WorldWideScience

Sample records for therapeutic radiopharmaceutical development

  1. Rhenium radioisotopes for therapeutic radiopharmaceutical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.; Beets, A.L.; Pinkert, J.; Kropp, J.; Lin, W.Y.; Wang, S.Y.

    2001-01-01

    Rhenium-186 and rhenium-188 represent two important radioisotopes which are of interest for a variety of therapeutic applications in oncology, nuclear medicine and interventional cardiology. Rhenium-186 is directly produced in a nuclear reactor and the 90 hour half-life allows distribution to distant sites. The relatively low specific activity of rhenium-186 produced in most reactors, however, permits use of phosphonates, but limits use for labelled peptides and antibodies. Rhenium-188 has a much shorter 16.9 hour half-life which makes distribution from direct reactor production difficult. However, rhenium-188 can be obtained carrier-free from a tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator, which has a long useful shelf-life of several months which is cost-effective, especially for developing regions. In this paper we discuss the issues associated with the production of rhenium-186- and rhenium-188 and the development and use of various radiopharmaceuticals and devices labelled with these radioisotopes for bone pain palliation, endoradiotherapy of tumours by selective catheterization and tumour therapy using radiolabelled peptides and antibodies, radionuclide synovectomy and the new field of vascular radiation therapy. (author)

  2. Therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, W.J.; Datz, F.L.; Beightol, R.W.

    1987-01-01

    Whether a radiopharmaceutical has diagnostic or therapeutic application depends on both the isotope and pharmaceutical used. For diagnostic applications, the isotope should undergo only γ-decay, since usually only γ-radiation is detected by nuclear medicine cameras. The half-life should be just long enough to allow the procedure to be performed. In contrast, the isotope needed for therapeutic purposes should have particulate radiation, such as a β-particle (electron), since these are locally absorbed an increase the local radiation dose. γ-Radiation, which penetrates the tissues, produces less radiation dose than do Β-particles. Several references dealing with radioactive decay, particulate interactions, and diagnostic and therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals are available. Radiopharmaceuticals can legally be used only by physicians who are qualified by specific training in the safe handling of radionuclides. The experience and training of these physicians must be approved by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission or Agreement State Agency authorized to license the use of radiopharmaceuticals. A list of all byproduct material and procedures is available in the Code of Federal Regulations. Of the many radiopharmaceuticals available for diagnostic and therapeutic use, only those commonly used are discussed in this chapter

  3. Molecularly targeted therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saw, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: It is generally agreed that current focus of nuclear medicine development should be on molecular imaging and therapy. Though, the widespread use of the terminology 'molecular imaging' is quite recent, nuclear medicine has used molecular imaging techniques for more than 20 years ago. A variety of radiopharmaceuticals have been introduced for the internal therapy of malignant and inflammatory lesions in nuclear medicine. In the field of bio/medical imaging, nuclear medicine is one of the disciplines which has the privilege of organized and well developed chemistry/ pharmacy section; radio-chemistry/radiopharmacy. Fundamental principles have been developed more than 40 years ago and advanced research is going well into postgenomic era. The genomic revolution and dramatically increased insight in the molecular mechanisms underlying pathology have led to paradigm shift in drug development. Likewise does in the nuclear medicine. Here, the author will present current clinical and pre-clinical therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on molecular targets such as membrane-bound receptors, enzymes, nucleic acids, sodium iodide symporter, etc, in correlation with fundamentals of radiopharmacy. (author)

  4. The IAEA Activities on Supporting Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals and Capacity Building in Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, M.R.A.; Haji-Saeid, M.; Zaknun, J.; Ramamoorthy, N.

    2009-01-01

    The IAEA activities on supporting development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are focused on identified radionuclides that can be produced in large quantities and making use of carrier molecules which can be synthesized locally or procured from commercial sources or already available in MS from other related programs. The main emphasis is on 90 Y and 177 Lu based products, which cover the hard beta energy and soft beta energy range respectively, and also since both these radionuclides can be produced in large quantities with very high specific activity and high radionuclidic purity. The services to MS are provided through implementing Coordinated Research Projects (CRP), Technical Cooperation (TC) projects, technical meetings and regional training courses in addition to documenting practically useful technical information related to these products though IAEA publications. The CRP is a group activity in which nearly 15 participants from as many countries come together to work towards an identified objective. Two of the completed CRPs in this area are: (i) Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals (2002-2005) that focussed on the development of 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' techniques for evaluating new generation therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals; and (ii) Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides (2004-2007) that addressed technologies for 90 Sr/ 90 Y and 188 W/ 188 Re generators and which can be easily adapted by MS. The participants in the CRP on 'Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals' used the somatostatin analogue, DOTATATE as the lead molecule for developing radiopharmaceuticals and testing the efficacy by in vitro biological assays and animal biodistribution studies. A significant outcome of the CRP was that 177 Lu-DOTATATE therapy is now practised in several of the CRP participating countries including Brazil, India, Italy, and Poland. The major outcome of the CRP on 'Development of generator

  5. Novel diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides for the development of innovative radiopharmaceuticals

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose the exploration of novel radionuclides with diagnostic or therapeutic properties from ISOLDE. Access to such unique isotopes will enable the fundamental research in radiopharmaceutical science towards superior treatment, e.g. in nuclear oncology. The systematic investigation of the biological response to the different characteristics of the decay radiation will be performed for a better understanding of therapeutic effects. The development of alternative diagnostic tools will be applied for the management and optimization of radionuclide therapy.

  6. Development and therapeutic application of internally emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    This project is concerned with developing the potential of alpha-emitting radionuclides as agents for radiotherapy. Among the available α-emitters, astatine-211 appears most promising for testing the efficacy of α-emitters for therapeutic applications because: (1) it has some chemical similarities to iodine, an element that can readily be incorporated into numerous proteins and peptides; (2) it has a half life that is long enough to permit chemical manipulation yet short enough to minimize destruction of healthy cells; and (3) α-emission is associated with 100% of its decays. If appropriate biological carriers can be labeled with an alpha emitter such as 211 At, they could be of great utility in several areas of therapeutic medicine where elimination of specific cell populations is desired. While previous attempts to astatinate proteins using standard iodination techniques have been unsuccessful, effective labeling of proteins with astatine by first synthesizing an aryl astatide and then coupling this compound to the protein via an acylation has been achieved. Undergoing current investigation are several different aryl astatide-followed-by-acylation approaches including an astatinated Bolton-Hunter type reagent using concanavalin A (ConA) and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) as model compounds

  7. The IAEA Activities on Supporting Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals and Capacity Building in Member States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, M R.A.; Haji-Saeid, M; Zaknun, J; Ramamoorthy, N [Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    The IAEA activities on supporting development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are focused on identified radionuclides that can be produced in large quantities and making use of carrier molecules which can be synthesized locally or procured from commercial sources or already available in MS from other related programs. The main emphasis is on {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu based products, which cover the hard beta energy and soft beta energy range respectively, and also since both these radionuclides can be produced in large quantities with very high specific activity and high radionuclidic purity. The services to MS are provided through implementing Coordinated Research Projects (CRP), Technical Cooperation (TC) projects, technical meetings and regional training courses in addition to documenting practically useful technical information related to these products though IAEA publications. The CRP is a group activity in which nearly 15 participants from as many countries come together to work towards an identified objective. Two of the completed CRPs in this area are: (i) Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals (2002-2005) that focussed on the development of 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' techniques for evaluating new generation therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals; and (ii) Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides (2004-2007) that addressed technologies for {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generators and which can be easily adapted by MS. The participants in the CRP on 'Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals' used the somatostatin analogue, DOTATATE as the lead molecule for developing radiopharmaceuticals and testing the efficacy by in vitro biological assays and animal biodistribution studies. A significant outcome of the CRP was that {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE therapy is now practised in several of the CRP participating countries including Brazil, India, Italy, and Poland. The major outcome of the CRP

  8. Radiopharmaceutical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, F.W.; Robinson, G.D. Jr.; MacDonald, N.S.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas of research: compact cyclotron production of 123 I iodide for radiopharmaceutical synthesis; synthesis of 123 I-labeled compounds for myocardial imaging and evaluation of kidney and liver functions; 62 Cu: a short-lived, generator-produced, positron emitting radionuclide for radiopharmaceuticals; dry radioaerosols for lung airway imaging; and improved particulate agents for perfusion imaging

  9. The development of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, K. W.; Suh, Y. S.; Lee, J. D.; Ahn, S. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop the radiopharmaceuticals and automatic synthetic unit for labelled compounds, and to establish mass production system of radiopharmaceuticals. These will contribute to the early diagnosis of the disease hard to cure. The contents of this project are as follows, the development of the radiopharmaceutical for imaging of cancer, the development of automatic synthesizer for the synthesis of radio-pharmaceuticals, the development of hormone derivatives labelled with 12 '3I, the development of the radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of myocardial metabolism

  10. Report on the Technical Meeting on Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the TM was to provide an experts' platform to facilitate exploring the current status and future directions on therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. The invited talks and presentations in the TM were in the following topics: - Radionuclide Production; - Production and availability of alpha emitters and their radiopharmaceuticals; - Therapeutic radiopharmaceutical chemistry; - Targets and biological evaluation; - Medical physics and dosimetry; - Clinical applications including radioimmunotherapy and clinical needs; - Peptide receptor mediated therapy Panel discussions: - Radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters; - Regulatory challenges with therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals; - International activities in radionuclide therapy. he technical meeting generated a large interest among scientists and physicians working in the field of targeted therapy using radiopharmaceuticals. Participants from both developed and developing MS reported on recent developments on the research work and clinical studies going on in the field and provided their views on the future developments in this field. The unexpected high number of participants and the high number of presentations with exceptional quality underlines the great interest of scientists and professionals in therapeutic applications using radiolabelled drugs / biomolecules. The intensive discussions including panels specified the challenges in the future on developing novel agents and to finally use them for the benefit of patients. The IAEA can play as vital role in streamlining developments and to provide tools to overcome scientific, professional and regulatory challenges in the field of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

  11. Report on the Technical Meeting on Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of the TM was to provide an experts' platform to facilitate exploring the current status and future directions on therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. The invited talks and presentations in the TM were in the following topics: - Radionuclide Production; - Production and availability of alpha emitters and their radiopharmaceuticals; - Therapeutic radiopharmaceutical chemistry; - Targets and biological evaluation; - Medical physics and dosimetry; - Clinical applications including radioimmunotherapy and clinical needs; - Peptide receptor mediated therapy Panel discussions: - Radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters; - Regulatory challenges with therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals; - International activities in radionuclide therapy. he technical meeting generated a large interest among scientists and physicians working in the field of targeted therapy using radiopharmaceuticals. Participants from both developed and developing MS reported on recent developments on the research work and clinical studies going on in the field and provided their views on the future developments in this field. The unexpected high number of participants and the high number of presentations with exceptional quality underlines the great interest of scientists and professionals in therapeutic applications using radiolabelled drugs / biomolecules. The intensive discussions including panels specified the challenges in the future on developing novel agents and to finally use them for the benefit of patients. The IAEA can play as vital role in streamlining developments and to provide tools to overcome scientific, professional and regulatory challenges in the field of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

  12. Development of radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Bae; Kim, J R; Shin, B C; Kim, Y M; Cho, U K; Han, K H; Chung, Y J; Shin, H Y; Hong, S B

    1997-09-01

    To overcome many problems caused by external radiation therapy, we have developed a new agent for internal radiation therapy, which is administered directly to the lesions and irradiate {beta}-rays resulting in maximized therapeutic effect and minimized radiation damage to normal tissues or organs to nearby. In the same reasons, we have also developed a new radioactive patch for the treatment of skin cancer using {beta}-emitting radionuclide. We prepared for {sup 166}Ho-chitosan complex ({sup 166}Ho-CHICO) which is potential radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of liver cancer, peritoneal cancer metastasized from stomach cancer, ovarian cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis in knee joints. We carried out various experiments such as evaluation of absorbed dosimetry, studies on absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) and clinical trials with {sup 166}Ho-CHICO. For commercialization of {sup 166}Ho-CHICO, we evaluated its toxicity, efficacy and safety, and then prepared documents for submission to the Mininstry of Health and Welfare to get license as an investigational new drug. {sup 166}Ho-Patch for skin cancer treatment was prepared by neutron irradiation of pre-made non-radioactive {sup 165}Ho-Patch. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of {sup 166}Ho-Patch in the treatment of skin cancer using an animal model and in clinical cases. (author). 49 refs., 15 tabs., 36 figs.

  13. Development of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyung Bae; Kim, J. R.; Shin, B. C.; Kim, Y. M.; Cho, U. K.; Han, K. H.; Chung, Y. J.; Shin, H. Y.; Hong, S. B.

    1997-09-01

    To overcome many problems caused by external radiation therapy, we have developed a new agent for internal radiation therapy, which is administered directly to the lesions and irradiate β-rays resulting in maximized therapeutic effect and minimized radiation damage to normal tissues or organs to nearby. In the same reasons, we have also developed a new radioactive patch for the treatment of skin cancer using β-emitting radionuclide. We prepared for 166 Ho-chitosan complex ( 166 Ho-CHICO) which is potential radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of liver cancer, peritoneal cancer metastasized from stomach cancer, ovarian cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis in knee joints. We carried out various experiments such as evaluation of absorbed dosimetry, studies on absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) and clinical trials with 166 Ho-CHICO. For commercialization of 166 Ho-CHICO, we evaluated its toxicity, efficacy and safety, and then prepared documents for submission to the Mininstry of Health and Welfare to get license as an investigational new drug. 166 Ho-Patch for skin cancer treatment was prepared by neutron irradiation of pre-made non-radioactive 165 Ho-Patch. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of 166 Ho-Patch in the treatment of skin cancer using an animal model and in clinical cases. (author). 49 refs., 15 tabs., 36 figs

  14. Report on the 1. research coordination meeting on 'Development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on {sup 177}Lu for radionuclide therapy'

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2006-07-01

    supply the products to places far away from the production site. Patients suffering from breast, lung and prostate cancer develop metastasis in bone in the advanced stage of their diseases and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP and {sup 89}SrCl2 are used effectively for pain palliation due to skeletal metastases. Despite the fact that the above bone pain palliating agents give good clinical results; their wider use has met with practical difficulties. Though {sup 153}Sm can be prepared in adequate quantities in medium flux reactors, its short half life (47 h) is the major disadvantage. It is essential to handle large quantities of activity to compensate for decay losses, during production and delivery of the radiopharmaceutical. In the case of {sup 89}Sr, there is very limited capacity for production due to the very low cross section making this product expensive and unaffordable for many patients. It is expected that a {sup 177}Lu based bone palliating agent will offer the same clinical efficacy without the disadvantages mentioned above. Currently there is good published data available on the production of {sup 177}Lu and the preparation of phosphonates based radiopharmaceuticals which show high bone uptake. {sup 177}Lu produced in the low to medium flux research reactors available in the MS can be used for bone pain palliation. High specific activity {sup 177}Lu that is prepared in high flux research reactors is needed for radiolabelling antibodies and peptides. These antibodies introduced to patients alone or in conjunction with {sup 90}Y products are showing promising results in clinical trials. Large quantities of high specific activity {sup 177}Lu can be prepared by irradiating enriched targets in high flux research reactors and hence, in the long term the cost of high specific activity {sup 177}Lu should come down to reasonable levels. The wider availability of {sup 177}Lu will make it feasible for the production of therapeutic

  15. Report on the 1. research coordination meeting on 'Development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on 177Lu for radionuclide therapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    far away from the production site. Patients suffering from breast, lung and prostate cancer develop metastasis in bone in the advanced stage of their diseases and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals such as 153 Sm-EDTMP and 89 SrCl2 are used effectively for pain palliation due to skeletal metastases. Despite the fact that the above bone pain palliating agents give good clinical results; their wider use has met with practical difficulties. Though 153 Sm can be prepared in adequate quantities in medium flux reactors, its short half life (47 h) is the major disadvantage. It is essential to handle large quantities of activity to compensate for decay losses, during production and delivery of the radiopharmaceutical. In the case of 89 Sr, there is very limited capacity for production due to the very low cross section making this product expensive and unaffordable for many patients. It is expected that a 177 Lu based bone palliating agent will offer the same clinical efficacy without the disadvantages mentioned above. Currently there is good published data available on the production of 177 Lu and the preparation of phosphonates based radiopharmaceuticals which show high bone uptake. 177 Lu produced in the low to medium flux research reactors available in the MS can be used for bone pain palliation. High specific activity 177 Lu that is prepared in high flux research reactors is needed for radiolabelling antibodies and peptides. These antibodies introduced to patients alone or in conjunction with 90 Y products are showing promising results in clinical trials. Large quantities of high specific activity 177 Lu can be prepared by irradiating enriched targets in high flux research reactors and hence, in the long term the cost of high specific activity 177 Lu should come down to reasonable levels. The wider availability of 177 Lu will make it feasible for the production of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals with lower cost ensuring higher availability in MS. The CRP 'Development of

  16. Laboratory methods to evaluate therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteaga de Murphy, C.; Rodriguez-Cortes, J.; Pedraza-Lopez, M.; Ramirez-Iglesias, MT.; Ferro-Flores, G.

    2007-01-01

    The overall aim of this coordinated research project was to develop in vivo and in vitro laboratory methods to evaluate therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Towards this end, the laboratory methods used in this study are described in detail. Two peptides - an 8 amino acid minigastrin analogue and octreotate - were labelled with 177 Lu. Bombesin was labelled with 99 mTc, and its diagnostic utility was proven. For comparison, 99 mTc-TOC was used. The cell lines used in this study were AR42J cells, which overexpress somatostatin receptors found in neuroendocrine cancers, and PC3 cells, which overexpress gastric releasing peptide receptors (GRP-r) found in human prostate and breast cancers. The animal model chosen was athymic mice with implanted dorsal tumours of pathologically confirmed cell cancers. The methodology described for labelling, quality control, and in vitro and in vivo assays can be easily used with other radionuclides and other peptides of interest. (author)

  17. The development of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, K. W.; Suh, Y. S.; Lee, J. D.; Ahn, S. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to developthe radiopharmaceuticals and automatic synthetic unit for labelled compounds, and to establish mass production system of radiopharmaceuticals. These will contribute to the early diagnosis of the disease hard to cure. The contents of this project are as follows, the development of the radiopharmaceutical for imaging of cancer, the development of automatic synthesizer for the synthesis of radio-pharmaceuticals, the development of hormone derivatives labelled with {sup 12}'3I, the development of the radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of myocardial metabolism.

  18. Development of new radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The possibilities to design and prepare better and more organ-specific radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic nuclear medicine has increased dramatically in the recent past with a deeper understanding of the relationships between chemical structure and biological activity. Whereas most of the research is performed in well-funded laboratories of industrialized countries, there are several developing countries with adequate resources and expertise as to undertake fruitful research in the field of radiopharmacy. With the aim of promoting advanced research in radiopharmacy by developing new radiodiagnostics agents, in particular, hepatobiliary imaging agents labelled with 99m Tc, and to facilitate exchange of information, the IAEA has established in 1983 the present Research Co-ordination Programme (CRP) with a duration of five years. The report includes detailed results obtained by all participants as well as novel preparation procedures for some of the newest and more promising radiopharmaceuticals developed under the auspices of the CRP. The extensive bibliographic reference listing is considered another important information of particular value for scientists in developing countries who do not always have access to updated scientific information sources. Refs, figs and tabs

  19. Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theobald, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a review of the latest developments in radiopharmaceuticals. It covers the development of radiopharmaceutical compounds, the theory and practice of their synthesis, and examples of their application. Also covers safe handling of radiopharmaceuticals, legislation affecting their use, radiation monitoring, radiochromatography, and computer techniques

  20. Development of the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical 117Lu-DOTA-Minigastrin for potential use in PRRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Bularte, Ana C.; Nevares, Noemi; Zapata, Miguel; Perez, Juan; Crudo, Jose L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The main objectives of this work were to obtain 177 Lu-DOTA-Minigastrin with high radiochemical purity (RP) and specific activity (SA) as high as possible, using locally produced medium SA 177 LuCl3 (range 6,36-9,73 Ci/mg of 176 Lu), and to carry out in vitro and in vivo stability tests. Materials and methods: For a typical labelling, 20 or 15 μg of DOTA-MG (pi Chem, Austria) dissolved in ammonium acetate buffer pH 6 were mixed with 1mCi of 177 LuCl3 (SA = 6,36, 7,52 y 9,73 Ci/mg). The solution was incubated for 30 min. at 80 C degrees (pH 5,5). The stability assays in saline (SS) were carried out by incubation of the radiopharmaceutical with SA of 0.05 mCi/ μg of peptide in 80 μ of SS for 24 and 48 h at room temperature. The stability assays in human serum (HS) were carried out by incubation of 2.5 μ of 177 Lu-DOTA-MG with SA of 0.05 mCi/ μg of peptide in 500 μl of HS for 15 min. and 2 h at 37 C degrees. The samples were centrifuged at 3000 xg for 5 min. The supernatant (SN) was taken and acetonitrile (ACN) was added in a ratio 2:3 (SP:ACN). The solution was centrifuged at 3000 xg for 5 min. and the resulting supernatant was concentrated by ultra-filtration (Vivaspin 500, Sartorius). The concentrated SN was analyzed by Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) in order to determine the radiochemical purity. The serum protein binding was calculated taking into account the relation between the pellets activity in respect to the total activity. Bio distributions of 177 Lu-DOTA-MG in normal mice were done at 15 and 30 min., 1 and 4 h p.i. The results were expressed as percentage of injected activity per gram of tissue (%IAgr). Results: 20 μg of peptide were labelled with different SA 177 LuCl3 (6,36, 7,52 and 9,73 Ci/mg of 176 Lu) resulting in high radiochemical purities 96,31 %, 98,95 % and 97.57 %, respectively (SA 0.05 mCi/μg of peptide). 15 ug of peptide were labelled with 177 LuCl3 (SA 7,52 Ci/mg of 176 Lu) obtaining a

  1. Radiopharmaceutical development and clinical needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    The use of radionuclides for medical applications has continued to grow at a very rapid pace. The use of radiotracers for nuclear medicine imaging and for radiotherapy of cancer as well as certain benign disorders is firmly established as an important clinical modality. Over the past ten years, nuclear medicine has experienced an evolution towards functional studies and novel therapeutic approaches. New radionuclides are required for these applications. In the developmental stages, each new isotope has to go through a phase of careful scrutiny and evaluation, and practical concerns related to the cost of production and availability must be addressed. The development of 18 F-labeled radiopharmaceuticals has opened a completely new area of investigation. Research on bioconjugates (this term includes radiolabeled antibodies, peptides, receptor-specific and other bioactive molecules) has experienced rapid growth because of the promise of a number of these ''bioactive molecules'' to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides for tumor-associated and other specific antigens/receptors ''in vivo''. The new concept of nuclear medicine, particularly when applied to the field of oncology is directed towards the physiological mechanisms and the study of molecular disfunctions. The search for new radiopharmaceuticals thus aims at studying tumors at a tissue and molecular level. Examples of this new approach are scans utilizing the following substances: -guanethidine and noradrenaline analogues such as meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine labeled with iodine-131 or iodine-123 aimed at targeting neuroendocrine cells and their secretory granules; -various monoclonal antibodies directed at different tumor types, both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Radioimmunotherapy is considered particularly suited for treatment of tumors not easily amenable to surgery and for the treatment of small disseminated lesions; -somatostatin analogs tagged with indium-111 or more recently with Yttrium

  2. Report on the 2nd Research Coordination Meeting on The Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on 188Re and 90Y for Radionuclide. Working Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy is practiced for the treatment of malignant disorders of various organs and tissues as well as for treating certain other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Advances in understanding tumor biology as well as developments in peptide chemistry and monoclonal antibody technology are opening new opportunities for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, thereby widening the scope of radionuclide therapy. In addition, particulate based radiopharmaceuticals are useful for treating hepatocarcinoma as well as in radiation synovectomy. With the establishment of new products the demand and application of therapeutic nuclear medicine is expected to grow rapidly. While there are a large number of radioisotopes proposed for targeted therapy, practical considerations had been limiting the number of usable isotopes. Generator-produced radionuclides are an attractive option for the large scale on-site availability of therapeutic isotopes. The IAEA’s CRP on the ‘Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides’ (2004-2007) was successful in developing technologies for the preparation of 188 W/ 188 Re and 90 Sr/ 90 Y generators for eluting 188 Re and 90 Y of high radionuclidic and chemical purity usable for research applications in the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. The IAEA’s CRP on ‘The development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on 188 Re and 90 Y for radionuclide therapy’ was formulated to focus on enhancing the capacity of the 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator; to develop and validate quality control methods for the generator eluate; and to develop therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on 188 Re and 90 Y. The first RCM of the CRP was held in Polatom, Warsaw, Poland from 30 June to 4 July 2008. The meeting reviewed the work going on in the different participating laboratories, and the facilities, expertise and capabilities of the different participating groups, and formulated the work plan of

  3. Report on the 2{sup nd} Research Coordination Meeting on The Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on {sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Y for Radionuclide. Working Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-07-01

    Radionuclide therapy is practiced for the treatment of malignant disorders of various organs and tissues as well as for treating certain other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Advances in understanding tumor biology as well as developments in peptide chemistry and monoclonal antibody technology are opening new opportunities for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, thereby widening the scope of radionuclide therapy. In addition, particulate based radiopharmaceuticals are useful for treating hepatocarcinoma as well as in radiation synovectomy. With the establishment of new products the demand and application of therapeutic nuclear medicine is expected to grow rapidly. While there are a large number of radioisotopes proposed for targeted therapy, practical considerations had been limiting the number of usable isotopes. Generator-produced radionuclides are an attractive option for the large scale on-site availability of therapeutic isotopes. The IAEA’s CRP on the ‘Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides’ (2004-2007) was successful in developing technologies for the preparation of {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generators for eluting {sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Y of high radionuclidic and chemical purity usable for research applications in the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. The IAEA’s CRP on ‘The development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on {sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Y for radionuclide therapy’ was formulated to focus on enhancing the capacity of the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generator; to develop and validate quality control methods for the generator eluate; and to develop therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on {sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Y. The first RCM of the CRP was held in Polatom, Warsaw, Poland from 30 June to 4 July 2008. The meeting reviewed the work going on in the different participating laboratories, and the facilities, expertise and capabilities of the different

  4. Development of radiopharmaceutical for radiosinovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Renata Martinussi

    2009-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals prepared with different radionuclides have been used in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in Nuclear Medicine. The interest in radionuclidic therapy has been increased in last years, with the introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals applied in the destruction of specific cells or to prevent its undesired proliferation. Radiosinovectomy (RSV) is a therapeutic modality that uses radiopharmaceuticals administered in the intra-articular cavity and represents an alternative to the treatment of different arthropaties and, in particular, the arthropaties derived from rheumatoid arthritis and haemophilic. The objective of the present work was to study the labeling of compounds with 90 Y and 177 Lu in order to improve the production conditions and quality control procedures, study the stability of the labeled compounds and preliminary biodistribution studies of the radiopharmaceuticals with potential for RSV applications. The study of the production of 90 Y citrate colloid ( 90 Y-Cit) was based in a labeling procedure using 90 Y Cl 3 solution (37 - 54 MBq) that was previously dried, followed by the addition of yttrium nitrate and sodium citrate in p H 7 at 37 deg C for 30 minutes. The production of hydroxyapatite (HA) labeled with 90 Y was based in a labeling procedure using mono hydrated citric acid, yttrium nitrate and 90 Y Cl 3 solution (37 - 370 MBq). The reaction mixture was incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature and the HA was introduced in aqueous medium and the reaction proceed for 30 minutes under strong stirring. 177 Lu-HA was produced using 177 Lu Cl 3 solution (296 MBq), in presence of lutetium oxide in NaCl medium, p H 7, under continuous stirring for 30 minutes at room temperature. Several reaction parameters were studied for the three radiopharmaceuticals. Labeling yield was determined after particles were centrifuged and washed with NaCl 0,9%. Radiochemical purity was determined by ascending chromatography using different

  5. Consequences of radiopharmaceutical extravasation and therapeutic interventions: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pol, Jochem van der; Voeoe, Stefan [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC+), Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bucerius, Jan; Mottaghy, Felix M. [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC+), Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    Radiopharmaceutical extravasation can potentially lead to severe soft tissue damage, but little is known about incidence, medical consequences, possible interventions, and effectiveness of these. The aims of this study are to estimate the incidence of extravasation of diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, to evaluate medical consequences, and to evaluate medical treatment applied subsequently to those incidents. A sensitive and elaborate literature search was performed in Embase and PubMed using the keywords ''misadministration'', ''extravasation'', ''paravascular infiltration'', combined with ''tracer'', ''radionuclide'', ''radiopharmaceutical'', and a list of keywords referring to clinically used tracers (i.e. ''Technetium-99m'', ''Yttrium-90''). Reported data on radiopharmaceutical extravasation and applied interventions was extracted and summarised. Thirty-seven publications reported 3016 cases of diagnostic radiopharmaceutical extravasation, of which three cases reported symptoms after extravasation. Eight publications reported 10 cases of therapeutic tracer extravasation. The most severe symptom was ulceration. Thirty-four different intervention and prevention strategies were performed or proposed in literature. Extravasation of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals is common. {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 123}I, {sup 18}F, and {sup 68}Ga labelled tracers do not require specific intervention. Extravasation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can give severe soft tissue lesions. Although not evidence based, surgical intervention should be considered. Furthermore, dispersive intervention, dosimetry and follow up is advised. Pharmaceutical intervention has no place yet in the immediate care of radiopharmaceutical extravasation. (orig.)

  6. The development of new radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Britton, K.E.

    1990-01-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is the basis of the continuing growth of nuclear medicine. Chemical interactions of electron clouds in their three-dimensional conformations bring together, in the process of molecular recognition, the reaction of antibody and antigen, receptor and ligand, enzyme and substrate, hormone and response site. This convergence enables the computer design of molecules such as ligands to fit computer-displayed conformational models showing active centres, positive and negative charges and other interactions. Indeed, given a particular molecule, a complementary binding structure can be devised. The hybridoma approach to monoclonal antibody production is being superceded by the bacterial bioengineer. The gene for the hypervariable region from the spleen cells of immunized mouse can be coupled with the myeloma gene. The polymerase chain reaction can duplicate the DNA a million times over in 20 min and the result transfected into a bacterial plasmid to produce the antibody. These scientific problems are soluble in principle and are being solved. However, so much damage to this developing biological field is being done by regulatory authorities that one must ask who should or can regulate the regulators. The problems have to be overcome in order to provide the new radiopharmaceuticals that are the food and wine of nuclear medicine. (orig.)

  7. Development of European regulations on radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1990-01-01

    Separate regulatory systems are being developed on the use of radiopharmaceuticals including radiation protection of patients and personnel and on the quality including safety and efficacy of radiopharmaceuticals. Radiation protection legislation has been introduced in most western European Economic Community (EEC). Within the drug field radiopharmaceuticals have been excepted up till now. However, new EEC directive on radiopharmaceuticals will soon come into force. The work done on the preparation of regulations and guidelines will be discussed. This discussion will focus on the problems faced when radiation protection aspects shall be balanced to traditional requirements of pharmaceutical aspects

  8. Experimental nuclear medicine radiopharmaceutical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harper, P.; Lathrop, K.

    1980-01-01

    This report summarizes progress that has been made on the preparation and biological accumulation of various radiopharmaceuticals including C-hexamethonium, C-cholic acid, Mn-51 and labeled amino acids

  9. Therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals. Proceedings of an international seminar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-06-01

    The potential of radionuclides in therapy has been recognised for many decades. A number of radionuclides such as iodine-131, phosphorous-32, yttrium-90 and 1-131 MIBG have been in use for the treatment of many benign and malignant disorders. Recently, however, there has been a significant growth of this branch of nuclear medicine with the introduction of a number of new radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic bone pain, neuroendocrine and other tumours. The prospect of localising or treating neoplastic diseases using specific antibodies labelled with radioactive isotopes capable of delivering large amounts of internally administered radiation may have the potential to fulfil the promise of EhrIich's 'magic bullet', which has tantalised investigators worldwide for the past sixty years. Recent success in this area has been largely due to genetic and molecular techniques that now permit production of a large number of suitable peptides and monoclonal antibodies directed against specific epitopes individually characteristic of specific tumours. The input of the radiochemist and the development of labelling techniques that do not destroy the immunological integrity of the monoclonal antibodies have also been essential ingredients of the success story. Recent significant advances in monoclonal antibody techniques for pretargeting make it very likely that radiopharmaceuticals will become an important part of therapy for various cancers. It may also be possible that in addition to the use of beta particles, alpha particles may soon become a mainstay of therapeutic nuclear medicine. Cancer researchers, looking for an extremely potent and highly specific way to target cancer cells, are investigating the use of monoclonal antibodies and peptides attached to alpha emitting radionuclides in early clinical trials. Today the field of radionuclide therapy is going through an extremely interesting and exciting phase and is poised for greater growth

  10. Therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals. Proceedings of an international seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The potential of radionuclides in therapy has been recognised for many decades. A number of radionuclides such as iodine-131, phosphorous-32, yttrium-90 and 1-131 MIBG have been in use for the treatment of many benign and malignant disorders. Recently, however, there has been a significant growth of this branch of nuclear medicine with the introduction of a number of new radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic bone pain, neuroendocrine and other tumours. The prospect of localising or treating neoplastic diseases using specific antibodies labelled with radioactive isotopes capable of delivering large amounts of internally administered radiation may have the potential to fulfil the promise of EhrIich's 'magic bullet', which has tantalised investigators worldwide for the past sixty years. Recent success in this area has been largely due to genetic and molecular techniques that now permit production of a large number of suitable peptides and monoclonal antibodies directed against specific epitopes individually characteristic of specific tumours. The input of the radiochemist and the development of labelling techniques that do not destroy the immunological integrity of the monoclonal antibodies have also been essential ingredients of the success story. Recent significant advances in monoclonal antibody techniques for pretargeting make it very likely that radiopharmaceuticals will become an important part of therapy for various cancers. It may also be possible that in addition to the use of beta particles, alpha particles may soon become a mainstay of therapeutic nuclear medicine. Cancer researchers, looking for an extremely potent and highly specific way to target cancer cells, are investigating the use of monoclonal antibodies and peptides attached to alpha emitting radionuclides in early clinical trials. Today the field of radionuclide therapy is going through an extremely interesting and exciting phase and is poised for greater growth

  11. Radiopharmaceutical development of radiolabelled peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fani, Melpomeni; Maecke, Helmut R. [University Hospital Freiburg, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Freiburg (Germany)

    2012-02-15

    Receptor targeting with radiolabelled peptides has become very important in nuclear medicine and oncology in the past few years. The overexpression of many peptide receptors in numerous cancers, compared to their relatively low density in physiological organs, represents the molecular basis for in vivo imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy with radiolabelled peptide-based probes. The prototypes are analogs of somatostatin which are routinely used in the clinic. More recent developments include somatostatin analogs with a broader receptor subtype profile or with antagonistic properties. Many other peptide families such as bombesin, cholecystokinin/gastrin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)/exendin, arginine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) etc. have been explored during the last few years and quite a number of potential radiolabelled probes have been derived from them. On the other hand, a variety of strategies and optimized protocols for efficient labelling of peptides with clinically relevant radionuclides such as {sup 99m}Tc, M{sup 3+} radiometals ({sup 111}In, {sup 86/90}Y, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 67/68}Ga), {sup 64/67}Cu, {sup 18}F or radioisotopes of iodine have been developed. The labelling approaches include direct labelling, the use of bifunctional chelators or prosthetic groups. The choice of the labelling approach is driven by the nature and the chemical properties of the radionuclide. Additionally, chemical strategies, including modification of the amino acid sequence and introduction of linkers/spacers with different characteristics, have been explored for the improvement of the overall performance of the radiopeptides, e.g. metabolic stability and pharmacokinetics. Herein, we discuss the development of peptides as radiopharmaceuticals starting from the choice of the labelling method and the conditions to the design and optimization of the peptide probe, as well as some recent developments, focusing on a selected list of peptide families, including somatostatin

  12. Rational development of radiopharmaceuticals for HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Maldarelli, Frank; Eckelman, William C.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    The global battle against HIV-1 would benefit from a sensitive and specific radiopharmaceutical to localize HIV-infected cells. Ideally, this probe would be able to identify latently infected host cells containing replication competent HIV sequences. Clinical and research applications would include assessment of reservoirs, informing clinical management by facilitating assessment of burden of infection in different compartments, monitoring disease progression and monitoring response to therapy. A “rational” development approach could facilitate efficient identification of an appropriate targeted radiopharmaceutical. Rational development starts with understanding characteristics of the disease that can be effectively targeted and then engineering radiopharmaceuticals to hone in on an appropriate target, which in the case of HIV-1 (HIV) might be an HIV-specific product on or in the host cell, a differentially expressed gene product, an integrated DNA sequence specific enzymatic activity, part of the inflammatory response, or a combination of these. This is different from the current approach that starts with a radiopharmaceutical for a target associated with a disease, mostly from autopsy studies, without a strong rationale for the potential to impact patient care. At present, no targeted therapies are available for HIV latency, although a number of approaches are under study. Here we discuss requirements for a radiopharmaceutical useful in strategies targeting persistently infected cells. The radiopharmaceutical for HIV should be developed based on HIV biology, studied in an animal model and then in humans, and ultimately used in clinical and research settings

  13. Applications and development trend of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, J.R.

    1978-01-01

    Present status of radiopharmaceuticals applications and the trend of the development are extensively reviewed and discussed. The followings are manifested: a) Among the various radionuclides, those of short lived, accelerator produced, and having moderate radiation energies are becoming popular. b) Diagnosis using various labelled molecules are considered to be the most active field in nuclear medicine. c) Development of radiopharmaceuticals for tumor localization studies is one of the trends. d) The use of various convenient kits of both in-vitro radioligand assay, and in-vivo instant labelling is now an enormous domain in nuclear medicine. A great stride is also made in the development of automation technique. Upon it, an urgent development of some new radiopharmaceuticals having local characteristics is proposed. (author)

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The catalogue offers a wide-spread product range which meets the requirements of the international trend of in vivo application of radiopharmaceuticals. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) delivery schedule for radiopharmaceuticals, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  15. Development of radiopharmaceuticals and industrial constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, R.

    2005-01-01

    The development process of a diagnostic or therapeutic radiopharmaceutical does not really differ from the development of a classical drug. Some specific properties of these nuclear medicine tools mainly linked to the ease to follow their distribution in the human body allow to save a couple of years out of the dozen of years required to bring a drug on the market. Overall development costs can be significantly reduced for the same reason. An industrial who wants to invest in such a business bases its analysis on other criteria that need to evaluate the medical, safety and regulatory environment at the time of drug launching. Competition is obviously a major decision criteria, but in order to evaluate the market potential, other data must be available such as the analysis of the medical landscape, the reimbursement issues, the technology evolution, the investment needs or the development of other imaging modalities, among others. In fact all these parameters concentrate toward a common criteria, the profitability of the project. Nuclear medicine moved from an art and crafts era towards the industrial era and hence plunged from the twentieth to the twenty first century in the economic reality with all its constraints and consequences. (author)

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1988-01-01

    Different forms of radiopharmaceuticals such as radioactive gases, aerosols and colloids used for diagnostic techniques and radiotherapy and methods of labelling them are discussed. Some reference is made to their documentation, handling and quality control. (U.K.)

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Today there are an estimated ten million nuclear imaging procedures, performed each year, in just the United States, and the number is still growing. More than 30,000 therapy procedures are performed in the USA each year using radiopharmaceuticals. Moreover, while the numbers continue to grow, so also do the variety of the procedures being employed. A weakness of nuclear medicine is related also to one of its strengths. Unlike other types of imaging where only an instrument and the patient are required (e.g., with ultrasonics); nuclear medicine requires a radiopharmaceutical. At the same time, the variety of radiopharmaceuticals offers the ability to trace one or more particular functions of the human body. This provides nuclear medicine with great variety in detecting specific pathologies. Various nuclear medicine studies are possible because of the localization of radiopharmaceuticals in different organs

  18. Concentration of 188Re-Perrhenate for Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhari, T.H.; Hina, S.; Ahmad, M.; Iqbal, M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Rhenium-188 (T1/2=16.9h) has great potential for a variety of therapeutic applications, including radionuclide synovectomy, oncology and bone pain palliation. The radioactive concentration of 188Re is dependent upon the specific activity of 188W, which dictates the bed size of the alumina/gel column. Due to the high content of inactive tungsten in neutron irradiated WO3, large columns containing aluminum oxide or gel are needed to prepare to double neutron capture based 188W/188Re generators that results in large elution volumes containing relatively high188W contents and low concentrations of /sup 188/ ReO/sub 4/ This decrease in specific volume of 188ReO/sub 4/ places a limitation because a high radioactive concentration of 188ReO4 - is always needed for filling angioplasty balloons or other therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals like188Re -EHDP 188Re -EDTMP, 188Re - MAG3 and 188Re -DTPA. We report post elution concentration of 188ReO4 - using in- house prepared lead cation exchange and alumina columns. Using these columns high bolus volume (10 mL saline) of 188ReO4 - can conveniently be concentrated in 1 mL of physiological saline for therapeutic use. (author)

  19. Developments in radioisotope production and labelling of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments in both reactor and accelerator production of radioisotopes finding applications in nuclear medicine and in biomedical research are summarised. The priorities for the production of 48 different cyclotron radioisotopes; and for 42 reactor produced radioisotopes finding biomedical applications are identified. Each includes 5 generator systems. The rapid expansion of cyclotron based radioisotope production and automated synthesis of short-lived radiopharmaceuticals with the position-emitting radionuclides continues to gain momentum. Recent feasibility studies of the cyclotron production of 186 Re, 99m Tc and of 99 Mo are cited as examples of motivation to develop accelerator alternatives to use of nuclear reactors for medical radioisotope production. Examples of SPET and PET radiopharmaceuticals labelled with 131 I, 123 I, 124 I, 18 F, and with therapeutic radionuclides are highlighted. (author)

  20. Radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, F C; Wilson, J G

    1980-03-13

    The claim describes a reducing metal complex of a compound in a suitable form for labelling with technetium-99m for radiopharmaceutical purposes, the compound being a complex derived from an indene heterocycle structure. The indene heterocycle structure is selected from the group consisting of iminodiacetic acid derivates of benzimidazole, benzthiazole and benzoxazole.

  1. International seminar on therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals. Programme. Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-01

    The document includes extended synopses of 64 presentations given at the International Seminar on Therapeutic Applications of Radiopharmaceuticals, held in Hyderabad, India, 18-22 January 1999. A separate indexing was prepared for each presentation Refs, figs, tabs

  2. International seminar on therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals. Programme. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The document includes extended synopses of 64 presentations given at the International Seminar on Therapeutic Applications of Radiopharmaceuticals, held in Hyderabad, India, 18-22 January 1999. A separate indexing was prepared for each presentation

  3. A remotely operated, automated system for the infusion of shielded therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macfarlane, D.J.; Bartlett, M.; Bellen, J.; Peters, J.; Domagala, M.; Allison, R.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: A number of radiopharmaceuticals may soon emerge into mainstream clinical oncology for palliative and therapeutic treatment for a variety of malignancies. These agents are characterized by high linear energy transfer particulate emissions. Dispensing and administration of these therapies on a regular basis pose a substantial radiation burden to staff, from direct g-emissions and from Bremsstrahlung (braking) radiations. In an effort to implement the ALARA principle, a multidisciplinary team was given the brief to design a system which permitted: (1) safe, sterile transfer of a nominated quantity of radiopharmaceutical into a shielded reservoir compatible with the infusion pump; (2) remote variation of volume and administration rate upon command; (3) purging of delivery system following administration of dose; (4) monitoring of and communication with patient during infusion; (5) use of TGA-approved delivery system. The final design centred around an Abbott 'Lifecare 5000' volumetric dual-channel intravenous infusion pump and featured: microprocessor control with mutiline LCD prompting display; remote operation of keypad by pneumatic actuator; CCTV monitoring of patient, pump and physiological data; delivery of therapy dose from a shielded vial; flushing of therapy vial by 'back-priming'; and full array of safety alarms (air in line, occlusion, empty vial, etc). Further developments include audio communication with patient and remote physiological monitoring

  4. Design and Development of New Radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagner, Jr., H. N.; Stern, H. S.; Rhodes, B. A.; Reba, R. C.; Hosain, F.; Zolle, I. [Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1969-05-15

    The major factors in the design of a new radiopharmaceutical for radioisotope scintigraphy are the photon energy of the radionuclide, the ability to incorporate the radionuclide insuitable chemical and biological form, the radiation dose to the patient, and the cost of production of the radiopharmaceutical. In this laboratory, the radionuclides, indium-113m and ytterbium-169, and technetium-99m, have been incorporated into a variety of radiopharmaceuticals. These include particles suitable for lung and liver studies, chelates for brain and kidney studies, and ionic forms for blood pool imaging. Studies in experimental animals and man indicate that these agents offer certain advantages over previously available radiopharmaceuticals. By providing larger numbers of photons, they permit more precise temporal and spatial resolution. The longer half-life of the tin-113 parent radionuclide from which indium-113m can be eluted makes indium-113m readily available, even at sites distant from the source of production. The tin-indium generator system need be purchased only every five months rather than weekly as in the case of the widely used molybdenum-technetium system. The ytterbium-radionuclide in the chemical form of a chelate is particularly useful as an inexpensive agent that provides high photon yields for renal and brain imaging. The rapid and complete biological excretion results in low radiation dose while the longer physical half-life greatly extends the shelf-life. (author)

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1971-07-01

    Radioisotopes are being used to an ever-increasing extent in medicine for diagnosis and therapy. In this contributed article, Walter Wolf, of the School of Pharmacy, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA, and Alexandru T. Balaban, formerly a senior research officer in the IAEA Division of Research and Laboratories and now working in the chemistry section of the Institute of Atomic Physics, Bucharest, Romania, discuss some applications, and consider possible developments. (author)

  6. Report of the consultants' meeting on comparative laboratory evaluation of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals consist of two components - the radionuclide and the biological carrier. With regard to the radionuclide, an advantage of targeted radiotherapy is that there are a wide variety of radionuclides with different physical half-lives and radiation qualities that can be applied for this purpose. An important task is to select a radionuclide that is compatible with the needs of a particular clinical application. The identification of the ideal targeted radiotherapeutic for each potential clinical application is a difficult task because of the multitude of variables that must be considered, some relating to the radioisotope, and others to the biological carrier. Hence it is recommended that a Co-ordinated Research Programme be established by the Agency to enable participants to acquire and intercompare the methodological expertise to evaluate the relative merit of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. These studies will be performed using a model system selected either from those described in this report or a promising agent that has emerged in the time since this meeting. The molecular carrier will be labelled with 131 I, 125 I as well as other therapeutic radionuclides available to the participant (for example, 90 Y, 186 Re, 188 Re, 153 Sm, 166 Ho, 165 Dy). The potential radiopharmaceuticals will then be compared in a progression of studies evaluating biological integrity after labelling, internalisation and residualization of radioactivity in the tumour cell, in vitro cytotoxicity, tissue distribution, normal organ toxicity (determination of the maximum tolerated dose) and finally, therapeutic efficacy

  7. Radiation Dosimetry considerations in the safe administration of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    A set of eight questions was put to advanced nuclear medicine physicians-in-training participating in a continuing assessment exercise in practical therapeutic nuclear oncology. Using the particular example of 131 I-MIBG treatment of neuroblastoma in children, the questions were directed to the rationale of therapy and the contribution of other forms of treatment to toxic effects. The best answer to the questions are reproduced together with an introduction by the examiner, Dr. H. Turner. tabs

  8. Molecular target in oncology. Opportunity for radiopharmaceuticals development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro Marques, Fabio Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a cellular multifactorial disease, regulated by changes in phenotype characteristics, such as adhesion, invasion, migration, and tumorigenesis; genotypic status of commonly altered genes (KRAS and p53); microenvironmental conditions, such pH, oxygen and nutrient supply. All these features provide opportunities for radiopharmaceuticals development, both for diagnostic and therapy. For both applications, radiopharmaceuticals molecules can be divided in small synthetic molecules, small peptides (natural or modified), large molecules such as antibody or nanoparticles. The characteristics of those molecules and use will guide the choice of the radionuclide to be used for labeling it. In the presentation, data from literature and research ongoing in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo/Brazil will be used for demonstrate the potential for radiopharmaceuticals development. (author)

  9. Recent developments in the field of 123I-radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machulla, H.J.; Knust, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    Due to its advantageous nuclear physical properties iodine-123 is an excellent label for radiopharmaceuticals very well suited for measurements by γ-cameras and single-photon emission tomography. The development of 123 I-radiopharmaceuticals should be based on a clear biochemical concept, reliable labelling procedures and careful pharmacokinetic studies in order to evaluate the physiological behaviour of the radioiodinated compounds being analogues of metabolic substrates. The development of 123 I-labelled fatty acids and biogenic amines clearly proved the successful use of 123 I for labelling compounds applied in medical diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  10. Individual optimization of therapeutic applications and dosimetry of radiopharmaceuticals with the help of compartmental analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Augusto Ciussani

    2007-01-01

    Complete test of publication follows. The successful application of radiopharmaceuticals requires a patient-specific optimization of the activity to be administered, in order to deliver the desired therapeutic dose to the target organ while saving the healthy tissues. For a therapy specifically tailored on the characteristics of the patient, the correct knowledge of the morphology of the regions of interest, of the fractional uptake and of the related kinetics is necessary. Compartmental modelling can represent a powerful and simple tool for deriving the information of interest. In this presentation, the potentiality of compartmental analysis will be illustrated and two applications presented. The first study was conducted in patients with the autonomous functioning thyroid nodule (AFTN) syndrome treated with 131 I at the Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico of Milano (Milano, Italy). In these patients, the great challenge is represented by the healthy lobe surrounding the malignant nodule. A model was developed, where nodule and lobe are considered as separate entities in order to provide distinct dose estimates for the two tissues. The model has been also used for the optimization of the sampling schedule and for interpretation of biokinetic discrepancies observed between the diagnostic tests and the therapeutic application. The second study, carried out at Ospedali Riuniti di Bergamo (Bergamo, Italy), dealt with the application of [ 186 Re]-HEDP (hydroxyethyliden-diphosphonate disodium salt) for palliation of pain due to bone metastases of primary carcinomas. On the basis of the biodistribution studies and of chromatographic measurements, a compartmental model was suggested, taking into account the possible dissociation of the compound after injection into the patient. Also in this case, the compartmental model represents a valuable tool for individual optimization of the therapeutic procedure and for a more precise evaluation of the radiation dose the organs.

  11. Development of peptide and protein based radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynendaele, Evelien; Bracke, Nathalie; Stalmans, Sofie; De Spiegeleer, Bart

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides and proteins have recently gained great interest as theranostics, due to their numerous and considerable advantages over small (organic) molecules. Developmental procedures of these radiolabelled biomolecules start with the radiolabelling process, greatly defined by the amino acid composition of the molecule and the radionuclide used. Depending on the radionuclide selection, radiolabelling starting materials are whether or not essential for efficient radiolabelling, resulting in direct or indirect radioiodination, radiometal-chelate coupling, indirect radiofluorination or (3)H/(14)C-labelling. Before preclinical investigations are performed, quality control analyses of the synthesized radiopharmaceutical are recommended to eliminate false positive or negative functionality results, e.g. changed receptor binding properties due to (radiolabelled) impurities. Therefore, radionuclidic, radiochemical and chemical purity are investigated, next to the general peptide attributes as described in the European and the United States Pharmacopeia. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo stability characteristics of the peptides and proteins also need to be explored, seen their strong sensitivity to proteinases and peptidases, together with radiolysis and trans-chelation phenomena of the radiopharmaceuticals. In vitro biomedical characterization of the radiolabelled peptides and proteins is performed by saturation, kinetic and competition binding assays, analyzing KD, Bmax, kon, koff and internalization properties, taking into account the chemical and metabolic stability and adsorption events inherent to peptides and proteins. In vivo biodistribution can be adapted by linker, chelate or radionuclide modifications, minimizing normal tissue (e.g. kidney and liver) radiation, and resulting in favorable dosimetry analyses. Finally, clinical trials are initiated, eventually leading to the marketing of radiolabelled peptides and proteins for PET/SPECT-imaging and therapy

  12. Recent advances in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Radiopharmaceuticals in Nuclear Medicine may be divided into diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The diagnostic area is perceived to be mature, while the therapeutic side of nuclear medicine is still evolving. There are over 100 diagnostic radiopharmaceutical products available, the greatest number applied in cardiology followed by oncology and neurology. The greatest success in therapeutic nuclear medicine has been achieved in thyroid cancer, hyperthyroidism and bone pain palliation. Those in the field believe the future of nuclear medicine resides in the growth potential of the emerging therapeutic market, hence much of the recent research has been focussed in the development of therapeutic agents for targeting cancers. Radiopharmaceuticals under development or in clinical trials involve the use of radionuclides such as Y-90, Pd-103, Ir-192, Re-188, I-131, Sm-153, Sn-114, Sr-90, Cu-64 and In-111. Advances in cyclotron and camera technology as well as automation has enhanced and widened the potential use of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals such as F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). However the relationship between FDG uptake and glucose consumption in normal and diseased tissue is still to be defined. Many challenges remain for the nuclear medicine community to apply new knowledge of human biochemistry in the development of new radiopharmaceuticals. A better understanding of effects of radiation and its role in the design of therapeutic agents is undoubtedly pivotal for advancing therapeutic Nuclear Medicine into the future

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals generalities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, A.S.

    1994-01-01

    Many applications in nuclear medicine used as diagnostic techniques, images methods with direct and indirect labelled compounds in organs. A brief description about scintillator counters or gamma counters SPECT(single photon emission computed tomography) and PECT (positron emission computed tomography), as well as therapeutic proceedings,radiopharmaceutical classification, labell steps,administration form in the body,physical form and the best radiopharmaceutical ideal classification. Two tables was used contain radiopharmaceuticals more used in diagnostic and more used in therapic uses. Tabs

  14. Dosimetry of Radiopharmaceuticals for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A standard formalism for radionuclide internal radiation dosimetry was developed in the 1960s and continues to be refined today. Early work was based on a mathematical phantom but this is being replaced by phantoms developed from whole-body CT scans to give more realistic dose estimates. The largest contributors to the uncertainties in these dose estimates are the errors associated with in vivo activity quantitation, the variability of the biokinetics between patients and the limited information that can be obtained on these kinetics in individual patients. Despite these limitations, pre-treatment patient-specific dosimetry is being increasing used, particularly to limit the toxicity to non-target organs such as the bone marrow.

  15. Routine clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals in Latin American developing countries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitta, A.E.

    1985-01-01

    The paper describes the routine clinical use of radiopharmaceuticals in the developing countries of Latin America made possible by: (1) the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), which sent experts and equipment to many countries and made a substantial bibliographic contribution on the subject; (2) the Latin American Association of Societies of Nuclear Biology and Medicine (ALASBIMN), which fostered the exchange of data on techniques of radiopharmaceutical preparation and quality control by providing materials for tests, etc., and by publishing quality control manuals in some countries, finally in 1982 producing the Manual of Radiopharmaceutical Quality Control, in collaboration with the Inter-American Nuclear Energy Commission (CIEN) and published by the Organization of American States (OAS); (3) the countries themselves under agreements between their atomic energy commissions; (4) radiopharmacy courses organized by universities, either alone or in collaboration with the IAEA, WHO, etc.; (5) professional workers who established radiopharmaceutical services at private centres. Finally, the societies of nuclear medicine and biology in each country, the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology, the ALASBIMN, the IAEA, etc. organized symposia and meetings which afforded opportunities to professionals of these countries to receive and exchange information, since in Latin America, given its language and human characteristics, the problems are similar. The countries referred to are Argentina, Brazil, Mexico, Uruguay, Bolivia, Paraguay, Chile, Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Venezuela, Costa Rica, Guatemala, Puerto Rico, El Salvador and Panama; little is known about Honduras, Nicaragua, the Dominican Republic and Cuba. (author)

  16. Therapeutical radiopharmaceuticals based In vivo generator system [166 Dy] Dy/166 Ho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro F, G.; Garcia S, L.; Monroy G, F.; Tendilla, J.I.; Pedraza L, M.; Murphy, C.A. de

    2002-01-01

    At the idea to administer to a patient a molecule containing in it structure a father radionuclide, with a half life enough large which allows to the radiolabelled molecule to take up position specifically in a white tissue and decaying In vivo to the daughter radionuclide with properties potentially therapeutic, it is known as In vivo generator system. In this work the preparation and the preliminary dosimetric valuations of radiopharmaceuticals based In vivo generator system 166 Dy Dy/ 166 Ho for applications in radioimmunotherapy, in the treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis and in the bone marrow ablation (m.o.) for candidates patients to bone marrow transplant are presented. (Author)

  17. Country report: India. Development of Radiopharmaceuticals Based on 188Re and 90Y for Radionuclide Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Venkatesh, M.; Pandey, U.; Dhami, P.S.; Chakravarty, R.; Kameswaran, M.; Subramanian, S.; Dash, A.; Samuel, G.

    2010-01-01

    During the past decade, our group has focused attention on the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals incorporating radioisotopes such as 90 Y, 188 Re etc. As the primary source of the radioisotopes 90 Y and 188 Re are the 90 Sr/ 90 Y generators and 188 W/ 188 Re generators respectively, the local availability of these generator systems is very important for the successful development of radiopharmaceuticals incorporating these radioisotopes. In this context, 90 Sr/ 90 Y generators based on Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) [1-3] and electrochemical techniques [4] could be designed and deployed in our laboratories for the elution of 90 Y to be used for preparation of 90 Y labeled products. This work formed a part of the IAEA co-ordinated CRP on “Development of Generator Technologies for Therapeutic Radionuclides: 90 Y and 188 Re”. In this report, work on the development of 90 Y radiopharmaceuticals for treatment of liver cancer and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) is reported. In addition, comparison of the Extraction Paper Chromatography technique (EPC) developed for determination of 90 Sr contamination in 90 Y samples with the US Pharmacopeia recommended method as well as the validation of the EPC technique is presented

  18. Development of radiopharmaceutical for radiosinovectomy; Desenvolvimento de radiofarmaco para radiosinovectomia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couto, Renata Martinussi

    2009-07-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals prepared with different radionuclides have been used in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in Nuclear Medicine. The interest in radionuclidic therapy has been increased in last years, with the introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals applied in the destruction of specific cells or to prevent its undesired proliferation. Radiosinovectomy (RSV) is a therapeutic modality that uses radiopharmaceuticals administered in the intra-articular cavity and represents an alternative to the treatment of different arthropaties and, in particular, the arthropaties derived from rheumatoid arthritis and haemophilic. The objective of the present work was to study the labeling of compounds with {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu in order to improve the production conditions and quality control procedures, study the stability of the labeled compounds and preliminary biodistribution studies of the radiopharmaceuticals with potential for RSV applications. The study of the production of {sup 90}Y citrate colloid ({sup 90}Y-Cit) was based in a labeling procedure using {sup 90}Y Cl{sub 3} solution (37 - 54 MBq) that was previously dried, followed by the addition of yttrium nitrate and sodium citrate in p H 7 at 37 deg C for 30 minutes. The production of hydroxyapatite (HA) labeled with {sup 90}Y was based in a labeling procedure using mono hydrated citric acid, yttrium nitrate and {sup 90}Y Cl{sub 3} solution (37 - 370 MBq). The reaction mixture was incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature and the HA was introduced in aqueous medium and the reaction proceed for 30 minutes under strong stirring. {sup 177}Lu-HA was produced using {sup 177}Lu Cl{sub 3} solution (296 MBq), in presence of lutetium oxide in NaCl medium, p H 7, under continuous stirring for 30 minutes at room temperature. Several reaction parameters were studied for the three radiopharmaceuticals. Labeling yield was determined after particles were centrifuged and washed with NaCl 0,9%. Radiochemical purity was

  19. Radiopharmaceuticals - pattern and development and utilisation in India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iya, V.K.; Mani, R.S.

    1990-01-01

    The availability of research reactors at an early stage of India's Atomic Energy Programme led to developemental efforts in the field of radiopharmaceuticals. The use of several 125 I-labelled compounds like Rose-Bengal, hippuran, etc. for imaging has been replaced over the years by 99m Tc compounds; the final formulations are prepared at the hospital using generators and cold kits supplied by the Board of Radioisotope Technology. Parallel with the development of short-lived generators in radiopharmaceuticals came advances in imaging and instrumentation techniques, the scanners being replaced by sophisticated gamma cameras, with capabilities for tomography and computerisation. About 40 centres in India have the modern instrumentation and equipment needed for carrying out nuclear medicine procedures. Further growth of nuclear medicine centres in the country has, however, been limited by the need to import such advanced high cost instumentation not currently available from indigeneous sources. Regarding in-vitro radiopharmaceuticals, some RIA and IRMA kits and procedures have been developed. These include assay of T 3 , T 4 and TSH in the thyroid group of hormones. There are over a hundred and fifty medical laboratories carrying out RIA procedures. (author)

  20. Short-lived radiopharmaceutical development at E.R. Squibb and Sons, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loberg, M.D.

    1985-01-01

    This paper describes the present status and future plans of E.R. Squibb and Sons, Inc. as they relate to the development of short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. The advantages of short-lived radiopharmaceuticals are summarized as are the problems inherent in their manufacture, quality control, and distribution. The nuclear generator is advocated as the best means of distributing short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. The E.R. Squibb and Sons work with the 82 Sr → 82 Rb generator is summarized

  1. Optimization of production and quality control of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1994-1998

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-09-01

    The `renaissance` of the therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals during the last few years was in part due to a greater availability of radionuclides with appropriate nuclear decay properties, as well as to the development of carrier molecules with improved characteristics. Although radionuclides such as {sup 32}P, {sup 89}Sr and {sup 131}I, were used from the early days of nuclear medicine in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the inclusion of other particle emitting radionuclides into the nuclear medicine armamentarium was rather late. Only in the early 1980s did the specialized scientific literature start to show the potential for using other beta emitting nuclear reactor produced radionuclides such as {sup 153}Sm, {sup 166} Ho, {sup 165}Dy and {sup 186-188}Re. Bone seeking agents radiolabelled with the above mentioned beta emitting radionuclides demonstrated clear clinical potential in relieving intense bone pain resulting from metastases of the breast, prostate and lung of cancer patients. Therefore, upon the recommendation of a consultants meeting held in Vienna in 1993, the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Optimization of the Production and quality control of Radiotherapeutic Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1994. The CRP aimed at developing and improving existing laboratory protocols for the production of therapeutic radionuclides using existing nuclear research reactors including the corresponding radiolabelling, quality control procedures; and validation in experimental animals. With the participation of ten scientists from IAEA Member States, several laboratory procedures for preparation and quality control were developed, tested and assessed as potential therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for bone pain palliation. In particular, the CRP optimised the reactor production of {sup 153}Sm and the preparation of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP (ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate), as well as radiolabelling

  2. Optimization of production and quality control of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1994-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The 'renaissance' of the therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals during the last few years was in part due to a greater availability of radionuclides with appropriate nuclear decay properties, as well as to the development of carrier molecules with improved characteristics. Although radionuclides such as 32 P, 89 Sr and 131 I, were used from the early days of nuclear medicine in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the inclusion of other particle emitting radionuclides into the nuclear medicine armamentarium was rather late. Only in the early 1980s did the specialized scientific literature start to show the potential for using other beta emitting nuclear reactor produced radionuclides such as 153 Sm, 166 Ho, 165 Dy and 186-188 Re. Bone seeking agents radiolabelled with the above mentioned beta emitting radionuclides demonstrated clear clinical potential in relieving intense bone pain resulting from metastases of the breast, prostate and lung of cancer patients. Therefore, upon the recommendation of a consultants meeting held in Vienna in 1993, the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Optimization of the Production and quality control of Radiotherapeutic Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1994. The CRP aimed at developing and improving existing laboratory protocols for the production of therapeutic radionuclides using existing nuclear research reactors including the corresponding radiolabelling, quality control procedures; and validation in experimental animals. With the participation of ten scientists from IAEA Member States, several laboratory procedures for preparation and quality control were developed, tested and assessed as potential therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for bone pain palliation. In particular, the CRP optimised the reactor production of 153 Sm and the preparation of the radiopharmaceutical 153 Sm-EDTMP (ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate), as well as radiolabelling techniques and quality control methods for

  3. New radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payoux, P.; Esquerre, J.P.; Alonso, M.; Tafani, M.

    2008-01-01

    With the development of positron emission tomography, the significant increase in prescriptions of [ 18 F]F.D.G. has underlined the interest for molecular imaging in many pathologies. Facing the demand of 'new' radiopharmaceuticals (frequently clinically validated in the last century) for more and more specific diagnosis, the nuclear physician is confronted with a sparse offer of the radiopharmaceutical companies and a particularly complicated radiopharmaceutical legislation. This paper briefly reports on the radiopharmaceutical statutes encountered in France nowadays; it emphasizes that is essential to deeply modify the conditions to obtain a marketing authorization for radiopharmaceuticals if we want to propose to our patients the kind of right they have to expect from nuclear medicine. (authors)

  4. Country report: Syria. Development of 90Y/90Sr Generator and 90Y Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassine, Taufik; Mukhallalati, Ch. Heyam

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a technique for preparation of 90 Sr- 90 Y generator, we have developed a separation technique for isolation of 90 Y from 90 Sr based on using Sr – Spec resin packed in three columns for separation and purification of 90 Sr- 90 Y .The resulting Y90 is used for therapeutic applications. The first part of this project describe a prototype design for the 90 Sr- 90 Y generator in order to get a very accurate method to obtain the minimum possible 90 Sr Breakthrough. 25 mci of 90 Sr was used in the generator 90 Sr- 90 Y and we obtained the elution yield of 90 Y higher than 88%, Also the eluate was used for preparation of several 90 Y radiopharmaceuticals such as 90 YEDTMP and 90 Y-DOTA-HR 3 . And the work is continues to investigate more radiopharmaceuticals applications in the second part of this project such as 90 Y– FHMA. In this part of the co-coordination research programmer, A protocol based on results of this studies was developed to prepare and operate a higher activity generator (50-100mci), the resulting elution yield was approximately 94% of 90 Y . The elute was used in preparation of new 90 Y radiopharmaceuticals. The monoclonal antibodies is still evolving by conjugate Rituximab to The macrocyclic bifunctional chelating agent,(p-SCN-Bn-DOTA)S-2-(4-Isothiocyanatobenzyle)-1,4,7,10- tetraazacyclododecane-tetraaceticacid to obtain the inmunoconjugate DOTA-Rituximub in simple way and then investigating the radio labeling conditions with 90 Y. (author)

  5. The current situation and future prospects of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Atsushi

    2001-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals play an important role in nuclear medicine. In this paper, nuclear medicine relating to radiopharmaceuticals was briefly described. And I would like to focus on the current situation and future prospects of radiopharmaceuticals. Nuclear medicine in this century should take the following directions. Firstly, cancer treatment by radionuclides will be one of the promising fields in oncology. Secondly, in order to achieve evidence-based medicine, sensitive, quantitative imaging using the nuclides will be necessary in nuclear medicine. Under these circumstances, it is important to develop radiopharmaceuticals for sensitive, quantitative imaging and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  6. Country report: India. Development of Radiopharmaceuticals Based on {sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Y for Radionuclide Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Venkatesh, M.; Pandey, U.; Dhami, P. S.; Chakravarty, R.; Kameswaran, M.; Subramanian, S.; Dash, A.; Samuel, G. [Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2010-07-01

    During the past decade, our group has focused attention on the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals incorporating radioisotopes such as {sup 90}Y, {sup 188}Re etc. As the primary source of the radioisotopes {sup 90}Y and {sup 188}Re are the {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generators and {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generators respectively, the local availability of these generator systems is very important for the successful development of radiopharmaceuticals incorporating these radioisotopes. In this context, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generators based on Supported Liquid Membrane (SLM) [1-3] and electrochemical techniques [4] could be designed and deployed in our laboratories for the elution of {sup 90}Y to be used for preparation of {sup 90}Y labeled products. This work formed a part of the IAEA co-ordinated CRP on “Development of Generator Technologies for Therapeutic Radionuclides: {sup 90}Y and {sup 188}Re”. In this report, work on the development of {sup 90}Y radiopharmaceuticals for treatment of liver cancer and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL) is reported. In addition, comparison of the Extraction Paper Chromatography technique (EPC) developed for determination of {sup 90}Sr contamination in {sup 90}Y samples with the US Pharmacopeia recommended method as well as the validation of the EPC technique is presented.

  7. Parameter estimation and compartmental modelling for individualization of therapeutic dosage of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giussani, A.; Cantone, C.

    2001-01-01

    A successful application of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy requires a patient-specific optimization of the administration activity. The intention of this contribution is to show how this is possible with a relatively limited effort, by combining an optimized experimental schedule for the collection of the anatomic and physiological data of interest and a rigorous mathematical analysis. The benefits of such an optimization will concern not only the success of the therapy, but also the radiological protection of the patients and could even be translated in a more cost-effective usage of the radiopharmaceutical available. (author)

  8. Prenatal radiation doses from radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.M.; Gomez Parada, I.M.; Di Trano, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author) [es

  9. Complete Biological Evaluation of Therapeutical Radiopharmaceuticals in Rodents, Laboratory Beagles and Veterinary Patients - Preclinical Distribution-, Kinetic-, Excretion-, Internal Dosimetry-, Radiotoxicological-, Radiation Safety- and Efficacy Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, L.; Domokos, M.; Polyak, A.; Thuroczy, J.; Janoki, G.

    2009-01-01

    The research and development of various novel therapeutical radiopharmaceuticals is a huge demand in many laboratories world-wide. Beside of multiple bone metastases pain-palliation and radiosynovectomy agents a number of specific radiopharmaceutical applicants mainly for oncological applications are in the pipeline. Numerous in vitro methods are available in the first line to test the radiolabelling efficiency, the possible radioactive and non-labelled impurities, the stability of the label at different conditions and mediums, and some specific characteristics of radiopharmaceutical applicants eg.: receptor binding assays, antigen-antibody assays. But, still before human clinical trials there are several questions to be solved in regards of toxicology, radiotoxicology, radiation safety and maybe most importantly the efficacy tasks. All these issues cannot be answered without animal tests. Several decades back animal tests in radiopharmacy meant only standard bioassays in a large number of healthy rodents. Later on pathological models eg.: human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient animals came-out and through them radiopharmaceutical tumor-uptake by the targets were available to evaluate in vivo as well. Xenografts are still popular and widely used models in the field but instead of wide-scaled bioassays nowadays repeated scintiscans or hybrid images (SPECT/CT, PET/CT) are more and more often used to answer kinetic-, excretion-, tumor uptake, internal dosimetry (Minimum Effective Dose, Maximum Tolerable Dose, critical organ doses, tumor doses) questions. Greater animals like laboratory Beagles are more closely in size, clinical and metabolic parameters to the human objects so playing a more perfect role of human medical doctor and especially veterinary patients. Easy to understand that many of the spontaneously occurring companion animal diseases are a good model of human pathological diseases. The need of a better diagnosis and treatment of that animals meets with

  10. Teaching and research in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L.I.

    1998-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals comprise a critical element of diagnostic and therapeutic clinical nuclear medicine. As well they contribute to more basic pre-clinical and clinical diagnostic studies such as the evaluation of new drugs and new drug formulations. Their development and utilization is based on the complex interaction of a number of disciplines including medicine, pharmacy, biochemistry, pharmacology, chemistry, physics and engineering. This technically-complex multidisciplinary base has impeded the development of a uniform curriculum of training for basic scientists and professionals who work with radiopharmaceuticals. the range of technical knowledge required is very broad; it ranges from chemical synthesis and radiolabelling, through a maze of biochemistry, pharmacology and now molecular biology, to GMP manufacture, dispensing and clinical consultation concerning use and interpretation of data. Clearly, no single discipline can (nor should) be expected to undertake in-depth training of radiopharmaceutical scientists, but equally clearly, there is need for the development of curricula that will develop specific components of the essential knowledge base. The 'radiopharmaceutical' or 'product' orientation of both teaching and research can be used to provide a focus for academic and professional organizations to develop 'radiopharmacy' curricula that effectively train radiopharmaceutical practitioners for specific roles within the clinical, academic, government and industrial interests of radiopharmaceutical scientists. Currently, there is a plethora of segmented training programs, many of which are inadequately positioned to be of great value to the field or its practitioners. Efforts to re-focus radiopharmacy programs and to build professional recognition for them are bringing about harmonization of performance objectives, and leading to didactic and experiential curricula. The impact and evolution of regulatory processes will demand new and better

  11. Teaching and research in radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, L I [Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research, University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada)

    1998-08-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals comprise a critical element of diagnostic and therapeutic clinical nuclear medicine. As well they contribute to more basic pre-clinical and clinical diagnostic studies such as the evaluation of new drugs and new drug formulations. Their development and utilization is based on the complex interaction of a number of disciplines including medicine, pharmacy, biochemistry, pharmacology, chemistry, physics and engineering. This technically-complex multidisciplinary base has impeded the development of a uniform curriculum of training for basic scientists and professionals who work with radiopharmaceuticals. the range of technical knowledge required is very broad; it ranges from chemical synthesis and radiolabelling, through a maze of biochemistry, pharmacology and now molecular biology, to GMP manufacture, dispensing and clinical consultation concerning use and interpretation of data. Clearly, no single discipline can (nor should) be expected to undertake in-depth training of radiopharmaceutical scientists, but equally clearly, there is need for the development of curricula that will develop specific components of the essential knowledge base. The `radiopharmaceutical` or `product` orientation of both teaching and research can be used to provide a focus for academic and professional organizations to develop `radiopharmacy` curricula that effectively train radiopharmaceutical practitioners for specific roles within the clinical, academic, government and industrial interests of radiopharmaceutical scientists. Currently, there is a plethora of segmented training programs, many of which are inadequately positioned to be of great value to the field or its practitioners. Efforts to re-focus radiopharmacy programs and to build professional recognition for them are bringing about harmonization of performance objectives, and leading to didactic and experiential curricula. The impact and evolution of regulatory processes will demand new and better

  12. Peptide Based Targeted Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals: A Focus on the Synthesis of Radiolabelled Nanobodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impens, N.; Campsteyn, A.; Aerts, A.; Baatout, S.; Devoogdt, N.; Caveliers, V.; Xavier, C.; Lahoutte, T.

    2009-01-01

    In 1993, the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Brussels, Belgium) discovered in the blood of camelidae antibodies consisting of only a heavy chain. Due to the lack of the light chain only the variable part of the heavy chain is important for antigen binding. This variable part of these heavy-chain-only antibodies is a good candidate as a targeted therapeutic radiopharmaceutical and was called a nanobody, having a molecular weight of about 15 kDa. Its dimensions are included in between the small peptides like derived from e.g. somatostatin, and the classical monoclonal antibodies. This makes that some characteristics like the physical behaviour, the chemical stability, the penetration in tumour and in healthy tissues, and the blood clearance lie in between the characteristics of the small peptides and the monoclonal antibodies, therefore taking advantage of both extremes. Nanobodies have been humanised to decrease the immunogenic response. The building blocks of molecules such as the octreotide, nanobodies and monoclonal antibodies are amino acids linked via peptide bonds. The modification reactions are therefore all based on the same 'peptide chemistry'. The functional groups on the present amino acids will determine the possible reactions. In order to link a radionuclide to the nanobodies, we opted to use bifunctional ligands containing DOTA, because this is a suitable chelating agent for the diagnostic radionuclide Ga-68, and for therapeutic radionuclides such as Lu-177 and Y-90, covering short and long range β-particle emitters suitable for attacking a wide range of tumour sizes. The ratio of bifunctional ligand to nanobody can be varied by carefully selecting the functional groups of the peptide involved in the reaction with the bifunctional ligand, avoiding the complementarity determining region (CDR), i.e. the part of the molecule binding to the antigen. This is a first way to predetermine the amount of radionuclides that can be linked to the peptide, or the

  13. Development of a lyophilized formulation for preparing the radiopharmaceutical 177Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano E, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    The radiolabeled proteins are molecules of interest in nuclear medicine for their diagnostic and therapeutic application in cancer. Antibodies, such as chimeric monoclonal antibody Anti-CD20 rituximab, have established themselves as suitable vectors of radionuclides (e.g. 177 Lu) , introducing high affinity by the surface antigens over- expressed and widely distributed in cells involved in certain diseases. The aim of this work was to design, optimize and document the production process of radiopharmaceutical 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 for sanitary registration request to the Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS). First, a raw material analysis using the Ft-Mir technique and gamma spectrometry was performed. Then, was carried out the development of the lyophilized formulation for the preparation of 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20, in which an ANOVA was performed where the dependent variable was the radiochemical purity. The optimal pharmaceutical formulation was: 5 mg DOTA-CD20 and 80 mg Mannitol to be reconstituted with 1 m L of acetate buffer 0.25 M, ph 7, with an incubation time of 15 min at 37 degrees Celsius in a dry bath. Once completed the development of the lyophilized formulation, we proceeded to the optimization of the production process, development and validation of the analytical method. Three batches were prepared under protocols of Good Manufacturing Practice, which met pre-established specifications as sterile and endotoxin-free of bacterial formulations, with greater that 95% of radiochemical purity. Currently, is conducting the study of shelf stability. Upon completion of the stability studies, the legal record of 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 will be integrated with documented evidence of the quality and stability of the formulation of this radiopharmaceutical. (Author)

  14. Activities of radiopharmaceuticals administered for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine in Argentina: results of a national survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomben, Ana M.; Chiliutti, Claudia A.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine in Argentine is carried out at 292 centres, distributed all over the country, mainly concentrated in the capital cities of the provinces. With the purpose of knowing the activity levels of radiopharmaceuticals that were administered to patients for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine, a national survey was conducted, during 2001 and 2002. This survey was answered voluntarily by 107 centres. Sixty-four percent of the participants centres are equipped with SPECT system while the other centres have a gamma camera or scintiscanner. There were 37 nuclear medicine procedures, chosen among those most frequently performed, were included in the survey. In those diagnostic procedures were included tests for: bone, brain, thyroid, kidney, liver, lung and cardiovascular system; and also activities administered for some therapeutic procedures. The nuclear medicine physicians reported the different radiopharmaceutical activities administered to typical adult patients. In this paper are presented the average radiopharmaceutical activity administered for each of the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures included in the survey and the range and distribution of values. In order to place these data in a frame of reference, these average values were compared to the guidance levels for diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine mentioned at the Safety Series no. 115. From this comparison it was noticed that the activities administered in the 40% of the diagnostic procedures included in the survey were between ±30% of the reference values. For those nuclear medicine procedures that could not be compared with the above mentioned guidance levels, the comparison was made with values published by UNSCEAR or standards recommended by international bodies. As a result of this study, it is important to point out the need to continue the gathering of data in a wider scale survey to increase the knowledge about national trends. It is also essential to widely

  15. Obligations, precautions and pending issues in regulatory development for radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, Maryelle Moreira Lima; Roesch, Heveline Rayane Moura; Lemos, Vanessa Pinheiro Amaral, E-mail: maryellelg@hotmail.com [PPG BioSaude, Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Rocha, Bruna Oliveira [Faculty of Biology, Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Santos-Oliveira, Ralph [Institute of Radiopharmacy Research, Universidade Estadual da Zona Oeste, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    Radiopharmaceuticals are compounds that have a radionuclide and may be gamma-radiation emitter (γ) or positrons emitter (β+), linked to a molecule with specific diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The progress in the use of radiopharmaceuticals has culminated to a sector in common with other types of drugs: regulation and surveillance. >From 2006 on, production, marketing and use of these drugs were open to the Brazilian market granting much more freedom due to the Constitutional Amendment 49, resulting from the previous Constitutional Amendment 199/03 which removes the Union monopoly for this kind of manipulation and granted this production to other nuclear medicine. From this date on, the amount of this type of sold product have been greatly increased, and the nucleus of surveillance and regulation in Brazil have also advanced in the legislative processes, creating documents that are now more focused on radiopharmaceuticals in the national territory (Resolutions No. 63 and No. 64). In international overview, there is too much to be done in regulatory terms in Brazil, such as adding mainly issues of drugs surveillance to pharmacovigilance practice in radiopharmaceuticals drugs. (author)

  16. Obligations, precautions and pending issues in regulatory development for radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamboa, Maryelle Moreira Lima; Roesch, Heveline Rayane Moura; Lemos, Vanessa Pinheiro Amaral; Rocha, Bruna Oliveira; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are compounds that have a radionuclide and may be gamma-radiation emitter (γ) or positrons emitter (β+), linked to a molecule with specific diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The progress in the use of radiopharmaceuticals has culminated to a sector in common with other types of drugs: regulation and surveillance. >From 2006 on, production, marketing and use of these drugs were open to the Brazilian market granting much more freedom due to the Constitutional Amendment 49, resulting from the previous Constitutional Amendment 199/03 which removes the Union monopoly for this kind of manipulation and granted this production to other nuclear medicine. From this date on, the amount of this type of sold product have been greatly increased, and the nucleus of surveillance and regulation in Brazil have also advanced in the legislative processes, creating documents that are now more focused on radiopharmaceuticals in the national territory (Resolutions No. 63 and No. 64). In international overview, there is too much to be done in regulatory terms in Brazil, such as adding mainly issues of drugs surveillance to pharmacovigilance practice in radiopharmaceuticals drugs. (author)

  17. Obligations, precautions and pending issues in regulatory development for radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryelle Moreira Lima Gamboa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiopharmaceuticals are compounds that have a radionuclide and may be gamma-radiation emitter (γ or positrons emitter (β+, linked to a molecule with specific diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The progress in the use of radiopharmaceuticals has culminated to a sector in common with other types of drugs: regulation and surveillance. From 2006 on, production, marketing and use of these drugs were open to the Brazilian market granting much more freedom due to the Constitutional Amendment 49, resulting from the previous Constitutional Amendment 199/03 which removes the Union monopoly for this kind of manipulation and granted this production to other nuclear medicine. From this date on, the amount of this type of sold product have been greatly increased, and the nucleus of surveillance and regulation in Brazil have also advanced in the legislative processes, creating documents that are now more focused on radiopharmaceuticals in the national territory (Resolutions No. 63 and No. 64. In international overview, there is too much to be done in regulatory terms in Brazil, such as adding mainly issues of drugs surveillance to pharmacovigilance practice in radiopharmaceuticals drugs.

  18. Synthesis and In Vitro and In Vivo Evaluation of Iodine-131-Labeled Folates: Potential Molecular Diagnostic and Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al Jammaz, I.

    2009-01-01

    Molecular targeting imaging has a great potential to be able to image molecular changes that are currently defined as predisease states which facilitate earlier detection of cancer and consequently, the greatest chance of cure. Advancement of scintigraphic imaging and radiotherapy is highly determined by development of more specific radiotracers. The Membrane-associated-folic acid receptor is a glycosylphospstidylinositol protein that overexpressed in approximately 100% of serious ovarian adenocarcinomas and various epithelial cancers including cervical, colorectal and renal cancers. Meanwhile, this receptor is highly restricted in most normal tissues which make these tumors as an excellent candidates for molecular targeting imaging and therapy through the folate receptor system. As part of our on-going research effort to develop prosthetic precursors for radiohalogenation of bioactive molecules, we have previously reported the synthesis and biological characterization of [ 18 F]- fluorobenzene and pyridine carbohydrazide-folate conjugates ([ 18 F]-SFB and [ 18 F]-SFP-folates). We here report the synthesis and biological characterization of [ 131 I]-iodobenzenecarbohydrazide-folate conjugate ([ 131 I]-SIB-folate) as a potential therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. The synthetic approaches for preparation of [ 131 I]iodobenzene carbohydrazide-folates ([ 131 I]-SIB-folate) entailed sequence of reactions. Hydrazide-folate was reacted with N-succinimidyl-m-[131I]-iodobenzoate-carboxylate ([ 131 I]-SIB) to give [ 131 I]-SIB-folate conjugate. Radiochemical yield was greater than 80% and synthesis times were ranging between 40-45 min. Radiochemical purity was also greater than 97% without HPLC purification. These synthetic approaches hold considerable promise as rapid and simple method for the radiohalogenation of folate in high radiochemical yield in short time. In vitro tests on KB cell line has shown that significant amount of the radioconjugate associated with cell

  19. Hospitable radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Two types of hospitalary radiopharmaceutical was given in Nuclear Medicine: the centralized and hospitalary radiopharmaceuticals. The good practice in the use, instrumentation and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals are used in nuclear medicine for diagnostic and therapy diseases

  20. Role of a radiopharmacist in the development of a tumor-localizing radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Briner, W.H.

    1974-01-01

    The development of a new radiopharmaceutical involves heavy responsibility relating to the safety of human lives. Although in past years the primary concern manifested by regulatory agencies was directed toward the radiation characteristics of these agents, more recent attention has been directed to the pharmaceutical quality of radioactive drugs. The technology of radiopharmaceutical design and formulation includes both aspects. Thus radiopharmacists have an exceedingly important role to play in this research and development area, for their training and experience in both the physical and biological sciences, their expertise in pharmaceutical formulation and quality control techniques, and their knowledge of laws and regulations that apply to all drugs can be invaluable. (U.S.)

  1. Synthesis, analysis, purification and biodistribution in an animal model of radiopharmaceutical 177Lu3+ -dotatato for diagnostic and therapeutic use in neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldeira Filho, Jose de Souza

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to propose rationalization in the synthesis, analysis and purification of radiopharmaceutical 177 Lu 3+ - DOTATATO for diagnostic and therapeutic use in neuroendocrine tumors, as well as for evaluation g biodistribution of this radiopharmaceutical an animal-mode. The complexation reaction for the synthesis of radiopharmaceutical was carried out in ammonium acetate buffer 0.5 M, p H 7.0, for 30 minutes at 95 deg C. The radiochemical purity was > 95%, according to analysis by chromatography in ITLC-SG, when using the sodium citrate buffer 0,1 M, p H 5.0, as the mobile phase. The molar-limit ratio 177 Lu 3+ :DOTATATO, in ammonium acetate buffer 0.5 M, p H 7.0, for 30 minutes at 95 deg C, was dependent on the specific activity and origin of the radioisotope, this being 1:3.5 (370 MBq : 26μg) for that from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory /USA, and 1:16 (370 MBq: 11.8 μg) for that from Nuclear Analytical and Medical Services/Holland, when considering a decay of five days from the production date of te radioisotopes. This rationalization in the synthesis of radiopharmaceutical 177 Lu 3+ - DOTATATO permits high economy in production costs. Chemical studies on the synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals also placed in evidence the interference of 177 Hf 4+ , the decay product of 177 Lu 3= , as the 177 Lu 3= competitor for DOTATATO. Radiopharmaceutical preparation proved to be stable during 24 hours, at an activity rate of 2775 MBq, with the addition of 0.6 mg/mL of gentisic acid and when kept in dry ice. In biodistribution studies on Swiss and Nuce mice, the specificity of radiopharmaceutical for somatostatin positive-receptor tissues, such as the pancreas, stomach, lungs, adrenal glands, kidneys and the cell tumor AR42J was demonstrated. (author)

  2. Chilean experience in production of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals labelled with 153Sm and 166Ho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandia, M.; Gil, M.G.; Tomicic, M.; Araya, G.; Olea, E.; Chong, G.

    1998-01-01

    153 Samarium ( 153 Sm) and 166 Holmium ( 166 Ho) were produced at the Nuclear Center of La Reina Research Reactor, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. 153 Sm-EDTMP (Ethylenediaminetetramethylene Phosphonate) used for clinical trial of therapy for painful skeletal metastases and labeled particles such as 166 Ho-FHMA (ferric hydroxide macroagregattes) and 153 Sm-HAP (hydroxiapatite particles) used for radiation synevectomy, were labeled. Radionuclide purity of both radionuclides was analyzed by gamma spectrometry using a multichannel gamma spectrometer. Radiochemical labeled reaction parameters of 153 Sm-EDTMP such as: Sm/EDTMP molar ratio, 153 Sm specific activity, labeled pH and temperature, were determined in order to get high radiolabeling yields. Radiochemical Quality Controls of 153 Sm-EDTMP using different chromatographic systems were carried out in order to determine labeling yields. Bodistribution studies were achieved in mice by dissection of animals and by autoradiography of histological slices in rats, after 2h post injection. 153 Sm-HAP and 166 Ho-FHMA labeled particles were prepared using the methods described. Radiochemical purity, in case of radiolabeled particles was carried out by centrifugation, measuring activity in the supernatant and in particles pellet. Physical parameters, such as particle size and range of the radiopharmaceuticals based on particles labeling were evaluated in order to determine the ideal conditions to obtain particles size range between 10 - 40μ. In vitro labeling stability for over seven days and wash out activity by incubation in human synovial fluid after 6 and 24h post labeling, was also studied. 153 Sm-EDTMP was easily labeled with a Radiochemical purity over 99.5% and stable for over 7 days. Biodistribution studies in mice give more than 50% of ID uptake in bone and less than 0,1% in liver this was correlated by autoradiographic image. 153 Sm-HAP and 166 Ho-FHMA were also labeling obtaining radiochemical purity over 95

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals and applications; Preparacoes radiofarmaceuticas e suas aplicacoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Rita [Universidade Fernando Pessoa, Porto (Portugal). Fac. de Ciencias da Saude; Santos, Delfim; Ferreira, Domingos; Coelho, Pedro [Universidade do Porto (Portugal). Fac. da Farmacia; Veiga, Francisco, E-mail: fveiga@ci.uc.pt [Universidade de Coimbra (Portugal). Fac. de Farmacia

    2006-04-15

    Radiopharmaceuticals are substances without pharmacological activity that are used in Nuclear Medicine for diagnosis and therapy for several diseases. Diagnosis radiopharmaceuticals generally emit {gamma} radiation or positrons ({beta}+), because their decay originates penetrating electromagnetic radiation that can cross the tissues and be externally detected. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals must include in their composition ionized particles emission nucleus ({alpha}, {beta}{sup -} or Auger electrons), since their action is based in selective tissue destruction. There are two main methods for image acquisition: SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography) that uses {gamma} emission radionuclides ({sup 99m}Tc, {sup 123}I, {sup 67}Ga, {sup 201}Tl) and PET (Positron Emission Tomography) that uses positron emission radionuclides like {sup 11}C, {sup 13}N, {sup 15}O, {sup 18}F. Radiopharmaceuticals can be classified into perfusion radiopharmaceuticals (first generation) or specific radiopharmaceuticals (second generation). Perfusion radiopharmaceuticals are transported in the blood e reach the target organ in the direct proportion of the blood stream. Specific radiopharmaceuticals contain a biologically active molecule that binds to cellular receptors that must remain biospecific after binding to the radiopharmaceutical. For this type of radiopharmaceuticals, tissue or organ uptake is determined by the biomolecule capacity of recognizing receptors in those biological structures. Radiopharmaceuticals are produced ready to use, in cold kits or in autologal preparations. According to the preparation type there is a different quality control procedure. Most of the radiopharmaceuticals used nowadays are of the perfusion type. Research focus in the development of specific radiopharmaceuticals that can provide information, at the molecular level, of biochemical alterations associated to different pathologies. (author)

  4. Country report: Syria. Development of {sup 90}Y/{sup 90}Sr Generator and {sup 90}Y Radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yassine, Taufik; Mukhallalati, Ch. Heyam, E-mail: atomic@aec.org.sy [Atomic Energy Commission of Syria, Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic)

    2010-07-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a technique for preparation of {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y generator, we have developed a separation technique for isolation of {sup 90}Y from {sup 90}Sr based on using Sr – Spec resin packed in three columns for separation and purification of {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y .The resulting Y90 is used for therapeutic applications. The first part of this project describe a prototype design for the {sup 90}Sr- {sup 90}Y generator in order to get a very accurate method to obtain the minimum possible {sup 90}Sr Breakthrough. 25 mci of {sup 90}Sr was used in the generator {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y and we obtained the elution yield of {sup 90}Y higher than 88%, Also the eluate was used for preparation of several {sup 90}Y radiopharmaceuticals such as {sup 90}YEDTMP and {sup 90}Y-DOTA-HR{sub 3}. And the work is continues to investigate more radiopharmaceuticals applications in the second part of this project such as {sup 90}Y– FHMA. In this part of the co-coordination research programmer, A protocol based on results of this studies was developed to prepare and operate a higher activity generator (50-100mci), the resulting elution yield was approximately 94% of {sup 90}Y . The elute was used in preparation of new {sup 90}Y radiopharmaceuticals. The monoclonal antibodies is still evolving by conjugate Rituximab to The macrocyclic bifunctional chelating agent,(p-SCN-Bn-DOTA)S-2-(4-Isothiocyanatobenzyle)-1,4,7,10- tetraazacyclododecane-tetraaceticacid to obtain the inmunoconjugate DOTA-Rituximub in simple way and then investigating the radio labeling conditions with {sup 90}Y. (author)

  5. Development of radiopharmaceuticals based on aptamers: selection and characterization of DNA aptamers for CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, C.R.; Andrade, A.S.R.; Augusto-Pinto, L.; Goes, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the top four causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex intracellular glycoprotein produced by about 90% of colorectal cancers. CEA has been identified as an attractive target for cancer research because of its pattern of expression in the surface cell and its likely functional role in tumorigenesis. Research on the rapid selection of ligands based on the SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) forms the basis for the development of high affinity and high specificity molecules, which can bind to surface determinants of tumour cells, like CEA. The oligonucleotides ligands generated in this technique are called aptamers. Aptamers can potentially find applications as therapeutic or diagnostic tools for many kind of diseases, like a tumor. Aptamers offer low immunogenicity, good tumour penetration, rapid uptake and fast systemic clearance, which favour their application as effective vehicles for radiotherapy. In addition aptamers can be labeled with different radioactive isotopes. The aim of this work was select aptamers binding to the CEA tumor marker. The aptamers are obtained through by SELEX, in which aptamers are selected from a library of random sequences of synthetic DNA by repetitive binding of the oligonucleotides to target molecule (CEA). Analyses of the secondary structure of the aptamers were determined using the m fold toll. Three aptamers were selected to binding assay with target cells. These aptamers were confirmed to have affinity and specific binding for T84 cell line (target cell), showed by confocal imaging. We are currently studying the potential efficacy of these aptamers as targeted radiopharmaceuticals, for use as imaging agents or therapeutic applications. The development of aptamers specific to CEA open new perspectives for colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment. Acknowledgments: This investigation was supported by the Centro de Desenvolvimento da

  6. Development of radiopharmaceuticals based on aptamers: selection and characterization of DNA aptamers for CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, C.R.; Andrade, A.S.R., E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Augusto-Pinto, L. [BioAptus, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Goes, A.M., E-mail: goes@icb.ufmg.br [Departamento de Imunologia e Bioquimica. Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the top four causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex intracellular glycoprotein produced by about 90% of colorectal cancers. CEA has been identified as an attractive target for cancer research because of its pattern of expression in the surface cell and its likely functional role in tumorigenesis. Research on the rapid selection of ligands based on the SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) forms the basis for the development of high affinity and high specificity molecules, which can bind to surface determinants of tumour cells, like CEA. The oligonucleotides ligands generated in this technique are called aptamers. Aptamers can potentially find applications as therapeutic or diagnostic tools for many kind of diseases, like a tumor. Aptamers offer low immunogenicity, good tumour penetration, rapid uptake and fast systemic clearance, which favour their application as effective vehicles for radiotherapy. In addition aptamers can be labeled with different radioactive isotopes. The aim of this work was select aptamers binding to the CEA tumor marker. The aptamers are obtained through by SELEX, in which aptamers are selected from a library of random sequences of synthetic DNA by repetitive binding of the oligonucleotides to target molecule (CEA). Analyses of the secondary structure of the aptamers were determined using the m fold toll. Three aptamers were selected to binding assay with target cells. These aptamers were confirmed to have affinity and specific binding for T84 cell line (target cell), showed by confocal imaging. We are currently studying the potential efficacy of these aptamers as targeted radiopharmaceuticals, for use as imaging agents or therapeutic applications. The development of aptamers specific to CEA open new perspectives for colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment. Acknowledgments: This investigation was supported by the Centro de Desenvolvimento da

  7. Molecular modeling in the development of metal radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    We began this project with a compilation of a structural library to serve as a data base containing descriptions of the molecular features of metal-labeled radiopharmaceuticals known to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier. Such a data base is needed in order to identify structural features (size, shape, molecular surface areas and volumes) that are critical in allowing blood-brain barrier penetration. Nine metal complexes have been added to this structural library. We have completed a detailed comparison of four molecular mechanics computer programs QUANTA, SYBYL, BOYD, and MM2DREW to assess their applicability to modeling the structures of low molecular weight metal complexes. We tested the ability of each program to reproduce the crystallographic structures of 38 complexes between nickel(II) and saturated N-donor ligands. The programs were evaluated in terns of their ability to reproduce structural features such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles. Recently, we investigated the synthesis and characterization of lipophilic cationic gallium complexes with hexadentate bis(salicylaldimine) ligands. This work identified the first gallium-68 radiopharrnaceuticals that can be injected intravenously and that subsequently exhibit significant myocardial uptake followed by prolonged myocardial retention of 68 Ga radioactivity. Tracers of this type remain under investigation as agents for evaluation of myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography

  8. Fetal absorbed doses by radiopharmaceutical administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Ana M; Gomez Parada, Ines M.; Di Trano, Jose L.

    2000-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author)

  9. Lung radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    Indication or main clinical use of Lung radiopharmaceuticals is presented and clasification of radiopharmaceuticals as ventilation and perfusion studies. Perfusion radiopharmaceuticals, main controls for administration quality acceptance. Clearence after blood administration and main clinical applications. Ventilation radiopharmaceuticals, gases and aerosols, characteristics of a ideal radioaerosol, techniques of good inhalation procedure, clinical applications. Comparison of several radiopharmaceuticals reflering to retention time as 50% administered dose, percent administered dose at 6 hours post inhalation, blood activity at 30 and 60 minutes post inhalation, initial lung absorbed dose, cumulated activity.Kinetic description of two radiopharmaceuticals, 99mTcDTPA and 99mTc-PYP

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals 1994. Nil desperandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, P.H.; Meyer, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of the discussions at a symposium held in Duesseldorf and attended by representatives of various interested bodies, European legislation as it affects radiopharmaceuticals is reviewed. Due consideration is given to the new, centralised and decentralised, registration procedures, effective since 1 January 1995. The dossier required to support an application for marketing authorisation is discussed, separate consideration being given to single-photon emitters, therapeutic radio-nuclides and positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The role of the European Pharmacopoiea is also considered. It is concluded that the new, modified procedures for the registration of medicinal products in the European Union may actually inhibit free availability of radiopharmaceuticals within the Community, and that there is a strong case for modification of the European Directives so that radiopharmaceuticals are placed in a separate category to therapeutic drugs, with less stringent registration requirements. (orig.)

  11. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by characterization of radiopharmaceuticals. Final report, September 1, 1992--June 30, 1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.; Seliskar, C.J.

    1998-01-01

    The primary goals of this project were twofold: (1) Development of a microsensor that would demonstrate the capability for in vivo monitoring of a radiopharmaceutical after its injection into a test animal; and (2) Exploration of capillary electrophoresis (CE) as a separation technique for the analysis of radiopharmaceuticals that are mixtures of different compounds. The combination of in vivo sensors for real-time monitoring of specific chemical states of a radiopharmaceutical in individual organs and CE for analysis of radiopharmaceuticals prior to injection would provide valuable information regarding the fate of an imaging agent after administration. Such information should give insight into strategies for the development of more efficacious radiopharmaceuticals

  12. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Burnstock

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990’s when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  13. Radiopharmaceutical drug review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, R.

    1985-01-01

    To ensure proper radioactive drug use (such as quality, diagnostic improvement, and minimal radioactive exposure), the Food and Drug Administration evaluates new drugs with respect to safety, effectiveness, and accuracy and adequacy of the labeling. The IND or NDA process is used for this purpose. A brief description of the process, including the Chemical Classification System and the therapeutic potential classification, is presented as it applies to radiopharmaceuticals. Also, the status of the IND or NDA review of radiopharmaceuticals is given

  14. Development of a radiopharmaceutical for endovascular treatment of primary and secondary liver lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Orio, E.; Glait, H.; Eiján, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    As much as 20% of colorectal cancer patients will develop surgical liver metastasis, according to Pautas en Oncología 2015, the rest will be candidates for systemic chemotherapy and when the progression occurs, they will be evaluated for endovascular treatment. "9"0Y labeled microspheres treatment is an effective alternative because it increase the time to progression and improve patients quality of life but the radiopharmaceutical expensiveness makes this alternative unviable for many people. [es

  15. Country report: Brazil. Development of Radiopharmaceuticals Based on {sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Y for Radionuclide Therapy at IPEN-CNEN/SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osso, Jr., J. A.; Barrio, G.; Dias, C. R.B.R.; Brambilla, T. P.; Dantas, D. M.; Suzuki, K. N.; Barboza, M. F.S.; Bortoleti, E.; Fukumori, N. T.; Mengatti, J. [Radiopharmacy Center – Institute of Energetic and Nuclear Research – IPE N-CNEN/SP, São Paulo – Brazil (Brazil)

    2010-07-01

    The overall objective of this CRP is to develop radiopharmaceuticals for targeted therapy using {sup 188}Re and {sup 90}Y and to study the performance of generators with long lived parent radionuclides as well as to validate the QC control procedures for estimating the purity of generator eluents. The CRP is expected to enhance the capability in production of {sup 90}Y and {sup 188}Re radiopharmaceuticals to meet the increasing demand of therapeutic products for clinical applications, in particular in Brazil. In this period efforts were made towards the assembling of {sup 90}Sr-{sup 90}Y generators, quality control of {sup 90}Y, the labelling of DMSA(V) and anti-CD20 with {sup 188}Re and the labelling of Hydroxiapatite(HA) with {sup 90}Y. (author)

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals for bone scintillators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, A.M.

    1994-01-01

    One of the diagnostic techniques used in nuclear medicine is the bone scintiscanning with labelled compounds for obtain skeletal images. The main sections in this work are: (1) bone composition and anatomy;(2)skeletal radiopharmaceutical development;(3)physical properties of radionuclides;(4)biological behaviour and chemical structures;(5)radiopharmaceuticals production for skeletal scintillation;(6)kits;(7)dosimetry and toxicity.tabs

  17. Recent developments in 99mTc and 123I-radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulkarni, P.V.

    1991-01-01

    Availability of 123 I of high radionuclidic purity has encouraged the development of 123 I-based radiopharmaceuticals for the assessment of myocardial fatty acid metabolism, myocardial neuronal activity, and for receptor and antibody imaging. Advances in the chemistry of technetium have resulted in the development of novel agents for myocardial and cerebral perfusion and renal function studies. Monoclonal antibodies labeled with 99m Tc show promise for imaging neoplastic lesions, myocardial infarcts, and thrombus localization. Recent developments in 123 I and 99m Tc agents for myocardial and brain imaging studies are discussed. (author)

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals developed at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketring, A.R.; Ehrhardt, G.J.; Day, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has put a great deal of effort in the last two decades into development of radiotherapeutic beta emitters as nuclear medicine radiotherapeutics for malignancies. This paper describes the development of two of these drugs, 153 Sm ethylenediaminetetra-methylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) (Quadramet trademark) and 90 Y glass microspheres (TheraSphere trademark). Samarium-153 EDTMP is a palliative used to treat the pain of metastatic bone cancer without the side effects of narcotic pain killers. Yttrium-90 glass microspheres are delivered via hepatic artery catheter to embolize the capillaries of liver tumors and deliver a large radiation dose for symptom palliation and life prolonging purposes

  19. Radiopharmaceuticals developed at the University of Missouri research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketring, A.R.; Ehrhardt, G.J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Day, D.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has put a great deal of effort in the last two decades into development of radiotherapeutic beta emitters as nuclear medicine radiotherapeutics for malignancies. This paper describes the development of two of these drugs, {sup 153}Sm ethylenediaminetetra-methylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) (Quadramet{trademark}) and {sup 90}Y glass microspheres (TheraSphere{trademark}). Samarium-153 EDTMP is a palliative used to treat the pain of metastatic bone cancer without the side effects of narcotic pain killers. Yttrium-90 glass microspheres are delivered via hepatic artery catheter to embolize the capillaries of liver tumors and deliver a large radiation dose for symptom palliation and life prolonging purposes.

  20. Radiopharmaceuticals for neurotransmitter imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seung Jun [Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-04-15

    Neurotransmitter imaging with radiopharmaceuticals plays major role for understanding of neurological and psychiatric disorders such as Parkinson's disease and depression. Radiopharmaceuticals for neurotransmitter imaging can be divided to dopamine transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals and serotonin transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals. Many kinds of new dopamine transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals has a tropane ring and they showed different biological properties according to the substituted functional group on tropane ring. After the first clinical trials with [{sup 123}I] {beta} -CIT, alkyl chain substituent introduced to tropane ring amine to decrease time for imaging acquisition and to increase selectivity. From these results, [{sup 123}I]PE2I, [18F]FE-CNT, [{sup 123}I]FP-CIT and [{sup 18}F]FP-CIT were developed and they showed high uptake on the dopamine transporter rich regions and fast peak uptake equilibrium time within 4 hours after injection. [{sup 11}C]McN 5652 was developed for serotonin transporter imaging but this compound showed slow kinetics and high background radioactivity. To overcome these problems, new diarylsulfide backbone derivatives such as ADAM, ODAM, AFM, and DASB were developed. In these candidates, [{sup 11}C]AFM and [{sup 11}C]DASB showed high binding affinity to serotonin transporter and fast in vivo kinetics. This paper gives an overview of current status on dopamine and serotonin transporter imaging radiopharmaceuticals and the development of new lead compounds as potential radiopharmaceuticals by medicinal chemistry.

  1. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in the development of drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frier, M.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Nuclear medicine imaging techniques have great potential in the study of the behaviour of drug formulations and drug delivery systems in human subjects. No other technique can locate so precisely the site of disintegration of a tablet in the Gl tract, the depth of penetration of a nebulized solution into the lung, or the residence time of a drug on the cornea. By using the gamma camera to image the in vivo distribution of pharmaceutical formulations radio labelled with a suitable gamma emitting radionuclide, images may be used to quantify the biodistribution, release and kinetics of drug formulations and delivery from novel carrier systems and devices. Radionuclide tracer techniques allow correlation between the observed pharmacological effects and the precise site of delivery. The strength of the technique lies in the quantitative nature of radionuclide images. Example will be shown of studies which examine the rate of transit of orally-administered formulations through the GI tract, as well as describing the development of devices for specific targeting of drugs to the colon. Data will also demonstrate the effectiveness of devices such as spacers in pulmonary drug delivery, in both normal volunteers, and in asthmatic subjects. Such studies not only provide data on the nature and characteristics of a product, such as reliability and reproducibility but, may also be used in submission to Regulatory Authorities in product registration dossiers

  2. Development of new radiopharmaceuticals for imaging monoamine oxidase B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasdev, Neil; Sadovski, Oleg; Moran, Matthew D.; Parkes, Jun; Meyer, Jeffrey H.; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Imaging monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) in the central nervous system with PET is an important goal for psychiatric studies. We here report an improved and automated radiosynthesis of N-(6-[ 18 F]-fluorohexyl)-N-methylpropargylamine ([ 18 F]FHMP; [ 18 F]-1), as well as the radiosynthesis of two new promising candidates for imaging cerebral MAO-B, namely, carbon-11-labeled 3-(4-[ 11 C]-methoxyphenyl)-6-methyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one ([ 11 C]-2) and N-((1H-pyrrol-2-yl)methyl)-N-[ 11 C]-methyl-1-phenylmethanamine ([ 11 C]-3). Methods: Fluorine-18-labeled 1 was prepared via a tosyloxy precursor in 29%±5% uncorrected radiochemical yield, relative to [ 18 F]-fluoride. Both carbon-11-labeled compounds were prepared with [ 11 C]CH 3 I using the 'LOOP' method in 11% and 18% uncorrected radiochemical yields, respectively, relative to starting [ 11 C]CO 2 . All radiotracers had specific activities >37 GBq/μmol and were >98% radiochemically pure at end of synthesis ( 18 F]-1. While [ 11 C]-2 had moderate brain penetration and good clearance from normal brain tissue, distribution of radioactivity in brain was indicative of free and nonspecific binding. Good brain uptake was observed with [ 11 C]-3 (0.8%-1.4% injected dose per gram at 5 min postinjection), binding appeared to be reversible and distribution conformed with regional distribution of MAO-B in the rat brain. Preinjection of 3 or L-deprenyl showed a modest reduction (up to 25%) of brain activity. Conclusion: Carbon-11-labeled 3 was found to have the most favorable properties of the radiotracers evaluated; however, the signal-to-noise ratio was too low to warrant further in vivo imaging studies. Alternative radiotracers for imaging MAO-B are under development.

  3. Development of new radiopharmaceuticals for imaging monoamine oxidase B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vasdev, Neil, E-mail: neil.vasdev@utoronto.ca; Sadovski, Oleg; Moran, Matthew D.; Parkes, Jun; Meyer, Jeffrey H.; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A.

    2011-10-15

    -B are under development.

  4. Regulatory aspects of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1985-01-01

    Regulatory systems in the field of radiopharmaceuticals have two main purposes: efficacy and safety. Efficacy expresses the quality of the diagnostic and therapeutic process for the patient. Safety involves the patient, the staff, and the environment. The world situation regarding regulations for radiopharmaceuticals is reviewed on the basis of a survey in WHO Member States. The main content of such regulations is discussed. The special properties of radiopharmaceuticals compared with ordinary drugs may call for modified regulations. Several countries are preparing such regulations. Close co-operation and good understanding among scientists working in hospital research, industry and regulatory bodies will be of great importance for the fast and safe introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals for the benefit of the patient. Before introducing new legislation in this field, a radiopharmaceutical expert should analyse the situation in the country and the relationship to the existing regulations. It is expected that the most important factor in promoting the fast introduction of new, safe and effective radiopharmaceuticals will be the training of people working within the regulatory bodies. It is foreseen that the IAEA and WHO will have an important role to play by providing expert advice and training in this area. (author)

  5. Radiopharmaceutical licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent health service legislation, and especially the loss of crown immunity has once again focussed attention on the arrangements for licensing of radiopharmaceuticals. The aim of the article is to describe in general terms the UK licensing system and in particular to provide guidance to those responsible for the supply of radiopharmaceuticals in hospitals. (author)

  6. Development in the Preparation and the Quality Assurance of Radiopharmaceuticals for Clinical Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangsuriyan, Jatupol; Paramatikul, Nipawan; Daengprasert, Moleepan; Pumkem, Sudkaneung; Sriwiang, Wiranee; Minsakorn, Naparat

    2011-06-01

    Full text: Radiopharmaceutical preparation technologies and a specific quality assurance system were developed. The kit formulation and the processing of a MDP kit, were developed as a model. NaCl was added as a bulking agent and the kit was filled with N 2 -gas at a slightly negative pressure before stoppering. The product quality tests met all quality control requirements and at least 1 year shelf life was reported. An EC kit and an ECD kit were also developed from the synthesis of starting materials with successful results. 99m T c-Hynic TOC, a neuroendocrine diagnostic agent, was developed both in the form of kit formulation and unit dose preparation for patients. The quality assurance systems for the Hynic-TOC kit and the unit dose preparation were set up and the technologies were taken into implementation by Radioisotope Center, TINT, as routine services

  7. Automation and use of robotic arm for development and routine production of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, P.A.; Di Sacco, S.; Riva, A.; Fusani, L.

    1993-01-01

    The target of a radiopharmaceutical group is twofold: production of radiotracers for clinical use (routine) and development of new compounds. The level of activity to be handled selects the strategy to be used for radiocompounds handling, ranging from direct manipulation during basic development at microcurie level to sophisticated equipments such as automated black-boxes and robotic arms at curie level. The authors looked for a common solution, to both the management of routine productions and the problems arising during activity scaling up in new tracer development, by choosing a robotic arm integrated by a variety of specialized automatic devices able to perform actions which are difficult (too slow, too precise, too complicated, etc.,) to be made by the robot. The final solution from this approach is a open-quotes synthetic stationclose quotes with flexible architecture which can be used for different applications without harware modification/adaptation

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals. 40 years is nothing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hager, Alfredo A.

    2006-01-01

    The nuclear medicine is today a medical speciality recognized and practised in the whole world. The birth was in the middle of the 20th century in the use of molecules or drugs marked with a radionuclide (radiopharmaceutical), for the diagnostic studies in vivo or in vitro, to obtain a therapeutic effect. Early in the decade of 70, its development and evolution was accentuated thanks to electronics, the contribution of new instruments for detection of diagnosis by images (gamma camera) and to the emergence of new radionuclide (in particular, 99m Tc). (author) [es

  9. Development of a lyophilized formulation for the preparation of radiopharmaceutical 68Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 for the diagnosis of breast cancer tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terron A, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals of third generation by its design that includes peptides capable of selectively directing the radiation to a specific molecular target are useful in molecular medicine for obtaining molecular images that allow recording in vivo phenomena temporal-space of molecular or cellular processes, with diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Generally, peptides that recognize cellular receptors that are over-expressed in cancer cells of interest are used; such is the case of RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) a tri-peptide sequence which recognizes to the membrane receptors α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) that are involved in metastasis and angiogenic processes as well as in tumor cells of breast glioma. The high affinity and selectivity of RGD peptide with integrin s α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) is the basis for designing radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic of breast cancer and the metastasis and angiogenic processes. In this paper a useful lyophilized formulation was development for obtaining 68 Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)] 2 radiopharmaceutical that for its effectiveness, stability and security can be used in humans. The production process of core-equipment DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK] 2 /Buffer sodium acetate 1.0 M was optimized, and the formulation was transferred to the radiopharmaceuticals production plant of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). The optimized formulation of the core-equipment for the 68 Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)] 2 radiopharmaceutical preparation is: DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)] 2 peptide - 75 μg; Mannitol - 50 mg; Sodium acetate - 14 mg; Sodium acetate buffer 1.0 M ph 4.3 - 0.5 m L. The production process was validated and stability studies were carried out to the validation batches in compliance with the validation master plan of the ININ and in adherence to compliance of the applicable national and international regulations. Also the legal dossier was drawn up in order to make the application of sanitary registration before Comision Federal para

  10. Click-to-Chelate: Development of Technetium and Rhenium-Tricarbonyl Labeled Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Mindt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Click-to-Chelate approach is a highly efficient strategy for the radiolabeling of molecules of medicinal interest with technetium and rhenium-tricarbonyl cores. Reaction of azide-functionalized molecules with alkyne prochelators by the Cu(I-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC; click reaction enables the simultaneous synthesis and conjugation of tridentate chelating systems for the stable complexation of the radiometals. In many cases, the functionalization of (biomolecules with the ligand system and radiolabeling can be achieved by convenient one-pot procedures. Since its first report in 2006, Click-to-Chelate has been applied to the development of numerous novel radiotracers with promising potential for translation into the clinic. This review summarizes the use of the Click-to-Chelate approach in radiopharmaceutical sciences and provides a perspective for future applications.

  11. State of the art and perspectives in radiopharmaceutical field since ACOMEN 8. International Conference (Bordeaux May 11-13, 2005)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vuillez, J.P.; Desruet, M.D.; Desruet, M.D.; Mundler, O.; Karcher, G.

    2009-01-01

    Since previous ACOMEN conference in 2005 on radiopharmaceuticals, many improvements have been encountered: active research has allowed the development of numerous new tracers of interest, with a large part dedicated for PET; clinical applications of radiopharmaceuticals have resulted in patients care improvement, both for management and survival; therapeutic applications are now fully recognized, as internal targeted radiotherapy could be considered as efficient in several cancer diseases; and regulation, despite remaining difficulties, will certainly become more favourable for radiopharmaceuticals. Thus we could make sure that radiopharmaceuticals use will be even more established in the next years. (authors)

  12. Drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladik, W.B.; Ponto, J.A.; Stathis, V.J.

    1985-01-01

    Patients seen in the nuclear medicine department have a wide variety of disorders and, consequently, may be receiving any number of therapeutic drugs. For this reason, nuclear medicine professionals should be aware of the potential effects that these pharmacologic agents may have on the bio-distribution of subsequently administered radiopharmaceuticals, commonly referred to as ''drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions.'' Compared with the quantity of literature written about interactions between various therapeutic drugs, the information available on drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions is scarce. However, there has been increasing interest in this subject, particularly during the past five years. Some of the reported interactions are used intentionally to add a new dimension to the nuclear medicine study and increase its diagnostic capabilities, i.e., pharmacologic intervention. These beneficial ''interactions'' are discussed in detail in several other chapters of this book. Other interactions, however, cause changes in the normal distribution of radiopharmaceuticals, which may interfere with the diagnostic utility of various nuclear medicine procedures. The latter group of interactions is the focus of this chapter

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals good practices handbook: ARCAL XV radiopharmaceuticals control and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdera Presto, Silvia

    1998-01-01

    A safety practice of the therapeutics diagnostic proceeding in nuclear medicine require a permanent provide high quality radiopharmaceuticals manufacture. This work treat to give a guide for all radio pharmacies laboratories that produce,control, fraction and or dispense radiopharmaceuticals products, with attention hospitable radiopharmacy laboratory. Three chapters with recommendations in manufacture good practice in Hospital radiopharmacy, industrial centralized, bibliography and three annexe's about clean area classification,standards work in laminar flux bell, and guarantee and cleaning areas

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals in China. Current status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Hong-Mei; Liu, Bo-Li [Beijing Normal Univ. (China). Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals

    2014-04-01

    The review provides an overview of the current status of radiopharmaceuticals in China for in vivo clinical use and also describes some important advances in the past three decades. Development of the diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals as well as basic research on radiopharmaceutical chemistry are being introduced. The radiotracers developed in China include: (1) Brain perfusion imaging agents and CNS radiotracers for β-amyloid plaques, σ{sub 1} receptors, and dopamine D{sub 2} or D{sub 4} receptors; (2) {sup 99m}Tc- and {sup 18}F-labeled myocardial perfusion imaging agents; (3) tumor imaging agents including integrin-targeting radiotracer, novel sentinel lymph node imaging agents, hypoxia imaging agents, {sup 99m}Tc-labeled glucose derivatives, σ{sub 2} receptor imaging agents, folate receptor imaging agents, and potential radiotracers for imaging of human telomerase reverse transcriptase expression; (4) Potential infection imaging agents; (5) Potential asialoglycoprotein receptor imaging agents; (6) Other imaging agents. Moreover, some prospects of research and development of radiopharmaceuticals in the near future are discussed. (orig.)

  15. 6. Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schiller, P.; Havranek, E.; Majer, J.

    1981-01-01

    Radionuclides commonly used in medicine are surveyed and their nuclear characteristics are presented. The methods are given of their preparation, most frequent use and detection. The list is given of radiopharmaceuticals included in the Czechoslovak Pharmacopoeia CsL 3 , ie., sodium chromate( 51 Cr), sodium iodide( 131 I), hippuran( 131 I), sodium phosphate( 32 P), colloidal gold( 198 Au), rose bengal sodium salt( 131 I), and sodium pertechnetate(sup(99m)Tc) injections. Characteristics, chemical preparation, identification tests, packaging, storage, application and dosage are shown for each preparation. Also listed are important unofficial radiopharmaceuticals, their main characteristics and data on their preparation and application. (B.S.)

  16. 188Re(V) Nitrido Radiopharmaceuticals for Radionuclide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Alessandra; Martini, Petra; Uccelli, Licia

    2017-01-19

    The favorable nuclear properties of rhenium-188 for therapeutic application are described, together with new methods for the preparation of high yield and stable 188 Re radiopharmaceuticals characterized by the presence of the nitride rhenium core in their final chemical structure. 188 Re is readily available from an 188 W/ 188 Re generator system and a parallelism between the general synthetic procedures applied for the preparation of nitride technetium-99m and rhenium-188 theranostics radiopharmaceuticals is reported. Although some differences between the chemical characteristics of the two metallic nitrido fragments are highlighted, it is apparent that the same general procedures developed for the labelling of biologically active molecules with technetium-99m can be applied to rhenium-188 with minor modification. The availability of these chemical strategies, that allow the obtainment, in very high yield and in physiological condition, of 188 Re radiopharmaceuticals, gives a new attractive prospective to employ this radionuclide for therapeutic applications.

  17. 188Re(V) Nitrido Radiopharmaceuticals for Radionuclide Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Alessandra; Martini, Petra; Uccelli, Licia

    2017-01-01

    The favorable nuclear properties of rhenium-188 for therapeutic application are described, together with new methods for the preparation of high yield and stable 188Re radiopharmaceuticals characterized by the presence of the nitride rhenium core in their final chemical structure. 188Re is readily available from an 188W/188Re generator system and a parallelism between the general synthetic procedures applied for the preparation of nitride technetium-99m and rhenium-188 theranostics radiopharmaceuticals is reported. Although some differences between the chemical characteristics of the two metallic nitrido fragments are highlighted, it is apparent that the same general procedures developed for the labelling of biologically active molecules with technetium-99m can be applied to rhenium-188 with minor modification. The availability of these chemical strategies, that allow the obtainment, in very high yield and in physiological condition, of 188Re radiopharmaceuticals, gives a new attractive prospective to employ this radionuclide for therapeutic applications. PMID:28106830

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals - current state and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.

    1981-07-01

    The current state as well as the tendencies of modern radiopharmaceutical development and application is reviewed. After an evaluation of the fundamental preconditions of decay characteristics and pharmaceutical properties the problems concerning sup(99m)Tc-radiopharmaceuticals, metabolizable compounds and the use of specific biological interactions are discussed. (author)

  19. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  20. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs

  1. Development of a pattern hot cell for production of injectable radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Fabio Eduardo de

    2010-01-01

    A controlled ambient should be established to the production/processing of materials susceptible to contamination, like injectable pharmaceuticals, in order to agree with normative and regulatory requirements. Considering medical but also toxic, radioactive and dangerous products, the ambient should work in special conditions to assure that the materials, which in same cases can be also volatile, do not escape to the external ambient, working in a selective, secure and controlled way. The conditions recommended by local and international rules in use, report an negative pressured ambient in relation to the adjacent areas. The technology related with the sizing of project to this kind of system is fully described in the literature, taking in account the rules that clearly describe the essential requirements. However, it is necessary to develop a controlled ambient for radiopharmaceutical production, in a way compatible with the concept of clean rooms and with the safety related to the manipulation of open radioactive wastes. In this work, some devices were created, methods and procedures were established making possible the classification of the ambient inside the hot cell, without physical barriers in the area, using ergonomic, flexible and practical conditions of work, that can results in the improvement of the productivity. The project resulted in the creation of a controlled ambient, in agreement with the normative requirements, using a pass through for entrance and exit of the materials, without compromise the internal air condition. The tight of the hot cell was obtained using doors with efficient sealing system and active joints. Tong manipulators were used to produce ergonomic and secure conditions, without compromise the internal conditions related to tight and classification in A and B grade, according to local and international rules. An efficient ventilation/exhaustion system was adopted to produce these results, composed by filters and special devices

  2. Development of a radiopharmaceutical dose calculator for pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Priyanka; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    It is important to ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept during the radiopharmaceutical (RPH) dose administration in pediatric patients. Several methods have been suggested over the years for the calculation of individualized RPH dose, sometimes requiring complex calculations and large variability exists for administered dose in children. The aim of the present study was to develop a software application that can calculate and store RPH dose along with patient record. We reviewed the literature to select the dose formula and used Microsoft Access (a software package) to develop this application. We used the Microsoft Excel to verify the accurate execution of the dose formula. The manual and computer time using this program required for calculating the RPH dose were compared. The developed application calculates RPH dose for pediatric patients based on European Association of Nuclear Medicine dose card, weight based, body surface area based, Clark, Solomon Fried, Young and Webster's formula. It is password protected to prevent the accidental damage and stores the complete record of patients that can be exported to Excel sheet for further analysis. It reduces the burden of calculation and saves considerable time i.e., 2 min computer time as compared with 102 min (manual calculation with the calculator for all seven formulas for 25 patients). The software detailed above appears to be an easy and useful method for calculation of pediatric RPH dose in routine clinical practice. This software application will help in helping the user to routinely applied ALARA principle while pediatric dose administration. (author)

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals for the imaging of functional abnormalities of the developing brain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senekowitsch, R.; Kriegel, H.

    1986-01-01

    The measurement of physiological parameters in man is possible with the help of positron emission tomography (PET) and radiopharmaceuticals labeled with short lived positron emitters as C 11, N 13, O 15 and F 18. With the use of this substances it is possible to make a tomographic map defining regional metabolic parameters in normal and diseased brain. This technique has therefore also be named 'in vivo autoradiography'. The possibility of applying C 11 or F 18 labeled deoxyglucose with PET for detecting regional and local changes in cerebral metabolic rate of glucose in brain development in children of 5 days to 1 year of age is discussed. Beyond this a relationship between cerebral metabolic rate of glucose, cerebral blood flow and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen by use of this technique after inhalation of O 15 and C 11-labeled CO 2 is shown. Attention is drawn to the application of C 11-methyl-spiperone and PET to visualize dopamine receptor density in the brain. The receptor density and the ability of receptors to bind neutrotransmitters is found to be influenced by prenatal irradiation. It is expected that relations between alterations in the developing brain and its postnatal function may be explored in this way. (orig.)

  4. Development of anti β glucan aptamers for use as radiopharmaceutical in the identification of fungal Infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Camila Maria de Sousa; Reis, Mariana Flister; Correa, Cristiane Rodrigues; Andrade, Antero S.R., E-mail: cmsl@cdtn.br, E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEM-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Invasive fungal infections caused by Candida albicans, are recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immuno compromised individuals. Patients may not show obvious clinical signs or symptoms, making it difficult to detect its origin or new focus that developed through hematogenous spread. Nuclear medicine could contribute to an early diagnosis of fungal infections, since specific markers are available. The aim of this study was to develop, through SELEX technique (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), aptamers for beta glucan for subsequent labeling with {sup 99}mTc and evaluation of this radiopharmaceutical in the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections, scintigraphy. To obtain aptamers were performed 15 cycles of SELEX technique, using centrifugation as separation method of oligonuclotideos linked to the beta-glucan is not connected. The DNA bands were observed in all 15 cycles. The oligonucleotides obtained after cycles were cloned using the standard protocol kit-Topo TA vector (Invitrogen), and subjected to sequencing Megabase. Three aptamers for yeast cells were selected for this study. Further, other studies should be performed to assess the specificity and affinity thereof for later use in the diagnosis of fungal infections. (author)

  5. Development of anti β glucan aptamers for use as radiopharmaceutical in the identification of fungal Infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Camila Maria de Sousa; Reis, Mariana Flister; Correa, Cristiane Rodrigues; Andrade, Antero S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections caused by Candida albicans, are recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immuno compromised individuals. Patients may not show obvious clinical signs or symptoms, making it difficult to detect its origin or new focus that developed through hematogenous spread. Nuclear medicine could contribute to an early diagnosis of fungal infections, since specific markers are available. The aim of this study was to develop, through SELEX technique (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), aptamers for beta glucan for subsequent labeling with 99 mTc and evaluation of this radiopharmaceutical in the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections, scintigraphy. To obtain aptamers were performed 15 cycles of SELEX technique, using centrifugation as separation method of oligonuclotideos linked to the beta-glucan is not connected. The DNA bands were observed in all 15 cycles. The oligonucleotides obtained after cycles were cloned using the standard protocol kit-Topo TA vector (Invitrogen), and subjected to sequencing Megabase. Three aptamers for yeast cells were selected for this study. Further, other studies should be performed to assess the specificity and affinity thereof for later use in the diagnosis of fungal infections. (author)

  6. Development and validation of methodology for technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Erika Vieira de

    2009-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are compounds, with no pharmacological action, which have a radioisotope in their composition and are used in Nuclear Medicine for diagnosis and therapy of several diseases. In this work, the development and validation of an analytical method for 99 mTc-HSA, 99 mTc-EC, 99 mTc-ECD and 99 mTc-Sestamibi radiopharmaceuticals and for some raw materials were carried out by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The analyses were performed in a Shimadzu HPLC equipment, LC-20AT Prominence model. Some impurities were identified by the addition of a reference standard substance. Validation of the method was carried out according to the criteria defined in RE n. 899/2003 of the National Sanitary Agency (ANVISA). The results for robustness of the method showed that it is necessary to control flow rate conditions, sample volume, pH of the mobile phase and temperature of the oven. The analytical curves were linear in the concentration ranges, with linear correlation coefficients (r 2 ) above 0.9995. The results for precision, accuracy and recovery showed values in the range of 0.07-4.78%, 95.38-106.50% and 94.40-100.95%, respectively. The detection limits and quantification limits varied from 0.27 to 5.77 μg mL -1 and 0.90 to 19.23 μg mL -1 , respectively. The values for HAS, EC, ECD and MIBI in the lyophilized reagents were 8.95; 0.485; 0.986 and 0.974 mg L-1, respectively. The mean radiochemical purity for 99 mTc-HSA, 99 mTc-EC, 99 mTc-ECD and 99 mTc-Sestamibi was (97.28 ± 0.09)%, (98.96 ± 0.03)%, (98.96 ± 0.03)% and (98.07 ± 0.01)%, respectively. All the parameters recommended by ANVISA were evaluated and the results are below the established limits. (author)

  7. Development, preparation and control of sup(99m)Tc or sup(113m)In labelled stannous hydroxide radiopharmaceuticals. Part of a coordinated programme on radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Cervera, J.

    1975-01-01

    The preparation of different sup(99m)Tc and sup(113m)In radiopharmaceuticals using stannous chloride was investigated. Chemical and radiochemical procedures for the quality control of these preparations were studied. Toxicity and biological controls of the preparation were carried out. Procedures for the preparation and control of the following radiopharmaceuticals have been standardized by the authors; albumin macroaggregates labelled with sup(99m)Tc, sup(113m)In and other isotopes for lung scanning; albumin microspheres labelled with sup(99m)Tc for lung scanning; sup(99m)Tc or sup(113m)In-labelled stannous hydroxide colloid for liver scanning; sup(99m)Tc-stannous phytate for liver scanning; sup(99m)Tc-Sn-dextrose, a new radiopharmaceutical which has been proposed by the authors and is now used in Mexico for renal and cerebral scanning and sup(99m)Tc-Sn pyrophosphate and diphosphonate for bone scanning

  8. Development of dopamine receptor radiopharmaceuticals for the study of neurological and psychiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Jogeshwar Mukherjee

    2009-01-02

    Our goals in this grant application are directed towards the development of radiotracers that may allow the study of the high-affinity state (functional state) of the dopamine receptors. There have been numerous reports on the presence of two inter-convertible states of these (G-protein coupled) receptors in vitro. However, there is no report that establishes the presence of these separate affinity states in vivo. We have made efforts in this direction in order to provide such direct in vivo evidence about the presence of the high affinity state. This understanding of the functional state of the receptors is of critical significance in our overall diagnosis and treatment of diseases that implicate the G-protein coupled receptors. Four specific aims have been listed in the grant application: (1). Design and syntheses of agonists (2). Radiosyntheses of agonists (3). In vitro pharmacology of agonists (4). In vivo distribution and pharmacology of labeled derivatives. We have accomplished the syntheses and radiosyntheses of three agonist radiotracers labeled with carbon-11. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological experiments have been accomplished in rats and preliminary PET studies in non-human primates have been carried out. Various accomplishments during the funded years, briefly outlined in this document, have been disseminated by several publications in various journals and presentations in national and international meetings (Society of Nuclear Medicine, Society for Neuroscience and International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry).

  9. Dry Kit Development And Clinical Test Of 99mTc-L,L-ECD Radiopharmaceutical For Vrain Perfusion Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartini, Nani; Sofyan, Rohestri; Rukmini; Iswahyudi

    2000-01-01

    Technetium- 99m ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 99m Tc-L,L-ECD) has been synthesized and formulated based on ligand exchanged reaction with 99mTc-glucoheptonate. Considering the low stability of the dry kit produced, it was fairly necessary to develop the manufacture of L,L-ECD dry kit in order to obtain a more stable one that meet the requirements as brain perfusion imaging radiopharmaceutical. Experiment was done by modifying the packing of dry kit components of the previous formulation. Characteristics of 99m Tc-L,L-ECD produced from this formulation were studied by carrying out the sterility and toxicity test, then followed with clinical test to some volunteers. Evaluation of brain perfusion was done by tomography technique using gamma camera at Nuclear Medicine Installation, Hasan Sadikin Hospital. The modified formulation obtained consist of three components i.e. main ligand L,L-ECD; exchange ligand Ca-glucoheptonate and HaOH. Its stability could reach 8 months at-10 derajat C of storage. Effects of toxicity on mice did not appear. The result of clinical study shows that the radiopharmaceutical was distributed very rapidly in the blood brain circulations and retained in the brain for about one hour. The body scanning indicates that the substance was excreted in the brain for about one hour. The body scanning indicates that the substance was excreted though kidney, liver and spleen. Based on the results obtained the radiopharmaceutical could be promoted to be used for brain perfusion imaging

  10. Hydrophilic and lipophilic radiopharmaceuticals as tracers in pharmaceutical development: In vitro – In vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terán, Mariella; Savio, Eduardo; Paolino, Andrea; Frier, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphic studies have been performed to assess the release, both in vitro and in vivo, of radiotracers from tablet formulations. Four different tracers with differing physicochemical characteristics have been evaluated to assess their suitability as models for drug delivery. In-vitro disintegration and dissolution studies have been performed at pH 1, 4 and 7. In-vivo studies have been performed by scintigraphic imaging in healthy volunteers. Two hydrophilic tracers, ( 99m Tc-DTPA) and ( 99m Tc-MDP), and two lipophilic tracers, ( 99m Tc-ECD) and ( 99m Tc-MIBI), were used as drug models. Dissolution and disintegration profiles, differed depending on the drug model chosen. In vitro dissolution velocity constants indicated a probable retention of the radiotracer in the formulation. In vivo disintegration velocity constants showed important variability for each radiopharmaceutical. Pearson statistical test showed no correlation between in vitro drug release, and in vivo behaviour, for 99m Tc-DTPA, 99m Tc-ECD and 99m Tc-MIBI. High correlation coefficients were found for 99m Tc-MDP not only for in vitro dissolution and disintegration studies but also for in vivo scintigraphic studies. Scintigraphic studies have made a significant contribution to the development of drug delivery systems. It is essential, however, to choose the appropriate radiotracers as models of drug behaviour. This study has demonstrated significant differences in release patterns, depending on the model chosen. It is likely that each formulation would require the development of a specific model, rather than being able to use a generic drug model on the basis of its physicochemical characteristics

  11. Development of PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals to study multi-drug resistance (MDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsififs, A.; Dikic, B.; Greguric, I.; Knott, R.; Mattner, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Cellular resistance or Multidrug Resistance (MDR) to cytotoxic agents is the major cause of treatment failure in many human cancers. P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a Mr 17,0000 transmembrane protein and Multi Resistance Protein (MRP) are two proteins that are over expressed and confer resistance to a large number of chemotherapeutic agents by enhancing their extracellular transport. P-glycoprotein is expressed at a relative high level in treated and untreated human malignant tumours, including renal, colonic, adrenal, hepatocellular carcinoma and a considerable percentage of breast carcinomas. 99m Tc-Sestamibi, a lipophilic cationic complex is a transport substrate for Pgp. In clinical studies of human neoplasms it was found that tumour uptake and clearance of this tracer correlate with Pgp expression and may be used for the phenotypic assessment of MDR. However, new tracers with better substrate specificity for Pgp and other drug transporters would greatly assist in optimising chemotherapeutic treatment and improving patient management by predicting tumour response to therapy and to assist in the development of antagonists, which may reverse or halt MDR. The aim of this project is therefore to develop PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals with improved affinity and selectivity for Pgp and MRP for the clinical evaluation of MDR in cancer patients. To optimise cellular transport characteristics, a number of chemical families that have been found to be substrates of Pgp and other drug efflux pumps, will be investigated. In the first instance, a series of drugs based on the flavonol natural product, Quercetin will be developed, screened for MDR and radiolabelled with PET and SPECT isotopes. Quercetin and related flavonol derivatives have been selected for this project because of their moderate to good affinity for Pgp. With the assistance of molecular modeling and in vitro studies, structural modification will be undertaken to improve the specificity and affinity for

  12. Genotoxic and cytotoxic damage by the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical [166Dy]Dy/166Ho-EDTMP as in vivo generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza L, M.; Piedras R, J.; Ferro F, G.; Morales R, P.; Murphy S, E.; Hernandez O, O.

    2005-01-01

    In patients with leukemias and multiple myeloma, the cure can be obtained to inclination of a bone marrow transplant (m.o.), for that which one is used a combination of external radiotherapy and chemotherapy with the consequent toxicity to healthy organs. The complex [ 166 Dy]Dy/ 166 Ho-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate ([ 166 Dy]Dy/ 166 Ho-EDTMP) it forms a generator system in vivo stable with bony selective likeness in mice therefore, this it could work as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical for bone marrow ablation. The objective of this original work was to determine the genotoxic and cytotoxic damage produced by the [ 166 Dy]Dy/ 166 Ho-EDTMP like a generator system in vivo by means of the reticulocytes reduction (RET) and micronucleus elevation in reticulocytes (RET-MN) in peripheral blood and to evaluate its myeloablative potential for histopathologic studies. It was irradiated 166 Dy 2 O 3 enriched and it was add in form 166 DyCI 3 to the EDTMP in a softening media of phosphates (pH 8), the optimal molar relationship 166 Dy: EDTMP was 1.7:1 and the radiochemical purity was evaluated by ITLC. The Dy:EDTMP complexes, non radioactive, its were prepared in the same way with non irradiated dysprosium oxide. A group of BALB/c mice was injected intraperitoneally with the radiopharmaceutical and two groups of control mice were injected with the non radioactive complex and with sodium chloride 0.9% respectively. Before injecting each one of the solutions it was take a basal sample of peripheral blood of the mouse tail and each 48 h post-injection during 12 d. The animals were sacrificed to obtain the organs of interest and to determine the radioactivity in each one. The femur was used for the histopathologic studies. The quantification of the frequency of RET and RET-MN was carried out by flow cytometry of the sanguine samples and the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B for the dosimetry calculations was used. The radiochemical purity was 99% and in average the specific

  13. Development of an injectable formulation for the preparation of radiopharmaceutical 68Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo P, M.

    2015-01-01

    The CCK2 receptor (cholecystokinin) is located in areas of the central and peripheral nervous system and is over expressed in several types of human cancer, as medullar thyroid, lung and ovarian carcinomas. One of the endogenous ligands for the CCK2 receptor is the gastrin, so that radiolabeled peptides analogues to gastrin as Sar gastrin (Gln-Gly-Pro-Trp-Leu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe-NH 2 ) have been proposed as potential diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for obtaining tumors images with CCK2 receptors over expressed. The 68 Ga is an ideal candidate for the peptides radiolabelled and has favorable characteristics to be used for diagnostic purposes by imaging with Positron emission tomography (PET). This work aimed to verify the technical documentation of the production process of radiopharmaceutical 68 Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin for its sanitary registration before the Comision Federal contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS) in Mexico. For optimization of the production process was assessed a factorial design of two variables with mixed levels (27 combinations), where the dependent variable was the radiochemical purity. The analytical method used for evaluating the content of Sar gastrin peptide in the injectable formulation was also validated by High-performance liquid chromatography. Subsequently the validation of the production process was carried out by manufacturing of lots in single-dose of the optimized injectable formulation of the radiopharmaceutical 68 Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin and the stability study was conducted at different times to determine the useful life time. The following was established as the optimal pharmaceutical formulation: 185 MBq of 68 Ga, 50 μg de DOTA-Sar gastrin, 14 mg of sodium acetate and 0.5 m L of buffer acetates, 1.0 M, ph 4.22 in 2.5 m L of the vehicle. The analytical method used to determine the radiochemical purity of the formulation satisfied the requirements for the intended analytical application. The lots in

  14. Radiopharmaceutical research: trends and novel concepts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wuest, F.

    2005-01-01

    The efficiency of nuclear medicine in diagnosis, therapy and medicinal research strongly depends on the progress to develop novel suitable radiopharmaceuticals. The selection, preparation, and preclinical evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals is addressed by the field of radiopharmaceutical chemistry. The rapid developments in the field of biotechnology in the post-genome era combined with the recent advances in the instrumentation of SPECT and PET have directed radiopharmaceutical research into a complex chemical science. Current radiopharmaceutical research comprises novel developments of coordination chemistry with [ 99m Tc]technetium pharmaceuticals, the development of non-standard PET radionuclides and the synthesis of 11 C- and 18 F-labelled radiopharmaceuticals at high specific radioactivity. Further developments deal with an increasing alignment to radiotherapeutics and the implementation of PET into the process of drug development and evaluation. (orig.)

  15. Development of methodologies for internal exposure assessment due to the radiopharmaceutical 18FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de

    2013-01-01

    The production of 18 F has increased in the last decade. It is produced basically for the synthesis of 18 F- fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 FDG), the main radiopharmaceutical used in PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scans. The growth in the frequency of these tests resulted in rise of the number of occupationally exposed individuals (OEI) to the radionuclide 18 F as 18 FDG, increasing thereby the probability of its accidental incorporation. This study aimed to implement optimized techniques for assessing internal exposures of individuals occupationally exposed through both in vivo and in vitro bioassay methods during production and handling of 18 FDG at the Divisao de Producao de Radiofarmacos (DIPRA), Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN). The in vivo monitoring was conducted at the Laboratorio de Dosimetria Interna, Divisao de Laboratorios Tecnico-Cientificos (DILAB). For this bioassay method, measurements were done with a 3x3' NaI(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to Genie 2000 software. The calibration of the system was performed with a brain phantom containing a standard liquid source of 22 Na to simulate a contaminated individual. The calibration of the HPGe coaxial detector for in vitro monitoring was performed at the Laboratorio de Medidas de Atividade de Radionuclideos (DIPRA/CRCN-NE/CNEN) with a standard source of 22 Na. Base on the calibration factors, it was possible to determine the minimum detectable activities (MDA) for the systems by using direct measurements and simulation of uncontaminated urine. Then, through the biokinetic models published by ICRP 106 and edited by the AIDE software (version 6.0), it was possible to estimate the minimum detectable effective dose (MDED), which evaluates the detection sensitivity of the techniques developed. The MDED was estimated for in vivo and in vitro measurements performed 2.4 hours after the occurrence of incorporation by ingestion, since this is the period of higher retention fraction

  16. Country report: Thailand. Development of Sr-90/ Y-90 Generator and Development of Radiopharmaceuticals Using Y-90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nipavan, Poramatikul

    2010-01-01

    The research project has been conducted at Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology in accordance to the 1st RCM plan during the IAEA meeting in Warsaw. The objectives of the project include the following 5 specific aims: 1. Development of Sr-90/Y-90 ion-exchange chromatography generator 2. Development of Sr-90/Y-90 extraction chromatography generator 3. Development of quality control technique 4. Development of herapeutic radiopharmaceuticals Y-90 particulates/colloids 5. Development of Re-188 DMSA–bis-phosphonates Currently we have achieved specific aims 1 to 3. The specific aims 4 and 5 are during investigation. For specific aim 4, we are during the process to extract high purity 90 Y from 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator that will yield the starting 90 Y for the production of Y-90 particulates and colloids. For the 5 th specific aim, we are on hold to receive the starting agent, bis- Phosphonates, from Dr. Blower group. Therefore, this progress report will cover our work focusing on specific aims 1 to 3

  17. Country report: Thailand. Development of Sr-90/ Y-90 Generator and Development of Radiopharmaceuticals Using Y-90

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nipavan, Poramatikul [Nuclear Research and Development Group, Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology (Public Organization), Bangkok (Thailand)

    2010-07-01

    The research project has been conducted at Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology in accordance to the 1st RCM plan during the IAEA meeting in Warsaw. The objectives of the project include the following 5 specific aims: 1. Development of Sr-90/Y-90 ion-exchange chromatography generator 2. Development of Sr-90/Y-90 extraction chromatography generator 3. Development of quality control technique 4. Development of herapeutic radiopharmaceuticals Y-90 particulates/colloids 5. Development of Re-188 DMSA–bis-phosphonates Currently we have achieved specific aims 1 to 3. The specific aims 4 and 5 are during investigation. For specific aim 4, we are during the process to extract high purity {sup 90}Y from {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y generator that will yield the starting {sup 90}Y for the production of Y-90 particulates and colloids. For the 5{sup th} specific aim, we are on hold to receive the starting agent, bis- Phosphonates, from Dr. Blower group. Therefore, this progress report will cover our work focusing on specific aims 1 to 3.

  18. Aptamer-based radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of epithelial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missailidis, Sotiris; Perkins, Alan; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2008-01-01

    In the continuous search for earlier diagnosis and improved therapeutic modalities against cancer, based on our constantly increasing knowledge of cancer biology, aptamers hold the promise to expand on current antibody success, but overcoming some of the problems faced with antibodies as therapeutic or delivery agents in cancer. However, as the first aptamer reached the market as an inhibitor against angiogenesis for the treatment of macular degeneration, aptamers have found only limited applications or interest in oncology, and even less as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of tumours. Yet, the chemistry for the labelling of aptamers and the options to alter their pharmacokinetic properties, to make them suitable for use as radiopharmaceuticals is now available and recent advances in their development can demonstrate that these molecules would make them ideal delivery vehicles for the development of targeted radiopharmaceuticals that could deliver their radiation load with accuracy to the tumour site, offering improved therapeutic properties and reduced side effects. (author)

  19. Aptamer-based radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of epithelial tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missailidis, Sotiris [The Open University, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry and Analytical Sciences]. E-mail: s.missailidis@open.ac.uk; Perkins, Alan [University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Medical Physics; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria

    2008-12-15

    In the continuous search for earlier diagnosis and improved therapeutic modalities against cancer, based on our constantly increasing knowledge of cancer biology, aptamers hold the promise to expand on current antibody success, but overcoming some of the problems faced with antibodies as therapeutic or delivery agents in cancer. However, as the first aptamer reached the market as an inhibitor against angiogenesis for the treatment of macular degeneration, aptamers have found only limited applications or interest in oncology, and even less as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of tumours. Yet, the chemistry for the labelling of aptamers and the options to alter their pharmacokinetic properties, to make them suitable for use as radiopharmaceuticals is now available and recent advances in their development can demonstrate that these molecules would make them ideal delivery vehicles for the development of targeted radiopharmaceuticals that could deliver their radiation load with accuracy to the tumour site, offering improved therapeutic properties and reduced side effects. (author)

  20. Development of fluorine 18 labelled MPPF, radiopharmaceutical tracer for serotoninergic system exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bars, D.; Tochon-Danguy, H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive method for exploration, in man and animals, of metabolism with radiopharmaceutical tracers labelled with positron emitters such as carbon 11 and fluorine 18 obtained with a cyclotron. Among the ever increasing number of tracers focussed at the CNS neurotransmission, the discovery of a new family of serotoninergic 5HT 1A antagonists (WAY 100635) has led to the first in vivo imaging of 5HT 1A receptors in man, located in cerebral structures such as cortex and hippocampus. Exploration of serotonine parthway is particulaly interesting in normal or diseased state, as this neurotransmitter is involved in the control of mood, sleep and is probably altered in psychiatric disorders. CERMEP, in collaboration with other PET centres has developped a new 5HT 1A antagonist, MPPF, labelled with fluorine 18. [ 18 F]MPPF has the advantadge of fluorine 18 labelling, with a longer half-life (110 min vs 20 min for carbon 11) and easier radiosynthesis automation. Moreover, MPPF affinity for 5HT 1A is close to serotonin itself, thus enabling displacement of MPPF by endogenous serotonin during pharmacological challenges. Automated radiosynthesis of MPPF is achieved via a classical [ 18 F]F - fluoro for nitro displacement, activated by a catalyst, on a nitro precursor prepared in four steps. A final HPLC purification ensures the production of [ 18 F]MPPF with a high purity and a high specific activity. Ex vivo autoradiographies and PET studies in animals (rat, cat) have shown the excellent specificity of MPPF for the 5HT 1A receptor. Experiments with intracerebral β probe have evidenced the displacement of [ 18 F]MPPF by endogenous serotonin after fenfluramine injection. [ 18 F]MPPF is now used in man for non-invasive PET studies of serotoninergic system. Normal volunteers matched for age and sex have been screened as a database and to compute a mathematical model of the tracer kinetic describing 5HT 1A receptor affinity and

  1. IPENS's social role in scientific and technological development of radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production - (1950 -1980)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Ana Maria P.L.

    2009-01-01

    Some facts and figures are present in the existent interaction between the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN) and the medical community. Among other characteristics, the IPEN has a permanent seat in the Biology and Nuclear Medicine Society and, the present Radiopharmacy Center, has had the continuous concern, since the Instituto de Energia Atomica (IEA) creation until today (2009), to perform an excellent approach with the medical faculty. In the past, some physicians would complete their courses in Europe and in the United States of America, and there noticed the importance of radioisotopes applications in medicine, mainly, in the beginning of these activities, with the I-131. Returning to Brazil, they requested that the former IEA, today IPEN researchers used the research reactor IEA-R1, installed in Sao Paulo, at Universidade Sao Paulo (USP) campus, for radioisotopes production. Then, in the late 1959, the first production line from the I-131 took place. The IPEN starts to accomplish what was planned as one of its targets, at the act of its official creation on August 31, 1956. From 1961 on, there was a continuous flux of I-131 and other radiopharmaceuticals production. The recovery and analysis of these happenings, in the Brazilian society cultural historic context, were partially published in different previous works. Nevertheless, history is dynamic and gains new interpretations, in the present research, from the reading of novel research sources, both primary and secondary, not explores so far - reports, interviews with IPEN researchers and papers published or divulged in meetings, either scientific or bureaucratic. This research is part of project supported by the Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo (FAPESP), with the aim, among others, of contributing for the analysis of the transformations occurred in all of the IPEN research lines, plus the social role of this institution for science and technology development. The

  2. Gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium and copper radionuclides have a long history of use in nuclear medicine. Table 1 presents the nuclear properties of several gallium and copper isotopes that either are used in the routine practice of clinical nuclear medicine or exhibit particular characteristics that might make them useful in diagnostic or therapeutic medicine. This paper will provide some historic perspective along with an overview of some current research directions in gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry. A more extensive review of gallium radiopharmaceutical chemistry has recently appeared and can be consulted for a more in-depth treatment of this topic

  3. The WFNMB Survey on the Introduction of New Radiopharmaceuticals for Clinical Research: Snapshot of the international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, J.M.; Choe, Y.S.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Development of new radiopharmaceuticals and their introduction into clinical trials ensures continuing improvement in the practice of nuclear medicine. Although it is crucial that safety and efficacy are established prior to use in humans, the characteristics of radiopharmaceuticals are quite different from other drugs since these agents are generally administered in trace, sub-pharmacological amounts. Diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceutical agents are used only in restricted and controlled areas and are administered only by trained personnel. In many cases - as often for PET -- such diagnostic agents are often used in the same institution where they are prepared. Thus, regulations for the preparation and use of radiopharmaceuticals should be different from other drugs. To evaluate the current status of radiopharmaceutical regulations, we surveyed radiopharmaceutical experts and nuclear medicine societies on an international basis. A questionnaire was provided which focused on the regulations required for the in-house non-commercial preparation of new radiopharmaceutical for routine clinical use or for use in clinical trials. Responses were received from participants in 36 countries. Although both government and institutional approval are required for introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals in the majority of countries, some countries require only institutional approval. In the case of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, as may be expected, only physician responsibility is more often required compared with similar approval for use of diagnostic agent in these settings. The requirement of current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) for PET agents was higher than with the other agents. This preponderance of cGMP requirements may be interpreted as much higher than may be expected, since many PET radiopharmaceuticals are used in-house and are prepared in the hospital by pharmaceutical compounding and not by manufacturing. Compounding is not regulated by c

  4. Development of nano radiopharmaceutical based on Bevacizumab labelled with Technetium-99m for early diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Thais Ligiero

    2015-01-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is an essential activity to improve nuclear medicine, and essential for the early and effective diagnosis of oncological diseases. Among the various possibilities current research in the world, the radiopharmaceuticals to chemotherapeutic base may be the most effective in detecting tumors, particularly Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST), the Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors. However, difficulties in directing, as well as adhesion of the radiopharmaceutical in the desired location, are currently the main problems in the early detection and treatment of some of these tumors. Advances in the field of nanotechnology, particularly in recent years, indicate significant contribution to overcoming these obstacles, particularly in the implementation of molecular barriers as well as the functionalization of the nanoparticles, thereby improving targeting by the use of surface nucleotides, and the increased adhesion, which facilitates the release of the drug and therefore increases the chances of early diagnosis and more effective treatment. This study aimed to the production, characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity, as well as in vivo biodistribution test Bevacizumab nanoparticles labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide for detection of type GIST tumors. Bevacizumab was encapsulated in the form of nanoparticles by the emulsification method using double poly-acetic acid and polyvinyl alcohol polymers (PLA / PVA) at a concentration of 2% of the monoclonal antibody. The characterization of the nanoparticles was performed by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity assessment was performed by XTT assay with various cell lines of solid tumor cells. The labeling with technetium-99m was done by the direct method, and its yield determined by paper chromatography using paper Whatmam 1 as the stationary phase and acetone as mobile phase. In the biodistribution study

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals targeting melanoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pham, T.Q.; Berghofer, P.; Liu, X.; Greguric, I.; Dikic, B.; Ballantyne, P.; Mattner, F.; Nguyen, V.; Loc' h, C.; Katsifis, A. [Radiopharmaceuticals Research Institute, Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation, Menai, N.S.W., Sydney (Australia)

    2008-02-15

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive cancers known with a high rate of mortality and increasing global incidence. So, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for either diagnostic or therapeutic purposes could make enormous contributions to melanoma patient health care. We have been studying melanoma tumours through several targeting mechanisms including melanin or specific receptor based radiopharmaceuticals Structure activity studies indicate that the substitution patterns on radioiodinated benzamides significantly influence the uptake mechanism from melanin to sigma-receptor binding. Furthermore, the position of the iodine as well as the presence of key functional groups and substituents has resulted in compounds with varying degrees of activity uptake and retention in tumours. From these results, a novel molecule 2-(2-(4-(4-iodo benzyl)piperazin-1-yl)-2-oxo-ethyl)isoindoline- 1,3-dione (M.E.L.037) was synthesized, labelled with iodine-123 and evaluated for application in melanoma tumour scintigraphy and radiotherapy. The tumour imaging potential of {sup 123}IM.E.L.037 was studied in vivo in C.57 B.L./ 6 J female mice bearing the B.16 F.0. murine melanoma tumour and in BALB/c nude mice bearing the A.375 human amelanotic melanoma tumour by biodistribution, competition studies and by SPECT imaging. {sup 123}I-M.E.L.037 exhibited high and rapid uptake in the B.16 F.0 melanoma tumour at 1 h (13 % I.D./g) increasing with time to reach 25 % I.D./g at 6 h. A significant uptake was also observed in the eyes (2% I.D., at 3-6 h p.i.) of black mice. No uptake was observed in the tumour or in the eyes of nude mice bearing the A.375 tumour. Due to high uptake and long retention in the tumour and rapid body clearance, standardized uptake values(S.U.V.) of {sup 123}I-M.E.L.037 were 30 and 60, at 24 and 48 h p.i.,respectively. SPECT imaging of mice bearing the B.16 melanoma indicated the radioactivity was predominately located in the tumour followed by the eyes, while no

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1990-06-01

    During this grant period 1 January 1988--31 December 1990, we have successfully developed a number of new approaches to fluorine-18 labeled compounds, prepared several new radiotracers for both animal studies and eventual clinical trials, and explored the utility of a high-quality industrial robot in radiopharmaceutical applications. The progress during the last grant period is summarized briefly in the following sections. Publications arising from this research are listed below and can be found in Appendix I. 1 fig

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hron, M.; Kronrad, L.; Svoboda, K.; Melichar, F.

    1986-01-01

    The history is briefly described of the production of radiopharmaceuticals in Czechoslovakia for nuclear medicine purposes. 131 I-labelled orthoiodohippurate and rose Bengal were first produced. Currently, 99m Tc is the most frequently requested radionuclide for radiopharmaceutical labelling. The preparation of 99m Tc is described in detail, a flow chart is shown and the network of 99m Tc distribution to hospitals outlined. In addition of 99m Tc and 131 I, UJV Rez produces other radionuclides for nuclear medicine, such as 113m In, 67 Ga, 35 S, 32 P, 203 Hg, 85 Sr. The methods are being developed of the production of 201 Tl, 125 I and 131 I-labelled bromosulfophthalein. (E.S.)

  8. Why are investors not interested in my radiotracer? The industrial and regulatory constraints in the development of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Four criteria are essential in the acceptance by investors of new radiopharmaceuticals: the existence of a market and a medical need, the quality of the science and technology behind the new molecule, the feasibility and compliance with regulations and the limited competitive landscape. Potential investors need to get more convincing market evidence, largely beyond the nice preclinical data generated to the point of first discussion. A properly protected compound not jeopardized by earlier published results is a must. A guarantee of an easy and secured source of the ligand is obvious. A safe access to the radionuclide in volumes corresponding to the targeted market is rarely taken into account, but of utmost importance. The evaluation of new drugs by investors will include the evaluation of the real market size for the targeted indication and the position of the drug in the healthcare environment at the time to market. This includes the potential competition with other radiopharmaceuticals, but also with conventional drugs or competitive modalities also at time to market. Both criteria are usually not easily accessible to researchers whose acquaintance remains limited to the scientific and technical part. Starting from this set of information, a first business plan can be deduced based on a best estimate for price per dose and a rough evaluation about the chance and level of reimbursement. In the following most of the events are covered that could jeopardize the development of the drug, focusing on the industrial, economic and regulatory aspects, comprehending the detailed analysis of the currently best available radionuclides

  9. Lung radiopharmaceuticals; Radioformacos pulmonares

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, B M [Instituto Nacional de Pediatroa (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    Indication or main clinical use of Lung radiopharmaceuticals is presented and clasification of radiopharmaceuticals as ventilation and perfusion studies. Perfusion radiopharmaceuticals, main controls for administration quality acceptance. Clearence after blood administration and main clinical applications. Ventilation radiopharmaceuticals, gases and aerosols, characteristics of a ideal radioaerosol, techniques of good inhalation procedure, clinical applications. Comparison of several radiopharmaceuticals reflering to retention time as 50% administered dose, percent administered dose at 6 hours post inhalation, blood activity at 30 and 60 minutes post inhalation, initial lung absorbed dose, cumulated activity.Kinetic description of two radiopharmaceuticals, 99mTcDTPA and 99mTc-PYP.

  10. Therapeutical radiopharmaceuticals based In vivo generator system [{sup 166} Dy] Dy/{sup 166} Ho; Radiofarmacos terapeuticos basados en un sistema de generador In vivo [{sup 166}Dy] Dy/{sup 166}Ho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G.; Garcia S, L.; Monroy G, F.; Tendilla, J.I. [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Pedraza L, M.; Murphy, C.A. de [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Pediatria, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    At the idea to administer to a patient a molecule containing in it structure a father radionuclide, with a half life enough large which allows to the radiolabelled molecule to take up position specifically in a white tissue and decaying In vivo to the daughter radionuclide with properties potentially therapeutic, it is known as In vivo generator system. In this work the preparation and the preliminary dosimetric valuations of radiopharmaceuticals based In vivo generator system {sup 166} Dy Dy/{sup 166} Ho for applications in radioimmunotherapy, in the treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis and in the bone marrow ablation (m.o.) for candidates patients to bone marrow transplant are presented. (Author)

  11. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the

  12. Development of glycoside-bound radiopharmaceuticals; Novel radioiodination method for digoxin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takemura, Yasutaka; Dote, Nobuhito; Taniuchi, Hideyuki; Iijima, Naoko; Yokoyama, Akira (Kyoto Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Pharmaceutical Science); Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Konishi, Junji

    1994-01-01

    We combined 2-hydroxy-3-methylbenzoylhydrazide (HMBH) with glycosides as a novel method for the radioiodination of physiologically active glycosides. This method was tested using digoxin, which is one of the cardiac glycosides. A digoxin-HMBH conjugate was synthesized by periodate cleavage of the third sugar ring, and was readily radiolabelled with Na[[sup 125]I] by the chloramine-T method. [sup 125]I labelled digoxin-HMBH conjugate retained Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase binding in vivo and in vitro, and also retained immunoreactivity to an anti-digoxin antibody. Thus, this [sup 125]I labelled digoxin-HMBH conjugate represents a potential radiopharmaceutical for Na[sup +], K[sup +]-ATPase imaging, as well as for the radioimmunoassay of digoxin. (author).

  13. Industrial constraints in the selection of radionuclides and the development of new radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    During the past twenty years, the number of new radiolabeled molecules that have been published weekly in specialized nuclear medicine journals is quite amazing. On the other hand, one can only be astonished when it is compared to the number of new radiopharmaceuticals that came on the market during the same period. A good science is not sufficient to transform a molecule in a marketed drug. The budget required to demonstrate with a larger number of patients the value of the molecule linked to a limited market potential discourages investors to enter in this area. In fact, there are a series of other limitations and constraints that have to be taken into account before deciding to start clinical trials. This paper tries to identify all the difficulties that are encountered by radiopharmaceutical industries. They include the choice of the best but not necessary ideal radionuclide, the analysis of the market viability in the frame of the overall competition, the increasing safety constraints when working with multi-doses, the investment in usually non existing manufacturing tools for a worldwide access to the new drug, as well as the limiting regulatory aspects with yearly increasing constraints. Unfortunately it must be noted that each of these criteria is mainly driven by financial parameters and an expectation of a certain return on investment. This analysis can help research centers to better control and orient their programs and to explain the reasons of the lack of interest by industry for some even a priori interesting molecules, targets, radionuclides or indications. (author)

  14. Development of mathematical phantoms for calculating internal doses from radiopharmaceuticals using patients' digital picture of bone scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.

    1996-01-01

    We made a new mathematical phantom using the patients' digital pictures of bone scintillation in nuclear medicine. The data of 99m Tc bone scintillation pictures include the information on the body sizes and shapes. In the bone scintillation pictures, no three dimensional data are available, so that the shapes and sizes of whole body and bones were modelled based on standard anatomical geometry. The organs except bone were also modelled after construction of the bone mathematical model. The mathematical phantoms were developed for each patient. The specific effective energy for each phantom can be calculated by the Monte Carlo code to compare it among the patients. Our mathematical phantoms would provide new calculation of internal doses from radiopharmaceuticals in place of the MIRD phantom. (author)

  15. Development and optimization of targeted radionuclide tumor therapy using folate based radiopharmaceuticals

    CERN Document Server

    Reber, Josefine Astrid

    The folate receptor (FR) has been used for a quarter of a century as a tumor-associated target for selective delivery of drugs and imaging agents to cancer cells. While several folic acid radioconjugates have been successfully employed for imaging purposes in (pre)clinical studies, a therapeutic application of folic acid radioconjugates has not yet reached the critical stage which would allow a clinical translation. Due to a substantial expression of the FR in the proximal tubule cells, radiofolates accumulate in the kidneys which are at risk of damage by particle-radiation. To improve this situation, we aimed to develop and evaluate strategies for the performance of FR-targeted radionuclide therapy by decreasing the renal uptake of radiofolates and thereby reducing potential nephrotoxic effects. Two different strategies were investigated. First, the combination of radiofolates with chemotherapeutic agents such as pemetrexed (PMX) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and secondly, an approach based on radioiodinated fol...

  16. Radioisotope requirements and usage in the radiopharmaceutical industry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langton, M.A.

    1995-01-01

    Radioisotopes are used extensively in many different productive and beneficial human endeavors. Amersham International, a U.K.-based company originating in the British Scientific Civil Service during World War II, has been actively involved in many of these activities for more than 50 yr. Today they are one of the world's largest suppliers of radioactive compounds and scaled radiation sources for use in industrial quality and safety assurance, life science research, and medicine. This paper outlines one of these applications: the use of radioisotopes as radiopharmaceuticals. Radiopharmaceuticals are radioactive nuclides and labeled compounds that have been developed for the diagnosis and treatment of (human) disease. They are manufactured via highly controlled processes and have gone through regulatory scrutiny and approval far in excess of other radioisotopes used in other applications. Radiopharmaceuticals can be conveniently split into two categories. One type is simply an active analog that mimics the physiological behavior of its inactive counterpart in the body. The other involves an actual pharmacological compound that exhibits the desired physiological behavior, which is then labeled with a radionuclide suitable for either imaging or the delivery of a therapeutic radiation dose as appropriate but which plays no part in the mechanism of action of the drug. The latter type, which is the more common of the two, can be supplied either as an active compounded product or as a open-quotes cold kit,close quotes which is then labeled with the appropriate radiopharmaceutical-grade radionuclide to yield the final product

  17. Why are investors not interested in my radiotracer? The industrial and regulatory constraints in the development of radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Richard G

    2013-02-01

    Four criteria are essential in the acceptance by investors of new radiopharmaceuticals: the existence of a market and a medical need, the quality of the science and technology behind the new molecule, the feasibility and compliance with regulations and the limited competitive landscape. Potential investors need to get more convincing market evidence, largely beyond the nice preclinical data generated to the point of first discussion. A properly protected compound not jeopardized by earlier published results is a must. A guarantee of an easy and secured source of the ligand is obvious. A safe access to the radionuclide in volumes corresponding to the targeted market is rarely taken into account, but of utmost importance. The evaluation of new drugs by investors will include the evaluation of the real market size for the targeted indication and the position of the drug in the healthcare environment at the time to market. This includes the potential competition with other radiopharmaceuticals, but also with conventional drugs or competitive modalities also at time to market. Both criteria are usually not easily accessible to researchers whose acquaintance remains limited to the scientific and technical part. Starting from this set of information, a first business plan can be deduced based on a best estimate for price per dose and a rough evaluation about the chance and level of reimbursement. In the following most of the events are covered that could jeopardize the development of the drug, focusing on the industrial, economic and regulatory aspects, comprehending the detailed analysis of the currently best available radionuclides. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical 177Lu-DOTA- Minigastrin for potential use in PRRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Bularte, A.C.; Nevares, N.N.; Zapata, A.M.; Perez, J.H.; Crudo, J.L.; Puerta Yepes, N.; Rojo, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain 177 Lu-DOTA-Minigastrin with high radiochemical purity (RP) and the highest specific activity (Ae) as possible, using a locally produced (Nuclear Reactor RA-3, Ezeiza Atomic Center) 177 LuCl 3 of an intermediate level of Ae (between 6.36 to 17.95 Ci/mg of 176 Lu) ) and also to perform in vitro and in vivo stability tests, dose calculation in normal mice and its extrapolation to a human model. (authors) [es

  19. Radiopharmaceuticals drug interactions: a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos-Oliveira, Ralph; Smith, Sheila W.; Carneiro-Leao, Ana Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals play a critical role in modern medicine primarily for diagnostic purposes, but also for monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. As the use of image has been increased, so has the use of prescription medications. These trends increase the risk of interactions between medications and radiopharmaceuticals. These interactions which have an impact on image by competing with the radiopharmaceutical for binding sites for example can lead to false negative results. Drugs that accelerate the metabolism of the radiopharmaceutical can have a positive impact (i.e. speeding its clearance) or, if repeating image is needed, a negative impact. In some cases, for example in cardiac image among patients taking doxirubacin, these interactions may have a therapeutic benefit. The incidence of drug-radiopharmaceuticals adverse reactions is unknown, since they may not be reported or even recognized. Here, we compiled the medical literature, using the criteria of a systematic review established by the Cochrane Collaboration, on pharmaceutical-drug interactions to provide a summary of documented interactions by organ system and radiopharmaceuticals. The purpose is to provide a reference on drug interactions that could inform the nuclear medicine staff in their daily routine. Efforts to increase adverse event reporting, and ideally consolidate reports worldwide, can provide a critically needed resource for prevention of drug-radiopharmaceuticals interactions. (author)

  20. Developing patient rapport, trust and therapeutic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bob

    2017-08-09

    Rapport is established at the first meeting between the patient and nurse, and is developed throughout the therapeutic relationship. However, challenges can arise during this process. Initially, nurses can establish trust with the patient through the questions they ask, however, as care progresses, the nurse will be required to demonstrate a commitment to maintaining the patient's psychological well-being. When the therapeutic relationship ends, the nurse should assist the patient to assess progress and plan the next stage of recovery. This article provides three reflective exercises using case study examples to demonstrate how rapport is developed and sustained. Evidence is provided to identify why challenges arise in the therapeutic relationship and how the nurse can ensure they provide care that the patient regards as genuine.

  1. Phototherapy : photobiological aspects and therapeutical developments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjioe, Milan

    2003-01-01

    Several therapeutical modalities are nowadays used in photodermatology. In this thesis several new developments, like narrow band UVB, highdose visible light, are compared with regard to aspects of phototageing and photodamage. When broad band UVB and UVA are compared maximal photoinduced infiltrate

  2. Modern trends in radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy. Proceedings of a symposium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-08-01

    The IAEA held an International Symposium on Modern Trends in Radiopharmaceuticals for Diagnosis and Therapy in Lisbon, Portugal, from 30 March to 3 April 1998. Two earlier symposia were organized on similar topics in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1973 and in Tokyo, Japan, in 1984. The proceedings of these symposia have been published and widely used as reference sources. To facilitate faster publication and more widespread availability, the IAEA has decided to publish the proceedings of this symposium as a cost-free TECDOC. The symposium was organized into 14 sessions consisting of five on {sup 99m}Tc radiopharmaceuticals, two each on therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals and radiohalogens/other isotopes and one each on bioevaluation, radiometric assay, medical isotope production, good radiopharmacy practice and technology transfer. In the proceedings the papers from multiple sessions on the same topic have been grouped together for the convenience of the reader. The papers presented in the symposium reflect current and future developments in diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The largest number of papers presented dealt with {sup 99m}Tc, highlighting its continuing importance to nuclear medicine and the role of imaging as an important tool. The emerging interest in therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on beta emitting short lived isotopes such as {sup 186}Re and {sup 153}Sm was evident from the papers presented in two sessions devoted to this topic. Also of steady interest was the development of agents labelled with other established isotopes, radioiodine in particular and also {sup 111}In and {sup 67}Ga. Regulation, training and good manufacturing practices are important for ensuring safety in regular use of radiopharmaceuticals and were discussed in a separate session. The production of radiopharmaceuticals has become a regular activity in many developing countries, often facilities were presented at the symposium Refs, figs, tabs

  3. Modern trends in radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy. Proceedings of a symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The IAEA held an International Symposium on Modern Trends in Radiopharmaceuticals for Diagnosis and Therapy in Lisbon, Portugal, from 30 March to 3 April 1998. Two earlier symposia were organized on similar topics in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1973 and in Tokyo, Japan, in 1984. The proceedings of these symposia have been published and widely used as reference sources. To facilitate faster publication and more widespread availability, the IAEA has decided to publish the proceedings of this symposium as a cost-free TECDOC. The symposium was organized into 14 sessions consisting of five on 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals, two each on therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals and radiohalogens/other isotopes and one each on bioevaluation, radiometric assay, medical isotope production, good radiopharmacy practice and technology transfer. In the proceedings the papers from multiple sessions on the same topic have been grouped together for the convenience of the reader. The papers presented in the symposium reflect current and future developments in diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The largest number of papers presented dealt with 99m Tc, highlighting its continuing importance to nuclear medicine and the role of imaging as an important tool. The emerging interest in therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on beta emitting short lived isotopes such as 186 Re and 153 Sm was evident from the papers presented in two sessions devoted to this topic. Also of steady interest was the development of agents labelled with other established isotopes, radioiodine in particular and also 111 In and 67 Ga. Regulation, training and good manufacturing practices are important for ensuring safety in regular use of radiopharmaceuticals and were discussed in a separate session. The production of radiopharmaceuticals has become a regular activity in many developing countries, often facilities were presented at the symposium

  4. Factors and pharmaceuticals that affect the radiopharmaceuticals bio distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    The pattern of biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals may be affected by various agents and therapeutical procedures, chemotherapy agents, thyroid hormones, metals, radiotherapy, surgery, anesthetic agents, dialysis other radiopharmaceutical interactions. Recommendations for the detection of altered biodistribution in patients by causes not directly related with the pathology itself was given. pathology itself was given

  5. Imaging enabled platforms for development of therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celli, Jonathan; Rizvi, Imran; Blanden, Adam R.; Evans, Conor L.; Abu-Yousif, Adnan O.; Spring, Bryan Q.; Muzikansky, Alona; Pogue, Brian W.; Finkelstein, Dianne M.; Hasan, Tayyaba

    2011-03-01

    Advances in imaging and spectroscopic technologies have enabled the optimization of many therapeutic modalities in cancer and noncancer pathologies either by earlier disease detection or by allowing therapy monitoring. Amongst the therapeutic options benefiting from developments in imaging technologies, photodynamic therapy (PDT) is exceptional. PDT is a photochemistry-based therapeutic approach where a light-sensitive molecule (photosensitizer) is activated with light of appropriate energy (wavelength) to produce reactive molecular species such as free radicals and singlet oxygen. These molecular entities then react with biological targets such as DNA, membranes and other cellular components to impair their function and lead to eventual cell and tissue death. Development of PDT-based imaging also provides a platform for rapid screening of new therapeutics in novel in vitro models prior to expensive and labor-intensive animal studies. In this study we demonstrate how an imaging platform can be used for strategizing a novel combination treatment strategy for multifocal ovarian cancer. Using an in vitro 3D model for micrometastatic ovarian cancer in conjunction with quantitative imaging we examine dose and scheduling strategies for PDT in combination with carboplatin, a chemotherapeutic agent presently in clinical use for management of this deadly form of cancer.

  6. Peptide radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, D.; Vermeij, P.; Feitsma, R.I.J.; Pauwels, E.J.K.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the labelling of peptides that are recognised to be of interest for nuclear medicine or are the subject of ongoing nuclear medicine research. Applications and approaches to the labelling of peptide radiopharmaceuticals are discussed, and drawbacks in their development considered. (orig.)

  7. Development of aptamers for use as radiopharmaceuticals in the bacterial infection identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ieda Mendes

    2013-01-01

    The difficulty in early detection of specific foci caused by bacteria in the bacterial infection has raised the need to search for new techniques for this purpose, since these foci require prolonged treatment with antibiotics and in some cases even drainage or, if applicable, removal of prostheses or grafts. Detection of bacterial infections by scintigraphy had the advantage that a whole body image could be obtained, since specific tracers were available. This study aims to obtain aptamers specific for bacteria identification for future use as radiopharmaceutical. The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) methodology can generate oligonucleotides (aptamers) that are able to bind with high affinity and specificity to a specific target, from small molecules to complex proteins, by using rounds of enrichment and amplification. Aptamers can be labeled with different radionucleotides such as 99 mTc, 18 F and 32 P. In this study, aptamers anti-peptidoglycan, the main component of the bacterial outer cell wall, were obtained through SELEX. Whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus were also used to perform the SELEX to cells (cell-SELEX). The selection of aptamers was performed by two different procedures (A and B). The A process has been accomplished by 15 SELEX rounds in which the separation of the oligonucleotides bound to the peptidoglycan of unbound ones was performed by filtration. In the B process 15 SELEX rounds were performed using the centrifugation for this separation, followed by 5 rounds cell-SELEX. The SELEX started with a pool of ssDNA (single stranded DNA). For A process, initially a library of ssDNA was incubated with peptidoglycan and the amplification of oligonucleotides that were able to bind to peptidoglycan was performed by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reation). The amplified oligonucleotides were again incubated with peptidoglycan, amplified and purified. At the end of 15 selection rounds the selected oligonucleotides were cloned

  8. Current directions in radiopharmaceutical research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mather, S J [Department of Nuclear Medicine, St. Bartholomew` s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1998-08-01

    Much of current radiopharmaceutical research is directed towards the development of receptor-binding tracers which are targeted towards biochemical processes. These may be extra or intracellular in nature and hold promise for an imaging approach to tissue characterisation in-vivo. Many of these products are based on proteins which range in size from large monoclonal antibodies to small neuropeptides and share a radiolabelling chemistry based on the use of bifunctional chelating agents. Although developed initially for use with indium-111, considerations of cost and isotope availability have continued to direct the efforts of many researchers towards the use of technetium-99m. While polypeptide-based radiopharmaceuticals may be useful for imaging peripheral cell-surface receptors, access to sites of interest within the cell, or in the brain, requires the development of small lipophilic molecules with retained ability to interact with intracellular targets. The design and synthesis of these compounds presents a particular challenge to the radiopharmaceutical chemist which is being met through either a pendant or integrated approach to the use of technetium coordination with particular emphasis on technetium (v) cores. Progress continues to be made in the application of targeted radionuclide therapy particularly in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of malignant bone disease. methods for labelling antibodies with a great variety of cytotoxic radionuclides have now been refined and their use for radioimmunotherapy in the treatment of haematological malignancies shows great promise. The major medical areas for application of these new radiopharmaceuticals will be in oncology, neurology and inflammation but the increasingly difficult regulatory climate in which drug development and health-care now operate will make it essential for researchers to direct their products toward specific clinical problems as well as biological targets. (author) 36 refs

  9. Current directions in radiopharmaceutical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    Much of current radiopharmaceutical research is directed towards the development of receptor-binding tracers which are targeted towards biochemical processes. These may be extra or intracellular in nature and hold promise for an imaging approach to tissue characterisation in-vivo. Many of these products are based on proteins which range in size from large monoclonal antibodies to small neuropeptides and share a radiolabelling chemistry based on the use of bifunctional chelating agents. Although developed initially for use with indium-111, considerations of cost and isotope availability have continued to direct the efforts of many researchers towards the use of technetium-99m. While polypeptide-based radiopharmaceuticals may be useful for imaging peripheral cell-surface receptors, access to sites of interest within the cell, or in the brain, requires the development of small lipophilic molecules with retained ability to interact with intracellular targets. The design and synthesis of these compounds presents a particular challenge to the radiopharmaceutical chemist which is being met through either a pendant or integrated approach to the use of technetium coordination with particular emphasis on technetium (v) cores. Progress continues to be made in the application of targeted radionuclide therapy particularly in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of malignant bone disease. methods for labelling antibodies with a great variety of cytotoxic radionuclides have now been refined and their use for radioimmunotherapy in the treatment of haematological malignancies shows great promise. The major medical areas for application of these new radiopharmaceuticals will be in oncology, neurology and inflammation but the increasingly difficult regulatory climate in which drug development and health-care now operate will make it essential for researchers to direct their products toward specific clinical problems as well as biological targets. (author)

  10. Bifunctional chelating agent for the design and development of site specific radiopharmaceuticals and biomolecule conjugation strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katti, Kattesh V.; Prabhu, Kandikere R.; Gali, Hariprasad; Pillarsetty, Nagavara Kishore; Volkert, Wynn A.

    2003-10-21

    There is provided a method of labeling a biomolecule with a transition metal or radiometal in a site specific manner to produce a diagnostic or therapeutic pharmaceutical compound by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radio metal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. Also provided is a method of synthesizing the --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecules by synthesizing a P.sub.2 N.sub.2 -bifunctional chelating agent intermediate, complexing the intermediate with a radiometal or a transition metal, and covalently linking the resulting radio metal-complexed bifunctional chelating agent with a biomolecule in a site specific manner. There is provided a therapeutic or diagnostic agent comprising a --PR.sub.2 containing biomolecule.

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    In the period 1969-1986, this project was directed to the evolution of target-specific labeled chemicals useful for nuclear medical imaging, especially radioactive indicators suited to tracing adrenal functions and localizing tumors in the neuroendocrine system. Since 1986, this project research has focused on the chemistry of positron emission tomography (PET) ligands. This project has involved the evaluation of methods for radiochemical syntheses with fluorine-18, as well as the development and preliminary evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography. In the radiochemistry area, the ability to predict fluorine-18 labeling yields for aromatic substitution reactions through the use of carbon-13 NMR analysis was studied. Radiochemical yields can be predicted for some structurally analogous aromatic compounds, but this correlation could not be generally applied to aromatic substrates for this reaction, particularly with changes in ring substituents or leaving groups. Importantly, certain aryl ring substituents, particularly methyl groups, appeared to have a negative effect on fluorination reactions. These observations are important in the future design of syntheses of complicated organic radiopharmaceuticals. In the radiopharmaceutical area, this project has supported the development of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals based on the monoamine vesicular uptake systems. The new radioligands, based on the tetrabenazine structure, offer a new approach to the quantification of monoaminergic neurons in the brain. Preliminary primate imaging studies support further development of these radioligands for PET studies in humans. If successful, such radiopharmaceuticals will find application in studies of the causes and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson`s disease.

  12. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.

    1991-04-01

    Capillary electrophoresis is being evaluated as a separation technique for analyzing Tc and Re diphosphonate radiopharmaceuticals. Advantages compared with currently used HPLC techniques include greater resolving power, smaller sample size and more rapid separations. Feasibility has been demonstrated with electropherograms obtained on a Re-HEDP sample. The Tc-PAA complexes in a radiopharmaceutical mixture were found to be unaffected by injection into a Sprague Dawley rat. This was determined by HPLC analysis of the rat's urine, which contained the same complexes as were in the injected sample. Proton NMR spectra have been obtained for samples of Tc-MDP and Re-MDP in order to provide structural information about these complexes. An in vivo sensor is being developed for a brain perfusion agent. Polymer coatings are being explored to extract the brain perfusion agent in order to enhance sensitivity for a microelectrode-based sensor. 4 refs., 2 figs

  13. Radiochemistry in nuclear medicine. Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samochocka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals play a kay role in nuclear medicine, both in diagnostics and therapy. Incorporation of radionuclides into biomolecules, and syntheses of radiolabelled compounds of high biological selectivity are a task for radiochemists working in the multidisciplinary field of radiopharmaceutical chemistry. The most commonly used radionuclide, 99m Tc, owes this popularity to its both nearly ideal nuclear properties in respect to medical imaging, and availability from inexpensive radionuclide generators. Also numerous other radionuclides are widely used for medical imaging and therapy. Labelling of biomolecules with radioiodine and various positron emitters is getting increasingly important. This review describes some chemical and radiochemical problems we meet while synthesizing and using 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals and radioiodine-labelled biomolecules. Also represented are the recent developments in the design and use of the second generation radiopharmaceuticals based on bifunctional radiochelates. Several principal routes of fast chemical synthesis concerning incorporation of short-lived positron emitters into biomolecules are outlined as well. The search for chemical structures of high biological selectivity, which would be activated by slow neutrons, is related to the method of Neutron Capture Therapy, an interesting option in nuclear medicine. (author)

  14. Monoclonal antibodies to the pretargeting approach: Developments in the radiopharmaceuticals for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinol, M.

    2001-01-01

    In recent years, large experience has been accrued through the clinical application of radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis and therapy of malignant disorders. While radioimmunoscintigraphy has established its role in the nuclear medicine practice, radioimmunotherapy has thus far gained limited acceptance mainly due to the low amount of radioactivity that can be targeted to the tumour and to the myelotoxicity which is typically the dose limiting factor. In an attempt to overcome the low uptake of label by the tumour and improve the tumour-to-blood ratio, various studies have examined the concept of tumour pretargeting based on the separate protocols, especially the 3-step approach, with respect to the use of directly labelled antibodies, lies in the lower toxicity observed which has allowed to administer high doses of therapeutic radionuclides, such as Y-90, without bone marrow toxicity. Pilot studies, applied to the treatment of advanced stage tumours, have shown that this approach interferes with the progression of tumours and produce tumours regression in patients no longer responsive to other conventional therapeutic modalities. The potency of pretargeting based on the avidin/biotin system may be exploited in the near future to convey a variety of cytotoxic substances, other than radioactivity, onto cancer cells. (author)

  15. Uncertainty sources in radiopharmaceuticals clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degenhardt, Aemilie Louize; Oliveira, Silvia Maria Velasques de

    2014-01-01

    The radiopharmaceuticals should be approved for consumption by evaluating their quality, safety and efficacy. Clinical studies are designed to verify the pharmacodynamics, pharmacological and clinical effects in humans and are required for assuring safety and efficacy. The Bayesian analysis has been used for clinical studies effectiveness evaluation. This work aims to identify uncertainties associated with the process of production of the radionuclide and radiopharmaceutical labelling as well as the radiopharmaceutical administration and scintigraphy images acquisition and processing. For the development of clinical studies in the country, the metrological chain shall assure the traceability of the surveys performed in all phases. (author)

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    One of the diagnostic technique periodically used in Nuclear Medicine is the angiographic studi e, employee for detect cardiovascular diseases. The radiopharmaceutical more used in the angiographic ones is 99mTc. Between thetopics described in the present work it find: myocardial infarction, radiopharmaceuticals classification for cardiac studies, labelled proceedings, cardiovascular diseases

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals for therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lazarus, C.R.; Maisey, M.N.

    1985-01-01

    Several factors influencing the choice of radiopharmaceutical used in the treatment of benign and malignant disease are discussed. A brief review is given of the routine clinical uses of radiopharmaceuticals including treatments for hyperthyroidism, thyroid cancer, polycythaemia rubra vera and intracavitary therapy. Finally clinical situations using radionuclides under evaluation including the treatment of bone disease, adrenal tumours and monoclonal antibodies are discussed. (UK)

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and treatment of arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hosain, F.; Haddon, M.J.; Hosain, H.; Drost, J.K.; Spencer, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    A brief review is given of radiopharmaceuticals for the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis. Topics covered include the pathophysiology of arthritis and the basis for the use of radiotracers, diagnostic procedures and radiotracer applications and therapeutic approaches and radionuclide applications. (UK)

  19. Organic radiopharmaceuticals: recent advances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1979-01-01

    Organic radiopharmaceuticals are considered in light of accelerator and nuclide production requirements, special problems relating to the carrier-free state, including terminology, of the special technology required to prepare and manipulate these compounds and new trends in compound design and synthesis. The emphasis is on medical cyclotrons and the positron-emitting radionuclides, carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15, and fluorine-18. New routes to synthetic precursors and organic compounds of high specific activity labeled with carbon-11, fluorine-18, and iodine-123 including monosaccharides, aromatic amines, neuroleptics, fatty acids, steroids, and other classes of compounds are discussed. Some compounds are considered in terms of the development and evaluation of structure-activity relationships and including some newer concepts such as metabolic trapping. 67 references

  20. Radiopharmaceutical development based on human blood albumin microspheres and 90Y

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petriev, V M; Vlasova, O P; Postnov, A A; Epstein, N B

    2017-01-01

    New radiopharmaceutial (RP) based on human serum albumin microspheres (MSA) and 90 Y was developed for treatment of liver cancer. The optimized synthesis using chelation resulted in approximately 80% yield with high specific activity. The RP developed was tested in mice with inoculated sarcoma-37. In two weeks the tumor size reduced by 43% after the treatment with the dose of 500 μCi injected into the tumor site. (paper)

  1. Synthesis and formulation of 99m Tc-ECD radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo G, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty which uses radioactive compounds (radionuclides) for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. 99m Tc is the more common radionuclide used in many studies in nuclear medicine because its advantages: it has a photopeak of 140 KeV and a half-life of 6 hours; it can be eluted from a Molybdenum 99 generator, so radiopharmaceuticals can be prepared on site. Ethyl cysteine dimer (ECD) labelled with reduced Technetium 99m has been purposed recently as a promising radiopharmaceutical for brain perfusion imaging 99m Tc-ECD is a lipophilic neutral complex which cross the brain blood barrier and show high brain uptake. The objective of this work was synthesize and to design a freeze dried formulation for the instant preparation of 99m Tc-ECD complex useful for brain perfusion imaging. We obtained a freeze dried stable formulation for the preparation of 99m Tc-ECD kit with a radiochemical purity higher than 90 %, which fulfills with the quality control of radiopharmaceuticals. Furthermore, we developed analytic techniques for the determination of the different chemical compounds into the lyophilized kit. (Author)

  2. Development of a lyophilized formulation for preparing the radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20; Desarrollo de una formulacion liofilizada para la preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 177}-DOTA-Anti-CD20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano E, L. A.

    2015-07-01

    The radiolabeled proteins are molecules of interest in nuclear medicine for their diagnostic and therapeutic application in cancer. Antibodies, such as chimeric monoclonal antibody Anti-CD20 rituximab, have established themselves as suitable vectors of radionuclides (e.g. {sup 177}Lu) , introducing high affinity by the surface antigens over- expressed and widely distributed in cells involved in certain diseases. The aim of this work was to design, optimize and document the production process of radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 for sanitary registration request to the Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS). First, a raw material analysis using the Ft-Mir technique and gamma spectrometry was performed. Then, was carried out the development of the lyophilized formulation for the preparation of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20, in which an ANOVA was performed where the dependent variable was the radiochemical purity. The optimal pharmaceutical formulation was: 5 mg DOTA-CD20 and 80 mg Mannitol to be reconstituted with 1 m L of acetate buffer 0.25 M, ph 7, with an incubation time of 15 min at 37 degrees Celsius in a dry bath. Once completed the development of the lyophilized formulation, we proceeded to the optimization of the production process, development and validation of the analytical method. Three batches were prepared under protocols of Good Manufacturing Practice, which met pre-established specifications as sterile and endotoxin-free of bacterial formulations, with greater that 95% of radiochemical purity. Currently, is conducting the study of shelf stability. Upon completion of the stability studies, the legal record of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 will be integrated with documented evidence of the quality and stability of the formulation of this radiopharmaceutical. (Author)

  3. Development of a methodology for radionuclide impurity analysis in radiopharmaceuticals using gamma spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paula, Eduardo Bonfim de; Araujo, Miriam Taina Ferreira de; Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Poledna, Roberto; Lins, Ronaldo; Leiras, Anderson; Silva, Carlos Jose da; Oliveira, Antonio Eduardo de

    2016-01-01

    The LNMRI has sought to develop a methodology for the identification and accurate detection of gamma radiation impurities stations in metrological level, aiming to meet the recommendations not only of international pharmacopoeia, as well as the CNEN and ANVISA regarding the quality control can ensure patients the doses received by the practices are as low as feasible. As an initial target, it was possible to obtain an efficiency curve with uncertainty around 1% necessary to initiate future measurements of interest applied to nuclear medicine and to start the development of impurities analysis technique. (author)

  4. Investigation of radiopharmaceuticals from cyclotron produced radionuclides and development of mathematical models. Part of a coordinated programme on production of radiopharmaceuticals from accelerator-produced isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaus, I.

    1983-04-01

    Several radioisotopes for diagnostic uses in nuclear medicine studies are produced using the internal 15 MeV (30 MeV alphas) deuteron beam of the ''Ruder Boskovic'' Institute in Zagreb, Yugoslavia. Some of the most important radioisotopes produced during the last few years are: Gallium-67 (d, xn reaction on a Cu/Ni/Zn target) with yield of 7.6 MBq/uAh, 81 Rb-sup(81m)Kr generator (α, 2n reaction on a Cu/Cu 2 Br 2 target) with a yield of 99 MBq/uAh, Iodine-123 (α, 2n reaction on a Cu/Ag/Sb target) with a yield of 6.3 MBq/uAh, and Indium-111 (α, 2n reaction on a Cu/Cu/Ag target) with a yield of 7.2 MBq/uAh. In addition, a simple mathematical lung model for regional ventilation measurements was developed and used for ventilation studies on normal subjects and subjects with various lung diseases. Based on these studies, a more sophisticated and quantitative lung ventilation model for radioactive tracer tidal breathing was further developed. In this new model, the periodicity of breathing is completely taken into account, and it makes possible to actually determine lung ventilation and volume parameters. The model is experimentally verified on healthy subjects, and the value of the effective specific ventilation obtained is in agreement with comparable parameters in the literature. sup(81m)Kr from a generator was used to perform these experimental studies

  5. Radiopharmaceutical scanning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This invention is directed to dispersions useful in preparing radiopharmaceutical scanning agents, to technetium labelled dispersions, to methods for preparing such dispersions and to their use as scanning agents

  6. Preparation of radiopharmaceutical formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simon, J.; Garlich, J.R.; Frank, R.K.; McMillan, K.

    1998-01-01

    Radiopharmaceutical formulations for complexes comprising at least one radionuclide complexed with a ligand, or its physiologically-acceptable salts thereof, especially 153 samarium-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonic acid, which optionally contains a divalent metal ion, e.g. calcium, and is frozen, thawed, and then administered by injection. Alternatively, the radiopharmaceutical formulations must contain the divalent metal and are frozen only if the time before administration is sufficiently long to cause concern for radiolysis of the ligand. 2 figs., 9 tabs

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals for cerebral studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    For obtain good brain scintillation images in nuclear medicine must be used several radiopharmaceuticals. Cerebral studies give a tumors visual image as well as brain anomalities detection and are helpful in the diagnostic diseases . Are described in this work: a cerebrum radiopharmaceuticals classification,labelled compounds proceeding and Tc 99m good properties in for your fast caption, post administration and blood purification for renal way

  8. Tumor imaging using Tc(V)-99m dimercaptosuccinic acid, a newly developed radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohta, Hitoya; Endo, Keigo; Koizumi, Mitsuru

    1985-01-01

    Being aware of the ideal nuclear properties of Tc-99m, we have developed a new tumor seeking agent, Tc-99m (V) dimercaptosuccinic acid (Tc(V)-DMS). In order to evaluate its clinical usefulness of Tc(V)-DMS, 400 untreated patients with histologically proven diagnoses were studied, and, in some selected cases, the results were compared with those of Ga-67 citrate. The Tc(V)-DMS scintigraphy was found especially useful in patients with head and neck tumors, medullary thyroid carcinomas, soft tissue tumors and bone tumors. But in patients with lung tumors, liver tumors, malignant melanoma or malignant lymphomas, it revealed no obvious advantage over Ga-67 scintigraphy, the results seemed to the different uptake mechanism of Tc(V)-DMS from that of Ga-67 citrate. Nevertheless the superiority of physical properties of Tc-99m, pharmacological advantage that may enable satisfactory imaging, and lower supply cost, Tc(V)-DMS would certainly offer good clinical applicability in some regions. (author)

  9. Pig models on intestinal development and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lanmei; Yang, Huansheng; Li, Jianzhong; Li, Yali; Ding, Xueqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2017-12-01

    The gastrointestinal tract plays a vital role in nutrient supply, digestion, and absorption, and has a crucial impact on the entire organism. Much attention is being paid to utilize animal models to study the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases in response to intestinal development and health. The piglet has a body size similar to that of the human and is an omnivorous animal with comparable anatomy, nutritional requirements, and digestive and associated inflammatory processes, and displays similarities to the human intestinal microbial ecosystem, which make piglets more appropriate as an animal model for human than other non-primate animals. Therefore, the objective of this review is to summarize key attributes of the piglet model with which to study human intestinal development and intestinal health through probing into the etiology of several gastrointestinal diseases, thus providing a theoretical and hopefully practical, basis for further studies on mammalian nutrition, health, and disease, and therapeutics. Given the comparable nutritional requirements and strikingly similar brain developmental patterns between young piglets and humans, the piglet has been used as an important translational model for studying neurodevelopmental outcomes influenced by pediatric nutrition. Because of similarities in anatomy and physiology between pigs and mankind, more emphasises are put on how to use the piglet model for human organ transplantation research.

  10. Radiation dose estimates for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stabin, M.G.; Stubbs, J.B.; Toohey, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    Tables of radiation dose estimates based on the Cristy-Eckerman adult male phantom are provided for a number of radiopharmaceuticals commonly used in nuclear medicine. Radiation dose estimates are listed for all major source organs, and several other organs of interest. The dose estimates were calculated using the MIRD Technique as implemented in the MIRDOSE3 computer code, developed by the Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Radiation Internal Dose Information Center. In this code, residence times for source organs are used with decay data from the MIRD Radionuclide Data and Decay Schemes to produce estimates of radiation dose to organs of standardized phantoms representing individuals of different ages. The adult male phantom of the Cristy-Eckerman phantom series is different from the MIRD 5, or Reference Man phantom in several aspects, the most important of which is the difference in the masses and absorbed fractions for the active (red) marrow. The absorbed fractions for flow energy photons striking the marrow are also different. Other minor differences exist, but are not likely to significantly affect dose estimates calculated with the two phantoms. Assumptions which support each of the dose estimates appears at the bottom of the table of estimates for a given radiopharmaceutical. In most cases, the model kinetics or organ residence times are explicitly given. The results presented here can easily be extended to include other radiopharmaceuticals or phantoms

  11. Implementation of the Good Practices of Manufacture of PET Radiopharmaceuticals in INOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinconegui Gómez, Belkys; Quesada Cepero, Waldo; González González, Joaquín J.; Calderón Marín, Carlos F.; Varela Corona, Consuelo; Figueroa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The growing advance of new technologies in Nuclear Medicine such as positron emission tomography (PET) allows visualizing biological processes in vivo and provides more sensitive results in the diagnosis of oncological processes in asymptomatic stages of the disease and contribute significantly to improve cancer management. It is significant to note that these technologies include radiopharmaceuticals marked with 90 Y and 177 Lu for the therapy of patients already diagnosed by the PET technique that contribute to a significant improvement in the quality of life of patients with cancer. Our country, taking into account the importance of this technology for Health, has developed in INOR a project for the obtaining, dispensing and quality control of PET radiopharmaceuticals marked with 68 Ga for diagnosis and its therapeutic analogues marked with 177 Lu and 90Y in Conditions of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). The objective of the present work is to present our experiences in the implementation of the Good Practices of Manufacture of PET Radiopharmaceuticals according to regulation 16-2012 GUIDELINES ON GOOD PRACTICES OF MANUFACTURE OF PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS, issued by the State Control Center for Medicines, Equipment and Devices Doctors (CECMED), a Cuban regulatory body. The implementation of the regulation considers from the preparation of personnel involved in the activity, moving through the facilities and equipment to the validation and quality control. A system for the quality assurance of the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals was implemented in accordance with Annex 5 of Regulation 16-2012 of the CECMED. This is the first experience in Cuba of the implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices of PET Radiopharmaceuticals in Hospital Radiopharmacy. The acquired experiences will be extended to the practices for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for the conventional Nuclear Medicine in the INOR.

  12. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  13. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

  14. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the oxygen

  15. Breast feeding's interruption following radiopharmaceutical administration to nursing mothers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.M.; Gomez Parada, I.M.; Dubner, D.; Gisone, P.; Perez de Serrano, M.

    1995-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration to lactating women for therapeutic or diagnostic purpose can achieve a radiological risk to the breast feeding child due to levels of radioactivity in the breast milk. International recommendations regarding safe assumption of nursing mother after radiopharmaceutical administration were analysed. We examined the formula proposed by Rommey et al. to establish objective guidelines in case of the administration of radiopharmaceutical to nursing mothers. The ICRP 54 metabolic model for iodine was modified in order to calculate the suppression breast feeding's period according to the radioactivity measured in the breast milk. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  16. Preliminary studies of EDDA-tricine-HYNIC-[Tyr3]octreotide labelled with Technetium-99m: radiopharmaceutical development for the diagnostic of neuroendocrine tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melero, Laura T.U.H.; Muramoto, Emiko; Arauho, Elaine Bortoleti de

    2007-01-01

    The use of labelled molecules with high specificity for an organ or receptor in scintigraphy, generate good local images of these specific receptors that are expressed for the biomolecule in question, minimizing the exposition of other organs. Small labelled peptides have showed a big potential for tumors image and other diseases in nuclear medicine. The octreotide was the first somatostatin synthetic analog introduced in clinical use in the localization of tumours with superexpression of somatostatin receptors which is a hundred times over in tumors cells that in normal cells. It did many attempts to development of a somatostatin analog labelled with 99mTc utilizing a variety of chelant systems until development the HYNIC-D-Phe1-Tyr3-octreotide, using tricine and EDDA as coligands, showing maintenance of in vivo affinity and promising of biodistribution in animals with induced tumours. This work involved the development of a 99mTc (technetium-99m) radiopharmaceutical based in a somatostatin peptide derivative (Tyr3-octreotide, TOC), with HYNIC chelating group, to be applied in the diagnostic of neuroendocrine tumors in nuclear medicine. Quality control methodologies to be applied in determination of the radiochemical purity of the labelled compound was also studied as well the biodistribution in normal Swiss mouse. The 99mTc-HYNIC-TOC was obtained in high radiochemical yield. Biodistribution studies suggests the potential of this radiopharmaceutical in the diagnostic of neuroendocrine tumours. (author)

  17. Development of a lyophilized formulation for preparing the radiopharmaceutical 68Ga-DOTA-Nal3-Octreotide for the diagnosis of tumors of neuroendocrine origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzo L, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to develop a radiopharmaceutical consisting of an emitter positrons radionuclide ( 68 Ga) which is used in imaging by positron emission tomography; and a peptide capable of binding to somatostatin receptors subtypes 2, 3 and 5; which together serve as a diagnostic support of tumors of neuroendocrine origin. The peptide characterization DOTA-1-Naphthylalanine 3 -Octreotide (DOTA-NOC) by infrared spectroscopy technique by Fourier transform was performed, in which the principal functional groups belonging to this molecule were identified as well as its identification by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Subsequently, a variance analysis taking into account three different levels of amounts of sodium acetate, and three different levels of amounts of the peptide was performed. These masses were subjected to lyophilization for a period of 21 h; after completion of lyophilization, were labeled with 2 m L of 68 GaCl 3 eluates of a 68 Ge/ 68 Ga ITG generator to determine the percentage of radiochemical purity of the different formulations. It was observed that the ideal formulation must contain 75 μg of peptide and 14 mg of NaOAc, according to studies, was determined that the amount of peptide does not influence the response of radiochemical purity in the same way that the amount of added sodium acetate, which produces different effects on the dependent variable. Finally the radiopharmaceutical formulation was obtained with greater than 95% of radiochemical purity. The validation of the analytical method was performed describing the system accuracy and linearity, specificity and accuracy; linearity and precision of the method, taking into account acceptance criteria based on the guidance of validation of analytical methods published by the National Association of Pharmacists Chemical Biologists of Mexico, A. C.; the parameters evaluated met the specifications given by the guide validation of analytical methods. Uptake and internalization tests of the

  18. Cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopicka, K.; Fiser, M.; Hradilek, P.; Hanc, P.; Lebeda, O.

    2003-01-01

    Some of the cyclotron-produced radionuclides may serve as important materials for the production of radiopharmaceuticals. This lecture deals with basic information relating to various aspects of these compounds. In comparison with radionuclides /compounds used for non-medical purposes, radiopharmaceuticals are subject to a broader scale of regulations, both from the safety and efficacy point of view; besides that, there are both radioactive and medical aspects that must be taken into account for any radiopharmaceutical. According to the regulations and in compliance with general rules of work with radioactivity, radiopharmaceuticals should only be prepared/manufactured under special conditions, using special areas and special equipment and applying special procedures (e.g. sterilisation, disinfection, aseptic work). Also, there are special procedures for cleaning and maintenance. Sometimes the requirements for the product safety clash with those for the safety of the personnel; several examples of solutions pertaining to these cases are given in the lecture. Also, the specific role of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals is discussed. (author)

  19. Quality control of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1981-01-01

    Quality assurance was introduced in the pharmaceutical field long before it was used in many other areas, and the term quality control has been used in a much broader sense than merely analytical quality control. The term Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) has been used to describe the system used for producing safe and effective drugs of a uniform quality. GMP has also been used for the industrial production of radiopharmaceuticals. For the preparation and control of radiopharmaceuticals in hospitals a similar system has been named Good Radiopharmacy Practice (GRP). It contains the same elements as GMP but takes into account the special nature of this group of drugs. Data on the assessment of the quality of radiopharmaceuticals in relation to present standards are reviewed. The general conclusion is that the quality of radiopharmaceuticals appears comparable to that of other drugs. It seems possible to establish the production of radiopharmaceuticals, generators and preparation kits in such a way that analytical control of the final product at the hospital may be limited provided the final preparation work is carried out in accordance with GRP principles. The elements of GRP are reviewed. (author)

  20. New blood flow radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sargent, T. III; Shulgin, A.T.; Mathis, C.A.; Budinger, T.F.

    1983-01-01

    Our program for research into the causes of mental disorders such as schizophrenia, manic depressive illness and senile dementia has led us to the development of a new radiopharmaceutical agent, IDNNA (4-iodo-2,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethylamphetamine). A series of some 15 different 131 I labeled molecules with various substitutions on the amine were synthesized and tested, and the uptake of the 131 I labeled conpounds in rats was measured. The dimethyl amine (IDNNA) had the best brain uptake and brain/blood ratio. When injected into a dog and scanned with a whole-body scanner, the uptake in the brain could be clearly seen and quantified. Plasma sampling at the same time showed that the maximum brain/blood ratio of 8.7 occurred at 8 min after injection, and the concentration in brain remained high for at least 15 min. Labeling is achieved by reacting 131 ICl and the precursor, 2,5-dimethoxy-N,N-dimethyl amphetamine, in glacial acetic acid; the reaction is complete in less than one minute

  1. Click synthesis of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Mei; Kuang Chunxiang

    2009-01-01

    Increasing attention has been focused on synthesis radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography (PET). The recent years witnessed applications of click chemistry to PET radiopharmaceutical synthesis,because of its distinctive advantages including high speed,yield and stereospecificity under mild conditions. Synthesis of 18 F-labeled and 11 C-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and intermediates via click chemistry are reviewed. The future trend of click chemistry for the synthesis of PET radiopharmaceutical is prospected. (authors)

  2. Radiopharmacy and radiopharmaceutical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galy, Gerard; Fraysse, Marc; Hammadi, Akli; Tafani, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    Written by two radio-pharmacist doctors, this book presents all the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary to radio-pharmacists in charge of the management, the preparation, the control and the delivery of radiopharmaceutical medicines. It presents the scientific, regulatory and technical foundations for the implementation and operation of radiopharmacy in hospitals, addressing themes such as the fundamentals and theories about nuclear physics and radioactivity (production of artificial radionuclides, detectors and measuring instruments, radio-chemistry), radio-biology and radiation protection (biological effects of ionizing radiations, radioprotection, regulations concerning the use of radiopharmaceutical products by medical personnel), the application domains of radiopharmaceutical medicines and products (diagnosis, therapy, biological assessment), and the management of radiopharmacy in a hospital (design, implementation, organizing, operation)

  3. Quality assurance of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frier, M.; Hesslewood, S.R.

    1980-01-01

    A practical guide has been composed for all persons involved in the preparation and use of radiopharmaceuticals on methods used in quality assurance and their applications. These methods include the calibration of ionization chamber assay calibrators, the determination of radionuclide purity, radiochemical purity and chemical purity, particle size analysis and the measurement of pH. Quality assurance procedures are described for products not described in Compendial Monographs, or where the monograph exists, additional useful information is provided; such radiopharmaceuticals include technetium, indium-labelled and iodine-labelled products. (U.K.)

  4. Audits of radiopharmaceutical formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castronovo, F.P. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for auditing radiopharmaceutical formulations is described. To meet FDA guidelines regarding the quality of radiopharmaceuticals, institutional radioactive drug research committees perform audits when such drugs are formulated away from an institutional pharmacy. All principal investigators who formulate drugs outside institutional pharmacies must pass these audits before they can obtain a radiopharmaceutical investigation permit. The audit team meets with the individual who performs the formulation at the site of drug preparation to verify that drug formulations meet identity, strength, quality, and purity standards; are uniform and reproducible; and are sterile and pyrogen free. This team must contain an expert knowledgeable in the preparation of radioactive drugs; a radiopharmacist is the most qualified person for this role. Problems that have been identified by audits include lack of sterility and apyrogenicity testing, formulations that are open to the laboratory environment, failure to use pharmaceutical-grade chemicals, inadequate quality control methods or records, inadequate training of the person preparing the drug, and improper unit dose preparation. Investigational radiopharmaceutical formulations, including nonradiolabeled drugs, must be audited before they are administered to humans. A properly trained pharmacist should be a member of the audit team

  5. Drug interactions with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hesslewood, S.; Leung, E.

    1994-01-01

    Considerable information on documented drug and radiopharmaceutical interactions has been assembled in a tabular form, classified by the type of nuclear medicine study. The aim is to provide a rapid reference for nuclear medicine staff to look for such interactions. The initiation of drug chart monitoring or drug history taking of nuclear medicine patients and the reporting of such events are encouraged. (orig.)

  6. F-18 Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-12-01

    This document includes 8 presentations delivered at the symposium. The topics discussed include: optimization of accelerator production of 18 F- and 18 F 2 -fluorodeoxyglucose; radiopharmaceuticals synthesis, synthesis modules, pharmacopoeia and GLP; quality control; radiation safety of production and application; PET imaging in human medicine. Each presentation has been indexed separately

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals for renal studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdera, Silvia

    1994-01-01

    Between the diagnostic techniques using radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine it find renal studies.A brief description about renal glomerular filtration(GFR) and reliability renal plasma flux (ERPF),renal blood flux measurement agents (RBF),renal scintillation agents and radiation dose estimates by organ physiology was given in this study.tabs

  8. Quality control of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdera, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The quality control of radiopharmaceuticals is based in physics, physics-chemical and biological controls. Between the different controls can be enumerated the following: visual aspect,side, number of particle beams,activity,purity,ph,isotonicity,sterility,radioinmunoessay,toxicity,stability and clinical essay

  9. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.; Fairchild, R.G.; Watts, K.P.; Greenberg, D.; Hannon, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals for thrombus detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knight, L.C.

    1990-01-01

    Most of the components of the thrombotic and fibrinolytic systems have at some time been evaluated as a means of carrying a radiolabel specifically to thrombi, although very few have been promising enough to emerge from investigational status to routine clinical use. New approaches are being explored, including improved methods of labeling platelets, chemically modified forms of previously tested plasma proteins, and new biomolecules, including monoclonal antibodies specific for fibrin and platelets. The current goal is to find one or more radiotracers that bind specifically and rapidly to thrombi, and that also have a rapid blood disappearance rate, permitting a clear diagnosis within a few hours after injection. Because this test may be needed to assess the course of therapy in an anticoagulated patient, the ideal radiopharmaceutical should be able to locate thrombi without interference by anticoagulants. Until a suitable thrombus-specific radiopharmaceutical becomes generally available, many hospitals will continue to attempt to make a diagnosis with nonspecific radiopharmaceuticals that can at best provide blood pool images to indicate filling defects. Several of the new approaches seem likely to provide the radiopharmaceutical sought, although clinical trials are at an early stage.137 references

  11. Process for preparing radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barak, M.; Winchell, H.S.

    1977-01-01

    A process for the preparation of technetium-99m labeled pharmaceuticals is disclosed. The process comprises initially isolating technetium-99m pertechnetate by adsorption upon an adsorbent packing in a chromatographic column. The technetium-99m is then eluted from the packing with a biological compound to form a radiopharmaceutical

  12. Pain palliative Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B. M.

    1994-01-01

    A pain relieving agents based on β emitters mainly and in some cases a complex preparation are being given for bone metastasis in relation with breast,prostate and lung carcinoma with good performance in clinical practice.Several radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals are mentioned giving strength to those newly proposed, 153Sm and 186Re.Bibliography

  13. 18F based radiopharmaceuticals and automation of synthesis. New 18F radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garg, P.K.; Garg, S.

    2007-01-01

    Fluorine-18 is one of the most commonly used positron emitting isotopes for clinical and research needs with a physical half-life of 110 min. PET isotopes deposit higher radiation absorbed dose than nuclear medicine isotopes. Because of their relatively short half-life, larger quantities of these isotopes are used at the start of synthesis. Therefore, increased shielding and remote automated synthesis are essential for their safe handling. Unlike other radiopharmaceuticals, it is not practical to produce PET radiopharmaceuticals at a central location for subsequent distribution to clinical and research facilities around the country. This limitation compels various academic and research facilities to manufacture their own PET radiopharmaceuticals for in-house use. For multiple reasons, 18 F fluorodeoxyglucose ([ 18 F]FDG) is one of the most commonly used radiopharmaceuticals. The synthesis of [ 18 F]FDG has been optimized and automated, thus allowing independent laboratories to produce this radiopharmaceutical safely. Nonetheless, these laboratories should acquire resources and expertise to fulfil ever increasing regulatory requirements for the safe production and usage of PET radiopharmaceuticals. In addition to [ 18 F]FDG, a wide array of new and novel radiotracers is being developed to explore various biological processes. This paper emphasizes the fact that it is possible to accomplish research and fulfil clinical needs within an academic setting with modest resources. A careful assessment of the need for due diligence in radiation safety issues is very important for the longevity of any PET research endeavour. (author)

  14. Development of kits for 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals for infection imaging. Report of a co-ordinated research project 2000-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    Infectious diseases remain a major health problem and cause of death worldwide, particularly in developing countries. Nuclear medicine imaging, because of its sensitivity, offers an attractive option for diagnosis of focal infections. This needs a reliable radiopharmaceutical that can selectively concentrate in sites of infection. Over the years 67 Ga and other radiopharmaceuticals that localize in inflammation associated with infection sites, also known as 'non-specific agents' have been used for infection imaging. However, experience has shown that an 'infection specific agent' that concentrates selectively at sites of infection and not inflammation would have several advantages. The first such agent developed more than two decades ago was 111 In-leucocytes which is still considered a 'gold standard'. Considerations of cost, availability, and superior properties for imaging make 99 mTc a better label than 111 In. 99 mTc white blood cell (WBC) was developed subsequently and used for infection imaging. However, both 111 In and 99 mTc WBCs have a number of drawbacks, in particular: each patient's blood sample has to be collected and individually radiolabelled; well-trained staff and suitable facilities for separating and labelling the patient's blood are needed; the risk of infection and cross-contamination associated with potential blood-borne microorganisms; and cost of materials. Because of these, considerable efforts have been continuously made towards developing convenient replacements for 99 mTc WBCs with limited success, 99 mTc antigranulocyte antibody being a good example. However, these radiopharmaceuticals still have many disadvantages, related to either their cost and availability or their performance. In view of the large potential for applications in patients, the development of new and improved 99 mTc labelled infection specific imaging agents was considered as a very worthwhile aim for scientific research in general and, in particular, for the

  15. Use of radiopharmaceuticals for treating bone metastases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alberti Ramírez, Alejandro; Morín Zorrilla, José; Cruz Arencibia, Jorge

    2016-01-01

    Cancer prevalence is estimated at around 2% of the population and on average between 64-80% of patients with solid tumors develop bone metastases, being breast tumors, lung and prostate those who do more frequency. In this paper an estimate of the prevalence of bone pain from metastases, with reference to the data reported in the literature is presented. the different treatment techniques are summarized for pain management with special emphasis on Radionuclidic therapy, analyzing the different factors to consider for the selection of suitable radiopharmaceutical. cost data and cost-benefit of some radiopharmaceuticals for the purpose to take into account during their selection are provided. It is concluded that although the treatment of metastatic bone disease requires multidisciplinary therapies, Radionuclidic therapy is not sufficiently used, particularly by inadequate perception of risks and costs of radiopharmaceuticals, despite the undeniable support of its efficacy and tolerability. (author)

  16. The safe and effective use of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, N.G.

    1982-01-01

    In the medical applications of radionuclides, we have to arrange effective radiation protection of patients, staff and general public, maintain high standards of pharmaceutical safety and ensure that the radiopharmaceuticals are effective in use. The influence of the 1976 Council of the European Communities Euratom Directive in producing legislation in the United Kingdom controlling medical work with radioactivity is discussed. Attention is drawn to current studies in the dosimetry of radiopharmaceuticals, and some of the problems that continue to arise in evaluating the dosimetry and possible hazards of isotopes of iodine are discussed. Developments in facilities for preparing radiopharmaceuticals in hospital laboratories are considered and a short report is given of an extensive study of quality control procedures which showed that it was difficult to justify their use as a routine on established products. (Author)

  17. Radiopharmaceutical prescription in nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biechlin-Chassel, M.L.; Lao, S.; Bolot, C.; Francois-Joubert, A.

    2010-01-01

    In France, radiopharmaceutical prescription is often discussed depending to which juridical structure the nuclear medicine department is belonging. According to current regulation, this prescription is an obligation in a department linked to hospital with a pharmacy department inside. But situation remains unclear for independent nuclear medicine departments where physicians are not constrained to prescribe radiopharmaceuticals. However, as radiographers and nurses are only authorized to realize theirs acts in front of a medical prescription, one prescription must be realized. Nowadays, computerized prescription tools have been developed but only for radiopharmaceutical drugs and not for medical acts. In the aim to achieve a safer patient care, the prescription regulation may be applied whatever differences between nuclear medicines departments. (authors)

  18. Development of more efficacious Tc-99, organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures: Progress report for period September 1, 1987-August 31, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.

    1988-04-01

    The long-range objective of this research is the development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. These objectives are being met by the development of analytical techniques which are capable of separating radiopharmaceutical mixtures into their component technetium complexes for subsequent evaluation. Three areas have been investigated during the second year of this project. (1) A chromatographic procedure has been developed for the separation of technetium dicarboxypropane diphosphonate (DPD) complexes. Tc-DPD complexes have been isolated from radiopharmaceutical preparations. The concentration of each complex in the preparation varies significantly depending on the pH of the preparation, the concentration of technetium, the presence or absence of oxygen, and the time interval after preparation. A single Tc-DPD complex has been isolated which shows good skeletal uptake and rapid soft tissue clearance. (2) An HPLC procedure for analyzing urine for Tc-Diphosphonate complexes has been developed. A Tc-HEDP complexd injected into a dog was found to concentrate rapidly in the bladder in the same chemical form. (3) An HPLC technique for the determination of /sup 99m/TcO 4 - in disphosphonate radiopharmaceuticals and biological samples has been developed. 15 refs., 2 figs

  19. Development and radiotherapeutic application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Zalutsky, M.; Bloomer, W.

    1981-01-01

    This project is concerned with developing the potential of alpha-emitting radionuclides as agents for radiotherapy. Alpha-emitters seem ideally suited for his application because their high linear energy transfer and short range permit the deposition of considerable energy in a very small volume of tissue. Unlike the beta particles of 131 I which have a range of about 1 to 2 mm in tissue, 5 to 7 MeV alpha particles would traverse only a few cell diameters. Among the available alpha-emitters, 211 At appears most promising for therapeutic applications because, (1) it has some chemical similarities to iodine, an element that can readily be incorporated into numerous proteins and peptides, (2) it has a half-life that is long enough to permit chemical manipulation yet short enough to minimize destruction of healthy cells due to degradation of the label over time, (3) it can be produced conveniently using a cyclotron, and (4) alpha emission is associated with 100% of its decays with no accompanying beta emission. In the past year the evaluation of an astatine-tellurium colloid as an agent for the destruction of malignant ascites has been completed. The therapeutic efficacy of 211 At-tellurium colloid has been compared with that of several beta-emitting radiocolloids. Studies on the application of monoclonal antibodies as carriers for selective delineation and destruction of malignant cell populations have also been initiated

  20. Development and radiotherapeutic application of /sup 211/At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Zalutsky, M.; Bloomer, W.

    1981-01-01

    This project is concerned with developing the potential of alpha-emitting radionuclides as agents for radiotherapy. Alpha-emitters seem ideally suited for his application because their high linear energy transfer and short range permit the deposition of considerable energy in a very small volume of tissue. Unlike the beta particles of /sup 131/I which have a range of about 1 to 2 mm in tissue, 5 to 7 MeV alpha particles would traverse only a few cell diameters. Among the available alpha-emitters, /sup 211/At appears most promising for therapeutic applications because, (1) it has some chemical similarities to iodine, an element that can readily be incorporated into numerous proteins and peptides, (2) it has a half-life that is long enough to permit chemical manipulation yet short enough to minimize destruction of healthy cells due to degradation of the label over time, (3) it can be produced conveniently using a cyclotron, and (4) alpha emission is associated with 100% of its decays with no accompanying beta emission. In the past year the evaluation of an astatine-tellurium colloid as an agent for the destruction of malignant ascites has been completed. The therapeutic efficacy of /sup 211/At-tellurium colloid has been compared with that of several beta-emitting radiocolloids. Studies on the application of monoclonal antibodies as carriers for selective delineation and destruction of malignant cell populations have also been initiated.

  1. Development of a lyophilized formulation for the preparation of radiopharmaceutical {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} for the diagnosis of breast cancer tumors; Desarrollo de una formulacion liofilizada para la preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} para el diagnostico de tumores de cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terron A, E. J.

    2015-07-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals of third generation by its design that includes peptides capable of selectively directing the radiation to a specific molecular target are useful in molecular medicine for obtaining molecular images that allow recording in vivo phenomena temporal-space of molecular or cellular processes, with diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Generally, peptides that recognize cellular receptors that are over-expressed in cancer cells of interest are used; such is the case of RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) a tri-peptide sequence which recognizes to the membrane receptors α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) that are involved in metastasis and angiogenic processes as well as in tumor cells of breast glioma. The high affinity and selectivity of RGD peptide with integrin s α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) is the basis for designing radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic of breast cancer and the metastasis and angiogenic processes. In this paper a useful lyophilized formulation was development for obtaining {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} radiopharmaceutical that for its effectiveness, stability and security can be used in humans. The production process of core-equipment DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK]{sub 2}/Buffer sodium acetate 1.0 M was optimized, and the formulation was transferred to the radiopharmaceuticals production plant of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). The optimized formulation of the core-equipment for the {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} radiopharmaceutical preparation is: DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} peptide - 75 μg; Mannitol - 50 mg; Sodium acetate - 14 mg; Sodium acetate buffer 1.0 M ph 4.3 - 0.5 m L. The production process was validated and stability studies were carried out to the validation batches in compliance with the validation master plan of the ININ and in adherence to compliance of the applicable national and international regulations. Also the legal dossier was drawn up in order to make the application of sanitary registration

  2. KAERI's challenge to steady production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, J.H.; Han, H.S.; Park, K.B.

    2000-01-01

    The Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) is a national organization in Korea, and has been doing many research and development works in radioisotope production and applications for more than 30 years. Now KAERI regularly produces radioisotopes (I-131, Tc-99m, Ho-166) for medical use and Ir-192 for industrial use. Various I-131 labeled compounds and more than 10 kinds of Tc-99m cold kits are also produced. Our multi-purpose reactor, named HANARO, has been operative since April of 1995. HANAKO is an open tank type reactor with 30 MW thermal capacity. This reactor was designed not only for research on neutron utilization but for production of radioisotopes. KAERI intended to maximize the radioisotope production capability. For this purpose, radioisotope production facilities (RIPF) have been constructed adjacent to the HANARO reactor building. There are four banks of hot cells equipped with manipulators and some of the hot cells were installed according to the KGMP standards and with clean rooms. In reviewing our RI production plan intensively, emphasis was placed on the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, development of new radiation sources for industrial and therapeutic use, and steady production of selected radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. The selected items are Ho-166 based pharmaceuticals, fission Mo-99/Tc-99m generators. solution and capsules of I-131, and Ir-192 and Co-60 for industrial use. The status and future plan of KAERI's research and development program will be introduced, and will highlight programs for steady production. (author)

  3. Production of radiopharmaceuticals by cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmitz, F.; Van Naemen, J.; Monclus, M.; Van Gansbeke, B.; Kadiata, M.; Ekelmans, D.; Moray, M.; Penninckx, R.; Goldman, S.

    2004-01-01

    Companies specialized in the development and installation of accelerator-based systems dedicated to the medical applications brought on the market cyclotrons well fitted to the requests of the industrial community or universities and so covering every segment of the market. These machines are fully automatic, and need reduced maintenance; they are highly specialized for defined tasks. They can produce high beam intensity and realize dual beam irradiation. Also the prices are reducing considerably. The targets and the automatic system follow the same trend. Unfortunately, the flexibility of these devices for new area of research and development has been dramatically reduced. The growing number of PET cameras has increased the popularity of PET tracers used for nuclear imaging. Consequently, there is a growing demand for these radiopharmaceuticals compounds labeled with short-lived radioisotopes for clinical applications. From a research and development tool in the eighties, PET has now grown up to a clinical tool. Moreover, depending of the social welfare, reimbursement of some PET examinations is granted, which accelerates the trend for an extended use of PET tracers. Regulatory affairs try to establish and standardize the control on these radiopharmaceutical compounds produced in a growing number of local radio pharmacies owning a baby cyclotron. On the other hand, the attention of equipment suppliers was brought in the setting up of a total quality control follow up. These efforts were successively achieved by getting for instance the ISO 9001 certificate

  4. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures: Progress report for period September 1, 1986-August 31, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.

    1987-06-01

    The long-range objective of this research is the development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. The author developed analytical techniques that are capable of separating radiopharmaceutical mixtures into their component technetium complexes for subsequent evaluation. During this one-year period, a chromatographic procedure has been developed for the separation of technetium phosphonoacetic acid (PAA) complexes and five Tc-PAA complexes have been isolated from radiopharmaceutical preparations. The concentration of each complex in the preparation varies significantly depending on the pH of the preparation. Radiopharmaceutical preparations based on the ligand methylene diphosphonate (MDP) have been prepared by electrochemical reduction of TcO 4 - . The yields of different Tc-MDP complexes are affected by the potential applied to the electrochemical cell. The control of both potential and pH enables a specific Tc-MDP complex to be produced in purer form and higher yield than by chemical reduction. An EXAFS spectrum of a solution of chromatographically isolated Tc-HEDP (hydroxyethylidine diphosphonate) complex shows evidence for a Tc-Tc bond, which is supportive of the postulated oligomeric/polymeric nature of these complexes. 9 refs., 4 figs

  5. Radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals catalogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) presents its radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals 2002 catalogue. In it we found physical characteristics of 9 different reactor produced radioisotopes ( Tc-99m, I-131, Sm-153, Ir-192, P-32, Na-24, K-42, Cu-64, Rb-86 ), 7 radiopharmaceuticals ( MDP, DTPA, DMSA, Disida, Phitate, S-Coloid, Red Blood Cells In-Vivo, Red Blood Cells In-Vitro) and 4 labelled compounds ( DMSA-Tc99m, DTPA-Tc99m, MIBG-I131, EDTMP-Sm153 ). In the near future the number of items will be increased with new reactor and cyclotron products. Our production system will be certified by ISO 9000 on March 2003. CCHEN is interested in being a national and an international supplier of these products (RS)

  6. Good radiopharmaceuticals practices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdera E, Silvia

    1994-01-01

    A careful security must be used in the nuclear medicine laboratory concerning to the proceedings, preparation and dispensation of radiopharmaceuticals. Each control laboratory must look after the radiation protection patients,workers and people in general. Between another routinary activities in the present work it find : equipment prearrangement,installations,handling and support of electronic instruments,proceedings,methodology, results and interpretation of analysis , as well as registry maintenance

  7. Safety and efficacy of radiopharmaceuticals 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.; Norbygaard, E.

    1987-01-01

    In this text aspects of the development of new radiopharmaceuticals are reviewed with particular reference to products of biological origin such as monoclonal antibodies and human cells. Also included in this survey are the legal aspects of the introduction of new pharmaceuticals and good radiopharmacy practice

  8. Supply of radiopharmaceuticals in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Genka, Tsuguo

    2006-01-01

    Detailed statistics of the application of radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine in Japan are summarized. They are the amount of supply in terms of monetary value and radioactivity, categorized usages of in vivo and in vitro, number of facilities using the radiopharmaceuticals for the time span of 5 years (1998-2002). Obvious tendency of decrease for in vitro use can be seen while the total amount of radiopharmaceuticals is almost unchanged. (author)

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals production activities in Egypt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raieh, M.

    1998-01-01

    Applications of radiopharmaceuticals and labelled compounds in the field of nuclear medicine in Egypt have increased so rapidly in the last few years. At present, a large number of hospitals are utilizing these radioisotopic techniques for both diagnosis and treatment. The following production activities are taking place in the Egyptian Radioisotope Production laboratories. By utilizing the research reactor a large number of radioisotopes which find wide applications in nuclear medicine were produced, such as iodine-131, phosphorus-32, sodium-24, potassium-42 and molybdenum-99 / technetium-99m generators. Gallium-67, indium-111 and iodine-123 will be produced locally after installation of the cyclotron at the end of 1998. A large number of Tc-99m based kits for diagnostic medical applications have been produced. Also, many radiopharmaceuticals labelled with iodine-131 were produced. The radioisotope production laboratory is able to supply many hospitals with the radioimmunoassay kits of the thyroid related hormones (T4, T3 and TSH). Research and development activities are taking place in the field of monoclonal antibodies and tumor markers with special consideration of AFP, CEA, PSA and βhCG. (author)

  10. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.; Watson, E.E.

    1986-04-01

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, H.

    1985-01-01

    During the last years, since short physical mean life radionuclides have started to be used, radionuclide scanning has been experienced with remarkable culmination. There are detector devices, which jointly with computation equipments, allow to obtain multiple images per second as properly rapid gammagraphic series, in order to obtain whole hemodynamic data or to generate functional images no representing an anatomical structure but reporting about cardiac dynamics at regional level. In these techniques, employed in Nuclear Cardiology, the following radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals are used: radiolabeled albumin 99m Tc red blood cells, 113m In-transferrin, very short physical mean life radionuclides, such as 195m Au, 178 Ta, 191 Ir. In addition, 113 Xe for coronary flow measurements; radiolabeled microspheres and macroparticles for angiogammagraphy; 129 Cs, 43 K, 81 Rb, 82 Rb and 201 Ti, the most largerly used, for myocardial gammagraphy. It is pointed out that fatty acids are the newest, basically if are radioiodate, and some 99m Tc labeled long chain hydrocarbons. It is expressed that 99m Tc-Sn-pyrophosphate has been used for myocardial infarction. Working on the development of new radiopharmaceuticals, basically fatty acids and 99m Tc chelating agents, for the improvement of these techniques is carried out. (author)

  12. Automation of cells of radiopharmaceuticals production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrini, Aguinaldo Donizete

    2010-01-01

    The 67 Ga is an important radiopharmaceutical used to identify inflammatory processes in chronic illnesses, diagnosis by image of tumors in soft tissues and the possibility to evaluate the result for therapeutic intervention. In the present work a module of 67 Ga processing was developed with the objective to reduce the interventions in the hot cell, in order to avoid oxidation caused by metallic materials, and consuming in hoses of the peristaltic pumps, that release residues that blocked the valves used in the process. With materials such as: acrylic, PVC, PEEK e teflon and they are used vacuum as method (way) of fluid transferences instead of peristaltic pump in the majority of the procedures, with this improvements the system can make shorter the lengths of transference hoses, increasing the yield in the process with less interventions for maintenance and time exposure of the workers, guaranteeing the quality and reducing the time of the processing. using a mobile system for displacement of the processing module making in the cleanness and maintenance of the cell that works with radioactive material. Reducing the time of exposure dose of the workers in compliance with RDC-17 of ANVISA, which ruling the Good Manufacturing Practice Procedures. (author)

  13. Drug interaction with radiopharmaceuticals: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Moura, Egberto Gaspar de; Maiworm, Adalgisa Ieda; Bernardo, Luciana Camargo; Brito, Lavinia de Carvalho; Orlando, Margarida Maria de Camoes; Penas, Maria Exposito; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento

    2005-01-01

    Clinical images are worthwhile in Health Sciences and their analysis and correct interpretation aid the professionals,such as physicians, physiotherapists and occupational therapists, to make decisions and take subsequent therapeutic and/or rehabilitation measures. Other factors, besides the state of the disease, may interfere and affect the bioavailability of the radiopharmaceuticals (radiobiocomplexes) and the quality of the SPECT and PET images. Furthermore, the labeling of some of these radiobiocomplexes, such as plasma proteins, white blood cells and red blood cells, with 99m T, can also be modified. These factors include drugs (synthetic and natural) and dietary conditions, as well as some medical procedures (invasive or non-invasive), such as radiation therapy, surgical procedures, prostheses, cardioversion, intubation, chemo perfusion, external massage, immunotherapy, blood transfusion and hemodialysis. In conclusion, the knowledge about these factors capable of interfering with the bioavailability of the radiobiocomplexes is worthwhile for secure diagnosis. Moreover, the development of biological models to study these phenomena is highly relevant and desirable.(author)

  14. The therapeutic relationship: historical development and contemporary significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, A J

    2001-04-01

    The therapeutic relationship is a concept held by many to be fundamental to the identity of mental health nurses. While the therapeutic relationship was given formal expression in nursing theory in the middle of the last century, its origins can be traced to attendants' interpersonal practices in the asylum era. The dominance of medical understandings of mental distress, and the working-class status of asylum attendants, prevented the development of an account of mental health nursing based on attendants' relationships with asylum inmates. It was left to Peplau and other nursing theorists to describe mental health nursing as a therapeutic relationship in the 1940s and later. Some distinctive features of colonial life in New Zealand suggest that the ideal of the attendant as the embodiment of bourgeoisie values seems particularly unlikely to have been realized in the New Zealand context. However, New Zealand literature from the 20th century shows that the therapeutic relationship, as part of a general development of a therapeutic discourse, came to assume a central place in conceptualizations of mental health nursing. While the therapeutic relationship is not by itself a sufficient basis for professional continuity, it continues to play a fundamental role in mental health nurses' professional identity. The way in which the therapeutic relationship is articulated in the future will determine the meaning of the therapeutic relationship for future generations of mental health nurses.

  15. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures. Progress report, May 1, 1981-April 30, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.; Deutsch, E.A.

    1981-12-01

    The objectives of this year's research were to develop a method for rapidly determining TcO 4 - in 99 Mo//sup 99m/Tc generator eluates, to improve the ability to chromatographically determine individual Tc-HEDP complexes in radiopharmaceuticals, and to investigate the effects of TcO 4 - concentration and electrochemical reduction on the types and relative amounts of Tc-HEDP complexes present in a radiopharmaceutical formulation. A rapid and sensitive high performance liquid chromatographic (HPLC) method for the quantitative determination of pertechnetate (TcO 4 - ) was developed. This HPLC-based analysis may be of considerable utility in assessing the history and function of 99 MO/sup 99m/Tc generators as well as in the routine analysis of reduced technetium radiopharmaceuticals for the presence of undesired TcO 4 - . Encouraging results were obtained on a dimethyl amine column using aqueous (NH 4 ) 2 SO 4 as the mobile phase. The preparation of Tc(NaBH 4 ) HEDP radiopharmaceutical analogues using varying concentrations of total TcO 4 - shows a dramatic effect in the number and distribution of Tc-HEDP complexes over a TcO 4 - concentration range of 10 -2 to 10 -8 M. These results suggest that total TcO 4 - concentration is an important parameter to be considered in the preparation of a specific Tc-HEDP complex to improve skeletal imaging. The preparation of Tc(electrode) HEDP radiopharmaceutical analogues by using electrochemical reduction was explored. The resulting solutions contain Tc-HEDP complexes that are tentatively identified as being the same complexes formed by NaBH 4 reduction, although the relative concentrations of these complexes are quite different with the two modes of reduction. Thus, electrochemical reduction shows promise as a viable route to the preparation of specific Tc-HEDP complexes for improved skeletal imaging

  16. Recent developments in Alzheimer's disease therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aisen Paul S

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Alzheimer's disease is a devastating neurological disorder that affects more than 37 million people worldwide. The economic burden of Alzheimer's disease is massive; in the United States alone, the estimated direct and indirect annual cost of patient care is at least $100 billion. Current FDA-approved drugs for Alzheimer's disease do not prevent or reverse the disease, and provide only modest symptomatic benefits. Driven by the clear unmet medical need and a growing understanding of the molecular pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease, the number of agents in development has increased dramatically in recent years. Truly *disease-modifying' therapies that target the underlying mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease have now reached late stages of human clinical trials. Primary targets include beta-amyloid, whose presence and accumulation in the brain is thought to contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease, and tau protein which, when hyperphosphorylated, results in the self-assembly of tangles of paired helical filaments also believed to be involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. In this review, we briefly discuss the current status of Alzheimer's disease therapies under study, as well the scientific context in which they have been developed.

  17. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    The long-range objective of this research program is the development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. We seek to isolate and develop distinct site imaging agents, each of which has properties optimized to provide diagnostic information concerning a given pathological condition. The specific objectives during the period (9/1/89 to 8/31/92) include: (1) Development of strategies for improving yields of specific Tc-diphosphonate complexes with optimum imaging properties; (2) Development of electrodes for rapid in situ electrochemical generation of skeletal imaging agents; (3) Development of electrochemical sensors for T c and Re imaging agents; (4) Characterization of stable T c - and Re-diphosphonate complexes obtainable in high yield by structural studies with techniques such as NMR, EXAFS, and Raman spectroscopy; (5) Development of improved separation techniques for the characterization of diphosphonate skeletal imaging agents; (6) Evaluation of the effect of the biological milieu on T c -diphosphonate complexes; and (7) Electrochemical studies of technetium and rhenium complexes synthesized by Professor Deutsch's research group for heart and brain imaging

  18. Advances in Therapeutic Development for Radiation Cystitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajaganapathy, Bharathi Raja; Jayabalan, Nirmal; Tyagi, Pradeep; Kaufman, Jonathan; Chancellor, Michael B

    2014-01-01

    Radiation treatment for pelvic malignancies is typically associated with radiation injury to urinary bladder that can ultimately lead to radiation cystitis (RC). The late sequelae of radiation therapy may take many years to develop and include bothersome storage symptoms such as hematuria, which may be life-threatening in severe cases of hemorrhagic cystitis. Although no definitive treatment is currently available, various interventions are used for radiation and hemorrhagic cystitis including blood transfusion, bladder irrigation, intravesical instillation of substances such as alum, silver nitrate, prostaglandins or formalin, and fulguration of intravesical bleeding sites and surgery options such as supravesical urinary diversions and cystectomy. Effects of non-surgical treatments for radiation and hemorrhagic cystitis are of modest success and studies are lacking to control the effects caused by RC. When such measures have proven ineffective, use of bladder botulinum toxin injection has been reported. New therapy, such as intravesical immunosuppression with local tacrolimus formulation is being developed for the treatment of radiation hemorrhagic cystitis. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. The hospital preparation of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in sections: introduction; preparation ((general - sterilization), production areas (laboratories), working methods for injections, working methods for oral preparations and iodination procedures); analytical testing (general, standards common to injections and oral preparations, standards for injections, standards for oral preparations); reliable methods of preparing sup(99m)Tc-radiopharmaceuticals and 51 Cr-red cells; commercial radiopharmaceutical kits. (U.K.)

  20. Placental transfer of selected radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegst, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews animal experiments carried out to determine the transfer of radiopharmaceuticals from mother to fetus. Animal data are compared to any human data available. The radiopharmaceuticals included in the discussion are Tc-99m pertechnetate, Tc-99m DTPA, Ga-67 citrate and Tl-201 chloride. (6 tab., 5 refs.)

  1. Radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barak, M.; Winchell, H.W.

    1975-01-01

    A chromatographic column for generating technetium-99m isotopes and technetium-99m labeled pharmaceuticals in a simple two-step process is described. Technetium-99m pertechnetate in a first step is isolated by adsorption upon an adsorbent packing. Then the technetium-99m in a second step is eluted from the packing, either with an immediately labeled biological compound to form a radiopharmaceutical, or by a controlled volume of eluant to produce a 99m-technetium-bearing eluate of a desired specific concentration. (Official Gazette)

  2. Development of Class IIa Bacteriocins as Therapeutic Agents

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher T. Lohans; John C. Vederas

    2012-01-01

    Class IIa bacteriocins have been primarily explored as natural food preservatives, but there is much interest in exploring the application of these peptides as therapeutic antimicrobial agents. Bacteriocins of this class possess antimicrobial activity against several important human pathogens. Therefore, the therapeutic development of these bacteriocins will be reviewed. Biological and chemical modifications to both stabilize and increase the potency of bacteriocins are discussed, as well as ...

  3. Development of a pattern hot cell for production of injectable radiopharmaceuticals; Desenvolvimento de um modelo de cela para processamento de radiofarmacos injetaveis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Fabio Eduardo de

    2010-07-01

    A controlled ambient should be established to the production/processing of materials susceptible to contamination, like injectable pharmaceuticals, in order to agree with normative and regulatory requirements. Considering medical but also toxic, radioactive and dangerous products, the ambient should work in special conditions to assure that the materials, which in same cases can be also volatile, do not escape to the external ambient, working in a selective, secure and controlled way. The conditions recommended by local and international rules in use, report an negative pressured ambient in relation to the adjacent areas. The technology related with the sizing of project to this kind of system is fully described in the literature, taking in account the rules that clearly describe the essential requirements. However, it is necessary to develop a controlled ambient for radiopharmaceutical production, in a way compatible with the concept of clean rooms and with the safety related to the manipulation of open radioactive wastes. In this work, some devices were created, methods and procedures were established making possible the classification of the ambient inside the hot cell, without physical barriers in the area, using ergonomic, flexible and practical conditions of work, that can results in the improvement of the productivity. The project resulted in the creation of a controlled ambient, in agreement with the normative requirements, using a pass through for entrance and exit of the materials, without compromise the internal air condition. The tight of the hot cell was obtained using doors with efficient sealing system and active joints. Tong manipulators were used to produce ergonomic and secure conditions, without compromise the internal conditions related to tight and classification in A and B grade, according to local and international rules. An efficient ventilation/exhaustion system was adopted to produce these results, composed by filters and special devices

  4. [The development of therapeutic vaccine for hepatitis C virus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Kiminori; Kohara, Michinori

    2012-10-01

    Chronic hepatitis C caused by infection with the hepatitis C virus(HCV)is a global health problem. HCV causes persistent infection that can lead to chronic liver diseases such as chronic hepatitis, liver cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. The therapeutic efficacy of antiviral drugs is not optimal in patients with chronic infection; furthermore, an effective vaccine has not yet been developed. To design an effective HCV vaccine, generation of a convenient animal model of HCV infection is necessary. Recently, we used the Cre/loxP switching system to generate an immunocompetent mouse model of HCV expression, thereby enabling the study of host immune responses against HCV proteins. At present vaccine has not yet been shown to be therapeutically effective against chronic HCV infection. We examined the therapeutic effects of a recombinant vaccinia virus(rVV)encoding HCV protein in a mouse model. we generated rVVs for 3 different HCV proteins and found that one of the recombinant viruses encoding a nonstructural protein(rVV-N25)resolved pathological chronic hepatitis C symptoms in the liver. We propose the possibility that rVV-N25 immunization has the potential for development of an effective therapeutic vaccine for HCV induced chronic hepatitis. The utilization of the therapeutic vaccine can protect progress to chronic hepatitis, and as a consequence, leads to eradication of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this paper, we summarized our current study for HCV therapeutic vaccine and review the vaccine development to date.

  5. Production, control and utilization of radioisotopes including radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.

    1985-05-01

    From April 29th to May 5th, 1984 27 participants from 21 developing countries stayed within an IAEA Study Tour ('Production, Control and Utilization of Radioisotopes including Radiopharmaceuticals') in the GDR. In the CINR, Rossendorf the reactor, the cyclotron, the technological centre as well as the animal test laboratory were visited. The participants were made familiar by 10 papers with the development, production and control of radiopharmaceuticals in the CINR, Rossendorf. (author)

  6. Positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals for cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krohn, K.A.; Graham, M.M.

    1989-01-01

    Cancer is principally a biochemical disease involving abnormal enzymology, gene expression and/or membrane composition. Cytotoxic chemical treatments, including radiation products, are important in controlling cancer. It therefore follows that imaging of the biochemical differences between tumor and normal tissues should lead to more effective therapy. Metabolic imaging should identify the best new treatment protocol for an individual patient and may identify specific causes of resistance to therapy. Methods have been developed for imaging the metabolism of energy substrates (glucose and O 2 ), and DNA precursors (thymidine) and for specifically identifying hormone-dependent tumors (estrogen or testosterone) and hypoxic tissues (bioreductive alkylators). Together these new radiopharmaceuticals are leading to better cancer therapy, not just improving diagnosis, but more by following the different responses of tumor and surrounding normal tissues to cytotoxic therapy

  7. Protein based therapeutic delivery agents: Contemporary developments and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Liming; Yuvienco, Carlo; Montclare, Jin Kim

    2017-07-01

    As unique biopolymers, proteins can be employed for therapeutic delivery. They bear important features such as bioavailability, biocompatibility, and biodegradability with low toxicity serving as a platform for delivery of various small molecule therapeutics, gene therapies, protein biologics and cells. Depending on size and characteristic of the therapeutic, a variety of natural and engineered proteins or peptides have been developed. This, coupled to recent advances in synthetic and chemical biology, has led to the creation of tailor-made protein materials for delivery. This review highlights strategies employing proteins to facilitate the delivery of therapeutic matter, addressing the challenges for small molecule, gene, protein and cell transport. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in Finland in 1997

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korpela, H.

    1999-02-01

    A survey on the use of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostics and therapy has been made by STUK Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Finland. In 1997 the number of nuclear medicine examinations was 51 700 and that of the therapeutic treatments was 2 240. In 1994 the number of nuclear medicine examinations was 50 900 and that of therapeutic treatments was 2 150. The collective effective dose to the patients was 207 manSv and the mean effective dose to the population was 0.04 mSv per person. In 1994 the collective effective dose was 220 manSv. The numbers of nuclear medicine examinations and of therapeutic treatments have not changed much when compared to those in 1994. The collective effective dose has decreased. The main reason for that is the decreased use of the radionuclide 131 I. (orig.)

  9. Report of a Technical Meeting on ''Alpha emitting radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for therapy''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Considering the high potential of α-emitters for future development of radionuclide therapy, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized a Technical Meeting on ‘Alpha Emitting Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy’, from June 24 to 28, 2013, at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna with the purpose of gathering eminent Experts in the field and discuss with them the status and future perspectives of the field. Sixteen Experts and two External Observers from ten different countries, and four IAEA Technical Officers attended this meeting. Outstanding lectures have been presented covering all relevant aspects of α-therapy, which were followed by extensive discussions and analysis. Selected arguments encompassed production methods and availability of alpha-emitting radionuclides, labelling chemistry of alpha-emittting radioelements, design and development of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals, physical principles of alpha-particle dosimetry and advanced dosimetric models, biological effects of alpha radiation at the cellular level, on-going preclinical and clinical studies with new radiopharmaceuticals, results of clinical trials on the use of radium-223 chloride solutions for the treatment of metastatic bone cancer. The broad scientific background of invited components of the Experts’ panel conferred a strong interdisciplinary trait to the overall discussion and stimulated a critical analysis of this emerging unexplored field. Results of this comprehensive overview on alpha therapy, including recommendations to the Agency on suitable initiatives that may help to promote and spread the knowledge to Members States on this emerging therapeutic modality, are summarized in the present Report

  10. New radiopharmaceuticals currently used in clinical nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladik, W.B. III

    1997-01-01

    During 1996 and 1997, six new radiopharmaceuticals have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for use in the diagnosis and/or management of patients with various disease states. Four of these new agents are antibody-based diagnostic radiotracers, and one is a therapeutic agent. One radio-pharmaceutical that has been available for several years has been approved for a new, unique indication. Our discussion focuses on the physicochemical and pharmacokinetic properties of these recently released agents as well as their specific role in the management of patients

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals in Radiosynoviorthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Arencibia, Jorge; Morin Zorrilla, Jose; Garcia Rodriguez, Enrique; Sagarra Veranes, Marta

    2010-01-01

    The Radiosynoviorthesis is a procedure of Metabolic Radiotherapy, consisting in the intraarticular injection of a radiopharmaceutical with a beta emitting radionuclide for the treatment of chronic synovitis, frequently present in rheumatoid arthritis, haemophilia and other systemic diseases. As this is a safe, effective and a relatively low-cost procedure, It is ordinarily used in Europe, USA and in some Latin American countries . The existing commercial products are based on 90 Y, 169 Er, 186 Re and 32 P, although research is carried out on the use of 188 Re, 166 Ho, among others radionuclides. In Cuba a suspension of Chromium Phosphate (III) labeled with 32 P, is on trial. The above-mentioned suspension has enough characteristics to become an efficient and safe product in practice. (Author)

  12. Challenges in the development of magnetic particles for therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Stephen E

    2008-09-01

    Certain iron-based particle formulations have useful magnetic properties that, when combined with low toxicity and desirable pharmacokinetics, encourage their development for therapeutic applications. This mini-review begins with background information on magnetic particle use as MRI contrast agents and the influence of material size on pharmacokinetics and tissue penetration. Therapeutic investigations, including (1) the loading of bioactive materials, (2) the use of stationary, high-gradient (HG) magnetic fields to concentrate magnetic particles in tissues or to separate material bound to the particles from the body, and (3) the application of high power alternating magnetic fields (AMF) to generate heat in magnetic particles for hyperthermic therapeutic applications are then surveyed. Attention is directed mainly to cancer treatment, as selective distribution to tumors is well-suited to particulate approaches and has been a focus of most development efforts. While magnetic particles have been explored for several decades, their use in therapeutic products remains minimal; a discussion of future directions and potential ways to better leverage magnetic properties and to integrate their use into therapeutic regimens is discussed.

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals in breast milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountford, P.J.; Coakley, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    As assessment has been made of the radiological hazards to an infant following the administration of a radiopharmaceutical to a breast feeding mother. Feeding should be discontinued after administration of most I-131 and I-125 compounds, Ga-67 citrate or Se-78 methionine, and for iodinated compounds where it was possible to resume feeding, a thyroid-blocking agent should be administered. For Tc-99m compounds, pertechnetate had the greatest excretion in milk and interruptions of 12hr and 4hr were considered appropriate for pertechnetate and MAA respectively. Other Tc-99m compounds, Cr-51 EDTA and In-111 leucocytes did not justify an interruption just on the grounds of their associated excretion in milk. The ingestion hazard could be minimized by reducing the administered activity, and in some cases, by the substitution of a radiopharmaceutical with lower breast milk excretion. For Tc-99m lung and brain scans, the absorbed dose due to radiation emitted by the mother (i.e. when cuddling) was less than the ingested dose, but for a Tc-99m bone scan the emitted dose was greater. In all three cases, the emitted dose did not exceed 0 x 5 mGy for the infant in close contact to the mother for one-third of the time. For In-111 leucocytes, the emitted dose was about 2mGy, and it was concluded that close contact should be restricted to feeding times during the first 3 days after injection. 36 references, 2 figures, 5 tables

  14. Ensuring quality while going local: IAEA helps Cuba produce radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawerth, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Cancer and cardiovascular disease are health conditions Cuba will now be able to more readily diagnose and treat thanks to its newly built facility for producing key radiopharmaceuticals. Nuclear medicine requires a constant and reliable supply of these radioactive drugs, prepared according to what the industry calls good manufacturing practices (GMP), and there have so far been limitations in getting them to the island nation. “Through our work with the IAEA, we now have a dedicated GMP compliant facility and the expertise to meet most of our national needs for diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for helping patients,” said René Leyva Montaña, Director of Production at the Isotope Centre (CENTIS), Cuba’s centre dedicated to radiopharmaceutical production.

  15. Radiopharmaceutical development of a freeze-dried kit formulation for the preparation of [99mTc-EDDA-HYNIC-D-Phe1, Tyr3]-octreotide, a somatostatin analog for tumor diagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guggenberg, Elisabeth Von; Mikolajczak, Renata; Janota, Barbara; Riccabona, Georg; Decristoforo, Clemens

    2004-10-01

    [(99m)Tc-EDDA-HYNIC-D-Phe(1),Tyr(3)]-Octreotide ((99m)Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-TOC) is a promising new radiopharmaceutical with the potential to replace [(111)In-DTPA-D-Phe(1)]-Octreotide ((111)In-DTPA-OCT) as the radiopharmaceutical for somatostatin receptor scintigraphy due to the advantage of improved image quality, lower radiation dose for the patient, and daily availability. Here we describe the development of a freeze-dried kit formulation based on the Tricine/EDDA exchange labeling approach for the preparation of this radiopharmaceutical in a clinical setting. Three parameters were of major importance to achieve a suitable formulation with a radiochemical purity (RCP) >90%: addition of bulking agent, the pH of the freeze-drying solution, and the content of stannous chloride. The final formulation consisted of 20 mg Tricine, 10 mg EDDA, 50 mg Mannitol, 20 microg SnCl(2). 2H(2)O, and 20 microg [HYNIC-D-Phe(1), Tyr(3)]-Octreotide (HYNIC-TOC). Radiolabeling was performed by addition of 0.2 M Na(2)HPO(4) to adjust the pH to 6-7, followed by 0.5-2 GBq (99m)Tc sodium pertechnetate, in a total volume of 2 mL and incubation for 10 min in a boiling water bath. Mean RCP values of 10 batches showed values >90% over a storage period of up to 1 year, a high stability up to 24 h of the final preparation, and retained biological activity. The developed kit formulation forms the basis for further clinical evaluation of this promising new radiopharmaceutical. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals good practices handbook: ARCAL XV radiopharmaceuticals control and production; Manual de buenas practicas radiofarmaceuticas: ARCAL XV produccion y control de radiofarmacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Verdera Presto, Silvia [comp.; Universidad de la Republica, Facultad de ciencias, Centro de Investigaciones Nucleares, Montevideo (Uruguay)

    1999-12-31

    A safety practice of the therapeutics diagnostic proceeding in nuclear medicine require a permanent provide high quality radiopharmaceuticals manufacture. This work treat to give a guide for all radio pharmacies laboratories that produce,control, fraction and or dispense radiopharmaceuticals products, with attention hospitable radiopharmacy laboratory. Three chapters with recommendations in manufacture good practice in Hospital radiopharmacy, industrial centralized, bibliography and three annexe`s about clean area classification,standards work in laminar flux bell, and guarantee and cleaning areas

  17. Aptamers as radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear imaging and therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gijs, Marlies; Aerts, An; Impens, Nathalie; Baatout, Sarah; Luxen, André

    2016-01-01

    Today, radiopharmaceuticals belong to the standard instrumentation of nuclear medicine, both in the context of diagnosis and therapy. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals consist of targeting biomolecules which are designed to interact with a disease-related molecular target. A plethora of targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals exists, including antibodies, antibody fragments, proteins, peptides and nucleic acids. Nucleic acids have some significant advantages relative to proteinaceous biomolecules in terms of size, production, modifications, possible targets and immunogenicity. In particular, aptamers (non-coding, synthetic, single-stranded DNA or RNA oligonucleotides) are of interest because they can bind a molecular target with high affinity and specificity. At present, few aptamers have been investigated preclinically for imaging and therapeutic applications. In this review, we describe the use of aptamers as targeting biomolecules of radiopharmaceuticals. We also discuss the chemical modifications which are needed to turn aptamers into valuable (radio-)pharmaceuticals, as well as the different radiolabeling strategies that can be used to radiolabel oligonucleotides and, in particular, aptamers.

  18. Mucociliary and cough clearance as a biomarker for therapeutic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, William D; Daviskas, Evangelia; Hasani, Amir

    2010-01-01

    or therapeutic evaluation presented details of their methodologies. Attendees participating in the workshop discussions included those interested in the physiology of MCC/CC, some of who use in vitro or animal methods for its study, pharmaceutical companies developing muco-active therapies, and many who were......A workshop/symposium on “Mucociliary and Cough Clearance (MCC/CC) as a Biomarker for Therapeutic Development” was held on October 21–22, 2008, in Research Triangle Park, NC, to discuss the methods for measurement of MCC/CC and how they may be optimized for assessing new therapies designed...

  19. Development and biological evaluation of {sup 90}Y-BPAMD as a novel bone seeking therapeutic agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiei, Ali; Shamsaei, Mojtaba [Amir Kabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Energy Engineering and Physics Dept.; Yousefnia, Hassan; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Jalilian, Amir Reza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Enayati, Razieh [Islamic Azad Univ. (IAU), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Engineering

    2016-07-01

    Nowadays, the bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals play an important role in the treatment of the bone-related pathologies. Whereas various phosphonate ligands have already been identified, a DOTA-based bisphosphonate, 4-{[(bis(phosphonomethyl))carbamoyl]methyl}-7,10-bis(carboxymethyl) -1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododec-1-yl (BPAMD) with better characteristics has recently been synthesized. In this study, {sup 90}Y-BPAMD was developed with radiochemical purity >98% and the specific activity of 3.52 TBq/mmol in the optimized conditions as a new bone-seeking therapeutic agent. The complex demonstrated significant stability at room temperature and in human serum even after 48 h. At even low amount of hydroxyapatite (5 mg), more than 90% binding to hydroxyapatite was observed. Biodistribution studies after injection of the complex into the Syrian rats showed major accumulation of the labelled compound in the bone tissue and an insignificant uptake in the other organs all the times after injection. Generally, {sup 90}Y-BPAMD demonstrated interesting characteristics compared to the other {sup 90}Y bone-seeking agents and even {sup 166}Ho-BPAMD, and can be considered as a new bone-seeking candidate for therapeutic applications.

  20. Development of Class IIa Bacteriocins as Therapeutic Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher T. Lohans

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Class IIa bacteriocins have been primarily explored as natural food preservatives, but there is much interest in exploring the application of these peptides as therapeutic antimicrobial agents. Bacteriocins of this class possess antimicrobial activity against several important human pathogens. Therefore, the therapeutic development of these bacteriocins will be reviewed. Biological and chemical modifications to both stabilize and increase the potency of bacteriocins are discussed, as well as the optimization of their production and purification. The suitability of bacteriocins as pharmaceuticals is explored through determinations of cytotoxicity, effects on the natural microbiota, and in vivo efficacy in mouse models. Recent results suggest that class IIa bacteriocins show promise as a class of therapeutic agents.

  1. Current issues of RNAi therapeutics delivery and development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussecker, D

    2014-12-10

    12 years following the discovery of the RNAi mechanism in Man, a number of RNAi therapeutics development candidates have emerged with profiles suggesting that they could become drugs of significant medical importance for diseases like TTR amyloidosis, HBV, solid cancers, and hemophilia. Despite this robust progress, the perception of RNAi therapeutics has been on a roller-coaster ride driven not only by science, but also regulatory trends, the stock markets, and Big Pharma business development decisions [1]. This presentation provides an update on the current state of RNAi therapeutics development with a particular focus on what RNAi delivery can achieve today and key challenges to be overcome to expand therapeutic opportunities. The delivery of RNAi triggers to disease-relevant cell types clearly represents the rate-limiting factor in broadly expanding the applicability of RNAi therapeutics. Today, with at least 3 delivery options (lipid nanoparticles/LNPs, GalNAc-siRNA conjugates, Dynamic PolyConjugates/DPCs) for which profound gene knockdowns have been demonstrated in non-human primates and in the clinic, RNAi therapeutics should in principle be able to address most diseases related to gene expression in the liver. Given the central importance of the liver in systemic physiology, this already represents a significant therapeutic and commercial opportunity rivaling that of e.g. monoclonal antibodies. Beyond the liver, there is a reason to believe that current RNAi therapeutics technologies can address a number of solid tumors (e.g. LNPs), diseases of the eye (e.g. self-delivering RNAi triggers) as well as diseases involving the respiratory epithelium (e.g. aerosolized LNPs), certain phagocytic cells (LNPs), hematopoietic stem cells and their progeny (lentiviral DNA-directed RNAi), vascular endothelial cells (cationic lipoplexes), and certain cell types in the kidney (self-delivering RNAi triggers, DPCs; Table 1). Despite this success, there has been a sense that

  2. Radiopharmaceuticals drug interactions: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Santos-Oliveira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiopharmaceuticals play a critical role in modern medicine primarily for diagnostic purposes, but also for monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. As the use of image has been increased, so has the use of prescription medications. These trends increase the risk of interactions between medications and radiopharmaceuticals. These interactions which have an impact on image by competing with the radiopharmaceutical for binding sites for example can lead to false negative results. Drugs that accelerate the metabolism of the radiopharmaceutical can have a positive impact (i.e. speeding its clearance or, if repeating image is needed, a negative impact. In some cases, for example in cardiac image among patients taking doxirubacin, these interactions may have a therapeutic benefit. The incidence of drug-radiopharmaceuticals adverse reactions is unknown, since they may not be reported or even recognized. Here,we compiled the medical literature, using the criteria of a systematic review established by the Cochrane Collaboration, on pharmaceutical-drug interactions to provide a summary of documented interactions by organ system and radiopharmaceuticals. The purpose is to provide a reference on drug interactions that could inform the nuclear medicine staff in their daily routine. Efforts to increase adverse event reporting, and ideally consolidate reports worldwide, can provide a critically needed resource for prevention of drug-radiopharmaceuticals interactions.Os radiofármacos desempenham função crítica na medicina moderna, primariamente para fins diagnósticos, mas também no monitoramento da progressão de doenças assim como na avaliação de respostas ao tratamento. O uso da tecnologia por imagem tem crescido e conseqüentemente as prescrições de medicamentos (radiofármacos em especial com esse propósito. Este fato, aumenta o risco de interações entre medicamentos e radiofármacos. Interações que podem ter um impacto na

  3. Re-thinking the role of radiometal isotopes: Towards a future concept for theranostic radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notni, Johannes; Wester, Hans-Jürgen

    2018-03-01

    The potential and future role of certain metal radionuclides, for example, 44 Sc, 89 Zr, 86 Y, 64 Cu, 68 Ga, 177 Lu, 225 Ac, and 213 Bi, and several terbium isotopes has been controversially discussed in the past decades. Furthermore, the possible benefits of "matched pairs" of isotopes for tandem applications of diagnostics and therapeutics (theranostics) have been emphasized, while such approaches still have not made their way into routine clinical practice. Analysis of bibliographical data illustrates how popularity of certain nuclides has been promoted by cycles of availability and applications. We furthermore discuss the different practical requirements for diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals and the resulting consequences for efficient development of clinically useful pairs of radionuclide theranostics, with particular emphasis on the underlying economical factors. Based on an exemplary assessment of overall production costs for 68 Ga and 18 F radiopharmaceuticals, we venture a look into the future of theranostics and predict that high-throughput PET applications, that is, diagnosis of frequent conditions, will ultimately rely on 18 F tracers. PET radiometals will occupy a niche in the clinical low-throughput sector (diagnosis of rare diseases), but above all, dominate preclinical research and clinical translation. Matched isotope pairs will be of lesser relevance for theranostics but may become important for future PET-based therapeutic dosimetry. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. The role of high performance liquid chromatography in radiochemical/radiopharmaceutical synthesis and quality assurance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boothe, T.E.; Emran, A.M.

    1990-01-01

    The usefulness of HPLC in all areas of radiopharmaceutics has been demonstrated in numerous laboratories, particularly in the development of in-house radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT and PET. HPLC continues to be a powerful tool in preparation and quality assurance (QA) as illustrated in such areas as chemical and radiochemical identification; product separation and isolation; preparative scale purification; and specific activity determination. A review of established HPLC techniques in radiopharmaceutics will be presented. Examples from the literature as well as newer applications will be used in an attempt to assess and define the present-day role of HPLC in the preparation of radiochemicals and radiopharmaceuticals with emphasis on QA

  5. Melanoma genetics and the development of rational therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Yakov; Khavari, Paul A; Adams, Amy E

    2005-04-01

    Melanoma is a cancer of the neural crest-derived cells that provide pigmentation to skin and other tissues. Over the past 4 decades, the incidence of melanoma has increased more rapidly than that of any other malignancy in the United States. No current treatments substantially enhance patient survival once metastasis has occurred. This review focuses on recent insights into melanoma genetics and new therapeutic approaches being developed based on these advances.

  6. Challenges in the development of therapeutics for narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Sarah Wurts; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2017-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder that afflicts 1 in 2000 individuals and is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy-a sudden loss of muscle tone triggered by positive emotions. Features of narcolepsy include dysregulation of arousal state boundaries as well as autonomic and metabolic disturbances. Disruption of neurotransmission through the hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) system, usually by degeneration of the HCRT-producing neurons in the posterior hypothalamus, results in narcolepsy. The cause of Hcrt neurodegeneration is unknown but thought to be related to autoimmune processes. Current treatments for narcolepsy are symptomatic, including wake-promoting therapeutics that increase presynaptic dopamine release and anticataplectic agents that activate monoaminergic neurotransmission. Sodium oxybate is the only medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration that alleviates both sleep/wake disturbances and cataplexy. Development of therapeutics for narcolepsy has been challenged by historical misunderstanding of the disease, its many disparate symptoms and, until recently, its unknown etiology. Animal models have been essential to elucidating the neuropathology underlying narcolepsy. These models have also aided understanding the neurobiology of the Hcrt system, mechanisms of cataplexy, and the pharmacology of narcolepsy medications. Transgenic rodent models will be critical in the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of narcolepsy, particularly efforts directed to overcome challenges in the development of hypocretin replacement therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate.

  8. Untangling the web of European regulations for the preparation of unlicensed radiopharmaceuticals : a concise overview and practical guidance for a risk-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Rogier; ter Heine, Rob; Decristoforo, Clemens; Penuelas, Ivan; Elsinga, Philip H.; van der Westerlaken, Monique M. L.; Hendrikse, N. Harry

    Radiopharmaceuticals are highly regulated, because they are controlled both as regular medicinal products and as radioactive substances. This can pose a hurdle for their development and clinical use. Radiopharmaceuticals are fundamentally different from other medicinal products and these regulations

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals for hepatobiliary imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chervu, L.R.; Nunn, A.D.; Loberg, M.D.

    1982-01-01

    Tests for liver function have by and large centered around clinical laboratory diagnostic procedures for a number of years. Besides these, radiographic imaging procedures, including oral cholecystography and intravenous cholangiography, serve a very useful purpose, but several of them are invasive and involve a certain degree of risk from the administered contrast media as well as discomfort to the patient. The cholescintigraphic procedures, though noninvasive, have not played a significant role in the evaluation of hepatobiliary disorders prior to the introduction of the currently available /sup 99m/Tc-labeled IDAs. These new hepatobiliary agents offer many advantages over the previously utilized radiopharmaceuticals ( 131 I-rose bengal in particular) in terms of the high degree of specificity for localization in the gallbladder with rapid extraction rates by the polygonal cells of the liver and very low excretion via the GU tract. A detailed understanding of the structure distribution relationship of the various groups in the complex enable the design of agents with an improvement in hepatobiliary specificity and other desirable characteristics. In many clinical situations, even in patients with high bilirubin levels, the /sup 99m/Tc-labeled IDAs offer far superior clinical information over the alternative diagnostic imaging modalities. Further, the absorbed radiation dose imparted to the critical organs is far lower than with the older agents. Thus, the introduction of the cholescintigraphic procedures with the /sup 99m/Tc-labeled IDAs have ushered in a new phase in the diagnostic workup of patients with impaired hepatocellular function and other biliary disorders

  10. 18F-Labelled catecholamine type radiopharmaceuticals in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases and neuroendocrine tumours: approaches to synthesis and development prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatsadze, S. Z.; Eremina, O. E.; Veselova, I. A.; Kalmykov, S. N.; Nenajdenko, V. G.

    2018-04-01

    The pathogenesis of many socially significant diseases such as neurodegenerative dementias and neuroendocrine tumours involves imbalance of neurotransmitters. Among the known neuroimaging methods, positron emission tomography (PET) is the most perfect and informative technique for diagnosing these diseases. The potential of PET is largely determined by the inventory of available radiopharmaceuticals, that is, biologically active molecules containing short-lived nuclides with positron decay. This review gives a systematic account of the application of fluorine-18-labelled catecholamine type radiopharmaceuticals in clinical investigations of the sympathetic and central nervous systems. The methods for the synthesis of these agents and existing problems are considered. The material is arranged according to the mechanisms of reactions that underlie the synthetic approaches: electrophilic, nucleophilic and metal-catalyzed reactions. The bibliography includes 198 references.

  11. Development of an evidence vase for therapeutic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    A prime objective of the World Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Council is the promotion of innovative clinical practice of safe, efficacious radionuclide therapy throughout the world. The evidence for safety and efficacy will emerge from global observational studies performed using standard protocols with uniformly defined end points. Observational studies have several advantages over randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including lower cost, greater timeliness and a broader range of patients. Observational studies and RCTs can produce similar estimates of the effects of treatment and meta- analyses of observational studies produce results that are similar to meta-analyses of randomised trials. RCTs have the disadvantage of excluding of patients who might benefit from treatment, low recruitment rates resulting in delays in obtaining definitive results and the danger of unjustified extrapolation of these results to different populations. Evidence from trials is most applicable in clinical practice, when the design and the outcomes chosen are directly relevant to real patients, the trials are undertaken against a background of standard medical care, patients in trials are broadly representative of patients in the real world and evidence from trials is integrated with individual patient characteristics for meaningful risk-benefit assessment. Despite the need for high-quality clinical trials, few patients participate in them. Less than 5% of eligible patients participate in most cancer trials and almost none are from developing countries. How do we in fact determine the truth in clinical medicine, given that the conclusions of the 'gold-standard' RCT may not be replicable when the outcomes are examined in everyday practice? Ethical standards, patient selection criteria and low participation rates often create RCT study groups that differ from the general population and extrapolation of results may not always be valid. Observational studies have been characterised as all

  12. Radiochemical stability of radiopharmaceutical preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Patricia de A.; Silva, Jose L. da; Ramos, Marcelo P.S.; Oliveira, Ideli M. de; Felgueiras, Carlos F.; Herrerias, Rosana; Zapparoli Junior, Carlos L.; Mengatti, Jair; Fukumori, Neuza T.O.; Matsuda, Margareth M.N.

    2011-01-01

    The 'in vitro' stability studies of the radiopharmaceutical preparations are an essential requirement for routine practice in nuclear medicine and are an important parameter for evaluating the quality, safety and efficacy required for the sanitary registration of pharmaceutical products. Several countries have published guidelines for the evaluation of pharmaceutical stability. In Brazil, the stability studies should be conducted according to the Guide for Conducting Stability Studies published in the Resolution-RE n. 1, of 29th July 2005. There are also for radiopharmaceutical products, two specific resolutions: RDC-63 regulates the Good Manufacturing Practices for Radiopharmaceuticals and RDC-64 provides the Registration of Radiopharmaceuticals, both published on the 18th December 2009. The radiopharmaceutical stability is defined as the time during which the radioisotope can be safely used for the intended purpose. The radiochemical stability can be affected by a variety of factors, including storage temperature, amount of radioactivity, radioactive concentration, presence or absence of antioxidants or other stabilizing agents. The radiochemical stability studies must be established under controlled conditions determined by the effective use of the product. The aim of this work was to evaluate the radiochemical stability of labeled molecules with 131 I, 123 I, 153 Sm, 18 F, 51 Cr, 177 Lu and 111 In as well as 67 Ga and 201 Tl radiopharmaceuticals. Radiochemical purity was evaluated after production and in the validity period, with the maximum activity and in the recommended storage conditions. The analyses were carried out by thin-layer silica gel plate, paper chromatography and gel chromatography. The experimental results showed to be in accordance with the specified limits for all the analysed products. (author)

  13. Country report: Cuba. Local Production of 90Y And 188Re Radionuclides and Development of Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiques, Abmel; Hernández, Ignacio; Leyva, René; Pérez, Marylaine; Alonso, Luis Michel; Zamora, Minelys

    2010-01-01

    During the first period of this CRP we could test an efficient and reliable generator system based on ion-chromatography to obtain 90 Y from its parent radionuclide 90 Sr. This production scheme for 90 Y was outlined in the previous CRP related with the development of generator technologies. Quality parameters such as trace metals that can potentially interfere in the labeling of biomoléculas, 90 Y recovery, 90 Sr/ 90 Y ratio and radiation dose to bed matrix were evaluated. The results showed that high recovery and radionuclidic purity could be obtained for 90 Y during its repeated separation from the 90 Sr cow. No replacement or treatment of the cow were necessary and low waste generation and 90 Sr losses less that 0.1% after each run were also observed during the present study. A Fab’ fragment was enzimatically produced and purified from the monoclonal antibody h-R3 (Nimotuzumab®). The fragment and the parent antibody were successfully conjugated with DOTA and labeled with 90 Y. The radioinmunoconjugate thus obtained also exhibited a good 24 h in-vitro stability in an excess of DTPA. A 90 Y radiocoloid was prepared in a cromic phosphate particle for radiosynoviorthesis with promising results in animal models. Two alumina based 188 W/ 188 Re generators were prepared and their eluates were used in the labeling of hR3-DOTA conjugates. Quality control and in vivo evaluation in comparison with 99m Tc-hR3 showed very good results and similar pattern of distribution and pharmacokinetic and will be used in clinical trials for cancer patients. (author)

  14. Country report: Cuba. Local Production of {sup 90}Y And {sup 188}Re Radionuclides and Development of Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiques, Abmel; Hernández, Ignacio; Leyva, René; Pérez, Marylaine; Alonso, Luis Michel; Zamora, Minelys [Centro de Isotopos (CENTIS) (Cuba)

    2010-07-01

    During the first period of this CRP we could test an efficient and reliable generator system based on ion-chromatography to obtain {sup 90}Y from its parent radionuclide {sup 90}Sr. This production scheme for {sup 90}Y was outlined in the previous CRP related with the development of generator technologies. Quality parameters such as trace metals that can potentially interfere in the labeling of biomoléculas, {sup 90}Y recovery, {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y ratio and radiation dose to bed matrix were evaluated. The results showed that high recovery and radionuclidic purity could be obtained for {sup 90}Y during its repeated separation from the {sup 90}Sr cow. No replacement or treatment of the cow were necessary and low waste generation and {sup 90}Sr losses less that 0.1% after each run were also observed during the present study. A Fab’ fragment was enzimatically produced and purified from the monoclonal antibody h-R3 (Nimotuzumab®). The fragment and the parent antibody were successfully conjugated with DOTA and labeled with {sup 90}Y. The radioinmunoconjugate thus obtained also exhibited a good 24 h in-vitro stability in an excess of DTPA. A {sup 90}Y radiocoloid was prepared in a cromic phosphate particle for radiosynoviorthesis with promising results in animal models. Two alumina based {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generators were prepared and their eluates were used in the labeling of hR3-DOTA conjugates. Quality control and in vivo evaluation in comparison with {sup 99m}Tc-hR3 showed very good results and similar pattern of distribution and pharmacokinetic and will be used in clinical trials for cancer patients. (author)

  15. Radiopharmaceuticals for palliative therapy pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudiano, Javier

    1994-01-01

    Dissemination to bone of various neoplasms is cause of pain with poor response by major analgesics.Indications. Radiopharmaceuticals,description of main characteristics of various β emitter radionuclides.Choose of patients for worm indication of pain palliative therapy with β emitter radiopharmaceuticals is adequate must be careful . Contraindications are recognized.Pre and post treatment controls as clinical examination and complete serology are described.It is essential to subscribe protocols,keep patient well informed,included the physician in charge of the patient as part of the team.Bibliography

  16. Preparações radiofarmacêuticas e suas aplicações Radiopharmaceuticals and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Oliveira

    2006-06-01

    ármacos em uso clínico corresponde a agentes de perfusão. Atualmente, o esforço de investigação na área da química radiofarmacêutica centra-se no desenvolvimento de radiofármacos específicos que possam fornecer informação, ao nível molecular, relativa às alterações bioquímicas associadas às diferentes patologias.Radiopharmaceuticals are substances without pharmacological activity that are used in Nuclear Medicine for diagnosis and therapy for several diseases. Diagnosis radiopharmaceuticals generally emit gamma radiation or positrons (beta+, because their decay originates penetrating electromagnetic radiation that can cross the tissues and be externally detected. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals must include in their composition ionized particles emission nucleus (a, b- or Auger electrons, since their action is based in selective tissue destruction. There are two main methods for image acquisition: SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography that uses g emission radionuclides (99mTc, 123I, 67Ga, 201Tl and PET (Positron Emission Tomography that uses positron emission radionuclides like 11C, 13N, 15O, 18F. Radiopharmaceuticals can be classified into perfusion radiopharmaceuticals (first generation or specific radiopharmaceuticals (second generation. Perfusion radiopharmaceuticals are transported in the blood e reach the target organ in the direct proportion of the blood stream. Specific radiopharmaceuticals contain a biologically active molecule that binds to cellular receptors that must remain biospecific after binding to the radiopharmaceutical. For this type of radiopharmaceuticals, tissue or organ uptake is determined by the biomolecule capacity of recognizing receptors in those biological structures. Radiopharmaceuticals are produced ready to use, in cold kits or in autologal preparations. According to the preparation type there is a different quality control procedure. Most of the radiopharmaceuticals used nowadays are of the perfusion type

  17. An industry update: the latest developments in therapeutic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Iain

    2018-01-01

    This industry update covers the period from 1 September through 30 September 2017, and is based on information sourced from company press releases, scientific literature, patents and various news websites. The month saw the US FDA approve three new molecular entities, Aliqopa (copanlisib dihydrochloride) (Bayer Healthcare); Solosec (secnidazole) (Symbiomix Therapeutics) and Verzenio (abemaciclib) (Eli Lilly and Co). Intarcia Therapeutics Inc. has its application for approval of a novel drug device combination of exenatide for the treatment of diabetes rejected by FDA but said that it will work to address the concerns and refile the application. The impact of biosimilars in the market is steadily increasing with seven biosimilars approved in the USA and Sandoz hoping to add to this with its announcement that FDA has accepted its Biologics License Application for a biosimilar version of Roche's Rituxan. Circassia announced positive top line results of a respiratory drug, Duaklir (for the treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) and Sarepta (for its new treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy). Axovant Sciences Ltd announced the failure if its drug Intepirdine in the treatment of Alzheimer's, adding to a growing list of drug failures in this area. There were a number of developments in the area of oncology with Bristol-Myers Squibb and Infinity Pharmaceuticals announcing an expansion of their collaboration looking at combination treatments, as well as Eli Lilly and Co's approval for Verzenio. Rani Therapeutics and Intra-Cellular Therapies announced successful funding rounds to support their drug programs. Allergan announced a novel licensing deal for its dry eye drug, Restasis, which it hopes would allow it to stave off patent challenges from several companies looking to develop generic versions of the drug. New research suggests that loss of sense of smell can be linked to an increased risk of developing Parkinson's disease.

  18. World Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Council: A report on the 5th International Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Colloquium and the Final Planning Meeting of the World Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Council held at Santiago, Chile, 29 September, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The 5th International Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Colloquium was held on 29th October 2002 as a pre-congress meeting of the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology Congress in Santiago, Chile. Work-in-Progress research papers were presented by leaders in the field of therapeutic nuclear oncology. Speakers gave untitled presentations without abstracts and reported data from studies performed only days or weeks before the meeting. Such cutting edge research presentations stimulated lively discussion which also addressed the problems encountered and ways in which they may be circumvented. Radioimmunotherapy of haematological malignancy was discussed by Greg Wiseman of the Mayo Clinic, and Thomas Behr of the University of Marburg. Radiopeptide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours was presented by Larry Kvols from the University of Florida, and locoregional therapy of glioma was presented by John Buscombe of the Royal Free Hospital, London. All speakers reported encouraging clinical results with objective tumour responses, increased survival and improved quality of life, which encourages wider clinical application of these novel radiopharmaceutical therapies. The Round Table Discussion on clinical applications of Rhenium-188 radiopharmaceuticals was chaired by Russ Knapp from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Hans Biersack of the University of Bonn. Following an outline of current developments by Russ Knapp preliminary results of clinical trials were presented for discussion. Hans Biersack, Javier Gaudiano from Montevideo and Achim Kropp from Dresden reported effective palliation of painful skeletal metastases with 188Re-HEDP. Ajit Padhy gave an update of the IAEA multicentre trial of intrahepatic arterial 188Re-Lipiodol therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma and Harvey Turner reported preliminary results in hepatoma patients using an alternative kit formulation of 188Re-Lipiodol in Fremantle. Early experience with Rhenium 188 in the prevention of re

  19. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  20. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  1. Current Status of Dengue Therapeutics Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Jenny G H; Ooi, Eng Eong; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2017-03-01

    Dengue is a significant global health problem. Even though a vaccine against dengue is now available, which is a notable achievement, its long-term protective efficacy against each of the 4 dengue virus serotypes remains to be definitively determined. Consequently, drugs directed at the viral targets or critical host mechanisms that can be used safely as prophylaxis or treatment to effectively ameliorate disease or reduce disease severity and fatalities are still needed to reduce the burden of dengue. This review will provide a brief account of the status of therapeutics research and development for dengue. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  2. Small Scaffolds, Big Potential: Developing Miniature Proteins as Therapeutic Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holub, Justin M

    2017-09-01

    Preclinical Research Miniature proteins are a class of oligopeptide characterized by their short sequence lengths and ability to adopt well-folded, three-dimensional structures. Because of their biomimetic nature and synthetic tractability, miniature proteins have been used to study a range of biochemical processes including fast protein folding, signal transduction, catalysis and molecular transport. Recently, miniature proteins have been gaining traction as potential therapeutic agents because their small size and ability to fold into defined tertiary structures facilitates their development as protein-based drugs. This research overview discusses emerging developments involving the use of miniature proteins as scaffolds to design novel therapeutics for the treatment and study of human disease. Specifically, this review will explore strategies to: (i) stabilize miniature protein tertiary structure; (ii) optimize biomolecular recognition by grafting functional epitopes onto miniature protein scaffolds; and (iii) enhance cytosolic delivery of miniature proteins through the use of cationic motifs that facilitate endosomal escape. These objectives are discussed not only to address challenges in developing effective miniature protein-based drugs, but also to highlight the tremendous potential miniature proteins hold for combating and understanding human disease. Drug Dev Res 78 : 268-282, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Prenatal radiation doses from radiopharmaceuticals; Dosis absorbida en el feto por administracion de radiofarmacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rojo, A M; Gomez Parada, I M; Di Trano, J L

    1999-12-31

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author) 8 refs. [Espanol] La administracion de radiofarmacos con fines diagnosticos o terapeuticos durante el embarazo, resulta en una dosis absorbida en el feto. La evaluacion de esta dosis y la consiguiente estimacion del riesgo radiologico asociado, adquiere relevancia dada la mayor radiosensibilidad de los tejidos fetales con respecto a la de los adultos. El proposito de este trabajo es hacer una revision de los lineamientos existentes sobre las hipotesis a considerar en el calculo de dosis al feto para los radiofarmacos de uso mas frecuente, incorporando las investigaciones recientes que aportan informacion sobre la transferencia placentaria, teniendo en cuenta la edad gestacional. Se analizan las practicas diagnosticas y terapeuticas mas frecuentes comparando las dosis que implican en el feto con los limites internacionalmente aceptados. Se pretende asi disponer de las herramientas necesarias para responder a las consultas sobre los riesgo radiologicos debidos a la administracion de radiofarmacos a embarazadas. (autor)

  4. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro F, G.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M.; Melendez A, L.

    2003-01-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  5. 77 FR 65582 - Pfizer Therapeutic Research, Pfizer Worldwide Reasearch & Development Division, Formerly Known as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-29

    ... Research, Pfizer Worldwide Reasearch & Development Division, Formerly Known as Warner Lambert Company... workers of Pfizer Therapeutic Research, Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development Division, formerly known... follows: All workers of Pfizer Therapeutic Research, Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development Division...

  6. Molecular modelling and radiopharmaceutical design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, M.; Gano, L.; Costa, M.C.; Raminhos, H.; Rosado, M.; Fausto, R.

    2002-01-01

    Aim: Among several headings for radiopharmaceuticals (RPs) design, molecular modelling (MM) could be used for the prediction of ligands and metal-complexes structures. Using MM it is also possible to simulate molecular interactions between predicted structures and specific biomolecules. Bisphosphonates (BPs) are ligands that are able to coordinate radioactive metals, such as 153 Sm, 166 Ho, 186 Re, etc., but they are all polymeric complexes difficult to characterize. It is reported that the bone uptake does not depend on the nature of metal center, but is primarily driven by the nature of the ligand, as in the case of HEDP-M (M= 99m Tc, 186 Re, 113 Sn). So, it would be interesting to estimate the relevant molecular properties of BPs by MM, simulate their interaction with hydroxyapatite (HAP) the main bone component, and then correlate the predicted molecular parameters with experimental data obtained from HAP binding and biodistribution studies of BPs carrying radioactive metals. Materials and Methods: The molecular structures and preferred conformations of BPs differing in the length of the aliphatic chain attached to their substituted amine groups (pami-dronate, olpadronate and ibandronate) were obtained using the second-generation CVFF 950 (version 1.01) force field of Hwang et al. Simulation of the interactions between the studied BPs and HAP were performed using a Cerius-2 system of programs running on a Silicon Graphics O2 workstation. BPs- 153 Sm complexes were synthesized and characterized by ITLC. Their binding to HAP and in vivo biodistribution studies were carried out as usual described in literature. Results: A direct correlation could be established between in vitro BPs affinity towards HAP and their corresponding energies from the Coulomb interactions involving the N and P atoms of the studied BPs bound to the HAP (0,0,1) surface and the nearest Ca atoms of HAP. The BPs- 153 Sm showing the highest binding to HAP and skeletal uptake are those which

  7. Radiopharmaceutical therapy of brain tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Riva, P.; Franceschi, G.; Frattarelli, M.; Casi, M.; Santimaria, M.; Cremonini, A.M.; Guiducci, G.; Riva, N.

    1999-01-01

    Full text: The loco-regional radioimmunotherapy (RIT) of high-grade malignant glioma may represent a further favourable therapeutic approach, able to ameliorate the ominous prognosis of these diseases. The anti-tenascin monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are directly injected in the tumoral bed after the operation. In the first pilot study, 81 glioblastoma patients received the MAbs (BC2 and BC4) labelled with 131 I (mean dose 2035 MBq). The toxicity was absent. The median survival was prolonged up to 25 months and the response rate (PR + CR + NED: no evidence of disease in cases with minimal lesions after customary treatments) was 44%. More recently, 90 Y instead of 131 I was employed. The benzyl-DTPA chelator was utilized for 90 Y conjugation. A phase I study was performed in 20 glioblastoma patients, who previously received all conventional regimens, but with progressive tumour. They were intralesionally given escalating 90 Y doses (185, 370, 555, 740, 925 MBq), 4 cases were included in each incremental level. No change in haematology, liver and renal parameters were encountered. The brain MTD was 925 MBq. The radiopharmaceutical remained in high amount only in the neoplastic area and did not diffuse in normal brain region nor in normal organs. The radiation dose to the tumour was, on average, 0.54 Gy per MBq of 90 Y administered (about 4 times higher in comparison to 131 I). Now a phase II study has been initiated. 30 evaluable patients (23 glioblastoma and 7 anaplastic astrocytoma; 8 newly diagnosed and 22 recurrent tumours) who have been already treated with surgery and radiotherapy, underwent loco-regional RIT, by administering a mean 90 Y dose of 740 MBq; in many cases multiple cycles were given. The median survival of patients who had the antibody infusion when their tumour burden was reduced was 28 months. The objective response consisted of 8 PD, 5 SD, 11 PR, 1 CR and 4 NED. The global response rate (PR + CR + NED) was 53.3% (47.8% in glioblastoma and 75.7% in

  8. Specific GMP guidelines for radiopharmaceutical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    These guidelines are intended to complement those provided in ''Good manufacturing practices for pharmaceutical products'', as well as the GMP for sterile pharmaceutical products. The regulatory procedures necessary to control radiopharmaceutical products are in large part determined by the sources of products and methods of manufacture. Manufacturing procedures within the scope of these guidelines include: preparation of radiopharmaceuticals in hospital radiopharmacies, preparation of radiopharmaceuticals in centralized radiopharmacies, production of radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear centres, institutes or industrial manufacturers, preparation and production of radiopharmaceuticals in Positron Emission Tomography (PET) centres

  9. The radiopharmaceutical industry and European Union regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fallais, C.J.; Sivewright, S.; Ogle, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    After a brief historical introduction to Council Directives relating to the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals the work of the Association of Radiopharmaceuticals Producers - Europe (ARPE) is discussed. ARPE has played a significant role as an officially recognized interlocutor with the EEC, influencing decisions on the registration of radiopharmaceuticals and labelling; this role is reviewed and difficulties identified. The future of radiopharmaceuticals is then considered; it is emphasized that harmonization of national laws by the European Council would represent a first step to enabling radiopharmaceutical manufacturers to access the largest possible market for their products. (orig.)

  10. The application of the 'ten-day rule' in radiopharmaceutical investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.E.; Nordin, B.E.C.; Tothill, P.; Veall, N.

    1977-01-01

    The working party first classified subjects who are investigated using radiopharmaceuticals into three groups, being (a) patients and other subjects who are asked to volunteer as controls for research studies, (b) patients on whom research investigations are being conducted which are relevant to their clinical condition but which are not strictly necessary for their management, and (c) patients on whom investigations are required for their proper management. The application of the 'ten-day rule' in relation to the use of radiopharmaceuticals is complicated by the fact that the total radiation dose is received over a time given by the effective life of the radiopharmaceutical in the organ, which may be a substantial part or even longer of the menstrual cycle. The activities of the radiopharmaceuticals normally administered are tabulted together with their effective half-lives and resulting gonad doses, and those radiopharmaceuticals requiring consideration of the implementation of the 'ten-day rule' for patients in groups (b) and (c) are identified. When the administration of therapeutic quantities of radiopharmaceuticals is being contemplated it is particularly important to take into account the applicability or otherwise of the 'ten-day rule'. It is recommended that the 'ten-day rule' should be strictly applied to all radiopharmaceutical administrations to women of child-bearing age who are volunteers for research purposes (group(a)). (U.K.)

  11. Traceability in the pharmaceutical industry: application to radiopharmaceutical production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanette, Camila; Melero, Laura T.U.H.; Araujo, Elaine B. de; Mengatti, Jair; Silva, Katia S. de S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of tools to promote the traceability of the drugs in the pharmaceutical industry during all the production chain is a necessary requisite. The traceability system is applied to enable the identification of the origin, destination and exact location of the drug. Traceability optimizes the process chain, reduces errors, is a requirement for quality process, promotes safety for the user and assists in pharmacovigilance. The health regulatory agency in Brazil (ANVISA) will implement a tracking system for medicaments with RDC no. 59 of 2009, to control distribution since the producer until the patients in order to prevent the traffic and adulteration of drugs. Thus, this study discusses the importance and impact of the new traceability system proposed by ANVISA in the production and distribution of radiopharmaceuticals from the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN). The radiopharmaceuticals have a difference track when compared with another drug classes. In this context, this RDC would increase the price of the medicines by up to 10%, since it provides deployment of a single stamp supplied by the Mint. Considering that radiopharmaceuticals are not sold to the final consumer (patients), but only for accredited medical clinics and nuclear medicine physicians, and the transport of radiopharmaceuticals is performed by specialized companies licensed by CNEN (National Nuclear Energy Commission), the use of the stamp to ensure authenticity and prevent falsification should not be appropriated and represents and additional cost for the radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  12. Compartmental analysis to predict biodistribution in radiopharmaceutical design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Marina F.; Pujatti, Priscilla B.; Araujo, Elaine B.; Mesquita, Carlos H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: mflima@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    The use of compartmental analysis allows the mathematical separation of tissues and organs to determinate the concentration of activity in each fraction of interest. Although the radiochemical purity must observe Pharmacopoeia specification (values upper 95%), very lower contains of free radionuclides could contribute significantly as dose in the neighborhood organs and make tumor up take studies not viable in case of radiopharmaceutical on the basis of labeled peptides. Animal studies with a product of Lutetium-177 labeled Bombesin derivative ({sup 177}Lu-BBNP) developed in IPEN-CNEN/SP and free Lutetium-177 developed in CNEA/EZEIZA was used to show how subtract free {sup 177}Lu contribution over {sup 177}Lu-BBNP to estimate the radiopharmaceutical potential as diagnosis or therapy agent. The first approach of the studies included the knowledge of chemical kinetics and mimetism of the Lutetium and the possible targets of the diagnosis/therapy to choose the possible models to apply over the sampling standard methods used in experimental works. A model with only one physical compartment (whole body) and one chemical compartment ({sup 177}Lu-BBNP) generated with the compartmental analysis protocol ANACOMP showed high differences between experimental and theoretical values over 2.5 hours, in spite of the concentration of activity had been in a good statistics rang of measurement. The values used in this work were residence time from three different kinds of study with free {sup 177}Lu: whole body, average excretion and maximum excretion as a chemical compartment. Activity concentration values as time function in measurements of total whole body and activity measurement in samples of blood with projection to total circulating blood volume with {sup 177}Lu-BBNP. Considering the two sources of data in the same modeling a better consistence was obtained. The next step was the statistic treatment of biodistribution and dosimetry in mice (Balb C) considering three chemical

  13. Database setup insuring radiopharmaceuticals traceability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert, N.; Salmon, F.; Clermont-Gallerande, H. de; Celerier, C.

    2002-01-01

    Having to organize radiopharmacy and to insure proper traceability of radiopharmaceutical medicines brings numerous problems, especially for the departments which are not assisted with global management network systems. Our work has been to find a solution enabling to use high street software to cover those needs. We have set up a PC database run by the Microsoft software ACCESS 97. Its use consists in: saving data related to generators, isotopes and kits reception and deletion, as well as the results of quality control; transferring data collected from the software that is connected to the activimeter (elutions and preparations registers, prescription book). By relating all the saved data, ACCESS enables to mix all information in order to proceed requests. At this stage, it is possible to edit all regular registers (prescription book, generator and radionuclides follow-up, blood derived medicines traceability) and to quickly retrieve patients who have received a particular radiopharmaceutical, or the radiopharmaceutical that has been given to a particular patient. This user-friendly database provides a considerable support to nuclear medicine department that don't possess any network management for their radiopharmaceutical activity. (author)

  14. Preclinical and clinical development of siRNA-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozcan, Gulnihal; Ozpolat, Bulent; Coleman, Robert L; Sood, Anil K; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel

    2015-06-29

    The discovery of RNA interference, first in plants and Caenorhabditis elegans and later in mammalian cells, led to the emergence of a transformative view in biomedical research. Knowledge of the multiple actions of non-coding RNAs has truly allowed viewing DNA, RNA and proteins in novel ways. Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) can be used as tools to study single gene function both in vitro and in vivo and are an attractive new class of therapeutics, especially against undruggable targets for the treatment of cancer and other diseases. Despite the potential of siRNAs in cancer therapy, many challenges remain, including rapid degradation, poor cellular uptake and off-target effects. Rational design strategies, selection algorithms, chemical modifications and nanocarriers offer significant opportunities to overcome these challenges. Here, we review the development of siRNAs as therapeutic agents from early design to clinical trial, with special emphasis on the development of EphA2-targeting siRNAs for ovarian cancer treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Discovery, clinical development, and therapeutic uses of bisphosphonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licata, Angelo A

    2005-04-01

    To review the literature concerning the history, development, and therapeutic uses of bisphosphonates. English-language articles were identified through a search of MEDLINE (through December 2004) using the key word bisphosphonate. Reference lists of pivotal studies, reviews, and full prescribing information for the approved agents were also examined. Selected studies included those that discussed the discovery and initial applications of bisphosphonates, as well as their historical development, pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties, and current therapeutic uses. Bisphosphonates structurally resemble pyrophosphates (naturally occurring polyphosphates) and have demonstrated similar physicochemical effects to pyrophosphates. In addition, bisphosphonates reduce bone turnover and resist hydrolysis when administered orally. The information gained from initial work with etidronate generated a considerable scientific effort to design new and more effective bisphosphonates. The PCP moiety in the general bisphosphonate structure is essential for binding to hydroxyapatite and allows for a number of chemical variations by changing the 2 lateral side chains (designated R(1) and R(2)). The R(1) side chain determines binding affinity to hydroxyapatite, and the R(2) side chain determines antiresorptive potency. Accordingly, each bisphosphonate has its own characteristic profile of activity. The bisphosphonates reduce bone turnover, increase bone mass, and decrease fracture risk and therefore have a significant place in the management of skeletal disorders including osteoporosis, Paget's disease, bone metastases, osteogenesis imperfecta, and heterotopic ossification.

  16. Development of radiolanthanide labeled porphyrin complexes as possible therapeutic agents in beast carcinoma xenografts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vahidfar, Nasim; Aghanejad, Ayuob; Beiki, Davood; Khalaj, Ali [Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Pharmacy; Jalilian, Amir R.; Fazaeli, Yousef; Bahrami-Samani, Ali; Alirezapour, Behrooz; Erfani, Mostafa [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Radiopharmacy Research Group

    2014-10-01

    Radiolabeled porphyrins are potential tumor avid radiopharmaceuticals because of their behaviour in the human body, ability to complex various radionuclides, water solubility, low toxicity etc., in this work radio ytterbium/samarium porphyrin complexes have been developed. {sup 175}Yb and {sup 153}Sm labeled 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) porphyrins ([{sup 175}Yb]-TDMPP/[{sup 153}Sm]-TDMPP) were prepared using 5,10,15,20-tetrakis(3,4-dimethoxyphenyl) porphyrin (H{sub 2}TDMPP) and [{sup 175}Yb]YbCl{sub 3} or [{sup 153}Sm]SmCl{sub 3} in 12-24 h at 60 C. Stability of the complexes were checked in final formulation and human serum for 24 h, followed by partition coefficient determination and biodistribution studies in wild type and breast carcinoma-bearing mice. The radiocomplexes were obtained with acceptable radiochemical purity (> 95% (paper chromatography) and > 96% (HPLC) for [{sup 175}Yb]-TDMPP and > 97% (paper chromatography) and > 98% (HPLC) for [{sup 153}Sm]-TDMPP) with specific activities of 12-15 GBq/mmol and 278 GBq/mmol at the end of bombardment for [{sup 175}Yb]-TDMPP and [{sup 153}Sm]-TDMPP respectively. The partition coefficients were determined for [{sup 175}Yb]-TDMPP and [{sup 153}Sm]-TDMPP (log P = 0.63 and log P = 0.96 respectively). The [{sup 175}Yb]-TDMPP complex is mostly washed out from the circulation through kidneys. Liver and spleen also demonstrated significant activity uptake in 72 h post injection. Also [{sup 153}Sm]-TDMPP, is mostly washed out from the circulation through kidneys, however lungs are the major accumulation sites. The [{sup 153}Sm]-TDMPP complex demonstrated significant targeted uptake in breast carcinoma xenografts with tumor: blood ratios of 10.67, 10.47 and 19.01 in 24, 48 and 72 h respectively. Also interesting tumor: kidney/liver ratios were obtained. {sup 153}Sm-TDMPP properties suggest an efficient tumor targeting agent with high tumor-avidity. Further investigation on the therapeutic properties must be

  17. Ionisation constants of radiopharmaceuticals by HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stylli, C.G.; Theobald, A.E.

    It has long been recognised that the pKsub(a) of drugs and radiopharmaceuticals is an important determinant of their biological distribution. In this study an HPLC method for pKa measurement has been developed for radiotracers. It has been validated with several amines and used to estimate the pKsub(a) values of some Tc-99m PnAO complexes by observing the change in chromatographic retention with change in mobile phase pH. The pKsub(a) values were estimated from the data by three methods: derivative analysis, quadratic regression, and the Henderson - Hasselbalch equation.

  18. Ionisation constants of radiopharmaceuticals by HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stylli, C.G.; Theobald, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    It has long been recognised that the pKsub(a) of drugs and radiopharmaceuticals is an important determinant of their biological distribution. In this study an HPLC method for pKa measurement has been developed for radiotracers. It has been validated with several amines and used to estimate the pKsub(a) values of some Tc-99m PnAO complexes by observing the change in chromatographic retention with change in mobile phase pH. The pKsub(a) values were estimated from the data by three methods: derivative analysis, quadratic regression, and the Henderson - Hasselbalch equation. (author)

  19. Development of nano radiopharmaceutical based on Bevacizumab labelled with Technetium-99m for early diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor; Desenvolvimento de nanorradiofarmaco a base de Bevacizumabe marcado com tecnecio-99m para diagnostico precoce do tumor estromal gastrointestinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Thais Ligiero

    2015-06-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is an essential activity to improve nuclear medicine, and essential for the early and effective diagnosis of oncological diseases. Among the various possibilities current research in the world, the radiopharmaceuticals to chemotherapeutic base may be the most effective in detecting tumors, particularly Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST), the Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors. However, difficulties in directing, as well as adhesion of the radiopharmaceutical in the desired location, are currently the main problems in the early detection and treatment of some of these tumors. Advances in the field of nanotechnology, particularly in recent years, indicate significant contribution to overcoming these obstacles, particularly in the implementation of molecular barriers as well as the functionalization of the nanoparticles, thereby improving targeting by the use of surface nucleotides, and the increased adhesion, which facilitates the release of the drug and therefore increases the chances of early diagnosis and more effective treatment. This study aimed to the production, characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity, as well as in vivo biodistribution test Bevacizumab nanoparticles labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide for detection of type GIST tumors. Bevacizumab was encapsulated in the form of nanoparticles by the emulsification method using double poly-acetic acid and polyvinyl alcohol polymers (PLA / PVA) at a concentration of 2% of the monoclonal antibody. The characterization of the nanoparticles was performed by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity assessment was performed by XTT assay with various cell lines of solid tumor cells. The labeling with technetium-99m was done by the direct method, and its yield determined by paper chromatography using paper Whatmam 1 as the stationary phase and acetone as mobile phase. In the biodistribution study

  20. Drug interaction with radiopharmaceuticals: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bernardo-Filho

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical images are worthwhile in Health Sciences and their analysis and correct interpretation aid the professionals,such as physicians, physiotherapists and occupational therapists, to make decisions and take subsequent therapeutic and/or rehabilitation measures. Other factors, besides the state of the disease, may interfere and affect the bioavailability of the radiopharmaceuticals (radiobiocomplexes and the quality of the SPECT and PET images. Furthermore, the labeling of some of these radiobiocomplexes, such as plasma proteins, white blood cells and red blood cells, with 99mT, can also be modified. These factors include drugs (synthetic and natural and dietary conditions, as well as some medical procedures (invasive or non-invasive, such as radiation therapy, surgical procedures, prostheses, cardioversion, intubation, chemoperfusion, external massage, immunotherapy, blood transfusion and hemodialysis. In conclusion, the knowledge about these factors capable of interfering with the bioavailability of the radiobiocomplexes is worthwhile for secure diagnosis. Moreover, the development of biological models to study these phenomena is highly relevant and desirable.Imagens clínicas são valiosas em Ciências da Saúde e a análise e a interpretação correta das mesmas auxiliam os profissionais, como médico, fisioterapeuta, terapeuta ocupacional, na tomada de decisões e subseqüentes ações terapêuticas e/ou de reabilitação. Além das doenças outros fatores podem interferir e afetar a biodisponibilidade dos radiofármacos (radiobiocomplexos e a qualidade das imagens (SPECT e PET. Além disso, a marcação de alguns desses radiobiocomplexos com Tc-99m, como proteínas plasmáticas, leucócitos e hemácias, também pode ser modificada. Entre esses fatores, estão drogas (sintéticas e naturais e condições alimentares, assim como alguns procedimentos médicos (invasivos e não invasivos, como a radioterapia, processos cirúrgicos, pr

  1. Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, B.; Seifert, S.

    2001-01-01

    In 2000 the Rossendorf research centre continued and further developed its basic and application-oriented research. Research at the Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, one of five institutes in the Research Centre, was focused on radiotracers as molecular probes to make the human body biochemically transparent with regard to individual molecular reactions. In this respect the potential for diagnostic application depends on the quality and versatility of radiopharmaceutical chemistry, which is the main discipline in our Institute. Areas in which the Institute was particularly active were the design of new radiotracers, both radiometal-based and natural organic molecules, the elaboration of radiolabelling concepts and procedures and the chemical and pharmacological evaluation of new tracers. This was complemented by more clinically oriented activities in the Positron Emission Tomography Centre Rossendorf. With numerous contributions in the fields of radiopharmaceutical chemistry, tumour agents, tumour diagnosis and brain biochemistry this Annual Report will document the scientific progress made in 2000. (orig.)

  2. Knowledge-based automated radiopharmaceutical manufacturing for Positron Emission Tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexoff, D.L.

    1991-01-01

    This article describes the application of basic knowledge engineering principles to the design of automated synthesis equipment for radiopharmaceuticals used in Positron Emission Tomography (PET). Before discussing knowledge programming, an overview of the development of automated radiopharmaceutical synthesis systems for PET will be presented. Since knowledge systems will rely on information obtained from machine transducers, a discussion of the uses of sensory feedback in today's automated systems follows. Next, the operation of these automated systems is contrasted to radiotracer production carried out by chemists, and the rationale for and basic concepts of knowledge-based programming are explained. Finally, a prototype knowledge-based system supporting automated radiopharmaceutical manufacturing of 18FDG at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is described using 1stClass, a commercially available PC-based expert system shell

  3. Quality assurance of radiopharmaceuticals - specifications and test procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldas, J.; Bonnyman, J.; Colmanet, S.F.; Ivanov, Z.; Lauder, R.A.

    1990-10-01

    The authors report on a Radiopharmaceutical Quality Assurance Test Programme carried out by the Australian Radiation Laboratory in which radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine in Australia are tested for compliance with specifications. Where the radiopharmaceutical is the subject of a monograph in the British Pharmacopoeia or the European Pharmacopoeia, then the specifications given in the Pharmacopoeia are adopted. In other cases the specifications given have been adopted by this Laboratory and have no legal status. In some cases test procedures described have been taken from various Pharmacopoeias or methods published in the literature. In other cases test methods described have been developed at this Laboratory. It should be noted that, unless stated otherwise, specifications listed apply at all times up until product expire

  4. Reactor-produced therapeutic radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The significant worldwide increase in therapeutic radioisotope applications in nuclear medicine, oncology and interventional cardiology requires the dependable production of sufficient levels of radioisotopes for these applications (Reba, 2000; J. Nucl. Med., 1998; Nuclear News, 1999; Adelstein and Manning, 1994). The issues associated with both accelerator- and reactor-production of therapeutic radioisotopes is important. Clinical applications of therapeutic radioisotopes include the use of both sealed sources and unsealed radiopharmaceutical sources. Targeted radiopharmaceutical agents include those for cancer therapy and palliation of bone pain from metastatic disease, ablation of bone marrow prior to stem cell transplantation, treatment modalities for mono and oligo- and polyarthritis, for cancer therapy (including brachytherapy) and for the inhibition of the hyperplastic response following coronary angioplasty and other interventional procedures (For example, see Volkert and Hoffman, 1999). Sealed sources involve the use of radiolabeled devices for cancer therapy (brachytherapy) and also for the inhibition of the hyperplasia which is often encountered after angioplasty, especially with the exponential increase in the use of coronary stents and stents for the peripheral vasculature and other anatomical applications. Since neutron-rich radioisotopes often decay by beta decay or decay to beta-emitting daughter radioisotopes which serve as the basis for radionuclide generator systems, reactors are expected to play an increasingly important role for the production of a large variety of therapeutic radioisotopes required for these and other developing therapeutic applications. Because of the importance of the availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes for these applications, an understanding of the contribution of neutron spectra for radioisotope production and determination of those cross sections which have not yet been established is important. This

  5. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures. Progress report, May 1, 1982-April 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.; Deutsch, E.A.

    1982-11-01

    A procedure based on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for separating individual Tc-diphosphonate complexes in skeletal-imaging radiopharmaceuticals prepared by reduction of TcO 4 - with NaBH 4 in the presence of methylene diphosphonate (MDP). Seven different Tc-MDP complexes have been detected and isolated in pure form. Significant differences in skeletal uptake and blood clearance are exhibited by the three complexes tested thus far by biodistribution studies in test animals. The relative quantities of these complexes present in a radiopharmaceutical preparation are dramatically influenced by the pH of the reaction mixture. Thus, control of pH is a simple means of forming in high yield the single, most efficacious Tc-MDP complex for skeletal imaginG. An HPLC method with electrochemical detection has been developed for the analytical determination of total TcO 4 - (/sup 99m/Tc + 99 Tc). Concentrations of TcO 4 - as low as 9 x 10 -9 M can be detected. The method is being evaluated for monitoring total TcO 4 - in 99 Mo//sup 99m/Tc generators

  6. Development and evaluation of an electronic drug and therapeutics bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Christopher P

    2002-10-01

    To describe the development, implementation, and initial evaluation of a paperless drug and therapeutics bulletin that is distributed by electronic mail from the pharmacy department of an Australian teaching hospital. A standardized format for the bulletin was designed and approved in February 2001. The aim of the bulletin is to facilitate the timely dissemination of concise, factual information about issues of current interest in therapeutics, drug safety, and the cost-effective use of medicines. A simple and attractive graphic design was chosen, and the hospital's clinical pharmacists and drug information staff developed an initial bank of content during the period immediately preceding the launch. The bulletin is presented as a 1-page, read-only file in Word for Windows format and was initially distributed by electronic mail to all users of the hospital's computerized communication network. As the popularity of the bulletin increased, healthcare practitioners from outside of the hospital began to request permission for inclusion on the circulation list, and the content was frequently forwarded by E-mail to workers in other hospitals and community-based settings. The bulletin is now distributed to pharmacists around Australia via 2 separate moderated discussion lists, one of which provides an archive site for previous editions. Healthcare workers in Singapore, the US, Canada, and New Zealand also receive the bulletin, which is now also abstracted by a major Australian pharmacy journal. A readership survey (also electronically distributed) was used to seek feedback after the publication of the first 12 editions. Readers indicated a high level of satisfaction with the content, format, and frequency of distribution of the materials. Although the concept and execution of this project was relatively simple, an extensive literature review did not reveal any previously published reports describing this type of approach to the distribution of a pharmacy bulletin. The

  7. Depyrogenation, sterilization and deproteination of radiopharmaceuticals with an ultrafilter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K; Tamate, K; Nakayama, T [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)

    1984-01-01

    A newly developed filter holder is described for an ultrafiltration method used in the removal of pyrogen, enzyme and bacteria in the preparation of intravenously injectable radiopharmaceuticals. Penetration ratios of bovine serum albumin, glutamate dehydrogenase and Escherichia coli endotoxin through the PTGC ultrafilter (NMWL = 10,000) were measured; these results are useful for estimating penetration ratios of other macromolecules. Attempts to obtain i.v. injectable /sup 13/NH, L- /sup 13/N-glutamate and 3- /sup 123/I-iodotyrosine radiopharmaceuticals were successful; after ultrafiltration, pyrogen, bacteria or protein were not detected.

  8. Design of radiopharmaceuticals for monitoring gene transfer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Staehler, P.; Kley, J.; Spiegel, M.; Gross, C.; Graepler, F.T.C.; Gregor, M.; Lauer, U.; Oberdorfer, F.

    1998-01-01

    The development of radiopharmaceuticals for monitoring gene transfer therapy with emission tomography is expected to lead to improved management of cancer by the year 2010. There are now only a few examples and approaches to the design of radiopharmaceuticals for gene transfer therapy. This paper introduces a novel concept for the monitoring of gene therapy. We present the optimisation of the labelling of recombinant human β-NGF ligands for in vitro studies prior to using 123 I for SPET and 124 I for PET studies. (author)

  9. The role of mathematical models in the optimization of radiopharmaceutical therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divgi, C.

    2001-01-01

    Mathematical models have been used in radiopharmaceutical therapy for over five decades. These have served to determine the amount of radioactivity required to treat disease, as in the therapy of hyperthyroidism with iodine-131, or, more frequently, to determine the largest amount of radioactivity that can be safely administered. Mathematical models are especially useful in the determination of fractionated radiopharmaceutical therapy. This review will briefly outline the historical development and current utility of mathematical models in radiopharmaceutical therapy, including thyroid disorders and radioimmunotherapy; and describe the potential of modeling in fractionated therapy. The extended application of such models to currently used radiopharmaceutical therapy based on indices of body mass or surface area, to alleviate toxicity and increase radiation dose to tumour, will be proposed. Finally, future applications of mathematical models in radiopharmaceutical therapy will be outlined. (author)

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L. I.

    1997-01-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of 'biologicals', in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, L I [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-10-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of `biologicals`, in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  12. Quality assurance of radiopharmaceuticals-specifications and test procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldas, J.; Bonnyman, J.; Pojer, P.M.

    1981-08-01

    This report is a compilation of test methods used and specifications adopted for the Radiopharmaceutical Quality Assurance Test Programme conducted by the Australian Radiation Laboratory. In some cases test procedures described have been taken from various Pharmacopoeias or methods published in the literature. In other cases test methods have been developed at the ARL

  13. Underwater Shock Wave Research Applied to Therapeutic Device Developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, K.; Yamamoto, H.; Shimokawa, H.

    2013-07-01

    The chronological development of underwater shock wave research performed at the Shock Wave Research Center of the Institute of Fluid Science at the Tohoku University is presented. Firstly, the generation of planar underwater shock waves in shock tubes and their visualization by using the conventional shadowgraph and schlieren methods are described. Secondly, the generation of spherical underwater shock waves by exploding lead azide pellets weighing from several tens of micrograms to 100 mg, that were ignited by irradiating with a Q-switched laser beam, and their visualization by using double exposure holographic interferometry are presented. The initiation, propagation, reflection, focusing of underwater shock waves, and their interaction with various interfaces, in particular, with air bubbles, are visualized quantitatively. Based on such a fundamental underwater shock wave research, collaboration with the School of Medicine at the Tohoku University was started for developing a shock wave assisted therapeutic device, which was named an extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL). Miniature shock waves created by irradiation with Q-switched HO:YAG laser beams are studied, as applied to damaged dysfunctional nerve cells in the myocardium in a precisely controlled manner, and are effectively used to design a catheter for treating arrhythmia.

  14. Developments in intervertebral disc disease research: pathophysiology, mechanobiology, and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Kathryn T; Jacobsen, Timothy D; Maidhof, Robert; Virojanapa, Justin; Overby, Chris; Bloom, Ona; Quraishi, Shaheda; Levine, Mitchell; Chahine, Nadeen O

    2015-03-01

    Low back pain is a leading cause of disability worldwide and the second most common cause of physician visits. There are many causes of back pain, and among them, disc herniation and intervertebral disc degeneration are the most common diagnoses and targets for intervention. Currently, clinical treatment outcomes are not strongly correlated with diagnoses, emphasizing the importance for characterizing more completely the mechanisms of degeneration and their relationships with symptoms. This review covers recent studies elucidating cellular and molecular changes associated with disc mechanobiology, as it relates to degeneration and regeneration. Specifically, we review findings on the biochemical changes in disc diseases, including cytokines, chemokines, and proteases; advancements in disc disease diagnostics using imaging modalities; updates on studies examining the response of the intervertebral disc to injury; and recent developments in repair strategies, including cell-based repair, biomaterials, and tissue engineering. Findings on the effects of the omega-6 fatty acid, linoleic acid, on nucleus pulposus tissue engineering are presented. Studies described in this review provide greater insights into the pathogenesis of disc degeneration and may define new paradigms for early or differential diagnostics of degeneration using new techniques such as systemic biomarkers. In addition, research on the mechanobiology of disease enriches the development of therapeutics for disc repair, with potential to diminish pain and disability associated with disc degeneration.

  15. Radiopharmaceuticals labelled with positron-emitting radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Comar, D.; Berridge, M.; Maziere, B.; Crouzel, C.

    1982-01-01

    This chapter reviews the preparation of radioisotopes for biochemical and physiological studies and the principal methods for their incorporation into radiopharmaceuticals, while pointing out the problems encountered with their use and considering their medical interest in the following areas: distribution and flow of fluids, metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies. Inorganic and organic radiopharmaceuticals presently in use and most probable to be used in the future are reviewed. It is anticipated that three types of products labelled with 15 O, 13 N, 11 C and 18 F will be developed in the future. The first type includes products which trace general phenomena such as fluid movement or metabolism of sugars, fats and proteins. The compromise between physiological accuracy and imaging technology is discussed in relation to the use of 11 C and 18 F. The second type of product is one to measure more specific parameters such as those of molecular transport kinetics, membrane permeability, cellular pH and receptor-ligand interactions, again with particular reference to 11 C and 18 F. The third type of product discussed is that intended for pharmacology studies, particular reference being made to 68 Ga, 82 Rb. Extensive bibliography. (U.K.)

  16. Absolute counting of 188Re radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravindra, Anuradha; Kulkarni, D.B.; Joseph, Leena; Kulkarni, M.S.

    2018-01-01

    Rhenium-188 is radiopharmaceutical that belongs to the group of strong beta-weak gamma emitters. It emits high energy beta particles, (E β m ax = 2.12MeV) and weak gamma rays (E γ = 155 keV) hence makes it suitable for wide variety of therapeutic as well as diagnostic applications. Therapeutic applications include therapy of tumors, radionuclide synovectomy, bone pain palliation, intra vascular radiation therapy etc. 188 Re-labeled medicines have been employed increasingly in the therapy of tumors and vascular restenosis. To ensure that patient receives the appropriate radiation dose during the treatment, both the activity standardization and the determination of sensitivity coefficient of the secondary standard for 188 Re have become important tasks. This paper presents the methods and results obtained for the following measurements a) Standardisation of the 188 Re by using the 4π proportional counter (4πPC)-gamma extrapolation method b) Determination of sensitivity coefficient (pA/MBq) of the secondary standard ionization chamber type Centronic IG12, 20A for 188 Re

  17. Auger Emitting Radiopharmaceuticals for Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falzone, Nadia; Cornelissen, Bart; Vallis, Katherine A.

    Radionuclides that emit Auger electrons have been of particular interest as therapeutic agents. This is primarily due to the short range in tissue, controlled linear paths and high linear energy transfer of these particles. Taking into consideration that ionizations are clustered within several cubic nanometers around the point of decay the possibility of incorporating an Auger emitter in close proximity to the cancer cell DNA has immense therapeutic potential thus making nuclear targeted Auger-electron emitters ideal for precise targeting of cancer cells. Furthermore, many Auger-electron emitters also emit γ-radiation, this property makes Auger emitting radionuclides a very attractive option as therapeutic and diagnostic agents in the molecular imaging and management of tumors. The first requirement for the delivery of Auger emitting nuclides is the definition of suitable tumor-selective delivery vehicles to avoid normal tissue toxicity. One of the main challenges of targeted radionuclide therapy remains in matching the physical and chemical characteristics of the radionuclide and targeting moiety with the clinical character of the tumor. Molecules and molecular targets that have been used in the past can be classified according to the carrier molecule used to deliver the Auger-electron-emitting radionuclide. These include (1) antibodies, (2) peptides, (3) small molecules, (4) oligonucleotides and peptide nucleic acids (PNAs), (5) proteins, and (6) nanoparticles. The efficacy of targeted radionuclide therapy depends greatly on the ability to increase intranuclear incorporation of the radiopharmaceutical without compromising toxicity. Several strategies to achieve this goal have been proposed in literature. The possibility of transferring tumor therapy based on the emission of Auger electrons from experimental models to patients has vast therapeutic potential, and remains a field of intense research.

  18. International symposium on trends in radiopharmaceuticals (ISTR-2005). Book of extended synopses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals, along with imaging instrumentation, are the pillars that support the edifice of clinical nuclear medicine and the former is the major driver enabling investigations of molecular phenomena for better understanding of human disease and developing effective treatments. The growth of nuclear medicine has been intimately linked to availability of new radioisotopes and the discovery of new radiopharmaceuticals. The field of radiopharmaceuticals has witnessed continuous evolution thanks to the immense contributions of scientists from diverse disciplines such as radiochemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, physiology and pharmacology. Several milestones can be cited in the trajectory of this growth, which include continuing development of a plethora of {sup 99}mTc radiopharmaceuticals, automated synthesis of {sup 18}F labelled compounds, labelled peptides for accurate mapping of metastasis and the advances in radionuclide therapy. The International Symposium on Trends in Radiopharmaceuticals, ISTR-2005, under the auspices of International Atomic Energy Agency, will provide scientists and professionals working in the field of radiopharmaceuticals and related sciences an opportunity to review the exciting developments in the field. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been organizing such Symposia on Radiopharmaceuticals since 1973 and the last one was held in Lisbon, Portugal, in 1998.

  19. International symposium on trends in radiopharmaceuticals (ISTR-2005). Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals, along with imaging instrumentation, are the pillars that support the edifice of clinical nuclear medicine and the former is the major driver enabling investigations of molecular phenomena for better understanding of human disease and developing effective treatments. The growth of nuclear medicine has been intimately linked to availability of new radioisotopes and the discovery of new radiopharmaceuticals. The field of radiopharmaceuticals has witnessed continuous evolution thanks to the immense contributions of scientists from diverse disciplines such as radiochemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, physiology and pharmacology. Several milestones can be cited in the trajectory of this growth, which include continuing development of a plethora of 99 mTc radiopharmaceuticals, automated synthesis of 18 F labelled compounds, labelled peptides for accurate mapping of metastasis and the advances in radionuclide therapy. The International Symposium on Trends in Radiopharmaceuticals, ISTR-2005, under the auspices of International Atomic Energy Agency, will provide scientists and professionals working in the field of radiopharmaceuticals and related sciences an opportunity to review the exciting developments in the field. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been organizing such Symposia on Radiopharmaceuticals since 1973 and the last one was held in Lisbon, Portugal, in 1998

  20. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of 177Lu-iPSMA-RGD as a new heterobivalent radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escudero-Castellanos, Alondra; Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Toluca, Estado de Mexico; Ocampo-Garcia, B.E.; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Santos-Cuevas, C.L.; Isaac-Olive, Keila; Olmos-Ortiz, Andrea; Garcia-Quiroz, Janice; Garcia-Becerra, Rocio; Diaz, Lorenza

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to synthesize a new 177 Lu-iPSMA-RGD heterobivalent radiopharmaceutical, as well as to assess the in vitro radiopharmaceutical potential to target cancer cells overexpressing PSMA and α(v) β(3) integrins. The radiotracer prepared with a radiochemical purity of 98.8 ± 1.0% showed stability in human serum, specific recognition with suitable affinity to PSMA and α(v)β(3) integrins, and capability to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and VEGF signaling (antiangiogenic effect). Results warrant further preclinical studies to establish the 177 Lu-iPSMA-RGD potential as a dual therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. (author)

  1. Development and Successful Validation of Simple and Fast TLC Spot Tests for Determination of Kryptofix® 2.2.2 and Tetrabutylammonium in 18F-Labeled Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Kuntzsch

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Kryptofix® 2.2.2 (Kry or tetrabutylammonium (TBA are commonly used as phase transfer catalysts in 18F-radiopharmaceutical productions for positron emission tomography (PET. Due to their toxicity, quality control has to be performed before administration of the tracer to assure that limit concentration of residual reagent is not reached. Here, we describe the successful development and pharmaceutical validation (for specificity, accuracy and detection limit of a simplified color spot test on TLC plates. We were able to prove its applicability as a general, time and resources saving, easy to handle and reliable method in daily routine analyzing 18F-tracer formulations for Kry (in [18F]FDG or [18F]FECh or TBA contaminations (in [18F]FLT with special regard to complex matrix compositions.

  2. Towards a harmonized radiopharmaceutical regulatory framework in Europe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Decristoforo, A.; Penuelas, I.

    2009-01-01

    Despite European unification regarding a common legal framework for many aspects of pharmaceutical production including industrial manufacture of pharmaceuticals, the practice of pharmacy in general, and of radiopharmacy in particular, differs substantially and are mainly regulated at the national level. Herein the authors discuss major European documents relevant for radiopharmacy practice in Europe and recent developments on the national level especially regarding the small-scale preparation of radiopharmaceuticals (R P). Issues related to marketing authorization (and exemptions from it), standards of preparation, quality requirements, regulations of clinical trials and education will be outlined. Standards for the industrial preparation of pharmaceuticals are defined in Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), not taking into account specific requirements for the small scale, extemporaneous preparation of R P. The European Association of Nuclear Medicine EANM has published several documents based on GMP and called Good Radiopharmaceutical Practice (cGRPP) to specifically address this in an attempt to harmonize R P preparation across Europe. Clinical trials have been hampered by the introduction of directive 2001/20/E C again aimed at the marketing track of industrial production and currently a number of activities are ongoing to counterbalance this problem in radiopharmaceutical research. Additionally, the role of the European Pharmacopoeia in regulating quality requirements and the need for specific education and training in the small scale radiopharmaceutical preparation are also discussed.

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals in metastatic bone pain palliation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Garcia, Enrique; Alberti, Alejandro; Cruz Arencibia, Jorge; Morin Zorrilla, Jose

    2012-01-01

    In the present work the current status of the use of Radiopharmaceuticals in the treatment of the pain provoked by bony metastasis is revised. Particular attention is devoted to the used doses, the effectiveness and security of the existent products in the market and in development. The convenience of the routine use in the case of multiple metastasis is established, since the results are adequate and the risks acceptable. The doses are examined, the adverse effects and the importance of the costs is indicated and related with it the supply of Radionuclides. Reference is made so much to the practice of countries developed as to that of countries of smaller resources. It is pointed out the Cuban experience and the perspectives of the use in our country.(author)

  4. Uncertainty sources in radiopharmaceuticals clinical studies; Fontes de incertezas em estudos clinicos com radiofarmacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Degenhardt, Aemilie Louize; Oliveira, Silvia Maria Velasques de, E-mail: silvia@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: amilie@bolsista.ird.gov.br [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria, (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    The radiopharmaceuticals should be approved for consumption by evaluating their quality, safety and efficacy. Clinical studies are designed to verify the pharmacodynamics, pharmacological and clinical effects in humans and are required for assuring safety and efficacy. The Bayesian analysis has been used for clinical studies effectiveness evaluation. This work aims to identify uncertainties associated with the process of production of the radionuclide and radiopharmaceutical labelling as well as the radiopharmaceutical administration and scintigraphy images acquisition and processing. For the development of clinical studies in the country, the metrological chain shall assure the traceability of the surveys performed in all phases. (author)

  5. Quality control in 99m technetium radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    This work means about the quality control in Tc radiopharmaceuticals preparation at hospitalary levels. Several steps must be used in a Nuclear Medicine Laboratory, such as proceeding,radiopharmaceuticals kits preparation, and dispensation materials,glasses,stopper,physical aspects,identification,ph control,storage,and reactif kits

  6. Physical and Chemical Aspects of PET Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    On the Workshop 23 contributions were presented. This proceedings includes 21 presentations delivered at the workshop. The topics discussed included: Cyclotron and Target Constructions; Target Chemistry; Radiopharmaceuticals Synthesis; Quality Control of Radiopharmaceuticals; GLP-GMP Design; PET Imaging. Each presentation has been indexed separately

  7. Studies of quality control procedures for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zivanovic, M.; Trott, N.G.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, a short description is given of a radiopharmaceutical preparation suite set up at the Royal Marsden Hospital and an account is presented of methods used for quality control of radiopharmaceuticals and of the results obtained over a period of about two and a half years

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis of ischemic heart disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komarek, P; Chalabala, M [Institut pro Dalsi Vzdelavani Lekaru a Farmaceutu, Prague (Czechoslovakia)

    1982-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnosing ischemic heart disease in the experimental and clinical practice are reviewed. The mechanism of their retention by the heart muscle is briefly described. The respective radiopharmaceuticals are divided into preparations imaging disorders in the blood supply of the cardiac muscle, diagnosing the myocardial infarction, and evaluating the contractility of the heart.

  9. Chirality plays important roles in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shen Yumei

    2006-01-01

    The paper introduces the basic concept of chirality, target specific selectivity and their relationship in radiopharmaceuticals. If the ligands labeled by radionuclides have chiral center, the enantiomers must be separated, or the target specific selectivity will not be good. Chirality is one of the most important factors which must be considered in the study of the structure-activity relationship of radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  10. Preparation and control of radiopharmaceuticals in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1979-01-01

    This guidebook covers the work commonly organized as part of the work in the hospital. It does not cover the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals on an industrial scale. The work is characterized by the small scale on which manufacture and preparation of radiopharmaceuticals take place

  11. Clean room installations in a radiopharmaceutical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The standards of radiopharmaceuticals on the facility, working environment and preparation control strategy are yet to be generated. In general, radiopharmaceuticals have short half-lives and emit gamma radiation. Due to its unique characteristics, its preparation has to be made in the fume hood and hot cell to avoid radiation exposure to workers. Considering radiation protection, the working environment has to be maintained under negative pressure so that dispersion of radiopharmaceuticals should be avoided. On the contrary, a positively pressurized working environment gives clean atmosphere and prevents contamination with harmful microorganisms during preparation. Hence, it is required to harmonize for mentioned contradictory conditions in preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for the safety of workers and its quality assurance as well. Therefore, it is reasonable that good manufacturing practice for radiopharmaceutical production facility should be constituted according to the standards for production of biological agents accompanied with a radiation shielding

  12. Genotoxic and cytotoxic damage by the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP as in vivo generator system; Dano genotoxico y citotoxico por el radiofarmaco terpeutico [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP como sistema de generador in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedraza L, M; Piedras R, J [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran. Vasco. de Quiroga 15, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ferro F, G; Morales R, P [ININ, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy S, E [Hospital Santaelena, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez O, O [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, IPN, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In patients with leukemias and multiple myeloma, the cure can be obtained to inclination of a bone marrow transplant (m.o.), for that which one is used a combination of external radiotherapy and chemotherapy with the consequent toxicity to healthy organs. The complex [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate ([{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP) it forms a generator system in vivo stable with bony selective likeness in mice therefore, this it could work as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical for bone marrow ablation. The objective of this original work was to determine the genotoxic and cytotoxic damage produced by the [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP like a generator system in vivo by means of the reticulocytes reduction (RET) and micronucleus elevation in reticulocytes (RET-MN) in peripheral blood and to evaluate its myeloablative potential for histopathologic studies. It was irradiated {sup 166}Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} enriched and it was add in form {sup 166}DyCI{sub 3} to the EDTMP in a softening media of phosphates (pH 8), the optimal molar relationship {sup 166}Dy: EDTMP was 1.7:1 and the radiochemical purity was evaluated by ITLC. The Dy:EDTMP complexes, non radioactive, its were prepared in the same way with non irradiated dysprosium oxide. A group of BALB/c mice was injected intraperitoneally with the radiopharmaceutical and two groups of control mice were injected with the non radioactive complex and with sodium chloride 0.9% respectively. Before injecting each one of the solutions it was take a basal sample of peripheral blood of the mouse tail and each 48 h post-injection during 12 d. The animals were sacrificed to obtain the organs of interest and to determine the radioactivity in each one. The femur was used for the histopathologic studies. The quantification of the frequency of RET and RET-MN was carried out by flow cytometry of the sanguine samples and the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B for the dosimetry calculations was used. The

  13. Radiopharmaceutical therapy in Dominican Republic. Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johny Osvaldo de los Santos

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this paper we present experience in Dominican Republic on Radiopharmaceutical Therapy. In our country, there are 8 Center with Nuclear Medicine Department. Only, 7 centers are working with Radiopharmaceutical Therapy. Radioiodine treatment with I-131 in Thyroid diseases(Thyroid Cancer and Hyperthyroidism). This is only Nuclear Medicine therapy available in Dominican Republic. The objectives of this paper are to analyze and assess the difficulties and facilities for the development of Radiopharmaceutical Therapy in Dominican Republic. We made surveys with the help of Nuclear Medicine Physicians of different Nuclear Medicine departments. 8 Nuclear Physicians accepted the interview. Two of these Nuclear Medicine Centers are Department of a Cancer Center and they have many patients for therapies. In the majority opinion of Physicians, Cost of Radiopharmaceuticals is principal problem to use Therapy in Dominican Republic. In addition the following problems were identified: Lack of awareness about new therapy in Nuclear Medicine among Physicians of other specialties, lack of adequate training in the current trends of radionuclide therapy and finally lack of basic infrastructure, equipment and finances to buy radiopharmaceuticals and introduce radionuclide therapy. For this reason, Nuclear Medicine Centers prefer to work with only I-131 Therapy and they do not have new programs to start other therapies. In the near future, our department of Nuclear Medicine will work with I-131, pain palliation, treatment of metastatic disease and Treatment of benign diseases. We have interest in offering other therapies in the department and we hope that other departments with more resources, have the same interest, to enhance practice of radionuclide therapy in our country. (author)

  14. Development of a specific radiopharmaceutical based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with HYNIC-peptide/mannose for the sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo G, B. E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to prepare a multifunctional system of 99m Tc-labelled gold nanoparticles conjugated to HYNIC-G GC/mannose and to evaluate its biological behaviour as a potential radiopharmaceutical for sentinel lymph node detection. Hydrazino nicotinyl-Gly-Gly-Cys-NH 2 (HYNIC-G GC) peptide and a thiol-triazole-mannose derivative were synthesized, characterized and conjugated to gold nanoparticles (Au-Np, 20 nm) to prepare a multifunctional system of HYNIC-G GC-Au-Np-mannose by means of spontaneous reaction of the thiol (Cys) present in HYNIC-G GC sequence and in the thiol-mannose derivative. The nano conjugate was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (Tem), IR, UV-Vis, Raman, Fluorescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S). 99m Tc labelling was carried out using EDDA/tricine as co ligands and SnCl 2 as reducing agent with further size-exclusion chromatography purification. Radiochemical purity was determined by size-exclusion HPLC and I TLC-Sg analyses. In vitro binding studies were carried out in rat liver homogenized tissue (mannose-receptor positive tissue). Biodistribution studies were accomplished in Wistar rats and images obtained using a micro-SPECT/CT system. Tem and the spectroscopic techniques demonstrated that Au-Np were functionalized with HYNIC-G GC and thiol-mannose through interactions with thiol groups of cysteine. Radio-chromatograms showed radiochemical purity higher than 95%. 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-G GC-Au-Np-mannose ( 99m Tc-Au-Np-mannose) showed specific recognition for mannose receptors in rat liver tissue. After subcutaneous administration of 99m Tc-Au-Np-mannose in rats (foot pad), radioactivity levels in the popliteal and inguinal lymph nodes revealed that 99% of the activity was extracted by the first lymph node (popliteal extraction). Biodistribution studies and in vivo micro-SPECT/CT images in Wistar rats showed an evident lymph node uptake (11.58 ± 1.98% Id at 1 h) which was retained during 24 h with

  15. Study of the radiolabeling of substance P with Lutetium-177 and analysis of the stability in vitro: development of new radiopharmaceutical for tumor treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Clarice Maria de; Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Mengatti, Jair Mengatti; Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de

    2009-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is an 11- amino acid neuropeptide, which is known as an important member of the family of the tachykinins, characterized by the C-terminal sequence Phe-X-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2. Radiolabeled SP has been described and proposal for detection and treatment of diseases such as arthritis and tumors. SP is the most important target of neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptors, over expressed in malignant gliomas. 177 Lu is commonly used in the production of radiopharmaceuticals for treatment of neuroendocrine tumors and is a radionuclide with favorable properties for endo radiotherapy. The half-life of 177 Lu is 6.75 days and it emits b- particles of 497 keV average energy. Moreover, 177 Lu also emits g radiation of 208 keV average energy, which makes imaging diagnosis possible. There are few studies describing radiolabeled SP analogs in literature and the objective of this work was to study the radiolabeling conditions and the stability of SP complexed to DOTA chelator, using 177 Lu as radionuclide, in order to determine the best radiolabeling methodology. A high radiochemical purity (> 95%) and high specific activity of DOTA-SP was achieved when the reaction time was 30 minutes, the temperature was 90 deg C, the mass of DOTA-SP was 10 mg and 177 Lu activity was 185 MBq. These conditions extrapolate will be used in future experiments with high activity and also in in vitro and in vivo studies involving glioma models. (author)

  16. Radiopharmaceutical labeling research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop methods of attaching radionuclides to monoclonal antibodies and antibody fragments for use in tumor imaging and internal radiation therapy. Monoclonal antibodies and their fragments are of interest because they enable the selective targeting of tumors. The labeled antibodies could be employed as carriers to transport radioisotopes to tumors, thus minimizing total-body radiation dose and radiation damage to normal tissue. Because the time required for labeled antibodies to find the tumor antigen and deliver the dose to the tumor is estimated to be about 1-3 days, radionuclides with a l- to 3-day half-life would be optimum for this purpose. Two of the radionuclides produced at LAMPF, 67 Cu and 77 Br, have the suitable half-life and nuclear-decay properties for use in tumor imaging or therapy with radiolabeled antibodies. These radionuclides and the efforts to prepare radiolabeled antibodies with them are described. We have used three different approaches to meet this objective of labeling antibodies: (1) labeling chelating agents with metal radionuclides, then conjugating the labeled chelating agents to antibodies; (2) conjugating activated chelating agents to antibodies, followed by metalation with metal radionuclides; and (3) radiobrominating small molecules that can be conjugated to antibodies

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor gene transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L. I.; Morin, K. W.; Knaus, E. E.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering and molecular biology have opened the door to disease treatment by transferring genes to cells that are responsible for the pathological condition being addressed. These genes can serve to supplement or introduce the function of indigenous genes that are either inadequately expressed or that are congenitally absent in the patient. They can introduce new functions such as drug sensitization to provide a unique therapeutic target. Gene transfer is readily monitored in vitro using a range of histochemical and biochemical tests that are ''built in'' to the therapeutic gene cassette. In vivo, in situ monitoring of the gene transfer and gene expression processes can be achieved with these tests only if biopsy is possible. Scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the extent and location of gene expression, provided that an appropriate reporter gene is included in the therapeutic cassette. This overview includes a brief orientation to gene transfer therapy and is followed by a review of current approaches to gene therapy imaging. The concluding section deals with imaging based on radiolabelled nucleoside substrates for herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase, with emphasis on IVFRU, a stable potent and selective HSV-1 TK substrate developed in their laboratories

  18. Molecular Engineering of Technetium and Rhenium Based Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zubieta, J.

    2003-01-01

    The research was based on the observation that despite the extraordinarily rich coordination chemistry of technetium and rhenium and several notable successes in reagent design, the extensive investigations by numerous research groups on a variety of N 2 S 2 and N 3 S donor type ligands and on HYNIC have revealed that the chemistries of these ligands with Tc and Re are rather complex, giving rise to considerable difficulties in the development of reliable procedures for the development of radiopharmaceutical reagents

  19. 78 FR 28630 - Pfizer Therapeutic Research, Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development Division, Formerly Known as...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-15

    ... Research, Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development Division, Formerly Known as Warner Lambert Company... Groton, Connecticut location of Pfizer Therapeutic Research, Pfizer Worldwide Research & Development... Worldwide Research & Development Division, formerly known as Warner Lambert Company, Comparative Medicine...

  20. Synthesis, quality control and dosimetry of the radiopharmaceutical 18F-sodium fluoride produced at the Center for Development of Nuclear Technology - CDTN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Marina Bicalho; Soares, Marcella Araugio; Valente, Eduardo Sarmento; Waquil, Samira Soares; Santos, Raquel Gouvea dos; Silva, Juliana Batista da, E-mail: silvajb@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Serv. de Aplicacao das Radiacoes na Saude; Ferreira, Andrea Vidal [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Serv. de Reator e Irradiacoes

    2010-07-15

    {sup 18}F-Sodium fluoride (Na{sup 18}F) is a radiopharmaceutical used for diagnosis in nuclear medicine by positron emission tomography (PET) imaging. Bone scintigraphy is normally performed using {sup 99m}Tc- MDP. However, {sup 18}F PET scans promise high quality imaging with increased resolution and improved sensitivity and specificity. In order to make available a tool for more specific studies of tumors and non oncological diseases of bone tissue, the UPPR/CDTN team undertook the production and quality control of Na{sup 18}F injectable solution with the physical-chemical, microbiological and biological characteristics recommended in the U.S. Pharmacopeia. Na{sup 18}F radiochemical purity was 96.7 {+-} 1.3 %, with Rf= 0.026 {+-} 0.006. The product presented a pH of 5.3 {+-} 0.6, half life of 109.0 {+-} 0.8 minutes, endotoxin limit < 5.0 EU.mL{sup -1} and no microbial contaminants. The biodistribution of Na{sup 18}F was similar to that described in the literature, with a clearance of 0.19 mL.min{sup -1} and distribution volume of 18.76 mL. The highest bone concentration (5.0 {+-} 0.5 %ID.g{sup -1}) was observed 20 minutes after injection. Na{sup 18}F produced at the UPPR presented all the quality assurance requirements of the U.S. Pharmacopeia and can be safely used for clinical bone imaging. (author)

  1. Radiopharmaceutical projects of CNESTEN (Centre National de l'Energie, des Sciences et des Techniques Nucleaires)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, the prescriptions of isotopic investigations are increasing because they can provide early information about morphological anomalies and permit,so to avoid long and onerous treatments. Until now, Morocco imports the radiopharmaceuticals in spite of the difficulties related to administrative procedures. To facilitate these procedures CNESTEN has launched a project which involves the following activities: - Import and distribution of needed radiopharmaceuticals; - development and production of new radiopharmaceutical kits in cooperation with scientific partners. Priority is given to the most prescribed radiopharmaceuticals. Many kits have been produced with manufacturing protocol modifications aiming to improve and optimize the production processes. The quality of the obtained products is tested and their biodistribution kinetics are studied. (F.M.)

  2. Radiopharmaceutical agents for skeletal scanning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jansen, S.E.; Van Aswegen, A.; Loetter, M.G.; Minnaar, P.C.; Otto, A.C.; Goedhals, L.; Dedekind, P.S.

    1987-01-01

    The quality of bone scan images obtained with a locally produced and with an imported radiopharmaceutical bone agent, methylene diphosphonate (MDP), was compared visually. Standard skeletal imaging was carried out on 10 patients using both agents, with a period of 2 to 7 days between studies with alternate agents. Equal amounts of activity were administered for both agents. All images were acquired on Polaroid film for subsequent evaluation. The acquisition time for standard amount of counts per study was recorded. Three physicians with applicable experience evaluated image quality (on a 4 point scale) and detectability of metastasis (on a 3 point scale). There was no statistically significant difference (p 0,05) between the two agents by paired t-test of Hotelling's T 2 analysis. It is concluded that the imaging properties of the locally produced and the imported MDP are similar

  3. Characterization of aerosols containing radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, Kenya Dias da; Santos, Maristela Souza

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study is to present the main lines of action of the Laboratorio de Caracterizacao de Aerossois (LCA /IRD) in the study of aerosols, the techniques available and the capability of these techniques as a tool in the biokinetics behavior study of radiopharmaceuticals and evaluating the particle exposed individuals containing these molecules. The LCA provides the following analytical techniques: spectrometry alpha, gamma and alpha counting and gross beta; PIXE (Particle Induced X rays Emission) and mass spectrometry-based flight time measurement of molecular ions ( 252 Cf-PDMS - 252 Cf-Plasma Desorption Mass Spectrometry). This technique is used to identify compounds mass to 10 000 a.m.u. The combination of these techniques has been applied to the study in vitro of the toxicology of the metals and radionuclides both in the respiratory tract as in the gastrointestinal

  4. Synthesis and formulation of {sup 99m} Tc-ECD radiopharmaceutical; Sintesis y formulacion del radiofarmaco {sup 99m} Tc-ECD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo G, B E

    1998-06-01

    Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty which uses radioactive compounds (radionuclides) for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. {sup 99m} Tc is the more common radionuclide used in many studies in nuclear medicine because its advantages: it has a photopeak of 140 KeV and a half-life of 6 hours; it can be eluted from a Molybdenum 99 generator, so radiopharmaceuticals can be prepared on site. Ethyl cysteine dimer (ECD) labelled with reduced Technetium 99m has been purposed recently as a promising radiopharmaceutical for brain perfusion imaging {sup 99m} Tc-ECD is a lipophilic neutral complex which cross the brain blood barrier and show high brain uptake. The objective of this work was synthesize and to design a freeze dried formulation for the instant preparation of {sup 99m} Tc-ECD complex useful for brain perfusion imaging. We obtained a freeze dried stable formulation for the preparation of {sup 99m} Tc-ECD kit with a radiochemical purity higher than 90 %, which fulfills with the quality control of radiopharmaceuticals. Furthermore, we developed analytic techniques for the determination of the different chemical compounds into the lyophilized kit. (Author).

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals using radioactive compounds in pharmaceutics and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theobald, A.

    1989-01-01

    This review of the latest techniques and developments indicates the importance of radiopharmaceutical techniques in the development of drug compounds. It presents practical demonstrations, offers practical exercises, as well as the underlying theoretical considerations: it will supplement existing (mostly American) texts in this subject, since most industrial pharmaceutical companies have a keen interest in the area and most pharmaceutical courses include the subject at degree level. The authors emphasize the pharmaceutical applications throughout. They review targeting aspects, including cell and protein labelling: and discuss radiotracers in testing dosage forms and formulation studies. Safety and legislation are considered, with reviews of the handling techniques, radiation monitoring, radiochromatography and the use of computer techniques. The latter part of the work discusses standards for radiopharmaceuticals, sterility and pyrogen testing, as well as both radiochromatographic and electrophoretic methods and their importance to quality control. (author)

  6. Export of radiopharmaceuticals and establishment of export base of cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kyungil; Kim, Youngsik

    2006-01-01

    Sam young Unit ech has seized an opportunity to advance into the radiopharmaceuticals market through successful transfer of radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing technology and medical cyclotron, an original technology in nuclear medicine that is the core of less developed areas in nuclear-related fields. The company has continued to push for research development and establishment of market base through industry-academia-research center cooperation with an aim to complement relatively less developed domestic technology and market than in advanced countries, and is making efforts to establish export base in the overseas market based on stabilized supply in the domestic market. As for radiopharmaceuticals, the company is exporting Tc-99m generator to Vietnam, Thailand and the Philippines and preparing itself to export manufacture facilities for Tc-99m generator to Syria and Kazakhstan. In addition, it plans to export 13Mev Cyclotron that has been commercialized after being developed in the domestic market to the U. S. The company plans to grow up to play a pivotal role in the domestic RT area by conducting proactive business activities with an aim to revitalize the domestic market and further domestic original technologies and products in the global market

  7. Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Annual report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, B.; Seifert, S.

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 the Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. continued and further developed its basic and application-oriented research. Research at the Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, one of five institutes in the Research Centre, was focused on radiotracers as molecular probes to make the human body biochemically transparent with regard to individual molecular reactions. As illustrated by the large number of contributions in this report, the Institute is predominantly engaged in the coordination chemistry and radiopharmacology of technetium and rhenium. (orig.)

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals and other compounds labelled with short-lived radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals and Other Compounds Labelled with Short-Lived Radionuclides covers through both review and contributed articles the potential applications and developments in labeling with short-lived radionuclides whose use is restricted to institutions with accelerators. The book discusses the current and potential use of generator-produced radionuclides as well as other short-lived radionuclides, and the problems of quality control of such labeled compounds. The book is useful to nuclear medicine physicians.

  9. Computational system for activity calculation of radiopharmaceuticals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... 2National Nuclear Energy Commission, Brazil. Accepted 24 October ... radiopharmaceuticals in use around the world with ... ment with a very important aspects: no profits ends. The tool ... The software interface is showed in ...

  10. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry for positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, PH

    Radiopharmaceutical chemistry includes the selection, preparation, and preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled compounds. This paper describes selection criteria for candidates for positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. Practical aspects of nucleophilic and electrophilic

  11. Therapeutic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Discusses all aspects of radionuclide therapy, including basic principles, newly available treatments, regulatory requirements, and future trends. Provides the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Explains the role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in effectively coordinating a diverse multidisciplinary team. Written by leading experts. The recent revolution in molecular biology offers exciting new opportunities for targeted radionuclide therapy. The selective irradiation of tumor cells through molecular biological mechanisms is now permitting the radiopharmaceutical control of tumors that are unresectable and unresponsive to either chemotherapy or conventional radiotherapy. In this up-to-date, comprehensive book, world-renowned experts discuss the basic principles of radionuclide therapy, explore in detail the available treatments, explain the regulatory requirements, and examine likely future developments. The full range of clinical applications is considered, including thyroid cancer, hematological malignancies, brain tumors, liver cancer, bone and joint disease, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of theoretical background and practical information will provide the reader with all the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Careful attention is also paid to the important role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in delivering the effective coordination of a diverse multidisciplinary team that is essential to the safe provision of treatment.

  12. Therapeutic nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Richard P. (ed.) [ENETS Center of Excellence, Bad Berka (Germany). THERANOSTICS Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Molecular Imaging

    2014-07-01

    Discusses all aspects of radionuclide therapy, including basic principles, newly available treatments, regulatory requirements, and future trends. Provides the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Explains the role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in effectively coordinating a diverse multidisciplinary team. Written by leading experts. The recent revolution in molecular biology offers exciting new opportunities for targeted radionuclide therapy. The selective irradiation of tumor cells through molecular biological mechanisms is now permitting the radiopharmaceutical control of tumors that are unresectable and unresponsive to either chemotherapy or conventional radiotherapy. In this up-to-date, comprehensive book, world-renowned experts discuss the basic principles of radionuclide therapy, explore in detail the available treatments, explain the regulatory requirements, and examine likely future developments. The full range of clinical applications is considered, including thyroid cancer, hematological malignancies, brain tumors, liver cancer, bone and joint disease, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of theoretical background and practical information will provide the reader with all the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Careful attention is also paid to the important role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in delivering the effective coordination of a diverse multidisciplinary team that is essential to the safe provision of treatment.

  13. An industry update: the latest developments in Therapeutic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Oliver C

    2018-05-01

    The present industry update covers the period of 1 January-31 January 2018, with information sourced from company press releases, regulatory and patent agencies as well as scientific literature. Several public offerings (Gecko, Insmed), licensing (Foresee) and commercialization agreements (Alnylam, Collegium Pharmaceutical) as well as patent filings (Elute) continue to prove the sustained investments in the drug delivery market. In increasing numbers, more effective ways to deliver the active ingredient to the right location and the right dose through devices (Boehringer Ingelheim's Respimat, Medtronics' SynchroMedII) or improved compound properties through formulation (Aquestive Therapeutics' PharmFilm, Noven Pharmaceuticals' transdermal patch) are reaching the market. Furthering biologics and gene delivery (Avacta, Bracco) proves that novel drug delivery technologies are successfully addressing more challenging drug formats.

  14. Metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reguera, L.; Lozano, M. L.; Alonso, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    In 1986 the National Board of Medical Specialties defined the specialty of nuclear medicine as a medical specialty that uses radioisotopes for prevention, diagnosis, therapy and medical research. Nowadays, treatment with radiopharmaceuticals has reached a major importance within of nuclear medicine. The ability to treat tumors with radiopharmaceutical, Radiation selective therapy has become a first line alternative. In this paper, the current situation of the different therapies that are sued in nuclear medicine, is reviewed. (Author)

  15. Radiation decomposition of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinghurst, M.W.; Rempel, S.; Westendorf, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    Technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals are shown to be subject to autoradiation-induced decomposition, which results in increasing abundance of pertechnetate in the preparation. This autodecomposition is catalyzed by the presence of oxygen, although the removal of oxygen does not prevent its occurrence. The initial appearance of pertechnetate in the radiopharmaceutical is shown to be a function of the amount of radioactivity, the quantity of stannous ion used, and the ratio of /sup 99m/Tc to total technetium in the preparation

  16. Report of the Task Force on radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacker, D.K.; Porter, B.J.; Watkins, G.

    1975-01-01

    The procedures for evaluation of IND and NDA applications were reviewed by FDA and the state members of the Task Force believe that there is significant progress being made toward expeditious handling of these items. Progress toward publication of the final rule on radiopharmaceuticals has reduced the need for state regulatory activity in investigational aspects of radiopharmaceutical research to the point that the original concept for the training is no longer valid

  17. New technologies for production of radiopharmaceuticals and other medical preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazaniak, Z.; Iller, E.; Mikolajczak, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Radioisotope Centre POLATOM belongs to the group of R and D institutions whose profile of activities comprises, besides applied research work, also manufacturing of a range of products based on implementation of the Centre's own developments. The Centre possesses considerable experience in its area of expertise: forty-six years of manufacturing of various radiation sources and radiopharmaceuticals, performing metrology and analysis of radioactive materials, which makes OBRI a unique R and D unit. The Centre is a chief manufacturer supplier of radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear medicine in Poland, and also an active exporter with a market of several tens countries. The current trends in the Centre activity assume combination of R and D work with practical application of its results for production purposes. The undertaken research topics are studied in co-operation with domestic and foreign scientific institutions. (author)

  18. Cerenkov Luminescence Tomography for In Vivo Radiopharmaceutical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI is a cost-effective molecular imaging tool for biomedical applications of radiotracers. The introduction of Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT relative to planar CLI can be compared to the development of X-ray CT based on radiography. With CLT, quantitative and localized analysis of a radiopharmaceutical distribution becomes feasible. In this contribution, a feasibility study of in vivo radiopharmaceutical imaging in heterogeneous medium is presented. Coupled with a multimodal in vivo imaging system, this CLT reconstruction method allows precise anatomical registration of the positron probe in heterogeneous tissues and facilitates the more widespread application of radiotracers. Source distribution inside the small animal is obtained from CLT reconstruction. The experimental results demonstrated that CLT can be employed as an available in vivo tomographic imaging of charged particle emitters in a heterogeneous medium.

  19. Infection imaging with radiopharmaceuticals in the 21st century

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Das, Satya S.; Wareham, David W. [St. Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Medical Microbiology; Britton, Keith E. [St. Bartholomew' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Hall, Anne V. [Harefield Hospital, Middlesex (United Kingdom). Microbiology Dept.

    2002-09-01

    Infection continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Nuclear medicine has an important role in aiding the diagnosis of particularly deep-seated infections such as abscesses, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, endocarditis, and infections of prosthetic devices. Established techniques such as radiolabelled leucocytes are sensitive and specific for inflammation but do not distinguish between infective and non-infective inflammation. The challenge for Nuclear Medicine in infection imaging in the 21st century is to build on the recent trend towards the development of more infection specific radiopharmaceuticals, such as radiolabelled anti-infectives (e.g. 99 m Tc ciprofloxacin). In addition to aiding early diagnosis of infection, through serial imaging these agents might prove very useful in monitoring the response to and determining the optimum duration of anti-infective therapy. This article reviews the current approach to infection imaging with radiopharmaceuticals nd the future direction it might take. (author)

  20. Infection imaging with radiopharmaceuticals in the 21st century

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Das, Satya S.; Wareham, David W.; Britton, Keith E.; Hall, Anne V.

    2002-01-01

    Infection continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Nuclear medicine has an important role in aiding the diagnosis of particularly deep-seated infections such as abscesses, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, endocarditis, and infections of prosthetic devices. Established techniques such as radiolabelled leucocytes are sensitive and specific for inflammation but do not distinguish between infective and non-infective inflammation. The challenge for Nuclear Medicine in infection imaging in the 21st century is to build on the recent trend towards the development of more infection specific radiopharmaceuticals, such as radiolabelled anti-infectives (e.g. 99 m Tc ciprofloxacin). In addition to aiding early diagnosis of infection, through serial imaging these agents might prove very useful in monitoring the response to and determining the optimum duration of anti-infective therapy. This article reviews the current approach to infection imaging with radiopharmaceuticals nd the future direction it might take. (author)

  1. Digital Therapeutics: An Integral Component of Digital Innovation in Drug Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sverdlov, Oleksandr; van Dam, Joris; Hannesdottir, Kristin; Thornton-Wells, Tricia

    2018-07-01

    Digital therapeutics represent a new treatment modality in which digital systems such as smartphone apps are used as regulatory-approved, prescribed therapeutic interventions to treat medical conditions. In this article we provide a critical overview of the rationale for investing in such novel modalities, including the unmet medical needs addressed by digital therapeutics and the potential for reducing current costs of medical care. We also discuss emerging pathways to regulatory approval and how innovative business models are enabling further growth in the development of digital therapeutics. We conclude by providing some recent examples of digital therapeutics that have gained regulatory approval and highlight opportunities for the near future. © 2018 American Society for Clinical Pharmacology and Therapeutics.

  2. Recent radiopharmaceutical research at the AAEC Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.G.; Boyd, R.E.

    1985-12-01

    During the past few years a large part of the radiochemical research carried out at Lucas Heights has been devoted to the synthesis of ligands capable of forming chelate complexes with technetium-99m, as part of a search for tumour-localising radiopharmaceuticals. An account is given of the synthesis and biological evaluation of a range of these compounds and of the investigation of certain biochemical and biological properties affecting the clinical application of both ligands and radiopharmaceuticals. In addition to the search for novel Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals, major research programs on the development of Tc-99m generating systems have been in progress at Lucas Heights for several years. Work on the AAEC's Mark III Tc-99m technetium generator has been brought to a successful conclusion. A new type of Tc-99m generator, which uses an insoluble zirconium molybdate gel and provides high yields of pertechnetate by a simple elution technique, has also been developed. Studies are in progress on the osmium-iridium generator

  3. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in skeletal malignancy: evolution, not revolution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacFarlane, D.

    2003-01-01

    Many advanced malignancies are complicated by skeletal metastases, with attendant pain and disability. External beam radiotherapy is still the most effective treatment for isolated lesions. Bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals were perceived as a means of delivering radiation to multiple lesions simultaneously. A wide variety of radioisotopes have been used in this endeavor, with myelosuppression being the most significant potential adverse effect. Benefits of treatment are modest, including a transient improvement in pain control and perhaps prolongation of the treatment-free period. This is best demonstrated in prostate cancer with lower responses by skeletal metastases from breast and lung cancers. However, the treatment is yet to produce any improvement in patient survival. Experimental approaches to improve treatment efficacy include combination with cytotoxic therapy, and administration earlier in the course of the disease. Bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals have been used in treatment of advanced osteosarcoma in humans and canines and achieved effective palliation. The myelosuppressive effects of these agents have been exploited in patients with multiple myeloma to assist in attaining myeloablation prior to stem cell transplantation. Development of more potent non-radiolabelled bisphosphonates and recognition of their antitumour effect against several tumours has sparked a recrudescence of interest in their use for bone metastases. Set against these developments, the role of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals in skeletal metastases may need to be redefined

  4. Affinity-tuning leukocyte integrin for development of safe therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Spencer

    Much attention has been given to the molecular and cellular pathways linking inflammation with cancer and the local tumor environment to identify new target molecules that could lead to improved diagnosis and treatment. Among the many molecular players involved in the complex response, central to the induction of inflammation is intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, which is of particular interest for its highly sensitive and localized expression in response to inflammatory signals. ICAM-1, which has been implicated to play a critical role in tumor progression in various types of cancer, has also been linked to cancer metastases, where ICAM-1 facilitates the spread of metastatic cancer cells to secondary sites. This unique expression profile of ICAM-1 throughout solid tumor microenvironment makes ICAM-1 an intriguing molecular target, which holds great potential as an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool. Herein, we have engineered the ligand binding domain, or the inserted (I) domain of a leukocyte integrin, to exhibit a wide range of monovalent affinities to the natural ligand, ICAM-1. Using the resulting I domain variants, we have created drug and gene delivery nanoparticles, as well as targeted immunotherapeutics that have the ability to bind and migrate to inflammatory sites prevalent in tumors and the associated microenvironment. Through the delivery of diagnostic agents, chemotherapeutics, and immunotherapeutics, the following chapters demonstrate that the affinity enhancements achieved by directed evolution bring the affinity of I domains into the range optimal for numerous applications.

  5. Report of the consultants meeting on good manufacturing practices and clean room requirements for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-07-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are compounds containing radioisotopes that are used in nuclear medicine for a variety of diagnostic studies and, to a limited extent, for therapy. Almost 80% of the diagnostic studies are carried out with 99m Tc containing radiopharmaceuticals (half-life, six hours). Recently, another class of radiopharmaceuticals contains the ultra short-lived isotopes 11 C, 13 N and 15 O as well as 18 F, which are mostly produced and immediately used in the hospital cyclotron Positron Emission Tomography (PET) facilities. In therapy, 131 I is widely used for thyroid disorders, 32 P for treatment of abnormal increase in circulating red blood cells, while 153 Sm and 89 Sr are used for palliation of pain in patients suffering from bone metastases. They contain very small amounts of chemical ingredients, normally do not have any pharmacological effects, and are administered in small volumes. Radiopharmaceuticals are produced, used and exported both in developing and developed countries. The scale of production is small compared to conventional pharmaceuticals. Monographs on radiopharmaceuticals can be found in many pharmacopoeias, such as BP, USP, EP and other compendia. This field is also marked by active research and development of new products both for diagnosis and therapy. Traditionally, production and supply of radiopharmaceuticals started as research activities of national nuclear laboratories operating reactors and cyclotrons. Certain products found useful and effective were continued to be provided to the clinics as a service from the nuclear centres. In developed countries demand of radiopharmaceuticals is so considerable that production and sale are increasingly taken over by commercial companies. On the other hand, in many developing countries, demand is still limited, and radiopharmaceutical production and supply still remain more of a service operation at the national nuclear centres. Depending on the radioactivity levels handled, production has to

  6. Development of aptamers for use as radiopharmaceuticals in the bacterial infection identification; Desenvolvimento de aptameros especificos para aplicacao como radiofarmacos na identificacao de bacterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ieda Mendes

    2013-08-01

    The difficulty in early detection of specific foci caused by bacteria in the bacterial infection has raised the need to search for new techniques for this purpose, since these foci require prolonged treatment with antibiotics and in some cases even drainage or, if applicable, removal of prostheses or grafts. Detection of bacterial infections by scintigraphy had the advantage that a whole body image could be obtained, since specific tracers were available. This study aims to obtain aptamers specific for bacteria identification for future use as radiopharmaceutical. The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) methodology can generate oligonucleotides (aptamers) that are able to bind with high affinity and specificity to a specific target, from small molecules to complex proteins, by using rounds of enrichment and amplification. Aptamers can be labeled with different radionucleotides such as {sup 99}mTc, {sup 18}F and {sup 32}P. In this study, aptamers anti-peptidoglycan, the main component of the bacterial outer cell wall, were obtained through SELEX. Whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus were also used to perform the SELEX to cells (cell-SELEX). The selection of aptamers was performed by two different procedures (A and B). The A process has been accomplished by 15 SELEX rounds in which the separation of the oligonucleotides bound to the peptidoglycan of unbound ones was performed by filtration. In the B process 15 SELEX rounds were performed using the centrifugation for this separation, followed by 5 rounds cell-SELEX. The SELEX started with a pool of ssDNA (single stranded DNA). For A process, initially a library of ssDNA was incubated with peptidoglycan and the amplification of oligonucleotides that were able to bind to peptidoglycan was performed by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reation). The amplified oligonucleotides were again incubated with peptidoglycan, amplified and purified. At the end of 15 selection rounds the selected oligonucleotides

  7. Synthesis, quality control and dosimetry of the radiopharmaceutical 18F-sodium fluoride produced at the Center for Development of Nuclear Technology - CDTN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Bicalho Silveira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 18F-Sodium fluoride (Na18F is a radiopharmaceutical used for diagnosis in nuclear medicine by positron emission tomography (PET imaging. Bone scintigraphy is normally performed using 99mTc-MDP. However, 18F PET scans promise high quality imaging with increased resolution and improved sensitivity and specificity. In order to make available a tool for more specific studies of tumors and non-oncological diseases of bone tissue, the UPPR/CDTN team undertook the production and quality control of Na18F injectable solution with the physical-chemical, microbiological and biological characteristics recommended in the U.S. Pharmacopeia. Na18F radiochemical purity was 96.7 ± 1.3 %, with Rf= 0.026 ± 0.006. The product presented a pH of 5.3 ± 0.6, half life of 109.0 ± 0.8 minutes, endotoxin limit O Fluoreto de sódio 18F (Na18F é um radiofármaco empregado para diagnóstico através da Tomografia por Emissão de Pósitrons (PET. Cintilografias ósseas são normalmente obtidas utilizando-se 99mTc-MDP. Entretanto, o interesse pelo Na18F é crescente, principalmente devido à obtanção de imagens de elevada resolução. Com o objetivo de tornar disponível uma ferramenta mais específica para estudos de tumores e doenças não-oncológicas do tecido ósseo, o grupo da UPPR/CDTN implementou a produção e o controle de qualidade da solução injetável de Na18F com as características físico-química, microbiológica e biológica preconizadas pela farmacopéia. Sua pureza radioquímica foi de 96,7 ± 1,3 %, com Rf= 0,026 ± 0,006. O produto apresentou pH igual a 5,3 ± 0,6, tempo de meia-vida de 109,0 ± 0,8 minutos, limite de endotoxinas < 5,0 EU.mL-1 e ausência de microrganismos. O perfil de biodistribuição em camundongos foi semelhante ao disponível na literatura, com depuração igual a 0,19 mL.min-1 e volume de distribuição igual a 18,76 mL. A concentração máxima (5,0 ± 0,5 % DI.g-1 foi observada no osso 20 minutos após a injeção. O Na18

  8. Advances in the production of isotopes and radiopharmaceuticals at the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louw, P.A.; De Villiers, W.Y.Z.; Jarvis, N.V.

    1997-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa Ltd (AEC) owns and operates the 20 MW research reactor, SAFARI-1. Utilisation of the reactor has in recent years changed from research and materials testing to the production of isotopes. The most important breakthrough achieved in recent years is the production of high quality fission 99Mo. This has been produced routinely since April 1993 and supplied to clients across the world. A capability for the reliable production of 1000 Ci of 99Mo per week (calibrated for six days after production) has been proven. The AEC has also established facilities to produce its own 99mTc generators together with a most of radiopharmaceutical kits for diagnostic nuclear medicine purposes. The production of 153 Sm and 131 I (tellurium oxide route) has been operational for many years. Applications include therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals such as 153 Sm-EDTMP for bone cancer pain palliation, 13' I-Lipiodol for liver cancer and 131 I capsules for thyroid treatment. Facilities for the production of other isotopes such as 131 I (from fission), 32 P and 35 S are in various stages of completion. Extensive analytical methods and equipment have been developed and are routinely used to certify the quality of exported isotopes. Irradiation and encapsulation of 192 Ir is also performed routinely at the AEC. Modern facilities allow for the production of isotopes such as 131 Ba and 140 La on an ad hoc basis. Quality assurance procedures based on ISO9000 were developed for all aspects of the production of the various isotopes. Documentation, such as Drug Master Files, required by authorities in various countries has also been submitted and accepted

  9. Monoclonal antibody hapten radiopharmaceutical delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goodwin, D.A.; McTigue, M.

    1986-01-01

    One hundred μg of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) CHA255 with a binding constant Kb of 4 x 10 9 was complexed with indium-111 labelled BLEDTA II, BLEDTA IV, benzyl EDTA, and an EDTA conjugate of Fab. The 24-h tumour and organ distribution of BALB/c mice bearing KHJJ tumours was studied for each compound alone, the antibody complex, and 3 h following a chelate chase of the antibody complex. Whole body biological half-life was measured for 7 days with and without a chelate chase for each antibody complex. The 24-h whole body counts dropped 20 to 60% and blood concentration fell over 89% within 3 h of administering the chelate chase. Theoretical equivalent human organ doses were calculated from the 24-h organ concentrations, effective half-life, and MIRD 11 S values (absorbed dose per cumulated activity). Liver and spleen were the target organs, with the dose ranging from 0.50 to 3.91 rads mCi -1 . The reduction in organ radiation dose varied up to 95% following the chelate chase. Rapid selective renal clearance of chelate labelled radiopharmaceuticals by competitive inhibition (chelate chase) of their reversible binding to monoclonal antibodies enhances tumour imaging and improves the radiation dosimetry. (author)

  10. Gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.; John, E.K.; Barnhart, A.J.

    1990-01-01

    Several isotopes of gallium and copper exhibit nuclear properties that make them attractive for applications in nuclear medicine, most notably Ga-67, Ga-68, Cu-67 and Cu-62. Of these, gamma-emitting Ga-67 has historically found the greatest clinical use, based on the observation that tracer gallium(III) citrate rapidly produces Ga-67 transferrin upon intravenous injection and then slowly affords selective Ga-67 localization in sites of abscess and certain tumors. Copper-67 has received attention as a potential label for tissue-selective monoclonal antibodies, since its associated γ-photons can be used for external imaging and its β - -emissions could be used for radiation therapy. Positron-emitting gallium-68 and copper-62, being available from parent/daughter generator systems, have attracted interest as potential labels for radiopharmaceuticals used in positron emission tomography (PET) because they could reduce the dependence of this imaging technology on hospital-based cyclotrons. The 10 min. half-life of Cu-62 is particularly well-suited to the time frame of PET studies of tissue perfusion, an application for which Cu(II)-bis(thiosemicarbazone) derivatives appear promising. The 68 min. half-life of Ga-68 makes it appropriate for PET studies over longer imaging time spans

  11. [Nuclear cardiology with new radiopharmaceuticals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunko, H

    1994-08-01

    In the field of nuclear cardiology, 99mTc labeled myocardial perfusion agents such as MIBI, Tetrofosmin and Teboroxime, 111In-antimyosin for imaging of myocardial necrosis, 123I-betamethyl-iodophenylpentadecanoic acid (BMIPP) for imaging of myocardial fatty acid metabolism and 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (MIBG) for imaging of myocardial adrenergic function are introduced recently in Japan. Improved image quality and simultaneous evaluation of myocardial perfusion, function and wall motion can be obtained with use of 99mTc labeled myocardial perfusion agents. 111In-antimyosin enables specific imaging of myocardial necrosis which leads to the use for wide variety of heart diseases. Discrepancy of the myocardial perfusion and metabolism in case of stunned myocardium or cardiomyopathy can be evaluated by 123I-BMIPP in conjunction with perfusion agent. Recently wide variety of diseases which may have cardiac adrenergic abnormality are targeted for 123I-MIBG imaging. These new radiopharmaceuticals are expected to be powerful tool for evaluation of the pathophysiology including severity and prognosis and evaluation of the etiology of the various heart diseases.

  12. Development of more efficacious /sup 99m/Tc organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures. Progress report, May 1, 1983-January 1, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of many different technetium complexes in the Tc(NaBH 4 )-HEDP, Tc(NaBH 4 )-MDP, and Tc(NaBH 4 )-DMAD systems has been clearly demonstrated by HPLC-separation of reaction mixtures. The dramatically different biodistributions exhibited by the various complexes strongly suggests that an improved skeletal radiopharmaceutical would result if the single technetium complex which exhibits the optimum biodistribution properties is administered to the patient. The influence of pH, time, concentrations of TcO 4 - and ligand, and the nature of reductant on the relative amounts of the different complexes formed were investigated. Electrochemical reduction offers a means of possibly generating a desired complex in very high yield due to the precision with which redox potential can be controlled. Additionally, we have developed HPLC methods with uv and electrochemical detection for the determination of total TcO 4 - in eluents from the 99 Mo//sup 99m/Tc radionuclide generator. The inadequacy of current theory to accurately predict total TcO 4 - in generator eluents was demonstrated in that the concentration of total TcO 4 - is a major factor determining the yield of individual Tc-diphosphonate complexes. Spectroelectrochemistry proved an effective technique to study the redox properties of Tc-complexes. 18 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  13. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules; Perspectivas diagnosticas y terapeuticas en medicina nuclear: biomoleculas radiomarcadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G. [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud. ININ, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear. Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Melendez A, L. [Facultad de Medicina, UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  14. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules; Perspectivas diagnosticas y terapeuticas en medicina nuclear: biomoleculas radiomarcadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud. ININ, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear. Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Melendez A, L [Facultad de Medicina, UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  15. Technical cooperation for the wider uses of Ho-166 therapeutic agents in European countries

    CERN Document Server

    Park, K B; Choi, S M; Han, K H; Hong, Y D; Park, W W; Shin, B C

    2002-01-01

    Czech has put their priority in developing the radiopharmaceuticals based on reactor produced Ho-166 and a related fabrication will be extended to other EU conturies including Germany, France, etc after a development of project. The collaboration will be based on the mutual agreement for developing the between research institutes, industries and academic institutes and further researches should be followed by the issue of developing radiopharmaceuticals using Ho-166. To strengthen the collaboration, detailed discussions for the practical collaboration have been made through the visitation to the research institution of each counter part. For implementing the collaboration between NPI and KAERI, an institutional basis technical cooperation agreement(TCA) will be concluded. Furthermore, agreement for the substantial collaboration on Ho-166 related researches will be made after the conclusion of the TCA. It will accelerate the commercialization of KAERI developed Ho-166 therapeutic agents into other European cou...

  16. Development of a Multifaceted Ovarian Cancer Therapeutic and Imaging Agent

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Markland, Francis S

    2008-01-01

    ...%. This project outlines the development of a recombinant version of a member of a class of proteins known as disintegrins as an innovative imaging and diagnostic agent for ovarian cancer (OC). Vicrostatin (VN...

  17. Concise review : Developing best-practice models for the therapeutic use of extracellular vesicles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reiner, Agnes T.; Witwer, Kenneth W.; Van Balkom, Bas W.M.; De Beer, Joel; Brodie, Chaya; Corteling, Randolph L.; Gabrielsson, Susanne; Gimona, Mario; Ibrahim, Ahmed G.; De Kleijn, Dominique; Lai, Charles P.; Tvall, Jan Lo; Del Portillo, Hernando A; Reischl, Ilona G; Riazifar, Milad; Salomon, Carlos; Tahara, Hidetoshi; Toh, Wei Seong; Wauben, Marca H M; Yang, Vicky K.; Yang, Yijun; Yeo, Ronne Wee Yeh; Yin, Hang; Giebel, Bernd; Rohde, Eva; Lim, Sai Kiang

    2017-01-01

    Growing interest in extracellular vesicles (EVs, including exosomes and microvesicles) as therapeutic entities, particularly in stem cell-related approaches, has underlined the need for standardization and coordination of development efforts. Members of the International Society for Extracellular

  18. Preparation of sup(113m)In-labelled compounds of radiopharmaceutical interest. Part of a coordinated programme on radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servian, J.; Robles, A.

    1975-06-01

    Techniques for the preparation and control of already known and new sup(113m)In-radiopharmaceuticals were investigated. New rapid procedures for the control and preparation of a number of radiopharmaceuticals were developed and standardized. After biological distribution studies and clinical tests, new techniques for the preparation of the following indium-113 radiopharmaceuticals were adopted: a) Indium - labelled colloids of: S, Al(OH) 3 , Fe(OH) 3 and AlPO 4 for liver and spleen scintigraphy. b) Indium labelled chelates using the ligands EDTA, DTPA, TTHA (Triethylene-tetramine-hexaacetic acid) and DHPTA (Diamino-hydroxy-propane-tetraacetic acid) for brain scintigraphy. c) Indium labelled Fe(OH) 3 macroaggregates and microspheres for lung scintigraphy. d) Several complexes of sup(113m)In with different ligands (fluoride, tartrate, pyrophosphate, tripolyphosphate, trimetaphosphate, EHDP (or ethane-1-hydroxy-1, 1-diphosphonate), ethylendiamine-pyrophosphate were synthesized and its potential use as bone-scanning agents were evaluated. It was found that the complexes with tartrate, tripolyphosphate and EHDP show appreciable skeletal uptake (bone/muscle ratio are 9.0, 5.5, and 4.7 respectively), although they are inferior to the sup(99m)Tc bone-scanning agents. e) A new simple technique is proposed for the preparation of highly concentrated sup(113m)In solutions. The technique is based on the precipitation of In(OH) 3 , millipore filtration and redissolution in a small volume of 0.05 N HCl

  19. 188W/188Re Generator System and Its Therapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boschi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The 188Re radioisotope represents a useful radioisotope for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic applications, particularly because of its favorable nuclear properties. The nuclide decay pattern is through the emission of a principle beta particle having 2.12 MeV maximum energy, which is enough to penetrate and destroy abnormal tissues, and principle gamma rays (Eγ=155 keV, which can efficiently be used for imaging and calculations of radiation dose. 188Re may be conveniently produced by 188W/188Re generator systems. The challenges related to the double neutron capture reaction route to provide only modest yield of the parent 188W radionuclide indeed have been one of the major issues about the use of 188Re in nuclear medicine. Since the specific activity of 188W used in the generator is relatively low (<185 GBq/g, the eluted Re188O4- can have a low radioactive concentration, often ineffective for radiopharmaceutical preparation. However, several efficient postelution concentration techniques have been developed, which yield clinically useful Re188O4- solutions. This review summarizes the technologies developed for the preparation of 188W/188Re generators, postelution concentration of the 188Re perrhenate eluate, and a brief discussion of new chemical strategies available for the very high yield preparation of 188Re radiopharmaceuticals.

  20. Radiopharmaceuticals For Detection Of Inflammation And Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurlaila, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Feeling of pain in the body could be caused by reaction of inflantation and infection as well. One of the methods could be used to detect the reaction is nuclear technique using radiopharmaceutical as radiotracer. Some radiopharmaceuticals having specific accunulation mechanism to diagnose the presence of inflamations and infections with satisfactory results. Among those radiophannaceuticals are technetium-99m-hexamethylpropileneamine-white blood cell ( 99m Tc-HMPAO-WBC), indium-111-oxine-white blood cell ( 111 In-oksin-WBC). technetium-99m-immunoglobuline G ( 99m Tc-lgG) and technetium-99m-infecton ( 99m Tc-infecton). In visualization using this method. the information of a serial previous medical treatment of the patient should be known, because cer1ain medicament, could influence the biological characteristic of radiopharmaceuticals and hence. a missed diagnosis could be resulted. This review discusses several radiopharmaceuticals for inflamation and infection, diagnoses their accumulation, mechanism in the body. Besides, the radiopharmaceuticals interaction with several drugs are also reviewed

  1. A new therapeutic community: development of a compassion-focussed and contextual behavioural environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veale, David; Gilbert, Paul; Wheatley, Jon; Naismith, Iona

    2015-01-01

    Social relationships and communities provide the context and impetus for a range of psychological developments, from genetic expression to the development of core self-identities. This suggests a need to think about the therapeutic changes and processes that occur within a community context and how communities can enable therapeutic change. However, the 'therapeutic communities' that have developed since the Second World War have been under-researched. We suggest that the concept of community, as a change process, should be revisited within mainstream scientific research. This paper briefly reviews the historical development of therapeutic communities and critically evaluates their current theory, practice and outcomes in a systematic review. Attention is drawn to recent research on the nature of evolved emotion regulation systems, the way these are entrained by social relationships, the importance of affiliative emotions in the regulation of threat and the role of fear of affiliative emotions in psychopathology. We draw on concepts from compassion-focussed therapy, social learning theory and functional analytical psychotherapy to consider how members of a therapeutic community can be aware of each other's acts of courage and respond using compassion. Living in structured and affiliative-orientated communities that are guided by scientific models of affect and self-regulation offers potential therapeutic advantages over individual outpatient therapy for certain client groups. This conclusion should be investigated further. Key Practitioner Message Current therapeutic community practice is not sufficiently evidence based and may not be maximizing the potential therapeutic value of a community. Compassion-focussed therapy and social learning theory offer new approaches for a therapeutic environment, involving an understanding of the role, nature and complexities of compassionate and affiliative relationships from staff and members, behavioural change guided by

  2. How will diagnostic and therapeutic oncology develop? Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senekowitsch-Schmidtke, R.

    1998-01-01

    New developments in the field of tumor biology and gene therapy reveal that by somatic gene transfer every tumor cell can be transferred into a high immonogenic cell. The gene transfer leads to an activation of accessory signals in lymphocytes which can destroy the tumor cell. After transfection of tumor cells with 'suicide genes' untoxic virostatics can be phosphorylated by the viral thymidine kinase. Incorporation of the phosphorylated substance into DNA inhibits further cell replication. The transfection efficiency can be visualized by the retention of the F-18 labeled virostatics in the tumor tissue. For characterization of tumor cells a large number of tracers have been developed including radiolobeled aminoacids, nucleotides and target specific modified antibodies and peptides. Modern concepts of chemotherapy are changing from cytostatic therapy to pathogeneses-oriented strategies with regard to molecular and functional characteristics of the malignant cells. Such kind of therapies can interact with specific receptors and inhibit the signal transduction in tumor cells. (orig.) [de

  3. Quality controls of radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez de Castiglia, S.I.; Fraga de Suarez, A.H.; Mitta, A.E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Chromatographic quality controls for Tc-99m; In-113m; I-131; Tl-201 and Ga-67 radiopharmaceuticals are described. Moreover, a chromatographic system which allows to separate different radiopharmaceuticals from In-113m is pointed out. (author) [es

  4. The search for consistency in the manufacture of PET radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Finn, R.D.

    1999-01-01

    Nuclear Medicine is the specialty of medical imaging, which utilizes a variety of radionuclides incorporated into specific compounds for diagnostic imaging and therapeutic applications. During recent years, research efforts in this discipline have concentrated on the decay characteristics of particular radionuclides and the design of unique radiolabeled tracers necessary to achieve time-dependent molecular images. Various oncology applications have utilized specific PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals, which have allowed an extension from functional process imaging in tissue to pathologic processes and nuclide directed treatments. One of the most widely recognized advantages of positron emission tomography (PET) is its use of the attractive, positron-emitting biologic radiotracers that mimic natural substrates. However, a major disadvantage is that these substances are relatively short-lived and unable to be transported great distances. At this time, economic considerations and regulatory guidelines associated with the creation of a PET facility, as well as the operational costs of maintaining both the facility and the necessary procedural documentation, continue to create interesting strategic dilemmas. This commentary will focus on the current approach and anticipated impact of pending regulations, which relate to the manufacture and formulation of a variety of PET radiopharmaceuticals used in clinical research and patient management at Memorial Hospital. (author)

  5. Stability studies of therapeutic 131I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine (131I-mIBG) using high performance liquid chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murhekar, V.V.; Mathur, Anupam; Pilkhwal, Neelam S.; Prabhakar, G.; Padmanabhan, D.; Sachdev, S.S.

    2014-01-01

    BRIT is a manufacturer and supplier of therapeutic doses (100 mCi) of the radiopharmaceutical 131 I-mIBG to various nuclear medicine centers in India. The therapeutic formulation is of high radioactive concentration (>10 mCi/ml) and is thus prone to radiolytic damage during transport, storage until administration. Earlier stability studies at this laboratory were done using conventional methods like Thin Layer Chromatography (TLC) which has an inherent limitation in terms of resolution. In view of this, a suitable HPLC method has been developed and the stability of therapeutic 131 I-mIBG was monitored at various conditions

  6. Development of Acne therapeutic hydrogel patches by radiation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Younmook; Nho, Youngchang; Gwon, Huijeong; Park, Jongseok; Kim, Jinkyu; Kim, Yongsoo

    2012-04-15

    In this project, hydrogel patches containing herbal extracts mixture were developed by radiation technology for acne treatment. Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), one of the anaerobic bacterium, is the cause of inflammatory acne. To find novel mediation for inflammation of P. acnes, we confirmed the anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of several herbal extracts against P. acnes. The water extracts from five dried herbs, Phellodendron amurense Rupr., Paeonia lactiflora Pallas., Houttuynia cordata Thumb., Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., were mixed into biocompatible polymers and irradiated by using gamma-ray to prepare hydrogels. The hydrogels containing herbal extracts mixture initiated to decrease the growth of P. acnes and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-{alpha}, IL-8, IL-1{beta} and IL-6, in experiment with human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with heat-killed P. acnes at 1 mg/ml of mixture concentration.

  7. Development of Acne therapeutic hydrogel patches by radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Younmook; Nho, Youngchang; Gwon, Huijeong; Park, Jongseok; Kim, Jinkyu; Kim, Yongsoo

    2012-04-01

    In this project, hydrogel patches containing herbal extracts mixture were developed by radiation technology for acne treatment. Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), one of the anaerobic bacterium, is the cause of inflammatory acne. To find novel mediation for inflammation of P. acnes, we confirmed the anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of several herbal extracts against P. acnes. The water extracts from five dried herbs, Phellodendron amurense Rupr., Paeonia lactiflora Pallas., Houttuynia cordata Thumb., Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., were mixed into biocompatible polymers and irradiated by using gamma-ray to prepare hydrogels. The hydrogels containing herbal extracts mixture initiated to decrease the growth of P. acnes and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6, in experiment with human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with heat-killed P. acnes at 1 mg/ml of mixture concentration

  8. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, March 1, 1983-February 29, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Brownell, G.L.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes research efforts towards the achievement of a clearer understanding of the solution chemistry of technetium in order to facilitate the design of future clinical agents labeled with Tc-99m, the development of new receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals for the in vivo assessment of insulin receptors and for imaging the adrenal medulla and the brain, the examination of the utility of monoclonal antibodies and liposomes in the design of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy, and the synthesis of short-lived positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals for transverse imaging of regional physiological processes

  9. Multi-disciplinary collaboration in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Tadashi

    1989-01-01

    Various possibilities often exist in each step of radiopharmaceutical preparation, and multi-disciplinary knowledge and collaboration are necessary for improved choice of the preparation conditions. In the radionuclide production step, proton bombardment of a separated nuclide target usually exceeds other bombardments of natural targets. Isotope separation by laser-chemical method is expected to soon offer several enriched nuclides useful as the target in enough amount and moderate price. The design and preparation of radiopharmaceuticals will be directly influenced by further progress of enzymology and immunology. Nondestructive, continuous observation of chemical changes in vivo is a longing of radiochemists, and may be realized gradually through elaborate examination of chemical effects in Mossbauer absorption, γ-γ angular correlation, EC X-ray properties, and positron annihilation. Present knowledge and techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, on the other hand, can be utilized effectively in other fields of life sciences

  10. Radiopharmaceutical potential of I-131 labelled diazepam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurt, F.; Unek, P.; Asikoglu, M.; Baggi, S.; Erener, G.; Ozkilic, H.; Uluc, F.; Tuglular, I.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, diazepam is a derivative of the 1.4 benzodiazepine family that the most widely used drug as anticonvulsant agent has been labeled with I-131, as a new radiopharmaceutical and its radiopharmaceutical potential has been determined. Labeling of diazepam has been performed by iodogen method and optimum labeling conditions have been determined. Optimum reaction conditions are 1 mg for iodogen amount; 1-5 mg for diazepam amount, 15-20 minutes for reaction time and room temperature for reaction temperature. Specific activity of labeled compound was 0,15 Ci/mmol level. N-octanol/water ratio was found 1.9 for 131 IDZ ( 131 I labeled diazepam). In vivo experiments have been carried out to determine radiopharmaceutical potentials of labeled compound. Biodistribution studies on rats showed that 131 IDZ have accumulated in kidneys, liver, lungs and brain tissues. Scintigraphic results taken with gamma camera on rabbits agree with biodistribution results of rats. (author)

  11. Exposure of croatian population to radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prlic, I.; Suric Mihic, M.; Marovic, G.; Mestrovic, T.; Mrcela, I.; Cerovac, Z.; Golubovic, D.; Hajdinjak, M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to call attention to the exposure of Croatian population to open sources of ionising radiation used in medical diagnostics, radiopharmaceuticals in particular, whose initial activity is very high. Without proper exposure monitoring, it is not possible to establish the effective dose per capita, but we have estimated it to be between 6.8 μSv and 7.0 μSv for this type of internal exposure, based on a very loose assumption that about 35,000 diagnostic procedures with radiopharmaceuticals are performed in Croatia every year. This calls for further research that would eventually lead to limiting the doses received through exposure to radiopharmaceuticals. (authors)

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals for thyroid imaging: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, H.

    1979-01-01

    A review of radiopharmaceuticals which have been used for thyroid imaging was made with special emphasis on palpable thyroid nodules. An attempt was made to evaluate cold nodules derived from imaging methods using radioiodine or Tc-99m pertechnetate, followed by a successive application of another radiopharmaceutical. An attempt was also made to understand the patho-physiology of various thyroid disorders. The latter was based on the accumulated cases with discordant images between radioiodine and Tc-99m pertechnetate, and also on the iodine content within the gland by means of fluorescent techniques. Better radiopharmaceuticals are anxiously awaited in order to realize the distinction between benign and malignant thyroid disorders at the preoperative decision-making stage

  13. Synthesis of the radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biricova, V.; Kuruc, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper is shown a short overview of the biogenic positron radiopharmaceuticals production and a brief summary of some PET preparation synthesis. At the end the overview of some forward-looking positron radionuclides, which can be used for a preparation of the PET radiopharmaceuticals is said. A short review of diagnostic use of PET radiopharmaceuticals is presented (authors)

  14. In vitro test for pyrogenes in radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jovanovic, V; Zmbova, B; Bzenic, J [Institut za Nuklearne Nauke Boris Kidric, Belgrade (Yugoslavia); Berkes, J [Institut za Biohemije, Belgrade (Yugoslavia)

    1978-05-01

    Procedure and results of determination of pyrogenic substances in radiopharmaceutical preparations by an in vitro method based on the reaction between bacterial endotoxine and Limulus Amebocyte Lysate are presented. The advantage of this method as compared to the test in experimental animals performed so far has also been analyzed and proved by the fact that it enables avoidance of introduction of radioactive materials in experimental animals and of radiation effects on the results obtained in efficiency studies. The in vitro method is a quick one and requires only small quantities of the radiopharmaceutical preparation to be examined.

  15. Present status and prospect of copper radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Huawei; Li Hongfeng; Liu Boli

    1996-01-01

    In the past decade most of the efforts of copper radiopharmaceuticals research has been focused on bis(thiosemicarbazonato) copper complexes for use in myocardial and brain imaging agents. In the present work, the analogs of bis(thiosemicarbazone) is studied in labeling antibodies and tumors. The retention mechanism of Cu-PTSM is investigated. Other kinds of ligands, BAT (N 2 S 2 ) for example, can be used to prepare neutral copper complexes in order to obtain brain radiopharmaceuticals in future. (60 refs.)

  16. Tc: chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals: a prospectus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulip, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    The recent explosion in technetium chemistry evident in this symposium promises to continue unabated. As in the past, radiopharmaceutical applications will lead to new Tc chemistry. In this lecture the author will discuss those areas which appear most fertile based on chemical and radiopharmaceutical criteria. Among these will be new organometallic Tc chemistry (e.g., Tc(CNR) 6 cations), Tc complexes as metabolic tracers (e.g., Tc-analogs to FDG), and peptide-based Tc chelators (e.g., Tc-metallothionein)

  17. Key formal and legal aspects of acquiring radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine departments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kapuscinski, J.

    2007-01-01

    The article presents the key both Polish and EU legal regulation concerning terms and conditions of acquiring radiopharmaceuticals, i.e. isotope labelled compounds used for diagnostic and/ therapeutic purposes in nuclear medicine departments. The emphasis was put on the requirements regarding provision of the medicaments' safety in broad meaning of the term, which are important factors in providing patients' safety. Legal acts discussed in the article remain valid as of May 2007. (author)

  18. Delivery of Therapeutic Proteins Using Electrospun Fibers-Recent Developments and Current Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seif, Salem; Planz, Viktoria; Windbergs, Maike

    2017-10-01

    Proteins play a vital role within the human body by regulating various functions and even serving as structural constituent of many body parts. In this context, protein-based therapeutics have attracted a lot of attention in the last few decades as potential treatment of different diseases. Due to the steadily increasing interest in protein-based therapeutics, different dosage forms were investigated for delivering such complex macromolecules to the human body. Here, electrospun fibers hold a great potential for embedding proteins without structural damage and for controlled release of the protein for therapeutic applications. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the current state of protein-based carrier systems using electrospun fibers, with special emphasis on discussing their potential and key challenges in developing such therapeutic strategies, along with a prospective view of anticipated future directions. © 2017 Deutsche Pharmazeutische Gesellschaft.

  19. Development of an algorithm simulator of the planar radioactive source for dosimetric evaluations in accidents with radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudino, Gutemberg L. Sales; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Leal Neto, Viriato; Lima, Fernando R. Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Objective of this work is to develop an algorithm simulator for dosimetric evaluation of accidents that may happen in Nuclear Medicine using PDF NT (Probability Density Functions). A software was developed using C# and WPF technology, in the integrated environment of Microsoft Visual Studio to organize and present the dosimetric results

  20. Radiopharmaceutical chelates and method of external imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loberg, M.D.; Callery, P.S.; Cooper, M.

    1977-01-01

    A chelate of technetium-99m, cobalt-57, gallium-67, gallium-68, indium-111 or indium-113m and a substituted iminodiacetic acid or an 8-hydroxyquinoline useful as a radiopharmaceutical external imaging agent. The invention also includes preparative methods therefor

  1. Pain palliative Radiopharmaceuticals; Radiofarmacos paliativos del dolor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez, B M [Instituto Nacional de Pediatria (Mexico)

    1994-12-31

    A pain relieving agents based on {beta} emitters mainly and in some cases a complex preparation are being given for bone metastasis in relation with breast,prostate and lung carcinoma with good performance in clinical practice.Several radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals are mentioned giving strength to those newly proposed, 153Sm and 186Re.Bibliography.

  2. Radiopharmaceutical quality control-Pragmatic approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barbier, Y.

    1994-01-01

    The quality control must be considered in a practical manner. The radiopharmaceuticals are drugs. They must satisfy the quality assurance control. These products are then conform to Pharmacopeia. But sometimes the user must control some data especially radiochemical purity and pH value. On all the administered solutions four controls are compulsory: radionuclide identity, administered radioactivity, organoleptic character and pH

  3. 77 FR 69637 - Development of Prioritized Therapeutic Area Data Standards; Request for Comments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-20

    ... regulatory information. FDA has developed a roadmap that provides its current thinking on therapeutic area... Clinical Data Interchange Standards Consortium (CDISC), the Critical Path Institute, Health Level 7's (HL7... 20993-0002, or the Office of Communication, Outreach and Development (HFM-40), Center for Biologics...

  4. Recent advances in (therapeutic protein drug development [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Daniel Lagassé

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic protein drugs are an important class of medicines serving patients most in need of novel therapies. Recently approved recombinant protein therapeutics have been developed to treat a wide variety of clinical indications, including cancers, autoimmunity/inflammation, exposure to infectious agents, and genetic disorders. The latest advances in protein-engineering technologies have allowed drug developers and manufacturers to fine-tune and exploit desirable functional characteristics of proteins of interest while maintaining (and in some cases enhancing product safety or efficacy or both. In this review, we highlight the emerging trends and approaches in protein drug development by using examples of therapeutic proteins approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over the previous five years (2011–2016, namely January 1, 2011, through August 31, 2016.

  5. Development of an injectable formulation for the preparation of radiopharmaceutical {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin; Desarrollo de una formulacion inyectable para la preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Sargastrina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo P, M.

    2015-07-01

    The CCK2 receptor (cholecystokinin) is located in areas of the central and peripheral nervous system and is over expressed in several types of human cancer, as medullar thyroid, lung and ovarian carcinomas. One of the endogenous ligands for the CCK2 receptor is the gastrin, so that radiolabeled peptides analogues to gastrin as Sar gastrin (Gln-Gly-Pro-Trp-Leu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe-NH{sub 2}) have been proposed as potential diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for obtaining tumors images with CCK2 receptors over expressed. The {sup 68}Ga is an ideal candidate for the peptides radiolabelled and has favorable characteristics to be used for diagnostic purposes by imaging with Positron emission tomography (PET). This work aimed to verify the technical documentation of the production process of radiopharmaceutical {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin for its sanitary registration before the Comision Federal contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS) in Mexico. For optimization of the production process was assessed a factorial design of two variables with mixed levels (27 combinations), where the dependent variable was the radiochemical purity. The analytical method used for evaluating the content of Sar gastrin peptide in the injectable formulation was also validated by High-performance liquid chromatography. Subsequently the validation of the production process was carried out by manufacturing of lots in single-dose of the optimized injectable formulation of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin and the stability study was conducted at different times to determine the useful life time. The following was established as the optimal pharmaceutical formulation: 185 MBq of {sup 68}Ga, 50 μg de DOTA-Sar gastrin, 14 mg of sodium acetate and 0.5 m L of buffer acetates, 1.0 M, ph 4.22 in 2.5 m L of the vehicle. The analytical method used to determine the radiochemical purity of the formulation satisfied the requirements for the intended analytical

  6. Quality control protocols for radiodiagnosis agents and radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, A.; Condor, M.; Caballero, J.; Morote, M.; Garcia, C.; Benites, M.

    1997-01-01

    Based on the compilation of pharmacopoeia methods, literature, manuals and other information developed in our laboratory, protocols have been prepared to carry out quality controls for radiodiagnosis agents (RDA), better known as kits and RDA labelled with Tc99m. Quality control protocols cover physicochemical and biological controls. Physicochemical controls described for RDA include physical characteristics, particle size and number, pH, chemical identification, humidity, tin II; whereas biological controls include sterility, acute toxicity and bacterial endotoxin determination (LAL). Physicochemical controls described for radiopharmaceuticals labelled with Tc99m are pH and radiochemical purity; while biological distribution is described as a biological control

  7. Development of a methodology for radionuclide impurity analysis in radiopharmaceuticals using gamma spectrometry; Desenvolvimento de uma metodologia para analise de impurezas radionuclidicas em radiofarmacos por espectrometria gama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paula, Eduardo Bonfim de; Araujo, Miriam Taina Ferreira de; Delgado, Jose Ubiratan; Poledna, Roberto; Lins, Ronaldo; Leiras, Anderson; Silva, Carlos Jose da; Oliveira, Antonio Eduardo de, E-mail: bonfim@bolsista.ird.gov.br, E-mail: miriamtaina@hotmail.com [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2016-07-01

    The LNMRI has sought to develop a methodology for the identification and accurate detection of gamma radiation impurities stations in metrological level, aiming to meet the recommendations not only of international pharmacopoeia, as well as the CNEN and ANVISA regarding the quality control can ensure patients the doses received by the practices are as low as feasible. As an initial target, it was possible to obtain an efficiency curve with uncertainty around 1% necessary to initiate future measurements of interest applied to nuclear medicine and to start the development of impurities analysis technique. (author)

  8. Discovery and Development of Therapeutic Drugs against Lethal Human RNA Viruses: a Multidisciplinary Assault.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-07-16

    AD-A239 742 AD GRANT NO: DAMD17-89-Z-9021 TITLE: DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPEUTIC DRUGS AGAINST LETHAL HUMAN RNA VIRUSES: A MULTIDISCIPLINARY...62787A871 AB WrJDA317987 11. TITLE (Include Securty Classification) DISCOVERY AND DEVELOPMENT OF THERAPEUTIC DRUGS AGAINST LETHAL HUMAN RNA VIRUSES: A...G. R. Pettit, III, D.-S. Huang, and G. R. Pettit, 23rd Int’l. Horticulture Congress, Italy, 8/27 - 9/1/90. "Bryostatins Define the Role of Protein

  9. Recent Progress toward Microfluidic Quality Control Testing of Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel S. Ha

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiopharmaceuticals labeled with short-lived positron-emitting or gamma-emitting isotopes are injected into patients just prior to performing positron emission tomography (PET or single photon emission tomography (SPECT scans, respectively. These imaging modalities are widely used in clinical care, as well as in the development and evaluation of new therapies in clinical research. Prior to injection, these radiopharmaceuticals (tracers must undergo quality control (QC testing to ensure product purity, identity, and safety for human use. Quality tests can be broadly categorized as (i pharmaceutical tests, needed to ensure molecular identity, physiological compatibility and that no microbiological, pyrogenic, chemical, or particulate contamination is present in the final preparation; and (ii radioactive tests, needed to ensure proper dosing and that there are no radiochemical and radionuclidic impurities that could interfere with the biodistribution or imaging. Performing the required QC tests is cumbersome and time-consuming, and requires an array of expensive analytical chemistry equipment and significant dedicated lab space. Calibrations, day of use tests, and documentation create an additional burden. Furthermore, in contrast to ordinary pharmaceuticals, each batch of short-lived radiopharmaceuticals must be manufactured and tested within a short period of time to avoid significant losses due to radioactive decay. To meet these challenges, several efforts are underway to develop integrated QC testing instruments that automatically perform and document all of the required tests. More recently, microfluidic quality control systems have been gaining increasing attention due to vastly reduced sample and reagent consumption, shorter analysis times, higher detection sensitivity, increased multiplexing, and reduced instrumentation size. In this review, we describe each of the required QC tests and conventional testing methods, followed by a

  10. New radiopharmaceuticals for receptor scintigraphy and radionuclide therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Virgolini, I.; Traub, T.; Leimer, M.; Novotny, C.; Pangerl, T.; Ofluoglu, S.; Halvadjieva, E.; Smith-Jones, P.; Flores, J.; Li, S.R.; Angelberger, P.; Havlik, E.; Andreae, F.; Raderer, M.; Kurtaran, A.; Niederle, B.; Dudczak, R. [Vienna Univ., Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine

    2000-03-01

    In vitro data have demonstrated a high amount of receptors for various hormones and peptides on malignant cells of neuroendocrine origin. Among these, binding sites for member of the SST-family (hSSTR1-5) are frequently found, and their expression has led to therapeutic and diagnostic attempts to specifically target these receptors. Receptor scintigraphy using radiolabeled peptide ligands has proved its effectiveness in clinical practice. In addition, initial results have indicated a clinical potential for receptor-targeted radiotherapy. Based on somatostatin (SST) receptor (R) recognition, the novel radiopharmaceuticals {sup 111}In/{sup 9}0Y-DOTA-lanreotide developed at the University of Vienna as well as {sup 111}In/{sup 9}0Y-DOTA-DPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide (NOVARTIS) both have provided promising data for diagnosis and treatment of hSSTR-positive tumors. SSTR scintigraphy using {sup 111}In-DTPA-DPhe{sup 1}-octreotide has a high positive predictive value for the vast majority of neuroendocrine tumors and has gained its place in the diagnostic work-up as well as follow-up of patients. Here it was used {sup 111}In-DOTA-lanreotide scintigraphy in 166 patients since 1997 and have seen positive results in 93% of patients. In 42 patients with neuroendocrine tumors comparative data were obtained. As opposed to {sup 111}In-DTPA-DPhe{sup 1}-octreotide and {sup 111}In-DOTA-DPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide, discrepancies in the scintigraphic results were seen in about one third of patients concerning both the tumor uptake as well as tumor lesion detection. Initial results both with {sup 9}0Y-DOTA-lanreotide as well as {sup 9}0Y-DOTA-DPhe{sup 1}-Tyr{sup 3}-octreotide has pointed out the clinical potential of radionuclide receptor-targeted radiotherapy. This new therapy could offer palliation and disease control at a reduced cost. The final peptide therapy strategy is most probably cheaper than conventional radio therapies or prolonged chemo therapies. Overall

  11. Indirect iodometric procedure for quantitation of Sn(II) in radiopharmaceutical kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muddukrishna, S.N.; Chen, A.; Sykes, T.R.; Noujaim, A.A.; Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB

    1994-01-01

    A method of quantitating stannous ion [Sn(II)] suitable for radiopharmaceutical kits, based on indirect iodometric titration, is described. The method is based on the oxidation of Sn(II) using a known excess of iodine and the excess unreacted iodine determined using thiosulphate by potentiometric titration. The titration cell is a beaker and the titrations are done conveniently under air using an autotitrator in approx. 4 min. The method is accurate and is linear in the range of approx. 10 μg to approx. 6 mg of Sn(II). Several radiopharmaceutical kits were analysed for their Sn(II) content using the method including those containing antibodies or other proteins. The studies indicate that the procedure is rapid, simple and accurate for routine quantitative estimation of Sn(II) in radiopharmaceutical preparations during development, manufacture and storage. (Author)

  12. Characterization of contaminated nuclear sites, facilities and materials: radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical manufacturers and suppliers. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is developing environmental protection standards for evaluating the risks and characterizing problems associated with disposal of radioactive wastes arising from decontamination and decommissioning DandD operations. Information on operations conducted at sites authorized to possess radioactive materials for the production and/or distribution of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals was compiled and evaluated. This information was used to project the types, nature, and volumes of wastes which are likely to be generated during decontamination and decommissioning at representative facilities and identifying special problems that may occur. Radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical manufacturers have been grouped together because decommissioning operations will be similar. Nuclear pharmacies were also evaluated because of their increasing numbers and their role as middlemen between manufacturers and users of radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of the radioactive waste will arise from the decontamination of the laboratories, rather than the disposal of components

  13. Development of Potential Small Molecule Therapeutics for Treatment of Ebola Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schafer, Adam Michael; Cheng, Han; Lee, Charles; Du, Ruikun; Han, Julianna; Perez, Jasmine; Peet, Norton; Manicassamy, Balaji; Rong, Lijun

    2017-10-10

    Ebola virus has caused 26 outbreaks in 10 different countries since its identification in 1976, making it one of the deadliest emerging viral pathogens. The most recent outbreak in West Africa from 2014-16 was the deadliest yet and culminated in 11,310 deaths out of 28,616 confirmed cases. Currently there are no FDA-approved therapeutics or vaccines to treat Ebola virus infections. The slow development of effective vaccines combined with the severity of past outbreaks emphasizes the need to accelerate research into understanding the virus lifecycle and the development of therapeutics for post exposure treatment. Here we present a summary of the major findings on the Ebola virus replication cycle and the therapeutic approaches explored to treat this devastating disease. The major focus of this review is on small molecule inhibitors. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Practical considerations in the development of hemoglobin-based oxygen therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae Won; Estep, Timothy N

    2012-09-01

    The development of hemoglobin based oxygen therapeutics (HBOCs) requires consideration of a number of factors. While the enabling technology derives from fundamental research on protein biochemistry and biological interactions, translation of these research insights into usable medical therapeutics demands the application of considerable technical expertise and consideration and reconciliation of a myriad of manufacturing, medical, and regulatory requirements. The HBOC development challenge is further exacerbated by the extremely high intravenous doses required for many of the indications contemplated for these products, which in turn implies an extremely high level of purity is required. This communication discusses several of the important product configuration and developmental considerations that impact the translation of fundamental research discoveries on HBOCs into usable medical therapeutics.

  15. Development of nutrition standards and therapeutic diet specifications for public hospitals in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter; Hazlewood, Tanya; Pang, Glen

    2014-09-01

    In New South Wales (NSW), a new suite of nutrition standards for menus and specifications for therapeutic diets to be used in hospitals has been developed. These standards were required to facilitate centralised menu planning and food production, with the move to management of most hospital food services by HealthShare NSW, a state-wide business unit of NSW Health. The standards also aim to improve communication between health professionals, particularly with the increasing use of computerised meal-ordering systems. Nutrition standards have been developed for adult, paediatric and mental health inpatients, and specifications for 147 different adult and paediatric therapeutic diets. There is still significant variation in the nutrition standards for nutrition and therapeutic diets in hospitals across the Australian states, and a move to a more nationally harmonised approach would be welcome. Further research is required to examine the impact of these standards on operating efficiency and patient care outcomes.

  16. Effect of mitomycin-c on biodistribution of 99 mTc-sodium pyrophosphate radiopharmaceuticals in mice; Efeito da mitomicina-c na biodistribuicao do radiofarmaco pirofosfato de sodio marcado com Tecnecio-99m em camundongos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomes, Maria L.; Braga, Ana C.S.; Gutfilen, Bianca; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    1997-12-01

    The desirable characteristics of technetium-99 have stimulated the development of labeling techniques for different molecular and cellular. It is generally acceptable that a variety of factors other than disease can alter the biodistribution of radiopharmaceutical and one such factor is the drug therapy. The absence of knowledge of these factors may result in an unexpected behavior of the radiopharmaceutical. Since patients on chemotherapeutic treatment ca be submitted, for different reasons, to a nuclear medicine procedure, we have studied in mice, the effect of mitomycin-C on the biodistribution of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 99m} Tc-pyrophosphate ({sup 99m} Tc-PYP). Mitomycin-C is an antineoplastic agent obtained from Streptomyces caesptosus. It was administered 0,15 mg of mitomycin-C in Balb/c in Balb/c female mice with an interval of 72 hours. After one hour of the last dose, 0.3 ml of {sup 99m} Tc-PYP (7.4 MBq) were injected after 0.5 h the animals were sacrificed. The organs were isolated, weighted and counted in a well counter. The percentages of radioactivity per gran of organs (% rad/g) were calculated and statistics analyses were performed (wilcoxon). The results have shown that the % rad/g has increased in pancreas, stomach, bone and lungs. These increased of radioactivity can be justified by the metabolic process or the therapeutic effect of mitomycin-C. (author). 8 refs., 2 tabs.

  17. The Chemistry of Re-188 Radiopharmaceuticals: Could Re-188 Play the Same Role in Therapy as Tc-99m in Diagnostics?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Duatti, A.

    2009-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals incorporating the β-emitting radionuclide Re-188 are still attracting much interest for their potential application in nuclear medicine as therapeutic agents. There are many advantages of employing this class of radioactive compounds as briefly summarized in the following. (1) Re-188 emits a high-energy β- particle (2.1 MeV) that can be efficiently used to deliver high-dose radiation to the target. (2) Re-188 concomitantly emits a 155-keV γ photon that can be conveniently employed to obtain good-quality SPECT images of the biodistribution of Re-188 radiopharmaceuticals and, ultimately, following in vivo the course of the therapy. (3) Re-188 has a relatively short half-life (17 hours) that may allow multiple treatments of the same patient's disease. (4) Re-188 is a radiometal belonging to the same group of Tc-99m in the transition metal series of the Periodic Table, and shares with its cogener similar (though not identical) chemical properties that could be useful for designing a broad class of Re-188 radiopharmaceuticals having the same biodistribution properties of the corresponding Tc-99m analogues. (5) Similarly to Tc-99m, the radionuclide Re-188 is produced in high-specific activity through the 188 W/ 188 Re transportable generator system. A first challenge encountered in the attempt to develop efficient labeling procedures for Re-188 was related to the low radiochemical yield usually observed in tracer-level preparations of Re-188 radiopharmaceuticals starting from generator-produced [ 188 ReO 4 ]-. This drawback is commonly associated with the low value of the standard reduction potential of the tetraoxo anion as compared to the corresponding Tc-99m pertechnetate anion. In recent years, we reported a simple and efficient procedure for overcoming this problem based on a general chemical principle called 'expansion of the coordination sphere' and involving the addition to the reaction vial of an ancillary ligand (usually, chelating hard

  18. Incorporation of radiohalogens via versatile organometallic reactions: applications in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, P.C.; Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Factors that must be considered for the design of radiohalogenated radio-pharmaceuticals include the stability and availability of the substrate, the physical half-life of the radiohalogen and the in vivo stability of the radiolabel. Vinyl and phenyl radiohalogen bonds show more in vivo stability than the alkyl radiohalogen bonds. Consequently, a variety of methods suitable for the synthesis of tissue specific radiopharmaceuticals bearing a vinyl or phenyl radiohalogen have been developed involving the synthesis and halogenation of metallovinyl and phenyl intermediates. The halogens and metallation reactions include iodine and bromine and alanation, boronation, mercuration, stannylation, and thallation, respectively. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  19. Quantitative HPLC determination of [99mTc]-pertechnetate in radiopharmaceuticals and biological samples: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tianze Zhou; Hirth, W.W.; Heineman, W.R.; Deutsch, Edward

    1988-01-01

    Techniques have been developed which allow HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) to be used for the quantitative determination of [ 99m Tc]pertechnetate in radiopharmaceuticals and biological samples. An instrumental technique accounts for 99m Tc species which do not elute from the HPLC column, while a chemical technique obviates interferences caused by Sn(II). These two techniques are incorporated into an anion exchange HPLC procedure which is applied to the determination of [ 99m Tc]pertechnetate in 99m Tc-diphosphonate radiopharmaceuticals and biological samples. (author)

  20. Basic evaluation of 67Ga labeled digoxin derivative as a metal-labeled bifunctional radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Konishi, Junji; Takemura, Yasutaka; Taniuchi, Hideyuki; Iijima, Naoko; Yokoyama, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    To develop metal-labeled digoxin radiopharmaceuticals with affinity with anti-digoxin antibody as well as Na + , K + -ATPase, a digoxin derivative conjugated with deferoxamine was synthesized. The derivative had a high binding affinity with 67 Ga at deferoxamine introduced to the terminal sugar ring of digoxin. The 67 Ga labeled digoxin derivative showed enough in vitro binding affinity and selectivity to anti-digoxin antibody as well as Na + , K + -ATPase. The 67 Ga labeled digoxin derivative is considered to be a potential metal-labeled bifunctional radiopharmaceutical for digoxin RIA as well as myocardial Na + , K + -ATPase imaging. (author)

  1. The quality of 99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals - a basic requirement in the diagnostic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ivanova, S.; Popsavova, H.; Kostadinova, I.

    2011-01-01

    Development and application of new high quality radiopharmaceuticals (RP) are of a great significance for the development in nuclear medicine. The high quality of the radiopharmaceuticals has a major influence on the accuracy of nuclear medical examinations. Therefore, a good knowledge and application if various control methods, is essential. Radiochemical impurities affect the quality of RP most significantly and they can appear at every stage of the preparation. The aim of this review is to present the literature information concerning the quality of the most commonly used radiopharmaceuticals, labeled with 99m Tc, and all requirements for them, i.e. radiochemical, radionuclide and chemical purity. This is well-known fact that metastable isotope of Technetium is golden standard for diagnostics in nuclear medicine. Research shows that about 80% of approx. 25 million nuclear medical studies a year are performed with this radionuclide. According to the European Pharmacopoeia and to the leaflets provided with the kits, radiochemical purity must exceed 95%. The main radiochemical impurities in 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals are free pertechnetate ( 99m TcO 4 - ), whose presence causes accumulation of RP in the thyroid gland, stomach, gastrointestinal tract, or the salivary glands, leading to a wrong diagnosis, and reduced hydrolyzed technetium, which causes visualization of the reticulo-endothelial system. This paper contains information about the authors' experience with analyses of the radiochemical purity of the two most commonly used radiopharmaceuticals in Bulgaria - for bone and renal scintigraphy (MDA and DTPA). An Instant Thin-Layer Chromatography (ITLC) is used for this purpose. It is concluded that the high quality of the applied 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals can be guaranteed only with both selection of renowned manufactures, recognized by EU, and a routine daily control of the labeling and generator eluate, meeting all requirements of the manufacturer and

  2. Development of [18F]halofluorination and [18F]fluoride ion displacement reactions for the synthesis of F-18 labelled radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, D.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Two fluorine-18 labeling methods, [ 18 F]halofluorination and [ 18 F]fluoride ion displacement reactions, have been developed to assess their potential for labeling molecules with the positron-emitting radionuclide fluorine-18 at the no-carrier-added level. Olefin halofluorination involves the in situ generation of a halogen-fluoride reagent and subsequent addition to an olefin. The characteristics of this reaction were investigated with three model olefins (allylbenzene, 1-hexene, and propene). A two-step method for the preparation of fluoroalkyl substituted amines and amides has been achieved. The sequence involves fluoride ion displacement of trifluoromethanesulfonates (triflates) from short-chain haloalkyl triflates, followed by fluoroalkylation of the amine or amide. Alternatively, short-chain fluoroalkyl halides can be prepared by halofluorination of a terminal olefin. These reactions have been used to prepare various fluoroalkyl derivatives of 1-phenylpiperazine and N-fluoroalkyl derivatives of the neuroleptic agent spiperone. A series of fluorine-18 labeled N-fluoroalkylated spiperone derivatives were synthesized by N-alkylation of spiperone with fluoroalkyl halides

  3. Development of new therapeutic methods of lung cancer through team approach study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Ho; Zo, Jae Ill; Baek, Hee Jong; Jung, Jin Haeng; Lee, Jae Cheol; Ryoo, Baek Yeol; Kim, Mi Sook; Choi, Du Hwan; Park, Sun Young; Lee, Hae Young

    2000-12-01

    The aims of this study were to make the lung cancer clinics in Korea Cancer Center Hospital, and to establish new therapeutic methods of lung cancer for increasing the cure rate and survival rate of patients. Also another purpose of this study was to establish a common treatment method in our hospital. All patients who were operated in Korea Cancer Center Hospital from 1987 due to lung cancer were followed up and evaluated. And we have been studied the effect of postoperative adjuvant therapy in stage I, II, IIIA non-small cell lung cancer patients from 1989 with the phase three study form. Follow-up examinations were scheduled in these patients and interim analysis was made. Also we have been studied the effect of chemo-therapeutic agents in small cell lung cancer patients from 1997 with the phase two study form. We evaluated the results of this study. Some important results of this study were as follows. 1. The new therapeutic method (surgery + MVP chemotherapy) was superior to the standard therapeutic one in stage I Non-small cell lung cancer patients. So, we have to change the standard method of treatment in stage I NSCLC. 2. Also, this new therapeutic method made a good result in stage II NSCLC patients. And this result was reported in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 3. However, this new therapeutic method was not superior to the standard treatment method (surgery only) in stage IIIA NSCLC patients. So, we must develop new chemo-therapeutic agents in the future for advanced NSCLC patients. 4. In the results of the randomized phase II studies about small cell lung cancer, there was no difference in survival between Etoposide + Carboplatin + Ifosfamide + Cisplatin group and Etoposide + Carboplatin + Ifosfamide + Cisplatin + Tamoxifen group in both the limited and extended types of small cell lung cancer patients

  4. The value of non-human primates in the development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Meer, P.J.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34153790X; Kooijman, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/322905788; Van Der Laan, J.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374879966; Moors, E.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/20241664X; Schellekens, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068406762

    2011-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is increasingly focusing on the development of biological therapeutics. These molecules generally cause no off-target toxicity and are highly species specific. Therefore, non-human primates (NHPs) are often the only relevant species in which to conduct regulatory safety

  5. 77 FR 62521 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... interleukin-10 (IL-10) inhibitor as a dual-biologic therapy to treat metastatic breast cancer, or ii) incorporating a p53 isoform antisense oligonucleotide as a single biologic therapy to treat T- cell lymphoma... Exclusive License: The Development of Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer and T...

  6. Development of methodologies for internal exposure assessment due to the radiopharmaceutical {sup 18}FDG; Desenvolvimento de metodologias para avaliacao da exposicao ocupational interna devido ao radiofarmaco {sup 18}FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de

    2013-07-01

    The production of {sup 18}F has increased in the last decade. It is produced basically for the synthesis of {sup 18}F- fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG), the main radiopharmaceutical used in PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scans. The growth in the frequency of these tests resulted in rise of the number of occupationally exposed individuals (OEI) to the radionuclide {sup 18}F as {sup 18}FDG, increasing thereby the probability of its accidental incorporation. This study aimed to implement optimized techniques for assessing internal exposures of individuals occupationally exposed through both in vivo and in vitro bioassay methods during production and handling of {sup 18}FDG at the Divisao de Producao de Radiofarmacos (DIPRA), Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN). The in vivo monitoring was conducted at the Laboratorio de Dosimetria Interna, Divisao de Laboratorios Tecnico-Cientificos (DILAB). For this bioassay method, measurements were done with a 3x3' NaI(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to Genie 2000 software. The calibration of the system was performed with a brain phantom containing a standard liquid source of {sup 22}Na to simulate a contaminated individual. The calibration of the HPGe coaxial detector for in vitro monitoring was performed at the Laboratorio de Medidas de Atividade de Radionuclideos (DIPRA/CRCN-NE/CNEN) with a standard source of {sup 22}Na. Base on the calibration factors, it was possible to determine the minimum detectable activities (MDA) for the systems by using direct measurements and simulation of uncontaminated urine. Then, through the biokinetic models published by ICRP 106 and edited by the AIDE software (version 6.0), it was possible to estimate the minimum detectable effective dose (MDED), which evaluates the detection sensitivity of the techniques developed. The MDED was estimated for in vivo and in vitro measurements performed 2.4 hours after the occurrence of incorporation by ingestion, since

  7. Technical artifacts in chromatographic analysis of Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kowalsky, R.J.; Creekmore, J.R.

    1982-01-01

    Technical artifacts produced during chromatographic analysis of technetium radiopharmaceuticals were investigated. Such artifacts are, we found, caused by improper spotting and drying techniques; these in turn produce spuriously high impurities in Tc-99m complexes of DTPA, MDP, PPi, and GH. The ITLC-SG/acetone system produces considerable streaking of Tc-complex if the applied spot is large and not dried before development. This results in activity in the solvent front portion of the chromatographic strip indicating falsely high levels of pertechnetate impurity. Proper drying of the applied spot eliminates the artifact. The ITLC-SG/saline system yields falsely high, hydrolyzed-reduced technetium impurities if the spot is allowed to enter the solvent during development. Correct spot placement and size eliminate this problem. Strips that are allowed to dry in room air for several minutes may indicate considerable pertechnetate impurity on the chromatogram; yet this may not actually be present in the radiopharmaceutical vial. Drying spots rapidly with hot air or in a nitrogen atmosphere before development eliminates this problem

  8. Development of the Fibulin-3 protein therapeutics of non small cell lung cancer stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kugchan; Jung, Il Lae; Kim, Seo Yeon; Choi, Su Im; Lee, Jae Ha

    2013-09-15

    This study focuses on developing an efficient bioprocess for large-scale production of fibulin-3 using Chinese Hamster Ovary cell expression system and evaluating its therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer. The specific aims are as follows: Isolation and establishment of CSCs using FACS based on cell surface markers and high ALDH1 activity. Identification and characterization of lung cancer stem cells that acquire features of CSC upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Evaluation of the fibulin-3 effects on the stem traits and signaling pathways required for the generation and maintenance of CSCs. In vivo validation of fivulin-3 for tumor prognosis and therapeutic efficacy against lung cancer using animal model.

  9. MicroRNA silencing in primates: towards development of novel therapeutics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petri, Andreas; Lindow, Morten; Kauppinen, Sakari

    2009-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNA) comprise an abundant class of small noncoding RNAs that act as important posttranscriptional regulators of gene expression. Accumulating evidence showing that aberrantly expressed miRNAs play important roles in human cancers underscores them as potential targets for therapeutic ...... intervention. Recent reports on efficient miRNA silencing in rodents and nonhuman primates using high-affinity targeting by chemically modified antisense oligonucleotides highlight the utility of such compounds in the development of miRNA-based cancer therapeutics....

  10. Translational research in addiction: toward a framework for the development of novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paterson, Neil E

    2011-06-15

    The development of novel substance use disorder (SUD) therapeutics is insufficient to meet the medical needs of a growing SUD patient population. The identification of translatable SUD models and tests is a crucial step in establishing a framework for SUD therapeutic development programs. The present review begins by identifying the clinical features of SUDs and highlights the narrow regulatory end-point required for approval of a novel SUD therapeutic. A conceptual overview of dependence is provided, followed by identification of potential intervention targets in the addiction cycle. The main components of the addiction cycle provide the framework for a discussion of preclinical models and their clinical analogs, all of which are focused on isolated behavioral end-points thought to be relevant to the persistence of compulsive drug use. Thus, the greatest obstacle to successful development is the gap between the multiplicity of preclinical and early clinical end-points and the regulatory end-point of sustained abstinence. This review proposes two pathways to bridging this gap: further development and validation of the preclinical extended access self-administration model; inclusion of secondary end-points comprising all of the measures highlighted in the present discussion in Phase 3 trials. Further, completion of the postdictive validation of analogous preclinical and clinical assays is of high priority. Ultimately, demonstration of the relevance and validity of a variety of end-points to the ultimate goal of abstinence will allow researchers to identify truly relevant therapeutic mechanisms and intervention targets, and establish a framework for SUD therapeutic development that allows optimal decision-making and resource allocation. 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis, characterization and biological evaluation of [{sup 188}Re(N)(cys{approx})(PNP)]{sup +/0} mixed-ligand complexes as prototypes for the development of {sup 188}Re(N)-based target-specific radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thieme, Stefan [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510 119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Agostini, Stefania [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 5, 35131 Padova (Italy); Bergmann, Ralf; Pietzsch, Jens; Pietzsch, Hans-Juergen [Institute of Radiopharmacy, Forschungszentrum Dresden Rossendorf, P.O. Box 510 119, 01314 Dresden (Germany); Carta, Davide; Salvarese, Nicola [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 5, 35131 Padova (Italy); Refosco, Fiorenzo [ICIS-CNR, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy); Bolzati, Cristina, E-mail: bolzati@icis.cnr.i [Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Padua, Via Marzolo 5, 35131 Padova (Italy); ICIS-CNR, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2011-04-15

    We report on an efficient procedure for the preparation of [{sup 188}Re(N)(PNP)]-based complexes (where PNP is diphosphinoamine) useful in the development of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals. The radiochemical yield of the compounds was optimized considering such reaction parameters as nature of the nitrido nitrogen donor, reaction times and pH level. The chemical identity of the {sup 188}Re agents was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography comparison with the corresponding well-characterized cold Re compounds. {sup 188}Re(N) mixed compounds have been evaluated with regard to stability toward transchelation with GSH and degradation by serum enzymes. The clearance of selected radiocompounds from normal tissues and their in vivo stability were evaluated in rats by biodistribution and imaging studies. [{sup 188}Re(N)(cys{approx})(PNP)]{sup +/0} mixed-ligand compounds were efficiently prepared in aqueous solution from perrhenate using a multistep procedure based on the preliminary formation of the labile {sup 188}Re{sup III}-EDTA species, which easily undergo oxidation/ligand exchange reaction to afford the [{sup 188}Re{sup V{identical_to}}N]{sup 2+} core in the presence of dithiocarbazate. The final mixed-ligand compounds were obtained, at 100{sup o}C, by adding the two bidentate ligands to the buffered [{sup 188}Re{sup V{identical_to}}N]{sup 2+} solution (pH 3.2-3.6). However, a relatively high amount of cys{approx} ligand was required to obtain a quantitative radiochemical yield. The complexes were stable toward reoxidation to perrhenate and ligand exchange reactions. In vivo studies showed rapid distribution and elimination of the complexes from the body. No specific uptakes in sensitive tissues/organs were detected. A positive correlation of the distribution of the complexes estimated with biodistribution studies (%ID) and with micro-SPECT semiquantification imaging analysis (standard uptake values) was observed. These results support the

  12. Adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals and their reporting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeling, D.

    1988-01-01

    Adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals are uncommon and the great majority that do occur are relatively trivial and require little or no treatment. Reporting schemes for such reactions are in operation in a number of countries but they vary in their effectiveness and the best collect only a minority of cases; only 10-15% of total reactions in the United Kingdom, for instance. Radiopharmaceutical reaction reports in the UK for the period 1982-1987 are summarised in a table and then discussed. Reliable incidence figures for such reactions are difficult to obtain. The UK figure is estimated here to be near 1 per 2000. The great majority of reactions reported are of an idiopathic hypersensitivity nature and are related to the chemical form of the material; radiation has very rarely caused recognisable problems since the discontinuance of colloid gold for lymphatic clearance studies. The value of such reaction reports is their role as a forewarning to doctors

  13. Detection of sentinel nodes with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Kinuya, Seigo; Konishi, Shota; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2000-01-01

    Sentinel lymph nodes have been found to be an indicator of lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. In Japan, the theory and concept of sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer have begun to be applied to carcinomas of the digestive system. Based on clinical experience in the detection of sentinel lymph nodes with radiopharmaceuticals, differences and similarities between the radiopharmaceuticals, methods, and techniques used to detect sentinel lymph nodes have been assessed in relation to breast cancer and carcinomas of the digestive system (including carcinomas of the esophagus and large intestine). The greatest difference between the methods used for breast and digestive cancers is the site of administration of the radiopharmaceutical. In breast cancer, the radiopharmaceutical is administered into a superficial organ (i.e., the mammary gland), whereas in carcinomas of the digestive system, it is administered into a deep organ (i.e., digestive tract). Another obvious difference is in lymph flow, i.e., the flow of the mammary glands is subcutaneous whereas lymph flow in the digestive tract is submucosal. Two radionuclide diagnostic methods are available to detect sentinel lymph nodes: sentinel lymphoscintigraphy with a gamma camera and a method that involves the use of a gamma probe intraoperatively. Radiopharmaceuticals used to detect sentinel lymph nodes must be smoothly transferred from the site of administration into the lymph, and uptake by the sentinel lymph node must continue for a long time without excessive flowing to lower reaches. The optimal particle size remains a matter of controversy, and no radiopharmaceuticals appropriate for lymphoscintigraphy have ever been approved in Japan. The authors compared the pharmacokinetics of three different radiopharmaceuticals used for sentinel lymphoscintigraphy in breast cancer ( 99m Tc-labeled albumin, 99m Tc-labeled tin colloid, and 99m Tc-labeled phytic acid) and founded that the detection rate was lowest with

  14. Innovative radiopharmaceuticals in oncology and neurology

    CERN Document Server

    Barbet, Jacques; Chérel, Michel; Guilloteau, Denis

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this Research Topic was to assemble a series of articles describing basic, preclinical and clinical research studies on radiopharmaceuticals and nuclear medicine. The articles were written by attendees of the third Nuclear Technologies for Health Symposium (NTHS, 10th-11th March 2015, Nantes, Frances) under the auspices of the IRON LabEx (Innovative Radiopharmaceuticals for Oncology and Neurology Laboratory of Excellence). This French network, gathering approximately 160 scientists from 12 academic research teams (Funded by “investissements d’Avenir”), fosters transdisciplinary projects between teams with expertise in chemistry, radiochemistry, radiopharmacy, formulation, biology, nuclear medicine and medical physics. The 12 articles within this resulting eBook present a series of comprehensive reviews and original research papers on multimodality imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy; illustrating the different facets of studies currently conducted in these domains.

  15. Computational chemistry and metal-based radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, M.; Fausto, R.

    1998-01-01

    Computer-assisted techniques have found extensive use in the design of organic pharmaceuticals but have not been widely applied on metal complexes, particularly on radiopharmaceuticals. Some examples of computer generated structures of complexes of In, Ga and Tc with N, S, O and P donor ligands are referred. Besides parameters directly related with molecular geometries, molecular properties of the predicted structures, as ionic charges or dipole moments, are considered to be related with biodistribution studies. The structure of a series of oxo neutral Tc-biguanide complexes are predicted by molecular mechanics calculations, and their interactions with water molecules or peptide chains correlated with experimental data of partition coefficients and percentage of human protein binding. The results stress the interest of using molecular modelling to predict molecular properties of metal-based radiopharmaceuticals, which can be successfully correlated with results of in vitro studies. (author)

  16. Recent developments in cyclotron-produced radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The major areas of interest over the past two years are briefly reviewed. These include: (1) tracers for in vivo measurements of blood flow; (2) tracers for in vivo measurements of regional metabolism; (3) tracers for the measurement of receptor sensitivities; and (4) radioisotope generator systems

  17. Developing nano-particles as radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambhir, S.

    2013-01-01

    The wide variety of core materials available, coupled with tunable surface properties, make nanoparticles an excellent platform for a broad range of biological and biomedical applications. The unique properties and utility of nanoparticles arise from a variety of attributes, including the similar size of nanoparticles and biomolecules such as proteins and polynucleic acids. Additionally, nanoparticles can be fashioned with a wide range of metal and semiconductor core materials that impart useful properties such as fluorescence and magnetic behavior. Bio-macromolecule surface recognition by nanoparticles as artificial receptors provides a potential tool for controlling cellular and extracellular processes for numerous biological applications such as transcription regulation, enzymatic inhibition, delivery and sensing. The size of nanoparticle cores can be tuned from 1.5 nm to more than 10 nm depending on the core material, providing a suitable platform for the interaction of nanoparticles with proteins and other biomolecules. The conjugation of nanoparticles with biomolecules such as proteins and DNA can be done by using two different approaches, direct covalent linkage and non-covalent interactions between the particle and bio-molecules.The most direct approach to the creation of integrated biomolecule-nanoparticle conjugates is through covalent attachment.This conjugation can be achieved either through chemisorptions of the biomolecule to the particle surface or through the use of hetero-bi-functional linkers. Chemisorption of proteins onto the surface of nanoparticles (usually containing a core of Au, ZnS, CdS, and CdSe/ZnS) can be done through cysteine residues that are present in the protein surface (e.g., oligo-peptide, serum albumin), or chemically using 2-iminothiolane (Traut's reagent). Bifunctional linkers provide a versatile means of bio-conjugation. Biomolecules are often covalently linked to ligands on the nanoparticle surface via traditional coupling strategies such as carbodiimide-mediated amidation and esterification

  18. Radiopharmaceutical chelates and method of external imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    The preparation of the following chemicals is described: chelates of technetium-99m, cobalt-57, gallium-67, gallium-68, indium-111 or indium-113m and a substituted iminodiacetic acid or an 8-hydroxyquinoline useful as a radiopharmaceutical external imaging agent. The compounds described are suitable for intravenous injection, have an excellent in vivo stability and are good organ seekers. Tin(II) choride or other tin(II) compounds are used as chelating agents

  19. Radiation absorbed dose from medically administered radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roedler, H.D.; Kaul, A.

    1975-01-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals for medical examinations is increasing. Surveys carried out in West Berlin show a 20% average yearly increase in such examinations. This implies an increased genetic and somatic radiation exposure of the population in general. Determination of radiation exposure of the population as well as of individual patients examined requires a knowledge of the radiation dose absorbed by each organ affected by each examination. An extensive survey of the literature revealed that different authors reported widely different dose values for the same defined examination methods and radiopharmaceuticals. The reason for this can be found in the uncertainty of the available biokinetic data for dose calculations and in the application of various mathematical models to describe the kinetics and calculation of organ doses. Therefore, the authors recalculated some of the dose values published for radiopharmaceuticals used in patients by applying biokinetic data obtained from exponential models of usable metabolism data reported in the literature. The calculation of organ dose values was done according to the concept of absorbed fractions in its extended form. For all radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine the energy dose values for the most important organs (ovaries, testicles, liver, lungs, spleen, kidneys, skeleton, total body or residual body) were recalculated and tabulated for the gonads, skeleton and critical or examined organs respectively. These dose values are compared with those reported in the literature and the reasons for the observed deviations are discussed. On the basis of recalculated dose values for the gonads and bone-marrow as well as on the basis of results of statistical surveys in West Berlin, the genetically significant dose and the somatically (leukemia) significant dose were calculated for 1970 and estimated for 1975. For 1970 the GSD was 0.2 mrad and the LSD was 0.7 mrad. For 1975 the GSD is estimated at < 0.5 mrad and the

  20. Radiopharmaceuticals to 99mTc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    Studies about 99m Tc had demonstrated that have favorable properties for support diagnostic proceedings in nuclear medicine. This physical and chemical properties used for obtain another radiopharmaceuticals have been employed through re actives kits labelled with Tc 99m . A brief description was given about 99m utilities in diagnostic techniques such as endothelium reticular system,renal and hepatic studies,bone scintillators,cardiac diagnostic and cerebral perfusion

  1. Considerations and controversies in the selection of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilton, H.M.; Cowan, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    When a radiopharmaceutical is selected for a specific study, multiple factors must be considered to ensure that optimum clinical information will be provided with minimum radiation exposure to the patient and laboratory personnel. In this endeavor, certain questions must be considered. What are the nuclear properties of the available radiopharmaceuticals? For the organ to be studied, are there multiple radiopharmaceutical localization pathways? If so, which is best suited to provide the desired diagnostic information? Does the presence of certain clinical factors preclude the use of some radiopharmaceuticals and require the use of others? Do certain radiopharmaceuticals have overriding radiopharmacologic properties which limit their usefulness for the evaluation of certain clinical situations? Finally, how significant are non-clinical properties such as cost, availability, and product formulation? In this chapter, some of these areas and several situations which illustrate the radiopharmaceutical selection process are discussed

  2. The ARPANSA quality assurance program for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldas, J.; Ivanov, Z.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The Australian Radiation Protection and Nuclear Safety Agency (ARPANSA) conducts a radiopharmaceutical quality assurance test program in which radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine in Australia are tested for compliance with specifications. Where the radiopharmaceutical is the subject of a monograph in the British Pharmacopoeia or the European Pharmacopoeia, then the specifications given in these Pharmacopoeias are adopted. Where a monograph is only available in the US Pharmacopoeia, then this specification is generally adopted. In other cases the specifications quoted have been adopted by this Agency. Animal biodistribution testing was discontinued in 1997 due to resource limitation. Samples for testing were obtained through commercial channels. All technetium-99m cold kits were reconstituted according to the directions in the package insert using Sodium Pertechnetate [ 99m Tc] injection. The results of testing conducted by the ARPANSA during 1984-1999 are summarised. A significant cause of failure to meet full specifications has been due to non-compliance of the vial/package labels. Copyright (2003) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  3. Zika Virus: Recent Advances towards the Development of Vaccines and Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Monica A

    2017-06-13

    Zika is a rapidly emerging public health threat. Although clinical infection is frequently mild, significant neurological manifestations have been demonstrated in infants born to Zika virus (ZIKV) infected mothers. Due to the substantial ramifications of intrauterine infection, effective counter-measures are urgently needed. In order to develop effective anti-ZIKV vaccines and therapeutics, improved animal models and a better understanding of immunological correlates of protection against ZIKV are required. This review will summarize what is currently known about ZIKV, the clinical manifestations and epidemiology of Zika as well as, the development of animal models to study ZIKV infection, host immune responses against ZIKV, and the current state of development of vaccines and therapeutics against ZIKV.

  4. Frequency of adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals in Europe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hesslewood, S.R.; Keeling, D.H. [Radiopharmacy Department, City Hospital NHS Trust, Dudley Road, Birmingham B18 7QH (United Kingdom)

    1997-09-01

    A prospective survey was performed in 17 nuclear medicine departments during 1996 in an attempt to provide reliable data on the prevalence of adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals. All adverse events following radiopharmaceutical administration were recorded, irrespective of the severity or likelihood of causality, and subsequently analysed using an algorithm developed by Silberstein et al., designed to establish a cause-effect relationship. A prevalence of 11 events per 10{sup 5}administrations was obtained (95% confidence limits 3.3-19.2). No serious of life-threatening events were reported. This rate is slightly higher than that obtained in a larger scale study in the United States (2.3 events per 10 {sup 5}administrations, 95% confidence limits 1.2-3.4). The difference may be due to the decision to include or exclude vasovagal events from the analysis, the way in which the algorithm was used and the comparative size and time scale of the two studies. The prevalence of adverse reactions is approximately 1000-fold than less that occurring with iodinated contrast media and drugs. (orig.). With 2 tabs.

  5. The influence of stereoisomerism on the pharmacokinetics of Tc radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, L.; Taylor, A. [Atlanta, Emory Univ. School of Medicine, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Marzilli, L.G. [Atlanta, Emory Univ. School of Medicine, GA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-12-01

    The influence of stereoisomerism on the pharmacokinetics of Tc mono-oxo complexes is reviewed. Tc(V) mono-oxo complexes formed with N/S ligands have four donor groups from the ligands in an equatorial plane; the oxo ligand coordinates in an axial position. Stereoisomerism in Tc(V) mono-oxo complexes can be centered within the ligand (carbon atom in the chelate ring of ligating nitrogen of amine donors) or at the Tc. The metal center becomes chiral when an equatorial ligand has a head and a tail (i.e. the two ends of the ligand differ). All types of stereocenter can produce significantly different pharmacokinetic profiles for individual isomers. Thus, biological evaluation of separated stereoisomers is necessary to identify the optimal stereochemical configuration, particularly for radiopharmaceuticals targeted to receptor molecules with low specificity. Because of inter species variation, there is ultimately no substitute for human testing. Although it is possible that the increase in nonspecific binding of agents incorporating L- vs D-amino acids may more than offset any increased receptor binding, much more information is needed. Stereochemical factors can also lead to unpredictable differences in coordination geometry and thermodynamic preference of a single isomer; thus chemical characterization of stereo-isomers continues to be an important component of radiopharmaceutical development.

  6. Automation of cells of radiopharmaceuticals production; Automacao de celulas de producao de radiofarmacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Negrini, Aguinaldo Donizete

    2010-07-01

    The {sup 67}Ga is an important radiopharmaceutical used to identify inflammatory processes in chronic illnesses, diagnosis by image of tumors in soft tissues and the possibility to evaluate the result for therapeutic intervention. In the present work a module of {sup 67}Ga processing was developed with the objective to reduce the interventions in the hot cell, in order to avoid oxidation caused by metallic materials, and consuming in hoses of the peristaltic pumps, that release residues that blocked the valves used in the process. With materials such as: acrylic, PVC, PEEK e teflon and they are used vacuum as method (way) of fluid transferences instead of peristaltic pump in the majority of the procedures, with this improvements the system can make shorter the lengths of transference hoses, increasing the yield in the process with less interventions for maintenance and time exposure of the workers, guaranteeing the quality and reducing the time of the processing. using a mobile system for displacement of the processing module making in the cleanness and maintenance of the cell that works with radioactive material. Reducing the time of exposure dose of the workers in compliance with RDC-17 of ANVISA, which ruling the Good Manufacturing Practice Procedures. (author)

  7. Air system in the hot cell for injectable radiopharmaceutical production: requirements for personnel and environment safety and protection of the product

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campos, Fabio E.; Araujo, Elaine B., E-mail: fecampos@ipen.b, E-mail: ebaraujo@ipen.b [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are applied in Nuclear Medicine in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and must be manufactured in accordance with the basic principles of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) for sterile pharmaceutical products. In order to prevent the uncontrolled spread of radioactive contamination, the processing of radioactive materials requires an exhausted and shielded special enclosure called hot cell. The quality of air inside the hot cell must be controlled in order to prevent the contamination of the product with particulate material or microorganisms. On the other hand, the hot cell must prevent external contamination with radioactive material. The aim of this work is to discuss the special requirements for hot cells taking in account the national rules for injectable pharmaceutical products and international standards available. Ventilation of radiopharmaceutical production facilities should meet the requirement to prevent the contamination of products and the exposure of working personnel to radioactivity. Positive pressure areas should be used to process sterile products. In general, any radioactivity should handle within specifically designed areas maintained under negative pressures. The production of sterile radioactive products should therefore be carried out under negative pressure surrounded by a positive pressure zone ensuring that appropriate air quality requirements are met. Some of the recent developments in the use of radioisotopes in medical field have also significantly impacted on the evolution of handling facilities. Application of pharmaceutical GMP requirements for air quality and processing conditions in the handling facilities of radioactive pharmaceuticals has led to significant improvements in the construction of isolator-like hot cells and clean rooms with HEPA filtered ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Clean grade A (class 100) air quality hot cells are now available commercially, but in a high cost

  8. Air system in the hot cell for injectable radiopharmaceutical production: requirements for personnel and environment safety and protection of the product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Fabio E.; Araujo, Elaine B.

    2009-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are applied in Nuclear Medicine in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and must be manufactured in accordance with the basic principles of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) for sterile pharmaceutical products. In order to prevent the uncontrolled spread of radioactive contamination, the processing of radioactive materials requires an exhausted and shielded special enclosure called hot cell. The quality of air inside the hot cell must be controlled in order to prevent the contamination of the product with particulate material or microorganisms. On the other hand, the hot cell must prevent external contamination with radioactive material. The aim of this work is to discuss the special requirements for hot cells taking in account the national rules for injectable pharmaceutical products and international standards available. Ventilation of radiopharmaceutical production facilities should meet the requirement to prevent the contamination of products and the exposure of working personnel to radioactivity. Positive pressure areas should be used to process sterile products. In general, any radioactivity should handle within specifically designed areas maintained under negative pressures. The production of sterile radioactive products should therefore be carried out under negative pressure surrounded by a positive pressure zone ensuring that appropriate air quality requirements are met. Some of the recent developments in the use of radioisotopes in medical field have also significantly impacted on the evolution of handling facilities. Application of pharmaceutical GMP requirements for air quality and processing conditions in the handling facilities of radioactive pharmaceuticals has led to significant improvements in the construction of isolator-like hot cells and clean rooms with HEPA filtered ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Clean grade A (class 100) air quality hot cells are now available commercially, but in a high cost

  9. A study on bacterial endotoxins test of radiopharmaceuticals with limulus agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suozhen, Bai; Kai, Luyu; Cheng, Luo [Academia Sinica, Beijing, BJ (China). Inst. of Atomic Energy; Ruiting, Zhang; Zhenmin, Xia [National Inst. for the Control of Pharmaceutical and Biological Products (China)

    1989-08-01

    The feasibility of endotoxins test of radiopharmaceuticals with limulus agent and the approach to take off the inhibition/enhancement effect of radiopharmaceuticals on limulus agent have been studied. Results of the test for 8 radiopharmaceuticals have been given.

  10. The progress on researching method and metabolism of positron radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan Hongmei; Qiao Jinping; Kong Aiying; Zhu Lin

    2010-01-01

    Positron radiopharmaceuticals are mainly used for PET studies, which are used in the field of nuclear medicine as tracers in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. They have important position and function in the clinical diagnosis and treatment. Metabolism or biotransformation will happen when PET radio-pharmaceuticals enter into the body. Understanding the metabolic fate of radiopharmaceutical probes is essential for an accurate analysis and interpretation of positron emission tomography imaging. The recent research progress on PET radiopharmaceuticals metabolism was reviewed in this paper, including the metabolism characteristics, research methods, analytical techniques and so on. (authors)

  11. Development of a lyophilized formulation for preparing the radiopharmaceutical {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Nal{sup 3}-Octreotide for the diagnosis of tumors of neuroendocrine origin; Desarrollo de una formulacion liofiizada para la preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Nal{sup 3}-Octreotido para el diagnostico de tumores de origen neuroendocrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzo L, G. A.

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to develop a radiopharmaceutical consisting of an emitter positrons radionuclide ({sup 68}Ga) which is used in imaging by positron emission tomography; and a peptide capable of binding to somatostatin receptors subtypes 2, 3 and 5; which together serve as a diagnostic support of tumors of neuroendocrine origin. The peptide characterization DOTA-1-Naphthylalanine{sup 3}-Octreotide (DOTA-NOC) by infrared spectroscopy technique by Fourier transform was performed, in which the principal functional groups belonging to this molecule were identified as well as its identification by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Subsequently, a variance analysis taking into account three different levels of amounts of sodium acetate, and three different levels of amounts of the peptide was performed. These masses were subjected to lyophilization for a period of 21 h; after completion of lyophilization, were labeled with 2 m L of {sup 68}GaCl{sub 3} eluates of a {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga ITG generator to determine the percentage of radiochemical purity of the different formulations. It was observed that the ideal formulation must contain 75 μg of peptide and 14 mg of NaOAc, according to studies, was determined that the amount of peptide does not influence the response of radiochemical purity in the same way that the amount of added sodium acetate, which produces different effects on the dependent variable. Finally the radiopharmaceutical formulation was obtained with greater than 95% of radiochemical purity. The validation of the analytical method was performed describing the system accuracy and linearity, specificity and accuracy; linearity and precision of the method, taking into account acceptance criteria based on the guidance of validation of analytical methods published by the National Association of Pharmacists Chemical Biologists of Mexico, A. C.; the parameters evaluated met the specifications given by the guide validation of analytical methods. Uptake and

  12. Development of therapeutic antibodies to G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels: Opportunities, challenges and their therapeutic potential in respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Finch, Donna K; Mustelin, Tomas; Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2017-01-01

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics continues to be a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Therapeutic drug targets such as soluble cytokines, growth factors and single transmembrane spanning receptors have been successfully targeted by recombinant monoclonal antibodies and the development of new product candidates continues. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important disease targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to the complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these important regulators of cell function. Given this opportunity, a significant effort has been applied to address the challenges of targeting these complex molecules and a number of targets are linked to the pathophysiology of respiratory diseases. In this review, we provide a summary of the importance of GPCRs and ion channels involved in respiratory disease and discuss advantages offered by antibodies as therapeutics at these targets. We highlight some recent GPCRs and ion channels linked to respiratory disease mechanisms and describe in detail recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional antibodies against challenging membrane protein targets such as GPCRs and ion channels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Lactate as an early predictor of psychomotor development in neonates with asphyxia receiving therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackova, Renata; Salounova, Dana; Kantor, Lumir

    2017-12-04

    This prospective study aimed to evaluate the relationship between persistently elevated lactate values in the arterial blood of newborns with grade II and III hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (treated with therapeutic hypothermia) and psychomotor development at 24 months. 51 neonates of gestational age from 36 to 41 weeks receiving therapeutic hypothermia for moderate to severe hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy had arterial blood lactate levels regularly analysed. At 24 months the infants' psychomotor development was evaluated and they were divided into two groups - those where the outcome was favourable (i.e. normal psychomotor development) and adverse (severe motor or sensory impairment or death). The lactate dynamics over time were retrospectively evaluated from the data collected, with the normal upper limit set at 4 mmol/L. Of the 51 affected neonates, 7 died over the course of the study. 34 of the remaining 44 infants demonstrated normal psychomotor findings at 2 years old, with adverse findings in 10 cases. Although both groups experienced significant reductions in lactate over time, there were statistically significant differences between them regarding currently measured lactate levels. Absolute lactate values and their development over time can be a used as an auxiliary factor in making early estimates of the long-term outcome for newborns with neonatal asphyxia being treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

  14. Aquatic environment as an occupational therapeutic scenario for the development of body scheme in Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrystiane Maria Veras Pôrto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effect of aquatic environment while an occupational therapeutic scenario in the development of body scheme of a child with Down Syndrome, considering the therapeutic properties of water. Description of the case: An interventionist research, with a qualitative and descriptive approach, conducted in an adapted pool of the Núcleo de Atenção Médica Integrada (NAMI of Fortaleza University (UNIFOR, Ceara, during the period of March to May, 2005. The subject of the study was a female child, aged 10 years old, diagnosed with Down Syndrome. Data collection had as instruments an interview guide for anamnesis, an evaluation form of psychomotor development, besides a field diary to record clinical observations during the sessions. This information was organized and analyzed based on clinical reasoning of occupational therapists and then described as a case study. We observed an evolution in the development of skills related to body scheme, such as the perception of fine parts of her own body, as well as large parts in someone else’s body, the imitation of positions, finishing with more active participation in activities of daily living. Final Considerations: We verified the effectiveness of occupational therapeutic activities conducted in aquatic environment for the development of the body scheme of the child in the study. This may be useful for conducting further research on the subject – whose literature is scarce – and contributing to the crescent update of occupational therapy practices.

  15. Therapeutics targeting tumor immune escape: towards the development of new generation anticancer vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocellin, Simone; Nitti, Donato

    2008-05-01

    Despite the evidence that immune effectors can play a significant role in controlling tumor growth under natural conditions or in response to therapeutic manipulation, it is clear that malignant cells evade immune surveillance in most cases. Considering that anticancer vaccination has reached a plateau of results and currently no vaccination regimen is indicated as a standard anticancer therapy, the dissection of the molecular events underlying tumor immune escape is the necessary condition to make anticancer vaccines a therapeutic weapon effective enough to be implemented in the routine clinical setting. Recent years have witnessed significant advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying tumor immune escape. These mechanistic insights are fostering the development of rationally designed therapeutics aimed at reverting the immunosuppressive circuits that undermine an effective antitumor immune response. In this review, the best characterized mechanisms that allow cancer cells to evade immune surveillance are overviewed and the most debated controversies constellating this complex field are highlighted. In addition, the latest therapeutic strategies devised to overcome tumor immune escape are described, with special regard to those entering clinical phase investigation. Copyright (c) 2007 Wiley-Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L.I.

    1998-01-01

    This paper addresses the utilization of three very distinct enzyme systems for imaging in oncology. The first of these is an enzyme encoded by a viral gene that is not present in non-infected mammalian cells. This enzyme is a nucleoside kinase that converts selected unnatural nucleosides to nucleotides in virus-infected or gene-transfected cells, but not in normal cells. The most commonly used viral kinase in gene therapy today is Herpes simplex virus type-1 thymidine kinase (HSV tk). The imaging applications of this gene therapy system are demonstrated using data from a murine tumour gene therapy model, with 123 IVFRU as the diagnostic radiopharmaceutical. The second enzyme system is endogenous to mammalian cells, but is found in highest concentrations in tissues of neutral crest derivation. The overall biochemical pathway of interest involves the conversion of tyrosine to either dopamine (neurotransmitter pathway), or to melanin (pigmentation pathway). In this system tyrosinase is the 'branching' enzyme, converting dopa to dopaquinone, thereby averting its conversion to dopamine. With selective agents, the tracer can be trapped in this 'melanin pathway', which is particularly active in melanomas. Data on the development of radioiodinated tyrosinase substrates, based on S-cysteaminyl phenol (SCAP), a highly specific tyrosinase substrate, are presented to illustrate this concept. The final example is that of endogenous enzymes that are virtually ubiquitous in biodistribution. One class of enzymes, the reductases, are particularly active in the liver and their activity is amplified in tissues that are hypoxic. They are important in radiotherapy, where they can be utilized to bioreductively activate compounds that can restore the radiosensitivity of hypoxic cells. The 2-nitroimidazoles are of special interest because they are easily reducible by a number of reductases, a process that is made selective by the reversibility of reduction in the presence of cellular

  17. [The prospects for the development of therapeutic and health-promoting tourism in Gorny Altai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhabarova, N K; Iakovenko, É S; Sidorina, N G; Firsova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The present balneological survey made it possible to identify the promising areas with a high potential for the health resort, recreational and touristic activities including the foothill, low-mountain, mid-mountain valleys and hollows of Northern, Northwestern, Central and Eastern bioclimatic provinces of Mountainous Altai. Recommendations have been proposed for the development of therapeutic and health-improving tourism in the Shebalinsk, Ust'-Kansk and Ulagansk districts of the Altai Republic.

  18. Design, development, and clinical validation of therapeutic toys for autistic children

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, Kevin C.; Tseng, Sung-Hui; Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] One of the characteristics of autistic children is social interaction difficulties. Although therapeutic toys can promote social interaction, however its related research remains insufficient. The aim of the present study was to build a set of cooperative play toys that are suitable for autistic children. [Subjects and Methods] This study used an innovative product design and development approach as the basis for the creation of cooperative play toys. [Results] The present study has...

  19. Therapeutic Ultrasound Research And Development From An Industrial And Commercial Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seip, Ralf

    2009-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to share the challenges and opportunities as viewed from an industrial and commercial perspective that one encounters when performing therapeutic ultrasound research, development, manufacturing, and sales activities. Research in therapeutic ultrasound has become an active field in the last decade, spurred by technological advances in the areas of transducer materials, control electronics, treatment monitoring techniques, an ever increasing number of clinical applications, and private and governmental funding opportunities. The development of devices and methods utilizing therapeutic ultrasound to cure or manage disease is being pursued by startup companies and large established companies alike, driven by the promise of profiting at many levels from this new and disruptive technology. Widespread penetration within the clinical community remains elusive, with current approaches focusing on very specific applications and niche markets. Challenges include difficulties in securing capital to develop the technology and undertake costly clinical trials, a regulatory landscape that varies from country to country, resistance from established practitioners, and difficulties in assembling a team with the right mix of technological savvy and business expertise. Success is possible and increasing, however, as evidenced by several companies, initiatives, and products with measurable benefits to the patient, clinician, and companies alike.

  20. Therapeutic Ultrasound Research And Development From An Industrial And Commercial Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seip, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to share the challenges and opportunities as viewed from an industrial and commercial perspective that one encounters when performing therapeutic ultrasound research, development, manufacturing, and sales activities. Research in therapeutic ultrasound has become an active field in the last decade, spurred by technological advances in the areas of transducer materials, control electronics, treatment monitoring techniques, an ever increasing number of clinical applications, and private and governmental funding opportunities. The development of devices and methods utilizing therapeutic ultrasound to cure or manage disease is being pursued by startup companies and large established companies alike, driven by the promise of profiting at many levels from this new and disruptive technology. Widespread penetration within the clinical community remains elusive, with current approaches focusing on very specific applications and niche markets. Challenges include difficulties in securing capital to develop the technology and undertake costly clinical trials, a regulatory landscape that varies from country to country, resistance from established practitioners, and difficulties in assembling a team with the right mix of technological savvy and business expertise. Success is possible and increasing, however, as evidenced by several companies, initiatives, and products with measurable benefits to the patient, clinician, and companies alike.

  1. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update

  2. Helping Oxytocin Deliver: Considerations in the Development of Oxytocin-Based Therapeutics for Brain Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eMacdonald

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Concerns regarding a drought in psychopharmacology have risen from many quarters. From one perspective, the wellspring of bedrock medications for anxiety disorders, depression, and schizophrenia was serendipitously discovered over thirty year ago, the swell of pharmaceutical investment in drug discovery has receded, and the pipeline’s flow of medications with unique mechanisms of action (i.e. glutamatergic agents, CRF antagonists has slowed to a trickle. Might oxytocin (OT-based therapeutics be an oasis? Though a large basic science literature and a slowly increasing number of studies in human diseases support this hope, the bulk of extant OT studies in humans are single-dose studies on normals, and do not directly relate to improvements in human brain-based diseases. Instead, these studies have left us with a field pregnant with therapeutic possibilities, but barren of definitive treatments. In this clinically-oriented review, we discuss the extant OT literature with an eye toward helping OT deliver on its promise as a therapeutic agent. To this end, we identify ten key questions that we believe future OT research should address. From this overview, several conclusions are clear: 1 the OT system represents an extremely promising target for novel CNS drug development; 2 there is a pressing need for rigorous, randomized controlled clinical trials targeting actual patients; and 3 in order to inform the design and execution of these vital trials, we need further translational studies addressing the questions posed in this review. Looking forward, we extend a cautious hope that the next decade of OT research will birth oxytocin-targetted therapeutics that can truly deliver on this system’s therapeutic potential.

  3. Application of a small molecule radiopharmaceutical concept to improve kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jae Min

    2016-01-01

    Recently, large molecules or nanoparticles are actively studied as radiopharmaceuticals. However, their kinetics is problematic because of a slow penetration through the capillaries and slow distribution to the target. To improve the kinetics, a two-step targeting method can be applied by using small molecules and very rapid copper-free click reaction. Although this method might have limitations such as internalization of the first targeted conjugate, it will provide high target-to-non-target ratio imaging of radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals. In conclusion, the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals generally show excellent biodistribution properties; however, they show poor efficiency of radioisotope delivery. Large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals have advantages of multimodal and efficient delivery, but lower target-to-non-target ratio. Two-step targeting using a bio-orthogonal copper-free click reaction can be a solution of the problem of large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals

  4. Application of a small molecule radiopharmaceutical concept to improve kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Recently, large molecules or nanoparticles are actively studied as radiopharmaceuticals. However, their kinetics is problematic because of a slow penetration through the capillaries and slow distribution to the target. To improve the kinetics, a two-step targeting method can be applied by using small molecules and very rapid copper-free click reaction. Although this method might have limitations such as internalization of the first targeted conjugate, it will provide high target-to-non-target ratio imaging of radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals. In conclusion, the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals generally show excellent biodistribution properties; however, they show poor efficiency of radioisotope delivery. Large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals have advantages of multimodal and efficient delivery, but lower target-to-non-target ratio. Two-step targeting using a bio-orthogonal copper-free click reaction can be a solution of the problem of large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals.

  5. Current status of production and research of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals in Indonesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soenarjo, Sunarhadijoso; Tamat, Swasono R.

    2000-01-01

    The use of radioactive preparation in Indonesia has sharply increased during the past years, indicated by increase of the number of companies utilizing radioisotopes during 1985 to 1999. It has been clearly stressed in the BATAN's Strategic Plan for 1994-2014 that the production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals is one of five main industrial fields within the platform of the Indonesian nuclear industry. Research programs supporting the production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals as well as development of production technology are undertaken by the Research Center for Nuclear Techniques (RCNT) in Bandung and by the Radioisotope Production Center (RPC) in Serpong, involving cooperation with other research center within BATAN, universities and hospitals as well as overseas nuclear research institution. The presented paper describes production and research status of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals in Indonesia after the establishment of P.T. Batan Teknologi in 1996, a government company assigned for activities related to the commercial application of nuclear technology. The reviewed status is divided into two short periods, i.e. before and after the Chairman Decree No. 73/KA/IV/1999 declaring new BATAN organizational structure. Subsequent to the Decree, all commercial requests for radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals are fulfilled by P.T. Batan Teknologi, while demands on novel radioactive preparations or new processing technology, as well as research and development activities should be fulfilled by the Center for the Development of Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals (CDRR) through non-commercial arrangement. The near-future strategic research programs to response to dynamic public demand are also discussed. The status of research cooperation with JAERI (Japan) is also reported. (author)

  6. Current status of production and research of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soenarjo, Sunarhadijoso; Tamat, Swasono R. [Center for Development of Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals, National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    2000-10-01

    The use of radioactive preparation in Indonesia has sharply increased during the past years, indicated by increase of the number of companies utilizing radioisotopes during 1985 to 1999. It has been clearly stressed in the BATAN's Strategic Plan for 1994-2014 that the production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals is one of five main industrial fields within the platform of the Indonesian nuclear industry. Research programs supporting the production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals as well as development of production technology are undertaken by the Research Center for Nuclear Techniques (RCNT) in Bandung and by the Radioisotope Production Center (RPC) in Serpong, involving cooperation with other research center within BATAN, universities and hospitals as well as overseas nuclear research institution. The presented paper describes production and research status of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals in Indonesia after the establishment of P.T. Batan Teknologi in 1996, a government company assigned for activities related to the commercial application of nuclear technology. The reviewed status is divided into two short periods, i.e. before and after the Chairman Decree No. 73/KA/IV/1999 declaring new BATAN organizational structure. Subsequent to the Decree, all commercial requests for radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals are fulfilled by P.T. Batan Teknologi, while demands on novel radioactive preparations or new processing technology, as well as research and development activities should be fulfilled by the Center for the Development of Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals (CDRR) through non-commercial arrangement. The near-future strategic research programs to response to dynamic public demand are also discussed. The status of research cooperation with JAERI (Japan) is also reported. (author)

  7. Preparation of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals for positron tomography. Progress report, November 1, 1980-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1981-06-01

    Although the germanium-68 → gallium-68 generator is probably the only source of positron-emitting radionuclides that could enable the widespread application of positron tomography, the commercially available 68 Ga/ 68 Ge generator system suffers from several major disadvantages. The most important of these is that the generator is eluted with EDTA, which forms a very strong chelate with gallium. In order to produce radiopharmaceuticals other than 68 Ga-EDTA, it is first necessary to break the stable EDTA complex and remove all traces of EDTA. This procedure adds several steps and a significant amount of time to procedures for preparing 68 Ga-radiopharmaceuticals. Several years ago, we developed a new generator using a solvent extraction system which produces 68 Ga-oxine (8-hydroxyquinoline), a weak chelate. We have also carried out studies to compare generator systems which produce 68 Ga in an ionic form. Using the gallium-68 eluted from these various generator systems, several 68 Ga-labeled radiopharmaceuticals have been synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo. In addition, attempts have been made to design and synthesize a lipophilic ligand for gallium-68. The stability of radiogallium complexed with a series of potentially lipophilic complexing agents has been studied using chromatographic techniques and in vivo distribution data. The potential of these complexing agents for altering the biodistribution of gallium radiopharmaceuticals has also been investigated

  8. Determination of Sn in 99mTc Radiopharmaceutical Kits by Polarographic Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, M.; Cruz, J.; Sanchez, M.

    2009-01-01

    Kits of 99 m Tc radiopharmaceuticals are used in nuclear medicine for diagnosis of different diseases. Sn (II) is one of the essential components in their formulations, which is used for reduction 99 m Tc-pertechnetate in cold kits for on-site preparation 99 m Tc-pertechnetate radiopharmaceuticals. Usually, these cold kits contain different additives (complexing agents, antioxidants, buffers, etc.) and the amount of Sn (II) varies from kit to kit. The determination of Sn in these products is essential in assessing their quality. We report here the development of a new polarographic method for the determination of Sn (II) and total Sn in representative radiopharmaceuticals kits (for the content of Sn and chemical composition) produced at the Center of Isotopes of Cuba (CENTIS). These methods were validated by analysis of variance and recovery techniques. From the results of the validation, the characteristic functions of uncertainties and fits are considered for the established methods, which give the necessary evidences to demonstrate the usefulness of these methods according to the current trends in Analytical Chemistry. This work provides practical results of great importance for CENTIS. After the speciation of Sn in the MAG3 radiopharmaceuticals kit is inferred that the production process is affected by uncontrolled factors that influence in the product stability, which demonstrates the necessity for analytical tools for the characterization of products and processes. (Author) 57 refs.

  9. Harnessing insulin- and leptin-induced oxidation of PTP1B for therapeutic development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Navasona; Bonham, Christopher A; Rus, Ioana A; Shrestha, Om Kumar; Gauss, Carla M; Haque, Aftabul; Tocilj, Ante; Joshua-Tor, Leemor; Tonks, Nicholas K

    2018-01-18

    The protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP1B is a major regulator of glucose homeostasis and energy metabolism, and a validated target for therapeutic intervention in diabetes and obesity. Nevertheless, it is a challenging target for inhibitor development. Previously, we generated a recombinant antibody (scFv45) that recognizes selectively the oxidized, inactive conformation of PTP1B. Here, we provide a molecular basis for its interaction with reversibly oxidized PTP1B. Furthermore, we have identified a small molecule inhibitor that mimics the effects of scFv45. Our data provide proof-of-concept that stabilization of PTP1B in an inactive, oxidized conformation by small molecules can promote insulin and leptin signaling. This work illustrates a novel paradigm for inhibiting the signaling function of PTP1B that may be exploited for therapeutic intervention in diabetes and obesity.

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear cardiology; Radiofarmacos para cardiologica nuclear

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leon Cabana, Alba [Universidad de la Republica, Facultad de Quimica (Uruguay)

    1994-12-31

    One of the diagnostic technique periodically used in Nuclear Medicine is the angiographic studi e, employee for detect cardiovascular diseases. The radiopharmaceutical more used in the angiographic ones is 99mTc. Between thetopics described in the present work it find: myocardial infarction, radiopharmaceuticals classification for cardiac studies, labelled proceedings, cardiovascular diseases.

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals for oncology: status and newer trends- an overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramamoorthy, N.; Prabhakar, G.

    1997-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals have provided a powerful means in the diagnosis and follow up of cancer patients. Radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic thyroid cancer and palliation of metastatic bone pain are in extensive use. Newer agents are on the anvil for more efficacious diagnosis and therapy. This article gives an overview of the status and trends in this context. (author)

  12. Sixth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium: Proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.-Stelson, A.T. [ed.] [comp.; Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B. [eds.; Smith, F.B. [comp.

    1999-01-01

    This conference was held May 7--10 in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on radiopharmaceutical dosimetry. Attention is focused on the following: quantitative analysis and treatment planning; cellular and small-scale dosimetry; dosimetric models; radiopharmaceutical kinetics and dosimetry; and animal models, extrapolation, and uncertainty.

  13. Molecular design of 99Tcm labelled radiopharmaceuticals. Pt.2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xuebin; Chu Jinfeng

    2003-01-01

    The structure-activity relationship of 99 Tc m labelled radiopharmaceuticals and the correlative contents of computer aided drug design are introduced. Of them, quantitative structure-activity relationship and its application to design 99 Tc m labelled radiopharmaceuticals are narrated on emphases

  14. Trends in radiopharmaceutical dispensing in a regional nuclear pharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmadjian, G.P.; Johnston, J.; Barker, K.; Ice, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Dispensing trends for radiopharmaceuticals at a regional nuclear pharmacy over a 51-month period were studied. dispensing records of a regional nuclear pharmacy were analyzed with a forecasting procedure that uses univariate time data to produce time trends and autoregressive models. The overall number of prescriptions increased from 3500 to 5500 per quarter. Radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear cardiology studies increased from less than 0.1% to 17.5% of total prescriptions dispensed, while radiopharmaceuticals used for brain imaging showed a steady decline from 29% to 11% of total prescriptions dispensed. The demand for other radiopharmaceuticals increased in areas such as renal studies, bone studies, lung studies, liver-function studies, and 67 Ga tumor-uptake studies, and declined slightly for static liver studies. Changes in dispensing trends for radiopharmaceuticals will continue as the practice of nuclear medicine concentrates more on functional studies and as newer imaging techniques become used for other purposes

  15. Evaluation of quality control of radiopharmaceuticals in Nuclear Medicine service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Jamille A. Lopes; Lira, Renata F. de; Santos, Marcus Aurelio P. dos

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are a type of pharmaceutical preparation associated with radionuclides with purpose of diagnosis and therapy. Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS) should perform quality control of radiopharmaceuticals according to the recommendations of the manufacturer and scientific evidences accepted by the National Agency Sanitary Surveillance ( Brazilian ANVISA). This study evaluated the quality of the main radiopharmaceuticals in a NMS of the state of Pernambuco in relation to pH and radiochemical purity. The results showed that 96.8% of the radiopharmaceuticals showed radiochemical purity and all pH values were within the range recommended by the American pharmacopoeia. The study found that the quality control when inserted into the NMS, provides important data that allows exclusion of radiopharmaceuticals with low radiochemistry purity, favoring a reliable diagnosis and ensuring good radiation protection practices and biosecurity for patient and occupationally exposed individuals

  16. 188Re radiopharmaceuticals for radiosynovectomy: evaluation and comparison of tin colloid, hydroxyapatite and tin-ferric hydroxide macroaggregates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savio, Eduardo; Ures, María Cristina; Zeledón, Patricia; Trindade, Victoria; Paolino, Andrea; Mockford, Virginia; Malanga, Antonio; Fernández, Marcelo; Gaudiano, Javier

    2004-01-01

    Re-Sn colloid was easy to prepare, minimum facilities were required, was stable for 24 hr and showed minimal leakage from the joint after intraarticular injection into the rabbit's knee. Furthermore, 188 Re-Sn colloid has greater retention in the knee when it is compared with the other radiopharmaceuticals, so it could provide the best therapeutic effect/absorbed dose ratio for the patient

  17. Accelerating the development of a therapeutic vaccine for human Chagas disease: rationale and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumonteil, Eric; Bottazzi, Maria Elena; Zhan, Bin; Heffernan, Michael J; Jones, Kathryn; Valenzuela, Jesus G; Kamhawi, Shaden; Ortega, Jaime; de Leon Rosales, Samuel Ponce; Lee, Bruce Y; Bacon, Kristina M; Fleischer, Bernhard; Slingsby, B T; Cravioto, Miguel Betancourt; Tapia-Conyer, Roberto; Hotez, Peter J

    2012-09-01

    Chagas disease is a leading cause of heart disease affecting approximately 10 million people in Latin America and elsewhere worldwide. The two major drugs available for the treatment of Chagas disease have limited efficacy in Trypanosoma cruzi-infected adults with indeterminate (patients who have seroconverted but do not yet show signs or symptoms) and determinate (patients who have both seroconverted and have clinical disease) status; they require prolonged treatment courses and are poorly tolerated and expensive. As an alternative to chemotherapy, an injectable therapeutic Chagas disease vaccine is under development to prevent or delay Chagasic cardiomyopathy in patients with indeterminate or determinate status. The bivalent vaccine will be comprised of two recombinant T. cruzi antigens, Tc24 and TSA-1, formulated on alum together with the Toll-like receptor 4 agonist, E6020. Proof-of-concept for the efficacy of these antigens was obtained in preclinical testing at the Autonomous University of Yucatan. Here the authors discuss the potential for a therapeutic Chagas vaccine as well as the progress made towards such a vaccine, and the authors articulate a roadmap for the development of the vaccine as planned by the nonprofit Sabin Vaccine Institute Product Development Partnership and Texas Children's Hospital Center for Vaccine Development in collaboration with an international consortium of academic and industrial partners in Mexico, Germany, Japan, and the USA.

  18. Development of Optically Active Nanostructures for Potential Applications in Sensing, Therapeutics and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Padmanabh

    Materials at nanoscale are finding manifold applications in the various fields like sensing, plasmonics, therapeutics, to mention a few. Large amount of development has taken place regarding synthesis and exploring the novel applications of the various types of nanomaterials like organic, inorganic and hybrid of both. Yet, it is believed that the full potential of different nanomaterials is yet to be fully established stimulating researchers to explore more in the field of nanotechnology. Building on the same premise, in the following studies we have developed the nanomaterials in the class of optically active nanoparticles. First part of the study we have successfully designed, synthesized, and characterized Ag-Fe3O4 nanocomposite substrate for potential applications in quantitative Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) measurements. Quantitative SERS-based detection of dopamine was performed successfully. In subsequent study, facile, single-step synthesis of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated lanthanide based NaYF4 (Yb, Er) nanoparticles was developed and their application as potential photodynamic therapy agent was studied using excitations by light in near infra-red and visible region. In the following and last study, synthesis and characterization of the conjugated polymer nanoparticles was attempted successfully. Functionalization of the conjugated nanoparticles, which is a bottleneck for their potential applications, was successfully performed by encapsulating them in the silica nanoparticles, surface of which was then functionalized by amine group. Three types of optically active nanoparticles were developed for potential applications in sensing, therapeutics and imaging.

  19. Development of Novel Therapeutic Agents by Inhibition of Oncogenic MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh-Duc Nguyen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRs, miRNAs are regulatory small noncoding RNAs, with their roles already confirmed to be important for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression affecting cell physiology and disease development. Upregulation of a cancer-causing miRNA, known as oncogenic miRNA, has been found in many types of cancers and, therefore, represents a potential new class of targets for therapeutic inhibition. Several strategies have been developed in recent years to inhibit oncogenic miRNAs. Among them is a direct approach that targets mature oncogenic miRNA with an antisense sequence known as antimiR, which could be an oligonucleotide or miRNA sponge. In contrast, an indirect approach is to block the biogenesis of miRNA by genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system or a small molecule inhibitor. The development of these inhibitors is straightforward but involves significant scientific and therapeutic challenges that need to be resolved. In this review, we summarize recent relevant studies on the development of miRNA inhibitors against cancer.

  20. A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry: Individual Development, Psychology, and Social Reparation. Psychoanalysis, Education and Social Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Todd O.

    2012-01-01

    A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry develops a poetry pedagogy that offers significant benefits to students by helping them to achieve a sense of renewal (a deeper awareness of self and potentials) and reparation (a realistic, but positive and proactive worldview). Todd O. Williams offers a thorough examination of the therapeutic potential…

  1. Preparation of kits for 99Tcm radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This publication details preparation under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) of thirteen widely used 99 Tc m radiopharmaceuticals and their quality assurance practices. The objective of this document is to present to those who intend to launch a kit preparation programme a set of preparation procedures and other relevant information gathered during kit production over a period of more than a decade, to serve as a good starting point. The manuals and monographs included in the document are based on the experience gained in two major centres. The publication of this material is intended to give a typical example, and not the only possible procedure for preparing the kits. Following the essentials of these kit preparation procedures, it is always possible to make alterations to the composition of the kits. The kits described here concern widely used 99 Tc m radiopharmaceuticals which do not require a Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) camera. These examples of the ''first generation'' of kits are not very intricate to prepare. Although it is advisable to have only one agent for a given intended use, a few agents for each purpose, e.g. EHDP and MDP for bone imagining, have been included in the document so that the reader can have some flexibility in selecting a particular kit. 24 refs, 2 figs

  2. In search of scar seeking radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salehi, N.; Lawlor, J.M.; Lichtenstein, M.; Allaway, M.; Barencevic, A. [Royal Melbourne Hospital, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Department of Nuclear Medicine]|[University of Melbourne, VIC (Australia)

    1998-03-01

    Full text: Sensitive detection of acute peri-osseous scar tissue should be valuable for detection of partial ligamentous, tears and other common rheumatological conditions including back pain and ligamentous scars. Our aim was to investigate acute scar uptake of {sup 99m}Tc(V)-DMSA (dimercapto-succinic-acid), {sup 99m}Tc-DMAD (di- methyl-aminodiphosphonate) compared to {sup 99m}Tc-MDP (methylen-diphosphonate), the standard bone-scanning radiopharmaceutical. New Zealand white rabbits were anaesthetised and had 5-7cm of their mid-line abdominal wall surgically incised. At 24, 48, 72, 96 and 240 hours post surgery, 74 MBq (2 mCi) of the above radiopharmaceuticals were injected intravenously and scintigraphy performed 2.5 hours later. Relative count rate in scar is tabulated. In conclusion, the increased activity in the acute surgical site and lesser bone uptake confirmed that Tc (V)-DMSA and Tc-DMAD are superior to Tc- MDP for detection of new scar tissue in the region of bone. 1 tab.

  3. Regulatory considerations concerning IND radiopharmaceutical drug products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissel, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration is charged by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as presently amended, to assure that any drug introduced into interstate commerce is safe and effective for the purposes for which it is labeled. A radiopharmaceutical is, by definition, a new drug unless there is in effect an approved New Drug Application (NDA) for it. Before the data for the NDA are compiled, investigative studies have to be done. Before such studies can be performed in humans, an exemption from the Act is necessary. This exemption, technically the Claimed Exemption for an Investigational New Drug, is termed the IND. Both the scientific and the administrative requirements for an IND are discussed. For radiopharmaceutical drug products (RDP's), the radiation hazards, as well as the pharmacological ones, must be documented. Should the early studies demonstrate a potential for efficacy in a certain condition or disease state, an investigative protocol for an extended clinical trial is presented. The necessary requirements for Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval and consent forms are discussed. For certain research purposes, uniquely for radioactive drugs, an IND is not required for certain specific studies; the requirements for such a research study, conducted under the auspices of an approved radioactive drug research committee, are outlined

  4. Phenolic aminocarboxylic acids as gallium-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, F.C.

    1984-06-01

    The phenolic aminocarboxylic acids ethylenediamine di (o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid) (EDDHA) and N,N'-bis (2-hydroxybenzyl) ethylenediamine N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED) form gallium complexes having high stability constants which enable them to resist exchange of gallium with plasma transferrin. /sup 67/Ga complexes were synthesized with these ligands, placing substituent groups in the phenolic ring to direct excretion via the renal or hepatobiliary route. The amount of /sup 67/Ga-Br-EDDHA excreted via the hepatobiliary route was comparable with that of some of the sup(99m)Tc agents. Excretion of /sup 67/Ga-Br-HBED was similar but with delayed transit from the liver. /sup 67/Ga COOH-EDDHA was excreted exclusively via the renal route. These findings provide a basis for developing new /sup 67/Ga or /sup 68/Ga radiopharmaceuticals, the latter for use in positron emission tomography, using these phenolic aminocarboxylates.

  5. Phenolic aminocarboxylic acids as gallium-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hunt, F.C.

    1984-01-01

    The phenolic aminocarboxylic acids ethylenediamine di [o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid] (EDDHA) and N,N'-bis [2-hydroxybenzyl] ethylenediamine N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED) form gallium complexes having high stability constants which enable them to resist exchange of gallium with plasma transferrin. 67 Ga complexes were synthesized with these ligands, placing substituent groups in the phenolic ring to direct excretion via the renal or hepatobiliary route. The amount of 67 Ga-Br-EDDHA excreted via the hepatobiliary route was comparable with that of some of the sup(99m)Tc agents. Excretion of 67 Ga-Br-HBED was similar but with delayed transit from the liver. 67 Ga COOH-EDDHA was excreted exclusively via the renal route. These findings provide a basis for developing new 67 Ga or 68 Ga radiopharmaceuticals, the latter for use in positron emission tomography, using these phenolic aminocarboxylates. (orig.) [de

  6. Phenolic aminocarboxylic acids as gallium-binding radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, F C

    1984-06-01

    The phenolic aminocarboxylic acids ethylenediamine di [o-hydroxyphenylacetic acid] (EDDHA) and N,N'-bis [2-hydroxybenzyl] ethylenediamine N,N'-diacetic acid (HBED) form gallium complexes having high stability constants which enable them to resist exchange of gallium with plasma transferrin. 67Ga complexes were synthesized with these ligands, placing substituent groups in the phenolic ring to direct excretion via the renal or hepatobiliary route. The amount of 67Ga-Br-EDDHA excreted via the hepatobiliary route was comparable with that of some of the 99mTc agents. Excretion of 67Ga-Br-HBED was similar but with delayed transit from the liver. 67Ga COOH-EDDHA was excreted exclusively via the renal route. These findings provide a basis for developing new 67Ga or 68Ga radiopharmaceuticals, the latter for use in positron emission tomography, using these phenolic aminocarboxylates.

  7. Determination of stannous tin in radiopharmaceutical cold kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrant, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    Two methods for determining stannous tin in 'cold kits', used for the preparation of Tc-99m labelled radiopharmaceuticals, have been developed. Both are based on the direct titration of the Sn2 in solution. In the first method titration is with N-bromosuccinimide. Of the materials commonly used as cold kits only albumin has been found to interfere with the determination. The second method is a standard iodometric titration in which starch is used as indicator. None of the materials tested interfere with this procedure. The N-bromosuccinimide method is the method of choice as the re-agent, a solid, can be used without prior standardization. Iodine solution must be standardized daily. The paper describes in detail the methods used and gives examples of kits in which the Sn2 levels have been determined using the described procedures

  8. Radiation protection optimization in practices for radiopharmaceuticals production at IEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Osvaldir Paulo dos

    2004-06-01

    This works has arisen from the need of updating radiological protection procedures, creating new ones and training qualified personnel to perform radiological protection duties in a nuclear facility. The main purpose of the research was to assess and minimize gamma and neutron dose rates emitted during the production and handling of radiopharmaceuticals at IEN/DIRA. A mobile measurements system (SMMG-N) was developed for on-site measurements. This system has proven to be more handy than the equipment formerly used for for this task. It has also proven to reduce the measurements uncertainties and to allow for the standardization of assessment procedures. He dose rates calculated using the data provided by this system have been compared with results obtained otherwise and good agreement was observed between them. This study has confirmed the need to improve the radiation shielding of KIPROS target-chamber and target vault in order to meet the radiological principles of dose rate limitation and optimization. (author)

  9. Radiation protection optimization in practices for radiopharmaceuticals production at IEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, P. dos; Delgado, Jose U.; Cardoso, Domingos D'Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    This work has arisen from the need of updating radiological protection procedures, creating new ones and training qualified personal to perform radiological protection duties in a nuclear facility. The main purpose of the research was to assess and minimize gamma and neutron dose rates emitted during the production and handling of radiopharmaceuticals at IEN/DIRA. A mobile measurements system (SMMG-N) was developed for on-site measurements. This system has proven to be handier than the equipment formerly used for this task. It has also proven to define the measurements uncertainties and to allow for the standardization of assessment procedures. Here dose rates calculated using the data provided by this system have been compared with results obtained otherwise and good agreement was observed between them. This study has confirmed the need to improve the radiation shielding of target-chamber and target vault in order to meet the radiological principles of dose rate limitation and optimization. (author)

  10. Development of Therapeutics That Induce Mitochondrial Biogenesis for the Treatment of Acute and Chronic Degenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert B; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2016-12-08

    Mitochondria have various roles in cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Because mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with many acute and chronic degenerative diseases, mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) is a therapeutic target for treating such diseases. Here, we review the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in acute and chronic degenerative diseases and the cellular signaling pathways by which MB is induced. We then review existing work describing the development and application of drugs that induce MB in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we discuss natural products and modulators of transcription factors, kinases, cyclic nucleotides, and G protein-coupled receptors.

  11. Development of Therapeutic Modality of Esophageal Cancer Using Ho-166 Stent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Doo; Park, Kwang Kyun; Lee, Min Geol [Yonsei University Medical College, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung Bae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-09-01

    The prognosis of esophageal cancer is poor due absence of serosa which prevent local invasion to the surrounding organs such as aorta, mediastinum, trachea, and bronchi. We developed a Ho-166 Coated Radioactive Self-Expandable Metallic Stent which is a new herapeutic device in the treatment of esophageal cancer and underwent an animal experiment in mongrel dogs. We observed mucosal destruction by 4-6 mCi of Ho-166 without serious complications such as perforation of esophageal wall. Therefore, Ho-166 coated self-expandable stent appears to be an effective therapeutic device in the palliative treatment of esophageal cancer. 17 refs., 4 figs. (author)

  12. Drugs that alter biodistribution and kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shani, J.

    1986-01-01

    Target localization and organ biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals (RPs) may be altered by non-radioactive drugs whose pharmacological mechanisms compete with the RPs for the same retention processes. Originally referred to as side effects or incompatibilities, such interactions became a major concern in evaluating Nuclear Medicine procedures, as they might cause interpretation of the latter to be without value or misleading. With accumulated experience, some interactions were intentionally included in Nuclear Medicine procedures and became an additional tool in differential diagnosis. Moreover, due to the ability of some RPs to compete with therapeutic agents, Nuclear Medicine studies shifted from anatomical-physiological to more pharmacologically-pathologically-based procedures that can also monitor the stage of disease, and follow its treatment. The aim of this review, therefore, is not only to illustrate some crucial pharmacological issues in Nuclear Medicine imaging, but to emphasize the possible input that alterations of RP biodistribution by drugs may have in achieving better and safer diagnosis, disease staging and monitoring of the patient's response to therapy. 166 references

  13. [Research on Depression in the GDR - Historical Lines of Development and Therapeutic Approaches].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thormann, J; Himmerich, H; Steinberg, H

    2014-02-01

    Historical research has raised the issue of whether GDR psychiatry was isolated from Western influences to such an extent that an autonomous East German psychiatry developed. Taking a chronological approach and being based on a clearly defined range of topics, the objective of this paper is to identify specific contributions made by GDR psychiatry to academic research as well as the degree of its international orientation by focusing on the treatment and research on depression. We have performed a systematic review of the East German psychiatric journal "Psychiatrie, Neurologie und medizinische Psychologie" and a screening of all psychiatric textbooks that appeared in the GDR. Although East German psychiatry was oriented towards Soviet as well as Western developments, some internationally used therapeutic or conceptual innovations reached East German clinics only with some delay. Yet, East German psychiatrists have also contributed their own, independent nosological and therapeutic concepts to research on depression. Pivotal figures included, among others, R. Lemke (Jena), D. Müller-Hegemann (Leipzig) or K. Leonhard (Berlin). With regard to research on depression one cannot truly speak of an autonomous East German psychiatry. Developments in East and West were largely running in parallel. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. DISC1 pathway in brain development: exploring therapeutic targets for major psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKamiya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic risk factors for major psychiatric disorders play key roles in neurodevelopment. Thus, exploring the molecular pathways of risk genes is important not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying brain development, but also to decipher how genetic disturbances affect brain maturation and functioning relevant to major mental illnesses. During the last decade, there has been significant progress in determining the mechanisms whereby risk genes impact brain development. Nonetheless, given that the majority of psychiatric disorders have etiological complexities encompassing multiple risk genes and environmental factors, the biological mechanisms of these diseases remain poorly understood. How can we move forward in our research for discovery of the biological markers and novel therapeutic targets for major mental disorders? Here we review recent progress in the neurobiology of Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1, a major risk gene for major mental disorders, with a particular focus on its roles in cerebral cortex development. Convergent findings implicate DISC1 as part of a large, multi-step pathway implicated in various cellular processes and signal transduction. We discuss links between the DISC1 pathway and environmental factors, such as immune/inflammatory responses, which may suggest novel therapeutic targets. Existing treatments for major mental disorders are hampered by a limited number of pharmacological targets. Consequently, elucidation of the DISC1 pathway, and its association with neuropsychiatric disorders, may offer hope for novel treatment interventions.

  15. Development of Quorum-Based Anti-Virulence Therapeutics Targeting Gram-Negative Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Shan Yew

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing is a cell density-dependent signaling phenomenon used by bacteria for coordination of population-wide phenotypes, such as expression of virulence genes, antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation. Lately, disruption of bacterial communication has emerged as an anti-virulence strategy with enormous therapeutic potential given the increasing incidences of drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria. The quorum quenching therapeutic approach promises a lower risk of resistance development, since interference with virulence generally does not affect the growth and fitness of the bacteria and, hence, does not exert an associated selection pressure for drug-resistant strains. With better understanding of bacterial communication networks and mechanisms, many quorum quenching methods have been developed against various clinically significant bacterial pathogens. In particular, Gram-negative bacteria are an important group of pathogens, because, collectively, they are responsible for the majority of hospital-acquired infections. Here, we discuss the current understanding of existing quorum sensing mechanisms and present important inhibitory strategies that have been developed against this group of pathogenic bacteria.

  16. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in Finland in 1997; Radioaktiivisten laeaekevalmisteiden kaeyttoe Suomessa vuonna 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, H

    1999-02-01

    A survey on the use of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostics and therapy has been made by STUK Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Finland. In 1997 the number of nuclear medicine examinations was 51 700 and that of the therapeutic treatments was 2 240. In 1994 the number of nuclear medicine examinations was 50 900 and that of therapeutic treatments was 2 150. The collective effective dose to the patients was 207 manSv and the mean effective dose to the population was 0.04 mSv per person. In 1994 the collective effective dose was 220 manSv. The numbers of nuclear medicine examinations and of therapeutic treatments have not changed much when compared to those in 1994. The collective effective dose has decreased. The main reason for that is the decreased use of the radionuclide {sup 131}I. (orig.) 4 refs.

  17. Advances in Antisense Oligonucleotide Development for Target Identification, Validation, and as Novel Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moizza Mansoor

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (As-ODNs are single stranded, synthetically prepared strands of deoxynucleotide sequences, usually 18–21 nucleotides in length, complementary to the mRNA sequence of the target gene. As-ODNs are able to selectively bind cognate mRNA sequences by sequence-specific hybridization. This results in cleavage or disablement of the mRNA and, thus, inhibits the expression of the target gene. The specificity of the As approach is based on the probability that, in the human genome, any sequence longer than a minimal number of nucleotides (nt, 13 for RNA and 17 for DNA, normally occurs only once. The potential applications of As-ODNs are numerous because mRNA is ubiquitous and is more accessible to manipulation than DNA. With the publication of the human genome sequence, it has become theoretically possible to inhibit mRNA of almost any gene by As-ODNs, in order to get a better understanding of gene function, investigate its role in disease pathology and to study novel therapeutic targets for the diseases caused by dysregulated gene expression. The conceptual simplicity, the availability of gene sequence information from the human genome, the inexpensive availability of synthetic oligonucleotides and the possibility of rational drug design makes As-ODNs powerful tools for target identification, validation and therapeutic intervention. In this review we discuss the latest developments in antisense oligonucleotide design, delivery, pharmacokinetics and potential side effects, as well as its uses in target identification and validation, and finally focus on the current developments of antisense oligonucleotides in therapeutic intervention in various diseases.

  18. Report of the 2. research coordination meeting on development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this CRP are to evaluate various generator and concentration technologies for 188 W- 188 Re, 99 Mo- 99 mTc and 90 Sr- 90 Y generators, to optimize generator fabrication and use, to standardize quality control techniques for the eluted radionuclides and to provide standardized procedures to participating laboratories. The following issues will be addressed during the CRP. - Development of reproducible methodologies for the preparation of 188 W- 188 Re, 99 Mo- 99 mTc and 90 Sr- 90 Y generators. - Development and evaluation of chromatography adsorbents (Zr/Ti composites) having higher binding capacities and demonstration of their utility in the preparation of column generators for 188 Re and 99 mTc. - Comparison and optimization of technologies for post elution concentration of 188 Re and 99 mTc in order to improve the radioactive concentration. - Development of quality control techniques and specifications for generator eluted therapeutic radionuclides

  19. Dosimetric studies of anti-CD20 labeled with therapeutic radionuclides at IPEN/CNEN-SP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrio, G.; Dias, C.R.B.R.; Osso Junior, J.A., E-mail: gracielabarrio@gmail.com [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2012-07-01

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) makes use of monoclonal antibodies (MAb) labeled with alpha/beta radionuclides for therapeutical purposes, leading to tumor irradiation and destruction, preserving the normal organs on the radiation excess. The therapeutic activity to be injected in a specific patient is based on information obtained in dosimetric studies. Beta emitting radionuclides such as {sup 131}I, {sup 188}Re, {sup 90}Y, {sup 177}Lu and {sup 166}Ho are useful for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Anti-CD20 (Rituximab) is a chimeric MAb directed against antigen surface CD20 on B-lymphocytes, used in non-Hodgkin lymphoma treatment (NHL). The association with beta radionuclides have shown greater therapeutic efficacy. Currently, two radiopharmaceuticals with Anti-CD20 for radioimmunotherapy have FDA approval for NHL treatment: {sup 131}I-AntiCD20 (Bexar) and {sup 90}Y-AntiCD20 (Zevalin). Techniques for the radiolabeling of {sup 188}Re-antiCD20 have been recently developed by IPEN-CNEN/SP in order to evaluate the clinical use of this radionuclide in particular. The use of {sup 188}Re (T{sub 1/2} 17h) produced by the decay of {sup 188}W (T{sub 1/2} 69d), from an {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generator system, has represented an alternative to RIT. Beyond high energy beta emission for therapy, {sup 188}Re also emits gamma rays (155keV) suitable for image. The aim of this new project is to compare the labeling of anti-CD20 with {sup 188}Re with the same MAb labeled with {sup 131}I, {sup 177}Lu, {sup 90}Y and even {sup 99m}Tc. The first step in this project is the review of the published data available concerning the labeling of this MAb with different radionuclides, along with data obtained at IPEN, taking into account labeling procedures, labeling yields, reaction time, level and kind of impurities and biodistribution studies. The pharmacokinetic code will be developed in Visual Studio.NET platform through VB.NET and C{sup ++} for biodistribution and dosimetric

  20. Harvard--MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, September 1, 1977--April 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Brownell, G.L.

    1978-05-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies: chemistry studies designed to achieve a more complete understanding of the fundamental chemistry of technetium in order to facilitate the design of future radiopharmaceuticals incorporating the radionuclide /sup 99m/Tc; the development of new radiopharmaceuticals intended to improve image quality and lower radiation doses by the use of short-lived radionuclides and disease-specific agents; the development of short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides which offer advantages in transverse section imaging of regional physiological processes; and studies of the toxic effects of particulate radiation