post stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabini, Rosanna C; Dijkers, Marcel P J M; Raghavan, Preeti

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative study to identify themes and explore mechanisms underlying recovery of hand function post stroke for individuals discharged from rehabilitation services. Post-stroke hemiparesis frequently results in persistent hand dysfunction; the mechanisms of functional recovery are however poorly understood. We assessed the perspectives of community-dwelling individuals with chronic stroke on their hand function limitations and recovery to explore the feasibility of developing a theoretical framework for understanding the process of continued post-stroke recovery. Eight subjects with chronic post-stroke hemiparesis were interviewed and videotaped while they performed a battery of 20 upper limb tasks. Qualitative analysis consisted of two investigators independently reviewing the videotapes and reading the transcribed conversations, identifying significant issues and then comparing their observations to determine common themes and develop emerging concepts. Four core themes pertaining to impairment and recovery of task-specific ability emerged: 1) spasticity can be overcome actively through task-specific attempts to use the affected arm and hand; 2) use of the affected arm can be facilitated by adopting positions that reduce the effect of gravity on the arm or enable gravity to act as a natural assist in the movement; 3) task-specific skill can be attained by repeatedly attempting specific component movements of tasks in the context of a variety of different tasks; and 4) frustration impedes task performance but a mental state of 'detached focus' can improve the motivation to use the affected arm. These themes suggest a therapeutic framework for continued upper limb rehabilitation in patients' own environment to maximize functional recovery in individuals long after their stroke, and generate hypotheses which may lead to the development of new therapeutic protocols. NA. Copyright © 2013 Hanley & Belfus. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Recent advancement to prevent the development of allergy and allergic diseases and therapeutic strategy in the perspective of barrier dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natsume, Osamu; Ohya, Yukihiro

    2018-01-01

    Therapeutic strategy in late 20th century to prevent allergic diseases was derived from a conceptual framework of allergens elimination which was as same as that of coping with them after their onset. Manifold trials were implemented; however, most of them failed to verify the effectiveness of their preventive measures. Recent advancement of epidemiological studies and cutaneous biology revealed epidermal barrier dysfunction plays a major role of allergen sensitization and development of atopic dermatitis which ignites the inception of allergy march. For this decade, therapeutic strategy to prevent the development of food allergy has been confronted with a paradigm shift from avoidance and delayed introduction of allergenic foods based on the theoretical concept to early introduction of them based on the clinical and epidemiological evidences. Especially, prevention of peanut allergy and egg allergy has been established with the highest evidence verified by randomized controlled trials, although application in clinical practice should be done with attention. This paradigm shift concerning food allergy was also due to the discovery of cutaneous sensitization risk of food allergens for an infant with eczema revealed by prospective studies. Here we have recognized the increased importance of prevention of eczema/atopic dermatitis in infancy. Two randomized controlled trials using emollients showed successful results in prevention of atopic dermatitis in infancy; however, longer term safety and prognosis including allergy march should be pursued. To establish more fundamental strategy for prevention of the development of allergy, further studies clarifying the mechanisms of interaction between barrier dysfunction and microbial milieu are needed with macroscope to understand the relationship between allergic diseases and a diversity of environmental influences. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society of Allergology. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Systematic Three-Dimensional Coculture Rapidly Recapitulates Interactions between Human Neurons and Astrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Krencik

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Human astrocytes network with neurons in dynamic ways that are still poorly defined. Our ability to model this relationship is hampered by the lack of relevant and convenient tools to recapitulate this complex interaction. To address this barrier, we have devised efficient coculture systems utilizing 3D organoid-like spheres, termed asteroids, containing pre-differentiated human pluripotent stem cell (hPSC-derived astrocytes (hAstros combined with neurons generated from hPSC-derived neural stem cells (hNeurons or directly induced via Neurogenin 2 overexpression (iNeurons. Our systematic methods rapidly produce structurally complex hAstros and synapses in high-density coculture with iNeurons in precise numbers, allowing for improved studies of neural circuit function, disease modeling, and drug screening. We conclude that these bioengineered neural circuit model systems are reliable and scalable tools to accurately study aspects of human astrocyte-neuron functional properties while being easily accessible for cell-type-specific manipulations and observations. : In this article, Krencik and colleagues show that high-density cocultures of pre-differentiated human astrocytes with induced neurons, from pluripotent stem cells, elicit mature characteristics by 3–5 weeks. This provides a faster and more defined alternative method to organoid cultures for investigating human neural circuit function. Keywords: human pluripotent stem cells, neurons, astrocytes, synapses, coculture, three-dimensional spheres, organoids, disease modeling

  5. Recapitulating physiological and pathological shear stress and oxygen to model vasculature in health and disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abaci, Hasan Erbil; Shen, Yu-I.; Tan, Scott; Gerecht, Sharon

    2014-05-01

    Studying human vascular disease in conventional cell cultures and in animal models does not effectively mimic the complex vascular microenvironment and may not accurately predict vascular responses in humans. We utilized a microfluidic device to recapitulate both shear stress and O2 levels in health and disease, establishing a microfluidic vascular model (μVM). Maintaining human endothelial cells (ECs) in healthy-mimicking conditions resulted in conversion to a physiological phenotype namely cell elongation, reduced proliferation, lowered angiogenic gene expression and formation of actin cortical rim and continuous barrier. We next examined the responses of the healthy μVM to a vasotoxic cancer drug, 5-Fluorouracil (5-FU), in comparison with an in vivo mouse model. We found that 5-FU does not induce apoptosis rather vascular hyperpermeability, which can be alleviated by Resveratrol treatment. This effect was confirmed by in vivo findings identifying a vasoprotecting strategy by the adjunct therapy of 5-FU with Resveratrol. The μVM of ischemic disease demonstrated the transition of ECs from a quiescent to an activated state, with higher proliferation rate, upregulation of angiogenic genes, and impaired barrier integrity. The μVM offers opportunities to study and predict human ECs with physiologically relevant phenotypes in healthy, pathological and drug-treated environments.

  6. Selective Activation of mTORC1 Signaling Recapitulates Microcephaly, Tuberous Sclerosis, and Neurodegenerative Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidetoshi Kassai

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR has been implicated in human neurological diseases such as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC, neurodegeneration, and autism. However, little is known about when and how mTOR is involved in the pathogenesis of these diseases, due to a lack of animal models that directly increase mTOR activity. Here, we generated transgenic mice expressing a gain-of-function mutant of mTOR in the forebrain in a temporally controlled manner. Selective activation of mTORC1 in embryonic stages induced cortical atrophy caused by prominent apoptosis of neuronal progenitors, associated with upregulation of HIF-1α. In striking contrast, activation of the mTORC1 pathway in adulthood resulted in cortical hypertrophy with fatal epileptic seizures, recapitulating human TSC. Activated mTORC1 in the adult cortex also promoted rapid accumulation of cytoplasmic inclusions and activation of microglial cells, indicative of progressive neurodegeneration. Our findings demonstrate that mTORC1 plays different roles in developmental and adult stages and contributes to human neurological diseases.

  7. Modeling the autistic cell: iPSCs recapitulate developmental principles of syndromic and nonsyndromic ASD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Reuven, Lihi; Reiner, Orly

    2016-06-01

    The opportunity to model autism spectrum disorders (ASD) through generation of patient-derived induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) is currently an emerging topic. Wide-scale research of altered brain circuits in syndromic ASD, including Rett Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, Angelman's Syndrome and sporadic Schizophrenia, was made possible through animal models. However, possibly due to species differences, and to the possible contribution of epigenetics in the pathophysiology of these diseases, animal models fail to recapitulate many aspects of ASD. With the advent of iPSCs technology, 3D cultures of patient-derived cells are being used to study complex neuronal phenotypes, including both syndromic and nonsyndromic ASD. Here, we review recent advances in using iPSCs to study various aspects of the ASD neuropathology, with emphasis on the efforts to create in vitro model systems for syndromic and nonsyndromic ASD. We summarize the main cellular activity phenotypes and aberrant genetic interaction networks that were found in iPSC-derived neurons of syndromic and nonsyndromic autistic patients. © 2016 Japanese Society of Developmental Biologists.

  8. Biomimetic strategies to recapitulate organ specific microenvironments for studying breast cancer metastasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narkhede, Akshay A; Shevde, Lalita A; Rao, Shreyas S

    2017-09-15

    The progression of breast cancer from the primary tumor setting to the metastatic setting is the critical event defining Stage IV disease, no longer considered curable. The microenvironment at specific organ sites is known to play a key role in influencing the ultimate fate of metastatic cells; yet microenvironmental mediated-molecular mechanisms underlying organ specific metastasis in breast cancer are not well understood. This review discusses biomimetic strategies employed to recapitulate metastatic organ microenvironments, particularly, bone, liver, lung and brain to elucidate the mechanisms dictating metastatic breast cancer cell homing and colonization. These biomimetic strategies include in vitro techniques such as biomaterial-based co-culturing techniques, microfluidics, organ-mimetic chips, bioreactor technologies, and decellularized matrices as well as cutting edge in vivo techniques to better understand the interactions between metastatic breast cancer cells and the stroma at the metastatic site. The advantages and disadvantages of these systems are discussed. In addition, how creation of biomimetic models will impact breast cancer metastasis research and their broad utility is explored. © 2017 UICC.

  9. Per2 mutation recapitulates the vascular phenotype of diabetes in the retina and bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatwadekar, Ashay D; Yan, Yuanqing; Qi, Xiaoping; Thinschmidt, Jeffrey S; Neu, Matthew B; Li Calzi, Sergio; Shaw, Lynn C; Dominiguez, James M; Busik, Julia V; Lee, Choogon; Boulton, Michael E; Grant, Maria B

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we assessed whether Per2 clock gene-mutant mice exhibit a vascular phenotype similar to diabetes. Per2 (B6.129-Per2(tm1Drw)/J) or wild-type control mice 4 and 12 months of age were used. To evaluate diabetes-like phenotype in Per2 mutant mice, retina was quantified for mRNA expression, and degree of diabetic retinopathy was evaluated. Bone marrow neuropathy was studied by staining femurs for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) and neurofilament 200 (NF-200). The rate of proliferation and quantification of bone marrow progenitor cells (BMPCs) was performed, and a threefold decrease in proliferation and 50% reduction in nitric oxide levels were observed in Per2 mutant mice. TH-positive nerve processes and NF-200 staining were reduced in Per2 mutant mice. Both retinal protein and mRNA expression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase were decreased by twofold. Other endothelial function genes (VEGFR2, VEGFR1) were downregulated (1.5-2-fold) in Per2 mutant retinas, whereas there was an upregulation of profibrotic pathway mediated by transforming growth factor-β1. Our studies suggest that Per2 mutant mice recapitulate key aspects of diabetes without the metabolic abnormalities, including retinal vascular damage, neuronal loss in the bone marrow, and diminished BMPC function.

  10. Recapitulating the Structural Evolution of Redox Regulation in Adenosine 5'-Phosphosulfate Kinase from Cyanobacteria to Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Jonathan; Nathin, David; Lee, Soon Goo; Sun, Tony; Jez, Joseph M

    2015-10-09

    In plants, adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (APS) kinase (APSK) is required for reproductive viability and the production of 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulfate (PAPS) as a sulfur donor in specialized metabolism. Previous studies of the APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAPSK) identified a regulatory disulfide bond formed between the N-terminal domain (NTD) and a cysteine on the core scaffold. This thiol switch is unique to mosses, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. To understand the structural evolution of redox control of APSK, we investigated the redox-insensitive APSK from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (SynAPSK). Crystallographic analysis of SynAPSK in complex with either APS and a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog or APS and sulfate revealed the overall structure of the enzyme, which lacks the NTD found in homologs from mosses and plants. A series of engineered SynAPSK variants reconstructed the structural evolution of the plant APSK. Biochemical analyses of SynAPSK, SynAPSK H23C mutant, SynAPSK fused to the AtAPSK NTD, and the fusion protein with the H23C mutation showed that the addition of the NTD and cysteines recapitulated thiol-based regulation. These results reveal the molecular basis for structural changes leading to the evolution of redox control of APSK in the green lineage from cyanobacteria to plants. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Matrix-Bound Nanovesicles Recapitulate Extracellular Matrix Effects on Macrophage Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huleihel, Luai; Bartolacci, Joseph G; Dziki, Jenna L; Vorobyov, Tatiana; Arnold, Brooke; Scarritt, Michelle E; Pineda Molina, Catalina; LoPresti, Samuel T; Brown, Bryan N; Naranjo, Juan Diego; Badylak, Stephen F

    2017-11-01

    The early macrophage response to biomaterials has been shown to be a critical and predictive determinant of downstream outcomes. When properly prepared, bioscaffolds composed of mammalian extracellular matrix (ECM) have been shown to promote a transition in macrophage behavior from a proinflammatory to a regulatory/anti-inflammatory phenotype, which in turn has been associated with constructive and functional tissue repair. The mechanism by which ECM bioscaffolds promote this phenotypic transition, however, is poorly understood. The present study shows that matrix-bound nanovesicles (MBV), a component of ECM bioscaffolds, are capable of recapitulating the macrophage activation effects of the ECM bioscaffold from which they are derived. MBV isolated from two different source tissues, porcine urinary bladder and small intestinal submucosa, were found to be enriched in miRNA125b-5p, 143-3p, and 145-5p. Inhibition of these miRNAs within macrophages was associated with a gene and protein expression profile more consistent with a proinflammatory rather than an anti-inflammatory/regulatory phenotype. MBV and their associated miRNA cargo appear to play a significant role in mediating the effects of ECM bioscaffolds on macrophage phenotype.

  12. Therapeutic Potential and Pharmaceutical Development of Thymoquinone: A Multitargeted Molecule of Natural Origin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer N. Goyal

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Thymoquinone, a monoterpene molecule is chemically known as 2-methyl-5-isopropyl-1, 4-benzoquinone. It is abundantly present in seeds of Nigella sativa L. that is popularly known as black cumin or black seed and belongs to the family Ranunculaceae. A large number of studies have revealed that thymoquinone is the major active constituent in N. sativa oil this constituent is responsible for the majority of the pharmacological properties. The beneficial organoprotective activities of thymoquinone in experimental animal models of different human diseases are attributed to the potent anti-oxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. Thymoquinone has also been shown to alter numerous molecular and signaling pathways in many inflammatory and degenerative diseases including cancer. Thymoquinone has been reported to possess potent lipophilicity and limited bioavailability and exhibits light and heat sensitivity. Altogether, these physiochemical properties encumber the successful formulation for the delivery of drug in oral dosages form and restrict the pharmaceutical development. In recent past, many efforts were undertaken to improve the bioavailability for clinical usage by manipulating the physiochemical parameters. The present review aimed to provide insights regarding the physicochemical characteristics, pharmacokinetics and the methods to promote pharmaceutical development and endorse the clinical usage of TQ in future by overcoming the associated physiochemical obstacles. It also enumerates briefly the pharmacological and molecular targets of thymoquinone as well as the pharmacological properties in various diseases and the underlying molecular mechanism. Though, a convincing number of experimental studies are available but human studies are not available with thymoquinone despite of the long history of use of black cumin in different diseases. Thus, the clinical studies including pharmacokinetic studies and regulatory toxicity studies are required

  13. Genomics and systems biology--how relevant are the developments to veterinary pharmacology, toxicology and therapeutics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witkamp, R F

    2005-06-01

    This review discusses some of the recent developments in genomics and its current and future relevance for veterinary pharmacology and toxicology. With the rapid progress made in this field several new approaches in pharmacological and toxicological research have developed and drug discovery and drug development strategies have changed dramatically. In this review, the term genomics is used to encompass the three sub-disciplines transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics (or metabonomics) to describe the formation and fate of mRNA, proteins and metabolites, respectively. The current status and methods of the technology and some applications are briefly described. Although the DNA sequencing programmes are receiving considerable attention, the real value of genomics for pharmacology and toxicology is brought by the parallel developments in bio-informatics, bio-statistics and the integration of biology with mathematics and information technology. The ultimate level of integration is now mostly called systems biology, where mRNA, proteins and metabolites are being analysed in parallel, using a complete arsenal of analytical techniques (DNA-array, LC-MS/MS, GC-MS/MS, NMR, etc.). The information thus collected is analysed, integrated, linked to database information and translated to pathways and systems. This approach offers an enormous potential to study disease mechanisms and find new drug targets. Thus far, genomics and systems biology have not been introduced significantly in typical veterinary pharmacological and toxicological research programmes. The high costs and complexity connected to these large projects often form major obstacles for research groups with limited budgets. In other veterinary areas and disciplines, including infectious diseases, animal production and food-safety more examples of application are available. Genomics and bio-informatics provide outstanding opportunities to study pharmacology and toxicology in a more holistic way, taking into

  14. Patient-derived xenotransplants can recapitulate the genetic driver landscape of acute leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, K; Sanchez-Martin, M; Wang, X; Knapp, K M; Koche, R; Vu, L; Nahas, M K; He, J; Hadler, M; Stein, E M; Tallman, M S; Donahue, A L; Frampton, G M; Lipson, D; Roels, S; Stephens, P J; Sanford, E M; Brennan, T; Otto, G A; Yelensky, R; Miller, V A; Kharas, M G; Levine, R L; Ferrando, A; Armstrong, S A; Krivtsov, A V

    2017-01-01

    Genomic studies have identified recurrent somatic mutations in acute leukemias. However, current murine models do not sufficiently encompass the genomic complexity of human leukemias. To develop preclinical models, we transplanted 160 samples from patients with acute leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia, mixed lineage leukemia, B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, T-cell ALL) into immunodeficient mice. Of these, 119 engrafted with expected immunophenotype. Targeted sequencing of 374 genes and 265 frequently rearranged RNAs detected recurrent and novel genetic lesions in 48 paired primary tumor (PT) and patient-derived xenotransplant (PDX) samples. Overall, the frequencies of 274 somatic variant alleles correlated between PT and PDX samples, although the data were highly variable for variant alleles present at 0-10%. Seventeen percent of variant alleles were detected in either PT or PDX samples only. Based on variant allele frequency changes, 24 PT-PDX pairs were classified as concordant while the other 24 pairs showed various degree of clonal discordance. There was no correlation of clonal concordance with clinical parameters of diseases. Significantly more bone marrow samples than peripheral blood samples engrafted discordantly. These data demonstrate the utility of developing PDX banks for modeling human leukemia, and emphasize the importance of genomic profiling of PDX and patient samples to ensure concordance before performing mechanistic or therapeutic studies.

  15. Pediatric exclusivity: evolving legislation and novel complexities within pediatric therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivera, Donna R; Hartzema, Abraham G

    2014-03-01

    To review the successes and omissions of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) pediatric exclusivity incentive. Pediatric drug development receives less attention and funding than drug development targeting adults resulting in fewer appropriately labeled pediatric drugs. Newly introduced legislation aims to correct this deficit using market exclusivity incentives. Under the Food and Drug Administration Modernization Act (FDAMA, 1997), the FDA established the exclusivity principle. This legislation was renewed and amended in 2007 under Food and Drug Administration Amendments Act (FDAAA) allowing drug companies to receive a 6-month patent extension for initiating clinical investigation in pediatric populations. Fostering improved knowledge in pediatric indications and dosing is the motivating force behind this program. We examined drugs granted exclusivity through FDA published database as well as relevant drug labeling and postmarket safety studies. Our examination shows that studies conducted in support of patent protection are often not designed to meet current pediatric needs. Amendments to FDAAA are needed to ensure that studies approved for exclusivity strive to meet the following requirements: relevant pediatric clinical indication ; disease addressed should represent a significant disease burden to the appropriate population; important age ranges should be covered; studies should not be allowed when a safety signal is identified prior to initiation of the study; and trials where endpoints are successfully achieved providing considerable contribution to pediatric dosing knowledge or result in labeling changes may gain an additional incentive.

  16. Animal Models of Diabetic Macrovascular Complications: Key Players in the Development of New Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suvi E. Heinonen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes mellitus is a lifelong, incapacitating metabolic disease associated with chronic macrovascular complications (coronary heart disease, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease and microvascular disorders leading to damage of the kidneys (nephropathy and eyes (retinopathy. Based on the current trends, the rising prevalence of diabetes worldwide will lead to increased cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Therefore, novel means to prevent and treat these complications are needed. Under the auspices of the IMI (Innovative Medicines Initiative, the SUMMIT (SUrrogate markers for Micro- and Macrovascular hard end points for Innovative diabetes Tools consortium is working on the development of novel animal models that better replicate vascular complications of diabetes and on the characterization of the available models. In the past years, with the high level of genomic information available and more advanced molecular tools, a very large number of models has been created. Selecting the right model for a specific study is not a trivial task and will have an impact on the study results and their interpretation. This review gathers information on the available experimental animal models of diabetic macrovascular complications and evaluates their pros and cons for research purposes as well as for drug development.

  17. GSK3 Inhibitors in the Therapeutic Development of Diabetes, Cancer and Neurodegeneration: Past, Present and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Mudasir; Hoda, Nasimul

    2017-11-16

    GSK3 has gained a considerable attention of researchers in the late 1970s as an inevitable drug target to treat diabetes. Furthermore, it was found to have a key role in the development of diseases like cancer and neurodegeneration (ND). A broad spectrum of GSK3 inhibitors have been discovered from time to time in order to curb these diseases. Inhibition of GSK3 by insulin boosts the dephosphorylation of glycogen synthase, hence its activation to convert UDP glucose into glycogen. Lack of insulin and insulin-resistance is supposed to be the cause of type 2 diabetes (Diabetes mellitus). Additionally, GSK3 stabilizes the components of beta-catenin complex, hence promotes oncogenesis. Phosphorylation of GSK3 by Akt and some other kinases also favours the carcinogenesis. However, in some cases GSK3 has tumor supressing character. GSK3 has been found to have a prominent role in the formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles (abnormal protein accumulations) which are the main suspects of Alzheimer's disease (AD). GSK3 inhibitors have been reported to have amyloidbeta disaggregation property and have been found to promote the adult hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo as well as in vitro. This manuscript thoroughly reviews the involvement of GSK3 in diabetes, cancer and ND. Furthermore, development of GSK3 inhibitors as antidiabetes, anticancer and antineurodegenerative agents focusing mainly on lead optimization has been discussed. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  18. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael A. Reiche

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB, an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR strains of M. tuberculosis, and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis. Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the

  19. Targeting DNA Replication and Repair for the Development of Novel Therapeutics against Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reiche, Michael A; Warner, Digby F; Mizrahi, Valerie

    2017-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is the etiological agent of tuberculosis (TB), an infectious disease which results in approximately 10 million incident cases and 1.4 million deaths globally each year, making it the leading cause of mortality from infection. An effective frontline combination chemotherapy exists for TB; however, this regimen requires the administration of four drugs in a 2 month long intensive phase followed by a continuation phase of a further 4 months with two of the original drugs, and is only effective for the treatment of drug-sensitive TB. The emergence and global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) as well as extensively drug-resistant (XDR) strains of M. tuberculosis , and the complications posed by co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and other co-morbidities such as diabetes, have prompted urgent efforts to develop shorter regimens comprising new compounds with novel mechanisms of action. This demands that researchers re-visit cellular pathways and functions that are essential to M. tuberculosis survival and replication in the host but which are inadequately represented amongst the targets of current anti-mycobacterial agents. Here, we consider the DNA replication and repair machinery as a source of new targets for anti-TB drug development. Like most bacteria, M. tuberculosis encodes a complex array of proteins which ensure faithful and accurate replication and repair of the chromosomal DNA. Many of these are essential; so, too, are enzymes in the ancillary pathways of nucleotide biosynthesis, salvage, and re-cycling, suggesting the potential to inhibit replication and repair functions at multiple stages. To this end, we provide an update on the state of chemotherapeutic inhibition of DNA synthesis and related pathways in M. tuberculosis . Given the established links between genotoxicity and mutagenesis, we also consider the potential implications of targeting DNA metabolic pathways implicated in the development of drug

  20. Probing suitable therapeutic nanoparticles for controlled drug delivery and diagnostic reproductive health biomarker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jha, Rakhi [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); National Institute of Animal Welfare, Ministry of Environment, Forest and Climate Change, Faridabad, Haryana 121 004 (India); Jha, Pradeep K., E-mail: jha.rk.pk@gmail.com [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Gupta, Santosh; Bhuvaneshwaran, S.P. [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 (India); Hossain, Maidul [Department of Chemistry & Chemical Technology, Vidyasagar University, Midnapore 721102 (India); Guha, Sujoy K. [School of Medical Science and Technology, Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, Kharagpur 721 302 (India)

    2016-04-01

    Nanomaterial mediated drug delivery represents a highly promising technique while its selectivity for reproductive healthcare application still remains a challenge. Since the delicate structure and functional role of reproductive tissue and gametes require the use of biocompatible nanomedicine/devices that do not affect fertility or the development of resulting offspring, this paper reports an intercomparative study of human spermatozoa interaction with three different nanoparticles (NPs) namely; iron oxide (Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4)}, multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) and graphene platelet nanopowder (GPN) to probe their suitability for drug delivery carrier and biomarker development purposes. ATR–FTIR results revealed that the sperm cell interaction with GPN had maximum amide I absorption for cell proteins and C=O stretching of the peptide backbone at the band around 1657 cm{sup −1} followed by iron oxide NPs whereas MWCNT had no absorption. These results showed that GPN followed by iron oxide NPs got maximally entrapped by cell membrane protein with maximum disruption but MWCNT exhibited less entrapment but significantly higher internalization which was further validated by morphological analysis of these cell NP interaction by SEM, HRTEM and fluorescence microscopy. The uptake kinetics and penetration mechanism of NPs were examined with isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). Interestingly, ITC results confirmed ATR–FTIR and morphological observations that the binding of GPN and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} NPs with cell was exothermic and their bindings were favored by both negative enthalpy and positive entropy whereas in the case of MWCNT it was endothermic supported by unfavorable positive enthalpy and a favorable entropy change. Hence, it was evident that MWCNT had better internalization efficiency without disrupting the sperm lipid membrane compared to Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} and GPN NPs. Therefore, this work proposes CNT as promising means. - Highlights: • Biophysical

  1. Development of C-Methyl Branched Purine Ribonucleoside Analogs: Chemistry, Biological Activity and Therapeutic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrelli, Riccardo; Grifantini, Mario; Cappellacci, Loredana

    2016-01-01

    In this review, we first highlighted on C-methyl-branched nucleosides and nucleotides approved as anti-hepatitis C infection (HCV) drugs, their mechanism of action and recent progress in the development of new clinical candidates. Then, we report on our attempt to develop several C-methyl nucleosides/tides potentially useful for treatment of various diseases such cancer, pain, epilepsy and glaucoma. Design, synthesis and pharmacological screening of 1'-C-, 2'-C-, 3'-C-methyladenosine or other purine/pyrimidine nucleosides allowed us to discover some promising new molecules. 3'-C-Methyladenosine showed antitumor activity against several human tumor cell lines. We have investigated the mechanism of action of 3;-C-methyladenosine that proved to be an effective inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase. Moreover, we will also summarize the chemical and biological properties of some of the recent N6-substituted and 5', N6-disubstituted 2'-C-methyladenosine derivatives that were synthetized in our laboratory and evaluated as A1 adenosine receptor agonists. 2-Chloro-2'- C-methyl-N6-cyclopentyladenosine (2'-Me-CCPA), 5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-N6-(±)-(endo-norborn- 2-yl)adenosine (5'Cl5'd-(±)-ENBA) and 2'-C-methyl-5'-chloro-5'-deoxy-N6-(±)-(endonorborn- 2-yl)adenosine (2'-Me-5'Cl5'd-(±)-ENBA) displayed high hA1AR affinity and selectivity. 2'-Me-CCPA and 5'Cl5'd-(±)-ENBA showed significant analgesic properties.

  2. Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease and Alkaline Reflux: the Mechanisms of the Development and Therapeutic Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T.D. Zviahintseva

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD — a pathology, which occupies a leading place among all acid-related diseases. The main mechanism of GERD is a violation of the motor-evacuation function of the stomach — slowing gastric emptying and duodenogastric reflux. Slow gastric emptying contributes to more frequent reflux, and the presence of duodenal contents in refluxate — alkaline reflux — is aggressive for the esophageal mucosa (EM. This is due to the presence of bile acids, lysolecithin and pancreatic enzymes in the esophageal refluxate. A long existing contact of aggressive factors in the stomach and the esophagus leads to the development of inflammatory and destructive lesions of the mucous membrane of these organs. According to many researchers, bile acids play a key role in the pathogenesis of the damaging effects on the EM. Drug correction of GERD with alkaline reflux includes, along with the administration of proton pump inhibitors, prokinetics (itopride hydrochloride and ursodeoxycholic acid preparations.

  3. HGF/MET-directed therapeutics in gastroesophageal cancer: a review of clinical and biomarker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Stephen P; Bruey, Jean-Marie; Koeppen, Hartmut

    2014-05-30

    Aberrant activation of the HGF/MET signaling axis has been strongly implicated in the malignant transformation and progression of gastroesophageal cancer (GEC). MET receptor overexpression in tumor samples from GEC patients has been consistently correlated with an aggressive metastatic phenotype and poor prognosis. In preclinical GEC models, abrogation of HGF/MET signaling has been shown to induce tumor regression as well as inhibition of metastatic dissemination. Promising clinical results in patient subsets in which MET is overexpressed have spurned several randomized studies of HGF/MET-directed agents, including two pivotal global Phase III trials. Available data highlight the need for predictive biomarkers in order to select patients most likely to benefit from HGF/MET inhibition. In this review, we discuss the current knowledge of mechanisms of MET activation in GEC, the current status of the clinical evaluation of MET-targeted therapies in GEC, characteristics of ongoing randomized GEC trials and the associated efforts to identify and validate biomarkers. We also discuss the considerations and challenges for HGF/MET inhibitor drug development in the GEC setting.

  4. Genetic basis of kidney cancer: Role of genomics for the development of disease-based therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linehan, W. Marston

    2012-01-01

    Kidney cancer is not a single disease; it is made up of a number of different types of cancer, including clear cell, type 1 papillary, type 2 papillary, chromophobe, TFE3, TFEB, and oncocytoma. Sporadic, nonfamilial kidney cancer includes clear cell kidney cancer (75%), type 1 papillary kidney cancer (10%), papillary type 2 kidney cancer (including collecting duct and medullary RCC) (5%), the microphalmia-associated transcription (MiT) family translocation kidney cancers (TFE3, TFEB, and MITF), chromophobe kidney cancer (5%), and oncocytoma (5%). Each has a distinct histology, a different clinical course, responds differently to therapy, and is caused by mutation in a different gene. Genomic studies identifying the genes for kidney cancer, including the VHL, MET, FLCN, fumarate hydratase, succinate dehydrogenase, TSC1, TSC2, and TFE3 genes, have significantly altered the ways in which patients with kidney cancer are managed. While seven FDA-approved agents that target the VHL pathway have been approved for the treatment of patients with advanced kidney cancer, further genomic studies, such as whole genome sequencing, gene expression patterns, and gene copy number, will be required to gain a complete understanding of the genetic basis of kidney cancer and of the kidney cancer gene pathways and, most importantly, to provide the foundation for the development of effective forms of therapy for patients with this disease. PMID:23038766

  5. Development of improved therapeutic mesothelin-based vaccines for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Michael; Freistaedter, Andrew; Jones, Gwendolyn J B; Zervos, Emmanuel; Roper, Rachel L

    2018-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer is the 5th leading cause of cancer deaths, and there are no effective treatments. We developed a poxvirus platform vaccine with improved immunogenicity and inserted the mesothelin gene to create an anti-mesothelin cancer vaccine. Mesothelin expression is mostly restricted to tumors in adult mammals and thus may be a good target for cancer treatment. We show here that the modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) virus expressing mesothelin and the enhanced MVA virus missing the immunosuppressive A35 gene and expressing mesothelin were both safe in mice and were able to induce IFN-gamma secreting T cells in response to mesothelin expressing tumor cells. In addition, the MVA virus has oncolytic properties in vitro as it can replicate in and kill Panc02 pancreatic adenocarcinoma cell line tumor cells, even though it is unable to replicate in most mammalian cells. Deletion of the A35 gene in MVA improved T cell responses as expected. However, we were unable to demonstrate inhibition of Panc02 tumor growth in immunocompetent mice with pre-vaccination of mice, boosts, or even intratumoral injections of the recombinant viruses. Vaccine efficacy may be limited by shedding of mesothelin from tumor cells thus creating a protective screen from the immune system.

  6. Effects of exogenous agents on brain development: stress, abuse and therapeutic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archer, Trevor

    2011-10-01

    The range of exogenous agents likely to affect, generally detrimentally, the normal development of the brain and central nervous system defies estimation although the amount of accumulated evidence is enormous. The present review is limited to certain types of chemotherapeutic and "use-and-abuse" compounds and environmental agents, exemplified by anesthetic, antiepileptic, sleep-inducing and anxiolytic compounds, nicotine and alcohol, and stress as well as agents of infection; each of these agents have been investigated quite extensively and have been shown to contribute to the etiopathogenesis of serious neuropsychiatric disorders. To greater or lesser extent, all of the exogenous agents discussed in the present treatise have been investigated for their influence upon neurodevelopmental processes during the period of the brain growth spurt and during other phases uptill adulthood, thereby maintaining the notion of critical phases for the outcome of treatment whether prenatal, postnatal, or adolescent. Several of these agents have contributed to the developmental disruptions underlying structural and functional brain abnormalities that are observed in the symptom and biomarker profiles of the schizophrenia spectrum disorders and the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders. In each case, the effects of the exogenous agents upon the status of the affected brain, within defined parameters and conditions, is generally permanent and irreversible. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. The "ouzo effect", recent developments and application to therapeutic drug carrying

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botet, Robert

    2012-03-01

    This short review is about the spontaneous emulsification effect, aka the "ouzo effect". Under certain conditions, pouring a mixture ol a totally water-miscible solvent and a hydrophobic oil into water, generates spontaneously nanometric droplets which are stable, even without surfactant. A basic example is anise-flavored aperitif, which is known from ages in South Europe and North Africa. Then, it is an amazingly old topic, potentially important in a number of applications - such as food additives, paints, cosmetic products or pharmaceutic drugs -, though the main mechanisms are yet essentially unexplained. This phenomenon is presently under intensive investigation using both microfluidic experiments and large-scale numerical simulations, through a CNRS project grouping four laboratories in France. This presentation will give an overview of the history, context and development of the ouzo effect, as well as recent advancements and ideas in the field. This unique effect is now related to two major streams of the scientific research, namely: nano-technology and bio-technology. Consequences in the latter domain is outlined.

  8. IDH mutations in cancer and progress toward development of targeted therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, L; Yen, K; Attar, E C

    2016-04-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 (IDH1 and IDH2) are key metabolic enzymes, converting isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate (αKG).IDH1 and IDH2 mutations have been identified in multiple tumor types, including gliomas and myeloid malignancies such as acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). Here we provide an overview of the function of normal and mutated IDH, discuss the role of IDH mutations in tumorigenesis and progression and review the key clinical considerations when treating IDH-mutated tumors based on emerging clinical data from mutant IDH1/2 inhibitor trials. IDH1 and IDH2 mutations confer neomorphic activity in the mutant protein, resulting in the conversion of αKG to the oncometabolite, D-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). The subsequent accumulation of 2-HG results in epigenetic dysregulation via inhibition of αKG-dependent histone and DNA demethylases, and a block in cellular differentiation. There is growing preclinical and clinical evidence suggesting that IDHmutations are involved in neoplasia. Furthermore, preclinical studies assessing small molecule inhibitors of mutant IDH1/2 enzymes have provided proof of concept that this approach decreases intracellular 2-HG levels, reverses epigenetic dysregulation and induces cellular differentiation. Phase I studies of mutant IDH inhibitors are currently ongoing in patients with IDH-mutant hematologic and solid tumors, with early data in hematologic tumors suggesting a manageable safety profile as well as clinical benefit, with a mechanism of action based on differentiation of malignant cells. Inhibition of mutant IDH shows promise as a treatment approach in hematologic malignancies, with further development ongoing in solid tumors and glioma. The mutant IDH inhibitors may have clinical utility both as single agents and in combination strategies that target additional oncogenic pathways. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical

  9. Influence networks based on coexpression improve drug target discovery for the development of novel cancer therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The demand for novel molecularly targeted drugs will continue to rise as we move forward toward the goal of personalizing cancer treatment to the molecular signature of individual tumors. However, the identification of targets and combinations of targets that can be safely and effectively modulated is one of the greatest challenges facing the drug discovery process. A promising approach is to use biological networks to prioritize targets based on their relative positions to one another, a property that affects their ability to maintain network integrity and propagate information-flow. Here, we introduce influence networks and demonstrate how they can be used to generate influence scores as a network-based metric to rank genes as potential drug targets. Results We use this approach to prioritize genes as drug target candidates in a set of ER + breast tumor samples collected during the course of neoadjuvant treatment with the aromatase inhibitor letrozole. We show that influential genes, those with high influence scores, tend to be essential and include a higher proportion of essential genes than those prioritized based on their position (i.e. hubs or bottlenecks) within the same network. Additionally, we show that influential genes represent novel biologically relevant drug targets for the treatment of ER + breast cancers. Moreover, we demonstrate that gene influence differs between untreated tumors and residual tumors that have adapted to drug treatment. In this way, influence scores capture the context-dependent functions of genes and present the opportunity to design combination treatment strategies that take advantage of the tumor adaptation process. Conclusions Influence networks efficiently find essential genes as promising drug targets and combinations of targets to inform the development of molecularly targeted drugs and their use. PMID:24495353

  10. Cell Death Mechanisms in Sulfur Mustard Injury: Basis for Therapeutics Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ray, R.; Keyser, B.; Benton, B.; Rosenthal, D. S.

    2007-01-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM, bis-(2-chloroethyl) sulfide), commonly called mustard gas, is a vesicant chemical warfare agent and a potential terrorism agent. SM is relatively easy to make and to deploy, which makes this chemical most likely to be used. SM exposure causes debilitating skin blisters (vesication) and injury to the eyes and the respiratory tract. Therefore, developing an effective medical countermeasure to protect against the dermal, ocular and airway injuries due to this dreaded chemical agent is an urgent priority of the US Army. SM pathophysiology is consistent with epithelial cell damage, particularly basal cell apoptosis. SM-induced apoptosis may occur via multiple pathways dependent on one or more of the following: (a) abnormal Ca2plus homeostasis, (b) disturbed cellular bioenergetics, and (c) Fas (death receptor) response. Apoptosis pathways are characterized by the involvement of the pathway-specific caspases (cysteine aspartase). We determined caspase activity by assay of fluorogenic caspase type-specific peptide substrate hydrolysis. We studied caspase processing, i.e., proteolytic conversion of procaspase to active caspase by immunoblot analyses utilizing caspase type-specific antibodies. Our results in cell culture models of both human epidermal keratinocytes and human airway epithelial cells indicated that SM activates (a) caspase-9, an indicator of the Ca2plus/CaM-mediated mitochondrial pathway, (b) caspase-8, a marker for the Fas-mediated pathway, and (c) caspase-3, the executioner caspase involved in both pathways. A peptide caspase inhibitor, specific for caspase-3 (AC-DEVD-CHO), added to cells prior to SM decreased apoptosis. These observations suggest apoptosis as a mechanism of SM toxicity and caspase inhibitors as prospective medical countermeasures.(author)

  11. Role of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases in infectious diseases and targets for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewan, Varun; Reader, John; Forsyth, Karin-Musier

    2014-01-01

    Aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases (AARSs) play a pivotal role in protein synthesis and cell viability. These 22 "housekeeping" enzymes (1 for each standard amino acid plus pyrrolysine and o-phosphoserine) are specifically involved in recognizing and aminoacylating their cognate tRNAs in the cellular pool with the correct amino acid prior to delivery of the charged tRNA to the protein synthesis machinery. Besides serving this canonical function, higher eukaryotic AARSs, some of which are organized in the cytoplasm as a multisynthetase complex of nine enzymes plus additional cellular factors, have also been implicated in a variety of non-canonical roles. AARSs are involved in the regulation of transcription, translation, and various signaling pathways, thereby ensuring cell survival. Based in part on their versatility, AARSs have been recruited by viruses to perform essential functions. For example, host synthetases are packaged into some retroviruses and are required for their replication. Other viruses mimic tRNA-like structures in their genomes, and these motifs are aminoacylated by the host synthetase as part of the viral replication cycle. More recently, it has been shown that certain large DNA viruses infecting animals and other diverse unicellular eukaryotes encode tRNAs, AARSs, and additional components of the protein-synthesis machinery. This chapter will review our current understanding of the role of host AARSs and tRNA-like structures in viruses and discuss their potential as anti-viral drug targets. The identification and development of compounds that target bacterial AARSs, thereby serving as novel antibiotics, will also be discussed. Particular attention will be given to recent work on a number of tRNA-dependent AARS inhibitors and to advances in a new class of natural "pro-drug" antibiotics called Trojan Horse inhibitors. Finally, we will explore how bacteria that naturally produce AARS-targeting antibiotics must protect themselves against cell suicide using

  12. The development of polymeric pellicles with gentamicine sulfate for therapeutic correction of cervical erosion (pseudoerosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Litvinenko

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction.Cervical erosionsoccur in 12-15%gynaecological diseases. Erosion is a damage of epithelialmucous membrane or skin. Therapy of patients with cervical erosionsis based on selection of pathogeneticsubstantiative method of treatment. Bathes and irrigations with 20% protargol, alum, carbolic acid, potassium permanganate are used. But some authors admit the destructive influence of these procedures. Using of tampons with 10% sintomycine emulsion, cod liver oil, sea-buckthorn oil,kalanchoe sap, propolis, vagotil, cigerol, galantamine also doesn’t give desirable result. Recently polymeric pellicleswith antibacterial substances are widely used. The most perspective in this route are aminoglycoside antibiotics. That is why we chose gentamicine sulfate (broad-spectrum aminoglycoside antibiotic. The aim of study is the development of the optimal composition of vaginal pellicleswith gentamicine sulfate for gynaecological practice, scientifically substantiation of excipients: polymeric base and plasticizer. Results and discussion.Polymeric bases and plasticizers influence on gentamicine sulfate releasing from polimericpellicleshas been studied. Research on choice of optimal composition has been carried out by two-factor experiment plan. The next bases and plasticizers have been used: methylcellulose, sodium carboxymethylcellulose, soluble biopolymer, gelatin; glycerine, propylenglycol, polyethylene glycol, twin 80. Gentamicine sulfate content was 80 mg in one pellicle. Gentamicine sulfate releasing from polimericpellicleshas been investigated by the Kruvchinsky method, concentration of active substance has been detected after 45 min. As a result it has been established that base makes essential influence on the gentamicine sulfate releasing (Fexp.52,88>Ftabl. 3,9. The best plasticizer is glycerin and the most optimal base is gelatin. So the optimal composition for vaginal films has been chosen: Gentamicine sulfate0,08 g Glycerin0,7 g Gelatin0

  13. 3D modeling of human cancer: A PEG-fibrin hydrogel system to study the role of tumor microenvironment and recapitulate the in vivo effect of oncolytic adenovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Bufalo, Francesca; Manzo, Teresa; Hoyos, Valentina; Yagyu, Shigeki; Caruana, Ignazio; Jacot, Jeffrey; Benavides, Omar; Rosen, Daniel; Brenner, Malcolm K

    2016-04-01

    Interactions between malignant and stromal cells and the 3D spatial architecture of the tumor both substantially modify tumor behavior, including the responses to small molecule drugs and biological therapies. Conventional 2D culture systems cannot replicate this complexity. To overcome these limitations and more accurately model solid tumors, we developed a highly versatile 3D PEG-fibrin hydrogel model of human lung adenocarcinoma. Our model relevantly recapitulates the effect of oncolytic adenovirus; tumor responses in this setting nearly reproduce those observed in vivo. We have also validated the use of this model for complex, long-term, 3D cultures of cancer cells and their stroma (fibroblasts and endothelial cells). Both tumor proliferation and invasiveness were enhanced in the presence of stromal components. These results validate our 3D hydrogel model as a relevant platform to study cancer biology and tumor responses to biological treatments. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Development of a mouse model for testing therapeutic agents: the anticancer effect of dienogest on endometrial neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Fumitaka; Tashiro, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Munekage; Honda, Ritsuo; Ohba, Takashi; Suzuki, Akira; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    As the number of younger women with endometrial carcinoma has increased, fertility-sparing treatments have received more attention. Although there have been several reports on conservative treatments with progestins for endometrial carcinoma, only medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is available in Japan. Dienogest has been developed as a fourth-generation progestin for treating endometriosis. Because of its high progesterone activity, its antitumor activity has attracted attention. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of dienogest on endometrial neoplasms using mouse model of endometrial carcinoma. Pten(loxP/loxP) mice were injected with MPA or dienogest subcutaneously to evaluate the anticancer effect against endometrial neoplasms that developed in the mice. One week after injections, histopathological analyzes were performed. Endometrial neoplasms were found in one of the eight (12.5%) mice from each group treated with either dienogest or MPA. In contrast, they were found in seven of eight (87.5%) mice not treated with progestins. Each progestin treatment showed anticancer activity against endometrial neoplasms that developed in the mice compared to those without treatment. Dienogest and MPA showed potent anticancer activity against endometrial neoplasms in our mouse model. The present study demonstrated that dienogest might be a useful therapeutic agent for human endometrial neoplasms.

  15. Generation of a novel mouse model that recapitulates early and adult onset glycogenosis type IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akman, H. Orhan; Sheiko, Tatiana; Tay, Stacey K.H.; Finegold, Milton J.; DiMauro, Salvatore; Craigen, William J.

    2011-01-01

    Glycogen storage disease type IV (GSD IV) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder caused by deficiency of the glycogen branching enzyme (GBE). The diagnostic feature of the disease is the accumulation of a poorly branched form of glycogen known as polyglucosan (PG). The disease is clinically heterogeneous, with variable tissue involvement and age of disease onset. Absence of enzyme activity is lethal in utero or in infancy affecting primarily muscle and liver. However, residual enzyme activity (5–20%) leads to juvenile or adult onset of a disorder that primarily affects muscle as well as central and peripheral nervous system. Here, we describe two mouse models of GSD IV that reflect this spectrum of disease. Homologous recombination was used to insert flippase recognition target recombination sites around exon 7 of the Gbe1 gene and a phosphoglycerate kinase-Neomycin cassette within intron 7, leading to a reduced synthesis of GBE. Mice bearing this mutation (Gbe1neo/neo) exhibit a phenotype similar to juvenile onset GSD IV, with wide spread accumulation of PG. Meanwhile, FLPe-mediated homozygous deletion of exon 7 completely eliminated GBE activity (Gbe1−/−), leading to a phenotype of lethal early onset GSD IV, with significant in utero accumulation of PG. Adult mice with residual GBE exhibit progressive neuromuscular dysfunction and die prematurely. Differently from muscle, PG in liver is a degradable source of glucose and readily depleted by fasting, emphasizing that there are structural and regulatory differences in glycogen metabolism among tissues. Both mouse models recapitulate typical histological and physiological features of two human variants of branching enzyme deficiency. PMID:21856731

  16. Celiac Disease Histopathology Recapitulates Hedgehog Downregulation, Consistent with Wound Healing Processes Activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senger, Stefania; Sapone, Anna; Fiorentino, Maria Rosaria; Mazzarella, Giuseppe; Lauwers, Gregory Y.; Fasano, Alessio

    2015-01-01

    Background In celiac disease (CD), intestinal epithelium damage occurs secondary to an immune insult and is characterized by blunting of the villi and crypt hyperplasia. Similarities between Hedgehog (Hh)/BMP4 downregulation, as reported in a mouse model, and CD histopathology, suggest mechanistic involvement of Hh/BMP4/WNT pathways in proliferation and differentiation of immature epithelial cells in the context of human intestinal homeostasis and regeneration after damage. Herein we examined the nature of intestinal crypt hyperplasia and involvement of Hh/BMP4 in CD histopathology. Methods and Findings Immunohistochemistry, qPCR and in situ hybridization were used to study a cohort of 24 healthy controls (HC) and 24 patients with diagnosed acute celiac disease (A-CD) intestinal biopsies. In A-CD we observed an increase in cells positive for Leucin-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5), an epithelial stem cell specific marker and expansion of WNT responding compartment. Further, we observed alteration in number and distribution of mesenchymal cells, predicted to be part of the intestinal stem cells niche. At the molecular level we found downregulation of indian hedgehog (IHH) and other components of the Hh pathway, but we did not observe a concurrent downregulation of BMP4. However, we observed upregulation of BMPs antagonists, gremlin 1 and gremlin 2. Conclusions Our data suggest that acute CD histopathology partially recapitulates the phenotype reported in Hh knockdown models. Specifically, Hh/BMP4 paradigm appears to be decoupled in CD, as the expansion of the immature cell population does not occur consequent to downregulation of BMP4. Instead, we provide evidence that upregulation of BMP antagonists play a key role in intestinal crypt hyperplasia. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying CD histopathology and the limitations in the use of mouse models for celiac disease. PMID:26649570

  17. Celiac Disease Histopathology Recapitulates Hedgehog Downregulation, Consistent with Wound Healing Processes Activation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Senger

    Full Text Available In celiac disease (CD, intestinal epithelium damage occurs secondary to an immune insult and is characterized by blunting of the villi and crypt hyperplasia. Similarities between Hedgehog (Hh/BMP4 downregulation, as reported in a mouse model, and CD histopathology, suggest mechanistic involvement of Hh/BMP4/WNT pathways in proliferation and differentiation of immature epithelial cells in the context of human intestinal homeostasis and regeneration after damage. Herein we examined the nature of intestinal crypt hyperplasia and involvement of Hh/BMP4 in CD histopathology.Immunohistochemistry, qPCR and in situ hybridization were used to study a cohort of 24 healthy controls (HC and 24 patients with diagnosed acute celiac disease (A-CD intestinal biopsies. In A-CD we observed an increase in cells positive for Leucin-rich repeat-containing G protein-coupled receptor 5 (LGR5, an epithelial stem cell specific marker and expansion of WNT responding compartment. Further, we observed alteration in number and distribution of mesenchymal cells, predicted to be part of the intestinal stem cells niche. At the molecular level we found downregulation of indian hedgehog (IHH and other components of the Hh pathway, but we did not observe a concurrent downregulation of BMP4. However, we observed upregulation of BMPs antagonists, gremlin 1 and gremlin 2.Our data suggest that acute CD histopathology partially recapitulates the phenotype reported in Hh knockdown models. Specifically, Hh/BMP4 paradigm appears to be decoupled in CD, as the expansion of the immature cell population does not occur consequent to downregulation of BMP4. Instead, we provide evidence that upregulation of BMP antagonists play a key role in intestinal crypt hyperplasia. This study sheds light on the molecular mechanisms underlying CD histopathology and the limitations in the use of mouse models for celiac disease.

  18. Report on the 1. research coordination meeting on 'Development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on 177Lu for radionuclide therapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    far away from the production site. Patients suffering from breast, lung and prostate cancer develop metastasis in bone in the advanced stage of their diseases and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals such as 153 Sm-EDTMP and 89 SrCl2 are used effectively for pain palliation due to skeletal metastases. Despite the fact that the above bone pain palliating agents give good clinical results; their wider use has met with practical difficulties. Though 153 Sm can be prepared in adequate quantities in medium flux reactors, its short half life (47 h) is the major disadvantage. It is essential to handle large quantities of activity to compensate for decay losses, during production and delivery of the radiopharmaceutical. In the case of 89 Sr, there is very limited capacity for production due to the very low cross section making this product expensive and unaffordable for many patients. It is expected that a 177 Lu based bone palliating agent will offer the same clinical efficacy without the disadvantages mentioned above. Currently there is good published data available on the production of 177 Lu and the preparation of phosphonates based radiopharmaceuticals which show high bone uptake. 177 Lu produced in the low to medium flux research reactors available in the MS can be used for bone pain palliation. High specific activity 177 Lu that is prepared in high flux research reactors is needed for radiolabelling antibodies and peptides. These antibodies introduced to patients alone or in conjunction with 90 Y products are showing promising results in clinical trials. Large quantities of high specific activity 177 Lu can be prepared by irradiating enriched targets in high flux research reactors and hence, in the long term the cost of high specific activity 177 Lu should come down to reasonable levels. The wider availability of 177 Lu will make it feasible for the production of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals with lower cost ensuring higher availability in MS. The CRP 'Development of

  19. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments

    OpenAIRE

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990’s when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine) receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and ...

  20. Metabolic Disorder, Inflammation, and Deregulated Molecular Pathways Converging in Pancreatic Cancer Development: Implications for New Therapeutic Strategies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Motoo, Yoshiharu, E-mail: motoo@kanazawa-med.ac.jp [Department of Medical Oncology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Shimasaki, Takeo [Department of Medical Oncology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Division of Translational & Clinical Oncology, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan); Ishigaki, Yasuhito [Medical Research Institute, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Nakajima, Hideo [Department of Medical Oncology, Kanazawa Medical University, 1-1 Daigaku, Uchinada, Ishikawa 920-0293 (Japan); Kawakami, Kazuyuki; Minamoto, Toshinari [Division of Translational & Clinical Oncology, Cancer Research Institute, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa (Japan)

    2011-01-24

    Pancreatic cancer develops and progresses through complex, cumulative biological processes involving metabolic disorder, local inflammation, and deregulated molecular pathways. The resulting tumor aggressiveness hampers surgical intervention and renders pancreatic cancer resistant to standard chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Based on these pathologic properties, several therapeutic strategies are being developed to reverse refractory pancreatic cancer. Here, we outline molecular targeting therapies, which are primarily directed against growth factor receptor-type tyrosine kinases deregulated in tumors, but have failed to improve the survival of pancreatic cancer patients. Glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) is a member of a serine/threonine protein kinase family that plays a critical role in various cellular pathways. GSK3β has also emerged as a mediator of pathological states, including glucose intolerance, inflammation, and various cancers (e.g., pancreatic cancer). We review recent studies that demonstrate the anti-tumor effects of GSK3β inhibition alone or in combination with chemotherapy and radiation. GSK3β inhibition may exert indirect anti-tumor actions in pancreatic cancer by modulating metabolic disorder and inflammation.

  1. Preclinical Development of a Subcutaneous ALAS1 RNAi Therapeutic for Treatment of Hepatic Porphyrias Using Circulating RNA Quantification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy Chan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The acute hepatic porphyrias are caused by inherited enzymatic deficiencies in the heme biosynthesis pathway. Induction of the first enzyme 5-aminolevulinic acid synthase 1 (ALAS1 by triggers such as fasting or drug exposure can lead to accumulation of neurotoxic heme intermediates that cause disease symptoms. We have demonstrated that hepatic ALAS1 silencing using siRNA in a lipid nanoparticle effectively prevents and treats induced attacks in a mouse model of acute intermittent porphyria. Herein, we report the development of ALN-AS1, an investigational GalNAc-conjugated RNAi therapeutic targeting ALAS1. One challenge in advancing ALN-AS1 to patients is the inability to detect liver ALAS1 mRNA in the absence of liver biopsies. We here describe a less invasive circulating extracellular RNA detection assay to monitor RNAi drug activity in serum and urine. A striking correlation in ALAS1 mRNA was observed across liver, serum, and urine in both rodents and nonhuman primates (NHPs following treatment with ALN-AS1. Moreover, in donor-matched human urine and serum, we demonstrate a notable correspondence in ALAS1 levels, minimal interday assay variability, low interpatient variability from serial sample collections, and the ability to distinguish between healthy volunteers and porphyria patients with induced ALAS1 levels. The collective data highlight the potential utility of this assay in the clinical development of ALN-AS1, and in broadening our understanding of acute hepatic porphyrias disease pathophysiology.

  2. The PRRT2 knockout mouse recapitulates the neurological diseases associated with PRRT2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michetti, Caterina; Castroflorio, Enrico; Marchionni, Ivan; Forte, Nicola; Sterlini, Bruno; Binda, Francesca; Fruscione, Floriana; Baldelli, Pietro; Valtorta, Flavia; Zara, Federico; Corradi, Anna; Benfenati, Fabio

    2017-03-01

    Heterozygous and rare homozygous mutations in PRoline-Rich Transmembrane protein 2 (PRRT2) underlie a group of paroxysmal disorders including epilepsy, kinesigenic dyskinesia episodic ataxia and migraine. Most of the mutations lead to impaired PRRT2 expression and/or function. Recently, an important role for PRTT2 in the neurotransmitter release machinery, brain development and synapse formation has been uncovered. In this work, we have characterized the phenotype of a mouse in which the PRRT2 gene has been constitutively inactivated (PRRT2 KO). β-galactosidase staining allowed to map the regional expression of PRRT2 that was more intense in the cerebellum, hindbrain and spinal cord, while it was localized to restricted areas in the forebrain. PRRT2 KO mice are normal at birth, but display paroxysmal movements at the onset of locomotion that persist in the adulthood. In addition, adult PRRT2 KO mice present abnormal motor behaviors characterized by wild running and jumping in response to audiogenic stimuli that are ineffective in wild type mice and an increased sensitivity to the convulsive effects of pentylentetrazol. Patch-clamp electrophysiology in hippocampal and cerebellar slices revealed specific effects in the cerebellum, where PRRT2 is highly expressed, consisting in a higher excitatory strength at parallel fiber-Purkinje cell synapses during high frequency stimulation. The results show that the PRRT2 KO mouse reproduces the motor paroxysms present in the human PRRT2-linked pathology and can be proposed as an experimental model for the study of the pathogenesis of the disease as well as for testing personalized therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Recapitulating the clinical scenario of BRCA-associated pancreatic cancer in pre-clinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golan, Talia; Stossel, Chani; Atias, Dikla; Buzhor, Ella; Halperin, Sharon; Cohen, Keren; Raitses-Gurevich, Maria; Glick, Yulia; Raskin, Stephen; Yehuda, Daniel; Feldman, Anna; Schvimer, Michael; Friedman, Eitan; Karni, Rotem; Wilson, Julie M; Denroche, Robert E; Lungu, Ilinca; Bartlett, John M S; Mbabaali, Faridah; Gallinger, Steven; Berger, Raanan

    2018-02-03

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is one of the most lethal malignancies. BRCA-associated PDAC comprises a clinically relevant subtype. A portion of these patients are highly susceptible to DNA damaging therapeutics, however, responses are heterogeneous and clinical resistance evolves. We have developed unique patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models from metastatic lesions of germline BRCA-mutated patients obtained at distinct time points; before treatment and at progression. Thus, closely mimicking clinical scenarios, to further investigate treatment naïve and resistant patients. DNA was isolated from six BRCA-mutated PDXs and classified by whole-genome sequencing to stable-genome or homologous recombination deficient (HRD)-genome. The sensitivity to DNA-damaging agents was evaluated in vivo in three BRCA-associated PDAC PDXs models: (1) HRD-genome naïve to treatments; (2) stable-genome naïve to treatment; (3) HRD-genome resistant to treatment. Correlation between disease course at tissue acquisition and response to PARP inhibitor (PARPi)/platinum was demonstrated in PDXs in vivo. Only the HRD-genome PDX, naïve to treatment, was sensitive to PARP inhibitor/cisplatin treatments. Our results demonstrate heterogeneous responses to DNA damaging agents/PARPi in BRCA-associated PDX thus reflecting the wide clinical spectrum. An HRD-genome PDX generated from a naïve to treatment biopsy was sensitive to platinum/PARPi whereas no benefit was observed in treating a HRD-genome PDXs generated from a patient that had acquired resistance nor stable-genome PDXs. © 2018 UICC.

  4. [PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway: Description, therapeutic development, resistance, predictive/prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic applications for cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brotelle, Thibault; Bay, Jacques-Olivier

    2016-01-01

    Among many cancer cells signaling pathways, PI3K-AKT-mTOR plays a major role in growth, proliferation and cellular survival. This is a complex pathway activated either by an extracellular way (receptors with tyrosine kinase activity) or by an intracellular way with transformed or overexpressed proteins involved in the signal transduction. To date, there are many applications of mTOR inhibitors in oncology with an expanding development rapidly. However, resistances appear to mTOR inhibitors which lead to 2nd generation mTOR inhibitors development. A better knowledge of predictive and prognostic biomarkers will allow to specify the group of patients who may benefit from these treatments and help to the choice. Copyright © 2015 Société Française du Cancer. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Genetic inactivation of glutamate neurons in the rat sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus recapitulates REM sleep behaviour disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valencia Garcia, Sara; Libourel, Paul-Antoine; Lazarus, Michael; Grassi, Daniela; Luppi, Pierre-Hervé; Fort, Patrice

    2017-02-01

    SEE SCHENCK AND MAHOWALD DOI101093/AWW329 FOR A SCIENTIFIC COMMENTARY ON THIS ARTICLE: Idiopathic REM sleep behaviour disorder is characterized by the enactment of violent dreams during paradoxical (REM) sleep in the absence of normal muscle atonia. Accumulating clinical and experimental data suggest that REM sleep behaviour disorder might be due to the neurodegeneration of glutamate neurons involved in paradoxical sleep and located within the pontine sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus. The purpose of the present work was thus to functionally determine first, the role of glutamate sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons in paradoxical sleep and second, whether their genetic inactivation is sufficient for recapitulating REM sleep behaviour disorder in rats. For this goal, we first injected two retrograde tracers in the intralaminar thalamus and ventral medulla to disentangle neuronal circuits in which sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus is involved; second we infused bilaterally in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus adeno-associated viruses carrying short hairpin RNAs targeting Slc17a6 mRNA [which encodes vesicular glutamate transporter 2 (vGluT2)] to chronically impair glutamate synaptic transmission in sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons. At the neuroanatomical level, sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons specifically activated during paradoxical sleep hypersomnia send descending efferents to glycine/GABA neurons within the ventral medulla, but not ascending projections to the intralaminar thalamus. These data suggest a crucial role of sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus neurons rather in muscle atonia than in paradoxical sleep generation. In line with this hypothesis, 30 days after adeno-associated virus injections into sublaterodorsal tegmental nucleus rats display a decrease of 30% of paradoxical sleep daily quantities, and a significant increase of muscle tone during paradoxical sleep concomitant to a tremendous increase of abnormal motor dream

  6. Role of Immune Escape Mechanisms in Hodgkin's Lymphoma Development and Progression: A Whole New World with Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis de la Cruz-Merino

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Hodgkin's lymphoma represents one of the most frequent lymphoproliferative syndromes, especially in young population. Although HL is considered one of the most curable tumors, a sizeable fraction of patients recur after successful upfront treatment or, less commonly, are primarily resistant. This work tries to summarize the data on clinical, histological, pathological, and biological factors in HL, with special emphasis on the improvement of prognosis and their impact on therapeutical strategies. The recent advances in our understanding of HL biology and immunology show that infiltrated immune cells and cytokines in the tumoral microenvironment may play different functions that seem tightly related with clinical outcomes. Strategies aimed at interfering with the crosstalk between tumoral Reed-Sternberg cells and their cellular partners have been taken into account in the development of new immunotherapies that target different cell components of HL microenvironment. This new knowledge will probably translate into a change in the antineoplastic treatments in HL in the next future and hopefully will increase the curability rates of this disease.

  7. The Therapeutic Aspects of the Endocannabinoid System (ECS) for Cancer and their Development: From Nature to Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohammed I; Sobocińska, Anna A; Czarnecka, Anna M; Król, Magdalena; Botta, Bruno; Szczylik, Cezary

    2016-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is a group of neuromodulatory lipids and their receptors, which are widely distributed in mammalian tissues. ECS regulates various cardiovascular, nervous, and immune system functions inside cells. In recent years, there has been a growing body of evidence for the use of synthetic and natural cannabinoids as potential anticancer agents. For instance, the CB1 and CB2 receptors are assumed to play an important role inside the endocannabinoid system. These receptors are abundantly expressed in the brain and fatty tissue of the human body. Despite recent developments in molecular biology, there is still a lack of knowledge about the distribution of CB1 and CB2 receptors in the human kidney and their role in kidney cancer. To address this gap, we explore and demonstrate the role of the endocannabinoid system in renal cell carcinoma (RCC). In this brief overview, we elucidate the therapeutic aspects of the endocannabinoid system for various cancers and explain how this system can be used for treating kidney cancer. Overall, this review provides new insights into cannabinoids' mechanisms of action in both in vivo and in vitro models, and focuses on recent discoveries in the field.

  8. A New Preclinical Paradigm for Testing Anti-Aging Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ladiges, Warren; Snyder, Jessica M; Wilkinson, Erby; Imai, Denise M; Snider, Tim; Ge, Xuan; Ciol, Marcia; Pettan-Brewer, Christina; Pillai, Smitha P S; Morton, John; Quarles, Ellen; Rabinovitch, Peter; Niedernhofer, Laura; Liggitt, Denny

    2017-06-01

    Testing drugs for anti-aging effects has historically been conducted in mouse life-span studies, but are costly and time consuming, and more importantly, difficult to recapitulate in humans. In addition, life-span studies in mice are not well suited to testing drug combinations that target multiple factors involved in aging. Additional paradigms for testing therapeutics aimed at slowing aging are needed. A new paradigm, designated as the Geropathology Grading Platform (GGP), is based on a standardized set of guidelines developed to detect the presence or absence of low-impact histopathological lesions and to determine the level of severity of high-impact lesions in organs from aged mice. The GGP generates a numerical score for each age-related lesion in an organ, summed for total lesions, and averaged over multiple mice to obtain a composite lesion score (CLS). Preliminary studies show that the platform generates CLSs that increase with the age of mice in an organ-dependent manner. The CLSs are sensitive enough to detect changes elicited by interventions that extend mouse life span, and thus help validate the GGP as a novel tool to measure biological aging. While currently optimized for mice, the GGP could be adapted to any preclinical animal model. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Characteristics and development of therapeutic patient education in rheumatoid arthritis: analysis of the 2003-2008 literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albano, Maria Grazia; Giraudet-Le Quintrec, Janine-Sophie; Crozet, Cyril; d'Ivernois, Jean-François

    2010-10-01

    The aim of this study is to point out the recent characteristics and developments of therapeutic patient education (TPE) in rheumatoid arthritis through an analysis of the international articles published from 2003 to 2008. Studies were selected from major databases, using the following keywords: rheumatoid arthritis, patient education, self-management, programs. Three authors independently reviewed each study and selected the data using the patient education research categories (PERC). Articles consistently related to patient education in rheumatoid arthritis (37 among 109) were included. The selected articles have been published in 23 scientific journals. The majority of them concern TPE for adult patients with rheumatoid arthritis. TPE is delivered in several structures and group education represents the most widespread educational strategy mainly provided by a multiprofessional team. There are two types of programs: educational, aiming to make the patient competent in the daily management of his disease and psycho-educational ones, aiming to improve coping and to decrease stress, anxiety and depression. Twenty-eight studies show the effectiveness of TPE on the basis of bio-clinical, educational, psychosocial, economical criteria, but the majority of these positive results are observed in short-term. Barriers to TPE are linked to cultural and socio-economic factors. A large number of studies still assess the positive effects of TPE. Nowadays, the problems of short-term efficacy of TPE and the cultural and social barriers to this practice have become a major issue for research. Copyright © 2010 Société française de rhumatologie. Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. The TREAT-NMD advisory committee for therapeutics (TACT): an innovative de-risking model to foster orphan drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heslop, Emma; Csimma, Cristina; Straub, Volker; McCall, John; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Wagner, Kathryn R; Caizergues, Didier; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Flanigan, Kevin M; Kaufmann, Petra; McNeil, Elizabeth; Mendell, Jerry; Hesterlee, Sharon; Wells, Dominic J; Bushby, Kate

    2015-04-23

    Despite multiple publications on potential therapies for neuromuscular diseases (NMD) in cell and animal models only a handful reach clinical trials. The ability to prioritise drug development according to objective criteria is particularly critical in rare diseases with large unmet needs and a limited numbers of patients who can be enrolled into clinical trials. TREAT-NMD Advisory Committee for Therapeutics (TACT) was established to provide independent and objective guidance on the preclinical and development pathway of potential therapies (whether novel or repurposed) for NMD.We present our experience in the establishment and operation of the TACT. TACT provides a unique resource of recognized experts from multiple disciplines. The goal of each TACT review is to help the sponsor to position the candidate compound along a realistic and well-informed plan to clinical trials, and eventual registration. The reviews and subsequent recommendations are focused on generating meaningful and rigorous data that can enable clear go/no-go decisions and facilitate longer term funding or partnering opportunities. The review process thereby acts to comment on viability, de-risking the process of proceeding on a development programme.To date TACT has held 10 review meeting and reviewed 29 program applications in several rare neuromuscular diseases: Of the 29 programs reviewed, 19 were from industry and 10 were from academia; 15 were for novel compounds and 14 were for repurposed drugs; 16 were small molecules and 13 were biologics; 14 were preclinical stage applications and 15 were clinical stage applications. 3 had received Orphan drug designation from European Medicines Agency and 3 from Food and Drug Administration. A number of recurrent themes emerged over the course of the reviews and we found that applicants frequently require advice and education on issues concerned with preclinical standard operating procedures, interactions with regulatory agencies, formulation

  11. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  12. Therapeutic Gardening

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Phyllis; Fox, Laurie; Parkhurst, James A. (James Albert)

    2013-01-01

    Gardening can be therapeutic for anyone and has been used as therapy for those with physical, emotional and social disabilities, for children, and for those who are elderly. Through careful adaptations to the garden, the gardener and the plants, almost anyone can benefit from the activity of gardening

  13. Developing a Therapeutic Range of Adalimumab Serum Concentrations in Management of Psoriasis: A Step Toward Personalized Treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Menting, Stef P.; Coussens, Emma; Pouw, Mieke F.; van den Reek, Juul M. P. A.; Temmerman, Linda; Boonen, Hugo; de Jong, Elke M. G. J.; Spuls, Phyllis I.; Lambert, Jo

    2015-01-01

    Adalimumab has proven to be effective in suppressing psoriasis disease activity and is administered in a standard dose. To establish a therapeutic range for adalimumab trough levels in the treatment of plaque-type psoriasis, leading to a more personalized treatment. A multicenter, prospective,

  14. Understanding the importance of therapeutic relationships in the development of self-management behaviours during cancer rehabilitation: a qualitative research protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Wendy M; Rance, Jaynie; Fitzsimmons, Deborah

    2017-01-17

    Cancer is a growing health, social and economic problem. 1 in 3 people in the UK will develop cancer in their lifetime. With survival rates rising to over 50%, the long-term needs of cancer survivors are of growing importance. Cancer rehabilitation is tailored to address the physical or psychosocial decline in ability to engage in daily activities. Its use is supported by high-quality international, multicentre research. Incorporating strategies for self-management behaviour development into rehabilitation can prepare individuals for cancer survivorship. However, healthcare professionals will need to adjust their therapeutic interactions accordingly. Research is yet to clarify the impact of the therapeutic relationship on rehabilitation outcomes in cancer. This study aims to explore the impact of therapeutic relationships on self-management behaviours after cancer. This qualitative study aims to understand cancer rehabilitation participants' beliefs regarding the importance of therapeutic relationships in developing self-management behaviours. A sample representative of a local cancer rehabilitation cohort will be asked to complete a semistructured interview to identify their perspectives on the importance of therapeutic relationships in cancer rehabilitation. Data obtained from the interviews will be analysed, coded and entered into a Delphi questionnaire for circulation to a local cancer rehabilitation population to determine if the views expressed by the interviewees are supported by group consensus. This study was approved by Wales Research Ethics Committee 6 (15/WA/0331) in April 2016. Findings will be disseminated through the first author's doctoral thesis; peer-reviewed journals; local, national and international conference presentations; and public events involving research participants and the general public. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  15. New weapons to penetrate the armor: Novel reagents and assays developed at the NCI RAS Initiative to enable discovery of RAS therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esposito, Dominic; Stephen, Andrew G; Turbyville, Thomas J; Holderfield, Matthew

    2018-02-09

    Development of therapeutic strategies against RAS-driven cancers has been challenging due in part to a lack of understanding of the biology of the system and the ability to design appropriate assays and reagents for targeted drug discovery efforts. Recent developments in the field have opened up new avenues for exploration both through advances in the number and quality of reagents as well as the introduction of novel biochemical and cell-based assay technologies which can be used for high-throughput screening of compound libraries. The reagents and assays developed at the NCI RAS Initiative offer a suite of new weapons that could potentially be used to enable the next generation of RAS drug discovery efforts with the hope of finding novel therapeutics for a target once deemed undruggable. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. The pig as a model for therapeutic human anti-cancer vaccine development, elucidating the T-cell reactivity against IDO and RhoC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Welner, Simon

    Immunotherapy against cancer has shown increased overall survival of metastatic cancer patients and is a promising new vaccine target. For this to succeed, appropriate tailoring of vaccine formulations to mount in vivo cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses towards co-delivered cancer antigens...... is important. Previous development of therapeutic cancer vaccines has largely been based on studies in mice and the majority of these candidate vaccines failed to establish therapeutic responses in subsequent human clinical trials. Since the porcine immunome is more closely related to the human counterpart, we...... here introduce pigs as a superior large animal model for human cancer vaccine development via the use of our unique technology for swine leukocyte antigen (SLA) production. IDO and RhoC, both known to be important in human cancer development and progression, were used as vaccine targets. Pigs were...

  17. A zebrafish model of X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy recapitulates key disease features and demonstrates a developmental requirement for abcd1 in oligodendrocyte patterning and myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strachan, Lauren R; Stevenson, Tamara J; Freshner, Briana; Keefe, Matthew D; Miranda Bowles, D; Bonkowsky, Joshua L

    2017-09-15

    X-linked adrenoleukodystrophy (ALD) is a devastating inherited neurodegenerative disease caused by defects in the ABCD1 gene and affecting peripheral and central nervous system myelin. ABCD1 encodes a peroxisomal transmembrane protein required for very long chain fatty acid (VLCFA) metabolism. We show that zebrafish (Danio rerio) Abcd1 is highly conserved at the amino acid level with human ABCD1, and during development is expressed in homologous regions including the central nervous system and adrenal glands. We used TALENs to generate five zebrafish abcd1 mutant allele lines introducing premature stop codons in exon 1, as well as obtained an abcd1 allele from the Zebrafish Mutation Project carrying a point mutation in a splice donor site. Similar to patients with ALD, zebrafish abcd1 mutants have elevated VLCFA levels. Interestingly, we found that CNS development of the abcd1 mutants is disrupted, with hypomyelination in the spinal cord, abnormal patterning and decreased numbers of oligodendrocytes, and increased cell death. By day of life five abcd1 mutants demonstrate impaired motor function, and overall survival to adulthood of heterozygous and homozygous mutants is decreased. Expression of human ABCD1 in oligodendrocytes rescued apoptosis in the abcd1 mutant. In summary, we have established a zebrafish model of ALD that recapitulates key features of human disease pathology and which reveals novel features of underlying disease pathogenesis. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Developing Novel Therapeutic Approaches in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Using Genetically Engineered Mouse Models and Human Circulating Tumor Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    drug sen- sitivity in cancer cells. Nature 483(7391):570–575. 14. Adams JM, et al. (2005) Subversion of the Bcl-2 life/death switch in cancer de ...SCLC (N=15) other solid tumors (N=229) P= 0.001 Faber et al. Sup. Figure 3 # Cancer type 1 biliary tract 2 bladder 3 breast 4 cervix 5...lung cancer (SCLC), Genetically engineered mouse model (GEMM), BH3 mimetic, TORC inhibitor, Apoptosis, Preclinical therapeutics 16. SECURITY

  19. Development and application of anticancer fluorescent CdS nanoparticles enriched Lactobacillus bacteria as therapeutic microbots for human breast carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, Ritu; Das, Surajit

    2017-07-01

    Applications of probiotic bacteria and nanoparticles (NPs) as therapeutic agents have great importance. This study demonstrates a combinatorial approach of both the probiotic Lactobacillus spp. (Lactobacillus fermentum and Lactobacillus plantarum) with fluorescent cadmium sulfide (CdS) NPs as therapeutic agents to target MCF-7 cancer cells (human breast cancer cells). In this study, facultative anaerobic Lactobacillus was successfully used as a vehicle to transport NPs into MCF-7 cancer cells. The cell viability assay and invasion study along with confocal and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) confirmed the release of payload (CdS NPs) into cytoplasm without any external stimuli. The biosynthesized CdS NPs of ∼22 nm were characterized by FESEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and fluorescence spectroscopy. The bacteria-NPs (microbots) interaction was investigated by growth curve studies, attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR), FESEM, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), and fluorescence and confocal microscopy. This alternative approach showed an approved and inexpensive delivering mode of specific functional cargos or therapeutic agents into the cancer cells.

  20. Development of a Novel BAFF Responsive Cell Line Suitable for Detecting Bioactive BAFF and Neutralizing Antibodies against BAFF-Pathway Inhibiting Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jenny; Yu, Yanbin; Han, Hong; Civoli, Francesca; Zhuang, Yao; Thomas, John; Swanson, Steve; Jing, Shuqian; Gupta, Shalini

    2014-01-01

    BAFF has a critical role in B-cell survival, maturation and function, which makes its pathway a prime therapeutic target for various autoimmune diseases, such as systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), rheumatoid arthritis and Sjögren’s syndrome. A cell-based assay that measures the functional activity of BAFF is required for many high throughput purposes, such as lead target screening and BAFF quantification. We report here the development of a sensitive BAFF responsive cell line via stable tra...

  1. A novel mouse model identifies cooperating mutations and therapeutic targets critical for chronic myeloid leukemia progression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giotopoulos, George; van der Weyden, Louise; Osaki, Hikari; Rust, Alistair G.; Gallipoli, Paolo; Meduri, Eshwar; Horton, Sarah J.; Chan, Wai-In; Foster, Donna; Prinjha, Rab K.; Pimanda, John E.; Tenen, Daniel G.; Vassiliou, George S.; Koschmieder, Steffen; Adams, David J.

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of highly selective ABL-tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has revolutionized therapy for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). However, TKIs are only efficacious in the chronic phase of the disease and effective therapies for TKI-refractory CML, or after progression to blast crisis (BC), are lacking. Whereas the chronic phase of CML is dependent on BCR-ABL, additional mutations are required for progression to BC. However, the identity of these mutations and the pathways they affect are poorly understood, hampering our ability to identify therapeutic targets and improve outcomes. Here, we describe a novel mouse model that allows identification of mechanisms of BC progression in an unbiased and tractable manner, using transposon-based insertional mutagenesis on the background of chronic phase CML. Our BC model is the first to faithfully recapitulate the phenotype, cellular and molecular biology of human CML progression. We report a heterogeneous and unique pattern of insertions identifying known and novel candidate genes and demonstrate that these pathways drive disease progression and provide potential targets for novel therapeutic strategies. Our model greatly informs the biology of CML progression and provides a potent resource for the development of candidate therapies to improve the dismal outcomes in this highly aggressive disease. PMID:26304963

  2. Engineered three-dimensional multicellular culture model to recapitulate morphogenetic fusion using human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tissue fusion during early mammalian development requires crosstalk between multiple cell types. For example, paracrine signaling between palatal epithelial cells and palatal mesenchyme mediates the fusion of opposing palatal shelves during embryonic development. Fusion events in...

  3. Recapitulation of the cellular xeroderma pigmentosum-variant phenotypes using short interfering RNA for DNA polymerase H.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laposa, Rebecca R; Feeney, Luzviminda; Cleaver, James E

    2003-07-15

    The lesion-specific DNA polymerase POLH gene is mutated in xeroderma pigmentosum variant (XP-V) patients who exhibit an increased skin cancer incidence from UV exposure. Normal cells in which POLH expression was reduced using short interfering RNAs (siRNAs) were compared with the XP-V cellular phenotype that results from naturally occurring inactivating mutations. Stable clones expressing siRNA had partially reduced POLH protein levels, and intermediate levels of UV sensitivity and S phase checkpoint activation, but similar levels of Mre11 foci as in XP-V cells. Therefore, suppression of POLH expression levels by siRNA recapitulates most of the phenotypes seen in cells from XP-V patients with inactivating mutations in POLH.

  4. Report on the 2nd Research Coordination Meeting on The Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on 188Re and 90Y for Radionuclide. Working Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy is practiced for the treatment of malignant disorders of various organs and tissues as well as for treating certain other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Advances in understanding tumor biology as well as developments in peptide chemistry and monoclonal antibody technology are opening new opportunities for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, thereby widening the scope of radionuclide therapy. In addition, particulate based radiopharmaceuticals are useful for treating hepatocarcinoma as well as in radiation synovectomy. With the establishment of new products the demand and application of therapeutic nuclear medicine is expected to grow rapidly. While there are a large number of radioisotopes proposed for targeted therapy, practical considerations had been limiting the number of usable isotopes. Generator-produced radionuclides are an attractive option for the large scale on-site availability of therapeutic isotopes. The IAEA’s CRP on the ‘Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides’ (2004-2007) was successful in developing technologies for the preparation of 188 W/ 188 Re and 90 Sr/ 90 Y generators for eluting 188 Re and 90 Y of high radionuclidic and chemical purity usable for research applications in the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. The IAEA’s CRP on ‘The development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on 188 Re and 90 Y for radionuclide therapy’ was formulated to focus on enhancing the capacity of the 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator; to develop and validate quality control methods for the generator eluate; and to develop therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on 188 Re and 90 Y. The first RCM of the CRP was held in Polatom, Warsaw, Poland from 30 June to 4 July 2008. The meeting reviewed the work going on in the different participating laboratories, and the facilities, expertise and capabilities of the different participating groups, and formulated the work plan of

  5. Developing shared understandings of recovery and care: a qualitative study of women with eating disorders who resist therapeutic care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musolino, Connie; Warin, Megan; Wade, Tracey; Gilchrist, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper explores the differing perspectives of recovery and care of people with disordered eating. We consider the views of those who have not sought help for their disordered eating, or who have been given a diagnosis but have not engaged with health care services. Our aim is to demonstrate the importance of the cultural context of care and how this might shape people's perspectives of recovery and openness to receiving professional care. This study utilised a mixed methods approach of ethnographic fieldwork and psychological evaluation with 28 women from Adelaide, South Australia. Semi-structured interviews, observations, field notes and the Eating Disorder Examination were the primary forms of data collection. Data was analysed using thematic analysis. Participants in our study described how their disordered eating afforded them safety and were consistent with cultural values concerning healthy eating and gendered bodies. Disordered eating was viewed as a form of self-care, in which people protect and 'take care' of themselves. These subjectively experienced understandings of care underlie eating disorder behaviours and provide an obstacle in seeking any form of treatment that might lead to recovery. A shared understanding between patients and health professionals about the function of the eating disorder may avoid conflict and provide a pathway to treatment. These results suggest the construction of care by patients should not be taken for granted in therapeutic guidelines. A discussion considering how disordered eating practices are embedded in a matrix of care, health, eating and body practices may enhance the therapeutic relationship.

  6. A Novel Letrozole Model Recapitulates Both the Reproductive and Metabolic Phenotypes of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome in Female Mice1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kauffman, Alexander S.; Thackray, Varykina G.; Ryan, Genevieve E.; Tolson, Kristen P.; Glidewell-Kenney, Christine A.; Semaan, Sheila J.; Poling, Matthew C.; Iwata, Nahoko; Breen, Kellie M.; Duleba, Antoni J.; Stener-Victorin, Elisabet; Shimasaki, Shunichi; Webster, Nicholas J.; Mellon, Pamela L.

    2015-01-01

    Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) pathophysiology is poorly understood, due partly to lack of PCOS animal models fully recapitulating this complex disorder. Recently, a PCOS rat model using letrozole (LET), a nonsteroidal aromatase inhibitor, mimicked multiple PCOS phenotypes, including metabolic features absent in other models. Given the advantages of using genetic and transgenic mouse models, we investigated whether LET produces a similar PCOS phenotype in mice. Pubertal female C57BL/6N mice were treated for 5 wk with LET, which resulted in increased serum testosterone and normal diestrus levels of estradiol, similar to the hyperandrogenemia and follicular phase estrogen levels of PCOS women. As in PCOS, ovaries from LET mice were larger, polycystic, and lacked corpora lutea versus controls. Most LET females were acyclic, and all were infertile. LET females displayed elevated serum LH levels and higher Lhb mRNA in the pituitary. In contrast, serum FSH and Fshb were significantly reduced in LET females, demonstrating differential effects on gonadotropins, as in PCOS. Within the ovary, LET females had higher Cyp17, Cyp19, and Fsh receptor mRNA expression. In the hypothalamus, LET females had higher kisspeptin receptor mRNA expression but lower progesterone receptor mRNA levels. LET females also gained more weight than controls, had increased abdominal adiposity and adipocyte size, elevated adipose inflammatory mRNA levels, and impaired glucose tolerance, mirroring the metabolic phenotype in PCOS women. This is the first report of a LET paradigm in mice that recapitulates both reproductive and metabolic PCOS phenotypes and will be useful to genetically probe the PCOS condition. PMID:26203175

  7. Recapitulation of metabolic defects in a model of propionic acidemia using patient-derived primary hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Kimberly A; Collado, Maria S; Figler, Robert A; Hoang, Stephen A; Armstrong, Allison J; Cui, Wanxing; Purdy, Michael; Simmers, Michael B; Yazigi, Nada A; Summar, Marshall L; Wamhoff, Brian R; Dash, Ajit

    2016-03-01

    Propionic acidemia (PA) is a disorder of intermediary metabolism with defects in the alpha or beta subunits of propionyl CoA carboxylase (PCCA and PCCB respectively) enzyme. We previously described a liver culture system that uses liver-derived hemodynamic blood flow and transport parameters to restore and maintain primary human hepatocyte biology and metabolism utilizing physiologically relevant milieu concentrations. In this study, primary hepatocytes isolated from the explanted liver of an 8-year-old PA patient were cultured in the liver system for 10 days and evaluated for retention of differentiated polarized morphology. The expression of PCCA and PCCB was assessed at a gene and protein level relative to healthy donor controls. Ammonia and urea levels were measured in the presence and absence of amino acid supplements to assess the metabolic consequences of branched-chain amino acid metabolism in this disease. Primary hepatocytes from the PA patient maintained a differentiated polarized morphology (peripheral actin staining) over 10 days of culture in the system. We noted lower levels of PCCA and PCCB relative to normal healthy controls at the mRNA and protein level. Supplementation of branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine (5mM) and valine (5mM) in the medium, resulted in increased ammonia and decreased urea in the PA patient hepatocyte system, but no such response was seen in healthy hepatocytes or patient-derived fibroblasts. We demonstrate for the first time the successful culture of PA patient-derived primary hepatocytes in a differentiated state, that stably retain the PCCA and PCCB enzyme defects at a gene and protein level. Phenotypic response of the system to an increased load of branched-chain amino acids, not possible with fibroblasts, underscores the utility of this system in the better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of PA and examining the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents in the most relevant tissue. Copyright © 2015

  8. Recapitulation of metabolic defects in a model of propionic acidemia using patient-derived primary hepatocytes☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figler, Robert A.; Hoang, Stephen A.; Armstrong, Allison J.; Cui, Wanxing; Purdy, Michael; Simmers, Michael B.; Yazigi, Nada A.; Summar, Marshall L.; Wamhoff, Brian R.; Dash, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Background Propionic acidemia (PA) is a disorder of intermediary metabolism with defects in the alpha or beta subunits of propionyl CoA carboxylase (PCCA and PCCB respectively) enzyme. We previously described a liver culture system that uses liver-derived hemodynamic blood flow and transport parameters to restore and maintain primary human hepatocyte biology and metabolism utilizing physiologically relevant milieu concentrations. Methods In this study, primary hepatocytes isolated from the explanted liver of an 8-year-old PA patient were cultured in the liver system for 10 days and evaluated for retention of differentiated polarized morphology. The expression of PCCA and PCCB was assessed at a gene and protein level relative to healthy donor controls. Ammonia and urea levels were measured in the presence and absence of amino acid supplements to assess the metabolic consequences of branched-chain amino acid metabolism in this disease. Results Primary hepatocytes from the PA patient maintained a differentiated polarized morphology (peripheral actin staining) over 10 days of culture in the system. We noted lower levels of PCCA and PCCB relative to normal healthy controls at the mRNA and protein level. Supplementation of branched-chain amino acids, isoleucine (5 mM) and valine (5 mM) in the medium, resulted in increased ammonia and decreased urea in the PA patient hepatocyte system, but no such response was seen in healthy hepatocytes or patient-derived fibroblasts. Conclusions We demonstrate for the first time the successful culture of PA patient-derived primary hepatocytes in a differentiated state, that stably retain the PCCA and PCCB enzyme defects at a gene and protein level. Phenotypic response of the system to an increased load of branched-chain amino acids, not possible with fibroblasts, underscores the utility of this system in the better understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of PA and examining the effectiveness of potential therapeutic agents in the

  9. Interplay between the Hepatitis B Virus and Innate Immunity: From an Understanding to the Development of Therapeutic Concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faure-Dupuy, Suzanne; Lucifora, Julie; Durantel, David

    2017-04-28

    The hepatitis B virus (HBV) infects hepatocytes, which are the main cell type composing a human liver. However, the liver is enriched with immune cells, particularly innate cells (e.g., myeloid cells, natural killer and natural killer T-cells (NK/NKT), dendritic cells (DCs)), in resting condition. Hence, the study of the interaction between HBV and innate immune cells is instrumental to: (1) better understand the conditions of establishment and maintenance of HBV infections in this secondary lymphoid organ; (2) define the role of these innate immune cells in treatment failure and pathogenesis; and (3) design novel immune-therapeutic concepts based on the activation/restoration of innate cell functions and/or innate effectors. This review will summarize and discuss the current knowledge we have on this interplay between HBV and liver innate immunity.

  10. Developing better mouse models to study cisplatin-induced kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Cierra N; Siskind, Leah J

    2017-10-01

    Cisplatin is a potent chemotherapeutic used for the treatment of many types of cancer. However, its dose-limiting side effect is nephrotoxicity leading to acute kidney injury (AKI). Patients who develop AKI have an increased risk of mortality and are more likely to develop chronic kidney disease (CKD). Unfortunately, there are no therapeutic interventions for the treatment of AKI. It has been suggested that the lack of therapies is due in part to the fact that the established mouse model used to study cisplatin-induced AKI does not recapitulate the cisplatin dosing regimen patients receive. In recent years, work has been done to develop more clinically relevant models of cisplatin-induced kidney injury, with much work focusing on incorporation of multiple low doses of cisplatin administered over a period of weeks. These models can be used to recapitulate the development of CKD after AKI and, by doing so, increase the likelihood of identifying novel therapeutic targets for the treatment of cisplatin-induced kidney injury. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  11. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...... garnered a great deal of interest due to the substantial room for improvement inherent to conventional chemotherapeutic agents. Chemotherapeutic agents and antiviral agents have a lot of features in common due to both of them typically targeting endogenous targets, unlike antibacterial compounds, though...... the examples of polymer therapeutics being applied as an antiviral treatment are few and far in-between. This work aims to explore antiviral therapeutics, specifically in context of hepatitis virus C (HCV) and HIV. The current treatment of hepatitis C consists of a combination of drugs, of which ribavirin...

  12. Oncopig soft-tissue sarcomas recapitulate key transcriptional features of human sarcomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schachtschneider, Kyle M.; Liu, Yingkai; Makelainen, Suvi; Madsen, Ole; Rund, Laurie A.; Groenen, Martien A.M.; Schook, Lawrence B.

    2017-01-01

    Human soft-tissue sarcomas (STS) are rare mesenchymal tumors with a 5-year survival rate of 50%, highlighting the need for further STS research. Research has been hampered by limited human sarcoma cell line availability and the large number of STS subtypes, making development of STS cell lines

  13. The Same Fish: Creating Space for Therapeutic Relationships, Play, and Development in a School for Children with Special Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alston, Richard; Sosland, Rachel; Tuohy, Anne; Weiler, Nori Anna; Zeitlin, Diane

    2015-01-01

    This paper represents and attempts to describe psychoanalytically informed work applied in a school setting with children with special needs. While many therapists at the Parkside School are trained in analytic techniques and principles, these ideas have not traditionally been applied to children with language-based learning difficulties. Over the years, we have found that analytic ideas such as transference, countertransference, projective identification, containment, and attachment are especially salient to our understanding of these very complex children. Despite being in a school--a nontraditional setting for psychoanalysis--children are seen in individual and group therapy, often more than once a week. We believe that therapeutic relationships and play (sometimes bringing a child to a place of being able to play) are especially mutative with children with language-based learning challenges. Play and relationship provide a holding environment that, over time, allows for the reorganization of a child's often immature developmental capacities into a sense of agency that captures more clearly a child's innate potential. This article includes case studies of children with complex language-based learning difficulties, including autism spectrum disorders.

  14. Fate bias during neural regeneration adjusts dynamically without recapitulating developmental fate progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng Chi Kei, Jeremy; Currie, Peter David; Jusuf, Patricia Regina

    2017-07-13

    Regeneration of neurons in the central nervous system is poor in humans. In other vertebrates neural regeneration does occur efficiently and involves reactivation of developmental processes. Within the neural retina of zebrafish, Müller glia are the main stem cell source and are capable of generating progenitors to replace lost neurons after injury. However, it remains largely unknown to what extent Müller glia and neuron differentiation mirror development. Following neural ablation in the zebrafish retina, dividing cells were tracked using a prolonged labelling technique. We investigated to what extent extrinsic feedback influences fate choices in two injury models, and whether fate specification follows the histogenic order observed in development. By comparing two injury paradigms that affect different subpopulations of neurons, we found a dynamic adaptability of fate choices during regeneration. Both injuries followed a similar time course of cell death, and activated Müller glia proliferation. However, these newly generated cells were initially biased towards replacing specifically the ablated cell types, and subsequently generating all cell types as the appropriate neuron proportions became re-established. This dynamic behaviour has implications for shaping regenerative processes and ensuring restoration of appropriate proportions of neuron types regardless of injury or cell type lost. Our findings suggest that regenerative fate processes are more flexible than development processes. Compared to development fate specification we observed a disruption in stereotypical birth order of neurons during regeneration Understanding such feedback systems can allow us to direct regenerative fate specification in injury and diseases to regenerate specific neuron types in vivo.

  15. Development of oral agent in the treatment of multiple sclerosis: how the first available oral therapy, Fingolimod will change therapeutic paradigm approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gasperini C

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Claudio Gasperini,1 Serena Ruggieri21Department of Neurosciences, S Camillo Forlanini Hospital, 2Department of Neurology and Psychiatry, University of Rome “Sapienza,” Rome, ItalyAbstract: Multiple sclerosis (MS is a chronic inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system, traditionally considered to be an autoimmune, demyelinating disease. Based on this understanding, the initial therapeutic strategies were directed at immune modulation and inflammation control. At present, there are five licensed first-line disease-modifying drugs and two second-line treatments in MS. Currently available MS therapies have shown significant efficacy throughout many trials, but they produce different side-effect profiles in patients. Since they are well known and safe, they require regular and frequent parenteral administration and are associated with limited long-term treatment adherence. Thus, there is an important need for the development of new therapeutic strategies. Several oral compounds are in late-stage development for treating MS. Fingolimod (FTY720; Novartis, Basel, Switzerland is an oral sphingosine-1-phosphase receptor modulator which has demonstrated superior efficacy compared with placebo and interferon β-1a in Phase III studies and has been approved in the treatment of MS. We summarily review the oral compounds in study, focusing on the recent development, approval and the clinical experience with FTY720.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, oral compounds, fingolimod, fty720, sphingosine 1, phosphate, patient satisfaction

  16. Development and evaluation of a training program for therapeutic radiographers as a basis for online adaptive radiation therapy for bladder carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foroudi, Farshad; Wong, Jacky; Kron, Tomas; Roxby, Paul; Haworth, Annette; Bailey, Alistair; Rolfo, Aldo; Paneghel, Andrea; Styles, Colin; Laferlita, Marcus; Tai, Keen Hun; Williams, Scott; Duchesne, Gillian

    2010-01-01

    Aims: Online adaptive radiotherapy requires a new level of soft tissue anatomy recognition and decision making by therapeutic radiographers at the linear accelerator. We have developed a therapeutic radiographer training workshop encompassing soft tissue matching for an online adaptive protocol for muscle invasive bladder cancer. Our aim is to present the training program, and its evaluation which compares pre and post training staff soft tissue matching and bladder contouring using Cone Beam Computer Tomography (CBCT). Materials and Methods: Prior to commencement of an online adaptive bladder protocol, a staff training program for 33 therapeutic radiographers, with a separate ethics approved evaluation component was developed. A multidisciplinary training program over two days was carried out with a total of 11 h of training, covering imaging technology, pelvic anatomy and protocol specific decision making in both practical and theoretical sessions. The evaluation included both pre training and post training testing of staff. Results: Pre training and post training, the standard deviations in the contoured bladder between participants in left-right direction were 0.64 vs 0.59 cm, superior-inferior 0.89 vs 0.77 cm and anterior-posterior direction was 0.88 vs 0.52 cm respectively. Similarly the standard deviation in the volume contoured decreased from 40.7 cc pre training to 24.5 cc post training. Time taken in contouring was reduced by the training program (19.8 vs 17.2 min) as was the discrepancy in choice of adaptive radiotherapy plans. The greatest reduction in variations in contouring was seen in staff whose pre training had the largest deviations from the reference radiation oncologist contours. Conclusion: A formalized staff training program is feasible, well received by staff and reduces variation in organ matching and contouring. The improvement was particularly noticed in staff who pre training had larger deviations from the reference standard.

  17. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  18. klf2ash317 Mutant Zebrafish Do Not Recapitulate Morpholino-Induced Vascular and Haematopoietic Phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Novodvorsky

    Full Text Available The zinc-finger transcription factor Krϋppel-like factor 2 (KLF2 transduces blood flow into molecular signals responsible for a wide range of responses within the vasculature. KLF2 maintains a healthy, quiescent endothelial phenotype. Previous studies report a range of phenotypes following morpholino antisense oligonucleotide-induced klf2a knockdown in zebrafish. Targeted genome editing is an increasingly applied method for functional assessment of candidate genes. We therefore generated a stable klf2a mutant zebrafish and characterised its cardiovascular and haematopoietic development.Using Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALEN we generated a klf2a mutant (klf2ash317 with a 14bp deletion leading to a premature stop codon in exon 2. Western blotting confirmed loss of wild type Klf2a protein and the presence of a truncated protein in klf2ash317 mutants. Homozygous klf2ash317 mutants exhibit no defects in vascular patterning, survive to adulthood and are fertile, without displaying previously described morphant phenotypes such as high-output cardiac failure, reduced haematopoetic stem cell (HSC development or impaired formation of the 5th accessory aortic arch. Homozygous klf2ash317 mutation did not reduce angiogenesis in zebrafish with homozygous mutations in von Hippel Lindau (vhl, a form of angiogenesis that is dependent on blood flow. We examined expression of three klf family members in wildtype and klf2ash317 zebrafish. We detected vascular expression of klf2b (but not klf4a or biklf/klf4b/klf17 in wildtypes but found no differences in expression that might account for the lack of phenotype in klf2ash317 mutants. klf2b morpholino knockdown did not affect heart rate or impair formation of the 5th accessory aortic arch in either wildtypes or klf2ash317 mutants.The klf2ash317 mutation produces a truncated Klf2a protein but, unlike morpholino induced klf2a knockdown, does not affect cardiovascular development.

  19. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated Dax1 knockout in the monkey recapitulates human AHC-HH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yu; Zheng, Bo; Shen, Bin; Chen, Yongchang; Wang, Lei; Wang, Jianying; Niu, Yuyu; Cui, Yiqiang; Zhou, Jiankui; Wang, Hong; Guo, Xuejiang; Hu, Bian; Zhou, Qi; Sha, Jiahao; Ji, Weizhi; Huang, Xingxu

    2015-12-20

    Mutations in the DAX1 locus cause X-linked adrenal hypoplasia congenita (AHC) and hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (HH), which manifest with primary adrenal insufficiency and incomplete or absent sexual maturation, respectively. The associated defects in spermatogenesis can range from spermatogenic arrest to Sertoli cell only syndrome. Conclusions from Dax1 knockout mouse models provide only limited insight into AHC/HH disease mechanisms, because mouse models exhibit more extensive abnormalities in testicular development, including disorganized and incompletely formed testis cords with decreased number of peritubular myoid cells and male-to-female sex reversal. We previously reported successful clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-mediated genome targeting in cynomolgus monkeys. Here, we describe a male fetal monkey in which targeted genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 produced Dax1-null mutations in most somatic tissues and in the gonads. This DAX1-deficient monkey displayed defects in adrenal gland development and abnormal testis architecture with small cords, expanded blood vessels and extensive fibrosis. Sertoli cell formation was not affected. This phenotype strongly resembles findings in human patients with AHC-HH caused by mutations in DAX1. We further detected upregulation of Wnt/β-catenin-VEGF signaling in the fetal Dax1-deficient testis, suggesting abnormal activation of signaling pathways in the absence of DAX1 as one mechanism of AHC-HH. Our study reveals novel insight into the role of DAX1 in HH and provides proof-of-principle for the generation of monkey models of human disease via CRISPR/Cas9-mediated gene targeting. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  20. Therapeutic misadventure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, N J

    2010-10-01

    Therapeutic misadventure can be defined as an injury or an adverse event caused by medical management rather than by an underlying disease. Within the National Health Service there were over 86,000 reported adverse incidents in 2007. In the USA medication errors have been rated as the fourth highest cause of death. Unfortunately one of the greatest contributors to iatrogenic injury is human error. The potential types of misadventure are infinite. Medication errors are a major part of this, being responsible for over 70% of cases that cause serious harm. However, many medication errors caused by slips, lapses, technical errors and mistakes are preventable; intentional violations of safe operating procedures are not. While medication errors were tolerated by society in the past, the readiness to institute criminal proceedings against health-care professionals has increased greatly in the UK over the last decade. The medication process consists of writing prescriptions, dispensing the product, administering it and monitoring its effects. Prescription errors arise owing to incomplete information, lack of appropriate labelling, environmental factors and human blunders. Even with a perfect prescription the right medication must be dispensed and appropriately labelled. Dispensing errors are not uncommon and may be compounded by non-clinical considerations. Administration of a drug by injection is one of the most dangerous aspects of the medication process, especially in inexperienced hands. The final component of medication supply is monitoring the effect of the medication. With short courses of medication such monitoring is easy, but with long-term medication, particularly with potent drugs where the margin between efficacy and toxicity is small, active procedures may be required to ensure toxicity does not ensue. Despite the endeavour of health-care professions to stick to the rule of 'first, do no harm', in reality this is difficult to achieve all of the time. When

  1. Fenton reaction induced cancer in wild type rats recapitulates genomic alterations observed in human cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Akatsuka

    Full Text Available Iron overload has been associated with carcinogenesis in humans. Intraperitoneal administration of ferric nitrilotriacetate initiates a Fenton reaction in renal proximal tubules of rodents that ultimately leads to a high incidence of renal cell carcinoma (RCC after repeated treatments. We performed high-resolution microarray comparative genomic hybridization to identify characteristics in the genomic profiles of this oxidative stress-induced rat RCCs. The results revealed extensive large-scale genomic alterations with a preference for deletions. Deletions and amplifications were numerous and sometimes fragmented, demonstrating that a Fenton reaction is a cause of such genomic alterations in vivo. Frequency plotting indicated that two of the most commonly altered loci corresponded to a Cdkn2a/2b deletion and a Met amplification. Tumor sizes were proportionally associated with Met expression and/or amplification, and clustering analysis confirmed our results. Furthermore, we developed a procedure to compare whole genomic patterns of the copy number alterations among different species based on chromosomal syntenic relationship. Patterns of the rat RCCs showed the strongest similarity to the human RCCs among five types of human cancers, followed by human malignant mesothelioma, an iron overload-associated cancer. Therefore, an iron-dependent Fenton chemical reaction causes large-scale genomic alterations during carcinogenesis, which may result in distinct genomic profiles. Based on the characteristics of extensive genome alterations in human cancer, our results suggest that this chemical reaction may play a major role during human carcinogenesis.

  2. A Steering Model of Endothelial Sheet Migration Recapitulates Monolayer Integrity and Directed Collective Migration ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitorino, Philip; Hammer, Mark; Kim, Jongmin; Meyer, Tobias

    2011-01-01

    Cells in endothelial cell monolayers maintain a tight barrier between blood and tissue, but it is not well understood how endothelial cells move within monolayers, pass each other, migrate when stimulated with growth factor, and also retain monolayer integrity. Here, we develop a quantitative steering model based on functional classes of genes identified previously in a small interfering RNA (siRNA) screen to explain how cells locally coordinate their movement to maintain monolayer integrity and collectively migrate in response to growth factor. In the model, cells autonomously migrate within the monolayer and turn in response to mechanical cues resulting from adhesive, drag, repulsive, and directed steering interactions with neighboring cells. We show that lateral-drag steering explains the local coordination of cell movement and the maintenance of monolayer integrity by allowing closure of small lesions. We further demonstrate that directional steering of cells at monolayer boundaries, combined with adhesive steering of cells behind, can explain growth factor-triggered collective migration into open space. Together, this model provides a mechanistic explanation for the observed genetic modularity and a conceptual framework for how cells can dynamically maintain sheet integrity and undergo collective directed migration. PMID:20974808

  3. Recapitulation of Ayurveda constitution types by machine learning of phenotypic traits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Tiwari

    Full Text Available In Ayurveda system of medicine individuals are classified into seven constitution types, "Prakriti", for assessing disease susceptibility and drug responsiveness. Prakriti evaluation involves clinical examination including questions about physiological and behavioural traits. A need was felt to develop models for accurately predicting Prakriti classes that have been shown to exhibit molecular differences. The present study was carried out on data of phenotypic attributes in 147 healthy individuals of three extreme Prakriti types, from a genetically homogeneous population of Western India. Unsupervised and supervised machine learning approaches were used to infer inherent structure of the data, and for feature selection and building classification models for Prakriti respectively. These models were validated in a North Indian population. Unsupervised clustering led to emergence of three natural clusters corresponding to three extreme Prakriti classes. The supervised modelling approaches could classify individuals, with distinct Prakriti types, in the training and validation sets. This study is the first to demonstrate that Prakriti types are distinct verifiable clusters within a multidimensional space of multiple interrelated phenotypic traits. It also provides a computational framework for predicting Prakriti classes from phenotypic attributes. This approach may be useful in precision medicine for stratification of endophenotypes in healthy and diseased populations.

  4. Expanding the Therapeutic Potential of the Iron Chelator Deferasirox in the Development of Aqueous Stable Ti(IV) Anticancer Complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loza-Rosas, Sergio A; Vázquez-Salgado, Alexandra M; Rivero, Kennett I; Negrón, Lenny J; Delgado, Yamixa; Benjamín-Rivera, Josué A; Vázquez-Maldonado, Angel L; Parks, Timothy B; Munet-Colón, Charlene; Tinoco, Arthur D

    2017-07-17

    The recent X-ray structure of titanium(IV)-bound human serum transferrin (STf) exhibiting citrate as a synergistic anion reveals a difference in Ti(IV) coordination versus iron(III), the metal endogenously delivered by the protein to cells. This finding enriches our bioinspired drug design strategy for Ti(IV)-based anticancer therapeutics, which applies a family of Fe(III) chelators termed chemical transferrin mimetic (cTfm) ligands to inhibit Fe bioavailability in cancer cells. Deferasirox, a drug used for iron overload disease, is a cTfm ligand that models STf coordination to Fe(III), favoring Fe(III) binding versus Ti(IV). This metal affinity preference drives deferasirox to facilitate the release of cytotoxic Ti(IV) intracellularly in exchange for Fe(III). An aqueous speciation study performed by potentiometric titration from pH 4 to 8 with micromolar levels of Ti(IV) deferasirox at a 1:2 ratio reveals exclusively Ti(deferasirox) 2 in solution. The predominant complex at pH 7.4, [Ti(deferasirox) 2 ] 2- , exhibits the one of the highest aqueous stabilities observed for a potent cytotoxic Ti(IV) species, demonstrating little dissociation even after 1 month in cell culture media. UV-vis and 1 H NMR studies show that the stability is unaffected by the presence of biomolecular Ti(IV) binders such as citrate, STf, and albumin, which have been shown to induce dissociation or regulate cellular uptake and can alter the activity of other antiproliferative Ti(IV) complexes. Kinetic studies on [Ti(deferasirox) 2 ] 2- transmetalation with Fe(III) show that a labile Fe(III) source is required to induce this process. The initial step of this process occurs on the time scale of minutes, and equilibrium for the complete transmetalation is reached on a time scale of hours to a day. This work reveals a mechanism to deliver Ti(IV) compounds into cells and trigger Ti(IV) release by a labile Fe(III) species. Cellular studies including other cTfm ligands confirm the Fe(III) depletion

  5. Long-Term Treatment of Eosinophilic Esophagitis With Swallowed Topical Corticosteroids: Development and Evaluation of a Therapeutic Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greuter, Thomas; Bussmann, Christian; Safroneeva, Ekaterina; Schoepfer, Alain M; Biedermann, Luc; Vavricka, Stephan R; Straumann, Alex

    2017-10-01

    Swallowed topical corticosteroids (STCs) are efficacious in inducing and presumably maintaining remission in patients with active eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE). Hitherto, it has not been evaluated whether long-lasting remission can be achieved, and whether treatment can be stopped once patients have achieved this remission. Since 2007, EoE patients included into a large database at the Swiss EoE Clinics were put on STCs as induction/maintenance therapy. Disease activity was assessed on an annual basis. In patients who achieved long-lasting (≥6 months) clinical, endoscopic, and histological (=deep) remission, treatment was stopped. Data on all patients treated using this therapeutic strategy were analyzed retrospectively. Of the 351 patients, 33 (9.4%) who were treated with STCs achieved deep remission. Median age of remitters at disease onset was 32.6 years (interquartile range (IQR) 19.1-49.3), and diagnostic delay was 5.4 years (IQR 1.2-11.4). Deep remission was achieved after 89.0 weeks (IQR 64.6-173.8). Female gender was the only independent prognostic factor for achieving deep remission (odds ratio (OR) 2.518, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.203-5.269). Overall, STCs were stopped after 104.7 weeks (IQR 65.5-176.6). No mucosal damage was observed upon histological examination. In 27 of the 33 remitters (81.8%), a clinical relapse occurred after a median of 22.4 weeks (95% CI 5.1-39.7). Six remitters (18.2%) did not experience a clinical relapse during a follow-up of 35.1 weeks (IQR 18.3-44.9). Hence, a total of 1.7% (6/351) patients were able to discontinue STCs in the long term. Long-term EoE treatment with STCs was well tolerated, but only a minority achieved deep remission. Female gender is the only prognostic factor for attainment of such remission. After treatment cessation, the majority experienced a clinical relapse.

  6. Amino acid-based advanced liquid formulation development for highly concentrated therapeutic antibodies balances physical and chemical stability and low viscosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemter, Kristina; Altrichter, Jens; Derwand, Roland; Kriehuber, Thomas; Reinauer, Eva; Scholz, Martin

    2018-04-16

    To develop highly concentrated therapeutic antibodies enabling convenient subcutaneous application, well stabilizing pharmaceutical formulations with low viscosities are considered to be key. The purpose of this study was to select specific amino acid combinations that reduce and balance aggregation, fragmentation and chemical degradation and also lower viscosity of highly concentrated liquid antibodies. As a model, the therapeutically well-established antibody trastuzumab (25 - >200 mg/mL) in liquid formulation was used. Pre-testing of formulations based on a stabilizing and protecting solutions (SPS®) platform was conducted in a thermal unfolding model using Differential Scanning Fluorimetry (DSF) and accelerated aging at 37 °C and 45 °C. Pre-selected amino acid combinations were further iteratively adjusted to obtain stable highly concentrated antibody formulations with low viscosity. Size Exclusion Chromatography (SE-HPLC) revealed significantly lower aggregation and fragmentation at specific amino acid:sugar and protein:excipient ratios. Dynamic viscosities <20 mPa∗s of highly concentrated trastuzumab (≥200 mg/mL) were measured by falling ball viscosimetry. Moreover, less chemical degradation was found by Cationic Exchange Chromatography (CEX -HPLC) even after six months liquid storage at 25 °C. In conclusion, specifically tailored and advanced amino acid-based liquid formulations avoid aggregation and enable the development of stable and low viscous highly concentrated biopharmaceuticals. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. Recapitulating the Structural Evolution of Redox Regulation in Adenosine 5′-Phosphosulfate Kinase from Cyanobacteria to Plants*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Jonathan; Nathin, David; Lee, Soon Goo; Sun, Tony; Jez, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    In plants, adenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (APS) kinase (APSK) is required for reproductive viability and the production of 3′-phosphoadenosine 5′-phosphosulfate (PAPS) as a sulfur donor in specialized metabolism. Previous studies of the APSK from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtAPSK) identified a regulatory disulfide bond formed between the N-terminal domain (NTD) and a cysteine on the core scaffold. This thiol switch is unique to mosses, gymnosperms, and angiosperms. To understand the structural evolution of redox control of APSK, we investigated the redox-insensitive APSK from the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 (SynAPSK). Crystallographic analysis of SynAPSK in complex with either APS and a non-hydrolyzable ATP analog or APS and sulfate revealed the overall structure of the enzyme, which lacks the NTD found in homologs from mosses and plants. A series of engineered SynAPSK variants reconstructed the structural evolution of the plant APSK. Biochemical analyses of SynAPSK, SynAPSK H23C mutant, SynAPSK fused to the AtAPSK NTD, and the fusion protein with the H23C mutation showed that the addition of the NTD and cysteines recapitulated thiol-based regulation. These results reveal the molecular basis for structural changes leading to the evolution of redox control of APSK in the green lineage from cyanobacteria to plants. PMID:26294763

  8. Development of lutetium-labeled bombesin derivates: relationship between structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli

    2009-01-01

    Bombesin (BBN) receptors - in particular, the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor peptide - have been shown to be massively over expressed in several human tumors types, including prostate cancer, and could be an alternative as target for its treatment by radionuclide therapy (RNT). A large number of BBN analogs had already been synthesized for this purpose and have shown to reduce tumor growth in mice. Nevertheless, most of the studied analogs exhibit high abdominal accumulation, especially in pancreas. This abdominal accumulation may represent a problem in clinical use of radiolabeled bombesin analogs probably due to serious side effects to patients. The goal of the present work was to radiolabel a novel series of bombesin derivatives with lutetium-177 and to evaluate the relationship between their structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor. The generic structure of studied peptides is DOTA-Phe-(Gly) n -BBN(6-14), where DOTA is the chelator, n is the number of glycine amino acids of Phe-(Gly) n spacer and BBN(6-14) is the bombesin sequence from the amino acid 6 to the amino acid 14. Preliminary studies were done to establish the ideal labeling conditions for obtaining the highest yield of labeled bombesin derivatives, determined by instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC-SG) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The stability of the preparations was evaluated either after storing at 2-8 degree C or incubation in human serum at 37 degree C and the partition coefficient was determined in n:octanol:water. In vivo studies were performed in both healthy Balb-c and Nude mice bearing PC-3 xenografts, in order to characterize the biological properties of labeled peptides. In vitro studies involved the evaluation of cold bombesin derivatives effect in PC-3 cells proliferation. Bombesin derivatives were successfully labeled with high yield at optimized conditions and exhibited high stability at 4 degree C. The analysis of the

  9. Understanding access and use of technology among youth with first-episode psychosis to inform the development of technology-enabled therapeutic interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Baki, Amal; Lal, Shalini; D-Charron, Olivier; Stip, Emmanuel; Kara, Nadjia

    2017-02-01

    Computers, video games and technological devices are part of young people's everyday lives. However, their use in first-episode psychosis (FEP) treatment is rare. The purpose of this study was to better understand the access and use of technology among individuals with FEP, including gaming activities, to inform future development of technology-enabled therapeutic applications. Self-administered survey on use of technological tools in 71 FEP individuals. PCs/laptops were used by all participants; cellphones/smartphones by 92%, consoles by 83% (mainly male and younger participants). Women texted and used social networks more frequently; men played games (mainly action) more often. The younger individuals reported playing games frequently (32% daily) with less use of the Web and social networks (favourite: Facebook). These data will be useful for developing Web-based psychoeducation tools and cognitive remediation video games for youth with FEP. © 2015 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  10. Biomaterials-based 3D cell printing for next-generation therapeutics and diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jinah; Park, Ju Young; Gao, Ge; Cho, Dong-Woo

    2018-02-01

    Building human tissues via 3D cell printing technology has received particular attention due to its process flexibility and versatility. This technology enables the recapitulation of unique features of human tissues and the all-in-one manufacturing process through the design of smart and advanced biomaterials and proper polymerization techniques. For the optimal engineering of tissues, a higher-order assembly of physiological components, including cells, biomaterials, and biomolecules, should meet the critical requirements for tissue morphogenesis and vascularization. The convergence of 3D cell printing with a microfluidic approach has led to a significant leap in the vascularization of engineering tissues. In addition, recent cutting-edge technology in stem cells and genetic engineering can potentially be adapted to the 3D tissue fabrication technique, and it has great potential to shift the paradigm of disease modeling and the study of unknown disease mechanisms required for precision medicine. This review gives an overview of recent developments in 3D cell printing and bioinks and provides technical requirements for engineering human tissues. Finally, we propose suggestions on the development of next-generation therapeutics and diagnostics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The TREAT-NMD advisory committee for therapeutics (TACT): an innovative de-risking model to foster orphan drug development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heslop, Emma; Csimma, Cristina; Straub, Volker; McCall, John; Nagaraju, Kanneboyina; Wagner, Kathryn R.; Caizergues, Didier; Korinthenberg, Rudolf; Flanigan, Kevin M.; Kaufmann, Petra; McNeil, Elizabeth; Mendell, Jerry; Hesterlee, Sharon; Wells, Dominic J.; Bushby, Kate; McNeil, Dawn Elizabeth; Allen, Hugh; Bourke, John; Burghes, Arthur; Buyse, Gunnar; Catlin, Nick; Clemens, Paula; Cnaan, Avital; Comi, Giacomo; Connor, Edward; de Luca, Annamaria; de Montleau, Béatrice; de Visser, Marianne; Day, Simon; Dittrich, Sven; Dubrosky, Alberto; Eagle, Michelle; Finkel, Richard; Fishbeck, Kenneth; Furlong, Patricia; Grounds, Miranda; Hauschke, Dieter; Hoffman, Eric; Irwin, Joseph; Jarecki, Jill; Kelly, Michael; Laforêt, Pascal; Lovering, Richard; Larkindale, Jane; Mayer, Henry; McDonald, Robert; McNally, Elizabeth; Miller, Debra; North, Kathryn; Ouillade, Marie-Christine; Pattinson, Shaun; Pearson, Paul; Pleiss, Mike; Pohlschmidt, Marita; Raymackers, Jean-Marc; Rehmann-Sutter, Christoph; Ruegg, Urs; Rutkowski, Anne; Ryan, Monique; Simonds, Anita; Sweeney, Lee; Tinsley, Jon; Towbin, Jeff; Tulinius, Mar; Verschuuren, Jan; Voit, Thomas; Vroom, Elizabeth; Walter, Maggie; Winberg, Meg; Wong, Brenda; Zoetis, Tracy; Johnston, Louise; Robertson, Agata

    2015-01-01

    Despite multiple publications on potential therapies for neuromuscular diseases (NMD) in cell and animal models only a handful reach clinical trials. The ability to prioritise drug development according to objective criteria is particularly critical in rare diseases with large unmet needs and a

  12. Pharmacokinetics of Exosomes-An Important Factor for Elucidating the Biological Roles of Exosomes and for the Development of Exosome-Based Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morishita, Masaki; Takahashi, Yuki; Nishikawa, Makiya; Takakura, Yoshinobu

    2017-09-01

    Exosomes are small membrane vesicles containing lipids, proteins, and nucleic acids. Recently, researchers have uncovered that exosomes are involved in various biological events, such as tumor growth, metastasis, and the immune response, by delivering their cargos to exosome-receiving cells. Moreover, exosomes are expected to be used in therapeutic treatments, such as tissue regeneration therapy and antitumor immunotherapy, because exosomes are effective delivery vehicles for proteins, nucleic acids, and other bioactive compounds. To elucidate the biological functions of exosomes, and for the development of exosome-based therapeutics, the pharmacokinetics of exosomes is important. In this review, we aim to summarize current knowledge about the pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of exosomes. The pharmacokinetics of exogenously administered exosomes is discussed based on the tissue distribution, types of cells taking up exosomes, and key molecules in the pharmacokinetics of exosomes. In addition, recent progress in the methods to control the pharmacokinetics of exosomes is reviewed. Copyright © 2017 American Pharmacists Association®. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Essential proteins and possible therapeutic targets of Wolbachia endosymbiont and development of FiloBase--a comprehensive drug target database for Lymphatic filariasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Om Prakash; Kumar, Muthuvel Suresh

    2016-01-25

    Lymphatic filariasis (Lf) is one of the oldest and most debilitating tropical diseases. Millions of people are suffering from this prevalent disease. It is estimated to infect over 120 million people in at least 80 nations of the world through the tropical and subtropical regions. More than one billion people are in danger of getting affected with this life-threatening disease. Several studies were suggested its emerging limitations and resistance towards the available drugs and therapeutic targets for Lf. Therefore, better medicine and drug targets are in demand. We took an initiative to identify the essential proteins of Wolbachia endosymbiont of Brugia malayi, which are indispensable for their survival and non-homologous to human host proteins. In this current study, we have used proteome subtractive approach to screen the possible therapeutic targets for wBm. In addition, numerous literatures were mined in the hunt for potential drug targets, drugs, epitopes, crystal structures, and expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences for filarial causing nematodes. Data obtained from our study were presented in a user friendly database named FiloBase. We hope that information stored in this database may be used for further research and drug development process against filariasis. URL: http://filobase.bicpu.edu.in.

  14. Developing therapeutic “arrows” with the precision of William Tell: the time has come for targeted therapies in kidney disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundel, Peter; Greka, Anna

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review A core mission for modern medicine is the development of precision therapeutics. Cancer therapies have been at the leading edge of this effort, while nephrology has lagged on the path to precision medicine. Breaking the stalemate, recent work revealed CD80 (B7-1) as a candidate for targeted therapy in treatment of resistant nephrotic syndrome. This review aims to summarize the current state of our understanding of podocyte CD80 biology, its therapeutic implications, and the challenges that lie ahead in essential future validation studies. Recent findings The CD80 targeting agent abatacept (CTLA4-Ig), approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis, was shown to induce remission of nephrotic range proteinuria in four patients with recurrence of disease post-transplant, and one patient with primary, treatment resistant nephrotic syndrome. The concept of “CD80-positive” proteinuric kidney disease due to podocyte CD80 staining in patient kidney biopsies was introduced as a molecular biomarker to define disease and guide treatment. The mechanism of action of CTLA4-Ig in podocytes was shown to center on β1 integrin activation in a T-cell-independent fashion. Subsequent work revealed a putative role for podocyte CD80 in diabetic kidney disease. Summary These studies have direct implications for patient care, and intense interest has focused on validating these findings in upcoming clinical trials. PMID:26050127

  15. Nuclear DNA replication and repair in parasites of the genus Leishmania: Exploiting differences to develop innovative therapeutic approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uzcanga, Graciela; Lara, Eliana; Gutiérrez, Fernanda; Beaty, Doyle; Beske, Timo; Teran, Rommy; Navarro, Juan-Carlos; Pasero, Philippe; Benítez, Washington; Poveda, Ana

    2017-03-01

    Leishmaniasis is a common tropical disease that affects mainly poor people in underdeveloped and developing countries. This largely neglected infection is caused by Leishmania spp, a parasite from the Trypanosomatidae family. This parasitic disease has different clinical manifestations, ranging from localized cutaneous to more harmful visceral forms. The main limitations of the current treatments are their high cost, toxicity, lack of specificity, and long duration. Efforts to improve treatments are necessary to deal with this infectious disease. Many approved drugs to combat diseases as diverse as cancer, bacterial, or viral infections take advantage of specific features of the causing agent or of the disease. Recent evidence indicates that the specific characteristics of the Trypanosomatidae replication and repair machineries could be used as possible targets for the development of new treatments. Here, we review in detail the molecular mechanisms of DNA replication and repair regulation in trypanosomatids of the genus Leishmania and the drugs that could be useful against this disease.

  16. A Genetic Approach to the Development of New Therapeutic Phages to Fight Pseudomonas Aeruginosa in Wound Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Pleteneva

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a frequent participant in wound infections. Emergence of multiple antibiotic resistant strains has created significant problems in the treatment of infected wounds. Phage therapy (PT has been proposed as a possible alternative approach. Infected wounds are the perfect place for PT applications, since the basic condition for PT is ensured; namely, the direct contact of bacteria and their viruses. Plenty of virulent (“lytic” and temperate (“lysogenic” bacteriophages are known in P. aeruginosa. However, the number of virulent phage species acceptable for PT and their mutability are limited. Besides, there are different deviations in the behavior of virulent (and temperate phages from their expected canonical models of development. We consider some examples of non-canonical phage-bacterium interactions and the possibility of their use in PT. In addition, some optimal approaches to the development of phage therapy will be discussed from the point of view of a biologist, considering the danger of phage-assisted horizontal gene transfer (HGT, and from the point of view of a surgeon who has accepted the Hippocrates Oath to cure patients by all possible means. It is also time now to discuss the possible approaches in international cooperation for the development of PT. We think it would be advantageous to make phage therapy a kind of personalized medicine.

  17. Astrocytes generated from patient induced pluripotent stem cells recapitulate features of Huntington’s disease patient cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juopperi Tarja A

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Huntington’s Disease (HD is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder that clinically manifests as motor dysfunction, cognitive impairment and psychiatric symptoms. There is currently no cure for this progressive and fatal disorder. The causative mutation of this hereditary disease is a trinucleotide repeat expansion (CAG in the Huntingtin gene that results in an expanded polyglutamine tract. Multiple mechanisms have been proposed to explain the preferential striatal and cortical degeneration that occurs with HD, including non-cell-autonomous contribution from astrocytes. Although numerous cell culture and animal models exist, there is a great need for experimental systems that can more accurately replicate the human disease. Human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are a remarkable new tool to study neurological disorders because this cell type can be derived from patients as a renewable, genetically tractable source for unlimited cells that are difficult to acquire, such as neurons and astrocytes. The development of experimental systems based on iPSC technology could aid in the identification of molecular lesions and therapeutic treatments. Results We derived iPSCs from a father with adult onset HD and 50 CAG repeats (F-HD-iPSC and his daughter with juvenile HD and 109 CAG repeats (D-HD-iPSC. These disease-specific iPSC lines were characterized by standard assays to assess the quality of iPSC lines and to demonstrate their pluripotency. HD-iPSCs were capable of producing phenotypically normal, functional neurons in vitro and were able to survive and differentiate into neurons in the adult mouse brain in vivo after transplantation. Surprisingly, when HD-iPSCs were directed to differentiate into an astrocytic lineage, we observed the presence of cytoplasmic, electron clear vacuoles in astrocytes from both F-HD-iPSCs and D-HD-iPSCs, which were significantly more pronounced in D-HD-astrocytes. Remarkably, the vacuolation in

  18. Practical management of therapeutic diphenylhydantoin ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. Development of easy, practical methods for the management and optimisation of therapeutic diphenylhydantoin (DPH) concentrations in children. Design. Investigation of DPH concentration profiles and pharmacokinetic parameters in children with poorly controlled epilepsy. Subsequent determination of ...

  19. Therapeutic emails

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinkule Jennifer

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this paper, we show how counselors and psychologists can use emails for online management of substance abusers, including the anatomy and content of emails that clinicians should send substance abusers. Some investigators have attempted to determine if providing mental health services online is an efficacious delivery of treatment. The question of efficacy is an empirical issue that cannot be settled unless we are explicitly clear about the content and nature of online treatment. We believe that it is not the communications via internet that matters, but the content of these communications. The purpose of this paper is to provide the content of our online counseling services so others can duplicate the work and investigate its efficacy. Results We have managed nearly 300 clients online for recovery from substance abuse. Treatment included individual counseling (motivational interviewing, cognitive-behavior therapy, relapse prevention assignments, participation in an electronic support group and the development of a recovery team. Our findings of success with these interventions are reported elsewhere. Our experience has led to development of a protocol of care that is described more fully in this paper. This protocol is based on stages of change and relapse prevention theories and follows a Motivational Interviewing method of counseling. Conclusion The use of electronic media in providing mental health treatment remains controversial due to concerns about confidentiality, security and legal considerations. More research is needed to validate and generalize the use of online treatment for mental health problems. If researchers have to build on each others work, it is paramount that we share our protocols of care, as we have done in this paper.

  20. Development of a Novel Therapeutic Paradigm Utilizing a Mammary Gland-Targeted, Bin-1 Knockout Mouse Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    Shanghai East Hospital, Shanghai, P.R. China . Current address for A.P. Soler: Richfield Laboratory of Dermatopathology, Cincinnati, OH. Requests for...which were cut. Developed TLC plates were visualized with UV light (254 nm), iodine, or KMnO4. Flash column chromatography was conducted with the...which made it difficult to obtain NMR information: TLC Rf ) 0.40 (30% H2O/MeOH with 0.1% CF3CO2H); 1H NMR (CDCl3 + TFA) δ 10.99 (s, 1H), 8.49–8.07

  1. Navigating the Future of Cardiovascular Drug Development-Leveraging Novel Approaches to Drive Innovation and Drug Discovery: Summary of Findings from the Novel Cardiovascular Therapeutics Conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povsic, Thomas J; Scott, Rob; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Blaustein, Robert; Edelberg, Jay M; Lefkowitz, Martin P; Solomon, Scott D; Fox, Jonathan C; Healy, Kevin E; Khakoo, Aarif Y; Losordo, Douglas W; Malik, Fady I; Monia, Brett P; Montgomery, Rusty L; Riesmeyer, Jeffrey; Schwartz, Gregory G; Zelenkofske, Steven L; Wu, Joseph C; Wasserman, Scott M; Roe, Matthew T

    2017-08-01

    The need for novel approaches to cardiovascular drug development served as the impetus to convene an open meeting of experts from the pharmaceutical industry and academia to assess the challenges and develop solutions for drug discovery in cardiovascular disease. The Novel Cardiovascular Therapeutics Summit first reviewed recent examples of ongoing or recently completed programs translating basic science observations to targeted drug development, highlighting successes (protein convertase sutilisin/kexin type 9 [PCSK9] and neprilysin inhibition) and targets still under evaluation (cholesteryl ester transfer protein [CETP] inhibition), with the hope of gleaning key lessons to successful drug development in the current era. Participants then reviewed the use of innovative approaches being explored to facilitate rapid and more cost-efficient evaluations of drug candidates in a short timeframe. We summarize observations gleaned from this summit and offer insight into future cardiovascular drug development. The rapid development in genetic and high-throughput drug evaluation technologies, coupled with new approaches to rapidly evaluate potential cardiovascular therapies with in vitro techniques, offer opportunities to identify new drug targets for cardiovascular disease, study new therapies with better efficiency and higher throughput in the preclinical setting, and more rapidly bring the most promising therapies to human testing. However, there must be a critical interface between industry and academia to guide the future of cardiovascular drug development. The shared interest among academic institutions and pharmaceutical companies in developing promising therapies to address unmet clinical needs for patients with cardiovascular disease underlies and guides innovation and discovery platforms that are significantly altering the landscape of cardiovascular drug development.

  2. B cells are required for Aire-deficient mice to develop multi-organ autoinflammation: A therapeutic approach for APECED patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavanescu, Irina; Benoist, Christophe; Mathis, Diane

    2008-09-02

    Autoimmune regulator (Aire)-deficient mice and humans have circulating autoantibodies against a multitude of organs and multiorgan autoinflammatory infiltrates. It is not known to what extent autoantibodies or their source, B lymphocytes, are required for disease onset or progression. We show in this research that B cells must be present for Aire-deficient mice to develop fulminant infiltrates. We found no evidence that autoantibodies were directly pathogenic; rather, B cells appeared to play a critical early role in T cell priming or expansion. A therapeutic reagent directed against B cells, Rituximab, induced remission of the autoimmune disease in Aire-deficient mice, raising the hope of applying it to human patients with autoimmune-polyendocrinopathy-candidiasis-ectodermal dystrophy (APECED).

  3. Therapeutic Development of Mesenchymal Stem Cells or Their Extracellular Vesicles to Inhibit Autoimmune-Mediated Inflammatory Processes in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juhi Sharma

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Since being discovered over half a century ago, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been investigated extensively to characterize their cellular and physiological influences. MSCs have been shown to possess immunosuppressive capacity through inhibiting lymphocyte activation/proliferation and proinflammatory cytokine secretion while simultaneously demonstrating limited allogenic reactivity, which subsequently led to the evaluation of therapeutic feasibility to treat inflammatory diseases. Although regulatory constraints have restricted MSC development pharmacologically, limited clinical studies have shown encouraging results using MSC infusions to treat systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; but, more trials will have to be performed to conclusively determine the clinical efficacy of MSCs to treat SLE. Moreover, there are some data to suggest that MSCs possess tumorigenic potential and that the immunosuppressive influence can be dramatically affected by both donor variability and ex vivo expansion. Given that recent studies have found that the immunosuppressive effects of MSCs are a result, at least in part, to extracellular vesicle (EV secretion, the use of MSC-derived EVs has been suggested as a cell-free therapeutic alternative. Despite the positive data observed using EVs isolated from human MSCs to suppress inflammatory responses in vitro and in inhibiting autoimmune disease pathogenesis in preclinical work, there are no studies to date examining EVs from MSCs to treat SLE in humans or animal models. Considering that EVs are not subject to the strict regulatory constraints of stem cell-based pharmacological development and are more readily standardized with regard to industrial-scale production and storage, this review outlines the anti-inflammatory biology of MSCs and the scientific evidence supporting the potential use of EVs derived from human MSCs to treat patients with SLE.

  4. Developing the next generation of graphene-based platforms for cancer therapeutics: The potential role of reactive oxygen species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabish, Tanveer A; Zhang, Shaowei; Winyard, Paul G

    2018-05-01

    Graphene has a promising future in applications such as disease diagnosis, cancer therapy, drug/gene delivery, bio-imaging and antibacterial approaches owing to graphene's unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties alongside minimal toxicity to normal cells, and photo-stability. However, these unique features and bioavailability of graphene are fraught with uncertainties and concerns for environmental and occupational exposure. Changes in the physicochemical properties of graphene affect biological responses including reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Lower production of ROS by currently available theranostic agents, e.g. magnetic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, gold nanostructures or polymeric nanoparticles, restricts their clinical application in cancer therapy. Oxidative stress induced by graphene accumulated in living organs is due to acellular factors which may affect physiological interactions between graphene and target tissues and cells. Acellular factors include particle size, shape, surface charge, surface containing functional groups, and light activation. Cellular responses such as mitochondrial respiration, graphene-cell interactions and pH of the medium are also determinants of ROS production. The mechanisms of ROS production by graphene and the role of ROS for cancer treatment, are poorly understood. The aim of this review is to set the theoretical basis for further research in developing graphene-based theranostic platforms. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Developing the next generation of graphene-based platforms for cancer therapeutics: The potential role of reactive oxygen species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanveer A. Tabish

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Graphene has a promising future in applications such as disease diagnosis, cancer therapy, drug/gene delivery, bio-imaging and antibacterial approaches owing to graphene's unique physical, chemical and mechanical properties alongside minimal toxicity to normal cells, and photo-stability. However, these unique features and bioavailability of graphene are fraught with uncertainties and concerns for environmental and occupational exposure. Changes in the physicochemical properties of graphene affect biological responses including reactive oxygen species (ROS production. Lower production of ROS by currently available theranostic agents, e.g. magnetic nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, gold nanostructures or polymeric nanoparticles, restricts their clinical application in cancer therapy. Oxidative stress induced by graphene accumulated in living organs is due to acellular factors which may affect physiological interactions between graphene and target tissues and cells. Acellular factors include particle size, shape, surface charge, surface containing functional groups, and light activation. Cellular responses such as mitochondrial respiration, graphene-cell interactions and pH of the medium are also determinants of ROS production. The mechanisms of ROS production by graphene and the role of ROS for cancer treatment, are poorly understood. The aim of this review is to set the theoretical basis for further research in developing graphene-based theranostic platforms.

  6. Priming nanoparticle-guided diagnostics and therapeutics towards human organs-on-chips microphysiological system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jin-Ha; Lee, Jaewon; Shin, Woojung; Choi, Jeong-Woo; Kim, Hyun Jung

    2016-10-01

    Nanotechnology and bioengineering have converged over the past decades, by which the application of multi-functional nanoparticles (NPs) has been emerged in clinical and biomedical fields. The NPs primed to detect disease-specific biomarkers or to deliver biopharmaceutical compounds have beena validated in conventional in vitro culture models including two dimensional (2D) cell cultures or 3D organoid models. However, a lack of experimental models that have strong human physiological relevance has hampered accurate validation of the safety and functionality of NPs. Alternatively, biomimetic human "Organs-on-Chips" microphysiological systems have recapitulated the mechanically dynamic 3D tissue interface of human organ microenvironment, in which the transport, cytotoxicity, biocompatibility, and therapeutic efficacy of NPs and their conjugates may be more accurately validated. Finally, integration of NP-guided diagnostic detection and targeted nanotherapeutics in conjunction with human organs-on-chips can provide a novel avenue to accelerate the NP-based drug development process as well as the rapid detection of cellular secretomes associated with pathophysiological processes.

  7. Therapeutic approaches to cellulite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Jeremy B; Cohen, Joel L; Kaufman, Joely; Metelitsa, Andrei I; Kaminer, Michael S

    2015-09-01

    Cellulite is a condition that affects the vast majority of women. Although it is of no danger to one's overall health, cellulite can be psychosocially debilitating. Consequently, much research has been devoted to understanding cellulite and its etiopathogenesis. With additional insights into the underlying causes of its clinical presentation, therapeutic modalities have been developed that offer hope to cellulite sufferers. This review examines evidence for topical treatments, noninvasive energy-based devices, and recently developed minimally invasive interventions that may finally provide a solution. ©2015 Frontline Medical Communications.

  8. Development of inhibitory antibodies to therapeutic factor VIII in severe hemophilia A is associated with microsatellite polymorphisms in the HMOX1 promoter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repessé, Yohann; Peyron, Ivan; Dimitrov, Jordan D; Dasgupta, Suryasarathi; Moshai, Elika Farrokhi; Costa, Catherine; Borel-Derlon, Annie; Guillet, Benoit; D’Oiron, Roseline; Aouba, Achille; Rothschild, Chantal; Oldenburg, Johannes; Pavlova, Anna; Kaveri, Srinivas V; Lacroix-Desmazes, Sébastien

    2013-01-01

    Induction of heme oxygenase-1, a stress-inducible enzyme with anti-inflammatory activity, reduces the immunogenicity of therapeutic factor VIII in experimental hemophilia A. In humans, heme oxygenase-1 expression is modulated by polymorphisms in the promoter of the heme oxygenase-1-encoding gene (HMOX1). We investigated the relationship between polymorphisms in the HMOX1 promoter and factor VIII inhibitor development in severe hemophilia A. We performed a case-control study on 99 inhibitor-positive patients and 263 patients who did not develop inhibitors within the first 150 cumulative days of exposure to therapeutic factor VIII. Direct sequencing and DNA fragment analysis were used to study (GT)n polymorphism and single nucleotide polymorphisms located at −1135 and −413 in the promoter of HMOX1. We assessed associations between the individual allele frequencies or genotypes, and inhibitor development. Our results demonstrate that inhibitor-positive patients had a higher frequency of alleles with large (GT)n repeats (L: n≥30), which are associated with lesser heme oxygenase-1 expression (odds ratio 2.31; 95% confidence interval 1.46–3.66; P<0.001]. Six genotypes (L/L, L/M, L/S, M/M, M/S and S/S) of (GT)n repeats were identified (S: n<21; M: 21≤n<30). The genotype group including L alleles (L/L, L/M and L/S) was statistically more frequent among inhibitor-positive than inhibitor-negative patients, as compared to the other genotypes (33.3% versus 17.1%) (odds ratio 2.21, 95% confidence interval 1.30–3.76; P<0.01). To our knowledge, this is the first association identified between HMOX1 promoter polymorphism and development of anti-drug antibodies. Our study paves the way towards modulation of the endogenous anti-inflammatory machinery of hemophilia patients to reduce the risk of inhibitor development PMID:23716558

  9. Development of a cell-based assay measuring the activation of FcγRIIa for the characterization of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minoru Tada

    Full Text Available Antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC is one of the important mechanisms of action of the targeting of tumor cells by therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. Among the human Fcγ receptors (FcγRs, FcγRIIIa is well known as the only receptor expressed in natural killer (NK cells, and it plays a pivotal role in ADCC by IgG1-subclass mAbs. In addition, the contributions of FcγRIIa to mAb-mediated cytotoxicity have been reported. FcγRIIa is expressed in myeloid effector cells including neutrophils and macrophages, and it is involved in the activation of these effector cells. However, the measurement of the cytotoxicity via FcγRIIa-expressing effector cells is complicated and inconvenient for the characterization of therapeutic mAbs. Here we report the development of a cell-based assay using a human FcγRIIa-expressing reporter cell line. The FcγRIIa reporter cell assay was able to estimate the activation of FcγRIIa by antigen-bound mAbs by a very simple method in vitro. The usefulness of this assay for evaluating the activity of mAbs with different abilities to activate FcγRIIa was confirmed by the examples including the comparison of the activity of the anti-CD20 mAb rituximab and its Fc-engineered variants, and two anti-EGFR mAbs with different IgG subclasses, cetuximab (IgG1 and panitumumab (IgG2. We also applied this assay to the characterization of a force-oxidized mAb, and we observed that oxidation significantly decreased the FcγRIIa activation by EGFR-bound cetuximab. These results suggest that our FcγRIIa reporter assay is a promising tool for the characterization of therapeutic mAbs, including Fc-engineered mAbs, IgG2-subclass mAbs, and their product-related variants.

  10. A reflection on choosing practice development as a framework to explore music as a therapeutic method to reduce anxiety in patients living with dementia in a ward setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alasdair Pithie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: As a student nurse I chose to write my fourth year dissertation on the use of music as a therapeutic method to reduce anxiety in patients living with dementia. Music has been shown to have a positive effect on patients’ anxiety levels and improve their quality of life. A music therapy intervention could be beneficial but I realised I would need a framework that would enable me to implement the intervention in a ward setting, while offering practitioners and other participants a reasonable level of control and ownership. Discussion: Practice development was chosen because it is a person-centred framework, encouraging the learning of all those involved as well as those facilitating. It is inclusive and allows staff to adapt to the way new practices are introduced in a project. Change management theory was also considered as a framework but lacked many of the person-centred qualities required. Conclusions and implications for practice: Practice development provides the required characteristics for a project to introduce music into a care setting. Given that the methods of the project rely heavily on the involvement of staff and patients’ families, it is important to offer them a sense of ownership and control as an encouragement to take an interest and pride in its success. Furthermore, student nurses can benefit from being introduced to practice development because it will offer them a change theory that is person centred and inclusive.

  11. Extensive Tonotopic Mapping across Auditory Cortex Is Recapitulated by Spectrally Directed Attention and Systematically Related to Cortical Myeloarchitecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Frederic K; Lehet, Matt I; Callaghan, Martina F; Keller, Tim A; Sereno, Martin I; Holt, Lori L

    2017-12-13

    diverse pathologies reduce quality of life by impacting such spectrally directed auditory attention, its neurobiological bases are unclear. We demonstrate that human primary and nonprimary auditory cortical activation is modulated by spectrally directed attention in a manner that recapitulates its tonotopic sensory organization. Further, the graded activation profiles evoked by single-frequency bands are correlated with attentionally driven activation when these bands are presented in complex soundscapes. Finally, we observe a strong concordance in the degree of cortical myelination and the strength of tonotopic activation across several auditory cortical regions. Copyright © 2017 Dick et al.

  12. Computational cell model based on autonomous cell movement regulated by cell-cell signalling successfully recapitulates the "inside and outside" pattern of cell sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajioka Itsuki

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of multicellular organisms proceeds from a single fertilized egg as the combined effect of countless numbers of cellular interactions among highly dynamic cells. Since at least a reminiscent pattern of morphogenesis can be recapitulated in a reproducible manner in reaggregation cultures of dissociated embryonic cells, which is known as cell sorting, the cells themselves must possess some autonomous cell behaviors that assure specific and reproducible self-organization. Understanding of this self-organized dynamics of heterogeneous cell population seems to require some novel approaches so that the approaches bridge a gap between molecular events and morphogenesis in developmental and cell biology. A conceptual cell model in a computer may answer that purpose. We constructed a dynamical cell model based on autonomous cell behaviors, including cell shape, growth, division, adhesion, transformation, and motility as well as cell-cell signaling. The model gives some insights about what cellular behaviors make an appropriate global pattern of the cell population. Results We applied the model to "inside and outside" pattern of cell-sorting, in which two different embryonic cell types within a randomly mixed aggregate are sorted so that one cell type tends to gather in the central region of the aggregate and the other cell type surrounds the first cell type. Our model can modify the above cell behaviors by varying parameters related to them. We explored various parameter sets with which the "inside and outside" pattern could be achieved. The simulation results suggested that direction of cell movement responding to its neighborhood and the cell's mobility are important for this specific rearrangement. Conclusion We constructed an in silico cell model that mimics autonomous cell behaviors and applied it to cell sorting, which is a simple and appropriate phenomenon exhibiting self-organization of cell population. The model

  13. Development and validation of novel enzyme activity methods to assess inhibition of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) in human serum by antibodies against enzyme therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edkins, Thomas J; Alhadeff, Jack A; Kwok, Vincent; Kalensky, Charles; Rock, Marie T; Vidmar, Thomas J; Del Tito, Benjamin J

    2012-11-01

    This paper summarizes the development and validation of five enzyme activity methods to assess the specific inhibition of human endogenous matrix metalloproteinases MMP-1 (interstitial collagenase), MMP-2 (gelatinase A), MMP-3 (stromelysin 1), MMP-8 (collagenase 2) and MMP-13 (collagenase 3) by anti-Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) antibodies in human serum. These MMPs are of interest since antibodies against a therapeutic enzyme may cross-react with, and inactivate, the MMPs. The validated methods utilize spiked exogenous individual MMPs added to serum to determine if the serum inhibits MMP enzyme activity. Factors evaluated and optimized during development include pH, reaction time and temperature, inhibitor concentration for the positive control, and substrate and serum concentration. Characteristics established during validation for each MMP activity inhibition method included intra- and inter-assay precision and recovery, recovery in the pooled normal human serum samples, bench-top stability at room temperature and on wet ice, and assay cut-point determination. Precision results ranged from ~1 to 12% CV, recoveries of the activities of the exogenous MMPs ranged from ~84 to 90% and cut-point values ranged from 67 to 91%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Development and acceptability of a novel milk-free soybean-maize-sorghum ready-to-use therapeutic food (SMS-RUTF) based on industrial extrusion cooking process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owino, Victor O; Irena, Abel H; Dibari, Filippo; Collins, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Peanut milk-based ready-to-use therapeutic food (P-RUTF) primarily used to treat severe acute malnutrition at community setting is expensive. We developed an alternative milk-free soybean-maize-sorghum-based RUTF (SMS-RUTF) using locally grown ingredients that have the potential to support local economy and reduce the cost of RUTF. We describe the production process and results of acceptability of the new product. Acceptability and tolerance of SMS-RUTF was compared with P-RUTF among 45 children aged 4-11 years old based on a cross-over design. Each child consumed 250 g RUTF for 10 days followed by a five-day washout period and a subsequent 10-day period on the second RUTF. The SMS-RUTF was as acceptable as the P-RUTF among normal children aged 4-11 years of age with no associated adverse effects. SMS-RUTF was stable for at least 12 months without detectable microbiological or chemical deterioration. The major challenge encountered in SMS-RUTF development was the difficulty to accurately determine key nutrient composition due to its high oil content. Use of diversified locally available ingredients to produce RUTF is feasible. The SMS-RUTF meets expected standards and is acceptable to children aged 4-11 months old. Effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of SMS-RUTF is required. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee Points-to-consider Paper*: Drug-induced Vascular Injury Associated with Nonsmall Molecule Therapeutics in Preclinical Development: Part 2. Antisense Oligonucleotides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelhardt, Jeffery A; Fant, Pierluigi; Guionaud, Silvia; Henry, Scott P; Leach, Michael W; Louden, Calvert; Scicchitano, Marshall S; Weaver, James L; Zabka, Tanja S; Frazier, Kendall S

    2015-10-01

    Drug-induced vascular injury (DIVI) is a recurrent challenge in the development of novel pharmaceutical agents. In recent years, DIVI has been occasionally observed in nonhuman primates given RNA-targeting therapeutics such as antisense oligonucleotide therapies (ASOs) during chronic toxicity studies. While DIVI in laboratory animal species has been well characterized for vasoactive small molecules, and immune-mediated responses against large molecule biotherapeutics have been well described, there is little published information regarding DIVI induced by ASOs to date. Preclinical DIVI findings in monkeys have caused considerable delays in development of promising new ASO therapies, because of the uncertainty about whether DIVI in preclinical studies is predictive of effects in humans, and the lack of robust biomarkers of DIVI. This review of DIVI discusses clinical and microscopic features of vasculitis in monkeys, their pathogenic mechanisms, and points to consider for the toxicologist and pathologist when confronted with ASO-related DIVI. Relevant examples of regulatory feedback are included to provide insight into risk assessment of ASO therapies. © 2015 by The Author(s).

  16. Revitalizing Psychiatric Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyman, Steven E

    2014-01-01

    Despite high prevalence and enormous unmet medical need, the pharmaceutical industry has recently de-emphasized neuropsychiatric disorders as ‘too difficult' a challenge to warrant major investment. Here I describe major obstacles to drug discovery and development including a lack of new molecular targets, shortcomings of current animal models, and the lack of biomarkers for clinical trials. My major focus, however, is on new technologies and scientific approaches to neuropsychiatric disorders that give promise for revitalizing therapeutics and may thus answer industry's concerns. PMID:24317307

  17. Synaptic pathology and therapeutic repair in adult retinoschisis mouse by AAV-RS1 transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jingxing; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Ziccardi, Lucia; Chen, Shan; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Pope, Jodie G.; Bush, Ronald A.; Wu, Zhijian; Li, Wei; Sieving, Paul A.

    2015-01-01

    Strategies aimed at invoking synaptic plasticity have therapeutic potential for several neurological conditions. The human retinal synaptic disease X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is characterized by impaired visual signal transmission through the retina and progressive visual acuity loss, and mice lacking retinoschisin (RS1) recapitulate human disease. Here, we demonstrate that restoration of RS1 via retina-specific delivery of adeno-associated virus type 8-RS1 (AAV8-RS1) vector rescues molecular pathology at the photoreceptor–depolarizing bipolar cell (photoreceptor-DBC) synapse and restores function in adult Rs1-KO animals. Initial development of the photoreceptor-DBC synapse was normal in the Rs1-KO retina; however, the metabotropic glutamate receptor 6/transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily M member 1–signaling (mGluR6/TRPM1-signaling) cascade was not properly maintained. Specifically, the TRPM1 channel and G proteins Gαo, Gβ5, and RGS11 were progressively lost from postsynaptic DBC dendritic tips, whereas the mGluR6 receptor and RGS7 maintained proper synaptic position. This postsynaptic disruption differed from other murine night-blindness models with an electronegative electroretinogram response, which is also characteristic of murine and human XLRS disease. Upon AAV8-RS1 gene transfer to the retina of adult XLRS mice, TRPM1 and the signaling molecules returned to their proper dendritic tip location, and the DBC resting membrane potential was restored. These findings provide insight into the molecular plasticity of a critical synapse in the visual system and demonstrate potential therapeutic avenues for some diseases involving synaptic pathology. PMID:26098217

  18. Synaptic pathology and therapeutic repair in adult retinoschisis mouse by AAV-RS1 transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou, Jingxing; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Ziccardi, Lucia; Chen, Shan; Zeng, Yong; Marangoni, Dario; Pope, Jodie G; Bush, Ronald A; Wu, Zhijian; Li, Wei; Sieving, Paul A

    2015-07-01

    Strategies aimed at invoking synaptic plasticity have therapeutic potential for several neurological conditions. The human retinal synaptic disease X-linked retinoschisis (XLRS) is characterized by impaired visual signal transmission through the retina and progressive visual acuity loss, and mice lacking retinoschisin (RS1) recapitulate human disease. Here, we demonstrate that restoration of RS1 via retina-specific delivery of adeno-associated virus type 8-RS1 (AAV8-RS1) vector rescues molecular pathology at the photoreceptor-depolarizing bipolar cell (photoreceptor-DBC) synapse and restores function in adult Rs1-KO animals. Initial development of the photoreceptor-DBC synapse was normal in the Rs1-KO retina; however, the metabotropic glutamate receptor 6/transient receptor potential melastatin subfamily M member 1-signaling (mGluR6/TRPM1-signaling) cascade was not properly maintained. Specifically, the TRPM1 channel and G proteins Gαo, Gβ5, and RGS11 were progressively lost from postsynaptic DBC dendritic tips, whereas the mGluR6 receptor and RGS7 maintained proper synaptic position. This postsynaptic disruption differed from other murine night-blindness models with an electronegative electroretinogram response, which is also characteristic of murine and human XLRS disease. Upon AAV8-RS1 gene transfer to the retina of adult XLRS mice, TRPM1 and the signaling molecules returned to their proper dendritic tip location, and the DBC resting membrane potential was restored. These findings provide insight into the molecular plasticity of a critical synapse in the visual system and demonstrate potential therapeutic avenues for some diseases involving synaptic pathology.

  19. Recapitulative list of the C.E.A. reports published by the French Atomic Energy Commission (n.757-1062, december 1957-december 1958) supplement to C.E.A. reports n. 593 and 756

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmiterlow, C.G.; Cohen, Y.

    1958-01-01

    Recapitulative list of the C.E.A. reports published by the French Atomic Energy Commission. (number 757-1062, december 1957 - december 1958). Supplement to C.E.A. reports number 593 and 756. (author) [fr

  20. Prospects of multidisciplinary research for development of new therapeutic modalities in India: preclinical research on brain tumors as an illustrative example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kalia, Vijay K.; Kalyani Kumari; George, Jennifer; Shobha, A.G.

    2012-01-01

    Preclinical research is an essential prerequisite for the development of new therapeutic modalities for different diseases. Close interactions between basic scientists and clinicians are important for rapid progress with optimum input of resources. Cancer is emerging as a very important health hazard in India. Brain tumors, particularly malignant gliomas present a unique challenge, because of their location within the limited space of skull compartment. Conventional adjuvant radiotherapy after surgery is ineffective in killing the residual tumour, and also leads to radiation necrosis in patients with prolonged survival. Therefore, several agents and their combinations are being investigated to enhance the radiation sensitivity of brain tumor cells. Malignant brain tumors are known to have significantly elevated glycolytic activity as compared to the corresponding normal tissues. Our earlier preclinical studies combining 2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-DG) with radiation showed that manifestation of damage was increased in several tumor cell systems, whereas it was reduced in the normal cells. These studies lead to clinical trials using radiation plus 2-DG on malignant gliomas. Lonidamine (LND), a selective inhibitor of glycolytic pathway in cancer cells has been used in clinical trials on patients with brain and several other types of malignant tumors. Recent studies from this laboratory on the combination of LND and 2-DG with other anticancer agents on malignant human glioma cell lines as well as cells derived from glioma biopsies will be described in this presentation. The role of multidisciplinary collaborations between basic scientists and clinicians in such studies will also be discussed. (author)

  1. Therapeutic Potential of Selectively Targeting the α2C-Adrenoceptor in Cognition, Depression, and Schizophrenia—New Developments and Future Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madeleine Monique Uys

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available α2A- and α2C-adrenoceptors (ARs are the primary α2-AR subtypes involved in central nervous system (CNS function. These receptors are implicated in the pathophysiology of psychiatric illness, particularly those associated with affective, psychotic, and cognitive symptoms. Indeed, non-selective α2-AR blockade is proposed to contribute toward antidepressant (e.g., mirtazapine and atypical antipsychotic (e.g., clozapine drug action. Both α2C- and α2A-AR share autoreceptor functions to exert negative feedback control on noradrenaline (NA release, with α2C-AR heteroreceptors regulating non-noradrenergic transmission (e.g., serotonin, dopamine. While the α2A-AR is widely distributed throughout the CNS, α2C-AR expression is more restricted, suggesting the possibility of significant differences in how these two receptor subtypes modulate regional neurotransmission. However, the α2C-AR plays a more prominent role during states of low endogenous NA activity, while the α2A-AR is relatively more engaged during states of high noradrenergic tone. Although augmentation of conventional antidepressant and antipsychotic therapy with non-selective α2-AR antagonists may improve therapeutic outcome, animal studies report distinct yet often opposing roles for the α2A- and α2C-ARs on behavioral markers of mood and cognition, implying that non-selective α2-AR antagonism may compromise therapeutic utility both in terms of efficacy and side-effect liability. Recently, several highly selective α2C-AR antagonists have been identified that have allowed deeper investigation into the function and utility of the α2C-AR. ORM-13070 is a useful positron emission tomography ligand, ORM-10921 has demonstrated antipsychotic, antidepressant, and pro-cognitive actions in animals, while ORM-12741 is in clinical development for the treatment of cognitive dysfunction and neuropsychiatric symptoms in Alzheimer’s disease. This review will emphasize the importance and

  2. The significance of measuring serum IGF1, IGFBP3 and OST for the judgement of abnormal skeletal development and therapeutic monitoring in precocious children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ji Zhiying; Zhao Ruifang; Lv Xiaomei; Gu Fanlei; Cai Depei

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To study the value of measuring serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF 1 ), insulin-like growth factor binding protein III (IGFBP 3 ) and osteocalcin (OST) for evaluating acceleration of skeletal growth and skeletal maturity, and its value for therapeutic monitoring in precocious children. Methods: Serum IGF 1 and IGFBP 3 were measured with immunoradiometric assay, serum OST was measured with radioimmunoassay in 117 girls with idiopathic precocious puberty. The girls were grouped according to age, and various parameters collected from them were compared with normal values of matched girls. Furthermore, the girls were grouped according to Tanner's staging (the extent of precocious puberty), the analysis of correlativity between various parameters to the extent of precocious puberty was performed, and the analysis of correlativity between the level of serum IGF 1 and advancing of bone age was performed. Various parameters were measured once more in 38 of the study girls after six months of the treatment, and the parameters were compared with that before treatment. Results: 1) The levels of serum IGF 1 and OST in the girls with precocious puberty were elevated obviously than that in matched normal girls, but the level of serum IGFBP 3 was reduced obviously than that in matched normal girls. It was demonstrated that typical elevation of serum IGF 1 and OST occurred in normal adolescence appeared ahead of time in the girls with precocious puberty. 2) The extent of precocious puberty correlated closely with the level of serum IGF 1 (r=0.489, P 1 (r=0.411, P 1 was. 3) After the treatment, the concentration of serum IGF 1 reduced from (455.52 ± 119.45) μg/L to (284.55 ± 99.52) μg/L (P 1 and OST reduced obviously. Conclusions: Serum IGF 1 and OST could act as quantitative parameters for evaluating acceleration of skeletal growth and advancing of skeletal maturity in girls with idiopathic true precocious puberty. It could act as a parameter for therapeutic

  3. Recapitulative list of the C.E.A. reports published by the French Atomic Energy Commission (n.757-1062, december 1957-december 1958) supplement to C.E.A. reports n. 593 and 756; Liste recapitulative des rapports C.E.A. publies par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (du n.757 a 1062, decembre 1957-decembre 1958) complement aux rapports C.E.A. n. 593 et 756

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmiterlow, C.G.; Cohen, Y. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1958-07-01

    Recapitulative list of the C.E.A. reports published by the French Atomic Energy Commission. (number 757-1062, december 1957 - december 1958). Supplement to C.E.A. reports number 593 and 756. (author) [French] Liste recapitulative des rapports C.E.A. publies par le Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique (du numero 757 au numero 1062, decembre 1957 - decembre 1958). Complement aux rapports C.E.A. numero 593 et 756. (auteur)

  4. Development of a fluorescent reporter system for monitoring ER stress in Chinese hamster ovary cells and its application for therapeutic protein production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gargi Roy

    Full Text Available Mammalian cell expression systems have become a workhorse for the production of biotherapeutic proteins. As such, there is an ever increasing demand for higher productivity from these expression platforms to reduce manufacturing costs. While great advances have been made in the optimization of culture conditions and cell line selection to improve productivity, protein mis-folding remains a common limitation to high levels of production of therapeutic proteins. Accumulation of mis- and unfolded protein in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER causes ER stress and initiates the unfolded protein response (UPR that results in an activation of protein folding machinery, translation attenuation in an effort to proper folding of the newly synthesized peptides or may even lead to apoptosis if the correct folding is not restored. As a result, UPR associated apoptosis often results in lower protein expression. To better understand the molecular mechanisms in these pathways, we developed a reporter construct that detects Inositol-requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1-alpha mediated splicing of X-box binding protein 1 (XBP1 to monitor the course of UPR activation in cell lines expressing monoclonal antibodies. Using this reporter we observed a clear activation of UPR in cells treated with known ER stress causing pharmacological agents, such as Tunicamycin (Tm and Thapsigargin (Tg, as well as in stable IgG expressing cells during fed-batch cultures. Furthermore, we developed a stress metric that we term as ER stress index (ERSI to gauge basal ER stress in cells which we used as a predictive tool for isolation of high IgG expressing cell lines. This reporter system, with its ability to monitor the stress involved in recombinant protein expression, has utility to assist in devising engineering strategies for improved production of biotherapeutic drugs.

  5. Therapeutic nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Richard P. (ed.) [ENETS Center of Excellence, Bad Berka (Germany). THERANOSTICS Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Molecular Imaging

    2014-07-01

    Discusses all aspects of radionuclide therapy, including basic principles, newly available treatments, regulatory requirements, and future trends. Provides the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Explains the role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in effectively coordinating a diverse multidisciplinary team. Written by leading experts. The recent revolution in molecular biology offers exciting new opportunities for targeted radionuclide therapy. The selective irradiation of tumor cells through molecular biological mechanisms is now permitting the radiopharmaceutical control of tumors that are unresectable and unresponsive to either chemotherapy or conventional radiotherapy. In this up-to-date, comprehensive book, world-renowned experts discuss the basic principles of radionuclide therapy, explore in detail the available treatments, explain the regulatory requirements, and examine likely future developments. The full range of clinical applications is considered, including thyroid cancer, hematological malignancies, brain tumors, liver cancer, bone and joint disease, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of theoretical background and practical information will provide the reader with all the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Careful attention is also paid to the important role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in delivering the effective coordination of a diverse multidisciplinary team that is essential to the safe provision of treatment.

  6. Therapeutic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Discusses all aspects of radionuclide therapy, including basic principles, newly available treatments, regulatory requirements, and future trends. Provides the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Explains the role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in effectively coordinating a diverse multidisciplinary team. Written by leading experts. The recent revolution in molecular biology offers exciting new opportunities for targeted radionuclide therapy. The selective irradiation of tumor cells through molecular biological mechanisms is now permitting the radiopharmaceutical control of tumors that are unresectable and unresponsive to either chemotherapy or conventional radiotherapy. In this up-to-date, comprehensive book, world-renowned experts discuss the basic principles of radionuclide therapy, explore in detail the available treatments, explain the regulatory requirements, and examine likely future developments. The full range of clinical applications is considered, including thyroid cancer, hematological malignancies, brain tumors, liver cancer, bone and joint disease, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of theoretical background and practical information will provide the reader with all the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Careful attention is also paid to the important role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in delivering the effective coordination of a diverse multidisciplinary team that is essential to the safe provision of treatment.

  7. Acceptability and impact on anthropometry of a locally developed ready-to-use therapeutic food in pre-school children in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nga, Tran T; Nguyen, Marie; Mathisen, Roger; Hoa, Do T B; Minh, Nguyen H; Berger, Jacques; Wieringa, Frank T

    2013-08-15

    In South East Asia, concerns exist about the acceptability of peanut-based Ready-to-Use-Therapeutic-Foods (RUTF) for the treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Therefore, an alternative, culturally acceptable RUTF made from locally available ingredients and complying with local food traditions and preferences was developed. The current study evaluated its acceptability and impact on anthropometry. The study was a randomized, two-arm, cross-over intervention trial to test the acceptability of the local product (bar) against a commercially available, peanut-based RUTF paste (Plumpy'nut®). Children (n = 67) from two kindergartens in a rural area of North Vietnam were recruited. The age of the children was between 3 and 5 years. The Vietnamese RUTF was well-accepted, although overall acceptability was less than of Plumpy'nut®, with the latter scoring higher on palatability (P < 0.05). In contrast, reluctance to eat Plumpy'nut® was higher than for the Vietnamese RUTF (P < 0.05). Impact on anthropmetrical indices was similar for both RUTF. The nutritional status of the children who consumed the two RUTF over a 4 week period improved significantly, with a mean weight gain of 0.64 (SD 0.27) Kg, and increases in WHZ and HAZ z-scores of 0.48 (SD 0.30) and 0.05 (SD 0.13) respectively (P < 0.01 both). Weight gain was similar between the 2 products (0.32 kg per 2 weeks for both). Both the commercial Plumpy'nut® and the local produced RUTF were accepted although the harder consistency of the local product might have caused the lower overall acceptance. The promising increase in nutritional status needs to be confirmed in a controlled trial in children with SAM.

  8. Development of a cross-over randomized trial method to determine the acceptability and safety of novel ready-to-use therapeutic foods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dibari, Filippo; Bahwere, Paluku; Huerga, Helena; Irena, Abel Hailu; Owino, Victor; Collins, Steve; Seal, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    To develop a method for determining the acceptability and safety of ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF) before clinical trialing. Acceptability was defined using a combination of three consumption, nine safety, and six preference criteria. These were used to compare a soy/maize/sorghum RUTF (SMS-RUTFh), designed for the rehabilitation of human immunodeficiency virus/tuberculosis (HIV/TB) wasted adults, with a peanut-butter/milk-powder paste (P-RUTF; brand: Plumpy'nut) designed for pediatric treatment. A cross-over, randomized, controlled trial was conducted in Kenya. Ten days of repeated measures of product intake by 41 HIV/TB patients, >18 y old, body mass index (BMI) 18-24 kg · m(-2), 250 g were offered daily under direct observation as a replacement lunch meal. Consumption, comorbidity, and preferences were recorded. The study arms had similar age, sex, marital status, initial BMI, and middle upper-arm circumference. No carryover effect or serious adverse events were found. SMS-RUTFh energy intake was not statistically different from the control, when adjusted for BMI on day 1, and the presence of throat sores. General preference, taste, and sweetness scores were higher for SMS-RUTFh compared to the control (P preference criteria for SMS-RUTFh were satisfied except for the average number of days of nausea (0.16 versus 0.09 d) and vomiting (0.04 versus 0.02 d), which occurred with a higher frequency (P < 0.05). SMS-RUTFh appears to be acceptable and can be safely clinically trialed, if close monitoring of vomiting and nausea is included. The method reported here is a useful and feasible approach for testing the acceptability of ready-to-use foods in low income countries. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Using therapeutic touch in nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdtner, S

    2000-01-01

    This article is an introduction to "therapeutic touch" and its implications for nursing. A case study provides an example of how therapeutic touch was used with an individual who fell from a ladder and injured his elbow. A brief history and assumptions that support the practice of therapeutic touch are discussed. Rogers' Science of Unitary Human Beings, a nursing theory, provides a theoretical basis for therapeutic touch. The method developed by Kunz and Krieger involves four phases and each of these is identified and described. General uses for therapeutic touch are presented and a variety of research studies validate the practice of therapeutic touch in nursing. Resources are provided for those who may be interested in learning more about therapeutic touch.

  10. Ablation of fast-spiking interneurons in the dorsal striatum, recapitulating abnormalities seen post-mortem in Tourette syndrome, produces anxiety and elevated grooming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, M; Li, L; Pittenger, C

    2016-06-02

    Tic disorders, including Tourette syndrome (TS), are thought to involve pathology of cortico-basal ganglia loops, but their pathology is not well understood. Post-mortem studies have shown a reduced number of several populations of striatal interneurons, including the parvalbumin-expressing fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs), in individuals with severe, refractory TS. We tested the causal role of this interneuronal deficit by recapitulating it in an otherwise normal adult mouse using a combination transgenic-viral cell ablation approach. FSIs were reduced bilaterally by ∼40%, paralleling the deficit found post-mortem. This did not produce spontaneous stereotypies or tic-like movements, but there was increased stereotypic grooming after acute stress in two validated paradigms. Stereotypy after amphetamine, in contrast, was not elevated. FSI ablation also led to increased anxiety-like behavior in the elevated plus maze, but not to alterations in motor learning on the rotorod or to alterations in prepulse inhibition, a measure of sensorimotor gating. These findings indicate that a striatal FSI deficit can produce stress-triggered repetitive movements and anxiety. These repetitive movements may recapitulate aspects of the pathophysiology of tic disorders. Copyright © 2016 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Medullary Thymic Epithelial Cells and Central Tolerance in Autoimmune Hepatitis Development: Novel Perspective from a New Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantina Alexandropoulos

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Autoimmune hepatitis (AIH is an immune-mediated disorder that affects the liver parenchyma. Diagnosis usually occurs at the later stages of the disease, complicating efforts towards understanding the causes of disease development. While animal models are useful for studying the etiology of autoimmune disorders, most of the existing animal models of AIH do not recapitulate the chronic course of the human condition. In addition, approaches to mimic AIH-associated liver inflammation have instead led to liver tolerance, consistent with the high tolerogenic capacity of the liver. Recently, we described a new mouse model that exhibited spontaneous and chronic liver inflammation that recapitulated the known histopathological and immunological parameters of AIH. The approach involved liver-extrinsic genetic engineering that interfered with the induction of T-cell tolerance in the thymus, the very process thought to inhibit AIH induction by liver-specific expression of exogenous antigens. The mutation led to depletion of specialized thymic epithelial cells that present self-antigens and eliminate autoreactive T-cells before they exit the thymus. Based on our findings, which are summarized below, we believe that this mouse model represents a relevant experimental tool towards elucidating the cellular and molecular aspects of AIH development and developing novel therapeutic strategies for treating this disease.

  12. Antiviral Polymer Therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Anton Allen Abbotsford

    2014-01-01

    polymerized in a controlled manner with carrier monomers of historically proven biocompatible polymers. The carrier polymers, the loading of ribavirin as well as the size of the polymer were varied systematically with the aid of an automated synthesis platform. These polymers were tested in a cellular assay...... of reversible-addition-fragmentation chain transfer polymerization, which not only controls the size of polymer, but also allows the introduction of a terminal amine on the polymer which can be used for further conjugation. This has allowed for not only fluorescent labeling of the polymer, but also protein......The field of drug delivery is in essence an exercise in engineered pharmacokinetics. Methods of doing so have been developed through the introduction of a vehicle carrying the drug, either by encapsulation or covalent attachment. The emergence of polymer therapeutics in anticancer therapy has...

  13. Acylation of Therapeutic Peptides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trier, Sofie; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Jensen, Simon Bjerregaard

    to the harsh and selective gastrointestinal system, and development has lacked far behind injection therapy. Peptide acylation is a powerful tool to alter the pharmacokinetics, biophysical properties and chemical stability of injectable peptide drugs, primarily used to prolong blood circulation....... This work aims to characterize acylated analogues of two therapeutic peptides by systematically increasing acyl chain length in order to elucidate its influence on membrane interaction and intestinal cell translocation in vitro. The studied peptides are the 33 amino acid Glucagon-like peptide-2 (GLP-2...... peptides can increase in vitro intestinal permeability, modestly for GLP-2 and drastically for sCT, and might benefit oral delivery. GLP-2 results provide a well-founded predictive power for future peptide analogues, whereas sCT results hold great promise for future analogues, albeit with a larger...

  14. Therapeutic and diagnostic nanomaterials

    CERN Document Server

    Devasena T

    2017-01-01

    This brief highlights nanoparticles used in the diagnosis and treatment of prominent diseases and toxic conditions. Ecofriendly methods which are ideal for the synthesis of medicinally valued nanoparticles are explained and the characteristic features of these particles projected. The role of these particles in the therapeutic field, and the induced biological changes in some diseases are discussed. The main focus is on inflammation, oxidative stress and cellular membrane integrity alterations. The effect of nanoparticles on these changes produced by various agents are highlighted using in vitro and in vivo models. The mechanism of nanoparticles in ameliorating the biological changes is supported by relevant images and data. Finally, the brief demonstrates recent developments on the use of nanoparticles in diagnosis or sensing of some biological materials and biologically hazardous environmental materials.

  15. A novel osteogenic oxysterol compound for therapeutic development to promote bone growth: activation of hedgehog signaling and osteogenesis through smoothened binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, Scott R; Nargizyan, Taya; Meliton, Vicente; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Rohatgi, Rajat; Stappenbeck, Frank; Jung, Michael E; Johnson, Jared S; Aghdasi, Bayan; Tian, Haijun; Weintraub, Gil; Inoue, Hirokazu; Atti, Elisa; Tetradis, Sotirios; Pereira, Renata C; Hokugo, Akishige; Alobaidaan, Raed; Tan, Yanlin; Hahn, Theodor J; Wang, Jeffrey C; Parhami, Farhad

    2014-08-01

    molecule osteogenic oxysterols may serve as the next generation of bone anabolic agents for therapeutic development. © 2014 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research.

  16. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Myogenic Cells from Urine-Derived Stem Cells Recapitulate the Dystrophin Genotype and Phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; D'Amario, Domenico; Siracusano, Andrea; Massetti, Massimo; Amodeo, Antonio; La Neve, Federica; Maroni, Camilla Reina; Mercuri, Eugenio; Osman, Hana; Scotton, Chiara; Armaroli, Annarita; Rossi, Rachele; Selvatici, Rita; Crea, Filippo; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2016-10-01

    A ready source of autologous myogenic cells is of vital importance for drug screening and functional genetic studies in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), a rare disease caused by a variety of dystrophin gene mutations. As stem cells (SCs) can be easily and noninvasively obtained from urine specimens, we set out to determine whether they could be myogenically induced and useful in DMD research. To this end, we isolated stem cells from the urine of two healthy donors and from one patient with DMD, and performed surface marker characterization, myogenic differentiation (MyoD), and then transfection with antisense oligoribonucleotides to test for exon skipping and protein restoration. We demonstrated that native urine-derived stem cells express the full-length dystrophin transcript, and that the dystrophin mutation was retained in the cells of the patient with DMD, although the dystrophin protein was detected solely in control cells after myogenic transformation according to the phenotype. Notably, we also showed that treatment with antisense oligoribonucleotide against dystrophin exon 44 induced skipping in both native and MyoD-transformed urine-derived stem cells in DMD, with a therapeutic transcript-reframing effect, as well as visible protein restoration in the latter. Hence MyoD-transformed cells may be a good myogenic model for studying dystrophin gene expression, and native urine stem cells could be used to study the dystrophin transcript, and both diagnostic procedures and splicing modulation therapies in both patients and control subjects, without invasive and costly collection methods. New, bankable bioproducts from urine stem cells, useful for prescreening studies and therapeutic applications alike, are also foreseeable after further, more in-depth characterization.

  17. Development of Antisense Therapeutic and Imaging Agents to Detect and Suppress Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase (iNOS) Expression in Acute Lung Injury (ALI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yuefei

    This dissertation focuses on the development and investigation of antisense imaging and therapeutic agents, combined with nanotechnology, to detect and suppress inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression for the diagnosis and treatment of acute lung injury (ALI). To achieve this goal, several efforts were made. The first effort was the identification and characterization of high binding affinity antisense peptide nucleic acids (PNAs) and shell-crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (SCK)-PNA conjugates to the iNOS mRNA. Antisense binding sites on the iNOS mRNA were first mapped by a procedure for rapidly generating a library of antisense accessible sites on native mRNAs (MASL) which involves reverse transcription of whole cell mRNA extracts with a random oligodeoxynucleotide primer followed by mRNA-specific PCR. Antisense PNAs against the antisense accessible sites were accordingly synthesized and characterized. The second effort was the investigation of cationic shell crosslinked knedel-like nanoparticle (cSCK)-mediated siRNA delivery to suppress iNOS expression for the treatment of ALI. siRNA with its unique gene-specific properties could serve as a promising therapeutic agent, however success in this area has been challenged by a lack of efficient biocompatible transfection agents. cSCK with its nanometer size and positive charge previously showed efficient cellular delivery of phosphorothioate ODNs (oligodeoxynucleotides), plasmid DNA and PNA. Herein, cSCK showed good siRNA binding and facilitated efficient siRNA transfection in HeLa, a mouse macrophage cell line and other human cell lines. cSCK led to greater silencing efficiency than Lipofectamine 2000 in HeLa cells as determined by the viability following transfection with cytotoxic and non-cytotoxic siRNAs, as well in 293T and HEK cells, and was comparable in BEAS-2B and MCF10a cells. The third effort was the preparation of an iNOS imaging probe through electrostatic complexation between a radiolabeled

  18. Potential therapeutic applications of biosurfactants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudiña, Eduardo J; Rangarajan, Vivek; Sen, Ramkrishna; Rodrigues, Lígia R

    2013-12-01

    Biosurfactants have recently emerged as promising molecules for their structural novelty, versatility, and diverse properties that are potentially useful for many therapeutic applications. Mainly due to their surface activity, these molecules interact with cell membranes of several organisms and/or with the surrounding environments, and thus can be viewed as potential cancer therapeutics or as constituents of drug delivery systems. Some types of microbial surfactants, such as lipopeptides and glycolipids, have been shown to selectively inhibit the proliferation of cancer cells and to disrupt cell membranes causing their lysis through apoptosis pathways. Moreover, biosurfactants as drug delivery vehicles offer commercially attractive and scientifically novel applications. This review covers the current state-of-the-art in biosurfactant research for therapeutic purposes, providing new directions towards the discovery and development of molecules with novel structures and diverse functions for advanced applications. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A mouse model for fucosidosis recapitulates storage pathology and neurological features of the milder form of the human disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heike Wolf

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Fucosidosis is a rare lysosomal storage disorder caused by the inherited deficiency of the lysosomal hydrolase α-L-fucosidase, which leads to an impaired degradation of fucosylated glycoconjugates. Here, we report the generation of a fucosidosis mouse model, in which the gene for lysosomal α-L-fucosidase (Fuca1 was disrupted by gene targeting. Homozygous knockout mice completely lack α-L-fucosidase activity in all tested organs leading to highly elevated amounts of the core-fucosylated glycoasparagine Fuc(α1,6-GlcNAc(β1-N-Asn and, to a lesser extent, other fucosylated glycoasparagines, which all were also partially excreted in urine. Lysosomal storage pathology was observed in many visceral organs, such as in the liver, kidney, spleen and bladder, as well as in the central nervous system (CNS. On the cellular level, storage was characterized by membrane-limited cytoplasmic vacuoles primarily containing water-soluble storage material. In the CNS, cellular alterations included enlargement of the lysosomal compartment in various cell types, accumulation of secondary storage material and neuroinflammation, as well as a progressive loss of Purkinje cells combined with astrogliosis leading to psychomotor and memory deficits. Our results demonstrate that this new fucosidosis mouse model resembles the human disease and thus will help to unravel underlying pathological processes. Moreover, this model could be utilized to establish diagnostic and therapeutic strategies for fucosidosis.

  20. Antiretroviral therapeutic drug monitoring

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Winnie

    A narrow therapeutic window. □ Good correlation between drug ... Antiretroviral therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM) is an additional monitoring tool to assist in the management of HIV-infected patients. Antiretroviral TDM is ... Antiretroviral TDM could play an important adjunctive role in our area. Clearly this will be a limited ...

  1. Development and Pre-Clinical Evaluation of Recombinant Human Myelin Basic Protein Nano Therapeutic Vaccine in Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Mice Animal Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ghobashy, Medhat A.; Elmeshad, Aliaa N.; Abdelsalam, Rania M.; Nooh, Mohammed M.; Al-Shorbagy, Muhammad; Laible, Götz

    2017-04-01

    Recombinant human myelin basic protein (rhMBP) was previously produced in the milk of transgenic cows. Differences in molecular recognition of either hMBP or rhMBP by surface-immobilized anti-hMBP antibodies were demonstrated. This indicated differences in immunological response between rhMBP and hMBP. Here, the activity of free and controlled release rhMBP poly(ε-caprolactone) nanoparticles (NPs), as a therapeutic vaccine against multiple sclerosis (MS) was demonstrated in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal model. Following optimization of nanoformulation, discrete spherical, rough-surfaced rhMBP NPs with high entrapment efficiency and controlled release pattern were obtained. Results indicated that rhMBP was loaded into and electrostatically adsorbed onto the surface of NPs. Subcutaneous administration of free or rhMBP NPs before EAE-induction reduced the average behavioral score in EAE mice and showed only mild histological alterations and preservation of myelin sheath, with rhMBP NPs showing increased protection. Moreover, analysis of inflammatory cytokines (IFN-γ and IL-10) in mice brains revealed that pretreatment with free or rhMBP NPs significantly protected against induced inflammation. In conclusion: i) rhMBP ameliorated EAE symptoms in EAE animal model, ii) nanoformulation significantly enhanced efficacy of rhMBP as a therapeutic vaccine and iii) clinical investigations are required to demonstrate the activity of rhMBP NPs as a therapeutic vaccine for MS.

  2. Development and Use of Personalized Bacteriophage-Based Therapeutic Cocktails To Treat a Patient with a Disseminated Resistant Acinetobacter baumannii Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Biswajit; Gill, Jason J.; Hernandez-Morales, Adriana; Lancaster, Jacob; Lessor, Lauren; Barr, Jeremy J.; Reed, Sharon L.; Rohwer, Forest; Benler, Sean; Segall, Anca M.; Taplitz, Randy; Smith, Davey M.; Kerr, Kim; Kumaraswamy, Monika; Nizet, Victor; Lin, Leo; McCauley, Melanie D.; Strathdee, Steffanie A.; Benson, Constance A.; Pope, Robert K.; Leroux, Brian M.; Picel, Andrew C.; Mateczun, Alfred J.; Cilwa, Katherine E.; Regeimbal, James M.; Estrella, Luis A.; Wolfe, David M.; Henry, Matthew S.; Quinones, Javier; Salka, Scott; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A.; Young, Ry; Hamilton, Theron

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Widespread antibiotic use in clinical medicine and the livestock industry has contributed to the global spread of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacterial pathogens, including Acinetobacter baumannii. We report on a method used to produce a personalized bacteriophage-based therapeutic treatment for a 68-year-old diabetic patient with necrotizing pancreatitis complicated by an MDR A. baumannii infection. Despite multiple antibiotic courses and efforts at percutaneous drainage of a pancreatic pseudocyst, the patient deteriorated over a 4-month period. In the absence of effective antibiotics, two laboratories identified nine different bacteriophages with lytic activity for an A. baumannii isolate from the patient. Administration of these bacteriophages intravenously and percutaneously into the abscess cavities was associated with reversal of the patient's downward clinical trajectory, clearance of the A. baumannii infection, and a return to health. The outcome of this case suggests that the methods described here for the production of bacteriophage therapeutics could be applied to similar cases and that more concerted efforts to investigate the use of therapeutic bacteriophages for MDR bacterial infections are warranted. PMID:28807909

  3. Therapeutic vaccines for leishmaniasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khamesipour, Ali

    2014-11-01

    Numerous therapeutic strategies are used to treat leishmaniasis. The treatment of cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is solely depends on antimonate derivatives with safety issues and questionable efficacy and there is no fully effective modality to treat CL caused by Leishmania tropica and Leishmania braziliensis. There is no prophylactic vaccine available against any form of leishmaniasis. Immunotherapy for CL has a long history; immunotherapy trials of first and second generation vaccines showed promising results. The current article briefly covers the prophylactic vaccines and explains different immunotherapy strategies that have been used to treat leishmaniasis. This paper does not include experimental vaccines and only lays emphasis on human trials and those vaccines which reached human trials. Immunotherapy is currently used to successfully treat several disorders; Low cost, limited side effects and no possibility to develop resistance make immunotherapy a valuable choice especially for infectious disease with chemotherapy problems. Efforts are needed to explore the immunological surrogate marker(s) of cure and protection in leishmaniasis and overcome the difficulties in standardization of crude Leishmania vaccines. One of the reasons for anti-leishmaniasis vaccine failure is lack of an appropriate adjuvant. So far, not enough attention has been paid to develop vaccines for immunotherapy of leishmaniasis.

  4. The renaissance of complement therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Mastellos, Dimitrios C; Reis, Edimara S; Lambris, John D

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of clinical conditions that involve a pathological contribution from the complement system - many of which affect the kidneys - has spurred a regained interest in therapeutic options to modulate this host defence pathway. Molecular insight, technological advances, and the first decade of clinical experience with the complement-specific drug eculizumab, have contributed to a growing confidence in therapeutic complement inhibition. More than 20 candidate drugs that target various stages of the complement cascade are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, and additional agents are in preclinical development. Such diversity is clearly needed in view of the complex and distinct involvement of complement in a wide range of clinical conditions, including rare kidney disorders, transplant rejection and haemodialysis-induced inflammation. The existing drugs cannot be applied to all complement-driven diseases, and each indication has to be assessed individually. Alongside considerations concerning optimal points of intervention and economic factors, patient stratification will become essential to identify the best complement-specific therapy for each individual patient. This Review provides an overview of the therapeutic concepts, targets and candidate drugs, summarizes insights from clinical trials, and reflects on existing challenges for the development of complement therapeutics for kidney diseases and beyond.

  5. The renaissance of complement therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricklin, Daniel; Mastellos, Dimitrios C.; Reis, Edimara S.; Lambris, John D.

    2018-01-01

    The increasing number of clinical conditions that involve a pathological contribution from the complement system — many of which affect the kidneys — has spurred a regained interest in therapeutic options to modulate this host defence pathway. Molecular insight, technological advances, and the first decade of clinical experience with the complement-specific drug eculizumab, have contributed to a growing confidence in therapeutic complement inhibition. More than 20 candidate drugs that target various stages of the complement cascade are currently being evaluated in clinical trials, and additional agents are in preclinical development. Such diversity is clearly needed in view of the complex and distinct involvement of complement in a wide range of clinical conditions, including rare kidney disorders, transplant rejection and haemodialysis-induced inflammation. The existing drugs cannot be applied to all complement-driven diseases, and each indication has to be assessed individually. Alongside considerations concerning optimal points of intervention and economic factors, patient stratification will become essential to identify the best complement-specific therapy for each individual patient. This Review provides an overview of the therapeutic concepts, targets and candidate drugs, summarizes insights from clinical trials, and reflects on existing challenges for the development of complement therapeutics for kidney diseases and beyond. PMID:29199277

  6. Reactor-produced therapeutic radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The significant worldwide increase in therapeutic radioisotope applications in nuclear medicine, oncology and interventional cardiology requires the dependable production of sufficient levels of radioisotopes for these applications (Reba, 2000; J. Nucl. Med., 1998; Nuclear News, 1999; Adelstein and Manning, 1994). The issues associated with both accelerator- and reactor-production of therapeutic radioisotopes is important. Clinical applications of therapeutic radioisotopes include the use of both sealed sources and unsealed radiopharmaceutical sources. Targeted radiopharmaceutical agents include those for cancer therapy and palliation of bone pain from metastatic disease, ablation of bone marrow prior to stem cell transplantation, treatment modalities for mono and oligo- and polyarthritis, for cancer therapy (including brachytherapy) and for the inhibition of the hyperplastic response following coronary angioplasty and other interventional procedures (For example, see Volkert and Hoffman, 1999). Sealed sources involve the use of radiolabeled devices for cancer therapy (brachytherapy) and also for the inhibition of the hyperplasia which is often encountered after angioplasty, especially with the exponential increase in the use of coronary stents and stents for the peripheral vasculature and other anatomical applications. Since neutron-rich radioisotopes often decay by beta decay or decay to beta-emitting daughter radioisotopes which serve as the basis for radionuclide generator systems, reactors are expected to play an increasingly important role for the production of a large variety of therapeutic radioisotopes required for these and other developing therapeutic applications. Because of the importance of the availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes for these applications, an understanding of the contribution of neutron spectra for radioisotope production and determination of those cross sections which have not yet been established is important. This

  7. [A therapeutic education tool in paediatric dentistry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marquillier, Thomas; Trentesaux, Thomas; Catteau, Céline; Delfosse, Caroline

    Therapeutic education for children is developing in the treatment of dental caries. The Elmy pathway, a pedagogical game aiming to improve children's oral health skills, has been designed. The qualitative assessment of this tool seems to confirm its benefit for use in therapeutic education sessions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  8. Bioactive poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels to recapitulate the HSC niche and facilitate HSC expansion in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuchiara, Maude L; Coşkun, Süleyman; Banda, Omar A; Horter, Kelsey L; Hirschi, Karen K; West, Jennifer L

    2016-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) have been used therapeutically for decades, yet their widespread clinical use is hampered by the inability to expand HSCs successfully in vitro. In culture, HSCs rapidly differentiate and lose their ability to self-renew. We hypothesize that by mimicking aspects of the bone marrow microenvironment in vitro we can better control the expansion and differentiation of these cells. In this work, derivatives of poly(ethylene glycol) diacrylate hydrogels were used as a culture substrate for hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell (HSPC) populations. Key HSC cytokines, stem cell factor (SCF) and interferon-γ (IFNγ), as well as the cell adhesion ligands RGDS and connecting segment 1 were covalently immobilized onto the surface of the hydrogels. With the use of SCF and IFNγ, we observed significant expansion of HSPCs, ∼97 and ∼104 fold respectively, while maintaining c-kit(+) lin(-) and c-kit(+) Sca1(+) lin(-) (KSL) populations and the ability to form multilineage colonies after 14 days. HSPCs were also encapsulated within degradable poly(ethylene glycol) hydrogels for three-dimensional culture. After expansion in hydrogels, ∼60% of cells were c-kit(+), demonstrating no loss in the proportion of these cells over the 14 day culture period, and ∼50% of colonies formed were multilineage, indicating that the cells retained their differentiation potential. The ability to tailor and use this system to support HSC growth could have implications on the future use of HSCs and other blood cell types in a clinical setting. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The Secret Life of Exosomes: What Bees Can Teach Us About Next-Generation Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marbán, Eduardo

    2018-01-16

    Mechanistic exploration has pinpointed nanosized extracellular vesicles, known as exosomes, as key mediators of the benefits of cell therapy. Exosomes appear to recapitulate the benefits of cells and more. As durable azoic entities, exosomes have numerous practical and conceptual advantages over cells. Will cells end up just being used to manufacture exosomes, or will they find lasting value as primary therapeutic agents? Here, a venerable natural process-the generation of honey-serves as an instructive parable. Flowers make nectar, which bees collect and process into honey. Cells make conditioned medium, which laboratory workers collect and process into exosomes. Unlike flowers, honey is durable, compact, and nutritious, but these facts do not negate the value of flowers themselves. The parallels suggest new ways of thinking about next-generation therapeutics. Copyright © 2018 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Therapeutic advances in muscular dystrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Leung, Doris G; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that produce progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. There has been rapid growth and change in our understanding of these disorders in recent years, and advances in basic science are being translated into increasing numbers of clinical trials. This review will discuss therapeutic developments in 3 of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystr...

  11. Oncolytic Viruses: Therapeutics With an Identity Crisis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline J. Breitbach

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic viruses (OV are replicating viral therapeutics for the treatment of cancer and have been in laboratory development for about twenty years. Recently, the FDA approved Imlygic, a herpes virus based therapeutic for the treatment of melanoma and thus OVs have entered a new era where they are a weapon in the armament of the oncologist. OVs are unique therapeutics with multiple mechanisms of therapeutic activity. The exact path for their development and eventual uptake by pharmaceutical companies is somewhat clouded by an uncertain identity. Are they vaccines, tumour lysing therapeutics, inducers of innate immunity, gene therapy vectors, anti-vascular agents or all of the above? Should they be developed as stand-alone loco-regional therapeutics, systemically delivered tumour hunters or immune modulators best tested as combination therapeutics? We summarize data here supporting the idea, depending upon the virus, that OVs can be any or all of these things. Pursuing a “one-size fits all” approach is counter-productive to their clinical development and instead as a field we should build on the strengths of individual virus platforms.

  12. Defining New Therapeutics Using a More Immunocompetent Mouse Model of Antibody-Enhanced Dengue Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinto, Amelia K; Brien, James D; Lam, Chia-Ying Kao; Johnson, Syd; Chiang, Cindy; Hiscott, John; Sarathy, Vanessa V; Barrett, Alan D; Shresta, Sujan; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-09-15

    With over 3.5 billion people at risk and approximately 390 million human infections per year, dengue virus (DENV) disease strains health care resources worldwide. Previously, we and others established models for DENV pathogenesis in mice that completely lack subunits of the receptors (Ifnar and Ifngr) for type I and type II interferon (IFN) signaling; however, the utility of these models is limited by the pleotropic effect of these cytokines on innate and adaptive immune system development and function. Here, we demonstrate that the specific deletion of Ifnar expression on subsets of murine myeloid cells (LysM Cre(+) Ifnar(flox/flox) [denoted as Ifnar(f/f) herein]) resulted in enhanced DENV replication in vivo. The administration of subneutralizing amounts of cross-reactive anti-DENV monoclonal antibodies to LysM Cre(+) Ifnar(f/f) mice prior to infection with DENV serotype 2 or 3 resulted in antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of infection with many of the characteristics associated with severe DENV disease in humans, including plasma leakage, hypercytokinemia, liver injury, hemoconcentration, and thrombocytopenia. Notably, the pathogenesis of severe DENV-2 or DENV-3 infection in LysM Cre(+) Ifnar(f/f) mice was blocked by pre- or postexposure administration of a bispecific dual-affinity retargeting molecule (DART) or an optimized RIG-I receptor agonist that stimulates innate immune responses. Our findings establish a more immunocompetent animal model of ADE of infection with multiple DENV serotypes in which disease is inhibited by treatment with broad-spectrum antibody derivatives or innate immune stimulatory agents. Although dengue virus (DENV) infects hundreds of millions of people annually and results in morbidity and mortality on a global scale, there are no approved antiviral treatments or vaccines. Part of the difficulty in evaluating therapeutic candidates is the lack of small animal models that are permissive to DENV and recapitulate the clinical features

  13. Simian varicella virus infection of rhesus macaques recapitulates essential features of varicella zoster virus infection in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhem Messaoudi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Simian varicella virus (SVV, the etiologic agent of naturally occurring varicella in primates, is genetically and antigenically closely related to human varicella zoster virus (VZV. Early attempts to develop a model of VZV pathogenesis and latency in nonhuman primates (NHP resulted in persistent infection. More recent models successfully produced latency; however, only a minority of monkeys became viremic and seroconverted. Thus, previous NHP models were not ideally suited to analyze the immune response to SVV during acute infection and the transition to latency. Here, we show for the first time that intrabronchial inoculation of rhesus macaques with SVV closely mimics naturally occurring varicella (chickenpox in humans. Infected monkeys developed varicella and viremia that resolved 21 days after infection. Months later, viral DNA was detected only in ganglia and not in non-ganglionic tissues. Like VZV latency in human ganglia, transcripts corresponding to SVV ORFs 21, 62, 63 and 66, but not ORF 40, were detected by RT-PCR. In addition, as described for VZV, SVV ORF 63 protein was detected in the cytoplasm of neurons in latently infected monkey ganglia by immunohistochemistry. We also present the first in depth analysis of the immune response to SVV. Infected animals produced a strong humoral and cell-mediated immune response to SVV, as assessed by immunohistology, serology and flow cytometry. Intrabronchial inoculation of rhesus macaques with SVV provides a novel model to analyze viral and immunological mechanisms of VZV latency and reactivation.

  14. Recapitulating X-Linked Juvenile Retinoschisis in Mouse Model by Knock-In Patient-Specific Novel Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ding Chen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available X-linked juvenile retinoschisis (XLRS is a retinal disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding retinoschisin (RS1, which leads to a significant proportion of visual impairment and blindness. To develop personalized genome editing based gene therapy, knock-in animal disease models that have the exact mutation identified in the patients is extremely crucial, and that the way which genome editing in knock-in animals could be easily transferred to the patients. Here we recruited a family diagnosed with XLRS and identified the causative mutation (RS1, p.Y65X, then a knock-in mouse model harboring this disease-causative mutation was generated via TALEN (transcription activator-like effector nucleases. We found that the b-wave amplitude of the ERG of the RS1-KI mice was significantly decreased. Moreover, we observed that the structure of retina in RS1-KI mice has become disordered, including the disarray of inner nuclear layer and outer nuclear layer, chaos of outer plexiform layer, decreased inner segments of photoreceptor and the loss of outer segments. The novel knock-in mice (RS1-KI harboring patient-specific mutation will be valuable for development of treatment via genome editing mediated gene correction.

  15. Avian Diagnostic and Therapeutic Antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bradley, David Sherman [UND SMHS

    2012-12-31

    A number of infectious agents have the potential of causing significant clinical symptomology and even death, but dispite this, the number of incidence remain below the level that supports producing a vaccine. Therapeutic antibodies provide a viable treatment option for many of these diseases. We proposed that antibodies derived from West Nile Virus (WNV) immunized geese would be able to treat WNV infection in mammals and potential humans. We demonstrated that WNV specific goose antibodies are indeed successful in treating WNV infection both prophylactically and therapeutically in a golden hamster model. We demonstrated that the goose derived antibodies are non-reactogenic, i.e. do not cause an inflammatory response with multiple exposures in mammals. We also developed both a specific pathogen free facility to house the geese during the antibody production phase and a patent-pending purification process to purify the antibodies to greater than 99% purity. Therefore, the success of these study will allow a cost effective rapidly producible therapeutic toward clinical testing with the necessary infrastructure and processes developed and in place.

  16. Therapeutic approaches for celiac disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plugis, Nicholas M.; Khosla, Chaitan

    2015-01-01

    Celiac disease is a common, lifelong autoimmune disorder for which dietary control is the only accepted form of therapy. A strict gluten-free diet is burdensome to patients and can be limited in efficacy, indicating there is an unmet need for novel therapeutic approaches to supplement or supplant dietary therapy. Many molecular events required for disease pathogenesis have been recently characterized and inspire most current and emerging drug-discovery efforts. Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) confirm the importance of human leukocyte antigen genes in our pathogenic model and identify a number of new risk loci in this complex disease. Here, we review the status of both emerging and potential therapeutic strategies in the context of disease pathophysiology. We conclude with a discussion of how genes identified during GWAS and follow-up studies that enhance susceptibility may offer insight into developing novel therapies. PMID:26060114

  17. Oncogenic fusion proteins expressed in immature hematopoietic cells fail to recapitulate the transcriptional changes observed in human AML

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rapin, N; Porse, B T

    2014-01-01

    Reciprocal chromosomal translocations are observed in one-third of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cases. Targeting and understanding the effects of the resulting aberrant oncogenic fusion proteins may help developing drugs against specific leukemic subtypes, as demonstrated earlier by the use of ATRA....... Surprisingly, we found that the gene-expression profiles of CD34+ human HSPCs transformed with the potent oncogenic fusion proteins AML-ETO or MLL-AF9, only weakly resembled those derived from primary AML samples. Hence, our work raises concerns as to the relevance of the use of in vitro transduced cells...... in acute promyelocytic leukemia. Hematopoietic stem/progenitor (HSPCs) cells transduced with oncogenic fusion genes are regarded as promising in vitromodels of their corresponding AML subtypes. Here, we critically assessed the potential of such in vitro models using an integrative bioinformatics approach...

  18. Novel Therapeutics for Pancreatic Adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery, Maeve A; O'Reilly, Eileen M

    2015-08-01

    The last decade has seen significant developments in the use of combination systemic therapy for advanced pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), with median survival approaching 1 year for select patients treated with FOLFIRINOX in the metastatic setting. However, it is sobering that these developments have been achieved with the use of traditional cytotoxics rather than from successes in the more modern fields of molecularly targeted therapies or immunotherapy. This article highlights several promising therapeutic approaches to PDAC currently under clinical evaluation, including immune therapies, molecularly targeted therapies, strategies for stromal depletion, and targeted therapy for genetically selected patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Anti-proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies recapitulate systemic vasculitis in mice with a humanized immune system.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Little, Mark A

    2012-01-01

    Evidence is lacking for direct pathogenicity of human anti-proteinase-3 (PR3) antibodies in development of systemic vasculitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener\\'s granulomatosis). Progress in study of these antibodies in rodents has been hampered by lack of PR3 expression on murine neutrophils, and by different Fc-receptor affinities for IgG across species. Therefore, we tested whether human anti-PR3 antibodies can induce acute vasculitis in mice with a human immune system. Chimeric mice were generated by injecting human haematopoietic stem cells into irradiated NOD-scid-IL2Rγ⁻\\/⁻ mice. Matched chimera mice were treated with human IgG from patients with: anti-PR3 positive renal and lung vasculitis; patients with non-vasculitic renal disease; or healthy controls. Six-days later, 39% of anti-PR3 treated mice had haematuria, compared with none of controls. There was punctate bleeding on the surface of lungs of anti-PR3 treated animals, with histological evidence of vasculitis and haemorrhage. Anti-PR3 treated mice had mild pauci-immune proliferative glomerulonephritis, with infiltration of human and mouse leukocytes. In 3 mice (17%) more severe glomerular injury was present. There were no glomerular changes in controls. Human IgG from patients with anti-PR3 autoantibodies is therefore pathogenic. This model of anti-PR3 antibody-mediated vasculitis may be useful in dissecting mechanisms of microvascular injury.

  20. Anti-proteinase 3 anti-neutrophil cytoplasm autoantibodies recapitulate systemic vasculitis in mice with a humanized immune system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark A Little

    Full Text Available Evidence is lacking for direct pathogenicity of human anti-proteinase-3 (PR3 antibodies in development of systemic vasculitis and granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA, Wegener's granulomatosis. Progress in study of these antibodies in rodents has been hampered by lack of PR3 expression on murine neutrophils, and by different Fc-receptor affinities for IgG across species. Therefore, we tested whether human anti-PR3 antibodies can induce acute vasculitis in mice with a human immune system. Chimeric mice were generated by injecting human haematopoietic stem cells into irradiated NOD-scid-IL2Rγ⁻/⁻ mice. Matched chimera mice were treated with human IgG from patients with: anti-PR3 positive renal and lung vasculitis; patients with non-vasculitic renal disease; or healthy controls. Six-days later, 39% of anti-PR3 treated mice had haematuria, compared with none of controls. There was punctate bleeding on the surface of lungs of anti-PR3 treated animals, with histological evidence of vasculitis and haemorrhage. Anti-PR3 treated mice had mild pauci-immune proliferative glomerulonephritis, with infiltration of human and mouse leukocytes. In 3 mice (17% more severe glomerular injury was present. There were no glomerular changes in controls. Human IgG from patients with anti-PR3 autoantibodies is therefore pathogenic. This model of anti-PR3 antibody-mediated vasculitis may be useful in dissecting mechanisms of microvascular injury.

  1. Overexpression of ERG in cord blood progenitors promotes expansion and recapitulates molecular signatures of high ERG leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tursky, M L; Beck, D; Thoms, J A I; Huang, Y; Kumari, A; Unnikrishnan, A; Knezevic, K; Evans, K; Richards, L A; Lee, E; Morris, J; Goldberg, L; Izraeli, S; Wong, J W H; Olivier, J; Lock, R B; MacKenzie, K L; Pimanda, J E

    2015-04-01

    High expression of the ETS family transcription factor ERG is associated with poor clinical outcome in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and acute T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). In murine models, high ERG expression induces both T-ALL and AML. However, no study to date has defined the effect of high ERG expression on primary human hematopoietic cells. In the present study, human CD34+ cells were transduced with retroviral vectors to elevate ERG gene expression to levels detected in high ERG AML. RNA sequencing was performed on purified populations of transduced cells to define the effects of high ERG on gene expression in human CD34+ cells. Integration of the genome-wide expression data with other data sets revealed that high ERG drives an expression signature that shares features of normal hematopoietic stem cells, high ERG AMLs, early T-cell precursor-ALLs and leukemic stem cell signatures associated with poor clinical outcome. Functional assays linked this gene expression profile to enhanced progenitor cell expansion. These results support a model whereby a stem cell gene expression network driven by high ERG in human cells enhances the expansion of the progenitor pool, providing opportunity for the acquisition and propagation of mutations and the development of leukemia.

  2. Low dose rectal inoculation of rhesus macaques by SIV smE660 or SIVmac251 recapitulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hraber, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giorgi, Elena E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keele, Brandon [UNIV OF ALABAMA; Li, Hui [UNIV OF ALABAMA; Learn, Gerald [UNIV OF ALABAMA

    2008-01-01

    We recently developed a novel strategy to identify transmitted HIV-1 genomes in acutely infected humans using single-genome amplification and a model of random virus evolution. Here, we used this approach to determine the molecular features of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) transmission in 18 experimentally infected Indian rhesus macaques. Animals were inoculated intrarectally (i.r.) or intravenously (i.v.) with stocks of SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 that exhibited sequence diversity typical of early-chronic HIV-1 infection. 987 full-length SIV env sequences (median of 48 per animal) were determined from plasma virion RNA 1--5 wk after infection. i.r. inoculation was followed by productive infection by one or a few viruses (median 1; range 1--5) that diversified randomly with near starlike phylogeny and a Poisson distribution of mutations. Consensus viral sequences from ramp-up and peak viremia were identical to viruses found in the inocula or differed from them by only one or a few nucleotides, providing direct evidence that early plasma viral sequences coalesce to transmitted/founder viruses. i.v. infection was >2,000-fold more efficient than i.r. infection, and viruses transmitted by either route represented the full genetic spectra of the inocula. These findings identify key similarities in mucosal transmission and early diversification between SIV and HIV-1, and thus validate the SIV-macaque mucosal infection model for HIV-1 vaccine and microbicide research.

  3. Therapeutic HIV Peptide Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomsgaard, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to control chronic HIV infection and eliminate the need for lifelong antiretroviral therapy (ART). Therapeutic HIV vaccine is being pursued as part of a functional cure for HIV/AIDS. We have outlined a basic protocol for inducing new T cell immunity during chronic HIV-1...... infection directed to subdominant conserved HIV-1 epitopes restricted to frequent HLA supertypes. The rationale for selecting HIV peptides and adjuvants are provided. Peptide subunit vaccines are regarded as safe due to the simplicity, quality, purity, and low toxicity. The caveat is reduced immunogenicity...

  4. Renin-angiotensin system transgenic mouse model recapitulates pathophysiology similar to human preeclampsia with renal injury that may be mediated through VEGF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denney, J Morgan; Bird, Cynthia; Gendron-Fitzpatrick, Annette; Sampene, Emmanuel; Bird, Ian M; Shah, Dinesh M

    2017-03-01

    Using a transgenic cross, we evaluated features of preeclampsia, renal injury and the sFlt1/VEGF changes. Transgenic hAGT and hREN, or wild-type (WT) C57Bl/6 mice were cross-bred: female hAGT × male hREN for preeclampsia (PRE) model and female WT × male WT for pregnant controls (WTP). Samples were collected for plasma VEGF, sFlt1, and urine albumin. Blood pressures (BP) were monitored by telemetry. Vascular reactivity was investigated by wire myography. Kidneys and placenta were immunostained for sFlt1 and VEGF. Eleven PRE and 9 WTP mice were compared. PRE more frequently demonstrated albuminuria, glomerular endotheliosis (80% vs. 11%; P = 0.02), and placental necrosis (60% vs. 0%; P preeclampsia recapitulates human preeclamptic state with high fidelity, and that, vascular adaptation to pregnancy is suggested by declining BPs and reduced vascular response to PE and increased response to acetylcholine. Placental damage with resultant increased release of sFlt1, proteinuria, deficient spiral artery remodeling, and glomerular endotheliosis were observed in this model of PRE. Increased VEGF binding to glomerular endothelial cells in this model of PRE is similar to human PRE and leads us to hypothesize that renal injury in preeclampsia may be mediated through local VEGF. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Heterozygous Pitx2 Null Mice Accurately Recapitulate the Ocular Features of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and Congenital Glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Lisheng; Gage, Philip J

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to assess the utility of Pitx2+/- mice as a model for the ocular features of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and for congenital glaucoma. Eyes of Pitx2+/- and wild-type littermates were examined clinically using optical coherence tomography (OCT) and fundus photography. Intraocular pressures were measured using a TonoLab rebound tonometer. Eyes were examined histologically to assess PITX2 expression, structural integrity, and optic nerve and ganglion cell content. PITX2 is present postnatally in the corneal endothelium and stroma, iris stroma, trabecular meshwork, and Schlemm's canal. Reduced central corneal thickness, iris defects, and iridicorneal adhesions are all prevalent in Pitx2+/- eyes. Although optic nerve heads appear normal at postnatal day 7, IOP is elevated and optic nerve head cupping is fully penetrant in Pitx2+/- eyes by 3 weeks of age. Neurodegeneration is present in a significant percentage of optic nerves from Pitx2+/- mice by 3 weeks of age, and is fully penetrant by 2 months of age. Pitx2+/- eyes show significant reductions in specifically ganglion cell density in all four quadrants by 2 months of age. Pitx2+/- mice model the major ocular features of Axenfeld-Rieger Syndrome and will be an important resource for understanding the molecular mechanisms leading to anterior segment dysgenesis and a high prevalence of glaucoma in this disease. In addition, these mice may provide an efficient new model for assessing the molecular events in glaucoma more generally, and for developing and testing new treatment paradigms for this disease.

  6. Recapitulation of spinal motor neuron-specific disease phenotypes in a human cell model of spinal muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Bo; Zhang, Xiaoqing; Li, Xue-Jun

    2013-03-01

    Establishing human cell models of spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) to mimic motor neuron-specific phenotypes holds the key to understanding the pathogenesis of this devastating disease. Here, we developed a closely representative cell model of SMA by knocking down the disease-determining gene, survival motor neuron (SMN), in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Our study with this cell model demonstrated that knocking down of SMN does not interfere with neural induction or the initial specification of spinal motor neurons. Notably, the axonal outgrowth of spinal motor neurons was significantly impaired and these disease-mimicking neurons subsequently degenerated. Furthermore, these disease phenotypes were caused by SMN-full length (SMN-FL) but not SMN-Δ7 (lacking exon 7) knockdown, and were specific to spinal motor neurons. Restoring the expression of SMN-FL completely ameliorated all of the disease phenotypes, including specific axonal defects and motor neuron loss. Finally, knockdown of SMN-FL led to excessive mitochondrial oxidative stress in human motor neuron progenitors. The involvement of oxidative stress in the degeneration of spinal motor neurons in the SMA cell model was further confirmed by the administration of N-acetylcysteine, a potent antioxidant, which prevented disease-related apoptosis and subsequent motor neuron death. Thus, we report here the successful establishment of an hESC-based SMA model, which exhibits disease gene isoform specificity, cell type specificity, and phenotype reversibility. Our model provides a unique paradigm for studying how motor neurons specifically degenerate and highlights the potential importance of antioxidants for the treatment of SMA.

  7. Organ-on-Chip Recapitulates Thrombosis Induced by an anti-CD154 Monoclonal Antibody: Translational Potential of Advanced Microengineered Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrile, Riccardo; van der Meer, Andries D; Park, Hyoungshin; Fraser, Jacob P; Simic, Damir; Teng, Fang; Conegliano, David; Nguyen, Justin; Jain, Abhishek; Zhou, Mimi; Karalis, Katia; Ingber, Donald E; Hamilton, Geraldine A; Otieno, Monicah A

    2018-02-27

    Clinical development of Hu5c8, a monoclonal antibody against CD40L intended for treatment of autoimmune disorders, was terminated due to unexpected thrombotic complications. These life-threatening side-effects were not discovered during preclinical testing due to the lack of predictive models. In the present study, we describe the development of a microengineered system lined by human endothelium perfused with human whole blood, a 'Vessel-Chip'. The Vessel-Chip allowed us to evaluate key parameters in thrombosis, such as endothelial activation, platelet adhesion, platelet aggregation, fibrin clot formation, and thrombin anti-thrombin (TAT) complexes in the Chip-effluent in response to Hu5c8 in the presence of soluble CD40L. Importantly, the observed pro-thrombotic effects were not observed with Hu5c8-IgG2σ designed with a Fc domain that does not bind FcγRIIa receptor, suggesting that this approach may have a low potential risk for thrombosis. Our results demonstrate the translational potential of Organs-on-Chips, as advanced microengineered system to better predict human response. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2018 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  8. [Therapeutic values of dance movement and its influence on psychomotor development of deaf persons as a form of socialization and integration with the environment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelc, Zofia

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the work was to show to what extent esthetic education, mainly dance, influences the level of socialization of deaf persons, and how important the integration of the examined with the outside world is. The effectiveness of the Dance Theatre "Pinokio" of the J. Korczak Special Training and Educational Center in Przemyśl was verified by diagnostic soundings. Source material was also used in the study (chronicles, press articles, interviews with instructors of the ensemble). Young deaf people participated in dance practices with pleasure. The motivation of the young deaf people to enter the dance group was of mature character. They take part in dance activities because of their love to dance (70%), instructor's engagement (20%), and the health aspect (10%). The therapy effectiveness depended on how long they participated in the dance group. Deaf people who dance for a longer time (3 years 70%, 1 year 20%, 2 years 10%) had a more mature outlook on life, better school grades (80%), and started conversation with other people more easily (instructor's opinion). The self-consciousness of participants after practice manifested itself by relaxation (50%), joy (30%), and resolution in taking decisions (15%). Only 5% of the examined felt tired and fed-up. Polish choreo-therapeutists trust mainly their own intuition and also use information found in articles and publications, which, however, are not easily accessed. The scarcity of qualified therapeutic dancing instructors limits application of choreo-therapy on a wider scale.

  9. Conotoxins that confer therapeutic possibilities

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2012-06-04

    Cone snails produce a distinctive repertoire of venom peptides that are used both as a defense mechanism and also to facilitate the immobilization and digestion of prey. These peptides target a wide variety of voltage- and ligand-gated ion channels, which make them an invaluable resource for studying the properties of these ion channels in normal and diseased states, as well as being a collection of compounds of potential pharmacological use in their own right. Examples include the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved pharmaceutical drug, Ziconotide (Prialt; Elan Pharmaceuticals, Inc.) that is the synthetic equivalent of the naturally occurring ?-conotoxin MVIIA, whilst several other conotoxins are currently being used as standard research tools and screened as potential therapeutic drugs in pre-clinical or clinical trials. These developments highlight the importance of driving conotoxin-related research. A PubMed query from 1 January 2007 to 31 August 2011 combined with hand-curation of the retrieved articles allowed for the collation of 98 recently identified conotoxins with therapeutic potential which are selectively discussed in this review. Protein sequence similarity analysis tentatively assigned uncharacterized conotoxins to predicted functional classes. Furthermore, conotoxin therapeutic potential for neurodegenerative disorders (NDD) was also inferred. 2012 by the authors; licensee MDPI.

  10. Enzyme therapeutics for systemic detoxification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang; Li, Jie; Lu, Yunfeng

    2015-08-01

    Life relies on numerous biochemical processes working synergistically and correctly. Certain substances disrupt these processes, inducing living organism into an abnormal state termed intoxication. Managing intoxication usually requires interventions, which is referred as detoxification. Decades of development on detoxification reveals the potential of enzymes as ideal therapeutics and antidotes, because their high substrate specificity and catalytic efficiency are essential for clearing intoxicating substances without adverse effects. However, intrinsic shortcomings of enzymes including low stability and high immunogenicity are major hurdles, which could be overcome by delivering enzymes with specially designed nanocarriers. Extensive investigations on protein delivery indicate three types of enzyme-nanocarrier architectures that show more promise than others for systemic detoxification, including liposome-wrapped enzymes, polymer-enzyme conjugates, and polymer-encapsulated enzymes. This review highlights recent advances in these nano-architectures and discusses their applications in systemic detoxifications. Therapeutic potential of various enzymes as well as associated challenges in achieving effective delivery of therapeutic enzymes will also be discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Therapeutic neutrality reconsidered.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, R H

    1982-06-01

    This paper suggests that therapists' tendency to ignore the impact of their own religious beliefs on their patients constitutes an area of potential abuse of psychotherapy. The author reviews the religious stance of the founders of psychotherapy, as well as recent criticisms of the therapeutic process, and proposes steps to safeguard against the inadvertent fostering of therapists' religious views on the patient.

  12. The therapeutic collaboration in life design counselling: The case of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The collaboration coding system enables the assessment of each therapeutic exchange within and outside of the client's therapeutic zone of proximal development, defined as the space between the client's actual therapeutic developmental level and his/her potential developmental level fomented by a collaborative ...

  13. Exubera. Inhale therapeutic systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bindra, Sanjit; Cefalu, William T

    2002-05-01

    Inhale, in colaboration with Pfizer and Aventis Pharma (formerly Hoechst Marion Roussel; HMR), is developing an insulin formulation utilizing its pulmonary delivery technology for macromolecules for the potential treatment of type I and II diabetes. By July 2001, the phase III program had been completed and the companies had begun to assemble data for MAA and NDA filings; however, it was already clear at this time that additional data might be required for filing. By December 2001, it had been decided that the NDA should include an increased level of controlled, long-term pulmonary safety data in diabetic patients and a major study was planned to be completed in 2002, with the NDA filed thereafter (during 2002). US-05997848 was issued to Inhale Therapeutic Systems in December 1999, and corresponds to WO-09524183, filed in February 1995. Equivalent applications have appeared to date in Australia, Brazil, Canada, China, Czech Republic, Europe, Finland, Hungary, Japan, Norway, New Zealand, Poland and South Africa. This family of applications is specific to pulmonary delivery of insulin. In February 1999, Lehman Brothers gave this inhaled insulin a 60% probability of reaching market, with a possible launch date of 2001. The analysts estimated peak sales at $3 billion in 2011. In May 2000, Aventis predicted that estimated peak sales would be in excess of $1 billion. In February 2000, Merrill Lynch expected product launch in 2002 and predicted that it would be a multibillion-dollar product. Analysts Merril Lynch predicted, in September and November 2000, that the product would be launched by 2002, with sales in that year of e75 million, rising to euro 500 million in 2004. In April 2001, Merrill Lynch predicted that filing for this drug would occur in 2001. Following the report of the potential delay in regulatory filing, issued in July 2001, Deutsche Banc Alex Brown predicted a filing would take place in the fourth quarter of 2002 and launch would take place in the first

  14. Structural Studies on Acetylcholinesterase and Paraoxonase Directed Towards Development of Therapeutic Biomolecules for the Treatment of Degenerative Diseases and Protection Against Chemical Threat Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Joel L.; Silman, Israel

    Acetylcholinesterase and paraoxonase are important targets for treatment of degenerative diseases, Alzheimer's disease and atherosclerosis, respectively, both of which impose major burdens on the health care systems in Western society. Acetylcholinesterase is the target of lethal nerve agents, and paraoxonase is under consideration as a bioscavenger for their detoxification. Both are thus the subject of research and development in the context of nerve agent toxicology. The crystal structures of the two enzymes are described, and structure/function relationships are discussed in the context of drug development and of development of means of protection against chemical threats.

  15. Development of a Transgenic Mouse Model for Breast Cancer that is Optimized for the Study of T Cell-Based Therapeutic Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Brad

    2003-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a transgenic mouse model for breast cancer that will allow the in vivo activities of tumor-specific T cell clones to be tracked at all stages of tumorigenesis and after various...

  16. Development of a Transgenic Mouse Model for Breast Cancer that is Optimized for the Study of T Cell-Based Therapeutic Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Brad

    2001-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a transgenic mouse model for breast cancer that will allow the in vivo activities of tumor-specific T cell clones to be tracked at all stages of tumorigenesis and after various...

  17. Development of a Transgenic Mouse Model for Breast Cancer that is Optimized for the Study of T Cell-Based Therapeutic Strategies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nelson, Brad

    2002-01-01

    Our goal is to develop a transgenic mouse model for breast cancer that will allow the in vivo activities of tumor-specific T cell clones to be tracked at all stages of tumorigenesis and after various...

  18. Shiga Toxin Therapeutics: Beyond Neutralization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory Hall

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Ribotoxic Shiga toxins are the primary cause of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS in patients infected with Shiga toxin-producing enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (STEC, a pathogen class responsible for epidemic outbreaks of gastrointestinal disease around the globe. HUS is a leading cause of pediatric renal failure in otherwise healthy children, resulting in a mortality rate of 10% and a chronic morbidity rate near 25%. There are currently no available therapeutics to prevent or treat HUS in STEC patients despite decades of work elucidating the mechanisms of Shiga toxicity in sensitive cells. The preclinical development of toxin-targeted HUS therapies has been hindered by the sporadic, geographically dispersed nature of STEC outbreaks with HUS cases and the limited financial incentive for the commercial development of therapies for an acute disease with an inconsistent patient population. The following review considers potential therapeutic targeting of the downstream cellular impacts of Shiga toxicity, which include the unfolded protein response (UPR and the ribotoxic stress response (RSR. Outcomes of the UPR and RSR are relevant to other diseases with large global incidence and prevalence rates, thus reducing barriers to the development of commercial drugs that could improve STEC and HUS patient outcomes.

  19. Toward Personalized Medicine: Using Cardiomyocytes Differentiated From Urine-Derived Pluripotent Stem Cells to Recapitulate Electrophysiological Characteristics of Type 2 Long QT Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jouni, Mariam; Si-Tayeb, Karim; Es-Salah-Lamoureux, Zeineb; Latypova, Xenia; Champon, Benoite; Caillaud, Amandine; Rungoat, Anais; Charpentier, Flavien; Loussouarn, Gildas; Baró, Isabelle; Zibara, Kazem; Lemarchand, Patricia; Gaborit, Nathalie

    2015-09-01

    Human genetically inherited cardiac diseases have been studied mainly in heterologous systems or animal models, independent of patients' genetic backgrounds. Because sources of human cardiomyocytes (CMs) are extremely limited, the use of urine samples to generate induced pluripotent stem cell-derived CMs would be a noninvasive method to identify cardiac dysfunctions that lead to pathologies within patients' specific genetic backgrounds. The objective was to validate the use of CMs differentiated from urine-derived human induced pluripotent stem (UhiPS) cells as a new cellular model for studying patients' specific arrhythmia mechanisms. Cells obtained from urine samples of a patient with long QT syndrome who harbored the HERG A561P gene mutation and his asymptomatic noncarrier mother were reprogrammed using the episomal-based method. UhiPS cells were then differentiated into CMs using the matrix sandwich method.UhiPS-CMs showed proper expression of atrial and ventricular myofilament proteins and ion channels. They were electrically functional, with nodal-, atrial- and ventricular-like action potentials recorded using high-throughput optical and patch-clamp techniques. Comparison of HERG expression from the patient's UhiPS-CMs to the mother's UhiPS-CMs showed that the mutation led to a trafficking defect that resulted in reduced delayed rectifier K(+) current (IKr). This phenotype gave rise to action potential prolongation and arrhythmias. UhiPS cells from patients carrying ion channel mutations can be used as novel tools to differentiate functional CMs that recapitulate cardiac arrhythmia phenotypes. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  20. A preclinical orthotopic model for glioblastoma recapitulates key features of human tumors and demonstrates sensitivity to a combination of MEK and PI3K pathway inhibitors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajaa El Meskini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current therapies for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM, the highest grade malignant brain tumor, are mostly ineffective, and better preclinical model systems are needed to increase the successful translation of drug discovery efforts into the clinic. Previous work describes a genetically engineered mouse (GEM model that contains perturbations in the most frequently dysregulated networks in GBM (driven by RB, KRAS and/or PI3K signaling and PTEN that induce development of Grade IV astrocytoma with properties of the human disease. Here, we developed and characterized an orthotopic mouse model derived from the GEM that retains the features of the GEM model in an immunocompetent background; however, this model is also tractable and efficient for preclinical evaluation of candidate therapeutic regimens. Orthotopic brain tumors are highly proliferative, invasive and vascular, and express histology markers characteristic of human GBM. Primary tumor cells were examined for sensitivity to chemotherapeutics and targeted drugs. PI3K and MAPK pathway inhibitors, when used as single agents, inhibited cell proliferation but did not result in significant apoptosis. However, in combination, these inhibitors resulted in a substantial increase in cell death. Moreover, these findings translated into the in vivo orthotopic model: PI3K or MAPK inhibitor treatment regimens resulted in incomplete pathway suppression and feedback loops, whereas dual treatment delayed tumor growth through increased apoptosis and decreased tumor cell proliferation. Analysis of downstream pathway components revealed a cooperative effect on target downregulation. These concordant results, together with the morphologic similarities to the human GBM disease characteristics of the model, validate it as a new platform for the evaluation of GBM treatment.

  1. Acute Organophosphate Poisonings: Therapeutic Dilemmas and New Potential Therapeutic Agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucinic, S.; Jovanovic, D.; Vucinic, Z.; Todorovic, V.; Segrt, Z.

    2007-01-01

    years. New potential therapeutic agents for OPI poisoning include: glycopyrrolate as anticholinergic; organophosphorous hydrolases, butyrilcholinesterases and sodium bicarbonate which degrade OPI and accelerate AChE reactivation; reversible anticholinesterases for reduction of AChE reinchibition; NMDA antagonist as neuroprotectors. Authors from Maryland have proposed the usage of IL-1 Rp antagonists in acute OPI intoxication, a new, original approach to therapy which deserves to be elucidated. For now pharmaceutical industries do not show satisfying initiative in developing new therapeutic agents and antidotes for OPI poisoning. However, randomized, controlled clinical studies, for the beginning with the agents which are in clinical practice, would elucidate their clinical efficacy, reduce the number of lethal pesticide poisonings in developing countries and provide information of special importance for the army and medical service. (author)

  2. Novel approach to cancer therapeutics using comparative cancer biology

    OpenAIRE

    Revi, Bhindu

    2018-01-01

    Developing personalized cancer therapies based on cancer genomics methodologies forms the basis for future cancer therapeutics. A genomics platform was developed based on canine cancer to produce a proof-of-concept for personalized genomics led therapeutic choices but also developing personalized therapeutics for canine cancer patients themselves. The platform identified the genetic state of a canine cancer patient within two drugable pathways; p53 and HSP90/IRF1. The former ge...

  3. [Therapeutic update in cystic fibrosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durupt, S; Nove Josserand, R; Durieu, I

    2014-06-01

    We present the recent therapeutic advances in the cystic fibrosis care. It concerns improvements in symptomatic treatment with the development of dry powder inhaled antibiotics that improved quality of life, and innovative treatments namely the modulators of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane protein conductance regulator (CFTR), molecules which act specifically at the level of the defective mechanisms implied in the disease. The life expectancy of cystic fibrosis patients born after 2000, is estimated now to be about 50 years. This improvement of survival was obtained with the organization of the care within the specialized centers for cystic fibrosis (Centre de ressource et de compétences de la mucoviscidose) and remains still based on heavy symptomatic treatments. Dry powder inhaled antibiotics constitute a significant time saving for patients to whom all the care can achieve two hours daily. Since 2012, the modulators of CFTR, molecules allowing a pharmacological approach targeted according to the type of the mutations, allows a more specific approach of the disease. Ivacaftor (Kalydeco(®)) which potentialises the function of the CFTR protein expressed on the cellular surface is now available for patients with the G551D mutation. Lumacaftor is going to be tested in association with ivacaftor in patients with the F508del mutation, that is present in at least 75% of the patients. The ataluren which allows the production of a functional protein CFTR in patients with a no sense mutation is the third representing of this new therapeutic class. We presently have numerous symptomatic treatments for the cystic fibrosis care. The development of CFTR modulators, today available to a restricted number of patients treated with ivacaftor represents a very promising therapeutic avenue. It will represent probably the first step to a personalized treatment according to CFTR genotype. Copyright © 2013 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by

  4. Assessing schizophrenia-relevant cognitive and social deficits in mice: a selection of mouse behavioral tasks and potential therapeutic compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Wen-Sung; Chang, Chia-Yuan; Wong, Wan-Rong; Pei, Ju-Chun; Chen, Ya-Shan; Hung, Wei-Li

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia and other psychiatric disorders are generally diagnosed based on a collection of symptoms defined by a combination of an individual's feelings, perceptions, and behaviors. Many of these disorders are characterized by specific cognitive and social deficits. Although it is nearly impossible to recapitulate the full phenotypic spectrum of schizophrenia in mice, mouse models play an indispensable role in understanding the pathogenesis of this disorder and the development of new therapeutics. Genetic mouse models of schizophrenia and mouse behavioral tests provide a feasible approach for elucidating causal relationships between susceptibility gene(s) and schizophrenia-related symptoms. There has been a proliferation of studies characterizing basic behavioral phenotypes in mice. Since there is no way to completely model human psychiatric symptoms in mice, the major role of behavioral tests is to provide insights into underlying affected circuitry and pathophysiology. Given that the recovery of cognitive and social abilities significantly benefits functional outcomes, there has been an increasing interest in characterizing cognitive and social functions in mutant mice; however, these functions are not easy to measure. In this review, a selection of conventional behavioral tasks was briefly described and three specific behavioral tasks aimed at characterizing social communication, attentional function, and choice behavior in mice were highlighted. The choice of specific behavioral tasks during experimental planning should take into consideration a variety of factors, including their validity, reliability, sensitivity, utility, and specificity. Based upon the hypothetical hypofunction of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR)-mediated signaling pathways in the involvement of cognitive and social impairments in schizophrenia, three NMDAR-related compounds/drugs, D-serine, sarcosine, and D-cycloserine, are discussed as an example.

  5. Scientific and Regulatory Policy Committee Points-to-consider Paper*: Drug-induced Vascular Injury Associated with Nonsmall Molecule Therapeutics in Preclinical Development: Part I. Biotherapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frazier, Kendall S; Engelhardt, Jeffery A; Fant, Pierluigi; Guionaud, Silvia; Henry, Scott P; Leach, Michael W; Louden, Calvert; Scicchitano, Marshall S; Weaver, James L; Zabka, Tanja S

    2015-10-01

    Drug-induced vascular injury (DIVI) is a recurrent challenge in the development of novel pharmaceutical agents. Although DIVI in laboratory animal species has been well characterized for vasoactive small molecules, there is little available information regarding DIVI associated with biotherapeutics such as peptides/proteins or antibodies. Because of the uncertainty about whether DIVI in preclinical studies is predictive of effects in humans and the lack of robust biomarkers of DIVI, preclinical DIVI findings can cause considerable delays in or even halt development of promising new drugs. This review discusses standard terminology, characteristics, and mechanisms of DIVI associated with biotherapeutics. Guidance and points to consider for the toxicologist and pathologist facing preclinical cases of biotherapeutic-related DIVI are outlined, and examples of regulatory feedback for each of the mechanistic types of DIVI are included to provide insight into risk assessment. © 2015 by The Author(s).

  6. A Novel Osteogenic Oxysterol Compound for Therapeutic Development to Promote Bone Growth: Activation of Hedgehog Signaling and Osteogenesis through Smoothened Binding

    OpenAIRE

    Montgomery, Scott R.; Nargizyan, Taya; Meliton, Vicente; Nachtergaele, Sigrid; Rohatgi, Rajat; Stappenbeck, Frank; Jung, Michael E.; Johnson, Jared S.; Aghdasi, Bayan; Tian, Haijun; Weintraub, Gil; Inoue, Hirokazu; Atti, Elisa; Tetradis, Sotirios; Pereira, Renata C

    2014-01-01

    Osteogenic factors are often used in orthopedics to promote bone growth, improve fracture healing, and induce spine fusion. Osteogenic oxysterols are naturally occurring molecules that were shown to induce osteogenic differentiation in vitro and promote spine fusion in vivo. The purpose of this study was to identify an osteogenic oxysterol more suitable for clinical development than those previously reported, and evaluate its ability to promote osteogenesis in vitro and spine fusion in rats i...

  7. Development of 90Sr/90Y Generator Systems Based on SLM Techniques for Radiolabelling of Therapeutic Biomolecules with 90Y. Chapter 14

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thu, N.T.; Van Dong, D.; Van Cuong, B.; Van Khoa, C.; Cam Hoa, V.T.

    2015-01-01

    Yttrium-90 is one of the most useful radionuclides for radioimmunotherapeutic applications, especially for labelling peptides and antibodies. Studies were carried out to develop a 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator system based on the SLM technique. Two stages of 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator systems were developed at different activity levels of 5, 20, 50 and 100 mCi and operated with semiautomation in sequential mode. In the first stage of the system, PC88A based SLM was used, which transported 90 Y from a nitric acid medium containing 0.01–4M HNO 3 . In the second stage, the 90 Y from the first stage was transferred to the first compartment of the second stage using carbamoylmethyl phosphine oxide (CMPO) based SLM where 1M acetic acid was used as the receiving phase for 90 Y. Quality control was carried out for the products of 90 Y using EPC with paper chromatography and Tec control chromatography. Peptides and antibodies were labelled using the 90 Y product obtained from the generator developed in house. (author)

  8. ALS Pathogenesis and Therapeutic Approaches: The Role of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Extracellular Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonafede, Roberta; Mariotti, Raffaella

    2017-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a fatal neurodegenerative disease characterized by progressive muscle paralysis determined by the degeneration of motoneurons in the motor cortex brainstem and spinal cord. The ALS pathogenetic mechanisms are still unclear, despite the wealth of studies demonstrating the involvement of several altered signaling pathways, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, glutamate excitotoxicity, oxidative stress and neuroinflammation. To date, the proposed therapeutic strategies are targeted to one or a few of these alterations, resulting in only a minimal effect on disease course and survival of ALS patients. The involvement of different mechanisms in ALS pathogenesis underlines the need for a therapeutic approach targeted to multiple aspects. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) can support motoneurons and surrounding cells, reduce inflammation, stimulate tissue regeneration and release growth factors. On this basis, MSC have been proposed as promising candidates to treat ALS. However, due to the drawbacks of cell therapy, the possible therapeutic use of extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by stem cells is raising increasing interest. The present review summarizes the main pathological mechanisms involved in ALS and the related therapeutic approaches proposed to date, focusing on MSC therapy and their preclinical and clinical applications. Moreover, the nature and characteristics of EVs and their role in recapitulating the effect of stem cells are discussed, elucidating how and why these vesicles could provide novel opportunities for ALS treatment.

  9. Automated (Centrifugal) Therapeutic Plasma Exchange Option for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) is performed frequently and effectively in developed countries, whereas the reverse is the case in developing countries. Guillain-Barre syndrome (GBS), synonymous with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, is an important indication for TPE, but this is.

  10. automated (centrifugal) therapeutic plasma exchange option for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) is performed frequently and effectively in developed countries, whereas the reverse is the case in developing countries. Guillain‑Barre syndrome (GBS), synonymous with acute inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy, is an important indication for TPE, but this is rarely administered ...

  11. Review of Polarities of experience: Relatedness and self-definition in personality development, psychopathology, and the therapeutic process and Relatedness, self-definition and mental representation: Essays in honor of Sidney J. Blatt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallerstein, Robert S

    2009-03-01

    Reviews the books, Polarities of experience: Relatedness and self-definition in personality development, psychopathology, and the therapeutic process by Sidney J. Blatt (see record 2008-01813-000) and Relatedness, self-definition and mental representation: Essays in honor of Sidney J. Blatt edited by John S. Auerbach, Kenneth N. Levy, and Carrie E. Schaffer (2005). These two volumes present a most impressive and fitting capstone to Sidney Blatt's very productive lifetime of almost unmatched threefold integration of (a) clinical experience, beginning with his astute observation of the strikingly different thematic preoccupations of two otherwise very similarly depressed patients whom Blatt was analyzing during his psychoanalytic training; (b) the theoretic conceptualization stemming from these clinical observations, which became the basic fabric of his lifetime major addition to our psychological explanatory universe; and (c) the painstaking systematic empirical data gathering, together with the creation of necessary-and truly appropriate-measures and instruments that, in ensemble, provide such strong data-based support for Blatt's clinically inspired theoretic harvesting. In the book Polarities of experience: Relatedness and self-definition in personality development, psychopathology, and the therapeutic process, Blatt draws upon a vast literature review of his own work with his collaborating authors-as well as a seemingly exhaustive list of contributors in all the linked and related areas. Blatt has organized his volume sequentially (after defining and describing his fundamental polarity of experience) into three logically following sections on personality development, personality organization and psychopathology, and lastly, the therapeutic process. Relatedness, self-definition and mental representation: Essays in honor of Sidney J. Blatt is put together by three of Blatt's former students, and now collaborating partners, although published 3 years earlier (2005

  12. [Achievement of therapeutic objectives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantilla, Teresa

    2014-07-01

    Therapeutic objectives for patients with atherogenic dyslipidemia are achieved by improving patient compliance and adherence. Clinical practice guidelines address the importance of treatment compliance for achieving objectives. The combination of a fixed dose of pravastatin and fenofibrate increases the adherence by simplifying the drug regimen and reducing the number of daily doses. The good tolerance, the cost of the combination and the possibility of adjusting the administration to the patient's lifestyle helps achieve the objectives for these patients with high cardiovascular risk. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis y Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of sodium acetate trihydrate-ethylene glycol composite phase change materials with enhanced thermophysical properties for thermal comfort and therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rohitash; Vyas, Sumita; Kumar, Ravindra; Dixit, Ambesh

    2017-07-12

    The heat packs using phase change materials (PCMs) are designed for possible applications such as body comfort and medical applications under adverse situations. The development and performance of such heat packs rely on thermophysical properties of PCMs such as latent heat, suitable heat releasing temperature, degree of supercooling, effective heat releasing time, crystallite size, stability against spontaneous nucleation in metastable supercooled liquid state and thermal stability during heating and cooling cycles. Such PCMs are rare and the available PCMs do not exhibit such properties simultaneously to meet the desired requirements. The present work reports a facile approach for the design and development of ethylene glycol (EG) and aqueous sodium acetate trihydrate (SAT) based composite phase change materials, showing these properties simultaneously. The addition of 2-3 wt% EG in aqueous SAT enhances the softness of SAT crystallites, its degree of supercooling and most importantly the effective heat releasing time by ~10% with respect to aqueous SAT material. In addition, the maximum heat releasing temperature of aqueous SAT has been tailored from 56.5 °C to 55 °C, 54.9 °C, 53.5 °C, 51.8 °C and 43.2 °C using 2%, 3%, 5%, 7% and 10 wt% EG respectively, making the aqueous SAT-EG composite PCMs suitable for desired thermal applications.

  14. Bone Marrow Stem Cell Derived Paracrine Factors for Regenerative Medicine: Current Perspectives and Therapeutic Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom J. Burdon

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available During the past several years, there has been intense research in the field of bone marrow-derived stem cell (BMSC therapy to facilitate its translation into clinical setting. Although a lot has been accomplished, plenty of challenges lie ahead. Furthermore, there is a growing body of evidence showing that administration of BMSC-derived conditioned media (BMSC-CM can recapitulate the beneficial effects observed after stem cell therapy. BMSCs produce a wide range of cytokines and chemokines that have, until now, shown extensive therapeutic potential. These paracrine mechanisms could be as diverse as stimulating receptor-mediated survival pathways, inducing stem cell homing and differentiation or regulating the anti-inflammatory effects in wounded areas. The current review reflects the rapid shift of interest from BMSC to BMSC-CM to alleviate many logistical and technical issues regarding cell therapy and evaluates its future potential as an effective regenerative therapy.

  15. Rethinking Therapeutic Misconception in Biobanking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tupasela, Aaro; Snell, Karoliina; Cañada, Jose

    2017-01-01

    Some authors have noted that in biobank research participants may be guided by what is called therapeutic misconception, whereby participants attribute therapeutic intent to research procedures.This article argues that the notion of therapeutic misconception is increasingly less justified when ev...

  16. Development of a multi-layer ion chamber for measurement of depth dose distributions of heavy-ion therapeutic beam for individual patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Munefumi; Futami, Yasuyuki; Yusa, Ken; Matsufuji, Naruhiro; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Urakabe, Eriko; Yamashita, Haruo; Akagi, Takashi; Higashi, Akio

    2000-01-01

    In heavy-ion radiotherapy, an accelerated beam is modified to realize a desired dose distribution in patients. The set-up of the beam-modifying devices in the irradiation system is changed according to the patient, and it is important to check the depth dose distributions in the patient. In order to measure dose distributions realized by an irradiation system for heavy-ion radiotherapy, a multi-layer ionization chamber (MLIC) was developed. The MLIC consists of 64 ionization chambers, which are stacked mutually. The interval between each ionization chamber is about 4.1 mm water. There are signal and high voltage plates in the MLIC, which are used as electrodes of the ionization chambers and phantom. Depth dose distribution from 5.09 mm to 261.92 mm water can be measured in about 30 seconds using this MLIC. Thus, it is possible to check beam quality in a short amount of time. (author)

  17. 'Mind the gap' between the development of therapeutic innovations and the clinical practice in oncology: A proposal of the European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) to optimise cancer clinical research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Emmanuelle; Bogaerts, Jan; Lacombe, Denis; Liu, Lifang

    2017-11-01

    In Europe, most of the cancer clinical research dedicated to therapeutic innovations aims primarily at regulatory approval. Once an anticancer drug enters the common market, each member state determines its real-world use based on its own criteria: pricing, reimbursement and clinical indications. Such an innovation-centred clinical research landscape might neglect patient-relevant issues in real-world setting, such as comparative effectiveness of distinct treatment options or long-term safety monitoring. The European Organisation for Research and Treatment of Cancer (EORTC) advocates reforming the current 'innovation-centred' system to a truly 'patient-centred' paradigm with systematically coordinated applied clinical research in conjunction with drug development, featuring the following strategy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Mechanisms of Plasma Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graves, David

    2015-09-01

    In this talk, I address research directed towards biomedical applications of atmospheric pressure plasma such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy. The field has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that plasmas readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. It is postulated that cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) can trigger a therapeutic shielding response in tissue in part by creating a time- and space-localized, burst-like form of oxy-nitrosative stress on near-surface exposed cells through the flux of plasma-generated RONS. RONS-exposed surface layers of cells communicate to the deeper levels of tissue via a form of the ``bystander effect,'' similar to responses to other forms of cell stress. In this proposed model of CAP therapeutics, the plasma stimulates a cellular survival mechanism through which aerobic organisms shield themselves from infection and other challenges.

  19. [Hemoglobinopathies. Current therapeutic possibilities].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgens, H S; Karle, H

    1995-05-29

    In recent years, the number of immigrants has increased considerably in Denmark. Consequently, a series of new clinical pictures has appeared in the Danish health care system. Typical examples are the genetic diseases, the haemoglobinopathies. Most of the immigrants come from areas, where the gene frequency of these disorders is widely distributed, for instance the Mediterranean countries, the Middle East, Southeast Asia and Africa. Most frequent are the heterozygous thalassaemias, but also the number of patients with severe thalassaemia and other clinically important haemoglobinopathies such as sickle cell anaemia has also increased in recent years. The clinical problems concerning these patients focus on two important topics, namely genetic counselling of heterozygous individuals (in some cases combined with prenatal diagnostics) and the treatment of patients with clinically severe haemoglobinopathy. The only curative treatment of the haemoglobinopathies is allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, but this treatment can only be offered to a few of these patients. However, a variety of therapeutic options exist which can improve their prognosis and quality of life. Since the number of patients with these diseases will probably increase over the next years we find it relevant, based on typical case stories, to give a review of the present therapeutic possibilities for these disorders.

  20. Pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Seok Hwee; Lee, Edmund Jon Deoon

    2006-01-01

    1. Pharmacogenetics refers to the study of genetically controlled variations in drug response. Functional variants caused by single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding drug-metabolising enzymes, transporters, ion channels and drug receptors have been known to be associated with interindividual and interethnic variation in drug response. Genetic variations in these genes play a role in influencing the efficacy and toxicity of medications. 2. Rapid, precise and cost-effective high-throughput technological platforms are essential for performing large-scale mutational analysis of genetic markers involved in the aetiology of variable responses to drug therapy. 3. The application of a pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics in general clinical practice is still far from being achieved today owing to various constraints, such as limited accessibility of technology, inadequate knowledge, ambiguity of the role of variants and ethical concerns. 4. Drug actions are determined by the interplay of several genes encoding different proteins involved in various biochemical pathways. With rapidly emerging SNP discovery technological platforms and widespread knowledge on the role of SNPs in disease susceptibility and variability in drug response, the pharmacogenetics approach to therapeutics is anticipated to take off in the not-too-distant future. This will present profound clinical, economic and social implications for health care.

  1. Peripheral facial nerve palsy after therapeutic endoscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Jeong; Lee, Jun; Lee, Ji Woon; Lee, Jun Hyung; Park, Chol Jin; Kim, Young Dae; Lee, Hyun Jin

    2015-03-01

    Peripheral facial nerve palsy (FNP) is a mononeuropathy that affects the peripheral part of the facial nerve. Primary causes of peripheral FNP remain largely unknown, but detectable causes include systemic infections (viral and others), trauma, ischemia, tumor, and extrinsic compression. Peripheral FNP in relation to extrinsic compression has rarely been described in case reports. Here, we report a case of a 71-year-old man who was diagnosed with peripheral FNP following endoscopic submucosal dissection. This case is the first report of the development of peripheral FNP in a patient undergoing therapeutic endoscopy. We emphasize the fact that physicians should be attentive to the development of peripheral FNP following therapeutic endoscopy.

  2. Development, validation, and application of a fast and simple GC-MS method for determination of some therapeutic drugs relevant in emergency toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Markus R; Welter, Jessica; Weber, Armin A; Maurer, Hans H

    2011-10-01

    To date, immunoassays are commercially available for quantification of valproic acid, salicylic acid, paracetamol, phenobarbital, phenytoin, and primidone. As they are no longer available, a fast, simple, and cost-effective quantitative gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method was developed and fully validated for these drugs. After simple and fast liquid-liquid extraction, the samples were analyzed by GC-MS using the selected ion monitoring mode. The method was validated including the parameters selectivity, calibration model, precision, accuracy, and extraction efficiency. The above-mentioned analytes were separated within 8.5 minutes and sensitively detected. No interfering peaks were observed in blank samples from 8 different sources. The linearity ranges were 20-200 mg/L for valproic acid, 100-1200 mg/L for salicylic acid, 10-200 mg/L for paracetamol, 10-200 mg/L for phenobarbital, 4-20 mg/L for primidone, and 2.5-30 mg/L for phenytoin. Generally accepted criteria for accuracy and precision were fulfilled for all analytes using 6-point calibration. Even 1-point calibration was applicable for all analytes. The assay was successfully applied to analysis of real plasma samples and proficiency testing material. The assay described allowed fast and reliable determination of analytes relevant in the diagnosis of poisonings. Furthermore, time- and cost-saving 1-point calibration was shown to be suitable for daily routine work, especially in emergency cases.

  3. Italian Advisory Board: sFlt-1/PlGF ratio and preeclampsia, state of the art and developments in diagnostic, therapeutic and clinical management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Martino, Daniela; Cetin, Irene; Frusca, Tiziana; Ferrazzi, Enrico; Fuse', Federica; Gervasi, Maria Teresa; Plebani, Mario; Todros, Tullia

    2016-11-01

    Extensive research has been published, showing the usefulness of angiogenic markers in both diagnosis and subsequent prediction and management of preeclampsia and placenta-related disorders. Recent evidence provides a helpful cut off for the Elecsys ratio sFlt-1 to PlGF, that predicts preeclampsia development in women with sign and symptoms, before its clinical onset in the short term. In Europe, no accordance exists for the use of such kind of test in clinical practice; only German guidelines have recently taken it into account, as a diagnostic aid for preeclampsia, in conjunction with other clinical findings. This panel of Italian experts recently met, in order to review the literature and to promote the evaluation of the clinical utility of sFlt-1/PlGF ratio at the Italian country level, as regards: prediction of preeclampsia during the first trimester, prediction or exclusion of new onset or recurrence in patients with risk factors for preeclampsia, triage of patients suffering from gestational hypertension, evaluation of disease severity, prediction of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of solid lipid nanoparticles containing total flavonoid extract from Dracocephalum moldavica L. and their therapeutic effect against myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Mei-E; He, Cheng-Hui; Jiang, Wen; Zeng, Cheng; Yu, Ning; Huang, Wei; Gao, Zhong-Gao; Xing, Jian-Guo

    2017-01-01

    Total flavonoid extract from Dracocephalum moldavica L. (TFDM) contains effective components of D. moldavica L. that have myocardial protective function. However, the cardioprotection function of TFDM is undesirable due to its poor solubility. In order to improve the solubility and efficacy of TFDM, we developed TFDM-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (TFDM-SLNs) and optimized the formulation of TFDM-SLNs using central composite design and response surface methodology. The physicochemical properties of TFDM-SLNs were characterized, and the pharmacodynamics was investigated using the myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury model in rats. The nanoparticles of optimal formulation for TFDM-SLNs were spherical in shape with the average particle size of 104.83 nm and had a uniform size distribution with the polydispersity index value of 0.201. TFDM-SLNs also had a negative zeta potential of -28.7 mV to ensure the stability of the TFDM-SLNs emulsion system. The results of pharmacodynamics demonstrated that both TFDM and TFDM-SLN groups afforded myocardial protection, and the protective effect of TFDM-SLNs was significantly superior to that of TFDM alone, based on the infarct area, histopathological examination, cardiac enzyme levels and inflammatory factors in serum. Due to the optimal quality and the better myocardial protective effect, TFDM-SLNs are expected to become a safe and effective nanocarrier for the oral delivery of TFDM.

  5. Development of solid lipid nanoparticles containing total flavonoid extract from Dracocephalum moldavica L. and their therapeutic effect against myocardial ischemia–reperfusion injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan ME

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Mei-e Tan,1–3,* Cheng-hui He,3,* Wen Jiang,4 Cheng Zeng,2–4 Ning Yu,3 Wei Huang,2 Zhong-gao Gao,2 Jian-guo Xing3 1Key Laboratory of Xinjiang Endemic Phytomedicine Resources of Ministry of Education, School of Pharmacy, Shihezi University, Shihezi, 2State Key Laboratory of Bioactive Substance and Function of Natural Medicines, Department of Pharmaceutics, Institute of Materia Medica, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Beijing, 3Xinjiang Key Laboratory of Uighur Medicines, Xinjiang Institute of Materia Medica, 4Xinjiang Medical University, Urumqi, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Total flavonoid extract from Dracocephalum moldavica L. (TFDM contains effective components of D. moldavica L. that have myocardial protective function. However, the cardioprotection function of TFDM is undesirable due to its poor solubility. In order to improve the solubility and efficacy of TFDM, we developed TFDM-loaded solid lipid nanoparticles (TFDM-SLNs and optimized the formulation of TFDM-SLNs using central composite design and response surface methodology. The physicochemical properties of TFDM-SLNs were characterized, and the pharmacodynamics was investigated using the myocardial ischemia–reperfusion injury model in rats. The nanoparticles of optimal formulation for TFDM-SLNs were spherical in shape with the average particle size of 104.83 nm and had a uniform size distribution with the polydispersity index value of 0.201. TFDM-SLNs also had a negative zeta potential of -28.7 mV to ensure the stability of the TFDM-SLNs emulsion system. The results of pharmacodynamics demonstrated that both TFDM and TFDM-SLN groups afforded myocardial protection, and the protective effect of TFDM-SLNs was significantly superior to that of TFDM alone, based on the infarct area, histopathological examination, cardiac enzyme levels and inflammatory factors in serum. Due to the optimal

  6. Playing and therapeutic action in child analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayes, L C; Cohen, D J

    1993-12-01

    From its inception, child psychoanalysis has used fantasy play as a window to both the content and process of children's inner worlds. Because of the link to action and primary process, young children's imaginary play is rich in symbolic expressions that facilitate analytic interpretive interventions addressing the conflicts impeding development. There are inevitable tensions between allowing play to emerge as a therapeutic process in its own right and the usual psychoanalytic emphasis on clarification, verbalisation and, above all, interpretation within and about the transference. For many children, the very act of playing carries much of the therapeutic work aimed toward facilitating their return to developmentally appropriate and adaptive psychic functioning. The mobilisation of capacities for play in the analysis allows children to do what is needed for their development to continue and makes use of the developmentally restorative functions of play in the service of therapeutic action.

  7. [Therapeutic education didactic techniques].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valverde, Maite; Vidal, Mercè; Jansa, Margarida

    2012-10-01

    This article includes an introduction to the role of Therapeutic Education for Diabetes treatment according to the recommendations of the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the Diabetes Education Study Group (DESG) of the "European Association for Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the clinical Practice Guidelines (CPG) of the Spanish Ministry of Health. We analyze theoretical models and the differences between teaching vs. learning as well as current trends (including Internet), that can facilitate meaningful learning of people with diabetes and their families and relatives. We analyze the differences, similarities, advantages and disadvantages of individual and group education. Finally, we describe different educational techniques (metaplan, case method, brainstorming, role playing, games, seminars, autobiography, forums, chats,..) applicable to individual, group or virtual education and its application depending on the learning objective.

  8. Therapeutic target for protozoal diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathore, Dharmendar [Blacksburg, VA; Jani, Dewal [Blacksburg, VA; Nagarkatti, Rana [Blacksburg, VA

    2008-10-21

    A novel Fasciclin Related Adhesive Protein (FRAP) from Plasmodium and related parasites is provided as a target for therapeutic intervention in diseases caused by the parasites. FRAP has been shown to play a critical role in adhesion to, or invasion into, host cells by the parasite. Furthermore, FRAP catalyzes the neutralization of heme by the parasite, by promoting its polymerization into hemozoin. This invention provides methods and compositions for therapies based on the administration of protein, DNA or cell-based vaccines and/or antibodies based on FRAP, or antigenic epitopes of FRAP, either alone or in combination with other parasite antigens. Methods for the development of compounds that inhibit the catalytic activity of FRAP, and diagnostic and laboratory methods utilizing FRAP are also provided.

  9. Transcriptional Profiling Confirms the Therapeutic Effects of Mast Cell Stabilization in a Dengue Disease Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Juliet; Rathore, Abhay P S; Mantri, Chinmay K; Aman, Siti A B; Nishida, Andrew; St John, Ashley L

    2017-09-15

    There are no approved therapeutics for the treatment of dengue disease despite the global prevalence of dengue virus (DENV) and its mosquito vectors. DENV infections can lead to vascular complications, hemorrhage, and shock due to the ability of DENV to infect a variety of immune and nonimmune cell populations. Increasingly, studies have implicated the host response as a major contributor to severe disease. Inflammatory products of various cell types, including responding T cells, mast cells (MCs), and infected monocytes, can contribute to immune pathology. In this study, we show that the host response to DENV infection in immunocompetent mice recapitulates transcriptional changes that have been described in human studies. We found that DENV infection strongly induced metabolic dysregulation, complement signaling, and inflammation. DENV also affected the immune cell content of the spleen and liver, enhancing NK, NKT, and CD8 + T cell activation. The MC-stabilizing drug ketotifen reversed many of these responses without suppressing memory T cell formation and induced additional changes in the transcriptome and immune cell composition of the spleen, consistent with reduced inflammation. This study provides a global transcriptional map of immune activation in DENV target organs of an immunocompetent host and supports the further development of targeted immunomodulatory strategies to treat DENV disease. IMPORTANCE Dengue virus (DENV), which causes febrile illness, is transmitted by mosquito vectors throughout tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Symptoms of DENV infection involve damage to blood vessels and, in rare cases, hemorrhage and shock. Currently, there are no targeted therapies to treat DENV infection, but it is thought that drugs that target the host immune response may be effective in limiting symptoms that result from excessive inflammation. In this study, we measured the host transcriptional response to infection in multiple DENV target organs

  10. Therapeutic enhancement: nursing intervention category for patients diagnosed with Readiness for Therapeutic Regimen Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Cynthia W

    2008-04-01

    To present a new nursing intervention category called therapeutic enhancement. Fewer than half of North Americans follow their physician's recommendations for diet and exercise, even when such are crucial to their health or recovery. It is imperative that nurses consider new ways to promote healthy behaviours. Therapeutic enhancement is intended to provide such a fresh approach. Traditional intervention techniques focusing on education, contracts, social support and more frequent interaction with physicians appear not to be effective when used alone. Successful strategies have been multidisciplinary; and have included interventions by professional nurses who assist patients to understand their disease and the disease process and that helps them to develop disease-management and self-management skills. Therapeutic enhancement incorporates The Stages of Change Theory, Commitment to Health Theory, Motivational Interviewing techniques and instrumentation specifically designed for process evaluation of health-promoting interventions. This is a critical review of approaches that, heretofore, have not been synthesised in a single published article. Based on the commonly used Stages of Change model, therapeutic enhancement is useful for patients who are at the action stage of change. Using therapeutic enhancement as well as therapeutic strategies identified in Stages of Change Theory, such as contingency management, helping relationships, counterconditioning, stimulus control and Motivational Interviewing techniques, nursing professionals can significantly increase the chances of patients moving from action to the maintenance stage of change for a specific health behaviour. Using the nursing intervention category, therapeutic enhancement can increase caregivers' success in helping patients maintain healthy behaviours.

  11. Effect of therapeutic ultrasound on endochondral ossification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiltink, A.; Nijweide, P.J.; Oosterbaan, W.A.; Hekkenberg, R.T.; Helders, P.J.M.

    1995-01-01

    The effect of therapeutic doses of ultrasound was tested on endochondral ossification of in vitro developing metatarsal long bone rudiments of 16- and 17-day-old fetal mice. Bone growth, calcification and resorption following exposure to several doses of pulse-wave (PW) or continuous-wave (CW)

  12. The Fragility of a Robust Therapeutic Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vikkelsø, Signe

    2012-01-01

    How can therapeutic techniques simultaneously be tools for emancipation and act as subtle forms of control? The article investigates this seeming paradox by examining a technique for group analysis developed by Wilfred Bion aimed at surfacing the inclination of a group to prompt inexpedient leade...

  13. Reading Philemon as therapeutic narrative | Jordaan | HTS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article analysed the different narratives implied in Philemon by utilising the narrative therapeutic approach, as developed by Epston and White (1990). A dominant narrative (the harsh treatment of slaves in the early Christian environment) and a challenging narrative (a more humane conduct of slaves) were clearly ...

  14. Mindfulness and the Therapeutic Function of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyland, Terry

    2009-01-01

    Although it has been given qualified approval by a number of philosophers of education, the so-called "therapeutic turn" in education has been the subject of criticism by several commentators on post-compulsory and adult learning over the last few years. A key feature of this alleged development in recent educational policy is said to be the…

  15. [Video games, a therapeutic mediator for teens].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickler, Christophe

    2015-10-01

    Teenagers love video games and other multimedia tools. Sometimes they love them too much, leading to addictive use. A child psychiatry team in Nancy has developed a therapeutic multimedia workshop to contribute to treating teens. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Therapeutic Dimensions of the Black Aesthetic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toldson, Ivory L.; Pasteur, Alfred B.

    1976-01-01

    The authors of this article see the black aesthetic largely in terms of the affective component. Emotional oneness which is foreign to the white world view is the means by which the black man can achieve optimal mental health and development. The therapeutic implications of the black aesthetic are outlined. (NG)

  17. Therapeutic Developments for Tics and Myoclonus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Joseph

    2015-09-15

    Tics and myoclonus are phenomenologically similar given that both are jerk-like movements, but, in contrast to myoclonus, tics are often preceded by premonitory sensations and are typically associated with a variety of behavioral comorbidities, including attention deficit and obsessive-compulsive disorder. There are many other clinical features that help differentiate these two hyperkinetic disorders. Whereas behavioral and antidopaminergic therapies are most effective in the management of tics, clonazepam, other anticonvulsants, and serotonergic drugs are often used to control myoclonic movements. Botulinum toxin may also be helpful in focal tics and in segmental forms of myoclonus. DBS plays an increasingly important role in the treatment of these disorders, particularly when they are generalized and are disabling despite optimal medical therapy. © 2015 International Parkinson and Movement Disorder Society.

  18. Therapeutics development for spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sumner, Charlotte J.

    2006-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease that is the leading inherited cause of infant and early childhood mortality. Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by mutation of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1), but all patients retain a centromeric copy of the gene,SMN2. SMN2 produces reduced amounts of full-length SMN mRNA, and spinal muscular atrophy likely results from insufficient levels of SMN protein in motor neurons. The SMN protein plays ...

  19. New therapeutic developments in lipidology | Blom | Continuing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing Medical Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 27, No 3 (2009) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  20. Development of Targeted Therapeutic Agents for Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-02-01

    remodelling’ at the 13th IST World Congress on Animal, Plant and Microbial Toxins. April, Costa Brava , Spain : Guest presenter on ’Nerve regeneration...incubated at 37°C in LISM for 24 h in the absence (open bars ) or presence (hatched bars ) of 6.6 nM BoNT/A (A) or 66 nM BoNT/B (B). After replacement of...in the absence (open bars ) or presence (hatched bars ) of 6.6 nM BoNT/A, as described in the legend to Figure 13. After a 24 h recovery period, the

  1. Development of Targeted Therapeutic Agents for Botulism

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-09-01

    Affinity-purified Ig raised against residues 33-94 of human Sbr-2 (anologically distinct proteins produced by Clostridium tetani region of amino acid...to the plasma membrane. By microinjecting Binding of insulin to its receptor activates the integral tyro- 3T3-L1 adipocytes with the Clostridium ...sequence shared with Sbr and Cbr; Ref. 12) was and Clostridium botulinum, respectively. They are composed of prepared, as detailed elsewhere (32

  2. Therapeutic Vaccination for HPV Induced Cervical Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joeli A. Brinkman

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer–related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining therapeutic vaccination have shown limited efficacy due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Current trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents examine patients with pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. However, longer follow-up is necessary to correlate immune responses to lesion regression. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field include further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. As long as pre-clinical studies continue to advance, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions seem good in the near future. Positive consequences of therapeutic vaccination would include less disfiguring treatment options and fewer instances of recurrent or progressive lesions leading to a reduction in cervical cancer incidence.

  3. Therapeutic vaccination for HPV induced cervical cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinkman, Joeli A; Hughes, Sarah H; Stone, Pamela; Caffrey, Angela S; Muderspach, Laila I; Roman, Lynda D; Weber, Jeffrey S; Kast, W Martin

    2007-01-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining therapeutic vaccination have shown limited efficacy due to examining patients with more advanced-stage cancer who tend to have decreased immune function. Current trends in clinical trials with therapeutic agents examine patients with pre-invasive lesions in order to prevent invasive cervical cancer. However, longer follow-up is necessary to correlate immune responses to lesion regression. Meanwhile, preclinical studies in this field include further exploration of peptide or protein vaccination, and the delivery of HPV antigens in DNA-based vaccines or in viral vectors. As long as pre-clinical studies continue to advance, the prospect of therapeutic vaccination to treat existing lesions seem good in the near future. Positive consequences of therapeutic vaccination would include less disfiguring treatment options and fewer instances of recurrent or progressive lesions leading to a reduction in cervical cancer incidence.

  4. RNAi Therapeutic Platforms for Lung Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuyoshi Kuwano

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is rapidly becoming an important method for analyzing gene functions in many eukaryotes and holds promise for the development of therapeutic gene silencing. The induction of RNAi relies on small silencing RNAs, which affect specific messenger RNA (mRNA degradation. Two types of small RNA molecules, i.e. small interfering RNAs (siRNAs and microRNAs (miRNAs, are central to RNAi. Drug discovery studies and novel treatments of siRNAs are currently targeting a wide range of diseases, including various viral infections and cancers. Lung diseases in general are attractive targets for siRNA therapeutics because of their lethality and prevalence. In addition, the lung is anatomically accessible to therapeutic agents via the intrapulmonary route. Recently, increasing evidence indicates that miRNAs play an important role in lung abnormalities, such as inflammation and oncogenesis. Therefore, miRNAs are being targeted for therapeutic purposes. In this review, we present strategies for RNAi delivery and discuss the current state-of-the-art RNAi-based therapeutics for various lung diseases.

  5. Therapeutic Residential Care for Children and Youth:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Whittaker, James K.; Holmes, Lisa; del Valle, Jorge F.

    2016-01-01

    for Child and Family Research, Loughborough University in the U.K. for a Summit meeting on therapeutic residential care for children and youth funded by the Sir Halley Stewart Trust (UK). The focus centered on what is known about therapeutic residential care and what key questions should inform a priority......In many developed countries around the world, ‘group care’ interventions for children and adolescents have come under increasing scrutiny from central government, private philanthropic and child advocacy agencies desirous of (1) achieving better outcomes for vulnerable children and youth; (2) doing...... alternatives to serve high-resource needing youth has had unintended and negative consequences. It is within this context that a working group international experts representing research, policy, service delivery and families (International Work Group for Therapeutic Residential Care) convened at the Centre...

  6. Pharmacological caspase inhibitors: research towards therapeutic perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudelova, J; Fleischmannova, J; Adamova, E; Matalova, E

    2015-08-01

    Caspases are key molecules of apoptosis and the inflammatory response. Up-regulation of the caspase cascade contributes to human pathologies such as neurodegenerative and immune disorders. Thus, blocking the excessive apoptosis by pharmacological inhibitors seems promising for therapeutic interventions in such diseases. Caspase inhibitors, both natural and artificial, have been used as research tools and have helped to define the role of the individual caspases in apoptosis and in non-apoptotic processes. Moreover, some caspase inhibitors have demonstrated their therapeutic efficiency in the reduction of cell death and inflammation in animal models of human diseases. However, no drug based on caspase inhibition has been approved on the market until now. Thus, the development of therapeutic approaches that specifically target caspases remains a great challenge and is now the focus of intense biological and clinical interest. Here, we provide a brief review of recent knowledge about pharmacological caspase inhibitors with special focus on their proposed clinical applications.

  7. Therapeutic Angiogenesis for Treating Cardiovascular Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deveza, Lorenzo; Choi, Jeffrey; Yang, Fan

    2012-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide and is often associated with partial or full occlusion of the blood vessel network in the affected organs. Restoring blood supply is critical for the successful treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Therapeutic angiogenesis provides a valuable tool for treating cardiovascular diseases by stimulating the growth of new blood vessels from pre-existing vessels. In this review, we discuss strategies developed for therapeutic angiogenesis using single or combinations of biological signals, cells and polymeric biomaterials. Compared to direct delivery of growth factors or cells alone, polymeric biomaterials provide a three-dimensional drug-releasing depot that is capable of facilitating temporally and spatially controlled release. Biomimetic signals can also be incorporated into polymeric scaffolds to allow environmentally-responsive or cell-triggered release of biological signals for targeted angiogenesis. Recent progress in exploiting genetically engineered stem cells and endogenous cell homing mechanisms for therapeutic angiogenesis is also discussed. PMID:22916079

  8. Observational therapeutics: Scope, challenges, and organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rama Vaidya

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of Observational Therapeutics in the progress of medicine has been neglected in the current era of the hierarchal position imparted to Randomized Controlled Trials (RCTs for new drug discovery and practice of evidence-based medicine. There is a need to reflect on the reason for many new drugs being withdrawn during post marketing surveillance. There are several examples in literature where drug-discovery has originated initially from keen clinical and / or laboratory observations. The roots of these discoveries have often been from observations made by practitioners of traditional medicine including Ayurveda. The present article draws attention to the scope and challenges for observational therapeutics. There is an urgent need for the meticulous planning for a systematic organization of developing observational therapeutics, with a full understanding of its strengths and limitations.

  9. Nanotechnology—novel therapeutics for CNS disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srikanth, Maya; Kessler, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Research into treatments for diseases of the CNS has made impressive strides in the past few decades, but therapeutic options are limited for many patients with CNS disorders. Nanotechnology has emerged as an exciting and promising new means of treating neurological disease, with the potential to fundamentally change the way we approach CNS-targeted therapeutics. Molecules can be nanoengineered to cross the blood–brain barrier, target specific cell or signalling systems, respond to endogenous stimuli, or act as vehicles for gene delivery, or as a matrix to promote axon elongation and support cell survival. The wide variety of available nanotechnologies allows the selection of a nanoscale material with the characteristics best suited to the therapeutic challenges posed by an individual CNS disorder. In this Review, we describe recent advances in the development of nanotechnology for the treatment of neurological disorders—in particular, neurodegenerative disease and malignant brain tumours—and for the promotion of neuroregeneration. PMID:22526003

  10. Therapeutic cloning: The ethical limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whittaker, Peter A.

    2005-01-01

    A brief outline of stem cells, stem cell therapy and therapeutic cloning is given. The position of therapeutic cloning with regard to other embryonic manipulations - IVF-based reproduction, embryonic stem formation from IVF embryos and reproductive cloning - is indicated. The main ethically challenging stages in therapeutic cloning are considered to be the nuclear transfer process including the source of eggs for this and the destruction of an embryo to provide stem cells for therapeutic use. The extremely polarised nature of the debate regarding the status of an early human embryo is noted, and some potential alternative strategies for preparing immunocompatible pluripotent stem cells are indicated

  11. Unexplored therapeutic opportunities in the human genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oprea, Tudor I; Bologa, Cristian G; Brunak, Søren

    2018-01-01

    A large proportion of biomedical research and the development of therapeutics is focused on a small fraction of the human genome. In a strategic effort to map the knowledge gaps around proteins encoded by the human genome and to promote the exploration of currently understudied, but potentially...... Management Center have enabled the development of evidence-based criteria for tracking the target development level (TDL) of human proteins, which indicates a substantial knowledge deficit for approximately two out of five proteins in the human proteome. We then present spotlights on the TDL categories...... as well as key drug target classes, including G protein-coupled receptors, protein kinases and ion channels, which illustrate the nature of the unexplored opportunities for biomedical research and therapeutic development....

  12. Therapeutical aspect of trichomoniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vukićević Jelica

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Trichomoniasis is frequent, parasitic and sexually transmitted infection of genitourinary tract. It is treated by metronidazole (5-nitroimidazole according to protocol recommended by Center for Disease Control (CDC formerly called: Communicable Disease Center [19]. The resistance of Trichomonas vaginalis (TV strains to metronidazole (MND was described in USA in 1960, and later on in many European countries [8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13]. In these cases, due to persistent trichomonas infection, it is necessary to repeat MND treatment with moderate modification of dose and/or length of its application. Nevertheless, oncogenic and toxic effects of MND have to be taken into consideration. OBJECT The aim of this study was to investigate and analyze the incidence of TV in STD and lower susceptibility of certain TV strains to MND were analyzed. MATERIAL AND METHODS In three-year period (1999-2001 612 patients (244 females and 368 males suspected of STD were examined clinically and microbiologically at the Institute of Dermatovenereology in Belgrade. The patients detected for TV were treated according to CDC protocol. The affected were considered cured if there was no manifest clinical infection, and no TV verified by microbiological test. Results TV was isolated in 216 patients (35.29 % of all subjects. Trichomonas infection was found in 90 (36.88 % out of 244 tested females and in 126 (32.34 % of 368 males. Clinically manifested infection, with extensive urethral and vaginal secretion, was recorded in 161 patients, while the asymptomatic form was found in 55 subjects. This result indicates the predominance of manifested trichomonas infections (75.54 % of cases. The difference of distribution of clinical forms of trichomoniasis, in relation to sex, was not statistically significant (c2=0.854; p>0.05. The patients with verified trichomonas infection were treated by metronidazole according to CDC protocol. The recommended therapeutical scheme consisted of three

  13. Clinical applications of therapeutic phlebotomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim KH

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Kyung Hee Kim,1 Ki Young Oh,2 1Department of Laboratory Medicine, Gachon University Gil Medical Center, Incheon, 2Department of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Soonchunhyang University, Cheonan Hospital, Cheonan, South Korea Abstract: Phlebotomy is the removal of blood from the body, and therapeutic phlebotomy is the preferred treatment for blood disorders in which the removal of red blood cells or serum iron is the most efficient method for managing the symptoms and complications. Therapeutic phlebotomy is currently indicated for the treatment of hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, porphyria cutanea tarda, sickle cell disease, and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease with hyperferritinemia. This review discusses therapeutic phlebotomy and the related disorders and also offers guidelines for establishing a therapeutic phlebotomy program. Keywords: therapeutic phlebotomy, hemochromatosis, polycythemia vera, porphyria cutanea tarda, sickle cell disease, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease

  14. [Hepatitis C infection: Therapeutic strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diatta, Thierno; Chavade, Delphine; Degos, Françoise; d'Andon, Anne; Guillevin, Loïc

    2016-05-01

    The development of new direct acting antivirals has significantly modified strategies to treat chronic hepatitis C. Treatments were previously made of an interferon-based combination. This article aims to review the direct acting antivirals clinical data and to discuss the new regimens for the management of chronic hepatitis C. Direct acting antivirals combinations - with or without ribavirin - are the new chronic hepatitis C standard treatment regimen. These combinations often result in sustained viral response rate (>90%, including in patients with uncomplicated cirrhosis) after a 12-week treatment for most patients. The innovation could represent a new era for patients with unmet medical need (especially ineligible or non-responders to interferon and/or ribavirin patients). Further investigations are required to confirm the efficacy in specific population (complicated cirrhosis, pre- or post-transplantation, chronic renal failure, comorbidities, etc.) where clinical data are still limited. Other treatments are currently being developed and might lead to new perspectives, especially in terms of treatment duration or therapeutic simplification. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  15. Therapeutic targets in liver fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallowfield, Jonathan A

    2011-05-01

    Detailed analysis of the cellular and molecular mechanisms that mediate liver fibrosis has provided a framework for therapeutic approaches to prevent, slow down, or even reverse fibrosis and cirrhosis. A pivotal event in the development of liver fibrosis is the activation of quiescent hepatic stellate cells (HSCs) to scar-forming myofibroblast-like cells. Consequently, HSCs and the factors that regulate HSC activation, proliferation, and function represent important antifibrotic targets. Drugs currently licensed in the US and Europe for other indications target HSC-related components of the fibrotic cascade. Their deployment in the near future looks likely. Ultimately, treatment strategies for liver fibrosis may vary on an individual basis according to etiology, risk of fibrosis progression, and the prevailing pathogenic milieu, meaning that a multiagent approach could be required. The field continues to develop rapidly and starts to identify exciting potential targets in proof-of-concept preclinical studies. Despite this, no antifibrotics are currently licensed for use in humans. With epidemiological predictions for the future prevalence of viral, obesity-related, and alcohol-related cirrhosis painting an increasingly gloomy picture, and a shortfall in donors for liver transplantation, the clinical urgency for new therapies is high. There is growing interest from stakeholders keen to exploit the market potential for antifibrotics. However, the design of future trials for agents in the developmental pipeline will depend on strategies that enable equal patient stratification, techniques to reliably monitor changes in fibrosis over time, and the definition of clinically meaningful end points.

  16. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic considerations for the next generation protein therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Dhaval K

    2015-10-01

    Increasingly sophisticated protein engineering efforts have been undertaken lately to generate protein therapeutics with desired properties. This has resulted in the discovery of the next generation of protein therapeutics, which include: engineered antibodies, immunoconjugates, bi/multi-specific proteins, antibody mimetic novel scaffolds, and engineered ligands/receptors. These novel protein therapeutics possess unique physicochemical properties and act via a unique mechanism-of-action, which collectively makes their pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) different than other established biological molecules. Consequently, in order to support the discovery and development of these next generation molecules, it becomes important to understand the determinants controlling their PK/PD. This review discusses the determinants that a PK/PD scientist should consider during the design and development of next generation protein therapeutics. In addition, the role of systems PK/PD models in enabling rational development of the next generation protein therapeutics is emphasized.

  17. Designer Probiotics: Paving the Way to Living Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Birbal; Mal, Gorakh; Marotta, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    Enhancing the functional repertoire of probiotics is a promising approach to cope with the inexorable rise of antibiotic-resistant pathogens and the rather slow development of new antibiotics. Probiotics that deliver novel therapeutics efficiently and with site specificity are emerging living therapeutics that may transform existing paradigms of disease diagnosis and prevention. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Therapeutic conversations: Therapists' use of observational language contributes to optimal therapeutic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banham, James A; Schweitzer, Robert D

    2017-09-01

    Reflexivity is the process of critically examining one's own experience. Emerging literature suggests that reflexivity is a positive predictor of outcomes in psychotherapy. However, limited research has been conducted regarding therapists' use of reflexivity as a therapeutic technique. In particular, we have a limited understanding of how therapists use language to initiate reflexive conversations. This study investigates the characteristics of therapist language that elicit reflexivity focused on internal and external processes. Therapeutic outcomes of 42 trainee-therapists who provided psychotherapy to 173 clients were tracked with the OQ-45.2 with the view of identifying client-trainee-therapist dyads (CTTDs) with the best and poorest outcomes. Six best outcome and six poorest outcome CTTDs were identified. Thirty-six therapy transcripts were initially coded with the Narrative Process Coding System to identify each Narrative Process Mode (NPM). Sixty external, internal, and reflexive NPMs (N = 180 NPMs) were randomly selected across all therapy transcripts for the best outcome group and the same number for the poorest outcome group. The Narrative Initiating Language Element Coding Manual, developed for this study, was used to code therapists' use of language to initiate each NPM. Therapists belonging to the best outcome group utilized more observational language to initiate internal and reflexive NPMs. Therapists belonging to the poorest outcome group evidenced high proportions of questioning language to elicit each NPM. Examining how therapists use language to elicit NPMs provides further insight as to how therapeutic language may contribute to successful therapeutic outcomes. Reflexive therapeutic conversations characterized by a greater use of observational language were associated with positive therapeutic outcomes. Therapeutic conversations characterized by a high proportion of questioning language were associated with poorer therapeutic outcomes

  19. Rett syndrome: genes, synapses, circuits and therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek eBanerjee

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Development of the nervous system proceeds through a set of complex checkpoints which arise from a combination of sequential gene expression and early neural activity sculpted by the environment. Genetic and environmental insults lead to neurodevelopmental disorders which encompass a large group of diseases that result from anatomical and physiological abnormalities during maturation and development of brain circuits. Rett syndrome (RTT is a postnatal neurological disorder of genetic origin, caused by mutations in the X-linked gene MECP2. It features neuropsychiatric abnormalities like motor dysfunctions and mild to severe cognitive impairment. This review discusses several key questions and attempts to evaluate recently developed animal models, cell-type specific function of MeCP2, defects in neural circuit plasticity and possible therapeutic strategies. Finally, we also discuss how genes, proteins and overlapping signaling pathways affect the molecular etiology of apparently unrelated neuropsychiatric disorders, an understanding of which can offer novel therapeutic strategies.

  20. Development of New Treatments for Prostate Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiPaola, R. S.; Abate-Shen, C.; Hait, W. N.

    2005-02-01

    The Dean and Betty Gallo Prostate Cancer Center (GPCC) was established with the goal of eradicating prostate cancer and improving the lives of men at risk for the disease through research, treatment, education and prevention. GPCC was founded in the memory of Dean Gallo, a beloved New Jersey Congressman who died tragically of prostate cancer diagnosed at an advanced stage. GPCC unites a team of outstanding researchers and clinicians who are committed to high-quality basic research, translation of innovative research to the clinic, exceptional patient care, and improving public education and awareness of prostate cancer. GPCC is a center of excellence of The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, which is the only NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center in the state. GPCC efforts are now integrated well as part of our Prostate Program at CINJ, in which Dr. Robert DiPaola and Dr. Cory Abate-Shen are co-leaders. The Prostate Program unites 19 investigators from 10 academic departments who have broad and complementary expertise in prostate cancer research. The overall goal and unifying theme is to elucidate basic mechanisms of prostate growth and oncogenesis, with the ultimate goal of promoting new and effective strategies for the eradication of prostate cancer. Members' wide range of research interests collectively optimize the chances of providing new insights into normal prostate biology and unraveling the molecular pathophysiology of prostate cancer. Cell culture and powerful animal models developed by program members recapitulate the various stages of prostate cancer progression, including prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia, adenocarcinoma, androgen-independence, invasion and metastases. These models promise to further strengthen an already robust program of investigator-initiated therapeutic clinical trials, including studies adopted by national cooperative groups. Efforts to translate laboratory results into clinical studies of early detection and

  1. Development and translational imaging of a TP53 porcine tumorigenesis model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieren, Jessica C; Meyerholz, David K; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T; Newell, John D; Hammond, Emily; Rohret, Judy A; Rohret, Frank A; Struzynski, Jason T; Goeken, J Adam; Naumann, Paul W; Leidinger, Mariah R; Taghiyev, Agshin; Van Rheeden, Richard; Hagen, Jussara; Darbro, Benjamin W; Quelle, Dawn E; Rogers, Christopher S

    2014-09-01

    Cancer is the second deadliest disease in the United States, necessitating improvements in tumor diagnosis and treatment. Current model systems of cancer are informative, but translating promising imaging approaches and therapies to clinical practice has been challenging. In particular, the lack of a large-animal model that accurately mimics human cancer has been a major barrier to the development of effective diagnostic tools along with surgical and therapeutic interventions. Here, we developed a genetically modified porcine model of cancer in which animals express a mutation in TP53 (which encodes p53) that is orthologous to one commonly found in humans (R175H in people, R167H in pigs). TP53(R167H/R167H) mutant pigs primarily developed lymphomas and osteogenic tumors, recapitulating the tumor types observed in mice and humans expressing orthologous TP53 mutant alleles. CT and MRI imaging data effectively detected developing tumors, which were validated by histopathological evaluation after necropsy. Molecular genetic analyses confirmed that these animals expressed the R167H mutant p53, and evaluation of tumors revealed characteristic chromosomal instability. Together, these results demonstrated that TP53(R167H/R167H) pigs represent a large-animal tumor model that replicates the human condition. Our data further suggest that this model will be uniquely suited for developing clinically relevant, noninvasive imaging approaches to facilitate earlier detection, diagnosis, and treatment of human cancers.

  2. Development and translational imaging of a TP53 porcine tumorigenesis model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieren, Jessica C.; Meyerholz, David K.; Wang, Xiao-Jun; Davis, Bryan T.; Newell, John D.; Hammond, Emily; Rohret, Judy A.; Rohret, Frank A.; Struzynski, Jason T.; Goeken, J. Adam; Naumann, Paul W.; Leidinger, Mariah R.; Taghiyev, Agshin; Van Rheeden, Richard; Hagen, Jussara; Darbro, Benjamin W.; Quelle, Dawn E.; Rogers, Christopher S.

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the second deadliest disease in the United States, necessitating improvements in tumor diagnosis and treatment. Current model systems of cancer are informative, but translating promising imaging approaches and therapies to clinical practice has been challenging. In particular, the lack of a large-animal model that accurately mimics human cancer has been a major barrier to the development of effective diagnostic tools along with surgical and therapeutic interventions. Here, we developed a genetically modified porcine model of cancer in which animals express a mutation in TP53 (which encodes p53) that is orthologous to one commonly found in humans (R175H in people, R167H in pigs). TP53R167H/R167H mutant pigs primarily developed lymphomas and osteogenic tumors, recapitulating the tumor types observed in mice and humans expressing orthologous TP53 mutant alleles. CT and MRI imaging data effectively detected developing tumors, which were validated by histopathological evaluation after necropsy. Molecular genetic analyses confirmed that these animals expressed the R167H mutant p53, and evaluation of tumors revealed characteristic chromosomal instability. Together, these results demonstrated that TP53R167H/R167H pigs represent a large-animal tumor model that replicates the human condition. Our data further suggest that this model will be uniquely suited for developing clinically relevant, noninvasive imaging approaches to facilitate earlier detection, diagnosis, and treatment of human cancers. PMID:25105366

  3. Frontiers in nano-therapeutics

    CERN Document Server

    Tasnim, Nishat; Sai Krishna, Katla; Kalagara, Sudhakar; Narayan, Mahesh; Noveron, Juan C; Joddar, Binata

    2017-01-01

    This brief highlights recent research advances in the area of nano-therapeutics. Nanotechnology holds immense potential for application in a wide range of biological and engineering applications such as molecular sensors for disease diagnosis, therapeutic agents for the treatment of diseases, a vehicle for delivering therapeutics and imaging agents for theranostic applications, both in-vitro and in-vivo. The brief is grouped into the following sections namely, A) Discrete Nanosystems ; B) Anisotropic Nanoparticles; C) Nano-films/coated/layered and D) Nano-composites.

  4. [End therapeutic nihilism towards COPD].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juergens, Uwe R

    2007-03-15

    Prevention of COPD requires appropriate patient education, especially of adolescents, as well as the establishment of an effective national health policy. The new GOLD guidelines represent the current standard of knowledge on the management of chronic, progressive, obstructive pulmonary diseases. It points out that COPD is avoidable and treatable,and hence, there is no reason for therapeutic nihilism. Chronic bronchitis preceding a progressive respiratory obstruction cannot be improved with the presently available respiratory therapeutics. For this reason, therapeutic measures concentrate on the avoidance of exacerbations, which are primarily responsible for the severity of the course of COPD.

  5. Therapeutic drug monitoring of antimicrobials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Jason A; Norris, Ross; Paterson, David L; Martin, Jennifer H

    2012-01-01

    Optimizing the prescription of antimicrobials is required to improve clinical outcome from infections and to reduce the development of antimicrobial resistance. One such method to improve antimicrobial dosing in individual patients is through application of therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM). The aim of this manuscript is to review the place of TDM in the dosing of antimicrobial agents, specifically the importance of pharmacokinetics (PK) and pharmacodynamics (PD) to define the antimicrobial exposures necessary for maximizing killing or inhibition of bacterial growth. In this context, there are robust data for some antimicrobials, including the ratio of a PK parameter (e.g. peak concentration) to the minimal inhibitory concentration of the bacteria associated with maximal antimicrobial effect. Blood sampling of an individual patient can then further define the relevant PK parameter value in that patient and, if necessary, antimicrobial dosing can be adjusted to enable achievement of the target PK/PD ratio. To date, the clinical outcome benefits of a systematic TDM programme for antimicrobials have only been demonstrated for aminoglycosides, although the decreasing susceptibility of bacteria to available antimicrobials and the increasing costs of pharmaceuticals, as well as emerging data on pharmacokinetic variability, suggest that benefits are likely. PMID:21831196

  6. Therapeutic potential of cannabinoid medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robson, P J

    2014-01-01

    Cannabis was extensively used as a medicine throughout the developed world in the nineteenth century but went into decline early in the twentieth century ahead of its emergence as the most widely used illicit recreational drug later that century. Recent advances in cannabinoid pharmacology alongside the discovery of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) have re-ignited interest in cannabis-based medicines. The ECS has emerged as an important physiological system and plausible target for new medicines. Its receptors and endogenous ligands play a vital modulatory role in diverse functions including immune response, food intake, cognition, emotion, perception, behavioural reinforcement, motor co-ordination, body temperature, wake/sleep cycle, bone formation and resorption, and various aspects of hormonal control. In disease it may act as part of the physiological response or as a component of the underlying pathology. In the forefront of clinical research are the cannabinoids delta-9-tetrahydrocannabinol and cannabidiol, and their contrasting pharmacology will be briefly outlined. The therapeutic potential and possible risks of drugs that inhibit the ECS will also be considered. This paper will then go on to review clinical research exploring the potential of cannabinoid medicines in the following indications: symptomatic relief in multiple sclerosis, chronic neuropathic pain, intractable nausea and vomiting, loss of appetite and weight in the context of cancer or AIDS, psychosis, epilepsy, addiction, and metabolic disorders. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. Thymoquinone and its therapeutic potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darakhshan, Sara; Bidmeshki Pour, Ali; Hosseinzadeh Colagar, Abasalt; Sisakhtnezhad, Sajjad

    2015-01-01

    Herbal medicine has attracted great attention in the recent years and is increasingly used as alternatives to chemical drugs. Several lines of evidence support the positive impact of medicinal plants in the prevention and cure of a wide range of diseases. Thymoquinone (TQ) is the most abundant constituent of the volatile oil of Nigella sativa seeds and most properties of N sativa are mainly attributed to TQ. A number of pharmacological actions of TQ have been investigated including anti-oxidant, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, anti-histaminic, anti-microbial and anti-tumor effects. It has also gastroprotective, hepatoprotective, nephroprotective and neuroprotective activities. In addition, positive effects of TQ in cardiovascular disorders, diabetes, reproductive disorders and respiratory ailments, as well as in the treatment of bone complications as well as fibrosis have been shown. In addition, a large body of data shows that TQ has very low adverse effects and no serious toxicity. More recently, a great deal of attention has been given to this dietary phytochemical with an increasing interest to investigate it in pre-clinical and clinical researches for assessing its health benefits. Here we report on and analyze numerous properties of the active ingredient of N. sativa seeds, TQ, in the context of its therapeutic potentials for a wide range of illnesses. We also summarize the drug's possible mechanisms of action. The evidence reported sugests that TQ should be developed as a novel drug in clinical trials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Complexity in the therapeutic delivery of RNAi medicines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Colombo, Stefano; Zeng, Xianghui; Ragelle, Héloïse

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Nucleic acids have witnessed a dramatic acceleration in their therapeutic exploitation and currently represent a growing number of applications in drug development pipelines. However, a more wide-spread development of therapeutics based on nucleic acids is restricted by their poor...... chemical and enzymatic stability in vivo, lack of cellular uptake and insufficient capability to reach intracellular targets. AREAS COVERED: Advanced formulation of nucleic acids in nano-sized carriers may help unlocking their potential as therapeutic agents. Nano-sized matters own specific features...... of this review is to reflect on the complexity in the therapeutic delivery of RNA interference-based drugs emerging from the recent clinical experiences and report the actual technological and analytical advances introduced to solve it. EXPERT OPINION: The complexity in the therapeutic delivery of nucleic acids...

  9. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danbo Yang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(L-g-glutamylglutamine-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX. PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic.

  10. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Danbo; Yu, Lei; Van, Sang

    2010-01-01

    The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(l-γ-glutamylglutamine)-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX). PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic

  11. Clinically Relevant Anticancer Polymer Paclitaxel Therapeutics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Danbo [Biomedical Engineering and Technology Institute, Institutes for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai, 200062 (China); Yu, Lei, E-mail: yu-lei@gg.nitto.co.jp [Biomedical Engineering and Technology Institute, Institutes for Advanced Interdisciplinary Research, East China Normal University, 3663 North Zhongshan Road, Shanghai, 200062 (China); Biomedical Group, Nitto Denko Technical Corporation, 501 Via Del Monte, Oceanside, CA 92058 (United States); Van, Sang [Biomedical Group, Nitto Denko Technical Corporation, 501 Via Del Monte, Oceanside, CA 92058 (United States)

    2010-12-23

    The concept of utilizing polymers in drug delivery has been extensively explored for improving the therapeutic index of small molecule drugs. In general, polymers can be used as polymer-drug conjugates or polymeric micelles. Each unique application mandates its own chemistry and controlled release of active drugs. Each polymer exhibits its own intrinsic issues providing the advantage of flexibility. However, none have as yet been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. General aspects of polymer and nano-particle therapeutics have been reviewed. Here we focus this review on specific clinically relevant anticancer polymer paclitaxel therapeutics. We emphasize their chemistry and formulation, in vitro activity on some human cancer cell lines, plasma pharmacokinetics and tumor accumulation, in vivo efficacy, and clinical outcomes. Furthermore, we include a short review of our recent developments of a novel poly(l-γ-glutamylglutamine)-paclitaxel nano-conjugate (PGG-PTX). PGG-PTX has its own unique property of forming nano-particles. It has also been shown to possess a favorable profile of pharmacokinetics and to exhibit efficacious potency. This review might shed light on designing new and better polymer paclitaxel therapeutics for potential anticancer applications in the clinic.

  12. Cobalt Derivatives as Promising Therapeutic Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heffern, Marie C.; Yamamoto, Natsuho; Holbrook, Robert J.; Eckermann, Amanda L.; Meade, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Inorganic complexes are versatile platforms for the development of potent and selective pharmaceutical agents. Cobalt possesses a diverse array of properties that can be manipulated to yield promising drug candidates. Investigations into the mechanism of cobalt therapeutic agents can provide valuable insight into the physicochemical properties that can be harnessed for drug development. This review presents examples of bioactive cobalt complexes with special attention to their mechanisms of action. Specifically, cobalt complexes that elicit biological effects through protein inhibition, modification of drug activity, and bioreductive activation are discussed. Insights gained from these examples reveal features of cobalt that can be rationally tuned to produce therapeutics with high specificity and improved efficacy for the biomolecule or pathway of interest. PMID:23270779

  13. Revitalizing Psychiatric Therapeutics

    OpenAIRE

    Hyman, Steven E

    2013-01-01

    Despite high prevalence and enormous unmet medical need, the pharmaceutical industry has recently de-emphasized neuropsychiatric disorders as ‘too difficult' a challenge to warrant major investment. Here I describe major obstacles to drug discovery and development including a lack of new molecular targets, shortcomings of current animal models, and the lack of biomarkers for clinical trials. My major focus, however, is on new technologies and scientific approaches to neuropsychiatric disorder...

  14. An imaging-based platform for high-content, quantitative evaluation of therapeutic response in 3D tumour models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Jonathan P.; Rizvi, Imran; Blanden, Adam R.; Massodi, Iqbal; Glidden, Michael D.; Pogue, Brian W.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2014-01-01

    While it is increasingly recognized that three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models recapitulate drug responses of human cancers with more fidelity than monolayer cultures, a lack of quantitative analysis methods limit their implementation for reliable and routine assessment of emerging therapies. Here, we introduce an approach based on computational analysis of fluorescence image data to provide high-content readouts of dose-dependent cytotoxicity, growth inhibition, treatment-induced architectural changes and size-dependent response in 3D tumour models. We demonstrate this approach in adherent 3D ovarian and pancreatic multiwell extracellular matrix tumour overlays subjected to a panel of clinically relevant cytotoxic modalities and appropriately designed controls for reliable quantification of fluorescence signal. This streamlined methodology reads out the high density of information embedded in 3D culture systems, while maintaining a level of speed and efficiency traditionally achieved with global colorimetric reporters in order to facilitate broader implementation of 3D tumour models in therapeutic screening.

  15. Therapeutic Vaccines for Chronic Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autran, Brigitte; Carcelain, Guislaine; Combadiere, Béhazine; Debre, Patrice

    2004-07-01

    Therapeutic vaccines aim to prevent severe complications of a chronic infection by reinforcing host defenses when some immune control, albeit insufficient, can already be demonstrated and when a conventional antimicrobial therapy either is not available or has limited efficacy. We focus on the rationale and challenges behind this still controversial strategy and provide examples from three major chronic infectious diseases-human immunodeficiency virus, hepatitis B virus, and human papillomavirus-for which the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines is currently being evaluated.

  16. Evaluation of therapeutic patient education

    OpenAIRE

    D'Ivernois, Jean-François; Gagnayre, Rémi; Assal, Jean-Philippe; Golay, Alain; Libion, France; Deccache, Alain

    2006-01-01

    9 pages; These guidelines mainly focus on the principles of evaluating Therapeutic Patient Education; Over the past thirty years, therapeutic patient education (TPE) has become an essential part of the treatment of long-term diseases. Evaluations of this new practice are expected, and are sometimes imposed according to protocols and criteria that do not always reflect the complexity of changes taking place within patients and healthcare providers. Sometimes, expected results are not achieved ...

  17. Profiling Prostate Cancer Therapeutic Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Cameron A. Wade; Natasha Kyprianou

    2018-01-01

    The major challenge in the treatment of patients with advanced lethal prostate cancer is therapeutic resistance to androgen-deprivation therapy (ADT) and chemotherapy. Overriding this resistance requires understanding of the driving mechanisms of the tumor microenvironment, not just the androgen receptor (AR)-signaling cascade, that facilitate therapeutic resistance in order to identify new drug targets. The tumor microenvironment enables key signaling pathways promoting cancer cell survival ...

  18. Immunology. Therapeutic manipulation of gut flora.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Shanahan, F

    2012-02-03

    In developed countries as many as two individuals in every thousand suffer from inflammatory bowel disease (ulcerative colitis and Crohn\\'s disease). In his Perspective, Shanahan discusses a new therapeutic approach to treating these conditions in which bacteria normally found in the gut are engineered to produce the anti-inflammatory cytokine interleukin-10 and then are fed as probiotics to mice with these disorders (Steidler et al.).

  19. Therapeutic Vaccination for HPV Induced Cervical Cancers

    OpenAIRE

    Brinkman, Joeli A.; Hughes, Sarah H.; Stone, Pamela; Caffrey, Angela S.; Muderspach, Laila I.; Roman, Lynda D.; Weber, Jeffrey S.; Kast, W. Martin

    2007-01-01

    Cervical Cancer is the second leading cause of cancer–related deaths in women worldwide and is associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection, creating a unique opportunity to treat cervical cancer through anti-viral vaccination. Although a prophylactic vaccine may be available within a year, millions of women, already infected, will continue to suffer from HPV-related disease, emphasizing the need to develop therapeutic vaccination strategies. A majority of clinical trials examining th...

  20. Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    a cystatin -like molecule, inhibits ERK-dependent lymphocyte proliferation. Mech Ageing Dev 126:1284-91 7. Gomez, C.R., Acuña-Castillo, C ., Nishimura...the development of better prostate cancer cell vaccines 2. Gomez, C.R., Kosari, F., Munz, J.M., Schreiber, C ., Knutson, G., Charlesworth, C ., Karnes...TITLE: Enhancing Therapeutic Cellular Prostate Cancer Vaccines PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Christian R. Gomez, Ph.D

  1. Implementation of nanoparticles in therapeutic radiation oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beeler, Erik; Gabani, Prashant; Singh, Om V.

    2017-05-01

    Development and progress of cancer is a very complex disease process to comprehend because of the multiple changes in cellular physiology, pathology, and pathophysiology resulting from the numerous genetic changes from which cancer originates. As a result, most common treatments are not directed at the molecular level but rather at the tissue level. While personalized care is becoming an increasingly aim, the most common cancer treatments are restricted to chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery, each of which has a high likelihood of resulting in rather severe adverse side effects. For example, currently used radiation therapy does not discriminate between normal and cancerous cells and greatly relies on the external targeting of the radiation beams to specific cells and organs. Because of this, there is an immediate need for the development of new and innovative technologies that help to differentiate tumor cells and micrometastases from normal cells and facilitate the complete destruction of those cells. Recent advancements in nanoscience and nanotechnology have paved a way for the development of nanoparticles (NPs) as multifunctional carriers to deliver therapeutic radioisotopes for tumor targeted radiation therapy, to monitor their delivery, and improve the therapeutic index of radiation and tumor response to the treatment. The application of NPs in radiation therapy has aimed to improve outcomes in radiation therapy by increasing therapeutic effect in tumors and reducing toxicity on normal tissues. Because NPs possess unique properties, such as preferential accumulation in tumors and minimal uptake in normal tissues, it makes them ideal for the delivery of radiotherapy. This review provides an overview of the recent development of NPs for carrying and delivering therapeutic radioisotopes for systemic radiation treatment for a variety of cancers in radiation oncology.

  2. Therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J; Biley, F C; Dolk, H

    2007-07-18

    Anxiety disorders are a common occurrence in today's society. There is interest from the community in the use of complementary therapies for anxiety disorders. This review examined the currently available evidence supporting the use of therapeutic touch in treating anxiety disorders. To examine the efficacy and adverse effects of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders. We searched the Cochrane Collaboration Depression, Anxiety and Neurosis Controlled Trials Registers (CCDANCTR-Studies and CCDANCTR-References) (search date 13/01/06), the Controlled Trials website and Dissertation Abstracts International. Searches of reference lists of retrieved papers were also carried out and experts in the field were contacted. Inclusion criteria included all published and unpublished randomised and quasi-randomised controlled trials comparing therapeutic touch with sham (mimic) TT, pharmacological therapy, psychological treatment, other treatment or no treatment /waiting list. The participants included adults with an anxiety disorder defined by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual (DSM-IV),the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10), validated diagnostic instruments, or other validated clinician or self-report instruments. Two review authors independently applied inclusion criteria. Further information was sought from trialists where papers contained insufficient information to make a decision about eligibility. No randomised or quasi-randomised controlled trials of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders were identified. Given the high prevalence of anxiety disorders and the current paucity of evidence on therapeutic touch in this population, there is a need for well conducted randomised controlled trials to examine the effectiveness of therapeutic touch for anxiety disorders.

  3. Universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nachbagauer, R; Krammer, F

    2017-04-01

    Current influenza virus vaccines are effective when well matched to the circulating strains. Unfortunately, antigenic drift and the high diversity of potential emerging zoonotic and pandemic viruses make it difficult to select the right strains for vaccine production. This problem causes vaccine mismatches, which lead to sharp drops in vaccine effectiveness and long response times to manufacture matched vaccines in case of novel pandemic viruses. To provide an overview of universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies in preclinical and clinical development. PubMed and clinicaltrials.gov were used as sources for this review. Universal influenza virus vaccines that target conserved regions of the influenza virus including the haemagglutinin stalk domain, the ectodomain of the M2 ion channel or the internal matrix and nucleoproteins are in late preclinical and clinical development. These vaccines could confer broad protection against all influenza A and B viruses including drift variants and thereby abolish the need for annual re-formulation and re-administration of influenza virus vaccines. In addition, these novel vaccines would enhance preparedness against emerging influenza virus pandemics. Finally, novel therapeutic antibodies against the same conserved targets are in clinical development and could become valuable tools in the fight against influenza virus infection. Both universal influenza virus vaccines and therapeutic antibodies are potential future options for the control of human influenza infections. Copyright © 2017 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mining the Genome for Therapeutic Targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florez, Jose C

    2017-07-01

    Current pharmacological options for type 2 diabetes do not cure the disease. Despite the availability of multiple drug classes that modulate glycemia effectively and minimize long-term complications, these agents do not reverse pathogenesis, and in practice they are not selected to correct the molecular profile specific to the patient. Pharmaceutical companies find drug development programs increasingly costly and burdensome, and many promising compounds fail before launch to market. Human genetics can help advance the therapeutic enterprise. Genomic discovery that is agnostic to preexisting knowledge has uncovered dozens of loci that influence glycemic dysregulation. Physiological investigation has begun to define disease subtypes, clarifying heterogeneity and suggesting molecular pathways for intervention. Convincing genetic associations have paved the way for the identification of effector transcripts that underlie the phenotype, and genetic or experimental proof of gain or loss of function in select cases has clarified the direction of effect to guide therapeutic development. Genetic studies can also examine off-target effects and furnish causal inference. As this information is curated and made widely available to all stakeholders, it is hoped that it will enhance therapeutic development pipelines by accelerating efficiency, maximizing cost-effectiveness, and raising ultimate success rates. © 2017 by the American Diabetes Association.

  5. Dental caries: Therapeutic possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perić Tamara

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary tendencies in dentistry are based on the concept of maximal protection of healthy tooth tissues. Caries removal has been done traditionally with mechanical rotary instruments that are fast and precise. However, conventional cavity preparation has potential adverse effects to the pulp due to heat, pressure and vibrations. Moreover, drilling often causes pain and requires local anaesthesia, and these procedures are frequently perceived as unpleasant. Etiology, development and prevention of dental caries are better understood today and new restorative materials that bond micromechanically and/or chemically to dental tissues have been introduced. Thus, development of a new, less destructive caries removal technique is allowed. In the last decades, many alternative methods have been introduced in an attempt to replace rotary instruments. These are claimed to be efficient and selective for diseased tissues and to offer comfortable treatment to the patients. New methods include air abrasion, air polishing, ultrasonic, polymer burs, enzymes, systems for chemo-mechanical caries removal, and lasers. The aim of this paper was to discuss various caries removal techniques and possibilities of their use in clinical practice. Based on the literature review it can be concluded that none of the new caries removal methods can completely replace conventional rotary instruments.

  6. Hepatic leukemia factor promotes resistance to cell death: Implications for therapeutics and chronotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waters, Katrina M.; Sontag, Ryan L.; Weber, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Physiological variation related to circadian rhythms and aberrant gene expression patterns are believed to modulate therapeutic efficacy, but the precise molecular determinants remain unclear. Here we examine the regulation of cell death by hepatic leukemia factor (HLF), which is an output regulator of circadian rhythms and is aberrantly expressed in human cancers, using an ectopic expression strategy in JB6 mouse epidermal cells and human keratinocytes. Ectopic HLF expression inhibited cell death in both JB6 cells and human keratinocytes, as induced by serum-starvation, tumor necrosis factor alpha and ionizing radiation. Microarray analysis indicates that HLF regulates a complex multi-gene transcriptional program encompassing upregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, downregulation of pro-apoptotic genes, and many additional changes that are consistent with an anti-death program. Collectively, our results demonstrate that ectopic expression of HLF, an established transcription factor that cycles with circadian rhythms, can recapitulate many features associated with circadian-dependent physiological variation. - Highlights: ► Circadian-dependent physiological variation impacts therapeutic efficacy. ► Hepatic leukemia factor inhibits cell death and is a candidate circadian factor. ► Hepatic leukemia factor anti-death program is conserved in murine and human cells. ► Transcriptomics indicates the anti-death program results from a systems response

  7. MALDI Mass Spectrometry Imaging for Evaluation of Therapeutics in Colorectal Tumor Organoids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xin; Flinders, Colin; Mumenthaler, Shannon M.; Hummon, Amanda B.

    2018-03-01

    Patient-derived colorectal tumor organoids (CTOs) closely recapitulate the complex morphological, phenotypic, and genetic features observed in in vivo tumors. Therefore, evaluation of drug distribution and metabolism in this model system can provide valuable information to predict the clinical outcome of a therapeutic response in individual patients. In this report, we applied matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry imaging (MALDI-MSI) to examine the spatial distribution of the drug irinotecan and its metabolites in CTOs from two patients. Irinotecan is a prodrug and is often prescribed as part of therapeutic regimes for patients with advanced colorectal cancer. Irinotecan shows a time-dependent and concentration-dependent permeability and metabolism in the CTOs. More interestingly, the active metabolite SN-38 does not co-localize well with the parent drug irinotecan and the inactive metabolite SN-38G. The phenotypic effect of irinotecan metabolism was also confirmed by a viability study showing significantly reduced proliferation in the drug treated CTOs. MALDI-MSI can be used to investigate various pharmaceutical compounds in CTOs derived from different patients. By analyzing multiple CTOs from a patient, this method could be used to predict patient-specific drug responses and help to improve personalized dosing regimens. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  8. Recent progress in nanomedicine: therapeutic, diagnostic and theranostic applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizzo, L.Y.; Theek, B.; Storm, Gerrit; Kiessling, F.; Lammers, Twan Gerardus Gertudis Maria

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, the use of nanomedicine formulations for therapeutic and diagnostic applications has increased exponentially. Many different systems and strategies have been developed for drug targeting to pathological sites, as well as for visualizing and quantifying important (patho-)

  9. Structure-guided deimmunization of therapeutic proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Andrew S; Choi, Yoonjoo; Griswold, Karl E; Bailey-Kellogg, Chris

    2013-02-01

    Therapeutic proteins continue to yield revolutionary new treatments for a growing spectrum of human disease, but the development of these powerful drugs requires solving a unique set of challenges. For instance, it is increasingly apparent that mitigating potential anti-therapeutic immune responses, driven by molecular recognition of a therapeutic protein's peptide fragments, may be best accomplished early in the drug development process. One may eliminate immunogenic peptide fragments by mutating the cognate amino acid sequences, but deimmunizing mutations are constrained by the need for a folded, stable, and functional protein structure. These two concerns may be competing, as the mutations that are best at reducing immunogenicity often involve amino acids that are substantially different physicochemically. We develop a novel approach, called EpiSweep, that simultaneously optimizes both concerns. Our algorithm identifies sets of mutations making such Pareto optimal trade-offs between structure and immunogenicity, embodied by a molecular mechanics energy function and a T-cell epitope predictor, respectively. EpiSweep integrates structure-based protein design, sequence-based protein deimmunization, and algorithms for finding the Pareto frontier of a design space. While structure-based protein design is NP-hard, we employ integer programming techniques that are efficient in practice. Furthermore, EpiSweep only invokes the optimizer once per identified Pareto optimal design. We show that EpiSweep designs of regions of the therapeutics erythropoietin and staphylokinase are predicted to outperform previous experimental efforts. We also demonstrate EpiSweep's capacity for deimmunization of the entire proteins, case analyses involving dozens of predicted epitopes, and tens of thousands of unique side-chain interactions. Ultimately, Epi-Sweep is a powerful protein design tool that guides the protein engineer toward the most promising immunotolerant biotherapeutic

  10. Chemical Modifications of Nucleic Acid Aptamers for Therapeutic Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuaijian Ni

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Nucleic acid aptamers have minimal immunogenicity, high chemical synthesis production, low cost and high chemical stability when compared with antibodies. However, the susceptibility to nuclease degradation, rapid excretion through renal filtration and insufficient binding affinity hindered their development as drug candidates for therapeutic applications. In this review, we will discuss methods to conquer these challenges and highlight recent developments of chemical modifications and technological advances that may enable early aptamers to be translated into clinical therapeutics.

  11. Implications for Therapeutic Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. L. Hof

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with an upper motor neurone syndrome (CP suffer from many disabling primary symptoms: spasms, weakness, and loss of dexterity. These primary ‘neurogenic’ symptoms often lead to secondary disabilities, muscle contractures, and tertiary effects, bone deformations. A common symptom of CP is hypertonia, with. the consequence that the involved muscles remain in an excessively shortened length for most of the time. As a normal reaction of the muscle tissue, the number of sarcomeres is reduced and the muscle fibers shorten permanently: a contracture develops. A possible second type of contracture is that normal muscle lengthening along with bone growth is affected. Current treatments for the secondary effects include (1 reduction of muscle force, (2lengthening of the muscle fibers by serial plaster casts, and (3surgical lengthening of tendons or aponeurosis. The choice of treatment depends on the cause of the functional deficit. Bone tissue also adapts itself to abnormal forces, especially in the growth period. The hypertonias or contractures of CP so may give rise to bone malformations that interfere with function (e.g. femur endorotation or may reduce the action of muscles by changing the lever arm (e.g. ankle varus. Although prevention should always be preferred, a timely surgical intervention cannot always be avoided. The differences in treatment for the various groups require and justify an extensive laboratory investigation, including EMG recordings in gait, measurement of passive elastic properties, and long-term observation of the hypertonia.

  12. Predictive and therapeutic markers in ovarian cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Joe W.; Guan, Yinghui; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Fridlyand, Jane; Mills, Gordon B.

    2013-03-26

    Cancer markers may be developed to detect diseases characterized by increased expression of apoptosis-suppressing genes, such as aggressive cancers. Genes in the human chromosomal regions, 8q24, 11q13, 20q11-q13, were found to be amplified indicating in vivo drug resistance in diseases such as ovarian cancer. Diagnosis and assessment of amplification levels certain genes shown to be amplified, including PVT1, can be useful in prediction of poor outcome of patient's response and drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates. Certain genes were found to be high priority therapeutic targets by the identification of recurrent aberrations involving genome sequence, copy number and/or gene expression are associated with reduced survival duration in certain diseases and cancers, specifically ovarian cancer. Therapeutics to inhibit amplification and inhibitors of one of these genes, PVT1, target drug resistance in ovarian cancer patients with low survival rates is described.

  13. Towards universal therapeutics for memory disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Miao-Kun; Nelson, Thomas J; Alkon, Daniel L

    2015-06-01

    Evidence is accumulating that many memory disorders, including those due to neurodegenerative diseases, traumatic brain injury (TBI), vascular disease, or abnormal brain development, share common features of memory-related pathology. Structural and functional deficits of synapses are at the core of the underlying pathophysiology, constituting a critical point of convergence in memory disorders. Memory therapeutics that target synaptic loss and dysfunction - that is, to slow, halt, or reverse progression of the disorders at the level of synapses, via synaptogenic molecular cascades such as those of protein kinase C (PKC) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) - possess universal therapeutic value for many forms of memory disorder. They may be useful either as standalone interventions for patients with memory disorders or as adjuncts to drugs that target the underlying pathology. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Genome Engineering for Personalized Arthritis Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adkar, Shaunak S; Brunger, Jonathan M; Willard, Vincent P; Wu, Chia-Lung; Gersbach, Charles A; Guilak, Farshid

    2017-10-01

    Arthritis represents a family of complex joint pathologies responsible for the majority of musculoskeletal conditions. Nearly all diseases within this family, including osteoarthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, and juvenile idiopathic arthritis, are chronic conditions with few or no disease-modifying therapeutics available. Advances in genome engineering technology, most recently with CRISPR-Cas9, have revolutionized our ability to interrogate and validate genetic and epigenetic elements associated with chronic diseases such as arthritis. These technologies, together with cell reprogramming methods, including the use of induced pluripotent stem cells, provide a platform for human disease modeling. We summarize new evidence from genome-wide association studies and genomics that substantiates a genetic basis for arthritis pathogenesis. We also review the potential contributions of genome engineering in the development of new arthritis therapeutics. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Examinando o desenho infantil como recurso terapêutico para o desenvolvimento de linguagem de crianças surdas Examining children's drawing as a therapeutic resource for deaf children's language development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Campos Machado Araújo

    2008-06-01

    stemming from a Historic-Cultural perspective. The subjects of this case report were two bilingual male deaf children with ages between nine and ten years, both with profound bilateral hearing loss and complaints of delay in their language development. Data were gathered for a year, producing 30 hours of video recordings and reports regarding the 60-minutes weekly therapy sessions that were carried out during this period. Taking children's, language's and drawing's development as a constantly-changing process, the focus of the analyses was the emergence of actions-in-change and the dynamics of the interactions between the studied subjects. Results showed that the priority given to the use of sign language associated with the therapeutic focus on signic activities, which took into account linguistic particularities and semiotic mediations, were vital for language acquisition and development to favor deaf children's social practices.

  16. The therapeutic voyage of pyrazole and its analogs: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Mohemmed Faraz; Alam, Mohammad Mumtaz; Verma, Garima; Akhtar, Wasim; Akhter, Mymoona; Shaquiquzzaman, Mohammad

    2016-09-14

    Pyrazole, a five membered heteroaromatic ring with two nitrogen atoms is of immense significance. Presence of this nucleus in the pharmacological agents of diverse therapeutic categories viz. antianxiety, anti-inflammatory, antipsychotic, anticancer, antiobesity, analgesic, antipyretic etc. has made it an indispensable anchor for design and development of new pharmacological agents. Owing to the development of novel and new pyrazole based therapeutic agents at a faster pace, there is a need to couple the latest information with previously available information to understand status of this moiety in medicinal chemistry research. The review herein highlights the therapeutic worth of pyrazole derivatives. Several therapeutically active pyrazole based derivatives developed by numerous scientists across the globe are reported here. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Emerging Mitochondrial Therapeutic Targets in Optic Neuropathies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez Sanchez, M I G; Crowston, J G; Mackey, D A; Trounce, I A

    2016-09-01

    Optic neuropathies are an important cause of blindness worldwide. The study of the most common inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies, Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal dominant optic atrophy (ADOA) has highlighted a fundamental role for mitochondrial function in the survival of the affected neuron-the retinal ganglion cell. A picture is now emerging that links mitochondrial dysfunction to optic nerve disease and other neurodegenerative processes. Insights gained from the peculiar susceptibility of retinal ganglion cells to mitochondrial dysfunction are likely to inform therapeutic development for glaucoma and other common neurodegenerative diseases of aging. Despite it being a fast-evolving field of research, a lack of access to human ocular tissues and limited animal models of mitochondrial disease have prevented direct retinal ganglion cell experimentation and delayed the development of efficient therapeutic strategies to prevent vision loss. Currently, there are no approved treatments for mitochondrial disease, including optic neuropathies caused by primary or secondary mitochondrial dysfunction. Recent advances in eye research have provided important insights into the molecular mechanisms that mediate pathogenesis, and new therapeutic strategies including gene correction approaches are currently being investigated. Here, we review the general principles of mitochondrial biology relevant to retinal ganglion cell function and provide an overview of the major optic neuropathies with mitochondrial involvement, LHON and ADOA, whilst highlighting the emerging link between mitochondrial dysfunction and glaucoma. The pharmacological strategies currently being trialed to improve mitochondrial dysfunction in these optic neuropathies are discussed in addition to emerging therapeutic approaches to preserve retinal ganglion cell function. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Bone-seeking therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Suresh C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone-seeking therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are utilized on the basis of the radionuclide?s particulate emissions (primarily low to intermediate beta emission. The requirements therefore are different from those of bone imaging agents that consist mainly of short-lived single photon emitters. Lately, the therapeutic bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals have attained increasing importance due to their potential role in alleviating pain from osseous metastases in cancer patients, for the treatment of joint pain resulting from inflamed synovium (radiosynoviorthesis, or radiosynovectomy, or from various other forms of arthritic disease. There is, however, a paucity of published data on the bio-pharmacokinetics of these agents when used following intravenous administration for bone pain palliation. This paper will briefly review and summarize the presently available chemical and biopharmacokinetic information on the various clinically approved as well as experimental bone-localizing therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, and make projections on their clinical application for the treatment of primary/metastatic cancer in bone.

  19. Conflicts in the therapeutic field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Aprea

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available How the analytical knowledge that compare human consciousness with that, even more disturbing, moving behind his fifth can be said to be “for peace”? It can be - and this will be the contribution of the proposal - the same tortuous and enigmatic of therapeutic practice, with its hesitations and his impulses, to outline a path crossing and overcoming the conflict? May, finally, peace, in the sense of feasibility of intra-and interpersonal dialectic instead of tearing and hostileconfrontation with oneself and with the other, to be a reference in some crucial pivot of ethical therapeutic work? To these questions the intervention seeks to answer retracing some of the highlights of almost three years of therapeutic work with a young woman and her family.

  20. [Therapeutic touch and anorexia nervosa].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satori, Nadine

    2016-01-01

    An innovative practice, therapeutic touch has been used for around ten years in the treatment of eating disorders. Delivered by nurse clinicians having received specific training, this approach is based on nursing diagnoses which identify the major symptoms of this pathology. The support is built around the body and its perceptions. Through the helping relationship, it mobilises the patient's resources to favour a relationship of trust, a letting-go, physical, psychological and emotional relaxation, and improves the therapeutic alliance. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  1. Therapeutic angiogenesis for cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D'Amore Patricia A

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The identification of angiogenic growth factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor and fibroblast growth factor, has fueled interest in using such factors to induce therapeutic angiogenesis. The results of numerous animal studies and clinical trials have offered promise for new treatment strategies for various ischemic diseases. Increased understanding of the cellular and molecular biology of vessel growth has, however, prompted investigators and clinicians alike to reconsider the complexity of therapeutic angiogenesis. The realization that formation of a stable vessel is a complex, multistep process may provide useful insights into the design of the next generation of angiogenesis therapy.

  2. Therapeutic validity and effectiveness of preoperative exercise on functional recovery after joint replacement: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogeboom, T.J.; Oosting, E.; Vriezekolk, J.E.; Veenhof, C.; Siemonsma, P.C.; Bie, R.A. de; Ende, C.H.M. van den; Meeteren, N.L.U. van

    2012-01-01

    Background: Our aim was to develop a rating scale to assess the therapeutic validity of therapeutic exercise programmes. By use of this rating scale we investigated the therapeutic validity of therapeutic exercise in patients awaiting primary total joint replacement (TJR). Finally, we studied the

  3. New approaches to molecular cancer therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Ian; Workman, Paul

    2006-12-01

    Cancer drug development is leading the way in exploiting molecular biological and genetic information to develop "personalized" medicine. The new paradigm is to develop agents that target the precise molecular pathology driving the progression of individual cancers. Drug developers have benefited from decades of academic cancer research and from investment in genomics, genetics and automation; their success is exemplified by high-profile drugs such as Herceptin (trastuzumab), Gleevec (imatinib), Tarceva (erlotinib) and Avastin (bevacizumab). However, only 5% of cancer drugs entering clinical trials reach marketing approval. Cancer remains a high unmet medical need, and many potential cancer targets remain undrugged. In this review we assess the status of the discovery and development of small-molecule cancer therapeutics. We show how chemical biology approaches offer techniques for interconnecting elements of the traditional linear progression from gene to drug, thereby providing a basis for increasing speed and success in cancer drug discovery.

  4. Therapeutic experiences of community gardens: putting flow in its place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pitt, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    This paper develops the concept of therapeutic place experiences by considering the role of activity. Research of community gardening finds that particular tasks are therapeutic and exhibit the characteristics of flow, but those who lack influence over their community gardening are less likely to benefit from flow as their sense of control is reduced. The notion of emplaced flow is proposed to locate individual experiences amongst socio-spatial factors which limit self-determinacy and therefore affect wellbeing. Emplacing flow prompts critical reflection on who is excluded from therapeutic place experiences, and whether sites offering momentary escape have an enduring impact on wellbeing. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Therapeutic hypothermia for acute stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Tom Skyhøj; Weber, Uno Jakob; Kammersgaard, Lars Peter

    2003-01-01

    Experimental evidence and clinical experience show that hypothermia protects the brain from damage during ischaemia. There is a growing hope that the prevention of fever in stroke will improve outcome and that hypothermia may be a therapeutic option for the treatment of stroke. Body temperature i...

  6. Therapeutic Drug Monitoring of Lithium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mose, Tina; Damkier, Per; Petersen, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Serum lithium is monitored to ensure levels within the narrow therapeutic window. This study examines the interlaboratory variation and inaccuracy of lithium monitoring in Denmark. METHODS: In 16 samples consisting of (1) control materials (n = 4), (2) pooled patient serum (n = 5), an...

  7. Therapeutic Versatility of Resveratrol Derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Waqas Nawaz; Zhongqin Zhou; Sa Deng; Xiaodong Ma; Xiaochi Ma; Chuangang Li; Xiaohong Shu

    2017-01-01

    Resveratrol, a natural phytoalexin, exhibits a remarkable range of biological activities, such as anticancer, cardioprotective, neuroprotective and antioxidant properties. However, the therapeutic application of resveratrol was encumbered for its low bioavailability. Therefore, many researchers focused on designing and synthesizing the derivatives of resveratrol to enhance the bioavailability and the pharmacological activity of resveratrol. During the past decades, a large number of natural a...

  8. Therapeutic balloon-assisted enteroscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Aktas (Huseyin); P.B.F. Mensink (Peter)

    2009-01-01

    textabstractSince the introduction of the first balloon-based enteroscopic technique in 2001, therapeutic balloon-assisted enteroscopy (BAE) using either the single or double balloon enteroscopy technique (respectively SBE and DBE) has evolved rapidly. Argon plasma coagulation (APC), polypectomy,

  9. DNA molecules and human therapeutics

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-29

    Dec 29, 2009 ... Nucleic acid molecules are championing a new generation of reverse engineered biopharmaceuticals. In terms of potential application in gene medicine, plasmid DNA (pDNA) vectors have exceptional therapeutic and immunological profiles as they are free from safety concerns associated with viral vectors ...

  10. Therapeutic drug monitoring of antimicrobials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balakrishnan, Indran; Shorten, Robert J

    2016-05-01

    As pathology services become more centralized and automated, the measurement of therapeutic antimicrobial drugs concentrations is increasingly performed in clinical biochemistry or 'blood science' laboratories. This review outlines key groups of antimicrobial agents: aminoglycosides, glycopeptides, antifungal agents and antituberculosis agents, their role in managing infectious diseases, and the reasons why serum concentration measurement is important. © The Author(s) 2016.

  11. The therapeutic community for addicts : intimacy, perent involvment and treatment outcome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Kooyman (Martien)

    1992-01-01

    textabstractTherapeutic communities for addicts developed since the Sixties without a clear theory on what made them therapeutic. There have also been some doubts on their long term outcome results. Part I of this book describes how therapeutic communities for addicts have roots in the self-help

  12. Secukinumab: a promising therapeutic option in spondyloarthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldonado-Ficco, Hernan; Perez-Alamino, Rodolfo; Maldonado-Cocco, José A

    2016-09-01

    Psoriatic arthritis (PsA) is the second most common chronic inflammatory joint disease. Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is another less common but equally chronic and disabling spondyloarthritis (SpA). Therapeutic agents for the treatment of these diseases have been somewhat lacking as compared with those available for rheumatoid arthritis, which represents a significant challenge for both the treating physician and the pharmaceutical industry. A promising development for our understanding of the physiopathology of PsA and AS involves new targets to interrupt IL-17 and IL-12/IL-23 pathways. Up to 30-40 % of SpA patients have inadequate or poor response, or are intolerant to anti-TNF therapies. Therefore, there has been a clear unmet medical need in an important group of these patients. As a result, new therapeutic targets have emerged for the treatment of both axial and peripheral SpA. Interleukin 17 (IL-17) is a pro-inflammatory cytokine that is increased in psoriatic lesions as well as in the synovial fluid of patients with PsA and in sites of enthesitis in SpA. IL-23 has been shown to play an important role in the polarization of CD4+ T-cells to become IL-17 producers. Based on these evidences, blockade of the cytokine IL-17 or its receptors was considered to have therapeutic implications for the treatment of psoriasis, as well as PsA and AS.This article presents a thorough review of an IL-17 A blocking agent, its mechanism of action, its clinical efficacy and its therapeutic safety.

  13. Nanoparticle-Based Delivery of RNAi Therapeutics: Progress and Challenges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John C. Burnett

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available RNA interference (RNAi is an evolutionarily conserved, endogenous process for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Although RNAi therapeutics have recently progressed through the pipeline toward clinical trials, the application of these as ideal, clinical therapeutics requires the development of safe and effective delivery systems. Inspired by the immense progress with nanotechnology in drug delivery, efforts have been dedicated to the development of nanoparticle-based RNAi delivery systems. For example, a precisely engineered, multifunctional nanocarrier with combined passive and active targeting capabilities may address the delivery challenges for the widespread use of RNAi as a therapy. Therefore, in this review, we introduce the major hurdles in achieving efficient RNAi delivery and discuss the current advances in applying nanotechnology-based delivery systems to overcome the delivery hurdles of RNAi therapeutics. In particular, some representative examples of nanoparticle-based delivery formulations for targeted RNAi therapeutics are highlighted.

  14. A modular platform for targeted RNAi therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kedmi, Ranit; Veiga, Nuphar; Ramishetti, Srinivas; Goldsmith, Meir; Rosenblum, Daniel; Dammes, Niels; Hazan-Halevy, Inbal; Nahary, Limor; Leviatan-Ben-Arye, Shani; Harlev, Michael; Behlke, Mark; Benhar, Itai; Lieberman, Judy; Peer, Dan

    2018-01-01

    Previous studies have identified relevant genes and signalling pathways that are hampered in human disorders as potential candidates for therapeutics. Developing nucleic acid-based tools to manipulate gene expression, such as short interfering RNAs1-3 (siRNAs), opens up opportunities for personalized medicine. Yet, although major progress has been made in developing siRNA targeted delivery carriers, mainly by utilizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for targeting4-8, their clinical translation has not occurred. This is in part because of the massive development and production requirements and the high batch-to-batch variability of current technologies, which rely on chemical conjugation. Here we present a self-assembled modular platform that enables the construction of a theoretically unlimited repertoire of siRNA targeted carriers. The self-assembly of the platform is based on a membrane-anchored lipoprotein that is incorporated into siRNA-loaded lipid nanoparticles that interact with the antibody crystallizable fragment (Fc) domain. We show that a simple switch of eight different mAbs redirects the specific uptake of siRNAs by diverse leukocyte subsets in vivo. The therapeutic potential of the platform is demonstrated in an inflammatory bowel disease model by targeting colon macrophages to reduce inflammatory symptoms, and in a Mantle Cell Lymphoma xenograft model by targeting cancer cells to induce cell death and improve survival. This modular delivery platform represents a milestone in the development of precision medicine.

  15. Unexplored therapeutic opportunities in the human genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprea, Tudor I; Bologa, Cristian G; Brunak, Søren; Campbell, Allen; Gan, Gregory N; Gaulton, Anna; Gomez, Shawn M; Guha, Rajarshi; Hersey, Anne; Holmes, Jayme; Jadhav, Ajit; Jensen, Lars Juhl; Johnson, Gary L; Karlson, Anneli; Leach, Andrew R; Ma'ayan, Avi; Malovannaya, Anna; Mani, Subramani; Mathias, Stephen L; McManus, Michael T; Meehan, Terrence F; von Mering, Christian; Muthas, Daniel; Nguyen, Dac-Trung; Overington, John P; Papadatos, George; Qin, Jun; Reich, Christian; Roth, Bryan L; Schürer, Stephan C; Simeonov, Anton; Sklar, Larry A; Southall, Noel; Tomita, Susumu; Tudose, Ilinca; Ursu, Oleg; Vidovic, Dušica; Waller, Anna; Westergaard, David; Yang, Jeremy J; Zahoránszky-Köhalmi, Gergely

    2018-03-23

    A large proportion of biomedical research and the development of therapeutics is focused on a small fraction of the human genome. In a strategic effort to map the knowledge gaps around proteins encoded by the human genome and to promote the exploration of currently understudied, but potentially druggable, proteins, the US National Institutes of Health launched the Illuminating the Druggable Genome (IDG) initiative in 2014. In this article, we discuss how the systematic collection and processing of a wide array of genomic, proteomic, chemical and disease-related