WorldWideScience

Sample records for therapeutic radiopharmaceutical development

  1. Radioisotopes for Therapy and Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikolajczak, R.

    2009-01-01

    In recent years there has been a rapid expansion in the use of radionuclides for therapeutic purposes. The potential usefulness of a particular radioisotope depends on many factors: physical data (half-life, energy of beta-particles, gamma ray emissions), production method including separation, labeling and targeting properties of a radionuclide carrier molecule. Depending on the production mode, the radioisotope can be obtained in the pure form (without any carrier) or in the form of the mixture of isotopes, containing also the stable forms. The specific activity is than defined as radioactivity of a certain radioisotope in this mixture. Several beta-emitting radionuclides for targeted radionuclide therapy can be produced in the nuclear reactors, including generator systems, and the list of other potentially useful isotopes is not yet closed. Among the radionuclides used for cancer therapy, 131 I, 90 Y, 188 Re, 166 Ho and 153 Sm have found applications in a number of clinical procedures and have been used for cancer therapy, bone pain palliation, radiosynovectomy, intravascular radiation therapy and other disorders. Extensive research in the field of radiopharmaceuticals and nuclear medicine practices have lead to the identification of other radionuclides including 177 Lu, 161 Tb, 67 Cu, 47 Sc with promising radionuclide physical and chemical properties, which still need to be explored. The latter two are of interest due to their positron emitting 'twins' i.e. 64 Cu and 44 Sc, which can be used for diagnostic imaging and therapy follow up using the same carrier molecules. On the other hand various techniques have been developed in order to improve the therapeutic effect such as the isotope cocktail approach, loco-regional administration, pre-targeting or combination with chemotherapy, providing new therapy options. The most popular in last years were carrier-free 90 Y and 177L u as well as carrier-added 177 Lu used for labeling of peptides specific to somatostatin

  2. Novel diagnostic and therapeutic radionuclides for the development of innovative radiopharmaceuticals

    CERN Multimedia

    We propose the exploration of novel radionuclides with diagnostic or therapeutic properties from ISOLDE. Access to such unique isotopes will enable the fundamental research in radiopharmaceutical science towards superior treatment, e.g. in nuclear oncology. The systematic investigation of the biological response to the different characteristics of the decay radiation will be performed for a better understanding of therapeutic effects. The development of alternative diagnostic tools will be applied for the management and optimization of radionuclide therapy.

  3. Development and therapeutic application of internally emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Bloomer, W.D.

    1980-01-01

    This project is concerned with developing the potential of alpha-emitting radionuclides as agents for radiotherapy. Among the available α-emitters, astatine-211 appears most promising for testing the efficacy of α-emitters for therapeutic applications because: (1) it has some chemical similarities to iodine, an element that can readily be incorporated into numerous proteins and peptides; (2) it has a half life that is long enough to permit chemical manipulation yet short enough to minimize destruction of healthy cells; and (3) α-emission is associated with 100% of its decays. If appropriate biological carriers can be labeled with an alpha emitter such as 211 At, they could be of great utility in several areas of therapeutic medicine where elimination of specific cell populations is desired. While previous attempts to astatinate proteins using standard iodination techniques have been unsuccessful, effective labeling of proteins with astatine by first synthesizing an aryl astatide and then coupling this compound to the protein via an acylation has been achieved. Undergoing current investigation are several different aryl astatide-followed-by-acylation approaches including an astatinated Bolton-Hunter type reagent using concanavalin A (ConA) and melanocyte stimulating hormone (MSH) as model compounds

  4. Radiopharmaceutical development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zielinski, F.W.; Robinson, G.D. Jr.; MacDonald, N.S.

    1976-01-01

    Progress is reported in the following areas of research: compact cyclotron production of 123 I iodide for radiopharmaceutical synthesis; synthesis of 123 I-labeled compounds for myocardial imaging and evaluation of kidney and liver functions; 62 Cu: a short-lived, generator-produced, positron emitting radionuclide for radiopharmaceuticals; dry radioaerosols for lung airway imaging; and improved particulate agents for perfusion imaging

  5. Bone-seeking therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srivastava Suresh C.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone-seeking therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are utilized on the basis of the radionuclide?s particulate emissions (primarily low to intermediate beta emission. The requirements therefore are different from those of bone imaging agents that consist mainly of short-lived single photon emitters. Lately, the therapeutic bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals have attained increasing importance due to their potential role in alleviating pain from osseous metastases in cancer patients, for the treatment of joint pain resulting from inflamed synovium (radiosynoviorthesis, or radiosynovectomy, or from various other forms of arthritic disease. There is, however, a paucity of published data on the bio-pharmacokinetics of these agents when used following intravenous administration for bone pain palliation. This paper will briefly review and summarize the presently available chemical and biopharmacokinetic information on the various clinically approved as well as experimental bone-localizing therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, and make projections on their clinical application for the treatment of primary/metastatic cancer in bone.

  6. The development of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, K. W.; Suh, Y. S.; Lee, J. D.; Ahn, S. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop the radiopharmaceuticals and automatic synthetic unit for labelled compounds, and to establish mass production system of radiopharmaceuticals. These will contribute to the early diagnosis of the disease hard to cure. The contents of this project are as follows, the development of the radiopharmaceutical for imaging of cancer, the development of automatic synthesizer for the synthesis of radio-pharmaceuticals, the development of hormone derivatives labelled with 12 '3I, the development of the radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of myocardial metabolism

  7. Report on the Technical Meeting on Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the TM was to provide an experts' platform to facilitate exploring the current status and future directions on therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. The invited talks and presentations in the TM were in the following topics: - Radionuclide Production; - Production and availability of alpha emitters and their radiopharmaceuticals; - Therapeutic radiopharmaceutical chemistry; - Targets and biological evaluation; - Medical physics and dosimetry; - Clinical applications including radioimmunotherapy and clinical needs; - Peptide receptor mediated therapy Panel discussions: - Radionuclide therapy using alpha emitters; - Regulatory challenges with therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals; - International activities in radionuclide therapy. he technical meeting generated a large interest among scientists and physicians working in the field of targeted therapy using radiopharmaceuticals. Participants from both developed and developing MS reported on recent developments on the research work and clinical studies going on in the field and provided their views on the future developments in this field. The unexpected high number of participants and the high number of presentations with exceptional quality underlines the great interest of scientists and professionals in therapeutic applications using radiolabelled drugs / biomolecules. The intensive discussions including panels specified the challenges in the future on developing novel agents and to finally use them for the benefit of patients. The IAEA can play as vital role in streamlining developments and to provide tools to overcome scientific, professional and regulatory challenges in the field of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

  8. Development of radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyung Bae; Kim, J. R.; Shin, B. C.; Kim, Y. M.; Cho, U. K.; Han, K. H.; Chung, Y. J.; Shin, H. Y.; Hong, S. B.

    1997-09-01

    To overcome many problems caused by external radiation therapy, we have developed a new agent for internal radiation therapy, which is administered directly to the lesions and irradiate {beta}-rays resulting in maximized therapeutic effect and minimized radiation damage to normal tissues or organs to nearby. In the same reasons, we have also developed a new radioactive patch for the treatment of skin cancer using {beta}-emitting radionuclide. We prepared for {sup 166}Ho-chitosan complex ({sup 166}Ho-CHICO) which is potential radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of liver cancer, peritoneal cancer metastasized from stomach cancer, ovarian cancer, and rheumatoid arthritis in knee joints. We carried out various experiments such as evaluation of absorbed dosimetry, studies on absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) and clinical trials with {sup 166}Ho-CHICO. For commercialization of {sup 166}Ho-CHICO, we evaluated its toxicity, efficacy and safety, and then prepared documents for submission to the Mininstry of Health and Welfare to get license as an investigational new drug. {sup 166}Ho-Patch for skin cancer treatment was prepared by neutron irradiation of pre-made non-radioactive {sup 165}Ho-Patch. We evaluated the efficacy and safety of {sup 166}Ho-Patch in the treatment of skin cancer using an animal model and in clinical cases. (author). 49 refs., 15 tabs., 36 figs.

  9. The development of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, K. W.; Suh, Y. S.; Lee, J. D.; Ahn, S. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to developthe radiopharmaceuticals and automatic synthetic unit for labelled compounds, and to establish mass production system of radiopharmaceuticals. These will contribute to the early diagnosis of the disease hard to cure. The contents of this project are as follows, the development of the radiopharmaceutical for imaging of cancer, the development of automatic synthesizer for the synthesis of radio-pharmaceuticals, the development of hormone derivatives labelled with {sup 12}'3I, the development of the radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of myocardial metabolism.

  10. Report on the 1. research coordination meeting on 'Development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on 177Lu for radionuclide therapy'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    far away from the production site. Patients suffering from breast, lung and prostate cancer develop metastasis in bone in the advanced stage of their diseases and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals such as 153 Sm-EDTMP and 89 SrCl2 are used effectively for pain palliation due to skeletal metastases. Despite the fact that the above bone pain palliating agents give good clinical results; their wider use has met with practical difficulties. Though 153 Sm can be prepared in adequate quantities in medium flux reactors, its short half life (47 h) is the major disadvantage. It is essential to handle large quantities of activity to compensate for decay losses, during production and delivery of the radiopharmaceutical. In the case of 89 Sr, there is very limited capacity for production due to the very low cross section making this product expensive and unaffordable for many patients. It is expected that a 177 Lu based bone palliating agent will offer the same clinical efficacy without the disadvantages mentioned above. Currently there is good published data available on the production of 177 Lu and the preparation of phosphonates based radiopharmaceuticals which show high bone uptake. 177 Lu produced in the low to medium flux research reactors available in the MS can be used for bone pain palliation. High specific activity 177 Lu that is prepared in high flux research reactors is needed for radiolabelling antibodies and peptides. These antibodies introduced to patients alone or in conjunction with 90 Y products are showing promising results in clinical trials. Large quantities of high specific activity 177 Lu can be prepared by irradiating enriched targets in high flux research reactors and hence, in the long term the cost of high specific activity 177 Lu should come down to reasonable levels. The wider availability of 177 Lu will make it feasible for the production of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals with lower cost ensuring higher availability in MS. The CRP 'Development of

  11. Laboratory methods to evaluate therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteaga de Murphy, C.; Rodriguez-Cortes, J.; Pedraza-Lopez, M.; Ramirez-Iglesias, MT.; Ferro-Flores, G.

    2007-01-01

    The overall aim of this coordinated research project was to develop in vivo and in vitro laboratory methods to evaluate therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. Towards this end, the laboratory methods used in this study are described in detail. Two peptides - an 8 amino acid minigastrin analogue and octreotate - were labelled with 177 Lu. Bombesin was labelled with 99 mTc, and its diagnostic utility was proven. For comparison, 99 mTc-TOC was used. The cell lines used in this study were AR42J cells, which overexpress somatostatin receptors found in neuroendocrine cancers, and PC3 cells, which overexpress gastric releasing peptide receptors (GRP-r) found in human prostate and breast cancers. The animal model chosen was athymic mice with implanted dorsal tumours of pathologically confirmed cell cancers. The methodology described for labelling, quality control, and in vitro and in vivo assays can be easily used with other radionuclides and other peptides of interest. (author)

  12. Development of new radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1989-12-01

    The possibilities to design and prepare better and more organ-specific radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic nuclear medicine has increased dramatically in the recent past with a deeper understanding of the relationships between chemical structure and biological activity. Whereas most of the research is performed in well-funded laboratories of industrialized countries, there are several developing countries with adequate resources and expertise as to undertake fruitful research in the field of radiopharmacy. With the aim of promoting advanced research in radiopharmacy by developing new radiodiagnostics agents, in particular, hepatobiliary imaging agents labelled with 99m Tc, and to facilitate exchange of information, the IAEA has established in 1983 the present Research Co-ordination Programme (CRP) with a duration of five years. The report includes detailed results obtained by all participants as well as novel preparation procedures for some of the newest and more promising radiopharmaceuticals developed under the auspices of the CRP. The extensive bibliographic reference listing is considered another important information of particular value for scientists in developing countries who do not always have access to updated scientific information sources. Refs, figs and tabs

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theobald, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a review of the latest developments in radiopharmaceuticals. It covers the development of radiopharmaceutical compounds, the theory and practice of their synthesis, and examples of their application. Also covers safe handling of radiopharmaceuticals, legislation affecting their use, radiation monitoring, radiochromatography, and computer techniques

  14. Development of the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical 117Lu-DOTA-Minigastrin for potential use in PRRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Bularte, Ana C.; Nevares, Noemi; Zapata, Miguel; Perez, Juan; Crudo, Jose L.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: The main objectives of this work were to obtain 177 Lu-DOTA-Minigastrin with high radiochemical purity (RP) and specific activity (SA) as high as possible, using locally produced medium SA 177 LuCl3 (range 6,36-9,73 Ci/mg of 176 Lu), and to carry out in vitro and in vivo stability tests. Materials and methods: For a typical labelling, 20 or 15 μg of DOTA-MG (pi Chem, Austria) dissolved in ammonium acetate buffer pH 6 were mixed with 1mCi of 177 LuCl3 (SA = 6,36, 7,52 y 9,73 Ci/mg). The solution was incubated for 30 min. at 80 C degrees (pH 5,5). The stability assays in saline (SS) were carried out by incubation of the radiopharmaceutical with SA of 0.05 mCi/ μg of peptide in 80 μ of SS for 24 and 48 h at room temperature. The stability assays in human serum (HS) were carried out by incubation of 2.5 μ of 177 Lu-DOTA-MG with SA of 0.05 mCi/ μg of peptide in 500 μl of HS for 15 min. and 2 h at 37 C degrees. The samples were centrifuged at 3000 xg for 5 min. The supernatant (SN) was taken and acetonitrile (ACN) was added in a ratio 2:3 (SP:ACN). The solution was centrifuged at 3000 xg for 5 min. and the resulting supernatant was concentrated by ultra-filtration (Vivaspin 500, Sartorius). The concentrated SN was analyzed by Reverse Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) in order to determine the radiochemical purity. The serum protein binding was calculated taking into account the relation between the pellets activity in respect to the total activity. Bio distributions of 177 Lu-DOTA-MG in normal mice were done at 15 and 30 min., 1 and 4 h p.i. The results were expressed as percentage of injected activity per gram of tissue (%IAgr). Results: 20 μg of peptide were labelled with different SA 177 LuCl3 (6,36, 7,52 and 9,73 Ci/mg of 176 Lu) resulting in high radiochemical purities 96,31 %, 98,95 % and 97.57 %, respectively (SA 0.05 mCi/μg of peptide). 15 ug of peptide were labelled with 177 LuCl3 (SA 7,52 Ci/mg of 176 Lu) obtaining a

  15. Radiopharmaceutical development and clinical needs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vieira, M.R.

    1998-01-01

    The use of radionuclides for medical applications has continued to grow at a very rapid pace. The use of radiotracers for nuclear medicine imaging and for radiotherapy of cancer as well as certain benign disorders is firmly established as an important clinical modality. Over the past ten years, nuclear medicine has experienced an evolution towards functional studies and novel therapeutic approaches. New radionuclides are required for these applications. In the developmental stages, each new isotope has to go through a phase of careful scrutiny and evaluation, and practical concerns related to the cost of production and availability must be addressed. The development of 18 F-labeled radiopharmaceuticals has opened a completely new area of investigation. Research on bioconjugates (this term includes radiolabeled antibodies, peptides, receptor-specific and other bioactive molecules) has experienced rapid growth because of the promise of a number of these ''bioactive molecules'' to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides for tumor-associated and other specific antigens/receptors ''in vivo''. The new concept of nuclear medicine, particularly when applied to the field of oncology is directed towards the physiological mechanisms and the study of molecular disfunctions. The search for new radiopharmaceuticals thus aims at studying tumors at a tissue and molecular level. Examples of this new approach are scans utilizing the following substances: -guanethidine and noradrenaline analogues such as meta-iodo-benzyl-guanidine labeled with iodine-131 or iodine-123 aimed at targeting neuroendocrine cells and their secretory granules; -various monoclonal antibodies directed at different tumor types, both for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. Radioimmunotherapy is considered particularly suited for treatment of tumors not easily amenable to surgery and for the treatment of small disseminated lesions; -somatostatin analogs tagged with indium-111 or more recently with Yttrium

  16. Report on the 2nd Research Coordination Meeting on The Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals Based on 188Re and 90Y for Radionuclide. Working Document

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy is practiced for the treatment of malignant disorders of various organs and tissues as well as for treating certain other diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. Advances in understanding tumor biology as well as developments in peptide chemistry and monoclonal antibody technology are opening new opportunities for the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, thereby widening the scope of radionuclide therapy. In addition, particulate based radiopharmaceuticals are useful for treating hepatocarcinoma as well as in radiation synovectomy. With the establishment of new products the demand and application of therapeutic nuclear medicine is expected to grow rapidly. While there are a large number of radioisotopes proposed for targeted therapy, practical considerations had been limiting the number of usable isotopes. Generator-produced radionuclides are an attractive option for the large scale on-site availability of therapeutic isotopes. The IAEA’s CRP on the ‘Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides’ (2004-2007) was successful in developing technologies for the preparation of 188 W/ 188 Re and 90 Sr/ 90 Y generators for eluting 188 Re and 90 Y of high radionuclidic and chemical purity usable for research applications in the development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. The IAEA’s CRP on ‘The development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on 188 Re and 90 Y for radionuclide therapy’ was formulated to focus on enhancing the capacity of the 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator; to develop and validate quality control methods for the generator eluate; and to develop therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on 188 Re and 90 Y. The first RCM of the CRP was held in Polatom, Warsaw, Poland from 30 June to 4 July 2008. The meeting reviewed the work going on in the different participating laboratories, and the facilities, expertise and capabilities of the different participating groups, and formulated the work plan of

  17. Development of radiopharmaceutical for radiosinovectomy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Couto, Renata Martinussi

    2009-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals prepared with different radionuclides have been used in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in Nuclear Medicine. The interest in radionuclidic therapy has been increased in last years, with the introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals applied in the destruction of specific cells or to prevent its undesired proliferation. Radiosinovectomy (RSV) is a therapeutic modality that uses radiopharmaceuticals administered in the intra-articular cavity and represents an alternative to the treatment of different arthropaties and, in particular, the arthropaties derived from rheumatoid arthritis and haemophilic. The objective of the present work was to study the labeling of compounds with 90 Y and 177 Lu in order to improve the production conditions and quality control procedures, study the stability of the labeled compounds and preliminary biodistribution studies of the radiopharmaceuticals with potential for RSV applications. The study of the production of 90 Y citrate colloid ( 90 Y-Cit) was based in a labeling procedure using 90 Y Cl 3 solution (37 - 54 MBq) that was previously dried, followed by the addition of yttrium nitrate and sodium citrate in p H 7 at 37 deg C for 30 minutes. The production of hydroxyapatite (HA) labeled with 90 Y was based in a labeling procedure using mono hydrated citric acid, yttrium nitrate and 90 Y Cl 3 solution (37 - 370 MBq). The reaction mixture was incubated for 30 minutes at room temperature and the HA was introduced in aqueous medium and the reaction proceed for 30 minutes under strong stirring. 177 Lu-HA was produced using 177 Lu Cl 3 solution (296 MBq), in presence of lutetium oxide in NaCl medium, p H 7, under continuous stirring for 30 minutes at room temperature. Several reaction parameters were studied for the three radiopharmaceuticals. Labeling yield was determined after particles were centrifuged and washed with NaCl 0,9%. Radiochemical purity was determined by ascending chromatography using different

  18. Use of conventional radiopharmaceuticals in drug development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owunwanne, A.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Non beta-plus radiopharmaceuticals are routinely used to monitor therapeutic and toxic effects of drugs but still there is hesitancy in using them in drug development mainly due to the fact that most of them cannot be used to directly assess the target site for which the drug is being developed. However, they can be useful during safety, preclinical and clinical testing of new drugs to measure or monitor the pharmacodynamic effects of the drug on the tissue. Initial toxic effect of the drug can be studied in small and or large animals. Screening of multiorgan toxicity can be done in small animals while chronological studies can be done in large animals where planar or SPECT imaging can be performed. For screening, a lipophilic radioactive tracer such as 125 I-HIPDM can be used to study multiorgan toxicity. The percentage uptake in various organs of the drug-treated and control animals are compared to each other and the difference is assumed to reflect the tissue response of the drug. Once such a determination is made, organ-specific radiopharmaceuticals are then used to more accurately determine the toxic effect of the candidate drug as exemplified in the use of In-111 antimyosin antibody to document cardiotoxicity of the anthracyclines (particularly adriamycin). During pre-clinical and clinical testing stages, the non beta-plus radiopharmaceutical can be used to determine the therapeutic efficacy of the candidate drug as exemplified in the use of Ga-67 citrate to monitor chemotherapeutic treatment in cancer patients. The use of non-beta plus radiopharmaceuticals in drug development offers several advantages: a) the procedure is currently being routinely used to monitor therapeutic and toxic effects of drugs; b) it is simple, repeatable and adaptable to a chronological study using the same animal when employing imaging technique; c) it can be done in human thereby avoiding the necessity of extrapolating data from animals to human. To establish the use of

  19. Consequences of radiopharmaceutical extravasation and therapeutic interventions: a systematic review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pol, Jochem van der; Voeoe, Stefan [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC+), Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); Bucerius, Jan; Mottaghy, Felix M. [Maastricht University Medical Centre (MUMC+), Department of Radiology and Nuclear Medicine, Postbox 5800, Maastricht (Netherlands); University Hospital, RWTH Aachen University, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Aachen (Germany)

    2017-07-15

    Radiopharmaceutical extravasation can potentially lead to severe soft tissue damage, but little is known about incidence, medical consequences, possible interventions, and effectiveness of these. The aims of this study are to estimate the incidence of extravasation of diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, to evaluate medical consequences, and to evaluate medical treatment applied subsequently to those incidents. A sensitive and elaborate literature search was performed in Embase and PubMed using the keywords ''misadministration'', ''extravasation'', ''paravascular infiltration'', combined with ''tracer'', ''radionuclide'', ''radiopharmaceutical'', and a list of keywords referring to clinically used tracers (i.e. ''Technetium-99m'', ''Yttrium-90''). Reported data on radiopharmaceutical extravasation and applied interventions was extracted and summarised. Thirty-seven publications reported 3016 cases of diagnostic radiopharmaceutical extravasation, of which three cases reported symptoms after extravasation. Eight publications reported 10 cases of therapeutic tracer extravasation. The most severe symptom was ulceration. Thirty-four different intervention and prevention strategies were performed or proposed in literature. Extravasation of diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals is common. {sup 99m}Tc, {sup 123}I, {sup 18}F, and {sup 68}Ga labelled tracers do not require specific intervention. Extravasation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can give severe soft tissue lesions. Although not evidence based, surgical intervention should be considered. Furthermore, dispersive intervention, dosimetry and follow up is advised. Pharmaceutical intervention has no place yet in the immediate care of radiopharmaceutical extravasation. (orig.)

  20. Development of European regulations on radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1990-01-01

    Separate regulatory systems are being developed on the use of radiopharmaceuticals including radiation protection of patients and personnel and on the quality including safety and efficacy of radiopharmaceuticals. Radiation protection legislation has been introduced in most western European Economic Community (EEC). Within the drug field radiopharmaceuticals have been excepted up till now. However, new EEC directive on radiopharmaceuticals will soon come into force. The work done on the preparation of regulations and guidelines will be discussed. This discussion will focus on the problems faced when radiation protection aspects shall be balanced to traditional requirements of pharmaceutical aspects

  1. Rational development of radiopharmaceuticals for HIV-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Chuen-Yen; Maldarelli, Frank; Eckelman, William C.; Neumann, Ronald D.

    2014-01-01

    The global battle against HIV-1 would benefit from a sensitive and specific radiopharmaceutical to localize HIV-infected cells. Ideally, this probe would be able to identify latently infected host cells containing replication competent HIV sequences. Clinical and research applications would include assessment of reservoirs, informing clinical management by facilitating assessment of burden of infection in different compartments, monitoring disease progression and monitoring response to therapy. A “rational” development approach could facilitate efficient identification of an appropriate targeted radiopharmaceutical. Rational development starts with understanding characteristics of the disease that can be effectively targeted and then engineering radiopharmaceuticals to hone in on an appropriate target, which in the case of HIV-1 (HIV) might be an HIV-specific product on or in the host cell, a differentially expressed gene product, an integrated DNA sequence specific enzymatic activity, part of the inflammatory response, or a combination of these. This is different from the current approach that starts with a radiopharmaceutical for a target associated with a disease, mostly from autopsy studies, without a strong rationale for the potential to impact patient care. At present, no targeted therapies are available for HIV latency, although a number of approaches are under study. Here we discuss requirements for a radiopharmaceutical useful in strategies targeting persistently infected cells. The radiopharmaceutical for HIV should be developed based on HIV biology, studied in an animal model and then in humans, and ultimately used in clinical and research settings

  2. The importance of metal based redox reactions in controlling the biodistributions of diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deutsch, E.A.

    1990-01-01

    Many radiopharmaceuticals used for diagnosing and treating disease are formed by incorporating transition metal radionuclides (e.g., 62-Cu, 99m-Tc, 186-Re) into coordination complexes. After intravenous injection, such complexes can undergo in vivo redox reactions which strongly affect the biodistribution of the core radionuclide. Understanding and controlling these redox reactions is important to the design and development of new radiopharmaceuticals. These principles are illustrated by examples taken from the development of 99m-Tc and 62-Cu complexes as potential heart and brain perfusion imaging agents, and the development of 186-Re complexes a therapeutic agents for palliation of the pain associated with metastatic bone cancer

  3. Therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals. Proceedings of an international seminar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2001-06-01

    The potential of radionuclides in therapy has been recognised for many decades. A number of radionuclides such as iodine-131, phosphorous-32, yttrium-90 and 1-131 MIBG have been in use for the treatment of many benign and malignant disorders. Recently, however, there has been a significant growth of this branch of nuclear medicine with the introduction of a number of new radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of metastatic bone pain, neuroendocrine and other tumours. The prospect of localising or treating neoplastic diseases using specific antibodies labelled with radioactive isotopes capable of delivering large amounts of internally administered radiation may have the potential to fulfil the promise of EhrIich's 'magic bullet', which has tantalised investigators worldwide for the past sixty years. Recent success in this area has been largely due to genetic and molecular techniques that now permit production of a large number of suitable peptides and monoclonal antibodies directed against specific epitopes individually characteristic of specific tumours. The input of the radiochemist and the development of labelling techniques that do not destroy the immunological integrity of the monoclonal antibodies have also been essential ingredients of the success story. Recent significant advances in monoclonal antibody techniques for pretargeting make it very likely that radiopharmaceuticals will become an important part of therapy for various cancers. It may also be possible that in addition to the use of beta particles, alpha particles may soon become a mainstay of therapeutic nuclear medicine. Cancer researchers, looking for an extremely potent and highly specific way to target cancer cells, are investigating the use of monoclonal antibodies and peptides attached to alpha emitting radionuclides in early clinical trials. Today the field of radionuclide therapy is going through an extremely interesting and exciting phase and is poised for greater growth

  4. Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The catalogue offers a wide-spread product range which meets the requirements of the international trend of in vivo application of radiopharmaceuticals. It includes: (1) conditions of sale and delivery, (2) delivery schedule for radiopharmaceuticals, (3) technical information, (4) product specifications, and (5) the complete delivery programme

  5. Development of radiopharmaceuticals and industrial constraints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, R.

    2005-01-01

    The development process of a diagnostic or therapeutic radiopharmaceutical does not really differ from the development of a classical drug. Some specific properties of these nuclear medicine tools mainly linked to the ease to follow their distribution in the human body allow to save a couple of years out of the dozen of years required to bring a drug on the market. Overall development costs can be significantly reduced for the same reason. An industrial who wants to invest in such a business bases its analysis on other criteria that need to evaluate the medical, safety and regulatory environment at the time of drug launching. Competition is obviously a major decision criteria, but in order to evaluate the market potential, other data must be available such as the analysis of the medical landscape, the reimbursement issues, the technology evolution, the investment needs or the development of other imaging modalities, among others. In fact all these parameters concentrate toward a common criteria, the profitability of the project. Nuclear medicine moved from an art and crafts era towards the industrial era and hence plunged from the twentieth to the twenty first century in the economic reality with all its constraints and consequences. (author)

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganatra, R.D.

    1992-01-01

    Today there are an estimated ten million nuclear imaging procedures, performed each year, in just the United States, and the number is still growing. More than 30,000 therapy procedures are performed in the USA each year using radiopharmaceuticals. Moreover, while the numbers continue to grow, so also do the variety of the procedures being employed. A weakness of nuclear medicine is related also to one of its strengths. Unlike other types of imaging where only an instrument and the patient are required (e.g., with ultrasonics); nuclear medicine requires a radiopharmaceutical. At the same time, the variety of radiopharmaceuticals offers the ability to trace one or more particular functions of the human body. This provides nuclear medicine with great variety in detecting specific pathologies. Various nuclear medicine studies are possible because of the localization of radiopharmaceuticals in different organs

  7. Developments in radioisotope production and labelling of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.

    1998-01-01

    Recent developments in both reactor and accelerator production of radioisotopes finding applications in nuclear medicine and in biomedical research are summarised. The priorities for the production of 48 different cyclotron radioisotopes; and for 42 reactor produced radioisotopes finding biomedical applications are identified. Each includes 5 generator systems. The rapid expansion of cyclotron based radioisotope production and automated synthesis of short-lived radiopharmaceuticals with the position-emitting radionuclides continues to gain momentum. Recent feasibility studies of the cyclotron production of 186 Re, 99m Tc and of 99 Mo are cited as examples of motivation to develop accelerator alternatives to use of nuclear reactors for medical radioisotope production. Examples of SPET and PET radiopharmaceuticals labelled with 131 I, 123 I, 124 I, 18 F, and with therapeutic radionuclides are highlighted. (author)

  8. Concentration of 188Re-Perrhenate for Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bokhari, T.H.; Hina, S.; Ahmad, M.; Iqbal, M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Rhenium-188 (T1/2=16.9h) has great potential for a variety of therapeutic applications, including radionuclide synovectomy, oncology and bone pain palliation. The radioactive concentration of 188Re is dependent upon the specific activity of 188W, which dictates the bed size of the alumina/gel column. Due to the high content of inactive tungsten in neutron irradiated WO3, large columns containing aluminum oxide or gel are needed to prepare to double neutron capture based 188W/188Re generators that results in large elution volumes containing relatively high188W contents and low concentrations of /sup 188/ ReO/sub 4/ This decrease in specific volume of 188ReO/sub 4/ places a limitation because a high radioactive concentration of 188ReO4 - is always needed for filling angioplasty balloons or other therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals like188Re -EHDP 188Re -EDTMP, 188Re - MAG3 and 188Re -DTPA. We report post elution concentration of 188ReO4 - using in- house prepared lead cation exchange and alumina columns. Using these columns high bolus volume (10 mL saline) of 188ReO4 - can conveniently be concentrated in 1 mL of physiological saline for therapeutic use. (author)

  9. International seminar on therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals. Programme. Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-12-01

    The document includes extended synopses of 64 presentations given at the International Seminar on Therapeutic Applications of Radiopharmaceuticals, held in Hyderabad, India, 18-22 January 1999. A separate indexing was prepared for each presentation

  10. Medicinal Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry of Metal Radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saw, Maung Maung

    2012-06-01

    Metal complexes have been used as medicinal compounds. Metals have advantageous features over organic compounds. Significant applications of metal complexes are in the field of nuclear medicine. Radiopharmaceuticals are drugs containing radioisotopes used for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The generalized targeting strategy for molecular imaging probe consists of three essential parts: (i) reporter unit or payload, (ii) carrier, and (iii) targeting system. Medicinal radiopharmaceutical chemistry pays special consideration to radioisotopes, as a reporter unit for diagnostic application or as a payload for therapeutic application. Targeting is achieved by a few approaches but the most common is the bifunctional chelator approach. While designing a radiopharmaceutical, a range of issues needs to be considered including properties of metal radioisotopes, bifunctional chelators, linkers, and targeting molecules. Designing radiopharmaceuticals requires consideration of two key words: "compounds of biological interest" and "fit for intended use." The ultimate goal is the development of new diagnostic methods and treatment. Diagnostic metal radiopharmaceuticals are used for SPECT and PET applications. Technetium chemistry constitutes a major portion of SPECT and gallium chemistry constitutes a major portion of PET. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals can be constructed by using alpha-, beta minus-, or Auger electron-emitting radiometals. Special uses of medicinal radiopharmaceuticals include internal radiation therapy, brachytherapy, immunoPET, radioimmunotherapy, and peptide receptor radionuclide imaging and therapy.

  11. Molecular target in oncology. Opportunity for radiopharmaceuticals development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Navarro Marques, Fabio Luiz

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a cellular multifactorial disease, regulated by changes in phenotype characteristics, such as adhesion, invasion, migration, and tumorigenesis; genotypic status of commonly altered genes (KRAS and p53); microenvironmental conditions, such pH, oxygen and nutrient supply. All these features provide opportunities for radiopharmaceuticals development, both for diagnostic and therapy. For both applications, radiopharmaceuticals molecules can be divided in small synthetic molecules, small peptides (natural or modified), large molecules such as antibody or nanoparticles. The characteristics of those molecules and use will guide the choice of the radionuclide to be used for labeling it. In the presentation, data from literature and research ongoing in the Faculty of Medicine of the University of São Paulo/Brazil will be used for demonstrate the potential for radiopharmaceuticals development. (author)

  12. Recent developments in the field of 123I-radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Machulla, H.J.; Knust, E.J.

    1984-01-01

    Due to its advantageous nuclear physical properties iodine-123 is an excellent label for radiopharmaceuticals very well suited for measurements by γ-cameras and single-photon emission tomography. The development of 123 I-radiopharmaceuticals should be based on a clear biochemical concept, reliable labelling procedures and careful pharmacokinetic studies in order to evaluate the physiological behaviour of the radioiodinated compounds being analogues of metabolic substrates. The development of 123 I-labelled fatty acids and biogenic amines clearly proved the successful use of 123 I for labelling compounds applied in medical diagnosis. (orig.) [de

  13. Report of the consultants' meeting on comparative laboratory evaluation of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-12-01

    Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals consist of two components - the radionuclide and the biological carrier. With regard to the radionuclide, an advantage of targeted radiotherapy is that there are a wide variety of radionuclides with different physical half-lives and radiation qualities that can be applied for this purpose. An important task is to select a radionuclide that is compatible with the needs of a particular clinical application. The identification of the ideal targeted radiotherapeutic for each potential clinical application is a difficult task because of the multitude of variables that must be considered, some relating to the radioisotope, and others to the biological carrier. Hence it is recommended that a Co-ordinated Research Programme be established by the Agency to enable participants to acquire and intercompare the methodological expertise to evaluate the relative merit of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. These studies will be performed using a model system selected either from those described in this report or a promising agent that has emerged in the time since this meeting. The molecular carrier will be labelled with 131 I, 125 I as well as other therapeutic radionuclides available to the participant (for example, 90 Y, 186 Re, 188 Re, 153 Sm, 166 Ho, 165 Dy). The potential radiopharmaceuticals will then be compared in a progression of studies evaluating biological integrity after labelling, internalisation and residualization of radioactivity in the tumour cell, in vitro cytotoxicity, tissue distribution, normal organ toxicity (determination of the maximum tolerated dose) and finally, therapeutic efficacy

  14. Radiation Dosimetry considerations in the safe administration of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.H.

    1995-01-01

    A set of eight questions was put to advanced nuclear medicine physicians-in-training participating in a continuing assessment exercise in practical therapeutic nuclear oncology. Using the particular example of 131 I-MIBG treatment of neuroblastoma in children, the questions were directed to the rationale of therapy and the contribution of other forms of treatment to toxic effects. The best answer to the questions are reproduced together with an introduction by the examiner, Dr. H. Turner. tabs

  15. Recent advances in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, S.

    2000-01-01

    Full text: Radiopharmaceuticals in Nuclear Medicine may be divided into diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The diagnostic area is perceived to be mature, while the therapeutic side of nuclear medicine is still evolving. There are over 100 diagnostic radiopharmaceutical products available, the greatest number applied in cardiology followed by oncology and neurology. The greatest success in therapeutic nuclear medicine has been achieved in thyroid cancer, hyperthyroidism and bone pain palliation. Those in the field believe the future of nuclear medicine resides in the growth potential of the emerging therapeutic market, hence much of the recent research has been focussed in the development of therapeutic agents for targeting cancers. Radiopharmaceuticals under development or in clinical trials involve the use of radionuclides such as Y-90, Pd-103, Ir-192, Re-188, I-131, Sm-153, Sn-114, Sr-90, Cu-64 and In-111. Advances in cyclotron and camera technology as well as automation has enhanced and widened the potential use of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals such as F-18 Fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG). However the relationship between FDG uptake and glucose consumption in normal and diseased tissue is still to be defined. Many challenges remain for the nuclear medicine community to apply new knowledge of human biochemistry in the development of new radiopharmaceuticals. A better understanding of effects of radiation and its role in the design of therapeutic agents is undoubtedly pivotal for advancing therapeutic Nuclear Medicine into the future

  16. Dosimetry of Radiopharmaceuticals for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, Richard

    2011-05-01

    A standard formalism for radionuclide internal radiation dosimetry was developed in the 1960s and continues to be refined today. Early work was based on a mathematical phantom but this is being replaced by phantoms developed from whole-body CT scans to give more realistic dose estimates. The largest contributors to the uncertainties in these dose estimates are the errors associated with in vivo activity quantitation, the variability of the biokinetics between patients and the limited information that can be obtained on these kinetics in individual patients. Despite these limitations, pre-treatment patient-specific dosimetry is being increasing used, particularly to limit the toxicity to non-target organs such as the bone marrow.

  17. Dosimetry of Radiopharmaceuticals for Diagnostic and Therapeutic Nuclear Medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart, Richard

    2011-01-01

    A standard formalism for radionuclide internal radiation dosimetry was developed in the 1960s and continues to be refined today. Early work was based on a mathematical phantom but this is being replaced by phantoms developed from whole-body CT scans to give more realistic dose estimates. The largest contributors to the uncertainties in these dose estimates are the errors associated with in vivo activity quantitation, the variability of the biokinetics between patients and the limited information that can be obtained on these kinetics in individual patients. Despite these limitations, pre-treatment patient-specific dosimetry is being increasing used, particularly to limit the toxicity to non-target organs such as the bone marrow.

  18. Therapeutical radiopharmaceuticals based In vivo generator system [166 Dy] Dy/166 Ho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro F, G.; Garcia S, L.; Monroy G, F.; Tendilla, J.I.; Pedraza L, M.; Murphy, C.A. de

    2002-01-01

    At the idea to administer to a patient a molecule containing in it structure a father radionuclide, with a half life enough large which allows to the radiolabelled molecule to take up position specifically in a white tissue and decaying In vivo to the daughter radionuclide with properties potentially therapeutic, it is known as In vivo generator system. In this work the preparation and the preliminary dosimetric valuations of radiopharmaceuticals based In vivo generator system 166 Dy Dy/ 166 Ho for applications in radioimmunotherapy, in the treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis and in the bone marrow ablation (m.o.) for candidates patients to bone marrow transplant are presented. (Author)

  19. Development and applications of radiopharmaceutical 'Milican inj.'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, Jei Man

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy has been used for the cancer treatment. There are two kinds of radiation therapy; the external radiation therapy and the internal radiation therapy. Hitherto, the external radiation therapy has been widely used, but for the lack of its selectivity it requires strong radiation dose and causes the irritation and damage of the normal tissue or organ. Therefore many researchers give their interests to the internal radiation therapy in which the radioactive materials are injected directly into the target organ or tissue. Many β -emitting radionuclides have been studied for the application of the internal radiation therapy. Among them, Holmium-166 has the many beneficial physical characteristics for the internal radiation therapy such as appropriate half life (26.8hr), high β energy (max.. 1.85 MeV (51%), 1.77 MeV (48%), mean 0.67MeV), and low γ energy (0.081MeV) easily detected by γ -camera. In the internal radiation therapy, the administered radioactive materials should be retained in the target long enough to increase the therapeutic effects and avoid the damage in the normal tissue or organ. For this purpose, radionuclides are used as complex form with carriers. Carriers should have a high affinity with radionuclides in vivo and in vitro, so the complex can be evenly distributed in the lesion but can not be leaked out from the lesion. It is known that Chitosan, a polymer of 2-deoxy-2-amino-D-glucose, obtained by the deacety lation of chitin, forms the chelate with heavy metals, so it can be used as an agent for removing heavy metals. Recently many researchers are studying various applications of chitosan for the food and pharmaceuticals. Moreover, the advantage of chitosan is that it makes a clear solution in acidic condition but changes into a gel in basic condition. In this respect, Holmium 166-chitosan chelate compound (Milican inj.) is administered into the lesion through percutaneous injection and pH of the solution is changed to neutral p

  20. New radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payoux, P.; Esquerre, J.P.; Alonso, M.; Tafani, M.

    2008-01-01

    With the development of positron emission tomography, the significant increase in prescriptions of [ 18 F]F.D.G. has underlined the interest for molecular imaging in many pathologies. Facing the demand of 'new' radiopharmaceuticals (frequently clinically validated in the last century) for more and more specific diagnosis, the nuclear physician is confronted with a sparse offer of the radiopharmaceutical companies and a particularly complicated radiopharmaceutical legislation. This paper briefly reports on the radiopharmaceutical statutes encountered in France nowadays; it emphasizes that is essential to deeply modify the conditions to obtain a marketing authorization for radiopharmaceuticals if we want to propose to our patients the kind of right they have to expect from nuclear medicine. (authors)

  1. Applying quality by design principles to the small-scale preparation of the bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceutical rhenium-188-HEDP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Rogier; Ter Heine, Rob; Van Der Gronde, Toon; Selles, Suzanne; De Klerk, John; Bloemendal, Haiko|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269266178; Hendrikse, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Rhenium-188-HEDP (188Re-HEDP) is a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical for treatment of osteoblastic bone metastases. No standard procedure for the preparation of this radiopharmaceutical is available. Preparation conditions may influence the quality and in vivo behaviour of this product.

  2. Optimization of production and quality control of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals. Final report of a co-ordinated research project 1994-1998

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1999-09-01

    The 'renaissance' of the therapeutic applications of radiopharmaceuticals during the last few years was in part due to a greater availability of radionuclides with appropriate nuclear decay properties, as well as to the development of carrier molecules with improved characteristics. Although radionuclides such as 32 P, 89 Sr and 131 I, were used from the early days of nuclear medicine in the late 1930s and early 1940s, the inclusion of other particle emitting radionuclides into the nuclear medicine armamentarium was rather late. Only in the early 1980s did the specialized scientific literature start to show the potential for using other beta emitting nuclear reactor produced radionuclides such as 153 Sm, 166 Ho, 165 Dy and 186-188 Re. Bone seeking agents radiolabelled with the above mentioned beta emitting radionuclides demonstrated clear clinical potential in relieving intense bone pain resulting from metastases of the breast, prostate and lung of cancer patients. Therefore, upon the recommendation of a consultants meeting held in Vienna in 1993, the Co-ordinated Research Project (CRP) on Optimization of the Production and quality control of Radiotherapeutic Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1994. The CRP aimed at developing and improving existing laboratory protocols for the production of therapeutic radionuclides using existing nuclear research reactors including the corresponding radiolabelling, quality control procedures; and validation in experimental animals. With the participation of ten scientists from IAEA Member States, several laboratory procedures for preparation and quality control were developed, tested and assessed as potential therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for bone pain palliation. In particular, the CRP optimised the reactor production of 153 Sm and the preparation of the radiopharmaceutical 153 Sm-EDTMP (ethylene diamine tetramethylene phosphonate), as well as radiolabelling techniques and quality control methods for

  3. Country report: Syria. Development of 90Y/90Sr Generator and 90Y Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yassine, Taufik; Mukhallalati, Ch. Heyam

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop a technique for preparation of 90 Sr- 90 Y generator, we have developed a separation technique for isolation of 90 Y from 90 Sr based on using Sr – Spec resin packed in three columns for separation and purification of 90 Sr- 90 Y .The resulting Y90 is used for therapeutic applications. The first part of this project describe a prototype design for the 90 Sr- 90 Y generator in order to get a very accurate method to obtain the minimum possible 90 Sr Breakthrough. 25 mci of 90 Sr was used in the generator 90 Sr- 90 Y and we obtained the elution yield of 90 Y higher than 88%, Also the eluate was used for preparation of several 90 Y radiopharmaceuticals such as 90 YEDTMP and 90 Y-DOTA-HR 3 . And the work is continues to investigate more radiopharmaceuticals applications in the second part of this project such as 90 Y– FHMA. In this part of the co-coordination research programmer, A protocol based on results of this studies was developed to prepare and operate a higher activity generator (50-100mci), the resulting elution yield was approximately 94% of 90 Y . The elute was used in preparation of new 90 Y radiopharmaceuticals. The monoclonal antibodies is still evolving by conjugate Rituximab to The macrocyclic bifunctional chelating agent,(p-SCN-Bn-DOTA)S-2-(4-Isothiocyanatobenzyle)-1,4,7,10- tetraazacyclododecane-tetraaceticacid to obtain the inmunoconjugate DOTA-Rituximub in simple way and then investigating the radio labeling conditions with 90 Y. (author)

  4. The current situation and future prospects of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ando, Atsushi

    2001-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals play an important role in nuclear medicine. In this paper, nuclear medicine relating to radiopharmaceuticals was briefly described. And I would like to focus on the current situation and future prospects of radiopharmaceuticals. Nuclear medicine in this century should take the following directions. Firstly, cancer treatment by radionuclides will be one of the promising fields in oncology. Secondly, in order to achieve evidence-based medicine, sensitive, quantitative imaging using the nuclides will be necessary in nuclear medicine. Under these circumstances, it is important to develop radiopharmaceuticals for sensitive, quantitative imaging and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  5. [Nuclear medicine and radiopharmaceuticals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopena Novales, P; Plancha Mansanet, M C; Martinez Carsi, C; Sopena Monforte, R

    2014-06-01

    Nuclear Medicine is a medical specialty that allows modern diagnostics and treatments using radiopharmaceuticals original radiotracers (drugs linked to a radioactive isotope). In Europe, radiopharmaceuticals are considered a special group of drugs and thus their preparation and use are regulated by a set of policies that have been adopted by individual member countries. The radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic examinations are administered in very small doses. So, in general, they have no pharmacological action, side effects or serious adverse reactions. The biggest problem associated with their use are the alterations in their biodistribution that may cause diagnostic errors. Nuclear Medicine is growing considerably influenced by the appearance and development of new radiopharmaceuticals in both the diagnostic and therapeutic fields and primarily to the impact of new multimodality imaging techniques (SPECT-CT, PET-CT, PET-MRI, etc.). It's mandatory to know the limitations of these techniques, distribution and eventual physiological alterations of radiopharmaceuticals, contraindications and adverse reactions of radiological contrasts, and the possible interference of both. Copyright © 2013 SERAM. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  6. Drug composition matters: the influence of carrier concentration on the radiochemical purity, hydroxyapatite affinity and in-vivo bone accumulation of the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical 188Rhenium-HEDP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, R; de Klerk, J M H; Bloemendal, H J; Ramakers, R M; Beekman, F J; van der Westerlaken, M M L; Hendrikse, N H; Ter Heine, R

    2015-05-01

    (188)Rhenium-HEDP is an effective bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceutical, for treatment of osteoblastic bone metastases. It is known that the presence of carrier (non-radioactive rhenium as ammonium perrhenate) in the reaction mixture during labeling is a prerequisite for adequate bone affinity, but little is known about the optimal carrier concentration. We investigated the influence of carrier concentration in the formulation on the radiochemical purity, in-vitro hydroxyapatite affinity and the in-vivo bone accumulation of (188)Rhenium-HEDP in mice. The carrier concentration influenced hydroxyapatite binding in-vitro as well as bone accumulation in-vivo. Variation in hydroxyapatite binding with various carrier concentrations seemed to be mainly driven by variation in radiochemical purity. The in-vivo bone accumulation appeared to be more complex: satisfactory radiochemical purity and hydroxyapatite affinity did not necessarily predict acceptable bio-distribution of (188)Rhenium-HEDP. For development of new bisphosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals for clinical use, human administration should not be performed without previous animal bio-distribution experiments. Furthermore, our clinical formulation of (188)Rhenium-HEDP, containing 10 μmol carrier, showed excellent bone accumulation that was comparable to other bisphosphonate-based radiopharmaceuticals, with no apparent uptake in other organs. Radiochemical purity and in-vitro hydroxyapatite binding are not necessarily predictive of bone accumulation of (188)Rhenium-HEDP in-vivo. The formulation for (188)Rhenium-HEDP as developed by us for clinical use exhibits excellent bone uptake and variation in carrier concentration during preparation of this radiopharmaceutical should be avoided. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Prenatal radiation doses from radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.M.; Gomez Parada, I.M.; Di Trano, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author) [es

  8. Teaching and research in radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L.I.

    1998-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals comprise a critical element of diagnostic and therapeutic clinical nuclear medicine. As well they contribute to more basic pre-clinical and clinical diagnostic studies such as the evaluation of new drugs and new drug formulations. Their development and utilization is based on the complex interaction of a number of disciplines including medicine, pharmacy, biochemistry, pharmacology, chemistry, physics and engineering. This technically-complex multidisciplinary base has impeded the development of a uniform curriculum of training for basic scientists and professionals who work with radiopharmaceuticals. the range of technical knowledge required is very broad; it ranges from chemical synthesis and radiolabelling, through a maze of biochemistry, pharmacology and now molecular biology, to GMP manufacture, dispensing and clinical consultation concerning use and interpretation of data. Clearly, no single discipline can (nor should) be expected to undertake in-depth training of radiopharmaceutical scientists, but equally clearly, there is need for the development of curricula that will develop specific components of the essential knowledge base. The 'radiopharmaceutical' or 'product' orientation of both teaching and research can be used to provide a focus for academic and professional organizations to develop 'radiopharmacy' curricula that effectively train radiopharmaceutical practitioners for specific roles within the clinical, academic, government and industrial interests of radiopharmaceutical scientists. Currently, there is a plethora of segmented training programs, many of which are inadequately positioned to be of great value to the field or its practitioners. Efforts to re-focus radiopharmacy programs and to build professional recognition for them are bringing about harmonization of performance objectives, and leading to didactic and experiential curricula. The impact and evolution of regulatory processes will demand new and better

  9. Development and application of peptide-based radiopharmaceuticals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dijkgraaf, I.; Boerman, O.C.; Oyen, W.J.G.; Corstens, F.H.M.; Gotthardt, M.

    2007-01-01

    During the past decade, radiolabeled receptor-binding peptides have emerged as an important class of radiopharmaceuticals for tumor diagnosis and therapy. The specific receptor binding property of the ligand can be exploited by labeling the ligand with a radionuclide and using the radiolabeled

  10. Complete Biological Evaluation of Therapeutical Radiopharmaceuticals in Rodents, Laboratory Beagles and Veterinary Patients - Preclinical Distribution-, Kinetic-, Excretion-, Internal Dosimetry-, Radiotoxicological-, Radiation Safety- and Efficacy Data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balogh, L.; Domokos, M.; Polyak, A.; Thuroczy, J.; Janoki, G.

    2009-01-01

    The research and development of various novel therapeutical radiopharmaceuticals is a huge demand in many laboratories world-wide. Beside of multiple bone metastases pain-palliation and radiosynovectomy agents a number of specific radiopharmaceutical applicants mainly for oncological applications are in the pipeline. Numerous in vitro methods are available in the first line to test the radiolabelling efficiency, the possible radioactive and non-labelled impurities, the stability of the label at different conditions and mediums, and some specific characteristics of radiopharmaceutical applicants eg.: receptor binding assays, antigen-antibody assays. But, still before human clinical trials there are several questions to be solved in regards of toxicology, radiotoxicology, radiation safety and maybe most importantly the efficacy tasks. All these issues cannot be answered without animal tests. Several decades back animal tests in radiopharmacy meant only standard bioassays in a large number of healthy rodents. Later on pathological models eg.: human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient animals came-out and through them radiopharmaceutical tumor-uptake by the targets were available to evaluate in vivo as well. Xenografts are still popular and widely used models in the field but instead of wide-scaled bioassays nowadays repeated scintiscans or hybrid images (SPECT/CT, PET/CT) are more and more often used to answer kinetic-, excretion-, tumor uptake, internal dosimetry (Minimum Effective Dose, Maximum Tolerable Dose, critical organ doses, tumor doses) questions. Greater animals like laboratory Beagles are more closely in size, clinical and metabolic parameters to the human objects so playing a more perfect role of human medical doctor and especially veterinary patients. Easy to understand that many of the spontaneously occurring companion animal diseases are a good model of human pathological diseases. The need of a better diagnosis and treatment of that animals meets with

  11. Development of a lyophilized formulation for preparing the radiopharmaceutical 177Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Serrano E, L. A.

    2015-01-01

    The radiolabeled proteins are molecules of interest in nuclear medicine for their diagnostic and therapeutic application in cancer. Antibodies, such as chimeric monoclonal antibody Anti-CD20 rituximab, have established themselves as suitable vectors of radionuclides (e.g. 177 Lu) , introducing high affinity by the surface antigens over- expressed and widely distributed in cells involved in certain diseases. The aim of this work was to design, optimize and document the production process of radiopharmaceutical 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 for sanitary registration request to the Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS). First, a raw material analysis using the Ft-Mir technique and gamma spectrometry was performed. Then, was carried out the development of the lyophilized formulation for the preparation of 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20, in which an ANOVA was performed where the dependent variable was the radiochemical purity. The optimal pharmaceutical formulation was: 5 mg DOTA-CD20 and 80 mg Mannitol to be reconstituted with 1 m L of acetate buffer 0.25 M, ph 7, with an incubation time of 15 min at 37 degrees Celsius in a dry bath. Once completed the development of the lyophilized formulation, we proceeded to the optimization of the production process, development and validation of the analytical method. Three batches were prepared under protocols of Good Manufacturing Practice, which met pre-established specifications as sterile and endotoxin-free of bacterial formulations, with greater that 95% of radiochemical purity. Currently, is conducting the study of shelf stability. Upon completion of the stability studies, the legal record of 177 Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 will be integrated with documented evidence of the quality and stability of the formulation of this radiopharmaceutical. (Author)

  12. Peptide Based Targeted Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals: A Focus on the Synthesis of Radiolabelled Nanobodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Impens, N.; Campsteyn, A.; Aerts, A.; Baatout, S.; Devoogdt, N.; Caveliers, V.; Xavier, C.; Lahoutte, T.

    2009-01-01

    In 1993, the Vrije Universiteit Brussel (Brussels, Belgium) discovered in the blood of camelidae antibodies consisting of only a heavy chain. Due to the lack of the light chain only the variable part of the heavy chain is important for antigen binding. This variable part of these heavy-chain-only antibodies is a good candidate as a targeted therapeutic radiopharmaceutical and was called a nanobody, having a molecular weight of about 15 kDa. Its dimensions are included in between the small peptides like derived from e.g. somatostatin, and the classical monoclonal antibodies. This makes that some characteristics like the physical behaviour, the chemical stability, the penetration in tumour and in healthy tissues, and the blood clearance lie in between the characteristics of the small peptides and the monoclonal antibodies, therefore taking advantage of both extremes. Nanobodies have been humanised to decrease the immunogenic response. The building blocks of molecules such as the octreotide, nanobodies and monoclonal antibodies are amino acids linked via peptide bonds. The modification reactions are therefore all based on the same 'peptide chemistry'. The functional groups on the present amino acids will determine the possible reactions. In order to link a radionuclide to the nanobodies, we opted to use bifunctional ligands containing DOTA, because this is a suitable chelating agent for the diagnostic radionuclide Ga-68, and for therapeutic radionuclides such as Lu-177 and Y-90, covering short and long range β-particle emitters suitable for attacking a wide range of tumour sizes. The ratio of bifunctional ligand to nanobody can be varied by carefully selecting the functional groups of the peptide involved in the reaction with the bifunctional ligand, avoiding the complementarity determining region (CDR), i.e. the part of the molecule binding to the antigen. This is a first way to predetermine the amount of radionuclides that can be linked to the peptide, or the

  13. Hospitable radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, M.B.

    1994-01-01

    Two types of hospitalary radiopharmaceutical was given in Nuclear Medicine: the centralized and hospitalary radiopharmaceuticals. The good practice in the use, instrumentation and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals are used in nuclear medicine for diagnostic and therapy diseases

  14. Obligations, precautions and pending issues in regulatory development for radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gamboa, Maryelle Moreira Lima; Roesch, Heveline Rayane Moura; Lemos, Vanessa Pinheiro Amaral; Rocha, Bruna Oliveira; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are compounds that have a radionuclide and may be gamma-radiation emitter (γ) or positrons emitter (β+), linked to a molecule with specific diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The progress in the use of radiopharmaceuticals has culminated to a sector in common with other types of drugs: regulation and surveillance. >From 2006 on, production, marketing and use of these drugs were open to the Brazilian market granting much more freedom due to the Constitutional Amendment 49, resulting from the previous Constitutional Amendment 199/03 which removes the Union monopoly for this kind of manipulation and granted this production to other nuclear medicine. From this date on, the amount of this type of sold product have been greatly increased, and the nucleus of surveillance and regulation in Brazil have also advanced in the legislative processes, creating documents that are now more focused on radiopharmaceuticals in the national territory (Resolutions No. 63 and No. 64). In international overview, there is too much to be done in regulatory terms in Brazil, such as adding mainly issues of drugs surveillance to pharmacovigilance practice in radiopharmaceuticals drugs. (author)

  15. Obligations, precautions and pending issues in regulatory development for radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryelle Moreira Lima Gamboa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Radiopharmaceuticals are compounds that have a radionuclide and may be gamma-radiation emitter (γ or positrons emitter (β+, linked to a molecule with specific diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The progress in the use of radiopharmaceuticals has culminated to a sector in common with other types of drugs: regulation and surveillance. From 2006 on, production, marketing and use of these drugs were open to the Brazilian market granting much more freedom due to the Constitutional Amendment 49, resulting from the previous Constitutional Amendment 199/03 which removes the Union monopoly for this kind of manipulation and granted this production to other nuclear medicine. From this date on, the amount of this type of sold product have been greatly increased, and the nucleus of surveillance and regulation in Brazil have also advanced in the legislative processes, creating documents that are now more focused on radiopharmaceuticals in the national territory (Resolutions No. 63 and No. 64. In international overview, there is too much to be done in regulatory terms in Brazil, such as adding mainly issues of drugs surveillance to pharmacovigilance practice in radiopharmaceuticals drugs.

  16. Obligations, precautions and pending issues in regulatory development for radiopharmaceuticals in Brazil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gamboa, Maryelle Moreira Lima; Roesch, Heveline Rayane Moura; Lemos, Vanessa Pinheiro Amaral, E-mail: maryellelg@hotmail.com [PPG BioSaude, Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Rocha, Bruna Oliveira [Faculty of Biology, Universidade Luterana do Brasil, Canoas, RS (Brazil); Santos-Oliveira, Ralph [Institute of Radiopharmacy Research, Universidade Estadual da Zona Oeste, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2014-04-15

    Radiopharmaceuticals are compounds that have a radionuclide and may be gamma-radiation emitter (γ) or positrons emitter (β+), linked to a molecule with specific diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. The progress in the use of radiopharmaceuticals has culminated to a sector in common with other types of drugs: regulation and surveillance. >From 2006 on, production, marketing and use of these drugs were open to the Brazilian market granting much more freedom due to the Constitutional Amendment 49, resulting from the previous Constitutional Amendment 199/03 which removes the Union monopoly for this kind of manipulation and granted this production to other nuclear medicine. From this date on, the amount of this type of sold product have been greatly increased, and the nucleus of surveillance and regulation in Brazil have also advanced in the legislative processes, creating documents that are now more focused on radiopharmaceuticals in the national territory (Resolutions No. 63 and No. 64). In international overview, there is too much to be done in regulatory terms in Brazil, such as adding mainly issues of drugs surveillance to pharmacovigilance practice in radiopharmaceuticals drugs. (author)

  17. Activities of radiopharmaceuticals administered for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine in Argentina: results of a national survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomben, Ana M.; Chiliutti, Claudia A.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine in Argentine is carried out at 292 centres, distributed all over the country, mainly concentrated in the capital cities of the provinces. With the purpose of knowing the activity levels of radiopharmaceuticals that were administered to patients for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine, a national survey was conducted, during 2001 and 2002. This survey was answered voluntarily by 107 centres. Sixty-four percent of the participants centres are equipped with SPECT system while the other centres have a gamma camera or scintiscanner. There were 37 nuclear medicine procedures, chosen among those most frequently performed, were included in the survey. In those diagnostic procedures were included tests for: bone, brain, thyroid, kidney, liver, lung and cardiovascular system; and also activities administered for some therapeutic procedures. The nuclear medicine physicians reported the different radiopharmaceutical activities administered to typical adult patients. In this paper are presented the average radiopharmaceutical activity administered for each of the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures included in the survey and the range and distribution of values. In order to place these data in a frame of reference, these average values were compared to the guidance levels for diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine mentioned at the Safety Series no. 115. From this comparison it was noticed that the activities administered in the 40% of the diagnostic procedures included in the survey were between ±30% of the reference values. For those nuclear medicine procedures that could not be compared with the above mentioned guidance levels, the comparison was made with values published by UNSCEAR or standards recommended by international bodies. As a result of this study, it is important to point out the need to continue the gathering of data in a wider scale survey to increase the knowledge about national trends. It is also essential to widely

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals package monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farias, Marcos S.; Oliveira, Mauro V.; Aghina, Mauricio A.C.; Grecco, Claudio H.S.; Wendhausen, Marcos A.S.

    2011-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are used in the field of nuclear medicine as tracers in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. The production of a radiopharmaceutical involves two main processes: the production of the radionuclide on which the pharmaceutical is based, and the preparation and packaging of the complete radiopharmaceutical. Before dispatching package radiopharmaceuticals to the users, each package must be labeling according to the maximum radiation level measured at its surface, according to the radiation protection guidelines CNEN-NE-5.01, to ensure that transport containers comply with regulatory requirements for transport of radiopharmaceuticals. This work describes the package monitoring system developed for help to radioprotection personnel in the process of monitor package radiopharmaceuticals. The system was installed and tested at IEN's dispatch package radiopharmaceuticals room and showed good contribution to reduce the radiation dose to the radioprotection personnel during the package measure process. (author)

  19. Drug composition matters : The influence of carrier concentration on the radiochemical purity, hydroxyapatite affinity and in-vivo bone accumulation of the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical 188Rhenium-HEDP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, R.; de Klerk, J. M H; Bloemendal, H. J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/269266178; Ramakers, R. M.; Beekman, F. J.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/107730200; van der Westerlaken, M. M L; Hendrikse, N. H.; ter Heine, R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: 188Rhenium-HEDP is an effective bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceutical, for treatment of osteoblastic bone metastases. It is known that the presence of carrier (non-radioactive rhenium as ammonium perrhenate) in the reaction mixture during labeling is a prerequisite for

  20. Drug composition matters: the influence of carrier concentration on the radiochemical purity, hydroxyapatite affinity and in-vivo bone accumulation of the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical 188Rhenium-HEDP

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, R.; Klerk, J.M. de; Bloemendal, H.J.; Ramakers, R.M.; Beekman, F.J.; Westerlaken, M.M. van der; Hendrikse, N.H.; Heine, R. ter

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: (188)Rhenium-HEDP is an effective bone-targeting therapeutic radiopharmaceutical, for treatment of osteoblastic bone metastases. It is known that the presence of carrier (non-radioactive rhenium as ammonium perrhenate) in the reaction mixture during labeling is a prerequisite for

  1. Synthesis, analysis, purification and biodistribution in an animal model of radiopharmaceutical 177Lu3+ -dotatato for diagnostic and therapeutic use in neuroendocrine tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldeira Filho, Jose de Souza

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to propose rationalization in the synthesis, analysis and purification of radiopharmaceutical 177 Lu 3+ - DOTATATO for diagnostic and therapeutic use in neuroendocrine tumors, as well as for evaluation g biodistribution of this radiopharmaceutical an animal-mode. The complexation reaction for the synthesis of radiopharmaceutical was carried out in ammonium acetate buffer 0.5 M, p H 7.0, for 30 minutes at 95 deg C. The radiochemical purity was > 95%, according to analysis by chromatography in ITLC-SG, when using the sodium citrate buffer 0,1 M, p H 5.0, as the mobile phase. The molar-limit ratio 177 Lu 3+ :DOTATATO, in ammonium acetate buffer 0.5 M, p H 7.0, for 30 minutes at 95 deg C, was dependent on the specific activity and origin of the radioisotope, this being 1:3.5 (370 MBq : 26μg) for that from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory /USA, and 1:16 (370 MBq: 11.8 μg) for that from Nuclear Analytical and Medical Services/Holland, when considering a decay of five days from the production date of te radioisotopes. This rationalization in the synthesis of radiopharmaceutical 177 Lu 3+ - DOTATATO permits high economy in production costs. Chemical studies on the synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals also placed in evidence the interference of 177 Hf 4+ , the decay product of 177 Lu 3= , as the 177 Lu 3= competitor for DOTATATO. Radiopharmaceutical preparation proved to be stable during 24 hours, at an activity rate of 2775 MBq, with the addition of 0.6 mg/mL of gentisic acid and when kept in dry ice. In biodistribution studies on Swiss and Nuce mice, the specificity of radiopharmaceutical for somatostatin positive-receptor tissues, such as the pancreas, stomach, lungs, adrenal glands, kidneys and the cell tumor AR42J was demonstrated. (author)

  2. Molecular modeling in the development of metal radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1993-10-01

    We began this project with a compilation of a structural library to serve as a data base containing descriptions of the molecular features of metal-labeled radiopharmaceuticals known to efficiently cross the blood-brain barrier. Such a data base is needed in order to identify structural features (size, shape, molecular surface areas and volumes) that are critical in allowing blood-brain barrier penetration. Nine metal complexes have been added to this structural library. We have completed a detailed comparison of four molecular mechanics computer programs QUANTA, SYBYL, BOYD, and MM2DREW to assess their applicability to modeling the structures of low molecular weight metal complexes. We tested the ability of each program to reproduce the crystallographic structures of 38 complexes between nickel(II) and saturated N-donor ligands. The programs were evaluated in terns of their ability to reproduce structural features such as bond lengths, bond angles, and torsion angles. Recently, we investigated the synthesis and characterization of lipophilic cationic gallium complexes with hexadentate bis(salicylaldimine) ligands. This work identified the first gallium-68 radiopharrnaceuticals that can be injected intravenously and that subsequently exhibit significant myocardial uptake followed by prolonged myocardial retention of 68 Ga radioactivity. Tracers of this type remain under investigation as agents for evaluation of myocardial perfusion with positron emission tomography

  3. Development of radiopharmaceuticals based on aptamers: selection and characterization of DNA aptamers for CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correa, C.R.; Andrade, A.S.R.; Augusto-Pinto, L.; Goes, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the top four causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex intracellular glycoprotein produced by about 90% of colorectal cancers. CEA has been identified as an attractive target for cancer research because of its pattern of expression in the surface cell and its likely functional role in tumorigenesis. Research on the rapid selection of ligands based on the SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) forms the basis for the development of high affinity and high specificity molecules, which can bind to surface determinants of tumour cells, like CEA. The oligonucleotides ligands generated in this technique are called aptamers. Aptamers can potentially find applications as therapeutic or diagnostic tools for many kind of diseases, like a tumor. Aptamers offer low immunogenicity, good tumour penetration, rapid uptake and fast systemic clearance, which favour their application as effective vehicles for radiotherapy. In addition aptamers can be labeled with different radioactive isotopes. The aim of this work was select aptamers binding to the CEA tumor marker. The aptamers are obtained through by SELEX, in which aptamers are selected from a library of random sequences of synthetic DNA by repetitive binding of the oligonucleotides to target molecule (CEA). Analyses of the secondary structure of the aptamers were determined using the m fold toll. Three aptamers were selected to binding assay with target cells. These aptamers were confirmed to have affinity and specific binding for T84 cell line (target cell), showed by confocal imaging. We are currently studying the potential efficacy of these aptamers as targeted radiopharmaceuticals, for use as imaging agents or therapeutic applications. The development of aptamers specific to CEA open new perspectives for colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment. Acknowledgments: This investigation was supported by the Centro de Desenvolvimento da

  4. Development of radiopharmaceuticals based on aptamers: selection and characterization of DNA aptamers for CEA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correa, C.R.; Andrade, A.S.R., E-mail: antero@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Augusto-Pinto, L. [BioAptus, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Goes, A.M., E-mail: goes@icb.ufmg.br [Departamento de Imunologia e Bioquimica. Instituto de Ciencias Biologicas. Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais. Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is among the top four causes of cancer deaths worldwide. Carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) is a complex intracellular glycoprotein produced by about 90% of colorectal cancers. CEA has been identified as an attractive target for cancer research because of its pattern of expression in the surface cell and its likely functional role in tumorigenesis. Research on the rapid selection of ligands based on the SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) forms the basis for the development of high affinity and high specificity molecules, which can bind to surface determinants of tumour cells, like CEA. The oligonucleotides ligands generated in this technique are called aptamers. Aptamers can potentially find applications as therapeutic or diagnostic tools for many kind of diseases, like a tumor. Aptamers offer low immunogenicity, good tumour penetration, rapid uptake and fast systemic clearance, which favour their application as effective vehicles for radiotherapy. In addition aptamers can be labeled with different radioactive isotopes. The aim of this work was select aptamers binding to the CEA tumor marker. The aptamers are obtained through by SELEX, in which aptamers are selected from a library of random sequences of synthetic DNA by repetitive binding of the oligonucleotides to target molecule (CEA). Analyses of the secondary structure of the aptamers were determined using the m fold toll. Three aptamers were selected to binding assay with target cells. These aptamers were confirmed to have affinity and specific binding for T84 cell line (target cell), showed by confocal imaging. We are currently studying the potential efficacy of these aptamers as targeted radiopharmaceuticals, for use as imaging agents or therapeutic applications. The development of aptamers specific to CEA open new perspectives for colorectal cancer diagnosis and treatment. Acknowledgments: This investigation was supported by the Centro de Desenvolvimento da

  5. Chilean experience in production of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals labelled with 153Sm and 166Ho

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandia, M.; Gil, M.G.; Tomicic, M.; Araya, G.; Olea, E.; Chong, G.

    1998-01-01

    153 Samarium ( 153 Sm) and 166 Holmium ( 166 Ho) were produced at the Nuclear Center of La Reina Research Reactor, Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission. 153 Sm-EDTMP (Ethylenediaminetetramethylene Phosphonate) used for clinical trial of therapy for painful skeletal metastases and labeled particles such as 166 Ho-FHMA (ferric hydroxide macroagregattes) and 153 Sm-HAP (hydroxiapatite particles) used for radiation synevectomy, were labeled. Radionuclide purity of both radionuclides was analyzed by gamma spectrometry using a multichannel gamma spectrometer. Radiochemical labeled reaction parameters of 153 Sm-EDTMP such as: Sm/EDTMP molar ratio, 153 Sm specific activity, labeled pH and temperature, were determined in order to get high radiolabeling yields. Radiochemical Quality Controls of 153 Sm-EDTMP using different chromatographic systems were carried out in order to determine labeling yields. Bodistribution studies were achieved in mice by dissection of animals and by autoradiography of histological slices in rats, after 2h post injection. 153 Sm-HAP and 166 Ho-FHMA labeled particles were prepared using the methods described. Radiochemical purity, in case of radiolabeled particles was carried out by centrifugation, measuring activity in the supernatant and in particles pellet. Physical parameters, such as particle size and range of the radiopharmaceuticals based on particles labeling were evaluated in order to determine the ideal conditions to obtain particles size range between 10 - 40μ. In vitro labeling stability for over seven days and wash out activity by incubation in human synovial fluid after 6 and 24h post labeling, was also studied. 153 Sm-EDTMP was easily labeled with a Radiochemical purity over 99.5% and stable for over 7 days. Biodistribution studies in mice give more than 50% of ID uptake in bone and less than 0,1% in liver this was correlated by autoradiographic image. 153 Sm-HAP and 166 Ho-FHMA were also labeling obtaining radiochemical purity over 95

  6. Lung radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    Indication or main clinical use of Lung radiopharmaceuticals is presented and clasification of radiopharmaceuticals as ventilation and perfusion studies. Perfusion radiopharmaceuticals, main controls for administration quality acceptance. Clearence after blood administration and main clinical applications. Ventilation radiopharmaceuticals, gases and aerosols, characteristics of a ideal radioaerosol, techniques of good inhalation procedure, clinical applications. Comparison of several radiopharmaceuticals reflering to retention time as 50% administered dose, percent administered dose at 6 hours post inhalation, blood activity at 30 and 60 minutes post inhalation, initial lung absorbed dose, cumulated activity.Kinetic description of two radiopharmaceuticals, 99mTcDTPA and 99mTc-PYP

  7. Fetal absorbed doses by radiopharmaceutical administration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, Ana M; Gomez Parada, Ines M.; Di Trano, Jose L.

    2000-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration with diagnostic or therapeutic purpose during pregnancy implies a prenatal radiation dose. The dose assessment and the evaluation of the radiological risks become relevant due to the great radiosensitivity of the fetal tissues in development. This paper is a revision of the available data for estimating fetal doses in the cases of the more frequently used radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, taking into account recent investigation in placental crossover. The more frequent diagnostic and therapeutic procedures were analyzed according to the radiation doses implied. (author)

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals 1994. Nil desperandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cox, P.H.; Meyer, G.J.

    1995-01-01

    On the basis of the discussions at a symposium held in Duesseldorf and attended by representatives of various interested bodies, European legislation as it affects radiopharmaceuticals is reviewed. Due consideration is given to the new, centralised and decentralised, registration procedures, effective since 1 January 1995. The dossier required to support an application for marketing authorisation is discussed, separate consideration being given to single-photon emitters, therapeutic radio-nuclides and positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals. The role of the European Pharmacopoiea is also considered. It is concluded that the new, modified procedures for the registration of medicinal products in the European Union may actually inhibit free availability of radiopharmaceuticals within the Community, and that there is a strong case for modification of the European Directives so that radiopharmaceuticals are placed in a separate category to therapeutic drugs, with less stringent registration requirements. (orig.)

  9. Radiopharmaceutical drug review process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, R.

    1985-01-01

    To ensure proper radioactive drug use (such as quality, diagnostic improvement, and minimal radioactive exposure), the Food and Drug Administration evaluates new drugs with respect to safety, effectiveness, and accuracy and adequacy of the labeling. The IND or NDA process is used for this purpose. A brief description of the process, including the Chemical Classification System and the therapeutic potential classification, is presented as it applies to radiopharmaceuticals. Also, the status of the IND or NDA review of radiopharmaceuticals is given

  10. Development of a radiopharmaceutical for endovascular treatment of primary and secondary liver lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D’Orio, E.; Glait, H.; Eiján, A.M.

    2017-01-01

    As much as 20% of colorectal cancer patients will develop surgical liver metastasis, according to Pautas en Oncología 2015, the rest will be candidates for systemic chemotherapy and when the progression occurs, they will be evaluated for endovascular treatment. 90 Y labeled microspheres treatment is an effective alternative because it increase the time to progression and improve patients quality of life but the radiopharmaceutical expensiveness makes this alternative unviable for many people. [es

  11. Preparation and bio-distribution of bone tumor therapeutic radiopharmaceutical 153Sm-TTHMP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Shubin; Luo Shunzhong; Liu Guoping; Bing Wenzeng; Wang Wenjin; Wei Hongyuan; Deng Houfu; Hu Shu

    2003-01-01

    TTHMP (triethylenetetraaminehexamethylenephosphonic acid) was labeled with 153 Sm. The labeling condition, stability, mole ratio of 153 Sm to TTHMP, rabbit bone imaging and bio-distribution of 153 Sm-TTHMP in mice were investigated. The results showed that weak basic media and high concentration ligands were favorable to form 153 Sm-TTHMP; labeling compounds were stable at pH 7 in 7 days. The results also indicated that the chemical mole ratio of 153 Sm-TTHMP is n( 153 Sm):n(TTHMP)=1:1 and skeleton uptake of 153 Sm-TTHMP is high ((13.96 ± 3.51)%/g at 1h post injection and (13.54 ± 2.98)%/g at 48h post injection), while the non-target tissue uptake is relatively low, so 153 Sm-TTHMP is a promising bone tumor therapeutic agent

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals developed at the University of Missouri research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketring, A.R.; Ehrhardt, G.J.; Day, D.E.

    1997-01-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has put a great deal of effort in the last two decades into development of radiotherapeutic beta emitters as nuclear medicine radiotherapeutics for malignancies. This paper describes the development of two of these drugs, 153 Sm ethylenediaminetetra-methylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) (Quadramet trademark) and 90 Y glass microspheres (TheraSphere trademark). Samarium-153 EDTMP is a palliative used to treat the pain of metastatic bone cancer without the side effects of narcotic pain killers. Yttrium-90 glass microspheres are delivered via hepatic artery catheter to embolize the capillaries of liver tumors and deliver a large radiation dose for symptom palliation and life prolonging purposes

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals developed at the University of Missouri research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketring, A.R.; Ehrhardt, G.J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States); Day, D.E. [Univ. of Missouri, Rolla, MO (United States)

    1997-12-01

    The University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR) has put a great deal of effort in the last two decades into development of radiotherapeutic beta emitters as nuclear medicine radiotherapeutics for malignancies. This paper describes the development of two of these drugs, {sup 153}Sm ethylenediaminetetra-methylene phosphonic acid (EDTMP) (Quadramet{trademark}) and {sup 90}Y glass microspheres (TheraSphere{trademark}). Samarium-153 EDTMP is a palliative used to treat the pain of metastatic bone cancer without the side effects of narcotic pain killers. Yttrium-90 glass microspheres are delivered via hepatic artery catheter to embolize the capillaries of liver tumors and deliver a large radiation dose for symptom palliation and life prolonging purposes.

  14. Regulatory aspects of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1985-01-01

    Regulatory systems in the field of radiopharmaceuticals have two main purposes: efficacy and safety. Efficacy expresses the quality of the diagnostic and therapeutic process for the patient. Safety involves the patient, the staff, and the environment. The world situation regarding regulations for radiopharmaceuticals is reviewed on the basis of a survey in WHO Member States. The main content of such regulations is discussed. The special properties of radiopharmaceuticals compared with ordinary drugs may call for modified regulations. Several countries are preparing such regulations. Close co-operation and good understanding among scientists working in hospital research, industry and regulatory bodies will be of great importance for the fast and safe introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals for the benefit of the patient. Before introducing new legislation in this field, a radiopharmaceutical expert should analyse the situation in the country and the relationship to the existing regulations. It is expected that the most important factor in promoting the fast introduction of new, safe and effective radiopharmaceuticals will be the training of people working within the regulatory bodies. It is foreseen that the IAEA and WHO will have an important role to play by providing expert advice and training in this area. (author)

  15. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in the development of drug delivery systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frier, M.

    1997-01-01

    Full text. Nuclear medicine imaging techniques have great potential in the study of the behaviour of drug formulations and drug delivery systems in human subjects. No other technique can locate so precisely the site of disintegration of a tablet in the Gl tract, the depth of penetration of a nebulized solution into the lung, or the residence time of a drug on the cornea. By using the gamma camera to image the in vivo distribution of pharmaceutical formulations radio labelled with a suitable gamma emitting radionuclide, images may be used to quantify the biodistribution, release and kinetics of drug formulations and delivery from novel carrier systems and devices. Radionuclide tracer techniques allow correlation between the observed pharmacological effects and the precise site of delivery. The strength of the technique lies in the quantitative nature of radionuclide images. Example will be shown of studies which examine the rate of transit of orally-administered formulations through the GI tract, as well as describing the development of devices for specific targeting of drugs to the colon. Data will also demonstrate the effectiveness of devices such as spacers in pulmonary drug delivery, in both normal volunteers, and in asthmatic subjects. Such studies not only provide data on the nature and characteristics of a product, such as reliability and reproducibility but, may also be used in submission to Regulatory Authorities in product registration dossiers

  16. Development of new radiopharmaceuticals for imaging monoamine oxidase B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasdev, Neil; Sadovski, Oleg; Moran, Matthew D.; Parkes, Jun; Meyer, Jeffrey H.; Houle, Sylvain; Wilson, Alan A.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Imaging monoamine oxidase B (MAO-B) in the central nervous system with PET is an important goal for psychiatric studies. We here report an improved and automated radiosynthesis of N-(6-[ 18 F]-fluorohexyl)-N-methylpropargylamine ([ 18 F]FHMP; [ 18 F]-1), as well as the radiosynthesis of two new promising candidates for imaging cerebral MAO-B, namely, carbon-11-labeled 3-(4-[ 11 C]-methoxyphenyl)-6-methyl-2H-1-benzopyran-2-one ([ 11 C]-2) and N-((1H-pyrrol-2-yl)methyl)-N-[ 11 C]-methyl-1-phenylmethanamine ([ 11 C]-3). Methods: Fluorine-18-labeled 1 was prepared via a tosyloxy precursor in 29%±5% uncorrected radiochemical yield, relative to [ 18 F]-fluoride. Both carbon-11-labeled compounds were prepared with [ 11 C]CH 3 I using the 'LOOP' method in 11% and 18% uncorrected radiochemical yields, respectively, relative to starting [ 11 C]CO 2 . All radiotracers had specific activities >37 GBq/μmol and were >98% radiochemically pure at end of synthesis ( 18 F]-1. While [ 11 C]-2 had moderate brain penetration and good clearance from normal brain tissue, distribution of radioactivity in brain was indicative of free and nonspecific binding. Good brain uptake was observed with [ 11 C]-3 (0.8%-1.4% injected dose per gram at 5 min postinjection), binding appeared to be reversible and distribution conformed with regional distribution of MAO-B in the rat brain. Preinjection of 3 or L-deprenyl showed a modest reduction (up to 25%) of brain activity. Conclusion: Carbon-11-labeled 3 was found to have the most favorable properties of the radiotracers evaluated; however, the signal-to-noise ratio was too low to warrant further in vivo imaging studies. Alternative radiotracers for imaging MAO-B are under development.

  17. Radiopharmaceutical licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, S.J.

    1992-01-01

    Recent health service legislation, and especially the loss of crown immunity has once again focussed attention on the arrangements for licensing of radiopharmaceuticals. The aim of the article is to describe in general terms the UK licensing system and in particular to provide guidance to those responsible for the supply of radiopharmaceuticals in hospitals. (author)

  18. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnstock, Geoffrey

    2017-01-01

    Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990's when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine) receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A 2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson's disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y 12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y 12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y 2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  19. Purinergic Signalling: Therapeutic Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geoffrey Burnstock

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Purinergic signalling, i.e., the role of nucleotides as extracellular signalling molecules, was proposed in 1972. However, this concept was not well accepted until the early 1990’s when receptor subtypes for purines and pyrimidines were cloned and characterised, which includes four subtypes of the P1 (adenosine receptor, seven subtypes of P2X ion channel receptors and 8 subtypes of the P2Y G protein-coupled receptor. Early studies were largely concerned with the physiology, pharmacology and biochemistry of purinergic signalling. More recently, the focus has been on the pathophysiology and therapeutic potential. There was early recognition of the use of P1 receptor agonists for the treatment of supraventricular tachycardia and A2A receptor antagonists are promising for the treatment of Parkinson’s disease. Clopidogrel, a P2Y12 antagonist, is widely used for the treatment of thrombosis and stroke, blocking P2Y12 receptor-mediated platelet aggregation. Diquafosol, a long acting P2Y2 receptor agonist, is being used for the treatment of dry eye. P2X3 receptor antagonists have been developed that are orally bioavailable and stable in vivo and are currently in clinical trials for the treatment of chronic cough, bladder incontinence, visceral pain and hypertension. Antagonists to P2X7 receptors are being investigated for the treatment of inflammatory disorders, including neurodegenerative diseases. Other investigations are in progress for the use of purinergic agents for the treatment of osteoporosis, myocardial infarction, irritable bowel syndrome, epilepsy, atherosclerosis, depression, autism, diabetes, and cancer.

  20. Development in the Preparation and the Quality Assurance of Radiopharmaceuticals for Clinical Uses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sangsuriyan, Jatupol; Paramatikul, Nipawan; Daengprasert, Moleepan; Pumkem, Sudkaneung; Sriwiang, Wiranee; Minsakorn, Naparat

    2011-06-01

    Full text: Radiopharmaceutical preparation technologies and a specific quality assurance system were developed. The kit formulation and the processing of a MDP kit, were developed as a model. NaCl was added as a bulking agent and the kit was filled with N 2 -gas at a slightly negative pressure before stoppering. The product quality tests met all quality control requirements and at least 1 year shelf life was reported. An EC kit and an ECD kit were also developed from the synthesis of starting materials with successful results. 99m T c-Hynic TOC, a neuroendocrine diagnostic agent, was developed both in the form of kit formulation and unit dose preparation for patients. The quality assurance systems for the Hynic-TOC kit and the unit dose preparation were set up and the technologies were taken into implementation by Radioisotope Center, TINT, as routine services

  1. Automation and use of robotic arm for development and routine production of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salvadori, P.A.; Di Sacco, S.; Riva, A.; Fusani, L.

    1993-01-01

    The target of a radiopharmaceutical group is twofold: production of radiotracers for clinical use (routine) and development of new compounds. The level of activity to be handled selects the strategy to be used for radiocompounds handling, ranging from direct manipulation during basic development at microcurie level to sophisticated equipments such as automated black-boxes and robotic arms at curie level. The authors looked for a common solution, to both the management of routine productions and the problems arising during activity scaling up in new tracer development, by choosing a robotic arm integrated by a variety of specialized automatic devices able to perform actions which are difficult (too slow, too precise, too complicated, etc.,) to be made by the robot. The final solution from this approach is a open-quotes synthetic stationclose quotes with flexible architecture which can be used for different applications without harware modification/adaptation

  2. The developing placenta in selecting potential radiopharmaceuticals for tumour-localizing properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoekstra, A.; Vos, C.M.; Herscheid, J.D.M.

    1984-01-01

    The tissue distribution of various radiopharmaceuticals was investigated in rhabdomyosarcoma-bearing and in pregnant rats during the period of rapid foetal and placental growth (days 17-19 of pregnancy). The preliminary results indicate that with the radiopharmaceuticals tested the uptake in placental tissue followed closely the data obtained with tumour tissue in rhabdomyosarcoma-bearing rats. (orig.) [de

  3. Development of a lyophilized formulation for the preparation of radiopharmaceutical 68Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]2 for the diagnosis of breast cancer tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terron A, E. J.

    2015-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals of third generation by its design that includes peptides capable of selectively directing the radiation to a specific molecular target are useful in molecular medicine for obtaining molecular images that allow recording in vivo phenomena temporal-space of molecular or cellular processes, with diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Generally, peptides that recognize cellular receptors that are over-expressed in cancer cells of interest are used; such is the case of RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) a tri-peptide sequence which recognizes to the membrane receptors α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) that are involved in metastasis and angiogenic processes as well as in tumor cells of breast glioma. The high affinity and selectivity of RGD peptide with integrin s α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) is the basis for designing radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic of breast cancer and the metastasis and angiogenic processes. In this paper a useful lyophilized formulation was development for obtaining 68 Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)] 2 radiopharmaceutical that for its effectiveness, stability and security can be used in humans. The production process of core-equipment DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK] 2 /Buffer sodium acetate 1.0 M was optimized, and the formulation was transferred to the radiopharmaceuticals production plant of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). The optimized formulation of the core-equipment for the 68 Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)] 2 radiopharmaceutical preparation is: DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)] 2 peptide - 75 μg; Mannitol - 50 mg; Sodium acetate - 14 mg; Sodium acetate buffer 1.0 M ph 4.3 - 0.5 m L. The production process was validated and stability studies were carried out to the validation batches in compliance with the validation master plan of the ININ and in adherence to compliance of the applicable national and international regulations. Also the legal dossier was drawn up in order to make the application of sanitary registration before Comision Federal para

  4. Click-to-Chelate: Development of Technetium and Rhenium-Tricarbonyl Labeled Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas L. Mindt

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The Click-to-Chelate approach is a highly efficient strategy for the radiolabeling of molecules of medicinal interest with technetium and rhenium-tricarbonyl cores. Reaction of azide-functionalized molecules with alkyne prochelators by the Cu(I-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC; click reaction enables the simultaneous synthesis and conjugation of tridentate chelating systems for the stable complexation of the radiometals. In many cases, the functionalization of (biomolecules with the ligand system and radiolabeling can be achieved by convenient one-pot procedures. Since its first report in 2006, Click-to-Chelate has been applied to the development of numerous novel radiotracers with promising potential for translation into the clinic. This review summarizes the use of the Click-to-Chelate approach in radiopharmaceutical sciences and provides a perspective for future applications.

  5. Drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hladik, W.B.; Ponto, J.A.; Stathis, V.J.

    1985-01-01

    Patients seen in the nuclear medicine department have a wide variety of disorders and, consequently, may be receiving any number of therapeutic drugs. For this reason, nuclear medicine professionals should be aware of the potential effects that these pharmacologic agents may have on the bio-distribution of subsequently administered radiopharmaceuticals, commonly referred to as ''drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions.'' Compared with the quantity of literature written about interactions between various therapeutic drugs, the information available on drug-radiopharmaceutical interactions is scarce. However, there has been increasing interest in this subject, particularly during the past five years. Some of the reported interactions are used intentionally to add a new dimension to the nuclear medicine study and increase its diagnostic capabilities, i.e., pharmacologic intervention. These beneficial ''interactions'' are discussed in detail in several other chapters of this book. Other interactions, however, cause changes in the normal distribution of radiopharmaceuticals, which may interfere with the diagnostic utility of various nuclear medicine procedures. The latter group of interactions is the focus of this chapter

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals good practices handbook: ARCAL XV radiopharmaceuticals control and production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdera Presto, Silvia

    1998-01-01

    A safety practice of the therapeutics diagnostic proceeding in nuclear medicine require a permanent provide high quality radiopharmaceuticals manufacture. This work treat to give a guide for all radio pharmacies laboratories that produce,control, fraction and or dispense radiopharmaceuticals products, with attention hospitable radiopharmacy laboratory. Three chapters with recommendations in manufacture good practice in Hospital radiopharmacy, industrial centralized, bibliography and three annexe's about clean area classification,standards work in laminar flux bell, and guarantee and cleaning areas

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals in China. Current status and prospects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia, Hong-Mei; Liu, Bo-Li [Beijing Normal Univ. (China). Key Laboratory of Radiopharmaceuticals

    2014-04-01

    The review provides an overview of the current status of radiopharmaceuticals in China for in vivo clinical use and also describes some important advances in the past three decades. Development of the diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals as well as basic research on radiopharmaceutical chemistry are being introduced. The radiotracers developed in China include: (1) Brain perfusion imaging agents and CNS radiotracers for β-amyloid plaques, σ{sub 1} receptors, and dopamine D{sub 2} or D{sub 4} receptors; (2) {sup 99m}Tc- and {sup 18}F-labeled myocardial perfusion imaging agents; (3) tumor imaging agents including integrin-targeting radiotracer, novel sentinel lymph node imaging agents, hypoxia imaging agents, {sup 99m}Tc-labeled glucose derivatives, σ{sub 2} receptor imaging agents, folate receptor imaging agents, and potential radiotracers for imaging of human telomerase reverse transcriptase expression; (4) Potential infection imaging agents; (5) Potential asialoglycoprotein receptor imaging agents; (6) Other imaging agents. Moreover, some prospects of research and development of radiopharmaceuticals in the near future are discussed. (orig.)

  8. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals - current state and trends

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.

    1981-07-01

    The current state as well as the tendencies of modern radiopharmaceutical development and application is reviewed. After an evaluation of the fundamental preconditions of decay characteristics and pharmaceutical properties the problems concerning sup(99m)Tc-radiopharmaceuticals, metabolizable compounds and the use of specific biological interactions are discussed. (author)

  10. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  11. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  12. 188Re(V Nitrido Radiopharmaceuticals for Radionuclide Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Boschi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The favorable nuclear properties of rhenium-188 for therapeutic application are described, together with new methods for the preparation of high yield and stable 188Re radiopharmaceuticals characterized by the presence of the nitride rhenium core in their final chemical structure. 188Re is readily available from an 188W/188Re generator system and a parallelism between the general synthetic procedures applied for the preparation of nitride technetium-99m and rhenium-188 theranostics radiopharmaceuticals is reported. Although some differences between the chemical characteristics of the two metallic nitrido fragments are highlighted, it is apparent that the same general procedures developed for the labelling of biologically active molecules with technetium-99m can be applied to rhenium-188 with minor modification. The availability of these chemical strategies, that allow the obtainment, in very high yield and in physiological condition, of 188Re radiopharmaceuticals, gives a new attractive prospective to employ this radionuclide for therapeutic applications.

  13. Development of a pattern hot cell for production of injectable radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Fabio Eduardo de

    2010-01-01

    A controlled ambient should be established to the production/processing of materials susceptible to contamination, like injectable pharmaceuticals, in order to agree with normative and regulatory requirements. Considering medical but also toxic, radioactive and dangerous products, the ambient should work in special conditions to assure that the materials, which in same cases can be also volatile, do not escape to the external ambient, working in a selective, secure and controlled way. The conditions recommended by local and international rules in use, report an negative pressured ambient in relation to the adjacent areas. The technology related with the sizing of project to this kind of system is fully described in the literature, taking in account the rules that clearly describe the essential requirements. However, it is necessary to develop a controlled ambient for radiopharmaceutical production, in a way compatible with the concept of clean rooms and with the safety related to the manipulation of open radioactive wastes. In this work, some devices were created, methods and procedures were established making possible the classification of the ambient inside the hot cell, without physical barriers in the area, using ergonomic, flexible and practical conditions of work, that can results in the improvement of the productivity. The project resulted in the creation of a controlled ambient, in agreement with the normative requirements, using a pass through for entrance and exit of the materials, without compromise the internal air condition. The tight of the hot cell was obtained using doors with efficient sealing system and active joints. Tong manipulators were used to produce ergonomic and secure conditions, without compromise the internal conditions related to tight and classification in A and B grade, according to local and international rules. An efficient ventilation/exhaustion system was adopted to produce these results, composed by filters and special devices

  14. Development of a radiopharmaceutical dose calculator for pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Priyanka; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    It is important to ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept during the radiopharmaceutical (RPH) dose administration in pediatric patients. Several methods have been suggested over the years for the calculation of individualized RPH dose, sometimes requiring complex calculations and large variability exists for administered dose in children. The aim of the present study was to develop a software application that can calculate and store RPH dose along with patient record. We reviewed the literature to select the dose formula and used Microsoft Access (a software package) to develop this application. We used the Microsoft Excel to verify the accurate execution of the dose formula. The manual and computer time using this program required for calculating the RPH dose were compared. The developed application calculates RPH dose for pediatric patients based on European Association of Nuclear Medicine dose card, weight based, body surface area based, Clark, Solomon Fried, Young and Webster's formula. It is password protected to prevent the accidental damage and stores the complete record of patients that can be exported to Excel sheet for further analysis. It reduces the burden of calculation and saves considerable time i.e., 2 min computer time as compared with 102 min (manual calculation with the calculator for all seven formulas for 25 patients). The software detailed above appears to be an easy and useful method for calculation of pediatric RPH dose in routine clinical practice. This software application will help in helping the user to routinely applied ALARA principle while pediatric dose administration. (author)

  15. Development of anti β glucan aptamers for use as radiopharmaceutical in the identification of fungal Infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Camila Maria de Sousa; Reis, Mariana Flister; Correa, Cristiane Rodrigues; Andrade, Antero S.R.

    2013-01-01

    Invasive fungal infections caused by Candida albicans, are recognized as a major cause of morbidity and mortality in immuno compromised individuals. Patients may not show obvious clinical signs or symptoms, making it difficult to detect its origin or new focus that developed through hematogenous spread. Nuclear medicine could contribute to an early diagnosis of fungal infections, since specific markers are available. The aim of this study was to develop, through SELEX technique (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment), aptamers for beta glucan for subsequent labeling with 99 mTc and evaluation of this radiopharmaceutical in the diagnosis of invasive fungal infections, scintigraphy. To obtain aptamers were performed 15 cycles of SELEX technique, using centrifugation as separation method of oligonuclotideos linked to the beta-glucan is not connected. The DNA bands were observed in all 15 cycles. The oligonucleotides obtained after cycles were cloned using the standard protocol kit-Topo TA vector (Invitrogen), and subjected to sequencing Megabase. Three aptamers for yeast cells were selected for this study. Further, other studies should be performed to assess the specificity and affinity thereof for later use in the diagnosis of fungal infections. (author)

  16. Development and validation of methodology for technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Almeida, Erika Vieira de

    2009-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are compounds, with no pharmacological action, which have a radioisotope in their composition and are used in Nuclear Medicine for diagnosis and therapy of several diseases. In this work, the development and validation of an analytical method for 99 mTc-HSA, 99 mTc-EC, 99 mTc-ECD and 99 mTc-Sestamibi radiopharmaceuticals and for some raw materials were carried out by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The analyses were performed in a Shimadzu HPLC equipment, LC-20AT Prominence model. Some impurities were identified by the addition of a reference standard substance. Validation of the method was carried out according to the criteria defined in RE n. 899/2003 of the National Sanitary Agency (ANVISA). The results for robustness of the method showed that it is necessary to control flow rate conditions, sample volume, pH of the mobile phase and temperature of the oven. The analytical curves were linear in the concentration ranges, with linear correlation coefficients (r 2 ) above 0.9995. The results for precision, accuracy and recovery showed values in the range of 0.07-4.78%, 95.38-106.50% and 94.40-100.95%, respectively. The detection limits and quantification limits varied from 0.27 to 5.77 μg mL -1 and 0.90 to 19.23 μg mL -1 , respectively. The values for HAS, EC, ECD and MIBI in the lyophilized reagents were 8.95; 0.485; 0.986 and 0.974 mg L-1, respectively. The mean radiochemical purity for 99 mTc-HSA, 99 mTc-EC, 99 mTc-ECD and 99 mTc-Sestamibi was (97.28 ± 0.09)%, (98.96 ± 0.03)%, (98.96 ± 0.03)% and (98.07 ± 0.01)%, respectively. All the parameters recommended by ANVISA were evaluated and the results are below the established limits. (author)

  17. Development, preparation and control of sup(99m)Tc or sup(113m)In labelled stannous hydroxide radiopharmaceuticals. Part of a coordinated programme on radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alvarez Cervera, J.

    1975-01-01

    The preparation of different sup(99m)Tc and sup(113m)In radiopharmaceuticals using stannous chloride was investigated. Chemical and radiochemical procedures for the quality control of these preparations were studied. Toxicity and biological controls of the preparation were carried out. Procedures for the preparation and control of the following radiopharmaceuticals have been standardized by the authors; albumin macroaggregates labelled with sup(99m)Tc, sup(113m)In and other isotopes for lung scanning; albumin microspheres labelled with sup(99m)Tc for lung scanning; sup(99m)Tc or sup(113m)In-labelled stannous hydroxide colloid for liver scanning; sup(99m)Tc-stannous phytate for liver scanning; sup(99m)Tc-Sn-dextrose, a new radiopharmaceutical which has been proposed by the authors and is now used in Mexico for renal and cerebral scanning and sup(99m)Tc-Sn pyrophosphate and diphosphonate for bone scanning

  18. Development of dopamine receptor radiopharmaceuticals for the study of neurological and psychiatric disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Jogeshwar Mukherjee

    2009-01-02

    Our goals in this grant application are directed towards the development of radiotracers that may allow the study of the high-affinity state (functional state) of the dopamine receptors. There have been numerous reports on the presence of two inter-convertible states of these (G-protein coupled) receptors in vitro. However, there is no report that establishes the presence of these separate affinity states in vivo. We have made efforts in this direction in order to provide such direct in vivo evidence about the presence of the high affinity state. This understanding of the functional state of the receptors is of critical significance in our overall diagnosis and treatment of diseases that implicate the G-protein coupled receptors. Four specific aims have been listed in the grant application: (1). Design and syntheses of agonists (2). Radiosyntheses of agonists (3). In vitro pharmacology of agonists (4). In vivo distribution and pharmacology of labeled derivatives. We have accomplished the syntheses and radiosyntheses of three agonist radiotracers labeled with carbon-11. In vitro and in vivo pharmacological experiments have been accomplished in rats and preliminary PET studies in non-human primates have been carried out. Various accomplishments during the funded years, briefly outlined in this document, have been disseminated by several publications in various journals and presentations in national and international meetings (Society of Nuclear Medicine, Society for Neuroscience and International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry).

  19. Organometallic Radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alberto, Roger

    Although molecular imaging agents have to be synthesized ultimately from aqueous solutions, organometallic complexes are becoming more and more important as flexible yet kinetically stable building blocks for radiopharmaceutical drug discovery. The diversity of ligands, targets, and targeting molecules related to these complexes is an essential base for finding novel, noninvasive imaging agents to diagnose and eventually treat widespread diseases such as cancer. This review article covers the most important findings toward these objectives accomplished during the past 3-4 years. The two major available organometallic building blocks will be discussed in the beginning together with constraints for market introduction as imposed by science and industry. Since targeting radiopharmaceuticals are a major focus of current research in molecular imaging, attempts toward so-called technetium essential radiopharmaceuticals will be briefly touched in the beginning followed by the main discussion about the labeling of targeting molecules such as folic acid, nucleosides, vitamins, carbohydrates, and fatty acids. At the end, some new strategies for drug discovery will be introduced together with results from organometallic chemistry in water. The majority of the new results have been achieved with the [99mTc(OH2)3(CO)3]+ complex which will, though not exclusively, be a focus of this review.

  20. Dry Kit Development And Clinical Test Of 99mTc-L,L-ECD Radiopharmaceutical For Vrain Perfusion Imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kartini, Nani; Sofyan, Rohestri; Rukmini; Iswahyudi

    2000-01-01

    Technetium- 99m ethyl cysteinate dimer ( 99m Tc-L,L-ECD) has been synthesized and formulated based on ligand exchanged reaction with 99mTc-glucoheptonate. Considering the low stability of the dry kit produced, it was fairly necessary to develop the manufacture of L,L-ECD dry kit in order to obtain a more stable one that meet the requirements as brain perfusion imaging radiopharmaceutical. Experiment was done by modifying the packing of dry kit components of the previous formulation. Characteristics of 99m Tc-L,L-ECD produced from this formulation were studied by carrying out the sterility and toxicity test, then followed with clinical test to some volunteers. Evaluation of brain perfusion was done by tomography technique using gamma camera at Nuclear Medicine Installation, Hasan Sadikin Hospital. The modified formulation obtained consist of three components i.e. main ligand L,L-ECD; exchange ligand Ca-glucoheptonate and HaOH. Its stability could reach 8 months at-10 derajat C of storage. Effects of toxicity on mice did not appear. The result of clinical study shows that the radiopharmaceutical was distributed very rapidly in the blood brain circulations and retained in the brain for about one hour. The body scanning indicates that the substance was excreted in the brain for about one hour. The body scanning indicates that the substance was excreted though kidney, liver and spleen. Based on the results obtained the radiopharmaceutical could be promoted to be used for brain perfusion imaging

  1. Development of a radiopharmaceutical dose calculator for pediatric patients undergoing diagnostic nuclear medicine studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Anil Kumar; Sharma, Sanjay Kumar; Sharma, Punit; Gupta, Priyanka; Kumar, Rakesh

    2013-01-01

    Objective: It is important to ensure that as low as reasonably achievable (ALARA) concept during the radiopharmaceutical (RPH) dose administration in pediatric patients. Several methods have been suggested over the years for the calculation of individualized RPH dose, sometimes requiring complex calculations and large variability exists for administered dose in children. The aim of the present study was to develop a software application that can calculate and store RPH dose along with patient record. Materials and Methods: We reviewed the literature to select the dose formula and used Microsoft Access (a software package) to develop this application. We used the Microsoft Excel to verify the accurate execution of the dose formula. The manual and computer time using this program required for calculating the RPH dose were compared. Results: The developed application calculates RPH dose for pediatric patients based on European Association of Nuclear Medicine dose card, weight based, body surface area based, Clark, Solomon Fried, Young and Webster's formula. It is password protected to prevent the accidental damage and stores the complete record of patients that can be exported to Excel sheet for further analysis. It reduces the burden of calculation and saves considerable time i.e., 2 min computer time as compared with 102 min (manual calculation with the calculator for all seven formulas for 25 patients). Conclusion: The software detailed above appears to be an easy and useful method for calculation of pediatric RPH dose in routine clinical practice. This software application will help in helping the user to routinely applied ALARA principle while pediatric dose administration. PMID:24163510

  2. Hydrophilic and lipophilic radiopharmaceuticals as tracers in pharmaceutical development: In vitro – In vivo studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Terán, Mariella; Savio, Eduardo; Paolino, Andrea; Frier, Malcolm

    2005-01-01

    Scintigraphic studies have been performed to assess the release, both in vitro and in vivo, of radiotracers from tablet formulations. Four different tracers with differing physicochemical characteristics have been evaluated to assess their suitability as models for drug delivery. In-vitro disintegration and dissolution studies have been performed at pH 1, 4 and 7. In-vivo studies have been performed by scintigraphic imaging in healthy volunteers. Two hydrophilic tracers, ( 99m Tc-DTPA) and ( 99m Tc-MDP), and two lipophilic tracers, ( 99m Tc-ECD) and ( 99m Tc-MIBI), were used as drug models. Dissolution and disintegration profiles, differed depending on the drug model chosen. In vitro dissolution velocity constants indicated a probable retention of the radiotracer in the formulation. In vivo disintegration velocity constants showed important variability for each radiopharmaceutical. Pearson statistical test showed no correlation between in vitro drug release, and in vivo behaviour, for 99m Tc-DTPA, 99m Tc-ECD and 99m Tc-MIBI. High correlation coefficients were found for 99m Tc-MDP not only for in vitro dissolution and disintegration studies but also for in vivo scintigraphic studies. Scintigraphic studies have made a significant contribution to the development of drug delivery systems. It is essential, however, to choose the appropriate radiotracers as models of drug behaviour. This study has demonstrated significant differences in release patterns, depending on the model chosen. It is likely that each formulation would require the development of a specific model, rather than being able to use a generic drug model on the basis of its physicochemical characteristics

  3. Development of PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals to study multi-drug resistance (MDR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katsififs, A.; Dikic, B.; Greguric, I.; Knott, R.; Mattner, F.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Cellular resistance or Multidrug Resistance (MDR) to cytotoxic agents is the major cause of treatment failure in many human cancers. P-glycoprotein (Pgp), a Mr 17,0000 transmembrane protein and Multi Resistance Protein (MRP) are two proteins that are over expressed and confer resistance to a large number of chemotherapeutic agents by enhancing their extracellular transport. P-glycoprotein is expressed at a relative high level in treated and untreated human malignant tumours, including renal, colonic, adrenal, hepatocellular carcinoma and a considerable percentage of breast carcinomas. 99m Tc-Sestamibi, a lipophilic cationic complex is a transport substrate for Pgp. In clinical studies of human neoplasms it was found that tumour uptake and clearance of this tracer correlate with Pgp expression and may be used for the phenotypic assessment of MDR. However, new tracers with better substrate specificity for Pgp and other drug transporters would greatly assist in optimising chemotherapeutic treatment and improving patient management by predicting tumour response to therapy and to assist in the development of antagonists, which may reverse or halt MDR. The aim of this project is therefore to develop PET and SPECT radiopharmaceuticals with improved affinity and selectivity for Pgp and MRP for the clinical evaluation of MDR in cancer patients. To optimise cellular transport characteristics, a number of chemical families that have been found to be substrates of Pgp and other drug efflux pumps, will be investigated. In the first instance, a series of drugs based on the flavonol natural product, Quercetin will be developed, screened for MDR and radiolabelled with PET and SPECT isotopes. Quercetin and related flavonol derivatives have been selected for this project because of their moderate to good affinity for Pgp. With the assistance of molecular modeling and in vitro studies, structural modification will be undertaken to improve the specificity and affinity for

  4. The importance of radiopharmaceuticals and radionuclides in medicine and research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, R.W.

    2003-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals and medical radionuclides are used by physicians and biomedical researchers each day throughout the world. Radiopharmaceuticals provide physicians with a means of diagnosing a variety of diseases including cancer, AIDS, pulmonary emboli, coronary artery disease, and many others. Radiopharmaceuticals can also be used for therapeutic treatment of many types of cancer as well as other diseases. Medical radionuclides are used by biomedical researchers for the study of human disease, drug development, AIDS research, and many other areas. Transport of these radionuclides is critically important. Their unencumbered movement ensures availability of these products to all physicians and researchers. Uniform international standards for transport provide the framework for the free movement of these materials across member state borders. (author)

  5. Development of an injectable formulation for the preparation of radiopharmaceutical 68Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castillo P, M.

    2015-01-01

    The CCK2 receptor (cholecystokinin) is located in areas of the central and peripheral nervous system and is over expressed in several types of human cancer, as medullar thyroid, lung and ovarian carcinomas. One of the endogenous ligands for the CCK2 receptor is the gastrin, so that radiolabeled peptides analogues to gastrin as Sar gastrin (Gln-Gly-Pro-Trp-Leu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe-NH 2 ) have been proposed as potential diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for obtaining tumors images with CCK2 receptors over expressed. The 68 Ga is an ideal candidate for the peptides radiolabelled and has favorable characteristics to be used for diagnostic purposes by imaging with Positron emission tomography (PET). This work aimed to verify the technical documentation of the production process of radiopharmaceutical 68 Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin for its sanitary registration before the Comision Federal contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS) in Mexico. For optimization of the production process was assessed a factorial design of two variables with mixed levels (27 combinations), where the dependent variable was the radiochemical purity. The analytical method used for evaluating the content of Sar gastrin peptide in the injectable formulation was also validated by High-performance liquid chromatography. Subsequently the validation of the production process was carried out by manufacturing of lots in single-dose of the optimized injectable formulation of the radiopharmaceutical 68 Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin and the stability study was conducted at different times to determine the useful life time. The following was established as the optimal pharmaceutical formulation: 185 MBq of 68 Ga, 50 μg de DOTA-Sar gastrin, 14 mg of sodium acetate and 0.5 m L of buffer acetates, 1.0 M, ph 4.22 in 2.5 m L of the vehicle. The analytical method used to determine the radiochemical purity of the formulation satisfied the requirements for the intended analytical application. The lots in

  6. Development of methodologies for internal exposure assessment due to the radiopharmaceutical 18FDG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de

    2013-01-01

    The production of 18 F has increased in the last decade. It is produced basically for the synthesis of 18 F- fluorodeoxyglucose ( 18 FDG), the main radiopharmaceutical used in PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scans. The growth in the frequency of these tests resulted in rise of the number of occupationally exposed individuals (OEI) to the radionuclide 18 F as 18 FDG, increasing thereby the probability of its accidental incorporation. This study aimed to implement optimized techniques for assessing internal exposures of individuals occupationally exposed through both in vivo and in vitro bioassay methods during production and handling of 18 FDG at the Divisao de Producao de Radiofarmacos (DIPRA), Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN). The in vivo monitoring was conducted at the Laboratorio de Dosimetria Interna, Divisao de Laboratorios Tecnico-Cientificos (DILAB). For this bioassay method, measurements were done with a 3x3' NaI(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to Genie 2000 software. The calibration of the system was performed with a brain phantom containing a standard liquid source of 22 Na to simulate a contaminated individual. The calibration of the HPGe coaxial detector for in vitro monitoring was performed at the Laboratorio de Medidas de Atividade de Radionuclideos (DIPRA/CRCN-NE/CNEN) with a standard source of 22 Na. Base on the calibration factors, it was possible to determine the minimum detectable activities (MDA) for the systems by using direct measurements and simulation of uncontaminated urine. Then, through the biokinetic models published by ICRP 106 and edited by the AIDE software (version 6.0), it was possible to estimate the minimum detectable effective dose (MDED), which evaluates the detection sensitivity of the techniques developed. The MDED was estimated for in vivo and in vitro measurements performed 2.4 hours after the occurrence of incorporation by ingestion, since this is the period of higher retention fraction

  7. Therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sun Ju; Hong, Young Don; Lee, So Young

    2006-01-01

    Since the development of sophisticated molecular carriers such as octereotides for peptide receptor targeting and monoclonal antibodies against various associated with specific tumor types, radionuclide therapy (RNT) employing open sources of therapeutic agents is promising modality for treatment of tumors. Furthermore, the emerging of new therapeutic regimes and new approaches for tumor treatment using radionuclide are anticipated in near future. In targeted radiotherapy using peptides and other receptor based carrier molecules, the use of radionuclide with high specific activity in formulating the radiopharmaceutical is essential in order to deliver sufficient number of radionuclides to the target site without saturating the target. In order to develop effective radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic applications, it is crucial to carefully consider the choice of appropriate radionuclides as well as the carrier moiety with suitable pharmacokinetic properties that could result in good in vivo localization and desired excretion. Up to date, only a limited number of radionuclides have been applied in radiopharmaceutical development due to the constraints in compliance with their physical half-life, decay characteristics, cost and availability in therapeutic applications. In this review article, we intend to provide with the improved understanding of the factors of importance of appropriate radionuclide for therapy with respect to their physical properties and therapeutic applications

  8. Gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Green, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium and copper radionuclides have a long history of use in nuclear medicine. Table 1 presents the nuclear properties of several gallium and copper isotopes that either are used in the routine practice of clinical nuclear medicine or exhibit particular characteristics that might make them useful in diagnostic or therapeutic medicine. This paper will provide some historic perspective along with an overview of some current research directions in gallium and copper radiopharmaceutical chemistry. A more extensive review of gallium radiopharmaceutical chemistry has recently appeared and can be consulted for a more in-depth treatment of this topic

  9. Genotoxic and cytotoxic damage by the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical [166Dy]Dy/166Ho-EDTMP as in vivo generator system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza L, M.; Piedras R, J.; Ferro F, G.; Morales R, P.; Murphy S, E.; Hernandez O, O.

    2005-01-01

    In patients with leukemias and multiple myeloma, the cure can be obtained to inclination of a bone marrow transplant (m.o.), for that which one is used a combination of external radiotherapy and chemotherapy with the consequent toxicity to healthy organs. The complex [ 166 Dy]Dy/ 166 Ho-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate ([ 166 Dy]Dy/ 166 Ho-EDTMP) it forms a generator system in vivo stable with bony selective likeness in mice therefore, this it could work as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical for bone marrow ablation. The objective of this original work was to determine the genotoxic and cytotoxic damage produced by the [ 166 Dy]Dy/ 166 Ho-EDTMP like a generator system in vivo by means of the reticulocytes reduction (RET) and micronucleus elevation in reticulocytes (RET-MN) in peripheral blood and to evaluate its myeloablative potential for histopathologic studies. It was irradiated 166 Dy 2 O 3 enriched and it was add in form 166 DyCI 3 to the EDTMP in a softening media of phosphates (pH 8), the optimal molar relationship 166 Dy: EDTMP was 1.7:1 and the radiochemical purity was evaluated by ITLC. The Dy:EDTMP complexes, non radioactive, its were prepared in the same way with non irradiated dysprosium oxide. A group of BALB/c mice was injected intraperitoneally with the radiopharmaceutical and two groups of control mice were injected with the non radioactive complex and with sodium chloride 0.9% respectively. Before injecting each one of the solutions it was take a basal sample of peripheral blood of the mouse tail and each 48 h post-injection during 12 d. The animals were sacrificed to obtain the organs of interest and to determine the radioactivity in each one. The femur was used for the histopathologic studies. The quantification of the frequency of RET and RET-MN was carried out by flow cytometry of the sanguine samples and the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B for the dosimetry calculations was used. The radiochemical purity was 99% and in average the specific

  10. IPENS's social role in scientific and technological development of radioisotope and radiopharmaceutical production - (1950 -1980)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gordon, Ana Maria P.L.

    2009-01-01

    Some facts and figures are present in the existent interaction between the Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN) and the medical community. Among other characteristics, the IPEN has a permanent seat in the Biology and Nuclear Medicine Society and, the present Radiopharmacy Center, has had the continuous concern, since the Instituto de Energia Atomica (IEA) creation until today (2009), to perform an excellent approach with the medical faculty. In the past, some physicians would complete their courses in Europe and in the United States of America, and there noticed the importance of radioisotopes applications in medicine, mainly, in the beginning of these activities, with the I-131. Returning to Brazil, they requested that the former IEA, today IPEN researchers used the research reactor IEA-R1, installed in Sao Paulo, at Universidade Sao Paulo (USP) campus, for radioisotopes production. Then, in the late 1959, the first production line from the I-131 took place. The IPEN starts to accomplish what was planned as one of its targets, at the act of its official creation on August 31, 1956. From 1961 on, there was a continuous flux of I-131 and other radiopharmaceuticals production. The recovery and analysis of these happenings, in the Brazilian society cultural historic context, were partially published in different previous works. Nevertheless, history is dynamic and gains new interpretations, in the present research, from the reading of novel research sources, both primary and secondary, not explores so far - reports, interviews with IPEN researchers and papers published or divulged in meetings, either scientific or bureaucratic. This research is part of project supported by the Fundacao de Amparo a Pesquisa do Estado de Sao Paulo (FAPESP), with the aim, among others, of contributing for the analysis of the transformations occurred in all of the IPEN research lines, plus the social role of this institution for science and technology development. The

  11. Development of fluorine 18 labelled MPPF, radiopharmaceutical tracer for serotoninergic system exploration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Le Bars, D.; Tochon-Danguy, H.

    2002-01-01

    Full text: Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a non-invasive method for exploration, in man and animals, of metabolism with radiopharmaceutical tracers labelled with positron emitters such as carbon 11 and fluorine 18 obtained with a cyclotron. Among the ever increasing number of tracers focussed at the CNS neurotransmission, the discovery of a new family of serotoninergic 5HT 1A antagonists (WAY 100635) has led to the first in vivo imaging of 5HT 1A receptors in man, located in cerebral structures such as cortex and hippocampus. Exploration of serotonine parthway is particulaly interesting in normal or diseased state, as this neurotransmitter is involved in the control of mood, sleep and is probably altered in psychiatric disorders. CERMEP, in collaboration with other PET centres has developped a new 5HT 1A antagonist, MPPF, labelled with fluorine 18. [ 18 F]MPPF has the advantadge of fluorine 18 labelling, with a longer half-life (110 min vs 20 min for carbon 11) and easier radiosynthesis automation. Moreover, MPPF affinity for 5HT 1A is close to serotonin itself, thus enabling displacement of MPPF by endogenous serotonin during pharmacological challenges. Automated radiosynthesis of MPPF is achieved via a classical [ 18 F]F - fluoro for nitro displacement, activated by a catalyst, on a nitro precursor prepared in four steps. A final HPLC purification ensures the production of [ 18 F]MPPF with a high purity and a high specific activity. Ex vivo autoradiographies and PET studies in animals (rat, cat) have shown the excellent specificity of MPPF for the 5HT 1A receptor. Experiments with intracerebral β probe have evidenced the displacement of [ 18 F]MPPF by endogenous serotonin after fenfluramine injection. [ 18 F]MPPF is now used in man for non-invasive PET studies of serotoninergic system. Normal volunteers matched for age and sex have been screened as a database and to compute a mathematical model of the tracer kinetic describing 5HT 1A receptor affinity and

  12. Country report: Thailand. Development of Sr-90/ Y-90 Generator and Development of Radiopharmaceuticals Using Y-90

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nipavan, Poramatikul

    2010-01-01

    The research project has been conducted at Thailand Institute of Nuclear Technology in accordance to the 1st RCM plan during the IAEA meeting in Warsaw. The objectives of the project include the following 5 specific aims: 1. Development of Sr-90/Y-90 ion-exchange chromatography generator 2. Development of Sr-90/Y-90 extraction chromatography generator 3. Development of quality control technique 4. Development of herapeutic radiopharmaceuticals Y-90 particulates/colloids 5. Development of Re-188 DMSA–bis-phosphonates Currently we have achieved specific aims 1 to 3. The specific aims 4 and 5 are during investigation. For specific aim 4, we are during the process to extract high purity 90 Y from 90 Sr/ 90 Y generator that will yield the starting 90 Y for the production of Y-90 particulates and colloids. For the 5 th specific aim, we are on hold to receive the starting agent, bis- Phosphonates, from Dr. Blower group. Therefore, this progress report will cover our work focusing on specific aims 1 to 3

  13. Aptamer-based radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of epithelial tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Missailidis, Sotiris [The Open University, Milton Keynes (United Kingdom). Dept. of Chemistry and Analytical Sciences]. E-mail: s.missailidis@open.ac.uk; Perkins, Alan [University of Nottingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Medical Physics; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado do Rio de Janeiro (UERJ), RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria

    2008-12-15

    In the continuous search for earlier diagnosis and improved therapeutic modalities against cancer, based on our constantly increasing knowledge of cancer biology, aptamers hold the promise to expand on current antibody success, but overcoming some of the problems faced with antibodies as therapeutic or delivery agents in cancer. However, as the first aptamer reached the market as an inhibitor against angiogenesis for the treatment of macular degeneration, aptamers have found only limited applications or interest in oncology, and even less as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of tumours. Yet, the chemistry for the labelling of aptamers and the options to alter their pharmacokinetic properties, to make them suitable for use as radiopharmaceuticals is now available and recent advances in their development can demonstrate that these molecules would make them ideal delivery vehicles for the development of targeted radiopharmaceuticals that could deliver their radiation load with accuracy to the tumour site, offering improved therapeutic properties and reduced side effects. (author)

  14. Aptamer-based radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of epithelial tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Missailidis, Sotiris; Perkins, Alan; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Fonseca, Adenilson de Souza da; Bernardo-Filho, Mario

    2008-01-01

    In the continuous search for earlier diagnosis and improved therapeutic modalities against cancer, based on our constantly increasing knowledge of cancer biology, aptamers hold the promise to expand on current antibody success, but overcoming some of the problems faced with antibodies as therapeutic or delivery agents in cancer. However, as the first aptamer reached the market as an inhibitor against angiogenesis for the treatment of macular degeneration, aptamers have found only limited applications or interest in oncology, and even less as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic imaging and targeted radiotherapy of tumours. Yet, the chemistry for the labelling of aptamers and the options to alter their pharmacokinetic properties, to make them suitable for use as radiopharmaceuticals is now available and recent advances in their development can demonstrate that these molecules would make them ideal delivery vehicles for the development of targeted radiopharmaceuticals that could deliver their radiation load with accuracy to the tumour site, offering improved therapeutic properties and reduced side effects. (author)

  15. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1990-06-01

    During this grant period 1 January 1988--31 December 1990, we have successfully developed a number of new approaches to fluorine-18 labeled compounds, prepared several new radiotracers for both animal studies and eventual clinical trials, and explored the utility of a high-quality industrial robot in radiopharmaceutical applications. The progress during the last grant period is summarized briefly in the following sections. Publications arising from this research are listed below and can be found in Appendix I. 1 fig.

  16. The WFNMB Survey on the Introduction of New Radiopharmaceuticals for Clinical Research: Snapshot of the international perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, J.M.; Choe, Y.S.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Development of new radiopharmaceuticals and their introduction into clinical trials ensures continuing improvement in the practice of nuclear medicine. Although it is crucial that safety and efficacy are established prior to use in humans, the characteristics of radiopharmaceuticals are quite different from other drugs since these agents are generally administered in trace, sub-pharmacological amounts. Diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceutical agents are used only in restricted and controlled areas and are administered only by trained personnel. In many cases - as often for PET -- such diagnostic agents are often used in the same institution where they are prepared. Thus, regulations for the preparation and use of radiopharmaceuticals should be different from other drugs. To evaluate the current status of radiopharmaceutical regulations, we surveyed radiopharmaceutical experts and nuclear medicine societies on an international basis. A questionnaire was provided which focused on the regulations required for the in-house non-commercial preparation of new radiopharmaceutical for routine clinical use or for use in clinical trials. Responses were received from participants in 36 countries. Although both government and institutional approval are required for introduction of new radiopharmaceuticals in the majority of countries, some countries require only institutional approval. In the case of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals, as may be expected, only physician responsibility is more often required compared with similar approval for use of diagnostic agent in these settings. The requirement of current Good Manufacturing Practice (cGMP) for PET agents was higher than with the other agents. This preponderance of cGMP requirements may be interpreted as much higher than may be expected, since many PET radiopharmaceuticals are used in-house and are prepared in the hospital by pharmaceutical compounding and not by manufacturing. Compounding is not regulated by c

  17. Development of nano radiopharmaceutical based on Bevacizumab labelled with Technetium-99m for early diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Braga, Thais Ligiero

    2015-01-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is an essential activity to improve nuclear medicine, and essential for the early and effective diagnosis of oncological diseases. Among the various possibilities current research in the world, the radiopharmaceuticals to chemotherapeutic base may be the most effective in detecting tumors, particularly Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST), the Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors. However, difficulties in directing, as well as adhesion of the radiopharmaceutical in the desired location, are currently the main problems in the early detection and treatment of some of these tumors. Advances in the field of nanotechnology, particularly in recent years, indicate significant contribution to overcoming these obstacles, particularly in the implementation of molecular barriers as well as the functionalization of the nanoparticles, thereby improving targeting by the use of surface nucleotides, and the increased adhesion, which facilitates the release of the drug and therefore increases the chances of early diagnosis and more effective treatment. This study aimed to the production, characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity, as well as in vivo biodistribution test Bevacizumab nanoparticles labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide for detection of type GIST tumors. Bevacizumab was encapsulated in the form of nanoparticles by the emulsification method using double poly-acetic acid and polyvinyl alcohol polymers (PLA / PVA) at a concentration of 2% of the monoclonal antibody. The characterization of the nanoparticles was performed by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity assessment was performed by XTT assay with various cell lines of solid tumor cells. The labeling with technetium-99m was done by the direct method, and its yield determined by paper chromatography using paper Whatmam 1 as the stationary phase and acetone as mobile phase. In the biodistribution study

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hron, M.; Kronrad, L.; Svoboda, K.; Melichar, F.

    1986-01-01

    The history is briefly described of the production of radiopharmaceuticals in Czechoslovakia for nuclear medicine purposes. 131 I-labelled orthoiodohippurate and rose Bengal were first produced. Currently, 99m Tc is the most frequently requested radionuclide for radiopharmaceutical labelling. The preparation of 99m Tc is described in detail, a flow chart is shown and the network of 99m Tc distribution to hospitals outlined. In addition of 99m Tc and 131 I, UJV Rez produces other radionuclides for nuclear medicine, such as 113m In, 67 Ga, 35 S, 32 P, 203 Hg, 85 Sr. The methods are being developed of the production of 201 Tl, 125 I and 131 I-labelled bromosulfophthalein. (E.S.)

  19. Pharmaceuticals—Special Issue on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry between Imaging and Endoradiotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Kopka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The fields of molecular biology, immunology and genetics have generated many important developments that advance the understanding of the induction and progression of oncological, cardiological and neurological diseases as well as the identification of disease-associated molecules and drugs that specifically target diseased cells during therapy. These insights have triggered the development of targeted radiopharmaceuticals which open up a new dimension of radiopharmaceutical sciences in nuclear medicine. Radiopharmaceuticals, also called radiotracers, are radiolabelled molecules, bearing a “radioactive lantern”, and used as molecular probes to address clinically relevant biological targets such as receptors, enzymes, transport systems and others. Positron emission tomography (PET and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT realised in the en-vogue hybrid technologies PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MRI represent the state-of-the-art diagnostic imaging technologies in nuclear medicine which are used to follow the trace of the administered radiopharmaceutical noninvasively thereby in vivo visualising and assessing biological processes at the subcellular and molecular level in a highly sensitive manner. In this connexion novel radiopharmaceuticals for the noninvasive molecular imaging of early disease states and monitoring of treatment responses in vivo by means of PET/CT, SPECT/CT and PET/MRI are indispensable prerequisites to further advance and strengthen the unique competence of radiopharmaceutical sciences. In the era of personalised medicine the diagnostic potential of radiopharmaceuticals is directly linked to a subsequent individual therapeutic approach called endoradiotherapy. Depending on the “radioactive lantern” (gamma or particle emitter used for radiolabelling of the respective tracer molecule, the field of Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry can contribute to the set-up of an “in vivo theranostic” approach especially in

  20. Why are investors not interested in my radiotracer? The industrial and regulatory constraints in the development of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Richard G.

    2013-01-01

    Four criteria are essential in the acceptance by investors of new radiopharmaceuticals: the existence of a market and a medical need, the quality of the science and technology behind the new molecule, the feasibility and compliance with regulations and the limited competitive landscape. Potential investors need to get more convincing market evidence, largely beyond the nice preclinical data generated to the point of first discussion. A properly protected compound not jeopardized by earlier published results is a must. A guarantee of an easy and secured source of the ligand is obvious. A safe access to the radionuclide in volumes corresponding to the targeted market is rarely taken into account, but of utmost importance. The evaluation of new drugs by investors will include the evaluation of the real market size for the targeted indication and the position of the drug in the healthcare environment at the time to market. This includes the potential competition with other radiopharmaceuticals, but also with conventional drugs or competitive modalities also at time to market. Both criteria are usually not easily accessible to researchers whose acquaintance remains limited to the scientific and technical part. Starting from this set of information, a first business plan can be deduced based on a best estimate for price per dose and a rough evaluation about the chance and level of reimbursement. In the following most of the events are covered that could jeopardize the development of the drug, focusing on the industrial, economic and regulatory aspects, comprehending the detailed analysis of the currently best available radionuclides

  1. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-02-16

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N{sup 4}-methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the

  2. Industrial constraints in the selection of radionuclides and the development of new radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmermann, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    During the past twenty years, the number of new radiolabeled molecules that have been published weekly in specialized nuclear medicine journals is quite amazing. On the other hand, one can only be astonished when it is compared to the number of new radiopharmaceuticals that came on the market during the same period. A good science is not sufficient to transform a molecule in a marketed drug. The budget required to demonstrate with a larger number of patients the value of the molecule linked to a limited market potential discourages investors to enter in this area. In fact, there are a series of other limitations and constraints that have to be taken into account before deciding to start clinical trials. This paper tries to identify all the difficulties that are encountered by radiopharmaceutical industries. They include the choice of the best but not necessary ideal radionuclide, the analysis of the market viability in the frame of the overall competition, the increasing safety constraints when working with multi-doses, the investment in usually non existing manufacturing tools for a worldwide access to the new drug, as well as the limiting regulatory aspects with yearly increasing constraints. Unfortunately it must be noted that each of these criteria is mainly driven by financial parameters and an expectation of a certain return on investment. This analysis can help research centers to better control and orient their programs and to explain the reasons of the lack of interest by industry for some even a priori interesting molecules, targets, radionuclides or indications. (author)

  3. Development of mathematical phantoms for calculating internal doses from radiopharmaceuticals using patients' digital picture of bone scintillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akahane, K.; Kai, M.; Kusama, T.

    1996-01-01

    We made a new mathematical phantom using the patients' digital pictures of bone scintillation in nuclear medicine. The data of 99m Tc bone scintillation pictures include the information on the body sizes and shapes. In the bone scintillation pictures, no three dimensional data are available, so that the shapes and sizes of whole body and bones were modelled based on standard anatomical geometry. The organs except bone were also modelled after construction of the bone mathematical model. The mathematical phantoms were developed for each patient. The specific effective energy for each phantom can be calculated by the Monte Carlo code to compare it among the patients. Our mathematical phantoms would provide new calculation of internal doses from radiopharmaceuticals in place of the MIRD phantom. (author)

  4. Therapeutical radiopharmaceuticals based In vivo generator system [{sup 166} Dy] Dy/{sup 166} Ho; Radiofarmacos terapeuticos basados en un sistema de generador In vivo [{sup 166}Dy] Dy/{sup 166}Ho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G.; Garcia S, L.; Monroy G, F.; Tendilla, J.I. [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud, ININ, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Pedraza L, M.; Murphy, C.A. de [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear, Instituto Nacional de Pediatria, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2002-07-01

    At the idea to administer to a patient a molecule containing in it structure a father radionuclide, with a half life enough large which allows to the radiolabelled molecule to take up position specifically in a white tissue and decaying In vivo to the daughter radionuclide with properties potentially therapeutic, it is known as In vivo generator system. In this work the preparation and the preliminary dosimetric valuations of radiopharmaceuticals based In vivo generator system {sup 166} Dy Dy/{sup 166} Ho for applications in radioimmunotherapy, in the treatment of the rheumatoid arthritis and in the bone marrow ablation (m.o.) for candidates patients to bone marrow transplant are presented. (Author)

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals drug interactions: a critical review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos-Oliveira, Ralph; Smith, Sheila W.; Carneiro-Leao, Ana Maria A.

    2008-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals play a critical role in modern medicine primarily for diagnostic purposes, but also for monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. As the use of image has been increased, so has the use of prescription medications. These trends increase the risk of interactions between medications and radiopharmaceuticals. These interactions which have an impact on image by competing with the radiopharmaceutical for binding sites for example can lead to false negative results. Drugs that accelerate the metabolism of the radiopharmaceutical can have a positive impact (i.e. speeding its clearance) or, if repeating image is needed, a negative impact. In some cases, for example in cardiac image among patients taking doxirubacin, these interactions may have a therapeutic benefit. The incidence of drug-radiopharmaceuticals adverse reactions is unknown, since they may not be reported or even recognized. Here, we compiled the medical literature, using the criteria of a systematic review established by the Cochrane Collaboration, on pharmaceutical-drug interactions to provide a summary of documented interactions by organ system and radiopharmaceuticals. The purpose is to provide a reference on drug interactions that could inform the nuclear medicine staff in their daily routine. Efforts to increase adverse event reporting, and ideally consolidate reports worldwide, can provide a critically needed resource for prevention of drug-radiopharmaceuticals interactions. (author)

  6. Radiopharmaceuticals drug interactions: a critical review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos-Oliveira, Ralph [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN/CRCN-NE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares. Servico de Controle de Qualidade]. E-mail: roliveira@cnen.gov.br; Smith, Sheila W. [University of Maryland, Baltimore, MF (United States). School of Pharmacy and Medicine. Dept. of Pharmaceutical Health Service Research; Carneiro-Leao, Ana Maria A. [Universidade Federal Rural de Pernambuco (UFRPE), Recife, PE (Brazil). Dept. de Morfologia e Fisiologia Animal

    2008-12-15

    Radiopharmaceuticals play a critical role in modern medicine primarily for diagnostic purposes, but also for monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. As the use of image has been increased, so has the use of prescription medications. These trends increase the risk of interactions between medications and radiopharmaceuticals. These interactions which have an impact on image by competing with the radiopharmaceutical for binding sites for example can lead to false negative results. Drugs that accelerate the metabolism of the radiopharmaceutical can have a positive impact (i.e. speeding its clearance) or, if repeating image is needed, a negative impact. In some cases, for example in cardiac image among patients taking doxirubacin, these interactions may have a therapeutic benefit. The incidence of drug-radiopharmaceuticals adverse reactions is unknown, since they may not be reported or even recognized. Here, we compiled the medical literature, using the criteria of a systematic review established by the Cochrane Collaboration, on pharmaceutical-drug interactions to provide a summary of documented interactions by organ system and radiopharmaceuticals. The purpose is to provide a reference on drug interactions that could inform the nuclear medicine staff in their daily routine. Efforts to increase adverse event reporting, and ideally consolidate reports worldwide, can provide a critically needed resource for prevention of drug-radiopharmaceuticals interactions. (author)

  7. Development and optimization of targeted radionuclide tumor therapy using folate based radiopharmaceuticals

    CERN Document Server

    Reber, Josefine Astrid

    The folate receptor (FR) has been used for a quarter of a century as a tumor-associated target for selective delivery of drugs and imaging agents to cancer cells. While several folic acid radioconjugates have been successfully employed for imaging purposes in (pre)clinical studies, a therapeutic application of folic acid radioconjugates has not yet reached the critical stage which would allow a clinical translation. Due to a substantial expression of the FR in the proximal tubule cells, radiofolates accumulate in the kidneys which are at risk of damage by particle-radiation. To improve this situation, we aimed to develop and evaluate strategies for the performance of FR-targeted radionuclide therapy by decreasing the renal uptake of radiofolates and thereby reducing potential nephrotoxic effects. Two different strategies were investigated. First, the combination of radiofolates with chemotherapeutic agents such as pemetrexed (PMX) and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and secondly, an approach based on radioiodinated fol...

  8. Preliminary studies of Technetium-99m-labeled antimyosin monoclonal antibody: development of radiopharmaceutical for cardiac evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, Guilherme Luiz de Castro; Spencer, Patrick Jack; Muramoto, Emiko; Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: glcarval@ipen.br

    2007-07-01

    In the acute myocardium infarction, the myocytes cell membrane loses its integrity, allowing the influx of extracellular macromolecules such as circulating antibody into the damaged cell. Specific antibodies to cardiac myosin can therefore bind to the acutely necrotic myocyte, allowing the noninvasive localization and dimension of myocardial infarction. Because of its favorable physical characteristics, low cost, and ready availability, technetium-99m ({sup 99m}Tc) is the radionuclide of choice for scintigraphy. The purpose of this work was to study the labeling of the antimyosin monoclonal antibody with ({sup 99m}Tc for development of a radiopharmaceutical with high sensitivity and specificity used in the diagnostic of the myocardial infarction. The intact monoclonal antibody (IgG{sub 1}) was reduced by treatment with dithiothreitol (DTT) with the consequent generation of free thiol groups (- SH), responsible for the labeling of the antibody with ({sup 99m}Tc. The radiochemical yield was determined using Sephadex G-25 column (PD-10). The percentage of ({sup 99m}Tc-antibody was 90,06% and after purification procedure the radiochemical yield was > 98%. The biodistribution studies showed low uptake in the stomach and thyroid at different times (1, 4 e 24 hours) representing a small amount of unbounded ({sup 99m}Tc and a good stability of the purified ({sup 99m}Tc-antibody. The uptake in the normal heart was relatively low as expected. Based on these results, we concluded that the direct labeling procedure applied to the antimyosin monoclonal antibody allowed the easy preparation of the radiopharmaceutical with good stability to be used in the noninvasive diagnostic of the myocardial infarction. (author)

  9. Modern trends in radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy. Proceedings of a symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-08-01

    The IAEA held an International Symposium on Modern Trends in Radiopharmaceuticals for Diagnosis and Therapy in Lisbon, Portugal, from 30 March to 3 April 1998. Two earlier symposia were organized on similar topics in Copenhagen, Denmark in 1973 and in Tokyo, Japan, in 1984. The proceedings of these symposia have been published and widely used as reference sources. To facilitate faster publication and more widespread availability, the IAEA has decided to publish the proceedings of this symposium as a cost-free TECDOC. The symposium was organized into 14 sessions consisting of five on 99m Tc radiopharmaceuticals, two each on therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals and radiohalogens/other isotopes and one each on bioevaluation, radiometric assay, medical isotope production, good radiopharmacy practice and technology transfer. In the proceedings the papers from multiple sessions on the same topic have been grouped together for the convenience of the reader. The papers presented in the symposium reflect current and future developments in diagnostic and therapeutic agents. The largest number of papers presented dealt with 99m Tc, highlighting its continuing importance to nuclear medicine and the role of imaging as an important tool. The emerging interest in therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals based on beta emitting short lived isotopes such as 186 Re and 153 Sm was evident from the papers presented in two sessions devoted to this topic. Also of steady interest was the development of agents labelled with other established isotopes, radioiodine in particular and also 111 In and 67 Ga. Regulation, training and good manufacturing practices are important for ensuring safety in regular use of radiopharmaceuticals and were discussed in a separate session. The production of radiopharmaceuticals has become a regular activity in many developing countries, often facilities were presented at the symposium

  10. Peptide radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blok, D.; Vermeij, P.; Feitsma, R.I.J.; Pauwels, E.J.K.

    1999-01-01

    This article reviews the labelling of peptides that are recognised to be of interest for nuclear medicine or are the subject of ongoing nuclear medicine research. Applications and approaches to the labelling of peptide radiopharmaceuticals are discussed, and drawbacks in their development considered. (orig.)

  11. Factors and pharmaceuticals that affect the radiopharmaceuticals bio distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B.M.

    1994-01-01

    The pattern of biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals may be affected by various agents and therapeutical procedures, chemotherapy agents, thyroid hormones, metals, radiotherapy, surgery, anesthetic agents, dialysis other radiopharmaceutical interactions. Recommendations for the detection of altered biodistribution in patients by causes not directly related with the pathology itself was given. pathology itself was given

  12. Development of a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical 177Lu-DOTA- Minigastrin for potential use in PRRT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Bularte, A.C.; Nevares, N.N.; Zapata, A.M.; Perez, J.H.; Crudo, J.L.; Puerta Yepes, N.; Rojo, A.M.

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work is to obtain 177 Lu-DOTA-Minigastrin with high radiochemical purity (RP) and the highest specific activity (Ae) as possible, using a locally produced (Nuclear Reactor RA-3, Ezeiza Atomic Center) 177 LuCl 3 of an intermediate level of Ae (between 6.36 to 17.95 Ci/mg of 176 Lu) ) and also to perform in vitro and in vivo stability tests, dose calculation in normal mice and its extrapolation to a human model. (authors) [es

  13. Current directions in radiopharmaceutical research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mather, S.J.

    1998-01-01

    Much of current radiopharmaceutical research is directed towards the development of receptor-binding tracers which are targeted towards biochemical processes. These may be extra or intracellular in nature and hold promise for an imaging approach to tissue characterisation in-vivo. Many of these products are based on proteins which range in size from large monoclonal antibodies to small neuropeptides and share a radiolabelling chemistry based on the use of bifunctional chelating agents. Although developed initially for use with indium-111, considerations of cost and isotope availability have continued to direct the efforts of many researchers towards the use of technetium-99m. While polypeptide-based radiopharmaceuticals may be useful for imaging peripheral cell-surface receptors, access to sites of interest within the cell, or in the brain, requires the development of small lipophilic molecules with retained ability to interact with intracellular targets. The design and synthesis of these compounds presents a particular challenge to the radiopharmaceutical chemist which is being met through either a pendant or integrated approach to the use of technetium coordination with particular emphasis on technetium (v) cores. Progress continues to be made in the application of targeted radionuclide therapy particularly in the development of radiopharmaceuticals for the treatment of malignant bone disease. methods for labelling antibodies with a great variety of cytotoxic radionuclides have now been refined and their use for radioimmunotherapy in the treatment of haematological malignancies shows great promise. The major medical areas for application of these new radiopharmaceuticals will be in oncology, neurology and inflammation but the increasingly difficult regulatory climate in which drug development and health-care now operate will make it essential for researchers to direct their products toward specific clinical problems as well as biological targets. (author)

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-03-01

    In the period 1969-1986, this project was directed to the evolution of target-specific labeled chemicals useful for nuclear medical imaging, especially radioactive indicators suited to tracing adrenal functions and localizing tumors in the neuroendocrine system. Since 1986, this project research has focused on the chemistry of positron emission tomography (PET) ligands. This project has involved the evaluation of methods for radiochemical syntheses with fluorine-18, as well as the development and preliminary evaluation of new radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography. In the radiochemistry area, the ability to predict fluorine-18 labeling yields for aromatic substitution reactions through the use of carbon-13 NMR analysis was studied. Radiochemical yields can be predicted for some structurally analogous aromatic compounds, but this correlation could not be generally applied to aromatic substrates for this reaction, particularly with changes in ring substituents or leaving groups. Importantly, certain aryl ring substituents, particularly methyl groups, appeared to have a negative effect on fluorination reactions. These observations are important in the future design of syntheses of complicated organic radiopharmaceuticals. In the radiopharmaceutical area, this project has supported the development of a new class of radiopharmaceuticals based on the monoamine vesicular uptake systems. The new radioligands, based on the tetrabenazine structure, offer a new approach to the quantification of monoaminergic neurons in the brain. Preliminary primate imaging studies support further development of these radioligands for PET studies in humans. If successful, such radiopharmaceuticals will find application in studies of the causes and treatment of neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson`s disease.

  15. Radiochemistry in nuclear medicine. Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samochocka, K.

    1999-01-01

    Radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals play a kay role in nuclear medicine, both in diagnostics and therapy. Incorporation of radionuclides into biomolecules, and syntheses of radiolabelled compounds of high biological selectivity are a task for radiochemists working in the multidisciplinary field of radiopharmaceutical chemistry. The most commonly used radionuclide, 99m Tc, owes this popularity to its both nearly ideal nuclear properties in respect to medical imaging, and availability from inexpensive radionuclide generators. Also numerous other radionuclides are widely used for medical imaging and therapy. Labelling of biomolecules with radioiodine and various positron emitters is getting increasingly important. This review describes some chemical and radiochemical problems we meet while synthesizing and using 99m Tc-radiopharmaceuticals and radioiodine-labelled biomolecules. Also represented are the recent developments in the design and use of the second generation radiopharmaceuticals based on bifunctional radiochelates. Several principal routes of fast chemical synthesis concerning incorporation of short-lived positron emitters into biomolecules are outlined as well. The search for chemical structures of high biological selectivity, which would be activated by slow neutrons, is related to the method of Neutron Capture Therapy, an interesting option in nuclear medicine. (author)

  16. Development of aptamers for use as radiopharmaceuticals in the bacterial infection identification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferreira, Ieda Mendes

    2013-01-01

    The difficulty in early detection of specific foci caused by bacteria in the bacterial infection has raised the need to search for new techniques for this purpose, since these foci require prolonged treatment with antibiotics and in some cases even drainage or, if applicable, removal of prostheses or grafts. Detection of bacterial infections by scintigraphy had the advantage that a whole body image could be obtained, since specific tracers were available. This study aims to obtain aptamers specific for bacteria identification for future use as radiopharmaceutical. The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) methodology can generate oligonucleotides (aptamers) that are able to bind with high affinity and specificity to a specific target, from small molecules to complex proteins, by using rounds of enrichment and amplification. Aptamers can be labeled with different radionucleotides such as 99 mTc, 18 F and 32 P. In this study, aptamers anti-peptidoglycan, the main component of the bacterial outer cell wall, were obtained through SELEX. Whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus were also used to perform the SELEX to cells (cell-SELEX). The selection of aptamers was performed by two different procedures (A and B). The A process has been accomplished by 15 SELEX rounds in which the separation of the oligonucleotides bound to the peptidoglycan of unbound ones was performed by filtration. In the B process 15 SELEX rounds were performed using the centrifugation for this separation, followed by 5 rounds cell-SELEX. The SELEX started with a pool of ssDNA (single stranded DNA). For A process, initially a library of ssDNA was incubated with peptidoglycan and the amplification of oligonucleotides that were able to bind to peptidoglycan was performed by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reation). The amplified oligonucleotides were again incubated with peptidoglycan, amplified and purified. At the end of 15 selection rounds the selected oligonucleotides were cloned

  17. Uncertainty sources in radiopharmaceuticals clinical studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degenhardt, Aemilie Louize; Oliveira, Silvia Maria Velasques de

    2014-01-01

    The radiopharmaceuticals should be approved for consumption by evaluating their quality, safety and efficacy. Clinical studies are designed to verify the pharmacodynamics, pharmacological and clinical effects in humans and are required for assuring safety and efficacy. The Bayesian analysis has been used for clinical studies effectiveness evaluation. This work aims to identify uncertainties associated with the process of production of the radionuclide and radiopharmaceutical labelling as well as the radiopharmaceutical administration and scintigraphy images acquisition and processing. For the development of clinical studies in the country, the metrological chain shall assure the traceability of the surveys performed in all phases. (author)

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear cardiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    One of the diagnostic technique periodically used in Nuclear Medicine is the angiographic studi e, employee for detect cardiovascular diseases. The radiopharmaceutical more used in the angiographic ones is 99mTc. Between thetopics described in the present work it find: myocardial infarction, radiopharmaceuticals classification for cardiac studies, labelled proceedings, cardiovascular diseases

  19. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.

    1991-04-01

    Capillary electrophoresis is being evaluated as a separation technique for analyzing Tc and Re diphosphonate radiopharmaceuticals. Advantages compared with currently used HPLC techniques include greater resolving power, smaller sample size and more rapid separations. Feasibility has been demonstrated with electropherograms obtained on a Re-HEDP sample. The Tc-PAA complexes in a radiopharmaceutical mixture were found to be unaffected by injection into a Sprague Dawley rat. This was determined by HPLC analysis of the rat's urine, which contained the same complexes as were in the injected sample. Proton NMR spectra have been obtained for samples of Tc-MDP and Re-MDP in order to provide structural information about these complexes. An in vivo sensor is being developed for a brain perfusion agent. Polymer coatings are being explored to extract the brain perfusion agent in order to enhance sensitivity for a microelectrode-based sensor. 4 refs., 2 figs

  20. New therapeutic developments in lipidology

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... on the market, but attempts to influence atherosclerosis by new mechanisms have unfortunately generally been unsuccessful so far. This article briefly reviews selected developments that may be of interest to the non-specialist practitioner. Lipid-modifying medications. The statin family has grown with the ...

  1. Development of Antibody Therapeutics against Flaviviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Haiyan; Chen, Qiang; Lai, Huafang

    2017-01-01

    Recent outbreaks of Zika virus (ZIKV) highlight the urgent need to develop efficacious interventions against flaviviruses, many of which cause devastating epidemics around the world. Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have been at the forefront of treatment for cancer and a wide array of other diseases due to their specificity and potency. While mammalian cell-produced mAbs have shown promise as therapeutic candidates against several flaviviruses, their eventual approval for human application still faces several challenges including their potential risk of predisposing treated patients to more severe secondary infection by a heterologous flavivirus through antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The high cost associated with mAb production in mammalian cell cultures also poses a challenge for the feasible application of these drugs to the developing world where the majority of flavivirus infection occurs. Here, we review the current therapeutic mAb candidates against various flaviviruses including West Nile (WNV), Dengue virus (DENV), and ZIKV. The progress of using plants for developing safer and more economical mAb therapeutics against flaviviruses is discussed within the context of their expression, characterization, downstream processing, neutralization, and in vivo efficacy. The progress of using plant glycoengineering to address ADE, the major impediment of flavivirus therapeutic development, is highlighted. These advancements suggest that plant-based systems are excellent alternatives for addressing the remaining challenges of mAb therapeutic development against flavivirus and may facilitate the eventual commercialization of these drug candidates. PMID:29295568

  2. Radiopharmaceutical scanning agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1976-01-01

    This invention is directed to dispersions useful in preparing radiopharmaceutical scanning agents, to technetium labelled dispersions, to methods for preparing such dispersions and to their use as scanning agents

  3. Synthesis and formulation of 99m Tc-ECD radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo G, B.E.

    1998-01-01

    Nuclear medicine is a medical specialty which uses radioactive compounds (radionuclides) for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes. 99m Tc is the more common radionuclide used in many studies in nuclear medicine because its advantages: it has a photopeak of 140 KeV and a half-life of 6 hours; it can be eluted from a Molybdenum 99 generator, so radiopharmaceuticals can be prepared on site. Ethyl cysteine dimer (ECD) labelled with reduced Technetium 99m has been purposed recently as a promising radiopharmaceutical for brain perfusion imaging 99m Tc-ECD is a lipophilic neutral complex which cross the brain blood barrier and show high brain uptake. The objective of this work was synthesize and to design a freeze dried formulation for the instant preparation of 99m Tc-ECD complex useful for brain perfusion imaging. We obtained a freeze dried stable formulation for the preparation of 99m Tc-ECD kit with a radiochemical purity higher than 90 %, which fulfills with the quality control of radiopharmaceuticals. Furthermore, we developed analytic techniques for the determination of the different chemical compounds into the lyophilized kit. (Author)

  4. Developing patient rapport, trust and therapeutic relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, Bob

    2017-08-09

    Rapport is established at the first meeting between the patient and nurse, and is developed throughout the therapeutic relationship. However, challenges can arise during this process. Initially, nurses can establish trust with the patient through the questions they ask, however, as care progresses, the nurse will be required to demonstrate a commitment to maintaining the patient's psychological well-being. When the therapeutic relationship ends, the nurse should assist the patient to assess progress and plan the next stage of recovery. This article provides three reflective exercises using case study examples to demonstrate how rapport is developed and sustained. Evidence is provided to identify why challenges arise in the therapeutic relationship and how the nurse can ensure they provide care that the patient regards as genuine.

  5. Radiopharmaceuticals for cerebral studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    For obtain good brain scintillation images in nuclear medicine must be used several radiopharmaceuticals. Cerebral studies give a tumors visual image as well as brain anomalities detection and are helpful in the diagnostic diseases . Are described in this work: a cerebrum radiopharmaceuticals classification,labelled compounds proceeding and Tc 99m good properties in for your fast caption, post administration and blood purification for renal way

  6. Investigation of radiopharmaceuticals from cyclotron produced radionuclides and development of mathematical models. Part of a coordinated programme on production of radiopharmaceuticals from accelerator-produced isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slaus, I.

    1983-04-01

    Several radioisotopes for diagnostic uses in nuclear medicine studies are produced using the internal 15 MeV (30 MeV alphas) deuteron beam of the ''Ruder Boskovic'' Institute in Zagreb, Yugoslavia. Some of the most important radioisotopes produced during the last few years are: Gallium-67 (d, xn reaction on a Cu/Ni/Zn target) with yield of 7.6 MBq/uAh, 81 Rb-sup(81m)Kr generator (α, 2n reaction on a Cu/Cu 2 Br 2 target) with a yield of 99 MBq/uAh, Iodine-123 (α, 2n reaction on a Cu/Ag/Sb target) with a yield of 6.3 MBq/uAh, and Indium-111 (α, 2n reaction on a Cu/Cu/Ag target) with a yield of 7.2 MBq/uAh. In addition, a simple mathematical lung model for regional ventilation measurements was developed and used for ventilation studies on normal subjects and subjects with various lung diseases. Based on these studies, a more sophisticated and quantitative lung ventilation model for radioactive tracer tidal breathing was further developed. In this new model, the periodicity of breathing is completely taken into account, and it makes possible to actually determine lung ventilation and volume parameters. The model is experimentally verified on healthy subjects, and the value of the effective specific ventilation obtained is in agreement with comparable parameters in the literature. sup(81m)Kr from a generator was used to perform these experimental studies

  7. Development of a lyophilized formulation for preparing the radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20; Desarrollo de una formulacion liofilizada para la preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 177}-DOTA-Anti-CD20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Serrano E, L. A.

    2015-07-01

    The radiolabeled proteins are molecules of interest in nuclear medicine for their diagnostic and therapeutic application in cancer. Antibodies, such as chimeric monoclonal antibody Anti-CD20 rituximab, have established themselves as suitable vectors of radionuclides (e.g. {sup 177}Lu) , introducing high affinity by the surface antigens over- expressed and widely distributed in cells involved in certain diseases. The aim of this work was to design, optimize and document the production process of radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 for sanitary registration request to the Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS). First, a raw material analysis using the Ft-Mir technique and gamma spectrometry was performed. Then, was carried out the development of the lyophilized formulation for the preparation of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20, in which an ANOVA was performed where the dependent variable was the radiochemical purity. The optimal pharmaceutical formulation was: 5 mg DOTA-CD20 and 80 mg Mannitol to be reconstituted with 1 m L of acetate buffer 0.25 M, ph 7, with an incubation time of 15 min at 37 degrees Celsius in a dry bath. Once completed the development of the lyophilized formulation, we proceeded to the optimization of the production process, development and validation of the analytical method. Three batches were prepared under protocols of Good Manufacturing Practice, which met pre-established specifications as sterile and endotoxin-free of bacterial formulations, with greater that 95% of radiochemical purity. Currently, is conducting the study of shelf stability. Upon completion of the stability studies, the legal record of {sup 177}Lu-DOTA-Anti-CD20 will be integrated with documented evidence of the quality and stability of the formulation of this radiopharmaceutical. (Author)

  8. Development of novel epidermal growth receptor-based radiopharmaceuticals: Imaging agents for breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Brocklin, Henry F.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of this research was to develop epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nuclear medicine breast cancer imaging agents. Our approach was to synthesize small molecule inhibitors of the EGFR tyrosine kinase (tk) suitable for labeling with single photon or positron-emitting radioisotopes and evaluate the imaging potential of these new molecules.We have synthesized and fully characterized 22 quinazoline compounds. All compounds inhibit EGFR tk phosphorylation activity in the nanomolar range. All compounds tested exhibited specificity for the EGFR tk versus the ErbB2 and ErbB4 tyrosine kinases. A radiometric binding assay using an iodine-125 labeled quinazoline was developed to determine the affinity of the quinazolines for the EGFR tk ATP binding site. The affinities ranged from 0.4-51 nM. The octanol/water partition coefficients (Log P; lipophilicity) of the new compounds ranged from 2.2-5.5. Six compounds have been labeled with fluorine-18. Biodistribution in EGFR overexpressing tumor bearing mice demonstrated tumor uptake but highlighted delivery and metabolism issues. The 2-fluoro quinazoline was not metabolized in an in vitro hepatocyte study. From this work a breadth of agent characteristics was created establishing the foundation for future research toward the optimal EGFR imaging agent

  9. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1995-01-01

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

  10. Eleventh international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    This document contains abstracts of papers which were presented at the Eleventh International Symposium on Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Sessions included: radiopharmaceuticals for the dopaminergic system, strategies for the production and use of labelled reactive small molecules, radiopharmaceuticals for measuring metabolism, radiopharmaceuticals for the serotonin and sigma receptor systems, labelled probes for molecular biology applications, radiopharmaceuticals for receptor systems, radiopharmaceuticals utilizing coordination chemistry, radiolabelled antibodies, radiolabelling methods for small molecules, analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, and analytical techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry.

  11. Assessment of {sup 186}Re chelate-conjugated bisphosphonate for the development of new radiopharmaceuticals for bones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uehara, Tomoya [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Jin Zhelong [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Ogawa, Kazuma [Advanced Science Research Center, Kanazawa University, Kanazawa 920-8640 (Japan); Akizawa, Hiromichi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan); Hashimoto, Kazuyuki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai-mura, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Nakayama, Morio [Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521 (Japan); Arano, Yasushi [Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Chiba University, Chuo-ku, Chiba 260-8675 (Japan)]. E-mail: arano@p.chiba-u.ac.jp

    2007-01-15

    increase in renal radioactivity levels were observed particularly with {sup 186}Re-HEDP. Conclusions: Although {sup 186}Re-HEDP possessed HA binding and bone accumulation similar to those of [{sup 186}Re]CpTR-Gly-APD, the specific activity of {sup 186}Re-labeled BPs was found to play a crucial role in bone accumulation and blood clearance. Thus, the molecular design of chelate-conjugated BP would be useful for the development of bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals with a variety of radionuclides by selecting chelating molecules that provide high specific activities.

  12. Implementation of the Good Practices of Manufacture of PET Radiopharmaceuticals in INOR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sinconegui Gómez, Belkys; Quesada Cepero, Waldo; González González, Joaquín J.; Calderón Marín, Carlos F.; Varela Corona, Consuelo; Figueroa, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The growing advance of new technologies in Nuclear Medicine such as positron emission tomography (PET) allows visualizing biological processes in vivo and provides more sensitive results in the diagnosis of oncological processes in asymptomatic stages of the disease and contribute significantly to improve cancer management. It is significant to note that these technologies include radiopharmaceuticals marked with 90 Y and 177 Lu for the therapy of patients already diagnosed by the PET technique that contribute to a significant improvement in the quality of life of patients with cancer. Our country, taking into account the importance of this technology for Health, has developed in INOR a project for the obtaining, dispensing and quality control of PET radiopharmaceuticals marked with 68 Ga for diagnosis and its therapeutic analogues marked with 177 Lu and 90Y in Conditions of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP). The objective of the present work is to present our experiences in the implementation of the Good Practices of Manufacture of PET Radiopharmaceuticals according to regulation 16-2012 GUIDELINES ON GOOD PRACTICES OF MANUFACTURE OF PHARMACEUTICAL PRODUCTS, issued by the State Control Center for Medicines, Equipment and Devices Doctors (CECMED), a Cuban regulatory body. The implementation of the regulation considers from the preparation of personnel involved in the activity, moving through the facilities and equipment to the validation and quality control. A system for the quality assurance of the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals was implemented in accordance with Annex 5 of Regulation 16-2012 of the CECMED. This is the first experience in Cuba of the implementation of Good Manufacturing Practices of PET Radiopharmaceuticals in Hospital Radiopharmacy. The acquired experiences will be extended to the practices for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for the conventional Nuclear Medicine in the INOR.

  13. Quality control of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1981-01-01

    Quality assurance was introduced in the pharmaceutical field long before it was used in many other areas, and the term quality control has been used in a much broader sense than merely analytical quality control. The term Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) has been used to describe the system used for producing safe and effective drugs of a uniform quality. GMP has also been used for the industrial production of radiopharmaceuticals. For the preparation and control of radiopharmaceuticals in hospitals a similar system has been named Good Radiopharmacy Practice (GRP). It contains the same elements as GMP but takes into account the special nature of this group of drugs. Data on the assessment of the quality of radiopharmaceuticals in relation to present standards are reviewed. The general conclusion is that the quality of radiopharmaceuticals appears comparable to that of other drugs. It seems possible to establish the production of radiopharmaceuticals, generators and preparation kits in such a way that analytical control of the final product at the hospital may be limited provided the final preparation work is carried out in accordance with GRP principles. The elements of GRP are reviewed. (author)

  14. Breast feeding's interruption following radiopharmaceutical administration to nursing mothers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rojo, A.M.; Gomez Parada, I.M.; Dubner, D.; Gisone, P.; Perez de Serrano, M.

    1995-01-01

    The radiopharmaceutical administration to lactating women for therapeutic or diagnostic purpose can achieve a radiological risk to the breast feeding child due to levels of radioactivity in the breast milk. International recommendations regarding safe assumption of nursing mother after radiopharmaceutical administration were analysed. We examined the formula proposed by Rommey et al. to establish objective guidelines in case of the administration of radiopharmaceutical to nursing mothers. The ICRP 54 metabolic model for iodine was modified in order to calculate the suppression breast feeding's period according to the radioactivity measured in the breast milk. (author). 6 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  15. Preparation of Radiopharmaceuticals Labeled with Metal Radionuclides. Final Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    2012-01-01

    The overall goal of this project was to develop methods for the production of metal-based radionuclides, to develop metal-based radiopharmaceuticals and in a limited number of cases, to translate these agents to the clinical situation. Initial work concentrated on the application of the radionuclides of Cu, Cu-60, Cu-61 and Cu-64, as well as application of Ga-68 radiopharmaceuticals. Initially Cu-64 was produced at the Missouri University Research Reactor and experiments carried out at Washington University. A limited number of studies were carried out utilizing Cu-62, a generator produced radionuclide produced by Mallinckrodt Inc. (now Covidien). In these studies, copper-62-labeled pyruvaldehyde Bis(N 4 -methylthiosemicarbazonato)-copper(II) was studied as an agent for cerebral myocardial perfusion. A remote system for the production of this radiopharmaceutical was developed and a limited number of patient studies carried out with this agent. Various other copper radiopharmaceuticals were investigated, these included copper labeled blood imaging agents as well as Cu-64 labeled antibodies. Cu-64 labeled antibodies targeting colon cancer were translated to the human situation. Cu-64 was also used to label peptides (Cu-64 octriatide) and this is one of the first applications of a peptide radiolabeled with a positron emitting metal radionuclide. Investigations were then pursued on the preparation of the copper radionuclides on a small biomedical cyclotron. A system for the production of high specific activity Cu-64 was developed and initially the Cu-64 was utilized to study the hypoxic imaging agent Cu-64 ATSM. Utilizing the same target system, other positron emitting metal radionuclides were produced, these were Y-86 and Ga-66. Radiopharmaceuticals were labeled utilizing both of these radionuclides. Many studies were carried out in animal models on the uptake of Cu-ATSM in hypoxic tissue. The hypothesis is that Cu-ATSM retention in vivo is dependent upon the oxygen

  16. Development of a lyophilized formulation for preparing the radiopharmaceutical 68Ga-DOTA-Nal3-Octreotide for the diagnosis of tumors of neuroendocrine origin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenzo L, G. A.

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to develop a radiopharmaceutical consisting of an emitter positrons radionuclide ( 68 Ga) which is used in imaging by positron emission tomography; and a peptide capable of binding to somatostatin receptors subtypes 2, 3 and 5; which together serve as a diagnostic support of tumors of neuroendocrine origin. The peptide characterization DOTA-1-Naphthylalanine 3 -Octreotide (DOTA-NOC) by infrared spectroscopy technique by Fourier transform was performed, in which the principal functional groups belonging to this molecule were identified as well as its identification by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Subsequently, a variance analysis taking into account three different levels of amounts of sodium acetate, and three different levels of amounts of the peptide was performed. These masses were subjected to lyophilization for a period of 21 h; after completion of lyophilization, were labeled with 2 m L of 68 GaCl 3 eluates of a 68 Ge/ 68 Ga ITG generator to determine the percentage of radiochemical purity of the different formulations. It was observed that the ideal formulation must contain 75 μg of peptide and 14 mg of NaOAc, according to studies, was determined that the amount of peptide does not influence the response of radiochemical purity in the same way that the amount of added sodium acetate, which produces different effects on the dependent variable. Finally the radiopharmaceutical formulation was obtained with greater than 95% of radiochemical purity. The validation of the analytical method was performed describing the system accuracy and linearity, specificity and accuracy; linearity and precision of the method, taking into account acceptance criteria based on the guidance of validation of analytical methods published by the National Association of Pharmacists Chemical Biologists of Mexico, A. C.; the parameters evaluated met the specifications given by the guide validation of analytical methods. Uptake and internalization tests of the

  17. Radiopharmacy and radiopharmaceutical products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Galy, Gerard; Fraysse, Marc; Hammadi, Akli; Tafani, Mathieu

    2012-01-01

    Written by two radio-pharmacist doctors, this book presents all the theoretical and practical knowledge necessary to radio-pharmacists in charge of the management, the preparation, the control and the delivery of radiopharmaceutical medicines. It presents the scientific, regulatory and technical foundations for the implementation and operation of radiopharmacy in hospitals, addressing themes such as the fundamentals and theories about nuclear physics and radioactivity (production of artificial radionuclides, detectors and measuring instruments, radio-chemistry), radio-biology and radiation protection (biological effects of ionizing radiations, radioprotection, regulations concerning the use of radiopharmaceutical products by medical personnel), the application domains of radiopharmaceutical medicines and products (diagnosis, therapy, biological assessment), and the management of radiopharmacy in a hospital (design, implementation, organizing, operation)

  18. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with metal radionuclides. Progress report, July 1, 1988--June 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1992-06-01

    We recently developed a useful zinc-62/copper-62 generator and are presently evaluating copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals for clinical studies. While developing these copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals, in collaboration with the University of Missouri Research Reactor, Columbia we have also explored copper-64 radiopharmaceuticals. The PET images we obtained with copper-64 tracers were of such high quality that we have developed and evaluated copper-64 labeled antibodies for PET imaging. The major research activities described herein include: the development and assessment of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals; the development and evaluation of a new zinc-62/copper-62 generator and the assessment of copper-62 radiopharmaceuticals; mechanistic studies on proteins labeled with metal radionuclides.

  19. Pain palliative Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalez, B. M.

    1994-01-01

    A pain relieving agents based on β emitters mainly and in some cases a complex preparation are being given for bone metastasis in relation with breast,prostate and lung carcinoma with good performance in clinical practice.Several radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals are mentioned giving strength to those newly proposed, 153Sm and 186Re.Bibliography

  20. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packer, S; Fairchild, R G; Watts, K P; Greenberg, D; Hannon, S J

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed. (PSB)

  1. Audits of radiopharmaceutical formulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castronovo, F.P. Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A procedure for auditing radiopharmaceutical formulations is described. To meet FDA guidelines regarding the quality of radiopharmaceuticals, institutional radioactive drug research committees perform audits when such drugs are formulated away from an institutional pharmacy. All principal investigators who formulate drugs outside institutional pharmacies must pass these audits before they can obtain a radiopharmaceutical investigation permit. The audit team meets with the individual who performs the formulation at the site of drug preparation to verify that drug formulations meet identity, strength, quality, and purity standards; are uniform and reproducible; and are sterile and pyrogen free. This team must contain an expert knowledgeable in the preparation of radioactive drugs; a radiopharmacist is the most qualified person for this role. Problems that have been identified by audits include lack of sterility and apyrogenicity testing, formulations that are open to the laboratory environment, failure to use pharmaceutical-grade chemicals, inadequate quality control methods or records, inadequate training of the person preparing the drug, and improper unit dose preparation. Investigational radiopharmaceutical formulations, including nonradiolabeled drugs, must be audited before they are administered to humans. A properly trained pharmacist should be a member of the audit team

  2. Cyclotron produced radiopharmaceuticals

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kopička, Karel; Fišer, Miroslav; Hradilek, Pavel; Hanč, Petr; Lebeda, Ondřej

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2003), s. A763-A768 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Keywords : cyclotron * radionuclides * radiopharmaceuticals Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 0.263, year: 2003

  3. Melanin-binding radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.; Fairchild, R.G.; Watts, K.P.; Greenberg, D.; Hannon, S.J.

    1980-01-01

    The scope of this paper is limited to an analysis of the factors that are important to the relationship of radiopharmaceuticals to melanin. While the authors do not attempt to deal with differences between melanin-binding vs. melanoma-binding, a notable variance is assumed

  4. Quality control of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verdera, E.S.

    1994-01-01

    The quality control of radiopharmaceuticals is based in physics, physics-chemical and biological controls. Between the different controls can be enumerated the following: visual aspect,side, number of particle beams,activity,purity,ph,isotonicity,sterility,radioinmunoessay,toxicity,stability and clinical essay

  5. [Therapeutic problems in disorders of sex development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajszczak, Katarzyna; Słowikowska-Hilczer, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    The compatibility between genetic, gonadal, genital, somatic and psychic sex should be present for the proper sexual development. If there is no such compatibility, disorders of sex development (DSD) appear. Medical procedure in such cases leads to many problems which mainly come from the lack of sufficient knowledge about the pathophysiology of the disorders. The main difficulties met by diagnostic and therapeutic team are: determination of the official sex, prediction of gender identity, hormonal activity of gonads and fertility, as well as the decision to undertake surgical procedures involving the genitals and gonads. Disorders of sex development lead also to psychological problems of patients and their families, because they disturb the proper social functioning. © Polish Society for Pediatric Endocrinology and Diabetology.

  6. The safe and effective use of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, N.G.

    1982-01-01

    In the medical applications of radionuclides, we have to arrange effective radiation protection of patients, staff and general public, maintain high standards of pharmaceutical safety and ensure that the radiopharmaceuticals are effective in use. The influence of the 1976 Council of the European Communities Euratom Directive in producing legislation in the United Kingdom controlling medical work with radioactivity is discussed. Attention is drawn to current studies in the dosimetry of radiopharmaceuticals, and some of the problems that continue to arise in evaluating the dosimetry and possible hazards of isotopes of iodine are discussed. Developments in facilities for preparing radiopharmaceuticals in hospital laboratories are considered and a short report is given of an extensive study of quality control procedures which showed that it was difficult to justify their use as a routine on established products. (Author)

  7. Development of kits for 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals for infection imaging. Report of a co-ordinated research project 2000-2003

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    Infectious diseases remain a major health problem and cause of death worldwide, particularly in developing countries. Nuclear medicine imaging, because of its sensitivity, offers an attractive option for diagnosis of focal infections. This needs a reliable radiopharmaceutical that can selectively concentrate in sites of infection. Over the years 67 Ga and other radiopharmaceuticals that localize in inflammation associated with infection sites, also known as 'non-specific agents' have been used for infection imaging. However, experience has shown that an 'infection specific agent' that concentrates selectively at sites of infection and not inflammation would have several advantages. The first such agent developed more than two decades ago was 111 In-leucocytes which is still considered a 'gold standard'. Considerations of cost, availability, and superior properties for imaging make 99 mTc a better label than 111 In. 99 mTc white blood cell (WBC) was developed subsequently and used for infection imaging. However, both 111 In and 99 mTc WBCs have a number of drawbacks, in particular: each patient's blood sample has to be collected and individually radiolabelled; well-trained staff and suitable facilities for separating and labelling the patient's blood are needed; the risk of infection and cross-contamination associated with potential blood-borne microorganisms; and cost of materials. Because of these, considerable efforts have been continuously made towards developing convenient replacements for 99 mTc WBCs with limited success, 99 mTc antigranulocyte antibody being a good example. However, these radiopharmaceuticals still have many disadvantages, related to either their cost and availability or their performance. In view of the large potential for applications in patients, the development of new and improved 99 mTc labelled infection specific imaging agents was considered as a very worthwhile aim for scientific research in general and, in particular, for the

  8. Synthesis, analysis, purification and biodistribution in an animal model of radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu{sup 3+} -dotatato for diagnostic and therapeutic use in neuroendocrine tumors; Sintese, analise, purificacao e biodistribuicao em modelo animal do radiofarmaco {sup 177}Lu{sup 3+} -dotatato para uso diagnostico e terapeutico em tumores neuroendocrinos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldeira Filho, Jose de Souza

    2009-07-01

    The aim of this work was to propose rationalization in the synthesis, analysis and purification of radiopharmaceutical {sup 177} Lu{sup 3+} - DOTATATO for diagnostic and therapeutic use in neuroendocrine tumors, as well as for evaluation g biodistribution of this radiopharmaceutical an animal-mode. The complexation reaction for the synthesis of radiopharmaceutical was carried out in ammonium acetate buffer 0.5 M, p H 7.0, for 30 minutes at 95 deg C. The radiochemical purity was > 95%, according to analysis by chromatography in ITLC-SG, when using the sodium citrate buffer 0,1 M, p H 5.0, as the mobile phase. The molar-limit ratio {sup 177}Lu{sup 3+}:DOTATATO, in ammonium acetate buffer 0.5 M, p H 7.0, for 30 minutes at 95 deg C, was dependent on the specific activity and origin of the radioisotope, this being 1:3.5 (370 MBq : 26{mu}g) for that from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory /USA, and 1:16 (370 MBq: 11.8 {mu}g) for that from Nuclear Analytical and Medical Services/Holland, when considering a decay of five days from the production date of te radioisotopes. This rationalization in the synthesis of radiopharmaceutical {sup 177}Lu{sup 3+} - DOTATATO permits high economy in production costs. Chemical studies on the synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals also placed in evidence the interference of {sup 177}Hf{sup 4+}, the decay product of {sup 177}Lu{sup 3=}, as the {sup 177} Lu{sup 3=} competitor for DOTATATO. Radiopharmaceutical preparation proved to be stable during 24 hours, at an activity rate of 2775 MBq, with the addition of 0.6 mg/mL of gentisic acid and when kept in dry ice. In biodistribution studies on Swiss and Nuce mice, the specificity of radiopharmaceutical for somatostatin positive-receptor tissues, such as the pancreas, stomach, lungs, adrenal glands, kidneys and the cell tumor AR42J was demonstrated. (author)

  9. Cyclotron targets and production technologies used for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiser, M.; Kopicka, K.; Hradilek, P.; Hanc, P.; Lebeda, O.; Panek, J.; Vognar, M.

    2002-01-01

    Some technical aspects of development and production of cyclotron-made radiopharmaceuticals (excluding PET) are discussed. In this field, nuclear chemistry and pharmacy are in a close contact; therefore, requirements of both should be taken into account. The principles of cyclotron targetry, separation/recovery of materials and synthesis of the active substances are given, as well as issues connected with formulation pharmaceutical forms of radioactive medical products. As the radiopharmaceuticals should fulfil the requirements for in vivo preparations, there exist a variety of demands pertaining to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP), which is also briefly discussed. A typical production chain is presented involving the treatment of irradiated cyclotron target, choosing and validation of method for pharmacon synthesis, selection or development of necessary analytical procedures, preparing active substance according pharmaceutical standards, development of dosage form, adoption of final technology procedure and opening the clinical trial. Practical examples of real technologies based on cyclotron-made radionuclides ( 81 Rb, 123 I, 68 Ge, 211 At) are given. Special attention is devoted to the technology of enriched cyclotron targets. Frequently used medicinal products employing some cyclotron-produced active substances are characterised (Rb/Kr or Ge/Ga generators, 123 I-labelled MIBG, OIH, MAB's and some others). The cyclotron produced radioactive implants for transluminal coronary angioplasty (radioactive stent) are introduced as an example of a medical device developed for therapeutic application. (author)

  10. Development of a lyophilized formulation for the preparation of radiopharmaceutical {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} for the diagnosis of breast cancer tumors; Desarrollo de una formulacion liofilizada para la preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} para el diagnostico de tumores de cancer de mama

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terron A, E. J.

    2015-07-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals of third generation by its design that includes peptides capable of selectively directing the radiation to a specific molecular target are useful in molecular medicine for obtaining molecular images that allow recording in vivo phenomena temporal-space of molecular or cellular processes, with diagnostic or therapeutic applications. Generally, peptides that recognize cellular receptors that are over-expressed in cancer cells of interest are used; such is the case of RGD (arginine-glycine-aspartic acid) a tri-peptide sequence which recognizes to the membrane receptors α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) that are involved in metastasis and angiogenic processes as well as in tumor cells of breast glioma. The high affinity and selectivity of RGD peptide with integrin s α(v)β(3) and α(v)β(5) is the basis for designing radiopharmaceuticals for diagnostic of breast cancer and the metastasis and angiogenic processes. In this paper a useful lyophilized formulation was development for obtaining {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} radiopharmaceutical that for its effectiveness, stability and security can be used in humans. The production process of core-equipment DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK]{sub 2}/Buffer sodium acetate 1.0 M was optimized, and the formulation was transferred to the radiopharmaceuticals production plant of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ). The optimized formulation of the core-equipment for the {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} radiopharmaceutical preparation is: DOTA-E-[c(RGDfK)]{sub 2} peptide - 75 μg; Mannitol - 50 mg; Sodium acetate - 14 mg; Sodium acetate buffer 1.0 M ph 4.3 - 0.5 m L. The production process was validated and stability studies were carried out to the validation batches in compliance with the validation master plan of the ININ and in adherence to compliance of the applicable national and international regulations. Also the legal dossier was drawn up in order to make the application of sanitary registration

  11. Radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals catalogue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The Chilean Nuclear Energy Commission (CCHEN) presents its radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals 2002 catalogue. In it we found physical characteristics of 9 different reactor produced radioisotopes ( Tc-99m, I-131, Sm-153, Ir-192, P-32, Na-24, K-42, Cu-64, Rb-86 ), 7 radiopharmaceuticals ( MDP, DTPA, DMSA, Disida, Phitate, S-Coloid, Red Blood Cells In-Vivo, Red Blood Cells In-Vitro) and 4 labelled compounds ( DMSA-Tc99m, DTPA-Tc99m, MIBG-I131, EDTMP-Sm153 ). In the near future the number of items will be increased with new reactor and cyclotron products. Our production system will be certified by ISO 9000 on March 2003. CCHEN is interested in being a national and an international supplier of these products (RS)

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals and tumor detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ansari, A.N.; Atkins, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    A number of radiopharmaceuticals are evaluated as to their usefulness for the reliable localization of malignant tumors by radioisotope scanning. Compounds discussed include 75 Se-selenomethionine, 32 P-phosphate, /sup 99m/Tc-phosphate, 67 Ga-citrate, and 111 In-bleomycin. It is pointed out that no ideal agent has yet been found and that considerable difficulties exist in comparing one clinical series with another

  13. Development and radiotherapeutic application of 211At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Zalutsky, M.; Bloomer, W.

    1981-01-01

    This project is concerned with developing the potential of alpha-emitting radionuclides as agents for radiotherapy. Alpha-emitters seem ideally suited for his application because their high linear energy transfer and short range permit the deposition of considerable energy in a very small volume of tissue. Unlike the beta particles of 131 I which have a range of about 1 to 2 mm in tissue, 5 to 7 MeV alpha particles would traverse only a few cell diameters. Among the available alpha-emitters, 211 At appears most promising for therapeutic applications because, (1) it has some chemical similarities to iodine, an element that can readily be incorporated into numerous proteins and peptides, (2) it has a half-life that is long enough to permit chemical manipulation yet short enough to minimize destruction of healthy cells due to degradation of the label over time, (3) it can be produced conveniently using a cyclotron, and (4) alpha emission is associated with 100% of its decays with no accompanying beta emission. In the past year the evaluation of an astatine-tellurium colloid as an agent for the destruction of malignant ascites has been completed. The therapeutic efficacy of 211 At-tellurium colloid has been compared with that of several beta-emitting radiocolloids. Studies on the application of monoclonal antibodies as carriers for selective delineation and destruction of malignant cell populations have also been initiated

  14. Development and radiotherapeutic application of /sup 211/At-labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Zalutsky, M.; Bloomer, W.

    1981-01-01

    This project is concerned with developing the potential of alpha-emitting radionuclides as agents for radiotherapy. Alpha-emitters seem ideally suited for his application because their high linear energy transfer and short range permit the deposition of considerable energy in a very small volume of tissue. Unlike the beta particles of /sup 131/I which have a range of about 1 to 2 mm in tissue, 5 to 7 MeV alpha particles would traverse only a few cell diameters. Among the available alpha-emitters, /sup 211/At appears most promising for therapeutic applications because, (1) it has some chemical similarities to iodine, an element that can readily be incorporated into numerous proteins and peptides, (2) it has a half-life that is long enough to permit chemical manipulation yet short enough to minimize destruction of healthy cells due to degradation of the label over time, (3) it can be produced conveniently using a cyclotron, and (4) alpha emission is associated with 100% of its decays with no accompanying beta emission. In the past year the evaluation of an astatine-tellurium colloid as an agent for the destruction of malignant ascites has been completed. The therapeutic efficacy of /sup 211/At-tellurium colloid has been compared with that of several beta-emitting radiocolloids. Studies on the application of monoclonal antibodies as carriers for selective delineation and destruction of malignant cell populations have also been initiated.

  15. Safety and efficacy of radiopharmaceuticals 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.; Norbygaard, E.

    1987-01-01

    In this text aspects of the development of new radiopharmaceuticals are reviewed with particular reference to products of biological origin such as monoclonal antibodies and human cells. Also included in this survey are the legal aspects of the introduction of new pharmaceuticals and good radiopharmacy practice

  16. Fourth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schlafke-Stelson, A.T.; Watson, E.E.

    1986-04-01

    The focus of the Fourth International Radiopharmaceutical Dosimetry Symposium was to explore the impact of current developments in nuclear medicine on absorbed dose calculations. This book contains the proceedings of the meeting including the edited discussion that followed the presentations. Topics that were addressed included the dosimetry associated with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and blood elements, ultrashort-lived radionuclides, and positron emitters. Some specific areas of discussion were variations in absorbed dose as a result of alterations in the kinetics, the influence of radioactive contaminants on dose, dose in children and in the fetus, available instrumentation and techniques for collecting the kinetic data needed for dose calculation, dosimetry requirements for the review and approval of new radiopharmaceuticals, and a comparison of the effect on the thyroid of internal versus external irradiation. New models for the urinary blader, skeleton including the active marrow, and the blood were presented. Several papers dealt with the validity of traditional ''average-organ'' dose estimates to express the dose from particulate radiation that has a short range in tissue. These problems are particularly important in the use of monoclonal antibodies and agents used to measure intracellular functions. These proceedings have been published to provide a resource volume for anyone interested in the calculation of absorbed radiation dose

  17. Cyclotron targets and production technologies used for radiopharmaceuticals in NPI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiser, M.; Kopicka, K.; Hradilek, P.; Hanc, P.; Lebeda, O.; Panek, J.; Vognar, M.

    2003-01-01

    This paper deals with some technical aspects of the development and production of cyclotron-made radiopharmaceuticals (excluding PET). In this field, nuclear chemistry and pharmacy are in a close contact; therefore, requirements of the both should be taken into account. The principles of cyclotron targetry, separation/recovery of materials and synthesis of active substances are given, as well as issues connected with formulation of pharmaceutical forms. As the radiopharmaceuticals should fulfil the requirements on in vivo preparations, there exist a variety of demands pertaining to Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) concept, which is also briefly discussed. A typical production chain is presented and practical examples of real technologies based on cyclotron-made radionuclides are given as they have been used in Nuclear Physics Institute of CAS (NPI). Special attention is devoted to the technology of enriched cyclotron targets. Frequently used medicinal products employing cyclotron-produced active substances are characterised (Rb/Kr generators, 123 I-labelled MIBG, OIH and MAB's). The cyclotron produced radioactive implants for transluminal coronary angioplasty (radioactive stents) are introduced as an example of a medical device developed for therapeutic application. (author)

  18. Pig models on intestinal development and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Lanmei; Yang, Huansheng; Li, Jianzhong; Li, Yali; Ding, Xueqing; Wu, Guoyao; Yin, Yulong

    2017-12-01

    The gastrointestinal tract plays a vital role in nutrient supply, digestion, and absorption, and has a crucial impact on the entire organism. Much attention is being paid to utilize animal models to study the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal diseases in response to intestinal development and health. The piglet has a body size similar to that of the human and is an omnivorous animal with comparable anatomy, nutritional requirements, and digestive and associated inflammatory processes, and displays similarities to the human intestinal microbial ecosystem, which make piglets more appropriate as an animal model for human than other non-primate animals. Therefore, the objective of this review is to summarize key attributes of the piglet model with which to study human intestinal development and intestinal health through probing into the etiology of several gastrointestinal diseases, thus providing a theoretical and hopefully practical, basis for further studies on mammalian nutrition, health, and disease, and therapeutics. Given the comparable nutritional requirements and strikingly similar brain developmental patterns between young piglets and humans, the piglet has been used as an important translational model for studying neurodevelopmental outcomes influenced by pediatric nutrition. Because of similarities in anatomy and physiology between pigs and mankind, more emphasises are put on how to use the piglet model for human organ transplantation research.

  19. Drug interaction with radiopharmaceuticals: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernardo-Filho, Mario; Santos-Filho, Sebastiao David; Moura, Egberto Gaspar de; Maiworm, Adalgisa Ieda; Bernardo, Luciana Camargo; Brito, Lavinia de Carvalho [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia. Dept. de Biofisica e Biometria; Orlando, Margarida Maria de Camoes [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Pedro Ernesto. Setor de Medicina Nuclear; Penas, Maria Exposito [Universidade Federal do Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Hospital Universitario Clementino Fraga Filho. Setor de Medicina Nuclear; Cardoso, Valbert Nascimento [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Farmacia. Lab. de Radioisotopos

    2005-10-15

    Clinical images are worthwhile in Health Sciences and their analysis and correct interpretation aid the professionals,such as physicians, physiotherapists and occupational therapists, to make decisions and take subsequent therapeutic and/or rehabilitation measures. Other factors, besides the state of the disease, may interfere and affect the bioavailability of the radiopharmaceuticals (radiobiocomplexes) and the quality of the SPECT and PET images. Furthermore, the labeling of some of these radiobiocomplexes, such as plasma proteins, white blood cells and red blood cells, with 99m T, can also be modified. These factors include drugs (synthetic and natural) and dietary conditions, as well as some medical procedures (invasive or non-invasive), such as radiation therapy, surgical procedures, prostheses, cardioversion, intubation, chemo perfusion, external massage, immunotherapy, blood transfusion and hemodialysis. In conclusion, the knowledge about these factors capable of interfering with the bioavailability of the radiobiocomplexes is worthwhile for secure diagnosis. Moreover, the development of biological models to study these phenomena is highly relevant and desirable.(author)

  20. Automation of cells of radiopharmaceuticals production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negrini, Aguinaldo Donizete

    2010-01-01

    The 67 Ga is an important radiopharmaceutical used to identify inflammatory processes in chronic illnesses, diagnosis by image of tumors in soft tissues and the possibility to evaluate the result for therapeutic intervention. In the present work a module of 67 Ga processing was developed with the objective to reduce the interventions in the hot cell, in order to avoid oxidation caused by metallic materials, and consuming in hoses of the peristaltic pumps, that release residues that blocked the valves used in the process. With materials such as: acrylic, PVC, PEEK e teflon and they are used vacuum as method (way) of fluid transferences instead of peristaltic pump in the majority of the procedures, with this improvements the system can make shorter the lengths of transference hoses, increasing the yield in the process with less interventions for maintenance and time exposure of the workers, guaranteeing the quality and reducing the time of the processing. using a mobile system for displacement of the processing module making in the cleanness and maintenance of the cell that works with radioactive material. Reducing the time of exposure dose of the workers in compliance with RDC-17 of ANVISA, which ruling the Good Manufacturing Practice Procedures. (author)

  1. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures. Progress report, May 1, 1980-April 30, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.; Deutsch, E.A.

    1980-12-01

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to efficiently separate and detect the individual components in a radiopharmaceutical mixture. A procedure for separating Tc(NaBH 4 )HEDP radiopharmaceutical analogues by anion exchange HPLC with uv-visible and γ detection was developed. Such preparations consist of as many as 7 Tc-containing components, the relative quantities of which are highly dependent on the conditions during preparation and subsequent handling. The in vivo distributions of 3 of the isolated Tc-HEDP species were evaluated as skeletal imaging agents in normal rats. The chromatographically separated Tc-HEDP components exhibit distinctly different biodistributions which are related to the chromatographic characteristics of the individual components. These same Tc-HEDP components were evaluated for uptake in myocardial infarcts using the isoproterenol-induced necrosis model in the rat. The relative uptake of the various components in the infarcted heart parallels the skeletal uptake. An optically transparent thin layer electrochemical flow cell was developed and characterized. This cell enables optical and electrochemical measurements to be made simultaneously on individual Tc-HEDP complexes as they elute from the HPLC. These results demonstrate the potential presence of numerous technetium complexes in radiopharmaceuticals and the efficacy of HPLC as a mode of separation and detection of these complexes. One particular component in the Tc(NaBH 4 )HEDP radiopharmaceutical analogue is more effective than the others for both skeletal and myocardial infarct uptake. This is strongly suggestive that a more efficacious radiopharmaceutical would result from the administration of this single component

  2. Developing therapeutic rapport: a training validation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norfolk, Tim; Birdi, Kamaljit; Patterson, Fiona

    2009-01-01

    Patient-centred consulting is at the heart of modern medicine, and training programmes now routinely highlight a range of communication skills that enhance the doctor-patient relationship. The present pilot study focuses on the central role played by empathic skills in developing rapport and shared understanding, as captured in a new model developed by the authors. The specific aim of the study was to evaluate the potential of a short-term training programme using this model to improve rapport-related behaviour in general practitioner (GP) trainees. In a quasi-experimental study, 37 GP trainees from schemes in central England (the training group) participated in a training programme based around a new model of therapeutic rapport, with pre- and post-training analysis of relevant knowledge-based, affective and behavioural outcomes. A control group of ten GP trainees, from schemes in a comparable UK medical deanery, took no part in the training programme but were involved in all pre- and post-training analyses. The training group demonstrated significant increases in rapport-related knowledge and all three affective dimensions (attitudes, confidence and motivation); there was a similar finding in terms of 'positive engagement' and all expert-rated aspects of rapport-related behaviours. The control group showed no comparable improvement in any area, and recorded a significant drop in demonstration of positive engagement behaviours. The significant improvement in rapport-related knowledge, attitudes and behaviour after training, and the lack of any comparable change in the control group, gives some support to the suggestion that the module (and the model that underpinned it) may have triggered such an impact independent of ongoing experience or other educational activities.

  3. Placental transfer of selected radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wegst, A.V.

    1992-01-01

    This paper reviews animal experiments carried out to determine the transfer of radiopharmaceuticals from mother to fetus. Animal data are compared to any human data available. The radiopharmaceuticals included in the discussion are Tc-99m pertechnetate, Tc-99m DTPA, Ga-67 citrate and Tl-201 chloride. (6 tab., 5 refs.)

  4. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.

    1992-01-01

    The long-range objective of this research program is the development of more efficacious technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals for use as imaging agents in diagnostic nuclear medicine. We seek to isolate and develop distinct site imaging agents, each of which has properties optimized to provide diagnostic information concerning a given pathological condition. The specific objectives during the period (9/1/89 to 8/31/92) include: (1) Development of strategies for improving yields of specific Tc-diphosphonate complexes with optimum imaging properties; (2) Development of electrodes for rapid in situ electrochemical generation of skeletal imaging agents; (3) Development of electrochemical sensors for T c and Re imaging agents; (4) Characterization of stable T c - and Re-diphosphonate complexes obtainable in high yield by structural studies with techniques such as NMR, EXAFS, and Raman spectroscopy; (5) Development of improved separation techniques for the characterization of diphosphonate skeletal imaging agents; (6) Evaluation of the effect of the biological milieu on T c -diphosphonate complexes; and (7) Electrochemical studies of technetium and rhenium complexes synthesized by Professor Deutsch's research group for heart and brain imaging

  5. Production, control and utilization of radioisotopes including radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.

    1985-05-01

    From April 29th to May 5th, 1984 27 participants from 21 developing countries stayed within an IAEA Study Tour ('Production, Control and Utilization of Radioisotopes including Radiopharmaceuticals') in the GDR. In the CINR, Rossendorf the reactor, the cyclotron, the technological centre as well as the animal test laboratory were visited. The participants were made familiar by 10 papers with the development, production and control of radiopharmaceuticals in the CINR, Rossendorf. (author)

  6. Development of additive [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} target system in the KOTRON-13 cyclotron and its application for [{sup 11}C]radiopharmaceutical production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moon, Byung Seok; Lee, Hong Jin [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Kyung [Technical Support Team, Duchembio, Seoul 121-844 (Korea, Republic of); Hur, Min Goo; Yang, Seung Dae [Radiation Instrumentation Research Division, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup 580-185 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Chul, E-mail: leebc2001@gmail.com [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Nanomolecular Imaging and Innovative Drug Development, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Eun [Department of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University Bundang Hospital, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seongnam 463-707 (Korea, Republic of); Center for Nanomolecular Imaging and Innovative Drug Development, Advanced Institutes of Convergence Technology, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Smart Humanity Convergence Center, Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, Seoul 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-08-01

    The KOTRON-13 cyclotron, which was developed in South Korea for the production of medical radioisotopes, has the structural limitation of only one beam-output port, restricting the production of the carbon-11 isotope. In the present study, we investigate the design of a switchable target system and develop an effective carbon-11 target in the KOTRON-13 cyclotron, for combination with the fluorine-18 target. The target system was designed by introducing a sliding-type element between the fluorine-18 and carbon-11 targets, a tailor-made C-11 target and its cooling system. For the efficient production of [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2}, the desirable target shape and internal volume were determined by a Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) simulation program, and the target grid was modified to resist the cavity pressure during beam irradiation. We evaluated the [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} production while varying the material and thickness of the target foil, oxygen content of the nitrogen gas, and target loading pressure. Using sliding-type equipment including an additional gate valve and a high vacuum in a beam line, the bi-directional conversion between the fluorine-18 and carbon-11 targets was efficient regarding the accurate beam irradiation on both targets. The optimal [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} production for 30 min irradiation at 60 μA (86.6 ± 1.7 GBq in the target at EOB) was observed at a thickness of 19 μm with HAVAR® material as a target foil and a target loading pressure of 24 bar with nitrogen plus 300 ppb of oxygen gas. Additionally, the coolant cavity system in the target grid and target chamber is useful to remove the heat transferred to the target body by the internal convection of water and thereby ensure the stability of the [{sup 11}C]CO{sub 2} production under a high beam current. In the application of C-11 labeled radiopharmaceuticals such as [{sup 11}C]PIB, [{sup 11}C]DASB, [{sup 11}C]PBR28, [{sup 11}C]Methionine and [{sup 11}C]Clozapine, the radiochemical

  7. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in Finland in 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korpela, H.

    2002-05-01

    A survey on the use of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostics and therapy in 2000 in Finland has been made by STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Finland. In 2000 the number of nuclear medicine examinations was 45 492 and that of the therapeutic treatments was 2028. The frequency of examinations per 1000 population was 8.8 and that of therapeutic treatments was 0.39. The collective effective dose to the patients was 172.3 manSv and the mean effective dose to the population was 0.03 mSv per person. The mean effective dose per examination was 3.8 mSv. The number of nuclear medicine examinations has decreased 12.0 % and of therapeutic treatments 9.5 % when compared to those in 1997 when the survey was made last time. The collective effective dose from nuclear medicine examinations has decreased 16.8 % when compared to that in 1997. The frequency of nuclear medicine examinations per 1000 population was in 2000 in Finland lower than on the average in developed countries (health care level I) in 1991-1996. According to UNSCEAR report 2000 the frequency of nuclear medicine examinations per 1000 population was 19 on the average the range being 0.5-65 in countries of health care level I in 1991-1996. The frequency of therapeutic treatments per 1000 population was higher in 2000 in Finland than on the average in countries of health care level I (0.19/1000) and of the same order as in other Scandinavian countries and in Middle Europe. The mean effective dose per examination was in 1997 (4.0 mSv) and in 2000 (3.8 mSv) in Finland lower than on the average in developed countries. According to UNSCEAR report 2000 the mean effective dose per examination was 4.3 mSv in health care level I and 4.6 mSv worldwide in 1991-1996. The mean effective dose to the population was 0.08 mSv per year in health care level I and 0.03 mSv per year worldwide in 1991-1996. (orig.)

  8. Report of a Technical Meeting on ''Alpha emitting radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals for therapy''

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    Considering the high potential of α-emitters for future development of radionuclide therapy, the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) organized a Technical Meeting on ‘Alpha Emitting Radionuclides and Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy’, from June 24 to 28, 2013, at IAEA Headquarters in Vienna with the purpose of gathering eminent Experts in the field and discuss with them the status and future perspectives of the field. Sixteen Experts and two External Observers from ten different countries, and four IAEA Technical Officers attended this meeting. Outstanding lectures have been presented covering all relevant aspects of α-therapy, which were followed by extensive discussions and analysis. Selected arguments encompassed production methods and availability of alpha-emitting radionuclides, labelling chemistry of alpha-emittting radioelements, design and development of target-specific radiopharmaceuticals, physical principles of alpha-particle dosimetry and advanced dosimetric models, biological effects of alpha radiation at the cellular level, on-going preclinical and clinical studies with new radiopharmaceuticals, results of clinical trials on the use of radium-223 chloride solutions for the treatment of metastatic bone cancer. The broad scientific background of invited components of the Experts’ panel conferred a strong interdisciplinary trait to the overall discussion and stimulated a critical analysis of this emerging unexplored field. Results of this comprehensive overview on alpha therapy, including recommendations to the Agency on suitable initiatives that may help to promote and spread the knowledge to Members States on this emerging therapeutic modality, are summarized in the present Report

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals in Radiosynoviorthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Arencibia, Jorge; Morin Zorrilla, Jose; Garcia Rodriguez, Enrique; Sagarra Veranes, Marta

    2010-01-01

    The Radiosynoviorthesis is a procedure of Metabolic Radiotherapy, consisting in the intraarticular injection of a radiopharmaceutical with a beta emitting radionuclide for the treatment of chronic synovitis, frequently present in rheumatoid arthritis, haemophilia and other systemic diseases. As this is a safe, effective and a relatively low-cost procedure, It is ordinarily used in Europe, USA and in some Latin American countries . The existing commercial products are based on 90 Y, 169 Er, 186 Re and 32 P, although research is carried out on the use of 188 Re, 166 Ho, among others radionuclides. In Cuba a suspension of Chromium Phosphate (III) labeled with 32 P, is on trial. The above-mentioned suspension has enough characteristics to become an efficient and safe product in practice. (Author)

  10. Tumor detection with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Packer, S.

    1984-01-01

    The most common primary ocular tumor in adults is malignant melanoma of the choroid. Metastatic tumors to the choroid occur with the same frequency. The radioactive phosphorous uptake test is used most often as a nuclear diagnostic test. The test does not differentiate melanomas from metastases, and it is necessary to perform surgery for proper placement of a detection device within a distance of 1-2 mm of the tumor. These deficiencies leave ophthalmologists with a pressing need for a gamma-emitting radiopharmaceutical that would facilitate noninvasive identification of choroidal melanoma. This need is made more urgent by the fact that recently, radiation therapy has been used to treat these tumors rather than enucleation. Eyes then harbor irradiated melanoma whose status is unknown. The tumor rarely decreases in size more than 25% to 50%. There is thus a need for a specific diagnostic test to assess the nature of the tumor and the effectiveness of therapy

  11. Radiopharmaceutical cellular uptake mechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefanescu, Cipriana; Rusu, V.

    1996-01-01

    Cellular radiopharmaceutical specificity depends mainly of the uptake mechanisms. Usually, this can be one of the classical membrane transport type (a passive or active transport, a receptor mediated one or a combination of them). It can also be an electrochemical gradient dependent membrane transport in relation with Nernst equation, as in case of 99m Tc MIBI, the representative molecule of a widely studied family tracers, with applications in cardiac and oncological scintigraphy. Another mechanism can be an ATP dependent active transport, that results in the most important 201 Tl inflow. 201 Tl inflow is also an example of multiple mechanisms involved in cellular ionic inflow. Over 30% of 201 Tl transport imply other ways, like Na + - K + - Cl - co-transport. For a given tracer, the mechanism may depend also on the cell type. In conclusion, knowledge of the radiotracer uptake mechanisms allows finding the 'ideal' radiotracer with high specificity for the tissue to be visualized. (authors)

  12. Radiopharmaceuticals in breast milk

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mountford, P.J.; Coakley, A.J.

    1986-01-01

    As assessment has been made of the radiological hazards to an infant following the administration of a radiopharmaceutical to a breast feeding mother. Feeding should be discontinued after administration of most I-131 and I-125 compounds, Ga-67 citrate or Se-78 methionine, and for iodinated compounds where it was possible to resume feeding, a thyroid-blocking agent should be administered. For Tc-99m compounds, pertechnetate had the greatest excretion in milk and interruptions of 12hr and 4hr were considered appropriate for pertechnetate and MAA respectively. Other Tc-99m compounds, Cr-51 EDTA and In-111 leucocytes did not justify an interruption just on the grounds of their associated excretion in milk. The ingestion hazard could be minimized by reducing the administered activity, and in some cases, by the substitution of a radiopharmaceutical with lower breast milk excretion. For Tc-99m lung and brain scans, the absorbed dose due to radiation emitted by the mother (i.e. when cuddling) was less than the ingested dose, but for a Tc-99m bone scan the emitted dose was greater. In all three cases, the emitted dose did not exceed 0 x 5 mGy for the infant in close contact to the mother for one-third of the time. For In-111 leucocytes, the emitted dose was about 2mGy, and it was concluded that close contact should be restricted to feeding times during the first 3 days after injection. 36 references, 2 figures, 5 tables

  13. Ensuring quality while going local: IAEA helps Cuba produce radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jawerth, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    Cancer and cardiovascular disease are health conditions Cuba will now be able to more readily diagnose and treat thanks to its newly built facility for producing key radiopharmaceuticals. Nuclear medicine requires a constant and reliable supply of these radioactive drugs, prepared according to what the industry calls good manufacturing practices (GMP), and there have so far been limitations in getting them to the island nation. “Through our work with the IAEA, we now have a dedicated GMP compliant facility and the expertise to meet most of our national needs for diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals for helping patients,” said René Leyva Montaña, Director of Production at the Isotope Centre (CENTIS), Cuba’s centre dedicated to radiopharmaceutical production.

  14. SPECT and PET radiopharmaceuticals for molecular imaging of apoptosis: from bench to clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaobo; Feng, Han; Zhao, Shichao; Xu, Junling; Wu, Xinyu; Cui, Jing; Zhang, Ying; Qin, Yuhua; Liu, Zhiguo; Gao, Tang; Gao, Yongju; Zeng, Wenbin

    2017-01-01

    Owing to the central role of apoptosis in many human diseases and the wide-spread application of apoptosis-based therapeutics, molecular imaging of apoptosis in clinical practice is of great interest for clinicians, and holds great promises. Based on the well-defined biochemical changes for apoptosis, a rich assortment of probes and approaches have been developed for molecular imaging of apoptosis with various imaging modalities. Among these imaging techniques, nuclear imaging (including single photon emission computed tomography and positron emission tomography) remains the premier clinical method owing to their high specificity and sensitivity. Therefore, the corresponding radiopharmaceuticals have been a major focus, and some of them like 99mTc-Annexin V, 18F-ML-10, 18F-CP18, and 18F-ICMT-11 are currently under clinical investigations in Phase I/II or Phase II/III clinical trials on a wide scope of diseases. In this review, we summarize these radiopharmaceuticals that have been widely used in clinical trials and elaborate them in terms of radiosynthesis, pharmacokinetics and dosimetry, and their applications in different clinical stages. We also explore the unique features required to qualify a desirable radiopharmaceutical for imaging apoptosis in clinical practice. Particularly, a perspective of the impact of these clinical efforts, namely, apoptosis imaging as predictive and prognostic markers, early-response indicators and surrogate endpoints, is also the highlight of this review. PMID:28108738

  15. Developing therapeutic vaccines against Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wisniewski, Thomas; Drummond, Eleanor

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia worldwide. It is characterized by an imbalance between the production and clearance of amyloid β (Aβ) and tau proteins. In AD these normal proteins accumulate, leading to aggregation and a conformational change forming oligomeric and fibrillary species with a high β-sheet content. Active and passive immunotherapeutic approaches result in dramatic reduction of Aβ pathology in AD animal models. However, there is much more limited evidence in human studies of significant clinical benefits from these strategies and it is becoming apparent that they may only be effective very early in AD. Vaccination targeting only tau pathology has shown benefits in some mouse studies but human studies are limited. Greater therapeutic efficacy for the next generation of vaccine approaches will likely benefit from specifically targeting the most toxic species of Aβ and tau, ideally simultaneously.

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals drug interactions: a critical review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralph Santos-Oliveira

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Radiopharmaceuticals play a critical role in modern medicine primarily for diagnostic purposes, but also for monitoring disease progression and response to treatment. As the use of image has been increased, so has the use of prescription medications. These trends increase the risk of interactions between medications and radiopharmaceuticals. These interactions which have an impact on image by competing with the radiopharmaceutical for binding sites for example can lead to false negative results. Drugs that accelerate the metabolism of the radiopharmaceutical can have a positive impact (i.e. speeding its clearance or, if repeating image is needed, a negative impact. In some cases, for example in cardiac image among patients taking doxirubacin, these interactions may have a therapeutic benefit. The incidence of drug-radiopharmaceuticals adverse reactions is unknown, since they may not be reported or even recognized. Here,we compiled the medical literature, using the criteria of a systematic review established by the Cochrane Collaboration, on pharmaceutical-drug interactions to provide a summary of documented interactions by organ system and radiopharmaceuticals. The purpose is to provide a reference on drug interactions that could inform the nuclear medicine staff in their daily routine. Efforts to increase adverse event reporting, and ideally consolidate reports worldwide, can provide a critically needed resource for prevention of drug-radiopharmaceuticals interactions.Os radiofármacos desempenham função crítica na medicina moderna, primariamente para fins diagnósticos, mas também no monitoramento da progressão de doenças assim como na avaliação de respostas ao tratamento. O uso da tecnologia por imagem tem crescido e conseqüentemente as prescrições de medicamentos (radiofármacos em especial com esse propósito. Este fato, aumenta o risco de interações entre medicamentos e radiofármacos. Interações que podem ter um impacto na

  17. Untangling the web of European regulations for the preparation of unlicensed radiopharmaceuticals : a concise overview and practical guidance for a risk-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, Rogier; ter Heine, Rob; Decristoforo, Clemens; Penuelas, Ivan; Elsinga, Philip H.; van der Westerlaken, Monique M. L.; Hendrikse, N. Harry

    Radiopharmaceuticals are highly regulated, because they are controlled both as regular medicinal products and as radioactive substances. This can pose a hurdle for their development and clinical use. Radiopharmaceuticals are fundamentally different from other medicinal products and these regulations

  18. Untangling the web of European regulations for the preparation of unlicensed radiopharmaceuticals: a concise overview and practical guidance for a risk-based approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lange, R.; Heine, R. ter; Decristoforo, C.; Penuelas, I.; Elsinga, P.H.; Westerlaken, M.M. van der; Hendrikse, N.H.

    2015-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are highly regulated, because they are controlled both as regular medicinal products and as radioactive substances. This can pose a hurdle for their development and clinical use. Radiopharmaceuticals are fundamentally different from other medicinal products and these regulations

  19. Radiochemical stability of radiopharmaceutical preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martins, Patricia de A.; Silva, Jose L. da; Ramos, Marcelo P.S.; Oliveira, Ideli M. de; Felgueiras, Carlos F.; Herrerias, Rosana; Zapparoli Junior, Carlos L.; Mengatti, Jair; Fukumori, Neuza T.O.; Matsuda, Margareth M.N.

    2011-01-01

    The 'in vitro' stability studies of the radiopharmaceutical preparations are an essential requirement for routine practice in nuclear medicine and are an important parameter for evaluating the quality, safety and efficacy required for the sanitary registration of pharmaceutical products. Several countries have published guidelines for the evaluation of pharmaceutical stability. In Brazil, the stability studies should be conducted according to the Guide for Conducting Stability Studies published in the Resolution-RE n. 1, of 29th July 2005. There are also for radiopharmaceutical products, two specific resolutions: RDC-63 regulates the Good Manufacturing Practices for Radiopharmaceuticals and RDC-64 provides the Registration of Radiopharmaceuticals, both published on the 18th December 2009. The radiopharmaceutical stability is defined as the time during which the radioisotope can be safely used for the intended purpose. The radiochemical stability can be affected by a variety of factors, including storage temperature, amount of radioactivity, radioactive concentration, presence or absence of antioxidants or other stabilizing agents. The radiochemical stability studies must be established under controlled conditions determined by the effective use of the product. The aim of this work was to evaluate the radiochemical stability of labeled molecules with 131 I, 123 I, 153 Sm, 18 F, 51 Cr, 177 Lu and 111 In as well as 67 Ga and 201 Tl radiopharmaceuticals. Radiochemical purity was evaluated after production and in the validity period, with the maximum activity and in the recommended storage conditions. The analyses were carried out by thin-layer silica gel plate, paper chromatography and gel chromatography. The experimental results showed to be in accordance with the specified limits for all the analysed products. (author)

  20. Radiopharmaceuticals for palliative therapy pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaudiano, Javier

    1994-01-01

    Dissemination to bone of various neoplasms is cause of pain with poor response by major analgesics.Indications. Radiopharmaceuticals,description of main characteristics of various β emitter radionuclides.Choose of patients for worm indication of pain palliative therapy with β emitter radiopharmaceuticals is adequate must be careful . Contraindications are recognized.Pre and post treatment controls as clinical examination and complete serology are described.It is essential to subscribe protocols,keep patient well informed,included the physician in charge of the patient as part of the team.Bibliography

  1. Preparações radiofarmacêuticas e suas aplicações Radiopharmaceuticals and applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Oliveira

    2006-06-01

    ármacos em uso clínico corresponde a agentes de perfusão. Atualmente, o esforço de investigação na área da química radiofarmacêutica centra-se no desenvolvimento de radiofármacos específicos que possam fornecer informação, ao nível molecular, relativa às alterações bioquímicas associadas às diferentes patologias.Radiopharmaceuticals are substances without pharmacological activity that are used in Nuclear Medicine for diagnosis and therapy for several diseases. Diagnosis radiopharmaceuticals generally emit gamma radiation or positrons (beta+, because their decay originates penetrating electromagnetic radiation that can cross the tissues and be externally detected. Therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals must include in their composition ionized particles emission nucleus (a, b- or Auger electrons, since their action is based in selective tissue destruction. There are two main methods for image acquisition: SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography that uses g emission radionuclides (99mTc, 123I, 67Ga, 201Tl and PET (Positron Emission Tomography that uses positron emission radionuclides like 11C, 13N, 15O, 18F. Radiopharmaceuticals can be classified into perfusion radiopharmaceuticals (first generation or specific radiopharmaceuticals (second generation. Perfusion radiopharmaceuticals are transported in the blood e reach the target organ in the direct proportion of the blood stream. Specific radiopharmaceuticals contain a biologically active molecule that binds to cellular receptors that must remain biospecific after binding to the radiopharmaceutical. For this type of radiopharmaceuticals, tissue or organ uptake is determined by the biomolecule capacity of recognizing receptors in those biological structures. Radiopharmaceuticals are produced ready to use, in cold kits or in autologal preparations. According to the preparation type there is a different quality control procedure. Most of the radiopharmaceuticals used nowadays are of the perfusion type

  2. Country report: Cuba. Local Production of 90Y And 188Re Radionuclides and Development of Radiopharmaceuticals for Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiques, Abmel; Hernández, Ignacio; Leyva, René; Pérez, Marylaine; Alonso, Luis Michel; Zamora, Minelys

    2010-01-01

    During the first period of this CRP we could test an efficient and reliable generator system based on ion-chromatography to obtain 90 Y from its parent radionuclide 90 Sr. This production scheme for 90 Y was outlined in the previous CRP related with the development of generator technologies. Quality parameters such as trace metals that can potentially interfere in the labeling of biomoléculas, 90 Y recovery, 90 Sr/ 90 Y ratio and radiation dose to bed matrix were evaluated. The results showed that high recovery and radionuclidic purity could be obtained for 90 Y during its repeated separation from the 90 Sr cow. No replacement or treatment of the cow were necessary and low waste generation and 90 Sr losses less that 0.1% after each run were also observed during the present study. A Fab’ fragment was enzimatically produced and purified from the monoclonal antibody h-R3 (Nimotuzumab®). The fragment and the parent antibody were successfully conjugated with DOTA and labeled with 90 Y. The radioinmunoconjugate thus obtained also exhibited a good 24 h in-vitro stability in an excess of DTPA. A 90 Y radiocoloid was prepared in a cromic phosphate particle for radiosynoviorthesis with promising results in animal models. Two alumina based 188 W/ 188 Re generators were prepared and their eluates were used in the labeling of hR3-DOTA conjugates. Quality control and in vivo evaluation in comparison with 99m Tc-hR3 showed very good results and similar pattern of distribution and pharmacokinetic and will be used in clinical trials for cancer patients. (author)

  3. Development of novel {sup 99m} T C-labeled radiopharmaceutical for imaging acute myocardial infarction in patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariani, Giuliano [Genoa Univ. (Italy). Nuclear Medicine Service; Strauss, H. Willian [Stanford University, CA (United States). School of Medicine. Dept. of Radiology

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Definitive diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction is often difficult in the emergency room. Although electrocardiograms, serum enzyme assays, and clinical history are helpful, the diagnosis remains elusive in a significant fraction of patients, in this lecture. We review the sequential steps that have led to the development of a novel {sup 99m} Tc-labeled radio pharmaceutical for imaging acute myocardial infarction in patients. In particular, we will focus on the results of a human study which was performed to determine if radionuclide imaging with {sup 99m} Tc labeled D-Glucaric acid ({sup 99m} Tc- G L A), an agent that locates in zones of necrosis within 30 min of vessel occlusion in the animal mode, could be used to identify acute myocardial infarction shortly after onset of chest pain. Twenty-eight presenting to the emergency with symptoms suggestive of acute infarction were evaluated with {sup 99m} Tc-G L A imaging. The agent was injected as early as possible in the course of the patients clinical care (average 11,5 hours {l_brace}range 1-41 {r_brace}) after onset of chest pain, and imaging was. Of 15 patients with acute infarction injected within 9 hours of onset of chest pain, all patients had positive scans. Negative scans were found in 13 patients including 10 patients with acute infarction injected later than 9 hours, and 3 patients who were subsequently found not to have myocardial infarction (unstable angina) even though they were injected within 9 hours of chest pain. In the 15 patients with positive scans, concentration of {sup 99m} Tc - G L A in the zone of necrosis was greater in patients who had successful reperfusion therapy than in those with occlusion at the time of injection. However, even in patients with occlusion, uptake was observed in the zone of necrosis. Six patients reinjected with {sup 99m} Tc- G L A 4-6 weeks after their initial study had negative scans. This study suggests that {sup 99m} Tc-glucaric acid locates in zones

  4. World Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Council: A report on the 5th International Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Colloquium and the Final Planning Meeting of the World Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Council held at Santiago, Chile, 29 September, 2002

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.V.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: The 5th International Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Colloquium was held on 29th October 2002 as a pre-congress meeting of the World Federation of Nuclear Medicine and Biology Congress in Santiago, Chile. Work-in-Progress research papers were presented by leaders in the field of therapeutic nuclear oncology. Speakers gave untitled presentations without abstracts and reported data from studies performed only days or weeks before the meeting. Such cutting edge research presentations stimulated lively discussion which also addressed the problems encountered and ways in which they may be circumvented. Radioimmunotherapy of haematological malignancy was discussed by Greg Wiseman of the Mayo Clinic, and Thomas Behr of the University of Marburg. Radiopeptide therapy of neuroendocrine tumours was presented by Larry Kvols from the University of Florida, and locoregional therapy of glioma was presented by John Buscombe of the Royal Free Hospital, London. All speakers reported encouraging clinical results with objective tumour responses, increased survival and improved quality of life, which encourages wider clinical application of these novel radiopharmaceutical therapies. The Round Table Discussion on clinical applications of Rhenium-188 radiopharmaceuticals was chaired by Russ Knapp from Oak Ridge National Laboratory and Hans Biersack of the University of Bonn. Following an outline of current developments by Russ Knapp preliminary results of clinical trials were presented for discussion. Hans Biersack, Javier Gaudiano from Montevideo and Achim Kropp from Dresden reported effective palliation of painful skeletal metastases with 188Re-HEDP. Ajit Padhy gave an update of the IAEA multicentre trial of intrahepatic arterial 188Re-Lipiodol therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma and Harvey Turner reported preliminary results in hepatoma patients using an alternative kit formulation of 188Re-Lipiodol in Fremantle. Early experience with Rhenium 188 in the prevention of re

  5. Traceability in the pharmaceutical industry: application to radiopharmaceutical production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanette, Camila; Melero, Laura T.U.H.; Araujo, Elaine B. de; Mengatti, Jair; Silva, Katia S. de S., E-mail: czanette@usp.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares, (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2011-07-01

    The development of tools to promote the traceability of the drugs in the pharmaceutical industry during all the production chain is a necessary requisite. The traceability system is applied to enable the identification of the origin, destination and exact location of the drug. Traceability optimizes the process chain, reduces errors, is a requirement for quality process, promotes safety for the user and assists in pharmacovigilance. The health regulatory agency in Brazil (ANVISA) will implement a tracking system for medicaments with RDC no. 59 of 2009, to control distribution since the producer until the patients in order to prevent the traffic and adulteration of drugs. Thus, this study discusses the importance and impact of the new traceability system proposed by ANVISA in the production and distribution of radiopharmaceuticals from the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN). The radiopharmaceuticals have a difference track when compared with another drug classes. In this context, this RDC would increase the price of the medicines by up to 10%, since it provides deployment of a single stamp supplied by the Mint. Considering that radiopharmaceuticals are not sold to the final consumer (patients), but only for accredited medical clinics and nuclear medicine physicians, and the transport of radiopharmaceuticals is performed by specialized companies licensed by CNEN (National Nuclear Energy Commission), the use of the stamp to ensure authenticity and prevent falsification should not be appropriated and represents and additional cost for the radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  6. Traceability in the pharmaceutical industry: application to radiopharmaceutical production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zanette, Camila; Melero, Laura T.U.H.; Araujo, Elaine B. de; Mengatti, Jair; Silva, Katia S. de S.

    2011-01-01

    The development of tools to promote the traceability of the drugs in the pharmaceutical industry during all the production chain is a necessary requisite. The traceability system is applied to enable the identification of the origin, destination and exact location of the drug. Traceability optimizes the process chain, reduces errors, is a requirement for quality process, promotes safety for the user and assists in pharmacovigilance. The health regulatory agency in Brazil (ANVISA) will implement a tracking system for medicaments with RDC no. 59 of 2009, to control distribution since the producer until the patients in order to prevent the traffic and adulteration of drugs. Thus, this study discusses the importance and impact of the new traceability system proposed by ANVISA in the production and distribution of radiopharmaceuticals from the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN-CNEN). The radiopharmaceuticals have a difference track when compared with another drug classes. In this context, this RDC would increase the price of the medicines by up to 10%, since it provides deployment of a single stamp supplied by the Mint. Considering that radiopharmaceuticals are not sold to the final consumer (patients), but only for accredited medical clinics and nuclear medicine physicians, and the transport of radiopharmaceuticals is performed by specialized companies licensed by CNEN (National Nuclear Energy Commission), the use of the stamp to ensure authenticity and prevent falsification should not be appropriated and represents and additional cost for the radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  7. Development and biological evaluation of {sup 90}Y-BPAMD as a novel bone seeking therapeutic agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabiei, Ali; Shamsaei, Mojtaba [Amir Kabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Energy Engineering and Physics Dept.; Yousefnia, Hassan; Zolghadri, Samaneh; Jalilian, Amir Reza [Nuclear Science and Technology Research Institute (NSTRI), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Enayati, Razieh [Islamic Azad Univ. (IAU), Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of). Faculty of Engineering

    2016-07-01

    Nowadays, the bone-seeking radiopharmaceuticals play an important role in the treatment of the bone-related pathologies. Whereas various phosphonate ligands have already been identified, a DOTA-based bisphosphonate, 4-{[(bis(phosphonomethyl))carbamoyl]methyl}-7,10-bis(carboxymethyl) -1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododec-1-yl (BPAMD) with better characteristics has recently been synthesized. In this study, {sup 90}Y-BPAMD was developed with radiochemical purity >98% and the specific activity of 3.52 TBq/mmol in the optimized conditions as a new bone-seeking therapeutic agent. The complex demonstrated significant stability at room temperature and in human serum even after 48 h. At even low amount of hydroxyapatite (5 mg), more than 90% binding to hydroxyapatite was observed. Biodistribution studies after injection of the complex into the Syrian rats showed major accumulation of the labelled compound in the bone tissue and an insignificant uptake in the other organs all the times after injection. Generally, {sup 90}Y-BPAMD demonstrated interesting characteristics compared to the other {sup 90}Y bone-seeking agents and even {sup 166}Ho-BPAMD, and can be considered as a new bone-seeking candidate for therapeutic applications.

  8. The Radiochemical and Radiopharmaceutical Applications of Radium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gott Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the chemistry and application of radium isotopes to environmental monitoring, analytical, and medicinal uses. In recent years, radium has been used primarily as a tracer to study the migration of radioactive substances in environmental systems. Tracing the naturally occurring radium isotopes in mineral and water sources allows for the determination of source location, residence time, and concentrations. An understanding of the concentration of radionuclides in our food and water sources is essential to everyone’s health as alpha particle decay is highly damaging in vivo. Due to this high radiobiological effectiveness, there is increased interest in using alpha-emitting radionuclides to prepare new, therapeutic radiopharmaceutical drugs. Selected studies from the recent literature are provided as examples of these modern applications of radium isotopes.

  9. Radiopharmaceuticals preparation following hygienic rule

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bertrand-Barat, J.; Rogues, A.M.; Brunet-Desruet, M.D.; Couret, I.; Saurat, S.; Tafani, M.; Bounaud, M.P.; Fialdes, P.

    1999-01-01

    The rules of radiation protection are essential in a service of nuclear medicine. A sensitization to hygiene in hospital in front of the fresh outbreak of nosocomial infections is useful in order to optimize the quality approach. In this context, the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals in the structure of nuclear medicine deserves a specific reflection. (N.C.)

  10. The application of the 'ten-day rule' in radiopharmaceutical investigations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, R.E.; Nordin, B.E.C.; Tothill, P.; Veall, N.

    1977-01-01

    The working party first classified subjects who are investigated using radiopharmaceuticals into three groups, being (a) patients and other subjects who are asked to volunteer as controls for research studies, (b) patients on whom research investigations are being conducted which are relevant to their clinical condition but which are not strictly necessary for their management, and (c) patients on whom investigations are required for their proper management. The application of the 'ten-day rule' in relation to the use of radiopharmaceuticals is complicated by the fact that the total radiation dose is received over a time given by the effective life of the radiopharmaceutical in the organ, which may be a substantial part or even longer of the menstrual cycle. The activities of the radiopharmaceuticals normally administered are tabulted together with their effective half-lives and resulting gonad doses, and those radiopharmaceuticals requiring consideration of the implementation of the 'ten-day rule' for patients in groups (b) and (c) are identified. When the administration of therapeutic quantities of radiopharmaceuticals is being contemplated it is particularly important to take into account the applicability or otherwise of the 'ten-day rule'. It is recommended that the 'ten-day rule' should be strictly applied to all radiopharmaceutical administrations to women of child-bearing age who are volunteers for research purposes (group(a)). (U.K.)

  11. Compartmental analysis to predict biodistribution in radiopharmaceutical design studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima, Marina F.; Pujatti, Priscilla B.; Araujo, Elaine B.; Mesquita, Carlos H. [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)], e-mail: mflima@ipen.br

    2009-07-01

    The use of compartmental analysis allows the mathematical separation of tissues and organs to determinate the concentration of activity in each fraction of interest. Although the radiochemical purity must observe Pharmacopoeia specification (values upper 95%), very lower contains of free radionuclides could contribute significantly as dose in the neighborhood organs and make tumor up take studies not viable in case of radiopharmaceutical on the basis of labeled peptides. Animal studies with a product of Lutetium-177 labeled Bombesin derivative ({sup 177}Lu-BBNP) developed in IPEN-CNEN/SP and free Lutetium-177 developed in CNEA/EZEIZA was used to show how subtract free {sup 177}Lu contribution over {sup 177}Lu-BBNP to estimate the radiopharmaceutical potential as diagnosis or therapy agent. The first approach of the studies included the knowledge of chemical kinetics and mimetism of the Lutetium and the possible targets of the diagnosis/therapy to choose the possible models to apply over the sampling standard methods used in experimental works. A model with only one physical compartment (whole body) and one chemical compartment ({sup 177}Lu-BBNP) generated with the compartmental analysis protocol ANACOMP showed high differences between experimental and theoretical values over 2.5 hours, in spite of the concentration of activity had been in a good statistics rang of measurement. The values used in this work were residence time from three different kinds of study with free {sup 177}Lu: whole body, average excretion and maximum excretion as a chemical compartment. Activity concentration values as time function in measurements of total whole body and activity measurement in samples of blood with projection to total circulating blood volume with {sup 177}Lu-BBNP. Considering the two sources of data in the same modeling a better consistence was obtained. The next step was the statistic treatment of biodistribution and dosimetry in mice (Balb C) considering three chemical

  12. Ionisation constants of radiopharmaceuticals by HPLC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stylli, C.G.; Theobald, A.E.

    It has long been recognised that the pKsub(a) of drugs and radiopharmaceuticals is an important determinant of their biological distribution. In this study an HPLC method for pKa measurement has been developed for radiotracers. It has been validated with several amines and used to estimate the pKsub(a) values of some Tc-99m PnAO complexes by observing the change in chromatographic retention with change in mobile phase pH. The pKsub(a) values were estimated from the data by three methods: derivative analysis, quadratic regression, and the Henderson - Hasselbalch equation.

  13. Ionisation constants of radiopharmaceuticals by HPLC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stylli, C.G.; Theobald, A.E.

    1986-01-01

    It has long been recognised that the pKsub(a) of drugs and radiopharmaceuticals is an important determinant of their biological distribution. In this study an HPLC method for pKa measurement has been developed for radiotracers. It has been validated with several amines and used to estimate the pKsub(a) values of some Tc-99m PnAO complexes by observing the change in chromatographic retention with change in mobile phase pH. The pKsub(a) values were estimated from the data by three methods: derivative analysis, quadratic regression, and the Henderson - Hasselbalch equation. (author)

  14. Quality assurance of radiopharmaceuticals - specifications and test procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldas, J.; Bonnyman, J.; Colmanet, S.F.; Ivanov, Z.; Lauder, R.A.

    1990-10-01

    The authors report on a Radiopharmaceutical Quality Assurance Test Programme carried out by the Australian Radiation Laboratory in which radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine in Australia are tested for compliance with specifications. Where the radiopharmaceutical is the subject of a monograph in the British Pharmacopoeia or the European Pharmacopoeia, then the specifications given in the Pharmacopoeia are adopted. In other cases the specifications given have been adopted by this Laboratory and have no legal status. In some cases test procedures described have been taken from various Pharmacopoeias or methods published in the literature. In other cases test methods described have been developed at this Laboratory. It should be noted that, unless stated otherwise, specifications listed apply at all times up until product expire

  15. Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Annual report 2000

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, B.; Seifert, S.

    2001-01-01

    In 2000 the Rossendorf research centre continued and further developed its basic and application-oriented research. Research at the Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, one of five institutes in the Research Centre, was focused on radiotracers as molecular probes to make the human body biochemically transparent with regard to individual molecular reactions. In this respect the potential for diagnostic application depends on the quality and versatility of radiopharmaceutical chemistry, which is the main discipline in our Institute. Areas in which the Institute was particularly active were the design of new radiotracers, both radiometal-based and natural organic molecules, the elaboration of radiolabelling concepts and procedures and the chemical and pharmacological evaluation of new tracers. This was complemented by more clinically oriented activities in the Positron Emission Tomography Centre Rossendorf. With numerous contributions in the fields of radiopharmaceutical chemistry, tumour agents, tumour diagnosis and brain biochemistry this Annual Report will document the scientific progress made in 2000. (orig.)

  16. Development of nano radiopharmaceutical based on Bevacizumab labelled with Technetium-99m for early diagnosis of gastrointestinal stromal tumor; Desenvolvimento de nanorradiofarmaco a base de Bevacizumabe marcado com tecnecio-99m para diagnostico precoce do tumor estromal gastrointestinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braga, Thais Ligiero

    2015-06-01

    The development of new radiopharmaceuticals is an essential activity to improve nuclear medicine, and essential for the early and effective diagnosis of oncological diseases. Among the various possibilities current research in the world, the radiopharmaceuticals to chemotherapeutic base may be the most effective in detecting tumors, particularly Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor (GIST), the Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma and neuroendocrine pancreatic tumors. However, difficulties in directing, as well as adhesion of the radiopharmaceutical in the desired location, are currently the main problems in the early detection and treatment of some of these tumors. Advances in the field of nanotechnology, particularly in recent years, indicate significant contribution to overcoming these obstacles, particularly in the implementation of molecular barriers as well as the functionalization of the nanoparticles, thereby improving targeting by the use of surface nucleotides, and the increased adhesion, which facilitates the release of the drug and therefore increases the chances of early diagnosis and more effective treatment. This study aimed to the production, characterization and evaluation of cytotoxicity, as well as in vivo biodistribution test Bevacizumab nanoparticles labeled with Technetium-99m radionuclide for detection of type GIST tumors. Bevacizumab was encapsulated in the form of nanoparticles by the emulsification method using double poly-acetic acid and polyvinyl alcohol polymers (PLA / PVA) at a concentration of 2% of the monoclonal antibody. The characterization of the nanoparticles was performed by the technique of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The cytotoxicity assessment was performed by XTT assay with various cell lines of solid tumor cells. The labeling with technetium-99m was done by the direct method, and its yield determined by paper chromatography using paper Whatmam 1 as the stationary phase and acetone as mobile phase. In the biodistribution study

  17. Design of radiopharmaceuticals for monitoring gene transfer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Staehler, P.; Kley, J.; Spiegel, M.; Gross, C.; Graepler, F.T.C.; Gregor, M.; Lauer, U.; Oberdorfer, F.

    1998-01-01

    The development of radiopharmaceuticals for monitoring gene transfer therapy with emission tomography is expected to lead to improved management of cancer by the year 2010. There are now only a few examples and approaches to the design of radiopharmaceuticals for gene transfer therapy. This paper introduces a novel concept for the monitoring of gene therapy. We present the optimisation of the labelling of recombinant human β-NGF ligands for in vitro studies prior to using 123 I for SPET and 124 I for PET studies. (author)

  18. Drug interaction with radiopharmaceuticals: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mario Bernardo-Filho

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Clinical images are worthwhile in Health Sciences and their analysis and correct interpretation aid the professionals,such as physicians, physiotherapists and occupational therapists, to make decisions and take subsequent therapeutic and/or rehabilitation measures. Other factors, besides the state of the disease, may interfere and affect the bioavailability of the radiopharmaceuticals (radiobiocomplexes and the quality of the SPECT and PET images. Furthermore, the labeling of some of these radiobiocomplexes, such as plasma proteins, white blood cells and red blood cells, with 99mT, can also be modified. These factors include drugs (synthetic and natural and dietary conditions, as well as some medical procedures (invasive or non-invasive, such as radiation therapy, surgical procedures, prostheses, cardioversion, intubation, chemoperfusion, external massage, immunotherapy, blood transfusion and hemodialysis. In conclusion, the knowledge about these factors capable of interfering with the bioavailability of the radiobiocomplexes is worthwhile for secure diagnosis. Moreover, the development of biological models to study these phenomena is highly relevant and desirable.Imagens clínicas são valiosas em Ciências da Saúde e a análise e a interpretação correta das mesmas auxiliam os profissionais, como médico, fisioterapeuta, terapeuta ocupacional, na tomada de decisões e subseqüentes ações terapêuticas e/ou de reabilitação. Além das doenças outros fatores podem interferir e afetar a biodisponibilidade dos radiofármacos (radiobiocomplexos e a qualidade das imagens (SPECT e PET. Além disso, a marcação de alguns desses radiobiocomplexos com Tc-99m, como proteínas plasmáticas, leucócitos e hemácias, também pode ser modificada. Entre esses fatores, estão drogas (sintéticas e naturais e condições alimentares, assim como alguns procedimentos médicos (invasivos e não invasivos, como a radioterapia, processos cirúrgicos, pr

  19. The role of mathematical models in the optimization of radiopharmaceutical therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Divgi, C.

    2001-01-01

    Mathematical models have been used in radiopharmaceutical therapy for over five decades. These have served to determine the amount of radioactivity required to treat disease, as in the therapy of hyperthyroidism with iodine-131, or, more frequently, to determine the largest amount of radioactivity that can be safely administered. Mathematical models are especially useful in the determination of fractionated radiopharmaceutical therapy. This review will briefly outline the historical development and current utility of mathematical models in radiopharmaceutical therapy, including thyroid disorders and radioimmunotherapy; and describe the potential of modeling in fractionated therapy. The extended application of such models to currently used radiopharmaceutical therapy based on indices of body mass or surface area, to alleviate toxicity and increase radiation dose to tumour, will be proposed. Finally, future applications of mathematical models in radiopharmaceutical therapy will be outlined. (author)

  20. Development of more efficacious Tc-99m organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures. Progress report, May 1, 1982-April 30, 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.; Deutsch, E.A.

    1982-11-01

    A procedure based on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) has been developed for separating individual Tc-diphosphonate complexes in skeletal-imaging radiopharmaceuticals prepared by reduction of TcO 4 - with NaBH 4 in the presence of methylene diphosphonate (MDP). Seven different Tc-MDP complexes have been detected and isolated in pure form. Significant differences in skeletal uptake and blood clearance are exhibited by the three complexes tested thus far by biodistribution studies in test animals. The relative quantities of these complexes present in a radiopharmaceutical preparation are dramatically influenced by the pH of the reaction mixture. Thus, control of pH is a simple means of forming in high yield the single, most efficacious Tc-MDP complex for skeletal imaginG. An HPLC method with electrochemical detection has been developed for the analytical determination of total TcO 4 - (/sup 99m/Tc + 99 Tc). Concentrations of TcO 4 - as low as 9 x 10 -9 M can be detected. The method is being evaluated for monitoring total TcO 4 - in 99 Mo//sup 99m/Tc generators

  1. Radiopharmaceuticals and tumor detection. [Evaluation of radiopharmaceuticals for tumor scintiscanning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ansari, A.N.; Atkins, H.L.

    1976-01-01

    A number of radiopharmaceuticals are evaluated as to their usefulness for the reliable localization of malignant tumors by radioisotope scanning. Compounds discussed include /sup 75/Se-selenomethionine, /sup 32/P-phosphate, /sup 99m/Tc-phosphate, /sup 67/Ga-citrate, and /sup 111/In-bleomycin. It is pointed out that no ideal agent has yet been found and that considerable difficulties exist in comparing one clinical series with another. (CH)

  2. Mucociliary and cough clearance as a biomarker for therapeutic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, William D; Daviskas, Evangelia; Hasani, Amir

    2010-01-01

    or therapeutic evaluation presented details of their methodologies. Attendees participating in the workshop discussions included those interested in the physiology of MCC/CC, some of who use in vitro or animal methods for its study, pharmaceutical companies developing muco-active therapies, and many who were......A workshop/symposium on “Mucociliary and Cough Clearance (MCC/CC) as a Biomarker for Therapeutic Development” was held on October 21–22, 2008, in Research Triangle Park, NC, to discuss the methods for measurement of MCC/CC and how they may be optimized for assessing new therapies designed...

  3. Radiopharmaceutical transport system in France

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenot, J.; Gilles, J.P.; Vinarnick, L.

    1986-06-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are transported in type A package, activities are low and distributed among more than 200 000 packages sent throughout France. Impact of ICRP recommendations and of French regulations on packaging, storage, handling and transport is underlined. Road, rail or air transport are determined by geographical consideration and importance of each means of transport concerning quantities or mileage are easily deduced. Risks for normal conditions are evaluated. Accidents or incidents are rare and statistic analysis non-significant. 7 refs [fr

  4. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferro F, G.; Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M.; Melendez A, L.

    2003-01-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  5. Quality assurance of radiopharmaceuticals-specifications and test procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baldas, J.; Bonnyman, J.; Pojer, P.M.

    1981-08-01

    This report is a compilation of test methods used and specifications adopted for the Radiopharmaceutical Quality Assurance Test Programme conducted by the Australian Radiation Laboratory. In some cases test procedures described have been taken from various Pharmacopoeias or methods published in the literature. In other cases test methods have been developed at the ARL

  6. Challenges in development of nanoparticle-based therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Neil

    2012-06-01

    In recent years, nanotechnology has been increasingly applied to the area of drug development. Nanoparticle-based therapeutics can confer the ability to overcome biological barriers, effectively deliver hydrophobic drugs and biologics, and preferentially target sites of disease. However, despite these potential advantages, only a relatively small number of nanoparticle-based medicines have been approved for clinical use, with numerous challenges and hurdles at different stages of development. The complexity of nanoparticles as multi-component three dimensional constructs requires careful design and engineering, detailed orthogonal analysis methods, and reproducible scale-up and manufacturing process to achieve a consistent product with the intended physicochemical characteristics, biological behaviors, and pharmacological profiles. The safety and efficacy of nanomedicines can be influenced by minor variations in multiple parameters and need to be carefully examined in preclinical and clinical studies, particularly in context of the biodistribution, targeting to intended sites, and potential immune toxicities. Overall, nanomedicines may present additional development and regulatory considerations compared with conventional medicines, and while there is generally a lack of regulatory standards in the examination of nanoparticle-based medicines as a unique category of therapeutic agents, efforts are being made in this direction. This review summarizes challenges likely to be encountered during the development and approval of nanoparticle-based therapeutics, and discusses potential strategies for drug developers and regulatory agencies to accelerate the growth of this important field.

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L. I.

    1997-01-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of 'biologicals', in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  8. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor the expression of transferred genes in gene transfer therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiebe, L. I. [University of Alberta, Edmonton (Canada). Noujaim Institute for Pharmaceutical Oncology Research

    1997-10-01

    The development and application of radiopharmaceuticals has, in many instances, been based on the pharmacological properties of therapeutic agents. The molecular biology-biotechnology revolution has had an important impact on treatment of diseases, in part through the reduced toxicity of `biologicals`, in part because of their specificity for interaction at unique molecular sites and in part because of their selective delivery to the target site. Immunotherapeutic approaches include the use of monoclonal antibodies (MABs), MAB-fragments and chemotactic peptides. Such agents currently form the basis of both diagnostic and immunotherapeutic radiopharmaceuticals. More recently, gene transfer techniques have been advanced to the point that a new molecular approach, gene therapy, has become a reality. Gene therapy offers an opportunity to attack disease at its most fundamental level. The therapeutic mechanism is based on the expression of a specific gene or genes, the product of which will invoke immunological, receptor-based or enzyme-based therapeutic modalities. Several approaches to gene therapy of cancer have been envisioned, the most clinically-advanced concepts involving the introduction of genes that will encode for molecular targets nor normally found in healthy mammalian cells. A number of gene therapy clinical trials are based on the introduction of the Herpes simplex virus type-1 (HSV-1) gene that encodes for viral thymidine kinase (tk+). Once HSV-1 tk+ is expressed in the target (cancer) cell, therapy can be effected by the administration of a highly molecularly-targeted and systemically non-toxic antiviral drug such as ganciclovir. The development of radiodiagnostic imaging in gene therapy will be reviewed, using HSV-1 tk+ and radioiodinated IVFRU as a basis for development of the theme. Molecular targets that could be exploited in gene therapy, other than tk+, will be identified

  9. International symposium on trends in radiopharmaceuticals (ISTR-2005). Book of extended synopses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals, along with imaging instrumentation, are the pillars that support the edifice of clinical nuclear medicine and the former is the major driver enabling investigations of molecular phenomena for better understanding of human disease and developing effective treatments. The growth of nuclear medicine has been intimately linked to availability of new radioisotopes and the discovery of new radiopharmaceuticals. The field of radiopharmaceuticals has witnessed continuous evolution thanks to the immense contributions of scientists from diverse disciplines such as radiochemistry, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, biochemistry, physiology and pharmacology. Several milestones can be cited in the trajectory of this growth, which include continuing development of a plethora of 99 mTc radiopharmaceuticals, automated synthesis of 18 F labelled compounds, labelled peptides for accurate mapping of metastasis and the advances in radionuclide therapy. The International Symposium on Trends in Radiopharmaceuticals, ISTR-2005, under the auspices of International Atomic Energy Agency, will provide scientists and professionals working in the field of radiopharmaceuticals and related sciences an opportunity to review the exciting developments in the field. The International Atomic Energy Agency has been organizing such Symposia on Radiopharmaceuticals since 1973 and the last one was held in Lisbon, Portugal, in 1998

  10. Disclosure and the development of trust in the therapeutic setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bjork, Darla

    2004-01-01

    ABSTRACT This essay describes my personal path towards becoming an openly lesbian therapist, the internalized homophobia that interfered with this evolution, and the impact of this process on my patients. I then explore the interplay between when and how the therapist and/or the patient disclose in therapy, the link between homophobia and shame to the fear of disclosure, and the subsequent development of a more trusting therapeutic relationship that results from disclosure.

  11. Melanoma genetics and the development of rational therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chudnovsky, Yakov; Khavari, Paul A; Adams, Amy E

    2005-04-01

    Melanoma is a cancer of the neural crest-derived cells that provide pigmentation to skin and other tissues. Over the past 4 decades, the incidence of melanoma has increased more rapidly than that of any other malignancy in the United States. No current treatments substantially enhance patient survival once metastasis has occurred. This review focuses on recent insights into melanoma genetics and new therapeutic approaches being developed based on these advances.

  12. Challenges in the development of therapeutics for narcolepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Sarah Wurts; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2017-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder that afflicts 1 in 2000 individuals and is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy-a sudden loss of muscle tone triggered by positive emotions. Features of narcolepsy include dysregulation of arousal state boundaries as well as autonomic and metabolic disturbances. Disruption of neurotransmission through the hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) system, usually by degeneration of the HCRT-producing neurons in the posterior hypothalamus, results in narcolepsy. The cause of Hcrt neurodegeneration is unknown but thought to be related to autoimmune processes. Current treatments for narcolepsy are symptomatic, including wake-promoting therapeutics that increase presynaptic dopamine release and anticataplectic agents that activate monoaminergic neurotransmission. Sodium oxybate is the only medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration that alleviates both sleep/wake disturbances and cataplexy. Development of therapeutics for narcolepsy has been challenged by historical misunderstanding of the disease, its many disparate symptoms and, until recently, its unknown etiology. Animal models have been essential to elucidating the neuropathology underlying narcolepsy. These models have also aided understanding the neurobiology of the Hcrt system, mechanisms of cataplexy, and the pharmacology of narcolepsy medications. Transgenic rodent models will be critical in the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of narcolepsy, particularly efforts directed to overcome challenges in the development of hypocretin replacement therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Application of Ion-Exchange Resin Column for Basic Development of Strontium-90/Yttrium-90 Generator for Preparation of Radiopharmaceutical Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muchtaridi Muchtaridi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the possible use of ion-exchange resin on Dowex AG 50x8 in separating Y-90 from Sr-90 which then could be applied in the basic of manufacture of producing Sr-90/Y-90 generator for the production of radiopharmaceutical cancer therapy. The findings showed that a distributive coefficient of Sr-90 and Y-90 with HCl 6 N solvent showed that distributive coefficient of Sr-90 in cation-exchange resin on Dowex 50x8 was greater than Y-90. Y-90 in HCl 6 N solvent was more easily eluted, while Sr-90 was bound to resin.. In conclusion, resin on Dowex AG 50x8 with HCl 6 N elution solvent might be able to separate Y-90 from Sr-90 as the basis for Sr-90/Y-90 generator.

  14. Design of clinical trials for therapeutic cancer vaccines development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Andrzej

    2009-12-25

    Advances in molecular and cellular biology as well as biotechnology led to definition of a group of drugs referred to as medicinal products of advanced technologies. It includes gene therapy products, somatic cell therapeutics and tissue engineering. Therapeutic cancer vaccines including whole cell tumor cells vaccines or gene modified whole cells belong to somatic therapeutics and/or gene therapy products category. The drug development is a multistep complex process. It comprises of two phases: preclinical and clinical. Guidelines on preclinical testing of cell based immunotherapy medicinal products have been defined by regulatory agencies and are available. However, clinical testing of therapeutic cancer vaccines is still under debate. It presents a serious problem since recently clinical efficacy of the number of cancer vaccines has been demonstrated that focused a lot of public attention. In general clinical testing in the current form is very expensive, time consuming and poorly designed what may lead to overlooking of products clinically beneficial for patients. Accordingly regulatory authorities and researches including Cancer Vaccine Clinical Trial Working Group proposed three regulatory solutions to facilitate clinical development of cancer vaccines: cost-recovery program, conditional marketing authorization, and a new development paradigm. Paradigm includes a model in which cancer vaccines are investigated in two types of clinical trials: proof-of-principle and efficacy. The proof-of-principle trial objectives are: safety; dose selection and schedule of vaccination; and demonstration of proof-of-principle. Efficacy trials are randomized clinical trials with objectives of demonstrating clinical benefit either directly or through a surrogate. The clinical end points are still under debate.

  15. Development of an evidence vase for therapeutic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turner, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    A prime objective of the World Radiopharmaceutical Therapy Council is the promotion of innovative clinical practice of safe, efficacious radionuclide therapy throughout the world. The evidence for safety and efficacy will emerge from global observational studies performed using standard protocols with uniformly defined end points. Observational studies have several advantages over randomised controlled trials (RCTs) including lower cost, greater timeliness and a broader range of patients. Observational studies and RCTs can produce similar estimates of the effects of treatment and meta- analyses of observational studies produce results that are similar to meta-analyses of randomised trials. RCTs have the disadvantage of excluding of patients who might benefit from treatment, low recruitment rates resulting in delays in obtaining definitive results and the danger of unjustified extrapolation of these results to different populations. Evidence from trials is most applicable in clinical practice, when the design and the outcomes chosen are directly relevant to real patients, the trials are undertaken against a background of standard medical care, patients in trials are broadly representative of patients in the real world and evidence from trials is integrated with individual patient characteristics for meaningful risk-benefit assessment. Despite the need for high-quality clinical trials, few patients participate in them. Less than 5% of eligible patients participate in most cancer trials and almost none are from developing countries. How do we in fact determine the truth in clinical medicine, given that the conclusions of the 'gold-standard' RCT may not be replicable when the outcomes are examined in everyday practice? Ethical standards, patient selection criteria and low participation rates often create RCT study groups that differ from the general population and extrapolation of results may not always be valid. Observational studies have been characterised as all

  16. Preparation and in vitro evaluation of 177Lu-iPSMA-RGD as a new heterobivalent radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Escudero-Castellanos, Alondra; Universidad Autonoma del Estado de Mexico, Toluca, Estado de Mexico; Ocampo-Garcia, B.E.; Ferro-Flores, Guillermina; Santos-Cuevas, C.L.; Isaac-Olive, Keila; Olmos-Ortiz, Andrea; Garcia-Quiroz, Janice; Garcia-Becerra, Rocio; Diaz, Lorenza

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to synthesize a new 177 Lu-iPSMA-RGD heterobivalent radiopharmaceutical, as well as to assess the in vitro radiopharmaceutical potential to target cancer cells overexpressing PSMA and α(v) β(3) integrins. The radiotracer prepared with a radiochemical purity of 98.8 ± 1.0% showed stability in human serum, specific recognition with suitable affinity to PSMA and α(v)β(3) integrins, and capability to inhibit cancer cell proliferation and VEGF signaling (antiangiogenic effect). Results warrant further preclinical studies to establish the 177 Lu-iPSMA-RGD potential as a dual therapeutic radiopharmaceutical. (author)

  17. Preparation and control of radiopharmaceuticals in hospitals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, K.

    1979-01-01

    This guidebook covers the work commonly organized as part of the work in the hospital. It does not cover the manufacture of radiopharmaceuticals on an industrial scale. The work is characterized by the small scale on which manufacture and preparation of radiopharmaceuticals take place

  18. Studies of quality control procedures for radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zivanovic, M.; Trott, N.G.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper, a short description is given of a radiopharmaceutical preparation suite set up at the Royal Marsden Hospital and an account is presented of methods used for quality control of radiopharmaceuticals and of the results obtained over a period of about two and a half years

  19. Quality control in 99m technetium radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon Cabana, Alba

    1994-01-01

    This work means about the quality control in Tc radiopharmaceuticals preparation at hospitalary levels. Several steps must be used in a Nuclear Medicine Laboratory, such as proceeding,radiopharmaceuticals kits preparation, and dispensation materials,glasses,stopper,physical aspects,identification,ph control,storage,and reactif kits

  20. Physical and Chemical Aspects of PET Radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-09-01

    On the Workshop 23 contributions were presented. This proceedings includes 21 presentations delivered at the workshop. The topics discussed included: Cyclotron and Target Constructions; Target Chemistry; Radiopharmaceuticals Synthesis; Quality Control of Radiopharmaceuticals; GLP-GMP Design; PET Imaging. Each presentation has been indexed separately

  1. Radioactive Ion Beams and Radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxdal, R. E.; Morton, A. C.; Schaffer, P.

    2014-02-01

    Experiments performed at radioactive ion beam facilities shed new light on nuclear physics and nuclear structure, as well as nuclear astrophysics, materials science and medical science. The many existing facilities, as well as the new generation of facilities being built and those proposed for the future, are a testament to the high interest in this rapidly expanding field. The opportunities inherent in radioactive beam facilities have enabled the search for radioisotopes suitable for medical diagnosis or therapy. In this article, an overview of the production techniques and the current status of RIB facilities and proposals will be presented. In addition, accelerator-generated radiopharmaceuticals will be reviewed.

  2. Development and Successful Validation of Simple and Fast TLC Spot Tests for Determination of Kryptofix® 2.2.2 and Tetrabutylammonium in 18F-Labeled Radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntzsch, Matthias; Lamparter, Denis; Brüggener, Nils; Müller, Marco; Kienzle, Gabriele J.; Reischl, Gerald

    2014-01-01

    Kryptofix® 2.2.2 (Kry) or tetrabutylammonium (TBA) are commonly used as phase transfer catalysts in 18F-radiopharmaceutical productions for positron emission tomography (PET). Due to their toxicity, quality control has to be performed before administration of the tracer to assure that limit concentration of residual reagent is not reached. Here, we describe the successful development and pharmaceutical validation (for specificity, accuracy and detection limit) of a simplified color spot test on TLC plates. We were able to prove its applicability as a general, time and resources saving, easy to handle and reliable method in daily routine analyzing 18F-tracer formulations for Kry (in [18F]FDG or [18F]FECh) or TBA contaminations (in [18F]FLT) with special regard to complex matrix compositions. PMID:24830987

  3. Reactor-produced therapeutic radioisotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    2002-01-01

    The significant worldwide increase in therapeutic radioisotope applications in nuclear medicine, oncology and interventional cardiology requires the dependable production of sufficient levels of radioisotopes for these applications (Reba, 2000; J. Nucl. Med., 1998; Nuclear News, 1999; Adelstein and Manning, 1994). The issues associated with both accelerator- and reactor-production of therapeutic radioisotopes is important. Clinical applications of therapeutic radioisotopes include the use of both sealed sources and unsealed radiopharmaceutical sources. Targeted radiopharmaceutical agents include those for cancer therapy and palliation of bone pain from metastatic disease, ablation of bone marrow prior to stem cell transplantation, treatment modalities for mono and oligo- and polyarthritis, for cancer therapy (including brachytherapy) and for the inhibition of the hyperplastic response following coronary angioplasty and other interventional procedures (For example, see Volkert and Hoffman, 1999). Sealed sources involve the use of radiolabeled devices for cancer therapy (brachytherapy) and also for the inhibition of the hyperplasia which is often encountered after angioplasty, especially with the exponential increase in the use of coronary stents and stents for the peripheral vasculature and other anatomical applications. Since neutron-rich radioisotopes often decay by beta decay or decay to beta-emitting daughter radioisotopes which serve as the basis for radionuclide generator systems, reactors are expected to play an increasingly important role for the production of a large variety of therapeutic radioisotopes required for these and other developing therapeutic applications. Because of the importance of the availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes for these applications, an understanding of the contribution of neutron spectra for radioisotope production and determination of those cross sections which have not yet been established is important. This

  4. Radiopharmaceutical therapy in Dominican Republic. Present and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johny Osvaldo de los Santos

    2005-01-01

    Full text: In this paper we present experience in Dominican Republic on Radiopharmaceutical Therapy. In our country, there are 8 Center with Nuclear Medicine Department. Only, 7 centers are working with Radiopharmaceutical Therapy. Radioiodine treatment with I-131 in Thyroid diseases(Thyroid Cancer and Hyperthyroidism). This is only Nuclear Medicine therapy available in Dominican Republic. The objectives of this paper are to analyze and assess the difficulties and facilities for the development of Radiopharmaceutical Therapy in Dominican Republic. We made surveys with the help of Nuclear Medicine Physicians of different Nuclear Medicine departments. 8 Nuclear Physicians accepted the interview. Two of these Nuclear Medicine Centers are Department of a Cancer Center and they have many patients for therapies. In the majority opinion of Physicians, Cost of Radiopharmaceuticals is principal problem to use Therapy in Dominican Republic. In addition the following problems were identified: Lack of awareness about new therapy in Nuclear Medicine among Physicians of other specialties, lack of adequate training in the current trends of radionuclide therapy and finally lack of basic infrastructure, equipment and finances to buy radiopharmaceuticals and introduce radionuclide therapy. For this reason, Nuclear Medicine Centers prefer to work with only I-131 Therapy and they do not have new programs to start other therapies. In the near future, our department of Nuclear Medicine will work with I-131, pain palliation, treatment of metastatic disease and Treatment of benign diseases. We have interest in offering other therapies in the department and we hope that other departments with more resources, have the same interest, to enhance practice of radionuclide therapy in our country. (author)

  5. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene.

  6. Current Status of Dengue Therapeutics Research and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Jenny G H; Ooi, Eng Eong; Vasudevan, Subhash G

    2017-03-01

    Dengue is a significant global health problem. Even though a vaccine against dengue is now available, which is a notable achievement, its long-term protective efficacy against each of the 4 dengue virus serotypes remains to be definitively determined. Consequently, drugs directed at the viral targets or critical host mechanisms that can be used safely as prophylaxis or treatment to effectively ameliorate disease or reduce disease severity and fatalities are still needed to reduce the burden of dengue. This review will provide a brief account of the status of therapeutics research and development for dengue. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  7. Gene therapy of cancer and development of therapeutic target gene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Chang Min; Kwon, Hee Chung

    1998-04-01

    We applied HSV-tk/GCV strategy to orthotopic rat hepatoma model and showed anticancer effects of hepatoma. The increased expression of Lac Z gene after adenovirus-mediated gene delivery throughout hepatic artery was thought that is increased the possibility of gene therapy for curing hepatoma. With the construction of kGLP-laboratory, it is possible to produce a good quantity and quality of adenovirus in lage-scale production and purification of adenovirus vector. Also, the analysis of hepatoma related genes by PCR-LOH could be used for the diagnosis of patients and the development of therapeutic gene

  8. Huntington Disease: Linking Pathogenesis to the Development of Experimental Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mestre, Tiago A; Sampaio, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is an autosomal dominant neurodegenerative condition caused by a CAG trinucleotide expansion in the huntingtin gene. At present, the HD field is experiencing exciting times with the assessment for the first time in human subjects of interventions aimed at core disease mechanisms. Out of a portfolio of interventions that claim a potential disease-modifying effect in HD, the target huntingtin has more robust validation. In this review, we discuss the spectrum of huntingtin-lowering therapies that are currently being considered. We provide a critical appraisal of the validation of huntingtin as a drug target, describing the advantages, challenges, and limitations of the proposed therapeutic interventions. The development of these new therapies relies strongly on the knowledge of HD pathogenesis and the ability to translate this knowledge into validated pharmacodynamic biomarkers. Altogether, the goal is to support a rational drug development that is ethical and cost-effective. Among the pharmacodynamic biomarkers under development, the quantification of mutant huntingtin in the cerebral spinal fluid and PET imaging targeting huntingtin or phosphodiesterase 10A deserve special attention. Huntingtin-lowering therapeutics are eagerly awaited as the first interventions that may be able to change the course of HD in a meaningful way.

  9. Biomarkers in mood disorders research: developing new and improved therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MARK J. NICIU

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Recently, surrogate neurobiological biomarkers that correlate with target engagement and therapeutic response have been developed and tested in early phase studies of mood disorders. Objective The identification of biomarkers could help develop personalized psychiatric treatments that may impact public health. Methods These biomarkers, which are associated with clinical response post-treatment, can be directly validated using multimodal approaches including genetic tools, proteomics/metabolomics, peripheral measures, neuroimaging, biostatistical predictors, and clinical predictors. Results To date, early phase biomarker studies have sought to identify measures that can serve as “biosignatures”, or biological patterns of clinical response. These studies have also sought to identify clinical predictors and surrogate outcomes associated with pathophysiological domains consistently described in the National Institute of Mental Health’s (NIMH new Research Domain Criteria (RDoC. Using the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA antagonist ketamine as an example, we identified changes in several domains (clinical, cognitive, and neurophysiological that predicted ketamine’s rapid and sustained antidepressant effects in individuals with treatment-resistant major depressive disorder (MDD or bipolar depression. Discussion These approaches may ultimately provide clues into the neurobiology of psychiatric disorders and may have enormous impact Backon the development of novel therapeutics.

  10. Study of the radiolabeling of substance P with Lutetium-177 and analysis of the stability in vitro: development of new radiopharmaceutical for tumor treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima, Clarice Maria de; Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli; Mengatti, Jair Mengatti; Araujo, Elaine Bortoleti de

    2009-01-01

    Substance P (SP) is an 11- amino acid neuropeptide, which is known as an important member of the family of the tachykinins, characterized by the C-terminal sequence Phe-X-Gly-Leu-Met-NH2. Radiolabeled SP has been described and proposal for detection and treatment of diseases such as arthritis and tumors. SP is the most important target of neurokinin 1 (NK-1) receptors, over expressed in malignant gliomas. 177 Lu is commonly used in the production of radiopharmaceuticals for treatment of neuroendocrine tumors and is a radionuclide with favorable properties for endo radiotherapy. The half-life of 177 Lu is 6.75 days and it emits b- particles of 497 keV average energy. Moreover, 177 Lu also emits g radiation of 208 keV average energy, which makes imaging diagnosis possible. There are few studies describing radiolabeled SP analogs in literature and the objective of this work was to study the radiolabeling conditions and the stability of SP complexed to DOTA chelator, using 177 Lu as radionuclide, in order to determine the best radiolabeling methodology. A high radiochemical purity (> 95%) and high specific activity of DOTA-SP was achieved when the reaction time was 30 minutes, the temperature was 90 deg C, the mass of DOTA-SP was 10 mg and 177 Lu activity was 185 MBq. These conditions extrapolate will be used in future experiments with high activity and also in in vitro and in vivo studies involving glioma models. (author)

  11. High Yield Production and Radiochemical Isolation of Isotopically Pure Arsenic-72 and Novel Radioarsenic Labeling Strategies for the Development of Theranostic Radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Paul A.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Chen, Feng; Hong, Hao; Zhang, Yin; Theuer, Charles P.; Cai, Weibo; Nickles, Robert J.; DeJesus, Onofre T.

    2016-01-01

    Radioisotopes of arsenic are of considerable interest to the field of nuclear medicine with unique nuclear and chemical properties making them well-suited for use in novel theranostic radiopharmaceuticals. However, progress must still be made in the production of isotopically pure radioarsenic and in its stable conjugation to biological targeting vectors. This work presents the production and irradiation of isotopically enriched 72Ge(m) discs in an irrigation-cooled target system allowing for the production of isotopically pure 72As with capability on the order of 10 GBq. A radiochemical separation procedure isolated the reactive trivalent radioarsenic in a small volume buffered aqueous solution, while reclaiming 72Ge target material. The direct thiol-labeling of a monoclonal antibody resulted in a conjugate exhibiting exceptionally poor in vivo stability in a mouse model. This prompted further investigations to alternative radioarsenic labeling strategies, including the labeling of the dithiol-containing chelator dihydrolipoic acid, and thiol-modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN-SH). Radioarsenic-labeled MSN-SH showed exceptional in vivo stability toward dearsenylation. PMID:26646989

  12. Development of a specific radiopharmaceutical based on gold nanoparticles functionalized with HYNIC-peptide/mannose for the sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ocampo G, B. E.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this research was to prepare a multifunctional system of 99m Tc-labelled gold nanoparticles conjugated to HYNIC-G GC/mannose and to evaluate its biological behaviour as a potential radiopharmaceutical for sentinel lymph node detection. Hydrazino nicotinyl-Gly-Gly-Cys-NH 2 (HYNIC-G GC) peptide and a thiol-triazole-mannose derivative were synthesized, characterized and conjugated to gold nanoparticles (Au-Np, 20 nm) to prepare a multifunctional system of HYNIC-G GC-Au-Np-mannose by means of spontaneous reaction of the thiol (Cys) present in HYNIC-G GC sequence and in the thiol-mannose derivative. The nano conjugate was characterized by transmission electron microscopy (Tem), IR, UV-Vis, Raman, Fluorescence and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XP S). 99m Tc labelling was carried out using EDDA/tricine as co ligands and SnCl 2 as reducing agent with further size-exclusion chromatography purification. Radiochemical purity was determined by size-exclusion HPLC and I TLC-Sg analyses. In vitro binding studies were carried out in rat liver homogenized tissue (mannose-receptor positive tissue). Biodistribution studies were accomplished in Wistar rats and images obtained using a micro-SPECT/CT system. Tem and the spectroscopic techniques demonstrated that Au-Np were functionalized with HYNIC-G GC and thiol-mannose through interactions with thiol groups of cysteine. Radio-chromatograms showed radiochemical purity higher than 95%. 99m Tc-EDDA/HYNIC-G GC-Au-Np-mannose ( 99m Tc-Au-Np-mannose) showed specific recognition for mannose receptors in rat liver tissue. After subcutaneous administration of 99m Tc-Au-Np-mannose in rats (foot pad), radioactivity levels in the popliteal and inguinal lymph nodes revealed that 99% of the activity was extracted by the first lymph node (popliteal extraction). Biodistribution studies and in vivo micro-SPECT/CT images in Wistar rats showed an evident lymph node uptake (11.58 ± 1.98% Id at 1 h) which was retained during 24 h with

  13. Radiopharmaceuticals to monitor gene transfer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L. I.; Morin, K. W.; Knaus, E. E.

    1997-01-01

    Advances in genetic engineering and molecular biology have opened the door to disease treatment by transferring genes to cells that are responsible for the pathological condition being addressed. These genes can serve to supplement or introduce the function of indigenous genes that are either inadequately expressed or that are congenitally absent in the patient. They can introduce new functions such as drug sensitization to provide a unique therapeutic target. Gene transfer is readily monitored in vitro using a range of histochemical and biochemical tests that are ''built in'' to the therapeutic gene cassette. In vivo, in situ monitoring of the gene transfer and gene expression processes can be achieved with these tests only if biopsy is possible. Scintigraphic imaging can offer unique information on both the extent and location of gene expression, provided that an appropriate reporter gene is included in the therapeutic cassette. This overview includes a brief orientation to gene transfer therapy and is followed by a review of current approaches to gene therapy imaging. The concluding section deals with imaging based on radiolabelled nucleoside substrates for herpes simplex type-1 thymidine kinase, with emphasis on IVFRU, a stable potent and selective HSV-1 TK substrate developed in their laboratories

  14. Radiopharmaceutical projects of CNESTEN (Centre National de l'Energie, des Sciences et des Techniques Nucleaires)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    In nuclear medicine, the prescriptions of isotopic investigations are increasing because they can provide early information about morphological anomalies and permit,so to avoid long and onerous treatments. Until now, Morocco imports the radiopharmaceuticals in spite of the difficulties related to administrative procedures. To facilitate these procedures CNESTEN has launched a project which involves the following activities: - Import and distribution of needed radiopharmaceuticals; - development and production of new radiopharmaceutical kits in cooperation with scientific partners. Priority is given to the most prescribed radiopharmaceuticals. Many kits have been produced with manufacturing protocol modifications aiming to improve and optimize the production processes. The quality of the obtained products is tested and their biodistribution kinetics are studied. (F.M.)

  15. Genotoxic and cytotoxic damage by the therapeutic radiopharmaceutical [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP as in vivo generator system; Dano genotoxico y citotoxico por el radiofarmaco terpeutico [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP como sistema de generador in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedraza L, M.; Piedras R, J. [Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion, Salvador Zubiran. Vasco. de Quiroga 15, 14000 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Ferro F, G.; Morales R, P. [ININ, Km. 36.5 Carretera Mexico-Toluca, Ocoyoacac, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Murphy S, E. [Hospital Santaelena, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Hernandez O, O. [Escuela Superior de Fisica y Matematicas, IPN, Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    2005-07-01

    In patients with leukemias and multiple myeloma, the cure can be obtained to inclination of a bone marrow transplant (m.o.), for that which one is used a combination of external radiotherapy and chemotherapy with the consequent toxicity to healthy organs. The complex [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonate ([{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP) it forms a generator system in vivo stable with bony selective likeness in mice therefore, this it could work as a therapeutic radiopharmaceutical for bone marrow ablation. The objective of this original work was to determine the genotoxic and cytotoxic damage produced by the [{sup 166}Dy]Dy/{sup 166}Ho-EDTMP like a generator system in vivo by means of the reticulocytes reduction (RET) and micronucleus elevation in reticulocytes (RET-MN) in peripheral blood and to evaluate its myeloablative potential for histopathologic studies. It was irradiated {sup 166}Dy{sub 2}O{sub 3} enriched and it was add in form {sup 166}DyCI{sub 3} to the EDTMP in a softening media of phosphates (pH 8), the optimal molar relationship {sup 166}Dy: EDTMP was 1.7:1 and the radiochemical purity was evaluated by ITLC. The Dy:EDTMP complexes, non radioactive, its were prepared in the same way with non irradiated dysprosium oxide. A group of BALB/c mice was injected intraperitoneally with the radiopharmaceutical and two groups of control mice were injected with the non radioactive complex and with sodium chloride 0.9% respectively. Before injecting each one of the solutions it was take a basal sample of peripheral blood of the mouse tail and each 48 h post-injection during 12 d. The animals were sacrificed to obtain the organs of interest and to determine the radioactivity in each one. The femur was used for the histopathologic studies. The quantification of the frequency of RET and RET-MN was carried out by flow cytometry of the sanguine samples and the Monte Carlo code MCNP4B for the dosimetry calculations was used. The

  16. Development and evaluation of an electronic drug and therapeutics bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alderman, Christopher P

    2002-10-01

    To describe the development, implementation, and initial evaluation of a paperless drug and therapeutics bulletin that is distributed by electronic mail from the pharmacy department of an Australian teaching hospital. A standardized format for the bulletin was designed and approved in February 2001. The aim of the bulletin is to facilitate the timely dissemination of concise, factual information about issues of current interest in therapeutics, drug safety, and the cost-effective use of medicines. A simple and attractive graphic design was chosen, and the hospital's clinical pharmacists and drug information staff developed an initial bank of content during the period immediately preceding the launch. The bulletin is presented as a 1-page, read-only file in Word for Windows format and was initially distributed by electronic mail to all users of the hospital's computerized communication network. As the popularity of the bulletin increased, healthcare practitioners from outside of the hospital began to request permission for inclusion on the circulation list, and the content was frequently forwarded by E-mail to workers in other hospitals and community-based settings. The bulletin is now distributed to pharmacists around Australia via 2 separate moderated discussion lists, one of which provides an archive site for previous editions. Healthcare workers in Singapore, the US, Canada, and New Zealand also receive the bulletin, which is now also abstracted by a major Australian pharmacy journal. A readership survey (also electronically distributed) was used to seek feedback after the publication of the first 12 editions. Readers indicated a high level of satisfaction with the content, format, and frequency of distribution of the materials. Although the concept and execution of this project was relatively simple, an extensive literature review did not reveal any previously published reports describing this type of approach to the distribution of a pharmacy bulletin. The

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals using radioactive compounds in pharmaceutics and medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Theobald, A.

    1989-01-01

    This review of the latest techniques and developments indicates the importance of radiopharmaceutical techniques in the development of drug compounds. It presents practical demonstrations, offers practical exercises, as well as the underlying theoretical considerations: it will supplement existing (mostly American) texts in this subject, since most industrial pharmaceutical companies have a keen interest in the area and most pharmaceutical courses include the subject at degree level. The authors emphasize the pharmaceutical applications throughout. They review targeting aspects, including cell and protein labelling: and discuss radiotracers in testing dosage forms and formulation studies. Safety and legislation are considered, with reviews of the handling techniques, radiation monitoring, radiochromatography and the use of computer techniques. The latter part of the work discusses standards for radiopharmaceuticals, sterility and pyrogen testing, as well as both radiochromatographic and electrophoretic methods and their importance to quality control. (author)

  18. Current developments in pharmacological therapeutics for chronic constipation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chunhuan Jiang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Chronic constipation is a common gastrointestinal disease severely affecting the patient׳s quality of life. The traditional treatment of constipation is the use of laxatives. Recently, several new drugs including lubiprostone, linaclotide and prucalopride have been approved for treatment of chronic constipation. However, a significant unmet medical need still remains, particularly among those patients achieving poor results by current therapies. The 5-HT4 receptor modulators velusetrag and naronapride, the guanylate cyclase C agonist plecanatide and the ileal bile acid transporter inhibitor elobixibat are recognized as the most promising drugs under investigation. Herein, we give a comprehensive review on the pharmacological therapeutics for the treatment of chronic constipation, with the purpose of reflecting the drug development trends in this field.

  19. Export of radiopharmaceuticals and establishment of export base of cyclotron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Kyungil; Kim, Youngsik

    2006-01-01

    Sam young Unit ech has seized an opportunity to advance into the radiopharmaceuticals market through successful transfer of radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing technology and medical cyclotron, an original technology in nuclear medicine that is the core of less developed areas in nuclear-related fields. The company has continued to push for research development and establishment of market base through industry-academia-research center cooperation with an aim to complement relatively less developed domestic technology and market than in advanced countries, and is making efforts to establish export base in the overseas market based on stabilized supply in the domestic market. As for radiopharmaceuticals, the company is exporting Tc-99m generator to Vietnam, Thailand and the Philippines and preparing itself to export manufacture facilities for Tc-99m generator to Syria and Kazakhstan. In addition, it plans to export 13Mev Cyclotron that has been commercialized after being developed in the domestic market to the U. S. The company plans to grow up to play a pivotal role in the domestic RT area by conducting proactive business activities with an aim to revitalize the domestic market and further domestic original technologies and products in the global market

  20. Radiopharmaceuticals and other compounds labelled with short-lived radionuclides

    CERN Document Server

    Welch, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals and Other Compounds Labelled with Short-Lived Radionuclides covers through both review and contributed articles the potential applications and developments in labeling with short-lived radionuclides whose use is restricted to institutions with accelerators. The book discusses the current and potential use of generator-produced radionuclides as well as other short-lived radionuclides, and the problems of quality control of such labeled compounds. The book is useful to nuclear medicine physicians.

  1. Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Annual report 2001

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, B.; Seifert, S.

    2002-01-01

    In 2001 the Forschungszentrum Rossendorf e.V. continued and further developed its basic and application-oriented research. Research at the Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry, one of five institutes in the Research Centre, was focused on radiotracers as molecular probes to make the human body biochemically transparent with regard to individual molecular reactions. As illustrated by the large number of contributions in this report, the Institute is predominantly engaged in the coordination chemistry and radiopharmacology of technetium and rhenium. (orig.)

  2. Radiopharmaceutical chemistry for positron emission tomography

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, PH

    Radiopharmaceutical chemistry includes the selection, preparation, and preclinical evaluation of radiolabeled compounds. This paper describes selection criteria for candidates for positron emission tomography (PET) investigations. Practical aspects of nucleophilic and electrophilic

  3. Radiopharmaceuticals in PET, Progress and Promise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, A. P.; Fowler, J. S.

    1988-11-01

    It is the intention of this presentation to focus on the current state of radiopharmaceuticals for PET and where this is leading us. PET radiopharmaceuticals can be broken down into perhaps seven categories at present with each being applicable to a different aspect of human biochemistry. These are: metabolic probes, neurochemical probes, enzyme probes, ion channel blockers, blood flow agents, ethical drugs and other positron emitters.

  4. Metabolic radiopharmaceutical therapy in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reguera, L.; Lozano, M. L.; Alonso, J. C.

    2016-01-01

    In 1986 the National Board of Medical Specialties defined the specialty of nuclear medicine as a medical specialty that uses radioisotopes for prevention, diagnosis, therapy and medical research. Nowadays, treatment with radiopharmaceuticals has reached a major importance within of nuclear medicine. The ability to treat tumors with radiopharmaceutical, Radiation selective therapy has become a first line alternative. In this paper, the current situation of the different therapies that are sued in nuclear medicine, is reviewed. (Author)

  5. Radiation decomposition of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Billinghurst, M.W.; Rempel, S.; Westendorf, B.A.

    1979-01-01

    Technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals are shown to be subject to autoradiation-induced decomposition, which results in increasing abundance of pertechnetate in the preparation. This autodecomposition is catalyzed by the presence of oxygen, although the removal of oxygen does not prevent its occurrence. The initial appearance of pertechnetate in the radiopharmaceutical is shown to be a function of the amount of radioactivity, the quantity of stannous ion used, and the ratio of /sup 99m/Tc to total technetium in the preparation

  6. Challenges and opportunities in developing respiratory syncytial virus therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simões, Eric A F; DeVincenzo, John P; Boeckh, Michael; Bont, Louis; Crowe, James E; Griffiths, Paul; Hayden, Frederick G; Hodinka, Richard L; Smyth, Rosalind L; Spencer, Keith; Thirstrup, Steffen; Walsh, Edward E; Whitley, Richard J

    2015-03-15

    Two meetings, one sponsored by the Wellcome Trust in 2012 and the other by the Global Virology Foundation in 2013, assembled academic, public health and pharmaceutical industry experts to assess the challenges and opportunities for developing antivirals for the treatment of respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infections. The practicalities of clinical trials and establishing reliable outcome measures in different target groups were discussed in the context of the regulatory pathways that could accelerate the translation of promising compounds into licensed agents. RSV drug development is hampered by the perceptions of a relatively small and fragmented market that may discourage major pharmaceutical company investment. Conversely, the public health need is far too large for RSV to be designated an orphan or neglected disease. Recent advances in understanding RSV epidemiology, improved point-of-care diagnostics, and identification of candidate antiviral drugs argue that the major obstacles to drug development can and will be overcome. Further progress will depend on studies of disease pathogenesis and knowledge provided from controlled clinical trials of these new therapeutic agents. The use of combinations of inhibitors that have different mechanisms of action may be necessary to increase antiviral potency and reduce the risk of resistance emergence. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  7. New technologies for production of radiopharmaceuticals and other medical preparations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazaniak, Z.; Iller, E.; Mikolajczak, R.

    2004-01-01

    The Radioisotope Centre POLATOM belongs to the group of R and D institutions whose profile of activities comprises, besides applied research work, also manufacturing of a range of products based on implementation of the Centre's own developments. The Centre possesses considerable experience in its area of expertise: forty-six years of manufacturing of various radiation sources and radiopharmaceuticals, performing metrology and analysis of radioactive materials, which makes OBRI a unique R and D unit. The Centre is a chief manufacturer supplier of radiopharmaceuticals for nuclear medicine in Poland, and also an active exporter with a market of several tens countries. The current trends in the Centre activity assume combination of R and D work with practical application of its results for production purposes. The undertaken research topics are studied in co-operation with domestic and foreign scientific institutions. (author)

  8. Cerenkov Luminescence Tomography for In Vivo Radiopharmaceutical Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianghong Zhong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI is a cost-effective molecular imaging tool for biomedical applications of radiotracers. The introduction of Cerenkov luminescence tomography (CLT relative to planar CLI can be compared to the development of X-ray CT based on radiography. With CLT, quantitative and localized analysis of a radiopharmaceutical distribution becomes feasible. In this contribution, a feasibility study of in vivo radiopharmaceutical imaging in heterogeneous medium is presented. Coupled with a multimodal in vivo imaging system, this CLT reconstruction method allows precise anatomical registration of the positron probe in heterogeneous tissues and facilitates the more widespread application of radiotracers. Source distribution inside the small animal is obtained from CLT reconstruction. The experimental results demonstrated that CLT can be employed as an available in vivo tomographic imaging of charged particle emitters in a heterogeneous medium.

  9. Recent radiopharmaceutical research at the AAEC Research Establishment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, J.G.; Boyd, R.E.

    1985-12-01

    During the past few years a large part of the radiochemical research carried out at Lucas Heights has been devoted to the synthesis of ligands capable of forming chelate complexes with technetium-99m, as part of a search for tumour-localising radiopharmaceuticals. An account is given of the synthesis and biological evaluation of a range of these compounds and of the investigation of certain biochemical and biological properties affecting the clinical application of both ligands and radiopharmaceuticals. In addition to the search for novel Tc-99m radiopharmaceuticals, major research programs on the development of Tc-99m generating systems have been in progress at Lucas Heights for several years. Work on the AAEC's Mark III Tc-99m technetium generator has been brought to a successful conclusion. A new type of Tc-99m generator, which uses an insoluble zirconium molybdate gel and provides high yields of pertechnetate by a simple elution technique, has also been developed. Studies are in progress on the osmium-iridium generator

  10. Development and validation of methodology for technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); Desenvolvimento e validacao de metodologia para radiofarmacos de tecnecio-99m empregando cromatografia liquida de alta eficiencia (CLAE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almeida, Erika Vieira de

    2009-07-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are compounds, with no pharmacological action, which have a radioisotope in their composition and are used in Nuclear Medicine for diagnosis and therapy of several diseases. In this work, the development and validation of an analytical method for {sup 99}mTc-HSA, {sup 99}mTc-EC, {sup 99}mTc-ECD and {sup 99}mTc-Sestamibi radiopharmaceuticals and for some raw materials were carried out by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The analyses were performed in a Shimadzu HPLC equipment, LC-20AT Prominence model. Some impurities were identified by the addition of a reference standard substance. Validation of the method was carried out according to the criteria defined in RE n. 899/2003 of the National Sanitary Agency (ANVISA). The results for robustness of the method showed that it is necessary to control flow rate conditions, sample volume, pH of the mobile phase and temperature of the oven. The analytical curves were linear in the concentration ranges, with linear correlation coefficients (r{sup 2}) above 0.9995. The results for precision, accuracy and recovery showed values in the range of 0.07-4.78%, 95.38-106.50% and 94.40-100.95%, respectively. The detection limits and quantification limits varied from 0.27 to 5.77 {mu}g mL{sup -1} and 0.90 to 19.23 {mu}g mL{sup -1}, respectively. The values for HAS, EC, ECD and MIBI in the lyophilized reagents were 8.95; 0.485; 0.986 and 0.974 mg L-1, respectively. The mean radiochemical purity for {sup 99}mTc-HSA, {sup 99}mTc-EC, {sup 99}mTc-ECD and {sup 99}mTc-Sestamibi was (97.28 {+-} 0.09)%, (98.96 {+-} 0.03)%, (98.96 {+-} 0.03)% and (98.07 {+-} 0.01)%, respectively. All the parameters recommended by ANVISA were evaluated and the results are below the established limits. (author)

  11. Synthesis, quality control and dosimetry of the radiopharmaceutical 18F-sodium fluoride produced at the Center for Development of Nuclear Technology - CDTN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Bicalho Silveira

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available 18F-Sodium fluoride (Na18F is a radiopharmaceutical used for diagnosis in nuclear medicine by positron emission tomography (PET imaging. Bone scintigraphy is normally performed using 99mTc-MDP. However, 18F PET scans promise high quality imaging with increased resolution and improved sensitivity and specificity. In order to make available a tool for more specific studies of tumors and non-oncological diseases of bone tissue, the UPPR/CDTN team undertook the production and quality control of Na18F injectable solution with the physical-chemical, microbiological and biological characteristics recommended in the U.S. Pharmacopeia. Na18F radiochemical purity was 96.7 ± 1.3 %, with Rf= 0.026 ± 0.006. The product presented a pH of 5.3 ± 0.6, half life of 109.0 ± 0.8 minutes, endotoxin limit O Fluoreto de sódio 18F (Na18F é um radiofármaco empregado para diagnóstico através da Tomografia por Emissão de Pósitrons (PET. Cintilografias ósseas são normalmente obtidas utilizando-se 99mTc-MDP. Entretanto, o interesse pelo Na18F é crescente, principalmente devido à obtanção de imagens de elevada resolução. Com o objetivo de tornar disponível uma ferramenta mais específica para estudos de tumores e doenças não-oncológicas do tecido ósseo, o grupo da UPPR/CDTN implementou a produção e o controle de qualidade da solução injetável de Na18F com as características físico-química, microbiológica e biológica preconizadas pela farmacopéia. Sua pureza radioquímica foi de 96,7 ± 1,3 %, com Rf= 0,026 ± 0,006. O produto apresentou pH igual a 5,3 ± 0,6, tempo de meia-vida de 109,0 ± 0,8 minutos, limite de endotoxinas < 5,0 EU.mL-1 e ausência de microrganismos. O perfil de biodistribuição em camundongos foi semelhante ao disponível na literatura, com depuração igual a 0,19 mL.min-1 e volume de distribuição igual a 18,76 mL. A concentração máxima (5,0 ± 0,5 % DI.g-1 foi observada no osso 20 minutos após a injeção. O Na18

  12. Development of aptamers for use as radiopharmaceuticals in the bacterial infection identification; Desenvolvimento de aptameros especificos para aplicacao como radiofarmacos na identificacao de bacterias

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferreira, Ieda Mendes

    2013-08-01

    The difficulty in early detection of specific foci caused by bacteria in the bacterial infection has raised the need to search for new techniques for this purpose, since these foci require prolonged treatment with antibiotics and in some cases even drainage or, if applicable, removal of prostheses or grafts. Detection of bacterial infections by scintigraphy had the advantage that a whole body image could be obtained, since specific tracers were available. This study aims to obtain aptamers specific for bacteria identification for future use as radiopharmaceutical. The SELEX (Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential Enrichment) methodology can generate oligonucleotides (aptamers) that are able to bind with high affinity and specificity to a specific target, from small molecules to complex proteins, by using rounds of enrichment and amplification. Aptamers can be labeled with different radionucleotides such as {sup 99}mTc, {sup 18}F and {sup 32}P. In this study, aptamers anti-peptidoglycan, the main component of the bacterial outer cell wall, were obtained through SELEX. Whole cells of Staphylococcus aureus were also used to perform the SELEX to cells (cell-SELEX). The selection of aptamers was performed by two different procedures (A and B). The A process has been accomplished by 15 SELEX rounds in which the separation of the oligonucleotides bound to the peptidoglycan of unbound ones was performed by filtration. In the B process 15 SELEX rounds were performed using the centrifugation for this separation, followed by 5 rounds cell-SELEX. The SELEX started with a pool of ssDNA (single stranded DNA). For A process, initially a library of ssDNA was incubated with peptidoglycan and the amplification of oligonucleotides that were able to bind to peptidoglycan was performed by PCR (Polymerase Chain Reation). The amplified oligonucleotides were again incubated with peptidoglycan, amplified and purified. At the end of 15 selection rounds the selected oligonucleotides

  13. Advances in the production of isotopes and radiopharmaceuticals at the Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louw, P.A.; De Villiers, W.Y.Z.; Jarvis, N.V.

    1997-01-01

    The Atomic Energy Corporation of South Africa Ltd (AEC) owns and operates the 20 MW research reactor, SAFARI-1. Utilisation of the reactor has in recent years changed from research and materials testing to the production of isotopes. The most important breakthrough achieved in recent years is the production of high quality fission 99Mo. This has been produced routinely since April 1993 and supplied to clients across the world. A capability for the reliable production of 1000 Ci of 99Mo per week (calibrated for six days after production) has been proven. The AEC has also established facilities to produce its own 99mTc generators together with a most of radiopharmaceutical kits for diagnostic nuclear medicine purposes. The production of 153 Sm and 131 I (tellurium oxide route) has been operational for many years. Applications include therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals such as 153 Sm-EDTMP for bone cancer pain palliation, 13' I-Lipiodol for liver cancer and 131 I capsules for thyroid treatment. Facilities for the production of other isotopes such as 131 I (from fission), 32 P and 35 S are in various stages of completion. Extensive analytical methods and equipment have been developed and are routinely used to certify the quality of exported isotopes. Irradiation and encapsulation of 192 Ir is also performed routinely at the AEC. Modern facilities allow for the production of isotopes such as 131 Ba and 140 La on an ad hoc basis. Quality assurance procedures based on ISO9000 were developed for all aspects of the production of the various isotopes. Documentation, such as Drug Master Files, required by authorities in various countries has also been submitted and accepted

  14. Development of more efficacious /sup 99m/Tc organ imaging agents for use in nuclear medicine by analytical characterization of radiopharmaceutical mixtures. Progress report, May 1, 1983-January 1, 1986

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heineman, W.R.

    1986-01-01

    The formation of many different technetium complexes in the Tc(NaBH 4 )-HEDP, Tc(NaBH 4 )-MDP, and Tc(NaBH 4 )-DMAD systems has been clearly demonstrated by HPLC-separation of reaction mixtures. The dramatically different biodistributions exhibited by the various complexes strongly suggests that an improved skeletal radiopharmaceutical would result if the single technetium complex which exhibits the optimum biodistribution properties is administered to the patient. The influence of pH, time, concentrations of TcO 4 - and ligand, and the nature of reductant on the relative amounts of the different complexes formed were investigated. Electrochemical reduction offers a means of possibly generating a desired complex in very high yield due to the precision with which redox potential can be controlled. Additionally, we have developed HPLC methods with uv and electrochemical detection for the determination of total TcO 4 - in eluents from the 99 Mo//sup 99m/Tc radionuclide generator. The inadequacy of current theory to accurately predict total TcO 4 - in generator eluents was demonstrated in that the concentration of total TcO 4 - is a major factor determining the yield of individual Tc-diphosphonate complexes. Spectroelectrochemistry proved an effective technique to study the redox properties of Tc-complexes. 18 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab

  15. Preparation of sup(113m)In-labelled compounds of radiopharmaceutical interest. Part of a coordinated programme on radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Servian, J.; Robles, A.

    1975-06-01

    Techniques for the preparation and control of already known and new sup(113m)In-radiopharmaceuticals were investigated. New rapid procedures for the control and preparation of a number of radiopharmaceuticals were developed and standardized. After biological distribution studies and clinical tests, new techniques for the preparation of the following indium-113 radiopharmaceuticals were adopted: a) Indium - labelled colloids of: S, Al(OH) 3 , Fe(OH) 3 and AlPO 4 for liver and spleen scintigraphy. b) Indium labelled chelates using the ligands EDTA, DTPA, TTHA (Triethylene-tetramine-hexaacetic acid) and DHPTA (Diamino-hydroxy-propane-tetraacetic acid) for brain scintigraphy. c) Indium labelled Fe(OH) 3 macroaggregates and microspheres for lung scintigraphy. d) Several complexes of sup(113m)In with different ligands (fluoride, tartrate, pyrophosphate, tripolyphosphate, trimetaphosphate, EHDP (or ethane-1-hydroxy-1, 1-diphosphonate), ethylendiamine-pyrophosphate were synthesized and its potential use as bone-scanning agents were evaluated. It was found that the complexes with tartrate, tripolyphosphate and EHDP show appreciable skeletal uptake (bone/muscle ratio are 9.0, 5.5, and 4.7 respectively), although they are inferior to the sup(99m)Tc bone-scanning agents. e) A new simple technique is proposed for the preparation of highly concentrated sup(113m)In solutions. The technique is based on the precipitation of In(OH) 3 , millipore filtration and redissolution in a small volume of 0.05 N HCl

  16. (Coordinated research of chemotherapeutic agents and radiopharmaceuticals)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, P.C.

    1991-01-14

    The traveler received a United Nations Development Program (UNDP) Award for Distinguished Scientists to visit Indian Research Institutions including Central Drug Research Institute (CDRI), Lucknow, the host institution, in cooperation with the Council of Scientific and Industrial Research (CSIR) of India. At CDRI, the traveler had meetings to discuss progress and future directions of on-going collaborative research work on nucleosides and had the opportunity to initiate new projects with the divisions of pharmacology, biopolymers, and membrane biology. As a part of this program, the traveler also visited Sanjay Gandhi Post Graduate Institute (SGPI) of Medical Sciences, Lucknow; Board of Radiation and Isotope Technology (BRIT) and Bhabha Atomic Research Center (BARC), Bombay; Variable Energy Cyclotron Center (VECC) and Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Calcutta. He also attended the Indo-American Society of Nuclear Medicine Meeting held in Calcutta. The traveler delivered five seminars describing various aspects of radiopharmaceutical development at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and discussed the opportunities for exchange visits to ORNL by Indian scientists.

  17. Radiopharmaceuticals For Detection Of Inflammation And Infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nurlaila, Z.

    2002-01-01

    Feeling of pain in the body could be caused by reaction of inflantation and infection as well. One of the methods could be used to detect the reaction is nuclear technique using radiopharmaceutical as radiotracer. Some radiopharmaceuticals having specific accunulation mechanism to diagnose the presence of inflamations and infections with satisfactory results. Among those radiophannaceuticals are technetium-99m-hexamethylpropileneamine-white blood cell ( 99m Tc-HMPAO-WBC), indium-111-oxine-white blood cell ( 111 In-oksin-WBC). technetium-99m-immunoglobuline G ( 99m Tc-lgG) and technetium-99m-infecton ( 99m Tc-infecton). In visualization using this method. the information of a serial previous medical treatment of the patient should be known, because cer1ain medicament, could influence the biological characteristic of radiopharmaceuticals and hence. a missed diagnosis could be resulted. This review discusses several radiopharmaceuticals for inflamation and infection, diagnoses their accumulation, mechanism in the body. Besides, the radiopharmaceuticals interaction with several drugs are also reviewed

  18. In Vitro Assessment of the In Vivo Stability of Cu-64 Radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Packard, Alan B

    2011-12-15

    Research Plans: The successful development of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals depends upon retention of the Cu-64 atom in the radiopharmaceutical. To date, the focus has been on the development of chelators that better retain Cu-64, but there has been no effort to develop an effective method by which improved retention may be measured. In the absence of a suitable analytical method, the stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals is estimated indirectly, with decreased liver uptake suggesting higher in vivo complex stability. But this approach is inadequate for radiopharmaceuticals, such as radiolabeled antibodies, that are expected to accumulate in the liver even when there is no free Cu-64 present. The absence of such a method has also hampered efforts to systematically evaluate the chemical factors that may give rise to improved retention. The objective of this project is to develop and validate such a method. Accomplishments: The two primary accomplishments of this project will be 1) the development and validation of a method to measure the stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals and 2) the determination of the chemical factors that define the in vivo stability of Cu 64 radiopharmaceuticals. Because Cu(II) is extremely labile, the in vivo stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals is not primarily determined by the amount of free Cu that is present at any given time or by the thermodynamic stability constants, but rather by the rate at which Cu is lost from the complex, the dissociation rate constant, kd. The dissociation rate constants of the Cu-64 complexes from a series of bifunctional chelators (BFCs) will be measured using Free Ion Selective Radiotracer Extraction (FISRE), a technique originally developed to measure bioavailable Cu in environmental samples. FISRE will also be applied to the determination of the kd's of a series of reference Cu-64 complexes to determine the chemical factors that define the in vivo stability of Cu-64 radiopharmaceuticals. Potential

  19. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, March 1, 1983-February 29, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Brownell, G.L.

    1984-02-01

    This report describes research efforts towards the achievement of a clearer understanding of the solution chemistry of technetium in order to facilitate the design of future clinical agents labeled with Tc-99m, the development of new receptor binding radiopharmaceuticals for the in vivo assessment of insulin receptors and for imaging the adrenal medulla and the brain, the examination of the utility of monoclonal antibodies and liposomes in the design of radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy, and the synthesis of short-lived positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals for transverse imaging of regional physiological processes

  20. Multi-disciplinary collaboration in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nozaki, Tadashi

    1989-01-01

    Various possibilities often exist in each step of radiopharmaceutical preparation, and multi-disciplinary knowledge and collaboration are necessary for improved choice of the preparation conditions. In the radionuclide production step, proton bombardment of a separated nuclide target usually exceeds other bombardments of natural targets. Isotope separation by laser-chemical method is expected to soon offer several enriched nuclides useful as the target in enough amount and moderate price. The design and preparation of radiopharmaceuticals will be directly influenced by further progress of enzymology and immunology. Nondestructive, continuous observation of chemical changes in vivo is a longing of radiochemists, and may be realized gradually through elaborate examination of chemical effects in Mossbauer absorption, γ-γ angular correlation, EC X-ray properties, and positron annihilation. Present knowledge and techniques in radiopharmaceutical chemistry, on the other hand, can be utilized effectively in other fields of life sciences

  1. Radiopharmaceutical potential of I-131 labelled diazepam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yurt, F.; Unek, P.; Asikoglu, M.; Baggi, S.; Erener, G.; Ozkilic, H.; Uluc, F.; Tuglular, I.

    1998-01-01

    In this study, diazepam is a derivative of the 1.4 benzodiazepine family that the most widely used drug as anticonvulsant agent has been labeled with I-131, as a new radiopharmaceutical and its radiopharmaceutical potential has been determined. Labeling of diazepam has been performed by iodogen method and optimum labeling conditions have been determined. Optimum reaction conditions are 1 mg for iodogen amount; 1-5 mg for diazepam amount, 15-20 minutes for reaction time and room temperature for reaction temperature. Specific activity of labeled compound was 0,15 Ci/mmol level. N-octanol/water ratio was found 1.9 for 131 IDZ ( 131 I labeled diazepam). In vivo experiments have been carried out to determine radiopharmaceutical potentials of labeled compound. Biodistribution studies on rats showed that 131 IDZ have accumulated in kidneys, liver, lungs and brain tissues. Scintigraphic results taken with gamma camera on rabbits agree with biodistribution results of rats. (author)

  2. Mucociliary and cough clearance as a biomarker for therapeutic development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennett, William D; Daviskas, Evangelia; Hasani, Amir

    2010-01-01

    A workshop/symposium on “Mucociliary and Cough Clearance (MCC/CC) as a Biomarker for Therapeutic Development” was held on October 21–22, 2008, in Research Triangle Park, NC, to discuss the methods for measurement of MCC/CC and how they may be optimized for assessing new therapies designed...

  3. Synthesis of the radiopharmaceuticals for positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biricova, V.; Kuruc, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this paper is shown a short overview of the biogenic positron radiopharmaceuticals production and a brief summary of some PET preparation synthesis. At the end the overview of some forward-looking positron radionuclides, which can be used for a preparation of the PET radiopharmaceuticals is said. A short review of diagnostic use of PET radiopharmaceuticals is presented (authors)

  4. Tc: chemistry and radiopharmaceuticals: a prospectus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tulip, T.H.

    1987-01-01

    The recent explosion in technetium chemistry evident in this symposium promises to continue unabated. As in the past, radiopharmaceutical applications will lead to new Tc chemistry. In this lecture the author will discuss those areas which appear most fertile based on chemical and radiopharmaceutical criteria. Among these will be new organometallic Tc chemistry (e.g., Tc(CNR) 6 cations), Tc complexes as metabolic tracers (e.g., Tc-analogs to FDG), and peptide-based Tc chelators (e.g., Tc-metallothionein)

  5. Radiopharmaceutical therapy for bone pain palliation: Philippine setting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jefferson, P.; Barrenechea, E.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: Bone metastases are often multiple, presenting with multifocal bone pain. Bone pain is a common symptom in advancing malignancy and often determines the quality of life in the later stages of disease. Management of bone pain remains palliative at present. Systemic targeted treatment of metastatic sites using radiopharmaceuticals offers potential pain relief with minimal adverse effects. Acting systemically, targeted therapy using bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals are well suited to the management of disseminated cancer when repeated local treatment becomes impractical. Radiopharmaceuticals developed for treating painful bone metastases use the following radionuclides: 32 P, 89 Sr, 186 Re, 188 Re, 153 Sm, 117mSn, 177 Lu and 223 Ra. Nuclear medicine started in the Philippines in the year 1969. Majority of the procedures are mostly diagnostic. With the improved cancer survival resulting from advances in cancer management, the population of patients seeking relief of bone pain has increased. The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of radiopharmaceutical therapy for bone pain palliation in the Philippines. It also aims to determine which radiopharmaceuticals are being used for therapy and to evaluate the acceptability, efficacy, accessibility, and cost effectiveness of the therapy in the country. To date, no local study has been done on bone pain palliation therapy. This pioneer study can serve as a baseline study for future researches on the therapy. This can also promote the therapy as an effective treatment modality in the management of bone pain secondary to bone metastases. Methods: The study population included all cancer patients with bone metastasis presenting with chronic bone pain who were subjected to radiopharmaceutical therapy for bone pain palliation in the different medical centers and hospitals in the Philippines. The clinical histories of the patients were reviewed. The specific radiopharmaceutical and corresponding doses

  6. A proposal to use iterative, small clinical trials to optimize therapeutic HIV vaccine immunogens to launch therapeutic HIV vaccine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapiro, Stuart Z

    2015-01-01

    The HIV cure agenda has rekindled interest in the development of a therapeutic HIV vaccine. An iterative clinical trial strategy that proved successful for the development of effective cancer chemotherapies in the 1960s may be applicable to the development of a CD8 T lymphocyte-based therapeutic HIV vaccine. However, while cancer chemotherapy development could begin with iterative clinical trials to improve the use of active drugs, the first step in therapeutic HIV vaccine design should be discovery of immunogen constructs with potential for activity and their optimization to meet the challenges of HIV-1 sequence diversity and human polymorphism in T cell antigen presentation. A strategy for doing this is discussed in this article. The proposed strategy relies on a major commitment by funding organizations to fund organized and coordinated manufacture and clinical testing of a series of first- and second-generation constructs to test basic concepts in product design. This is presented as an alternative to funding a more traditional competition among private manufacturers and product champions of individual, already designed products.

  7. Diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives in nuclear medicine: radiolabelled biomolecules; Perspectivas diagnosticas y terapeuticas en medicina nuclear: biomoleculas radiomarcadas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferro F, G. [Gerencia de Aplicaciones Nucleares en la Salud. ININ, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Murphy, C.A. de; Pedraza L, M. [Departamento de Medicina Nuclear. Instituto Nacional de Ciencias Medicas y Nutricion Salvador Zubiran, Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Melendez A, L. [Facultad de Medicina, UAEM, 50000 Toluca, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2003-07-01

    From their beginning, the radiopharmaceuticals chemistry has gone to the study of the molecular chemistry. The radiopharmaceuticals are only in their capacity to detect such specific biochemical places as the receivers and the enzymes. With the recent obtaining of the complete structural sequence of the genome, it doesn't fit doubt of the importance that they have acquired the molecular images for the study from the genetic information to the alterations phenotypic in the chemistry of the human body. So, the future of the diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine, practically is based in the study of protein fragments, peptide structures and chains of DNA radiolabelled for the study of the metabolism In vivo. These investigations represent a substantial change in those paradigms of the pharmaceutical development, when using the own organic capacities as source of medications, instead of considering to the organism like a simple assay tube where molecules act, like they are most of the traditional medications. The investigation of new techniques to design complex stable of Tc-99m, Re-188, Lu-177, Y-90 and Dy-166/Ho-l66 with biomolecules that don't alter the specificity and in general the molecular properties of the same ones. it is a topic of world interest in the environment of the radiopharmaceutical chemistry. In this work some achievements and perspectives are presented on those main diagnostic and therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals of third generation. (Author)

  8. Therapeutic nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baum, Richard P. (ed.) [ENETS Center of Excellence, Bad Berka (Germany). THERANOSTICS Center for Molecular Radiotherapy and Molecular Imaging

    2014-07-01

    Discusses all aspects of radionuclide therapy, including basic principles, newly available treatments, regulatory requirements, and future trends. Provides the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Explains the role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in effectively coordinating a diverse multidisciplinary team. Written by leading experts. The recent revolution in molecular biology offers exciting new opportunities for targeted radionuclide therapy. The selective irradiation of tumor cells through molecular biological mechanisms is now permitting the radiopharmaceutical control of tumors that are unresectable and unresponsive to either chemotherapy or conventional radiotherapy. In this up-to-date, comprehensive book, world-renowned experts discuss the basic principles of radionuclide therapy, explore in detail the available treatments, explain the regulatory requirements, and examine likely future developments. The full range of clinical applications is considered, including thyroid cancer, hematological malignancies, brain tumors, liver cancer, bone and joint disease, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of theoretical background and practical information will provide the reader with all the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Careful attention is also paid to the important role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in delivering the effective coordination of a diverse multidisciplinary team that is essential to the safe provision of treatment.

  9. Therapeutic nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baum, Richard P.

    2014-01-01

    Discusses all aspects of radionuclide therapy, including basic principles, newly available treatments, regulatory requirements, and future trends. Provides the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Explains the role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in effectively coordinating a diverse multidisciplinary team. Written by leading experts. The recent revolution in molecular biology offers exciting new opportunities for targeted radionuclide therapy. The selective irradiation of tumor cells through molecular biological mechanisms is now permitting the radiopharmaceutical control of tumors that are unresectable and unresponsive to either chemotherapy or conventional radiotherapy. In this up-to-date, comprehensive book, world-renowned experts discuss the basic principles of radionuclide therapy, explore in detail the available treatments, explain the regulatory requirements, and examine likely future developments. The full range of clinical applications is considered, including thyroid cancer, hematological malignancies, brain tumors, liver cancer, bone and joint disease, and neuroendocrine tumors. The combination of theoretical background and practical information will provide the reader with all the knowledge required to administer radionuclide therapy safely and effectively in the individual patient. Careful attention is also paid to the important role of the therapeutic nuclear physician in delivering the effective coordination of a diverse multidisciplinary team that is essential to the safe provision of treatment.

  10. Technical cooperation for the wider uses of Ho-166 therapeutic agents in European countries

    CERN Document Server

    Park, K B; Choi, S M; Han, K H; Hong, Y D; Park, W W; Shin, B C

    2002-01-01

    Czech has put their priority in developing the radiopharmaceuticals based on reactor produced Ho-166 and a related fabrication will be extended to other EU conturies including Germany, France, etc after a development of project. The collaboration will be based on the mutual agreement for developing the between research institutes, industries and academic institutes and further researches should be followed by the issue of developing radiopharmaceuticals using Ho-166. To strengthen the collaboration, detailed discussions for the practical collaboration have been made through the visitation to the research institution of each counter part. For implementing the collaboration between NPI and KAERI, an institutional basis technical cooperation agreement(TCA) will be concluded. Furthermore, agreement for the substantial collaboration on Ho-166 related researches will be made after the conclusion of the TCA. It will accelerate the commercialization of KAERI developed Ho-166 therapeutic agents into other European cou...

  11. Production and Clinical Applications of Radiopharmaceuticals and Medical Radioisotopes in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, Amir Reza; Beiki, Davood; Hassanzadeh-Rad, Arman; Eftekhari, Arash; Geramifar, Parham; Eftekhari, Mohammad

    2016-07-01

    During past 3 decades, nuclear medicine has flourished as vibrant and independent medical specialty in Iran. Since that time, more than 200 nuclear physicians have been trained and now practicing in nearly 158 centers throughout the country. In the same period, Tc-99m generators and variety of cold kits for conventional nuclear medicine were locally produced for the first time. Local production has continued to mature in robust manner while fulfilling international standards. To meet the ever-growing demand at the national level and with international achievements in mind, work for production of other Tc-99m-based peptides such as ubiquicidin, bombesin, octreotide, and more recently a kit formulation for Tc-99m TRODAT-1 for clinical use was introduced. Other than the Tehran Research Reactor, the oldest facility active in production of medical radioisotopes, there is one commercial and three hospital-based cyclotrons currently operational in the country. I-131 has been one of the oldest radioisotope produced in Iran and traditionally used for treatment of thyrotoxicosis and differentiated thyroid carcinoma. Since 2009, (131)I-meta-iodobenzylguanidine has been locally available for diagnostic applications. Gallium-67 citrate, thallium-201 thallous chloride, and Indium-111 in the form of DTPA and Oxine are among the early cyclotron-produced tracers available in Iran for about 2 decades. Rb-81/Kr-81m generator has been available for pulmonary ventilation studies since 1996. Experimental production of PET radiopharmaceuticals began in 1998. This work has culminated with development and optimization of the high-scale production line of (18)F-FDG shortly after installation of PET/CT scanner in 2012. In the field of therapy, other than the use of old timers such as I-131 and different forms of P-32, there has been quite a significant advancement in production and application of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in recent years. Application of (131)I

  12. Measurement of the activity of the radiopharmaceuticals used in therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahagia, M.; Razdolescu, A.C.; Grigorescu, E.L.; Luca, A.; Ivan, C. [National Institute of R and D for Physics and Nuclear Engineering ' Horia Hulubei' IFIN-HH, POB MG-6, Bucharest (Romania)

    2006-07-01

    The paper presents the results obtained in the assurance of the whole traceability chain in the measurement of the activity for a particular group of radionuclides used as therapeutic pharmaceuticals: strong beta - weak gamma emitters, such as: 153 Sm, 177 Lu, 186 Re, 188 Re. The regulations regarding the uncertainty of the activity of therapy radiopharmaceuticals impose a maximum limit of 5%. All the above mentioned radionuclides belong to the group of triangular decay scheme and consequently they were standardized absolutely by the 4{pi}{beta}-{gamma} coincidence method. The solutions were then used for the calibration of the secondary standard, consisting from a 'Centronic I.G.12/20 A' ionization chamber. The calibration was transferred to the commercial radioisotope calibrators, as initial calibration figures. Some of these results are presented in the paper. (author)

  13. Computational system for activity calculation of radiopharmaceuticals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for distribution to several hospitals is practised widely and the transport is usually by road and plain, this is specially practised in big countries like Brazil where the distance from one state to other is bigger than one country compared to others in continents like Europe. The purpose ...

  14. Computational system for activity calculation of radiopharmaceuticals

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-29

    Dec 29, 2008 ... 2National Nuclear Energy Commission, Brazil. Accepted 24 October, 2008. The preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for distribution to several hospitals is practised widely and the transport is usually by road and plain, this is specially practised in big countries like Brazil where the distance from one state to ...

  15. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging chronic lymphocytic inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Malviya, Gaurav; De Vries, Erik F. J.; Dierckx, Rudi A.; Signore, Alberto

    In the last few decades, a number of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging inflammation have been proposed that differ in their specificity and mechanism of uptake in inflamed foci as compared to the traditional inflammation imaging agents. Radiolabelled cytokines represent a reliable tool for the

  16. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis. [Final] report, 1 January 1991--31 December 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuhl, D.E.

    1993-06-01

    Since 1987, this grant has supported the development of new radiochemical methods for use with short-lived, positron-emitting radionuclides; new laboratory techniques for radiochemical syntheses; and development of new radiopharmaceuticals which will be of use in Positron Emission Tomography. For the period 1 January 1991 to 31 December 1993, the authors have continued their efforts in all of these areas, as they feel that an integrated approach to the synthesis and characterization of new PET Radiopharmaceuticals is crucial to the continued growth and application of this imaging technique in modern medicine. Progress in a number of these areas is described in this report.

  17. The pig as a large preclinical model for therapeutic human anti-cancer vaccine development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Overgaard, Nana Haahr; Frøsig, Thomas Mørch; Welner, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Development of therapeutic cancer vaccines has largely been based on rodent models and the majority failed to establish therapeutic responses in clinical trials. We therefore used pigs as a large animal model for human cancer vaccine development due to the large similarity between the porcine...

  18. Radiopharmaceuticals for the therapy of metastatic bone pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Kyungpook National University Medicine School, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-04-15

    Bone metastasis is a common sequelae of solid malignant tumors such as prostate, breast, lung, and renal cancers, which can lead to various complications, including fractures, hypercalcemia, and bone pain, as well as reduced performance status and quality of life. It occurs as a result of a complex pathophysiologic process between host and tumor cells leading to cellular invasion, migration adhesion, and stimulation of osteoclastic and osteoblastic activity. Several sequelae occur as a result of osseous metastases and resulting bone pain can lead to significant debilitation. A multidisciplinary approach is usually required not only to address the etiology of the pain and is complicating factors but also to treat the patient appropriately. Pharmaceutical therapy of bone pain, includes non-steroidal analgesics, opiates, steroids, hormones, bisphosphonates, and chemotherapy. While external beam radiation therapy remains the mainstay of pain palliation of a solitary lesions, bone seeking radiopharmaceuticals have entered the therapeutic armamentarium for the treatment of multiple painful osseous lesion. {sup 32}P, {sup 89}SrCl, {sup 153}Sm-EDTMP, {sup 188}Re/{sup 186}Re-HEDP, and {sup 177}Lu-EDTMP can be used to treat painful osseous metastases. These various radiopharmaceuticals have shown good efficacy in relieving bone pain secondary to bone metastasis. This systemic from of metabolic radiotherapy is simple to administer and complements other treatment options. This has been associated with improved mobility in many patients, reduced dependence on narcotic and non-narcotic analgesics, improved performance status and quality of life, and in some studies, improved survival. All of these agents, although comprising different physical and chemical characteristics, offer certain advantages in that they are simple to administer, are well tolerated by the patient if used appropriately, and can be used alone or in combination with the other forms of treatment. This article

  19. 188W/188Re Generator System and Its Therapeutic Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Boschi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The 188Re radioisotope represents a useful radioisotope for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic applications, particularly because of its favorable nuclear properties. The nuclide decay pattern is through the emission of a principle beta particle having 2.12 MeV maximum energy, which is enough to penetrate and destroy abnormal tissues, and principle gamma rays (Eγ=155 keV, which can efficiently be used for imaging and calculations of radiation dose. 188Re may be conveniently produced by 188W/188Re generator systems. The challenges related to the double neutron capture reaction route to provide only modest yield of the parent 188W radionuclide indeed have been one of the major issues about the use of 188Re in nuclear medicine. Since the specific activity of 188W used in the generator is relatively low (<185 GBq/g, the eluted Re188O4- can have a low radioactive concentration, often ineffective for radiopharmaceutical preparation. However, several efficient postelution concentration techniques have been developed, which yield clinically useful Re188O4- solutions. This review summarizes the technologies developed for the preparation of 188W/188Re generators, postelution concentration of the 188Re perrhenate eluate, and a brief discussion of new chemical strategies available for the very high yield preparation of 188Re radiopharmaceuticals.

  20. Quality control protocols for radiodiagnosis agents and radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robles, A.; Condor, M.; Caballero, J.; Morote, M.; Garcia, C.; Benites, M.

    1997-01-01

    Based on the compilation of pharmacopoeia methods, literature, manuals and other information developed in our laboratory, protocols have been prepared to carry out quality controls for radiodiagnosis agents (RDA), better known as kits and RDA labelled with Tc99m. Quality control protocols cover physicochemical and biological controls. Physicochemical controls described for RDA include physical characteristics, particle size and number, pH, chemical identification, humidity, tin II; whereas biological controls include sterility, acute toxicity and bacterial endotoxin determination (LAL). Physicochemical controls described for radiopharmaceuticals labelled with Tc99m are pH and radiochemical purity; while biological distribution is described as a biological control

  1. Recent Progress toward Microfluidic Quality Control Testing of Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noel S. Ha

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Radiopharmaceuticals labeled with short-lived positron-emitting or gamma-emitting isotopes are injected into patients just prior to performing positron emission tomography (PET or single photon emission tomography (SPECT scans, respectively. These imaging modalities are widely used in clinical care, as well as in the development and evaluation of new therapies in clinical research. Prior to injection, these radiopharmaceuticals (tracers must undergo quality control (QC testing to ensure product purity, identity, and safety for human use. Quality tests can be broadly categorized as (i pharmaceutical tests, needed to ensure molecular identity, physiological compatibility and that no microbiological, pyrogenic, chemical, or particulate contamination is present in the final preparation; and (ii radioactive tests, needed to ensure proper dosing and that there are no radiochemical and radionuclidic impurities that could interfere with the biodistribution or imaging. Performing the required QC tests is cumbersome and time-consuming, and requires an array of expensive analytical chemistry equipment and significant dedicated lab space. Calibrations, day of use tests, and documentation create an additional burden. Furthermore, in contrast to ordinary pharmaceuticals, each batch of short-lived radiopharmaceuticals must be manufactured and tested within a short period of time to avoid significant losses due to radioactive decay. To meet these challenges, several efforts are underway to develop integrated QC testing instruments that automatically perform and document all of the required tests. More recently, microfluidic quality control systems have been gaining increasing attention due to vastly reduced sample and reagent consumption, shorter analysis times, higher detection sensitivity, increased multiplexing, and reduced instrumentation size. In this review, we describe each of the required QC tests and conventional testing methods, followed by a

  2. Development of an algorithm simulator of the planar radioactive source for dosimetric evaluations in accidents with radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Claudino, Gutemberg L. Sales; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Leal Neto, Viriato; Lima, Fernando R. Andrade

    2013-01-01

    Objective of this work is to develop an algorithm simulator for dosimetric evaluation of accidents that may happen in Nuclear Medicine using PDF NT (Probability Density Functions). A software was developed using C# and WPF technology, in the integrated environment of Microsoft Visual Studio to organize and present the dosimetric results

  3. Development of an algorithm simulator of the planar radioactive source for dosimetric evaluations in accidents with radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claudino, Gutemberg L. Sales; Vieira, Jose Wilson; Leal Neto, Viriato, E-mail: berg2020@hotmail.com [Instituto Federal de Educacao, Ciencia e Tecnologia de Pernambuco (IFPE), Recife, PE (Brazil); Lima, Fernando R. Andrade, E-mail: falima@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN-PE), Recife, PE (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Objective of this work is to develop an algorithm simulator for dosimetric evaluation of accidents that may happen in Nuclear Medicine using PDF NT (Probability Density Functions). A software was developed using C# and WPF technology, in the integrated environment of Microsoft Visual Studio to organize and present the dosimetric results.

  4. Indirect iodometric procedure for quantitation of Sn(II) in radiopharmaceutical kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muddukrishna, S.N.; Chen, A.; Sykes, T.R.; Noujaim, A.A.; Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB

    1994-01-01

    A method of quantitating stannous ion [Sn(II)] suitable for radiopharmaceutical kits, based on indirect iodometric titration, is described. The method is based on the oxidation of Sn(II) using a known excess of iodine and the excess unreacted iodine determined using thiosulphate by potentiometric titration. The titration cell is a beaker and the titrations are done conveniently under air using an autotitrator in approx. 4 min. The method is accurate and is linear in the range of approx. 10 μg to approx. 6 mg of Sn(II). Several radiopharmaceutical kits were analysed for their Sn(II) content using the method including those containing antibodies or other proteins. The studies indicate that the procedure is rapid, simple and accurate for routine quantitative estimation of Sn(II) in radiopharmaceutical preparations during development, manufacture and storage. (Author)

  5. Development of an injectable formulation for the preparation of radiopharmaceutical {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin; Desarrollo de una formulacion inyectable para la preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Sargastrina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castillo P, M.

    2015-07-01

    The CCK2 receptor (cholecystokinin) is located in areas of the central and peripheral nervous system and is over expressed in several types of human cancer, as medullar thyroid, lung and ovarian carcinomas. One of the endogenous ligands for the CCK2 receptor is the gastrin, so that radiolabeled peptides analogues to gastrin as Sar gastrin (Gln-Gly-Pro-Trp-Leu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Glu-Ala-Tyr-Gly-Trp-Nle-Asp-Phe-NH{sub 2}) have been proposed as potential diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals for obtaining tumors images with CCK2 receptors over expressed. The {sup 68}Ga is an ideal candidate for the peptides radiolabelled and has favorable characteristics to be used for diagnostic purposes by imaging with Positron emission tomography (PET). This work aimed to verify the technical documentation of the production process of radiopharmaceutical {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin for its sanitary registration before the Comision Federal contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS) in Mexico. For optimization of the production process was assessed a factorial design of two variables with mixed levels (27 combinations), where the dependent variable was the radiochemical purity. The analytical method used for evaluating the content of Sar gastrin peptide in the injectable formulation was also validated by High-performance liquid chromatography. Subsequently the validation of the production process was carried out by manufacturing of lots in single-dose of the optimized injectable formulation of the radiopharmaceutical {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Sar gastrin and the stability study was conducted at different times to determine the useful life time. The following was established as the optimal pharmaceutical formulation: 185 MBq of {sup 68}Ga, 50 μg de DOTA-Sar gastrin, 14 mg of sodium acetate and 0.5 m L of buffer acetates, 1.0 M, ph 4.22 in 2.5 m L of the vehicle. The analytical method used to determine the radiochemical purity of the formulation satisfied the requirements for the intended analytical

  6. Quantitative HPLC determination of [99mTc]-pertechnetate in radiopharmaceuticals and biological samples: Pt. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tianze Zhou; Hirth, W.W.; Heineman, W.R.; Deutsch, Edward

    1988-01-01

    Techniques have been developed which allow HPLC (high performance liquid chromatography) to be used for the quantitative determination of [ 99m Tc]pertechnetate in radiopharmaceuticals and biological samples. An instrumental technique accounts for 99m Tc species which do not elute from the HPLC column, while a chemical technique obviates interferences caused by Sn(II). These two techniques are incorporated into an anion exchange HPLC procedure which is applied to the determination of [ 99m Tc]pertechnetate in 99m Tc-diphosphonate radiopharmaceuticals and biological samples. (author)

  7. Incorporation of radiohalogens via versatile organometallic reactions: applications in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, P.C.; Goodman, M.M.; Knapp, F.F. Jr.

    1985-01-01

    Factors that must be considered for the design of radiohalogenated radio-pharmaceuticals include the stability and availability of the substrate, the physical half-life of the radiohalogen and the in vivo stability of the radiolabel. Vinyl and phenyl radiohalogen bonds show more in vivo stability than the alkyl radiohalogen bonds. Consequently, a variety of methods suitable for the synthesis of tissue specific radiopharmaceuticals bearing a vinyl or phenyl radiohalogen have been developed involving the synthesis and halogenation of metallovinyl and phenyl intermediates. The halogens and metallation reactions include iodine and bromine and alanation, boronation, mercuration, stannylation, and thallation, respectively. 19 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  8. Basic evaluation of 67Ga labeled digoxin derivative as a metal-labeled bifunctional radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujibayashi, Yasuhisa; Konishi, Junji; Takemura, Yasutaka; Taniuchi, Hideyuki; Iijima, Naoko; Yokoyama, Akira.

    1993-01-01

    To develop metal-labeled digoxin radiopharmaceuticals with affinity with anti-digoxin antibody as well as Na + , K + -ATPase, a digoxin derivative conjugated with deferoxamine was synthesized. The derivative had a high binding affinity with 67 Ga at deferoxamine introduced to the terminal sugar ring of digoxin. The 67 Ga labeled digoxin derivative showed enough in vitro binding affinity and selectivity to anti-digoxin antibody as well as Na + , K + -ATPase. The 67 Ga labeled digoxin derivative is considered to be a potential metal-labeled bifunctional radiopharmaceutical for digoxin RIA as well as myocardial Na + , K + -ATPase imaging. (author)

  9. Therapeutic Radionuclide Generators: 90Sr/90Y and 188W/188Re Generators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy using radiopharmaceuticals has been in existence for over 60 years and offers substantial benefits to cancer patients, in particular, patients suffering from thyroid cancer. Numerous clinical trials for treating other types of cancer using therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are in progress, and their success will increase the demand for therapeutic radionuclides in the coming years. Those radioisotopes having short physical half-lives ranging from a few hours to a few days are useful for radionuclide therapy. The use of short lived radioisotopes for radionuclide therapy involves important challenges including the transport of the radionuclides and the need for frequent shipments. Radionuclide generators represent an efficient means for making short lived therapeutic radionuclides more widely available throughout the world. To meet the requirements for sustained growth and future expansion of the application of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine, particularly in oncology, it is important to develop and maintain a constant and reliable supply of therapeutic radionuclides of the required quality in the desired quantities. The IAEA has several activities to support programmes that foster the enhanced availability of therapeutic radionuclides and radiopharmaceuticals in Member States. One such activity was the coordinated research project (CRP) on the development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides, which ran from 2004 to 2007, in which participants from 13 countries worked to develop generator technologies for the preparation of 90 Y and 188 Re usable for radionuclide therapy. The objectives of the CRP were: (a) To develop reproducible methodologies for the preparation of 90 Sr/ 90 Y and 188 W/ 188 Re generators; (b) To standardize quality control techniques for generator eluted therapeutic radionuclides; (c) To optimize technologies for post-elution concentration of 188 Re; (d) To prepare chromatography

  10. Affinity-tuning leukocyte integrin for development of safe therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Spencer

    Much attention has been given to the molecular and cellular pathways linking inflammation with cancer and the local tumor environment to identify new target molecules that could lead to improved diagnosis and treatment. Among the many molecular players involved in the complex response, central to the induction of inflammation is intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM)-1, which is of particular interest for its highly sensitive and localized expression in response to inflammatory signals. ICAM-1, which has been implicated to play a critical role in tumor progression in various types of cancer, has also been linked to cancer metastases, where ICAM-1 facilitates the spread of metastatic cancer cells to secondary sites. This unique expression profile of ICAM-1 throughout solid tumor microenvironment makes ICAM-1 an intriguing molecular target, which holds great potential as an important diagnostic and therapeutic tool. Herein, we have engineered the ligand binding domain, or the inserted (I) domain of a leukocyte integrin, to exhibit a wide range of monovalent affinities to the natural ligand, ICAM-1. Using the resulting I domain variants, we have created drug and gene delivery nanoparticles, as well as targeted immunotherapeutics that have the ability to bind and migrate to inflammatory sites prevalent in tumors and the associated microenvironment. Through the delivery of diagnostic agents, chemotherapeutics, and immunotherapeutics, the following chapters demonstrate that the affinity enhancements achieved by directed evolution bring the affinity of I domains into the range optimal for numerous applications.

  11. Development of methodologies for internal exposure assessment due to the radiopharmaceutical {sup 18}FDG; Desenvolvimento de metodologias para avaliacao da exposicao ocupational interna devido ao radiofarmaco {sup 18}FDG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Isabelle Viviane Batista de

    2013-07-01

    The production of {sup 18}F has increased in the last decade. It is produced basically for the synthesis of {sup 18}F- fluorodeoxyglucose ({sup 18}FDG), the main radiopharmaceutical used in PET (Positron Emission Tomography) scans. The growth in the frequency of these tests resulted in rise of the number of occupationally exposed individuals (OEI) to the radionuclide {sup 18}F as {sup 18}FDG, increasing thereby the probability of its accidental incorporation. This study aimed to implement optimized techniques for assessing internal exposures of individuals occupationally exposed through both in vivo and in vitro bioassay methods during production and handling of {sup 18}FDG at the Divisao de Producao de Radiofarmacos (DIPRA), Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Nordeste (CRCN-NE/CNEN). The in vivo monitoring was conducted at the Laboratorio de Dosimetria Interna, Divisao de Laboratorios Tecnico-Cientificos (DILAB). For this bioassay method, measurements were done with a 3x3' NaI(Tl) scintillation detector coupled to Genie 2000 software. The calibration of the system was performed with a brain phantom containing a standard liquid source of {sup 22}Na to simulate a contaminated individual. The calibration of the HPGe coaxial detector for in vitro monitoring was performed at the Laboratorio de Medidas de Atividade de Radionuclideos (DIPRA/CRCN-NE/CNEN) with a standard source of {sup 22}Na. Base on the calibration factors, it was possible to determine the minimum detectable activities (MDA) for the systems by using direct measurements and simulation of uncontaminated urine. Then, through the biokinetic models published by ICRP 106 and edited by the AIDE software (version 6.0), it was possible to estimate the minimum detectable effective dose (MDED), which evaluates the detection sensitivity of the techniques developed. The MDED was estimated for in vivo and in vitro measurements performed 2.4 hours after the occurrence of incorporation by ingestion, since

  12. Development of [18F]halofluorination and [18F]fluoride ion displacement reactions for the synthesis of F-18 labelled radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chi, D.Y.

    1986-01-01

    Two fluorine-18 labeling methods, [ 18 F]halofluorination and [ 18 F]fluoride ion displacement reactions, have been developed to assess their potential for labeling molecules with the positron-emitting radionuclide fluorine-18 at the no-carrier-added level. Olefin halofluorination involves the in situ generation of a halogen-fluoride reagent and subsequent addition to an olefin. The characteristics of this reaction were investigated with three model olefins (allylbenzene, 1-hexene, and propene). A two-step method for the preparation of fluoroalkyl substituted amines and amides has been achieved. The sequence involves fluoride ion displacement of trifluoromethanesulfonates (triflates) from short-chain haloalkyl triflates, followed by fluoroalkylation of the amine or amide. Alternatively, short-chain fluoroalkyl halides can be prepared by halofluorination of a terminal olefin. These reactions have been used to prepare various fluoroalkyl derivatives of 1-phenylpiperazine and N-fluoroalkyl derivatives of the neuroleptic agent spiperone. A series of fluorine-18 labeled N-fluoroalkylated spiperone derivatives were synthesized by N-alkylation of spiperone with fluoroalkyl halides

  13. Computational chemistry and metal-based radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neves, M.; Fausto, R.

    1998-01-01

    Computer-assisted techniques have found extensive use in the design of organic pharmaceuticals but have not been widely applied on metal complexes, particularly on radiopharmaceuticals. Some examples of computer generated structures of complexes of In, Ga and Tc with N, S, O and P donor ligands are referred. Besides parameters directly related with molecular geometries, molecular properties of the predicted structures, as ionic charges or dipole moments, are considered to be related with biodistribution studies. The structure of a series of oxo neutral Tc-biguanide complexes are predicted by molecular mechanics calculations, and their interactions with water molecules or peptide chains correlated with experimental data of partition coefficients and percentage of human protein binding. The results stress the interest of using molecular modelling to predict molecular properties of metal-based radiopharmaceuticals, which can be successfully correlated with results of in vitro studies. (author)

  14. The synthesis of halogenated radiopharmaceuticals using organomercurials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flanagan, R.J.

    1991-01-01

    Organomercury chemistry began in 1852 with the synthesis of dimethylmercury by Frankland. Since that time thousands of organomercurials have been described. One of the most attractive aspects of organomercury chemistry is the wide range of compounds reported in the literature. Organomercury compounds are known in all the major families of organic compounds, and aliphatic, vinylic, aromatic and heterocyclic compounds have been prepared with relative ease. In contrast with many other organometallic compounds, organomercury compounds have been described in which the mercury group is present in the molecule with other reactive functional groups. Mercury substitution is usually compatible with alcohols, ketones, esters, amides, carboxylic acids, aldehydes and most nitrogen containing groups. Since radiopharmaceuticals are usually molecules with complex substitution patterns, it is this special ability of mercury groups to coexist with other functionalities and yet offer enhanced reactivity for halogenation, that makes them so attractive as intermediates in radiopharmaceutical chemistry

  15. Detection of sentinel nodes with radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Kinuya, Seigo; Konishi, Shota; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tonami, Norihisa [Kanazawa Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    2000-10-01

    Sentinel lymph nodes have been found to be an indicator of lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. In Japan, the theory and concept of sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer have begun to be applied to carcinomas of the digestive system. Based on clinical experience in the detection of sentinel lymph nodes with radiopharmaceuticals, differences and similarities between the radiopharmaceuticals, methods, and techniques used to detect sentinel lymph nodes have been assessed in relation to breast cancer and carcinomas of the digestive system (including carcinomas of the esophagus and large intestine). The greatest difference between the methods used for breast and digestive cancers is the site of administration of the radiopharmaceutical. In breast cancer, the radiopharmaceutical is administered into a superficial organ (i.e., the mammary gland), whereas in carcinomas of the digestive system, it is administered into a deep organ (i.e., digestive tract). Another obvious difference is in lymph flow, i.e., the flow of the mammary glands is subcutaneous whereas lymph flow in the digestive tract is submucosal. Two radionuclide diagnostic methods are available to detect sentinel lymph nodes: sentinel lymphoscintigraphy with a gamma camera and a method that involves the use of a gamma probe intraoperatively. Radiopharmaceuticals used to detect sentinel lymph nodes must be smoothly transferred from the site of administration into the lymph, and uptake by the sentinel lymph node must continue for a long time without excessive flowing to lower reaches. The optimal particle size remains a matter of controversy, and no radiopharmaceuticals appropriate for lymphoscintigraphy have ever been approved in Japan. The authors compared the pharmacokinetics of three different radiopharmaceuticals used for sentinel lymphoscintigraphy in breast cancer ({sup 99m}Tc-labeled albumin, {sup 99m}Tc-labeled tin colloid, and {sup 99m}Tc-labeled phytic acid) and founded that the detection rate was

  16. Detection of sentinel nodes with radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokoyama, Kunihiko; Michigishi, Takatoshi; Kinuya, Seigo; Konishi, Shota; Nakajima, Kenichi; Tonami, Norihisa

    2000-01-01

    Sentinel lymph nodes have been found to be an indicator of lymph node metastasis in breast cancer. In Japan, the theory and concept of sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer have begun to be applied to carcinomas of the digestive system. Based on clinical experience in the detection of sentinel lymph nodes with radiopharmaceuticals, differences and similarities between the radiopharmaceuticals, methods, and techniques used to detect sentinel lymph nodes have been assessed in relation to breast cancer and carcinomas of the digestive system (including carcinomas of the esophagus and large intestine). The greatest difference between the methods used for breast and digestive cancers is the site of administration of the radiopharmaceutical. In breast cancer, the radiopharmaceutical is administered into a superficial organ (i.e., the mammary gland), whereas in carcinomas of the digestive system, it is administered into a deep organ (i.e., digestive tract). Another obvious difference is in lymph flow, i.e., the flow of the mammary glands is subcutaneous whereas lymph flow in the digestive tract is submucosal. Two radionuclide diagnostic methods are available to detect sentinel lymph nodes: sentinel lymphoscintigraphy with a gamma camera and a method that involves the use of a gamma probe intraoperatively. Radiopharmaceuticals used to detect sentinel lymph nodes must be smoothly transferred from the site of administration into the lymph, and uptake by the sentinel lymph node must continue for a long time without excessive flowing to lower reaches. The optimal particle size remains a matter of controversy, and no radiopharmaceuticals appropriate for lymphoscintigraphy have ever been approved in Japan. The authors compared the pharmacokinetics of three different radiopharmaceuticals used for sentinel lymphoscintigraphy in breast cancer ( 99m Tc-labeled albumin, 99m Tc-labeled tin colloid, and 99m Tc-labeled phytic acid) and founded that the detection rate was lowest with

  17. Innovative radiopharmaceuticals in oncology and neurology

    CERN Document Server

    Barbet, Jacques; Chérel, Michel; Guilloteau, Denis

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this Research Topic was to assemble a series of articles describing basic, preclinical and clinical research studies on radiopharmaceuticals and nuclear medicine. The articles were written by attendees of the third Nuclear Technologies for Health Symposium (NTHS, 10th-11th March 2015, Nantes, Frances) under the auspices of the IRON LabEx (Innovative Radiopharmaceuticals for Oncology and Neurology Laboratory of Excellence). This French network, gathering approximately 160 scientists from 12 academic research teams (Funded by “investissements d’Avenir”), fosters transdisciplinary projects between teams with expertise in chemistry, radiochemistry, radiopharmacy, formulation, biology, nuclear medicine and medical physics. The 12 articles within this resulting eBook present a series of comprehensive reviews and original research papers on multimodality imaging and targeted radionuclide therapy; illustrating the different facets of studies currently conducted in these domains.

  18. Considerations and controversies in the selection of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chilton, H.M.; Cowan, R.J.

    1987-01-01

    When a radiopharmaceutical is selected for a specific study, multiple factors must be considered to ensure that optimum clinical information will be provided with minimum radiation exposure to the patient and laboratory personnel. In this endeavor, certain questions must be considered. What are the nuclear properties of the available radiopharmaceuticals? For the organ to be studied, are there multiple radiopharmaceutical localization pathways? If so, which is best suited to provide the desired diagnostic information? Does the presence of certain clinical factors preclude the use of some radiopharmaceuticals and require the use of others? Do certain radiopharmaceuticals have overriding radiopharmacologic properties which limit their usefulness for the evaluation of certain clinical situations? Finally, how significant are non-clinical properties such as cost, availability, and product formulation? In this chapter, some of these areas and several situations which illustrate the radiopharmaceutical selection process are discussed

  19. Radiopharmaceutical potential of I-131 labelled chlordiazepoxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unak, P.; Yurt, F.; Asikoglu, M.; Erener, G.; Ozkilic, H.; Dundar, C.; Tuglular, I.

    1998-01-01

    1,4 Benzodiazepine derivatives have been largely used in Medicine since 1960. Chlordiazepoxide (7-Chloro-2-(methyl amino)-5-phenyl-3H-1.4 benzodiazepine 4-oxide) has been mostly used and the oldest one after diazepam. The aim of this study is labeling of chlordiazepoxide (CDZ) with I-131 and investigation of radiopharmaceutical potential as a benzodiazepine receptor agent. Iodogen has been used as iodination agent. Labeling yields have been determined by ITLC (instant This Layer Chromatography) and Paper Electrophoresis. pH and iodogen amount effects to labeling yields have been examined to obtain optimum reaction conditions. Labeling yield was 90% for 1 mg chlordiazepoxide, 1 mg iodogen, 1 pH, 15-20 minutes at room temperature. Radiopharmaceutical potential of I-131 labeled chlordiazepoxide was searched in vivo experiments carried out on rabbits by using Sophy DX Gamma Camera. I-131 labeled chlordiazepoxide of specific activity 690 MBq/mmol has been injected ear vein of rabbit and static perspectives were taken by pointed time intervals. Brain activity has increased after the injection, reached to maximum in 20th minutes and has not decreased during the imaging time (90 minutes). Obtained results have shown that I-131 labeled chlordiazepoxide can be used as a benzodiazepine receptor radiopharmaceutical for SPECT studies of brain. (author)

  20. Cyclophosphamide effect in the 99mTc-phytate radiopharmaceutical biodistribution in blood elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, J.S.; Gutfilen, B.; Oliveira, M.B.; Bernardo-Filho, M.

    1996-01-01

    When a radiopharmaceutical is administered, a fraction of it is always bound to blood elements. Several authors have reported that therapeutic drugs can modify the binding of radiopharmaceutical to blood elements, this faith can alter its biodistribution. The aim of this work is to evaluate, in vivo, if the cyclophosphamide (CTX) is capable to after the binding of 99m Tc-phytate to blood elements. Mice we also treatment with CTX are after 99m Tc-phytate was also administered to the same animals. The percentage of radioactivity (% rad) in the insoluble fraction of plasma and blood cells was it modified by the CTX treatment. However, this drug altered the distribution of radioactivity between plasma and blood cells. (author)

  1. The influence of stereoisomerism on the pharmacokinetics of Tc radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, L.; Taylor, A. [Atlanta, Emory Univ. School of Medicine, GA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry; Marzilli, L.G. [Atlanta, Emory Univ. School of Medicine, GA (United States). Dept. of Radiology

    1998-12-01

    The influence of stereoisomerism on the pharmacokinetics of Tc mono-oxo complexes is reviewed. Tc(V) mono-oxo complexes formed with N/S ligands have four donor groups from the ligands in an equatorial plane; the oxo ligand coordinates in an axial position. Stereoisomerism in Tc(V) mono-oxo complexes can be centered within the ligand (carbon atom in the chelate ring of ligating nitrogen of amine donors) or at the Tc. The metal center becomes chiral when an equatorial ligand has a head and a tail (i.e. the two ends of the ligand differ). All types of stereocenter can produce significantly different pharmacokinetic profiles for individual isomers. Thus, biological evaluation of separated stereoisomers is necessary to identify the optimal stereochemical configuration, particularly for radiopharmaceuticals targeted to receptor molecules with low specificity. Because of inter species variation, there is ultimately no substitute for human testing. Although it is possible that the increase in nonspecific binding of agents incorporating L- vs D-amino acids may more than offset any increased receptor binding, much more information is needed. Stereochemical factors can also lead to unpredictable differences in coordination geometry and thermodynamic preference of a single isomer; thus chemical characterization of stereo-isomers continues to be an important component of radiopharmaceutical development.

  2. Advanced Development of Antiviral Prophylactics and Therapeutics (ADAPT) - Research Area 10

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-17

    designing lead series analogs to optimize antiviral activity, Prosetta has initiated design of analogs based on the structural properties believed or...1-Mar-2011 - 31-May-2014 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Final Rep01i: Advanced Development of Antiviral Prophylactics and Therapeutics...Number of Papers published in non peer-reviewed journals: Final Report: Advanced Development of Antiviral Prophylactics and Therapeutics (ADAPT

  3. Late-Developing Supernumerary Premolars: Analysis of Different Therapeutic Approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergio Paduano

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This case series describes the different potential approaches to late-developing supernumerary premolars (LDSP. LDSP are supernumerary teeth (ST formed after the eruption of the permanent dentition; usually they develop in the premolar region of the upper and lower jaw. The choice to extract or to monitor the LDSP depends on many factors and has to be carefully planned due to the several risks that either the monitoring or the extraction could provoke. These four cases of LDSP showed different treatment plan alternatives derived from a scrupulous assessment of the clinical and radiographic information.

  4. The progress on researching method and metabolism of positron radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gan Hongmei; Qiao Jinping; Kong Aiying; Zhu Lin

    2010-01-01

    Positron radiopharmaceuticals are mainly used for PET studies, which are used in the field of nuclear medicine as tracers in the diagnosis and treatment of many diseases. They have important position and function in the clinical diagnosis and treatment. Metabolism or biotransformation will happen when PET radio-pharmaceuticals enter into the body. Understanding the metabolic fate of radiopharmaceutical probes is essential for an accurate analysis and interpretation of positron emission tomography imaging. The recent research progress on PET radiopharmaceuticals metabolism was reviewed in this paper, including the metabolism characteristics, research methods, analytical techniques and so on. (authors)

  5. Recent developments in cyclotron-produced radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friedman, A.M.

    1981-01-01

    The major areas of interest over the past two years are briefly reviewed. These include: (1) tracers for in vivo measurements of blood flow; (2) tracers for in vivo measurements of regional metabolism; (3) tracers for the measurement of receptor sensitivities; and (4) radioisotope generator systems

  6. Developing nano-particles as radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambhir, S.

    2013-01-01

    The wide variety of core materials available, coupled with tunable surface properties, make nanoparticles an excellent platform for a broad range of biological and biomedical applications. The unique properties and utility of nanoparticles arise from a variety of attributes, including the similar size of nanoparticles and biomolecules such as proteins and polynucleic acids. Additionally, nanoparticles can be fashioned with a wide range of metal and semiconductor core materials that impart useful properties such as fluorescence and magnetic behavior. Bio-macromolecule surface recognition by nanoparticles as artificial receptors provides a potential tool for controlling cellular and extracellular processes for numerous biological applications such as transcription regulation, enzymatic inhibition, delivery and sensing. The size of nanoparticle cores can be tuned from 1.5 nm to more than 10 nm depending on the core material, providing a suitable platform for the interaction of nanoparticles with proteins and other biomolecules. The conjugation of nanoparticles with biomolecules such as proteins and DNA can be done by using two different approaches, direct covalent linkage and non-covalent interactions between the particle and bio-molecules.The most direct approach to the creation of integrated biomolecule-nanoparticle conjugates is through covalent attachment.This conjugation can be achieved either through chemisorptions of the biomolecule to the particle surface or through the use of hetero-bi-functional linkers. Chemisorption of proteins onto the surface of nanoparticles (usually containing a core of Au, ZnS, CdS, and CdSe/ZnS) can be done through cysteine residues that are present in the protein surface (e.g., oligo-peptide, serum albumin), or chemically using 2-iminothiolane (Traut's reagent). Bifunctional linkers provide a versatile means of bio-conjugation. Biomolecules are often covalently linked to ligands on the nanoparticle surface via traditional coupling strategies such as carbodiimide-mediated amidation and esterification

  7. Challenges and Opportunities in Developing Respiratory Syncytial Virus Therapeutics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simoes, Eric A. F.; DeVincenzo, John P.; Boeckh, Michael; Bont, LJ; Crowe, James E.; Griffiths, Paul; Hayden, Frederick G.; Hodinka, Richard L.; Smyth, Rosalind L.; Spencer, Keith; Thirstrup, Steffen; Walsh, Edward E.; Whitley, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Two meetings, one sponsored by the Wellcome Trust in 2012 and the other by the Global Virology Foundation in 2013, assembled academic, public health and pharmaceutical industry experts to assess the challenges and opportunities for developing antivirals for the treatment of respiratory syncytial

  8. Development of a peptide conjugate vaccine for inducing therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Licari, Amelia; Castagnoli, Riccardo; De Sando, Elisabetta; Marseglia, Gian Luigi

    2017-04-01

    Given the multifaceted effector functions of IgE in immediate hypersensitivity, late-phase reactions, regulation of IgE receptor expression and immune modulation, IgE antibodies have long represented an attractive target for therapeutic agents in asthma and other allergic diseases. Effective pharmacologic blockade of the binding of IgE to its receptors has become one of most innovative therapeutic strategies in the field of allergic diseases in the last 10 years. Areas covered: The latest strategies targeting IgE include the development of a therapeutic vaccine, able to trigger our own immune systems to produce therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies, potentially providing a further step forward in the treatment of allergic diseases. The aim of this review is to discuss the discovery strategy, preclinical and early clinical development of a peptide conjugate vaccine for inducing therapeutic anti-IgE antibodies. Expert opinion: Outside the area of development of humanized anti-IgE monoclonal antibodies, the research field of therapeutic IgE-targeted vaccines holds potential benefits for the treatment of allergic diseases. However, most of the experimental observations in animal models have not yet been translated into new treatments and evidence of human efficacy and safety of this new therapeutic strategy are still lacking.

  9. Fostering child development with therapeutic dog: Case study

    OpenAIRE

    Kobešćak, Sanja; Selaković, Tea; Katalenić, Lucija

    2014-01-01

    During the last 20 years research and implementation of programs with service dogs in education, therapies and other process experienced intensive development. Croatian Guide Dog and Mobility Association is implementing a program of including therapy dogs in families of children with disability. In children with cerebral palsy additional diffi culties are often present, such as problems with sense, perception, cognition, communication and behaviour, epilepsy, and secondary muscular skeletal p...

  10. Development of Novel Therapeutics for Neglected Tropical Disease Leishmaniasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-01

    geralc.baldeviano.fn@mail.mil 14. ABSTRACT Infections caused by protozoan parasites of the genus Leishmania include cutaneous (CL), mucosal (ML) and...forms of leishmaniasis including CL involves multiple injections of antimonial drugs (GlucantimeTM or PentostamTM) for 20 days or more. Therefore...under development do not offer new alternatives because they are either reformulations or combinations of existing drugs . Hence, there is pressing

  11. Air system in the hot cell for injectable radiopharmaceutical production: requirements for personnel and environment safety and protection of the product

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campos, Fabio E.; Araujo, Elaine B.

    2009-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are applied in Nuclear Medicine in diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and must be manufactured in accordance with the basic principles of Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) for sterile pharmaceutical products. In order to prevent the uncontrolled spread of radioactive contamination, the processing of radioactive materials requires an exhausted and shielded special enclosure called hot cell. The quality of air inside the hot cell must be controlled in order to prevent the contamination of the product with particulate material or microorganisms. On the other hand, the hot cell must prevent external contamination with radioactive material. The aim of this work is to discuss the special requirements for hot cells taking in account the national rules for injectable pharmaceutical products and international standards available. Ventilation of radiopharmaceutical production facilities should meet the requirement to prevent the contamination of products and the exposure of working personnel to radioactivity. Positive pressure areas should be used to process sterile products. In general, any radioactivity should handle within specifically designed areas maintained under negative pressures. The production of sterile radioactive products should therefore be carried out under negative pressure surrounded by a positive pressure zone ensuring that appropriate air quality requirements are met. Some of the recent developments in the use of radioisotopes in medical field have also significantly impacted on the evolution of handling facilities. Application of pharmaceutical GMP requirements for air quality and processing conditions in the handling facilities of radioactive pharmaceuticals has led to significant improvements in the construction of isolator-like hot cells and clean rooms with HEPA filtered ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Clean grade A (class 100) air quality hot cells are now available commercially, but in a high cost

  12. An industry update: the latest developments in therapeutic delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Oliver C

    2018-02-01

    The present industry update covers the period 1 October-31 October 2017, with information sourced from company press releases, regulatory and patent agencies as well as scientific literature. While the corporate news in October was traditionally dominated by the announcement of the third quarter results, with most of them showing market and revenue growth but also an increasing number of initial public offerings after years of slower financial development, we also saw trends continuing toward an increasing number of convergences of drugs with nanotechnology, devices and 21st century information technology. Whether it is using E Ink's 'Smart Patch', AstraZeneca's autoinjector, Elektrofi's Elektroject suspensions or NanOlogy's NanoPac, there is an ever increasing number of combinations dof devices, drugs and applications reaching, more and more the clinic and the market. Controlled release is another feature increasingly addressed by many of the above innovations. For example, the drug-loaded x-ray imageable microscopic beads that have been developed by researchers at UCL Cancer Institute (London, UK) take this one step further in order to pursue local, controlled and in situ validated local delivery.

  13. Development of a lyophilized formulation for preparing the radiopharmaceutical {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Nal{sup 3}-Octreotide for the diagnosis of tumors of neuroendocrine origin; Desarrollo de una formulacion liofiizada para la preparacion del radiofarmaco {sup 68}Ga-DOTA-Nal{sup 3}-Octreotido para el diagnostico de tumores de origen neuroendocrino

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lorenzo L, G. A.

    2015-07-01

    The present study aimed to develop a radiopharmaceutical consisting of an emitter positrons radionuclide ({sup 68}Ga) which is used in imaging by positron emission tomography; and a peptide capable of binding to somatostatin receptors subtypes 2, 3 and 5; which together serve as a diagnostic support of tumors of neuroendocrine origin. The peptide characterization DOTA-1-Naphthylalanine{sup 3}-Octreotide (DOTA-NOC) by infrared spectroscopy technique by Fourier transform was performed, in which the principal functional groups belonging to this molecule were identified as well as its identification by UV-Vis spectroscopy. Subsequently, a variance analysis taking into account three different levels of amounts of sodium acetate, and three different levels of amounts of the peptide was performed. These masses were subjected to lyophilization for a period of 21 h; after completion of lyophilization, were labeled with 2 m L of {sup 68}GaCl{sub 3} eluates of a {sup 68}Ge/{sup 68}Ga ITG generator to determine the percentage of radiochemical purity of the different formulations. It was observed that the ideal formulation must contain 75 μg of peptide and 14 mg of NaOAc, according to studies, was determined that the amount of peptide does not influence the response of radiochemical purity in the same way that the amount of added sodium acetate, which produces different effects on the dependent variable. Finally the radiopharmaceutical formulation was obtained with greater than 95% of radiochemical purity. The validation of the analytical method was performed describing the system accuracy and linearity, specificity and accuracy; linearity and precision of the method, taking into account acceptance criteria based on the guidance of validation of analytical methods published by the National Association of Pharmacists Chemical Biologists of Mexico, A. C.; the parameters evaluated met the specifications given by the guide validation of analytical methods. Uptake and

  14. Development of Acne therapeutic hydrogel patches by radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lim, Younmook; Nho, Youngchang; Gwon, Huijeong; Park, Jongseok; Kim, Jinkyu; Kim, Yongsoo

    2012-04-01

    In this project, hydrogel patches containing herbal extracts mixture were developed by radiation technology for acne treatment. Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), one of the anaerobic bacterium, is the cause of inflammatory acne. To find novel mediation for inflammation of P. acnes, we confirmed the anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of several herbal extracts against P. acnes. The water extracts from five dried herbs, Phellodendron amurense Rupr., Paeonia lactiflora Pallas., Houttuynia cordata Thumb., Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., were mixed into biocompatible polymers and irradiated by using gamma-ray to prepare hydrogels. The hydrogels containing herbal extracts mixture initiated to decrease the growth of P. acnes and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-α, IL-8, IL-1β and IL-6, in experiment with human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with heat-killed P. acnes at 1 mg/ml of mixture concentration

  15. Development of Acne therapeutic hydrogel patches by radiation technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Younmook; Nho, Youngchang; Gwon, Huijeong; Park, Jongseok; Kim, Jinkyu; Kim, Yongsoo

    2012-04-15

    In this project, hydrogel patches containing herbal extracts mixture were developed by radiation technology for acne treatment. Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), one of the anaerobic bacterium, is the cause of inflammatory acne. To find novel mediation for inflammation of P. acnes, we confirmed the anti-bacterial and anti-inflammatory activities of several herbal extracts against P. acnes. The water extracts from five dried herbs, Phellodendron amurense Rupr., Paeonia lactiflora Pallas., Houttuynia cordata Thumb., Agrimonia pilosa Ledeb. and Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch., were mixed into biocompatible polymers and irradiated by using gamma-ray to prepare hydrogels. The hydrogels containing herbal extracts mixture initiated to decrease the growth of P. acnes and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, TNF-{alpha}, IL-8, IL-1{beta} and IL-6, in experiment with human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with heat-killed P. acnes at 1 mg/ml of mixture concentration.

  16. Developing Rapport and Therapeutic Alliance During Telemental Health Sessions with Children and Adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, Felissa; Glueck, Dehra

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the special considerations for building rapport and establishing a therapeutic alliance when conducting mental health evaluations for children and adolescents via videoconferencing. The authors review the literature and describe their experience in conducting mental health evaluations, developing rapport, and establishing a therapeutic alliance during telemental health practice. Clinical need and shortages of clinicians with expertise in evaluating mental conditions for children and adolescents in underserved communities have stimulated the rapid expansion of telemental health programs while the research base continues to develop. The emerging evidence base and clinical experience suggest that teleclinicians can, and do, build rapport and establish a therapeutic alliance during telemental health sessions with youth and families. Families may be more accepting of telemental health approaches than clinicians. The impact that technology, equipment, site staff, community supports, cultural identification, and teleclinicians' characteristics have on building rapport and establishing a therapeutic alliance should be considered when establishing a telemental health service. Staff at the patient site and referring providers have a valuable role in supporting the therapeutic alliance between telemental health providers and their patients, and ultimately supporting the success of a telemental health program. Teleclinicians are creative in transcending the videoconferencing technology to evaluate patients using guideline-based care. Further research is needed to determine how clinicians build rapport and establish a therapeutic alliance during telemental health sessions, and whether the therapeutic alliance is associated with the accuracy of evaluation and outcomes.

  17. Application of a small molecule radiopharmaceutical concept to improve kinetics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Jae Min

    2016-01-01

    Recently, large molecules or nanoparticles are actively studied as radiopharmaceuticals. However, their kinetics is problematic because of a slow penetration through the capillaries and slow distribution to the target. To improve the kinetics, a two-step targeting method can be applied by using small molecules and very rapid copper-free click reaction. Although this method might have limitations such as internalization of the first targeted conjugate, it will provide high target-to-non-target ratio imaging of radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals. In conclusion, the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals generally show excellent biodistribution properties; however, they show poor efficiency of radioisotope delivery. Large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals have advantages of multimodal and efficient delivery, but lower target-to-non-target ratio. Two-step targeting using a bio-orthogonal copper-free click reaction can be a solution of the problem of large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals

  18. Application of a small molecule radiopharmaceutical concept to improve kinetics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Jae Min [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Recently, large molecules or nanoparticles are actively studied as radiopharmaceuticals. However, their kinetics is problematic because of a slow penetration through the capillaries and slow distribution to the target. To improve the kinetics, a two-step targeting method can be applied by using small molecules and very rapid copper-free click reaction. Although this method might have limitations such as internalization of the first targeted conjugate, it will provide high target-to-non-target ratio imaging of radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals. In conclusion, the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals generally show excellent biodistribution properties; however, they show poor efficiency of radioisotope delivery. Large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals have advantages of multimodal and efficient delivery, but lower target-to-non-target ratio. Two-step targeting using a bio-orthogonal copper-free click reaction can be a solution of the problem of large molecule or nanoparticle radiopharmaceuticals. The majority of radiopharmaceuticals belong to small molecules of which the molecular weight is less than 2000 Da, and the molecular size is smaller than 2 nm generally. The outstanding feature of the small molecule radiopharmaceuticals compared to large molecules is with their kinetics. Their distribution to target and clearance from non-target tissues are very rapid, which is the essential requirement of radiopharmaceuticals.

  19. Small Molecule PET-Radiopharmaceuticals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.

    This review describes several aspects required for the development of small molecule PET-tracers. Design and selection criteria are important to consider before starting to develop novel PET-tracers. Principles and latest trends in C-11 and F-18-radiochemistry are summarized. In addition an update

  20. Current status of production and research of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals in Indonesia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soenarjo, Sunarhadijoso; Tamat, Swasono R. [Center for Development of Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals, National Nuclear Energy Agency (BATAN), Kawasan Puspiptek, Serpong, Tangerang (Indonesia)

    2000-10-01

    The use of radioactive preparation in Indonesia has sharply increased during the past years, indicated by increase of the number of companies utilizing radioisotopes during 1985 to 1999. It has been clearly stressed in the BATAN's Strategic Plan for 1994-2014 that the production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals is one of five main industrial fields within the platform of the Indonesian nuclear industry. Research programs supporting the production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals as well as development of production technology are undertaken by the Research Center for Nuclear Techniques (RCNT) in Bandung and by the Radioisotope Production Center (RPC) in Serpong, involving cooperation with other research center within BATAN, universities and hospitals as well as overseas nuclear research institution. The presented paper describes production and research status of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals in Indonesia after the establishment of P.T. Batan Teknologi in 1996, a government company assigned for activities related to the commercial application of nuclear technology. The reviewed status is divided into two short periods, i.e. before and after the Chairman Decree No. 73/KA/IV/1999 declaring new BATAN organizational structure. Subsequent to the Decree, all commercial requests for radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals are fulfilled by P.T. Batan Teknologi, while demands on novel radioactive preparations or new processing technology, as well as research and development activities should be fulfilled by the Center for the Development of Radioisotopes and Radiopharmaceuticals (CDRR) through non-commercial arrangement. The near-future strategic research programs to response to dynamic public demand are also discussed. The status of research cooperation with JAERI (Japan) is also reported. (author)

  1. Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-13-1-0238 TITLE: Developing Inhibitors of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL...of Translesion DNA Synthesis as Therapeutic Agents against Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S...Oxygen-rich environments can create pro- mutagenic DNA lesions such as 8-oxoguanine (8-oxo-G) that can be misreplicated during translesion DNA synthesis

  2. Preparation of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals for positron tomography. Progress report, November 1, 1980-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1981-06-01

    Although the germanium-68 → gallium-68 generator is probably the only source of positron-emitting radionuclides that could enable the widespread application of positron tomography, the commercially available 68 Ga/ 68 Ge generator system suffers from several major disadvantages. The most important of these is that the generator is eluted with EDTA, which forms a very strong chelate with gallium. In order to produce radiopharmaceuticals other than 68 Ga-EDTA, it is first necessary to break the stable EDTA complex and remove all traces of EDTA. This procedure adds several steps and a significant amount of time to procedures for preparing 68 Ga-radiopharmaceuticals. Several years ago, we developed a new generator using a solvent extraction system which produces 68 Ga-oxine (8-hydroxyquinoline), a weak chelate. We have also carried out studies to compare generator systems which produce 68 Ga in an ionic form. Using the gallium-68 eluted from these various generator systems, several 68 Ga-labeled radiopharmaceuticals have been synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo. In addition, attempts have been made to design and synthesize a lipophilic ligand for gallium-68. The stability of radiogallium complexed with a series of potentially lipophilic complexing agents has been studied using chromatographic techniques and in vivo distribution data. The potential of these complexing agents for altering the biodistribution of gallium radiopharmaceuticals has also been investigated

  3. Determination of Sn in 99mTc Radiopharmaceutical Kits by Polarographic Methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, M.; Cruz, J.; Sanchez, M.

    2009-01-01

    Kits of 99 m Tc radiopharmaceuticals are used in nuclear medicine for diagnosis of different diseases. Sn (II) is one of the essential components in their formulations, which is used for reduction 99 m Tc-pertechnetate in cold kits for on-site preparation 99 m Tc-pertechnetate radiopharmaceuticals. Usually, these cold kits contain different additives (complexing agents, antioxidants, buffers, etc.) and the amount of Sn (II) varies from kit to kit. The determination of Sn in these products is essential in assessing their quality. We report here the development of a new polarographic method for the determination of Sn (II) and total Sn in representative radiopharmaceuticals kits (for the content of Sn and chemical composition) produced at the Center of Isotopes of Cuba (CENTIS). These methods were validated by analysis of variance and recovery techniques. From the results of the validation, the characteristic functions of uncertainties and fits are considered for the established methods, which give the necessary evidences to demonstrate the usefulness of these methods according to the current trends in Analytical Chemistry. This work provides practical results of great importance for CENTIS. After the speciation of Sn in the MAG3 radiopharmaceuticals kit is inferred that the production process is affected by uncontrolled factors that influence in the product stability, which demonstrates the necessity for analytical tools for the characterization of products and processes. (Author) 57 refs.

  4. Public exposure due to the transport of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodrigues, Demerval L.; Carneiro, Janete C.G.G.; Sanches, Matias P.; Sordi, Gian Maria A.A.

    2011-01-01

    This paper estimate the radiological impact resulting from radiopharmaceuticals transport from the IPEN to some destinations defined a priori. So, doses were estimated in the public individuals, which are in the streets and vehicles that transit near the public transport, alongside the itinerary went through by packages, during the realization of radiopharmaceuticals transport

  5. Sixth international radiopharmaceutical dosimetry symposium: Proceedings. Volume 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    S.-Stelson, A.T. [ed.] [comp.; Stabin, M.G.; Sparks, R.B. [eds.; Smith, F.B. [comp.

    1999-01-01

    This conference was held May 7--10 in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. The purpose of this conference was to provide a multidisciplinary forum for exchange of state-of-the-art information on radiopharmaceutical dosimetry. Attention is focused on the following: quantitative analysis and treatment planning; cellular and small-scale dosimetry; dosimetric models; radiopharmaceutical kinetics and dosimetry; and animal models, extrapolation, and uncertainty.

  6. Therapy using radiopharmaceuticals: prospects and status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, M.R.A.

    2011-01-01

    Radionuclide therapy with artificially produced radionuclides started in 1936 with the administration of the cyclotron produced 32 P as orthophosphate for the treatment of leukemia by J.H. Lawrence. Thanks to the availability of nuclear reactors for peaceful applications post World War II, the treatment of thyroid cancer using Na 131 I was introduced in the late forties thereby beginning the successful use of radionuclides for targeted therapy. Though radionuclide therapy is only a small fraction of the current nuclear medicine practice, it is expected to grow significantly in the coming decades. This paper discusses the prospects and status of therapy using radiopharmaceuticals

  7. Trends in radiopharmaceutical dispensing in a regional nuclear pharmacy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basmadjian, G.P.; Johnston, J.; Barker, K.; Ice, R.D.

    1982-01-01

    Dispensing trends for radiopharmaceuticals at a regional nuclear pharmacy over a 51-month period were studied. dispensing records of a regional nuclear pharmacy were analyzed with a forecasting procedure that uses univariate time data to produce time trends and autoregressive models. The overall number of prescriptions increased from 3500 to 5500 per quarter. Radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear cardiology studies increased from less than 0.1% to 17.5% of total prescriptions dispensed, while radiopharmaceuticals used for brain imaging showed a steady decline from 29% to 11% of total prescriptions dispensed. The demand for other radiopharmaceuticals increased in areas such as renal studies, bone studies, lung studies, liver-function studies, and 67 Ga tumor-uptake studies, and declined slightly for static liver studies. Changes in dispensing trends for radiopharmaceuticals will continue as the practice of nuclear medicine concentrates more on functional studies and as newer imaging techniques become used for other purposes

  8. Evaluation of quality control of radiopharmaceuticals in Nuclear Medicine service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tavares, Jamille A. Lopes; Lira, Renata F. de; Santos, Marcus Aurelio P. dos

    2014-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are a type of pharmaceutical preparation associated with radionuclides with purpose of diagnosis and therapy. Nuclear Medicine Services (NMS) should perform quality control of radiopharmaceuticals according to the recommendations of the manufacturer and scientific evidences accepted by the National Agency Sanitary Surveillance ( Brazilian ANVISA). This study evaluated the quality of the main radiopharmaceuticals in a NMS of the state of Pernambuco in relation to pH and radiochemical purity. The results showed that 96.8% of the radiopharmaceuticals showed radiochemical purity and all pH values were within the range recommended by the American pharmacopoeia. The study found that the quality control when inserted into the NMS, provides important data that allows exclusion of radiopharmaceuticals with low radiochemistry purity, favoring a reliable diagnosis and ensuring good radiation protection practices and biosecurity for patient and occupationally exposed individuals

  9. Recent advances in (therapeutic protein drug development [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.A. Daniel Lagassé

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Therapeutic protein drugs are an important class of medicines serving patients most in need of novel therapies. Recently approved recombinant protein therapeutics have been developed to treat a wide variety of clinical indications, including cancers, autoimmunity/inflammation, exposure to infectious agents, and genetic disorders. The latest advances in protein-engineering technologies have allowed drug developers and manufacturers to fine-tune and exploit desirable functional characteristics of proteins of interest while maintaining (and in some cases enhancing product safety or efficacy or both. In this review, we highlight the emerging trends and approaches in protein drug development by using examples of therapeutic proteins approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration over the previous five years (2011–2016, namely January 1, 2011, through August 31, 2016.

  10. Technetium-99m nitrido radiopharmaceuticals with unprecedented biological properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriano Duatti

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available The chemical methods for the production of technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals containing a terminal TcºN triple bond have been established more than a decade ago. From that time, the chemistry of nitrido Tc-99m complexes has provided a highly efficient tool for the design and preparation of novel classes of diagnostic agents, and a number of potentially useful radiopharmaceuticals have been discovered. In particular, nitrido technetium-99m tracers have been developed for heart perfusion imaging. In this short review, the chemical and biological properties of the neutral myocardial perfusion tracer bis(N-ethoxy, N-ethyl-dithiocarbamato nitrido Tc-99m (TcN-NOEt will be summarized along with the preparation and preliminary biological evaluation of the first class of monocationic nitrido technetium-99m radiopharmaceuticals exhibiting improved biodistribution properties closer to those expected for an ideal perfusion imaging agent.Os métodos químicos para produção de radiofármacos marcados com tecnécio-99m contendo a ligação tripla terminal TcºN foram estabelecidos há mais de uma década. Desde esta época, a química dos complexos nitridos marcados com 99mTc tem sido uma ferramenta altamente eficiente para o desenho e preparo de novas classes de agentes para diagnóstico e, foi descoberto um número de radiofarmacos potencialmente úteis. Nesta pequena revisão, as propriedades biológicas e químicas do traçador para perfusão miocárdica neutra, o bis(N-etoxi, N-etil-ditiocarbamato nitrido 99mTc (TcN-NOEt, serão resumidas junto com o preparo e avaliação biológica preliminar da primeira classe de radiofármacos nitrido monocatiônico marcado com tecnécio-99m que exibe melhores propriedades em relação à biodistribuição, mais próximas daquelas esperadas para um agente perfusor ideal para imagens.

  11. Preparation of kits for 99Tcm radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1992-05-01

    This publication details preparation under Good Manufacturing Practices (GMP) of thirteen widely used 99 Tc m radiopharmaceuticals and their quality assurance practices. The objective of this document is to present to those who intend to launch a kit preparation programme a set of preparation procedures and other relevant information gathered during kit production over a period of more than a decade, to serve as a good starting point. The manuals and monographs included in the document are based on the experience gained in two major centres. The publication of this material is intended to give a typical example, and not the only possible procedure for preparing the kits. Following the essentials of these kit preparation procedures, it is always possible to make alterations to the composition of the kits. The kits described here concern widely used 99 Tc m radiopharmaceuticals which do not require a Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) camera. These examples of the ''first generation'' of kits are not very intricate to prepare. Although it is advisable to have only one agent for a given intended use, a few agents for each purpose, e.g. EHDP and MDP for bone imagining, have been included in the document so that the reader can have some flexibility in selecting a particular kit. 24 refs, 2 figs

  12. Regulatory considerations concerning IND radiopharmaceutical drug products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nissel, M.

    1985-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration is charged by the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, as presently amended, to assure that any drug introduced into interstate commerce is safe and effective for the purposes for which it is labeled. A radiopharmaceutical is, by definition, a new drug unless there is in effect an approved New Drug Application (NDA) for it. Before the data for the NDA are compiled, investigative studies have to be done. Before such studies can be performed in humans, an exemption from the Act is necessary. This exemption, technically the Claimed Exemption for an Investigational New Drug, is termed the IND. Both the scientific and the administrative requirements for an IND are discussed. For radiopharmaceutical drug products (RDP's), the radiation hazards, as well as the pharmacological ones, must be documented. Should the early studies demonstrate a potential for efficacy in a certain condition or disease state, an investigative protocol for an extended clinical trial is presented. The necessary requirements for Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval and consent forms are discussed. For certain research purposes, uniquely for radioactive drugs, an IND is not required for certain specific studies; the requirements for such a research study, conducted under the auspices of an approved radioactive drug research committee, are outlined

  13. Adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals in France: analysis of the national pharmacovigilance database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laroche, Marie-Laure; Quelven, Isabelle; Mazère, Joachim; Merle, Louis

    2015-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are regarded as safe by the nuclear medicine community, but up to now, no survey has been conducted with from the perspective of pharmacovigilance. To describe the adverse reactions to radiopharmaceuticals (ARRPs) reported to the French Pharmacovigilance Database (FPVD). We selected and described all reports encompassing at least one radiopharmaceutical in the FPVD. The annual incidence of reported ARRPs used in diagnosis was also estimated. From 1989 to 2013, 304 reports of ARRPs were identified (43.0% serious, 12 deaths) in 54.6% women and 45.4% men; the median age was 58 years. Five therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals ((131)I-sodium iodide, (131)I-lipiodol, (89)Sr-chloride, (153)Sm-lexidronam, and (90)Y-ibritumomab-tiuxetan) were involved in 48 reports (97 adverse reactions: 86.6% serious, 9 deaths). Pulmonary disorders represented 44.3% of ARRPs used for therapy, mainly related to (131)I-lipiodol. There were 34 diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals involved in 256 reports (451 adverse reactions: 38.1% serious, 3 deaths); 8 diagnostic products ((99m)Tc-oxidronate, (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose, (99m)Tc-tin pyrophosphate, (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin, (99m)Tc-dimercaptosuccinic acid, (201)Tl-chloride, (99m)Tc-sestamibi, and (111)In-pentetate) accounted for two-thirds of ARRPs. The most frequent adverse reactions were skin (34.4%), general (18.2%), nervous (9.0%), and gastrointestinal disorders (7.0%). There were 25 cases of altered images and 10 medication errors. The annual incidence of reported adverse reactions ranged from 1.2 × 10(-5) to 3.4 × 10(-5) diagnostic administrations. Reported ARRPs occurred rarely and were more serious in the therapeutic than in the diagnostic field. The notification of ARRPs was able to provide new guidance for safe use, as was the case for (131)I-lipiodol. Therefore, it is important to report ARRPs to a pharmacovigilance system. © The Author(s) 2014.

  14. Radiation protection optimization in practices for radiopharmaceuticals production at IEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, P. dos; Delgado, Jose U.; Cardoso, Domingos D'Oliveira

    2005-01-01

    This work has arisen from the need of updating radiological protection procedures, creating new ones and training qualified personal to perform radiological protection duties in a nuclear facility. The main purpose of the research was to assess and minimize gamma and neutron dose rates emitted during the production and handling of radiopharmaceuticals at IEN/DIRA. A mobile measurements system (SMMG-N) was developed for on-site measurements. This system has proven to be handier than the equipment formerly used for this task. It has also proven to define the measurements uncertainties and to allow for the standardization of assessment procedures. Here dose rates calculated using the data provided by this system have been compared with results obtained otherwise and good agreement was observed between them. This study has confirmed the need to improve the radiation shielding of target-chamber and target vault in order to meet the radiological principles of dose rate limitation and optimization. (author)

  15. Radiation protection optimization in practices for radiopharmaceuticals production at IEN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Osvaldir Paulo dos

    2004-06-01

    This works has arisen from the need of updating radiological protection procedures, creating new ones and training qualified personnel to perform radiological protection duties in a nuclear facility. The main purpose of the research was to assess and minimize gamma and neutron dose rates emitted during the production and handling of radiopharmaceuticals at IEN/DIRA. A mobile measurements system (SMMG-N) was developed for on-site measurements. This system has proven to be more handy than the equipment formerly used for for this task. It has also proven to reduce the measurements uncertainties and to allow for the standardization of assessment procedures. He dose rates calculated using the data provided by this system have been compared with results obtained otherwise and good agreement was observed between them. This study has confirmed the need to improve the radiation shielding of KIPROS target-chamber and target vault in order to meet the radiological principles of dose rate limitation and optimization. (author)

  16. Determination of stannous tin in radiopharmaceutical cold kits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farrant, A.J.

    1979-01-01

    Two methods for determining stannous tin in 'cold kits', used for the preparation of Tc-99m labelled radiopharmaceuticals, have been developed. Both are based on the direct titration of the Sn2 in solution. In the first method titration is with N-bromosuccinimide. Of the materials commonly used as cold kits only albumin has been found to interfere with the determination. The second method is a standard iodometric titration in which starch is used as indicator. None of the materials tested interfere with this procedure. The N-bromosuccinimide method is the method of choice as the re-agent, a solid, can be used without prior standardization. Iodine solution must be standardized daily. The paper describes in detail the methods used and gives examples of kits in which the Sn2 levels have been determined using the described procedures

  17. Development of nutrition standards and therapeutic diet specifications for public hospitals in New South Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Peter; Hazlewood, Tanya; Pang, Glen

    2014-09-01

    In New South Wales (NSW), a new suite of nutrition standards for menus and specifications for therapeutic diets to be used in hospitals has been developed. These standards were required to facilitate centralised menu planning and food production, with the move to management of most hospital food services by HealthShare NSW, a state-wide business unit of NSW Health. The standards also aim to improve communication between health professionals, particularly with the increasing use of computerised meal-ordering systems. Nutrition standards have been developed for adult, paediatric and mental health inpatients, and specifications for 147 different adult and paediatric therapeutic diets. There is still significant variation in the nutrition standards for nutrition and therapeutic diets in hospitals across the Australian states, and a move to a more nationally harmonised approach would be welcome. Further research is required to examine the impact of these standards on operating efficiency and patient care outcomes.

  18. Drugs that alter biodistribution and kinetics of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shani, J.

    1986-01-01

    Target localization and organ biodistribution of radiopharmaceuticals (RPs) may be altered by non-radioactive drugs whose pharmacological mechanisms compete with the RPs for the same retention processes. Originally referred to as side effects or incompatibilities, such interactions became a major concern in evaluating Nuclear Medicine procedures, as they might cause interpretation of the latter to be without value or misleading. With accumulated experience, some interactions were intentionally included in Nuclear Medicine procedures and became an additional tool in differential diagnosis. Moreover, due to the ability of some RPs to compete with therapeutic agents, Nuclear Medicine studies shifted from anatomical-physiological to more pharmacologically-pathologically-based procedures that can also monitor the stage of disease, and follow its treatment. The aim of this review, therefore, is not only to illustrate some crucial pharmacological issues in Nuclear Medicine imaging, but to emphasize the possible input that alterations of RP biodistribution by drugs may have in achieving better and safer diagnosis, disease staging and monitoring of the patient's response to therapy. 166 references

  19. Harvard--MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, September 1, 1977--April 30, 1978

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Brownell, G.L.

    1978-05-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies: chemistry studies designed to achieve a more complete understanding of the fundamental chemistry of technetium in order to facilitate the design of future radiopharmaceuticals incorporating the radionuclide /sup 99m/Tc; the development of new radiopharmaceuticals intended to improve image quality and lower radiation doses by the use of short-lived radionuclides and disease-specific agents; the development of short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides which offer advantages in transverse section imaging of regional physiological processes; and studies of the toxic effects of particulate radiation

  20. Effect of blood activity on dosimetric calculations for radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zvereva, Alexandra; Petoussi-Henss, Nina; Li, Wei Bo; Schlattl, Helmut; Oeh, Uwe; Zankl, Maria; Graner, Frank Philipp; Hoeschen, Christoph; Nekolla, Stephan G.; Parodi, Katia; Schwaiger, Markus

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this work was to investigate the influence of the definition of blood as a distinct source on organ doses, associated with the administration of a novel radiopharmaceutical for positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET/CT) imaging—(S)-4-(3-18F-fluoropropyl)-L-glutamic acid (18F-FSPG). Personalised pharmacokinetic models were constructed based on clinical PET/CT images from five healthy volunteers and blood samples from four of them. Following an identifiability analysis of the developed compartmental models, person-specific model parameters were estimated using the commercial program SAAM II. Organ doses were calculated in accordance to the formalism promulgated by the Committee on Medical Internal Radiation Dose (MIRD) and the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) using specific absorbed fractions for photons and electrons previously derived for the ICRP reference adult computational voxel phantoms. Organ doses for two concepts were compared: source organ activities in organs parenchyma with blood as a separate source (concept-1); aggregate activities in perfused source organs without blood as a distinct source (concept-2). Aggregate activities comprise the activities of organs parenchyma and the activity in the regional blood volumes (RBV). Concept-1 resulted in notably higher absorbed doses for most organs, especially non-source organs with substantial blood contents, e.g. lungs (92% maximum difference). Consequently, effective doses increased in concept-1 compared to concept-2 by 3-10%. Not considering the blood as a distinct source region leads to an underestimation of the organ absorbed doses and effective doses. The pronounced influence of the blood even for a radiopharmaceutical with a rapid clearance from the blood, such as 18F-FSPG, suggests that blood should be introduced as a separate compartment in most compartmental pharmacokinetic models and blood should be considered as a distinct source in

  1. Quantitative studies in radiopharmaceutical science. Progress report, January 1-December 31, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beck, R.N.; Cooper, M.

    1985-09-01

    This program, during the past 30 years, has developed with the constant awareness of the close interrelationships and interdependence between clinical needs, radiopharmaceutical and instrument developments, and clinical feasibility studies. This is a year of transition for this contract with two of the responsible investigators, Katherine Lathrop and Paul Harper, reaching the age of mandatory retirement. This report focuses on the completion and write-up of current research projects by Dr. Harper and Mrs. Lathrop. 4 refs

  2. Finger doses for staff handling radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pant, Gauri S; Sharma, Sanjay K; Rath, Gaura K

    2006-09-01

    Radiation doses to the fingers of occupational workers handling 99mTc-labeled compounds and 131I for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine were measured by thermoluminescence dosimetry. The doses were measured at the base of the ring finger and the index finger of both hands in 2 groups of workers. Group 1 (7 workers) handled 99mTc-labeled radiopharmaceuticals, and group 2 (6 workers) handled 131I for diagnosis and therapy. Radiation doses to the fingertips of 3 workers also were measured. Two were from group 1, and 1 was from group 2. The doses to the base of the fingers for the radiopharmacy staff and physicians from group 1 were observed to be 17+/-7.5 (mean+/-SD) and 13.4+/-6.5 microSv/GBq, respectively. Similarly, the dose to the base of the fingers for the 3 physicians in group 2 was estimated to be 82.0+/-13.8 microSv/GBq. Finger doses for the technologists in both groups could not be calculated per unit of activity because they did not handle the radiopharmaceuticals directly. Their doses were reported in millisieverts that accumulated in 1 wk. The doses to the fingertips of the radiopharmacy worker and the physician in group 1 were 74.3+/-19.8 and 53.5+/-21.9 microSv/GBq, respectively. The dose to the fingertips of the physician in group 2 was 469.9+/-267 microSv/GBq. The radiation doses to the fingers of nuclear medicine staff at our center were measured. The maximum expected annual dose to the extremities appeared to be less than the annual limit (500 mSv/y), except for a physician who handled large quantities of 131I for treatment. Because all of these workers are on rotation and do not constantly handle radioactivity throughout the year, the doses to the base of the fingers or the fingertips should not exceed the prescribed annual limit of 500 mSv.

  3. Development of new therapeutic methods of lung cancer through team approach study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jong Ho; Zo, Jae Ill; Baek, Hee Jong; Jung, Jin Haeng; Lee, Jae Cheol; Ryoo, Baek Yeol; Kim, Mi Sook; Choi, Du Hwan; Park, Sun Young; Lee, Hae Young

    2000-12-01

    The aims of this study were to make the lung cancer clinics in Korea Cancer Center Hospital, and to establish new therapeutic methods of lung cancer for increasing the cure rate and survival rate of patients. Also another purpose of this study was to establish a common treatment method in our hospital. All patients who were operated in Korea Cancer Center Hospital from 1987 due to lung cancer were followed up and evaluated. And we have been studied the effect of postoperative adjuvant therapy in stage I, II, IIIA non-small cell lung cancer patients from 1989 with the phase three study form. Follow-up examinations were scheduled in these patients and interim analysis was made. Also we have been studied the effect of chemo-therapeutic agents in small cell lung cancer patients from 1997 with the phase two study form. We evaluated the results of this study. Some important results of this study were as follows. 1. The new therapeutic method (surgery + MVP chemotherapy) was superior to the standard therapeutic one in stage I Non-small cell lung cancer patients. So, we have to change the standard method of treatment in stage I NSCLC. 2. Also, this new therapeutic method made a good result in stage II NSCLC patients. And this result was reported in The Annals of Thoracic Surgery. 3. However, this new therapeutic method was not superior to the standard treatment method (surgery only) in stage IIIA NSCLC patients. So, we must develop new chemo-therapeutic agents in the future for advanced NSCLC patients. 4. In the results of the randomized phase II studies about small cell lung cancer, there was no difference in survival between Etoposide + Carboplatin + Ifosfamide + Cisplatin group and Etoposide + Carboplatin + Ifosfamide + Cisplatin + Tamoxifen group in both the limited and extended types of small cell lung cancer patients.

  4. The value of non-human primates in the development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Meer, P.J.K.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/34153790X; Kooijman, M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/322905788; Van Der Laan, J.W.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/374879966; Moors, E.H.M.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/20241664X; Schellekens, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068406762

    2011-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry is increasingly focusing on the development of biological therapeutics. These molecules generally cause no off-target toxicity and are highly species specific. Therefore, non-human primates (NHPs) are often the only relevant species in which to conduct regulatory safety

  5. The Medicinal Chemistry of Therapeutic Peptides: Recent Developments in Synthesis and Design Optimizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parthasarathy, Anutthaman; Anandamma, Sasikala K; Kalesh, Karunakaran A

    2017-10-12

    Peptide therapeutics have made tremendous progress in the past decade. Many of the inherent weaknesses of peptides which hampered their development as therapeutics are now more or less effectively tackled with recent scientific and technological advancements in integrated drug discovery settings. These include recent developments in synthetic organic chemistry, high-throughput recombinant production strategies, high-resolution analytical methods, high-throughput screening options, ingenious drug delivery strategies and novel formulation preparations. Here, we will briefly describe the key methodologies and strategies used in the therapeutic peptide development processes with select examples of the most recent developments in the field. The aim of this review is to highlight the viable options a medicinal chemist may consider in order to improve a specific pharmacological property of interest in a peptide lead entity and thereby rationally assess the therapeutic potential this class of molecules possesses while they are traditionally (and incorrectly) considered 'undruggable'. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  6. 77 FR 62521 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    ... interleukin-10 (IL-10) inhibitor as a dual-biologic therapy to treat metastatic breast cancer, or ii) incorporating a p53 isoform antisense oligonucleotide as a single biologic therapy to treat T- cell lymphoma... Exclusive License: The Development of Therapeutic Agents for the Treatment of Metastatic Breast Cancer and T...

  7. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in Finland in 1997; Radioaktiivisten laeaekevalmisteiden kaeyttoe Suomessa vuonna 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, H

    1999-02-01

    A survey on the use of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostics and therapy has been made by STUK Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority in Finland. In 1997 the number of nuclear medicine examinations was 51 700 and that of the therapeutic treatments was 2 240. In 1994 the number of nuclear medicine examinations was 50 900 and that of therapeutic treatments was 2 150. The collective effective dose to the patients was 207 manSv and the mean effective dose to the population was 0.04 mSv per person. In 1994 the collective effective dose was 220 manSv. The numbers of nuclear medicine examinations and of therapeutic treatments have not changed much when compared to those in 1994. The collective effective dose has decreased. The main reason for that is the decreased use of the radionuclide {sup 131}I. (orig.) 4 refs.

  8. Good Practice for Introducing Radiopharmaceuticals for Clinical Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-02-01

    The use of new radiopharmaceuticals can provide extremely valuable information in the evaluation of cancer, as well as heart and brain diseases. Information that often times cannot be obtained by other means. However, there is a perceived need in many Member States for a useful reference to facilitate and expedite the introduction of radiopharmaceuticals already in clinical use in other countries. This publication intends to provide practical support for the introduction of new radiotracers, including recommendations on the necessary steps needed to facilitate and expedite the introduction of radiopharmaceuticals in clinical use, while ensuring that a safe and high quality product is administered to the patient at all times

  9. Development of the Fibulin-3 protein therapeutics of non small cell lung cancer stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kugchan; Jung, Il Lae; Kim, Seo Yeon; Choi, Su Im; Lee, Jae Ha

    2013-09-15

    This study focuses on developing an efficient bioprocess for large-scale production of fibulin-3 using Chinese Hamster Ovary cell expression system and evaluating its therapeutic potential for the treatment of cancer. The specific aims are as follows: Isolation and establishment of CSCs using FACS based on cell surface markers and high ALDH1 activity. Identification and characterization of lung cancer stem cells that acquire features of CSC upon exposure to ionizing radiation. Evaluation of the fibulin-3 effects on the stem traits and signaling pathways required for the generation and maintenance of CSCs. In vivo validation of fivulin-3 for tumor prognosis and therapeutic efficacy against lung cancer using animal model.

  10. Use of radiopharmaceuticals in Finland in 1997

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korpela, H

    1999-04-01

    The use of radiopharmaceuticals in diagnostics and therapy has been surveyed by STUK - Radiation and Nuclear Safety Authority. In 1997 the number of nuclear medicine examinations was 51,700, and the number of treatments 2,240. In 1994 the number of nuclear medicine examinations had been 50,900, and the number of treatments 2,150. In 1997 the collective effective dose received by patients was 207 manSv, and the mean effective dose received by the population was 0.04 mSv per person. In 1994 the collective effective dose had been 220 manSv. Numbers of nuclear medicine examinations and treatments have not changed much from 1994. The collective effective dose has slightly decreased. The main reason for the reduction is decreased use of the radionuclide {sup 131}I. (orig.) 4 refs.

  11. Good practice in the production of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cruz Arencibia, Jorge

    2012-01-01

    In the paper the evolution of concepts regarding the quality of the pharmaceutical products is analyzed in the framework of the production of radiopharmaceuticals at CENTIS. The world trends range from the quality control of the fi nal product to the comprehensive concept of quality management. It is concluded from the analysis that CENTIS has an appropriate system of Good Manufacturing Practice as a result of 15 years of systematic, growing and qualified attention to the issue, in correspondence with the world tendencies and the continuous support of CECMED, the Cuban regulatory authority. That is certified by the fact that all the production processes of CENTIS have been licensed and all the CENTIS products in the market have been registered. The existing conditions at CENTIS are favorable to establish and certificate a Quality Management System. (author)

  12. Internal dosimetry of radiopharmaceuticals derived of antitumor polypeptide isolated from venoms: Crotalus durissus terrifucus and Scorpaena plumieri

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Andrade, Henrique Martins de

    2009-01-01

    MBq for both intravenous injection and for the intratumoral injection. In tumor, the value was 3.28 mGy/370MBq for intravenous injection and 107.18 mGy/370MBq for intratumoral injection. For the administration of 131 I-SPGP values for the bone marrow were 1.34 mGy/370MBq for intravenous injection and 0.12 mGy/370MBq for intratumoral injection. In tumor, 256.29 mGy/370MBq for intravenous injection and 895.69 mGy/370MBq for intratumoral injection. The results suggest good radiation safety for both radiopharmaceuticals considering the values found for the bone marrow by both intratumoral and intravenous routes, in view of the importance of this body to generate blood cells. The results for the tumor intravenously indicate diagnostic applicability for both molecules. Through intratumoral, the values suggest the feasibility for use of 131 I-Crtx and of 131 I-SPGP as a therapeutic agent, given the persistence of radioactivity in the tumor site. Although 131 I-Crtx has proved to be more secure for applications in diagnosis, its potential for application in internal radiotherapy is lower than that of 131 I-SPGp. Both 131 I-Crtx and 131 I-SPGP, proved to be good prototypes for the development of radiopharmaceuticals. This study indicates that is necessary the synthesis of analogues with lower uptake in healthy organs and a higher tumor uptake, as well as pharmaceutical formulations, using nano technology, such as liposomes, nano-materials for controlled release of drugs. (author)

  13. Quality control procedures for iodinated radiopharmaceuticals 131I-Hippuran and 131I-Risa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toledo e Souza, I.T. de; Pereira, N.P.S. de; Silva, C.P.G. da.

    1986-02-01

    A rapid miniaturized chromatography system was developed for fast determination of the proportion of inorganic radioactive iodide from radiopharmaceutical 131 I-Hippuran and 131 I-Risa. The technical parameters associated with miniaturized chromatography system were evaluated. One of the problems found in this system was the movement of the 131 I-Risa from the origin with consequent overestimation of the inorganic iodide. A correct spot placement eliminated this problem. (Author) [pt

  14. Zika Virus: Recent Advances towards the Development of Vaccines and Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Monica A

    2017-06-13

    Zika is a rapidly emerging public health threat. Although clinical infection is frequently mild, significant neurological manifestations have been demonstrated in infants born to Zika virus (ZIKV) infected mothers. Due to the substantial ramifications of intrauterine infection, effective counter-measures are urgently needed. In order to develop effective anti-ZIKV vaccines and therapeutics, improved animal models and a better understanding of immunological correlates of protection against ZIKV are required. This review will summarize what is currently known about ZIKV, the clinical manifestations and epidemiology of Zika as well as, the development of animal models to study ZIKV infection, host immune responses against ZIKV, and the current state of development of vaccines and therapeutics against ZIKV.

  15. Zika Virus: Recent Advances towards the Development of Vaccines and Therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    McArthur, Monica A.

    2017-01-01

    Zika is a rapidly emerging public health threat. Although clinical infection is frequently mild, significant neurological manifestations have been demonstrated in infants born to Zika virus (ZIKV) infected mothers. Due to the substantial ramifications of intrauterine infection, effective counter-measures are urgently needed. In order to develop effective anti-ZIKV vaccines and therapeutics, improved animal models and a better understanding of immunological correlates of protection against ZIKV are required. This review will summarize what is currently known about ZIKV, the clinical manifestations and epidemiology of Zika as well as, the development of animal models to study ZIKV infection, host immune responses against ZIKV, and the current state of development of vaccines and therapeutics against ZIKV. PMID:28608813

  16. Regulatory requirements for radiopharmaceutical radiochemistry and radiation dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnyman, J.

    1985-01-01

    The Australian Department of Health is responsible for ensuring that radiopharmaceuticals are safe and effective and that their use does not result in unnecessary radiation exposure. Section B1 requirements of New Drug Form 4 (NDF4) fall into the following sections - manufacture, product specifications, quality assurance testing, stability studies and expiry dating. It covers ready to inject pharmaceuticals, radioactive formulations used to prepare a radiopharmaceutical, generators and cold kits

  17. Preparation of radiopharmaceutical formulations; Fremstilling av radioaktive farmasoeytiske blandinger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simon, J.; Garlich, J.R.; Frank, R.K.; McMillan, K

    1998-03-16

    Radiopharmaceutical formulations for complexes comprising at least one radionuclide complexed with a ligand, or its physiologically-acceptable salts thereof, especially {sup 153}samarium-ethylenediaminetetramethylenephosphonic acid, which optionally contains a divalent metal ion, e.g. calcium, and is frozen, thawed, and then administered by injection. Alternatively, the radiopharmaceutical formulations must contain the divalent metal and are frozen only if the time before administration is sufficiently long to cause concern for radiolysis of the ligand. 2 figs., 9 tabs.

  18. Radionuclide production and radiopharmaceutical chemistry with BNL cyclotrons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lambrecht, R.M.; Wolf, A.P.

    1985-01-01

    The Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) radiopharmaceutical chemistry program focuses on production and utilization of radionuclides having a half-life of > 2 hr. However, a major portion of the BNL program is devoted to short-lived radionuclides, such as 11 C and 18 F. Activities encompassed in the program are classified into seven areas: cyclotron parameters, radiochemistry, design and rapid synthesis of radiopharmaceuticals and labeled compounds, radiotracer evaluation in animals, studies in humans, technology transfer, and several other areas

  19. Radiopharmaceuticals in positron emission tomography: Radioisotope productions and radiolabelling procedures at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Sachinidis, J.I.; Chan, J.G.; Cook, M. [Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Centre for Positron Emission Tomography

    1997-10-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a technique that utilizes positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals to map the physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology of the human body. Positron-emitting radioisotopes produced in a medical cyclotron are incorporated into compounds that are biologically active in the body. A scanner measures radioactivity emitted from a patient`s body and provides cross-sectional images of the distribution of these radiolabelled compounds in the body. It is the purpose of this paper to review the variety of PET radiopharmaceuticals currently produced at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. Radioisotope production, radiolabelling of molecules and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals will be discussed. A few examples of their clinical applications will be shown as well. During the last five years we achieved a reliable routine production of various radiopharmaceuticals labelled with the four most important positron-emitters: oxygen-15 (t,{sub 1/2}=2min), nitrogen-13 (t{sub 1/2}= 10 min), carbon-11 (t{sub 1/2}=20 min) and fluorine-18 (t{sub 1/2}= 110 min). These radiopharmaceuticals include [{sup 15}O]oxygen, [{sup 15}O]carbon monoxide, [{sup 15}O]carbon dioxide, [{sup 15}O]water, [{sup 13}N]ammonia, [{sup 11}C]flumazenil, [{sup 11}C]SCH23390, [{sup 18}F]fluoromisonidazole and [{sup 18}F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose ([{sup 18}F]FDG). In addition, since the half life of [{sup 18}F] is almost two hours, regional distribution can be done, and the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre is currently supplying [{sup 18}F]FDG in routine to other hospitals. Future new radiopharmaceuticals development include a [{sup 18}F]thymidine analog to measure cell proliferation and a [{sup 11}C]pyrroloisoquinoline to visualize serotonergic neuron abnormalities. (authors) 23 refs., 2 tabs.

  20. Radiopharmaceuticals in positron emission tomography: Radioisotope productions and radiolabelling procedures at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J.; Sachinidis, J.I.; Chan, J.G.; Cook, M.

    1997-01-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a technique that utilizes positron-emitting radiopharmaceuticals to map the physiology, biochemistry and pharmacology of the human body. Positron-emitting radioisotopes produced in a medical cyclotron are incorporated into compounds that are biologically active in the body. A scanner measures radioactivity emitted from a patient's body and provides cross-sectional images of the distribution of these radiolabelled compounds in the body. It is the purpose of this paper to review the variety of PET radiopharmaceuticals currently produced at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. Radioisotope production, radiolabelling of molecules and quality control of radiopharmaceuticals will be discussed. A few examples of their clinical applications will be shown as well. During the last five years we achieved a reliable routine production of various radiopharmaceuticals labelled with the four most important positron-emitters: oxygen-15 (t, 1/2 =2min), nitrogen-13 (t 1/2 = 10 min), carbon-11 (t 1/2 =20 min) and fluorine-18 (t 1/2 = 110 min). These radiopharmaceuticals include [ 15 O]oxygen, [ 15 O]carbon monoxide, [ 15 O]carbon dioxide, [ 15 O]water, [ 13 N]ammonia, [ 11 C]flumazenil, [ 11 C]SCH23390, [ 18 F]fluoromisonidazole and [ 18 F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose ([ 18 F]FDG). In addition, since the half life of [ 18 F] is almost two hours, regional distribution can be done, and the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre is currently supplying [ 18 F]FDG in routine to other hospitals. Future new radiopharmaceuticals development include a [ 18 F]thymidine analog to measure cell proliferation and a [ 11 C]pyrroloisoquinoline to visualize serotonergic neuron abnormalities. (authors)

  1. Pediatric patients: criteria for radiopharmaceuticals activities in diagnostic procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Felipe Simas dos; Oliveira, Silvia M. Velasques de, E-mail: simas@ird.gov.b, E-mail: silvia@ird.gov.b [Instituto de Radioprotecao e Dosimetria (IRD/CNEN-RJ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    Recent studies recommend new criteria to determine radiopharmaceuticals activities per diagnostic procedures for children and teenagers. In USA, the criteria are: minimum and maximum activity and activity per body weight. The minimum activity is necessary for assuring the quality image due to the minimum requested statistical counting. The reduction of maximum activities minimizes the probability of detriment of radiation. In the European Union (EU), the Pediatric Dosage Card (PDC) proposes combined parameters: category of radiopharmaceutical, patient body weight and minimum activity per procedure. The PDC classifies the radiopharmaceuticals according to their biodistribution in the most sensitive organs. In Brazil, an investigation evaluated radiopharmaceuticals activities administered to 2,411 pediatric patients in sixteen institutions. The Brazilian mean activities per body weight, minimum and maximum activities used per institutions were compared with similar parameters surveyed in thirteen American hospitals. It was also used the PDC model to calculate the minimum activities per radiopharmaceuticals using recorded Brazilian patients corporal masses. The wider differences between Brazilian and USA installations were noticed for minimum activities by as much as a factor of 2 and 8. For {sup 67}Ga Citrate, the ranges of activities per patient corporal mass were by as much as a factor of 2 and 9 than activities used in USA. The range of maximum activities presented fewer differences, varying between 0.5 and 2 times for the radiopharmaceuticals studied. The present work needs the collaboration of the professional staff for discussion of the results, to promote regional surveys and to optimize pediatric patient protocols (author)

  2. Eichrom's ABEC trademark resins: Alkaline radioactive waste treatment, radiopharmaceutical, and potential hydrometallurgical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bond, A.H.; Gula, M.J.; Chang, F.; Rogers, R.D.

    1997-01-01

    Eichrom's ABEC trademark resins selectivity extract certain anions from high ionic strength acidic, neutral, or strongly alkaline media, and solute stripping can be accomplished by eluting with water. ABEC resins are stable to pH extreme and radiolysis and operate in high ionic strength and/or alkaline solutions where anion-exchange is often ineffective. Potential applications of the ABEC materials include heavy metal and ReO 4 - separations in hydrometallurgy and purification of perrhenate iodide, and iodate in radiopharmaceutical production. Separation of 99m TcO 4 - from its 99 MoO 4 2- parent and stripping with water or physiological saline solution have been demonstrated for radiopharmaceutical applications. Removal of 99 TcO 4 - and 129 I - from alkaline tank wastes has also been successfully demonstrated. The authors will discuss the scale-up studies, process-scale testing, and market development of this new extraction material

  3. Preparation of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals for positron tomography. Progress report, November 1, 1978-October 31, 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, M.J.

    1978-06-01

    Although the germanium-gallium generator is probably the only source of positron-emitting radionuclides that would enable the wide application of positron tomography, the generator system in use suffers from several major disadvantages. The most important of these is that the generator is eluted with EDTA, and EDTA forms a very strong chelate with gallium. In order to produce radiopharmaceuticals other than gallium-68 EDTA it is necessary to break the stable EDTA complex and remove all the EDTA. A new generator system using a solvent extraction system which will produce gallium-68 8-hydroxyquinoline, a weak chelate has been developed. Using this agent, several gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals have been synthesized and tested in vitro and in vivo. Attempts have been made using polarographic and chromatographic techniques to investigate the stability of gallium-68 complexes with a series of cryptates

  4. Forschungszentrum Rossendorf, Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Annual report 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, B.

    1996-02-01

    Research at the Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry of the Research Center Rossendorf is focused on radiotracers as molecular probes for diagnosis of disease. The research effort has two main components: -Positron emission tomography (PET) - technetium chemistry and radiopharmacology. The research activities of the Institute have been performed in three administratively classified groups. A PET tracer group is engaged in the chemistry and radiopharmacy of 11 C and 18 F compounds and in the setup of the PET center. A SPECT tracer group deals with the design, synthesis and chemical characterization of metal coordination compounds, primarily rhenium and technetium complexes. A biochemical group is working on SPECT and PET-relevant biochemical and biological projects. This includes the characterization and assessment of new compounds developed in the two synthetically oriented groups. The annual report presented here covers the research activities of the Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry in 1995. (orig.)

  5. Lactate as an early predictor of psychomotor development in neonates with asphyxia receiving therapeutic hypothermia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polackova, Renata; Salounova, Dana; Kantor, Lumir

    2017-12-04

    This prospective study aimed to evaluate the relationship between persistently elevated lactate values in the arterial blood of newborns with grade II and III hypoxic ischemic encephalopathy (treated with therapeutic hypothermia) and psychomotor development at 24 months. 51 neonates of gestational age from 36 to 41 weeks receiving therapeutic hypothermia for moderate to severe hypoxic ischaemic encephalopathy had arterial blood lactate levels regularly analysed. At 24 months the infants' psychomotor development was evaluated and they were divided into two groups - those where the outcome was favourable (i.e. normal psychomotor development) and adverse (severe motor or sensory impairment or death). The lactate dynamics over time were retrospectively evaluated from the data collected, with the normal upper limit set at 4 mmol/L. Of the 51 affected neonates, 7 died over the course of the study. 34 of the remaining 44 infants demonstrated normal psychomotor findings at 2 years old, with adverse findings in 10 cases. Although both groups experienced significant reductions in lactate over time, there were statistically significant differences between them regarding currently measured lactate levels. Absolute lactate values and their development over time can be a used as an auxiliary factor in making early estimates of the long-term outcome for newborns with neonatal asphyxia being treated with therapeutic hypothermia.

  6. Aquatic environment as an occupational therapeutic scenario for the development of body scheme in Down syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chrystiane Maria Veras Pôrto

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the effect of aquatic environment while an occupational therapeutic scenario in the development of body scheme of a child with Down Syndrome, considering the therapeutic properties of water. Description of the case: An interventionist research, with a qualitative and descriptive approach, conducted in an adapted pool of the Núcleo de Atenção Médica Integrada (NAMI of Fortaleza University (UNIFOR, Ceara, during the period of March to May, 2005. The subject of the study was a female child, aged 10 years old, diagnosed with Down Syndrome. Data collection had as instruments an interview guide for anamnesis, an evaluation form of psychomotor development, besides a field diary to record clinical observations during the sessions. This information was organized and analyzed based on clinical reasoning of occupational therapists and then described as a case study. We observed an evolution in the development of skills related to body scheme, such as the perception of fine parts of her own body, as well as large parts in someone else’s body, the imitation of positions, finishing with more active participation in activities of daily living. Final Considerations: We verified the effectiveness of occupational therapeutic activities conducted in aquatic environment for the development of the body scheme of the child in the study. This may be useful for conducting further research on the subject – whose literature is scarce – and contributing to the crescent update of occupational therapy practices.

  7. Development of therapeutic antibodies to G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels: Opportunities, challenges and their therapeutic potential in respiratory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douthwaite, Julie A; Finch, Donna K; Mustelin, Tomas; Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2017-01-01

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics continues to be a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Therapeutic drug targets such as soluble cytokines, growth factors and single transmembrane spanning receptors have been successfully targeted by recombinant monoclonal antibodies and the development of new product candidates continues. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important disease targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to the complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these important regulators of cell function. Given this opportunity, a significant effort has been applied to address the challenges of targeting these complex molecules and a number of targets are linked to the pathophysiology of respiratory diseases. In this review, we provide a summary of the importance of GPCRs and ion channels involved in respiratory disease and discuss advantages offered by antibodies as therapeutics at these targets. We highlight some recent GPCRs and ion channels linked to respiratory disease mechanisms and describe in detail recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional antibodies against challenging membrane protein targets such as GPCRs and ion channels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. The Function and Therapeutic Potential of Long Non-coding RNAs in Cardiovascular Development and Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarissa P.C. Gomes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The popularization of genome-wide analyses and RNA sequencing led to the discovery that a large part of the human genome, while effectively transcribed, does not encode proteins. Long non-coding RNAs have emerged as critical regulators of gene expression in both normal and disease states. Studies of long non-coding RNAs expressed in the heart, in combination with gene association studies, revealed that these molecules are regulated during cardiovascular development and disease. Some long non-coding RNAs have been functionally implicated in cardiac pathophysiology and constitute potential therapeutic targets. Here, we review the current knowledge of the function of long non-coding RNAs in the cardiovascular system, with an emphasis on cardiovascular development and biology, focusing on hypertension, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, ischemia, and heart failure. We discuss potential therapeutic implications and the challenges of long non-coding RNA research, with directions for future research and translational focus.

  9. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelstein, S.J. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States). Office of Sponsored Programs

    1995-02-01

    The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors` 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and their fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy.

  10. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1995-02-01

    The Harvard-MIT Research Program in Short-lived Radiopharmaceuticals was established in 1977 to foster interaction among groups working in radiopharmaceutical chemistry at Harvard Medical School, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and the Massachusetts General Hospital. To this was added a group at The Childrens Hospital. From these collaborations and building upon the special strengths of the participating individuals, laboratories and institutions, it was hoped that original approaches would be found for the design of new, clinically useful, radiolabeled compounds. The original thrust of this proposal included: (a) examination of the coordination chemistry of technetium as a basis for rational radiopharmaceutical design, (b) development of an ultrashort-lived radionuclide generator for the diagnosis of congenital heart disease in newborns, (c) synthesis of receptor-site-directed halopharmaceuticals, (d) improved facile labeling of complex molecules with positron-emitting radionuclides. The authors' 1986 proposal was oriented toward organs and disease, emphasizing radiolabeled agents that delineate specific functions and the distribution of receptors in brain, heart, and tumors. In 1989, they further refined their purposes and focused on two major aims: (a) synthesis and utilization of neutral technetium and rhenium complexes of high specific activity, and (b) development of new approaches to the radiolabeling of proteins, peptides, immunoglobulins, and their fragments. In 1992, the authors amended this proposal to concentrate their efforts on biologically active peptides and proteins for targeted radiodiagnosis and therapy

  11. [The prospects for the development of therapeutic and health-promoting tourism in Gorny Altai].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dzhabarova, N K; Iakovenko, É S; Sidorina, N G; Firsova, I A

    2014-01-01

    The present balneological survey made it possible to identify the promising areas with a high potential for the health resort, recreational and touristic activities including the foothill, low-mountain, mid-mountain valleys and hollows of Northern, Northwestern, Central and Eastern bioclimatic provinces of Mountainous Altai. Recommendations have been proposed for the development of therapeutic and health-improving tourism in the Shebalinsk, Ust'-Kansk and Ulagansk districts of the Altai Republic.

  12. Therapeutic Ultrasound Research And Development From An Industrial And Commercial Perspective

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seip, Ralf

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to share the challenges and opportunities as viewed from an industrial and commercial perspective that one encounters when performing therapeutic ultrasound research, development, manufacturing, and sales activities. Research in therapeutic ultrasound has become an active field in the last decade, spurred by technological advances in the areas of transducer materials, control electronics, treatment monitoring techniques, an ever increasing number of clinical applications, and private and governmental funding opportunities. The development of devices and methods utilizing therapeutic ultrasound to cure or manage disease is being pursued by startup companies and large established companies alike, driven by the promise of profiting at many levels from this new and disruptive technology. Widespread penetration within the clinical community remains elusive, with current approaches focusing on very specific applications and niche markets. Challenges include difficulties in securing capital to develop the technology and undertake costly clinical trials, a regulatory landscape that varies from country to country, resistance from established practitioners, and difficulties in assembling a team with the right mix of technological savvy and business expertise. Success is possible and increasing, however, as evidenced by several companies, initiatives, and products with measurable benefits to the patient, clinician, and companies alike.

  13. Helping Oxytocin Deliver: Considerations in the Development of Oxytocin-Based Therapeutics for Brain Disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai eMacdonald

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Concerns regarding a drought in psychopharmacology have risen from many quarters. From one perspective, the wellspring of bedrock medications for anxiety disorders, depression, and schizophrenia was serendipitously discovered over thirty year ago, the swell of pharmaceutical investment in drug discovery has receded, and the pipeline’s flow of medications with unique mechanisms of action (i.e. glutamatergic agents, CRF antagonists has slowed to a trickle. Might oxytocin (OT-based therapeutics be an oasis? Though a large basic science literature and a slowly increasing number of studies in human diseases support this hope, the bulk of extant OT studies in humans are single-dose studies on normals, and do not directly relate to improvements in human brain-based diseases. Instead, these studies have left us with a field pregnant with therapeutic possibilities, but barren of definitive treatments. In this clinically-oriented review, we discuss the extant OT literature with an eye toward helping OT deliver on its promise as a therapeutic agent. To this end, we identify ten key questions that we believe future OT research should address. From this overview, several conclusions are clear: 1 the OT system represents an extremely promising target for novel CNS drug development; 2 there is a pressing need for rigorous, randomized controlled clinical trials targeting actual patients; and 3 in order to inform the design and execution of these vital trials, we need further translational studies addressing the questions posed in this review. Looking forward, we extend a cautious hope that the next decade of OT research will birth oxytocin-targetted therapeutics that can truly deliver on this system’s therapeutic potential.

  14. Preparation of carbon 11-labelled radiopharmaceuticals by the use of HPLC method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berget, G.; Maziere, M.; Godot, J.M.; Sastre, J.; Prenant, C.; Comar, D.

    1982-06-01

    Various medical examinations and metabolic studies are carried out with carbon 11-labelled radiopharmaceuticals. This radioelement offers a number of advantages: it can be introduced into an organic molecule without changing its properties; the radiation dose delivered to the patient is low (T = 20 mn); since the specific activity obtained is high (0.5 to 2 Ci/μ mole) the injected masses are very small; finally, tomographic images of the distribution of the product in the body may be obtained by the use of positron cameras. However in view of the radioactivities handled on a routine basis the preparations must be carried out without manual intervention, in closed shielded hoods. Synthesis methods and special equipment have been developed. In all cases the reaction mixtures are purified by HPLC, a method chosen for its speed, efficiency, ease of automation and adaptation to any product with a suitable choice of column and eluant. The radiopharmaceuticals are obtained in injectable solution (ethanol-physiological serum, buffered physiological serum) or in a mixture of volatile solvents which are evaporated by nitrogen bubbling and finally sterilised by passage over millipore filter. About ten different radiopharmaceuticals are prepared in this way in the laboratory [fr

  15. Medical application of nuclear science: nuclear medicine and production of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornet, L.

    1997-01-01

    Nuclear science in attendance on medicine or from Radium to Radiopharmaceuticals. By a brief historical reminder of the evolution of the radioactivity and development of nuclear science, we could see a very early interest and application of the radioactivity in the medical field. Main steps: Detection of natural radioactivity/Discovery of artificial radioactivity/First treatment of leukaemia and thyroid/First nuclear reactor/First radioisotope laboratory in hospital/First scintigraphy/First radiopharmaceutical/First cyclotron and cyclotron products/First immunoscintigraphy/Biotechnology and radioisotope/Evolution of technics [equipment for diagnosis (imaging, scintigraphy) and therapy]/Evolution of production technics and concept of products (generators of Technetium) and machines, reactor, cyclotron/Evolution of importance and interest of nuclear medicine/Creation of international association of nuclear medicine and producers (example ARPR)/Evolution of safety and pharmaceuticals regulation. After the sixties, period extremely rich in invention of products, characterized by a high fertility specially due to a non-restrictive regulation in terms of safety and pharmaceutical consideration, the evolution of technics, the importance of costs (investment, research, healthcare and the evolution of the regulations) have smoothly but continuously transformed the contexts and different actors. Consequences and facts: Rationalization and standardization of the catalogues, total integration of radiopharmaceuticals into the pharmaceutical laws, stop of nuclear research reactors, increase of number of cyclotrons, transformation of size and role of the producers and nuclear centers, risk in supply of some raw materials like Molybdenum, medical nuclear application as a worldwide business

  16. Preparation of gallium-68 radiopharmaceuticals for positron tomography. Progress report, November 1, 1977-October 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, M.J.

    1980-06-01

    Although the germanium-68 ..-->.. gallium-68 generator is probably the only source of positron-emitting radionuclides that could enable the widespread application of positron tomography, the commercially available /sup 68/Ga//sup 68/Ge generator system suffers from several major disadvantages. The most important of these is that the generator is eluted with EDTA, which forms a very strong chelate with gallium. In order to produce radiopharmaceuticals other than /sup 68/Ga-EDTA, it is first necessary to break the stable EDTA complex and remove all traces of EDTA. This procedure adds several steps and a significant amount of time to procedures for preparing /sup 68/Ga-radiopharmaceuticals. We have developed a new generator using a solvent extraction system which will produce /sup 68/Ga-oxine (8-hydroxyquinoline), a weak chelate. Using this agent we have synthesized several /sup 68/Ga-radiopharmaceuticals and tested them in vitro and in vivo. We have also carried out some preliminary studies to compare generator systems which produce /sup 68/Ga in an ionic form. Attempts have been made using polarographic and chromatographic techniques, and in vivo distribution data to investigate the stability of radiogallium complexes with a series of potentially lipophilic complexing agents.

  17. The development of the therapeutic alliance and the emergence of alliance ruptures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joana Coutinho

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: This study evaluated the development of the therapeutic alliance and the emergence of alliance ruptures, in a sample of patients with different diagnosis and different therapeutic outcome. Design: We examined the longitudinal data of 38 therapeutic dyads receiving cognitive-behavioural therapy, including dropouts as well as successful and unsuccessful cases. The sample included cases with Axis I and Axis II disorders. Method: At the end of each session, patients evaluated the alliance using the Working Alliance Inventory (WAI. Six judges trained in the observation of alliance rupture markers with an observational system of ruptures, rated 201 videotaped sessions. Longitudinal statistical models were applied to the data. Results: We found that the pattern of alliance development of successful cases was different from the unsuccessful and dropouts cases. In addition on average, patients with personality disorders began therapy with a lower WAI score that decreased over time, whereas patients with Axis-I disorders began therapy with a higher WAI score that increased over time.

  18. Development of next generation cardiovascular therapeutics through bio-assisted nanotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmanan, Rajesh; Maulik, Nilanjana

    2017-09-26

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) rank, next to cancer and stroke, among the deadliest diseases in the world. Among the major CVDs, acute myocardial infarction is a life-threatening disorder resulting from permanent damage to the left ventricular cardiac tissue. The major coronary arteries that supply blood to the functional left ventricle become blocked due to thrombotic plaque occlusion. During myocardial ischemia, oxidative stress and free radicals destroy healthy cardiomyocytes, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells, followed by degradation of the extracellular matrix, which results in ventricular wall-thinning and dilation. To protect the left ventricle from further damage and to rescue ischemic cardiac tissue, specially designed scaffolds consisting of biological material and nanomaterials have been developed. At the preclinical level, scaffolds loaded with growth factors and cells have been shown to regenerate ischemic tissue into healthy, functional myocardium. In this review, different therapeutic strategies currently available to treat the disease conditions at various stages are discussed, with special emphasis on biomaterials. Recent advancements in cardiovascular therapeutics using graphene and exosomal nanovesicles are discussed in detail. In addition, future directions for the development of next-generation cardiovascular therapeutics with biological and non-biological materials through nano-assisted technology are explored. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. [Design, development and successful application of safe and effective HIV therapeutic and prophylactic vaccines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abalaka, Jeremiah O A

    2005-01-01

    It is generally held that HIV, the causative agent of the rampaging global HIV/AIDS pandemic, is incurable and uniformly fatal. Since the discovery and isolation of the virus over two decades ago, global efforts at producing preventive and curative vaccines against it have so far resulted in failure. Working single-handedly with only his family's meagre resources and against the tide of universally accepted dogmas on HIV/AIDS, the author designed, developed and applied new HIV therapeutic and preventive vaccines in Nigeria, and has been using them on willing HIV-infected and normal persons respectively with their informed and written consent since their development. In many cases, the therapeutic vaccine produced rapid improvement not only in the symptoms and signs attributable to HIV infection, but also in various laboratory parameters with a sustained seroconversion to HIV antibody negative status in a number of the patients. In those HIV-infected patients with concomitant hepatitis B (HBV) and/or C (HCV) infection(s), the therapeutic vaccine has resulted in maintained seroconversion to negative (normal) for the HBsAg and HCV antibodies also. No significant adverse or side effect has been observed yet with the use of these vaccines. The vaccines do not cause the production of any detectable levels of stigmatizing anti-HIV antibodies. It is postulated that the vaccines elicit effective but selective cell-mediated cytotoxic immune responses against HIV, HBV and HCV-infected cells.

  20. Application of lectins to tumor imaging radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kojima, Shuji; Jay, M.

    1986-11-01

    We investigated the in vitro binding of /sup 125/I-lectins to Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells and in vivo uptake of /sup 125/I-lectins in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST) bearing mice. In in vitro binding assays, phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA), pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), and concanavalia agglutinin (Con A) showed a high affinity for EAT cells. The in vivo biodistribution of /sup 125/I-lectins showed /sup 125/I-PSA to be significantly taken up into EST tissues 24 h postinjection. After IV injection of /sup 125/I-PSA, uptake of the radioactivity into the tumor tissues reached a maximum at 6 h, and thereafter decreased. Rapid disappearance of the radioactivity from blood and its excretion into kidney soon after injection of /sup 125/I-PSA were observed. When compared with the biodistribution of /sup 67/Ga-citrate in EST bearing mice 24 h postinjection, tumor to liver (T/B), tumor to muscle (T/M), and tumor to blood (T/B) ratios were superior for /sup 125/I-PSA. At 6 h postinjection, the T/B-ratio of /sup 125/I-PSA was 2.5, and this value may be sufficient to enable discernable diagnostic images. Our results suggest that PSA might be a useful tumor imaging radiopharmaceutical.

  1. Application of lectins to tumor imaging radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kojima, Shuji; Jay, M.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the in vitro binding of 125 I-lectins to Ehrlich ascites tumor (EAT) cells and in vivo uptake of 125 I-lectins in Ehrlich solid tumor (EST) bearing mice. In in vitro binding assays, phaseolus vulgaris agglutinin (PHA), pisum sativum agglutinin (PSA), and concanavalia agglutinin (Con A) showed a high affinity for EAT cells. The in vivo biodistribution of 125 I-lectins showed 125 I-PSA to be significantly taken up into EST tissues 24 h postinjection. After IV injection of 125 I-PSA, uptake of the radioactivity into the tumor tissues reached a maximum at 6 h, and thereafter decreased. Rapid disappearance of the radioactivity from blood and its excretion into kidney soon after injection of 125 I-PSA were observed. When compared with the biodistribution of 67 Ga-citrate in EST bearing mice 24 h postinjection, tumor to liver (T/B), tumor to muscle (T/M), and tumor to blood (T/B) ratios were superior for 125 I-PSA. At 6 h postinjection, the T/B-ratio of 125 I-PSA was 2.5, and this value may be sufficient to enable discernable diagnostic images. Our results suggest that PSA might be a useful tumor imaging radiopharmaceutical. (orig.)

  2. Role of radiopharmaceuticals in detection of osteomyelitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, J.M.; Spencer, R.P.

    1990-01-01

    Osteomyelitis can present as a significant diagnostic problem in medicine. Knowledge of the presence and extent of infection involving bone is important in determining treatment. In this paper the authors review the role played by radiopharmaceutical techniques in establishing the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Osteomyelitis has been recognized as one of the most serious complications of emergency surgery to repair severe bone trauma. It is also a complication of surgery for prosthesis placement. In still other instances, osteomyelitis can be of hematogenous origin, without a major wound site. Unlike other infections, it rarely presents with acute symptoms. Osteomyelitis is divided into two categories that are time related: acute, in which clinical signs and symptoms of bone infection have been present for less than 1 month, and chronic, in which symptoms have been present for more than 1 month. The acute type is usually caused by Staphylococcus aureus in children (often secondary to skin infection), whereas in adults it can be secondary to intravenous drug abuse. Predisposing factors such as diabetes mellitus, peripheral vascular disease, and sickle cell disease are important to the outcome of osteomyelitis. One way to determine the microbe causing the infection is direct bone biopsy from the site of suspected osteomyelitis. There is one important limitation for needle biopsy in the diagnosis of osteomyelitis. Biopsies are contraindicated in the small bones of the hands and feet, because of risk of pathologic fracture (and may be relatively contraindicated after diphosphonate therapy and loss of bone mineral)

  3. New SPECT and PET Radiopharmaceuticals for Imaging Cardiovascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oyebola O. Sogbein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nuclear cardiology has experienced exponential growth within the past four decades with converging capacity to diagnose and influence management of a variety of cardiovascular diseases. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI with technetium-99m radiotracers or thallium-201 has dominated the field; however new hardware and software designs that optimize image quality with reduced radiation exposure are fuelling a resurgence of interest at the preclinical and clinical levels to expand beyond MPI. Other imaging modalities including positron emission tomography (PET and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI continue to emerge as powerful players with an expanded capacity to diagnose a variety of cardiac conditions. At the forefront of this resurgence is the development of novel target vectors based on an enhanced understanding of the underlying pathophysiological process in the subcellular domain. Molecular imaging with novel radiopharmaceuticals engineered to target a specific subcellular process has the capacity to improve diagnostic accuracy and deliver enhanced prognostic information to alter management. This paper, while not comprehensive, will review the recent advancements in radiotracer development for SPECT and PET MPI, autonomic dysfunction, apoptosis, atherosclerotic plaques, metabolism, and viability. The relevant radiochemistry and preclinical and clinical development in addition to molecular imaging with emerging modalities such as cardiac MRI and PET-MR will be discussed.

  4. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1987-01-01

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma

  5. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-01-01

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma.

  6. AUTOMATION FOR THE SYNTHESIS AND APPLICATION OF PET RADIOPHARMACEUTICALS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexoff, D.L.

    2001-09-21

    The development of automated systems supporting the production and application of PET radiopharmaceuticals has been an important focus of researchers since the first successes of using carbon-11 (Comar et al., 1979) and fluorine-18 (Reivich et al., 1979) labeled compounds to visualize functional activity of the human brain. These initial successes of imaging the human brain soon led to applications in the human heart (Schelbert et al., 1980), and quickly radiochemists began to see the importance of automation to support PET studies in humans (Lambrecht, 1982; Langstrom et al., 1983). Driven by the necessity of controlling processes emanating high fluxes of 511 KeV photons, and by the tedium of repetitive syntheses for carrying out these human PET investigations, academic and government scientists have designed, developed and tested many useful and novel automated systems in the past twenty years. These systems, originally designed primarily by radiochemists, not only carry out effectively the tasks they were designed for, but also demonstrate significant engineering innovation in the field of laboratory automation.

  7. Radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis of inflammation; Radiopharmaka fuer die Entzuendungsdiagnostik

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meller, B.; Baehre, M. [Luebeck Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin

    2007-06-15

    Inflammations represent mediator-induced reactions of the hematopoetic-immunologic cell system resulting from exogenous or endogenous stimuli. On cellular level, an increased expression of inflammatory genes is followed by the release of several mediators. As inflammatory response vascular permeability increases and interstitial oedema develops. Additionally, white blood cells emigrate and several transduction cascades are activated. Radiopharmaceuticals for inflammation scintigraphy should specifically reflect one or several aspects of inflammation pathophysiology on molecular level. A group of elder tracers for this purpose comprised substances that are accumulated due to the permeability of physiological barriers. However, their property to accumulate in all processes with increased vascular permeability results in a comparably low specificity of these methods. In-vitro-labelled granulocytes were the method of choice for scintigraphic imaging of inflammation for years. Investigations with {sup 111}In-labelled granulocytes are still frequently considered as the gold standard to detect inflammation by scintigraphy. The use of antibodies or antibody fragments directed against leucocytes allowed in vivo labelling and substituted more complex techniques of in vitro labelling despite of several disadvantages. Due to the superior imaging quality of positron emission tomography, [{sup 18}F]FDG-labelled leucocytes might result in a renaissance of in vitro methods. In cases of cerebral inflammation, activated microglia was visualised by its increased expression of benzodiazepin receptors. An interesting approach to differentiate between infection and sterile inflammation could be the use of bacterial gyrase inhibitors labelled with radioactive compounds. At present, specificity of this method is still controversially discussed. In search of substances to visualise inflammatory transduction cascades selectively, several chemotactic and chemokinetic cytokines, metabolites

  8. Infection imaging with radiopharmaceuticals in the 21st century

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satya S. Das

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Infection continues to be a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Nuclear medicine has an important role in aiding the diagnosis of particularly deep-seated infections such as abscesses, osteomyelitis, septic arthritis, endocarditis, and infections of prosthetic devices. Established techniques such as radiolabelled leucocytes are sensitive and specific for inflammation but do not distinguish between infective and non-infective inflammation. The challenge for Nuclear medicine in infection imaging in the 21st century is to build on the recent trend towards the development of more infection specific radiopharmaceuticals, such as radiolabelled anti-infectives (e.g. 99mTc- ciprofloxacin. In addition to aiding early diagnosis of infection, through serial imaging these agents might prove very useful in monitoring the response to and determining the optimum duration of anti-infective therapy. This article reviews the current approach to infection imaging with radiopharmaceuticals and the future direction it might take.A infecção continua a ser uma das grandes causas de morbidade e mortalidade mundiais. A Medicina Nuclear tem um importante papel em contribuir elucidar o diagnóstico de infecções tais como abscessos, osteomielites, artrite séptica, endocardite e infecção nos aparatos de prótese. As técnicas já estabelecidas tais como leucócitos marcados são sensíveis e específicas para inflamação, mas não distinguem entre inflamação infecciosa e não-infecciosa. O desafio para a Medicina Nuclear para obtenção de imagem de infecções no século 21 é trabalhar na recente tendência para o desenvolvimento de radiofármacos mais específicos para o estudo de infecções, tais como agentes anti-infecciosos marcados (por exemplo, 99mTc-ciprofloxacina. Além disto, para ajudar no diagnóstico precoce das infecções, através de imagens seriadas, estes agentes podem se provar muito úteis no monitoramento das respostas e para

  9. Helping oxytocin deliver: considerations in the development of oxytocin-based therapeutics for brain disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, K; Feifel, D

    2013-01-01

    Concerns regarding a drought in psychopharmacology have risen from many quarters. From one perspective, the wellspring of bedrock medications for anxiety disorders, depression, and schizophrenia was serendipitously discovered over 30 year ago, the swell of pharmaceutical investment in drug discovery has receded, and the pipeline's flow of medications with unique mechanisms of action (i.e., glutamatergic agents, CRF antagonists) has slowed to a trickle. Might oxytocin (OT)-based therapeutics be an oasis? Though a large basic science literature and a slowly increasing number of studies in human diseases support this hope, the bulk of extant OT studies in humans are single-dose studies on normals, and do not directly relate to improvements in human brain-based diseases. Instead, these studies have left us with a field pregnant with therapeutic possibilities, but barren of definitive treatments. In this clinically oriented review, we discuss the extant OT literature with an eye toward helping OT deliver on its promise as a therapeutic agent. To this end, we identify 10 key questions that we believe future OT research should address. From this overview, several conclusions are clear: (1) the OT system represents an extremely promising target for novel CNS drug development; (2) there is a pressing need for rigorous, randomized controlled clinical trials targeting actual patients; and (3) in order to inform the design and execution of these vital trials, we need further translational studies addressing the questions posed in this review. Looking forward, we extend a cautious hope that the next decade of OT research will birth OT-targeted treatments that can truly deliver on this system's therapeutic potential.

  10. Development of Novel Therapeutic Agents by Inhibition of Oncogenic MicroRNAs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinh-Duc Nguyen

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRs, miRNAs are regulatory small noncoding RNAs, with their roles already confirmed to be important for post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression affecting cell physiology and disease development. Upregulation of a cancer-causing miRNA, known as oncogenic miRNA, has been found in many types of cancers and, therefore, represents a potential new class of targets for therapeutic inhibition. Several strategies have been developed in recent years to inhibit oncogenic miRNAs. Among them is a direct approach that targets mature oncogenic miRNA with an antisense sequence known as antimiR, which could be an oligonucleotide or miRNA sponge. In contrast, an indirect approach is to block the biogenesis of miRNA by genome editing using the CRISPR/Cas9 system or a small molecule inhibitor. The development of these inhibitors is straightforward but involves significant scientific and therapeutic challenges that need to be resolved. In this review, we summarize recent relevant studies on the development of miRNA inhibitors against cancer.

  11. Results of the quality assurance testing program for radiopharmaceuticals 1982-1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonnyman, J.; Lauder, R.; Van Every, B.

    1986-02-01

    The Australian Radiation Laboratory conducts a Radiopharmaceutical Quality Assurance Test Programme in which radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine in Australia are tested for compliance with specifications. The results of testing during 1982 and 1983 are summarised. Overall 144 batches of 27 different types of radiopharmaceutical were tested in 1982-83. Samples failed to meet specification in 17 of the 1150 tests performed. In all, failure to meet full specification was observed in 13 different types of radiopharmaceutical. No single radiopharmaceutical was responsible for more than 2 failures. Labelling errors accounted for 6/17 failures. Most other errors were of a minor nature and were due to the product being slightly outside specified limits. Of the 17 failures, 11 were associated with imported radiopharmaceuticals (86 batches tested) and 6 were associated with locally produced radiopharmaceuticals (58 batches tested). There is thus no significant difference in the failure rate of local and imported radiopharmaceuticals

  12. A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry: Individual Development, Psychology, and Social Reparation. Psychoanalysis, Education and Social Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Todd O.

    2012-01-01

    A Therapeutic Approach to Teaching Poetry develops a poetry pedagogy that offers significant benefits to students by helping them to achieve a sense of renewal (a deeper awareness of self and potentials) and reparation (a realistic, but positive and proactive worldview). Todd O. Williams offers a thorough examination of the therapeutic potential…

  13. Development of Therapeutics That Induce Mitochondrial Biogenesis for the Treatment of Acute and Chronic Degenerative Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Robert B; Beeson, Craig C; Schnellmann, Rick G

    2016-12-08

    Mitochondria have various roles in cellular metabolism and homeostasis. Because mitochondrial dysfunction is associated with many acute and chronic degenerative diseases, mitochondrial biogenesis (MB) is a therapeutic target for treating such diseases. Here, we review the role of mitochondrial dysfunction in acute and chronic degenerative diseases and the cellular signaling pathways by which MB is induced. We then review existing work describing the development and application of drugs that induce MB in vitro and in vivo. In particular, we discuss natural products and modulators of transcription factors, kinases, cyclic nucleotides, and G protein-coupled receptors.

  14. Investigation on chemistry of model compounds of technetium radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Muenze, R.; Hartmann, E.

    1983-01-01

    The report summarized experimental and theoretical results concerning the chemical structures and the biodistribution of hydrophilic technetium chelates with hydroxycarboxylic and aminopolycarboxylic acids, thiol compounds and aliphatic and aromatic nitrogen compounds as ligands. Methods which are suitable for synthesizing and characterizing defined chelates of Tc(V), Tc(IV) and Tc(III) have been developed for crystlline substances and species in solution, respectively. For certain types of technetium chelates three dimensional structure models were calculated from atomic parameters. The electron energies and electron distribution of Tc(V) thiol compounds were calculated by quantum chemical methods in order to interprete physical properties of these substances. Biodistribution studies revealed relationships between the osteotropic behaviour and the structure of phosphorous and non-phosphorous technetium chelates and between the kidney uptake and ligand exchange ability of Tc(V) hydroxycarboxylates. Important parameters for the production of technetium-99m kits have been elaborated and used for the optimization of radiopharmaceuticals (bone-, kidney and hepatobiliaer agents). (author)

  15. DISC1 pathway in brain development: exploring therapeutic targets for major psychiatric disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi eKamiya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic risk factors for major psychiatric disorders play key roles in neurodevelopment. Thus, exploring the molecular pathways of risk genes is important not only for understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying brain development, but also to decipher how genetic disturbances affect brain maturation and functioning relevant to major mental illnesses. During the last decade, there has been significant progress in determining the mechanisms whereby risk genes impact brain development. Nonetheless, given that the majority of psychiatric disorders have etiological complexities encompassing multiple risk genes and environmental factors, the biological mechanisms of these diseases remain poorly understood. How can we move forward in our research for discovery of the biological markers and novel therapeutic targets for major mental disorders? Here we review recent progress in the neurobiology of Disrupted in schizophrenia 1 (DISC1, a major risk gene for major mental disorders, with a particular focus on its roles in cerebral cortex development. Convergent findings implicate DISC1 as part of a large, multi-step pathway implicated in various cellular processes and signal transduction. We discuss links between the DISC1 pathway and environmental factors, such as immune/inflammatory responses, which may suggest novel therapeutic targets. Existing treatments for major mental disorders are hampered by a limited number of pharmacological targets. Consequently, elucidation of the DISC1 pathway, and its association with neuropsychiatric disorders, may offer hope for novel treatment interventions.

  16. Development of Quorum-Based Anti-Virulence Therapeutics Targeting Gram-Negative Bacterial Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Shan Yew

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing is a cell density-dependent signaling phenomenon used by bacteria for coordination of population-wide phenotypes, such as expression of virulence genes, antibiotic resistance and biofilm formation. Lately, disruption of bacterial communication has emerged as an anti-virulence strategy with enormous therapeutic potential given the increasing incidences of drug resistance in pathogenic bacteria. The quorum quenching therapeutic approach promises a lower risk of resistance development, since interference with virulence generally does not affect the growth and fitness of the bacteria and, hence, does not exert an associated selection pressure for drug-resistant strains. With better understanding of bacterial communication networks and mechanisms, many quorum quenching methods have been developed against various clinically significant bacterial pathogens. In particular, Gram-negative bacteria are an important group of pathogens, because, collectively, they are responsible for the majority of hospital-acquired infections. Here, we discuss the current understanding of existing quorum sensing mechanisms and present important inhibitory strategies that have been developed against this group of pathogenic bacteria.

  17. Calculating patient specific doses in X-ray diagnostics and from radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lampinen, J.

    2000-01-01

    The risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation is dependent on the characteristics of the exposed individual. The size and structure of the individual influences the absorbed dose distribution in the organs. Traditional methods used to calculate the patient organ doses are based on standardised calculation phantoms, which neglect the variance of the patient size or even sex. When estimating the radiation dose of an individual patient, patient specific calculation methods must be used. Methods for patient specific dosimetry in the fields of X-ray diagnostics and diagnostic and therapeutic use of radiopharmaceuticals were proposed in this thesis. A computer program, ODS-60, for calculating organ doses from diagnostic X-ray exposures was presented. The calculation is done in a patient specific phantom with depth dose and profile algorithms fitted to Monte Carlo simulation data from a previous study. Improvements to the version reported earlier were introduced, e.g. bone attenuation was implemented. The applicability of the program to determine patient doses from complex X-ray examinations (barium enema examination) was studied. The conversion equations derived for female and male patients as a function of patient weight gave the smallest deviation from the actual patient doses when compared to previous studies. Another computer program, Intdose, was presented for calculation of the dose distribution from radiopharmaceuticals. The calculation is based on convolution of an isotope specific point dose kernel with activity distribution, obtained from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Anatomical information is taken from magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images. According to a phantom study, Intdose agreed within 3 % with measurements. For volunteers administered diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, the results given by Intdose were found to agree with traditional methods in cases of medium sized patients. For patients

  18. Calculating patient-specific doses in X-ray diagnostics and from radiopharmaceuticals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampinen, Juha Sakari

    2000-06-01

    The risk associated with exposure to ionising radiation is dependent on the characteristics of the exposed individual. The size and structure of the individual influences the absorbed dose distribution in the organs. Traditional methods used to calculate the patient organ doses are based on standardised calculation phantoms, which neglect the variance of the patient size or even sex. Methods for patient specific dosimetry in the fields of X-ray diagnostics and diagnostic and therapeutic use of radiopharmaceuticals were proposed in this thesis. A computer program, ODS-60, for calculating organ doses from diagnostic X-ray exposures was presented. The calculation is done in a patient specific phantom with depth dose and profile algorithms fitted to Monte Carlo simulation data from a previous study. Improvements to the version reported earlier were introduced, e.g. bone attenuation was implemented. The applicability of the program to determine patient doses from complex X-ray examinations (barium enema examination) was studied. The conversion equations derived for female and male patients as a function of patient weight gave the smallest deviation from the actual patient doses when compared to previous studies. Another computer program, Intdose, was presented for calculation of the dose distribution from radiopharmaceuticals. The calculation is based on convolution of an isotope specific point dose kernel with activity distribution, obtained from single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) images. Anatomical information is taken from magnetic resonance (MR) or computed tomography (CT) images. According to a phantom study, Intdose agreed within 3% with measurements. For volunteers administered diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals, the results given by Intdose were found to agree with traditional methods in cases of medium sized patients. For patients undergoing systemic radiation therapy, the results by Intdose differed from measurements due to dynamic biodistribution

  19. Introduction to the use of FRAM on the effectiveness assessment of a radiopharmaceutical dispatches process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pereira, Ana G.A.A.

    2013-01-01

    This article aims to make an introduction to the use of Functional Resonance Analysis Method (FRAM) on the effectiveness assessment of a specific radiopharmaceutical dispatching process. The main purpose was to provide a didactic view of the method application to further in-depth analysis. The investigation also provided a relevant body of knowledge of radiopharmaceuticals dispatches processes. This work uses the term 'effectiveness assessment' instead of 'risk assessment' due to the broader meaning the former provide. The radiopharmaceutical dispatching process is the final task of a dynamic system designed to attend several medical facilities. It is comprised by functions involving mostly human activities, such as checking and packaging the product and measuring the radiopharmaceutical nuclear activity. Although the dispatch process has well-known steps for its completion, the human factor is the fundamental mechanism of work and control, being susceptible of irregular and instable performance. As a socio-technical system, the risk assessment provided by FRAM may be of importance for safety and quality improvements, even more if considered the nuclear nature of the product, which makes risk assessment critical and mandatory. A system is safe if it is resistant and resilient to perturbations. Identification and assessment of possible risks is, therefore, an essential prerequisite for system safety. Although this seems obvious, most risk assessments are conducted under relative ignorance of the full behavior of the system. Such condition has lead to an approach to assess the risks of intractable systems (i.e., systems that are incompletely described or under specified), namely Resilience Engineering. Into this area, the Functional Resonance Analysis Method has been developed in order to provide concepts, terminology and a set of methods capable of dealing with such systems. The study was conducted following the Functional Resonance Analysis Method. At first, the

  20. Efficiancy of hydrogen peroxide for cleaning production areas and equipments in the radiopharmaceutical production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baptista, Tatyana S.; Batista, Vanessa; Gomes, Antonio; Matsuda, Margareth; Fukumori, Neuza; Araujo, Elaine B. de, E-mail: tsbaptista@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A great challenge in the radiopharmaceuticals production is to fulfill the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs), involving the validation of process and of all supporting activities such as cleaning and sanitization. The increasingly strict requirements for quality assurance system, with several norms and normative resolutions has led to a constant concern with programs and cleaning validation in pharmaceutical production. The main goal of GMP is to reduce risks inherent to pharmaceutical production, that is to reduce product contamination with microorganisms and cross-contamination. The basic requirements to prevent contamination is the development and implementation of efficient cleaning programs. In the case of clean rooms for the production of injectable radiopharmaceuticals, the requirement for cleaning programs is evidently higher due to the characteristics of these areas with hot cells for radioactive materials, where sterile radiopharmaceuticals are manipulated and distributed before administration to patients just after minutes or hours of its preparation. In the Radiopharmacy Department at IPEN it was established a cleaning program for clean rooms and hot cells using a hydrogen peroxide solution (20% proxitane alfa). The objective of this work was to assess effectiveness of this cleaning agent in reducing and/or eliminating microbial load in the clean rooms and equipment to acceptable levels in accordance with the current legislation. The analysis was conducted using results of the environmental monitoring program with and settling contact plates in clean rooms after the cleaning procedures. Furthermore, it was possible to evaluate the action of the sanitizing agent on the microbial population on the surface of equipment and clean rooms. It was also evaluated the best way to accomplish the cleaning program considering the dosimetric factor in each production process, as the main concern of pharmaceutical companies is the microbiological contamination, in

  1. Efficiancy of hydrogen peroxide for cleaning production areas and equipments in the radiopharmaceutical production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baptista, Tatyana S.; Batista, Vanessa; Gomes, Antonio; Matsuda, Margareth; Fukumori, Neuza; Araujo, Elaine B. de

    2013-01-01

    A great challenge in the radiopharmaceuticals production is to fulfill the Good Manufacturing Practices (GMPs), involving the validation of process and of all supporting activities such as cleaning and sanitization. The increasingly strict requirements for quality assurance system, with several norms and normative resolutions has led to a constant concern with programs and cleaning validation in pharmaceutical production. The main goal of GMP is to reduce risks inherent to pharmaceutical production, that is to reduce product contamination with microorganisms and cross-contamination. The basic requirements to prevent contamination is the development and implementation of efficient cleaning programs. In the case of clean rooms for the production of injectable radiopharmaceuticals, the requirement for cleaning programs is evidently higher due to the characteristics of these areas with hot cells for radioactive materials, where sterile radiopharmaceuticals are manipulated and distributed before administration to patients just after minutes or hours of its preparation. In the Radiopharmacy Department at IPEN it was established a cleaning program for clean rooms and hot cells using a hydrogen peroxide solution (20% proxitane alfa). The objective of this work was to assess effectiveness of this cleaning agent in reducing and/or eliminating microbial load in the clean rooms and equipment to acceptable levels in accordance with the current legislation. The analysis was conducted using results of the environmental monitoring program with and settling contact plates in clean rooms after the cleaning procedures. Furthermore, it was possible to evaluate the action of the sanitizing agent on the microbial population on the surface of equipment and clean rooms. It was also evaluated the best way to accomplish the cleaning program considering the dosimetric factor in each production process, as the main concern of pharmaceutical companies is the microbiological contamination, in

  2. Preparation and stability of the 99m Tc-HNE2 radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Estrada T, J.

    2002-01-01

    A radiopharmaceutical is all substance containing a radioactive atom inside of its structure and what because of its pharmaceutical form, quantity and quality of radiation can be administered in the human beings with diagnostic or therapeutic aims. With the purpose to developing effective radiopharmaceuticals it is necessary to pick carefully the appropriate radionuclide in combination with the In vivo localization and the pharmacon kinetic properties of the carrier molecule. The peptides are designed by the nature to stimulate, regulate or inhibit numerous life functions, they act mainly as information transmitters and activity coordinators of several tissues in the body; it has been found that such substances are present in cells and in the body fluids in quantities extremely small, therefore the peptides have been considered as ideal agents for therapeutic applications. Elastase of human neutrophylls is a 29 kDa protease which is produced in high levels inside the neutrophyll and it is released as response for an inflammatory stimulus in infection/inflammation places. Once it liberated is quickly inhibited by the anti elastase α tripsine (HNE-2) peptide. Therefore, the neutrophylls elastase is considered as a target to obtain In vivo images of inflammatory/infectious processes by the intravenous application of 99m Tc-HNE-2. The objective of this work was to develop a labelling method with 99m Tc for the inhibitor peptide of the human neutrophyll elastase (HNE-2). Likewise, for evaluating its In vivo and In vitro stabilities. The methodology which was followed as first step to conjugate the (HNE-2) peptide with the bi chelating agents HYNIC and DTPA capable to chelate the 99m Tc metal. Therefore the attachment reactions to the peptide were realized starting from the NHS and HYNIC and the DTPA anhydride in buffer of 0.1 M, pH= 9.0/DMF (10:1) bicarbonates with a molar relation peptide/bi chelating agent 1:5. For the purification of the conjugate the solid phase

  3. Design of GMP compliance radiopharmaceutical production facility in MINT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anwar Abd Rahman; Shaharum Ramli; M Rizal Mamat Ibrahim; Rosli Darmawan; Yusof Azuddin Ali; Jusnan Hashim

    2005-01-01

    In 1985, MINT built the only radiopharmaceutical production facility in Malaysia. The facility was designed based on IAEA (International Atomic Energy Agency) standard guidelines which provide radiation safety to the staff and the surrounding environment from radioactive contamination. Since 1999, BPFK (Biro Pengawalan Farmaseutikal Kebangsaan) has used the guidelines from Pharmaceutical Inspection Convention Scheme (PICS) to meet the requirements of the Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) for Pharmaceutical Products. In the guidelines, the pharmaceutical production facility shall be designed based on clean room environment. In order to design a radiopharmaceutical production facility, it is important to combine the concept of radiation safety and clean room to ensure that both requirements from GMP and IAEA are met. The design requirement is necessary to set up a complete radiopharmaceutical production facility, which is safe, has high production quality and complies with the Malaysian and International standards. (Author)

  4. Formulation of an inhibitor radiopharmaceutical of prostatic antigen of 177Lu-Glu-Nh-CO-Nh-Lys membrane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega S, D.

    2015-01-01

    The prostate specific membrane antigen (PSMA) is a zinc metalloenzyme that is expressed on the cell membrane and highly expressed in prostate cancer. Recently, it has been demonstrated that the peptide sequence Glu-Nh-CO-Nh-Lys inhibit PSMA activity through an electrostatic interaction with the Zn. Several theragnostic radiopharmaceuticals with base in 177 Lu have been developed for radiotherapy of specific molecular targets because gamma and beta emissions of the radionuclide (β = 0.498 MeV and γ= 0.133 MeV). However, there is currently no label a formulation for preparing a radiopharmaceutical of 177 Lu-Glu-Nh-CO-Nh-Lys useful treatment of prostate cancer. The aim of this research was to optimize and document the process of production of the radiopharmaceutical 177 Lu-Glu-Nh-CO-Nh-Lys for sanitary registration application before the Comision Federal para la Proteccion contra Riesgos Sanitarios (COFEPRIS). The optimization of the production process was assessed a factorial design of three variables with mixed levels (3 x 3 x 2) where the dependent variable is the radiochemical purity, the analytical method was validated by UV-Vis spectrophotometry. Next, process validation was carried out by labeling 3 lots of the optimized formulation of the radiopharmaceutical (5.55 GBq (2.16 μg) of 177 LuCl 3 , 90 mg peptide PSMA, 50 mg ascorbic acid and 150 μL of acetate buffer 1 M ph 5), long-term stability was performed by high resolution liquid chromatography) to determine its useful shelf life. 3 validation batches were prepared under protocols of Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) in the Production Plant of Radiopharmaceuticals of the Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), meet specifications preset by obtaining a sterile and free development of bacterial endotoxin yields of labeled 100% and which retains its quality characteristics radiochemical purity greater than 90% for at least 15 days. (Author)

  5. Analytical techniques for the determination of radiochemical purity of radiopharmaceuticals prepared from kits. Part II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MacLean, J.R.; Rockwell, L.J.; Welsh, W.J.

    The evaluation of efficacy of commercially available kits used for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals is one aspect of the Radiation Protection Bureau's radiopharmaceutical quality control program. This report describes some of the analytical methodology employed in the program. Many of the tests can be performed rapidly and with a minimum of special equipment, thus enabling the confirmation of radiopharmaceutical purity prior to patient administration

  6. Report of the 2. research coordination meeting on development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2006-01-01

    The objectives of this CRP are to evaluate various generator and concentration technologies for 188 W- 188 Re, 99 Mo- 99 mTc and 90 Sr- 90 Y generators, to optimize generator fabrication and use, to standardize quality control techniques for the eluted radionuclides and to provide standardized procedures to participating laboratories. The following issues will be addressed during the CRP. - Development of reproducible methodologies for the preparation of 188 W- 188 Re, 99 Mo- 99 mTc and 90 Sr- 90 Y generators. - Development and evaluation of chromatography adsorbents (Zr/Ti composites) having higher binding capacities and demonstration of their utility in the preparation of column generators for 188 Re and 99 mTc. - Comparison and optimization of technologies for post elution concentration of 188 Re and 99 mTc in order to improve the radioactive concentration. - Development of quality control techniques and specifications for generator eluted therapeutic radionuclides

  7. A short history of radiopharmaceutical research in Australia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker, R.

    1989-01-01

    A brief summary is given of radiopharmaceuticals research carried out in Australia. Historically, a number of the larger hospital radiopharmacies have been, and still are, involved with 99m Tc-cold kit production. Originally, this scenario evolved because the nuclear medicine community was denied access to state-of-the-art products available overseas. Although the situation has improved in recent times, most such departments continue kit production, having made a large capital investment in sterile facilities, equipment and staff. Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organization has a leading role in radiopharmaceutical research and some of the topics which have occupied its scientists over the last few years are outlined

  8. The transport of radiopharmaceuticals in the United States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferate, F.D.

    2004-01-01

    Among all the various uses of radioactive materials for peaceful purposes, the creation and use of radiopharmaceuticals to diagnose and treat medical ailments has probably brought the greatest benefit to humanity. The use of radionuclides in medicine has mushroomed over the past 20 years, as has the number of nuclides and procedures which are now routinely used in hospitals and clinics around the globe. Parallel to the growth in the use of radiopharmaceuticals has been the growth in shipments of these nuclides and their compounds to the locations where they are used

  9. Indigenous capacity building in radiopharmaceuticals: Saudi Arabian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vora, M.M.

    2007-01-01

    Easy availability of radiopharmaceuticals is a key element in the application of radioisotopes in health care. Furthermore, creating self-sufficiency within the country and the geographical region further enhances this prospect. Manufacture of radiopharmaceutical began at King Faisal Specialist Hospital and Research Centre (KFSH and RC) in 1983 with the installation of the CS-30 (26.4 MeV) cyclotron, with the intention not only to make available the cyclotron products for the country and the geographical region, but also to establish a contemporary research programme. Consequently, a PET scanner was installed at KFSH and RC in 1995. Currently, the centre routinely produces several SPECT and PET radiopharmaceuticals supporting around 40 nuclear medicine facilities within the country and the geographical region. A key motivating and driving force has been the goal of becoming a comprehensive radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing facility and making the country self-sufficient in all its radiopharmaceutical needs. Consequently, 2000 witnessed the introduction of 131 I based products for diagnosis as well as for therapy. GMP is the cornerstone of any radiopharmaceuticals manufacturing programme. The KFSH and RC is a perfect example of how this operational and guiding principle has been applied and evolved over the years, culminating in an effective quality management system (ISO 9001:2000) for manufacturing high quality radiopharmaceuticals. The programme building has been 'work in progress'. For efficient functioning, the staff must be well qualified and appropriately trained to achieve the mission of the organization. This has been achieved through selective staffing, followed by extensive on the job training, as well as didactic education, including various IAEA programmes for specific training. The year 2005 marked the beginning of an expansion of the KFSH and RC's programme entailing construction of a new building; provision of a state of the art cyclotron (30 Me

  10. Effects of radiation exposure from radiopharmaceuticals used in diagnostic studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Witcofski, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    In the United States about 90 percent of man-made radiation exposure to the general population is from the use of radiation in diagnostic medicine. Although the doses of radiation from these procedures to individuals are generally quite small, large numbers of people are exposed. Estimates of the radiation doses associated with such use in the healing arts are approximately 15 million person-rem to the general population from diagnostic x ray and 3.3 million person-rem from the diagnostic use of radiopharmaceuticals. The purpose of this paper is to present what is known about the possible effects of radiation from diagnostic radiopharmaceuticals

  11. The transport of radiopharmaceuticals in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferate, F.D. [U. S. Dept. of Transportation, Washington, DC (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Among all the various uses of radioactive materials for peaceful purposes, the creation and use of radiopharmaceuticals to diagnose and treat medical ailments has probably brought the greatest benefit to humanity. The use of radionuclides in medicine has mushroomed over the past 20 years, as has the number of nuclides and procedures which are now routinely used in hospitals and clinics around the globe. Parallel to the growth in the use of radiopharmaceuticals has been the growth in shipments of these nuclides and their compounds to the locations where they are used.

  12. Recent legal developments and the authority of the Australian Therapeutic Goods Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirlow, Esme; Faunce, Thomas

    2009-05-01

    Recent legal developments have highlighted the need for greater support from the Federal Government for the authority of the Therapeutic Goods Administration (TGA) to ensure, by pre-approval assessments and post-approval regulation, the safety of listed medicines in Australia. One of these developments concerns the impact of ongoing civil litigation in Australian courts led by Pan Pharmaceuticals stakeholders to recover compensation from the government for the losses they incurred following the TGA's post-listing shut-down of that pharmaceutical manufacturing company in 2003. Another factor is the recently announced governmental policy to outsource to the United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) safety assessments of foreign drug manufacturers whose products will be used in Australia.

  13. Progress in AQP Research and New Developments in Therapeutic Approaches to Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren E. Previch

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Cerebral edema often manifests after the development of cerebrovascular disease, particularly in the case of stroke, both ischemic and hemorrhagic. Without clinical intervention, the influx of water into brain tissues leads to increased intracranial pressure, cerebral herniation, and ultimately death. Strategies to manage the development of edema constitute a major unmet therapeutic need. However, despite its major clinical significance, the mechanisms underlying cerebral water transport and edema formation remain elusive. Aquaporins (AQPs are a class of water channel proteins which have been implicated in the regulation of water homeostasis and cerebral edema formation, and thus represent a promising target for alleviating stroke-induced cerebral edema. This review examines the significance of relevant AQPs in stroke injury and subsequently explores neuroprotective strategies aimed at modulating AQP expression, with a particular focus on AQP4, the most abundant AQP in the central nervous system.

  14. Progress in AQP Research and New Developments in Therapeutic Approaches to Ischemic and Hemorrhagic Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previch, Lauren E.; Ma, Linlin; Wright, Joshua C.; Singh, Sunpreet; Geng, Xiaokun; Ding, Yuchuan

    2016-01-01

    Cerebral edema often manifests after the development of cerebrovascular disease, particularly in the case of stroke, both ischemic and hemorrhagic. Without clinical intervention, the influx of water into brain tissues leads to increased intracranial pressure, cerebral herniation, and ultimately death. Strategies to manage the development of edema constitute a major unmet therapeutic need. However, despite its major clinical significance, the mechanisms underlying cerebral water transport and edema formation remain elusive. Aquaporins (AQPs) are a class of water channel proteins which have been implicated in the regulation of water homeostasis and cerebral edema formation, and thus represent a promising target for alleviating stroke-induced cerebral edema. This review examines the significance of relevant AQPs in stroke injury and subsequently explores neuroprotective strategies aimed at modulating AQP expression, with a particular focus on AQP4, the most abundant AQP in the central nervous system. PMID:27438832

  15. Development of gastroenterology and hepatology in Iran: Part II- advances in research and therapeutic modalities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saberifiroozi, Mehdi; Mir-Madjlessi, Seid-Hossein

    2009-09-01

    Following the establishment of Gastroenterology and Hepatology Fellowship Programs in 1987, significant developments in research and health care delivery have been achieved. The number of published articles has increased significantly and now more than 10 approved research centers are involved in several longitudinal and population based studies in GI epidemiology, viral hepatitis and GI oncology around the country. Before 1987 less than 50 gastroenterologists were working in the country, but now more than 300 gastroenterologists are involved in public and private health care delivery systems. Advanced diagnostic and therapeutic endoscopic procedures and complex surgical procedures such as liver transplantation are a routine now. These achievements are indicative of hard work and determination of dedicated physicians after the Islamic Revolution, and the support of governmental and non-governmental sectors. The future prospect of development in the discipline of gastroenterology and hepatology in Iran seems to be very encouraging.

  16. Recent Advances in Developing Inhibitors for Hypoxia-Inducible Factor Prolyl Hydroxylases and Their Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Yeon Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF prolyl hydroxylases (PHDs are members of the 2-oxoglutarate dependent non-heme iron dioxygenases. Due to their physiological roles in regulation of HIF-1α stability, many efforts have been focused on searching for selective PHD inhibitors to control HIF-1α levels for therapeutic applications. In this review, we first describe the structure of PHD2 as a molecular basis for structure-based drug design (SBDD and various experimental methods developed for measuring PHD activity. We further discuss the current status of the development of PHD inhibitors enabled by combining SBDD approaches with high-throughput screening. Finally, we highlight the clinical implications of small molecule PHD inhibitors.

  17. Basic/Translational Development of Forthcoming Opioid- and Nonopioid-Targeted Pain Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick; Yekkirala, Ajay; Yaksh, Tony L

    2017-11-01

    Opioids represent an efficacious therapeutic modality for some, but not all pain states. Singular reliance on opioid therapy for pain management has limitations, and abuse potential has deleterious consequences for patient and society. Our understanding of pain biology has yielded insights and opportunities for alternatives to conventional opioid agonists. The aim is to have efficacious therapies, with acceptable side effect profiles and minimal abuse potential, which is to say an absence of reinforcing activity in the absence of a pain state. The present work provides a nonexclusive overview of current drug targets and potential future directions of research and development. We discuss channel activators and blockers, including sodium channel blockers, potassium channel activators, and calcium channel blockers; glutamate receptor-targeted agents, including N-methyl-D-aspartate, α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid, and metabotropic receptors. Furthermore, we discuss therapeutics targeted at γ-aminobutyric acid, α2-adrenergic, and opioid receptors. We also considered antagonists of angiotensin 2 and Toll receptors and agonists/antagonists of adenosine, purine receptors, and cannabinoids. Novel targets considered are those focusing on lipid mediators and anti-inflammatory cytokines. Of interest is development of novel targeting strategies, which produce long-term alterations in pain signaling, including viral transfection and toxins. We consider issues in the development of druggable molecules, including preclinical screening. While there are examples of successful translation, mechanistically promising preclinical candidates may unexpectedly fail during clinical trials because the preclinical models may not recapitulate the particular human pain condition being addressed. Molecular target characterization can diminish the disconnect between preclinical and humans' targets, which should assist in developing nonaddictive analgesics.

  18. Radiolabelled peptides: New radiopharmaceuticals for targeted therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chinol, M.

    2001-01-01

    Radiolabelled peptides have been the focus of an increasing interest by the nuclear medicine community within the last few years. This has mainly been due to successful development of one of these peptides, somatostatin, as a tool to visualise various pathologic conditions known to express a high number of somatostatin receptors. Somatostatin receptors have been identified in different tumours such as neuroendocrine tumours, tumours of the central nervous system, breast, lung and lymphatic tissue. These observations served as the biomolecular basis for the clinical use of radiolabelled somatostatin analogs, which are at present of great interest for diagnostic and therapeutic applications. A promising somatostatin analogue, DOTA-D-Phe 1 -Ty 3 -octreotide, named DOTATOC, has shown favourable biodistribution and high affinity binding to SSTR2 and SSTR5, high hydrophilicity and ease of labelling and stability with 111 In and 90 Y. A clinical trial aimed at evaluating the biodistribution and dosimetry of DOTATOC radiolabelled with 111 In, in anticipation of therapy trials with 90 Y-DOTATOC in patients was undertaken. 111 In-DOTATOC showed favourable pharmacokinetics (fast blood clearance and urinary excretion) and biodistribution, and high affinity to tumours expressing somatostatin receptors (thus, a high residence time in tumour). These results are promising for therapy trials with 90 Y-DOTAOC, for which radiation dosimetry appears acceptable for normal organs (including the red marrow). Moreover, labelling conditions of DOTATOC with 90 Y has been optimised in order to achieve labelling yields of more than 98% and specific activities of greater than 60 GBq (1.6 Ci)/μmol. (author)

  19. Development and Implementation of an Advanced Therapeutic Communication Course: An Interprofessional Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwind, Jasna K; McCay, Elizabeth; Metersky, Kateryna; Martin, Jennifer

    2016-10-01

    Interprofessional education and practice have been gaining recognition during the past decade. However, little has been written on person-centered care (PCC) within interprofessional practice and how it could be taught to interprofessional learners. A key element of PCC is therapeutic communication. Consequently, a group of interprofessional faculty innovated a graduate-level elective course on advanced therapeutic communication where interprofessional learners together explore PCC within interprofessional care. The course curriculum is underpinned by mindfulness in education, nonviolent communication, and reflective writing. Various teaching- learning strategies, including creative self-expression, are also used. The created competencies and conceptual framework may be used by other educators in creating a similar interprofessional course. Interprofessional learners gained a deeper and broader understanding of PCC in interprofessional care. On the basis of this undertaking, the faculty gained a deeper appreciation for interprofessional collaboration in the development of innovative educational methodologies that advance interprofessional teamwork in education and professional practice. [J Nurs Educ. 2016;55(10):592-597.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Kinetic model for the dosimetry of radiopharmaceuticals contaminated by Mo-99

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shearer, D.R.; Pezzullo, J.C.

    1986-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals tagged with Tc-99m may become contaminated with breakthrough products from the Mo-99/Tc-99m generator. If a fraction of the contaminant becomes bound to the radiopharmaceutical, the dose to the radiopharmaceutical target organ from the contaminant must be considered. The dose to the contaminant target organ may then be calculated as the sum of the doses from a) the initially unbound contaminant, and b) the contaminant later released by degradation of the radiopharmaceutical. This paper presents a model which takes the above processes into account. The model is illustrated with clinical data derived from Mo-99 contaminated radiopharmaceuticals. 5 references, 2 figures, 6 tables

  1. Radioimmunotherapy: Development of an effective approach. Progress report, 1987

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-12-31

    Goals of this program are to answer the fundamental scientific questions for the development of an effective approach for delivering radiation therapy to cancer on antibody-based radiopharmaceuticals. The following list consists of highlights of developments from our program: documented therapeutic response of lymphoma in patients receiving radioimmunotherapy; development and application of quantitative radionuclide imaging techniques for therapy planning and dosimetry calculations; multicompartmental modeling and analysis of the in vivo MoAb kinetics in patients; a MoAb macrocycle chelate for Cu-67: development, production, in vitro and in vivo testing; NMR analysis of immunoradiotherapeutic effects on the metabolism of lymphoma; analysis of the variable molecular characteristics of the MoAb radiopharmaceutical, and their significance; in vivo studies in mice and patients of the metabolism of radioiodinated MoAb as well as In-111 CITC MoAb; and biodistribution of Cu-67 TETA MoAb in nude mice with human lymphoma.

  2. Quercetin as an Emerging Anti-Melanoma Agent: A four-focus area therapeutic development strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoey Harris

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Replacing current refractory treatments for melanoma with new prevention and therapeutic approaches is crucial in order to successfully treat this aggressive cancer form. Melanoma develops from neural crest cells, which express tyrosinase -- a key enzyme in the pigmentation pathway. The tyrosinase enzyme is highly active in melanoma cells and metabolizes polyphenolic compounds; tyrosinase expression thus makes a feasible a target for polyphenol-based therapies. For example, quercetin (3,3′,4′,5,7-pentahydroxyflavone is a highly ubiquitous and well-classified dietary polyphenol found in various fruits, vegetables and other plant products including onions, broccoli, kale, oranges, blueberries, apples, and tea. Quercetin has demonstrated anti-proliferative and pro-apoptotic activity in various cancer cell types. Quercetin is readily metabolized by tyrosinase into various compounds that promote anti-cancer activity; additionally, given that tyrosinase expression increases during tumorigenesis, and its activity is associated with pigmentation changes in both early- and late-stage melanocytic lesions, it suggests that quercetin can be used to target melanoma. In this review we explore the potential of Quercetin as an anti-melanoma agent utilizing and extrapolating on evidence from previous in vitro studies in various human malignant cell lines and propose a four-focus area strategy to develop quercetin as a targeted anti-melanoma compound for use as either a preventative or therapeutic agent. The four areas of focus include utilizing quercetin to i modulate cellular bioreduction potential and associated signaling cascades, ii affect transcription of relevant genes, iii regulate epigenetic processes, and iv develop effective combination therapies and delivery modalities/protocols. In general, quercetin could be used to exploit tyrosinase activity to prevent, and/or treat, melanoma with minimal additional side effects.

  3. Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry. Annual report 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Johannsen, B.

    1993-04-01

    The Institute of Bioinorganic and Radiopharmaceutical Chemistry of the Rossendorf Research Center (FZR) presents its 1992 anual report in order to in form on research activities in the first year of its existence. This volume contains 27 individual reports devoted to various aspects of radiotracers for nuclear medicine. (BBR)

  4. Sixth international symposium on radiopharmaceutical chemistry: Abstracts: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The 113 abstracts are arranged under the following section headings: alkyl spiperone derivatives labeled with fluorine, synthesis of compounds labeled with positron emitters, technetium compounds, positron emitters (target design and synthesis), indium and gallium, halogens, labeled proteins and antibodies, radiopharmaceuticals for brain and SPECT, general, and receptor radioligands

  5. Harvard-MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelstein, S.J.

    1991-01-01

    This report presents research on radiopharmaceuticals. The following topics are discussed: antibody labeling with positron-emitting radionuclides; antibody modification for radioimmune imaging; labeling antibodies; evaluation of technetium acetlyacetonates as potential cerebral blood flow agents; and studies in technetium chemistry. (CBS)

  6. Influence of sweeteners in the biodistribution of radiopharmaceutical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Influence of sweeteners in the biodistribution of radiopharmaceutical and laboratory tests in rats. Michelly Pires Queiroz, Vanessa Santos de Arruda Barbosa, Cecília Maria de Carvalho Xavier Holanda, Janette Monroy Osório, Tarciso Bruno Montenegro Sampaio, Christina da Silva Camillo, Aldo Cunha Medeiros, Marília ...

  7. Guidance for nuclear medicine staff on radiopharmaceuticals drug interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2009-01-01

    Numerous drug interactions related to radiopharmaceuticals take place every day in hospitals many of which are not reported or detected. Information concerning this kind of reaction is not abundant, and nuclear medicine staff are usually overwhelmed by this information. To better understand this type of reaction, and to help nuclear medicine staff deal with it, a review of the literature was conducted. The results show that almost all of radiopharmaceuticals marketed around the world present drug interactions with a large variety of compounds. This suggests that a logical framework to make decisions based on reviews incorporating adverse reactions must be created. The review also showed that researchers undertaking a review of literature, or even a systematic review that incorporates drug interactions, must understand the rationale for the suggested methods and be able to implement them in their review. Additionally, a global effort should be made to report as many cases of drug interaction with radiopharmaceuticals as possible. With this, a complete picture of drug interactions with radiopharmaceuticals can be drawn. (author)

  8. Cyclotron targets and production technologies used for radiopharmaceuticals in NPI

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fišer, Miroslav; Kopička, Karel; Hradilek, Pavel; Hanč, Petr; Lebeda, Ondřej; Panek, T.; Vognar, M.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 53, č. 2 (2003), s. A737-A743 ISSN 0011-4626 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KSK4055109 Keywords : cyclotron * radiopharmaceuticals Subject RIV: CH - Nuclear ; Quantum Chemistry Impact factor: 0.263, year: 2003

  9. WIPR 2013 - Radiopharmaceuticals: from research to industry - Book of abstracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2015-01-01

    This workshop aims at presenting the latest progress in the field of radioimmunotherapy: radiopharmaceutical production, radiochemistry, radiolabelling, nuclear imaging and clinical applications. The presentations have been divided into 4 sessions: 1) alpha or beta radioimmunotherapy, 2) peptides or antibodies, 3) the benefits from nuclear imaging, and multimodal imaging

  10. Early developability screen of therapeutic antibody candidates using Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavoisier, Alexandra; Schlaeppi, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic antibodies represent one of the fastest growing segments in the pharmaceutical market. They are used in a broad range of disease fields, such as autoimmune diseases, cancer, inflammation and infectious diseases. The growth of the segment has necessitated development of new analytical platforms for faster and better antibody selection and characterization. Early quality control and risk assessment of biophysical parameters help prevent failure in later stages of antibody development, and thus can reduce costs and save time. Critical parameters such as aggregation, conformational stability, colloidal stability and hydrophilicity, are measured during the early phase of antibody generation and guide the selection process of the best lead candidates in terms of technical developability. We report on the use of a novel instrument (ActiPix/Viscosizer) for measuring both the hydrodynamic radius and the absolute viscosity of antibodies based on Taylor dispersion analysis and UV area imaging. The looped microcapillary-based method combines low sample consumption, fast throughput and high precision compared to other conventional methods. From a random panel of 130 antibodies in the early selection process, we identified some with large hydrodynamic radius outside the normal distribution and others with non-Gaussian Taylor dispersion profiles. The antibodies with such abnormal properties were confirmed later in the selection process to show poor developability profiles. Moreover, combining these results with those of the viscosity measurements at high antibody concentrations allows screening, with limited amounts of materials, candidates with potential issues in pre-formulation development.

  11. Harvard--MIT research program in short-lived radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, September 1, 1977--April 30, 1978. [/sup 99m/Tc, positron-emitting radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adelstein, S.J.; Brownell, G.L.

    1978-05-01

    Progress is reported on the following studies: chemistry studies designed to achieve a more complete understanding of the fundamental chemistry of technetium in order to facilitate the design of future radiopharmaceuticals incorporating the radionuclide /sup 99m/Tc; the development of new radiopharmaceuticals intended to improve image quality and lower radiation doses by the use of short-lived radionuclides and disease-specific agents; the development of short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides which offer advantages in transverse section imaging of regional physiological processes; and studies of the toxic effects of particulate radiation.

  12. Design and Development of a Bilateral Therapeutic Hand Device for Stroke Rehabilitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akhlaquor Rahman

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The major cause of disability is stroke. It is the second highest cause of death after coronary heart disease in Australia. In this paper, a post stroke therapeutic device has been designed and developed for hand motor function rehabilitation that a stroke survivor can use for bilateral movement practice. A prototype of the device was fabricated that can fully flex and extend metacarpophalangeal (MCP, proximal interphalangeal (PIP and distal interphalangeal (DIP joints of the fingers, and interphalangeal (IP, metacarpophalangeal (MCP and trapeziometacarpal (IM joints of the thumb of the left hand (impaired hand, based on movements of the right hand's (healthy hand fingers. Out of 21 degrees of freedom (DOFs of hand fingers, the prototype of the hand exoskeleton allowed fifteen degrees of freedom (DOFs, with three degrees of freedom (DOFs for each finger and three degrees of freedom (DOFs for the thumb. In addition, testing of the device on a healthy subject was conducted to validate the design requirements.

  13. Emerging Strategies for Developing Next-Generation Protein Therapeutics for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kintzing, James R; Filsinger Interrante, Maria V; Cochran, Jennifer R

    2016-12-01

    Protein-based therapeutics have been revolutionizing the oncology space since they first appeared in the clinic two decades ago. Unlike traditional small-molecule chemotherapeutics, protein biologics promote active targeting of cancer cells by binding to cell-surface receptors and other markers specifically associated with or overexpressed on tumors versus healthy tissue. While the first approved cancer biologics were monoclonal antibodies, the burgeoning field of protein engineering is spawning research on an expanded range of protein formats and modifications that allow tuning of properties such as target-binding affinity, serum half-life, stability, and immunogenicity. In this review we highlight some of these strategies and provide examples of modified and engineered proteins under development as preclinical and clinical-stage drug candidates for the treatment of cancer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Recent Developments in Synthetic Carbohydrate-Based Diagnostics, Vaccines, and Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Tejada, Alberto; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús

    2015-07-20

    Glycans are everywhere in biological systems, being involved in many cellular events with important implications for medical purposes. Building upon a detailed understanding of the functional roles of carbohydrates in molecular recognition processes and disease states, glycans are increasingly being considered as key players in pharmacological research. On the basis of the important progress recently made in glycochemistry, glycobiology, and glycomedicine, we provide a complete overview of successful applications and future perspectives of carbohydrates in the biopharmaceutical and medical fields. This review highlights the development of carbohydrate-based diagnostics, exemplified by glycan imaging techniques and microarray platforms, synthetic oligosaccharide vaccines against infectious diseases (e.g., HIV) and cancer, and finally carbohydrate-derived therapeutics, including glycomimetic drugs and glycoproteins. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Rational design of highly potent HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins: Implication for developing antiviral therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Ling; Gao, George F.; Tien Po

    2005-01-01

    Recombinant protein containing one heptad-repeat 1 (HR1) segment and one HR2 segment of the HIV-1 gp41 (HR1-HR2) has been shown to fold into thermally stable six-helix bundle, representing the fusogenic core of gp41. In this study, we have used the fusogenic core as a scaffold to design HIV-1 fusion inhibitory proteins by linking another HR1 to the C terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR121) or additional HR2 to the N terminus of HR1-HR2 (HR212). Both recombinant proteins could be abundantly and solubly expressed and easily purified, exhibiting high stability and potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 fusion with IC 50 values of 16.2 ± 2.8 and 2.8 ± 0.63 nM, respectively. These suggest that these rationally designed proteins can be further developed as novel anti-HIV-1 therapeutics

  16. Pre-clinical therapeutic development of a series of metalloporphyrins for Parkinson's disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liang, Li-Ping; Huang, Jie; Fulton, Ruth; Pearson-Smith, Jennifer N.; Day, Brian J.; Patel, Manisha

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species are a well-defined therapeutic target for Parkinson's disease (PD) and pharmacological agents that catalytically scavenge reactive species are promising neuroprotective strategies for treatment. Metalloporphyrins are synthetic catalytic antioxidants that mimic the body's own antioxidant enzymes i.e. superoxide dismutases and catalase. The goal of this study was to determine if newly designed metalloporphyrins have enhanced pharmacodynamics including oral bioavailability, longer plasma elimination half-lives, penetrate the blood brain barrier, and show promise for PD treatment. Three metalloporphyrins (AEOL 11216, AEOL 11203 and AEOL 11114) were identified in this study as potential candidates for further pre-clinical development. Each of these compounds demonstrated blood brain barrier permeability by the i.p. route and two of three compounds (AEOL 11203 and AEOL 11114) were orally bioavailable. All of these compounds protected against 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced neurotoxicity, including dopamine depletion in the striatum, dopaminergic neuronal loss in the substantial nigra, and increased oxidative/nitrative stress indices (glutathione disulfide and 3-nitrotyrosine) in the ventral midbrain of the mice without inhibiting MPTP metabolism. Daily therapeutic dosing of these metalloporphyrins were well tolerated without accumulation of brain manganese levels or behavioral alterations assessed by open field and rotarod tests. The study identified two orally active metalloporphyrins and one injectable metalloporphyrin as clinical candidates for further development in PD. - Highlights: • A series of metalloporphyrins were optimized in a mouse model of parkinsonism. • Two novel orally active, brain permeable antioxidant metalloporphyrins were identified. • The identified metalloporphyrins were well tolerated.

  17. Radiopharmaceutical substances and nuclear pharmacy; Les medicaments radiopharmaceutiques et la radiopharmacie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guilloteau, D. [Hopital Bretonneau, 37 - Tours (France)

    1994-12-31

    Nuclear medicine needs more and more specific radiolabelled agents which are injected in humans for diagnosis or therapy: as such, they are pharmaceutical substances. Therefore, these radiopharmaceuticals must be prepared and distributed according to the rules applied to other pharmaceutical drugs. Such rules allow to warrant a good quality in diagnosis and therapy applications with a high security for the patient. In this article, we describe the role of the nuclear pharmacist in the field of development, preparation, quality control and dispensation. (author). 16 refs.

  18. Systemic Radiopharmaceutical Agents (Sm-153) may be Dangerous in Hepatacellular Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keskin, Onur; Soydal, Cigdem; Deda, Xheni; Manti, Bengu; Tuzun, Ali

    2015-01-01

    Palliation of bone metastases in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is sometimes difficult. Systemic pharmaceuticals have been successfully used for the palliation of bone metastasis for many years. Safety of these agents in HCC is not known completely. We presented a male patient with decompensated liver cirrhosis with HCC. Multifocal bone metastases developed in this patient and he had refractory bone pain. We treated this patient with Sm-153 (samarium) after obtaining patient's consent. Two days after treatment, he experienced dyspnea and we detected a massive hemorrhagic pericardial effusion. He died due to this unexpected bleeding. We should use this radiopharmaceutical treatment cautiously in these cytopenic cirrhotic patients. PMID:25709546

  19. Refurbishing of a Freeze Drying Machine, used in Nuclear Medicine for Radiopharmaceuticals Production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gaytan-Gallardo, E.; Desales-Galeana, G.

    2006-01-01

    The refurbishing of a freeze drying machine used in the radiopharmaceuticals production, applied in nuclear medicine in the Radioactive Materials Department of the Nuclear Research National Institute in Mexico (ININ in Spanish), is presented. The freeze drying machine was acquired in the 80's decade and some components started having problems. Then it was necessary to refurbish this equipment by changing old cam-type temperature controllers and outdated recording devices, developing a sophisticated software system that substitutes those devices. The system is composed by a freeze drying machine by Hull, AC output modules for improved temperature control, a commercial data acquisition card, and the software system

  20. Intelligent control of liquid transfer for the automated synthesis of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iwata, Ren; Ido, Tatsuo; Yamazaki, Shigeki

    1990-01-01

    A method for the intelligent control of liquid transfer, developed for automated synthesis of 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose from [ 18 F]fluoride, is described. A thermal mass flow controller coupled to a personal computer is used to monitor conditions for transferring or passing liquid through a tube or a column. Using this sensor a computer can detect completion of liquid transfer, dispense a stock solution and check the setup conditions of the system. The present feedback control can be readily adapted to other automated syntheses of positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals. (author)

  1. Acute development of collateral circulation and therapeutic prospects in ischemic stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasawa, Eri; Ichijo, Masahiko; Ishibashi, Satoru; Yokota, Takanori

    2016-03-01

    In acute ischemic stroke, collateral circulation plays an important role in maintaining blood flow to the tissue that is at risk of progressing into ischemia, and in increasing the successful recanalization rate without hemorrhagic transformation. We have reported that well-developed collateral circulation is associated with smaller infarct volume and better long-term neurological outcome, and it disappears promptly once the effective recanalization is achieved. Contrary to the belief that collateral vessels develop over time in chronic stenotic condition, there exists a phenomenon that collateral circulation develops immediately in acute stenosis or occlusion of the arteries and it seems to be triggered by fluid shear stress, which occurs between the territories of stenotic/occluded arteries and those fed by surrounding intact arteries. We believe that this acute development of collateral circulation is a target of novel therapeutics in ischemic stroke and refer our recent attempt in enhancing collateral circulation by modulating sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1, which is a known shear-stress mechanosensing protein.

  2. Acute development of collateral circulation and therapeutic prospects in ischemic stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eri Iwasawa

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In acute ischemic stroke, collateral circulation plays an important role in maintaining blood flow to the tissue that is at risk of progressing into ischemia, and in increasing the successful recanalization rate without hemorrhagic transformation. We have reported that well-developed collateral circulation is associated with smaller infarct volume and better long-term neurological outcome, and it disappears promptly once the effective recanalization is achieved. Contrary to the belief that collateral vessels develop over time in chronic stenotic condition, there exists a phenomenon that collateral circulation develops immediately in acute stenosis or occlusion of the arteries and it seems to be triggered by fluid shear stress, which occurs between the territories of stenotic/occluded arteries and those fed by surrounding intact arteries. We believe that this acute development of collateral circulation is a target of novel therapeutics in ischemic stroke and refer our recent attempt in enhancing collateral circulation by modulating sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 1, which is a known shear-stress mechanosensing protein.

  3. Synthesis, labeling with 99mTc and biokinetics of brains scintigraphy diaminodithiol perfusion radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goncalves, Marcos Moises

    1999-01-01

    The recent tomography status using radiopharmaceuticals have been contributing greatly with the 'age of certainty' in the diagnosis examination of syndromes, pathologies and clinical signs, because they can evidence some phenomena occurring in a molecular manner. The purpose of this work have had the development of new diaminodithiol (DADT) perfusion radiopharmaceuticals to be used in brain diagnosis using S.P.E.T. (Single Photon Emission Tomography). Initially, the rational planning had been performed with the new DADT molecular structures as radiopharmaceutical candidates. Using of Q.S.A.R. (Quantitative Structure Activity Relationship) techniques, the molecular descriptors such as partition coefficient and effective polarizability, have been studied in order to increase the blood brain barrier transport and the brain uptake respectively. Applying the Q.S.P.R. (Quantitative Structure Property Relationship) concepts to perform drug latentiation, based on bio-labile functional groups, the congener DADT derivative has been transformed into a pro-drug that works as a DADT moiety carrier, allowing the increasing of brain radiopharmaceutical uptake. Later on, synthetic routes and chemical purifications have been developed allowing the creation of the proposed chemical structure. Each new DADT derivative has been synthesized and analyzed in terms of elemental analysis, infrared and NMR spectra, in order to confirm its proposed chemical structure. Then, the new derivative has been labeled with 99m Tc, radiochemically purified, intravenously injected in Swiss mice, allowing its biodistribution to evidence its brain transport and uptake. The rational planning studies have been re-evaluated after each biodistribution had been performed, to see what kind of molecular descriptor was responsible for causing a stronger optimization in the brain perfusion characteristics and then, new DADT derivatives have been prepared. Three new DADT derivatives have been obtained by using

  4. Fluorine-18 radiopharmaceuticals beyond [18F]FDG for use in oncology and neurosciences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coenen, H.H.; Elsinga, P.H.; Iwata, R.; Kilbourn, M.R.; Pillai, M.R.A.; Rajan, M.G.R.; Wagner, H.N.; Zaknun, J.J.

    2010-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) is a rapidly expanding clinical modality worldwide thanks to the availability of compact medical cyclotrons and automated chemistry for the production of radiopharmaceuticals. There is an armamentarium of fluorine-18 ( 18 F) tracers that can be used for PET studies in the fields of oncology and neurosciences. However, most of the 18 F-tracers other than 2-deoxy-2-[18F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG) are in less than optimum human use and there is considerable scope to bring potentially useful 18 F-tracers to clinical investigation stage. The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) convened a consultants' group meeting to review the current status of 18 F-based radiotracers and to suggest means for accelerating their use for diagnostic applications. The consultants reviewed the developments including the synthetic approaches for the preparation of 18 F-tracers for oncology and neurosciences. A selection of three groups of 18 F-tracers that are useful either in oncology or in neurosciences was done based on well-defined criteria such as application, lack of toxicity, availability of precursors and ease of synthesis. Based on the recommendations of the consultants' group meeting, IAEA started a coordinated research project on 'Development of 18 F radiopharmaceuticals (beyond [ 18 F]FDG) for use in oncology and neurosciences' in which 14 countries are participating in a 3-year collaborative program. The outcomes of the coordinated research project are expected to catalyze the wider application of several more 18 F-radiopharmaceuticals beyond FDG for diagnostic applications in oncology and neurosciences.

  5. Determination of bacterial endotoxin (pyrogen) in radiopharmaceuticals by the gel clot method. Validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukumori, Neuza Taeko Okasaki

    2008-01-01

    Before the Limulus amebocyte lysate (LAL) test, the only available means of pirogenicity testing for parenteral drugs and medical devices was the United States Pharmacopoeia (USP) rabbit pyrogen test. Especially for radiopharmaceuticals, the LAL assay is the elective way to determine bacterial endotoxin. The aim of this work was to validate the gel clot method for some radiopharmaceuticals without measurable interference. The FDA's LALTest guideline defines interference as a condition that causes a significant difference between the endpoints of a positive water control and positive product control series using a standard endotoxin. Experiments were performed in accordance to the USP bacterial endotoxins test in the 131 I- m-iodobenzylguanidine; the radioisotopes Gallium-67 and Thallium-201; the lyophilized reagents DTPA, Phytate, GHA, HSA and Colloidal Tin. The Maximum Valid Dilution (MVD) was calculated for each product based upon the clinical dose of the material and a twofold serial dilution below the MVD was performed in duplicate to detect interferences. The labeled sensitivity of the used LAL reagent was 0.125 EU mL -1 (Endotoxin Units per milliliter). For validation, a dilution series was performed, a twofold dilution of control standard endotoxin (CSE) from 0.5 to 0.03 EU mL -1 , to confirm the labeled sensitivity of the LAL reagent being tested in sterile and non pyrogenic water, in quadruplicate. The same dilution series was performed with the CSE and the product in the 1:100 dilution factor, in three consecutive batches of each radiopharmaceutical. The products 131 I-m-iodobenzylguanidine, Gallium-67, Thallium-201, DTPA, HSA and Colloidal Tin were found compatible with the LAL test at a 1:100 dilution factor. Phytate and GHA showed some interference in the gel clot test. Other techniques to determine endotoxins as the chromogenic (color development) and the turbidimetric test (turbidity development), were also assessed to get valuable quantitative and

  6. [Development and evaluation of a therapeutic community model in Japan: Use of an encounter group method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hikitsuchi, Emi; Okazaki, Shigeto; Yamasaki, Akiyoshi; Matsumoto, Toshihiko

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to develop a therapeutic community (TC) model in the Drug Addiction Rehabilitation Center (DARC), the rehabilitation facility group managed by recovered drug users in Japan, and to evaluate the effectiveness of the model. The TC model is a drug-free self-help program that is significant for its use of the peer community to facilitate social and psychological change in individuals. Although the TC model has been developed around the world in a variety of settings, its use in Japan is not well known. We introduced the therapy group with an encounter group method representing the TC model at the Kawasaki DARC, and conducted pre- and post-evaluations using the modified Self-Actualization Scale (SEAS2000). Results showed that the scores of the subscale "sobering of self-affirmation" were remarkably high among those who experienced encounter groups for six months. However, the scores of the subscale "release from biased view" declined among the users at the DARC who have experienced encounter group. for a short-term, while .the scores increased among those who have a medium-term and a long-term experience. These results suggest that the encounter group may be effective especially for the medium- and long-term users in the DARC. The development of a more effective TC model is required.

  7. Challenges and considerations for development of therapeutic proteins in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Wei, Xiaohui; Bajaj, Gaurav; Barrett, Jeffrey S; Meibohm, Bernd; Joshi, Amita; Gupta, Manish

    2015-03-01

    Target specificity and generally good tolerability of therapeutic proteins (TPs) present desirable treatment opportunities for pediatric patients. However, little is known on the ontogeny of processes related to the pharmacokinetics (PK) and disposition of TPs. The science, regulatory requirements and strategy of developing TPs for children are evolving. Our current review of TPs, (with focus on monoclonal antibodies and fusion proteins) that were approved for pediatric use indicates that dose-selection for pediatric pivotal studies is often based on adult PK information alone. This approach might not be sufficient if more complex PK properties than simple linear PK are present. Body weight-based dosing for pediatric patients directly scaled down from adult dosing can lead to under-exposure in young pediatric patients who are usually in the lowest body-weight range. Tiered-fixed dosing can be reasonably effective for TPs in achieving comparable exposure in children over a wide age range. The uniqueness of the pediatric population, the practical challenges in conducting clinical studies in this population, as well as regulations from health authorities warrant including pharmacometrics as an integral component of pediatric drug development. We propose a framework distinct from previous proposals, to guide clinical pharmacology strategy for pediatric drug development specifically for TPs. © 2015, The American College of Clinical Pharmacology.

  8. Optimizing real time fMRI neurofeedback for therapeutic discovery and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckel, L.E.; Garrison, K.A.; Ghosh, S.; Wighton, P.; Hanlon, C.A.; Gilman, J.M.; Greer, S.; Turk-Browne, N.B.; deBettencourt, M.T.; Scheinost, D.; Craddock, C.; Thompson, T.; Calderon, V.; Bauer, C.C.; George, M.; Breiter, H.C.; Whitfield-Gabrieli, S.; Gabrieli, J.D.; LaConte, S.M.; Hirshberg, L.; Brewer, J.A.; Hampson, M.; Van Der Kouwe, A.; Mackey, S.; Evins, A.E.

    2014-01-01

    While reducing the burden of brain disorders remains a top priority of organizations like the World Health Organization and National Institutes of Health, the development of novel, safe and effective treatments for brain disorders has been slow. In this paper, we describe the state of the science for an emerging technology, real time functional magnetic resonance imaging (rtfMRI) neurofeedback, in clinical neurotherapeutics. We review the scientific potential of rtfMRI and outline research strategies to optimize the development and application of rtfMRI neurofeedback as a next generation therapeutic tool. We propose that rtfMRI can be used to address a broad range of clinical problems by improving our understanding of brain–behavior relationships in order to develop more specific and effective interventions for individuals with brain disorders. We focus on the use of rtfMRI neurofeedback as a clinical neurotherapeutic tool to drive plasticity in brain function, cognition, and behavior. Our overall goal is for rtfMRI to advance personalized assessment and intervention approaches to enhance resilience and reduce morbidity by correcting maladaptive patterns of brain function in those with brain disorders. PMID:25161891

  9. Optimized nonclinical safety assessment strategies supporting clinical development of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies targeting inflammatory diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Frank R; Cauvin, Annick; Tibbitts, Jay; Wolfreys, Alison

    2014-05-01

    An increasing number of immunomodulatory monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and IgG Fc fusion proteins are either approved or in early-to-late stage clinical trials for the treatment of chronic inflammatory conditions, autoimmune diseases and organ transplant rejection. The exquisite specificity of mAbs, in combination with their multi-functional properties, high potency, long half-life (permitting intermittent dosing and prolonged pharamcological effects), and general lack of off-target toxicity makes them ideal therapeutics. Dosing with mAbs for these severe and debilitating but often non life-threatening diseases is usually prolonged, for several months or years, and not only affects adults, including sensitive populations such as woman of child-bearing potential (WoCBP) and the elderly, but also children. Immunosuppression is usually a therapeutic goal of these mAbs and when administered to patients whose treatment program often involves other immunosuppressive therapies, there is an inherent risk for frank immunosuppression and reduced host defence which when prolonged increases the risk of infection and cancer. In addition when mAbs interact with the immune system they can induce other adverse immune-mediated drug reactions such as infusion reactions, cytokine release syndrome, anaphylaxis, immune-complex-mediated pathology and autoimmunity. An overview of the nonclinical safety assessment and risk mitigation strategies utilized to characterize these immunomodulatory mAbs and Fc fusion proteins to support first-in human (FIH) studies and futher clinical development in inflammatory disease indications is provided. Specific emphasis is placed on the design of studies to qualify animal species for toxicology studies, early studies to investigate safety and define PK/PD relationships, FIH-enabling and chronic toxicology studies, immunotoxicity, developmental, reproductive and juvenile toxicity studies and studies to determine the potential for immunosuppression and

  10. Proceedings of V International Seminar and V National Workshop 'Use and development of products isotopic health industry'. 20th anniversary CENTIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2016-01-01

    At the Salon Copa Room. Hotel Habana Riviera Took place the V International Seminar and V National Workshop 'Use and development of products isotopic health industry' for the 20th anniversary CENTIS. The event was organized by the Isotope Center. Some 200 domestic and foreign experts debated topics related to the development and production of radiopharmaceuticals in Cuba and the world, its therapeutic applications in certain tumors, and quality management systems in nuclear medicine. (author)

  11. Semi-automated production of ⁸⁹Zr-oxalate/⁸⁹Zr-chloride and the potential of ⁸⁹Zr-chloride in radiopharmaceutical compounding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Mai; Mukhopadhyay, Uday; Waligorski, Gregory J; Balatoni, Julius A; González-Lepera, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    Interest in using (89)Zr is rapidly increasing for immuno-PET applications due to its unique characteristics and increased availability. The focus of this study was to develop an optimized semi-automated methodology for producing (89)Zr-oxalate/(89)Zr-chloride, and evaluate the potential application of (89)Zr-chloride for radiopharmaceutical compounding. The data presented herein will be useful for the production of (89)Zr-labeled radiopharmaceuticals and their compliance with regulatory issues for both preclinical and clinical use. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Binding studies of the antitumoral radiopharmaceutical 125I-Crotoxin to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silveira, Marina B.; Santos, Raquel G. dos; Dias, Consuelo L. Fortes; Cassali, Geovanni D.

    2009-01-01

    The development of tools for functional diagnostic imaging is mainly based on radiopharmaceuticals that specifically target membrane receptors. Crotoxin (Crtx), a polypeptide isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, has been shown to have an antitumoral activity and is a promising bioactive tracer for tumor detection. More specific radiopharmaceuticals are being studied to complement the techniques applied in the conventional medicine against breast cancer, the most frequent cause of death from malignant disease in women. Crtx's effect has been shown to be related with the overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), present in high levels in 30 to 60% of breast tumor cells. Our objective was to evaluate Crtx as a tracer for cancer diagnosis, investigating its properties as an EGFR-targeting agent. Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT cells) were used due to its origin and similar characteristics to breast tumor cells, specially the presence of EGFR. Crtx was labeled with 125I and binding experiments were performed. To evaluate the specific binding in vitro of Crtx, competition binding assay was carried out in the presence of increasing concentrations of non-labelled crotoxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Specific binding of 125I-Crtx to EAT cells was determined and the binding was considered saturable, with approximately 70% of specificity, high affinity (Kd = 19.7 nM) and IC50 = 1.6 x 10-11 M. Our results indicate that Crtx's interaction with EAT cells is partially related with EGFR and increases the biotechnological potential of Crtx as a template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  13. Binding studies of the antitumoral radiopharmaceutical 125I-Crotoxin to Ehrlich ascites tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silveira, Marina B.; Santos, Raquel G. dos [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Dias, Consuelo L. Fortes [Fundacao Ezequiel Dias (FUNED), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: consuelo@pq.cnpq.br; Cassali, Geovanni D. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Lab. de Patologia Comparada], e-mail: cassalig@icb.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    The development of tools for functional diagnostic imaging is mainly based on radiopharmaceuticals that specifically target membrane receptors. Crotoxin (Crtx), a polypeptide isolated from Crotalus durissus terrificus venom, has been shown to have an antitumoral activity and is a promising bioactive tracer for tumor detection. More specific radiopharmaceuticals are being studied to complement the techniques applied in the conventional medicine against breast cancer, the most frequent cause of death from malignant disease in women. Crtx's effect has been shown to be related with the overexpression of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), present in high levels in 30 to 60% of breast tumor cells. Our objective was to evaluate Crtx as a tracer for cancer diagnosis, investigating its properties as an EGFR-targeting agent. Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EAT cells) were used due to its origin and similar characteristics to breast tumor cells, specially the presence of EGFR. Crtx was labeled with 125I and binding experiments were performed. To evaluate the specific binding in vitro of Crtx, competition binding assay was carried out in the presence of increasing concentrations of non-labelled crotoxin and epidermal growth factor (EGF). Specific binding of 125I-Crtx to EAT cells was determined and the binding was considered saturable, with approximately 70% of specificity, high affinity (Kd = 19.7 nM) and IC50 = 1.6 x 10-11 M. Our results indicate that Crtx's interaction with EAT cells is partially related with EGFR and increases the biotechnological potential of Crtx as a template for radiopharmaceutical design for cancer diagnosis. (author)

  14. Integration of systems biology with organs-on-chips to humanize therapeutic development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edington, Collin D.; Cirit, Murat; Chen, Wen Li Kelly; Clark, Amanda M.; Wells, Alan; Trumper, David L.; Griffith, Linda G.

    2017-02-01

    "Mice are not little people" - a refrain becoming louder as the gaps between animal models and human disease become more apparent. At the same time, three emerging approaches are headed toward integration: powerful systems biology analysis of cell-cell and intracellular signaling networks in patient-derived samples; 3D tissue engineered models of human organ systems, often made from stem cells; and micro-fluidic and meso-fluidic devices that enable living systems to be sustained, perturbed and analyzed for weeks in culture. Integration of these rapidly moving fields has the potential to revolutionize development of therapeutics for complex, chronic diseases, including those that have weak genetic bases and substantial contributions from gene-environment interactions. Technical challenges in modeling complex diseases with "organs on chips" approaches include the need for relatively large tissue masses and organ-organ cross talk to capture systemic effects, such that current microfluidic formats often fail to capture the required scale and complexity for interconnected systems. These constraints drive development of new strategies for designing in vitro models, including perfusing organ models, as well as "mesofluidic" pumping and circulation in platforms connecting several organ systems, to achieve the appropriate physiological relevance.

  15. Design, synthesis, and evaluation of new organomedicinal radiopharmaceuticals. Progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanson, R.N.

    1982-01-01

    The goal of this project is the development of radiopharmaceuticals which localize selectively in the normal myocardium and which can be used to assess myocardial perfusion and function with external detection systems. The availability of T1-201 as a myocardial imaging agent makes it possible to visualize compromised myocardium as an area of decreased radionuclide uptake. However, the long physical and biologic half-lives of this nuclide, as well as the low energy of its gamma emission and its cost, suggest a need to develop radiodiagnostic agents which have a similar myocardial distribution but employ a less expensive radioisotope with better decay properties. An approach developed in this proposal involves the use of cardioselective sympatholytic agents into which a suitable radionuclide can be incorporated. The two types of compounds to be investigated are the beta adrenoceptor antagonists and the catecholamine depleting agents. The radiolabeled products will be evaluated in normal and in experimentally infarcted animals, and their pharmacokinetics compared with those of T1-201. The most promising radiopharmaceuticals will subsequently be tested in larger animals having myocardial pathology

  16. Preparation of the radiopharmaceutical 99m Tc-HYNIC-cyclo-Lys-D-Phe-RGD for In vivo image of integrines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hernandez H, E.

    2007-01-01

    The diagnostic of some pathological processes by means of images constitutes one of the used methods in the determination of the origin, condition and/or evolution of one illness. The use of contrast agents in conjunction with other techniques help to the obtaining and visualization of complex systems, among these we can find to those radiopharmaceuticals used in nuclear medicine to visualize diverse organs and corporal systems. At the moment it is sought to develop a radiopharmaceutical of third generation that can be used for image In vivo of integrines with the purpose of detecting angio genesis processes, that which would allow to diagnose in way it specifies a wide range of primary tumors and their metastasis. Presently work it developed the radiopharmaceutical 99m Tc-HYNIC-cycle-Lys-D-Phe-RGD, likewise the good conditions were determined for the formation of this complex. The HYNIC was employee as chelating agent, using as co ligands EDDA and Tricine for to complete the sphere of coordination of the 99m Tc. The conjugated HYNIC-RGD was synthesized, purified, characterized and radiolabelled In situ with 99m Tc using High pressure liquid chromatography as analysis method in Reverse Phase (RP-HPLC). By this way it was developed the lyophilized formulation for its instantaneous labelled to which were carried out quality control tests. The one conjugated was obtained free of impurities, showing stability at same as their complex formed with 99m Tc. The analysis method was validated turning out to be necessary, exact, lineal and specific for the quantification of the analyte of interest. The lyophilized formulation showed a radiochemical purity bigger than 95%, besides being sterile and free of pyrogens. The biodistribution tests in athymic mice with induced tumors showed that the radiopharmaceutical was united mainly to the tumor and that this it was excreted mainly for renal via. (Author)

  17. Analysis of radiochemical impurities in radiopharmaceuticals. Pt. 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heide, L.; Stamm, A.; Boegl, W.

    1980-01-01

    In Volume III of the present study on the analysis of radiochemical contamination of radiopharmaceuticals (Vol.I: STH 15/1979, Vol. II: STH 7/1980) an index of pharmaceuticals was compiled exclusively listing methods for the different labelled compounds. The term 'radiopharmaceutical' covers a wide range, so that all those pharmaceuticals can be found which have been or are routinely applied, i.e. tested, in clinical practice as well as in initial animal tests. Even radioactive substances for radioimmunoassays were included in the study. All methods of analysis have been considered, even if they showed only slight differences. The methods collected in the present study are: Paper chromatography (125 methods); Thin layer chromatography (130 methods); Gelchromatography (22 methods); Elektrophoresis (73 methods); High pressure liquid chromatography (39 methods); Precipitation (5 methods); Centrifugation (2 methods); Ion-exchange chromatography (4 methods); Polyacrylamide-gelelectrophoresis (2 methods). The study is continued in Volume IV. (orig.) [de

  18. New Insights to Clathrin and Adaptor Protein 2 for the Design and Development of Therapeutic Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebbe Toftgaard Poulsen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Amyloid Precursor Protein (APP has been extensively studied for its role as the precursor of the β-amyloid protein (Aβ in Alzheimer’s disease (AD. However, our understanding of the normal function of APP is still patchy. Emerging evidence indicates that a dysfunction in APP trafficking and degradation can be responsible for neuronal deficits and progressive degeneration in humans. We recently reported that the Y682 mutation in the 682YENPTY687 domain of APP affects its binding to specific adaptor proteins and leads to its anomalous trafficking, to defects in the autophagy machinery and to neuronal degeneration. In order to identify adaptors that influence APP function, we performed pull-down experiments followed by quantitative mass spectrometry (MS on hippocampal tissue extracts of three month-old mice incubated with either the 682YENPTY687 peptide, its mutated form, 682GENPTY687 or its phosphorylated form, 682pYENPTY687. Our experiments resulted in the identification of two proteins involved in APP internalization and trafficking: Clathrin heavy chain (hc and its Adaptor Protein 2 (AP-2. Overall our results consolidate and refine the importance of Y682 in APP normal functions from an animal model of premature aging and dementia. Additionally, they open the perspective to consider Clathrin hc and AP-2 as potential targets for the design and development of new therapeutic strategies.

  19. Development of a Biofeedback Therapeutic Exercise Supporting Manipulator for Lower Limbs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yosuke; Hisada, Takashi; Komada, Satoshi; Hirai, Junji

    Although equipments that support physical therapy have been developed, there are few types of equipment to improve quality of physical therapy. This paper proposes a new concept of robotic biofeedback exercise equipment that displays human muscle force during training. The concept tries to have therapeutic value through grasping of condition for trainee during exercise and giving an incentive to perform training. The equipment is not only for convalescent patients but also for athletes and healthy persons with a physical trouble. The manipulator is designed to support lower limb rehabilitation of knee and hip joints in sagittal plane, where a 3-degrees-of-freedom manipulator is adopted in order to realize low height equipment. Since the manipulator has redundant degree of freedom, collision avoidance is performed by a controller based on acceleration control by disturbance observer. Moreover, simultaneous isokinetic movement for knee and hip joints that has an adjustment capability of maximum speed and time constant is realized in order to perform safe training by isokinetic muscular contraction. Desired motion is realized experimentally by the proposed manipulator.

  20. Engineered Bovine Antibodies in the Development of Novel Therapeutics, Immunomodulators and Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhuri Koti

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Some bovine antibodies across all classes are unique, such as the CDR3 of the variable heavy-domain (VH CDR3, which is exceptionally long (up to 66 amino acids, unlike most conventional antibodies where the VH CDR3 loops range from 10 to 25 amino acids. The exceptionally long VH CDR3 is encoded by unusually long germline IGHD genes together with insertion of novel “a” nucleotide rich conserved short nucleotide sequence (CSNS specifically at the IGH V-D junction. Such an exceptionally long VH CDR3 confers unique “knob and stalk” structural architecture where the knob, formed by intra-VH CDR3 disulfide bridges, is separated by 20 Å solvent exposed stalk composed of anti-parallel beta strands. The substitution of the knob with cytokines, such as, erythropoietin and granulocyte colony stimulating factor 3 (granulocyte colony stimulating factor, results in expression of functional fusion proteins with enhanced pharmacokinetics. The beta stranded stalk can be substituted with other rigid structures, for example, repeat alpha helices to form coiled-coil that mimics the beta-stranded stalk and, thus, opens opportunities for insertion of this structure in the CDRs of antibodies across species. Given the versatility of such a structural platform in bovine antibody VH CDR3, it provides the opportunity for the development of new generation of diagnostics, therapeutics, vaccines and immunomodulating drugs.

  1. Prion Protein-Specific Antibodies-Development, Modes of Action and Therapeutics Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tihana Lenac Rovis

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Prion diseases or Transmissible Spongiform Encephalopathies (TSEs are lethal neurodegenerative disorders involving the misfolding of the host encoded cellular prion protein, PrPC. This physiological form of the protein is expressed throughout the body, and it reaches the highest levels in the central nervous system where the pathology occurs. The conversion into the pathogenic isoform denoted as prion or PrPSc is the key event in prion disorders. Prominent candidates for the treatment of prion diseases are antibodies and their derivatives. Anti-PrPC antibodies are able to clear PrPSc from cell culture of infected cells. Furthermore, application of anti-PrPC antibodies suppresses prion replication in experimental animal models. Major drawbacks of immunotherapy are immune tolerance, the risks of neurotoxic side effects, limited ability of compounds to cross the blood-brain barrier and their unfavorable pharmacokinetic. The focus of this review is to recapitulate the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms for antibody mediated anti-prion activity. Although relevant for designing immunotherapeutic tools, the characterization of key antibody parameters shaping the molecular mechanism of the PrPC to PrPSc conversion remains elusive. Moreover, this review illustrates the various attempts towards the development of anti-PrP antibody compounds and discusses therapeutic candidates that modulate PrP expression.

  2. The Potential of Frog Skin-Derived Peptides for Development into Therapeutically-Valuable Immunomodulatory Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantic, Jelena M; Jovanovic, Ivan P; Radosavljevic, Gordana D; Arsenijevic, Nebojsa N; Conlon, J Michael; Lukic, Miodrag L

    2017-12-13

    The aim of this article is to review the immunoregulatory actions of frog skin-derived peptides in order to assess their potential as candidates for immunomodulatory or anti-inflammatory therapy. Frog skin peptides with demonstrable immunomodulatory properties have been isolated from skin secretions of a range of species belonging to the families Alytidae, Ascaphidae, Discoglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Pipidae and Ranidae. Their effects upon production of inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines by target cells have been evaluated ex vivo and effects upon cytokine expression and immune cell activity have been studied in vivo by flow cytometry after injection into mice. The naturally-occurring peptides and/or their synthetic analogues show complex and variable actions on the production of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, IL-23, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-17), pleiotropic (IL-4 and IL-6) and immunosuppressive (IL-10 and TGF-β) cytokines by peripheral and spleen cells, peritoneal cells and/or isolated macrophages. The effects of frenatin 2.1S include enhancement of the activation state and homing capacity of Th1-type lymphocytes and NK cells in the mouse peritoneal cavity, as well as the promotion of their tumoricidal capacities. Overall, the diverse effects of frog skin-derived peptides on the immune system indicate their potential for development into therapeutic agents.

  3. The Potential of Frog Skin-Derived Peptides for Development into Therapeutically-Valuable Immunomodulatory Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena M. Pantic

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review the immunoregulatory actions of frog skin-derived peptides in order to assess their potential as candidates for immunomodulatory or anti-inflammatory therapy. Frog skin peptides with demonstrable immunomodulatory properties have been isolated from skin secretions of a range of species belonging to the families Alytidae, Ascaphidae, Discoglossidae, Leptodactylidae, Pipidae and Ranidae. Their effects upon production of inflammatory and immunoregulatory cytokines by target cells have been evaluated ex vivo and effects upon cytokine expression and immune cell activity have been studied in vivo by flow cytometry after injection into mice. The naturally-occurring peptides and/or their synthetic analogues show complex and variable actions on the production of proinflammatory (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-12, IL-23, IL-8, IFN-γ and IL-17, pleiotropic (IL-4 and IL-6 and immunosuppressive (IL-10 and TGF-β cytokines by peripheral and spleen cells, peritoneal cells and/or isolated macrophages. The effects of frenatin 2.1S include enhancement of the activation state and homing capacity of Th1-type lymphocytes and NK cells in the mouse peritoneal cavity, as well as the promotion of their tumoricidal capacities. Overall, the diverse effects of frog skin-derived peptides on the immune system indicate their potential for development into therapeutic agents.

  4. Click Reactions in Chemistry of Triterpenes - Advances Towards Development of Potential Therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokorny, Jan; Borkova, Lucie; Urban, Milan

    2018-02-13

    Triterpenoids are natural compounds with a large variety of biological activities such as anticancer, antiviral, antibacterial, antifungal, antiparazitic, antiinflammatory and others. Despite their low toxicity and simple availability from the natural resources, their clinical use is still severely limited by their higher IC50 and worse pharmacological properties than in the currently used therapeutics. This fact encouraged a number of researchers to develop new terpenic derivatives more suitable for the potential clinical use. This review summarizes a new approach to improve both, the activity and ADME-Tox properties by connecting active terpenes to another modifying molecules using click reactions. Within the past few years, this synthetic approach was well explored yielding a lot of great improvements of the parent compounds along with some less successful attempts. A large quantity of the new compounds presented here are superior in both activity and ADME-Tox properties to their parents. This review should serve the researchers who need to promote their hit triterpenic structures towards their clinical use and it is intended as a guide for the chemical synthesis of better drug candidates. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. The history of the development of buprenorphine as an addiction therapeutic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Nancy D; Lovell, Anne M

    2012-02-01

    This paper traces the early 21st century success of the agonist-antagonist buprenorphine and the combination drug buprenorphine with naloxone within the broader quest to develop addiction therapeutics that began in the 1920s as the search for a nonaddictive analgesic. Drawing on archival research, document analysis, and interviews with contemporary actors, this paper situates the social organization of laboratory-based and clinical research within the domestic and international confluence of several issues, including research ethics, drug regulation, public attitudes, tensions around definitions of drug addiction, and the evolving roles of the pharmaceutical industry. The fervor that drove the champions of buprenorphine must be understood in relation to (1) the material work of research and pharmaceutical manufacturing; (2) the symbolic role of buprenorphine as a solution to numerous problems with addiction treatment evident by the mid-1970s; the destigmatization and individualization of addicts as patients; and (3) the complex configurations of public and private partnerships. © 2012 New York Academy of Sciences.

  6. Improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matanza, David; Hallouard, François; Rioufol, Catherine; Fessi, Hatem; Fraysse, Marc

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to describe and evaluate an approach for improving radiopharmaceutical supply chain safety by implementing bar code technology. We first evaluated the current situation of our radiopharmaceutical supply chain and, by means of the ALARM protocol, analysed two dispensing errors that occurred in our department. Thereafter, we implemented a bar code system to secure selected key stages of the radiopharmaceutical supply chain. Finally, we evaluated the cost of this implementation, from overtime, to overheads, to additional radiation exposure to workers. An analysis of the events that occurred revealed a lack of identification of prepared or dispensed drugs. Moreover, the evaluation of the current radiopharmaceutical supply chain showed that the dispensation and injection steps needed to be further secured. The bar code system was used to reinforce product identification at three selected key stages: at usable stock entry; at preparation-dispensation; and during administration, allowing to check conformity between the labelling of the delivered product (identity and activity) and the prescription. The extra time needed for all these steps had no impact on the number and successful conduct of examinations. The investment cost was reduced (2600 euros for new material and 30 euros a year for additional supplies) because of pre-existing computing equipment. With regard to the radiation exposure to workers there was an insignificant overexposure for hands with this new organization because of the labelling and scanning processes of radiolabelled preparation vials. Implementation of bar code technology is now an essential part of a global securing approach towards optimum patient management.

  7. Airtight miniaturized chromatography: a safer method for radiopharmaceutical quality control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Coupal, J.J.; Shih, W.J.; Ryo, U.Y.

    1988-01-01

    Miniaturized chromatography is widely used for quality control of radiopharmaceuticals. Recently, published chromatography procedures have illustrated or described chromatography chambers open to the air in use, suggesting that volatile toxic mobile phases are harmless to people in the vicinity. The authors describe the results of their search for an inexpensive closed chromatography chamber that can be used to derive safely the benefits from conventional miniaturized chromatography

  8. Active and passive vectorization of technetium99m and 188rhenium radiopharmaceuticals for medical imaging and radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lepareur, N.

    2003-11-01

    Research for new molecules for nuclear medicine is a field in constant development. Over the past few years, development of new radiopharmaceuticals for radiotherapy has renewed interest for rhenium chemistry. Indeed, its two isotopes 186 Re and 188 Re, owing to their ideal properties and their similitude with 99m Tc, which is widely used as a radiotracer for diagnostic imaging, seem very promising for the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals. In the first part of this manuscript, the synthesis of rhenium and technetium-99 complexes, [M(RPhCS3)2(RPhCS2)] (M = Re, Tc), is described. The preparation of technetium 99m based radiopharmaceuticals, analogues to the pondered complexes, is also described. The stability/reactivity of these complexes has been studied by exchange reactions with potential ligands, specially dithiocarbamates, and also by UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. The reactivity of the complexes towards dithiocarbamates leads to the possibility to bind biomolecules to the metallic core, via the dithiocarbamate moiety. This method represents a potential alternative to current ones using the so-called bifunctional approach. In the second part of this manuscript, a new kit formulation for the 188 Re labeling of lipiodol is described, using a complex analogous to those described in the previous part. The labeled oil is a potential cure for hepatocellular carcinoma. The in vitro and in vivo stability of this 188 Re-SSS lipiodol and of its analogue 99m Tc-SSS lipiodol has been studied, and also their in vivo behavior in healthy pigs. This study has shown the quasi-exclusive hepatic fixation of the radiopharmaceutical, and has proven its good stability. Its selectivity for tumors remains to be shown before trying it on humans. (author)

  9. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals for in vivo diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiebe, L.I.

    1984-01-01

    Radioactive tracers for in vivo clinical diagnosis fall within a narrow, strictly-defined set of specifications in respect of their physical properties, chemical and biochemical characteristics, and medical applications. The type of radioactive decay and physical half-life of the radionuclide are immutable properties which, along with the demands of production and supply, limit the choice of radionuclides used in medicine to only a small fraction of those known to exist. In use, the biochemical and physiological properties of a radiotracer are dictated by the chemical form of the radionuclide. This chemical form may range from elemental, molecular or ionic, to complex compounds formed by coordinate or covalent bonding of the radionuclide to either simple organic or inorganic molecules, or complex macromolecules. Few of the radiotracers which are tested in model systems ever become radiopharmaceuticals in the strictest sense. Radionuclides, radiotracers and radiopharmaceuticals in use are reviewed. Drug legislation and regulations concerning drug manufacture, as well as hospital ethical constraints and legislation concerning unsealed sources of radiation must all be satisfied in order to translate a radiopharmaceutical from the laboratory to clinical use. (author)

  10. Key factors influencing ADME properties of therapeutic proteins: A need for ADME characterization in drug discovery and development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tibbitts, Jay; Canter, David; Graff, Ryan; Smith, Alison; Khawli, Leslie A.

    2016-01-01

    abstract Protein therapeutics represent a diverse array of biologics including antibodies, fusion proteins, and therapeutic replacement enzymes. Since their inception, they have revolutionized the treatment of a wide range of diseases including respiratory, vascular, autoimmune, inflammatory, infectious, and neurodegenerative diseases, as well as cancer. While in vivo pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic, and efficacy studies are routinely carried out for protein therapeutics, studies that identify key factors governing their absorption, distribution, metabolism, and excretion (ADME) properties have not been fully investigated. Thorough characterization and in-depth study of their ADME properties are critical in order to support drug discovery and development processes for the production of safer and more effective biotherapeutics. In this review, we discuss the main factors affecting the ADME characteristics of these large macromolecular therapies. We also give an overview of the current tools, technologies, and approaches available to investigate key factors that influence the ADME of recombinant biotherapeutic drugs, and demonstrate how ADME studies will facilitate their future development. PMID:26636901

  11. Therapeutic radionuclides: Production and decay property considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Volkert, W.A.; Goeckeler, W.F.; Ehrhardt, G.J.; Ketring, A.R.

    1991-01-01

    The development of effective therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals requires careful consideration in the selection of the radionuclide. The in vivo targeting and clearance properties of the carrier molecule must be balanced with the decay properties of the attached radionuclide. Radionuclides for therapeutic applications fall into three general categories: beta-particle emitters, alpha-particle emitters, and Auger and Coster-Kronig-electron emitters following electron capture. Alpha particles and Auger electrons deposit their energy over short distances with a high LET that limits the ability of cells to repair damage to DNA. Despite their high levels of cytotoxicity, the relatively short range of alpha particles requires binding of the carrier molecule to most cancer cells within a tumor in order to be effective. Because of the extremely short range of Auger electrons, the radionuclide must be carried directly into the nucleus to elicit high radiotoxicity, making it necessary to deliver the radionuclide to every cell within a tumor cell population. These characteristics impose rigid restrictions on the nature of the carrier molecules for these types of particle emitters but successful targeting of these types of radionuclides could result in high therapeutic ratios. Most beta-emitting radionuclides are produced in nuclear rectors via neutron capture reactions; however, a few are produced in charged-particle accelerators. For radionuclides produced by direct neutron activation, the quantities and specific activities that can be produced are determined in large part by the cross-section of the target isotope and the flux of the reactor. Many applications do not require high-specific activities and can therefore utilize the wide range of radionuclides that can be produced in sufficient quantity by direct neutron activation. 114 refs

  12. Legislative situation of EEC member states and european provisions concerning preparation and use of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lalanne, P.

    1977-01-01

    Radiopharmaceuticals are excluded from the directives on pharmaceutical products and considerable gaps exist in the legislation of many countries. The pharmacopoeia provides standards and methods for the quality control of the final product. According to the same principles, it is proposed that special provisions, taking into consideration the very special nature of radiopharmaceuticals, might be introduced in the european economic community legislation, to secure that all radiopharmaceuticals used are safe and of an uniform quality

  13. Determination of Sn{sup 2+} in lyophilized radiopharmaceuticals by voltammetry, using hydrochloric acid as electrolyte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dadda, Adilio S.; Teixeira, Ariane C.; Feltes, Paula K.; Campos, Maria M.; Moriguchi-Jeckel, Cristina M., E-mail: adiliosd@yahoo.com.br [Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul (PUC-RS), Porto Alegre-RS (Brazil); Leite, Carlos E. [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Porto Alegre-RS (Brazil)

    2014-07-01

    This work aimed to develop and validate a routine method for the specific determination of Sn{sup 2+} 2-methoxy isobutyl isonitrile (MIBI) radiopharmaceutical kits. A voltammetric electrochemical technique was used for the analysis. Screening experiments revealed that 1 mol L{sup -1} HCl electrolyte showed the best results, among all the tested solutions. Stability experiments showed a gradual decline in the current of MIBI, and 23 days after the preparation of the solution, the current corresponding to stannous ion disappeared. To confirm the selectivity of the technique using HCl, we have induced oxidation of SnCl{sub 2} that resulted in a proportional decline of the current in the voltammogram. The reliability of the method was observed with the values of precision and accuracy intra- and inter-assay, and also its robustness. We provide novel evidence on the selective detection of Sn{sup 2+} in the presence of its oxidized form in radiopharmaceutical kits, by using 1 mol L{sup -1} HCl as electrolyte. (author)

  14. Radiopharmaceuticals for imaging infection and inflammation. Report of the consultants' meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1998-01-01

    Infection and inflammation remain widespread clinical problems throughout the world. Most infections can be effectively treated with antibiotics and will never require referral to an imaging department but certain types of infection are quite refractory to drug treatment and may require hospital intervention. Such conditions include deep-seated muscular or orthopaedic infections especially those resulting from previous surgery; acute life-threatening infections which require immediate effective treatment such as acute appendicitis; severe chronic infections arising from drug-resistance; and opportunistic infections in immune-compromised individuals. Recent years have seen some progress in the development of new radiopharmaceuticals for the detection of inflammation and, since infection remains a major clinical problem, it is recommended that the IAEA establish a new co-ordinated research programme in this field in order to further explore this new technology and to ensure its widest possible application. It is recommended that this CRP evaluate method for radiolabelling, analysis and preclinical assessment of a small number of radiopharmaceuticals which may be either 'specific' or 'non-specific' in their mode of action

  15. Formulation of DOTATATE Cold Kit for Preparation of Ga-68 Radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sriwiang, W.; Duangta, T.; Kaeopookum, P.; Wongsanit, S.

    2014-01-01

    Radiolabeled somatostatin analogs of peptide receptors targeting tumor cells have become a common practice in the diagnosis and treatment of certain types of cancer. The aim of this research was to develop the cold kit to be label with Ga-68 radionuclide for neuroendocrine tumor imaging. DOTATATE peptide for somatostatin receptor was formulated with NaOAc and ascorbic acid into lyophilized form. Radiochemical purity (RCP) of 68 Ga-DOTATATE labeled complex prepared from the cold kit was determined during storage period of 5 months and evaluated before clinical application to EANM guideline. The %RCP of the labeled peptide was more than 95% throughout period of storage with Ge-68 breakthrough less than 0.001%. The peptide content calculated from peak area of standard DOTATATE calibration curve using HPLC at uv 220 nm was found to be 15.3±4.62 μg. The specific activity of 68 Ga-DOTATATE, which depended on activities eluted from generator, was 34.7 - 52 MBq/nmol-peptide. The pH of the Ga-68 radiopharmaceutical kit after dilution with phosphate-buffered saline was 5.0 - 5.3. These results demonstrated that preparing of 68 Ga-DOTATATE radiopharmaceutical from lyophilized kit presented in this study was suitable and convenient method obtaining high radiochemical purity of short half-life Ga-68 radionuclide.

  16. Comparison of different thin layer detection techniques to determine the radiochemical purity of radiopharmaceuticals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammermaier, A.; Reich, E.; Boegl, W.

    1985-01-01

    Ten radiopharmaceuticals frequently used in clinical treatment were examined as to their radiochemical purity by paper and thin layer chromatography or electrophoresis, respectively. It is known that radiochemical impurities may result in an unnecessary exposure of the patients to be examined. Other than determining the radiochemical purity of several radiopharmaceuticals, a comparison of the different measuring methods of distributing activity on radiochromatograms or electropherograms is intended by this study. For this, the activity distribution in the developed radiochromatograms was assessed by four different measuring methods (TLC-linear analyzer, TLC-scanner with NaI(Tl) detector, TLC-scanner with gas flow counter and NaI(Tl) well-typ counter). As shown by the above analysis, only the TLC-linear analyzer and the NaI(Tl) well-typ counter (measurement of chromatograms or electropherograms cut into strips) are gen