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Sample records for therapeutic ultrasound parameters

  1. Therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Lawrence A

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques. (amum lecture)

  2. Optimization of ultrasound parameters of myocardial cavitation microlesions for therapeutic application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Douglas L; Dou, Chunyan; Owens, Gabe E; Kripfgans, Oliver D

    2014-06-01

    Intermittent high intensity ultrasound scanning with contrast microbubbles can induce scattered cavitation microlesions in the myocardium, which may be of value for tissue reduction therapy. Anesthetized rats were treated in a heated water bath with 1.5 MHz focused ultrasound pulses, guided by an 8 MHz imaging transducer. The relative efficacy with 2 or 4 MPa pulses, 1:4 or 1:8 trigger intervals and 5 or 10 cycle pulses was explored in six groups. Electrocardiogram premature complexes (PCs) induced by the triggered pulse bursts were counted, and Evans blue stained cardiomyocyte scores (SCSs) were obtained. The increase from 2 to 4 MPa produced significant increases in PCs and SCSs and eliminated an anticipated decline in the rate of PC induction with time, which might hinder therapeutic efficacy. Increased intervals and pulse durations did not yield significant increases in the effects. The results suggest that cavitation microlesion production can be refined and potentially lead to a clinically robust therapeutic method. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Microvessel rupture induced by high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound-a study of parameter sensitivity in a simple in vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yeonho; Nabili, Marjan; Acharya, Priyanka; Lopez, Asis; Myers, Matthew R

    2017-01-01

    Safety analyses of transcranial therapeutic ultrasound procedures require knowledge of the dependence of the rupture probability and rupture time upon sonication parameters. As previous vessel-rupture studies have concentrated on a specific set of exposure conditions, there is a need for more comprehensive parametric studies. Probability of rupture and rupture times were measured by exposing the large blood vessel of a live earthworm to high-intensity focused ultrasound pulse trains of various characteristics. Pressures generated by the ultrasound transducers were estimated through numerical solutions to the KZK (Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov) equation. Three ultrasound frequencies (1.1, 2.5, and 3.3 MHz) were considered, as were three pulse repetition frequencies (1, 3, and 10 Hz), and two duty factors (0.0001, 0.001). The pressures produced ranged from 4 to 18 MPa. Exposures of up to 10 min in duration were employed. Trials were repeated an average of 11 times. No trends as a function of pulse repetition rate were identifiable, for either probability of rupture or rupture time. Rupture time was found to be a strong function of duty factor at the lower pressures; at 1.1 MHz the rupture time was an order of magnitude lower for the 0.001 duty factor than the 0.0001. At moderate pressures, the difference between the duty factors was less, and there was essentially no difference between duty factors at the highest pressure. Probability of rupture was not found to be a strong function of duty factor. Rupture thresholds were about 4 MPa for the 1.1 MHz frequency, 7 MPa at 3.3 MHz, and 11 MPa for the 2.5 MHz, though the pressure value at 2.5 MHz frequency will likely be reduced when steep-angle corrections are accounted for in the KZK model used to estimate pressures. Mechanical index provided a better collapse of the data (less separation of the curves pertaining to the different frequencies) than peak negative pressure, for both probability of rupture and

  4. Triplet ultrasound growth parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vora, Neeta L; Ruthazer, Robin; House, Michael; Chelmow, David

    2006-03-01

    To create ultrasound growth curves for normal growth of fetal triplets using statistical methodology that properly accounts for similarities of growth of fetuses within a mother as well as repeated measurements over time for each fetus. In this longitudinal study, all triplet pregnancies managed at a single tertiary center from 1992-2004 were reviewed. Fetuses with major anomalies, prior selective reduction, or fetal demise were excluded. Data from early and late gestation in which there were fewer than 30 fetal measurements available for analysis were excluded. We used multilevel models to account for variation in growth within a single fetus over time, variations in growth between multiple fetuses within a single mother, and variations in fetal growth between mothers. Medians (50th), 10th, and 90th percentiles were estimated by the creation of multiple quadratic growth models from bootstrap samples adapting a previously published method to compute prediction intervals. Estimated fetal weight was derived from Hadlock's formula. One hundred fifty triplet pregnancies were identified. Twenty-seven pregnancies were excluded for the following reasons: missing records (23), fetal demise (3), and fetal anomaly (1). The study group consisted of 123 pregnancies. The gestational age range was restricted to 14-34 weeks. Figures and tables were developed showing medians, 10th and 90th percentiles for estimated fetal weight, femur length, biparietal diameter, abdominal circumference, and head circumference. Growth curves for triplet pregnancies were derived. These may be useful for identification of abnormal growth in triplet fetuses. III.

  5. Design Issues for Therapeutic Ultrasound Angioplasty Waveguides

    OpenAIRE

    Noone, Declan; Gavin, Graham; McGuinness, Garrett

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound angioplasty is a new minimally invasive cardiovascular procedure for disrupting atherosclerotic lesions. Mechanical energy is transmitted in the form of ultrasound waves via long, flexible wire waveguides navigated to the lesion site through the vascular system. The underpinning principle of this technology is that plaque may be disrupted through a combination of direct contact ablation, pressure waves, cavitation and acoustic streaming, which all depend on the amplitud...

  6. Therapeutic aspects of endoscopic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Timothy A.

    1999-06-01

    Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) is a technology that had been used primarily as a passive imaging modality. Recent advances have enabled us to move beyond the use of EUS solely as a staging tool to an interventional device. Current studies suggest that interventional applications of EUS will allow for minimally invasive assessment and therapies in a cost-effective manner. Endoscopic ultrasound with fine needle aspiration (EUS-FNA) has been demonstrated to be a technically feasible, relatively safe method of obtaining cytologic specimens. The clinical utility of EUS- FNA appears to be greatest in the diagnosis and staging of pancreatic cancer and in the nodal staging of gastrointestinal and pulmonary malignancies. In addition, EUS-FNA has demonstrated utility in the sampling pleural and ascitic fluid not generally appreciated or assessable to standard interventions. Interventional applications of EUS include EUS-guided pseudocyst drainage, EUS-guided injection of botulinum toxin in the treatment of achalasia, and EUS- guided celiac plexus neurolysis in the treatment of pancreatic cancer pain. Finally, EUS-guided fine-needle installation is being evaluated, in conjunction with recent bimolecular treatment modalities, as a delivery system in the treatment of certain gastrointestinal tumors.

  7. Therapeutic ultrasound - Exciting applications and future challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffari, Nader

    2018-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the applications of ultrasound for the treatment of an ever-growing range of medical conditions. After presenting a brief history of the development of therapeutic ultrasound, the different mechanisms by which beneficial bio-effects are triggered will be discussed. This will be followed by a discussion of some of the more promising applications, some of which have already been licensed and introduced into the clinic. The case of liver tumour ablation will be discussed to demonstrate some of the engineering challenges that still need to be overcome before this technology finds wider uptake in the medical world.

  8. Effect of modulated ultrasound parameters on ultrasound-induced thrombolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soltani, Azita; Volz, Kim R; Hansmann, Doulas R

    2008-01-01

    The potential of ultrasound to enhance enzyme-mediated thrombolysis by application of constant operating parameters (COP) has been widely demonstrated. In this study, the effect of ultrasound with modulated operating parameters (MOP) on enzyme-mediated thrombolysis was investigated. The MOP protocol was applied to an in vitro model of thrombolysis. The results were compared to a COP with the equivalent soft tissue thermal index (TIS) over the duration of ultrasound exposure of 30 min (p -2 ± 0.01 μm and 1.99 x 10 -2 ± 0.004 μm, respectively (p < 0.74). No signatures of inertial or stable cavitation were observed for either acoustic protocol. In conclusion, due to mechanisms other than cavitation, application of ultrasound with modulated operating parameters has the potential to significantly enhance the relative lysis enhancement compared to application of ultrasound with constant operating parameters.

  9. Nonthermal effects of therapeutic ultrasound: the frequency resonance hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johns, Lennart D

    2002-07-01

    To present the frequency resonance hypothesis, a possible mechanical mechanism by which treatment with non-thermal levels of ultrasound stimulates therapeutic effects. The review encompasses a 4-decade history but focuses on recent reports describing the effects of nonthermal therapeutic levels of ultrasound at the cellular and molecular levels. A search of MEDLINE from 1965 through 2000 using the terms ultrasound and therapeutic ultrasound. The literature provides a number of examples in which exposure of cells to therapeutic ultrasound under nonthermal conditions modified cellular functions. Nonthermal levels of ultrasound are reported to modulate membrane properties, alter cellular proliferation, and produce increases in proteins associated with inflammation and injury repair. Combined, these data suggest that nonthermal effects of therapeutic ultrasound can modify the inflammatory response. The concept of the absorption of ultrasonic energy by enzymatic proteins leading to changes in the enzymes activity is not novel. However, recent reports demonstrating that ultrasound affects enzyme activity and possibly gene regulation provide sufficient data to present a probable molecular mechanism of ultrasound's nonthermal therapeutic action. The frequency resonance hypothesis describes 2 possible biological mechanisms that may alter protein function as a result of the absorption of ultrasonic energy. First, absorption of mechanical energy by a protein may produce a transient conformational shift (modifying the 3-dimensional structure) and alter the protein's functional activity. Second, the resonance or shearing properties of the wave (or both) may dissociate a multimolecular complex, thereby disrupting the complex's function. This review focuses on recent studies that have reported cellular and molecular effects of therapeutic ultrasound and presents a mechanical mechanism that may lead to a better understanding of how the nonthermal effects of ultrasound may be

  10. Efficacy of therapeutic ultrasound and exercise therapy in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Results: Findings of the study revealed no significant difference in VAS, ROM and WOMAC scores in the study and control groups. Conclusions: This study confirms that therapeutic ultrasound is of no additional benefit to exercise therapy in the management of chronic osteoarthritis. Key words: Ultrasound; Exercise; ...

  11. Quality control culture of diagnostic ultrasound parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andam, A.A.B; Addison, E.C.K.; Aggry-Smith, S.; Nani, E.K.

    2003-01-01

    A phantom, consisting of two phases, has been designed and constructed to mimic the human body. The phase one phantom was designed to mimic a a surface lesion in the human body and the phase two phantom designed to mimic a section of the whole body. Ultrasound scans of the phantom were acquired for various material in the phantom at six hospitals in Kumasi, Ghana. A linear array transducer with parallel beams having a convex probe and a 3.5 MHz ultrasound frequency were used to carry out the experiment. It was observed that the depth of penetration of ultrasound, which constitutes the maximum depth of visualization or sensitivity, is determined by the frequency of the transducer, the attenuation of the medium being imaged and the system settings. Uniformity and linearity of the machines investigated were found to be within clinically acceptable standards. Spatial resolution, comprising axial and lateral resolutions, was observed to be satisfactory for the machines tested. It was observed that lateral resolution improved with the narrowing of the beam width. The ultrasound scanners at the selected hospitals were found to be operating at the expected level of performance. This work highlights the importance of putting in place a locally based mechanism for quality control of diagnostic ultrasound machines (author)

  12. The therapeutic impact of abdominal ultrasound in patients with acute abdominal symptoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhillon, S.; Halligan, S.; Goh, V.; Matravers, P.; Chambers, A.; Remedios, D.

    2002-01-01

    AIM: The technical performance of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain has been thoroughly investigated but its therapeutic effects are less well understood. We aimed to determine the therapeutic effect of abdominal ultrasound in the investigation of acute abdominal pain. MATERIAL AND METHODS: A pre- and post-intervention observational study design was used to determine the diagnostic and therapeutic effects of abdominal ultrasound for acute abdominal pain. Referring clinicians completed a pre-ultrasound questionnaire that detailed their leading diagnosis, confidence in this and intended management in 100 consecutive adult patients. Following ultrasound a second questionnaire was completed. This again detailed the leading diagnosis, confidence in this and their intended management. Clinicians quantified the management contribution of ultrasound both for the individual case in question and in their clinical experience generally. RESULTS: The leading diagnosis was either confirmed or rejected in 72 patients and a new diagnosis provided where no prior differential diagnosis existed in 10. Diagnostic confidence increased significantly following ultrasound (mean score 6·5 pre-ultrasound vs 7·6 post-ultrasound, P < 0·001). Intended management changed following ultrasound in 22 patients; 15 intended laparotomies were halted and a further seven patients underwent surgery where this was not originally intended. Ultrasound was rated either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful in 87% of patients, with 99% of clinicians finding it either 'very' or 'moderately' helpful generally. CONCLUSION: Abdominal ultrasound has considerable diagnostic and therapeutic effect in the setting of acute abdominal pain. Dhillon, S. et al. (2002)

  13. Endoscopic ultrasound in gastroenterology: from diagnosis to therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mekky, Mohamed A; Abbas, Wael A

    2014-06-28

    Since its advent in 1980, the scope of endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) has grown to include a wide range of indications, and it is now being incorporated as an integral part of everyday practice in the field of gastroenterology. Its use is extending from an adjuvant imaging aid to utilization as a therapeutic tool for various gastrointestinal disorders. EUS was first used to visualize remote organs, such as the pancreas and abdominal lymph nodes. When fine needle aspiration was introduced, the indications for EUS expanded to include tissue sampling for diagnostic purposes. At the same time, the needle can be used to convey a potential therapy to the internal organs, allowing access to remote sites. In this review, we aim to highlight the expanding spectrum of EUS indications and uses in the field of gastroenterology.

  14. Intramuscular Heating Characteristics of Multihour Low-Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigby, Justin H; Taggart, Rebecca M; Stratton, Kelly L; Lewis, George K; Draper, David O

    2015-11-01

    The heating characteristics of a stationary device delivering sustained acoustic medicine with low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (LITUS) are unknown. To measure intramuscular (IM) heating produced by a LITUS device developed for long-duration treatment of musculoskeletal injuries. Controlled laboratory study. University research laboratory. A total of 26 healthy volunteers (16 men, 10 women; age = 23.0 ± 2.1 years, height = 1.74 ± 0.09 m, mass = 73.48 ± 14.65 kg). Participants were assigned randomly to receive active (n = 20) or placebo (n = 6) LITUS at a frequency of 3 MHz and an energy intensity of 0.132 W/cm(2) continuously for 3 hours with a single transducer or dual transducers on the triceps surae muscle. We measured IM temperature using thermocouples inserted at 1.5- and 3-cm depths into muscle. Temperatures were recorded throughout treatment and 30 minutes posttreatment. We used 2-sample t tests to determine the heating curve of the LITUS treatment and differences in final temperatures between depth and number of transducers. A mild IM temperature increase of 1 °C was reached 10 ± 5 minutes into the treatment, and a more vigorous temperature increase of 4 °C was reached 80 ± 10 minutes into the treatment. The maximal steady-state IM temperatures produced during the final 60 minutes of treatment at the 1.5-cm depth were 4.42 °C ± 0.08 °C and 3.92 °C ± 0.06 °C using 1 and 2 transducers, respectively. At the 3.0-cm depth, the maximal steady-state IM temperatures during the final 60 minutes of treatment were 3.05 °C ± 0.09 °C and 3.17 °C ± 0.05 °C using 1 and 2 transducers, respectively. We observed a difference between the temperatures measured at each depth (t78 = -2.45, P = .02), but the number of transducers used to generate heating was not different (t78 = 1.79, P = .08). The LITUS device elicited tissue heating equivalent to traditional ultrasound but could be sustained for multiple hours. It is a safe and effective alternative tool

  15. A reduced-order, single-bubble cavitation model with applications to therapeutic ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreider, Wayne; Crum, Lawrence A; Bailey, Michael R; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2011-11-01

    Cavitation often occurs in therapeutic applications of medical ultrasound such as shock-wave lithotripsy (SWL) and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Because cavitation bubbles can affect an intended treatment, it is important to understand the dynamics of bubbles in this context. The relevant context includes very high acoustic pressures and frequencies as well as elevated temperatures. Relative to much of the prior research on cavitation and bubble dynamics, such conditions are unique. To address the relevant physics, a reduced-order model of a single, spherical bubble is proposed that incorporates phase change at the liquid-gas interface as well as heat and mass transport in both phases. Based on the energy lost during the inertial collapse and rebound of a millimeter-sized bubble, experimental observations were used to tune and test model predictions. In addition, benchmarks from the published literature were used to assess various aspects of model performance. Benchmark comparisons demonstrate that the model captures the basic physics of phase change and diffusive transport, while it is quantitatively sensitive to specific model assumptions and implementation details. Given its performance and numerical stability, the model can be used to explore bubble behaviors across a broad parameter space relevant to therapeutic ultrasound.

  16. Ultrasound enhanced release of therapeutics from drug-releasing implants based on titania nanotube arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aw, Moom Sinn; Losic, Dusan

    2013-02-25

    A non-invasive and external stimulus-driven local drug delivery system (DDS) based on titania nanotube (TNT) arrays loaded with drug encapsulated polymeric micelles as drug carriers and ultrasound generator is described. Ultrasound waves (USW) generated by a pulsating sonication probe (Sonotrode) in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at pH 7.2 as the medium for transmitting pressure waves, were used to release drug-loaded nano-carriers from the TNT arrays. It was demonstrated that a very rapid release in pulsatile mode can be achieved, controlled by several parameters on the ultrasonic generator. This includes pulse length, time, amplitude and power intensity. By optimization of these parameters, an immediate drug-micelles release of 100% that spans a desirable time of 5-50 min was achieved. It was shown that stimulated release can be generated and reproduced at any time throughout the TNT-Ti implant life, suggesting considerable potential of this approach as a feasible and tunable ultrasound-mediated drug delivery system in situ via drug-releasing implants. It is expected that this concept can be translated from an in vitro to in vivo regime for therapeutic applications using drug-releasing implants in orthopedic and coronary stents. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. A derating method for therapeutic applications of high intensity focused ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessonova, O. V.; Khokhlova, V. A.; Canney, M. S.; Bailey, M. R.; Crum, L. A.

    2010-05-01

    Current methods of determining high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields in tissue rely on extrapolation of measurements in water assuming linear wave propagation both in water and in tissue. Neglecting nonlinear propagation effects in the derating process can result in significant errors. A new method based on scaling the source amplitude is introduced to estimate focal parameters of nonlinear HIFU fields in tissue. Focal values of acoustic field parameters in absorptive tissue are obtained from a numerical solution to a KZK-type equation and are compared to those simulated for propagation in water. Focal wave-forms, peak pressures, and intensities are calculated over a wide range of source outputs and linear focusing gains. Our modeling indicates, that for the high gain sources which are typically used in therapeutic medical applications, the focal field parameters derated with our method agree well with numerical simulation in tissue. The feasibility of the derating method is demonstrated experimentally in excised bovine liver tissue.

  18. Antimicrobial Effect of Biocompatible Silicon Nanoparticles Activated Using Therapeutic Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Svetlana N; Burkhardt, Markus; Sheval, Eugene V; Natashina, Ulyana A; Grosse, Christina; Nikolaev, Alexander L; Gopin, Alexander V; Neugebauer, Ute; Kudryavtsev, Andrew A; Sivakov, Vladimir; Osminkina, Liubov A

    2017-03-14

    In this study, we report a method for the suppression of Escherichia coli (E. coli) vitality by means of therapeutic ultrasound irradiation (USI) using biocompatible silicon nanoparticles as cavitation sensitizers. Silicon nanoparticles without (SiNPs) and with polysaccharide (dextran) coating (DSiNPs) were used. Both types of nanoparticles were nontoxic to Hep 2 cells up to a concentration of 2 mg/mL. The treatment of bacteria with nanoparticles and application of 1 W/cm 2 USI resulted in the reduction of their viabilities up to 35 and 72% for SiNPs and DSiNPs, respectively. The higher bacterial viability reduction for DSiNPs as compared with SiNPs can be explained by the fact that the biopolymer shell of the polysaccharide provides a stronger adhesion of nanoparticles to the bacterial surface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies showed that the bacterial lipid shell was partially perforated after the combined treatment of DSiNPs and USI, which can be explained by the lysis of bacterial membrane due to the cavitation sensitized by the SiNPs. Furthermore, we have shown that 100% inhibition of E. coli bacterial colony growth is possible by coupling the treatments of DSiNPs and USI with an increased intensity of up to 3 W/cm 2 . The observed results reveal the application of SiNPs as promising antimicrobial agents.

  19. State of the art thoracic ultrasound: intervention and therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Corcoran, John P.; Tazi-Mezalek, Rachid; Maldonado, Fabien; Yarmus, Lonny B.; Annema, Jouke T.; Koegelenberg, Coenraad F. N.; St Noble, Victoria; Rahman, Najib M.

    2017-01-01

    The use of thoracic ultrasound outside the radiology department and in everyday clinical practice is becoming increasingly common, having been incorporated into standards of care for many specialties. For the majority of practitioners, their experience of, and exposure to, thoracic ultrasound will

  20. Current perspectives on therapeutic ultrasound in the management of chronic wounds: a review of evidence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conner-Kerr T

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Teresa Conner-Kerr,1 Mary Ellen Oesterle2 1College of Health Sciences & Professions, 2Department of Physical Therapy, University of North Georgia, Dahlonega, GA, USA Abstract: Although therapeutic ultrasound has been in existence since the 1930s, questions remain as to its effectiveness in promoting tissue healing in various injured tissues. These tissues include soft tissues such as skin, tendons, ligaments, bursae, joint capsules and muscles. Limited evidence exists to support a role for therapeutic ultrasound in closed, soft tissue lesions. However, an evolving literature provides support for the role of therapeutic ultrasound in the treatment of chronic wounds, acute injuries such as fractures and split thickness graft donor sites as well as in the modulation of wound-related pain. Modern technology that uses low-frequency (kilohertz, long wave ultrasound appears promising compared to older, higher frequency ultrasound (megahertz devices. These newer devices appear to have positive effects on healing rates in various wound types, pain levels and the modulation of proinflammatory cytokines. Keywords: low-frequency ultrasound, non-contact ultrasound, KHz, acoustic, healing, cavitation

  1. Therapeutic Ultrasound Enhancement of Drug Delivery to Soft Tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, George; Wang, Peng; Lewis, George; Olbricht, William

    2009-04-01

    Effects of exposure to 1.58 MHz focused ultrasound on transport of Evans Blue Dye (EBD) in soft tissues are investigated when an external pressure gradient is applied to induce convective flow through the tissue. The magnitude of the external pressure gradient is chosen to simulate conditions in brain parenchyma during convection-enhanced drug delivery (CED) to the brain. EBD uptake and transport are measured in equine brain, avian muscle and agarose brain-mimicking phantoms. Results show that ultrasound enhances EBD uptake and transport, and the greatest enhancement occurs when the external pressure gradient is applied. The results suggest that exposure of the brain parenchyma to ultrasound could enhance penetration of material infused into the brain during CED therapy.

  2. Therapeutic ultrasound - The healing sound and its applications in oral diseases: The review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyothirmai Koneru

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of medical ultrasound was mainly centered on the soft tissue diagnostic imaging until now. Recently, its use has been widened and adopted for various therapeutic purposes. It has been reported to facilitate the healing of bone fractures, wounds, apthous ulcers and temporomandibular disorders. In addition, ultrasound has also been shown to facilitate delivery of chemotherapeutic drugs into tumors, promote gene therapy to targeted tissues, and deliver thrombolytic drugs into blood clots. This article reviews the principles and current status of ultrasound-based treatments.

  3. Interobserver variability of ultrasound parameters in portal hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Moreno Sebastianes

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess interobserver agreement of ultrasound parameters for portal hypertension in hepatosplenic mansonic schistosomiasis. Spleen size, diameter of the portal, splenic and superior mesenteric veins and presence of thrombosis and cavernous transformation were determined by three radiologists in blinded and independent fashion in 30 patients. Interobserver agreement was measured by the kappa index and intraclass correlation coefficient. Interobserver agreement was considered substantial (κ = 0.714-0.795 for portal vein thrombosis and perfect (κ = 1 for cavernous transformation. Interobserver agreement measured by the intraclass correlation coefficient was excellent for longitudinal diameter of the spleen (r = 0.828-0.869 and splenic index (r = 0.816-0.905 and varied from fair to almost perfect for diameter of the portal (r = 0.622-0.675, splenic (r = 0.573-0.913 and superior mesenteric (r = 0.525-0.607 veins. According to the results, ultrasound is a highly reproducible method for the main morphological parameters of portal hypertension in schistosomiasis patients.

  4. Prospective utility of therapeutic ultrasound in dentistry-Review with recent comprehensive update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shalu Rai

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The utility of ultrasound (US for therapeutic purposes is still in its infancy. Therapeutic US (TUS has been used widely in medical field for urological application, surgical intervention, bone healing, and osteointegration in cancer and healing of full thickness excised skin lesions, and within dentistry as a prediagnostic, diagnostic and therapeutic purpose. The purpose of the paper is to review and determine the efficacy of US as one of the treatment modalities for its role in maxillofacial region to reduce pain and promote soft tissue healing. Materials and Methods: A Medline search included of the international literature published between 1976 and 2011 and was restricted to English language articles, published work of past researchers including in vitro and in vivo studies, recent additions of textbooks on surgical and therapeutic applications of US and, current articles in conference papers and reports accessed from the internet using Google search engine on therapeutic ultrasound. Results: Very few article regarding effect of therapeutic of US for its use of insonation for treatment of patient with pain and soft tissue injury are available. This review article mainly emphasizes the therapeutic utility of US in dentistry for its effectiveness to decrease joint stiffness, reduce pain and muscle spasms and improve muscle mobility. In vivo studies have shown very little clinical effects. Conclusions: Further research is warranted in this clinically important area to make the development of noninvasive, multifunctional ultrasound devices for repair, regeneration and other therapeutic utility a success.

  5. [New methodological aspects in the use of cryotherapy, ultrasound, magnetotherapy and therapeutic physical exercise in the rehabilitation of gonarthrosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grigor'eva, V D; Fedorova, N E

    1996-01-01

    Gonarthritis complicated by synovitis was treated by cryo-ultrasound or cryo-magnetotherapy in combination with therapeutic exercise. The comparison of the response has shown that both complexes are highly effective. In the absence of concomitant diseases and contraindications to ultrasound it is better to use cryo-ultrasound and exercise, otherwise cryo-magnetotherapy and exercise is preferential.

  6. The short-term effects of TENS plus therapeutic ultrasound combinations in chronic neck pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayilir, Selcuk

    2018-05-01

    To investigate the effects of TENS plus therapeutic ultrasound combinations on symptom relief, physical functionality, perceived stress levels, daytime sleepiness and neck mobility in patients with chronic neck pain (CNP). A total of 64 patients were divided into two groups as the TENS plus ultrasound group (n = 39) and the control CNP group (n = 25). The therapy comprised TENS and therapeutic ultrasound applications for 10 sessions. The control subjects were discouraged from using analgesics but were allowed to use paracetamol daily, if necessary. The Neck Disability Index (NDI), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), visual analog scale (VAS) and tragus-wall/chin-manubrium distances were recorded at the baseline and after therapy. Significant improvements were detected in the TENS plus ultrasound group compared to the control CNP subjects in respect of VAS, PSS and NDI scores after the TENS plus therapeutic ultrasound therapies (all p stress levels and improving functionality in the short-term of CNP. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. pH/Ultrasound Dual-Responsive Gas Generator for Ultrasound Imaging-Guided Therapeutic Inertial Cavitation and Sonodynamic Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Qianhua; Zhang, Wanxia; Yang, Xuemei; Li, Yuzhen; Hao, Yongwei; Zhang, Hongling; Hou, Lin; Zhang, Zhenzhong

    2018-03-01

    Herein, a pH/ultrasound dual-responsive gas generator is reported, which is based on mesoporous calcium carbonate (MCC) nanoparticles by loading sonosensitizer (hematoporphyrin monomethyl ether (HMME)) and modifying surface hyaluronic acid (HA). After pinpointing tumor regions with prominent targeting efficiency, HMME/MCC-HA decomposes instantaneously under the cotriggering of tumoral inherent acidic condition and ultrasound (US) irradiation, concurrently accompanying with CO 2 generation and HMME release with spatial/temporal resolution. Afterward, the CO 2 bubbling and bursting effect under US stimulus results in cavitation-mediated irreversible cell necrosis, as well as the blood vessel destruction to further occlude the blood supply, providing a "bystander effect." Meanwhile, reactive oxygen species generated from HMME can target the apoptotic pathways for effective sonodynamic therapy. Thus, the combination of apoptosis/necrosis with multimechanisms consequently results in a remarkable antitumor therapeutic efficacy, simultaneously minimizing the side effects on major organs. Moreover, the echogenic property of CO 2 make the nanoplatform as a powerful ultrasound contrast agent to identify cancerous lesions. Based on the above findings, such all-in-one drug delivery platform of HMME/MCC-HA is utilized to provide the US imaging guidance for therapeutic inertial cavitation and sonodynamic therapy simultaneously, which highlights possibilities of advancing cancer theranostics in biomedical fields. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Experimental and numerical investigation of wire waveguides for therapeutic ultrasound angioplasty

    OpenAIRE

    Noone, Declan J.

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound angioplasty is an emerging minimally invasive cardiovascular procedure for disrupting atherosclerotic lesions using small diameter wire waveguides. The lesions are damaged through a combination of direct ablation, pressure waves, cavitation and acoustic streaming caused by distal-tip displacements at ultrasonic frequencies. Numerical and experimental methods are used to investigate the outputs of the wire waveguides during ultrasonic activation. A commercially avail...

  9. Combined Kinesiotaoe and Therapeutic Ultrasound in the Treatment of Carpal Tunnel Syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mohamed, O.G.; Elhafez, H.M.; Alshatoury, H.A.; Refaat, R.

    2016-01-01

    Background : Carpal tunnel syndrome is the most common neuropathy of the upper limb and a significant contributor to hand functional impairment and disability. Hand is an Accepted November 2016 . important part of body to perform the complex daily living activities. Purpose: To find out effect of combined kinesiotape and therapeutic ultrasound in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome. Material and Methods :Thirty Carpal Tunnel Syndrome female patients with positive electro diagnostic findings (MMDL >4.2 ms) participated in this study, their ages ranged between 40 and 50 years. Design of study :They were divided randomly into two equal groups. Group (A) received kinesiotape applicatio n on the affected wrist for 3 days, then day off and then another three days each week for 4 weeks combined with a program of 12 sessions of continuous ultrasound, 3 sessions per week for 5 minute persession in addition nerve and tendon gliding exercise . While, Group (B) received a program of 12 sessions of continuous ultrasound, 3 sessions per week for 5 minute per session in addition tendon and nerve gliding exercise. The treatment program continued for 4 weeks. Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire and median motor distallatency, visual analogue scale and hand grip dynamometer were performed before and after the treatment program for all patients of the two groups. Results : The obtained results showed a highly statistically significant (P< 0.0001) improvement in both groups (A and B) concerning Boston carpal tunnel questionnaire , visual analogue scale and hand grip dynamometer but there was significant improvement in group (A) only concerning median motor distal latency. The improvement was highly significant (P< 0.0001) in group (A) when compared with group (B). Conclusion: It could be concluded that the use of combined kinesiotape and therapeutic ultrasound in the treatment of carpal tunnel syndrome appeared to be effective. Yet the combined effect of kinesiotape with

  10. Histomorphometrical analysis on the effects of two therapeutic ultrasound intensities on fracture healing in aged rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeronimo Rafael Skau

    Full Text Available Introduction Experimental studies conducted in young animals show that therapeutic ultrasound (TUS has been successfully used to shorten the healing time of bone fractures. However, they were not found in the literature, studies comparing the effect of different intensities of UST in aged animals. Objective To test the efficacy of intensity 1.0 W/cm2 and of 0.5 W/cm2 in the consolidation of experimental fracture of the tibia from aged Wistar rats. Materials and methods Three groups of 15 month old rats were submitted to a midshaft osteotomy of the tibia and then, the hind member was immobilized with a metal splint and plaster of Paris, wrapping the knee and ankle joint. One group (L, received ultrasound at 0.5 W/cm2; the other group (I, were exposed to ultrasound at 1.0 W/cm2. One control group (C, did not receive the ultrasound. Fifteen animals (five from each group were euthanatized at the end of the first week and fifteen (five from each group at the end of the third week. The progress of the fracture healing was performed for each group by morphometric analysis of histological sections of the fracture region. Results and conclusion The results showed that fractures treated with ultrasound at 1.0 W/cm2 healed significantly faster than did the fractures treated with ultrasound at 0.5 W/cm2 and the control.

  11. Quantitative ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging for the assessment of vascular parameters

    CERN Document Server

    Meiburger, Kristen M

    2017-01-01

    This book describes the development of quantitative techniques for ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging in the assessment of architectural and vascular parameters. It presents morphological vascular research based on the development of quantitative imaging techniques for the use of clinical B-mode ultrasound images, and preclinical architectural vascular investigations on quantitative imaging techniques for ultrasounds and photoacoustics. The book is divided into two main parts, the first of which focuses on the development and validation of quantitative techniques for the assessment of vascular morphological parameters that can be extracted from B-mode ultrasound longitudinal images of the common carotid artery. In turn, the second part highlights quantitative imaging techniques for assessing the architectural parameters of vasculature that can be extracted from 3D volumes, using both contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) imaging and photoacoustic imaging without the addition of any contrast agent. Sharing and...

  12. Therapeutic Ultrasound Research And Development From An Industrial And Commercial Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seip, Ralf

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to share the challenges and opportunities as viewed from an industrial and commercial perspective that one encounters when performing therapeutic ultrasound research, development, manufacturing, and sales activities. Research in therapeutic ultrasound has become an active field in the last decade, spurred by technological advances in the areas of transducer materials, control electronics, treatment monitoring techniques, an ever increasing number of clinical applications, and private and governmental funding opportunities. The development of devices and methods utilizing therapeutic ultrasound to cure or manage disease is being pursued by startup companies and large established companies alike, driven by the promise of profiting at many levels from this new and disruptive technology. Widespread penetration within the clinical community remains elusive, with current approaches focusing on very specific applications and niche markets. Challenges include difficulties in securing capital to develop the technology and undertake costly clinical trials, a regulatory landscape that varies from country to country, resistance from established practitioners, and difficulties in assembling a team with the right mix of technological savvy and business expertise. Success is possible and increasing, however, as evidenced by several companies, initiatives, and products with measurable benefits to the patient, clinician, and companies alike.

  13. Therapeutic Ultrasound Research And Development From An Industrial And Commercial Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seip, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to share the challenges and opportunities as viewed from an industrial and commercial perspective that one encounters when performing therapeutic ultrasound research, development, manufacturing, and sales activities. Research in therapeutic ultrasound has become an active field in the last decade, spurred by technological advances in the areas of transducer materials, control electronics, treatment monitoring techniques, an ever increasing number of clinical applications, and private and governmental funding opportunities. The development of devices and methods utilizing therapeutic ultrasound to cure or manage disease is being pursued by startup companies and large established companies alike, driven by the promise of profiting at many levels from this new and disruptive technology. Widespread penetration within the clinical community remains elusive, with current approaches focusing on very specific applications and niche markets. Challenges include difficulties in securing capital to develop the technology and undertake costly clinical trials, a regulatory landscape that varies from country to country, resistance from established practitioners, and difficulties in assembling a team with the right mix of technological savvy and business expertise. Success is possible and increasing, however, as evidenced by several companies, initiatives, and products with measurable benefits to the patient, clinician, and companies alike.

  14. Skin temperature increase mediated by wearable, long duration, low-intensity therapeutic ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Matthew D.; Huang, Wenyi; Ghanem, Angi; Guo, Yuan; Lewis, George K.

    2017-03-01

    One of the safety concerns with the delivery of therapeutic ultrasound is overheating of the transducer-skin interface due to poor or improper coupling. The objective of this research was to define a model that could be used to calculate the heating in the skin as a result of a novel, wearable long-duration ultrasound device. This model was used to determine that the maximum heating in the skin remained below the minimum threshold necessary to cause thermal injury over multiple hours of use. In addition to this model data, a human clinical study used wire thermocouples on the skin surface to measure heating characteristics during treatment with the sustained ultrasound system. Parametric analysis of the model determined that the maximum temperature increase is at the surface of the skin ranged from 40-41.8° C when perfusion was taken into account. The clinical data agreed well with the model predictions. The average steady state temperature observed across all 44 subjects was 40°C. The maximum temperature observed was less than 44° C, which is clinically safe for over 5 hours of human skin contact. The resultant clinical temperature data paired well with the model data suggesting the model can be used for future transducer and ultrasound system design simulation. As a result, the device was validated for thermal safety for typical users and use conditions.

  15. Ultrasound enhanced delivery of molecular imaging and therapeutic agents in Alzheimer's disease mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott B Raymond

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease is a neurodegenerative disorder typified by the accumulation of a small protein, beta-amyloid, which aggregates and is the primary component of amyloid plaques. Many new therapeutic and diagnostic agents for reducing amyloid plaques have limited efficacy in vivo because of poor transport across the blood-brain barrier. Here we demonstrate that low-intensity focused ultrasound with a microbubble contrast agent may be used to transiently disrupt the blood-brain barrier, allowing non-invasive, localized delivery of imaging fluorophores and immunotherapeutics directly to amyloid plaques. We administered intravenous Trypan blue, an amyloid staining red fluorophore, and anti-amyloid antibodies, concurrently with focused ultrasound therapy in plaque-bearing, transgenic mouse models of Alzheimer's disease with amyloid pathology. MRI guidance permitted selective treatment and monitoring of plaque-heavy anatomical regions, such as the hippocampus. Treated brain regions exhibited 16.5+/-5.4-fold increase in Trypan blue fluorescence and 2.7+/-1.2-fold increase in anti-amyloid antibodies that localized to amyloid plaques. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery was consistently reproduced in two different transgenic strains (APPswe:PSEN1dE9, PDAPP, across a large age range (9-26 months, with and without MR guidance, and with little or no tissue damage. Ultrasound-mediated, transient blood-brain barrier disruption allows the delivery of both therapeutic and molecular imaging agents in Alzheimer's mouse models, which should aid pre-clinical drug screening and imaging probe development. Furthermore, this technique may be used to deliver a wide variety of small and large molecules to the brain for imaging and therapy in other neurodegenerative diseases.

  16. Manual lymphatic drainage and therapeutic ultrasound in liposuction and lipoabdominoplasty post-operative period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor F. B. Masson

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Physiotherapy in the plastic surgery post-operative (PO is essential to provide means for an adequate and fast recovery as it restores function through the use of physiotherapeutic procedures. Aim: The aim of the following study is to verify the effects of the association between the manual lymphatic drainage and the therapeutic ultrasound on pain, oedema and the tissue fibrosis in liposuction and lipoabdominoplasty PO. Design: This is a clinical trial prospective. Materials and Methods: Eighteen women aged between 18 and 60 years participated in this study, in the late PO period following lipoabdominoplasty or liposuction in the abdomen, flanks and lower trunk, which showed tissue fibrosis of the flanks and abdomen regions. They were divided into two groups: Liposuction group and lipoabdominoplasty group. A total of twelve sessions of therapeutic ultrasound followed by the manual lymphatic drainage were performed. The patients were assessed with regard to pain, oedema and tissue fibrosis in different moments: Initial assessment, during assessment and final assessment through the application of the protocol of evaluation of cysts fibrosis levels. Statistical Analysis: The test of equality for two proportions and the confidence interval test for mean to evaluate the distribution of variables. The significance level adopted for statistical tests was 5% (P < 0.05. Results: There was a statistically significant reduction of pain, swelling and tissue fibrosis in both groups. Conclusion: the association between manual lymphatic drainage and the therapeutic ultrasound reduced the swelling and the tissue fibrosis and made pain disappear in liposuction and lipoabdominoplasty PO period.

  17. Effects of line fiducial parameters and beamforming on ultrasound calibration

    OpenAIRE

    Ameri, Golafsoun; Baxter, John S. H.; McLeod, A. Jonathan; Peters, Terry M.; Chen, Elvis C. S.

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided interventions are often enhanced via integration with an augmented reality environment, a necessary component of which is US calibration. Calibration requires the segmentation of fiducials, i.e., a phantom, in US images. Fiducial localization error (FLE) can decrease US calibration accuracy, which fundamentally affects the total accuracy of the interventional guidance system. Here, we investigate the effects of US image reconstruction techniques as well as phantom mater...

  18. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brujan, E A; Ikeda, T; Matsumoto, Y

    2005-10-21

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames/s and acoustic measurements, as well as by numerical calculations. The significant parameter of this study is the dimensionless stand-off, gamma, which is defined as the distance of the bubble centre at its maximum expansion scaled by the maximum bubble radius. High-speed photography is applied to observe the bubble motion and the velocity of the liquid jet formed during bubble collapse. Hydrophone measurements are used to determine the pressure and the duration of the shock wave emitted during bubble rebound. Calculations yield the variation with time of the bubble wall, the maximum velocity and the kinetic energy of the re-entrant jet. The comparisons between experimental and numerical data are favourable with regard to both shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The acoustic energy constitutes the largest individual amount in the energy balance of bubble collapse. The ratio of the shock wave energy, measured at 10 mm from the emission centre, to the cavitation bubble energy was 1:2.4 at gamma = 1.55 and 1:3.5 at gamma = 1. At this distance, the shock wave pressure ranges from 0.122 MPa, at gamma = 1, to 0.162 MPa, at gamma = 1.55, and the temporal duration at the half maximum level is 87 ns. The maximum jet velocity ranges from 27 m s(-1), at gamma = 1, to 36 m s(-1), at gamma = 1.55. For gamma < 1.2, the re-entrant jet can generate an impact pressure on the nearby boundary larger than 50 MPa. We discuss the implications of the results for the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound.

  19. Jet formation and shock wave emission during collapse of ultrasound-induced cavitation bubbles and their role in the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brujan, E A; Ikeda, T; Matsumoto, Y

    2005-01-01

    The dynamics of inertial cavitation bubbles produced by short pulses of high-intensity focused ultrasound near a rigid boundary are studied to get a better understanding of the role of jet formation and shock wave emission during bubble collapse in the therapeutic applications of ultrasound. The bubble dynamics are investigated by high-speed photography with up to 2 million frames/s and acoustic measurements, as well as by numerical calculations. The significant parameter of this study is the dimensionless stand-off, γ, which is defined as the distance of the bubble centre at its maximum expansion scaled by the maximum bubble radius. High-speed photography is applied to observe the bubble motion and the velocity of the liquid jet formed during bubble collapse. Hydrophone measurements are used to determine the pressure and the duration of the shock wave emitted during bubble rebound. Calculations yield the variation with time of the bubble wall, the maximum velocity and the kinetic energy of the re-entrant jet. The comparisons between experimental and numerical data are favourable with regard to both shape history and translational motion of the bubble. The acoustic energy constitutes the largest individual amount in the energy balance of bubble collapse. The ratio of the shock wave energy, measured at 10 mm from the emission centre, to the cavitation bubble energy was 1:2.4 at γ = 1.55 and 1:3.5 at γ = 1. At this distance, the shock wave pressure ranges from 0.122 MPa, at γ = 1, to 0.162 MPa, at γ 1.55, and the temporal duration at the half maximum level is 87 ns. The maximum jet velocity ranges from 27 m s -1 , at γ = 1, to 36 m s -1 , at γ = 1.55. For γ < 1.2, the re-entrant jet can generate an impact pressure on the nearby boundary larger than 50 MPa. We discuss the implications of the results for the therapeutic applications of high-intensity focused ultrasound

  20. Reliability of measuring abductor hallucis muscle parameters using two different diagnostic ultrasound machines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cameron Alyse FM

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Diagnostic ultrasound provides a method of analysing soft tissue structures of the musculoskeletal system effectively and reliably. The aim of this study was to evaluate within and between session reliability of measuring muscle dorso-plantar thickness, medio-lateral length and cross-sectional area, of the abductor hallucis muscle using two different ultrasound machines, a higher end Philips HD11 Ultrasound machine and clinically orientated Chison 8300 Deluxe Digital Portable Ultrasound System. Methods The abductor hallucis muscle of both the left and right feet of thirty asymptomatic participants was imaged and then measured using both ultrasound machines. Interclass correlation coefficients (ICC with 95% confidence intervals (CI were used to calculate both within and between session intra-tester reliability. Standard error of the measurement (SEM calculations were undertaken to assess difference between the actual measured score across trials and the smallest real difference (SRD was calculated from the SEM to indicate the degree of change that would exceed the expected trial to trial variability. Results The ICCs, SEM and SRD for dorso-plantar thickness and medial-lateral length were shown to have excellent to high within and between-session reliability for both ultrasound machines. The between-session reliability indices for cross-sectional area were acceptable for both ultrasound machines. Conclusion The results of the current study suggest that regardless of the type ultrasound machine, intra-tester reliability for the measurement the abductor hallucis muscle parameters is very high.

  1. Power ultrasound-assisted cleaner leather dyeing technique: influence of process parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivakumar, Venkatasubramanian; Rao, Paruchuri Gangadhar

    2004-03-01

    The application of power ultrasound to leather processing has a significant role in the concept of "clean technology" for leather production. The effect of power ultrasound in leather dyeing has been compared with dyeing in the absence of ultrasound and conventional drumming. The power ultrasound source used in these experiments was ultrasonic cleaner (150 W and 33 kHz). The effect of various process parameters such as amount of dye offer, temperature, and type of dye has been experimentally found out. The effect of presonication of dye solution as well as leather has been studied. Experiments at ultrasonic bath temperature were carried out to find out the combined thermal as well as stirring effects of ultrasound. Dyeing in the presence of ultrasound affords about 37.5 (1.8 times) difference as increase in % dye exhaustion or about 50% decrease in the time required for dyeing compared to dyeing in the absence of ultrasound for 4% acid red dye. About 29 (1.55 times) increase in % dye exhaustion or 30% reduction in time required for dyeing was observed using ultrasound at stationary condition compared with conventional dynamic drumming conditions. The effect of ultrasound at constant temperature conditions with a control experiment has also been studied. The dye exhaustion increases as the temperature increases (30-60 degrees C) and better results are observed at higher temperature due to the use of ultrasound. Presonication of dye solution or crust leather prior to the dyeing process has no significant improvement in dye exhaustion, suggesting ultrasound effect is realized when it is applied during the dyeing process. The results indicate that 1697 and 1416 ppm of dye can be reduced in the spent liquor due to the use of ultrasound for acid red (for 100 min) and acid black (for 3 h) dyes, respectively, thereby reducing the pollution load in the effluent stream. The color yield of the leather as inferred from the reflectance measurement indicates that dye offer can

  2. Interstitial Matrix Prevents Therapeutic Ultrasound From Causing Inertial Cavitation in Tumescent Subcutaneous Tissue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulakis, John P; Rouch, Joshua; Huynh, Nhan; Dubrovsky, Genia; Dunn, James C Y; Putterman, Seth

    2018-01-01

    We search for cavitation in tumescent subcutaneous tissue of a live pig under application of pulsed, 1-MHz ultrasound at 8 W cm -2 spatial peak and pulse-averaged intensity. We find no evidence of broadband acoustic emission indicative of inertial cavitation. These acoustic parameters are representative of those used in external-ultrasound-assisted lipoplasty and in physical therapy and our null result brings into question the role of cavitation in those applications. A comparison of broadband acoustic emission from a suspension of ultrasound contrast agent in bulk water with a suspension injected subcutaneously indicates that the interstitial matrix suppresses cavitation and provides an additional mechanism behind the apparent lack of in-vivo cavitation to supplement the absence of nuclei explanation offered in the literature. We also find a short-lived cavitation signal in normal, non-tumesced tissue that disappears after the first pulse, consistent with cavitation nuclei depletion in vivo. Copyright © 2018 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Structural and functional assessment of intense therapeutic ultrasound effects on partial Achilles tendon transection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Jennifer K.; Rice, Photini S.; Howard, Caitlin C.; Koevary, Jen W.; Danford, Forest; Gonzales, David A.; Vande Geest, Jon; Latt, L. Daniel; Szivek, John A.; Amodei, Richard; Slayton, Michael

    2018-02-01

    Tendinopathies and tendon tears heal slowly because tendons have a limited blood supply. Intense therapeutic ultrasound (ITU) is a treatment modality that creates very small, focal coagula in tissue, which can stimulate a healing response. This pilot study investigated the effects of ITU on rabbit and rat models of partial Achilles tendon rupture. The right Achilles tendons of 20 New Zealand White rabbits and 118 rats were partially transected. Twenty-four hours after surgery, ITU coagula were placed in the tendon and surrounding tissue, alternating right and left legs. At various time points, the following data were collected: ultrasound imaging, optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging, mechanical testing, gene expression analysis, histology, and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) of sectioned tissue. Ultrasound visualized cuts and treatment lesions. OCT showed the effect of the interventions on birefringence banding caused by collagen organization. MPM showed inflammatory infiltrate, collagen synthesis and organization. By day 14- 28, all tendons had a smooth appearance and histology, MPM and OCT still could still visualize residual healing processes. Few significant results in gene expression were seen, but trends were that ITU treatment caused an initial decrease in growth and collagen gene expression followed by an increase. No difference in failure loads was found between control, cut, and ITU treatment groups, suggesting that sufficient healing had occurred by 14 days to restore all test tissue to control mechanical properties. These results suggest that ITU does not cause harm to tendon tissue. Upregulation of some genes suggests that ITU may increase healing response.

  4. Screening for significant chronic liver disease by using three simple ultrasound parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lignon, Grégoire; Boursier, Jérome; Delumeau, Stéphanie; Michalak-Provost, Sophie; Lebigot, Jérome; Oberti, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Three US parameters have diagnosis accuracy for the diagnosis of severe fibrosis equal to 66%. • These three signs detect unidentified fibrosis with a predictive positive value of 32%. • It would be an easy way to detect patients with silent chronic liver diseases. - Abstract: Objectives: Chronic liver diseases remain asymptomatic for many years. Consequently, patients are diagnosed belatedly, when cirrhosis is unmasked by lifethreatening complications. We aimed to identify simple ultrasound parameters for the screening of patients with unknown significant chronic liver disease. Methods: Three hundred and twenty seven patients with chronic liver disease, liver biopsy, and ultrasound examination were included in the derivation set. 283 consecutive patients referred for ultrasound examination were included in the validation set; those selected according to the ultrasound parameters identified in the derivation set were then referred for specialized consultation including non-invasive fibrosis tests and ultimately liver biopsy if liver fibrosis was suspected. Results: In the derivation set, three ultrasound parameters were independent predictors of severe fibrosis: liver surface irregularity, spleen length (>110 mm), and demodulation of hepatic veins. The association of ≥2 of the three above parameters provided 49.1% sensitivity and 86.9% specificity. In the validation set, at ≥2 of the three parameters were present in 23 (8%) of the patients. Among these patients, 8 had liver fibrosis (F ≥ 1), 5 had significant fibrosis (F ≥2) and two cirrhosis. Conclusion: The generalized search of three simple ultrasound signs in patients referred for abdominal ultrasound examination may be an easy way to detect those with silent but significant chronic liver disease

  5. [Control parameters for high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) for tissue ablation in the ex-vivo kidney].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhrmann, K U; Michel, M S; Steidler, A; Marlinghaus, E H; Kraut, O; Alken, P

    2002-01-01

    Therapeutic application of contactless thermoablation by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) demands precise physical definition of focal size and determination of control parameters. Our objective was to define the focal expansion of a new ultrasound generator and to evaluate the extent of tissue ablation under variable generator parameters in an ex vivo model. Axial and transversal distribution of ultrasound intensity in the area of the focal point was calculated by needle hydrophone. The extent of tissue necrosis after focused ultrasound was assessed in an ex vivo porcine kidney model applying generator power up to 400 Watt and pulse duration up to 8 s. The measurement of field distribution revealed a physical focal size of 32 x 4 mm. Sharp demarcation between coagulation necrosis and intact tissue was observed in our tissue model. Lesion size was kept under control by variation of both generator power and impulse duration. At a constant impulse duration of 2 s, generator power of 100 W remained below the threshold doses for induction of a reproducible lesion. An increase in power up to 200 W and 400 W, respectively, induced lesions with diameters up to 11.2 x 3 mm. Constant total energy (generator power x impulse duration) led to a larger lesion size under higher generator power. It is possible to induce sharply demarcated, reproducible thermonecrosis, which can be regulated by generator power and impulse duration, by means of a cylindrical piezo element with a paraboloid reflector at a focal distance of 10 cm. The variation of generator power was an especially suitable control parameter for the inducement of a defined lesion size.

  6. Ultrasound for Appendicitis: Performance and Integration with Clinical Parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfvenberg, Fanny

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To evaluate the performance of ultrasound in pediatric appendicitis and the integration of US with the pediatric appendicitis score (PAS) and C-reactive protein (CRP). Method. An institution-based, retrospective study of children who underwent abdominal US for suspected appendicitis between 2012 and 2015 at a tertiary pediatric surgery center. US results were dichotomized, with a nonvisualized appendix considered as a negative examination. Results. In total, 438 children were included (mean 8.5 years, 54% boys), with an appendicitis rate of 29%. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) for US were 82%, 97%, 92%, and 93%, respectively, without significant age or gender differences. Pediatric radiologists had significantly higher sensitivity compared to general radiologists, 88% and 71%, respectively (p appendicitis, regardless of age or gender, and should be the first choice of imaging modalities. Combining US with PAS and CRP may reduce several unnecessary admissions for in-hospital observation. PMID:28044133

  7. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ultrasound is a useful procedure for monitoring the baby's development in the uterus. Ultrasound uses inaudible sound waves to produce a two-dimensional image of the baby while inside the mother's ...

  8. Effects of line fiducial parameters and beamforming on ultrasound calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Golafsoun; Baxter, John S H; McLeod, A Jonathan; Peters, Terry M; Chen, Elvis C S

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-guided interventions are often enhanced via integration with an augmented reality environment, a necessary component of which is US calibration. Calibration requires the segmentation of fiducials, i.e., a phantom, in US images. Fiducial localization error (FLE) can decrease US calibration accuracy, which fundamentally affects the total accuracy of the interventional guidance system. Here, we investigate the effects of US image reconstruction techniques as well as phantom material and geometry on US calibration. It was shown that the FLE was reduced by 29% with synthetic transmit aperture imaging compared with conventional B-mode imaging in a Z-bar calibration, resulting in a 10% reduction of calibration error. In addition, an evaluation of a variety of calibration phantoms with different geometrical and material properties was performed. The phantoms included braided wire, plastic straws, and polyvinyl alcohol cryogel tubes with different diameters. It was shown that these properties have a significant effect on calibration error, which is a variable based on US beamforming techniques. These results would have important implications for calibration procedures and their feasibility in the context of image-guided procedures.

  9. Quantum oscillation amplification of the ultrasound polarization parameters in tungsten during coupling with the spiral wave

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gudkov, V.V.; Zhevstovskikh, I.V.; Zimbovskaya, N.A.; Okulov, V.I.

    1991-01-01

    The quantum oscillations are studied of ellipcity, the rotation angle of the ultrasound polarization plane, the velocity and absorption of waves polarized circularly at the 196 MHz frequency in a tungsten single crystal in magnetic field of 30-80 kOe at temperature 1,8 K. The oscillation amplitudes of ellipticity and rotation angle of the ultrasound polarization plane beyond the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance are found to vary nonmonotonously with field and to be large enough, so that they are not described by the simple expressions for high fields. The explanation for the oscillation amplification of the polarization parameters is given within the theory involving the ultrasound-spiral wave coupling predicted by Kaner and Skobov. The quantitative comparison in details demonstrates a good agreement in the theory and experimental data and allows to find the numerical values of new parameters characterizing the Fermi surface, electron relaxation frequency, and deformation potential

  10. Focusing of high power ultrasound beams and limiting values of shock wave parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bessonova, O. V.; Khokhlova, V. A.; Bailey, M. R.; Canney, M. S.; Crum, L. A.

    2009-10-01

    In this work, the influence of nonlinear and diffraction effects on amplification factors of focused ultrasound systems is investigated. The limiting values of acoustic field parameters obtained by focusing of high power ultrasound are studied. The Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov (KZK) equation was used for the numerical modeling. Solutions for the nonlinear acoustic field were obtained at output levels corresponding to both pre- and post-shock formation conditions in the focal area of the beam in a weakly dissipative medium. Numerical solutions were compared with experimental data as well as with known analytic predictions.

  11. The effect of therapeutic ultrasound on metallic implants: a study in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocaoğlu, Barış; Cabukoglu, Cengiz; Ozeras, Nadire; Seyhan, Mustafa; Karahan, Mustafa; Yalcin, Selim

    2011-11-01

    To investigate whether therapeutic ultrasound (US) use over metallic implants has the potential for adverse effects as a result of greater temperature increases at the tissue-metal interface. A randomized controlled trial. A research laboratory. Sprague-Dawley rats (N=40; weight, 230-300g) were used and divided into 3 study groups. In group 1, both limbs of 10 rats were used for evaluation of temperature changes. Metal pins were placed into the femur of the left limb, and the right limbs were used as controls. A thermal sensor was placed into the medulla to record the elevation of tissue temperature during US application. In groups 2 and 3 with 15 rats in each, a midshaft femoral fracture was produced, and intramedullary fixation was performed with metal pins. Group 2 received US treatment for 5 minutes daily and continued for 27 days. Group 3 served as controls. The rats in groups 2 and 3 were killed on postoperative day 30. The specimens were evaluated by radiology, histopathology, and biomechanics. The presence of metal in bone did not cause an increased temperature rise. US application did not increase or decrease callus formation, and there was no tissue necrosis. The average removal torques of pins in groups did not show a significant difference. Internal fixation with metallic implants may not be a contraindication for therapeutic US treatment. Copyright © 2011 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Influence of extrinsic operational parameters on salt diffusion during ultrasound assisted meat curing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inguglia, Elena S; Zhang, Zhihang; Burgess, Catherine; Kerry, Joseph P; Tiwari, Brijesh K

    2018-02-01

    The present study investigated the effect of geometric parameters of the ultrasound instrument during meat salting in order to enhance salt diffusion and salt distribution in pork meat on a lab scale. The effects of probe size (∅2.5 and 1.3cm) and of different distances between the transducer and the meat sample (0.3, 0.5, and 0.8cm) on NaCl diffusion were investigated. Changes in the moisture content and NaCl gain were used to evaluate salt distribution and diffusion in the samples, parallel and perpendicular to ultrasound propagation direction. Results showed that 0.3cm was the most efficient distance between the probe and the sample to ensure a higher salt diffusion rate. A distance of 0.5cm was however considered as a trade-off distance to ensure salt diffusion and maintenance of meat quality parameters. The enhancement of salt diffusion by ultrasound was observed to decrease with increased horizontal distance from the probe. This study is of valuable importance for meat processing industries willing to apply new technologies on a larger scale and with defined operational standards. The data suggest that the geometric parameters of ultrasound systems can have strong influence on the efficiency of ultrasonic enhancement of NaCl uptake in meat and can be a crucial element in determining salt uptake during meat processing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging Predicts Therapeutic Outcomes of Patients With Crohn's Disease Treated With Anti-Tumour Necrosis Factor Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlando, Stefania; Fraquelli, Mirella; Coletta, Marina; Branchi, Federica; Magarotto, Andrea; Conti, Clara Benedetta; Mazza, Stefano; Conte, Dario; Basilisco, Guido; Caprioli, Flavio

    2018-01-05

    Ultrasound elasticity imaging is a non-invasive technique developed to evaluate fibrosis. Measuring tissue strain by ultrasound elasticity imaging can reliably detect severe ileal fibrosis in patients with Crohn's disease [CD]. We have hypothesised that a more severe range of fibrosis might influence the therapeutic response to anti-tumour necrosis factor [TNF] treatment. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of ultrasound elasticity imaging to predict the therapeutic outcome for CD patients. Consecutive patients with ileal/ileocolonic CD, starting anti-TNF treatment, were enrolled for the study. These patients underwent bowel ultrasound and ultrasound elasticity imaging at baseline and at 14 and 52 weeks after anti-TNF treatment. Bowel wall stiffness was quantified by calculating the strain ratio between the mesenteric tissue and the bowel wall. Strain ratio ≥ 2 was used to identify severe ileal fibrosis. Transmural healing at 14 and 52 weeks was defined as bowel wall thickness ≤ 3 mm. Thirty patients with CD were enrolled. Five patients underwent surgery for bowel obstruction. The frequency of surgeries was significantly greater in patients with a strain ratio ≥ 2 at baseline [p = 0.003]. A significant reduction of the bowel thickness was observed after 14 and 52 weeks of anti-TNF treatment [p < 0.005]. A significant inverse correlation was observed between the strain ratio values at baseline and the thickness variations following anti-TNF therapy [p = 0.007]; 27% of patients achieved transmural healing at 14 weeks. The baseline strain ratio was significantly lower in patients with transmural healing [p < 0.05]. This study shows that ultrasound elasticity imaging predicts therapeutic outcomes for CD patients treated with anti-TNF. Copyright © 2017 European Crohn’s and Colitis Organisation (ECCO). Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com

  14. Formulation and acoustic studies of a new phase-shift agent for diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheeran, Paul S; Luois, Samantha; Dayton, Paul A; Matsunaga, Terry O

    2011-09-06

    Recent efforts in the area of acoustic droplet vaporization with the objective of designing extravascular ultrasound contrast agents has led to the development of stabilized, lipid-encapsulated nanodroplets of the highly volatile compound decafluorobutane (DFB). We developed two methods of generating DFB droplets, the first of which involves condensing DFB gas (boiling point from -1.1 to -2 °C) followed by extrusion with a lipid formulation in HEPES buffer. Acoustic droplet vaporization of micrometer-sized lipid-coated droplets at diagnostic ultrasound frequencies and mechanical indices were confirmed optically. In our second formulation methodology, we demonstrate the formulation of submicrometer-sized lipid-coated nanodroplets based upon condensation of preformed microbubbles containing DFB. The droplets are routinely in the 200-300 nm range and yield microbubbles on the order of 1-5 μm once vaporized, consistent with ideal gas law expansion predictions. The simple and effective nature of this methodology allows for the development of a variety of different formulations that can be used for imaging, drug and gene delivery, and therapy. This study is the first to our knowledge to demonstrate both a method of generating ADV agents by microbubble condensation and formulation of primarily submicrometer droplets of decafluorobutane that remain stable at physiological temperatures. Finally, activation of DFB nanodroplets is demonstrated using pressures within the FDA guidelines for diagnostic imaging, which may minimize the potential for bioeffects in humans. This methodology offers a new means of developing extravascular contrast agents for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  15. Lower Extremity Injury Patterns in Elite Ballet Dancers: Ultrasound/MRI Imaging Features and an Institutional Overview of Therapeutic Ultrasound Guided Percutaneous Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehmani, Razia; Endo, Yoshimi; Bauman, Phillip; Hamilton, William; Potter, Hollis; Adler, Ronald

    2015-10-01

    Altered biomechanics from repetitive microtrauma, such as long practice hours in en pointe (tip of the toes) or demi pointe (balls of the feet) predispose ballet dancers to a multitude of musculoskeletal pathologies particularly in the lower extremities. Both ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) are radiation-sparing modalities which can be used to confidently evaluate these injuries, with ultrasound (US) offering the added utility of therapeutic intervention at the same time in experienced hands. The purposes of this paper were: (1) to illustrate the US and MRI features of lower extremity injury patterns in ballet dancers, focusing on pathologies commonly encountered at a single orthopedic hospital; (2) to present complementary roles of both ultrasound and MRI in the evaluation of these injuries whenever possible; (3) to review and present our institutional approach towards therapeutic ultrasound-guided interventions by presenting explicit cases. Online searches were performed using the search criteria of "ballet biomechanics" and "ballet injuries." The results were then further narrowed down by limiting articles published in the past 15 years, modality (US and MRI), anatomical region (foot and ankle, hip and knee) and to major radiology, orthopedics, and sports medicine journals. Performing ballet poses major stress to lower extremities and predisposes dancer to several musculoskeletal injuries. These can be adequately evaluated by both US and MRI. US is useful for evaluating superficial structures such as soft tissues, tendons, and ligaments, particularly in the foot and ankle. MRI provides superior resolution of deeper structures such as joints, bone marrow, and cartilage. In addition, US can be used as a therapeutic tool for providing quick symptomatic improvement in these athletes for who "time is money". Performing ballet may cause major stress to the lower extremities, predominantly affecting the foot and ankle, followed by the knee and hip. US

  16. Deep convolutional neural networks for estimating porous material parameters with ultrasound tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lähivaara, Timo; Kärkkäinen, Leo; Huttunen, Janne M. J.; Hesthaven, Jan S.

    2018-02-01

    We study the feasibility of data based machine learning applied to ultrasound tomography to estimate water-saturated porous material parameters. In this work, the data to train the neural networks is simulated by solving wave propagation in coupled poroviscoelastic-viscoelastic-acoustic media. As the forward model, we consider a high-order discontinuous Galerkin method while deep convolutional neural networks are used to solve the parameter estimation problem. In the numerical experiment, we estimate the material porosity and tortuosity while the remaining parameters which are of less interest are successfully marginalized in the neural networks-based inversion. Computational examples confirms the feasibility and accuracy of this approach.

  17. Therapeutic percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis in three dogs with extrahepatic biliary obstruction and pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herman, Beth A; Brawer, Robert S; Murtaugh, Robert J; Hackner, Susan G

    2005-12-01

    Three dogs were examined because of acute pancreatitis. In all 3, distension of the gallbladder was seen ultrasonographically, and extrahepatic biliary tract obstruction (EHBO) was diagnosed on the basis of ultrasonographic findings and serum biochemical abnormalities (i.e., high serum bilirubin and cholesterol concentrations and increased hepatic enzyme activities). In all 3 dogs, percutaneous ultrasound-guided cholecystocentesis (PUCC) was used to decompress the gallbladder, with cholecystocentesis performed multiple times in 1 dog. Serum bilirubin concentration was substantially decreased following the procedure in all 3 dogs. Two of the 3 dogs did not require surgery to resolve the obstruction. In the third dog, an exploratory laparotomy was performed because of concerns about development of abdominal effusion following the procedure. Bile staining of the mesenteric fat was seen during the laparotomy, but no defect in the gallbladder wall could be identified. In most dogs with EHBO secondary to pancreatitis, the obstruction resolves spontaneously as the acute pancreatitis improves so that surgery is not required. In those few dogs in which EHBO does not resolve or in which EHBO results in complications, therapeutic PUCC may be useful in relieving gallbladder distension.

  18. Physical therapy clinic therapeutic ultrasound equipment as a source for bacterial contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spratt, Henry G; Levine, David; Tillman, Larry

    2014-10-01

    A procedure commonly used in physical therapy (PT) clinics is therapeutic ultrasound (US). This equipment and associated gel comes in contact with patient skin, potentially serving as a reservoir for bacteria. In this study, we sampled US heads, gel bottle tips and gel from nine outpatient PT clinics in Southeastern Tennessee. Samples were collected using sterile swabs. At the microbiology laboratory, these swabs were used to inoculate mannitol salt agar and CHROM-MRSA agar (for Staphylococcal species) and tryptic soy broth to determine non-specific bacterial contamination. US heads, gel bottle tips and gel had variable levels of contamination. Tips of gel bottles had the highest contamination, with 52.7% positive for non-specific bacterial contamination and 3.6% positive for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Contamination of gel by non-specific bacteria was found in 14.5% of bottles sampled. US heads (35.5% of those sampled) had non-specific bacterial contamination, with no MRSA detected. Disinfecting US heads after initial swabbing resulted in removal of 90.9% of non-specific contamination. Gel storage at temperatures below 40 °C was found to encourage the growth of mesophilic bacteria. This study demonstrates the need for better cleaning and storage protocols for US heads and gel bottles in PT clinics.

  19. MRI-guided therapeutic ultrasound: Temperature feedback control for extracorporeal and endoluminal applicators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomir, Rares

    2005-09-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound is a mini-invasive and promising tool for in situ ablation of non-resectable tumors in uterus, breast, esophagus, kidney, liver, etc. Extracorporeal, endoluminal, and interstitial applicators have been successfully tested to date. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the only available technique providing non-invasive temperature mapping, together with excellent contrast of soft tissue. Coupling of these two technologies offers the advantage of both: (1) on line spatial guidance to the target region, and (2) thermal dose control during the treatment. This talk will provide an overview of the author's experience with automatic, active feedback control of the temperature evolution in tissues, which has been demonstrated with MRI compatible extracorporeal transducers (focused beam) or endoluminal applicators (plane waves). The feedback loop is based on fast switching capabilities of the driving electronics and real time data transfer out of the MR scanner. Precision of temperature control was typically better than 1°C. This approach is expected to improve the efficacy of the treatment (complete tumor ablation) and the thermal security of the critical regions crossed by the acoustic beam. It also permits one to reach an under-lethal heating regime for local drug delivery using thermosensitive liposomes or gene expression control based on hsp promoters.

  20. Determine the Dose Distribution Using Ultrasound Parameters in MAGIC-f Polymer Gels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Masoumi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study, using methacrylic and ascorbic acid in gelatin initiated by copper (MAGIC-f polymer gel after megavoltage energy exposure, the sensitivity of the ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient dose-dependent parameters was evaluated. The MAGIC-f polymer gel was irradiated under 1.25 MeV cobalt-60, ranging from 0 to 60 Gy in 2-Gy steps, and received dose uniformity and accuracy of ±2%. After calibration of the ultrasonic systems with a frequency of 500 kHz, the parameters of ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient of the irradiated gel samples were measured. According to the dose–response curve, the ability of ultrasonic parameters was evaluated in dose rate readings. Based on a 4-order polynomial curve, fitted on the dose–response parameters of ultrasound velocity and attenuation coefficient and observed at 24 hours after irradiation, ultrasonic parameters had more sensitivity. The sensitivity of the dose–velocity and dose-attenuation coefficient curves was observed as 50 m/s/Gy and 0.06 dB/MHz/Gy over the linear range of 4 to 44 Gy, respectively. The ultrasonic parameters at 5°C, 15°C, and 25°C on the gel dosimeter after 0 to 60 Gy irradiation showed that readings at 25°C have higher sensitivity compared to 15°C and 5°C. Maximum sensitivity time and temperature readings of the MAGIC-f ultrasonic parameters were concluded 24 hours after irradiation and at a temperature of 25°C.

  1. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... completed. Young children may need additional preparation. When scheduling an ultrasound for yourself or your child, ask ... of Privacy Practices Notice of Nondiscrimination Manage Cookies Advertising Mayo Clinic is a not-for-profit organization ...

  2. Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... reflect off body structures. A computer receives the waves and uses them to create a picture. Unlike with an x-ray or CT scan, this test does not use ionizing radiation. The test is done in the ultrasound ...

  3. EX VIVO STUDY OF QUANTITATIVE ULTRASOUND PARAMETERS IN FATTY RABBIT LIVERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Goutam; Lavarello, Roberto J.; Kemmerer, Jeremy P.; Miller, Rita J.; Oelze, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects more than 30% of Americans, and with increasing problems of obesity in the United States, NAFLD is poised to become an even more serious medical concern. At present, accurate classification of steatosis (fatty liver) represents a significant challenge. In this study, the use of high-frequency (8 to 25 MHz) quantitative ultrasound (QUS) imaging to quantify fatty liver was explored. QUS is an imaging technique that can be used to quantify properties of tissue giving rise to scattered ultrasound. The changes in the ultrasound properties of livers in rabbits undergoing atherogenic diets of varying durations were investigated using QUS. Rabbits were placed on a special fatty diet for 0, 3, or 6 weeks. The fattiness of the livers was quantified by estimating the total lipid content of the livers. Ultrasonic properties, such as speed of sound, attenuation, and backscatter coefficients, were estimated in ex vivo rabbit liver samples from animals that had been on the diet for varying periods. Two QUS parameters were estimated based on the backscatter coefficient: effective scatterer diameter (ESD) and effective acoustic concentration (EAC), using a spherical Gaussian scattering model. Two parameters were estimated based on the backscattered envelope statistics (the k parameter and the μ parameter) according to the homodyned K distribution. The speed of sound decreased from 1574 to 1565 m/s and the attenuation coefficient increased from 0.71 to 1.27 dB/cm/MHz, respectively, with increasing fat content in the liver. The ESD decreased from 31 to 17 μm and the EAC increased from 38 to 63 dB/cm3 with increasing fat content in the liver. A significant increase in the μ parameter from 0.18 to 0.93 scatterers/mm3 was observed with increasing fat content in the liver samples. The results of this study indicate that QUS parameters are sensitive to fat content in the liver. PMID:23062376

  4. Prediction of polycystic ovarian syndrome based on ultrasound findings and clinical parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moschos, Elysia; Twickler, Diane M

    2015-03-01

    To determine the accuracy of sonographic-diagnosed polycystic ovaries and clinical parameters in predicting polycystic ovarian syndrome. Medical records and ultrasounds of 151 women with sonographically diagnosed polycystic ovaries were reviewed. Sonographic criteria for polycystic ovaries were based on 2003 Rotterdam European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology/American Society for Reproductive Medicine guidelines: at least one ovary with 12 or more follicles measuring 2-9 mm and/or increased ovarian volume >10 cm(3) . Clinical variables of age, gravidity, ethnicity, body mass index, and sonographic indication were collected. One hundred thirty-five patients had final outcomes (presence/absence of polycystic ovarian syndrome). Polycystic ovarian syndrome was diagnosed if a patient had at least one other of the following two criteria: oligo/chronic anovulation and/or clinical/biochemical hyperandrogenism. A logistic regression model was constructed using stepwise selection to identify variables significantly associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome (p polycystic ovaries and 115 (89.8%) had polycystic ovarian syndrome (p = .009). Lower gravidity, abnormal bleeding, and body mass index >33 were significant in predicting polycystic ovarian syndrome (receiver operating characteristics curve, c = 0.86). Pain decreased the likelihood of polycystic ovarian syndrome. Polycystic ovaries on ultrasound were sensitive in predicting polycystic ovarian syndrome. Ultrasound, combined with clinical parameters, can be used to generate a predictive index for polycystic ovarian syndrome. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Ultrasound scatter in heterogeneous 3D microstructures: Parameters affecting multiple scattering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, B. J.; Roberts, R. A.; Grandin, R. J.

    2018-04-01

    This paper reports on a computational study of ultrasound propagation in heterogeneous metal microstructures. Random spatial fluctuations in elastic properties over a range of length scales relative to ultrasound wavelength can give rise to scatter-induced attenuation, backscatter noise, and phase front aberration. It is of interest to quantify the dependence of these phenomena on the microstructure parameters, for the purpose of quantifying deleterious consequences on flaw detectability, and for the purpose of material characterization. Valuable tools for estimation of microstructure parameters (e.g. grain size) through analysis of ultrasound backscatter have been developed based on approximate weak-scattering models. While useful, it is understood that these tools display inherent inaccuracy when multiple scattering phenomena significantly contribute to the measurement. It is the goal of this work to supplement weak scattering model predictions with corrections derived through application of an exact computational scattering model to explicitly prescribed microstructures. The scattering problem is formulated as a volume integral equation (VIE) displaying a convolutional Green-function-derived kernel. The VIE is solved iteratively employing FFT-based con-volution. Realizations of random microstructures are specified on the micron scale using statistical property descriptions (e.g. grain size and orientation distributions), which are then spatially filtered to provide rigorously equivalent scattering media on a length scale relevant to ultrasound propagation. Scattering responses from ensembles of media representations are averaged to obtain mean and variance of quantities such as attenuation and backscatter noise levels, as a function of microstructure descriptors. The computational approach will be summarized, and examples of application will be presented.

  6. Evaluation of gloves as a water bag coupling agent for therapeutic ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lúcio Salustiano de Lima

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Therapeutic ultrasound (TUS is a widespread modality in physiotherapy, and the water bag technique is a coupling method employed in the presence of anatomical irregularities in the treatment area. The aim of the present study is to evaluate the acoustic attenuation of the water bag and its effectiveness as a TUS coupling agent. Methods The rated output powers (ROPs of the TUS equipment were evaluated based on IEC 61689. Then, a radiation force balance was used to measure ROP with and without a water bag (latex and nitrile gloves filled with deionized water between a TUS transducer and the cone-shaped target of the balance. Each experiment was performed five times for each nominal power (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, 5.0, 6.0, and 7.0 W and in the following configurations: without the water bag (A, with nitrile gloves and with (B and without (C a height controller, and latex gloves with (D and without (E height controller. ROPs obtained in different media were compared. Results The highest relative error of ROP was 16.72% for 0.5 W. Although the power values of the equipment were within the range recommended by IEC, there was a significant difference between the ROP values measured with A and with B, C and D. Conclusion As intensity differences below 0.5 W/cm2 are considered clinically not relevant, conditions A, B, C, D, or E can be used interchangeably.

  7. Evaluation of a novel therapeutic focused ultrasound transducer based on Fermat’s spiral

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramaekers, P.; de Greef, M.; Berriet, R.; Moonen, C. T. W.; Ries, M.

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate a novel phased array transducer design rule for therapeutic focused ultrasound applications. This design rule uses the discretized Fermat’s spiral to determine the positioning of the transducer elements for a given number of elements and f-number. Using this principle, three variations of Fermat’s spiral were generated, aimed at (1) grating lobe minimization, (2) side lobe minimization, and (3) an optimized element packing efficiency. For each spiral, sparse layouts using identical circular elements and fully populated layouts based on additional Voronoi tessellation were evaluated numerically. Evaluation criteria included the element size distribution, beam steering capabilities, focal plane pressure distribution, prefocal pressure distribution, and practical considerations. Finally, one Voronoi-tessellated design with a focal length and aperture diameter of 16 cm and a natural frequency of 1.3 MHz was evaluated experimentally through hydrophone measurements. The numerical evaluation showed that while sparse arrays possess superior beam steering capabilities for a given number of elements, the focal point quality and prefocal pressure distribution is substantially more favorable when using the Voronoi-tessellated designs. Beam steering was shown to be feasible with the tessellated designs for lateral deflections up to 10 mm and axial deflections up to 20 mm. The experimental evaluation showed that such a transducer is capable of inducing 40.00 MPa rarefactional and 237.50 MPa compressional peak pressure levels at 800 W instantaneous acoustic output power under free-field conditions, making the system potentially relevant for thermal ablation therapy, histotripsy applications, and shockwave-enhanced heating.

  8. High-frequency ultrasound imaging of tattoo reactions with histopathology as a comparative method. Introduction of preoperative ultrasound diagnostics as a guide to therapeutic intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, K Hutton; Tolstrup, J; Serup, J

    2014-08-01

    Tattoo adverse reactions requiring diagnostic evaluation and treatment are becoming more common. The aim of this study was to assess tattoo reactions by 20-MHz ultrasonography referenced to histopathology as a comparative method. A total of 73 individuals with clinical adverse reactions in their tattoos were studied. Punch biopsies for reference histology were available from 58 patients. The Dermascan C(®) of Cortex Technology, Denmark, was employed. Total skin thickness and echo density of the echolucent band in the outer dermis were measured. Biopsy served for diagnosis and for determination of the level of cellular infiltration in the dermis. In every tattoo reaction studied, the skin affected was found thicker compared with regional control of the same individual (mean difference 0.73 mm). A prominent echolucent band of mean thickness 0.89 mm was demonstrated, primarily located in the very outer dermis but propagating to deeper dermal layers parallel to increasing severity of reactions. The thickness of the echolucent band correlated with the thickness of cellular infiltration determined by microscopic examination, R = 0.6412 (P tattoo reactions showed no distinct characteristics by ultrasound, but mainly displayed themselves by their advanced inflammatory component. It is demonstrated for the first time that ultrasound, with histopathology as the comparative method, can quantify the severity of tattoo reactions and non-invasively diagnose the depth of the inflammatory process in the dermis elicited by the microparticulate tattoo pigment, which itself is too minute to be imaged by ultrasound. Preoperative 20-MHz ultrasound scanning is introduced as a potentially useful method to guide therapeutic interventions by surgery and lasers. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Therapeutic effects of microbubble added to combined high-intensity focused ultrasound and chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Dept. of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Dept. of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Dept. of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Dept. of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-09-15

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  10. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Mi Hye [Department of Radiology, Konkuk University Medical Center, Seoul 05030 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Young [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hae Ri [Department of Pre-Dentistry, Gangneung-Wonju National University College of Dentistry, Gangneung 25457 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo [Department of Radiology, Seoul National University Hospital, Seoul 03080 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Byung Ihn [Department of Radiology, Chung-Ang University Hospital, Seoul 06973 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-11-01

    To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model.

  11. Grinding Parameter Optimization of Ultrasound-Aided Electrolytic in Process Dressing for Finishing Nanocomposite Ceramics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Chen

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to achieve the precision and efficient processing of nanocomposite ceramics, the ultrasound-aided electrolytic in process dressing method was proposed. But how to realize grinding parameter optimization, that is, the maximum processing efficiency, on the premise of the assurance of best workpiece quality is a problem that needs to be solved urgently. Firstly, this research investigated the influence of grinding parameters on material removal rate and critical ductile depth, and their mathematic models based on the existing models were developed to simulate the material removal process. Then, on the basis of parameter sensitivity analysis based on partial derivative, the sensitivity models of material removal rates on grinding parameter were established and computed quantitatively by MATLAB, and the key grinding parameter for optimal grinding process was found. Finally, the theoretical analyses were verified by experiments: the material removal rate increases with the increase of grinding parameters, including grinding depth (ap, axial feeding speed (fa, workpiece speed (Vw, and wheel speed (Vs; the parameter sensitivity of material removal rate was in a descending order as ap>fa>Vw>Vs; the most sensitive parameter (ap was optimized and it was found that the better machining result has been obtained when ap was about 3.73 μm.

  12. Therapeutic Ultrasound Bypasses Canonical Syndecan-4 Signaling to Activate Rac1*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Claire M.; Morgan, Mark R.; Harrison, Andrew; Humphries, Martin J.; Bass, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    The application of pulsed, low intensity ultrasound is emerging as a potent therapy for the treatment of complex bone fractures and tissue damage. Ultrasonic stimuli accelerate fracture healing by up to 40% and enhance tendon and ligament healing by promoting cell proliferation, migration, and matrix synthesis through an unresolved mechanism. Ultrasound treatment also induces closure of nonunion fractures, at a success rate (85% of cases) similar to that of surgical intervention (68-96%) while avoiding the complications associated with surgery. The regulation of cell adhesion necessary for wound healing depends on cooperative engagement of the extracellular matrix receptors, integrin and syndecan, as exemplified by the wound healing defects observed in syndecan- and integrin-knock-out mice. This report distinguishes the influence of ultrasound on signals downstream of the prototypic fibronectin receptors, α5β1 integrin and syndecan-4, which cooperate to regulate Rac1 and RhoA. Ultrasonic stimulation fails to activate integrins or induce cell spreading on poor, electrostatic ligands. By contrast, ultrasound treatment overcomes the necessity of engagement or expression of syndecan-4 during the process of focal adhesion formation, which normally requires simultaneous engagement of both receptors. Ultrasound exerts an influence downstream of syndecan-4 and PKCα to specifically activate Rac1, itself a critical regulator of tissue repair, and to a lesser extent RhoA. The ability of ultrasound to bypass syndecan-4 signaling, which is known to facilitate efficient tissue repair, explains the reduction in healing times observed in ultrasound-treated patients. By substituting for one of the key axes of adhesion-dependent signaling, ultrasound therapy has considerable potential as a clinical technique. PMID:19147498

  13. Acoustically active lipospheres containing paclitaxel: a new therapeutic ultrasound contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, E C; McCreery, T P; Sweitzer, R H; Caldwell, V E; Wu, Y

    1998-12-01

    Paclitaxel-carrying lipospheres (MRX-552) were developed and evaluated as a new ultrasound contrast agent for chemotherapeutic drug delivery. Paclitaxel was suspended in soybean oil and added to an aqueous suspension of phospholipids in vials. The headspace of the vials was replaced with perfluorobutane gas; the vials were sealed, and they were agitated at 4200 rpm on a shaking device. The resulting lipospheres containing paclitaxel were studied for concentration, size, acute toxicity in mice, and acoustic activity and drug release with ultrasound. Lipospheres containing sudan black dye were produced to demonstrate the acoustically active liposphere (AAL)-ultrasound release concept. Acoustically active lipospheres containing paclitaxel had a mean particle count of approximately 1 x 10(9) particles per mL and a mean size of 2.9 microns. Acute toxicity studies in mice showed a 10-fold reduction in toxicity for paclitaxel in AALs compared with free paclitaxel. The AALs reflected ultrasound as a contrast agent. Increasing amounts of ultrasound energy selectively ruptured the AALs and released the paclitaxel. Acoustically active lipospheres represent a new class of acoustically active drug delivery vehicles. Future studies will assess efficacy of AALs for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery.

  14. Focusing of high intensity ultrasound through the rib cage using a therapeutic random phased array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobkova, Svetlana; Gavrilov, Leonid; Khokhlova, Vera; Shaw, Adam; Hand, Jeffrey; #, ||

    2010-01-01

    A method for focusing high intensity ultrasound through a rib cage that aims to minimize heating of the ribs whilst maintaining high intensities at the focus (or foci) is proposed and tested theoretically and experimentally. Two approaches, one based on geometric acoustics and the other accounting for diffraction effects associated with propagation through the rib cage, are investigated theoretically for idealized source conditions. It is shown that for an idealized radiator the diffraction approach provides a 23% gain in peak intensity and results in significantly less power losses on the ribs (1% versus 7.5% of the irradiated power) compared with the geometric one. A 2D 1-MHz phased array with 254 randomly distributed elements, tissue mimicking phantoms, and samples of porcine rib cages are used in experiments; the geometric approach is used to configure how the array is driven. Intensity distributions are measured in the plane of the ribs and in the focal plane using an infra-red camera. Theoretical and experimental results show that it is possible to provide adequate focusing through the ribs without overheating them for a single focus and several foci, including steering at ± 10–15 mm off and ± 20 mm along the array axis. Focus splitting due to the periodic spatial structure of ribs is demonstrated both in simulations and experiments; the parameters of splitting are quantified. The ability to produce thermal lesions with a split focal pattern in ex vivo porcine tissue placed beyond the rib phantom is also demonstrated. The results suggest that the method is potentially useful for clinical applications of HIFU for which the rib cage lies between the transducer(s) and the targeted tissue. PMID:20510186

  15. Quantitative ultrasound assessment of breast tumor response to chemotherapy using a multi-parameter approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadayyon, Hadi; Sannachi, Lakshmanan; Gangeh, Mehrdad; Sadeghi-Naini, Ali; Tran, William; Trudeau, Maureen E; Pritchard, Kathleen; Ghandi, Sonal; Verma, Sunil; Czarnota, Gregory J

    2016-07-19

    This study demonstrated the ability of quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters in providing an early prediction of tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC). Using a 6-MHz array transducer, ultrasound radiofrequency (RF) data were collected from 58 LABC patients prior to NAC treatment and at weeks 1, 4, and 8 of their treatment, and prior to surgery. QUS parameters including midband fit (MBF), spectral slope (SS), spectral intercept (SI), spacing among scatterers (SAS), attenuation coefficient estimate (ACE), average scatterer diameter (ASD), and average acoustic concentration (AAC) were determined from the tumor region of interest. Ultrasound data were compared with the ultimate clinical and pathological response of the patient's tumor to treatment and patient recurrence-free survival. Multi-parameter discriminant analysis using the κ-nearest-neighbor classifier demonstrated that the best response classification could be achieved using the combination of MBF, SS, and SAS, with an accuracy of 60 ± 10% at week 1, 77 ± 8% at week 4 and 75 ± 6% at week 8. Furthermore, when the QUS measurements at each time (week) were combined with pre-treatment (week 0) QUS values, the classification accuracies improved (70 ± 9% at week 1, 80 ± 5% at week 4, and 81 ± 6% at week 8). Finally, the multi-parameter QUS model demonstrated a significant difference in survival rates of responding and non-responding patients at weeks 1 and 4 (p=0.035, and 0.027, respectively). This study demonstrated for the first time, using new parameters tested on relatively large patient cohort and leave-one-out classifier evaluation, that a hybrid QUS biomarker including MBF, SS, and SAS could, with relatively high sensitivity and specificity, detect the response of LABC tumors to NAC as early as after 4 weeks of therapy. The findings of this study also suggested that incorporating pre-treatment QUS parameters of a tumor improved the

  16. Effect of acoustic parameters on the cavitation behavior of SonoVue microbubbles induced by pulsed ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yutong; Lin, Lizhou; Cheng, Mouwen; Jin, Lifang; Du, Lianfang; Han, Tao; Xu, Lin; Yu, Alfred C H; Qin, Peng

    2017-03-01

    SonoVue microbubbles could serve as artificial nuclei for ultrasound-triggered stable and inertial cavitation, resulting in beneficial biological effects for future therapeutic applications. To optimize and control the use of the cavitation of SonoVue bubbles in therapy while ensuring safety, it is important to comprehensively understand the relationship between the acoustic parameters and the cavitation behavior of the SonoVue bubbles. An agarose-gel tissue phantom was fabricated to hold the SonoVue bubble suspension. 1-MHz transmitting transducer calibrated by a hydrophone was used to trigger the cavitation of SonoVue bubbles under different ultrasonic parameters (i.e., peak rarefactional pressure (PRP), pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and pulse duration (PD)). Another 7.5-MHz focused transducer was employed to passively receive acoustic signals from the exposed bubbles. The ultraharmonics and broadband intensities in the acoustic emission spectra were measured to quantify the extent of stable and inertial cavitation of SonoVue bubbles, respectively. We found that the onset of both stable and inertial cavitation exhibited a strong dependence on the PRP and PD and a relatively weak dependence on the PRF. Approximate 0.25MPa PRP with more than 20μs PD was considered to be necessary for ultraharmonics emission of SonoVue bubbles, and obvious broadband signals started to appear when the PRP exceeded 0.40MPa. Moreover, the doses of stable and inertial cavitation varied with the PRP. The stable cavitation dose initially increased with increasing PRP, and then decreased rapidly after 0.5MPa. By contrast, the inertial cavitation dose continuously increased with increasing PRP. Finally, the doses of both stable and inertial cavitation were positively correlated with PRF and PD. These results could provide instructive information for optimizing future therapeutic applications of SonoVue bubbles. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlation between Parameters of Calcaneal Quantitative Ultrasound and Hip Structural Analysis in Osteoporotic Fracture Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licheng Zhang

    Full Text Available Calcaneal quantitative ultrasound (QUS, which is used in the evaluation of osteoporosis, is believed to be intimately associated with the characteristics of the proximal femur. However, the specific associations of calcaneal QUS with characteristics of the hip sub-regions remain unclear.A cross-sectional assessment of 53 osteoporotic patients was performed for the skeletal status of the heel and hip.We prospectively enrolled 53 female osteoporotic patients with femoral fractures. Calcaneal QUS, dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA, and hip structural analysis (HSA were performed for each patient. Femoral heads were obtained during the surgery, and principal compressive trabeculae (PCT were extracted by a three-dimensional printing technique-assisted method. Pearson's correlation between QUS measurement with DXA, HSA-derived parameters and Young's modulus were calculated in order to evaluate the specific association of QUS with the parameters for the hip sub-regions, including the femoral neck, trochanteric and Ward's areas, and the femoral shaft, respectively.Significant correlations were found between estimated BMD (Est.BMD and BMD of different sub-regions of proximal femur. However, the correlation coefficient of trochanteric area (r = 0.356, p = 0.009 was higher than that of the neck area (r = 0.297, p = 0.031 and total proximal femur (r = 0.291, p = 0.034. Furthermore, the quantitative ultrasound index (QUI was significantly correlated with the HSA-derived parameters of the trochanteric area (r value: 0.315-0.356, all p<0.05 as well as with the Young's modulus of PCT from the femoral head (r = 0.589, p<0.001.The calcaneal bone had an intimate association with the trochanteric cancellous bone. To a certain extent, the parameters of the calcaneal QUS can reflect the characteristics of the trochanteric area of the proximal hip, although not specifically reflective of those of the femoral neck or shaft.

  18. Polyunsaturated fatty acids and calcaneal ultrasound parameters among Inuit women from Nuuk (Greenland): a longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paunescu, Alexandra-Cristina; Ayotte, Pierre; Dewailly, Eric; Dodin, Sylvie; Pedersen, Henning S; Mulvad, Gert; Côté, Suzanne

    2013-01-01

    The traditional diet of Inuit people comprises large amounts of fish and marine mammals that are rich in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs). Results from in vitro studies, laboratory animal experiments and population studies suggest that omega-3 PUFA intake and a high omega-3/omega-6 ratio exert a positive effect on bone health. This longitudinal study was conducted to examine the relationship between omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA status and quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters in Greenlandic Inuit women. The study included 118 Inuit women from Nuuk (Greenland), aged 49-64 years, whose QUS parameters measured at baseline (year 2000), along with PUFA status and covariates, and follow-up QUS measurements 2 years later (year 2002). QUS parameters [speed of sound (SOS); broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA)] were measured at the right calcaneus with a water-bath Lunar Achilles instrument. Omega-3 and omega-6 PUFA contents of erythrocyte membrane phospholipids were measured after transmethylation by gas chromatography coupled with a flame ionization detector. Relationships between QUS parameters and different PUFAs were studied in multiple linear regression models. Increasing values of EPA, DHA and the omega-3/omega-6 PUFA ratio were associated with increased BUA values measured at follow-up (year 2002). These associations were still present in models adjusted for several confounders and covariates. We found little evidence of associations between PUFAs and SOS values. The omega-3 PUFA intake from marine food consumption seems to have a positive effect on bone intrinsic quality and strength, as revealed by higher BUA values in this group of Greenlandic Inuit women.

  19. The dynamic behavior of microbubbles during long ultrasound tone-burst excitation: mechanistic insights into ultrasound-microbubble mediated therapeutics using high-speed imaging and cavitation detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacella, John J.; Villanueva, Flordeliza S.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound (US)-microbubble (MB) mediated therapies have been shown to restore perfusion and enhance drug/gene delivery. Due to the presumption that MBs do not persist during long US exposure under high acoustic pressures, most schemes utilize short US pulses when a high US pressure is employed. However, we recently observed an enhanced thrombolytic effect using long US pulses at high acoustic pressures. Therefore we explored the fate of MBs during long tone-burst exposures (5 ms) at various acoustic pressures and MB concentrations via direct high-speed optical observation and passive cavitation detection. MBs first underwent stable or inertial cavitation depending on the acoustic pressure, and then formed gas-filled clusters that continued to oscillate, break up, and form new clusters. Cavitation detection confirmed continued, albeit diminishing acoustic activity throughout the 5-ms US excitation. These data suggest that persisting cavitation activity during long tone-bursts may confer additional therapeutic effects. PMID:26603628

  20. Therapeutic-Ultrasound-Triggered Shape Memory of a Melamine-Enhanced Poly(vinyl alcohol) Physical Hydrogel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guo; Yan, Qiang; Xia, Hesheng; Zhao, Yue

    2015-06-10

    Therapeutic-ultrasound-triggered shape memory was demonstrated for the first time with a melamine-enhanced poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) physical hydrogel. The addition of a small amount of melamine (up to 1.5 wt %) in PVA results in a strong hydrogel due to the multiple H-bonding between the two constituents. A temporary shape of the hydrogel can be obtained by deformation of the hydrogel (∼65 wt % water) at room temperature, followed by fixation of the deformation by freezing/thawing the hydrogel under strain, which induces crystallization of PVA. We show that the ultrasound delivered by a commercially available device designed for the patient's pain relief could trigger the shape recovery process as a result of ultrasound-induced local heating in the hydrogel that melts the crystallized PVA cross-linking. This hydrogel is thus interesting for potential applications because it combines many desirable properties, being mechanically strong, biocompatible, and self-healable and displaying the shape memory capability triggered by a physiological stimulus.

  1. Effect of process parameters on crystal size and morphology of lactose in ultrasound-assisted crystallization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Patel, S.R.; Murthy, Z.V.P. [Chemical Engineering Department, S.V. National Institute of Technology, Surat - 395 007, Gujarat (India)

    2011-03-15

    {alpha}-lactose monohydrate is widely used as a pharmaceutical excipient. Drug delivery system requires the excipient to be of narrow particle size distribution with regular particle shape. Application of ultrasound is known to increase or decrease the growth rate of certain crystal faces and controls the crystal size distribution. In the present paper, effect of process parameters such as sonication time, anti-solvent concentration, initial lactose concentration and initial pH of sample on lactose crystal size, shape and thermal transition temperature was studied. The parameters were set according to the L{sub 9}-orthogonal array method at three levels and recovered lactose from whey by sonocrystallization. The recovered lactose was analyzed by particle size analyzer, scanning electron microscopy and differential scanning calorimeter. It was found that the morphology of lactose crystal was rod/needle like shape. Crystal size distribution of lactose was observed to be influenced by different process parameters. From the results of analysis of variance, the sonication time interval was found to be the most significant parameter affecting the volume median diameter of lactose with the highest percentage contribution (74.28%) among other parameters. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Ultrasound-Stimulated Drug Delivery Using Therapeutic Reconstituted High-Density Lipoprotein Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Fangyuan; Nirupama, Sabnis; Sirsi, Shashank R; Lacko, Andras; Hoyt, Kenneth

    2017-01-01

    The abnormal tumor vasculature and the resulting abnormal microenvironment are major barriers to optimal chemotherapeutic drug delivery. It is well known that ultrasound (US) can increase the permeability of the tumor vessel walls and enhance the accumulation of anticancer agents. Reconstituted high-density lipoproteins (rHDL) nanoparticles (NPs) allow selective delivery of anticancer agents to tumor cells via their overexpressed scavenger receptor type B1 (SR-B1) receptor. The goal of this study is to investigate the potential of noninvasive US therapy to further improve delivery and tumor uptake of the payload from rHDL NPs, preloaded with an infrared dye (IR-780), aimed to establish a surrogate chemotherapeutic model with optical localization. Athymic nude mice were implanted orthotopically with one million breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231/Luc). Three weeks later, animals were divided into seven groups with comparable mean tumor size: control, low, moderate, and high concentration of rHDL NPs alone groups, as well as these three levels of rHDL NPs plus US therapy groups ( N = 7 to 12 animals per group), where low, moderate and high denote 5, 10, and 50 µg of the IR-780 dye payload per rHDL NP injection, respectively. The US therapy system included a single element focused transducer connected in series with a function generator and power amplifier. A custom 3D printed cone with an acoustically transparent aperture and filled with degassed water allowed delivery of focused US energy to the tumor tissue. US exposure involved a pulsed sequence applied for a duration of 5 min. Each animal in the US therapy groups received a slow bolus co-injection of MB contrast agent and rHDL NPs. Animals were imaged using a whole-body optical system to quantify intratumoral rHDL NP accumulation at baseline and again at 1 min, 30 min, 24 h, and 48 h. At 48 h, all animals were euthanized and tumors were excised for ex vivo analysis. We investigated a noninvasive optical imaging

  3. Membrane damage effect of therapeutic ultrasound on Ehrlich ascitic tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Qiao; Liu, Quanhong; Wang, Xiaobing; Wang, Pan; Li, Tao; Tong, Wan Yan

    2009-02-01

    The biologic effects and the underlying mechanisms of Ehrlich ascitic tumor (EAT) cells induced by ultrasound were investigated in this study. Cells were subjected to ultrasonic irradiation with a frequency of 2.17 MHz and an intensity of 3 W/cm(2) for variable periods of time. Trypan blue exclusion was used to detect the integrity of cellular membrane; the membrane permeability was investigated by the incorporation of fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran during ultrasound exposure; and the cell membrane ultrastructure changes were observed under a scanning electron microscope. The potential mechanism was estimated from the generation of hydroxyl radicals, the lipid peroxidation levels, and intracellular reactive oxygen radicals production. The cell membrane damage effects induced by ultrasound increased with a prolonged exposure time; the fluorescent rates of the cells irradiated with ultrasound for 30 and 60 seconds were 11.46% and 18.50%, respectively; the amount of hydroxyl radicals in 30 (26.10 U/mL) and 60 seconds (28.47 U/mL) were significantly enhanced, compared with the control group (24.44 U/mL); then, the level of lipid peroxidation was also changed from 0.27 to 0.54 (30 seconds) and 1.21 nmol/mL (60 seconds). Shear forces and free radicals produced by acoustic cavitation may play important roles in these actions.

  4. Focused ultrasound-mediated noninvasive blood-brain barrier modulation: preclinical examination of efficacy and safety in various sonication parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jaewoo; Kong, Chanho; Cho, Jae Sung; Lee, Jihyeon; Koh, Chin Su; Yoon, Min-Sik; Na, Young Cheol; Chang, Won Seok; Chang, Jin Woo

    2018-02-01

    OBJECTIVE The application of pharmacological therapeutics in neurological disorders is limited by the ability of these agents to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Focused ultrasound (FUS) has recently gained attention for its potential application as a method for locally opening the BBB and thereby facilitating drug delivery into the brain parenchyma. However, this method still requires optimization to maximize its safety and efficacy for clinical use. In the present study, the authors examined several sonication parameters of FUS influencing BBB opening in small animals. METHODS Changes in BBB permeability were observed during transcranial sonication using low-intensity FUS in 20 adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The authors examined the effects of FUS sonication with different sonication parameters, varying acoustic pressure, center frequency, burst duration, microbubble (MB) type, MB dose, pulse repetition frequency (PRF), and total exposure time. The focal region of BBB opening was identified by Evans blue dye. Additionally, H & E staining was used to identify blood vessel damage. RESULTS Acoustic pressure amplitude and burst duration were closely associated with enhancement of BBB opening efficiency, but these parameters were also highly correlated with tissue damage in the sonicated region. In contrast, MB types, MB dose, total exposure time, and PRF had an influence on BBB opening without conspicuous tissue damage after FUS sonication. CONCLUSIONS The study aimed to identify these influential conditions and provide safety and efficacy values for further studies. Future work based on the current results is anticipated to facilitate the implementation of FUS sonication for drug delivery in various CNS disease states in the near future.

  5. Ultrasound-guided therapeutic injections for neural pathology about the foot and ankle: a 4 year retrospective review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, William R; Burke, Christopher J; Adler, Ronald S

    2017-06-01

    To describe a 4-year clinical experience with ultrasound-guided therapeutic perineural injections of peripheral nerves about the foot and ankle. Retrospective analysis of foot and ankle perineural injections performed between January 2012 and August 2016. Demographics, clinical indications, presence of structural pathology, immediate and interval pain relief, as well as complications were recorded. Fifty-nine therapeutic injections were performed among 46 patients, accounting for multiple injections in a single visit or multiple visits [mean age = 43 years (range 18-75), 31 female (67%) and 15 male (33%)]. Most commonly, perineural injections involved the hallux branch of the medial plantar nerve (n = 17, 22%). Least commonly, perineural injections involved the saphenous nerve (n = 3, 4%). Other injections in our series include sural (10), superficial (11) and deep (7) peroneal, medial (5) and lateral (3) plantar nerves, and the posterior tibial nerve (3). Ultrasound evaluation revealed structural abnormality associated with the nerve in 30 cases (51%)-most commonly thickening with perineural scarring (n = 14). Of 45 injections with complete documentation, immediate relief of symptoms was reported in 43 (96%) cases. Interval symptom relief was achieved in 23 injections [short term (n = 12), intermediate (n = 6), and long term (n = 5)] out of 38 for which follow-up was available (61%). Complications are rare, occurring in only one case. Ultrasound-guided perineural injections about the foot and ankle are safe and provide lasting symptomatic relief for many indications. Concomitant sonographic evaluation identifies structural abnormalities that may contribute to neuropathic symptoms, allowing targeting of injection or clinical therapy.

  6. Therapeutic response assessment of high intensity focused ultrasound therapy for uterine fibroid: Utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Xiaodong; Ren Xiaolong; Zhang Jun; He Guangbin; Zheng Minjuan; Tian Xue; Li Li; Zhu Ting; Zhang Min; Wang Lei; Luo Wen

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the utility of contrast-enhanced ultrasonography (ceUS) in the assessment of the therapeutic response to high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation in patients with uterine fibroid. Materials and methods: Sixty-four patients with a total of 64 uterine fibroids (mean: 5.3 ± 1.2 cm; range: 3.2-8.9 cm) treated with HIFU ablation under the ultrasound guidance were evaluated with ceUS after receiving an intravenous bolus injection of a microbubble contrast agent (SonoVue) within 1 week after intervention. We obtained serial ceUS images during the time period from beginning to 5 min after the initiation of the bolus contrast injection. All of the patients underwent a contrast enhanced MRI (ceMRI) and ultrasound guided needle puncture biopsy within 1 week after HIFU ablation. And as a follow-up, all of the patients underwent US at 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after HIFU treatment. The volume change was observed and compared to pre- and post-HIFU ablation. The results of the ceUS were compared with those of the ceMRI in terms of the presence or absence of residual unablated tumor and pathologic change in the treated lesions. Results: On ceUS, diagnostic accuracy was 100%, while residual unablated tumors were found in three uterine fibroids (4.7%) and failed treatment was found in eight uterine fibroids (12.5%). All the 11 fibroids were subjected to additional HIFU ablation. Of the 58 ablated fibroids without residual tumors on both the ceUS and ceMRI after the HIFU ablation, the volumes of all the fibroids decreased in different degrees during the 1 year follow-up USs. And histologic examinations confirmed findings of necrotic and viable tumor tissue, respectively. Conclusion: CEUS is potentially useful for evaluating the early therapeutic effect of percutaneous HIFU ablation for uterine fibroids

  7. Detecting changes in ultrasound backscattered statistics by using Nakagami parameters: Comparisons of moment-based and maximum likelihood estimators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jen-Jen; Cheng, Jung-Yu; Huang, Li-Fei; Lin, Ying-Hsiu; Wan, Yung-Liang; Tsui, Po-Hsiang

    2017-05-01

    The Nakagami distribution is an approximation useful to the statistics of ultrasound backscattered signals for tissue characterization. Various estimators may affect the Nakagami parameter in the detection of changes in backscattered statistics. In particular, the moment-based estimator (MBE) and maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) are two primary methods used to estimate the Nakagami parameters of ultrasound signals. This study explored the effects of the MBE and different MLE approximations on Nakagami parameter estimations. Ultrasound backscattered signals of different scatterer number densities were generated using a simulation model, and phantom experiments and measurements of human liver tissues were also conducted to acquire real backscattered echoes. Envelope signals were employed to estimate the Nakagami parameters by using the MBE, first- and second-order approximations of MLE (MLE 1 and MLE 2 , respectively), and Greenwood approximation (MLE gw ) for comparisons. The simulation results demonstrated that, compared with the MBE and MLE 1 , the MLE 2 and MLE gw enabled more stable parameter estimations with small sample sizes. Notably, the required data length of the envelope signal was 3.6 times the pulse length. The phantom and tissue measurement results also showed that the Nakagami parameters estimated using the MLE 2 and MLE gw could simultaneously differentiate various scatterer concentrations with lower standard deviations and reliably reflect physical meanings associated with the backscattered statistics. Therefore, the MLE 2 and MLE gw are suggested as estimators for the development of Nakagami-based methodologies for ultrasound tissue characterization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Reproducibility of phantom-based quality assurance parameters in real-time ultrasound imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipilä, Outi; Blomqvist, Päivi; Jauhiainen, Mervi; Kilpeläinen, Tiina; Malaska, Paula; Mannila, Vilma; Vinnurva-Jussila, Tuula; Virsula, Sari

    2011-07-01

    In a large radiological center, the ultrasound (US) quality assurance (QA) program involves several professionals. Although the operator and the parameters utilized can contribute to the results, the selected QA parameters should still reflect the quality of the US scanner, not the measuring process. To evaluate the reproducibility of recommended phantom-based US QA parameters in a realistic environment. Six sonographers measured six high-end US scanners with 20 transducers using a general purpose phantom. Every transducer was measured altogether seven times, using one frequency per transducer. The QA parameters studied were homogeneity, visualization depth, vertical and horizontal distance measurements, axial and lateral resolution, and the correct visibility of anechoic and high-contrast masses. The evaluation of the homogeneity was based on visual observations. Inter-observer interquartile ranges were computed for the grading of the masses. For the other QA parameters, the mean inter- and intra-observer coefficients of variation (CoV) were calculated. In addition, the symmetry of the reverberations when imaging air with a clean transducer was checked. The mean inter-observer CoVs were: visualization depth 11 ± 4%, vertical distance 1.7 ± 0.4%, horizontal distance 1.4 ± 0.6%, axial resolution 22 ± 7%, and lateral resolution 16 ± 8%. The mean intra-observer values were about half of these values with similar standard deviations. The visual evaluation of the homogeneity and the symmetry of the reverberations produced false-positive findings in 5% of the cases, but were found useful in detecting a defective transducer. The grading of the masses had mean interquartile ranges of 20-30% of the grading scale. The inter-observer variability in measuring phantom-based QA parameters can be relatively high. This should be considered when implementing a phantom-based QA protocol and evaluating the results.

  9. The Role of Doppler Ultrasound in Assessing the Therapeutic Response in Advanced Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamal Eyvazi-Ziaei

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers in Iran, which neo-adjuvant chemotherapy used to treat in advanced types to reduce tumor burden. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ultrasound scales of patients with advanced disease, using two common treatment methods include TACs (Taxotere, Adriamycin, and Cyclophosphamide and AC (Adriamycin, Cyclophosphamide. Material and Methods: Clinical examination and Doppler ultrasound were performed before and after treatment. Before and after the treatment, the size of the primary tumor and tumor vascularization, and the ultrasound Resistivity Index (RI, Pulsality Index (PI, Peak Systolic Velocity (PSV and the condition of the anterior lymph nodes, and the effect of two different therapies were investigated in response to treatment. The SPSS statistical software 17.0 was used to evaluate the relationship between the variables with 95% confidence interval, and P≤ 0.05. Results: The mean age of the patients was 48.90 (±10.58 SD years. From these, 8 were postmenopausal and 9 were menopausal, and in 3 cases the situation was unknown. There was significant difference between the PSV levels of the main breast mass, pre and post chemotherapy (P=0.004. Changes in other indexes of breast mass and axillary mass were not statistical significant. Conclusion: Color Doppler ultrasonography seems to be a promising alternative as an independent and complementary tool, to assess the response to treatment of breast masses to primary medical treatment in advanced breast cancers.

  10. Ultra-som terapêutico na cicatrização tecidual Therapeutic ultrasound in the tissue healing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Cristina Olsson

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Visando a minimizar o período de tratamento cicatricial em diversos tecidos, buscam-se alternativas à terapia convencional que colaborem com o processo reparativo criando um microambiente ideal para sua ocorrência. Dentre os inúmeros benefícios das técnicas aplicáveis à medicina regenerativa, o ultra-som terapêutico (UST é prática adjuvante cada vez mais freqüente. Os modelos experimentais de terapia sonora em animais têm propiciado informações relevantes para o tratamento de vários tipos de lesões; todavia, apesar de serem muito utilizados, ainda existem controvérsias em relação aos seus potenciaia biológicos de acordo com a modalidade e a dosimetria indicadas para cada caso. Os efeitos biofísicos do ultra-som (US sobre o reparo tecidual são pouco compreendidos, sendo seu uso muitas vezes negligenciado ou fundamentado na experiência prática, o que resulta em procedimentos errôneos. O objetivo desta revisão bibliográfica é apresentar informações sobre o UST, relatar a existência de riscos de danos celulares decorrentes da inadequada aplicação e revelar a importância de seus mecanismos de ação nos tecidos, tanto no sentido físico, como nos seus aspectos biológicos.Aiming to minimize the cicatricial treatment period, alternatives have been searched to conventional therapy, among which the therapeutic ultrasound is a practice more and more frequent. However, despite of being used in the treatment of various lesions types, there are still controversies related to its real therapeutical value and the indicated dosimetry for each case. The ultrasound effect on the tissue repair is little understood, and its use is seldom based on the practical experience, what sometimes results in wrong procedures. This review has the objective to show the therapeutic ultrasound information and to reveal the importance of its mechanisms in the tissues in the physical and biological aspects.

  11. Utilization of diagnostic ultrasound and intravenous lipid-encapsulated perfluorocarbons in non-invasive targeted cardiovascular therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Thomas R; Choudhury, Songita A; Xie, Feng

    2016-01-01

    Diagnostic ultrasound (DUS) pressures have the ability to induce inertial cavitation (IC) of systemically administered microbubbles; this bioeffect has many diagnostic and therapeutic implications in cardiovascular care. Diagnostically, commercially available lipid-encapsulated perfluorocarbons (LEP) can be utilized to improve endocardial and vascular border delineation as well as assess myocardial perfusion. Therapeutically, the liquid jets induced by IC can alter endothelial function and dissolve thrombi within the immediate vicinity of the cavitating microbubbles. The cavitating LEP can also result in the localized release of any bound therapeutic substance at the site of insonation. DUS-induced IC has been tested in pre-clinical studies to determine what effect it has on acute vascular and microvascular thrombosis as well as nitric oxide (NO) release. These pre-clinical studies have consistently shown that DUS-induced IC of LEP is effective in restoring coronary vascular and microvascular flow in acute ST segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), with microvascular flow improving even if upstream large vessel flow has not been achieved. The initial clinical trials examining the efficacy of short pulse duration DUS high mechanical index impulses in patients with STEMI are underway, and preliminary studies have suggested that earlier epicardial vessel recanalization can be achieved prior to arriving in the cardiac catheterization laboratory. DUS high mechanical index impulses have also been effective in pre-clinical studies for targeting DNA delivery that has restored islet cell function in type I diabetes and restored vascular flow in the extremities downstream from a peripheral vascular occlusion. Improvements in this technique will come from three dimensional arrays for therapeutic applications, more automated delivery techniques that can be applied in the field, and use of submicron-sized acoustically activated LEP droplets that may better permeate the

  12. Renal Sympathetic Denervation System via Intraluminal Ultrasonic Ablation: Therapeutic Intravascular Ultrasound Design and Preclinical Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chernin, Gil; Szwarcfiter, Iris; Bausback, Yvonne; Jonas, Michael

    2017-05-01

    To assess the safety and performance of a nonfocused and nonballooned ultrasonic (US) catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) system in normotensive swine. RDN with the therapeutic intravascular US catheter was evaluated in 3 experiments: (i) therapeutic intravascular US RDN vs a control group of untreated animals with follow-up of 30, 45, and 90 days (n = 6; n = 12 renal arteries for each group); (ii) therapeutic intravascular US RDN vs radiofrequency (RF) RDN in the contralateral artery in the same animal (n = 2; n = 4 renal arteries); and (iii) therapeutic intravascular US RDN in a recently stent-implanted renal artery (n = 2; n = 4 renal arteries). In the first experiment, therapeutic intravascular US RDN was safe, without angiographic evidence of dissection or renal artery stenosis. Neuronal tissue vacuolization, nuclei pyknosis, and perineuronal inflammation were evident after RDN, without renal artery wall damage. Norepinephrine levels were significantly lower after therapeutic intravascular US RDN after 30, 45, and 90 days compared with the control group (200.17 pg/mg ± 63.35, 184.75 pg/mg ± 44.51, and 203.43 pg/mg ± 58.54, respectively, vs 342.42 pg/mg ± 79.97). In the second experiment, deeper neuronal ablation penetrance was found with therapeutic intravascular US RDN vs RF RDN (maximal penetrance from endothelium of 7.0 mm vs 3.5 mm, respectively). There was less damage to the artery wall after therapeutic intravascular US RDN than with RF RDN, after which edema and injured endothelium were seen. In the third experiment, denervation inside the stent-implanted segments was feasible without damage to the renal artery wall or stent. The therapeutic intravascular US system performed safely and reduced norepinephrine levels. Deeper penetrance and better preservation of vessel wall were observed with therapeutic intravascular US RDN vs RF RDN. Neuronal ablations were observed in stent-implanted renal arteries. Copyright © 2017 SIR. Published

  13. Heating produced by therapeutic ultrasound in the presence of a metal plate in the femur of canine cadavers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.O. Andrades

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to assess the heat generated by a therapeutic ultrasound (TUS in a metal bone plate and adjacent structures after fixation to the femur of canine cadavers. Ten pairs of hind limbs were used, and they were equally distributed between groups that were subjected to 1- and 3-MHz frequencies, with each frequency testing 1- and 2-W/cm² intensities. The right hind limb was defined as the control group (absence of the metal plate, and the left hind limb was the test group (presence of the metal plate. Therefore, the control groups (CG were denominated CGI, using TUS with 1-MHz frequency and 1-W/cm² intensity; CGII, using 1-MHz frequency and 2-W/cm² intensity; CGIII, using 3-MHz frequency and 1-W/cm² intensity; and CGIV, using 3-MHz frequency and 2-W/cm² intensity. For each control group, its respective test group (TG was denominated TGI, TGII, TGIII and TGIV. The TUS was applied to the lateral aspect of the thigh using the continuous mode and a 3.5-cm² transducer in a 6.25-cm² area for 2 minutes. Sensors were coupled to digital thermometers that measured the temperature in different sites before (t0 and after (t1 of the TUS application. The temperatures in t1 were higher in all tested groups. The intramuscular temperature was significantly higher (P<0.05 in the groups used to test the 3-MHz frequency in the presence of the metal plate. The therapeutic ultrasound in the continuous mode using frequencies of 1 and 3 MHz and intensities of 1 and 2 W/cm2 for 2 minutes caused heating of the metal plate and adjacent structures after fixation to the femur of canine cadavers.

  14. Efeitos do ultrassom terapêutico em modelo experimental de ciatalgia Therapeutic ultrasound effects in a sciatica experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Policam Ciena

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A ciática possui grande prevalência geral e seu tratamento tende a resolver as causas de compressão nervosa. A fisioterapia objetiva reduzir os sintomas causados pela compressão. O presente estudo teve como objetivo avaliar a eficácia do ultrassom terapêutico sobre a dor, em animais submetidos a modelo experimental de ciatalgia. Foram usados 18 ratos neste estudo, divididos em três grupos: GS (n = 4, submetido a modelo de ciatalgia e tratados com ultrassom desligado; GUP (n = 7, submetido à ciatalgia e tratados com ultrassom pulsado 2W/cm² (SATP; 0,4 - SATA; e grupo GUC (n = 7, submetido à ciática e ultrassom contínuo (0,4W/cm². O nervo ciático do membro posterior direito foi exposto à compressão com fio categute em quatro pontos. No 3º dia pós-operatório (PO, iniciou-se tratamento indireto por quatro dias. No 9º dia PO, o tratamento direto começou sobre a área do procedimento cirúrgico, por cinco dias consecutivos. O tempo de elevação da pata, durante a marcha, foi avaliado antes e após a ciatalgia, no 3º, 6º, 9º e 13º PO. Os resultados demonstraram que a aplicação do ultrassom reduziu a dor com ambos os tratamentos efetivos e tendeu a ser mais eficaz na forma pulsada.The sciatica possesses great general population prevalence, and its treatment tends to solve the nervous compression causes. Physiotherapy aims to reduce the symptoms caused by compression. This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of therapeutic ultrasound on pain in animals subjected to sciatica experimental model. Eighteen rats were used and they were divided in 3 groups: group SG (n=4 submitted to the sciatica and treated with the ultrasound off, group PUG (n=7 submitted to the sciatica and treated with pulsed ultrasound 2 W/cm² (SATP; 0,4 - SATA and group CUG (n=7 submitted to the sciatica and treated with continuous ultrasound (0,4 W/cm². The sciatic nerve of the posterior right limb was exposed to the compression with Catgut wire in 4

  15. The influence of physical activity and fractures on ultrasound parameters in elderly people

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graafmans, W.C.; Bouter, L.M.; Lips, P.T.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    In this cross-sectional study we investigated the relationship between ultrasound measurements in the calcaneus versus daily physical activity and fractures sustained in the past in elderly subjects. Ultrasound measurements were performed at both heels, which enabled us to examine determinants of

  16. SU-E-J-04: Integration of Interstitial High Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound Applicators On a Clinical MRI-Guided High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Treatment Planning Software Platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellens, N [Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Partanen, A [Philips Healthcare, Andover, Massachusetts (United States); Ghoshal, G; Burdette, E [Acoustic MedSystems Inc., Savoy, IL (United States); Farahani, K [National Cancer Institute, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Interstitial high intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) applicators can be used to ablate tissue percutaneously, allowing for minimally-invasive treatment without ionizing radiation [1,2]. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility and usability of combining multielement interstitial HITU applicators with a clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided focused ultrasound software platform. Methods: The Sonalleve software platform (Philips Healthcare, Vantaa, Finland) combines anatomical MRI for target selection and multi-planar MRI thermometry to provide real-time temperature information. The MRI-compatible interstitial US applicators (Acoustic MedSystems, Savoy, IL, USA) had 1–4 cylindrical US elements, each 1 cm long with either 180° or 360° of active surface. Each applicator (4 Fr diameter, enclosed within a 13 Fr flexible catheter) was inserted into a tissue-mimicking agar-silica phantom. Degassed water was circulated around the transducers for cooling and coupling. Based on the location of the applicator, a virtual transducer overlay was added to the software to assist targeting and to allow automatic thermometry slice placement. The phantom was sonicated at 7 MHz for 5 minutes with 6–8 W of acoustic power for each element. MR thermometry data were collected during and after sonication. Results: Preliminary testing indicated that the applicator location could be identified in the planning images and the transducer locations predicted within 1 mm accuracy using the overlay. Ablation zones (thermal dose ≥ 240 CEM43) for 2 active, adjacent US elements ranged from 18 mm × 24 mm (width × length) to 25 mm × 25 mm for the 6 W and 8 W sonications, respectively. Conclusion: The combination of interstitial HITU applicators and this software platform holds promise for novel approaches in minimally-invasive MRI-guided therapy, especially when bony structures or air-filled cavities may preclude extracorporeal HIFU.[1] Diederich et al

  17. Fourier Transform Ultrasound Spectroscopy for the determination of wave propagation parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, Barnana

    2017-01-01

    The reported results for ultrasonic wave attenuation constant (α) in pure water show noticeable inconsistency in magnitude. A "Propagating-Wave" model analysis of the most popular pulse-echo technique indicates that this is a consequence of the inherent wave propagation characteristics in a bounded medium. In the present work Fourier Transform Ultrasound Spectroscopy (FTUS) is adopted to determine ultrasonic wave propagation parameters, the wave number (k) and attenuation constant (α) at 1MHz frequency in tri-distilled water at room temperature (25°C). Pulse-echo signals obtained under same experimental conditions regarding the exciting input signal and reflecting boundary wall of the water container for various lengths of water columns are captured. The Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) components of the echo signals are taken to compute k, α and r, the reflection constant at the boundary, using Oak Ridge and Oxford method. The results are compared with existing literature values. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Correcting Effect of Therapeutic Doses of Optical Radiation on Hematological Parameters of Blood Irradiated In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Laskina, O. V.

    2017-07-01

    We studied the effect of therapeutic doses of optical radiation on the hematological parameters of blood irradiated in vivo: hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, and the number of erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of patients during courses of extracorporeal, overvein, and intravenous blood irradiation and after treatment. The reversible changes during the procedures were found to differ from the changes obtained after treatment completion. At the end of the treatment course, the hematological parameters had changed in different directions and became higher, the same, or lower than the initial parameters depending on the initial parameters and photoinduced changes in blood oxygenation. A compensatory effect was found for photohemotherapy on oxygen-dependent processes altering the oxygen inflow into cells as well as the generation of active oxygen species and their inhibition by antioxidant systems.

  19. Therapeutic Ultrasound Examination of Follicular Reserve, and Ovarian Tissue Angiogenesis in Mice, 14 Days after Heterotopic Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N Abtahi

    2014-06-01

    Results: The study results showed that the CD31 angiogenic factor was expressed more in the irradiated animals than in control group animals and ultrasound-therapy resulted in better follicular preservation. Conclusion: The ultrasound therapy can improve preservation of ovarian follicle .This is probably due to acceleration of angiogenesis and increase in production of growth factors by low intensity pulse ultrasound.

  20. Nonsurgical treatment of hemifacial microsomia by therapeutic ultrasound and hybrid functional appliance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek El-Bialy

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Tarek El-Bialy1, Ali Hasan2, Ahmad Janadas3, Tarik Albaghdadi41Division of Orthodontics, Department of Dentistry, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada; 2Division of Orthodontics, Department of Preventive Dental Sciences, Faculty of Dentistry; 3Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Faculty of Dentistry; 4Division of Radiology, Faculty of Medicine, King Abdul Aziz University, Jeddah, Saudi ArabiaAim: Conventional treatment of patients with hemifacial microsomia involves orthognathic surgery and/or distraction osteogenesis of the mandible. Previous reports showed that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS enhances mandibular growth in growing rabbits and monkeys. In monkeys, LIPUS enhanced mandibular growth when combined with functional jaw orthopedic appliances. The purpose of this pilot study was to investigate if LIPUS could enhance mandibular growth in children with hemifacial microsomia.Methods: Five children (age range 3–11 years with hemifacial microsomia were treated with hybrid jaw orthopedic functional appliances and treatment of the affected mandibular condyle by LIPUS for 20 minutes per day.Results: The results showed that after one year of treatment, significant improvement of the underdeveloped side of patients’ faces and mandibles was recognized both clinically and radiographically.Discussion: Although improvement took a longer time than did a surgical approach, optimizing this technique may achieve better results in a shorter treatment time. A randomized controlled clinical trial to investigate the effect of optimized LIPUS application or functional appliances in the treatment of hemifacial microsomia is warranted.Keywords: hemifacial microsomia, LIPUS, non-surgical treatment, children

  1. Implication of ultrasound bladder parameters on treatment response in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia under medical management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Thekumpadam Puthenveetil

    2015-10-01

    Conclusion: Ultrasound bladder parameters are useful tools for measuring the treatment response in BPH patients. Our study shows that RI and DWT significantly correlate with the treatment response in BPH patients. More importantly, pretreatment values of increased IPP and PUA determines the non-improvement of symptoms in BPH patients. Our study suggests the importance of transabdominal ultrasonography (KUB–P with Doppler for evaluating treatment responses to medical management.

  2. Higher body mass, older age and higher monounsaturated fatty acids intake reflect better quantitative ultrasound parameters in Inuit preschoolers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessy El Hayek

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Investigate the effects of selected factors associated with quantitative ultrasound parameters among Inuit preschoolers living in Arctic communities (56° 32′–72° 40′N. Materials and methods. Children were selected randomly in summer and early fall (n=296. Dietary intake was assessed through the administration of a 24-h dietary recall (24-h recall and a food frequency questionnaire (FFQ. Anthropometry was measured using standardized procedures. Plasma 25-hydroxy vitamin D (25(OHD and parathyroid hormone (PTH were measured using a chemiluminescent assay (Liaison, Diasorin. Quantitative ultrasound parameters were measured using Sahara Sonometer, (Hologic Inc.. Results. Children divided by speed of sound (SoS and broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA quartiles were not different for age (years, sex (M/F, calcium (mg/d and vitamin D intake (µg/d and plasma 25(OHD concentration (nmol/L. However, children in the highest BUA and SoS quartile had higher body mass index (BMI compared to those in quartile 1. Using multivariate linear regression, higher BMI, older age and monounsaturated fatty acids (MUFA intake were predictors of BUA while only BMI was a predictor of SoS. Conclusions. Further investigation assessing intakes of traditional foods (TF and nutrients affecting bone parameters along with assessment of vitamin D status of Inuit children across seasons is required.

  3. Correlation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound parameters with oncogene expression and cell proliferation activity in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ce Zhang

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To study the correlation of contrast-enhanced ultrasound parameters with oncogene expression and cell proliferation activity in breast cancer. Methods: Breast cancer lesions and benign breast lesions surgically removed in Zigong Third People's Hospital between May 2014 and February 2017 were selected, contrast-enhanced ultrasound was done before operation to draw the time-intensity curve and calculate the area under the curve (AUC), and the expression of proliferation molecules and tumor suppressor genes were detected after operation. Results:The contrast-enhanced ultrasound parameter AUC of the breast cancer lesion was greatly higher than that of the benign breast lesion; ECT2, ZKSCAN3, USP39 and EphA2 mRNA expression in breast cancer lesions were obviously higher than those in benign breast lesions whereas HPK1, TCEAL17, CCN5, ATG2B and ATG4D mRNA expression were greatly lower than those in benign breast lesions; ECT2, ZKSCAN3, USP39 and EphA2 mRNA expression in breast cancer lesions with high AUC were greatly higher than those in breast cancer lesions with low AUC whereas HPK1, TCEAL17, CCN5, ATG2B and ATG4D mRNA expression were greatly lower than those in breast cancer lesions with low AUC. Conclusion: The contrast-enhanced ultrasound parameter AUC of breast cancer lesion significantly increases and is closely related to the higher expression of pro-proliferation molecules and the lower expression of tumor suppressor genes.

  4. Differential diagnosis between benign and malignant soft tissue tumors utilizing ultrasound parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morii, Takeshi; Kishino, Tomonori; Shimamori, Naoko; Motohashi, Mitsue; Ohnishi, Hiroaki; Honya, Keita; Aoyagi, Takayuki; Tajima, Takashi; Ichimura, Shoichi

    2018-01-01

    Preoperative discrimination between benign and malignant soft tissue tumors is critical for the prevention of excess application of magnetic resonance imaging and biopsy as well as unplanned resection. Although ultrasound, including power Doppler imaging, is an easy, noninvasive, and cost-effective modality for screening soft tissue tumors, few studies have investigated reliable discrimination between benign and malignant soft tissue tumors. To establish a modality for discrimination between benign and malignant soft tissue tumors using ultrasound, we extracted the significant risk factors for malignancy based on ultrasound information from 40 malignant and 56 benign pathologically diagnosed soft tissue tumors and established a scoring system based on these risk factors. The maximum size, tumor margin, and vascularity evaluated using ultrasound were extracted as significant risk factors. Using the odds ratio from a multivariate regression model, a scoring system was established. Receiver operating characteristic analyses revealed a high area under the curve value (0.85), confirming the accuracy of the scoring system. Ultrasound is a useful modality for establishing the differential diagnosis between benign and malignant soft tissue tumors.

  5. Ultrasound assisted synthesis of stable oil in milk emulsion: Study of operating parameters and scale-up aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patil, Leena; Gogate, Parag R

    2018-01-01

    In the present work, application of ultrasound and stirring individually or in combination for improved emulsification of turmeric oil in skimmed milk has been investigated. The effect of different operating parameters/strategies such as addition of surfactant, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), at different concentrations, quantity of oil phase, applied power, sonication time and duty cycle on the droplet size have been investigated. The stability of emulsion was analyzed in terms of the fraction of the emulsion that remains stable for a period of 28days. Optimized set of major emulsification process variables has been used at higher emulsion volumes. The effectiveness of treatment approach was analyzed based on oil droplet size, energy density and the time required for the formation of stable emulsion. It was observed that the stable emulsion at 50mL capacity with mean droplet diameter of about 235.4nm was obtained with the surfactant concentration of 5mg/mL, 11% of rated power (power density: 0.31W/mL) and irradiation time of 5min. The emulsion stability was higher in the case of ultrasound assisted approach as compared to the stirring. For the preparation of stable emulsion at 300mL capacity, it was observed that the sequential approach, i.e., stirring followed by ultrasound, gave lower mean droplet diameter (232.6nm) than the simultaneous approach, i.e., ultrasound and stirring together (257.9nm). However, the study also revealed that the simultaneous approach required very less time (15min) to synthesize stable emulsion as compared to the sequential approach (30min stirring and 60min ultrasound). It was successfully demonstrated that the ultrasound-assisted emulsification in the presence of SDS could be used for the preparation of stable turmeric oil-dairy emulsions, also providing insights into the role of SDS in increasing the stability of emulsions and of ultrasound in giving lower droplet sizes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Ultrasound pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pregnancy sonogram; Obstetric ultrasonography; Obstetric sonogram; Ultrasound - pregnancy; IUGR - ultrasound; Intrauterine growth - ultrasound; Polyhydramnios - ultrasound; Oligohydramnios - ultrasound; ...

  7. Therapeutic ultrasound as a potential male contraceptive: power, frequency and temperature required to deplete rat testes of meiotic cells and epididymides of sperm determined using a commercially available system

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuruta James K; Dayton Paul A; Gallippi Caterina M; O'Rand Michael G; Streicker Michael A; Gessner Ryan C; Gregory Thomas S; Silva Erick JR; Hamil Katherine G; Moser Glenda J; Sokal David C

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Studies published in the 1970s by Mostafa S. Fahim and colleagues showed that a short treatment with ultrasound caused the depletion of germ cells and infertility. The goal of the current study was to determine if a commercially available therapeutic ultrasound generator and transducer could be used as the basis for a male contraceptive. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and their testes were treated with 1 MHz or 3 MHz ultrasound while varying power, duration ...

  8. Sex hormones and quantitative ultrasound parameters at the heel in men and women from the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pätzug, Konrad; Friedrich, Nele; Kische, Hanna; Hannemann, Anke; Völzke, Henry; Nauck, Matthias; Keevil, Brian G; Haring, Robin

    2017-12-01

    The present study investigates potential associations between liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) measured sex hormones, dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) and bone ultrasound parameters at the heel in men and women from the general population. Data from 502 women and 425 men from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND) were used. Cross-sectional associations of sex hormones including testosterone (TT), calculated free testosterone (FT), dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate (DHEAS), androstenedione (ASD), estrone (E1) and SHBG with quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters at the heel, including broadband ultrasound attenuation (BUA), speed of sound (SOS) and stiffness index (SI) were examined by analysis of variance (ANOVA) and multivariable quantile regression models. Multivariable regression analysis showed a sex-specific inverse association of DHEAS with SI in men (Beta per SI unit = - 3.08, standard error (SE) = 0.88), but not in women (Beta = - 0.01, SE = 2.09). Furthermore, FT was positively associated with BUA in men (Beta per BUA unit = 29.0, SE = 10.1). None of the other sex hormones (ASD, E1) or SHBG was associated with QUS parameters after multivariable adjustment. This cross-sectional population-based study revealed independent associations of DHEAS and FT with QUS parameters in men, suggesting a potential influence on male bone metabolism. The predictive role of DHEAS and FT as a marker for osteoporosis in men warrants further investigation in clinical trials and large-scale observational studies.

  9. [Does transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation or therapeutic ultrasound increase the effectiveness of exercise for knee osteoarthritis: a randomized controlled study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyigör, Sibel; Karapolat, Hale; Ibisoğlu, Uğur; Durmaz, Berrin

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine if transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) or therapeutic ultrasound (US) increase the effectiveness of exercise on pain, function, muscle strength and quality of life for knee osteoarthritis (OA). Forty-five patients with primary knee OA diagnosis according to American College Rheumatology criteria were sequentially divided into 3 random groups. The patients in group 1 received TENS (with superficial heat and exercise), group 2 received US (with superficial heat and exercise), and group 3 acted as controls (superficial heat and exercise). Outcome measures were included as visual analog scale (VAS), a 20-meter walking test, Lequesne index, WOMAC scores, isokinetic muscle testing, and the Short Form 36 (SF 36). All treatment groups, physical modalities were carried out for a total fifteen sessions. All of the patients were subjected to six weeks of exercise program. All of the treatment groups had significant improvement on activity VAS, 20 meter walking test, Lequesne index, WOMAC scores, and most of the sub-scores of SF36 when compared with their initial status (p0.05). All of the treatment groups were effective on pain, function, muscle strength and quality of life in patients with knee OA. Statistically significant differences could not be found between the treatment groups. The exercise program, as it is cheaper, more easily performed and efficient, may be preferable for the treatment of knee OA. It is difficult to say, TENS or US could increase the effectiveness of isokinetic exercise for pain, function, muscle strength and quality of life of knee OA in this study.

  10. Intensification of extraction of curcumin from Curcuma amada using ultrasound assisted approach: Effect of different operating parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirsath, S R; Sable, S S; Gaikwad, S G; Sonawane, S H; Saini, D R; Gogate, P R

    2017-09-01

    Curcumin, a dietary phytochemical, has been extracted from rhizomes of Curcuma amada using ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) and the results compared with the conventional extraction approach to establish the process intensification benefits. The effect of operating parameters such as type of solvent, extraction time, extraction temperature, solid to solvent ratio, particle size and ultrasonic power on the extraction yield have been investigated in details for the approach UAE. The maximum extraction yield as 72% was obtained in 1h under optimized conditions of 35°C temperature, solid to solvent ratio of 1:25, particle size of 0.09mm, ultrasonic power of 250W and ultrasound frequency of 22kHz with ethanol as the solvent. The obtained yield was significantly higher as compared to the batch extraction where only about 62% yield was achieved in 8h of treatment. Peleg's model was used to describe the kinetics of UAE and the model showed a good agreement with the experimental results. Overall, ultrasound has been established to be a green process for extraction of curcumin with benefits of reduction in time as compared to batch extraction and the operating temperature as compared to Soxhlet extraction. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Correlation between the umbilical artery flow ultrasound parameters of intrauterine fetal distress and fetal ischemic hypoxic damage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hai-Ying Gu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To study the correlation between the umbilical artery flow ultrasound parameters of intrauterine fetal distress and fetal ischemic hypoxic damage. Methods: A total of 158 puerperae who gave birth in our hospital between July 2016 and June 2017 were selected and divided into the intrauterine distress group (Apgar<7 points and normal pregnancy group (Apgar≥7 points according to the neonatal Apgar score, the umbilical artery flow ultrasound parameters at 24-30 weeks, 31-36 weeks and 37-41 weeks of gestation were determined, and the umbilical arterial blood gas parameters and oxidative stress molecule levels were determined. Results: At 24-30 weeks, 31-36 weeks and 37-41 weeks of gestation, umbilical arterial RI, PI and S/D of intrauterine distress group were significantly higher than those of normal pregnancy group; umbilical arterial pH and PaO2 of intrauterine distress group were significantly lower than those of normal pregnancy group and negatively correlated with RI, PI and S/D while PaCO2 and lactic acid levels were significantly higher than those of normal pregnancy group and positively correlated with RI, PI and S/D; SOD, GSH-px and CAT levels in umbilical artery of intrauterine distress group were significantly lower than those of normal pregnancy group and negatively correlated with RI, PI and S/D while MDA and 8-OHdG levels were significantly higher than those of normal pregnancy group and positively correlated with RI, PI and S/D. Conclusion: Umbilical artery flow ultrasound characteristics of intrauterine fetal distress are characterized by the increased resistance and decreased blood flow and are correlated with the degree of fetal hypoxia and oxidative stress.

  12. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP3-04: Evaluation of Changes in Quantitative Ultrasound Parameters During Prostate Radiotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Najafi, M; El Kaffas, A; Han, B [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Cooper, D [Elekta Inc., Montreal, QC (Canada); Hancock, S; Hristov, D

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Clarity Autoscan ultrasound monitoring system allows acquisition of raw radiofrequency (RF) ultrasound data prior and during radiotherapy. This enables the computation of 3D Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) tissue parametric maps from. We aim to evaluate whether QUS parameters undergo changes with radiotherapy and thus potentially be used as early predictors and/or markers of treatment response in prostate cancer patients. Methods: In-vivo evaluation was performed under IRB protocol to allow data collection in prostate patients treated with VMAT whereby prostate was imaged through the acoustic window of the perineum. QUS spectroscopy analysis was carried out by computing a tissue power spectrum normalized to the power spectrum obtained from a quartz to remove system transfer function effects. A ROI was selected within the 3D image volume of the prostate. Because longitudinal registration was optimal, the same features could be used to select ROIs at roughly the same location in images acquired on different days. Parametric maps were generated within the rectangular ROIs with window sizes that were approximately 8 times the wavelength of the ultrasound. The mid-band fit (MBF), spectral slope (SS) and spectral intercept (SI) QUS parameters were computed for each window within the ROI and displayed as parametric maps. Quantitative parameters were obtained by averaging each of the spectral parameters over the whole ROI. Results: Data was acquired for over 21 treatment fractions. Preliminary results show changes in the parametric maps. MBF values decreased from −33.9 dB to −38.7 dB from pre-treatment to the last day of treatment. The spectral slope increased from −1.1 a.u. to −0.5 a.u., and spectral intercept decreased from −28.2 dB to −36.3 dB over the 21 treatment regimen. Conclusion: QUS parametric maps change over the course of treatment which warrants further investigation in their potential use for treatment planning and predicting treatment

  13. TU-H-CAMPUS-IeP3-04: Evaluation of Changes in Quantitative Ultrasound Parameters During Prostate Radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Najafi, M; El Kaffas, A; Han, B; Cooper, D; Hancock, S; Hristov, D

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Clarity Autoscan ultrasound monitoring system allows acquisition of raw radiofrequency (RF) ultrasound data prior and during radiotherapy. This enables the computation of 3D Quantitative Ultrasound (QUS) tissue parametric maps from. We aim to evaluate whether QUS parameters undergo changes with radiotherapy and thus potentially be used as early predictors and/or markers of treatment response in prostate cancer patients. Methods: In-vivo evaluation was performed under IRB protocol to allow data collection in prostate patients treated with VMAT whereby prostate was imaged through the acoustic window of the perineum. QUS spectroscopy analysis was carried out by computing a tissue power spectrum normalized to the power spectrum obtained from a quartz to remove system transfer function effects. A ROI was selected within the 3D image volume of the prostate. Because longitudinal registration was optimal, the same features could be used to select ROIs at roughly the same location in images acquired on different days. Parametric maps were generated within the rectangular ROIs with window sizes that were approximately 8 times the wavelength of the ultrasound. The mid-band fit (MBF), spectral slope (SS) and spectral intercept (SI) QUS parameters were computed for each window within the ROI and displayed as parametric maps. Quantitative parameters were obtained by averaging each of the spectral parameters over the whole ROI. Results: Data was acquired for over 21 treatment fractions. Preliminary results show changes in the parametric maps. MBF values decreased from −33.9 dB to −38.7 dB from pre-treatment to the last day of treatment. The spectral slope increased from −1.1 a.u. to −0.5 a.u., and spectral intercept decreased from −28.2 dB to −36.3 dB over the 21 treatment regimen. Conclusion: QUS parametric maps change over the course of treatment which warrants further investigation in their potential use for treatment planning and predicting treatment

  14. Pulsed ultrasound associated with gold nanoparticle gel reduces oxidative stress parameters and expression of pro-inflammatory molecules in an animal model of muscle injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Eduardo G

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nanogold has been investigated in a wide variety of biomedical applications because of the anti-inflammatory properties. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of TPU (Therapeutic Pulsed Ultrasound with gold nanoparticles (GNP on oxidative stress parameters and the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules after traumatic muscle injury. Materials and methods Animals were divided in nine groups: sham (uninjured muscle; muscle injury without treatment; muscle injury + DMSO; muscle injury + GNP; muscle injury + DMSO + GNP; muscle injury + TPU; muscle injury + TPU + DMSO; muscle injury + TPU + GNP; muscle injury + TPU + DMSO + GNP. The ROS production was determined by concentration of superoxide anion, modulation of antioxidant defenses was determined by the activity of superoxide dismutase, catalase and glutathione peroxidase enzymes, oxidative damage determined by formation of thiobarbituric acid-reactive substance and protein carbonyls. The levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α were measured as inflammatory parameters. Results Compared to muscle injury without treatment group, the muscle injury + TPU + DMSO + GNP gel group promoted a significant decrease in superoxide anion production and lipid peroxidation levels (p Conclusions Our results suggest that TPU + DMSO + GNP gel presents beneficial effects on the muscular healing process, inducing a reduction in the production of ROS and also the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules.

  15. Transverse comparisons between ultrasound and radionuclide parameters in children with presumed antenatally detected pelvi-ureteric junction obstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duong, Hong Phuoc; Janssen, Francoise; Hall, Michelle; Ismaili, Khalid [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Department of Pediatric Nephrology, Hopital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola, Brussels (Belgium); Piepsz, Amy [Hopital Universitaire Saint-Pierre, Department of Radioisotopes, Ghent (Belgium); Khelif, Karim; Collier, Frank [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Department of Pediatric Urology, Hopital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola, Brussel (Belgium); Man, Kathia de [University Hospital Ghent, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Ghent (Belgium); Damry, Nash [Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB), Department of Pediatric Radiology, Hopital Universitaire des Enfants Reine Fabiola, Brussel (Belgium)

    2015-05-01

    The main criteria used for deciding on surgery in children with presumed antenatally detected pelviureteric junction obstruction (PPUJO) are the level of hydronephrosis (ultrasonography), the level of differential renal function (DRF) and the quality of renal drainage after a furosemide challenge (renography), the importance of each factor being far from generally agreed. Can we predict, on the basis of ultrasound parameters, the patient in whom radionuclide renography can be avoided? We retrospectively analysed the medical charts of 81 consecutive children with presumed unilateral PPUJO detected antenatally. Ultrasound and renographic studies performed at the same time were compared. Anteroposterior pelvic diameter (APD) and calyceal size were both divided into three levels of dilatation. Parenchymal thickness was considered either normal or significantly decreased. Acquisition of renograms under furosemide stimulation provided quantification of DRF, quality of renal drainage and cortical transit. The percentages of patients with low DRF and poor drainage were significantly higher among those with major hydronephrosis, severe calyceal dilatation or parenchymal thinning. Moreover, impaired cortical transit, which is a major risk factor for functional decline, was seen more frequently among those with very severe calyceal dilatation. However, none of the structural parameters obtained by ultrasound examination was able to predict whether the level of renal function or the quality of drainage was normal or abnormal. Alternatively, an APD <30 mm, a calyceal dilatation of <10 mm and a normal parenchymal thickness were associated with a low probability of decreased renal function or poor renal drainage. In the management strategy of patients with prenatally detected PPUJO, nuclear medicine examinations may be postponed in those with an APD <30 mm, a calyceal dilatation of <10 mm and a normal parenchymal thickness. On the contrary, precise estimation of DRF and renal

  16. Short-term sensory and cutaneous vascular responses to therapeutic ultrasound in the forearms of healthy volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaik, Shaguftha Sultana; MacDermid, Joy C; Birmingham, Trevor; Grewal, Ruby; Farooq, Baseer

    2014-01-01

    Therapeutic ultrasound (US) is used for a variety of clinical pathologies and is thought to accelerate tissue repair and help with pain reduction via its thermal and nonthermal effects. The evidence on physiological effects of US on both sensory and vascular functions in humans is incomplete. Hence, the purpose of this study was to determine the short-term impact of two doses of US (3 MHz, 1:4, 0.25 W/cm(2), 5 min; 1 MHz, continuous, 0.8 W/cm(2), 3 min), on sensory and vascular responses in the healthy forearms. Twenty healthy subjects were recruited (mean age, 29.6 ± 8.8 years) for the study. Superficial blood flow (SBF) in the distal forearms was determined using the tissue viability imaging system. Sensory perception thresholds (SPT) were determined from ring finger (C7, C8) to assess A-beta (at 2,000 Hz) and C fiber function (at 5 Hz), using a Neurometer CPT/C device. Subject's two hands were randomly allocated to group order (AB/BA). Scores were obtained before and immediately after the application of US and control. Differences in these were analyzed using repeated measures. Both 3 MHz pulsed US and 1 MHz continuous US showed small to moderate (effect size = 0.12 to 0.68), statistically significant reductions in SBF (3 MHz, mean change = 2.8 AU and 1 MHz, mean change = 3.9 AU, p 0.05). Age and gender also had no effect on all outcome measures (p > 0.05). This study demonstrated minor reductions in skin blood flow, skin temperatures, and C fiber perception thresholds immediately after 3 MHz, and 1 MHz US. The responses observed may have been due to a thermo-cooling effect of the gel or due to the direct effect of US on C fibers of median and ulnar nerves. US had a negligible effect on A-beta fibres. This would suggest that future studies looking at physiological effects of US should move towards investigating larger dosages and study the effects in patient populations.

  17. Combination of therapeutic ultrasound with antibiotics interfere with the growth of bacterial culture that colonizes skin ulcers: An in-vitro study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guirro, Elaine Caldeira de Oliveira; Angelis, Dejanira de Franceschi de; Sousa, Natanael Teixeira Alves de; Guirro, Rinaldo Roberto de Jesus

    2016-09-01

    Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli are among the major bacterial species that colonize skin ulcers. Therapeutic ultrasound (TUS) produces biophysical effects that are relevant to wound healing; however, its application over a contaminated injury is not evidence-based. The objective of this research was to analyze the effect of TUS on in vitro-isolated S. aureus and E. coli, including the combination of ultrasound and antibiotics, in order to assess their antibiotic action on bacterial susceptibility. For the experiments, the bacterial strains were suspended in saline, then diluted (10(4)CFU/mL) for irradiation (at 1 and 3MHz, 0.5 and 0.8W/cm(2) for 0 and 15min) and the combination treatment of ultrasonication and antibiotics was administered by adding nalidixic acid (S. aureus) and tetracycline (E. coli) at concentrations equivalent to 50% of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). The experiments were carried out in duplicate with six repetitions. The suspensions were inoculated on to Petri plates and incubated at 37°C and the colony forming units (CFUs) were counted after 24h. The results were subjected to the Shapiro-Wilk normality test, followed by parametric ANOVA and Tukey's post hoc test at a significance level of 1%. The results demonstrated that the action of TUS at 1MHz inhibited bacterial growth while at 3MHz, bacterial growth was observed in both species. However, the synergistic combination of ultrasound and antibiotics was able to inhibit the growth of both bacteria completely after 15min of ultrasonication. The results suggest that the action of ultrasound on S. aureus and E. coli are dependent on the oscillation frequency as well as the intensity and time of application. The combination of ultrasound with antibiotics was able to inhibit bacterial growth fully at all frequencies and doses in both species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of cryotherapy combined with therapeutic ultrasound on oxidative stress and tissue damage after musculoskeletal contusion in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, C N; Moraes, M B; Hauck, M; Guerreiro, L F; Rossato, D D; Varela, A S; da Rosa, C E; Signori, L U

    2016-12-01

    To investigate the combined effects of cryotherapy and pulsed ultrasound therapy (PUT) on oxidative stress parameters, tissue damage markers and systemic inflammation after musculoskeletal injury. Experimental animal study. Research laboratory. Seventy male Wistar rats were divided into five groups: control, lesion, cryotherapy, PUT, and cryotherapy+PUT. The gastrocnemius muscle was injured by mechanical crushing. Cryotherapy was applied immediately after injury (immersion in water at 10°C for 20minutes). PUT was commenced 24hours after injury (1MHz, 0.4W/cm 2SPTA , 20% duty cycle, 5minutes). All animals were treated every 8hours for 3 days. Oxidative stress in muscle was evaluated by concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS), lipid peroxidation (LPO), anti-oxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals (ACAP) and catalase. Plasma levels of creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were assessed. When applied individually, cryotherapy and PUT reduced CK, LDH, CRP and LPO caused by muscle damage. Cryotherapy+PUT in combination maintained the previous results, caused a reduction in ROS [P=0.005, mean difference -0.9×10 -8 relative area, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.2 to -1.9], and increased ACAP {P=0.007, mean difference 0.34 1/[relative area with/without 2,2-azobis(2-methylpropionamidine)dihydrochloride], 95% CI 0.07 to 0.61} and catalase (P=0.002, mean difference 0.41units/mg protein, 95% CI 0.09 to 0.73) compared with the lesion group. Cryotherapy+PUT in combination reduced oxidative stress in muscle, contributing to a reduction in adjacent damage and tissue repair. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. A validation of the first genome-wide association study of calcaneus ultrasound parameters in the European Male Ageing Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Thang S

    2011-01-01

    . Conclusions We found suggestive evidence of association between a single SNP located in the 3'UTR of WDR77 with calcaneal ultrasound parameters. The majority of SNPs, associated with QUS parameters in the Framingham Study, were not replicated in an independent population sample of European men.

  20. Ultrasound and microbubble-targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds : ICIN Report Project 49: Drug and gene delivery through ultrasound and microbubbles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Juffermans, L J M; Meijering, D B M; van Wamel, A; Henning, R H; Kooiman, K; Emmer, M; de Jong, N; van Gilst, W H; Musters, R; Paulus, W J; van Rossum, A C; Deelman, L E; Kamp, O

    The molecular understanding of diseases has been accelerated in recent years, producing many new potential therapeutic targets. A noninvasive delivery system that can target specific anatomical sites would be a great boost for many therapies, particularly those based on manipulation of gene

  1. Using controlled attenuation parameter combined with ultrasound to survey non-alcoholic fatty liver disease in hemodialysis patients: A prospective cohort study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Hao Yen

    Full Text Available Controlled attenuation parameter (CAP is a non-invasive method for measuring hepatic steatosis (HS. Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD is closely related to cardiovascular diseases (CVDs. CVDs are the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of NAFLD in hemodialysis patients.We prospectively enrolled patients undergoing chronic hemodialysis, as well as patients with normal renal function who served as controls. The control group patients were referred by an endocrinologist to be tested for NAFLD; most of these patients had diabetes, hypertension, or dyslipidemia. We excluded those with excess alcohol intake, use of drugs known to induce HS, chronic viral hepatitis, or CAP failure. CAP ≥ 238 dB/m was used as a cutoff suggesting HS. An increased liver kidney contrast, as defined by ultrasound, was used to make the diagnosis of HS.Three hundred and forty-three hemodialysis patients and 252 control group patients were enrolled. Among the hemodialysis patients, 192 (56.0% had CAP- or ultrasound-identified HS compared with 91 (26.5% who only had ultrasound-identified HS (P<0.001. Among the control group patients, 212 (84.1% had CAP- or ultrasound-identified HS compared with 180 (71.4% who only had ultrasound-identified HS (P<0.001.The prevalence of NAFLD in the hemodialysis patients was 56%. The number of diagnoses of NAFLD made by using CAP combined with ultrasound was more than 2 times the number made with ultrasound alone in the hemodialysis patients. Therefore, we suggest the use of CAP combined with ultrasound to screen for NAFLD in hemodialysis patients.

  2. Comparison of the effect of low-power laser with therapeutic ultrasound on the treatment of rotator cuff tendonitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    asghar Akbari

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Akbari A1 1. Assistant Professor, Department of Physiotherapy, Faculty of Medicine, Zahedan University of Medical Sciences Abstract Background: Shoulder pain is the third most prevalent cause of musculoskeletal disorder after low back and cervical pains. Most of the shoulder symptoms are attributed to the rotator cuff. The objective of this study was to compare the effects of low-power laser therapy with ultrasound therapy on the patients with rotator cuff tendonitis. Materials and methods: This clinical trial was performed in Zahedan university of medical sciences in 2006. Thirty patients with rotator cuff tendonitis were randomly assigned to either a low-power laser therapy group (15 patients or an ultrasound therapy group (15 patients. Strength (kg of shoulder abductor, and internal and external rotator muscles, as well as range (degree of shoulder abduction, and internal and external rotation were measured before and after intervention using hand-held dynamometer and goniometer respectively. The pain was evaluated using the visual analogue scale. In the laser group, a low-level Ga-As laser was applied with a 100 mw point probe (average power, wave length of 905 nm, pulse duration of 200 ns, 6 J/cm2 dosage, 5 KHz frequency, and lasting 3 minutes. The ultrasound treatment was applied with a power of 1 W/cm2, a frequency of 1 MHz, pulse mode of 1:4, and lasting 10 minutes on each occasion. The treatment was carried out 3 times weekly for 10 days. The data were analyzed using independent sample t-test and paired t-test. Results: The pain in the laser group was significantly decreased from 6.06±1.6 to 5±1.3 in abduction, from 5.3±1.5 to 4.7±1.3 in internal rotation, and from 5.06±1.4 to 4.3±1.44 in external rotation (p0.05. A significant improvement after treatment was observed in the laser group in measures of shoulder abductor, internal rotator and external rotator muscles strength compared to those of the ultrasound therapy group (p<0

  3. MRI-guided Therapeutic Ultrasound : In vitro Validation of a New MR Compatible, Phased Array, Contact Endorectal Ultrasound Transducer with Active Feedback Control of Temperature Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomir, Rares; Rata, Mihaela; Lafon, Cyril; Melodelima, David; Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Mathias, Adrien; Cotton, François; Bonmartin, Alain; Cathignol, Dominique

    2006-05-01

    Contact application of high intensity ultrasound was demonstrated to be suitable for thermal ablation of sectorial tumours of the digestive duct. Experimental validation of a new MR compatible ultrasonic device is described here, dedicated to the minimal invasive therapy of localized colorectal cancer. This is a cylindrical 1D 64-element phased array transducer of 14 mm diameter and 25 mm height (Imasonic, France) allowing electronic rotation of the acoustic beam. Operating frequency ranges from 3.5 to 4.0 MHz and up to 5 effective electrical watts per element are available. A plane wave is reconstructed by simultaneous excitation of eigth adjacent elements with an appropriate phase law. Driving electronics operates outside the Faraday cage of the scanner and provides fast switching capabilities. Excellent passive and active compatibility with the MRI data acquisition has been demonstrated. In addition, feasibility of active temperature control has been demonstrated based on real-time data export out of the MR scanner and a PID feedback algorithm. Further studies will address the in-vivo validation and the integration of a miniature NMR coil for increased SNR in the near field.

  4. Dynamic Behavior of Microbubbles during Long Ultrasound Tone-Burst Excitation: Mechanistic Insights into Ultrasound-Microbubble Mediated Therapeutics Using High-Speed Imaging and Cavitation Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xucai; Wang, Jianjun; Pacella, John J; Villanueva, Flordeliza S

    2016-02-01

    Ultrasound (US)-microbubble (MB)-mediated therapies have been found to restore perfusion and enhance drug/gene delivery. On the presumption that MBs do not persist during long US exposure under high acoustic pressures, most schemes use short US pulses when a high US pressure is employed. However, we recently observed an enhanced thrombolytic effect using long US pulses at high acoustic pressures. Therefore, we explored the fate of MBs during long tone-burst exposures (5 ms) at various acoustic pressures and MB concentrations via direct high-speed optical observation and passive cavitation detection. MBs first underwent stable or inertial cavitation depending on the acoustic pressure and then formed gas-filled clusters that continued to oscillate, break up and form new clusters. Cavitation detection confirmed continued, albeit diminishing, acoustic activity throughout the 5-ms US excitation. These data suggest that persisting cavitation activity during long tone bursts may confer additional therapeutic effects. Copyright © 2016 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Strain and order-parameter coupling in Ni-Mn-Ga Heusler alloys from resonant ultrasound spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar Mejía, C.; Born, N.-O.; Schiemer, J. A.; Felser, C.; Carpenter, M. A.; Nicklas, M.

    2018-03-01

    Resonant ultrasound spectroscopy and magnetic susceptibility experiments have been used to characterize strain coupling phenomena associated with structural and magnetic properties of the shape-memory Heusler alloy series Ni50 +xMn25 -xGa25 (x =0 , 2.5, 5.0, and 7.5). All samples exhibit a martensitic transformation at temperature TM and ferromagnetic ordering at temperature TC, while the pure end member (x =0 ) also has a premartensitic transition at TP M, giving four different scenarios: TC>TP M>TM,TC>TM without premartensitic transition, TC≈TM , and TCparameters relating to magnetic ordering, a soft mode, and the electronic instability responsible for the large strains typical of martensitic transitions. Linear-quadratic or biquadratic coupling between these order parameters, either directly or indirectly via the common strains, is then used to explain the stabilities of the different structures. Acoustic losses are attributed to critical slowing down at the premartensite transition, to the mobility of interphases between coexisting phases at the martensitic transition, and to mobility of some aspect of the twin walls under applied stress down to the lowest temperatures at which measurements were made.

  6. Correction for photobleaching in dynamic fluorescence microscopy: application in the assessment of pharmacokinetic parameters in ultrasound-mediated drug delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derieppe, M; Bos, C; De Greef, M; Moonen, C; Denis de Senneville, B

    2016-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated the feasibility of monitoring ultrasound-mediated uptake of a hydrophilic model drug in real time with dynamic confocal fluorescence microscopy. In this study, we evaluate and correct the impact of photobleaching to improve the accuracy of pharmacokinetic parameter estimates. To model photobleaching of the fluorescent model drug SYTOX Green, a photobleaching process was added to the current two-compartment model describing cell uptake. After collection of the uptake profile, a second acquisition was performed when SYTOX Green was equilibrated, to evaluate the photobleaching rate experimentally. Photobleaching rates up to 5.0 10 −3 s −1 were measured when applying power densities up to 0.2 W.cm −2 . By applying the three-compartment model, the model drug uptake rate of 6.0 10 −3 s −1 was measured independent of the applied laser power. The impact of photobleaching on uptake rate estimates measured by dynamic fluorescence microscopy was evaluated. Subsequent compensation improved the accuracy of pharmacokinetic parameter estimates in the cell population subjected to sonopermeabilization. (paper)

  7. Ultra-som terapêutico contínuo térmico em modelo experimental de ciatalgia Continuous thermic therapeutic ultrasound in sciatica experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Polican Ciena

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available O ultra-som é um recurso fisioterapêutico que pode atuar na redução dos sintomas da ciatalgia. O objetivo deste estudo foi verificar a eficácia do ultra-som terapêutico, no modo contínuo, em duas diferentes densidades de potência (0,5 W/cm² e 1 W/cm², na redução do quadro álgico em ratos submetidos a modelo experimental de ciatalgia. Foram utilizados 20 ratos, divididos em 3 grupos: G1 (n=6 submetido à ciatalgia e a tratamento placebo; G2 (n=7 submetido à ciatalgia e tratado com ultra-som com 0,5 W/cm²; e G3 (n=7 submetido à ciatalgia e tratado com ultra-som com 1 W/cm². A ciatalgia foi provocada por lesão cirúrgica de compressão do nervo no membro posterior direito de todos os animais. O tratamento na região do procedimento cirúrgico, iniciado no 3º dia pós-operatório, consistiu em 10 sessões diárias de 5 minutos. Verificou-se a dor pelo do tempo de elevação da pata (TEP durante a marcha, medido pré-cirurgia e em mais cinco momentos. Os resultados mostram aumentos no TEP em todos os grupos após a lesão; e, naqueles tratados com ultra-som terapêutico, houve diminuição significativa da TEP, restaurando-se os valores iniciais, sendo mais precoce e intensa em G2. Conclui-se que a entrega na forma continua do ultra-som terapêutico foi eficaz na redução da dor ciática.Therapeutic ultrasound is a physical therapy resource for relieving sciatic pain. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of continuous therapeutic ultrasound in two different power densities (0,5 W/cm² and 1 W/cm², on reducing pain in rats submitted to a sciatica experimental model. Twenty rats were used, divided into 3 groups: G1 (n=6 submitted to sciatica and placebo treatment; G2 (n=7 submitted to sciatica and treated with 0.5 W/cm² ultrasound; and G3 (n=7, submitted to sciatica and treated with 1 W/cm² ultrasound. Sciatica was provoked by surgical nerve compression on the right posterior limb of all animals. Treatment on the

  8. Therapeutic efficacy of the combination of doxorubicin-loaded liposomes with inertial cavitation generated by confocal ultrasound in AT2 Dunning rat tumour model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestas, Jean-Louis; Fowler, R Andrew; Evjen, Tove J; Somaglino, Lucie; Moussatov, Alexei; Ngo, Jacqueline; Chesnais, Sabrina; Røgnvaldsson, Sibylla; Fossheim, Sigrid L; Nilssen, Esben A; Lafon, Cyril

    2014-09-01

    The combination of liposomal doxorubicin (DXR) and confocal ultrasound (US) was investigated for the enhancement of drug delivery in a rat tumour model. The liposomes, based on the unsaturated phospholipid dierucoylphosphocholine, were designed to be stable during blood circulation in order to maximize accumulation in tumour tissue and to release drug content upon US stimulation. A confocal US setup was developed for delivering inertial cavitation to tumours in a well-controlled and reproducible manner. In vitro studies confirm drug release from liposomes as a function of inertial cavitation dose, while in vivo pharmacokinetic studies show long blood circulation times and peak tumour accumulation at 24-48 h post intravenous administration. Animals injected 6 mg kg(-1) liposomal DXR exposed to US treatment 48 h after administration show significant tumour growth delay compared to control groups. A liposomal DXR dose of 3 mg kg(-1), however, did not induce any significant therapeutic response. This study demonstrates that inertial cavitation can be generated in such a fashion as to disrupt drug carrying liposomes which have accumulated in the tumour, and thereby increase therapeutic effect with a minimum direct effect on the tissue. Such an approach is an important step towards a therapeutic application of cavitation-induced drug delivery and reduced chemotherapy toxicity.

  9. Ultrasound-induced cavitation enhances the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of an oncolytic virus in an in vitro model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Arvanitis, Costas D; Rifai, Bassel; Seymour, Leonard W; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-01-30

    We investigated whether ultrasound-induced cavitation at 0.5 MHz could improve the extravasation and distribution of a potent breast cancer-selective oncolytic adenovirus, AdEHE2F-Luc, to tumour regions that are remote from blood vessels. We developed a novel tumour-mimicking model consisting of a gel matrix containing human breast cancer cells traversed by a fluid channel simulating a tumour blood vessel, through which the virus and microbubbles could be made to flow. Ultrasonic pressures were chosen to maximize either broadband emissions, associated with inertial cavitation, or ultraharmonic emissions, associated with stable cavitation, while varying duty cycle to keep the total acoustic energy delivered constant for comparison across exposures. None of the exposure conditions tested affected cell viability in the absence of the adenovirus. When AdEHE2F-Luc was delivered via the vessel, inertial cavitation increased transgene expression in tumour cells by up to 200 times. This increase was not observed in the absence of Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor cell expression, discounting sonoporation as the mechanism of action. In the presence of inertial cavitation, AdEHE2F-Luc distribution was greatly improved in the matrix surrounding the vessel, particularly in the direction of the ultrasound beam; this enabled AdEHE2F-Luc to kill up to 80% of cancer cells within the ultrasound focal volume in the gel 24 hours after delivery, compared to 0% in the absence of cavitation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Variation of High-Intensity Therapeutic Ultrasound (HITU) Pressure Field Characterization: Effects of Hydrophone Choice, Nonlinearity, Spatial Averaging and Complex Deconvolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yunbo; Wear, Keith A; Harris, Gerald R

    2017-10-01

    Reliable acoustic characterization is fundamental for patient safety and clinical efficacy during high-intensity therapeutic ultrasound (HITU) treatment. Technical challenges, such as measurement variation and signal analysis, still exist for HITU exposimetry using ultrasound hydrophones. In this work, four hydrophones were compared for pressure measurement: a robust needle hydrophone, a small polyvinylidene fluoride capsule hydrophone and two fiberoptic hydrophones. The focal waveform and beam distribution of a single-element HITU transducer (1.05 MHz and 3.3 MHz) were evaluated. Complex deconvolution between the hydrophone voltage signal and frequency-dependent complex sensitivity was performed to obtain pressure waveforms. Compressional pressure (p + ), rarefactional pressure (p - ) and focal beam distribution were compared up to 10.6/-6.0 MPa (p + /p - ) (1.05 MHz) and 20.65/-7.20 MPa (3.3 MHz). The effects of spatial averaging, local non-linear distortion, complex deconvolution and hydrophone damage thresholds were investigated. This study showed a variation of no better than 10%-15% among hydrophones during HITU pressure characterization. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. A comparison of hepatic steatosis index, controlled attenuation parameter and ultrasound as noninvasive diagnostic tools for steatosis in chronic hepatitis B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Liang; Lu, Wei; Li, Ping; Shen, Feng; Mi, Yu-Qiang; Fan, Jian-Gao

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate the value of noninvasive tools for diagnosis of hepatic steatosis in patients with chronic hepatitis B (CHB). Consecutive treatment-naïve patients with CHB with body mass index less than 30kg/m 2 who underwent liver biopsy, ultrasound and FibroScan ® were enrolled. The diagnostic performance of controlled attenuation parameter (CAP), hepatic steatosis index (HSI) and ultrasound for hepatic steatosis compared with liver biopsy was assessed. The areas under receiver operating characteristics curves (AUROCs) were calculated to determine the diagnostic efficacy, with comparisons using the DeLong test. CAP and HSI accuracies were significantly higher than that of ultrasound to detect patients with biopsy-proven mild steatosis (S1, 65.3%, 56.5%, respectively, vs. 17.7%, χ 2 =46.305, 31.736, both Psteatosis (92.3%, 100%, respectively, vs. 53.8%, χ 2 =4.887, 7.800, P=0.037, 0.007, respectively). Both CAP and HSI had lower underestimation rates of steatosis grade than ultrasound (12%, 14.8%, respectively, vs. 29.5%, χ 2 =9.765, 6.452; Phepatic steatosis than HSI and ultrasound in patients with CHB, but further studies are needed to reduce the overestimation rates. Copyright © 2017 Editrice Gastroenterologica Italiana S.r.l. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. How good is controlled attenuation parameter and fatty liver index for assessing liver steatosis in general population: correlation with ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalhana, Sofia; Leitão, Jorge; Alves, Ana C; Bourbon, Mafalda; Cortez-Pinto, Helena

    2014-07-01

    Liver steatosis measurement by controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) is a non-invasive method for diagnosing steatosis, based on transient elastography. Its usefulness as screening procedure for hepatic steatosis in general population has not been previously evaluated. The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of CAP and fatty liver index (FLI) for detection and quantification of steatosis in general population. Recruitment was done from a prospective epidemiological study of the general adult population. Steatosis was evaluated using CAP, FLI and ultrasound (US). Steatosis scored according to Hamaguchi's US scoring, from 0 (S0) to 6 (S6) points. Hepatic steatosis defined by score ≥2 (S≥2) and moderate/severe steatosis by score ≥4 (S≥4). Performance of CAP and FLI for diagnosing steatosis compared with US was assessed using areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUROC). From 219 consecutive individuals studied, 13 (5.9%) excluded because of failure/unreliable liver stiffness measurements. Steatosis prevalence: S≥2 38.4% and S≥4 12.1%. CAP significantly correlated with steatosis (ρ = 0.73, P steatosis score (ρ = 0.76; P steatosis quantification in the general population. Larger studies are needed for validation. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Relationship between Controlled Attenuation Parameter and Hepatic Steatosis as Assessed by Ultrasound in Alcoholic or Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Jem Ma; Paik, Yong-Han; Min, Sin Yeong; Cho, Ju Yeon; Sohn, Won; Sinn, Dong Hyun; Gwak, Geum-Youn; Choi, Moon Seok; Lee, Joon Hyeok; Koh, Kwang Cheol; Paik, Seung Woon; Yoo, Byung Chul

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between controlled attenuation parameter (CAP) and hepatic steatosis, as assessed by ultrasound (US) in patients with alcoholic liver disease (ALD) or non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). Patients with either ALD or NAFLD who were diagnosed with fatty liver with US and whose CAP scores were measured, were retrospectively enrolled in this study. The degree of hepatic steatosis assessed by US was categorized into mild (S1), moderate (S2), and severe (S3). A total of 186 patients were included 106 with NAFLD and 80 with ALD. Regarding hepatic steatosis, the CAP score was significantly correlated with US (ρ=0.580, psteatosis were excellent (0.789 and 0.843, respectively). For sensitivity ≥ 90%, CAP cutoffs for the detection of ≥ S2 and ≥ S3 steastosis were separated with a gap of approximately 35 dB/m in all patients and in each of the NAFLD and ALD groups. The CAP score is well correlated with hepatic steatosis, as assessed by US, in both ALD and NAFLD.

  14. Ultrasound resistive index, power Doppler, and clinical parameters in established rheumatoid arthritis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisi, Melissa Cláudia; do Prado, Aline Defaveri; Piovesan, Deise Marcela; Bredemeier, Markus; da Silveira, Inês Guimarães; Mendonça, José Alexandre; Staub, Henrique Luiz

    2017-04-01

    Ultrasonography (US) is a useful tool for the evaluation of sinovial vascularization and proliferation in rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Accordingly, resistive index (RI) on spectral Doppler (sD) US provides a quantitative analysis of vascular inflammation, but its utility in the evaluation of RA activity has not been established. Our objective was to determine the association of RI with other US parameters of synovitis and with clinical disease activity in established RA. Patients with positive power Doppler (pD) were included in a prospective cross-sectional study. Disease activity and disability were evaluated using the Disease Activity Score in 28-joints (DAS28) and Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ), respectively. Gray scale (GS) synovitis, pD, and sD analyses were performed by one of two examiners in wrists and the second and third metacarpophalangeal and proximal interphalangeal joints. The 10-joint GS and 10-joint pD scores and mean RI were then calculated. Weighted kappa (WK) values were employed to assess interobserver reability, and correlations were tested using the Spearman coefficient. Ninety-five RA patients (median duration of disease of 7 years and mean DAS28 of 4.32 ± 1.66) were included. WK values in real-time US were 0.77 for synovitis, 0.87 for pD, and 0.68 for RI. There were no significant correlations of RI with 10-joint GS, 10-joint pD, DAS28, joint counts, or HAQ (P > 0.10 for all tests). Patients in remission had a mean RI similar to those with high disease activity (0.62 ± 0.10, n = 15 versus 0.63 ± 0.13, n = 34, respectively). The addition of the RI score did not seem to improve US performance in patients with established RA.

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - Abdomen Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and ...

  18. Estimation of Genetic Parameters for Real-time Ultrasound Measurements for Hanwoo Cows at Different Ages and Pregnancy Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. H. Lee

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to estimate genetic parameters of ultrasound measurements for longissimus dorsi muscle area (LMA, backfat thickness (BFT, and marbling score (MS in Hanwoo cows (N = 3,062 at the ages between 18 and 42 months. Data were collected from 100 Hanwoo breeding farms in Gyeongbuk province, Korea, in 2007 and 2008. The cows were classified into four different age groups, i.e. 18 to 22 months (the first pregnancy period, 23 to 27 (the first parturition, 28 to 32 (the second pregnancy, and 33 to 42 (the second parturition, respectively. For each age group, a multi-trait animal model was used to estimate variance components and heritabilities of the three traits. The averages of LMA, BFT, and MS measurements across the cows of all age groups were 50.1 cm2, 4.62 mm, and 3.04, respectively and heritability estimates were 0.09, 0.10, and 0.08 for the respective traits. However, when the data were analyzed in different age groups, heritability estimates of LMA and BFT were 0.24 and 0.47, respectively, for the cows of 18 to 22 months of age, and 0.21 for MS in the 28 to 32 months old cows. When the cows of all age groups were used, the estimates of genetic (phenotypic correlations were 0.43 (0.35, −0.06 (0.34 and 0.21 (0.32 between LMA and BFT, LMA and MS, and BFT and MS, respectively. However, in the cow age group between 28 and 32 (18 and 22 months, the estimates of genetic (phenotypic correlations were 0.05 (0.29, −0.15 (0.24 and 0.38 (0.24, for the respective pairs of traits. These results suggest that genetic, environmental, and phenotypic variations differ depending on cow age, such that care must be taken when ultrasound measurements are applied to selection of cows for meat quality.

  19. Design and implementation of therapeutic ultrasound generating circuit for dental tissue formation and tooth-root healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woon Tiong Ang; Scurtescu, C; Wing Hoy; El-Bialy, T; Ying Yin Tsui; Jie Chen

    2010-02-01

    Biological tissue healing has recently attracted a great deal of research interest in various medical fields. Trauma to teeth, deep and root caries, and orthodontic treatment can all lead to various degrees of root resorption. In our previous study, we showed that low-intensity pulsed ultrasound (LIPUS) enhances the growth of lower incisor apices and accelerates their rate of eruption in rabbits by inducing dental tissue growth. We also performed clinical studies and demonstrated that LIPUS facilitates the healing of orthodontically induced teeth-root resorption in humans. However, the available LIPUS devices are too large to be used comfortably inside the mouth. In this paper, the design and implementation of a low-power LIPUS generator is presented. The generator is the core of the final intraoral device for preventing tooth root loss and enhancing tooth root tissue healing. The generator consists of a power-supply subsystem, an ultrasonic transducer, an impedance-matching circuit, and an integrated circuit composed of a digital controller circuitry and the associated driver circuit. Most of our efforts focus on the design of the impedance-matching circuit and the integrated system-on-chip circuit. The chip was designed and fabricated using 0.8- ¿m high-voltage technology from Dalsa Semiconductor, Inc. The power supply subsystem and its impedance-matching network are implemented using discrete components. The LIPUS generator was tested and verified to function as designed and is capable of producing ultrasound power up to 100 mW in the vicinity of the transducer's resonance frequency at 1.5 MHz. The power efficiency of the circuitry, excluding the power supply subsystem, is estimated at 70%. The final products will be tailored to the exact size of teeth or biological tissue, which is needed to be used for stimulating dental tissue (dentine and cementum) healing.

  20. Therapeutic ultrasound as a potential male contraceptive: power, frequency and temperature required to deplete rat testes of meiotic cells and epididymides of sperm determined using a commercially available system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsuruta James K

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Studies published in the 1970s by Mostafa S. Fahim and colleagues showed that a short treatment with ultrasound caused the depletion of germ cells and infertility. The goal of the current study was to determine if a commercially available therapeutic ultrasound generator and transducer could be used as the basis for a male contraceptive. Methods Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and their testes were treated with 1 MHz or 3 MHz ultrasound while varying power, duration and temperature of treatment. Results We found that 3 MHz ultrasound delivered with 2.2 Watt per square cm power for fifteen minutes was necessary to deplete spermatocytes and spermatids from the testis and that this treatment significantly reduced epididymal sperm reserves. 3 MHz ultrasound treatment reduced total epididymal sperm count 10-fold lower than the wet-heat control and decreased motile sperm counts 1,000-fold lower than wet-heat alone. The current treatment regimen provided nominally more energy to the treatment chamber than Fahim's originally reported conditions of 1 MHz ultrasound delivered at 1 Watt per square cm for ten minutes. However, the true spatial average intensity, effective radiating area and power output of the transducers used by Fahim were not reported, making a direct comparison impossible. We found that germ cell depletion was most uniform and effective when we rotated the therapeutic transducer to mitigate non-uniformity of the beam field. The lowest sperm count was achieved when the coupling medium (3% saline was held at 37 degrees C and two consecutive 15-minute treatments of 3 MHz ultrasound at 2.2 Watt per square cm were separated by 2 days. Conclusions The non-invasive nature of ultrasound and its efficacy in reducing sperm count make therapeutic ultrasound a promising candidate for a male contraceptive. However, further studies must be conducted to confirm its efficacy in providing a contraceptive effect, to test the

  1. Therapeutic ultrasound as a potential male contraceptive: power, frequency and temperature required to deplete rat testes of meiotic cells and epididymides of sperm determined using a commercially available system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuruta, James K; Dayton, Paul A; Gallippi, Caterina M; O'Rand, Michael G; Streicker, Michael A; Gessner, Ryan C; Gregory, Thomas S; Silva, Erick J R; Hamil, Katherine G; Moser, Glenda J; Sokal, David C

    2012-01-30

    Studies published in the 1970s by Mostafa S. Fahim and colleagues showed that a short treatment with ultrasound caused the depletion of germ cells and infertility. The goal of the current study was to determine if a commercially available therapeutic ultrasound generator and transducer could be used as the basis for a male contraceptive. Sprague-Dawley rats were anesthetized and their testes were treated with 1 MHz or 3 MHz ultrasound while varying power, duration and temperature of treatment. We found that 3 MHz ultrasound delivered with 2.2 Watt per square cm power for fifteen minutes was necessary to deplete spermatocytes and spermatids from the testis and that this treatment significantly reduced epididymal sperm reserves. 3 MHz ultrasound treatment reduced total epididymal sperm count 10-fold lower than the wet-heat control and decreased motile sperm counts 1,000-fold lower than wet-heat alone. The current treatment regimen provided nominally more energy to the treatment chamber than Fahim's originally reported conditions of 1 MHz ultrasound delivered at 1 Watt per square cm for ten minutes. However, the true spatial average intensity, effective radiating area and power output of the transducers used by Fahim were not reported, making a direct comparison impossible. We found that germ cell depletion was most uniform and effective when we rotated the therapeutic transducer to mitigate non-uniformity of the beam field. The lowest sperm count was achieved when the coupling medium (3% saline) was held at 37 degrees C and two consecutive 15-minute treatments of 3 MHz ultrasound at 2.2 Watt per square cm were separated by 2 days. The non-invasive nature of ultrasound and its efficacy in reducing sperm count make therapeutic ultrasound a promising candidate for a male contraceptive. However, further studies must be conducted to confirm its efficacy in providing a contraceptive effect, to test the result of repeated use, to verify that the contraceptive effect is

  2. Synthesis of magnetic resonance–, X-ray– and ultrasound-visible alginate microcapsules for immunoisolation and noninvasive imaging of cellular therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Brad P; Arepally, Aravind; Stuber, Matthias; Arifin, Dian R; Kraitchman, Dara L; Bulte, Jeff W M

    2011-01-01

    Cell therapy has the potential to treat or cure a wide variety of diseases. Non-invasive cell tracking techniques are, however, necessary to translate this approach to the clinical setting. This protocol details methods to create microcapsules that are visible by X-ray, ultrasound (US ) or magnetic resonance (MR) for the encapsulation and immunoisolation of cellular therapeutics. Three steps are generally used to encapsulate cellular therapeutics in an alginate matrix: (i) droplets of cell-containing liquid alginate are extruded, using an electrostatic generator, through a needle tip into a solution containing a dissolved divalent cation salt to form a solid gel; (ii) the resulting gelled spheres are coated with polycations as a cross-linker; and (iii) these complexes are then incubated in a second solution of alginate to form a semipermeable membrane composed of an inner and an outer layer of alginate. The microcapsules can be rendered visible during the first step by adding contrast agents to the primary alginate layer. Such contrast agents include superparamagnetic iron oxide for detection by 1H MR imaging (MRI); the radiopaque agents barium or bismuth sulfate for detection by X-ray modalities; or perfluorocarbon emulsions for multimodal detection by 19F MRI, X-ray and US imaging. The entire synthesis can be completed within 2 h. PMID:21799484

  3. Penile vascular diagnostic categorization using penile duplex Doppler ultrasound: Differences in vascular hemodynamics parameters by differences in anatomic sampling location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Pezzoni

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. In 2013 the International Society for Sexual Medicine(ISSM published the guidelines regarding the standard operating procedure (SOP for penile duplex Doppler ultrasound (PDDU. Although ISSM-SOP have given important strides in reducing interobserver variability in PDDU by procedural protocol and parameters these guidelines do not address the anatomic location along the penis at which hemodynamic measurements have to be done. In our opinion a “double sampling” may be interesting to detect the arteriogenic or venogenic nature of the erectile dysfunction (ED. In particular sampling measurements at the “crus” (at the level of the peno-scrotal junction may be significative for detection of veno-occlusive dysfunction (VOD,whereas an evaluation at “mid penis” (1/2 distance between peno-scrotal junction and coronal sulcus, may be useful to diagnose an arterial insufficiency (AI. Material and Methods. We evalued 90 men, mean age 56.3, affected with ED of medium degree, responder to PDE5-I that urdergone to PDDU and also responder after pharmacologic intracavernosal injection (PIIof prostaglandin E1 20 mcg, with rigid erection and normal maintenance. We moreover evalued 90 men in youthful age (mean 35.2, in absence of vascular risk factors, no responder to PDE5-I that undergone to PDDU by PII at high dosage (bimix: prostaglandin E1 20 mcg, papaverine 20 mg. Results. In the first pool the sampling at “mid penis” resulted significative for arterial insuffciency (AI in 81% (73, in presence of normal or borderline end diastolic velocity (EDV. Sampling at the “crus” resulted negative for VOD in 90% (81. In the second pool, 66.6% (60 resulted responder with rigid erection and normal maintenance in presence of normal hemodynamic parameters: peak systolic velocity (PSV and end diastolic velocity (EDV both at the “crus” and at “mid penis” sampling. 33.4% (30 responded with a semirigid erection and manifested a constant

  4. Therapeutic results after ultrasound-guided intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI®) in the treatment of rectus abdominis-related groin pain in professional footballers: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno, Carlos; Mattiussi, Gabriele; Núñez, Francisco J

    2016-10-01

    Rectus abdominis-related groin pain (RAGP) is one of the possible clinical patterns that determine pubalgia. RAGP is one of the typical patterns in footballers and is due to the degeneration and tendinopathy of the distal tendon, at the level of the two pubic tubercles. Intratissue percutaneous electrolysis (EPI) is a novel technique used in the treatment of tendinopathies. The aim of this study was to examine the therapeutic benefits of EPI by contrasting the two basic components that characterize RAGP: painful symptoms and resultant functional deficits. Eight professional footballers at Udinese Calcio Spa Football Club underwent ultrasound-guided EPI intervention. No other type of treatment was combined with EPI. Pain was monitored with the Verbal Rating Scale, while functional deficit was monitored using the Patient Specific Functional Scale. The scales implementation took place before treatment, then 24 hours, 1 week, 1 month and 6 months after the end of treatment. Treatment with EPI produced a complete reduction of pain symptoms in one month and enabled excellent functional recovery for walking and jogging in one week; for getting out of bed, running, jumping and kicking within one month from the end of the treatment. Treatment with ultrasound-guided EPI has shown encouraging clinical results for RAGP. Data are preliminary: considering the limitations of this study more complex design studies are necessary to test the efficacy of the technique. This study introduces the EPI technique for the first time in the treatment of professional footballers suffering from RAGP. Its future use is proposed as a treatment solution, including complementary to conservative treatment.

  5. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma by three-dimensional sonography with a perflubutane-based contrast agent

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numata, Kazushi; Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Ohto, Masao; Itou, Ryu; Nozaki, Akito; Kondou, Masaaki; Morimoto, Manabu; Karasawa, Eii; Tanaka, Katsuaki

    2010-01-01

    Objective: We performed contrast-enhanced three-dimensional sonography (CE 3D US) with a perflubutane-based contrast agent to immediately evaluate the completeness of ablation of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions by extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Subjects and methods: Twenty-one HCC lesions were treated by a single ultrasound-guided HIFU ablation session, and CE 3D US was performed before, immediately after, and 1 week, and 1 month after HIFU, and contrast-enhanced CT (CE CT) or contrast-enhanced MRI (CE MRI) was performed before HIFU, 1 week and 1 month after HIFU, and during the follow-up period. Results: Immediately and 1 month after HIFU, 17 lesions were evaluated as adequately ablated by CE 3D US, and the other 4 lesions as residual tumors. One month after HIFU, 18 were evaluated as adequately ablated by CE CT or CE MRI, and the other 3 as residual tumors. The evaluation by CE 3D US immediately after HIFU and by CE CT or CE MRI 1 month after HIFU was concordant with 20 lesions. The kappa value for agreement between the findings of CE 3D US and other modalities by two blinded observers was 0.83. When the 1-month CE CT or CE MRI findings were used as the reference standard, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CE 3D US immediately after HIFU for the diagnosis of the adequate ablation were 100%, 75%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusion: CE 3D US appears to be a useful method for immediate evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of HIFU ablation of HCC lesions.

  6. Evaluation of the therapeutic efficacy of high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma by three-dimensional sonography with a perflubutane-based contrast agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Numata, Kazushi, E-mail: kz-numa@urahp.yokohama-cu.ac.j [Gastroenterological Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 232-0024 (Japan); Fukuda, Hiroyuki; Ohto, Masao; Itou, Ryu [Department of Internal Medicine, Naruto General Hospital, 167 Naruto, Sanbu, Chiba 289-1326 (Japan); Nozaki, Akito; Kondou, Masaaki; Morimoto, Manabu [Gastroenterological Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 232-0024 (Japan); Karasawa, Eii [Department of Gastroenterology, International University of Health and Welfare Atami Hospital, 13-1 Higashi Kaigan-cho, Atami, Shizuoka 413-0012 (Japan); Tanaka, Katsuaki [Gastroenterological Center, Yokohama City University Medical Center, 4-57 Urafune-cho, Minami-ku, Yokohama, Kanagawa 232-0024 (Japan)

    2010-08-15

    Objective: We performed contrast-enhanced three-dimensional sonography (CE 3D US) with a perflubutane-based contrast agent to immediately evaluate the completeness of ablation of small hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) lesions by extracorporeal high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). Subjects and methods: Twenty-one HCC lesions were treated by a single ultrasound-guided HIFU ablation session, and CE 3D US was performed before, immediately after, and 1 week, and 1 month after HIFU, and contrast-enhanced CT (CE CT) or contrast-enhanced MRI (CE MRI) was performed before HIFU, 1 week and 1 month after HIFU, and during the follow-up period. Results: Immediately and 1 month after HIFU, 17 lesions were evaluated as adequately ablated by CE 3D US, and the other 4 lesions as residual tumors. One month after HIFU, 18 were evaluated as adequately ablated by CE CT or CE MRI, and the other 3 as residual tumors. The evaluation by CE 3D US immediately after HIFU and by CE CT or CE MRI 1 month after HIFU was concordant with 20 lesions. The kappa value for agreement between the findings of CE 3D US and other modalities by two blinded observers was 0.83. When the 1-month CE CT or CE MRI findings were used as the reference standard, the sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy of CE 3D US immediately after HIFU for the diagnosis of the adequate ablation were 100%, 75%, and 95%, respectively. Conclusion: CE 3D US appears to be a useful method for immediate evaluation of therapeutic efficacy of HIFU ablation of HCC lesions.

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to ... Ultrasound Imaging? What is Ultrasound Imaging of the Prostate? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and produces pictures ...

  8. Usefulness of combined percutaneous-endoscopic rendezvous techniques after failed therapeutic endoscopic retrograde cholangiography in the era of endoscopic ultrasound guided rendezvous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Min Jae; Kim, Jin Hong; Hwang, Jae Chul; Yoo, Byung Moo; Kim, Soon Sun; Lim, Sun Gyo; Won, Je Hwan

    2017-12-01

    The rendezvous approach is a salvage technique after failure of endoscopic retrograde cholangiography (ERC). In certain circumstances, percutaneous-endoscopic rendezvous (PE-RV) is preferred, and endoscopic ultrasound-guided rendezvous (EUS-RV) is difficult to perform. We aimed to evaluate PE-RV outcomes, describe the PE-RV techniques, and identify potential indications for PE-RV over EUS-RV.Retrospective analysis was conducted of a prospectively designed ERC database between January 2005 and December 2016 at a tertiary referral center including cases where PE-RV was used as a salvage procedure after ERC failure.During the study period, PE-RV was performed in 42 cases after failed therapeutic ERC; 15 had a surgically altered enteric anatomy. The technical success rate of PE-RV was 92.9% (39/42), with a therapeutic success rate of 88.1% (37/42). Potential indications for PE-RV over EUS-RV were identified in 23 cases, and either PE-RV or EUS-RV could have effectively been used in 19 cases. Endoscopic bile duct access was successfully achieved with PE-RV in 39 cases with accessible biliary orifice using one of PE-RV cannulation techniques (classic, n = 11; parallel, n = 19; and adjunctive maneuvers, n = 9).PE-RV uses a unique technology and has clinical indications that distinguish it from EUS-RV. Therefore, PE-RV can still be considered a useful salvage technique for the treatment of biliary obstruction after ERC failure.

  9. Comparative analysis of the number of neurofilaments in rat sciatic nerve undergoing neuropraxia treated by low-level laser and therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matamala, F; Cornejo, R; Paredes, M; Farfan, E; Garrido, O. S; Alves, N

    2014-01-01

    Therapy by low-level laser (LLL) or ultrasound (US) are commonly used as treatment after nerve crush. The aim of this study was to determine the effectiveness of such treatments to repair the neuronal cytoskeleton evaluating the variation in the number of neurofilaments. For this an experimental design was performed, which involved 30 rats divided into 6 groups: 1 - control healthy; 2 - control injured; 3 - irradiated by LLL 2 J/cm2; 4 - irradiated by LLL 10 J/cm2; 5 - irradiated by US 0.5 W/cm2 and 6 - irradiated by US 1W/cm2. With the exception of group 1 all specimens were anesthetized and underwent right sciatic nerve compression using 40N pressure for 45 seconds. Twenty-four hours after compression irradiation was started by LLL and US according protocol. In our research we found that the increase in the number of neurofilaments was related to the applied dose of LLL and US. The average value of neurofilaments / 0.25 mm2 obtained in each group was: 1 - 128; 2-100; 3-156; 4-140; 5-100; 6-148. We concluded that the application of LLL and therapeutic US increases the number of neurofilaments in rat sciatic nerve undergoing neuropraxia, with LLL being more effective compared to the US. Furthermore we concluded that the effectiveness of therapies to induce regeneration of injured nerve is related to the type of protocol used, demonstrating the need to establish an adequate radiation dose with the purpose of obtaining the best therapeutic response, thus achieving successful treatment [es

  10. Physical Therapists in Primary Care Are Interested in High Quality Evidence Regarding Efficacy of Therapeutic Ultrasound for Knee Osteoarthritis: A Provincial Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma J. MacIntyre

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent high-level evidence favours therapeutic ultrasound (US for reducing pain in people with knee osteoarthritis (OA. It is unknown how current practice patterns align with current evidence regarding US efficacy and whether physical therapists perceive a need for further high-level evidence. We conducted a descriptive electronic survey to characterize the beliefs and use of US among physical therapists in Ontario treating people with nonsurgical knee OA. Most of the 123 respondents (81% reported at least some use of US with 45% using it often or sometimes. The main goal for using US was to reduce pain in the surrounding soft tissue (n=66 and/or the knee joint (n=43. Almost half (46% endorsed the belief that US is likely to be beneficial for clients with nonsurgical knee OA. Most respondents (85% expressed interest in the results of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of US on pain and physical function. Patterns of use reflect the respondents’ belief that US is likely to be beneficial for knee OA pain.

  11. Optimization of process parameters for the inactivation of Lactobacillus sporogenes in tomato paste with ultrasound and {sup 60}Co-{gamma} irradiation using response surface methodology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye Shengying [College of Food Science, South China Agricultural University, Wushan, Guangzhou, GD 510640 (China)], E-mail: yesy@scau.edu.cn; Qiu Yuanxin; Song Xianliang; Luo Shucan [College of Food Science, South China Agricultural University, Wushan, Guangzhou, GD 510640 (China)

    2009-03-15

    The processing parameters for ultrasound and {sup 60}Co-{gamma} irradiation were optimized for their ability to inactivate Lactobacillus sporogenes in tomato paste using a systematic experimental design based on response surface methodology. Ultrasonic power, ultrasonic processing time and irradiation dose were explored and a central composite rotation design was adopted as the experimental plan, and a least-squares regression model was obtained. The significant influential factors for the inactivation rate of L. sporogenes were obtained from the quadratic model and the t-test analyses for each process parameter. Confirmation of the experimental results indicated that the proposed model was reasonably accurate and could be used to describe the efficacy of the treatments for inactivating L. sporogenes within the limits of the factors studied. The optimized processing parameters were found to be an ultrasonic power of 120 W with a processing time of 25 min and an irradiation dose of 6.5 kGy. These were measured under the constraints of parameter limitation, based on the Monte Carlo searching method and the quadratic model of the response surface methodology, including the a/b value of the Hunter color scale of tomato paste. Nevertheless, the ultrasound treatment prior to irradiation for the inactivation of L. sporogenes in tomato paste was unsuitable for reducing the irradiation dose.

  12. Genetic parameters for carcass and ultrasound traits in Hereford and admixed Simmental beef cattle: Accuracy of evaluating carcass traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, H; Golden, B; Hyde, L; Sanders, S; Garrick, D

    2017-11-01

    Genetic parameters are required to evaluate carcass merit using correlated real-time ultrasound (RTU) measurements. Many registered bulls and heifers are measured using RTU before consideration for selection as parents, whereas few animals are recorded for carcass traits and those are often crossbred steers. The objective of this study was to estimate genetic parameters required for evaluating carcass merit in the American Hereford Association (AHA) and the American Simmental Association (ASA) using multivariate models and to assess accuracy of carcass trait estimated breeding values (EBV) for selection candidates. All available carcass data including carcass weight (CWT), fat thickness (FAT), longissimus muscle area (LMA), and marbling score (MRB) were provided by the AHA and the ASA along with RTU data including fat thickness (UFAT), longissimus muscle area (ULMA), and percentage of intramuscular fat (UIMF). Carcass data comprised 6,054 AHA and 9,056 ASA cattle, while RTU data in comparable numbers from close relatives comprised 6,074 AHA and 7,753 ASA cattle. Pedigrees included 33,226 AHA and 37,665 ASA animals. Fixed effects for carcass and RTU data included contemporary group, age at scan/slaughter, and major breed percentages. Restricted maximum likelihood procedures were applied to all the carcass and RTU measurements, along with birth weight to account for selection, fitting 8-trait multivariate models separately for each breed association. Heritability estimates for AHA and ASA carcass traits were 0.41 ± 0.04 and 0.25 ± 0.03 for FAT, 0.47 ± 0.04 and 0.32 ± 0.03 for LMA, 0.48 ± 0.04 and 0.43 ± 0.04 for MRB, 0.51 ± 0.04 and 0.34 ± 0.03 for CWT, and for RTU traits were 0.29 ± 0.04 and 0.37 ± 0.03 for UFAT, 0.31 ± 0.04 and 0.44 ± 0.03 for ULMA, and 0.45 ± 0.04 and 0.42 ± 0.03 for UIMF. Genetic correlations for AHA and ASA analyses between FAT and UFAT were 0.74 ± 0.08 and 0.28 ± 0.13, between LMA and ULMA were 0.81 ± 0.07 and 0.57 ± 0.10, and

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, also called transrectal ultrasound, provides ...

  14. Quantitative ultrasound parameters as well as bone mineral density are better predictors of trochanteric than cervical hip fractures in elderly women. Results from the EPIDOS study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schott, A M; Hans, D; Duboeuf, F; Dargent-Molina, P; Hajri, T; Bréart, G; Meunier, P J

    2005-12-01

    Hip fractures can be separated into cervical and trochanteric fractures. Trochanteric fractures have been associated with up to twice the short-term mortality of cervical fractures in the elderly. There is also evidence suggesting that the mechanisms are different. Evidence from the literature remains limited on the predictive power of bone mineral density (BMD) and quantitative ultrasounds (QUS) for both types of hip fractures. 5703 elderly women aged 75 years or more, who were recruited from the voting lists in the EPIDOS study, and had baseline calcaneal ultrasounds (QUS) and DXA measurements at the hip and the whole body, were analyzed in this paper. Among those, 192 hip fractures occurred during an average follow-up of 4 years, 108 cervical and 84 trochanteric fractures. Femoral neck, trochanteric and whole body BMD were able to predict trochanteric hip fracture (RR's and 95% CI were, respectively, 3.2 (2.4-4.2); 4.8 (3.5-6.6); and 2.8 (2.2-3.6)) more accurately than cervical fractures (respectively, 2.1 (1.7-2.7); 2.3 (1.8-3.0); 1.2 (1.0-1.6)). All ultrasound parameters, SOS, BUA, and stiffness index (SI) were significant predictors of trochanteric (RR's respectively 3.0 (2.2-4.1), 2.5(2.0-3.1), and 3.5(2.6-4.7)) but not cervical fractures. After adjustment for femoral neck or trochanteric BMD ultrasound parameters were still significant predictors of trochanteric fracture, and stiffness tended to be a better predictor of trochanteric fractures than either BUA or SOS with a relative risk of 2.25 (1.6-3.1). A significant decrease of all bone measurements, BMD and QUS, was highly predictive of trochanteric fractures, whereas a decrease of femoral neck and trochanteric BMD were only associated with a slight increase in cervical fracture risk and a low total body BMD or QUS parameters were not significant predictors of cervical fractures. In women who sustained a hip fracture, the decrease of BMD and QUS values increases the risk of trochanteric fracture as

  15. Applications of ultrasound in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walmsley, A D

    1988-01-01

    An ultrasonic descaler working at kHz frequencies is used in dentistry to remove attached deposits from the teeth. Such devices offer many advantages over conventional hand instruments by reducing both the work and time involved in the clinical descaling process. Although it is a recognised clinical instrument, there has been little attempt to standardise its acoustic power output. A parameter which may characterise adequately the acoustic emission from these instruments is the displacement amplitude of the probe tip. Modification of the ultrasonic descaler generator has led to the further use of the instrument in other dental areas. Diagnostic applications of MHz ultrasound is limited by the structure and arrangement of the dental tissues. Therapeutic ultrasound has been used to treat a variety of dentally related ailments, and ultrasonic cleaning baths are used to clean both dental instruments and materials.

  16. Effects of Important Parameters Variations on Computing Eigenspace-Based Minimum Variance Weights for Ultrasound Tissue Harmonic Imaging

    OpenAIRE

    Heidari, Mehdi Haji; Mozaffarzadeh, Moein; Manwar, Rayyan; Nasiriavanaki, Mohammadreza

    2018-01-01

    In recent years, the minimum variance (MV) beamforming has been widely studied due to its high resolution and contrast in B-mode Ultrasound imaging (USI). However, the performance of the MV beamformer is degraded at the presence of noise, as a result of the inaccurate covariance matrix estimation which leads to a low quality image. Second harmonic imaging (SHI) provides many advantages over the conventional pulse-echo USI, such as enhanced axial and lateral resolutions. However, the low signa...

  17. Impact of process parameters in the generation of novel aspirin nanoemulsions--comparative studies between ultrasound cavitation and microfluidizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Siah Ying; Shridharan, Parthasarathy; Sivakumar, Manickam

    2013-01-01

    In the present investigation, the operating efficiency of a bench-top air-driven microfluidizer has been compared to that of a bench-top high power ultrasound horn in the production of pharmaceutical grade nanoemulsions using aspirin as a model drug. The influence of important process variables as well as the pre-homogenization and drug loading on the resultant mean droplet diameter and size distribution of emulsion droplets was studied in an oil-in-water nanoemulsion incorporated with a model drug aspirin. Results obtained show that both the emulsification methods were capable of producing very fine nanoemulsions containing aspirin with the minimum droplet size ranging from 150 to 170 nm. In case of using the microfluidizer, it has been observed that the size of the emulsion droplets obtained was almost independent of the applied microfluidization pressure (200-600 bar) and the number of passes (up to 10 passes) while the pre-homogenization and drug loading had a marginal effect in increasing the droplet size. Whereas, in the case of ultrasound emulsification, the droplet size was generally decreased with an increase in sonication amplitude (50-70%) and period of sonication but the resultant emulsion was found to be dependent on the pre-homogenization and drug loading. The STEM microscopic observations illustrated that the optimized formulations obtained using ultrasound cavitation technique are comparable to microfluidized emulsions. These comparative results demonstrated that ultrasound cavitation is a relatively energy-efficient yet promising method of pharmaceutical nanoemulsions as compared to microfluidizer although the means used to generate the nanoemulsions are different. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound or with a rectal examination, an ultrasound-guided biopsy can be performed. This procedure involves advancing ... of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and MRI-Guided Prostate Biopsy Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to produce pictures of the structures and ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of the prostate uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound in assessing the therapeutic response to radio frequency ablation for liver tumors: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xuan, Min; Zhou, Fengsheng; Ding, Yan; Zhu, Qiaoying; Dong, Ji; Zhou, Hao; Cheng, Jun; Jiang, Xiao; Wu, Pengxi

    2018-04-01

    To review the diagnostic accuracy of contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CEUS) used to detect residual or recurrent liver tumors after radiofrequency ablation (RFA). This technique uses contrast-enhanced computer tomography or/and contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging as the gold standard of investigation. MEDLINE, EMBASE, and COCHRANE were systematically searched for all potentially eligible studies comparing CEUS with the reference standard that follows RFA. Risk of bias and applicability concerns were addressed by adopting the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS-2) tool. Pooled point estimates for sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative likelihood ratios, and diagnostic odds ratios (DOR) with 95% CI were computed before plotting the sROC (summary receiver operating characteristic) curve. Meta-regression and subgroup analysis were used to identify the source of the heterogeneity that was detected. Publication bias was evaluated using Deeks' funnel plot asymmetry test. Ten eligible studies on 1162 lesions that occurred between 2001 and 2016 were included in the final analysis. The quality of the included studies assessed by the QUADAS-2 tool was considered reasonable. The pooled sensitivity and specificity of CEUS in detecting residual or recurrent liver tumors had the following values: 0.90 (95% CI 0.85-0.94) and 1.00 (95% CI 0.99-1.00), respectively. Overall DOR was 420.10 (95% CI 142.30-1240.20). The sources of heterogeneity could not be precisely identified by meta-regression or subgroup analysis. No evidence of publication bias was found. This study confirmed that CEUS exhibits high sensitivity and specificity in assessing therapeutic responses to RFA for liver tumors.

  3. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of adenomyosis: The relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging on T2 weighted images and the therapeutic efficacy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Chunmei [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Setzen, Raymond [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Chris Hani Baragwanath Academic Hospital, Johannesburg (South Africa); Liu, Zhongqiong; Liu, Yunchang [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China); Xie, Bin [Department of Ultrasound, Huanggang Central Hospital, Huanggang City, Hubei 438000 (China); Aili, Aixingzi, E-mail: 1819483078@qq.com [Shanghai First Maternity and Infant Health Hospital, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Lian, E-mail: lianwzhang@yahoo.com [State Key Laboratory of Ultrasound Engineering in Medicine Co-founded by Chongqing and the Ministry of Science and Technology, Chongqing Key Laboratory of Ultrasound in Medicine and Engineering, Chongqing Haifu Hospital, College of Biomedical Engineering, Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing (China)

    2017-04-15

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on T2 weighted images (T2WI) and the therapeutic efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on adenomyosis. Materials and methods: From January 2011 to November 2015, four hundred and twenty-eight patients with symptomatic adenomyosis were treated with HIFU. Based on the signal intensity and the number of hyperintense foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI, the patients were classified into groups. The day after HIFU ablation patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRI and a comparison was made of non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio, energy efficiency factor (EEF), treatment time, sonication time, and adverse effects. Results: No significant difference in terms of HIFU treatment settings and results was observed between the group of patients with hypointense adenomyotic lesions and the group with isointense adenomyotic lesions (P > 0.05). However, the sonication time and EEF were significantly higher in the group with multiple hyperintense foci compared to the group with few hyperintense foci. The NPV ratio achieved in the lesions with multiple hyperintenese foci was significantly lower than that in the lesions with few hyperintense foci (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed in the rate of adverse effects between the two groups. Conclusions: Based on our results, the response of the adenomyotic lesions to HIFU treatment is not related to the signal intensity of adenomyotic lesions on T2WI. However, the number of the high signal intensity foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI can be considered as a predictive factor to help select patients for HIFU treatment.

  4. High intensity focused ultrasound treatment of adenomyosis: The relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging on T2 weighted images and the therapeutic efficacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gong, Chunmei; Setzen, Raymond; Liu, Zhongqiong; Liu, Yunchang; Xie, Bin; Aili, Aixingzi; Zhang, Lian

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To investigate the relationship between the features of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) on T2 weighted images (T2WI) and the therapeutic efficacy of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on adenomyosis. Materials and methods: From January 2011 to November 2015, four hundred and twenty-eight patients with symptomatic adenomyosis were treated with HIFU. Based on the signal intensity and the number of hyperintense foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI, the patients were classified into groups. The day after HIFU ablation patients underwent contrast-enhanced MRI and a comparison was made of non-perfused volume (NPV) ratio, energy efficiency factor (EEF), treatment time, sonication time, and adverse effects. Results: No significant difference in terms of HIFU treatment settings and results was observed between the group of patients with hypointense adenomyotic lesions and the group with isointense adenomyotic lesions (P > 0.05). However, the sonication time and EEF were significantly higher in the group with multiple hyperintense foci compared to the group with few hyperintense foci. The NPV ratio achieved in the lesions with multiple hyperintenese foci was significantly lower than that in the lesions with few hyperintense foci (P < 0.05). No significant difference was observed in the rate of adverse effects between the two groups. Conclusions: Based on our results, the response of the adenomyotic lesions to HIFU treatment is not related to the signal intensity of adenomyotic lesions on T2WI. However, the number of the high signal intensity foci in the adenomyotic lesions on T2WI can be considered as a predictive factor to help select patients for HIFU treatment.

  5. Is the propagation speed of ultrasound in human organs a diagnostic parameter for tissue characterization? Evaluation using the liver parenchyma in children and adolescents as an example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Born, M.; Franke, I.

    2011-01-01

    New sonographic machines permit the measurement of the propagation speed of ultrasound (PSU) in humans. The liver seems to be an appropriate organ for examining whether the PSU may be used as a diagnostic parameter for tissue characterization since the liver is easily accessible to sonography and its variable content of fat impacts the PSU. Purpose: To determine whether there is a measurable correlation between obesity and PSU in the liver. Methods: In 69 children and adolescents, the PSU in the liver was measured sonographically and correlated to BMI, age, size and weight of the children. Results: A strong correlation was found between the PSU in the liver and the BMI. The PSU was significantly lower in obese children (1507 m/s) than in children with normal body weight (1564 m/s). Conclusion: PSU seems to be promising as an additional diagnostic parameter for characterizing liver tissue. Further evaluation is necessary. (orig.)

  6. TC > 0.05 as a Pharmacokinetic Parameter of Paclitaxel for Therapeutic Efficacy and Toxicity in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, D S; Zhou, L; Li, C Z; Zhang, S Q; Huang, H Q; Qiu, G D; Lin, L F; She, Y Q; Zheng, J T; Chen, C; Fang, L; Chen, Zhe-Sheng; Zhang, S Y

    2018-03-05

    Paclitaxel (PTX) has remarkable anti-tumor activity, but it causes severe toxicities. There is an urgent need to seek an appropriate pharmacokinetic parameter of PTX to improve treatment efficacy and reduce adverse effects. To evaluate the association of pharmacokinetic parameter TC>0.05 of paclitaxel (PTX) and its therapeutic efficacy and toxicity in patients with solid tumors. A total of 295 patients with ovarian cancer, esophageal cancer, breast cancer, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), who were admitted to the Tumor Hospital of Shantou University Medical College, China, were recruited for this study. Patients received 3 weeks of PTX chemotherapy. The plasma concentrations of PTX were examined using the MyPaclitaxelTM kit. The patients' PTX TC>0.05 (the time during which PTX plasma concentration exceed 0.05 μmol/L) were calculated based on pharmacokinetic analysis. The results showed that: (1) the concentrations of PTX in these 295 patients ranged from 0.0358-0.127 μmol/L; (2) the PTX TC> 0.05 ranged from 14 to 38 h with a median time of 27 h; (3) among all treatment cycles, there was a statistically significant difference in the PTX TC>0.05 between CR+PR and SD+PD; (4) with the increasing value of TC>0.05, level of leukopenia and leukopenic fever increased; (5) high PTX TC>0.05 led to the occurrence of neutropenia, neutropenic fever, severe anemia, and severe peripheral neurotoxicity. Taken together, our results indicated that the pharmacokinetic parameter PTX TC>0.05 was an effective measure of treatment efficacy and toxicity in patients with solid tumors. Maintaining PTX TC>0.05 at 26 to 30 h could improve its efficacy and reduce the incidence of leukopenia, neutropenia, anemia, and peripheral neurotoxicity in these patients. PTX TC>0.05 is a key pharmacokinetic parameter of PTX which should be monitored to optimize individual treatment in patients with solid tumors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  7. A new nonlinear parameter in the developed strain-to-applied strain of the soft tissues and its application in ultrasound elasticity imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jingping; Tripathy, Sakya; Rubin, Jonathan M; Stidham, Ryan W; Johnson, Laura A; Higgins, Peter D R; Kim, Kang

    2012-03-01

    Strain developed under quasi-static deformation has been mostly used in ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) to determine the stiffness change of tissues. However, the strain measure in UEI is often less sensitive to a subtle change of stiffness. This is particularly true for Crohn's disease where we have applied strain imaging to the differentiation of acutely inflamed bowel from chronically fibrotic bowel. In this study, a new nonlinear elastic parameter of the soft tissues is proposed to overcome this limit. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the newly proposed method and demonstrate its feasibility in the UEI. A nonlinear characteristic of soft tissues over a relatively large dynamic range of strain was investigated. A simplified tissue model based on a finite element (FE) analysis was integrated with a laboratory developed ultrasound radio-frequency (RF) signal synthesis program. Two-dimensional speckle tracking was applied to this model to simulate the nonlinear behavior of the strain developed in a target inclusion over the applied average strain to the surrounding tissues. A nonlinear empirical equation was formulated and optimized to best match the developed strain-to-applied strain relation obtained from the FE simulation. The proposed nonlinear equation was applied to in vivo measurements and nonlinear parameters were further empirically optimized. For an animal model, acute and chronic inflammatory bowel disease was induced in Lewis rats with trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS)-ethanol treatments. After UEI, histopathology and direct mechanical measurements were performed on the excised tissues. The extracted nonlinear parameter from the developed strain-to-applied strain relation differentiated the three different tissue types with 1.96 ± 0.12 for normal, 1.50 ± 0.09 for the acutely inflamed and 1.03 ± 0.08 for the chronically fibrotic tissue. T-tests determined that the nonlinear parameters between normal, acutely inflamed and fibrotic tissue

  8. Improving the prediction of strength and rigidity of structural timber by combining ultrasound techniques with visual grading parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hermoso Prieto, E.

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study explores the possibility of using longitudinal ultrasound transmission to evaluate the bending strength and modulus of elasticity in structural timber made from the two species most commonly found in Spanish construction and rehabilitation works: Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris L. and Laricio pine (Pinus nigra Arn.. An analysis of 1305 Scots pine and 852 Laricio pine beams shows that ultrasound transmission velocity alone can predict neither the bending strength nor the modulus of elasticity and that other predictive variables are required.A series of models are proposed based on ultrasound transmission velocity measurements, the relative size of the largest face and edge knots, length and density. After running models for each species individually and for the two jointly, a single model is found to be suitable for both. The models proposed explain from 63 to 73 per cent of bending strength and modulus of elasticity variability.Se analiza la posibilidad de aplicar la técnica de transmisión longitudinal de ultrasonidos para la evaluación de la resistencia y módulo de elasticidad a flexión de la madera estructural de las dos especies de mayor interés constructivo y más amplia presencia en obras de rehabilitación: el pino silvestre (Pinus sylvestris L. y el pino laricio (Pinus nigra Arn.. Trabajando sobre un total de 1.305 vigas de pino silvestre y 852 de pino laricio se concluye que por sí sola la velocidad de transmisión de ultrasonidos no es un buen predictor ni de la resistencia ni del módulo de elasticidad en flexión, necesitando el complemento de otras variables predictoras. Se proponen diversos modelos basados en la medición de la velocidad de transmisión de ultrasonidos, de los diámetros relativos del nudo máximo de cara y de canto, de la longitud y de la densidad. Los modelos se proponen tanto a nivel especie como global, comprobándose que es posible emplear un modelo único para ambas especies. Los modelos

  9. Correlation between quantitative ultrasound parameters of the calcinosis and bone density of the spine and femur in Arabian women: Relation to menopausal status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Suhaili, A.R.; Saadi, H.F.; Reed, R.L.; Carter, A.O.

    2002-01-01

    Aims: Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the calcaneus is being frequently used to screen for osteoporosis. This technique correlates very well with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) of the spine and femur, and predicts fracture risk in postmenopausal women. The correlation between QUS and DXA in premenopausal women with prevalent vitamin D deficiency however is not known. We assessed the correlation between both techniques in 55 pre- and postmenopausal Arabian women, a population with high prevalence of vitamin D deficiency. Methods: BMD of the right calcaneus was estimated by Sahara ultrasound (Hologic, Waltham, MA). Spine and right total femur BMD was determined by DXA scan (Lunar Expert XL, Madison, WI). Results: Overall, the correlation between calcaneal BMD estimated by QUS and spine and femur BMD measured by DXA in pre- and postmenopausal United Arab Emirates women was statistically significant (r=0.41; p=0.002 for spine and r=0.44; p=0.001 for femur, respectively). In postmenopausal women, all correlations between DXA and QUS parameters were statistically significant. In contrast, only BUA and SOS correlated significantly with spine BMD in premenopausal women. Conclusion: The correlation between DXA and QUS is statistically significant in postmenopausal United Arab Emirates women. However, this correlation is much weaker in premenopausal UAE women suggesting that other factors such as vitamin D deficiency may influence this correlation

  10. Prehospital Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Tang Sun

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound is a commonly used diagnostic tool in clinical conditions. With recent developments in technology, use of portable ultrasound devices has become feasible in prehospital settings. Many studies also proved the feasibility and accuracy of prehospital ultrasound. In this article, we focus on the use of prehospital ultrasound, with emphasis on trauma and chest ultrasound.

  11. In vitro parameter optimization for spatial control of focused ultrasound ablation when using low boiling point phase-change nanoemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puett, Connor; Phillips, Linsey C; Sheeran, Paul S; Dayton, Paul A

    2013-01-01

    Phase-shift nanoemulsions (PSNEs) provide cavitation sites when the perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanodroplets (ND) are vaporized to microbubbles by acoustic energy. Their presence lowers the power required to ablate tissue by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), potentially making it a safer option for a broader range of treatment sites. However, spatial control over the ablation region can be problematic when cavitation is used to enhance heating. This study explored relationships between vaporization, ablation, and the PSNE concentration in vitro to optimize the acoustic intensity and insonation time required for spatially controlled ablation enhancement using a PSNE that included a volatile PFC component. HIFU (continuous wave at 1 MHz; insonation times of 5, 10, 15, and 20 s; cool-down times of 2, 4, and 6 s; peak negative pressures of 2, 3, and 4 MPa) was applied to albumin-acrylamide gels containing PFC agents (1:1 mix of volatile decafluorobutane and more stable dodecafluoropentane at 10(5) to 10(8) PFC ND per milliliter) or agent-free controls. Vaporization fields (microbubble clouds) were imaged by conventional ultrasound, and ablation lesions were measured directly by calipers. Controlled ablation was defined as the production of 'cigar'-shaped lesions corresponding with the acoustic focal zone. This control was considered to be lost when ablation occurred in prefocal vaporization fields having a predominantly 'tadpole' or oblong shape. Changes in the vaporization field shape and location occurred on a continuum with increasing PSNE concentration and acoustic intensity. Working with the maximum concentration-intensity combinations resulting in controlled ablation demonstrated a dose-responsive relationship between insonation time and volumes of both the vaporization fields (approximately 20 to 240 mm(3)) and the ablation lesions (1 to 135 mm(3)) within them. HIFU ablation was enhanced by this PSNE and could be achieved using intensities ≤650 W/cm(2

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... a pelvic ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are ... Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently ... pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . Ultrasound examinations can help diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: ...

  16. Quantitative ultrasound characterization of tumor cell death: ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles for radiation enhancement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunjung Christina Kim

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of quantitative ultrasound imaging in characterizing cancer cell death caused by enhanced radiation treatments. This investigation focused on developing this ultrasound modality as an imaging-based non-invasive method that can be used to monitor therapeutic ultrasound and radiation effects. High-frequency (25 MHz ultrasound was used to image tumor responses caused by ultrasound-stimulated microbubbles in combination with radiation. Human prostate xenografts grown in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mice were treated using 8, 80, or 1000 µL/kg of microbubbles stimulated with ultrasound at 250, 570, or 750 kPa, and exposed to 0, 2, or 8 Gy of radiation. Tumors were imaged prior to treatment and 24 hours after treatment. Spectral analysis of images acquired from treated tumors revealed overall increases in ultrasound backscatter intensity and the spectral intercept parameter. The increase in backscatter intensity compared to the control ranged from 1.9±1.6 dB for the clinical imaging dose of microbubbles (8 µL/kg, 250 kPa, 2 Gy to 7.0±4.1 dB for the most extreme treatment condition (1000 µL/kg, 750 kPa, 8 Gy. In parallel, in situ end-labelling (ISEL staining, ceramide, and cyclophilin A staining demonstrated increases in cell death due to DNA fragmentation, ceramide-mediated apoptosis, and release of cyclophilin A as a result of cell membrane permeabilization, respectively. Quantitative ultrasound results indicated changes that paralleled increases in cell death observed from histology analyses supporting its use for non-invasive monitoring of cancer treatment outcomes.

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: ...

  18. Ultrasound mediated nanoparticle drug delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Lee B.

    Ultrasound is not only a powerful diagnostic tool, but also a promising therapeutic technology that can be used to improve localized drug delivery. Microbubble contrast agents are micron sized encapsulated gas filled bubbles that are administered intravenously. Originally developed to enhance ultrasound images, microbubbles are highly echogenic due to the gas core that provides a detectable impedance difference from the surrounding medium. The core also allows for controlled response of the microbubbles to ultrasound pulses. Microbubbles can be pushed using acoustic radiation force and ruptured using high pressures. Destruction of microbubbles can increase permeability at the cellular and vascular level, which can be advantageous for drug delivery. Advances in drug delivery methods have been seen with the introduction of nanoparticles, nanometer sized objects often carrying a drug payload. In chemotherapy, nanoparticles can deliver drugs to tumors while limiting systemic exposure due to abnormalities in tumor vasculature such large gaps between endothelial cells that allow nanoparticles to enter into the interstitial space; this is referred to as the enhanced permeability and retention (EPR) effect. However, this effect may be overestimated in many tumors. Additionally, only a small percentage of the injected dose accumulates in the tumor, which most the nanoparticles accumulating in the liver and spleen. It is hypothesized that combining the acoustic activity of an ultrasound contrast agent with the high payload and extravasation ability of a nanoparticle, localized delivery to the tumor with reduced systemic toxicity can be achieved. This method can be accomplished by either loading nanoparticles onto the shell of the microbubble or through a coadministration method of both nanoparticles and microbubbles. The work presented in this dissertation utilizes novel and commercial nanoparticle formulations, combined with microbubbles and a variety of ultrasound systems

  19. Blood flow parameters in the short gastric vein and splenic vein on Doppler ultrasound reflect gastric variceal bleeding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maruyama, Hitoshi; Ishihara, Takeshi; Ishii, Hiroshi; Tsuyuguchi, Toshio; Yoshikawa, Masaharu; Matsutani, Shoichi; Yokosuka, Osamu

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Hemodynamic features associated with the bleeding from gastric fundal varices (FV) have not been fully examined. The purpose of this study was to elucidate hemodynamics in the short gastric vein (SGV) which is a major inflow route for FV and flow direction of the splenic vein (SV) in relation to bleeding FV. Materials and Methods: The subject of this retrospective study was 54 cirrhotic patients who had medium- or large-sized FV (20 bleeders, 34 non-bleeders) on endoscopy with SGV on both angiogram and sonogram. Diameter, flow velocity, flow volume of SGV and flow direction in the SV were evaluated by Doppler ultrasound. Results: Diameter, flow velocity and flow volume of SGV were significantly greater in bleeders (9.6 ± 3.1 mm, 11.4 ± 5.2 cm/s, 499 ± 250.1 ml/min) than non-bleeders (6.5 ± 2.2 mm, p = 0.0141; 7.9 ± 3.3 cm/s, p = 0.022; 205 ± 129.1 ml/min, p = 0.0031). SV showed forward flow in 37 (68.5%), to and fro in 3 (5.6%) and reversed flow in 14 patients (25.9%). The frequency of FV bleeding was significantly higher in case with reversed or 'to and fro' SV flow (11/17) than forward SV flow (9/37, p = 0.0043). The cumulative bleeding rate at 3 and 5 years was significantly higher in patients without forward SV flow (38.8% at 3 years, 59.2% at 5 years) than in patients with forward SV flow (18.7% at 3 years, 32.2% at 5 years, p = 0.0199). Conclusion: Advanced SGV blood flow and reversed SV flow direction may be a hemodynamic features closely related to the FV bleeding.

  20. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shpak, O.; Verweij, M.; de Jong, N.; Versluis, Michel; Escoffre, J.M.; Bouakaz, A.

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to

  1. Sex hormones and quantitative ultrasound parameters at the heel in men and women from the general population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konrad Pätzug

    2017-12-01

    Conclusions: This cross-sectional population-based study revealed independent associations of DHEAS and FT with QUS parameters in men, suggesting a potential influence on male bone metabolism. The predictive role of DHEAS and FT as a marker for osteoporosis in men warrants further investigation in clinical trials and large-scale observational studies.

  2. Competitive Swimming and Handball Participation Have a Positive Influence on Bone Parameters as Assessed by Phalangeal Quantitative Ultrasound in Female Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krahenbuhl, Tathyane; Gonçalves, Ezequiel M; Guimarães, Roseane Fatima; Guerra-Junior, Gil; Barros-Filho, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    To examine the influence of participation in competitive sports on bone parameters, as assessed by quantitative ultrasound (QUS) of the phalanges in female adolescents. Female adolescents (n = 329, 13.0-16.7 years old) were classified into handball (n = 55), swimming (n = 49) and control (n = 225) groups. QUS was used to evaluate the amplitude-dependent speed of sound (AD-SoS) and bone transmission time (BTT), and their z-scores (zAD-SoS and zBTT) were calculated. Anthropometric measurements and Tanner's stages were also obtained. Swimmers had higher AD-SoS (2089 ± 43.8 m/s) and zAD-SoS (0.47 ± 0.8) than controls (2060 ± 54.0 m/s; 0.09 ± 1.0; both p ≤ .05) and both groups of athletes had higher BTT (handball: 1.44 ± 0.2 μs; swimming: 1.45 ± 0.2) and zBTT (handball: 0.71 ± 0.8; swimming: 0.72 ± 1.1) than the control group (1.37 ± 0.2 μs; 0.32 ± 0.9; all p ≤ .05). Swimmers had a higher total training time (TTT: 52.5 ± 27.6 months) and frequency of training per week (FT: 5.38 ± 0.1) compared with the handball group (35.9 ± 18.1; 3.32 ± 0.8; p ≤ .05). zAD-SoS, BTT and zBTT were positively correlated with FT, while BTT and zBTT showed a positive correlation with TTT. Sports practice influences bone parameters and higher bone parameter values are related to the amount of time and frequency of weekly training. The differences in phalangeal QUS parameters are independent of the impact of weight-bearing exercise.

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ... Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Kidney and Bladder Stones Abnormal Vaginal Bleeding Ovarian Cancer Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored ...

  5. Role of the combination of FA and T2* parameters as a new diagnostic method in therapeutic evaluation of parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Yuan; Zheng, Tao; Liu, Lanxiang; Gao, Dawei; Shi, Qinglei; Dong, Yanchao; Du, Dan

    2017-11-17

    Simple diffusion delivery (SDD) has attained good effects with only tiny amounts of drugs. Fractional anisotropy (FA) and relaxation time T2* that indicate the integrity of fiber tracts and iron concentration within brain tissue were used to evaluate the therapeutic effect of SDD. To evaluate therapeutic effect of SDD in the Parkinson's disease (PD) rat model with FA and T2* parameters. Prospective case-control animal study. Thirty-two male Sprague Dawley rats (eight normal, eight PD, eight SDD, and eight subcutaneous injection rats). Single-shot spin echo echo-planar imaging and fast low-angle shot T 2 WI sequences at 3.0T. Parameters of FA and T2* on the treated side of the substantia nigra were measured to evaluate the therapeutic effect of SDD in a PD rat model. The effects of time on FA and T2* values were analyzed by repeated measurement tests. A one-way analysis of variance was conducted, followed by individual comparisons of the mean FA and T2* values at different timepoints. The FA values on the treated side of the substantia nigra in the SDD treatment group and subcutaneous injection treatment group were significantly higher at week 1 and lower at week 6 than that of the PD control group (SDD vs. PD, week 1, adjusted P = 0.012; subcutaneous vs. PD, week 1, adjusted P T2* parameter in the SDD treatment group and subcutaneous injection treatment group was significantly higher than that in the PD control group at week 6 (SDD vs. PD, adjusted P = 0.032; subcutaneous vs. PD, adjusted P T2* parameters can potentially serve as a new effective evaluation method of the therapeutic effect of SDD. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 4 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  6. Maximum likelihood estimation of dose-response parameters for therapeutic operating characteristic (TOC) analysis of carcinoma of the nasopharynx

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metz, C.E.; Tokars, R.P.; Kronman, H.B.; Griem, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    A Therapeutic Operating Characteristic (TOC) curve for radiation therapy plots, for all possible treatment doses, the probability of tumor ablation as a function of the probability of radiation-induced complication. Application of this analysis to actual therapeutic situation requires that dose-response curves for ablation and for complication be estimated from clinical data. We describe an approach in which ''maximum likelihood estimates'' of these dose-response curves are made, and we apply this approach to data collected on responses to radiotherapy for carcinoma of the nasopharynx. TOC curves constructed from the estimated dose-response curves are subject to moderately large uncertainties because of the limitations of available data.These TOC curves suggest, however, that treatment doses greater than 1800 rem may substantially increase the probability of tumor ablation with little increase in the risk of radiation-induced cervical myelopathy, especially for T1 and T2 tumors

  7. Evaluation of hydrophilic permeant transport parameters in the localized and non-localized transport regions of skin treated simultaneously with low-frequency ultrasound and sodium lauryl sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushner, Joseph; Blankschtein, Daniel; Langer, Robert

    2008-02-01

    The porosity (epsilon), the tortuosity (tau), and the hindrance factor (H) of the aqueous pore channels located in the localized transport regions (LTRs) and the non-LTRs formed in skin treated simultaneously with low-frequency ultrasound (US) and the surfactant sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), were evaluated for the delivery of four hydrophilic permeants (urea, mannitol, raffinose, and inulin) by analyzing dual-radiolabeled diffusion masking experiments for three different idealized cases of the aqueous pore pathway hypothesis. When epsilon and tau were assumed to be independent of the permeant radius, H was found to be statistically larger in the LTRs than in the non-LTRs. When a distribution of pore radii was assumed to exist in the skin, no statistical differences in epsilon, tau, and H were observed due to the large variation in the pore radii distribution shape parameter (3 A to infinity). When infinitely large aqueous pores were assumed to exist in the skin, epsilon was found to be 3-8-fold greater in the LTRs than in the non-LTRs, while little difference was observed in the LTRs and in the non-LTRs for tau. This last result suggests that the efficacy of US/SLS treatment may be enhanced by increasing the porosity of the non-LTRs.

  8. Volumetry and biomechanical parameters detected by 3D and 2D ultrasound in patients with and without an abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batagini, Nayara Cioffi; Ventura, Carlos Augusto Pinto; Raghavan, Madhavan L; Chammas, Maria Cristina; Tachibana, Adriano; da Silva, Erasmo Simão

    2016-06-01

    The objective was to demonstrate the ability of ultrasound (US) with 3D properties to evaluate volumetry and biomechanical parameters of the aorta in patients with and without abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). Thirty-one patients with normal aortas (group 1), 46 patients with AAA measuring 3.0-5.5 cm (group 2) and 31 patients with AAA ⩾ 5.5 cm (group 3) underwent a 2D/3D-US examination of the infra-renal aorta, and the images were post-processed prior to being analyzed. In the maximum diameter, the global circumferential strain and the global maximum rotation assessed by 2D speckle-tracking algorithms were compared among the three groups. The volumetry data obtained using 3D-US from 40 AAA patients were compared with the volumetry data obtained by a contemporary computed tomography (CT) scan. The median global circumferential strain was 2.0% (interquartile range (IR): 1.0-3.0), 1.0% (IR: 1.0-2.0) and 1.0% (IR: 1.0-1.75) in groups 1, 2 and 3, respectively (p volumetry and biomechanical characteristics of AAA. © The Author(s) 2016.

  9. Techniques and evaluation from a cross-platform imaging comparison of quantitative ultrasound parameters in an in vivo rodent fibroadenoma model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirtzfeld, Lauren A; Nam, Kibo; Labyed, Yassin; Ghoshal, Goutam; Haak, Alexander; Sen-Gupta, Ellora; He, Zhi; Hirtz, Nathaniel R; Miller, Rita J; Sarwate, Sandhya; Simpson, Douglas G; Zagzebski, James A; Bigelow, Timothy A; Oelze, Michael; Hall, Timothy J; O'Brien, William D

    2013-07-01

    This contribution demonstrates that quantitative ultrasound (QUS) capabilities are platform independent, using an in vivo model. Frequency-dependent attenuation estimates, backscatter coefficient, and effective scatterer diameter estimates are shown to be comparable across four different ultrasound imaging systems with varied processing techniques. The backscatter coefficient (BSC) is a fundamental material property from which several QUS parameters are estimated; therefore, consistent BSC estimates among different systems must be demonstrated. This study is an intercomparison of BSC estimates acquired by three research groups (UIUC, UW, ISU) from four in vivo spontaneous rat mammary fibroadenomas using three clinical array systems and a single-element laboratory scanner system. Because of their highly variable backscatter properties, fibroadenomas provided an extreme test case for BSC analysis, and the comparison is across systems for each tumor, not across the highly heterogeneous tumors. RF echo data spanning the 1 to 12 MHz frequency range were acquired in three dimensions from all animals using each system. Each research group processed their RF data independently, and the resulting attenuation, BSC, and effective scatterer diameter (ESD) estimates were compared. The attenuation estimates across all systems showed the same trends and consistently fit the power-law dependence on frequency. BSCs varied among the multiple slices of data acquired by each transducer, with variations between transducers being of a similar magnitude as those from slice to slice. Variation between BSC estimates was assessed via functional signal-to-noise ratios derived from backscatter data. These functional signal-to-noise ratios indicated that BSC versus frequency variations between systems ranged from negligible compared with the noise level to roughly twice the noise level. The corresponding functional analysis of variance (fANOVA) indicated statistically significant differences

  10. Numerical Study for Optimizing Parameters of High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound-Induced Thermal Field during Liver Tumor Ablation: HIFU Simulator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somayeh gharloghi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction High intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU is considered a noninvasive and effective technique for tumor ablation. Frequency and acoustic power are the most effective parameters for temperature distribution and the extent of tissue damage. The aim of this study was to optimize the operating transducer parameters such as frequency and input power in order to acquire suitable temperature and thermal dose distribution in the course of a numerical assessment. Materials and Methods To model the sound propagation, the Khokhlov-Zabolotskava-Kuznetsov (KZK nonlinear wave equation was used and simulation was carried out using MATLAB HIFU toolbox. Bioheat equation was applied to calculate the transient temperature in the liver tissue. Frequency ranges of 2, 3, 4, and 5 MHz and power levels of 50 and 100 W were applied using an extracorporeal transducer. Results Using a frequency of 2 MHz, the maximum temperatures reached 53°C and 90°C in the focal point for power levels of 50 W and 100 W, respectively. With the same powers and using a frequency of 3 MHz, the temperature reached to 71°C and 170°C, respectively. In addition, for these power levels at the frequency of 4 MHz, the temperature reached to 72°C and 145°C, respectively. However, at the 5 MHz frequency, the temperature in the focal spot was either 57°C or 79°C. Conclusion Use of frequency of 2 MHz and power of 100 W led to higher thermal dose distribution, and subsequently, reduction of the treatment duration and complications at the same exposure time in ablation of large tumors.

  11. The efficacy of ultrasound treatment as a reversible male contraceptive in the rhesus monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandeVoort, Catherine A; Tollner, Theodore L

    2012-09-12

    The use of therapeutic ultrasound as a contraceptive approach has involved nonhuman primates as well as rats and dogs. The current study was undertaken to determine whether this treatment could be a method for reversible contraception, using a model with testes size similar to adult humans. Two methods of ultrasound exposure were used, either the transducer probe at the bottom of a cup filled with saline (Cup) or direct application to the surface of the scrotum (Direct). Four adult rhesus (Macaca mulatta) males with normal semen parameters were treated with therapeutic ultrasound at 2.5 W/cm(2) for 30 min. Treatment was given 3 times, one every other day on a Monday-Wednesday-Friday schedule. For each male, semen quality was evaluated a minimum of three times over several months prior to ultrasound exposure and weekly for two months following ultrasound treatment. Semen samples from all males, regardless of exposure method, exhibited a decrease in the percentage of motile sperm following ultrasound treatment. There was an average reduction in motility of 40% the week following treatment. Similarly, curvilinear velocity and the percentage of sperm with a normally shaped flagellum were also reduced in all males following ultrasound treatment. A significant reduction in the total number of sperm in an ejaculate (total sperm count) was only observed in males that received ultrasound via the cup method. Following treatment via the cup method, males exhibited up to a 91.7% decrease in average total sperm count (n = 2). Sperm count did not approach pre-treatment levels until 8 weeks following ultrasound exposure. The sustained reduction in sperm count, percent motility, normal morphology, and sperm vigor with the cup exposure method provides proof of principle that testicular treatment with ultrasound can be an effective contraceptive approach in humans.

  12. The efficacy of ultrasound treatment as a reversible male contraceptive in the rhesus monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VandeVoort Catherine A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of therapeutic ultrasound as a contraceptive approach has involved nonhuman primates as well as rats and dogs. The current study was undertaken to determine whether this treatment could be a method for reversible contraception, using a model with testes size similar to adult humans. Methods Two methods of ultrasound exposure were used, either the transducer probe at the bottom of a cup filled with saline (Cup or direct application to the surface of the scrotum (Direct. Four adult rhesus (Macaca mulatta males with normal semen parameters were treated with therapeutic ultrasound at 2.5 W/cm(2 for 30 min. Treatment was given 3 times, one every other day on a Monday-Wednesday-Friday schedule. For each male, semen quality was evaluated a minimum of three times over several months prior to ultrasound exposure and weekly for two months following ultrasound treatment. Results Semen samples from all males, regardless of exposure method, exhibited a decrease in the percentage of motile sperm following ultrasound treatment. There was an average reduction in motility of 40% the week following treatment. Similarly, curvilinear velocity and the percentage of sperm with a normally shaped flagellum were also reduced in all males following ultrasound treatment. A significant reduction in the total number of sperm in an ejaculate (total sperm count was only observed in males that received ultrasound via the cup method. Following treatment via the cup method, males exhibited up to a 91.7% decrease in average total sperm count (n = 2. Sperm count did not approach pre-treatment levels until 8 weeks following ultrasound exposure. Conclusions The sustained reduction in sperm count, percent motility, normal morphology, and sperm vigor with the cup exposure method provides proof of principle that testicular treatment with ultrasound can be an effective contraceptive approach in humans.

  13. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Jida; Chen, Jie

    2015-06-23

    In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared to our previous

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams ... pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic organs early ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... size, shape and consistency (whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an ... Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Prostate ultrasound, ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also help identify: ... fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... There are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams ... are three types of pelvic ultrasound: abdominal ( transabdominal ) vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound is most often performed to evaluate the: uterus cervix ovaries ... page How is the procedure performed? Transabdominal: For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... is used to evaluate the: bladder seminal vesicles prostate Transrectal ultrasound, a special study usually done to provide detailed evaluation of the prostate gland, involves inserting a specialized ultrasound transducer into ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use ... procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view the endometrium (the lining of the uterus) and the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the myometrium (muscular walls ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ... abnormal masses, such as tumors. In an ultrasound examination, a transducer both sends the sound waves into ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... needles are used to extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ... structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning ... radiation oncology provider in your community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ... sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... help to distract the child and make the time pass quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ... bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the prostate gland because ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of the body's ... Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such as needle ...

  16. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound exams in which the transducer ... in the sperm or urine following the procedure. After an ultrasound examination, you should be able to ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries ... abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ultrasound or sonohysterography for patients with infertility. In ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... and produces pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound ... from the probe through the gel into the body. The transducer collects the sounds that bounce back ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - ...

  1. Obstetrical Ultrasound

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    ... heartbeat can be seen as an ongoing ultrasound movie. Ultrasound devices also use Doppler, a special application ... the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Sonohysterography Ultrasound - ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also help identify: palpable masses such as ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian ... In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... and development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . ... object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is used to detect changes in appearance, ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face-up on an examination table that can be ... region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. If a Doppler ultrasound study ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound: abdominal, vaginal (for women), and rectal (for men). These exams are frequently used to evaluate the ... vaginal ( transvaginal / endovaginal ) for women rectal ( transrectal ) for men A Doppler ultrasound exam may be part of ...

  9. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery of targeted echogenic liposomes in a novel ex vivo mouse aorta model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitchcock, Kathryn E; Caudell, Danielle N; Sutton, Jonathan T; Klegerman, Melvin E; Vela, Deborah; Pyne-Geithman, Gail J; Abruzzo, Todd; Cyr, Peppar E P; Geng, Yong-Jian; McPherson, David D; Holland, Christy K

    2010-06-15

    The goal of this study was to determine whether targeted, Rhodamine-labeled echogenic liposomes (Rh-ELIP) containing nanobubbles could be delivered to the arterial wall, and whether 1-MHz continuous wave ultrasound would enhance this delivery profile. Aortae excised from apolipoprotein-E-deficient (n=8) and wild-type (n=8) mice were mounted in a pulsatile flow system through which Rh-ELIP were delivered in a stream of bovine serum albumin. Half the aortae from each group were treated with 1-MHz continuous wave ultrasound at 0.49 MPa peak-to-peak pressure, and half underwent sham exposure. Ultrasound parameters were chosen to promote stable cavitation and avoid inertial cavitation. A broadband hydrophone was used to monitor cavitation activity. After treatment, aortic sections were prepared for histology and analyzed by an individual blinded to treatment conditions. Delivery of Rh-ELIP to the vascular endothelium was observed, and sub-endothelial penetration of Rh-ELIP was present in five of five ultrasound-treated aortae and was absent in those not exposed to ultrasound. However, the degree of penetration in the ultrasound-exposed aortae was variable. There was no evidence of ultrasound-mediated tissue damage in any specimen. Ultrasound-enhanced delivery within the arterial wall was demonstrated in this novel model, which allows quantitative evaluation of therapeutic delivery. Copyright (c) 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  11. Efeitos do ultra-som terapêutico contínuo sobre a proliferação e viabilidade de células musculares C2C12 Effects of continuous therapeutic ultrasound on proliferation and viability of C2C12 muscle cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paola Pelegrineli Artilheiro

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available O ultra-som terapêutico (US é um recurso bioestimulante utilizado para propiciar reparo muscular de melhor qualidade e menor duração, mas o potencial terapêutico do US contínuo não está totalmente estabelecido. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar o efeito do US contínuo sobre a proliferação e viabilidade de células musculares precursoras (mioblastos C2C12. Mioblastos C2C12 foram cultivados em meio de cultura contendo 10% de soro fetal bovino e irradiados com US contínuo nas freqüências de 1 e 3 MHz nas intensidades de 0,2 e 0,5 W/cm2, durante 2 e 5 minutos. A viabilidade e proliferação celular foram avaliadas após 24, 48 e 72 h de incubação. Grupos não-irradiados serviram como controle. Foram realizados experimentos independentes em cada condição acima, e os dados obtidos submetidos à análise estatística. Os resultados mostram que não houve diferença estatisticamente significativa na proliferação e viabilidade celular entre os mioblastos tratados com US e as culturas controles após os diferentes períodos de incubação, em todos os parâmetros avaliados. Conclui-se que o US contínuo, nos parâmetros avaliados, não foi capaz de alterar a proliferação e viabilidade dos mioblastos.Therapeutic ultrasound (US is a biophysical stimulation resource widely used in order to promote better, faster muscle repair, but the effectiveness of continuous US in treating injuries is not fully established. The aim of the present in vitro study was to assess the effects of continuous ultrasound on viability and proliferation of skeletal muscle precursor cells (C2C12 myoblasts. C2C12 myoblasts were cultured in a medium containing 10% foetal bovine serum and irradiated with continuous ultrasound at 1 and 3 MHz frequencies, at intensities of 0.2 and 0.5 W/cm² for 2 and 5 minutes. Cell viability and proliferation were assessed after different incubation periods (24, 48 and 72 h. Non-irradiated groups served as control and data were

  12. Pilot randomized trial of therapeutic hypothermia with serial cranial ultrasound and 18-22 month follow-up for neonatal encephalopathy in a low resource hospital setting in uganda: study protocol

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    Costello Anthony

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is now convincing evidence that in industrialized countries therapeutic hypothermia for perinatal asphyxial encephalopathy increases survival with normal neurological function. However, the greatest burden of perinatal asphyxia falls in low and mid-resource settings where it is unclear whether therapeutic hypothermia is safe and effective. Aims Under the UCL Uganda Women's Health Initiative, a pilot randomized controlled trial in infants with perinatal asphyxia was set up in the special care baby unit in Mulago Hospital, a large public hospital with ~20,000 births in Kampala, Uganda to determine: (i The feasibility of achieving consent, neurological assessment, randomization and whole body cooling to a core temperature 33-34°C using water bottles (ii The temperature profile of encephalopathic infants with standard care (iii The pattern, severity and evolution of brain tissue injury as seen on cranial ultrasound and relation with outcome (iv The feasibility of neurodevelopmental follow-up at 18-22 months of age Methods/Design Ethical approval was obtained from Makerere University and Mulago Hospital. All infants were in-born. Parental consent for entry into the trial was obtained. Thirty-six infants were randomized either to standard care plus cooling (target rectal temperature of 33-34°C for 72 hrs, started within 3 h of birth or standard care alone. All other aspects of management were the same. Cooling was performed using water bottles filled with tepid tap water (25°C. Rectal, axillary, ambient and surface water bottle temperatures were monitored continuously for the first 80 h. Encephalopathy scoring was performed on days 1-4, a structured, scorable neurological examination and head circumference were performed on days 7 and 17. Cranial ultrasound was performed on days 1, 3 and 7 and scored. Griffiths developmental quotient, head circumference, neurological examination and assessment of gross motor function were

  13. Ultrasound diagnostics of thyroid diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kharchenko, Vladimir P.; Kotlyarov, Peter M.; Mogutov, Mikhail S.; Sencha, Alexander N.; Patrunov, Yury N.; Belyaev, Denis V.; Alexandrov, Yury K.

    2010-01-01

    This book is based on the authors' extensive practical experience in the use of modern ultrasound, and other radiological methods, in the diagnosis of thyroid diseases. The authors have analyzed more than 100,000 ultrasound examinations performed between 1995 and 2008 in patients with thyroid and parathyroid disease, as well as many thousands of diagnostic and therapeutic ultrasound-guided minimally invasive procedures. The opening chapters include discussion of current ultrasound techniques, pitfalls, and the specifics of ultrasound examination of the thyroid in children. Detailed attention is then devoted to findings in the normal thyroid and in the presence of diffuse and focal changes. Further chapters focus on such topics as ultrasound examination after thyroid surgery and ultrasound diagnosis of parathyroid disease, recurrent goiter, and neck masses. Ultrasound-guided minimally invasive techniques, such as fine-needle aspiration biopsy, percutaneous laser ablation, and ethanol and glucocorticoid injections, are considered in depth. This up-to-date and richly illustrated book will interest and assist specialists in ultrasound diagnostics, radiologists, endocrinologists, and neck surgeons. (orig.)

  14. Therapeutic response assessment using 3D ultrasound for hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer: Application of a personalized, 3D-printed tumor model using CT images.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ye Ra Choi

    Full Text Available To evaluate accuracy and reliability of three-dimensional ultrasound (3D US for response evaluation of hepatic metastasis from colorectal cancer (CRC using a personalized 3D-printed tumor model.Twenty patients with liver metastasis from CRC who underwent baseline and after chemotherapy CT, were retrospectively included. Personalized 3D-printed tumor models using CT were fabricated. Two radiologists measured volume of each 3D printing model using 3D US. With CT as a reference, we compared difference between CT and US tumor volume. The response evaluation was based on Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST criteria.3D US tumor volume showed no significant difference from CT volume (7.18 ± 5.44 mL, 8.31 ± 6.32 mL vs 7.42 ± 5.76 mL in CT, p>0.05. 3D US provided a high correlation coefficient with CT (r = 0.953, r = 0.97 as well as a high inter-observer intraclass correlation (0.978; 0.958-0.988. Regarding response, 3D US was in agreement with CT in 17 and 18 out of 20 patients for observer 1 and 2 with excellent agreement (κ = 0.961.3D US tumor volume using a personalized 3D-printed model is an accurate and reliable method for the response evaluation in comparison with CT tumor volume.

  15. Ultrasound in environmental engineering. Papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiehm, A; Neis, U [eds.

    1999-07-01

    This book presents recent research and state-of-the-art information on the scientific basis, modes of use, and engineering developments of ultrasound application in the field of environmental protection. The information is loosely grouped into the following themes: ultrasound and sonochemistry, design of sonoreactors, applications in water, waste water and sludge treatment: aggregation of suspended particles, degradation of hazardous pollutants, disinfection, disintegration of biosolids. Ultrasound is generated and applied at frequencies from 20 kHz to several MHz. Reactor design, applied intensity, duration of sonication, and physico-chemical parameters of the sonicated media influence ultrasound effects. Thus, ultrasound, at a first glance, is a complex and probably confusing matter. This book has been compiled from presentations held at the first workshop 'Ultrasound in Environmental Engineering' on March 22nd and 23rd, 1999, at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg in cooperation with the German Association for the Water Environment (ATV) and the DECHEMA e.V. (orig.)

  16. Therapeutic effects of marshmallow (Althaea officinalis L.) extract on plasma biochemical parameters of common carp infected with Aeromonas hydrophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banaee, Mahdi; Soleimany, Vahid; Nematdoost Haghi, Behzad

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated preclinical and clinical safety of marshmallow ( Althaea officinalis L.) extract as a naturopathic medicine in common carp deliberately infected with Aeromonas hydrophila . The fish were fed 0 (control), 2.50, 5.00 and 10.00 g of marshmallow extract for 60 days in a preclinical experiment and then, challenged with A. hydrophila for a 10-day experiment. Significant increases were observed in aspartate aminotransferase (AST), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase (ALP), creatine phosphokinase (CPK) activities and plasma creatinine levels in fish fed 10 g marshmallow extract per kg feed. However, alanine aminotransferase (ALT) significantly decreased on day 60. The fish fed 2.50 g marshmallow extract per kg feed indicated increased levels of total protein and globulin. There were no significant changes in albumin levels ( p > 0.05). 2.50 and 5.00 g marshmallow significantly decreased triglyceride and cholesterol levels and increased glucose levels ( p Marshmallow extract at 5.00 and 10.00 g can adjust plasma biochemical parameters in fish challenged with A. hydrophila . The results of preclinical studies and pharmaceutical toxicity of marshmallow extract revealed that dietary levels lower than 5.00 g were safe and effective. The results of this clinical study demonstrated that marshmallow extract (5.00 g kg -1 feed) can protect fish against A. hydrophila .

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... inserted into a man's rectum to view the prostate. Transvaginal ultrasound. The transducer is inserted into a ... Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview Images related to General Ultrasound Videos ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce ... the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and painless, and ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... be able to give a clearer picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as is necessary if medically indicated. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ...

  1. Prostate Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... be able to give a clearer picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as is necessary if medically indicated. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging of the pelvis uses sound waves to ...

  3. Interventional ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    VanSonnenberg, E.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 12 chapters and several case studies. Some of the chapter titles are: The Interplay of Ultrasound and Computed Tomography in the Planning and Execution of Interventional Procedures: Ulltrasound Guided Biopsy; Interventioal Genitourinary Sonography; Diagnosis and Treatment of Pericardial Effusion Using Ultrasonic Guidance; and New Ultrasound-Guided Interventional Procedures--Cholecystostomy, Pancreatography, Gastrostomy

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Pelvis Ultrasound imaging ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Ultrasound - Prostate Ultrasound of ...

  6. Ultrasound stethoscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E.C. Vourvouri (Eleni)

    2002-01-01

    textabstractIn this thesis we repmi the many evaluation studies with the hand-held ultrasound device in the assessment of different cardiac pathologies and in different clinical settings. The reason for using the tetm "ultrasound stethoscopy" is that these devices are augmenting our

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not use any ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning gives a clear picture of soft tissues that do not show up well on ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed over time. top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Ultrasound is widely available, easy-to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging uses ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide ...

  10. Tension-free vaginal tape versus lata fascia sling: The importance of transvulvar ultrasound in the assessment of relevant anatomical parameters in treatment of women with stress urinary incontinence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Teixeira Brandt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the relevance of transvulvar ultrasound in the assessment of anatomical differences induced by the lata fascia sling (LFS and tension-free vaginal tape (TVT procedures. Materials and Methods: Forty women with stress urinary incontinence (SUI, aged 30 to 60 years, have been treated with either LFS (20 patients or TVT (20 patients. The transvulvar ultrasound of the urethrovesical junction (UVJ and proximal urethra (PU has been used as the main investigational tool both pre- and post-operatively. The studied parameters were the vertical (VUVJD and horizontal (HUVJD UVJ distances, the pubourethral distance (PUD and the PU length. Results: The VUVJD did not vary significantly after the LFS surgery (P=0.10. The PUD became shorter (P=0.001 and the HUVJD became shorter only at rest (P=0.03 after the correction by LFS. The TVT procedure has led to shortening of the VUVJ displacement (P=0.0005 and of the PU length (P=0.02. Conclusions: The transvulvar ultrasound was of utmost importance in the demonstration that both the LFS and TVT surgical procedures elongate the PU, even though the LFS technique does it more efficiently. The LFS technique focus more on shortening the PUD and the TVT procedure focus more on the correction of the vertical UVJ displacement.

  11. 21 CFR 890.5860 - Ultrasound and muscle stimulator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., muscle spasms, and joint contractures, but not for the treatment of malignancies. The device also passes... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. 890.5860 Section... Ultrasound and muscle stimulator. (a) Ultrasound and muscle stimulator for use in applying therapeutic deep...

  12. Prediction of therapeutic response in steroid-treated pulmonary sarcoidosis. Evaluation of clinical parameters, bronchoalveolar lavage, gallium-67 lung scanning, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hollinger, W.M.; Staton, G.W. Jr.; Fajman, W.A.; Gilman, M.J.; Pine, J.R.; Check, I.J.

    1985-01-01

    To find a pretreatment predictor of steroid responsiveness in pulmonary sarcoidosis the authors studied 21 patients before and after steroid treatment by clinical evaluation, pulmonary function tests, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), gallium-67 lung scan, and serum angiotensin-converting enzyme (SACE) level. Although clinical score, forced vital capacity (FVC), BAL percent lymphocytes (% lymphs), quantitated gallium-67 lung uptake, and SACE levels all improved with therapy, only the pretreatment BAL % lymphs correlated with the improvement in FVC (r = 0.47, p less than 0.05). Pretreatment BAL % lymphs of greater than or equal to 35% predicted improvement in FVC of 10/11 patients, whereas among 10 patients with BAL % lymphs less than 35%, 5 patients improved and 5 deteriorated. Clinical score, pulmonary function parameters, quantitated gallium-67 lung uptake, and SACE level used alone, in combination with BAL % lymphs or in combination with each other, did not improve this predictive value. The authors conclude that steroid therapy improves a number of clinical and laboratory parameters in sarcoidosis, but only the pretreatment BAL % lymphs are useful in predicting therapeutic responsiveness

  13. Droplets, Bubbles and Ultrasound Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpak, Oleksandr; Verweij, Martin; de Jong, Nico; Versluis, Michel

    2016-01-01

    The interaction of droplets and bubbles with ultrasound has been studied extensively in the last 25 years. Microbubbles are broadly used in diagnostic and therapeutic medical applications, for instance, as ultrasound contrast agents. They have a similar size as red blood cells, and thus are able to circulate within blood vessels. Perfluorocarbon liquid droplets can be a potential new generation of microbubble agents as ultrasound can trigger their conversion into gas bubbles. Prior to activation, they are at least five times smaller in diameter than the resulting bubbles. Together with the violent nature of the phase-transition, the droplets can be used for local drug delivery, embolotherapy, HIFU enhancement and tumor imaging. Here we explain the basics of bubble dynamics, described by the Rayleigh-Plesset equation, bubble resonance frequency, damping and quality factor. We show the elegant calculation of the above characteristics for the case of small amplitude oscillations by linearizing the equations. The effect and importance of a bubble coating and effective surface tension are also discussed. We give the main characteristics of the power spectrum of bubble oscillations. Preceding bubble dynamics, ultrasound propagation is introduced. We explain the speed of sound, nonlinearity and attenuation terms. We examine bubble ultrasound scattering and how it depends on the wave-shape of the incident wave. Finally, we introduce droplet interaction with ultrasound. We elucidate the ultrasound-focusing concept within a droplets sphere, droplet shaking due to media compressibility and droplet phase-conversion dynamics.

  14. O ultrassom terapêutico na medula espinhal acelera a regeneração do nervo ciático de ratos Therapeutic ultrasound on the spinal cord accelerates regeneration of the sciatic nerve in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Guadallini Jatte

    2011-01-01

    sciatic functional index (SFI was measured with specific software. RESULTS: The SFI during the first and last week of treatment was -59.12 and -12.55 in Group 1, -53.31 and -1.32 in Group 2, indicating a 79% and 97% improvement, respectively, but differences between groups were only significant (p<0.05 during the third week. CONCLUSION: The authors conclude that low intensity therapeutic ultrasound enhances nerve regeneration, with significance during the 3rd week of treatment. Level of Evidence: Level II, prospective comparative study.

  15. EFSUMB Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound (INVUS), Part IV - EUS-guided interventions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jenssen, C; Hocke, M; Fusaroli, P

    2016-01-01

    The fourth part of the European Federation of Societies for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology (EFSUMB) Guidelines on Interventional Ultrasound describes general aspects of endoscopic ultrasound-guided diagnostic and therapeutic interventions and assesses the evidence for endoscopic ultrasound-gu...

  16. Fetal Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... isn't recommended simply to determine a baby's sex. Similarly, fetal ultrasound isn't recommended solely for the purpose of producing keepsake videos or pictures. If your health care provider doesn' ...

  17. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  18. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  20. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ... well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may be repeated as often as ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exams are also used to monitor the health and development of an embryo or fetus during ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on the skin. High-frequency sound waves are transmitted from the ... the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and receive the returning sound waves), ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... no ionizing radiation. Ultrasound scanning may be able to give a clearer picture of soft tissues that do ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... use different transducers (with different capabilities) during a single exam. The transducer sends out high-frequency sound ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... collects the sounds that bounce back and a computer then uses those sound waves to create an ... Ultrasound scanners consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a ...

  8. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  9. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... is located directly in front of the rectum, so the ultrasound exam is performed transrectally in order ... A follow-up examination may also be necessary so that any change in a known abnormality can ...

  10. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the region of the prostate. A biopsy ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate ... physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and submarines. The ultrasound image is immediately visible ... principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships and fishermen. When a sound wave strikes an ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. For ... make secure contact with the body and eliminate air pockets between the transducer and the skin that ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... a follow-up exam is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... is smaller than the standard speculum used when performing a Pap test . A protective cover is placed ... of soft tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... scanning or sonography , involves the use of a small transducer (probe) and ultrasound gel placed directly on ... the child prior to the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... less than 20 minutes. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound ... in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. Rarely, a small ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound images are reviewed. top of page What will I experience during and after the procedure? For ... in the region of the prostate. A biopsy will add time to the procedure. If a Doppler ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... arteries and veins in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or ... diagnose symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams ...

  2. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the best way to see if treatment is working or if a finding is stable or changed ...

  3. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... and development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the Obstetrical Ultrasound page for more information . ... move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such ... and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ... barium exams, CT scanning , and MRI are the methods of choice in such a setting. Large patients ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  9. Ultrasound imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wells, P.N.T.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasound is a form of energy which consists of mechanical vibrations the frequencies of which are so high that they are above the range of human hearing. The lower frequency limit of the ultrasonic spectrum may generally be taken to be about 20 kHz. Most biomedical applications of ultrasound employ frequencies in the range 1-15 MHz. At these frequencies, the wavelength is in the range 1.5 - 0.1 mm in soft tissues, and narrow beams of ultrasound can be generated which propagate through such tissues without excessive attenuation. This chapter begins with brief reviews of the physics of diagnostic ultrasound pulse-echo imaging methods and Doppler imaging methods. The remainder of the chapter is a resume of the applications of ultrasonic imaging to physiological measurement

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... be necessary. Your doctor will explain the exact reason why another exam is requested. Sometimes a follow- ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... frequently used to evaluate the reproductive and urinary systems. Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive and does not use ... and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without x-ray exposure. ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... be asked to drink water prior to the examination to fill your bladder. Leave jewelry at home ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... top of page Additional Information and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page ... to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please contact your ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect an abnormal growth within the prostate. help ... end of their bowel (rectum) removed during prior surgery are not good candidates for ultrasound of the ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... tip of the transducer is smaller than the standard speculum used when performing a Pap test . A ... both sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... in the abdomen, arms, legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs ... or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view ...

  19. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... is enlarged, also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment ... caption Related Articles and Media Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) (Enlargement of the Prostate) Prostate Cancer Ultrasound- and ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the exam. Bringing books, small toys, music or games can help to distract the child and make ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound permits evaluation of the uterus and ovaries in planes that ... a special study usually done to provide detailed evaluation of the prostate gland, involves inserting a specialized ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the examination process. To ensure a smooth experience, it often helps to explain the procedure to the ... on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate a nodule found during ... difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such ...

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... sexes without x-ray exposure. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... is done because a potential abnormality needs further evaluation with additional views or a special imaging technique. ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the ... tumors other disorders of the urinary bladder In children, pelvic ultrasound can help evaluate: pelvic masses pelvic ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... uterus). Sonohysterography allows for a more in-depth investigation of the uterine cavity . Three-dimensional (3-D) ... to-use and less expensive than other imaging methods. Ultrasound imaging is extremely safe and does not ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... is Pelvic Ultrasound Imaging? What are some common uses of the procedure? How should I prepare? What does the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... quickly. The ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite ... display screen that looks like a computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Prostate Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

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    Full Text Available ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please note RadiologyInfo.org is not a medical facility. Please ... is further reviewed by committees from the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of ...

  13. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms experienced by women such as: pelvic pain abnormal vaginal bleeding other menstrual problems Ultrasound exams also ... endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some physicians also use 3-D ...

  14. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... The ultrasound exam room may have a television. Feel free to ask for your child's favorite channel. ... performed over an area of tenderness, you may feel pressure or minor pain from the transducer. Once ...

  15. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... also known as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) , with measurements acquired as needed for any treatment planning. detect ... areas of the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. For ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ovarian cysts and uterine fibroids ovarian or uterine cancers A transvaginal ultrasound is usually performed to view ... detect: uterine anomalies uterine scars endometrial polyps fibroids cancer, especially in patients with abnormal uterine bleeding Some ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... rectum. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? A transrectal ultrasound of the ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... kidneys. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? In women, a pelvic ultrasound ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  19. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and ... standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  20. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of ...

  1. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... various body organs such as the liver or kidneys. top of page What are some common uses ... women, a pelvic ultrasound exam can help identify: kidney stones bladder tumors other disorders of the urinary ...

  2. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the myometrium (muscular walls of the uterus). Sonohysterography allows for a ... and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without x-ray exposure. ...

  3. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  4. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... echoes from the tissues in the body. The principles are similar to sonar used by boats and ... work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles involved in the sonar used by bats, ships ...

  5. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... is at high risk for cancer. In this case, a biopsy is performed and an ultrasound probe ... will share the results with you. In some cases, the radiologist may discuss results with you at ...

  6. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ovaries. Transvaginal ultrasound also evaluates the myometrium (muscular walls of the uterus). Sonohysterography allows for a more ... needle insertion) is usually minimal because the rectal wall is relatively insensitive to the pain in the ...

  7. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... uses sound waves to produce pictures of a man’s prostate gland and to help diagnose symptoms such ... also called transrectal ultrasound, provides images of a man's prostate gland and surrounding tissue. The exam typically ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... pain ambiguous genitalia and anomalies of pelvic organs early or delayed puberty in girls Pelvic ultrasound is ... sensitive to motion, and an active or crying child can prolong the examination process. To ensure a ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... consist of a console containing a computer and electronics, a video display screen and a transducer that ... the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... insertion. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... gel. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  12. Low-Frequency Ultrasound Therapy in Combination Treatment of Patients with Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YE.E. LAVRINENKO

    2013-04-01

    Results. The beginning of therapeutic effect was observed after 2 procedures of the ultrasound exposure. The maximum effect is appeared after 8–10 treatment sessions. The positive dynamics of complex treatment is improving the general state of health, a disappearance of asthenization, and a decrease in the symptoms of cardiovascular disorders, achieving faster compensation of carbohydrate metabolism. The course of treatment contributed to the hyperglycemia reduction in patients with newly detected type 2 DM. After ultrasound treatment, the authors noted a positive dynamics of clinical symptoms: an improvement of the general health status, a decrease in fatigue, an improvement of psycho-emotional indices, disappearance of pain in the right upper quadrant, and a decrease in liver size in all the patients under study. Conclusions. The use of low-frequency ultrasound therapy on cutaneous projection of the liver in patients with type 2 DM promotes the normalization both fasting and postprandial glycemia. The effect of low-frequency ultrasound on cutaneous projection of the liver is significantly decreasing parameters that characterize the pancreatic insulin synthesizing function (immunoreactive insulin, C-peptide in patients with newly diagnosed type 2 DM and a BMI > 25 kg/m2. Low-frequency ultrasound reduces the glucagon secretion and thereby positively affects the hepatic gluconeogenesis. Ultrasound therapy can be used in the complex treatment of patients with newly diagnosed type 2 DM.

  13. Cranial Ultrasound/Head Ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... used to screen for brain conditions associated with prematurity, such as bleeding or brain tissue damage as ... or crying child will slow the examination process. Large patients are more difficult to image by ultrasound, ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart ... Articles and Media Angioplasty and Vascular Stenting Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy Obstetric Ultrasound Ultrasound - Prostate Biopsies - Overview ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... kidneys. There are three types of Doppler ultrasound: Color Doppler uses a computer to convert Doppler measurements ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging uses sound waves to produce pictures of the inside of ... pictures of the inside of the body using sound waves. Ultrasound imaging, also called ultrasound scanning or ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... those sound waves to create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in ... ultrasound study may be part of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? What is General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound is safe and ... be heard with every heartbeat. top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Ultrasound ...

  19. Estimation of the distribution of low-intensity ultrasound mechanical index as a parameter affecting the proliferation of spermatogonia stem cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moghaddam, Zeinab Hormozi; Mokhtari-Dizaji, Manijhe; Movahedin, Mansoureh; Ravari, Mohammad Ehsan

    2017-07-01

    Considering the use of physical and mechanical stimulation, such as low-intensity ultrasound for proliferation and differentiation of stem cells, it is essential to understand the physical and acoustical mechanisms of acoustic waves in vitro. Mechanical index is used for quantifying acoustic cavitation and the relationship between acoustic pressure and the frequency. In this study, modeling of the mechanical index was applied to provide treatment protocol and to understand the effective physical processes on reproducibility of stem cells. Due to low intensity of ultrasound, Rayleigh integral model has been used for acoustic pressure computation. The acoustic pressure and mechanical index equations are modeled and solved to estimate optimal mechanical index for 28, 40, 150kHz and 1MHz frequencies. This model are solved in different intensities and distances from transducer in cylindrical coordinates. Based on the results of the mechanical index, regions with threshold mechanical index of 0.7 were identified for extracting of radiation arrangement to cell medium. Acoustic pressure distribution along the axial and radial was extracted. In order to validate the results of the modeling, the acoustic pressure in the water and near field depth was measured by a piston hydrophone. Results of modeling and experiments show that the model is consistent well to experimental results with 0.91 and 0.90 correlation of coefficient (pmechanical index is more effective on enhancing the proliferation rate of the spermatogonia stem cells during the seven days of culture. In contrast, higher mechanical index has a harmful effect on the spermatogonial stem cells. Thus, considering cavitation threshold of different materials is necessary to find effective mechanical index ranges on proliferation for the used frequencies. This acoustic propagation model and ultrasound mechanical index assessments can be used with acceptable accuracy, for the extraction special arrangement of acoustic

  20. [Ultrasound of spleen and retroperitoneum].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salcedo Joven, I; Segura-Grau, A; Díaz Rodríguez, N; Segura-Cabral, J M

    2016-09-01

    Ultrasound provides data of extremely great value when studying spleen pathology, being diagnostic in splenomegaly and splenic trauma, as well as offering a good approach to the diagnosis of both benign and malignant focal pathology, particularly lymphoma. However, for the evaluation of adrenal and retroperitoneal diseases, other techniques such as CT or MRI are more suitable, even though ultrasound is still an excellent screening and monitoring method, as well as being useful in non-invasive therapeutic approaches. Copyright © 2014 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Laparoscopic ultrasound and gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, T. Michael; Vu, Huan

    2001-05-01

    The management of gastrointestinal malignancies continues to evolve with the latest available therapeutic and diagnostic modalities. There are currently two driving forces in the management of these cancers: the benefits of minimally invasive surgery so thoroughly demonstrated by laparoscopic surgery, and the shift toward neoadjuvant chemotherapy for upper gastrointestinal cancers. In order to match the appropriate treatment to the disease, accurate staging is imperative. No technological advances have combined these two needs as much as laparascopic ultrasound to evaluate the liver and peritoneal cavity. We present a concise review of the latest application of laparoscopic ultrasound in management of gastrointestinal malignancy.

  2. Bone volume fraction and structural parameters for estimation of mechanical stiffness and failure load of human cancellous bone samples; in-vitro comparison of ultrasound transit time spectroscopy and X-ray μCT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alomari, Ali Hamed; Wille, Marie-Luise; Langton, Christian M

    2018-02-01

    Conventional mechanical testing is the 'gold standard' for assessing the stiffness (N mm -1 ) and strength (MPa) of bone, although it is not applicable in-vivo since it is inherently invasive and destructive. The mechanical integrity of a bone is determined by its quantity and quality; being related primarily to bone density and structure respectively. Several non-destructive, non-invasive, in-vivo techniques have been developed and clinically implemented to estimate bone density, both areal (dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA)) and volumetric (quantitative computed tomography (QCT)). Quantitative ultrasound (QUS) parameters of velocity and attenuation are dependent upon both bone quantity and bone quality, although it has not been possible to date to transpose one particular QUS parameter into separate estimates of quantity and quality. It has recently been shown that ultrasound transit time spectroscopy (UTTS) may provide an accurate estimate of bone density and hence quantity. We hypothesised that UTTS also has the potential to provide an estimate of bone structure and hence quality. In this in-vitro study, 16 human femoral bone samples were tested utilising three techniques; UTTS, micro computed tomography (μCT), and mechanical testing. UTTS was utilised to estimate bone volume fraction (BV/TV) and two novel structural parameters, inter-quartile range of the derived transit time (UTTS-IQR) and the transit time of maximum proportion of sonic-rays (TTMP). μCT was utilised to derive BV/TV along with several bone structure parameters. A destructive mechanical test was utilised to measure the stiffness and strength (failure load) of the bone samples. BV/TV was calculated from the derived transit time spectrum (TTS); the correlation coefficient (R 2 ) with μCT-BV/TV was 0.885. For predicting mechanical stiffness and strength, BV/TV derived by both μCT and UTTS provided the strongest correlation with mechanical stiffness (R 2 =0.567 and 0.618 respectively) and

  3. Comparison of therapeutic efficacy and clinical parameters between recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone and thyroid hormone withdrawal in high-dose radioiodine treatment with differentiated thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Se Hun; Na, Chang Ju; Kim, Jeong Hun; Han, Yeon Hee; KIm, Hee Kwon; Jeong, Hwan Jeong; Sohn, Myung Hee; Lim, Seok Tae [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Chonbuk National University Medical School and Hospital, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    High-dose radioiodine treatment (HD-RIT) after injection of recombinant human thyroid stimulating hormone (rh-TSH) has become widely used. This study compared the therapeutic efficacy of HD-RIT and clinical parameters between rh-TSH supplement and thyroid hormone withdrawal (THW) after total thyroidectomy in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer. We retrospectively reviewed 266 patients (47 male and 219 female; age, 49.0 ± 10.9 years) with differentiated thyroid cancer detected from September 2011 to September 2012. Patients comprised THW (217, 81.6 %) and rh-TSH (49, 18.4 %). Inclusion criteria were: first HD-RIT; any TN stage; absence of distant metastasis. To evaluate the complete ablation of the remnant thyroid tissue or metastasis, we reviewed stimulated serum thyroglobulin (sTg), I-123 whole-body scan (RxWBS) on T4 off-state, and thyroid ultrasonography (US) or [F-18]-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (F-18 FDG PET/CT) 6–8 months after HD-RIT. We defined a complete ablation state when all three of the follow-up conditions were satisfied; <2.0 ng/ml of the sTg, I-123 RxWBS (−), and thyroid US or F-18 FDG PET/CT (−). If one of the three was positive, ablation was considered incomplete. We also compared various clinical biomarkers (body weight, body mass index, liver and kidney function) between THW and rh-TSH groups. The rates of complete ablation were 73.7 % (160/217) for the THW group and 73.5 % (36/49) for the rh-TSH group. There was no significant difference between the two groups (p = 0.970). The follow-up aspartate transaminase (p = 0.001) and alanine transaminase (p = 0.001) were significantly higher in the THW group. The renal function parameters of blood urea nitrogen (p = 0.001) and creatinine (p = 0.005) tended to increase in the THW group. The change of body weight was + Δ0.96 (±1.9) kg for the THW group and was decreased by -Δ1.39 (±1.5) kg for the rh-TSH group. The change

  4. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the prostate. help diagnose the cause of a man's infertility. A transrectal ultrasound of the prostate gland is typically used to help diagnose symptoms such as: a nodule felt by a physician during a routine physical exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated ...

  5. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and Resources RTAnswers.org Radiation Therapy for Gynecologic Cancers Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer top of page This page was reviewed on ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. ... Images related to Ultrasound - Pelvis Sponsored by Please ...

  6. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within the body and then back again. Ultrasound ...

  7. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body tissue through which the sound travels. A small amount of gel is put on the skin to allow the sound waves to travel from the transducer to the examined area within the body and then back again. Ultrasound ...

  8. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound exams are also used to monitor the health and development of an embryo or fetus during pregnancy. See the ... can help to identify and evaluate a variety of urinary and reproductive system disorders in both sexes without x-ray exposure. ...

  9. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... of the reflected sound waves (called the Doppler effect). A computer collects and processes the sounds and creates graphs ... Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally ... known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  10. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  11. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... symptoms such as difficulty urinating or an elevated blood test result. It’s also used to investigate a nodule ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time ...

  12. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... in which needles are used to extract a sample of cells from organs for laboratory testing. Doppler ultrasound images can help the physician to see and evaluate: blockages to blood flow (such as clots) narrowing of vessels tumors ...

  13. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... exam or prostate cancer screening exam. an elevated blood test result. difficulty urinating. Because ultrasound provides real-time images, it also can be used to guide procedures such as needle biopsies , in which a needle is used to sample cells (tissue) from an abnormal area in the ...

  14. Prostate Ultrasound

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    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound causes no health problems and may ...

  15. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no radiation exposure to the ... tissues that do not show up well on x-ray images. Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for ...

  16. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  17. Prostate Ultrasound

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time it takes for the ultrasound signal to return from the area within the patient that is being examined to the transducer (the device placed on the patient's skin to send and ...

  18. Ultrasound -- Pelvis

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    Full Text Available ... the patient. Because ultrasound images are captured in real-time, they can show the structure and movement of ... by a computer, which in turn creates a real-time picture on the monitor. One or more frames ...

  19. Obstetrical ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bundy, A.L.

    1988-01-01

    The use of diagnostic ultrasound in obstetrics may provide fuel for legal action. While most legal implications of this relatively new imaging modality are purely speculative, some have already given rise to legal action. Several situations will likely provide a basis for the courts to find against the physician. The failure to perform a sonogram when clinically indicated will most likely be the strongest plaintiff argument. Other major concerns include the use and availability of state-of-the-art equipment, as well as interpretation of the scans by a trained physician. Obstetrical ultrasound is usually performed by a radiologist or obstetrician. However, many physicians performing these examinations have had little or no formal training in the field. While this is now being remedied by the respective board examines who require a certain amount of training, it may not be enough. When ultrasound-related cases reach the courts, the involved physicians will most likely be regarded as experts in the field and, therefore, will be held to a very high standard of care. This would be difficult to achieve without formal training. At the present time, the American Board of Radiology requires more training time in ultrasound than the American Board of Obstetrics and Gynecology

  20. Design of a Thermoacoustic Sensor for Low Intensity Ultrasound Measurements Based on an Artificial Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jida Xing

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In therapeutic ultrasound applications, accurate ultrasound output intensities are crucial because the physiological effects of therapeutic ultrasound are very sensitive to the intensity and duration of these applications. Although radiation force balance is a benchmark technique for measuring ultrasound intensity and power, it is costly, difficult to operate, and compromised by noise vibration. To overcome these limitations, the development of a low-cost, easy to operate, and vibration-resistant alternative device is necessary for rapid ultrasound intensity measurement. Therefore, we proposed and validated a novel two-layer thermoacoustic sensor using an artificial neural network technique to accurately measure low ultrasound intensities between 30 and 120 mW/cm2. The first layer of the sensor design is a cylindrical absorber made of plexiglass, followed by a second layer composed of polyurethane rubber with a high attenuation coefficient to absorb extra ultrasound energy. The sensor determined ultrasound intensities according to a temperature elevation induced by heat converted from incident acoustic energy. Compared with our previous one-layer sensor design, the new two-layer sensor enhanced the ultrasound absorption efficiency to provide more rapid and reliable measurements. Using a three-dimensional model in the K-wave toolbox, our simulation of the ultrasound propagation process demonstrated that the two-layer design is more efficient than the single layer design. We also integrated an artificial neural network algorithm to compensate for the large measurement offset. After obtaining multiple parameters of the sensor characteristics through calibration, the artificial neural network is built to correct temperature drifts and increase the reliability of our thermoacoustic measurements through iterative training about ten seconds. The performance of the artificial neural network method was validated through a series of experiments. Compared

  1. Ultrasound-guided drug delivery in cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chowdhury, Sayan Mullick; Lee, Tae Hwa; Willmann, Jugen K. [Dept. of Radiology, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford (United States)

    2017-07-15

    Recent advancements in ultrasound and microbubble (USMB) mediated drug delivery technology has shown that this approach can improve spatially confined delivery of drugs and genes to target tissues while reducing systemic dose and toxicity. The mechanism behind enhanced delivery of therapeutics is sonoporation, the formation of openings in the vasculature, induced by ultrasound-triggered oscillations and destruction of microbubbles. In this review, progress and challenges of USMB mediated drug delivery are summarized, with special focus on cancer therapy.

  2. Ultrasound-guided drug delivery in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sayan Mullick Chowdhury

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent advancements in ultrasound and microbubble (USMB mediated drug delivery technology has shown that this approach can improve spatially confined delivery of drugs and genes to target tissues while reducing systemic dose and toxicity. The mechanism behind enhanced delivery of therapeutics is sonoporation, the formation of openings in the vasculature, induced by ultrasound-triggered oscillations and destruction of microbubbles. In this review, progress and challenges of USMB mediated drug delivery are summarized, with special focus on cancer therapy.

  3. Is the propagation speed of ultrasound in human organs a diagnostic parameter for tissue characterization? Evaluation using the liver parenchyma in children and adolescents as an example; Die Schallleitgeschwindigkeit im menschlichen Gewebe. Ein diagnostisch verwertbarer Parameter? Evaluation am Beispiel der Leber bei Kindern und Jugendlichen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Born, M. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Radiologische Klinik - Kinderradiologie; Franke, I. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Kinderklinik

    2011-09-15

    New sonographic machines permit the measurement of the propagation speed of ultrasound (PSU) in humans. The liver seems to be an appropriate organ for examining whether the PSU may be used as a diagnostic parameter for tissue characterization since the liver is easily accessible to sonography and its variable content of fat impacts the PSU. Purpose: To determine whether there is a measurable correlation between obesity and PSU in the liver. Methods: In 69 children and adolescents, the PSU in the liver was measured sonographically and correlated to BMI, age, size and weight of the children. Results: A strong correlation was found between the PSU in the liver and the BMI. The PSU was significantly lower in obese children (1507 m/s) than in children with normal body weight (1564 m/s). Conclusion: PSU seems to be promising as an additional diagnostic parameter for characterizing liver tissue. Further evaluation is necessary. (orig.)

  4. Influence of treatment with alendronate on the speed of sound, an ultrasound parameter, of the calcaneus in postmenopausal Japanese women with osteoporosis: a clinical practice-based observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwamoto J

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Jun Iwamoto,1 Tetsuya Takada,2 Yoshihiro Sato,3 Hideo Matsumoto11Institute for Integrated Sports Medicine, Keio University School of Medicine, Tokyo, 2Department of Internal Medicine, Hiyoshi Medical Clinic, Kanagawa, 3Department of Neurology, Mitate Hospital, Fukuoka, JapanPurpose: The influence of alendronate (ALN treatment on the quantitative ultrasound parameters of the calcaneus remains to be established in Japanese patients. The aim of the present clinical practice-based observational study was to examine the influence of ALN treatment for 1 year on the speed of sound (SOS of the calcaneus and bone turnover markers in postmenopausal Japanese women with osteoporosis.Patients and methods: Forty-five postmenopausal Japanese women with osteoporosis who had received treatment with ALN for more than 1 year were enrolled in the study. The SOS and bone turnover markers were monitored over 1 year of ALN treatment.Results: The urinary levels of cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen and serum levels of alkaline phosphatase decreased significantly from the baseline values (–44.9% at 3 months and –22.2% at 12 months, respectively. The SOS increased modestly, but significantly, from the baseline value (0.6% at both 6 and 12 months. The percentage decrease in the urinary levels of cross-linked N-terminal telopeptides of type I collagen at 3 months was significantly correlated with the percentage increase in the SOS only at 6 months (correlation coefficient, 0.299.Conclusion: The present study confirmed that ALN treatment suppressed bone turnover, producing a clinically significant increase in the SOS of the calcaneus in postmenopausal Japanese women with osteoporosis.Keywords: postmenopausal osteoporosis, quantitative ultrasound (QUS, SOS, bone turnover, biochemical markers

  5. Therapeutic whole-body hypothermia reduces mortality in severe traumatic brain injury if the cooling index is sufficiently high: meta-analyses of the effect of single cooling parameters and their integrated measure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olah, Emoke; Poto, Laszlo; Hegyi, Peter; Szabo, Imre; Hartmann, Petra; Solymar, Margit; Petervari, Erika; Balasko, Marta; Habon, Tamas; Rumbus, Zoltan; Tenk, Judit; Rostas, Ildiko; Weinberg, Jordan; Romanovsky, Andrej A; Garami, Andras

    2018-04-21

    Therapeutic hypothermia was investigated repeatedly as a tool to improve the outcome of severe traumatic brain injury (TBI), but previous clinical trials and meta-analyses found contradictory results. We aimed to determine the effectiveness of therapeutic whole-body hypothermia on the mortality of adult patients with severe TBI by using a novel approach of meta-analysis. We searched the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases from inception to February 2017. The identified human studies were evaluated regarding statistical, clinical, and methodological designs to ensure inter-study homogeneity. We extracted data on TBI severity, body temperature, mortality, and cooling parameters; then we calculated the cooling index, an integrated measure of therapeutic hypothermia. Forest plot of all identified studies showed no difference in the outcome of TBI between cooled and not cooled patients, but inter-study heterogeneity was high. On the contrary, by meta-analysis of RCTs which were homogenous with regards to statistical, clinical designs and precisely reported the cooling protocol, we showed decreased odds ratio for mortality in therapeutic hypothermia compared to no cooling. As independent factors, milder and longer cooling, and rewarming at < 0.25°C/h were associated with better outcome. Therapeutic hypothermia was beneficial only if the cooling index (measure of combination of cooling parameters) was sufficiently high. We conclude that high methodological and statistical inter-study heterogeneity could underlie the contradictory results obtained in previous studies. By analyzing methodologically homogenous studies, we show that cooling improves the outcome of severe TBI and this beneficial effect depends on certain cooling parameters and on their integrated measure, the cooling index.

  6. Ultrasound therapy applicators for controlled thermal modification of tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdette, E. Clif; Lichtenstiger, Carol; Rund, Laurie; Keralapura, Mallika; Gossett, Chad; Stahlhut, Randy; Neubauer, Paul; Komadina, Bruce; Williams, Emery; Alix, Chris; Jensen, Tor; Schook, Lawrence; Diederich, Chris J.

    2011-03-01

    Heat therapy has long been used for treatments in dermatology and sports medicine. The use of laser, RF, microwave, and more recently, ultrasound treatment, for psoriasis, collagen reformation, and skin tightening has gained considerable interest over the past several years. Numerous studies and commercial devices have demonstrated the efficacy of these methods for treatment of skin disorders. Despite these promising results, current systems remain highly dependent on operator skill, and cannot effectively treat effectively because there is little or no control of the size, shape, and depth of the target zone. These limitations make it extremely difficult to obtain consistent treatment results. The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility for using acoustic energy for controlled dose delivery sufficient to produce collagen modification for the treatment of skin tissue in the dermal and sub-dermal layers. We designed and evaluated a curvilinear focused ultrasound device for treating skin disorders such as psoriasis, stimulation of wound healing, tightening of skin through shrinkage of existing collagen and stimulation of new collagen formation, and skin cancer. Design parameters were examined using acoustic pattern simulations and thermal modeling. Acute studies were performed in 201 freshly-excised samples of young porcine underbelly skin tissue and 56 in-vivo treatment areas in 60- 80 kg pigs. These were treated with ultrasound (9-11MHz) focused in the deep dermis. Dose distribution was analyzed and gross pathology assessed. Tissue shrinkage was measured based on fiducial markers and video image registration and analyzed using NIH Image-J software. Comparisons were made between RF and focused ultrasound for five energy ranges. In each experimental series, therapeutic dose levels (60degC) were attained at 2-5mm depth. Localized collagen changes ranged from 1-3% for RF versus 8-15% for focused ultrasound. Therapeutic ultrasound applied at high

  7. Ultrasound in environmental engineering. Papers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiehm, A.; Neis, U. [eds.

    1999-07-01

    This book presents recent research and state-of-the-art information on the scientific basis, modes of use, and engineering developments of ultrasound application in the field of environmental protection. The information is loosely grouped into the following themes: ultrasound and sonochemistry, design of sonoreactors, applications in water, waste water and sludge treatment: aggregation of suspended particles, degradation of hazardous pollutants, disinfection, disintegration of biosolids. Ultrasound is generated and applied at frequencies from 20 kHz to several MHz. Reactor design, applied intensity, duration of sonication, and physico-chemical parameters of the sonicated media influence ultrasound effects. Thus, ultrasound, at a first glance, is a complex and probably confusing matter. This book has been compiled from presentations held at the first workshop 'Ultrasound in Environmental Engineering' on March 22nd and 23rd, 1999, at the Technical University of Hamburg-Harburg in cooperation with the German Association for the Water Environment (ATV) and the DECHEMA e.V. (orig.)

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page How is the procedure performed? For most ultrasound exams, you will be positioned lying face- ... Ultrasound examinations are painless and easily tolerated by most patients. Ultrasound exams in which the transducer is ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ...

  11. Ultrasound guided supraclavicular block.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hanumanthaiah, Deepak

    2013-09-01

    Ultrasound guided regional anaesthesia is becoming increasingly popular. The supraclavicular block has been transformed by ultrasound guidance into a potentially safe superficial block. We reviewed the techniques of performing supraclavicular block with special focus on ultrasound guidance.

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... D images. A Doppler ultrasound study may be part of an ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called ... terms of the distance traveled per unit of time, rather than as a color picture. It can ...

  13. Safety of Medical Diagnostic Ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breyer, B.

    1998-01-01

    Large numbers of people (both sick and healthy) are routinely exposed to ultrasound waves. We shall discuss wave parameters and scanner properties that are relevant to the safety aspect. This includes central pulse frequency, pulse length, intensity (ISPTA and others), focusing, pulse repetition frequency, pulse pressure, etc. Since the transmitted ultrasound power has steadily been increasing during the last two decades, the problems are becoming more serious with time. Doppler methods have gained importance and 'popularity, which additionally increases ultrasound power requirements since the reflectivity of red blood cells is so small that the backscattered pressure is about 100 times less than that from soft tissue structures in the body. Main mechanisms that can potentially present hazard are heating and cavitation. The basic parameter used to assess thermal hazard is ISPTA and the optimal predictor of cavitation hazard is the peak rarefractional pressure. The hazard of heating-up can be summarized in saying that temperatures up to 38.5 o C are safe, while temperatures above 41 o C are definitely not. Care must be taken to stay within the safe zone. However, there does not exist a confirmed report of any type of hazardous effects on humans using intensities presently applied in diagnostic ultrasound scanners. Taking this into account, various international bodies have put limits to the application of ultrasound, which is best summarized in the FDA (USA) regulation that diagnostic apparatus may have an output of maximally 720 mW/cm 2 (derated) provided thermal and mechanical properties are indicated (onscreen) by properly defined Thermal Indices (TI) and Mechanical Index (MI). These aspects shall be discussed in some detail. We shall give the rules for the operator to apply ultrasound with minimal hazard. The general conclusion is that diagnostic ultrasound, as presently known, may be used whenever a qualified expert expects essential medical benefit for the

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... and treat medical conditions. Conventional ultrasound displays the images in thin, flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3- ...

  16. Vascular ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, D B; Ricci, M A

    1998-04-01

    Surgeon-interpreted diagnostic ultrasound has become the preferred screening test and often the definitive test for the diagnosis of arterial stenosis, aneurysm, and venous thrombosis. As a modality for surveillance, its noninvasive quality makes it particularly appealing as the test of choice to screen patients for abdominal aortic aneurysms or to perform follow-up examinations on those patients with a carotid endartectomy or in situ bypass grafts. The increasing reliance on intraoperative duplex imaging of vascular procedures demands that the surgeon learn the skills to perform the studies without a technologist or radiologist to interpret the examination.

  17. Deconvolution of ultrasound images

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    1992-01-01

    Based on physical models, it is indicated that the received pressure field in ultrasound B-mode images can be described by a convolution between a tissue reflection signal and the emitted pressure field. This result is used in a description of current image formation and in formulating a new...... processing scheme. The suggested estimator can take into account the dispersive attenuation, the temporal and spatial variation of the pulse, and the change in reflection strength and signal-to-noise ratio. Details of the algorithm and the estimation of parameters to be used are given. The performance...

  18. CT and Ultrasound Guided Stereotactic High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Bradford J.; Yanof, J.; Frenkel, V.; Viswanathan, A.; Dromi, S.; Oh, K.; Kruecker, J.; Bauer, C.; Seip, R.; Kam, A.; Li, K. C. P.

    2006-05-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of CT and B-mode Ultrasound (US) targeted HIFU, a prototype coaxial focused ultrasound transducer was registered and integrated to a CT scanner. CT and diagnostic ultrasound were used for HIFU targeting and monitoring, with the goals of both thermal ablation and non-thermal enhanced drug delivery. A 1 megahertz coaxial ultrasound transducer was custom fabricated and attached to a passive position-sensing arm and an active six degree-of-freedom robotic arm via a CT stereotactic frame. The outer therapeutic transducer with a 10 cm fixed focal zone was coaxially mounted to an inner diagnostic US transducer (2-4 megahertz, Philips Medical Systems). This coaxial US transducer was connected to a modified commercial focused ultrasound generator (Focus Surgery, Indianapolis, IN) with a maximum total acoustic power of 100 watts. This pre-clinical paradigm was tested for ability to heat tissue in phantoms with monitoring and navigation from CT and live US. The feasibility of navigation via image fusion of CT with other modalities such as PET and MRI was demonstrated. Heated water phantoms were tested for correlation between CT numbers and temperature (for ablation monitoring). The prototype transducer and integrated CT/US imaging system enabled simultaneous multimodality imaging and therapy. Pre-clinical phantom models validated the treatment paradigm and demonstrated integrated multimodality guidance and treatment monitoring. Temperature changes during phantom cooling corresponded to CT number changes. Contrast enhanced or non-enhanced CT numbers may potentially be used to monitor thermal ablation with HIFU. Integrated CT, diagnostic US, and therapeutic focused ultrasound bridges a gap between diagnosis and therapy. Preliminary results show that the multimodality system may represent a relatively inexpensive, accessible, and simple method of both targeting and monitoring HIFU effects. Small animal pre-clinical models may be translated to large

  19. Ultrasound in Space Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulchavsky, Scott A.; Sargsyan, A.E.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the use of ultrasound as a diagnostic tool in microgravity environments. The goals of research in ultrasound usage in space environments are: (1) Determine accuracy of ultrasound in novel clinical conditions. (2) Determine optimal training methodologies, (3) Determine microgravity associated changes and (4) Develop intuitive ultrasound catalog to enhance autonomous medical care. Also uses of Ultrasound technology in terrestrial applications are reviewed.

  20. Laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation in focused ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerold, Bjoern; Kotopoulis, Spiros; McDougall, Craig; McGloin, David; Postema, Michiel; Prentice, Paul

    2011-04-01

    Acoustic cavitation can occur in therapeutic applications of high-amplitude focused ultrasound. Studying acoustic cavitation has been challenging, because the onset of nucleation is unpredictable. We hypothesized that acoustic cavitation can be forced to occur at a specific location using a laser to nucleate a microcavity in a pre-established ultrasound field. In this paper we describe a scientific instrument that is dedicated to this outcome, combining a focused ultrasound transducer with a pulsed laser. We present high-speed photographic observations of laser-induced cavitation and laser-nucleated acoustic cavitation, at frame rates of 0.5×10(6) frames per second, from laser pulses of energy above and below the optical breakdown threshold, respectively. Acoustic recordings demonstrated inertial cavitation can be controllably introduced to the ultrasound focus. This technique will contribute to the understanding of cavitation evolution in focused ultrasound including for potential therapeutic applications. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  1. A REVIEW OF LOW-INTENSITY ULTRASOUND FOR CANCER THERAPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    WOOD, ANDREW K. W.; SEHGAL, CHANDRA M.

    2015-01-01

    The literature describing the use of low-intensity ultrasound in four major areas of cancer therapy was reviewed - sonodynamic therapy, ultrasound mediated chemotherapy, ultrasound mediated gene delivery and antivascular ultrasound therapy. Each technique consistently resulted in the death of cancer cells and the bioeffects of ultrasound were primarily attributed to thermal actions and inertial cavitation. In each therapeutic modality, theranostic contrast agents composed of microbubbles played a role in both therapy and vascular imaging. The development of these agents is important as it establishes a therapeutic-diagnostic platform which can monitor the success of anti-cancer therapy. Little attention, however, has been given to either the direct assessment of the underlying mechanisms of the observed bioeffects or to the viability of these therapies in naturally occurring cancers in larger mammals; if such investigations provided encouraging data there could be a prompt application of a therapy technique in treating cancer patients. PMID:25728459

  2. Contrast ultrasound targeted treatment of gliomas in mice via drug-bearing nanoparticle delivery and microvascular ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burke, Caitlin W; Price, Richard J

    2010-12-15

    We are developing minimally-invasive contrast agent microbubble based therapeutic approaches in which the permeabilization and/or ablation of the microvasculature are controlled by varying ultrasound pulsing parameters. Specifically, we are testing whether such approaches may be used to treat malignant brain tumors through drug delivery and microvascular ablation. Preliminary studies have been performed to determine whether targeted drug-bearing nanoparticle delivery can be facilitated by the ultrasound mediated destruction of "composite" delivery agents comprised of 100nm poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLAGA) nanoparticles that are adhered to albumin shelled microbubbles. We denote these agents as microbubble-nanoparticle composite agents (MNCAs). When targeted to subcutaneous C6 gliomas with ultrasound, we observed an immediate 4.6-fold increase in nanoparticle delivery in MNCA treated tumors over tumors treated with microbubbles co-administered with nanoparticles and a 8.5 fold increase over non-treated tumors. Furthermore, in many cancer applications, we believe it may be desirable to perform targeted drug delivery in conjunction with ablation of the tumor microcirculation, which will lead to tumor hypoxia and apoptosis. To this end, we have tested the efficacy of non-theramal cavitation-induced microvascular ablation, showing that this approach elicits tumor perfusion reduction, apoptosis, significant growth inhibition, and necrosis. Taken together, these results indicate that our ultrasound-targeted approach has the potential to increase therapeutic efficiency by creating tumor necrosis through microvascular ablation and/or simultaneously enhancing the drug payload in gliomas.

  3. Therapeutic electrons bunch energy spectrums: correlation among physical parameters and quality; Espectros de energia de feixe de eletrons terapeuticos: correlacao entre parametros fisicos e qualidade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Rolando Fonseca

    1993-07-01

    A new approach was described for clinical and physical parameters used in radiotherapy planning and dosimetry, studying their dependencies on spectral widths. Two different models of clinical linear accelerators were used-Mevatron 74 (UNICAMP) and Mevatron 12 (HC/FMRP/Ribeirao Preto). Mevatron 74 produces beams with nominal energies from 5 up to 12 MeV and Mevatron 12 from 3 up to 11 MeV. It was verified that the values of clinical parameters expected from a semi-empirical theory differ from that obtained experimentally. Such differences are relevant from the point of view of the design of electron accelerators, as well as, of the target clinical results. (author)

  4. Effect on therapeutic ratio of planning a boosted radiotherapy dose to the dominant intraprostatic tumour lesion within the prostate based on multifunctional MR parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, G S; deSouza, N M; Dearnaley, D; Morgan, V A; Morgan, S C; Partridge, M

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To demonstrate the feasibility of an 8-Gy focal radiation boost to a dominant intraprostatic lesion (DIL), identified using multiparametric MRI (mpMRI), and to assess the potential outcome compared with a uniform 74-Gy prostate dose. Methods: The DIL location was predicted in 23 patients using a histopathologically verified model combining diffusion-weighted imaging, dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging, T2 maps and three-dimensional MR spectroscopic imaging. The DIL defined prior to neoadjuvant hormone downregulation was firstly registered to MRI-acquired post-hormone therapy and subsequently to CT radiotherapy scans. Intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) treatment was planned for an 8-Gy focal boost with 74-Gy dose to the remaining prostate. Areas under the dose–volume histograms (DVHs) for prostate, bladder and rectum, the tumour control probability (TCP) and normal tissue complication probabilities (NTCPs) were compared with those of the uniform 74-Gy IMRT plan. Results: Deliverable IMRT plans were feasible for all patients with identifiable DILs (20/23). Areas under the DVHs were increased for the prostate (75.1 ± 0.6 vs 72.7 ± 0.3 Gy; p < 0.001) and decreased for the rectum (38.2 ± 2.5 vs 43.5 ± 2.5 Gy; p < 0.001) and the bladder (29.1 ± 9.0 vs 36.9 ± 9.3 Gy; p < 0.001) for the boosted plan. The prostate TCP was increased (80.1 ± 1.3 vs 75.3 ± 0.9 Gy; p < 0.001) and rectal NTCP lowered (3.84 ± 3.65 vs 9.70 ± 5.68 Gy; p = 0.04) in the boosted plan. The bladder NTCP was negligible for both plans. Conclusion: Delivery of a focal boost to an mpMRI-defined DIL is feasible, and significant increases in TCP and therapeutic ratio were found. Advances in knowledge: The delivery of a focal boost to an mpMRI-defined DIL demonstrates statistically significant increases in TCP and therapeutic ratio. PMID:24601648

  5. Ultrasound-enhanced nanotherapy of pancreatic cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, N.; Nam, K.-H.; Christensen, D. A.; Kennedy, A. M.; Shea, J. E.; Scaife, C. L.

    2010-03-01

    The paper reports in vivo results of ultrasonic nanotherapy of orthotopically grown pancreatic cancer. Phase-shift paclitaxel (PTX) loaded perfluoropentane (PFP) nanoemusions combined with tumor-directed ultrasound have been used with a considerable success for tumor-targeted chemotherapy of gemcitabin (GEM)-refractory pancreatic cancer (PC). The GEM-resistant pancreatic cancer proved sensitive to treatment by a micellar PTX formulation Genexol PM (GEN) andor nanodroplet PTX formulation ndGEN. Due to increased permeability of tumor blood vessels, drug-loaded nanodroplets accumulated in the tumor via passive targeting, which was confirmed by ultrasound imaging. Nanodroplets converted into microbubbles in situ under the action of tumor-directed 1-MHz therapeutic ultrasound. The strongest therapeutic effect was observed for the combination therapy by PTX-loaded nanodroplets, GEM and ultrasound (ndGEN+GEM+ultrasound). This combination therapy resulted in a spectacular tumor regression and in some cases complete tumor resolution. Moreover, formation of metastases was dramatically decreased and ascitis generation was completely suppressed. However for all animal groups, local tumor recurrence was observed after the completion of the treatment indicating that some cancer cells survived the treatment. The recurrent tumors proved more resistant to the repeated therapy than initial tumors.

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... size, shape and consistency (whether the object is solid or filled with fluid). In medicine, ultrasound is ... ultrasound, measures the direction and speed of blood cells as they move through vessels. The movement of ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... procedure? Ultrasound examinations can help to diagnose a variety of conditions and to assess organ damage following ... the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose a variety of heart conditions, including valve problems and congestive ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... 3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... 3-D) ultrasound that formats the sound wave data into 3-D images. A Doppler ultrasound study ... to do the scanning. The transducer is a small hand-held device that resembles a microphone, attached ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... in infections With knowledge about the speed and volume of blood flow gained from a Doppler ultrasound ... the body while other areas, especially air-filled lungs, are poorly suited for ultrasound. top of page ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... color picture. It can also convert blood flow information into a distinctive sound that can be heard ...

  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... care physician, or to the physician or other healthcare provider who requested the exam. Usually, the referring ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... at these links. About Us | Contact Us | FAQ | Privacy | Terms of Use | Links | Site Map Copyright © 2018 ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... top of page What are the benefits vs. risks? Benefits Most ultrasound scanning is noninvasive (no needles ... procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known ...

  15. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... move through vessels. The movement of blood cells causes a change in pitch of the reflected sound ...

  16. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... requested the exam. Usually, the referring physician or health care provider will share the results with you. ...

  17. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a ...

  18. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can ... ultrasound procedure View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric ...

  19. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... legs, neck and/or brain (in infants and children) or within various body organs such as the ...

  20. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... sonography is performed using the same transducer. Rarely, young children may need to be sedated in order ...

  1. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is no ... structure and movement of the body's internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound ...

  2. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... testing. image the breasts and guide biopsy of breast cancer ( see the Ultrasound-Guided Breast Biopsy page . diagnose ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ...

  3. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is the preferred imaging modality for the diagnosis and monitoring of pregnant women and their unborn ... needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on ...

  4. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound ... computer or television monitor. The image is created based on the amplitude (loudness), frequency (pitch) and time ...

  5. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... more extensive exams may take up to an hour. When the examination is complete, you may be ...

  6. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Imaging? Ultrasound waves are disrupted by air or gas; therefore ultrasound is not an ideal imaging technique ... with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes ...

  7. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... may produce minimal discomfort. If a Doppler ultrasound study is performed, you may actually hear pulse-like sounds that change in pitch as the blood flow is monitored and measured. Most ultrasound examinations ...

  8. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... have special pediatric considerations. The teddy bear denotes child-specific content. Related Articles and Media Angioplasty and ...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... about this beforehand and be made aware of food and drink restrictions that may be needed prior ...

  10. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... Ultrasound is safe, noninvasive, and does not use ionizing radiation. This procedure requires little to no special preparation. ... create an image. Ultrasound examinations do not use ionizing radiation (as used in x-rays ), thus there is ...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... flat sections of the body. Advancements in ultrasound technology include three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound that formats ... American College of Radiology (ACR) and the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA), comprising physicians with expertise ...

  12. Medical Ultrasound Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Stephen

    2001-01-01

    Explains the basic principles of ultrasound using everyday physics. Topics include the generation of ultrasound, basic interactions with material, and the measurement of blood flow using the Doppler effect. (Author/MM)

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... ultrasound. top of page How does the procedure work? Ultrasound imaging is based on the same principles ... the transducer is pressed against the skin, it directs small pulses of inaudible, high-frequency sound waves ...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

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    Full Text Available ... transducer sends out high-frequency sound waves (that the human ear cannot hear) into the body and then ... ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the limitations of General Ultrasound Imaging? Ultrasound waves are ...

  15. Clinical diagnostic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barnett, E.; Morley, P.

    1986-01-01

    This textbook on diagnostic ultrasound covers the main systems, with emphasis being placed on the clinical application of diagnostic ultrasound in everyday practice. It provides not only a textbook for postgraduates (particularly FRCR candidates), but also a reference work for practitioners of clinical ultrasound and clinicians generally

  16. Efeitos do ultra-som terapêutico sobre o crescimento longitudinal do fêmur e da tíbia em ratos Effects of therapeutic ultrasound on longitudinal growth of the femur and tibia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfredo Alcantara Barreto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Estudar efeitos do ultra-som terapêutico sobre o crescimento do fêmur e da tíbia, em ratos jovens. MÉTODO: Ratus norvegicus com quatro semanas de vida, machos, totalizando 115 animais, divididos em quatro grupos, foram submetidos ao ultra-som terapêutico (0,8 MHz, cabeçote fixo, pulso contínuo, por dez minutos, durante dez dias, na face medial do joelho direito, nas potências de 0,0 W/cm2 (grupo controle, 0,5 W/cm2 (grupo G2, 1,0 W/cm2 (grupo G3, e 1,5 W/cm2 (grupo G4. Lâminas histológicas da epífise, placa de crescimento e metáfise e as medidas dos comprimentos do fêmur e da tíbia foram estudadas na sexta, décima terceira e vigésima sexta semanas de vida. Os dados foram submetidos à análise de variância - fatorial inteiramente aleatorizado. RESULTADO: Nenhuma alteração estatística do crescimento ósseo foi estabelecida entre quaisquer dos três grupos tratados e o grupo controle. Entretanto, alterações sugestivas de diminuição do crescimento do fêmur e da tíbia de G4 em relação a G2 e G3, foram evidenciadas. No grupo G4 alterações histopatológicas como necroses celulares e neoformação óssea, pós-necrose, foram encontradas. CONCLUSÃO: Quando comparados os grupos tratados com o grupo controle, não há evidência estatística de estímulo ou inibição ao crescimento ósseo pela aplicação do ultra-som terapêutico. Nível de Evidência: Nível II, estudo coorte transversal.OBJECTIVES: To determine the effects of ultrasound therapy on the femur and tibia growth in young rats. METHOD: Four-week-old male Ratus Norvegicus totaling 115 animals, divided into four groups, were submitted to ultrasound therapy (0.8 MHz, fixed tube head, continuous pulse, for 10 minutes, once a day, ten times on the medial face of the right knee, with powers of 0.0 W/cm2 (group G1, 0.5 W/cm2 (group G2, 1.0 W/cm2 (group G3, and 1.5 W/cm2 (group G4. Histological slides of the epiphysis, growth plate and metaphysis and the

  17. Understanding of percutaneous puncture under guidance of ultrasound in treating peritoneal and perinephritic abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Liying; Wang Jiagang

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To explore the clinical value of percutaneous puncture under guidance of ultrasound in treating peritoneal abscess. Methods: To summarize 68 patients with peritoneal abscess underwent percutaneous puncture under guidance of ultrasound to analyse the method of operation and therapeutic effect. Results: effective power of percutaneous puncture under guidance of ultrasound in treating peritoneal abscess was 96.8%. Conclusion: Percutaneous puncture under guidance of ultrasound in treating peritoneal abscess may avoid injury induced by blinded puncture, with characteristic of easier operation, slighter trauma. higher safety, significant therapeutic effect, and can be spreaded to the clinical application. (authors)

  18. Ultrasound applicability in Speech Language Pathology and Audiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberena, Luciana da Silva; Brasil, Brunah de Castro; Melo, Roberta Michelon; Mezzomo, Carolina Lisbôa; Mota, Helena Bolli; Keske-Soares, Márcia

    2014-01-01

    To present recent studies that used the ultrasound in the fields of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology, which evidence possibilities of the applicability of this technique in different subareas. A bibliographic research was carried out in the PubMed database, using the keywords "ultrasonic," "speech," "phonetics," "Speech, Language and Hearing Sciences," "voice," "deglutition," and "myofunctional therapy," comprising some areas of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology Sciences. The keywords "ultrasound," "ultrasonography," "swallow," "orofacial myofunctional therapy," and "orofacial myology" were also used in the search. Studies in humans from the past 5 years were selected. In the preselection, duplicated studies, articles not fully available, and those that did not present direct relation between ultrasound and Speech Language Pathology and Audiology Sciences were discarded. The data were analyzed descriptively and classified subareas of Speech Language Pathology and Audiology Sciences. The following items were considered: purposes, participants, procedures, and results. We selected 12 articles for ultrasound versus speech/phonetics subarea, 5 for ultrasound versus voice, 1 for ultrasound versus muscles of mastication, and 10 for ultrasound versus swallow. Studies relating "ultrasound" and "Speech Language Pathology and Audiology Sciences" in the past 5 years were not found. Different studies on the use of ultrasound in Speech Language Pathology and Audiology Sciences were found. Each of them, according to its purpose, confirms new possibilities of the use of this instrument in the several subareas, aiming at a more accurate diagnosis and new evaluative and therapeutic possibilities.

  19. Contrast-enhanced harmonic endoscopic ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Săftoiu, A; Dietrich, C F; Vilmann, P

    2012-01-01

    Second-generation intravenous blood-pool ultrasound contrast agents are increasingly used in endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) for characterization of microvascularization, differential diagnosis of benign and malignant focal lesions, and improving staging and guidance of therapeutic procedures. Although...... initially used as Doppler signal enhancers, second-generation microbubble contrast agents are now used with specific contrast harmonic imaging techniques, which benefit from the highly nonlinear behavior of the microbubbles. Contrast-specific modes based on multi-pulse technology are used to perform...... contrast-enhanced harmonic EUS based on a very low mechanical index (0.08 - 0.12). Quantification techniques based on dynamic contrast-enhanced ultrasound have been recommended for perfusion imaging and monitoring of anti-angiogenic treatment, mainly based on time-intensity curve analysis. Most...

  20. Endoscopic Ultrasound Elastography: Current Clinical Use in Pancreas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Utpal; Henkes, Nichole; Patel, Sandeep; Rosenkranz, Laura

    2016-08-01

    Elastography is a newer technique for the assessment of tissue elasticity using ultrasound. Cancerous tissue is known to be stiffer (hence, less elastic) than corresponding healthy tissue, and as a result, could be identified in an elasticity-based imaging. Ultrasound elastography has been used in the breast, thyroid, and cervix to differentiate malignant from benign neoplasms and to guide or avoid unnecessary biopsies. In the liver, elastography has enabled a noninvasive and reliable estimate of fibrosis. Endoscopic ultrasound has become a robust diagnostic and therapeutic tool for the management of pancreatic diseases. The addition of elastography to endoscopic ultrasound enabled further characterization of pancreas lesions, and several European and Asian studies have reported encouraging results. The current clinical role of endoscopic ultrasound elastography in the management of pancreas disorders and related literature are reviewed.

  1. Application of airborne ultrasound in the convective drying of fruits and vegetables: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Zhang, Min; Mujumdar, Arun S

    2017-11-01

    The application of airborne ultrasound is a promising technology in the drying of foods, particularly to fruits and vegetables. In this paper, designs of dryers using ultrasound to combine the convective drying process are described. The main factors affecting the drying kinetics with the ultrasound application are discussed. The results show that the ultrasound application accelerated the drying kinetics. Ultrasound application during the convective drying of fruits and vegetables shorten the drying time. Ultrasound application can produce an increase of the effective moisture diffusivity and the mass transfer coefficient. The influence of ultrasound on physical and chemical parameters evaluating the product quality is reviewed. Ultrasound application can decrease the total color change, reveal a low water activity and reduce the loss of some nutrient elements. Meanwhile, ultrasound application can also better preserve the microstructure of fruits and vegetables in comparison to convective drying. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Ultrasound, CT and MRI of ruptured and disseminated hydatid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinner, W.N. von (King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre, Riyadh (Saudi Arabia). Department of Radiology)

    Three cases of echinococcus granulosus with rupture of hydatid cysts and widespread abdominal, pelvic of pleural dissemination are described. Ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allowed recognition of ruptured hydatid cysts. This assisted to come to an appropriate therapy and exclusion or confirmation of hydatid cysts elsewhere in the body. Ultrasound, CT and MRI are also important for follow-up, evaluation of therapeutic response and/or early diagnosis of recurrence. (author). 22 refs.; 3 figs.

  3. Ultrasound, CT and MRI of ruptured and disseminated hydatid cysts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinner, W.N. von

    1990-01-01

    Three cases of echinococcus granulosus with rupture of hydatid cysts and widespread abdominal, pelvic of pleural dissemination are described. Ultrasound (US), computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allowed recognition of ruptured hydatid cysts. This assisted to come to an appropriate therapy and exclusion or confirmation of hydatid cysts elsewhere in the body. Ultrasound, CT and MRI are also important for follow-up, evaluation of therapeutic response and/or early diagnosis of recurrence. (author). 22 refs.; 3 figs

  4. Macromolecular therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-09-28

    This review covers water-soluble polymer-drug conjugates and macromolecules that possess biological activity without attached low molecular weight drugs. The main design principles of traditional and backbone degradable polymer-drug conjugates as well as the development of a new paradigm in nanomedicines - (low molecular weight) drug-free macromolecular therapeutics are discussed. To address the biological features of cancer, macromolecular therapeutics directed to stem/progenitor cells and the tumor microenvironment are deliberated. Finally, the future perspectives of the field are briefly debated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  6. Acoustic Droplet Vaporization, Cavitation, and Therapeutic Properties of Copolymer-Stabilized Perfluorocarbon Nanoemulsions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nam, Kweon-Ho; Christensen, Douglas A.; Rapoport, Natalya; Kennedy, Anne M.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic and therapeutic properties of Doxorubicin (DOX) and paclitaxel (PTX)-loaded perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions have been investigated in a mouse model of ovarian cancer. The nanoemulsions were stabilized by two biodegradable amphiphilic block copolymers that differed in the structure of the hydrophobic block. Acoustic droplet vaporization (ADV) and cavitation parameters were measured as a function of ultrasound frequency, pressure, duty cycles, and temperature. The optimal parameters that induced ADV and inertial cavitation of the formed microbubbles were used in vivo in the experiments on the ultrasound-mediated chemotherapy of ovarian cancer. A combination tumor treatment by intravenous injections of drug-loaded perfluoropentane nanoemulsions and tumor-directed 1-MHz ultrasound resulted in a dramatic decrease of ovarian or breast carcinoma tumor volume and sometimes complete tumor resolution. However, tumors often recurred three to six weeks after the treatment indicating that some cancer cells survived the treatment. The recurrent tumors proved more aggressive and resistant to the repeated therapy than initial tumors suggesting selection for the resistant cells during the first treatment.

  7. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... child's abdominal ultrasound examination. Doppler ultrasound , also called color Doppler ultrasonography, is a special ultrasound technique that ... and processes the sounds and creates graphs or color pictures that represent the flow of blood through ...

  8. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  9. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of the ... abdomen using ultrasound. View full size with caption Pediatric Content Some imaging tests and treatments have special ...

  10. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Children's (Pediatric) Ultrasound - Abdomen Children’s (pediatric) ultrasound imaging of ... 30 minutes. top of page What will my child experience during and after the procedure? Ultrasound examinations ...

  11. The Indian ultrasound paradox

    OpenAIRE

    Akbulut-Yuksel, Mevlude; Rosenblum, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    The liberalization of the Indian economy in the 1990s made prenatal ultrasound technology affordable and available to a large fraction of the population. As a result, ultrasound use amongst pregnant women rose dramatically in many parts of India. This paper provides evidence on the consequences of the expansion of prenatal ultrasound use on sex-selection. We exploit state-by-cohort variation in ultrasound use in India as a unique quasi-experiment. We find that sex-selective abortion of female...

  12. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silverman RH

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Ronald H Silverman1,2 1Department of Ophthalmology, Columbia University Medical Center, 2F.L. Lizzi Center for Biomedical Engineering, Riverside Research, New York, NY, USA Abstract: The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via cilio-destruction, tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. Keywords: ophthalmic ultrasound, ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM, high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU, ultrafast imaging, Doppler imaging 

  13. Automatic Ultrasound Scanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moshavegh, Ramin

    on the user adjustments on the scanner interface to optimize the scan settings. This explains the huge interest in the subject of this PhD project entitled “AUTOMATIC ULTRASOUND SCANNING”. The key goals of the project have been to develop automated techniques to minimize the unnecessary settings...... on the scanners, and to improve the computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) in ultrasound by introducing new quantitative measures. Thus, four major issues concerning automation of the medical ultrasound are addressed in this PhD project. They touch upon gain adjustments in ultrasound, automatic synthetic aperture image...

  14. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... internal organs, as well as blood flowing through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  15. Point of Care Ultrasound

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, Christoph F; Goudie, Adrian; Chiorean, Liliana

    2017-01-01

    Over the last decade, the use of portable ultrasound scanners has enhanced the concept of point of care ultrasound (PoC-US), namely, "ultrasound performed at the bedside and interpreted directly by the treating clinician." PoC-US is not a replacement for comprehensive ultrasound, but rather allows...... and critical care medicine, cardiology, anesthesiology, rheumatology, obstetrics, neonatology, gynecology, gastroenterology and many other applications. In the future, PoC-US will be more diverse than ever and be included in medical student training....

  16. Ultrasound skin tightening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minkis, Kira; Alam, Murad

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound skin tightening is a noninvasive, nonablative method that allows for energy deposition into the deep dermal and subcutaneous tissue while avoiding epidermal heating. Ultrasound coagulation is confined to arrays of 1-mm(3) zones that include the superficial musculoaponeurotic system and connective tissue. This technology gained approval from the Food and Drug Administration as the first energy-based skin "lifting" device, specifically for lifting lax tissue on the neck, submentum, and eyebrows. Ultrasound has the unique advantage of direct visualization of treated structures during treatment. Ultrasound is a safe and efficacious treatment for mild skin tightening and lifting. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Ultrasound assisted biogas production from landfill leachate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oz, Nilgün Ayman; Yarimtepe, Canan Can

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Effect of low frequency ultrasound pretreatment on leachate was investigated. • Three different ultrasound energy inputs (200, 400 and 600 W/l) was applied. • Low-frequency ultrasound treatment increased soluble COD in landfill leachate. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased biogas production about 40%. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased total methane production rate about 20%. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to increase biogas production and methane yield from landfill leachate in anaerobic batch reactors by using low frequency ultrasound as a pretreatment step. In the first part of the study, optimum conditions for solubilization of organic matter in leachate samples were investigated using various sonication durations at an ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz. The level of organic matter solubilization during ultrasonic pretreatment experiments was determined by calculating the ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) to total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD). The sCOD/tCOD ratio was increased from 47% in raw leachate to 63% after 45 min sonication at 600 W/l. Non-parametric Friedman’s test indicated that ultrasonic pretreatment has a significant effect on sCOD parameter for leachate (p < 0.05). In the second part of the study, anaerobic batch reactors were operated for both ultrasonically pretreated and untreated landfill leachate samples in order to assess the effect of sonication on biogas and methane production rate. In anaerobic batch reactor feed with ultrasonically pretreated leachate, 40% more biogas was obtained compared to the control reactor. For statistical analysis, Mann–Whitney U test was performed to compare biogas and methane production rates for raw and pretreated leachate samples and it has been found that ultrasonic pretreatment significantly enhanced biogas and methane production rates from leachate (p < 0.05) in anaerobic batch reactors. The overall results showed that low frequency

  18. Ultrasound assisted biogas production from landfill leachate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oz, Nilgün Ayman, E-mail: nilgunayman@comu.edu.tr; Yarimtepe, Canan Can

    2014-07-15

    Highlights: • Effect of low frequency ultrasound pretreatment on leachate was investigated. • Three different ultrasound energy inputs (200, 400 and 600 W/l) was applied. • Low-frequency ultrasound treatment increased soluble COD in landfill leachate. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased biogas production about 40%. • Application of ultrasound to leachate increased total methane production rate about 20%. - Abstract: The aim of this study is to increase biogas production and methane yield from landfill leachate in anaerobic batch reactors by using low frequency ultrasound as a pretreatment step. In the first part of the study, optimum conditions for solubilization of organic matter in leachate samples were investigated using various sonication durations at an ultrasound frequency of 20 kHz. The level of organic matter solubilization during ultrasonic pretreatment experiments was determined by calculating the ratio of soluble chemical oxygen demand (sCOD) to total chemical oxygen demand (tCOD). The sCOD/tCOD ratio was increased from 47% in raw leachate to 63% after 45 min sonication at 600 W/l. Non-parametric Friedman’s test indicated that ultrasonic pretreatment has a significant effect on sCOD parameter for leachate (p < 0.05). In the second part of the study, anaerobic batch reactors were operated for both ultrasonically pretreated and untreated landfill leachate samples in order to assess the effect of sonication on biogas and methane production rate. In anaerobic batch reactor feed with ultrasonically pretreated leachate, 40% more biogas was obtained compared to the control reactor. For statistical analysis, Mann–Whitney U test was performed to compare biogas and methane production rates for raw and pretreated leachate samples and it has been found that ultrasonic pretreatment significantly enhanced biogas and methane production rates from leachate (p < 0.05) in anaerobic batch reactors. The overall results showed that low frequency

  19. Efeito do ultra-som terapêutico contínuo em placas epifisárias de coelhos Efectos de la ultrasonografia terapéutica continua en placas epifisarias de conejos Effect of continuous therapeutic ultrasound in rabbit growth plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andersom Ricardo Fréz

    2006-06-01

    que en el control (p The therapeutic efficiency of ultrasound has become an indispensable tool of physical therapy treatment in cases of alteration by lesions and in many kinds of sickness. However, in pediatric cases the use of ultrasound is controversial due to possible disturbance and damage to the growth plate. The aim of this study is to find out if the continuous ultrasound presents alteration effects on the growth plate of female rabbits. Eight New Zealand female rabbits with two months of age were tested. They were treated by continuous therapeutic ultrasound with doses of 1 W/cm² in the lateral region of the right knee joint for five minutes, during 10 days, with an interval of two days after five applications. The left knee joint was used as a control. The histological analysis showed an alteration in the thickness of the growth plate on the treated side 24.40% bigger than in the left knee joint of the control (p < 0.0001. On other hand, the radiological analysis did not show any difference between the limbs. The conclusion was that the therapeutic ultrasound produced significant histological alterations in the cartilage thickness on the treated side according to the manner it was used in the experiment. Such fact suggests an acceleration in the growth plate metabolism.

  20. Ultrasound arthroscopy of human knee cartilage and subchondral bone in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liukkonen, Jukka; Lehenkari, Petri; Hirvasniemi, Jukka; Joukainen, Antti; Virén, Tuomas; Saarakkala, Simo; Nieminen, Miika T; Jurvelin, Jukka S; Töyräs, Juha

    2014-09-01

    Arthroscopic ultrasound imaging enables quantitative evaluation of articular cartilage. However, the potential of this technique for evaluation of subchondral bone has not been investigated in vivo. In this study, we address this issue in clinical arthroscopy of the human knee (n = 11) by determining quantitative ultrasound (9 MHz) reflection and backscattering parameters for cartilage and subchondral bone. Furthermore, in each knee, seven anatomical sites were graded using the International Cartilage Repair Society (ICRS) system based on (i) conventional arthroscopy and (ii) ultrasound images acquired in arthroscopy with a miniature transducer. Ultrasound enabled visualization of articular cartilage and subchondral bone. ICRS grades based on ultrasound images were higher (p ultrasound-based ICRS grades were expected as ultrasound reveals additional information on, for example, the relative depth of the lesion. In line with previous literature, ultrasound reflection and scattering in cartilage varied significantly (p ultrasound parameters and structure or density of subchondral bone could be demonstrated. To conclude, arthroscopic ultrasound imaging had a significant effect on clinical grading of cartilage, and it was found to provide quantitative information on cartilage. The lack of correlation between the ultrasound parameters and bone properties may be related to lesser bone change or excessive attenuation in overlying cartilage and insufficient power of the applied miniature transducer. Copyright © 2014 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine & Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Children's (Pediatric) Abdominal Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... through blood vessels. Ultrasound imaging is a noninvasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. Children's (pediatric) abdominal ultrasound imaging produces pictures ...

  2. Guiding tissue regeneration with ultrasound in vitro and in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalecki, Diane; Comeau, Eric S.; Raeman, Carol H.; Child, Sally Z.; Hobbs, Laura; Hocking, Denise C.

    2015-05-01

    Developing new technologies that enable the repair or replacement of injured or diseased tissues is a major focus of regenerative medicine. This paper will discuss three ultrasound technologies under development in our laboratories to guide tissue regeneration both in vitro and in vivo. A critical obstacle in tissue engineering is the need for rapid and effective tissue vascularization strategies. To address this challenge, we are developing acoustic patterning techniques for microvascular tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields provide a rapid, non-invasive approach to spatially pattern cells in three dimensions without affecting cell viability. Acoustic patterning of endothelial cells leads to the rapid formation of microvascular networks throughout the volumes of three-dimensional hydrogels, and the morphology of the resultant microvessel networks can be controlled by design of the ultrasound field. A second technology under development uses ultrasound to noninvasively control the microstructure of collagen fibers within engineered tissues. The microstructure of extracellular matrix proteins provides signals that direct cell functions critical to tissue regeneration. Thus, controlling collagen microfiber structure with ultrasound provides a noninvasive approach to regulate the mechanical properties of biomaterials and control cellular responses. The third technology employs therapeutic ultrasound to enhance the healing of chronic wounds. Recent studies demonstrate increased granulation tissue thickness and collagen deposition in murine dermal wounds exposed to pulsed ultrasound. In summary, ultrasound technologies offer noninvasive approaches to control cell behaviors and extracellular matrix organization and thus hold great promise to advance tissue regeneration in vitro and in vivo.

  3. Blood-brain barrier disruption induced by diagnostic ultrasound combined with microbubbles in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Bingxia; Chen, Yihan; Liu, Jinfeng; Zhang, Li; Wang, Jing; Yang, Yali; Lv, Qing; Xie, Mingxing

    2018-01-12

    To investigate the effects of the microbubble (MB) dose, mechanism index (MI) and sonication duration on blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption induced by diagnostic ultrasound combined with MBs as well as to investigate the potential molecular mechanism. The extent of BBB disruption increased with MB dose, MI and sonication duration. A relatively larger extent of BBB disruption associated with minimal tissue damage was achieved by an appropriate MB dose and ultrasound exposure parameters with diagnostic ultrasound. Decreased expression of ZO-1, occludin and claudin-5 were correlated with disruption of the BBB, as confirmed by paracellular passage of the tracer lanthanum nitrate into the brain parenchyma after BBB disruption. These findings indicated that this technique is a promising tool for promoting brain delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents in the diagnosis and treatment of brain diseases. The extent of BBB disruption was qualitatively assessed by Evans blue (EB) staining and quantitatively analyzed by an EB extravasation measurement. A histological examination was performed to evaluate tissue damage. Expression of tight junction (TJ) related proteins ZO-1, occludin and claudin-5 was determined by western blotting analysis and immunohistofluorescence. Transmission electron microscopy was performed to observe ultrastructure changes of TJs after BBB disruption.

  4. Contrast ultrasound using SonoVue for pelvic radiation with concurrent chemotherapy monitoring in stage I B-II cervical cancer; Apport de l'echographie Doppler avec injection de contraste pour la prise en charge des cancers du col de l'uterus de stades IB et II par chimioradiotherapie concomitante

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marret, H. [Hopital Bretonneau, Service de Gynecologie, 37 - Tours (France); Barillot, I. [Hopital Bretonneau, Service de Radiotherapie, 37 - Tours (France); Rolland, Y. [CRLCC Eugene-Marquis, 35 - Rennes (France); Leveque, J. [Hopital Anne-de-Bretagne, 35 - Rennes (France)

    2009-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate whether angiogenic parameters as assessed by trans vaginal color Doppler ultrasound and by enhanced cervix ultrasound may predict prognostic factors of stage I B greater than 4 cm and II cervical cancer treated by radio chemotherapy. A total of 40 patients with histologically proven advanced stage invasive cervical cancer will be evaluated by color Doppler, contrast ultrasound, and MRI before radiotherapy, after the second chemotherapy cycle and prior to surgery. Subjective assessment of the amount of vessels within the tumor (scanty-moderate or abundant) and resistance index (R.I.) will be recorded for Doppler, enhancement and washout period will be studied after injection of SonoVue for contrast ultrasound. All patients will have radical hysterectomy and pelvic lymph node dissection. Comparison with MRI results will be done. The main parameter studied will be persistence of tumor cells in the analysis of the radical hysterectomy. We expected to correlate contrast parameters with persistent disease in order to confirm ultrasound parameters that will be useful to monitor radio chemotherapy and to predict therapeutic answer of such treatment. (authors)

  5. MO-AB-210-00: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Control and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Hands-On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  6. MO-AB-210-00: Diagnostic Ultrasound Imaging Quality Control and High Intensity Focused Ultrasound Therapy Hands-On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  7. CLINICAL FIELD NOTE - ULTRASOUND THERAPY: GETTING IT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    Incorporating this vital information has led to a turn around in the evidence of ultrasound research ... in clinical practice, there has not been enough research evidence to support its .... Parameters: 1W/cm , 50% duty cycle (pulsed), 15 minutes,. 2 with a 5cm ... New England Journal of Medicine 317: 141-145. Gam, A.N., F.

  8. Duplex ultrasound for identifying renal artery stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zachrisson, Karin; Herlitz, Hans; Lönn, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Background Renal artery duplex ultrasound (RADUS) is an established method for diagnosis of renal artery stenosis (RAS), but there is no consensus regarding optimal RADUS criteria. Purpose To define optimal cutoff values for RADUS parameters when screening for RAS using intra-arterial trans...

  9. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z General Ultrasound Ultrasound imaging ...

  10. Medical ultrasound imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2007-01-01

    The paper gives an introduction to current medical ultrasound imaging systems. The basics of anatomic and blood flow imaging are described. The properties of medical ultrasound and its focusing are described, and the various methods for two- and three-dimensional imaging of the human anatomy...

  11. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... to image by ultrasound because greater amounts of tissue attenuate (weaken) the sound waves as they pass deeper into the body and need to be returned to the transducer for analysis. Ultrasound has difficulty penetrating bone and, therefore, can only see the outer surface ...

  12. Ultrasound: Bladder (For Parents)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If You Have Questions Print en español Ultrasonido: vejiga What It Is A bladder ultrasound is a safe and painless test that ... Exam: Voiding Cystourethrogram (VCUG) Ultrasound: Renal (Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder) Urinary ... only. For specific medical advice, diagnoses, and treatment, consult your doctor. © 1995- The Nemours Foundation. All ...

  13. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... women and their unborn babies. Ultrasound provides real-time imaging, making it a good tool for guiding minimally invasive procedures such as needle biopsies and fluid aspiration. Risks For standard diagnostic ultrasound , there are no known harmful effects on humans. top of page What are the ...

  14. Laser generated ultrasound sources using polymer nanocomposites for high frequency metrology

    KAUST Repository

    Rajagopal, Srinath; Sainsbury, Toby; Treeby, Bradley; Cox, Ben

    2017-01-01

    Accurate characterisation of ultrasound fields generated by diagnostic and therapeutic transducers is critical for patient safety. This requires hydrophones calibrated to a traceable standard. The existing implementation of the primary standard

  15. Applications of ultrasound in food and bioprocessing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashokkumar, Muthupandian

    2015-07-01

    Improving the quality and nutritional aspects of food is one of the key issues for healthy life of human beings. The stability during storage is an important parameter in quality assurance of food products. Various processing techniques such as high pressure, thermal, pulsed electric field and microwave have been used to prolong the shelf-life of food products. In recent years, ultrasound technology has been found to be a potential food processing technique. The passage of ultrasound in a liquid matrix generates mechanical agitation and other physical effects due to acoustic cavitation. Owing to its importance, a number of review articles and book chapters on the applications of ultrasound in food processing have been published in recent years. This article provides an overview of recent developments in ultrasonic processing of food and dairy systems with a particular focus on functionality of food and dairy ingredients. More specifically, the use of high frequency ultrasound in fat separation from milk and viscosity modification in starch systems and the use of low frequency ultrasound in generating nutritional food emulsions, viscosity modification and encapsulation of nutrients have been highlighted. The issues associated with the development of large scale ultrasonic food processing equipment have also been briefly discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Passive cavitation imaging with ultrasound arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A; Datta, Saurabh; Holland, Christy K; Mast, T Douglas

    2009-12-01

    A method is presented for passive imaging of cavitational acoustic emissions using an ultrasound array, with potential application in real-time monitoring of ultrasound ablation. To create such images, microbubble emissions were passively sensed by an imaging array and dynamically focused at multiple depths. In this paper, an analytic expression for a passive image is obtained by solving the Rayleigh-Sommerfield integral, under the Fresnel approximation, and passive images were simulated. A 192-element array was used to create passive images, in real time, from 520-kHz ultrasound scattered by a 1-mm steel wire. Azimuthal positions of this target were accurately estimated from the passive images. Next, stable and inertial cavitation was passively imaged in saline solution sonicated at 520 kHz. Bubble clusters formed in the saline samples were consistently located on both passive images and B-scans. Passive images were also created using broadband emissions from bovine liver sonicated at 2.2 MHz. Agreement was found between the images and source beam shape, indicating an ability to map therapeutic ultrasound beams in situ. The relation between these broadband emissions, sonication amplitude, and exposure conditions are discussed.

  17. Synthesis of Laboratory Ultrasound Contrast Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaemin Oh

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound Contrast Agents (UCAs were developed to maximize reflection contrast so that organs can be seen clearly in ultrasound imaging. UCAs increase the signal to noise ratio (SNR by linear and non-linear mechanisms and thus help more accurately visualize the internal organs and blood vessels. However, the UCAs on the market are not only expensive, but are also not optimized for use in various therapeutic research applications such as ultrasound-aided drug delivery. The UCAs fabricated in this study utilize conventional lipid and albumin for shell formation and perfluorobutane as the internal gas. The shape and density of the UCA bubbles were verified by optical microscopy and Cryo SEM, and compared to those of the commercially available UCAs, Definity® and Sonovue®. The size distribution and characteristics of the reflected signal were also analyzed using a particle size analyzer and ultrasound imaging equipment. Our experiments indicate that UCAs composed of spherical microbubbles, the majority of which were smaller than 1 um, were successfully synthesized. Microbubbles 10 um or larger were also identified when different shell characteristics and filters were used. These laboratory UCAs can be used for research in both diagnoses and therapies.

  18. The growth of oscillating bubbles in an ultrasound field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamauchi, Risa; Yamashita, Tatsuya; Ando, Keita

    2017-11-01

    From our recent experiments to test particle removal by underwater ultrasound, dissolved gas supersaturation is found to play an important role in physical cleaning; cavitation bubble nucleation can be triggered easily by weak ultrasound under the supersaturation and mild motion of the bubbles contributes to efficient cleaning without erosion. The state of gas bubble nuclei in water is critical to the determination of a cavitation inception threshold. Under ultrasound forcing, the size of bubble nuclei is varied by the transfer of dissolved gas (i.e., rectified diffusion); the growth rate will be promoted by the supersaturation and is thus expected to contribute to cavitation activity enhancement. In the present work, we experimentally study rectified diffusion for bubbles attached at glass surfaces in an ultrasound field. We will present the evolution of bubble nuclei sizes with varying parameters such as dissolved oxygen supersaturation, and ultrasound intensity and frequency. the Research Grant of Keio Leading-edge Laboratory of Science & Technology.

  19. MO-AB-210-02: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammet, S.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  20. MO-AB-210-01: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lu, Z.

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  1. MO-AB-210-02: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sammet, S. [University of Chicago Medical Center (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  2. MO-AB-210-03: Workshop [Advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [University of Chicago (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  3. MO-AB-210-01: Ultrasound Imaging and Therapy-Hands On Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Z. [University of Chicago (United States)

    2015-06-15

    The goal of this ultrasound hands-on workshop is to demonstrate advancements in high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) and to demonstrate quality control (QC) testing in diagnostic ultrasound. HIFU is a therapeutic modality that uses ultrasound waves as carriers of energy. HIFU is used to focus a beam of ultrasound energy into a small volume at specific target locations within the body. The focused beam causes localized high temperatures and produces a well-defined regions of necrosis. This completely non-invasive technology has great potential for tumor ablation and targeted drug delivery. At the workshop, attendees will see configurations, applications, and hands-on demonstrations with on-site instructors at separate stations. The involvement of medical physicists in diagnostic ultrasound imaging service is increasing due to QC and accreditation requirements. At the workshop, an array of ultrasound testing phantoms and ultrasound scanners will be provided for attendees to learn diagnostic ultrasound QC in a hands-on environment with live demonstrations of the techniques. Target audience: Medical physicists and other medical professionals in diagnostic imaging and radiation oncology with interest in high-intensity focused ultrasound and in diagnostic ultrasound QC. Learning Objectives: Learn ultrasound physics and safety for HIFU applications through live demonstrations Get an overview of the state-of-the art in HIFU technologies and equipment Gain familiarity with common elements of a quality control program for diagnostic ultrasound imaging Identify QC tools available for testing diagnostic ultrasound systems and learn how to use these tools List of supporting vendors for HIFU and diagnostic ultrasound QC hands-on workshop: Philips Healthcare Alpinion Medical Systems Verasonics, Inc Zonare Medical Systems, Inc Computerized Imaging Reference Systems (CIRS), Inc. GAMMEX, Inc., Cablon Medical BV Steffen Sammet: NIH/NCI grant 5R25CA132822, NIH/NINDS grant 5R25NS

  4. Principles of Billing for Diagnostic Ultrasound in the Office and Operating Room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grasu, Beatrice L; Wolock, Bruce S; Sedgley, Matthew D; Murphy, Michael S

    2018-05-08

    Ultrasound is becoming more prevalent as physicians gain comfort in its diagnostic and therapeutic uses. It allows for both static and dynamic evaluation of conditions and assists in therapeutic injections of joints and tendons. Proper technique is necessary for successful use of this modality. Appropriate coding for physician reimbursement is required. We discuss common wrist and hand pathology for which ultrasound may be useful as an adjunct to diagnosis and treatment and provide an overview of technique and reimbursement codes when using ultrasound in a variety of situations. Copyright © 2018 American Society for Surgery of the Hand. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

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    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

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  10. Abdominal ultrasound (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

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  12. General Ultrasound Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

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