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Sample records for therapeutic optical activation

  1. Development of Optically Active Nanostructures for Potential Applications in Sensing, Therapeutics and Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Padmanabh

    Materials at nanoscale are finding manifold applications in the various fields like sensing, plasmonics, therapeutics, to mention a few. Large amount of development has taken place regarding synthesis and exploring the novel applications of the various types of nanomaterials like organic, inorganic and hybrid of both. Yet, it is believed that the full potential of different nanomaterials is yet to be fully established stimulating researchers to explore more in the field of nanotechnology. Building on the same premise, in the following studies we have developed the nanomaterials in the class of optically active nanoparticles. First part of the study we have successfully designed, synthesized, and characterized Ag-Fe3O4 nanocomposite substrate for potential applications in quantitative Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) measurements. Quantitative SERS-based detection of dopamine was performed successfully. In subsequent study, facile, single-step synthesis of polyethyleneimine (PEI) coated lanthanide based NaYF4 (Yb, Er) nanoparticles was developed and their application as potential photodynamic therapy agent was studied using excitations by light in near infra-red and visible region. In the following and last study, synthesis and characterization of the conjugated polymer nanoparticles was attempted successfully. Functionalization of the conjugated nanoparticles, which is a bottleneck for their potential applications, was successfully performed by encapsulating them in the silica nanoparticles, surface of which was then functionalized by amine group. Three types of optically active nanoparticles were developed for potential applications in sensing, therapeutics and imaging.

  2. OPTICAL DEFLECTOR CREATION FOR LASER THERAPEUTIC DEVICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. N. Baranov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with creation of optical deflector for management of laser radiation in physiotherapeutic devices. Design features and operation principles of electro-optical, optical-acoustic and mechanical deflectors, giving the possibility to carry out continuous or discrete scanning of a laser beam are shown. Operation mechanism of the mechanical type deflector on the example of domestic laser therapeutic scanners is described in detail. Application possibility in clinical practice for heating technique of the acupuncture points by volumetric scanning of tissues by the radiation of semiconductor lasers on wave lengths equal to 0,67 and 0,85 μm is investigated. Creation justification of the new type deflector is given. Comparison between stable and labile techniques of radiation is carried out. It is shown that more intensive warming up of a skin surface in acupuncture point projection is observed at volumetric scanning, rather than at planar scanning by laser beams. Temperature increase on a skin surface in projection of acupuncture points is detected at radiation in both the visible spectrum range (0,67 μm and the infrared range (0,85 μm. It gives the possibility to apply this scanning method to thermal photo-activation of the point and to extend an existing arsenal of laser reflexology methods. The optical deflector is offered for medical industry, making it possible to carry out volumetric scanning of a laser beam and to facilitate the medical personnel’s work in laser therapy and reflexology consulting rooms.

  3. Therapeutic radiation apparatus having an optical pointer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This patent specification relates to a therapeutic irradiating apparatus including a radiation source arranged to provide a beam of penetrating radiation and an optical alignment indicator comprising at least two light sources each provided with means to provide a planar divergent beam of light located so that at least two light beams intersect along a line substantially coincident with the central axis of the path of the radiation beam. The claim relates to cylindrical lenses providing the means of providing the divergent beams, and to lasers as the light sources. Claims are also made for the apparatus providing means of supporting and aligning the patient, and for disposing the light sources so that the exit point of the radiation beam is illuminated. (U.K.)

  4. New concepts in therapeutic photomedicine: photochemistry, optical targeting and the therapeutic window

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parrish, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Advances in optics technology, synthetic photochemistry, and the science of photobiology make it possible to think beyond phototherapy and photochemotherapy which is dependent on direct photochemical alteration of metabolites or direct phototoxic insult to cells. This report discusses another gender of photomedicine therapy which includes in vivo photoactivation of medicines, photon-dependent drug delivery, and manipulation of host and exposure source to maximize therapeutic index. These therapeutic manipulations are made possible because the skin is highly overperfused and because non-ionizing electromagnetic radiation that enters skin and blood has adequate photon energy to cause electronic excitation. Radiation of 320-800 nm is not very directly phototoxic, is absorbed by a variety of relatively nontoxic photolabile molecules and has an internal dosimetric depth profile. This radiation can therefore be used to activate, deactivate, bind, release or biotransform medications in vivo in skin or other organs. The photochemist, synthetic chemist and photobiologist can collaborate to significantly increase therapeutic possibilities

  5. Emotional Readiness and Music Therapeutic Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drossinou-Korea, Maria; Fragkouli, Aspasia

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to understand the children's expression with verbal and nonverbal communication in the Autistic spectrum. We study the emotional readiness and the music therapeutic activities which exploit the elements of music. The method followed focused on the research field of special needs education. Assumptions on the parameters…

  6. Active Faraday optical frequency standard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2014-11-01

    We propose the mechanism of an active Faraday optical clock, and experimentally demonstrate an active Faraday optical frequency standard based on narrow bandwidth Faraday atomic filter by the method of velocity-selective optical pumping of cesium vapor. The center frequency of the active Faraday optical frequency standard is determined by the cesium 6 (2)S(1/2) F=4 to 6 (2)P(3/2) F'=4 and 5 crossover transition line. The optical heterodyne beat between two similar independent setups shows that the frequency linewidth reaches 281(23) Hz, which is 1.9×10(4) times smaller than the natural linewidth of the cesium 852-nm transition line. The maximum emitted light power reaches 75 μW. The active Faraday optical frequency standard reported here has advantages of narrow linewidth and reduced cavity pulling, which can readily be extended to other atomic transition lines of alkali and alkaline-earth metal atoms trapped in optical lattices at magic wavelengths, making it useful for new generation of optical atomic clocks.

  7. Optical control of antibacterial activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velema, Willem A.; van der Berg, Jan Pieter; Hansen, Mickel J.; Szymanski, Wiktor; Driessen, Arnold J. M.; Feringa, Ben L.

    2013-11-01

    Bacterial resistance is a major problem in the modern world, stemming in part from the build-up of antibiotics in the environment. Novel molecular approaches that enable an externally triggered increase in antibiotic activity with high spatiotemporal resolution and auto-inactivation are highly desirable. Here we report a responsive, broad-spectrum, antibacterial agent that can be temporally activated with light, whereupon it auto-inactivates on the scale of hours. The use of such a ‘smart’ antibiotic might prevent the build-up of active antimicrobial material in the environment. Reversible optical control over active drug concentration enables us to obtain pharmacodynamic information. Precisely localized control of activity is achieved, allowing the growth of bacteria to be confined to defined patterns, which has potential for the development of treatments that avoid interference with the endogenous microbial population in other parts of the organism.

  8. Mitochondrial optic neuropathies – Disease mechanisms and therapeutic strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Griffiths, Philip G.; Chinnery, Patrick F.

    2011-01-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) and autosomal-dominant optic atrophy (DOA) are the two most common inherited optic neuropathies in the general population. Both disorders share striking pathological similarities, marked by the selective loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and the early involvement of the papillomacular bundle. Three mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) point mutations; m.3460G>A, m.11778G>A, and m.14484T>C account for over 90% of LHON cases, and in DOA, the majority of affected families harbour mutations in the OPA1 gene, which codes for a mitochondrial inner membrane protein. Optic nerve degeneration in LHON and DOA is therefore due to disturbed mitochondrial function and a predominantly complex I respiratory chain defect has been identified using both in vitro and in vivo biochemical assays. However, the trigger for RGC loss is much more complex than a simple bioenergetic crisis and other important disease mechanisms have emerged relating to mitochondrial network dynamics, mtDNA maintenance, axonal transport, and the involvement of the cytoskeleton in maintaining a differential mitochondrial gradient at sites such as the lamina cribosa. The downstream consequences of these mitochondrial disturbances are likely to be influenced by the local cellular milieu. The vulnerability of RGCs in LHON and DOA could derive not only from tissue-specific, genetically-determined biological factors, but also from an increased susceptibility to exogenous influences such as light exposure, smoking, and pharmacological agents with putative mitochondrial toxic effects. Our concept of inherited mitochondrial optic neuropathies has evolved over the past decade, with the observation that patients with LHON and DOA can manifest a much broader phenotypic spectrum than pure optic nerve involvement. Interestingly, these phenotypes are sometimes clinically indistinguishable from other neurodegenerative disorders such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, hereditary spastic

  9. Correcting Effect of Therapeutic Doses of Optical Radiation on Hematological Parameters of Blood Irradiated In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalesskaya, G. A.; Laskina, O. V.

    2017-07-01

    We studied the effect of therapeutic doses of optical radiation on the hematological parameters of blood irradiated in vivo: hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit, and the number of erythrocytes in the peripheral blood of patients during courses of extracorporeal, overvein, and intravenous blood irradiation and after treatment. The reversible changes during the procedures were found to differ from the changes obtained after treatment completion. At the end of the treatment course, the hematological parameters had changed in different directions and became higher, the same, or lower than the initial parameters depending on the initial parameters and photoinduced changes in blood oxygenation. A compensatory effect was found for photohemotherapy on oxygen-dependent processes altering the oxygen inflow into cells as well as the generation of active oxygen species and their inhibition by antioxidant systems.

  10. Water-equivalent one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter for measuring therapeutic photon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, Jinsoo; Won Jang, Kyoung; Jae Yoo, Wook; Han, Ki-Tek; Park, Jang-Yeon; Lee, Bongsoo

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we fabricated a one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter, which consists of 9 scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters, septa, and PMMA blocks for measuring surface and percentage depth doses of a therapeutic photon beam. Each dosimeter embedded in the 1-D scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter is composed of square type organic scintillators and plastic optical fibers. Also black PVC films are used as septa to minimize cross-talk between the scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters. To construct a dosimeter system, a 1-D scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter and a CMOS image sensor were combined with 20 m-length plastic optical fibers. Using the dosimeter system, we measured surface and percentage depth doses of 6 and 15 MV photon beams and compared the results with those of EBT films and an ionization chamber. - Highlights: ► Fabrication of a one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter. ► The one-dimensional scintillating fiber-optic dosimeter has 9 scintillating fiber-optic dosimeters. ► Measurements of surface and percentage depth doses of a therapeutic photon beam. ► The results were compared with those of EBT films and an ionization chamber.

  11. Measurement of optical activity of honey bee

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Gutiérrez, Mauricio; Olivares-Pérez, Arturo; Salgado-Verduzco, Marco Antonio; Ibarra-Torres, Juan Carlos

    2016-03-01

    Optical activity of some substances, such as chiral molecules, often exhibits circular birefringence. Circular birefringence causes rotation of the vibration plane of the plane polarized light as it passes through the substance. In this work we present optical characterization of honey as function of the optical activity when it is placed in a polariscope that consists of a light source and properly arranged polarizing elements.

  12. Biological and therapeutic activities, and anticancer properties of curcumin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Donatella; Ardito, Fatima; Giannatempo, Giovanni; Dioguardi, Mario; Troiano, Giuseppe; Lo Russo, Lucio; DE Lillo, Alfredo; Laino, Luigi; Lo Muzio, Lorenzo

    2015-11-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine, as it is nontoxic and exhibits a variety of therapeutic properties, including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activities. Recently, certain studies have indicated that curcumin may exert anticancer effects in a variety of biological pathways involved in mutagenesis, apoptosis, tumorigenesis, cell cycle regulation and metastasis. The present study reviewed previous studies in the literature, which support the therapeutic activity of curcumin in cancer. In addition, the present study elucidated a number of the challenges concerning the use of curcumin as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent. All the studies reviewed herein suggest that curcumin is able to exert anti-inflammatory, antiplatelet, antioxidative, hepatoprotective and antitumor activities, particularly against cancers of the liver, skin, pancreas, prostate, ovary, lung and head neck, as well as having a positive effect in the treatment of arthritis.

  13. Bone Marrow-Derived Cells as a Therapeutic Approach to Optic Nerve Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Louise A. Mesentier-Louro

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Following optic nerve injury associated with acute or progressive diseases, retinal ganglion cells (RGCs of adult mammals degenerate and undergo apoptosis. These diseases have limited therapeutic options, due to the low inherent capacity of RGCs to regenerate and due to the inhibitory milieu of the central nervous system. Among the numerous treatment approaches investigated to stimulate neuronal survival and axonal extension, cell transplantation emerges as a promising option. This review focuses on cell therapies with bone marrow mononuclear cells and bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells, which have shown positive therapeutic effects in animal models of optic neuropathies. Different aspects of available preclinical studies are analyzed, including cell distribution, potential doses, routes of administration, and mechanisms of action. Finally, published and ongoing clinical trials are summarized.

  14. Tunable 'optical activity' in electrorheological fluids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Q.; Zhao, X.P.

    2005-01-01

    The 'optical activity' of adjustable periodic structure material (SiO 2 and pentaerythrital electrorheological (ER) fluids) is firstly investigated using two kinds of setup. It is found that the rotation angles can be tuned by the external electric field and weight concentrations, and the sign of the rotation angle is negative, so, the used ER fluids are defined as the left-handed optically active substances under the application of electric field. The laser diffraction patterns are also observed in the ER fluids, which indicates the formation of alignment. It is thought that the symmetry breaking of structure induced by applied electric field is the origin of the 'optical activity' in the ER fluids. The electrically tunable 'optical activity' will find innovative applications in displays, optical devices and other fields

  15. Optical limiting properties of optically active phthalocyanine derivatives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Peng; Zhang, Shuang; Wu, Peiji; Ye, Cheng; Liu, Hongwei; Xi, Fu

    2001-06-01

    The optical limiting properties of four optically active phthalocyanine derivatives in chloroform solutions and epoxy resin thin plates were measured at 532 nm with 10 ns pulses. The excited state absorption cross-section σex and refractive-index cross-section σr were determined with the Z-scan technique. These chromophores possess larger σex than the ground state absorption cross-section σ0, indicating that they are the potential materials for reverse saturable absorption (RSA). The negative σr values of these chromophores add to the thermal contribution, producing a larger defocusing effect, which may be helpful in further enhancing their optical limiting performance. The optical limiting responses of the thin plate samples are stronger than those of the chloroform solutions.

  16. Fiber optic strain measurements using an optically-active polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckley, Leonard J.; Neumeister, Gary C.

    1992-03-01

    A study encompassing the use of an optically-active polymer as the strain-sensing medium in an organic matrix composite was performed. Several compounds were synthesized for use as the inner cladding material for silica fiber-optic cores. These materials include a diacetylene containing polyamide. It is possible to dynamically modify the optical properties of these materials through changes in applied strain or temperature. By doing so the characteristic absorption in the visible is reversibly shifted to a higher energy state. The polymer-coated fiber-optic cores were initially studied in epoxy resin. Additionally, one of the polyamide/diacetylene polymers was studied in a spin-fiber form consisting of 15 micron filaments assembled in multifilament tows. The most promising configuration and materials were then investigated further by embedding in graphite/epoxy composite laminates. In each case the shift in the visible absorption peak was monitored as a function of applied mechanical strain.

  17. The LAM space active optics facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, C.; Ferrari, M.; Hugot, E.; Escolle, C.; Bonnefois, A.; Bernot, M.; Bret-Dibat, T.; Carlavan, M.; Falzon, F.; Fusco, T.; Laubier, D.; Liotard, A.; Michau, V.; Mugnier, L.

    2017-11-01

    The next generation of large lightweight space telescopes will require the use of active optics systems to enhance the performance and increase the spatial resolution. Since almost 10 years now, LAM, CNES, THALES and ONERA conjugate their experience and efforts for the development of space active optics through the validation of key technological building blocks: correcting devices, metrology components and control strategies. This article presents the work done so far on active correcting mirrors and wave front sensing, as well as all the facilities implemented. The last part of this paper focuses on the merging of the MADRAS and RASCASSE test-set up. This unique combination will provide to the active optics community an automated, flexible and versatile facility able to feed and characterise space active optics components.

  18. Therapeutic potential of carbohydrates as regulators of macrophage activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundahl, Mimmi L E; Scanlan, Eoin M; Lavelle, Ed C

    2017-12-15

    It is well established for a broad range of disease states, including cancer and Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, that pathogenesis is bolstered by polarisation of macrophages towards an anti-inflammatory phenotype, known as M2. As these innate immune cells are relatively long-lived, their re-polarisation to pro-inflammatory, phagocytic and bactericidal "classically activated" M1 macrophages is an attractive therapeutic approach. On the other hand, there are scenarios where the resolving inflammation, wound healing and tissue remodelling properties of M2 macrophages are beneficial - for example the successful introduction of biomedical implants. Although there are numerous endogenous and exogenous factors that have an impact on the macrophage polarisation spectrum, this review will focus specifically on prominent macrophage-modulating carbohydrate motifs with a view towards highlighting structure-function relationships and therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Matricellular proteins in drug delivery: Therapeutic targets, active agents, and therapeutic localization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Andrew J; Kyriakides, Themis R

    2016-02-01

    Extracellular matrix is composed of a complex array of molecules that together provide structural and functional support to cells. These properties are mainly mediated by the activity of collagenous and elastic fibers, proteoglycans, and proteins such as fibronectin and laminin. ECM composition is tissue-specific and could include matricellular proteins whose primary role is to modulate cell-matrix interactions. In adults, matricellular proteins are primarily expressed during injury, inflammation and disease. Particularly, they are closely associated with the progression and prognosis of cardiovascular and fibrotic diseases, and cancer. This review aims to provide an overview of the potential use of matricellular proteins in drug delivery including the generation of therapeutic agents based on the properties and structures of these proteins as well as their utility as biomarkers for specific diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Photovoltaic concentrator assembly with optically active cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plesniak, Adam P

    2014-01-21

    A photovoltaic concentrator assembly that includes a housing that defines an internal volume and includes a rim, wherein the rim defines an opening into the internal volume, a photovoltaic cell positioned in the internal volume, and an optical element that includes an optically active body and a flange extending outward from the body, wherein the flange is sealingly engaged with the rim of the housing to enclose the internal volume.

  1. Therapeutic Uses of Active Videogames: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staiano, Amanda E; Flynn, Rachel

    2014-12-01

    Active videogames (AVGs) may be useful for promoting physical activity for therapeutic uses, including for balance, rehabilitation, and management of illness or disease. The literature from 64 peer-reviewed publications that assessed health outcomes of AVGs for therapeutic purposes was synthesized. PubMed, Medline, and PyschInfo were queried for original studies related to the use of AVGs to improve physical outcomes in patients who were ill or undergoing rehabilitation related to balance, burn treatment, cancer, cerebral palsy, Down's syndrome, extremity dysfunction or amputation, hospitalization, lupus, Parkinson's disease, spinal injury, or stroke. The following inclusion criteria were used: (1) human subjects; (2) English language; (3) not duplicates; (4) new empirical data; and (5) tests an AVG, including commercially available or custom-designed. Studies were included regardless of participants' age or the study design. Overall, the vast majority of studies demonstrated promising results for improved health outcomes related to therapy, including significantly greater or comparable effects of AVG play versus usual care. However, many studies were pilot trials with small, homogeneous samples, and many studies lacked a control or comparison group. Some trials tested multiweek or multimonth interventions, although many used a single bout of gameplay, and few included follow-up assessments to test sustainability of improved health. AVGs were acceptable and enjoyable to the populations examined and appear as a promising tool for balance, rehabilitation, and illness management. Future research directions and implications for clinicians are discussed.

  2. The use of contact lenses in low vision rehabilitation: optical and therapeutic applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Stephen J

    2017-09-01

    Ocular pathology that manifests at an early age has the potential to alter the vision-dependent emmetropisation mechanism, which co-ordinates ocular growth throughout childhood. The disruption of this feedback mechanism in children with congenital or early-onset visual impairment often results in the development of significant ametropia, including high levels of spherical refractive error, astigmatism and anisometropia. This review examines the use of contact lenses as a refractive correction, low vision aid and therapeutic intervention in the rehabilitation of patients with bilateral, irreversible visual loss due to congenital ocular disease. The advantages and disadvantages of the use of contact lenses for increased magnification (telescopes and microscopes) or field expansion (reverse telescopes) are discussed, along with the benefits and practical considerations for the correction of pathological high myopia. The historical and present use of therapeutic tinted contact lenses to reduce photosensitivity and nystagmus in achromatopsia, albinism and aniridia are also presented, including clinical considerations for the contact lens practitioner. In addition to the known optical benefits in comparison to spectacles for high levels of ametropia (an improved field of view for myopes and fewer inherent oblique aberrations), contact lenses may be of significant psycho-social benefit for patients with low vision, due to enhanced cosmesis and reduced conspicuity and potential related effects of improved self-esteem and peer acceptance. The contact lens correction of patients with congenital vision impairment can be challenging for both practitioner and patient but should be considered as a potential optical or therapeutic solution in modern low vision rehabilitation. © 2017 Optometry Australia.

  3. [Activating therapeutic care in geriatrics : Evaluation of a practice concept].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acklau, Stefanie; Gödecker, Lisa; Kaden, Andrea; Jahn, Patrick

    2016-10-01

    The special feature of the concept of activating therapeutic care in geriatrics (ATP-G) is based on the focus of nursing and therapeutic elements specifically related to the elderly. Further significance lies in the bottom-up development of this concept, which shows a close proximity to the nursing practice. The research project targeted the characteristics of ATP-G from a nursing point of view. Furthermore, the resulting elements of professional nursing care understanding for inpatient geriatric rehabilitation were used to build a scientific and theoretical foundation of the ATP-G concept. In this study 12 semi-structured interviews with professional caregivers were realized. The data collection was undertaken in three different facilities of inpatient geriatric (early) rehabilitation, chosen by lot. The data analysis was based on the methodology of qualitative content analysis according to Mayring. The research project showed that the basic elements described in the ATP-G concept are consistent with the view of nursing practitioners and therefore reflect the characteristic features of routine daily practice; nonetheless, some new aspects were found, primarily the importance of interdisciplinary teamwork in geriatric settings. There were also difficulties related to the ATP-G concept which were experienced as restraints by the questioned professionals. Further research should therefore investigate the structures for optimal implementation of the ATP-G concept into standard practice.

  4. Raman Optical Activity of Biological Molecules

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Barron, Laurence D.

    Now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure, Raman optical activity (ROA) measures a small difference in Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarized light. As ROA spectra measure vibrational optical activity, they contain highly informative band structures sensitive to the secondary and tertiary structures of proteins, nucleic acids, viruses and carbohydrates as well as the absolute configurations of small molecules. In this review we present a survey of recent studies on biomolecular structure and dynamics using ROA and also a discussion of future applications of this powerful new technique in biomedical research.

  5. 3D-printed optical active components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh Nair, S.; Nuding, J.; Heinrich, A.

    2018-02-01

    Additive Manufacturing (AM) has the potential to become a powerful tool in the realization of complex optical components. The primary advantage that meets the eye, is that fabrication of geometrically complicated optical structures is made easier in AM as compared to the conventional fabrication methods (using molds for instance). But this is not the only degree of freedom that AM has to offer. With the multitude of materials suitable for AM in the market, it is possible to introduce functionality into the components one step before fabrication: by altering the raw material. A passive example would be to use materials with varying properties together, in a single manufacturing step, constructing samples with localized refractive indices for instance. An active approach is to blend in materials with distinct properties into the photopolymer resin and manufacturing with this composite material. Our research is currently focused in this direction, with the desired optical property to be introduced being Photoluminescence. Formation of nanocomposite mixtures to produce samples is the current approach. With this endeavor, new sensor systems can be realized, which may be used to measure the absorption spectra of biological samples. Thereby the sample compartment, the optics and the spectral light source (different quantum dots) are 3D-printed in one run. This component can be individually adapted to the biological sample with respect to wavelength, optical and mechanical properties. Here we would like to present our work on the additive manufacturing of an active optical component. Based on the stereolithography method, a monolithic optical component was 3D-printed, showing light emission at different defined wavelengths due to UV excited quantum dots inside the 3D-printed optics.

  6. AMPK activation: a therapeutic target for type 2 diabetes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Coughlan KA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Kimberly A Coughlan, Rudy J Valentine, Neil B Ruderman, Asish K Saha Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Medicine, Boston University Medical Center, Boston, MA, USA Abstract: Type 2 diabetes (T2D is a metabolic disease characterized by insulin resistance, β-cell dysfunction, and elevated hepatic glucose output. Over 350 million people worldwide have T2D, and the International Diabetes Federation projects that this number will increase to nearly 600 million by 2035. There is a great need for more effective treatments for maintaining glucose homeostasis and improving insulin sensitivity. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK is an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine kinase whose activation elicits insulin-sensitizing effects, making it an ideal therapeutic target for T2D. AMPK is an energy-sensing enzyme that is activated when cellular energy levels are low, and it signals to stimulate glucose uptake in skeletal muscles, fatty acid oxidation in adipose (and other tissues, and reduces hepatic glucose production. There is substantial evidence suggesting that AMPK is dysregulated in animals and humans with metabolic syndrome or T2D, and that AMPK activation (physiological or pharmacological can improve insulin sensitivity and metabolic health. Numerous pharmacological agents, natural compounds, and hormones are known to activate AMPK, either directly or indirectly – some of which (for example, metformin and thiazolidinediones are currently used to treat T2D. This paper will review the regulation of the AMPK pathway and its role in T2D, some of the known AMPK activators and their mechanisms of action, and the potential for future improvements in targeting AMPK for the treatment of T2D. Keywords: adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase, type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance, drug therapy

  7. Active optical cable for intrasatellite communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blasco, J.; Cano, D.; Navasquillo, O.; Esteban, M. A.

    2017-11-01

    DAS Photonics and Airbus Defence and Space (Spain) have been working for more than six years in the concept of an Active Optical Cable (AOC) for copper cable substitution. The main advantages that AOC offers are significant mass and size saving, better flexibility and routing of the cable and immunity to EMI.

  8. Surface enhanced Raman optical activity (SEROA)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdali, Salim; Blanch, E.W.

    2008-01-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA) directly monitors the stereochemistry of chiral molecules and is now an incisive probe of biomolecular structure. ROA spectra contain a wealth of information on tertiary folding, secondary structure and even the orientation of individual residues in proteins and nucleic...

  9. Fiberoptic microneedles: novel optical diffusers for interstitial delivery of therapeutic light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosoglu, Mehmet A; Hood, Robert L; Rossmeisl, John H; Grant, David C; Xu, Yong; Robertson, John L; Rylander, Marissa Nichole; Rylander, Christopher G

    2011-11-01

    Photothermal therapies have limited efficacy and application due to the poor penetration depth of light inside tissue. In earlier work, we described the development of novel fiberoptic microneedles to provide a means to mechanically penetrate dermal tissue and deliver light directly into a localized target area.This paper presents an alternate fiberoptic microneedle design with the capability of delivering more diffuse, but therapeutically useful photothermal energy. Laser lipolysis is envisioned as a future clinical application for this design. A novel fiberoptic microneedle was developed using hydrofluoric acid etching of optical fiber to permit diffuse optical delivery. Microneedles etched for 10, 30, and 50 minutes, and an optical fiber control were compared with three techniques. First, red light delivery from the microneedles was evaluated by imaging the reflectance of the light from a white paper.Second, spatial temperature distribution of the paper in response to near-IR light (1,064 nm, 1 W CW) was recorded using infrared thermography. Third, ex vivo adipose tissue response during 1,064 nm, (5 W CW)irradiation was recorded with bright field microscopy. Acid etching exposed a 3 mm length of the fiber core, allowing circumferential delivery of light along this length. Increasing etching time decreased microneedle diameter, resulting in increased uniformity of red and 1,064 nm light delivery along the microneedle axis. For equivalent total energy delivery, thinner microneedles reduced carbonization in the adipose tissue experiments. We developed novel microscale optical diffusers that provided a more homogeneous light distribution from their surfaces, and compared performance to a flat-cleaved fiber, a device currently utilized in clinical practice. These fiberoptic microneedles can potentially enhance clinical laser procedures by providing direct delivery of diffuse light to target chromophores, while minimizing undesirable photothermal damage in adjacent

  10. International Consensus Statement on the Clinical and Therapeutic Management of Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carelli, Valerio; Carbonelli, Michele; de Coo, Irenaeus F; Kawasaki, Aki; Klopstock, Thomas; Lagrèze, Wolf A; La Morgia, Chiara; Newman, Nancy J; Orssaud, Christophe; Pott, Jan Willem R; Sadun, Alfredo A; van Everdingen, Judith; Vignal-Clermont, Catherine; Votruba, Marcela; Yu-Wai-Man, Patrick; Barboni, Piero

    2017-12-01

    Leber hereditary optic neuropathy (LHON) is currently estimated as the most frequent mitochondrial disease (1 in 27,000-45,000). Its molecular pathogenesis and natural history is now fairly well understood. LHON also is the first mitochondrial disease for which a treatment has been approved (idebenone-Raxone, Santhera Pharmaceuticals) by the European Medicine Agency, under exceptional circumstances because of the rarity and severity of the disease. However, what remains unclear includes the optimal target population, timing, dose, and frequency of administration of idebenone in LHON due to lack of accepted definitions, criteria, and general guidelines for the clinical management of LHON. To address these issues, a consensus conference with a panel of experts from Europe and North America was held in Milan, Italy, in 2016. The intent was to provide expert consensus statements for the clinical and therapeutic management of LHON based on the currently available evidence. We report the conclusions of this conference, providing the guidelines for clinical and therapeutic management of LHON.

  11. Eugenol nanocapsule for enhanced therapeutic activity against periodontal infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pramod, Kannissery; Aji Alex, M R; Singh, Manisha; Dang, Shweta; Ansari, Shahid H; Ali, Javed

    2016-01-01

    Eugenol is a godsend to dental care due to its analgesic, local anesthetic, and anti-inflammatory and antibacterial effects. The aim of the present research work was to prepare, characterize and evaluate eugenol-loaded nanocapsules (NCs) against periodontal infections. Eugenol-loaded polycaprolactone (PCL) NCs were prepared by solvent displacement method. The nanometric size of the prepared NCs was confirmed by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The in vitro drug release was found to follow a biphasic pattern and followed Michaelis-Menten like model. The percentage cell viability values near to 100 in the cell viability assay indicated that the NCs are not cytotoxic. In the in vivo studies, the eugenol NC group displayed significant difference in the continuity of epithelium of the interdental papilla in comparison to the untreated, pure eugenol and placebo groups. The in vivo performance of the eugenol-loaded NCs using ligature-induced periodontitis model in rats indicated that eugenol-loaded NCs could prevent septal bone resorption in periodontitis. On the basis of our research findings it could be concluded that eugenol-loaded PCL NCs could serve as a novel colloidal drug delivery system for enhanced therapeutic activity of eugenol in the treatment of periodontal infections.

  12. Androgen receptor activation: a prospective therapeutic target for bladder cancer?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizushima, Taichi; Tirador, Kathleen A; Miyamoto, Hiroshi

    2017-03-01

    Patients with non-muscle-invasive or muscle-invasive bladder cancer undergoing surgery and currently available conventional therapy remain having a high risk of tumor recurrence or progression, respectively. Novel targeted molecular therapy is therefore expected to improve patient outcomes. Meanwhile, substantially higher incidence of bladder cancer in men has prompted research on androgen-mediated androgen receptor (AR) signaling in this malignancy. Indeed, preclinical evidence has suggested that AR signaling plays an important role in urothelial carcinogenesis and tumor outgrowth as well as resistance to some of the currently available conventional non-surgical therapies. Areas covered: We summarize and discuss available data suggesting the involvement of AR and its potential downstream targets in the development and progression of bladder cancer. Associations between AR signaling and sensitivity to cisplatin/doxorubicin or bacillus Calmette-Guérin treatment are also reviewed. Expert opinion: AR activation is likely to correlate with the promotion of urothelial carcinogenesis and cancer outgrowth as well as resistance to conventional therapies. Molecular therapy targeting the AR may thus provide effective chemopreventive and therapeutic approaches for urothelial cancer. Accordingly, bladder cancer can now be considered as an endocrine-related neoplasm. Clinical application of various anti-AR therapies available for AR-dependent prostate cancer to bladder cancer patients is anticipated.

  13. Active Star Architectures For Fiber Optics Ethernet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linde, Yoseph L.

    1988-12-01

    Ethernet, and the closely related IEEE 802.3 CSMA/CD standard (Carrier Sense Multiple Access with Collision Detection), is probably the widest used method for high speed Local Area Networks (LANs). The original Ethernet medium was baseband coax but the wide acceptance of the system necessitated the ability to use Ethernet on a variety of media. So far the use of Ethernet on Thin Coax (CheaperNet), Twisted Pair (StarLan) and Broadband Coax has been standardized. Recently, an increased interest in Fiber Optic based LANs resulted in a formation of an IEEE group whose charter is to recommend approaches for Active and Passive Fiber Optic Ethernet systems. The various approaches which are being considered are described in this paper with an emphasis on Active Star based systems.

  14. Integration of active and passive polymer optics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Schøler, Mikkel; Kristensen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a wafer scale fabrication process for integration of active and passive polymer optics: Polymer DFB lasers and waveguides. Polymer dye DFB lasers are fabricated by combined nanoimprint and photolithography (CNP). The CNP fabrication relies on an UV transparent stamp with nm sized...... wavelength from temperature and refractive index changes in the surroundings is investigated, pointing towards the use of the described fabrication method for on-chip polymer sensor systems....

  15. Optical sensors for therapeutic drug monitoring of antidepressants for a better medication adjustment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, Anne K.; Hess, Stefan; Gauglitz, Günter

    2013-05-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring provides the attending physicians with detailed information on a patient's individual serum level especially during long-term medication. Due to the fact that each patient tolerates drugs or their metabolites differently a medication adjustment can reduce the number and intensity of noticeable side-effects. In particular, psychotropic drugs can cause unpleasant side-effects that affect a patient's life almost as much as the mental disease itself. The tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline is commonly used for treatment of depressions and was selected for the development of an immunoassay using the direct optical sensor technique Reflectometric Interference Spectroscopy (RIfS). RIfS is a simple, robust and label-free method for direct monitoring of binding events on glass surfaces. Binding to the surface causes a shift of the interference spectrum by a change of the refractive index or physical thickness. This technique can be used for time-resolved observation of association and dissociation of amitriptyline (antigen) and a specific antibody using the binding inhibition test format. An amitriptyline derivative is immobilized on the sensor surface and a specific amount of antibodies can bind to the surface unless the binding is inhibited by free amitriptyline in a sample. No fluorescent label is needed making the whole assay less expensive than label-based methods. With this recently developed immunoassay amitriptyline concentrations in buffer (PBS) can easily be detected down to 500 ng/L.

  16. Poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm)-gold nanoshell composites for optically-triggered cancer therapeutic delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Laura Elizabeth

    Cancer is currently the second leading cause of death in the United States. Although many treatment options exist, some of the most common, including radiotherapy and chemotherapy, are restricted by dose-limiting toxicities. For example, for 2-6% of patients receiving a regimen of the chemotherapeutic doxorubicin, irreversible cardiotoxicity will occur1, causing these patients to immediately cease treatment. In addition, the largest hurdle for translating novel biological therapies such as siRNA into the clinic is lack of an efficient delivery mechanism to get the therapeutic into malignant cells2. Both of these situations would benefit from a minimally invasive controlled release system that only delivers a therapeutic to the site of malignant tissue. This thesis presents work towards the creation of such a delivery platform using two novel material components: a thermally responsive poly[N-isopropylacrylamide-co-acrylamide] (NIPAAm-co-AAm) hydrogel and gold-silica nanoshells. Thermally responsive hydrogels go through a physical property transition at their lower critical solution temperature (LCST). When transitioning from below to above the LCST, the hydrogel material expels large amounts of water and absorbed molecules. This phase change can be optically triggered by embedded gold-silica nanoshells, which rapidly transfer near-infrared (NIR) light energy into heat energy due to the surface plasmon resonance phenomena. When this material is loaded with absorbed drug molecules, drug release can be externally triggered by exposure to an NIR laser. Initial characterization of this material was done using bulk hydrogel-nanoshell composites. Poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm)-nanoshell composites were synthesized via free radical polymerization. The LCST of the poly(NIPAAm-co-AAm) hydrogels was determined to be from 39-45 °C, or slightly above physiologic temperature. The material was swollen in a drug solution of either doxorubicin (a common chemotherapeutic) or a 21bp ds

  17. Active learning in optics for girls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, R.; Ashraf, I.

    2017-08-01

    Active learning in Optics (ALO) is a self-funded program under the umbrella of the Abdus Salam International Centre for Theoretical Physics (ICTP) and Quaid-i-Azam University (QAU) to bring physical sciences to traditionally underserved Girls high schools and colleges in Pakistan. There is a significant gender disparity in physical Sciences in Pakistan. In Department of Physics at QAU, approximately 10 to 20% of total students were used to be females from past many decades, but now this percentage is increasing. To keep it up at same pace, we started ALO in January 2016 as a way to provide girls an enriching science experiences, in a very friendly atmosphere. We have organized many one-day activities, to support and encourage girls' students of government high schools and colleges to pursue careers in sciences. In this presentation we will describe our experience and lesson learned in these activities.

  18. Expert Review of Pedagogical Activities at Therapeutic Recreation Camps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiselev, N. N.; Kiseleva, E. V.

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of pedagogical expert reviews at children's therapeutic recreation camps in Novosibirsk Region shows that it is necessary to implement an expert review system that plays a supporting and developmental role. Such a system should allow teams of teachers to submit their work to expert review and to move forward by reflecting on their…

  19. Vibrational optical activity principles and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Nafie, Laurence A

    2011-01-01

    This unique book stands as the only comprehensive introduction to vibrational optical activity (VOA) and is the first single book that serves as a complete reference for this relatively new, but increasingly important area of molecular spectroscopy. Key features:A single-source reference on this topic that introduces, describes the background and foundation of this area of spectroscopy.Serves as a guide on how to use it to carry out applications with relevant problem solving.Depth and breadth of the subject is presented in a logical, complete and progressive fashion. A

  20. Active Full-Shell Grazing-Incidence Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jacqueline M.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Ramsey, Brian D.; O'Dell, Stephen L.; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2016-01-01

    MSFC has a long history of developing full-shell grazing-incidence x-ray optics for both narrow (pointed) and wide field (surveying) applications. The concept presented in this paper shows the potential to use active optics to switch between narrow and wide-field geometries, while maintaining large effective area and high angular resolution. In addition, active optics has the potential to reduce errors due to mounting and manufacturing lightweight optics. The design presented corrects low spatial frequency error and has significantly fewer actuators than other concepts presented thus far in the field of active x-ray optics. Using a finite element model, influence functions are calculated using active components on a full-shell grazing-incidence optic. Next, the ability of the active optic to effect a change of optical prescription and to correct for errors due to manufacturing and mounting is modeled.

  1. Aharonov-Bohm effect in optical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, C Z

    2010-01-01

    Optically active media have the helical and dissymmetric crystal structure, which constrains the motions of the electrons to a helical path under the influence of the incident electric field. The charge flow along the helices induces a magnetic field in the direction of the axis of helices. The helical structure hence acts as natural micro-solenoids for the electromagnetic waves passing through them. Optical rotation is related to the difference in the accumulative Aharonov-Bohm (AB) phase between the right- and the left-circularly polarized waves. The AB phase is proportional to the angular momentum of an electron moving around the micro-solenoid. Originally the AB phase is shown to be a continuous function of the magnetic flux. However, quantization of the geometrical angular momentum leads to the quantized AB phase. The rotatory power and the Verdet constant are proportional to the refractive index of the medium. The quantized current in the micro-solenoid is proportional to the Bohr magneton and inversely proportional to the area of the helices.

  2. Daily activities and living at a Therapeutic Residential Care Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciane Prado Kantorki

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This study describes and analyzes day-to-day issues in a Therapeutic Residential Care Center and the daily life characteristics of its residents. This case study was conducted in Caxias do Sul, based on an evaluation of the fourth generation together with a Methodology for Analyzing Everyday Life Networks. The following categories emerged: possibilities in the territory, participation and flexibility in household tasks, situations that mark living, employees who are mediators in conflict resolution, staff committed to the resident, freedom as a therapeutic tool, difficulties in daily life, and building of alliances. This study helped to get to know the structure of everyday life experienced by the residents, identifying some difficulties they face and the mechanisms used to overcome them, in addition to noticing that the professionals can be instrumental in strengthening a daily living that can be pluralized, busy, and enriched, while still respecting the uniqueness of each resident. doi: 10.5216/ree.v16i4.22923.

  3. Vibrational Raman optical activity of ketose monosaccharides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Alasdair F.; Hecht, Lutz; Barron, Laurence D.

    1995-07-01

    The vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the four ketose sugars D-fructose, L-sorbose, D-tagatose and D-psicose in aqueous solution, which have been measured in backscattering in the range ≈250-1500 cm -1, are reported. These results are combined with those from a previous ROA study of aldose and pentose sugars in an attempt to establish new vibrational assignments and to verify old ones. The high information content of these spectra provides a new perspective on all the central features of monosaccharide stereochemistry including dominant anomeric configuration, ring conformation, exocyclic CH 2OH group conformation and relative disposition of the hydroxyl groups around the ring.

  4. Experiments of the origins of optical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonner, W A; Flores, J J

    1975-01-01

    Two recent reports claim that (1) aqueous L-aspartic acid polymerizes faster than D-Asp in the presence of kaolin at 90 degrees, and (2) L-phenylalanine is adsorbed by kaolin more extensively than D-Phe at pH 4(the reverse being true at pH2). The novelty of these observations and their potential significance for the origin of optical activity has prompted us to duplicate these experiments using more sensitive methods. L- and D, L-Asp in 0.01 M solution were incubated with kaolin at 90 degrees for 8 days. Careful examination of the aqueous residues from such experiments failed to demonstrate any preferential polymerization of L-Asp over D-Asp, or indeed any significant gross polymerization of Asp at all. In other experiments 0.001 M solutions of D, L-Phe at pH 6 and pH 2 were stirred with large excesses of kaolin for 24 hr, and the aqueous extracts from these mixtures were examined for gross adsorption using the amino acid analyzer. No significant gross adsorption was noted. We then looked for asymmetric adsorption in the aqueous residues using optical rotatory dispersion, gas chromatography and thin layer chromatography. By none of these analytical criteria could we find any evidence whatsoever for the preferential adsorption of D- versus L-Phe from either pH 6 or pH 2 solutions. Finally, in experiments bearing on the origin of optical activity by parity violation during beta-decay, we have irradiated solid samples of D-, L- and D,L-leucine in a 61700 Ci Sr-90 source at Oak Ridge National Lab. for 1.34 yr (total dose: 4.2 x 10(8) rad). Gas chromatographic examination of the (appropriately derivitized) recovered samples showed that the L-Leu was 16.7% decomposed, the D-Leu 11.4% and theD,L-Leu 13.8% decomposed. The recovered D,L-Leu sample had a gas-chromatographically determined enantiomeric composition of 50.8% D-leu and 49.2% L-Leu. These data, though very close to experimental error, may indicate a slight preferential radiolysis of L-Leu compared to D-Leu by the

  5. Activated signature of antiphospholipid syndrome neutrophils reveals potential therapeutic target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Jason S.; Meng, He; Coit, Patrick; Yalavarthi, Srilakshmi; Sule, Gautam; Gandhi, Alex A.; Grenn, Robert C.; Mazza, Levi F.; Ali, Ramadan A.; Renauer, Paul; Wren, Jonathan D.; Bockenstedt, Paula L.; Wang, Hui; Eitzman, Daniel T.; Sawalha, Amr H.

    2017-01-01

    Antiphospholipid antibodies, present in one-third of lupus patients, increase the risk of thrombosis. We recently reported a key role for neutrophils — neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs), in particular — in the thrombotic events that define antiphospholipid syndrome (APS). To further elucidate the role of neutrophils in APS, we performed a comprehensive transcriptome analysis of neutrophils isolated from patients with primary APS. Moreover, APS-associated venous thrombosis was modeled by treating mice with IgG prepared from APS patients, followed by partial restriction of blood flow through the inferior vena cava. In patients, APS neutrophils demonstrated a proinflammatory signature with overexpression of genes relevant to IFN signaling, cellular defense, and intercellular adhesion. For in vivo studies, we focused on P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), a key adhesion molecule overexpressed in APS neutrophils. The introduction of APS IgG (as compared with control IgG) markedly potentiated thrombosis in WT mice, but not PSGL-1–KOs. PSGL-1 deficiency was also associated with reduced leukocyte vessel wall adhesion and NET formation. The thrombosis phenotype was restored in PSGL-1–deficient mice by infusion of WT neutrophils, while an anti–PSGL-1 monoclonal antibody inhibited APS IgG–mediated thrombosis in WT mice. PSGL-1 represents a potential therapeutic target in APS. PMID:28931754

  6. Antimicrobial Effect of Biocompatible Silicon Nanoparticles Activated Using Therapeutic Ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevchenko, Svetlana N; Burkhardt, Markus; Sheval, Eugene V; Natashina, Ulyana A; Grosse, Christina; Nikolaev, Alexander L; Gopin, Alexander V; Neugebauer, Ute; Kudryavtsev, Andrew A; Sivakov, Vladimir; Osminkina, Liubov A

    2017-03-14

    In this study, we report a method for the suppression of Escherichia coli (E. coli) vitality by means of therapeutic ultrasound irradiation (USI) using biocompatible silicon nanoparticles as cavitation sensitizers. Silicon nanoparticles without (SiNPs) and with polysaccharide (dextran) coating (DSiNPs) were used. Both types of nanoparticles were nontoxic to Hep 2 cells up to a concentration of 2 mg/mL. The treatment of bacteria with nanoparticles and application of 1 W/cm 2 USI resulted in the reduction of their viabilities up to 35 and 72% for SiNPs and DSiNPs, respectively. The higher bacterial viability reduction for DSiNPs as compared with SiNPs can be explained by the fact that the biopolymer shell of the polysaccharide provides a stronger adhesion of nanoparticles to the bacterial surface. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies showed that the bacterial lipid shell was partially perforated after the combined treatment of DSiNPs and USI, which can be explained by the lysis of bacterial membrane due to the cavitation sensitized by the SiNPs. Furthermore, we have shown that 100% inhibition of E. coli bacterial colony growth is possible by coupling the treatments of DSiNPs and USI with an increased intensity of up to 3 W/cm 2 . The observed results reveal the application of SiNPs as promising antimicrobial agents.

  7. Polarization ray tracing in anisotropic optically active media. I. Algorithms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClain, S.C.; Hillman, L.W.; Chipman, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Procedures for performing polarization ray tracing through birefringent media are presented in a form compatible with the standard methods of geometrical ray tracing. The birefringent materials treated include the following: anisotropic optically active materials such as quartz, non-optically active uniaxial materials such as calcite, and isotropic optically active materials such as mercury sulfide and organic liquids. Refraction and reflection algorithms are presented that compute both ray directions and wave directions. Methods for computing polarization modes, refractive indices, optical path lengths, and Fresnel transmission and reflection coefficients are also specified. A numerical example of these algorithms is given for analyzing the field of view of a quartz rotator. 37 refs., 3 figs

  8. Striatal Activation Predicts Differential Therapeutic Responses to Methylphenidate and Atomoxetine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulz, Kurt P; Bédard, Anne-Claude V; Fan, Jin; Hildebrandt, Thomas B; Stein, Mark A; Ivanov, Iliyan; Halperin, Jeffrey M; Newcorn, Jeffrey H

    2017-07-01

    Methylphenidate has prominent effects in the dopamine-rich striatum that are absent for the selective norepinephrine transporter inhibitor atomoxetine. This study tested whether baseline striatal activation would predict differential response to the two medications in youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). A total of 36 youth with ADHD performed a Go/No-Go test during functional magnetic resonance imaging at baseline and were treated with methylphenidate and atomoxetine using a randomized cross-over design. Whole-brain task-related activation was regressed on clinical response. Task-related activation in right caudate nucleus was predicted by an interaction of clinical responses to methylphenidate and atomoxetine (F 1,30  = 17.00; p atomoxetine. The rate of robust response was higher for methylphenidate than for atomoxetine in youth with high (94.4% vs. 38.8%; p = .003; number needed to treat = 2, 95% CI = 1.31-3.73) but not low (33.3% vs. 50.0%; p = .375) caudate activation. Furthermore, response to atomoxetine predicted motor cortex activation (F 1,30  = 14.99; p atomoxetine in youth with ADHD, purportedly reflecting the dopaminergic effects of methylphenidate but not atomoxetine in the striatum, whereas motor cortex activation may predict response to atomoxetine. These data do not yet translate directly to the clinical setting, but the approach is potentially important for informing future research and illustrates that it may be possible to predict differential treatment response using a biomarker-driven approach. Stimulant Versus Nonstimulant Medication for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in Children; https://clinicaltrials.gov/; NCT00183391. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The catalystic asymmetric synthesis of optically active epoxy ketones

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marsman, Bertha Gerda

    1981-01-01

    In this thesis the use of catalytic asymmetric synthesis to prepare optically active epoxy ketones is described. This means that the auxiliary chirality, necessary to obtain an optically active product, is added in a catalytic quantity . In principle this is a very efficient way to make opticlly

  10. Active Learning Environment with Lenses in Geometric Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tural, Güner

    2015-01-01

    Geometric optics is one of the difficult topics for students within physics discipline. Students learn better via student-centered active learning environments than the teacher-centered learning environments. So this study aimed to present a guide for middle school teachers to teach lenses in geometric optics via active learning environment…

  11. STAT3 Activation in Glioblastoma: Biochemical and Therapeutic Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jennifer E.; Patel, Mira; Ruzevick, Jacob; Jackson, Christopher M.; Lim, Michael, E-mail: mlim3@jhmi.edu [Department of Neurosurgery, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, 600 N. Wolfe St., Phipps Building Rm 123, Baltimore, MD 21287 (United States)

    2014-02-10

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a potent regulator of gliomagenesis through its induction of angiogenesis, host immunosuppression, and tumor invasion. Gain of function mutations result in constitutive activation of STAT3 in glioma cells, making STAT3 an attractive target for inhibition in cancer therapy. Nevertheless, some studies show that STAT3 also participates in terminal differentiation and apoptosis of various cell lines and in glioma with phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN)-deficient genetic backgrounds. In light of these findings, the utility of STAT3 as a prognostic indicator and as a target of drug therapies will be contingent on a more nuanced understanding of its pro- and anti-tumorigenic effects.

  12. NASA's current activities in free space optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Bernard L.

    2017-11-01

    NASA and other space agencies around the world are currently developing free space optical communication systems for both space-to-ground links and space-to-space links. This paper provides an overview of NASA's current activities in free space optical communications with a focus on Near Earth applications. Activities to be discussed include the Lunar Laser Communication Demonstration, the Laser Communications Relay Demonstration, and the commercialization of the underlying technology. The paper will also briefly discuss ongoing efforts and studies for Deep Space optical communications. Finally the paper will discuss the development of international optical communication standards within the Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems.

  13. NRF2 ACTIVATION AS TARGET TO IMPLEMENT THERAPEUTIC TREATMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Velio eBocci

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A chronic increase of oxidative stress is typical of serious pathologies such as myocardial infarction, stroke, chronic limb ischemia, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD, type II-diabetes, age-related macular degeneration leads to an epic increase of morbidity and mortality in all countries of the world. The initial inflammation followed by an excessive release of reactive oxygen species (ROS implies a diffused cellular injury that needs to be corrected by an inducible expression of the innate detoxifying and antioxidant system. The transcription factor Nrf2, when properly activated, is able to restore a redox homeostasis and possibly improve human health.

  14. Live-Cell Imaging of Protease Activity: Assays to Screen Therapeutic Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Anita; Ji, Kyungmin; Sameni, Mansoureh; Mazumder, Samia H; Xu, Yong; Moin, Kamiar; Sloane, Bonnie F

    2017-01-01

    Methodologies to image and quantify the activity of proteolytic enzymes have been developed in an effort to identify protease-related druggable pathways that are involved in malignant progression of cancer. Our laboratory has pioneered techniques for functional live-cell imaging of protease activity in pathomimetic avatars for breast cancer. We analyze proteolysis in the context of proliferation and formation of structures by tumor cells in 3-D cultures over time (4D). In order to recapitulate the cellular composition and architecture of tumors in the pathomimetic avatars, we include other tumor-associated cells (e.g., fibroblasts, myoepithelial cells, microvascular endothelial cells). We also model noncellular aspects of the tumor microenvironment such as acidic pericellular pH. Use of pathomimetic avatars in concert with various types of imaging probes has allowed us to image, quantify, and follow the dynamics of proteolysis in the tumor microenvironment and to test interventions that impact directly or indirectly on proteolytic pathways. To facilitate use of the pathomimetic avatars for screening of therapeutic modalities, we have designed and fabricated custom 3D culture chambers with multiple wells that are either individual or connected by a channel to allow cells to migrate between wells. Optical glass microscope slides underneath an acrylic plate allow the cultures to be imaged with an inverted microscope. Fluid ports in the acrylic plate are at a level above the 3D cultures to allow introduction of culture media and test agents such as drugs into the wells and the harvesting of media conditioned by the cultures for immunochemical and biochemical analyses. We are using the pathomimetic avatars to identify druggable pathways, screen drug and natural product libraries and accelerate entry of validated drugs or natural products into clinical trials.

  15. Astragalin: A Bioactive Phytochemical with Potential Therapeutic Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammara Riaz

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural products, an infinite treasure of bioactive chemical entities, persist as an inexhaustible resource for discovery of drugs. This review article intends to emphasize on one of the naturally occurring flavonoids, astragalin (kaempferol 3-glucoside, which is a bioactive constituent of various traditional medicinal plants such as Cuscuta chinensis. This multifaceted compound is well known for its diversified pharmacological applications such as anti-inflammatory, antioxidant, neuroprotective, cardioprotective, antiobesity, antiosteoporotic, anticancer, antiulcer, and antidiabetic properties. It carries out the aforementioned activities by the regulation and modulation of various molecular targets such as transcription factors (NF-κB, TNF-α, and TGF-β1, enzymes (iNOS, COX-2, PGE2, MMP-1, MMP-3, MIP-1α, COX-2, PGE-2, HK2, AChe, SOD, DRP-1, DDH, PLCγ1, and GPX, kinases (JNK, MAPK, Akt, ERK, SAPK, IκBα, PI3K, and PKCβ2, cell adhesion proteins (E-cadherin, vimentin PAR-2, and NCam, apoptotic and antiapoptotic proteins (Beclin-1, Bcl-2, Bax, Bcl-xL, cytochrome c, LC3A/B, caspase-3, caspase-9, procaspase-3, procaspase-8, and IgE, and inflammatory cytokines (SOCS-3, SOCS-5, IL-1β, IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-13, MCP-1, CXCL-1, CXCL-2, and IFN-γ. Although researchers have reported multiple pharmacological applications of astragalin in various diseased conditions, further experimental investigations are still mandatory to fully understand its mechanism of action. It is contemplated that astragalin could be subjected to structural optimization to ameliorate its chemical accessibility, to optimize its absorption profiles, and to synthesize its more effective analogues which will ultimately lead towards potent drug candidates.

  16. Graves' disease: diagnostic and therapeutic challenges (multimedia activity).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahaly, George J; Grebe, Stefan K G; Lupo, Mark A; McDonald, Nicole; Sipos, Jennifer A

    2011-06-01

    Graves' disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism in the United States. Graves' disease occurs more often in women with a female:male ratio of 5:1 and a population prevalence of 1% to 2%. A genetic determinant to the susceptibility to Graves' disease is suspected because of familial clustering of the disease, a high sibling recurrence risk, the familial occurrence of thyroid autoantibodies, and the 30% concordance in disease status between identical twins. Graves' disease is an autoimmune thyroid disorder characterized by the infiltration of immune effector cells and thyroid antigen-specific T cells into the thyroid and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor expressing tissues, with the production of autoantibodies to well-defined thyroidal antigens, such as thyroid peroxidase, thyroglobulin, and the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor. The thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor is central to the regulation of thyroid growth and function. Stimulatory autoantibodies in Graves' disease activate the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor leading to thyroid hyperplasia and unregulated thyroid hormone production and secretion. Below-normal levels of baseline serum thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor, normal to elevated serum levels of T4, elevated serum levels of T3 and thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor autoantibodies, and a diffusely enlarged, heterogeneous, hypervascular (increased Doppler flow) thyroid gland confirm diagnosis of Graves' disease (available at: http://supplements.amjmed.com/2010/hyperthyroid/faculty.php). This Resource Center is also available through the website of The American Journal of Medicine (www.amjmed.com). Click on the “Thyroid/Graves' Disease” link in the “Resource Centers” section, found on the right side of the Journal homepage. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. THE NATURE OF OPTICALLY DULL ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI IN COSMOS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trump, Jonathan R.; Impey, Chris D.; Gabor, Jared M.; Taniguchi, Yoshi; Nagao, Tohru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Brusa, Marcella; Civano, Francesca; Elvis, Martin; Kelly, Brandon C.; Huchra, John P.; Jahnke, Knud; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salvato, Mara; Capak, Peter; Scoville, Nick Z.; Kartaltepe, Jeyhan S.; Lanzuisi, Giorgio; McCarthy, Patrick J.; Maineri, Vincenzo

    2009-01-01

    We present infrared, optical, and X-ray data of 48 X-ray bright, optically dull active galactic nuclei (AGNs) in the COSMOS field. These objects exhibit the X-ray luminosity of an AGN but lack broad and narrow emission lines in their optical spectrum. We show that despite the lack of optical emission lines, most of these optically dull AGNs are not well described by a typical passive red galaxy spectrum: instead they exhibit weak but significant blue emission like an unobscured AGN. Photometric observations over several years additionally show significant variability in the blue emission of four optically dull AGNs. The nature of the blue and infrared emission suggest that the optically inactive appearance of these AGNs cannot be caused by obscuration intrinsic to the AGNs. Instead, up to ∼70% of optically dull AGNs are diluted by their hosts, with bright or simply edge-on hosts lying preferentially within the spectroscopic aperture. The remaining ∼30% of optically dull AGNs have anomalously high f X /f O ratios and are intrinsically weak, not obscured, in the optical. These optically dull AGNs are best described as a weakly accreting AGN with a truncated accretion disk from a radiatively inefficient accretion flow.

  18. Optically active Babinet planar metamaterial film for terahertz polarization manipulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zalkovskij, Maksim; Malureanu, Radu; Kremers, C.

    2013-01-01

    A planar Babinet-inverted dimer metamaterial possessing strong optical activity is proposed and characterized. An original fabrication method to produce large area (up to several cm2) freely suspended flexible metallic membranes is implemented to fabricate the metamaterial. Its optical properties...

  19. Recent Progress in Functional Micellar Carriers with Intrinsic Therapeutic Activities for Anticancer Drug Delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qu, Ying; Chu, BingYang; Shi, Kun; Peng, JinRong; Qian, ZhiYong

    2017-12-01

    Polymeric micelles have presented superior delivery properties for poorly water-soluble chemotherapeutic agents. However, it remains discouraging that there may be some additional short or long-term toxicities caused by the metabolites of high quantities of carriers. If carriers had simultaneous therapeutic effects with the drug, these issues would not be a concern. For this, carriers not only simply act as drug carriers, but also exert an intrinsic therapeutic effect as a therapeutic agent. The functional micellar carriers would be beneficial to maximize the anticancer effect, overcome the drug resistance and reduce the systemic toxicity. In this review, we aim to summarize the recent progress on the development of functional micellar carriers with intrinsic anticancer activities for the delivery of anticancer drugs. This review focuses on the design strategies, properties of carriers and the drug loading behavior. In addition, the combinational therapeutic effects between carriers and chemotherapeutic agents are also discussed.

  20. Optically Activated Exciplex Shutter/Attenuator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    radiation of a certain wavelength to excite a bi-molecular exciplex solution. The exciplex solution reacts to a range of radiation wavelengths whereas...optical elements prevent passage of radiation below and above the operative range of an exciplex solution such as anthracene and diethylaniline.

  1. Active Micro structured Optical Arrays of Grazing Incidence Reflectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Willingale, R.; Feldman, Ch.; Michette, A.; Hart, D.; McFaul, Ch; Morrison, G.R.; Pfauntsch, S.; Powell, A.K.; Sahraei, Sh.; Shand, M.T.; Button, T.; Rodriguez-Sanmartin, D.; Zhang, D.; Dunare, C.; Parkes, W.; Stevenson, T.; Folkard, M.; Vojnovic, B.; Vojnovic, B.

    2011-01-01

    The UK Smart X-Ray Optics (SXO) programme is developing active/adaptive optics for terrestrial applications. One of the technologies proposed is micro structured optical arrays (MOAs), which focus X-rays using grazing incidence reflection through consecutive aligned arrays of microscopic channels. Although such arrays are similar in concept to poly capillary and microchannel plate optics, they can be bent and adjusted using piezoelectric actuators providing control over the focusing and inherent aberrations. Custom configurations can be designed, using ray tracing and finite element analysis, for applications from sub-keV to several-keV X-rays, and the channels of appropriate aspect ratios can be made using deep silicon etching. An exemplar application will be in the micro probing of biological cells and tissue samples using Ti Ka radiation (4.5?keV) in studies related to radiation-induced cancers. This paper discusses the optical design, modelling, and manufacture of such optics

  2. Optical Switching for Dynamic Distribution of Wireless-Over-Fiber Signals in Active Optical Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vegas Olmos, Juan José; Rodes, Guillermo; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we report on an experimental validation of dynamic distribution of wireless-over-fiber by employing optical switching using semiconductor optical amplifiers; we also provide a channel distribution scheme and a generic topology for such an optical switch. The experiment consists...... of a four wavelength-division-multiplexed channel system operating on a WiMax frequency band and employing an orthogonal-frequency-division-multiplexing modulation at 625 Mbits/s per channel, transmission of the data over 20 km of optical fiber, and active switching in a 1 × 16 active optical switch....... The results show a negligible power penalty on each channel for both the best and the worst case in terms of inter-channel crosstalk. The presented system is highly scalable both in terms of port count and throughput, a desirable feature in highly branched access networks, and is modulation- and frequency...

  3. Dextran solution optical activity in Tb (III) ion presence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasconcellos, Sandra S.; Rodrigues, J.F.; Faljoni-Alario, A.

    1984-01-01

    Optical activity studies of aqueous solutions of dextrana in presence of Tb (III) or without it shows the complex with the hidroxyl groups of C 2 and C 3 of monomeric unit participation is formed. (L.M.J.) [pt

  4. Synthesis and characterization of new optically active poly(amide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthesis and characterization of new optically active poly(amide-imide)s based on N -trimellitimido- ... Bulletin of the Chemical Society of Ethiopia ... (DMAc), dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP) at room temperature.

  5. Ultrafast chiroptical spectroscopy: Monitoring optical activity in quick time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanju Rhee

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical activity spectroscopy provides rich structural information of biologically important molecules in condensed phases. However, a few intrinsic problems of conventional method based on electric field intensity measurement scheme prohibited its extension to time domain technique. We have recently developed new types of optical activity spectroscopic methods capable of measuring chiroptical signals with femtosecond pulses. It is believed that these novel approaches will be applied to a variety of ultrafast chiroptical studies.

  6. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor Ligands and Their Role in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia: Therapeutic Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Bahman; Samadi, Nasser; Baradaran, Behzad; Shafiei-Irannejad, Vahid; Zarghami, Nosratollah

    2016-07-01

    Imatinib therapy remains the gold standard for treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia; however, the acquired resistance to this therapeutic agent in patients has urged the scientists to devise modalities for overcoming this chemoresistance. For this purpose, initially therapeutic agents with higher tyrosine kinase activity were introduced, which had the potential for inhibiting even mutant forms of Bcr-Abl. Furthermore, coupling imatinib with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor ligands also showed beneficial effects in chronic myeloid leukemia cell proliferation. These combination protocols inhibited cell growth and induced apoptosis as well as differentiation in chronic myeloid leukemia cell lines. In addition, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands increased imatinib uptake by upregulating the expression of human organic cation transporter 1. Taken together, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands are currently being considered as novel promising therapeutic candidates for chronic myeloid leukemia treatment, because they can synergistically enhance the efficacy of imatinib. In this article, we reviewed the potential of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors ligands for use in chronic myeloid leukemia treatment. The mechanism of action of these therapeutics modalities are also presented in detail. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. German activities in optical space instrumentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartmann, G.

    2018-04-01

    In the years of space exploration since the mid-sixties, a wide experience in optical space instrumentation has developed in Germany. This experience ranges from large telescopes in the 1 m and larger category with the accompanying focal plane detectors and spectrometers for all regimes of the electromagnetic spectrum (infrared, visible, ultraviolet, x-rays), to miniature cameras for cometary and planetary explorations. The technologies originally developed for space science. are now also utilized in the fields of earth observation and even optical telecommunication. The presentation will cover all these areas, with examples for specific technological or scientific highlights. Special emphasis will be given to the current state-of-the-art instrumentation technologies in scientific institutions and industry, and to the future perspective in approved and planned projects.

  8. Raman optical activity of proteins and glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smyth, E.

    2000-03-01

    Raman optical activity (ROA), measured in this project as a small difference in the intensity of Raman scattering from chiral molecules in right- and left-circularly polarised incident laser light, offers the potential to provide more information about the structure of biological molecules in aqueous solution than conventional spectroscopic techniques. Chapter one contains a general discussion of the relative merits of different spectroscopic techniques for structure determination of biomolecules, as well as a brief introduction to ROA. In Chapter two a theoretical analysis of ROA is developed, which extends the discussion in chapter one. The spectrometer setup and sample preparation is then discussed in chapter three. Instrument and sample conditions are monitored to ensure that the best results are obtained. As with any experimental project problems occur, which may result in a degradation of the spectra obtained. The cause of these problems was explored and remedied whenever possible. Chapter four introduces a brief account of protein, glycoprotein and carbohydrate structure and function, with a particular emphasis on the structure of proteins. In the remaining chapters experimental ROA results on proteins and glycoproteins, with some carbohydrate samples, from a wide range of sources are examined. For example, in chapter five some β-sheet proteins are examined. Structural features in these proteins are examined in the extended amide III region of their ROA spectra, revealing that ROA is sensitive to the rigidity or flexibility inherent in proteins. Chapter six concentrates on a group of proteins (usually glycoproteins) known as the serine proteinase inhibitors (serpins). Medically, the serpins are one of the most important groups of proteins of current interest, with wide-ranging implications in conditions such as Down's syndrome, Alzheimer's disease, and emphysema with associated cirrhosis of the liver. With favourable samples and conditions ROA may offer the

  9. Resonance Raman Optical Activity and Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity analysis of Cytochrome C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Christian; Abdali, Salim; White, Peter C.

    2007-01-01

    High quality Resonance Raman (RR) and resonance Raman Optical Activity (ROA) spectra of cytochrome c were obtained in order to perform full assignment of spectral features of the resonance ROA spectrum. The resonance ROA spectrum of cytochrome c revealed a distinct spectral signature pattern due...... to resonance enhanced skeletal porphyrin vibrations, more pronounced than any contribution from the protein back-bone. Combining the intrinsic resonance enhancement of cytochrome c with surface plasmon enhancement by colloidal silver particles, the Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Scattering (SERRS) and Chiral...... Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (ChERS) spectra of the protein were successfully obtained at very low concentration (as low as 1 µM). The assignment of spectral features was based on the information obtained from the RR and resonance ROA spectra. Excellent agreement between RR and SERRS spectra is reported...

  10. Optical drug monitoring: photoacoustic imaging of nanosensors to monitor therapeutic lithium in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cash, Kevin J; Li, Chiye; Xia, Jun; Wang, Lihong V; Clark, Heather A

    2015-02-24

    Personalized medicine could revolutionize how primary care physicians treat chronic disease and how researchers study fundamental biological questions. To realize this goal, we need to develop more robust, modular tools and imaging approaches for in vivo monitoring of analytes. In this report, we demonstrate that synthetic nanosensors can measure physiologic parameters with photoacoustic contrast, and we apply that platform to continuously track lithium levels in vivo. Photoacoustic imaging achieves imaging depths that are unattainable with fluorescence or multiphoton microscopy. We validated the photoacoustic results that illustrate the superior imaging depth and quality of photoacoustic imaging with optical measurements. This powerful combination of techniques will unlock the ability to measure analyte changes in deep tissue and will open up photoacoustic imaging as a diagnostic tool for continuous physiological tracking of a wide range of analytes.

  11. Therapeutic effect and safety of vincamine in anterior non-arteritic ischemic optic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Qun Liang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To observe the clinical efficacy and safety of vincamine sustained release capsules on non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy(NAION.METHODS:Patients who were diagnosed with monocular onset NAION in acute stage from January to September 2015 were divided into two groups. Routine treatment such as steroid pulse therapy and neurotrophic treatment were given to all the patients. Vincamine was added to the treatment group patients with 30mg twice a day for 3mo. The best corrected visual acuity(BCVA, mean deviation(MDof visual field, retinal nerve fiber layer(RNFL, ganglion cell complex(GCC, pattern visual evoked potential(PVEPand OCT results were analyzed before and after the treatment.RESULTS: Totally 42 eyes of 42 patients were enrolled in our study. There were 27 patients in the treatment group, aged from 33 to 79 years old, the average value was 55.55±11.83 years old. The control group has 15 patients, aged from 40 to 70 years old, the average value was 55.71±10.06 years old. There were no statistical differences between the two groups in the baseline. After 3mo of the treatment, MD value of the two groups were lower compared with the baseline, the difference was statistically significant in the treatment and control group respectively(t=2.342, 2.692; P=0.027, 0.041. The difference of PVEP amplitude and potential of the two groups before and after the treatment were not statistically significant. The thickness of retinal nerve fiber layer and the ganglion cell complex were all lower than the baseline, and the difference was statistically significant(PCONCLUSION: Vincamine is helpful in the treatment of non-arteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

  12. Modeling and analysis of laser active interference optical path

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shan, Cong-miao; Sun, Hua-yan; Zhao, Yan-zhong; Chen, Jian-biao; Ren, Jian-ying

    2017-10-01

    By using the geometrical optics and physical optics method, the models of wedge plate interference optical path, Michelson interferometer and Mach Zehnder interferometer thus three different active interference pattern are built. The optical path difference (OPD) launched by different interference patterns, fringe spacing and contrast expression have been derived. The results show that far field interference peak intensity of the wedge plate interference is small, so the detection distance is limited, Michelson interferometer with low contrast affects the performance of detection system, Mach Zehnder interferometer has greater advantages in peak intensity, the variable range of interference fringe spacing and contrast ratio. The results of this study are useful for the theoretical research and practical application of laser active interference detection.

  13. Near-simultaneous optical and infrared spectrophotometry of active galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yates, M.G.; Garden, R.P.

    1989-01-01

    We present optical and infrared spectrophotometry for a sample of eight optically bright quasars, and the broad-line radio galaxy (BLRG) 3C 120. The optical and infrared spectrophotometry is separated by only five weeks, thus we have been able to minimize uncertainties due to variations in the objects. We compare our observed Paα/Hα and Hα/Hβ ratios with a large number of current photoionization models. We find that none of these models are able to reproduce our observed values of Paα/Hα in any of the active galaxies except the quasars 3C 273 and 0736+017. (author)

  14. Polarized electrons and the origin of optical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bonner, W.A.; Dort, M.A. Van; Yearian, M.R.; Zeman, H.D.; Li, G.C.; Stanford Univ., Calif.

    1976-01-01

    The history of experiments bearing on the origin of optical acitivity in nature by parity non-conservation during the β-decay of radioactive isotopes is briefly reviewed. Following this, we present a more detailed description of our recent published and unpublished data and calculations regarding the generation of optical activity in DL-leucine by means of artificially produced longitudinally polarized electrons from a linear accelerator

  15. The IAEA Activities on Supporting Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals and Capacity Building in Member States

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pillai, M.R.A.; Haji-Saeid, M.; Zaknun, J.; Ramamoorthy, N.

    2009-01-01

    The IAEA activities on supporting development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are focused on identified radionuclides that can be produced in large quantities and making use of carrier molecules which can be synthesized locally or procured from commercial sources or already available in MS from other related programs. The main emphasis is on 90 Y and 177 Lu based products, which cover the hard beta energy and soft beta energy range respectively, and also since both these radionuclides can be produced in large quantities with very high specific activity and high radionuclidic purity. The services to MS are provided through implementing Coordinated Research Projects (CRP), Technical Cooperation (TC) projects, technical meetings and regional training courses in addition to documenting practically useful technical information related to these products though IAEA publications. The CRP is a group activity in which nearly 15 participants from as many countries come together to work towards an identified objective. Two of the completed CRPs in this area are: (i) Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals (2002-2005) that focussed on the development of 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' techniques for evaluating new generation therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals; and (ii) Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides (2004-2007) that addressed technologies for 90 Sr/ 90 Y and 188 W/ 188 Re generators and which can be easily adapted by MS. The participants in the CRP on 'Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals' used the somatostatin analogue, DOTATATE as the lead molecule for developing radiopharmaceuticals and testing the efficacy by in vitro biological assays and animal biodistribution studies. A significant outcome of the CRP was that 177 Lu-DOTATATE therapy is now practised in several of the CRP participating countries including Brazil, India, Italy, and Poland. The major outcome of the CRP on 'Development of generator

  16. Scalable Active Optical Access Network Using Variable High-Speed PLZT Optical Switch/Splitter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashizawa, Kunitaka; Sato, Takehiro; Tokuhashi, Kazumasa; Ishii, Daisuke; Okamoto, Satoru; Yamanaka, Naoaki; Oki, Eiji

    This paper proposes a scalable active optical access network using high-speed Plumbum Lanthanum Zirconate Titanate (PLZT) optical switch/splitter. The Active Optical Network, called ActiON, using PLZT switching technology has been presented to increase the number of subscribers and the maximum transmission distance, compared to the Passive Optical Network (PON). ActiON supports the multicast slot allocation realized by running the PLZT switch elements in the splitter mode, which forces the switch to behave as an optical splitter. However, the previous ActiON creates a tradeoff between the network scalability and the power loss experienced by the optical signal to each user. It does not use the optical power efficiently because the optical power is simply divided into 0.5 to 0.5 without considering transmission distance from OLT to each ONU. The proposed network adopts PLZT switch elements in the variable splitter mode, which controls the split ratio of the optical power considering the transmission distance from OLT to each ONU, in addition to PLZT switch elements in existing two modes, the switching mode and the splitter mode. The proposed network introduces the flexible multicast slot allocation according to the transmission distance from OLT to each user and the number of required users using three modes, while keeping the advantages of ActiON, which are to support scalable and secure access services. Numerical results show that the proposed network dramatically reduces the required number of slots and supports high bandwidth efficiency services and extends the coverage of access network, compared to the previous ActiON, and the required computation time for selecting multicast users is less than 30msec, which is acceptable for on-demand broadcast services.

  17. Active material, optical mode and cavity impact on nanoscale electro-optic modulation performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, Rubab; Suer, Can; Ma, Zhizhen; Sarpkaya, Ibrahim; Khurgin, Jacob B.; Agarwal, Ritesh; Sorger, Volker J.

    2017-10-01

    Electro-optic modulation is a key function in optical data communication and possible future optical compute engines. The performance of modulators intricately depends on the interaction between the actively modulated material and the propagating waveguide mode. While a variety of high-performance modulators have been demonstrated, no comprehensive picture of what factors are most responsible for high performance has emerged so far. Here we report the first systematic and comprehensive analytical and computational investigation for high-performance compact on-chip electro-optic modulators by considering emerging active materials, model considerations and cavity feedback at the nanoscale. We discover that the delicate interplay between the material characteristics and the optical mode properties plays a key role in defining the modulator performance. Based on physical tradeoffs between index modulation, loss, optical confinement factors and slow-light effects, we find that there exist combinations of bias, material and optical mode that yield efficient phase or amplitude modulation with acceptable insertion loss. Furthermore, we show how material properties in the epsilon near zero regime enable reduction of length by as much as by 15 times. Lastly, we introduce and apply a cavity-based electro-optic modulator figure of merit, Δλ/Δα, relating obtainable resonance tuning via phase shifting relative to the incurred losses due to the fundamental Kramers-Kronig relations suggesting optimized device operating regions with optimized modulation-to-loss tradeoffs. This work paves the way for a holistic design rule of electro-optic modulators for high-density on-chip integration.

  18. The Big Book of Therapeutic Activity Ideas for Children and Teens: Inspiring Arts-Based Activities and Character Education Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joiner, Lindsey

    2011-01-01

    For difficult or challenging children and teenagers in therapeutic or school settings, creative activities can be an excellent way of increasing enjoyment and boosting motivation, making the sessions more rewarding and successful for everyone involved. This resource provides over one hundred tried-and-tested fun and imaginative therapeutic…

  19. Active Learning Strategies for Introductory Light and Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokoloff, David R.

    2016-01-01

    There is considerable evidence that traditional approaches are ineffective in teaching physics concepts, including light and optics concepts. A major focus of the work of the Activity Based Physics Group has been on the development of active learning curricula like RealTime Physics (RTP) labs and Interactive Lecture Demonstrations (ILDs). Among…

  20. Low-frequency active surface plasmon optics on semiconductors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gómez Rivas, J.; Kuttge, M.; Kurz, H.; Haring Bolivar, P.; Sánchez-Gil, J.A.

    2006-01-01

    A major challenge in the development of surface plasmon optics or plasmonics is the active control of the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs). Here, we demonstrate the feasibility of low-frequency active plasmonics using semiconductors. We show experimentally that the Bragg scattering

  1. Active x-ray optics for high resolution space telescopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doel, Peter; Atkins, Carolyn; Brooks, D.; Feldman, Charlotte; Willingale, Richard; Button, Tim; Rodriguez Sanmartin, Daniel; Meggs, Carl; James, Ady; Willis, Graham; Smith, Andy

    2017-11-01

    The Smart X-ray Optics (SXO) Basic Technology project started in April 2006 and will end in October 2010. The aim is to develop new technologies in the field of X-ray focusing, in particular the application of active and adaptive optics. While very major advances have been made in active/adaptive astronomical optics for visible light, little was previously achieved for X-ray optics where the technological challenges differ because of the much shorter wavelengths involved. The field of X-ray astronomy has been characterized by the development and launch of ever larger observatories with the culmination in the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton and NASA's Chandra missions which are currently operational. XMM-Newton uses a multi-nested structure to provide modest angular resolution ( 10 arcsec) but large effective area, while Chandra sacrifices effective area to achieve the optical stability necessary to provide sub-arc second resolution. Currently the European Space Agency (ESA) is engaged in studies of the next generation of X-ray space observatories, with the aim of producing telescopes with increased sensitivity and resolution. To achieve these aims several telescopes have been proposed, for example ESA and NASA's combined International X-ray Observatory (IXO), aimed at spectroscopy, and NASA's Generation-X. In the field of X-ray astronomy sub 0.2 arcsecond resolution with high efficiency would be very exciting. Such resolution is unlikely to be achieved by anything other than an active system. The benefits of a such a high resolution would be important for a range of astrophysics subjects, for example the potential angular resolution offered by active X-ray optics could provide unprecedented structural imaging detail of the Solar Wind bowshock interaction of comets, planets and similar objects and auroral phenomena throughout the Solar system using an observing platform in low Earth orbit. A major aim of the SXO project was to investigate the production of thin

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) as therapeutic target in neurodegenerative disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Agarwal, Swati; Yadav, Anuradha; Chaturvedi, Rajnish Kumar

    2017-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) are nuclear receptors and they serve to be a promising therapeutic target for several neurodegenerative disorders, which includes Parkinson disease, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis. PPARs play an important role in the downregulation of mitochondrial dysfunction, proteasomal dysfunction, oxidative stress, and neuroinflammation, which are the major causes of the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. In this review, we discuss about the role of PPARs as therapeutic targets in neurodegenerative disorders. Several experimental approaches suggest potential application of PPAR agonist as well as antagonist in the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders. Several epidemiological studies found that the regular usage of PPAR activating non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs is effective in decreasing the progression of neurodegenerative diseases including PD and AD. We also reviewed the neuroprotective effects of PPAR agonists and associated mechanism of action in several neurodegenerative disorders both in vitro as well as in vivo animal models. - Highlights: • Peroxisome -activated receptors (PPARs) serve to be a promising therapeutic target for several neurodegenerative disorders. • PPAR agonist as well as provides neuroprotection in vitro as well as in vivo animal models of neurodegenerative disorders. • PPAR activating anti-inflammatory drugs use is effective in decreasing progression of neurodegenerative diseases.

  3. Fast incorporation of optical flow into active polygons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unal, Gozde; Krim, Hamid; Yezzi, Anthony

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, we first reconsider, in a different light, the addition of a prediction step to active contour-based visual tracking using an optical flow and clarify the local computation of the latter along the boundaries of continuous active contours with appropriate regularizers. We subsequently detail our contribution of computing an optical flow-based prediction step directly from the parameters of an active polygon, and of exploiting it in object tracking. This is in contrast to an explicitly separate computation of the optical flow and its ad hoc application. It also provides an inherent regularization effect resulting from integrating measurements along polygon edges. As a result, we completely avoid the need of adding ad hoc regularizing terms to the optical flow computations, and the inevitably arbitrary associated weighting parameters. This direct integration of optical flow into the active polygon framework distinguishes this technique from most previous contour-based approaches, where regularization terms are theoretically, as well as practically, essential. The greater robustness and speed due to a reduced number of parameters of this technique are additional and appealing features.

  4. Active polarization imaging system based on optical heterodyne balanced receiver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qian; Sun, Jianfeng; Lu, Zhiyong; Zhou, Yu; Luan, Zhu; Hou, Peipei; Liu, liren

    2017-08-01

    Active polarization imaging technology has recently become the hot research field all over the world, which has great potential application value in the military and civil area. By introducing active light source, the Mueller matrix of the target can be calculated according to the incident light and the emitted or reflected light. Compared with conventional direct detection technology, optical heterodyne detection technology have higher receiving sensitivities, which can obtain the whole amplitude, frequency and phase information of the signal light. In this paper, an active polarization imaging system will be designed. Based on optical heterodyne balanced receiver, the system can acquire the horizontal and vertical polarization of reflected optical field simultaneously, which contain the polarization characteristic of the target. Besides, signal to noise ratio and imaging distance can be greatly improved.

  5. FTTA System Demo Using Optical Fiber-Coupled Active Antennas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niels Neumann

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The convergence of optical and wireless systems such as Radio-over-Fiber (RoF networks is the key to coping with the increasing bandwidth demands due to the increasing popularity of video and other high data rate applications. A high level of integration of optical technologies enables simple base stations with a fiber-to-the-antenna (FTTA approach. In this paper, we present a complete full-duplex RoF–FTTA system consisting of integrated active fiber-coupled optical receiving and transmitting antennas that are directly connected to a standard single mode fiber optical link. Data rates up to 1 Gbit/s could be shown without advanced modulation formats on a 1.5 GHz carrier frequency. The antennas as well as the whole system are explained and the results of the system experiments are discussed.

  6. Chemopreventive and therapeutic activity of dietary blueberry against estrogen-mediated breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Aqil, Farrukh; Munagala, Radha; Annamalai, Lakshmanan; Vadhanam, Manicka V; Gupta, Ramesh C

    2014-05-07

    Berries are gaining increasing importance lately for their chemopreventive and therapeutic potential against several cancers. In earlier studies, a blueberry-supplemented diet has shown protection against 17β-estradiol (E2)-mediated mammary tumorigenesis. This study tested both preventive and therapeutic activities of diet supplemented with whole blueberry powder (50:50 blend of Tifblue and Rubel). Animals received 5% blueberry diet, either 2 weeks prior to or 12 weeks after E2 treatment in preventive and therapeutic groups, respectively. Both interventions delayed the tumor latency for palpable mammary tumors by 28 and 37 days, respectively. Tumor volume and multiplicity were also reduced significantly in both modes. The effect on mammary tumorigenesis was largely due to down-regulation of CYP 1A1 and ER-α gene expression and also favorable modulation of microRNA (miR-18a and miR-34c) levels. These data suggest that the blueberry blend tested is effective in inhibiting E2-mediated mammary tumorigenesis in both preventive and therapeutic modes.

  7. Revisiting the Therapeutic Potential of Bothrops jararaca Venom: Screening for Novel Activities Using Connectivity Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Alves Nicolau

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Snake venoms are sources of molecules with proven and potential therapeutic applications. However, most activities assayed in venoms (or their components are of hemorrhagic, hypotensive, edematogenic, neurotoxic or myotoxic natures. Thus, other relevant activities might remain unknown. Using functional genomics coupled to the connectivity map (C-map approach, we undertook a wide range indirect search for biological activities within the venom of the South American pit viper Bothrops jararaca. For that effect, venom was incubated with human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF7 followed by RNA extraction and gene expression analysis. A list of 90 differentially expressed genes was submitted to biosimilar drug discovery based on pattern recognition. Among the 100 highest-ranked positively correlated drugs, only the antihypertensive, antimicrobial (both antibiotic and antiparasitic, and antitumor classes had been previously reported for B. jararaca venom. The majority of drug classes identified were related to (1 antimicrobial activity; (2 treatment of neuropsychiatric illnesses (Parkinson’s disease, schizophrenia, depression, and epilepsy; (3 treatment of cardiovascular diseases, and (4 anti-inflammatory action. The C-map results also indicated that B. jararaca venom may have components that target G-protein-coupled receptors (muscarinic, serotonergic, histaminergic, dopaminergic, GABA, and adrenergic and ion channels. Although validation experiments are still necessary, the C-map correlation to drugs with activities previously linked to snake venoms supports the efficacy of this strategy as a broad-spectrum approach for biological activity screening, and rekindles the snake venom-based search for new therapeutic agents.

  8. Physical activity in type II Diabetes Mellitus, an effective therapeutic element: review of the clinical impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Iván Arias-Vázquez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available A review was conducted in databases (PubMed, PEDro of type studies clinical trial, cohort study, systematic reviews, meta-analysis and clinical practice guidelines based on evidence they have studied the benefits of physical activity in the prevention , treatment and decreased risk of complications and death in patients with Type II Diabetes Mellitus. Realization regular physical activity is associated with a decreased risk of developing Diabetes Mellitus; likewise was associated with decrease in glycated hemoglobin percentage A1C values. Diabetic patients undergoing high levels of physical activity had decreased risk of complications and death from cardiovascular disease and all causes. At present the scientific evidence on the impact of physical activity in the prevention and treatment of Diabetes Mellitus is solid, so it must be emphasized promoting physical activity as a fundamental part of the therapeutic regimens for this disease.

  9. Optical Variability of Active Galactic Nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kozłowski, Szymon, E-mail: simkoz@astrouw.edu.pl [Astronomical Observatory, University of Warsaw, Warsaw (Poland)

    2017-09-21

    Variability studies of active galactic nuclei (AGNs) typically use either power spectral density (PSD) and structure function (SF) analyses or direct modeling of light curves with the damped random walk (DRW) and the continuous autoregressive moving average (CARMA) models. A fair fraction of research publications on the subject are flawed, and simply report incorrect results, because they lack a deep understanding of where these methods originate from and what their limitations are. For example, SF analyses typically lack or use a wrong noise subtraction procedure, leading to flat SFs. DRW, on the other hand, can only be used if the experiment length is sufficient, at least ten times the signal decorrelation time scale τ, and if the data show the power-law SF slope of γ ≡ 0.5.

  10. Study towards diversity oriented synthesis of optically active ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    oxidation procedures, all the reactions were carried out either in argon or nitrogen .... ring solution of alcohol 9a (300mg, 0.70mmol) dis- solved in 20 mL of DCM ..... In summary, diversity-oriented approach for the synthe- sis of optically active, ...

  11. Features of optical modeling in educational and scientific activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article discusses the functionality of existing software for the modeling, analysis and optimization of lighting systems and optical elements, through which the stage of their design can be automated completely. The use of these programs is shown using the example of scientific work and the educational activity of ...

  12. Raman optical activity study on insulin amyloid- and prefibril intermediate

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yamamoto, Shigeki; Watarai, H.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 24, č. 2 (2012), s. 97-103 ISSN 0899-0042 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : raman optical activity * amyloid * fibril * intermediate * insulin Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.718, year: 2012

  13. Synthesis and characterization of new optically active poly(amide

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    Six new optically active poly(amide-imide)s (8a-f) were synthesized through the direct ... polyimides are widely used in the semiconductor and electronic packaging ... chiral polymers is of particular interest from the viewpoint of material science ...

  14. Optical storage media based on fluorite activated crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mokienko, I.Yu.; Poletimov, A.E.; Shcheulin, A.S.

    1991-01-01

    Earlier studied mechanisms of photo- and thermotransformations of defects in pure and activated additively coloured crystals with fluorite structure are considered to suggest several methods of reversible optical recording of images, characterized by high resistance to high-power laser radiation and mechanical deformation

  15. Active optics: off axis aspherics generation for high contrast imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hugot, E.; Laslandes, M.; Ferrari, M.; Vives, S.; Moindrot, S.; El Hadi, K.; Dohlen, K.

    2017-11-01

    Active Optics methods, based on elasticity theory, allow the aspherisation of optical surfaces by stress polishing but also active aspherisation in situ. Researches in this field will impact the final performance and the final cost of any telescope or instrument. The stress polishing method is well suited for the superpolishing of aspheric components for astronomy. Its principle relies on spherical polishing with a full-sized tool of a warped substrate, which becomes aspherical once unwarped. The main advantage of this technique is the very high optical quality obtained either on form or on high spatial frequency errors. Furthermore, the roughness can be decreased down to a few angstroms, thanks the classical polishing with a large pitch tool, providing a substantial gain on the final scientific performance, for instance on the contrast on coronagraphic images, but also on the polishing time and cost. Stress polishing is based on elasticity theory, and requires an optimised deformation system able to provide the right aspherical form on the optical surface during polishing. The optical quality of the deformation is validated using extensive Finite Element Analysis, allowing an estimation of residuals and an optimisation of the warping harness. We describe here the work realised on stress polishing of toric mirrors for VLT-SPHERE and then our actual work on off axis aspherics (OAA) for the ASPIICS-Proba3 mission for solar coronagraphy. The ASPIICS optical design made by Vives et al is a three mirrors anastigmat including a concave off axis hyperboloid and a convex off axis parabola (OAP). We are developing a prototype in order to demonstrate the feasibility of this type of surface, using a multi-mode warping harness (Lemaitre et al). Furthermore, we present our work on variable OAP, meaning the possibility to adjust the shape of a simple OAP in situ with a minimal number of actuators, typically one actuator per optical mode (Focus, Coma and Astigmatism

  16. Targeting Microglial Activation States as a Therapeutic Avenue in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudhakar R. Subramaniam

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Parkinson’s disease (PD is a chronic and progressive disorder characterized neuropathologically by loss of dopamine neurons in the substantia nigra, intracellular proteinaceous inclusions, reduction of dopaminergic terminals in the striatum, and increased neuroinflammatory cells. The consequent reduction of dopamine in the basal ganglia results in the classical parkinsonian motor phenotype. A growing body of evidence suggest that neuroinflammation mediated by microglia, the resident macrophage-like immune cells in the brain, play a contributory role in PD pathogenesis. Microglia participate in both physiological and pathological conditions. In the former, microglia restore the integrity of the central nervous system and, in the latter, they promote disease progression. Microglia acquire different activation states to modulate these cellular functions. Upon activation to the M1 phenotype, microglia elaborate pro-inflammatory cytokines and neurotoxic molecules promoting inflammation and cytotoxic responses. In contrast, when adopting the M2 phenotype microglia secrete anti-inflammatory gene products and trophic factors that promote repair, regeneration, and restore homeostasis. Relatively little is known about the different microglial activation states in PD and a better understanding is essential for developing putative neuroprotective agents. Targeting microglial activation states by suppressing their deleterious pro-inflammatory neurotoxicity and/or simultaneously enhancing their beneficial anti-inflammatory protective functions appear as a valid therapeutic approach for PD treatment. In this review, we summarize microglial functions and, their dual neurotoxic and neuroprotective role in PD. We also review molecules that modulate microglial activation states as a therapeutic option for PD treatment.

  17. Drug and therapeutics committees in Danish hospitals: a survey of organization, activities and drug selection procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Plet, H. T.; Hallas, J.; Nielsen, Gitte S.

    2013-01-01

    To implement rational pharmacotherapy in hospitals, it is important to develop, implement and evaluate hospital drug formularies (HDFs). A report from Denmark recommended standardizing activities of the drug and therapeutics committees (DTCs) in Denmark, but little is known about their current...... organization. The aim of the study was to describe the organization of DTCs in Denmark, how HDFs are developed and implemented, and to what extent policies that support the use of HDFs exist. A questionnaire was developed based on previous research and guidelines and contained 20 questions, which were divided...... of the meetings lasted between 1 and 2.5 hr. Eight (89%) DTCs developed HDFs, policies and guidelines (P&Gs) that supported the use of HDFs. Eight (89%) had established criteria for inclusion of drugs on the HDFs, and seven had developed criteria for generic substitution and therapeutic interchange. The number...

  18. Optical Character Recognition Using Active Contour Segmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabeel Oudah

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Document analysis of images snapped by camera is a growing challenge. These photos are often poor-quality compound images, composed of various objects and text; this makes automatic analysis complicated. OCR is one of the image processing techniques which is used to perform automatic identification of texts. Existing image processing techniques need to manage many parameters in order to clearly recognize the text in such pictures. Segmentation is regarded one of these essential parameters. This paper discusses the accuracy of segmentation process and its effect over the recognition process. According to the proposed method, the images were firstly filtered using the wiener filter then the active contour algorithm could be applied in the segmentation process. The Tesseract OCR Engine was selected in order to evaluate the performance and identification accuracy of the proposed method. The results showed that a more accurate segmentation process shall lead to a more accurate recognition results. The rate of recognition accuracy was 0.95 for the proposed algorithm compared with 0.85 for the Tesseract OCR Engine.

  19. The USC-OSA-EPS section activities in optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aymerich, María.; Cambronero-López, Ferran; Aragón, Ángel L.; Delgado, Tamara; Blanco, Manuel; Gómez Varela, Ana I.; Gargallo, Ana; Williamson, Sandra; Amorín, Adán.; Sánchez-García, Ángel; Bao-Varela, Carmen; Flores-Arias, M. Teresa

    2017-08-01

    The USC-OSA Student Chapter and USC-EPS Young Minds Section is a group financed by The Optical Society (OSA) and the European Physical Society (EPS). It is formed by PhD and degree students from the Universidade de Santiago de Compostela (USC) and one supervisor of the Faculty of Physics. Its main goal is to promote and diffuse Optics in the society. For this purpose, the group carries out several activities in the academic and non-academic community. The group is also committed to the professional development of our members and motivates the exposition of our work into the scientific community.

  20. Optical activity in planar chiral metamaterials: Theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bai, Benfeng; Svirko, Yuri; Turunen, Jari; Vallius, Tuomas

    2007-01-01

    A thorough theoretical study of the optical activity in planar chiral metamaterial (PCM) structures, made of both dielectric and metallic media, is conducted by the analysis of gammadion-shaped nanoparticle arrays. The general polarization properties are first analyzed from an effective-medium perspective, by analogy with natural optical activity, and then verified by rigorous numerical simulation, some of which are corroborated by previous experimental results. The numerical analysis suggests that giant polarization rotation (tens of degrees) may be achieved in the PCM structures with a thickness of only hundreds of nanometers. The artificial optical activity arises from circular birefringence induced by the structural chirality and is enhanced by the guided-mode or surface-plasmon resonances taking place in the structures. There are two polarization conversion types in the dielectric PCMs, whereas only one type in the metallic ones. Many intriguing features of the polarization property of PCMs are also revealed and explained: the polarization effect is reciprocal and vanishes in the symmetrically layered structures; the effect occurs only in the transmitted field, but not in the reflected field; and the polarization spectra of two enantiomeric PCM structures are mirror symmetric to each other. These remarkable properties pave the way for the PCMs to be used as polarization elements in new-generation integrated optical systems

  1. Investigation on dispersion in the active optical waveguide resonator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zihan; Gao, Yining; Xie, Wei

    2018-03-01

    Introducing active gain in the optical waveguide resonator not only compensates the loss, but also can change the dispersion relationship in the ring resonator. It is demonstrated that the group delay time is negative when the resonator is in the undercoupled condition, which also means the resonator exhibits the fast light effect. Theoretical analysis indicates that fast light effect due to anomalous dispersion, would be manipulated by the gain coefficient controlled by the input pump light power and that fast light would enhance scale factor of the optical resonant gyroscope. Resonance optical gyroscope (ROG)'s scale factor for measuring rotation rate is enhanced by anomalous dispersion with superluminal light propagation. The sensitivity of ROG could be enhanced by anomalous dispersion by coupled resonators even considering the effect of anomalous dispersion and propagation gain on broadened linewidth, and this could result in at least two orders of magnitude enhancement in sensitivity.

  2. Potentiating therapeutic effects by enhancing synergism based on active constituents from traditional medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Aihua; Sun, Hui; Wang, Xijun

    2014-04-01

    Shifting current drug discovery tide from 'finding new drugs' to 'screening natural products' may be helpful for overcoming the 'more investment, fewer drugs' challenge. Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), relying on natural products, has been playing a very important role in health protection and disease control for thousands of years in Asia, whose therapeutic efficacy is based on the 'synergism', that is, the combinational effects to be greater than that of the individual drug. Based on syndromes and patient characteristics and guided by the theories of TCM, formulae are designed to contain a combination of various kinds of crude drugs that, when combined, generally assume that a synergism of all ingredients will bring about the maximum of therapeutic efficacy. The increasing evidence has shown that multiple active component combinations of TCM could amplify the therapeutic efficacy of each agent, representing a new trend for modern medicine. However, the precise mechanism of synergistic action remains poorly understood. The present review highlights the concept of synergy and gives some examples of synergistic effects of TCM, and provides an overview of the recent and potential developments of advancing drug discovery towards more agile development of targeted combination therapies from TCM. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. [Therapeutically active dressings--biomaterials in a study of collagen glycation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pielesz, Anna; Paluch, Jadwiga

    2012-01-01

    Active dressings (biomaterials, hydrogels) are cross-linked three-dimensional macromolecular networks. One of the most important properties of active dressings, is their ability for controlled uptake, release and retention of molecules. The formation of advanced glycation end products AGEs progressively increases with normal aging. However, AGE products are formed at accelerated rates in age and stress-related diseases (burns, in wound healing) and also in vitro. The aim will be also to develop a series of gels showing ability of controlled uptake, release and retention of molecules. The hydrogels can be used as biologically and therapeutically (antibacterial and anticancer) active biomaterials. The following materials and reagents were used in the examination: dried plants: Equisetum arvense L., Pulmonaria officinalis L., Agropyron repens. Non-defatted films were extracted from the dried plants. The suspension was stirred and extracted. Temperature was controlled using a water bath. The filtrate was vacuum condensed. The gelling precipitate was poured onto Petri plates and dried. The swelling ratio and the percent loading were calculated. The released amount of CaCl2 at different time intervals was determined by measuring the conductivity. The extent of glycation in collagen was measured. Novel types of swelling hydrogels have been prepared from dried plants and alginic acid. The active dressings showed swelling in aqueous medium, swelling characteristics were dependent on the chemical composition of hydrogel. The hydrogels were also loaded with CaCl2 and their potential for release was judged by measuring conductivity. The activity of hydrogels--active dressings on collagen incubated with glucose showed an decrease in glycation. So, hydrogels--active dressings, a known antiglycating agent which have therapeutic role in wound healing.

  4. The effects of therapeutic hip exercise with abdominal core activation on recruitment of the hip muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Mandy Ky; Chow, Ka Wai; Lai, Alfred Ys; Mak, Noble Kc; Sze, Jason Ch; Tsang, Sharon Mh

    2017-07-21

    lower limb rehabilitation since the increased activation of target hip muscles may enhance the therapeutic effects of hip strengthening exercises.

  5. The IAEA Activities on Supporting Development of Therapeutic Radiopharmaceuticals and Capacity Building in Member States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pillai, M R.A.; Haji-Saeid, M; Zaknun, J; Ramamoorthy, N [Department of Nuclear Sciences and Applications, International Atomic Energy Agency, Vienna (Austria)

    2009-07-01

    The IAEA activities on supporting development of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals are focused on identified radionuclides that can be produced in large quantities and making use of carrier molecules which can be synthesized locally or procured from commercial sources or already available in MS from other related programs. The main emphasis is on {sup 90}Y and {sup 177}Lu based products, which cover the hard beta energy and soft beta energy range respectively, and also since both these radionuclides can be produced in large quantities with very high specific activity and high radionuclidic purity. The services to MS are provided through implementing Coordinated Research Projects (CRP), Technical Cooperation (TC) projects, technical meetings and regional training courses in addition to documenting practically useful technical information related to these products though IAEA publications. The CRP is a group activity in which nearly 15 participants from as many countries come together to work towards an identified objective. Two of the completed CRPs in this area are: (i) Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals (2002-2005) that focussed on the development of 'in vitro' and 'in vivo' techniques for evaluating new generation therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals; and (ii) Development of generator technologies for therapeutic radionuclides (2004-2007) that addressed technologies for {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y and {sup 188}W/{sup 188}Re generators and which can be easily adapted by MS. The participants in the CRP on 'Comparative evaluation of therapeutic radiopharmaceuticals' used the somatostatin analogue, DOTATATE as the lead molecule for developing radiopharmaceuticals and testing the efficacy by in vitro biological assays and animal biodistribution studies. A significant outcome of the CRP was that {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE therapy is now practised in several of the CRP participating countries including Brazil, India, Italy, and Poland. The major outcome of the CRP

  6. Therapeutic Targets for Neurodevelopmental Disorders Emerging from Animal Models with Perinatal Immune Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ibi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Increasing epidemiological evidence indicates that perinatal infection with various viral pathogens enhances the risk for several psychiatric disorders. The pathophysiological significance of astrocyte interactions with neurons and/or gut microbiomes has been reported in neurodevelopmental disorders triggered by pre- and postnatal immune insults. Recent studies with the maternal immune activation or neonatal polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid models of neurodevelopmental disorders have identified various candidate molecules that could be responsible for brain dysfunction. Here, we review the functions of several candidate molecules in neurodevelopment and brain function and discuss their potential as therapeutic targets for psychiatric disorders.

  7. Biological Activity of Lenalidomide and Its Underlying Therapeutic Effects in Multiple Myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Martiniani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Lenalidomide is a synthetic compound derived by modifying the chemical structure of thalidomide. It belongs to the second generation of immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs and possesses pleiotropic properties. Even if lenalidomide has been shown to be active in the treatment of several hematologic malignancies, this review article is mostly focalized on its mode of action in multiple myeloma. The present paper is about the direct and indirect antitumor effects of lenalidomide on malignant plasmacells, bone marrow microenvironment, bone resorption and host’s immune response. The molecular mechanisms and targets of lenalidomide remain largely unknown, but recent evidence shows cereblon (CRBN as a possible mediator of its therapeutical effects.

  8. Therapeutic intraspinal stimulation to generate activity and promote long-term recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E. Mondello

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuroprosthetic approaches have tremendous potential for the treatment of injuries to the brain and spinal cord by inducing appropriate neural activity in otherwise disordered circuits. Substantial work has demonstrated that stimulation applied to both the central and peripheral nervous system leads to immediate and in some cases sustained benefits after injury. Here we focus on cervical intraspinal microstimulation (ISMS as a promising method of activating the spinal cord distal to an injury site, either to directly produce movements or more intriguingly to improve subsequent volitional control of the paretic extremities. Incomplete injuries to the spinal cord are the most commonly observed in human patients, and these injuries spare neural tissue bypassing the lesion that could be influenced by neural devices to promote recovery of function. In fact, recent results have demonstrated that therapeutic ISMS leads to modest but sustained improvements in forelimb function after an incomplete spinal cord injury. This therapeutic spinal stimulation may promote long-term recovery of function by providing the necessary electrical activity needed for neuron survival, axon growth, and synaptic stability.

  9. Mechanistic and structural basis of bioengineered bovine Cathelicidin-5 with optimized therapeutic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahoo, Bikash R.; Maruyama, Kenta; Edula, Jyotheeswara R.; Tougan, Takahiro; Lin, Yuxi; Lee, Young-Ho; Horii, Toshihiro; Fujiwara, Toshimichi

    2017-03-01

    Peptide-drug discovery using host-defense peptides becomes promising against antibiotic-resistant pathogens and cancer cells. Here, we customized the therapeutic activity of bovine cathelicidin-5 targeting to bacteria, protozoa, and tumor cells. The membrane dependent conformational adaptability and plasticity of cathelicidin-5 is revealed by biophysical analysis and atomistic simulations over 200 μs in thymocytes, leukemia, and E. coli cell-membranes. Our understanding of energy-dependent cathelicidin-5 intrusion in heterogeneous membranes aided in designing novel loss/gain-of-function analogues. In vitro findings identified leucine-zipper to phenylalanine substitution in cathelicidin-5 (1-18) significantly enhance the antimicrobial and anticancer activity with trivial hemolytic activity. Targeted mutants of cathelicidin-5 at kink region and N-terminal truncation revealed loss-of-function. We ensured the existence of a bimodal mechanism of peptide action (membranolytic and non-membranolytic) in vitro. The melanoma mouse model in vivo study further supports the in vitro findings. This is the first structural report on cathelicidin-5 and our findings revealed potent therapeutic application of designed cathelicidin-5 analogues.

  10. In vitro and in vivo therapeutic activity of ibuprofen against dermatophytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    AlJanabi, Ali S

    2009-01-01

    To evaluate the in vitro and in vivo therapeutic activity of ibuprofen against dermatophytes. The period of study ranged from June to September 2008. For in vitro investigation of ibuprofen activity, measurement of colony diameter, and dry weight were employed against 4 isolated strains of dermatophytes from 46 patients (30-43 years) suffering from dermatophytoses at Morgan Hospital, Hilla City, Iraq in June 2008. For the in vivo evaluation of ibuprofen, rabbits as the main subjects, were infected with dermatophytes and treated with prepared ibuprofen cream (15mg/gm). In vitro application of ibuprofen showed cidal activity on 4 strains of dermatophytes at minimum inhibitory concentrations of 200 ug/ml. The infected rabbits were successfully cured of dermatophytoses after treatment with ibuprofen cream. Based on in vitro and in vivo application, Ibuprofen can be used as a short-term cure for dermatophytoses. (author)

  11. Raman Optical Activity and Raman Spectra of Amphetamine Species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Rolf W.; Shim, Irene; White, Peter Cyril

    2012-01-01

    Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT-molecular orbi......Theoretical calculations and preliminary measurements of vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of different species of amphetamine (amphetamine and amphetamine-H+) are reported for the first time. The quantum chemical calculations were carried out as hybrid ab initio DFT...... are employed for identification purposes. The DFT calculations show that the most stable conformations are those allowing for close contact between the aromatic ring and the amine hydrogen atoms. The internal rotational barrier within the same amphetamine enanti- omer has a considerable influence on the Raman...

  12. Diamagnetic Raman Optical Activity of Chlorine, Bromine, and Iodine Gases

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebestík, Jaroslav; Kapitán, J.; Pačes, Ondřej; Bouř, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 55, č. 10 (2016), s. 3504-3508 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-03978S; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-00431S; GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05935S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : angular momentum theory * diamagnetic molecules * excited electronic states * magnetic field * Raman optical activity Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 11.994, year: 2016

  13. Explicit versus Implicit Solvent Modeling of Raman Optical Activity Spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hopmann, K. H.; Ruud, K.; Pecul, M.; Kudelski, A.; Dračínský, Martin; Bouř, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 115, č. 14 (2011), s. 4128-4137 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033; GA ČR GAP208/11/0105 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200550902 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : raman optical activity * lactamide * solvent models Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.696, year: 2011

  14. Overlapping activities of TGF-β and Hedgehog signaling in cancer: therapeutic targets for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrot, Carole Y; Javelaud, Delphine; Mauviel, Alain

    2013-02-01

    Recent advances in the field of cancer therapeutics come from the development of drugs that specifically recognize validated oncogenic or pro-metastatic targets. The latter may be mutated proteins with altered function, such as kinases that become constitutively active, or critical components of growth factor signaling pathways, whose deregulation leads to aberrant malignant cell proliferation and dissemination to metastatic sites. We herein focus on the description of the overlapping activities of two important developmental pathways often exacerbated in cancer, namely Transforming Growth Factor-β (TGF-β) and Hedgehog (HH) signaling, with a special emphasis on the unifying oncogenic role played by GLI1/2 transcription factors. The latter are the main effectors of the canonical HH pathway, yet are direct target genes of TGF-β/SMAD signal transduction. While tumor-suppressor in healthy and pre-malignant tissues, TGF-β is often expressed at high levels in tumors and contributes to tumor growth, escape from immune surveillance, invasion and metastasis. HH signaling regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, and aberrant HH signaling is found in a variety of cancers. We discuss the current knowledge on HH and TGF-β implication in cancer including cancer stem cell biology, as well as the current state, both successes and failures, of targeted therapeutics aimed at blocking either of these pathways in the pre-clinical and clinical settings. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Therapeutic activity of two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berthou Christian

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously reported that allanxanthone C and macluraxanthone, two xanthones purified from Guttiferae trees, display in vitro antiproliferative and proapoptotic activities in leukemic cells from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL and leukemia B cell lines. Results Here, we investigated the in vivo therapeutic effects of the two xanthones in a xenograft murine model of human CLL, developed by engrafting CD5-transfected chronic leukemia B cells into SCID mice. Treatment of the animals with five daily injections of either allanxanthone C or macluraxanthone resulted in a significant prolongation of their survival as compared to control animals injected with the solvent alone (p = 0.0006 and p = 0.0141, respectively. The same treatment of mice which were not xenografted induced no mortality. Conclusion These data show for the first time the in vivo antileukemic activities of two plant-derived xanthones, and confirm their potential interest for CLL therapy.

  16. Structure-activity studies and therapeutic potential of host defense peptides of human thrombin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasetty, Gopinath; Papareddy, Praveen; Kalle, Martina; Rydengård, Victoria; Mörgelin, Matthias; Albiger, Barbara; Malmsten, Martin; Schmidtchen, Artur

    2011-06-01

    Peptides of the C-terminal region of human thrombin are released upon proteolysis and identified in human wounds. In this study, we wanted to investigate minimal determinants, as well as structural features, governing the antimicrobial and immunomodulating activity of this peptide region. Sequential amino acid deletions of the peptide GKYGFYTHVFRLKKWIQKVIDQFGE (GKY25), as well as substitutions at strategic and structurally relevant positions, were followed by analyses of antimicrobial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, the Gram-positive bacterium Staphylococcus aureus, and the fungus Candida albicans. Furthermore, peptide effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-, lipoteichoic acid-, or zymosan-induced macrophage activation were studied. The thrombin-derived peptides displayed length- and sequence-dependent antimicrobial as well as immunomodulating effects. A peptide length of at least 20 amino acids was required for effective anti-inflammatory effects in macrophage models, as well as optimal antimicrobial activity as judged by MIC assays. However, shorter (>12 amino acids) variants also displayed significant antimicrobial effects. A central K14 residue was important for optimal antimicrobial activity. Finally, one peptide variant, GKYGFYTHVFRLKKWIQKVI (GKY20) exhibiting improved selectivity, i.e., low toxicity and a preserved antimicrobial as well as anti-inflammatory effect, showed efficiency in mouse models of LPS shock and P. aeruginosa sepsis. The work defines structure-activity relationships of C-terminal host defense peptides of thrombin and delineates a strategy for selecting peptide epitopes of therapeutic interest.

  17. Optical activity via Kerr nonlinearity in a spinning chiral medium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khan, Anwar Ali, E-mail: anwarali@uom.edu.pk [Department of Physics, University of Malakand at Chakdara Dir(L) (Pakistan); Bacha, Bakht Amin, E-mail: aminoptics@gmail.com [Department of Physics, University of Malakand at Chakdara Dir(L) (Pakistan); Khan, Rahmat Ali, E-mail: rahmat_alipk@yahoo.com [Department of Mathematics, University of Malakand (Pakistan)

    2016-11-11

    Optical activity is investigated in a chiral medium by employing the four level cascade atomic model, in which the optical responses of the atomic medium are studied with Kerr nonlinearity. Light entering into a chiral medium splits into circular birefringent beams. The angle of divergence between the circular birefringent beams and the polarization states of the two light beams is manipulated with Kerr nonlinearity. In the stationary chiral medium the angle of divergence between the circular birefringent beams is calculated to be 1.3 radian. Furthermore, circular birefringence is optically controlled in a spinning chiral medium, where the maximum rotary photon drag angle for left (right) circularly polarized beam is ±1.1 (±1.5) microradian. The change in the angle of divergence between circular birefringent beams by rotary photon drag is calculated to be 0.4 microradian. The numerical results may help to understand image designing, image coding, discovery of photonic crystals and optical sensing technology. - Highlights: • Coherent control of a circular birefringence in a chiral medium is studied. • Angle of divergence between birefringent beams is modified with Kerr nonlinearity. • Rotary photon drag is controlled for birefringent beams and enhanced with Kerr nonlinearity in a spinning medium. • Rotation of the angle of divergence is observed with mechanical rotation of the medium about an axis and modified with Kerr effect. • A change in the angle of divergence is calculated by about a microradian with rotary photon drag.

  18. Last results of MADRAS, a space active optics demonstrator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hourtoule, Claire; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Devilliers, Christophe; Liotard, Arnaud; Lopez, Céline; Chazallet, Frédéric

    2017-11-01

    The goal of the MADRAS project (Mirror Active, Deformable and Regulated for Applications in Space) is to highlight the interest of Active Optics for the next generation of space telescope and instrumentation. Wave-front errors in future space telescopes will mainly come from thermal dilatation and zero gravity, inducing large lightweight primary mirrors deformation. To compensate for these effects, a 24 actuators, 100 mm diameter deformable mirror has been designed to be inserted in a pupil relay. Within the project, such a system has been optimized, integrated and experimentally characterized. The system is designed considering wave-front errors expected in 3m-class primary mirrors, and taking into account space constraints such as compactness, low weight, low power consumption and mechanical strength. Finite Element Analysis allowed an optimization of the system in order to reach a precision of correction better than 10 nm rms. A dedicated test-bed has been designed to fully characterize the integrated mirror performance in representative conditions. The test set up is made of three main parts: a telescope aberrations generator, a correction loop with the MADRAS mirror and a Shack-Hartman wave-front sensor, and PSF imaging. In addition, Fizeau interferometry monitors the optical surface shape. We have developed and characterized an active optics system with a limited number of actuators and a design fitting space requirements. All the conducted tests tend to demonstrate the efficiency of such a system for a real-time, in situ wave-front. It would allow a significant improvement for future space telescopes optical performance while relaxing the specifications on the others components.

  19. Therapeutic horticulture in clinical depression: a prospective study of active components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen; Hartig, Terry; Patil, Grete Grindal; Martinsen, Egil W; Kirkevold, Marit

    2010-09-01

    This paper is a report of a study conducted to assess change in depression severity, perceived attentional capacity and rumination (brooding) in individuals with clinical depression during a therapeutic horticulture programme and to investigate if the changes were mediated by experiences of being away and fascination. Individuals with clinical depression suffer from distortion of attention and rumination. Interventions can help to disrupt maladaptive rumination and promote restoration of depleted attentional capacity. A single-group study was conducted with a convenience sample of 28 people with clinical depression in 2009. Data were collected before, twice during, and immediately after a 12-week therapeutic horticulture programme, and at 3-month follow-up. Assessment instruments were the Beck Depression Inventory, Attentional Function Index, Brooding Scale, and Being Away and Fascination subscales from the Perceived Restorativeness Scale. Mean Beck Depression Inventory scores declined by 4.5 points during the intervention (F = 5.49, P = 0.002). The decline was clinically relevant for 50% of participants. Attentional Function Index scores increased (F = 4.14, P = 0.009), while Brooding scores decreased (F = 4.51, P = 0.015). The changes in Beck Depression Inventory and Attentional Function Index scores were mediated by increases in Being Away and Fascination, and decline in Beck Depression Inventory scores was also mediated by decline in Brooding. Participants maintained their improvements in Beck Depression Inventory scores at 3-month follow-up. Being away and fascination appear to work as active components in a therapeutic horticulture intervention for clinical depression.

  20. PARP-1 and PARP-2 activity in cancer-induced cachexia: potential therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreiro, Esther; Gea, Joaquim

    2018-01-26

    Skeletal muscle dysfunction and mass loss is a characteristic feature in patients with chronic diseases including cancer and acute conditions such as critical illness. Maintenance of an adequate muscle mass is crucial for the patients' prognosis irrespective of the underlying condition. Moreover, aging-related sarcopenia may further aggravate the muscle wasting process associated with chronic diseases and cancer. Poly(adenosine diphosphate-ribose) polymerase (PARP) activation has been demonstrated to contribute to the pathophysiology of muscle mass loss and dysfunction in animal models of cancer-induced cachexia. Genetic inhibition of PARP activity attenuated the deleterious effects seen on depleted muscles in mouse models of oncologic cachexia. In the present minireview the mechanisms whereby PARP activity inhibition may improve muscle mass and performance in models of cancer-induced cachexia are discussed. Specifically, the beneficial effects of inhibition of PARP activity on attenuation of increased oxidative stress, protein catabolism, poor muscle anabolism and mitochondrial content and epigenetic modulation of muscle phenotype are reviewed in this article. Finally, the potential therapeutic strategies of pharmacological PARP activity inhibition for the treatment of cancer-induced cachexia are also being described in this review.

  1. ALK receptor activation, ligands and therapeutic targeting in glioblastoma and in other cancers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wellstein, Anton

    2012-01-01

    The intracellular anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) fragment shows striking homology with members of the insulin receptor family and was initially identified as an oncogenic fusion protein resulting from a translocation in lymphoma and more recently in a range of cancers. The full-length ALK transmembrane receptor of ~220 kDa was identified based on this initial work. This tyrosine kinase receptor and its ligands, the growth factors pleiotrophin (PTN) and midkine (MK) are highly expressed during development of the nervous system and other organs. Each of these genes has been implicated in malignant progression of different tumor types and shown to alter phenotypes as well as signal transduction in cultured normal and tumor cells. Beyond its role in cancer, the ALK receptor pathway is thought to contribute to nervous system development, function, and repair, as well as metabolic homeostasis and the maintenance of tissue regeneration. ALK receptor activity in cancer can be up-regulated by amplification, overexpression, ligand binding, mutations in the intracellular domain of the receptor and by activity of the receptor tyrosine phosphatase PTPRz. Here we discuss the evidence for ligand control of ALK activity as well as the potential prognostic and therapeutic implications from gene expression and functional studies. An analysis of 18 published gene expression data sets from different cancers shows that overexpression of ALK, its smaller homolog LTK (leukocyte tyrosine kinase) and the ligands PTN and MK in cancer tissues from patients correlate significantly with worse course and outcome of the disease. This observation together with preclinical functional studies suggests that this pathway could be a valid therapeutic target for which complementary targeting strategies with small molecule kinase inhibitors as well as antibodies to ligands or the receptors may be used.

  2. Optical activities of steroid ketones - Elucidation of the octant rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatanaka, Masashi; Sayama, Daisuke; Miyasaka, Makoto

    2018-04-21

    Theoretical calculations of optical activities in steroid ketones are presented by using modern semi-empirical PM7 wavefunctions. Both circular dichroism (CD) and specific rotation, which is proportional to optical rotation dispersion (ORD), are well simulated, and signs of the Cotton effect at the most long-wavelength region are fully in accordance with the experimental results. The good accordance is related to the octant rule, which is deduced within the framework of the perturbation theory. Our treatment is promising to predict the signs of the Cotton effect of large molecules, and thus, the absolute configurations can also be grasped without demanding procedures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Optical Assessment of Caries Lesion Structure and Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Robert Chulsung

    New, more sophisticated diagnostic tools are needed for the detection and characterization of caries lesions in the early stages of development. It is not sufficient to simply detect caries lesions, methods are needed to assess the activity of the lesion and determine if chemical or surgical intervention is needed. Previous studies have demonstrated that polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) can be used to nondestructively image the subsurface lesion structure and measure the thickness of the highly mineralized surface zone. Other studies have demonstrated that the rate of dehydration can be correlated with the lesion activity and that the rate can be measured using optical methods. The main objective of this work was to test the hypothesis that optical methods can be used to assess lesion activity on tooth coronal and root surfaces. Simulated caries models were used to develop and validate an algorithm for detecting and measuring the highly mineralized surface layer using PS-OCT. This work confirmed that the algorithm was capable of estimating the thickness of the highly mineralized surface layer with high accuracy. Near-infrared (NIR) reflectance and thermal imaging methods were used to assess activity of caries lesions by measuring the state of lesion hydration. NIR reflectance imaging performed the best for artificial enamel and natural coronal caries lesion samples, particularly at wavelengths coincident with the water absorption band at 1460-nm. However, thermal imaging performed the best for artificial dentin and natural root caries lesion samples. These novel optical methods outperformed the conventional methods (ICDAS II) in accurately assessing lesion activity of natural coronal and root caries lesions. Infrared-based imaging methods have shown potential for in-vivo applications to objectively assess caries lesion activity in a single examination. It is likely that if future clinical trials are a success, this novel imaging

  4. Investigation of therapeutic potentials of some selected medicinal plants using neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abubakar, Sani; Isa, Nasiru Fage; Usman, Ahmed Rufa’i; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Abubakar, Nuraddeen

    2015-01-01

    Series of attempts were made to investigate concentrations of trace elements and their therapeutic properties in various medicinal plants. In this study, samples of some commonly used plants were collected from Bauchi State, Nigeria. They includes leaves of azadirachta indica (neem), Moringa Oleifera (moringa), jatropha curcas (purgin Nut), guiera senegalensis (custard apple) and anogeissus leiocarpus (African birch). These samples were analyzed for their trace elements contents with both short and long irradiation protocols of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at Nigerian Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) of Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. The level of trace elements found varies from one sample to another, with some reported at hundreds of mg/Kg dry weight. The results have been compared with the available literature data. The presence of these trace elements indicates promising potentials of these plants for relief of certain ailments

  5. Investigation of therapeutic potentials of some selected medicinal plants using neutron activation analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abubakar, Sani; Isa, Nasiru Fage [Bayero University, Kano Nigeria (Nigeria); Usman, Ahmed Rufa’i [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Umaru Musa Yar’adua University, Katsina Nigeria (Nigeria); Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Abubakar, Nuraddeen [Center for Energy Research and Training, Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria Nigeria (Nigeria)

    2015-04-24

    Series of attempts were made to investigate concentrations of trace elements and their therapeutic properties in various medicinal plants. In this study, samples of some commonly used plants were collected from Bauchi State, Nigeria. They includes leaves of azadirachta indica (neem), Moringa Oleifera (moringa), jatropha curcas (purgin Nut), guiera senegalensis (custard apple) and anogeissus leiocarpus (African birch). These samples were analyzed for their trace elements contents with both short and long irradiation protocols of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at Nigerian Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) of Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. The level of trace elements found varies from one sample to another, with some reported at hundreds of mg/Kg dry weight. The results have been compared with the available literature data. The presence of these trace elements indicates promising potentials of these plants for relief of certain ailments.

  6. Investigation of therapeutic potentials of some selected medicinal plants using neutron activation analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abubakar, Sani; Usman, Ahmed Rufa'i.; Isa, Nasiru Fage; Khandaker, Mayeen Uddin; Abubakar, Nuraddeen

    2015-04-01

    Series of attempts were made to investigate concentrations of trace elements and their therapeutic properties in various medicinal plants. In this study, samples of some commonly used plants were collected from Bauchi State, Nigeria. They includes leaves of azadirachta indica (neem), Moringa Oleifera (moringa), jatropha curcas (purgin Nut), guiera senegalensis (custard apple) and anogeissus leiocarpus (African birch). These samples were analyzed for their trace elements contents with both short and long irradiation protocols of Instrumental Neutron Activation Analysis (INAA) at Nigerian Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1) of Ahmadu Bello University, Zaria, Nigeria. The level of trace elements found varies from one sample to another, with some reported at hundreds of mg/Kg dry weight. The results have been compared with the available literature data. The presence of these trace elements indicates promising potentials of these plants for relief of certain ailments.

  7. Calculation of optical second-harmonic susceptibilities and optical activity for crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levine, Z.H.

    1994-01-01

    A new generation of nearly first-principles calculations predicts both the linear and second-harmonic susceptibilities for a variety of insulating crystals, including GaAs, GaP, AlAs, AlP, Se, α-quartz, and c-urea. The results are typically in agreement with experimental measurements. The calculations have been extended to optical activity, with somewhat less success to date. The theory, based on a simple self-energy correction to the local density approximation, and results are reviewed herein

  8. Assembling optically active and nonactive metamaterials with chiral units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Xiong

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Metamaterials constructed with chiral units can be either optically active or nonactive depending on the spatial configuration of the building blocks. For a class of chiral units, their effective induced electric and magnetic dipoles, which originate from the induced surface electric current upon illumination of incident light, can be collinear at the resonant frequency. This feature provides significant advantage in designing metamaterials. In this paper we concentrate on several examples. In one scenario, chiral units with opposite chiralities are used to construct the optically nonactive metamaterial structure. It turns out that with linearly polarized incident light, the pure electric or magnetic resonance (and accordingly negative permittivity or negative permeability can be selectively realized by tuning the polarization of incident light for 90°. Alternatively, units with the same chirality can be assembled as a chiral metamaterial by taking the advantage of the collinear induced electric and magnetic dipoles. It follows that for the circularly polarized incident light, negative refractive index can be realized. These examples demonstrate the unique approach to achieve certain optical properties by assembling chiral building blocks, which could be enlightening in designing metamaterials.

  9. Optical manipulation and catalytic activity enhanced by surface plasmon effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Ningmu; Min, Jiang; Jiao, Wenxiang; Wang, Guanghui

    2017-02-01

    For optical manipulation, a nano-optical conveyor belt consisting of an array of gold plasmonic non-concentric nano-rings (PNNRs) is demonstrated for the realization of trapping and unidirectional transportation of nanoparticles by polarization rotation of excitation beam. These hot spots of an asymmetric plasmonic nanostructure are polarization dependent, therefore, one can use the incident polarization state to manipulate the trapped targets. Trapped particles could be transferred between adjacent PNNRs in a given direction just by rotating the polarization of incident beam due to unbalanced potential. The angular dependent distribution of electric field around PNNR has been solved using the three- dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique. For optical enhanced catalytic activity, the spectral properties of dimers of Au nanorod-Au nanorod nanostructures under the excitation of 532nm photons have been investigated. With a super-resolution catalytic mapping technique, we identified the existence of "hot spot" in terms of catalytic reactivity at the gap region within the twined plasmonic nanostructure. Also, FDTD calculation has revealed an intrinsic correlation between hot electron transfer.

  10. (Bio)hybrid materials based on optically active particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reitzig, Manuela; Härtling, Thomas; Opitz, Jörg

    2014-03-01

    In this contribution we provide an overview of current investigations on optically active particles (nanodiamonds, upconversion phospors) for biohybrid and sensing applications. Due to their outstanding properties nanodiamonds gain attention in various application elds such as microelectronics, optical monitoring, medicine, and biotechnology. Beyond the typical diamond properties such as high thermal conductivity and extreme hardness, the carbon surface and its various functional groups enable diverse chemical and biological surface functionalization. At Fraunhofer IKTS-MD we develop a customization of material surfaces via integration of chemically modi ed nanodiamonds at variable surfaces, e.g bone implants and pipelines. For the rst purpose, nanodiamonds are covalently modi ed at their surface with amino or phosphate functionalities that are known to increase adhesion to bone or titanium alloys. The second type of surface is approached via mechanical implementation into coatings. Besides nanodiamonds, we also investigate the properties of upconversion phosphors. In our contribution we show how upconversion phosphors are used to verify sterilization processes via a change of optical properties due to sterilizing electron beam exposure.

  11. Zeno inhibition of polarization rotation in an optically active medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzalo, Isabel; Luis, Alfredo; Porras, Miguel A

    2015-01-01

    We describe an experiment in which the rotation of the polarization of light propagating in an optically active water solution of D-fructose tends to be inhibited by frequent monitoring whether the polarization remains unchanged. This is an example of the Zeno effect that has remarkable pedagogical interest because of its conceptual simplicity, easy implementation, low cost, and because the same the Zeno effect holds at classical and quantum levels. An added value is the demonstration of the Zeno effect beyond typical idealized assumptions in a practical setting with real polarizers. (paper)

  12. Dispersion relations and sum rules for natural optical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomaz, M.T.; Nussenzveig, H.M.

    1981-06-01

    Dispersion relations and sum rules are derived for the complex rotatory power of an arbitrary linear (nonmagnetic) isotropic medium showing natural optical activity. Both previously known dispersion relations and sum rules as well as new ones are obtained. It is shown that the Rosenfeld-Condon dispersion formula is inconsistent with the expected asymptotic behavior at high frequencies. A new dispersion formula based on quantum eletro-dynamics removes this inconsistency; however, it still requires modification in the low-frequency limit. (Author) [pt

  13. Transition polarizability model of induced resonance Raman optical activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yamamoto, S.; Bouř, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 34, č. 25 (2013), s. 2152-2158 ISSN 0192-8651 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA ČR GA13-03978S; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200551205 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : induced resonance Raman optical activity * europium complexes * density functional computations * light scattering Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.601, year: 2013

  14. A novel bioassay for the activity determination of therapeutic human brain natriuretic peptide (BNP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP is an important peptide-based therapeutic drug indicated for the treatment of acute heart failure. Accurate determination of the potency of therapeutic rhBNP is crucial for the safety and efficacy of the drug. The current bioassay involves use of rabbit aortic strips, with experiments being complicated and time-consuming and markedly variable in results. Animal-less methods with better precision and accuracy should be explored. We have therefore developed an alternative cell-based assay, which relies on the ability of BNP to induce cGMP production in HEK293 cells expressing BNP receptor guanylyl cyclase-A. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An alternative assay based on the measurement of BNP-induced cGMP production was developed. Specifically, the bioassay employs cells engineered to express BNP receptor guanylyl cyclase-A (GCA. Upon rhBNP stimulation, the levels of the second messager cGMP in these cells drastically increased and subsequently secreted into culture supernatants. The quantity of cGMP, which corresponds to the rhBNP activity, was determined using a competitive ELISA developed by us. Compared with the traditional assay, the novel cell-based assay demonstrated better reproducibility and precision. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The optimized cell-based assay is much simpler, more rapid and precise compared with the traditional assay using animal tissues. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a novel and viable alternative assay for rhBNP potency analysis.

  15. Activated mammalian target of rapamycin is a potential therapeutic target in gastric cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Da-zhi; Sun, Xiao-wei; Guan, Yuan-xiang; Li, Yuan-fang; Lin, Tong-yu; Geng, Qi-rong; Tian, Ying; Cai, Mu-yan; Fang, Xin-juan; Zhan, You-qing; Zhou, Zhi-wei; Li, Wei; Chen, Ying-bo

    2010-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) plays a key role in cellular growth and homeostasis. The purpose of our present study is to investigate the expression of activated mTOR (p-mTOR) in gastric cancer patients, their prognostic significance and the inhibition effect of RAD001 on tumor growth and to determine whether targeted inhibition of mTOR could be a potential therapeutic strategy for gastric cancer. The expression of p-mTOR was detected in specimens of 181 gastric cancers who underwent radical resection (R0) by immunohistochemistry. The correlation of p-mTOR expression to clinicopathologic features and survival of gastric cancer was studied. We also determined the inhibition effect of RAD001 on tumor growth using BGC823 and AGS human gastric cancer cell lines. Immunostaining for p-mTOR was positive in 93 of 181 (51.4%) gastric cancers, closely correlated with lymph node status and pTNM stage. Patients with p-mTOR positive showed significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) rates than those with p-mTOR-negative tumors in univariable analyses, and there was a trend toward a correlation between p-mTOR expression and survival in multivariable analyses. RAD001 markedly inhibited dose-dependently proliferation of human gastric carcinoma cells by down-regulating expression of p70s6k, p-p70s6k, C-myc, CyclinD1 and Bcl-2, up-regulating expression of P53. In gastric cancer, p-mTOR is a potential therapeutic target and RAD001 was a promising treatment agent with inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis by down-regulating expression of C-myc, CyclinD1 and Bcl-2, up-regulating expression of P53

  16. Activated Microglia Targeting Dendrimer-Minocycline Conjugate as Therapeutics for Neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rishi; Kim, Soo-Young; Sharma, Anjali; Zhang, Zhi; Kambhampati, Siva Pramodh; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2017-11-15

    Brain-related disorders have outmatched cancer and cardiovascular diseases worldwide as the leading cause of morbidity and mortality. The lack of effective therapies and the relatively dry central nervous system (CNS) drug pipeline pose formidable challenge. Superior, targeted delivery of current clinically approved drugs may offer significant potential. Minocycline has shown promise for the treatment of neurological diseases owing to its ability to penetrate the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and potency. Despite its potential in the clinic and in preclinical models, the high doses needed to affect a positive therapeutic response have led to side effects. Targeted delivery of minocycline to the injured site and injured cells in the brain can be highly beneficial. Systemically administered hydroxyl poly(amidoamine) (PAMAM) generation-6 (G6) dendrimers have a longer blood circulation time and have been shown to cross the impaired BBB. We have successfully prepared and characterized the in vitro efficacy and in vivo targeting ability of hydroxyl-G6 PAMAM dendrimer-9-amino-minocycline conjugate (D-mino). Minocycline is a challenging drug to carry out chemical transformations due to its inherent instability. We used a combination of a highly efficient and mild copper catalyzed azide-alkyne click reaction (CuAAC) along with microwave energy to conjugate 9-amino-minocycline (mino) to the dendrimer surface via enzyme responsive linkages. D-mino was further evaluated for anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activity in lipopolysaccharides-activated murine microglial cells. D-mino conjugates enhanced the intracellular availability of the drug due to their rapid uptake, suppressed inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) production, and reduced oxidative stress by suppressing nitric oxide production, all significantly better than the free drug. Fluorescently labeled dendrimer conjugate (Cy5-D-mino) was systematically administered (intravenous, 55 mg/kg) on postnatal

  17. Oocyte activation and phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ): diagnostic and therapeutic implications for assisted reproductive technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramadan, Walaa M; Kashir, Junaid; Jones, Celine; Coward, Kevin

    2012-07-09

    activation of mammalian oocytes, and that genetic, molecular, or biochemical perturbation of this key enzyme is strongly linked to human infertility where oocyte activation is deficient. Consequently, there is significant scope for our understanding of PLCζ to be translated to the ART clinic, both as a novel therapeutic agent with which to rescue oocyte activation deficiency (OAD), or as a prognostic/diagnostic biomarker of oocyte activation ability in target sperm samples.

  18. Molecular structures of viruses from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Hecht, Lutz; Syme, Christopher D.

    2002-01-01

    A vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) study of a range of different structural types of virus exemplified by filamentous bacteriophage fd, tobacco mosaic virus, satellite tobacco mosaic virus, bacteriophage MS2 and cowpea mosaic virus has revealed that, on account of its sensitivity to chira......A vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) study of a range of different structural types of virus exemplified by filamentous bacteriophage fd, tobacco mosaic virus, satellite tobacco mosaic virus, bacteriophage MS2 and cowpea mosaic virus has revealed that, on account of its sensitivity...... (top component) of cowpea mosaic virus from those of the intact middle and bottom-upper components separated by means of a caesium chloride density gradient, the ROA spectrum of the viral RNA was obtained, which revealed that the RNA takes up an A-type single-stranded helical conformation...... and that the RNA conformations in the middle and bottom-upper components are very similar. This information is not available from the X-ray crystal structure of cowpea mosaic virus since no nucleic acid is visible....

  19. Therapeutic Uses and Pharmacological Properties of Garlic, Shallot, and Their Biologically Active Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikaili, Peyman; Maadirad, Surush; Moloudizargari, Milad; Aghajanshakeri, Shahin; Sarahroodi, Shadi

    2013-01-01

    Objective(s): Garlic (Allium sativum L. family Liliaceae) is well known in Iran and its leaves, flowers, and cloves have been used in traditional medicine for a long time. Research in recent decades has shown widespread pharmacological effects of A. sativum and its organosulfur compounds especially Allicin. Studies carried out on the chemical composition of the plant show that the most important constituents of this plant are organosulfur compounds such as allicin, diallyl disulphide, S-allylcysteine, and diallyl trisulfide. Allicin represents one of the most studied among these naturally occurring compounds. In addition to A. sativum, these compounds are also present in A. hirtifolium (shallot) and have been used to treat various diseases. This article reviews the pharmacological effects and traditional uses of A. sativum, A. hirtifolium, and their active constituents to show whether or not they can be further used as potential natural sources for the development of novel drugs. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, the authors went through a vast number of sources and articles and all needed data was gathered. The findings were reviewed and classified on the basis of relevance to the topic and a summary of all effects were reported as tables. Conclusion: Garlic and shallots are safe and rich sources of biologically active compounds with low toxicity. Further studies are needed to confirm the safety and quality of the plants to be used by clinicians as therapeutic agents. PMID:24379960

  20. Antibacterial Free Fatty Acids and Monoglycerides: Biological Activities, Experimental Testing, and Therapeutic Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Bo Kyeong; Jackman, Joshua A.; Valle-González, Elba R.

    2018-01-01

    Antimicrobial lipids such as fatty acids and monoglycerides are promising antibacterial agents that destabilize bacterial cell membranes, causing a wide range of direct and indirect inhibitory effects. The goal of this review is to introduce the latest experimental approaches for characterizing how antimicrobial lipids destabilize phospholipid membranes within the broader scope of introducing current knowledge about the biological activities of antimicrobial lipids, testing strategies, and applications for treating bacterial infections. To this end, a general background on antimicrobial lipids, including structural classification, is provided along with a detailed description of their targeting spectrum and currently understood antibacterial mechanisms. Building on this knowledge, different experimental approaches to characterize antimicrobial lipids are presented, including cell-based biological and model membrane-based biophysical measurement techniques. Particular emphasis is placed on drawing out how biological and biophysical approaches complement one another and can yield mechanistic insights into how the physicochemical properties of antimicrobial lipids influence molecular self-assembly and concentration-dependent interactions with model phospholipid and bacterial cell membranes. Examples of possible therapeutic applications are briefly introduced to highlight the potential significance of antimicrobial lipids for human health and medicine, and to motivate the importance of employing orthogonal measurement strategies to characterize the activity profile of antimicrobial lipids. PMID:29642500

  1. Design of integrated optics all-optical label swappers for spectral amplitude code label swapping optical packet networks on active/passive InP technology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Habib, C.; Munoz, P.; Leijtens, X.J.M.; Chen, Lawrence; Smit, M.K.; Capmany, J.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper the designs of optical label swapper devices, for spectral amplitude coded labels, monolithically integrated on InP active/passive technology are pre sented. The devices are based on cross-gain modulation in a semiconductor optical amplifier. Multi-wavelength operation is enabled by

  2. Oocyte activation and phospholipase C zeta (PLCζ: diagnostic and therapeutic implications for assisted reproductive technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramadan Walaa M

    2012-07-01

    fundamental role in the activation of mammalian oocytes, and that genetic, molecular, or biochemical perturbation of this key enzyme is strongly linked to human infertility where oocyte activation is deficient. Consequently, there is significant scope for our understanding of PLCζ to be translated to the ART clinic, both as a novel therapeutic agent with which to rescue oocyte activation deficiency (OAD, or as a prognostic/diagnostic biomarker of oocyte activation ability in target sperm samples.

  3. Optically active vibrational modes of PPV derivatives on textile substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, M.A.T. da; Dias, I.F.L.; Santos, E.P. dos; Martins, A.A.; Duarte, J.L.; Laureto, E.; Reis, G.A. dos; Guimarães, P.S.S.; Cury, L.A.

    2013-01-01

    In this work, MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV films were deposited by spin-coating on “dirty” textile substrates of canvas, nylon, canvas with resin, jeans and on glass and the temperature dependence of the optical properties of them was studied by photoluminescence and Raman (300 K) techniques. The temperature dependence of the energy, of the half line width at half height of the purely electronic peak, of the integrated PL intensity and of the Huang-Rhys factor, S=I (01) /I (00) , were obtained directly from the PL spectrum. For an analysis of the vibrational modes involved, Raman measurements were performed on substrates with and without polymers deposited and the results compared with those found in the literature. The films of MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV showed optical properties similar to those films deposited on other substrates such as glass, metals, etc. It was observed an inversion of the first vibrational band in relation to the purely electronic peak with increasing temperature in the films deposited on nylon and canvas. The vibrational modes obtained by Raman were used to compose the simulation of the PL line shape of BDMO-PPV films on canvas and nylon, using a model proposed by Lin [29]. - Highlights: ► MEH-PPV and BDMO-PPV films were deposited by spin-coating on dirty textile. ► Their properties were studied by photoluminescence and Raman techniques. ► We observed inversion of first vibrational band in relation to purely electronic peak. ► Optically active vibrational modes of PPV derivatives were studied.

  4. Discovery Channel Telescope active optics system early integration and test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venetiou, Alexander J.; Bida, Thomas A.

    2012-09-01

    The Discovery Channel Telescope (DCT) is a 4.3-meter telescope with a thin meniscus primary mirror (M1) and a honeycomb secondary mirror (M2). The optical design is an f/6.1 Ritchey-Chrétien (RC) with an unvignetted 0.5° Field of View (FoV) at the Cassegrain focus. We describe the design, implementation and performance of the DCT active optics system (AOS). The DCT AOS maintains collimation and controls the figure of the mirror to provide seeing-limited images across the focal plane. To minimize observing overhead, rapid settling times are achieved using a combination of feed-forward and low-bandwidth feedback control using a wavefront sensing system. In 2011, we mounted a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor at the prime focus of M1, the Prime Focus Test Assembly (PFTA), to test the AOS with the wavefront sensor, and the feedback loop. The incoming wavefront is decomposed using Zernike polynomials, and the mirror figure is corrected with a set of bending modes. Components of the system that we tested and tuned included the Zernike to Bending Mode transformations. We also started open-loop feed-forward coefficients determination. In early 2012, the PFTA was replaced by M2, and the wavefront sensor moved to its normal location on the Cassegrain instrument assembly. We present early open loop wavefront test results with the full optical system and instrument cube, along with refinements to the overall control loop operating at RC Cassegrain focus.

  5. Changing University Students’ Alternative Conceptions of Optics by Active Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zalkida Hadžibegović

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Active learning is individual and group participation in effective activities such as in-class observing, writing, experimenting, discussion, solving problems, and talking about to-be-learned topics. Some instructors believe that active learning is impossible, or at least extremely difficult to achieve in large lecture sessions. Nevertheless, the truly impressive implementation results of theSCALE-UP learning environment suggest that such beliefs are false (Beichner et al., 2000. In this study, we present a design of an active learning environment with positive effect on students. The design is based on the following elements: (1 helping students to learn from interactive lecture experiment; (2 guiding students to use justified explanation and prediction after observing and exploring a phenomenon; (3 developing a conceptual question sequencedesigned for use in an interactive lecture with students answering questions in worksheets by writing and drawing; (4 evaluating students’ conceptual change and gains by questions related to light reflection, refraction, and image formation in an exam held a week after the active learning session. Data were collected from 95 science freshmen with different secondary school backgrounds. They participated in geometrical optics classes organized for collecting research results during and after only one active learning session.The results have showed that around 60% of the students changed their initial alternative conceptions of vision and of image formation. It was also found that a large group of university students is likely to be engaged in active learning, shifting from a passive role they usually play during teacher’s lectures.

  6. Optical monitoring of Active Galactic Nuclei from ARIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gopal-Krishna; Wiita, Paul Joseph

    2018-04-01

    This overview provides a historical perspective highlighting the pioneering role which the fairly modest observational facilities of ARIES have played since the 1990s in systematically characterizing the optical variability on hour-like time scale (intra-night optical variability, or INOV) of several major types of high-luminosity Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN). Such information was previously available only for blazars. Similar studies have since been initiated in at least a dozen countries, giving a boost to AGN variability research. Our work has, in particular, provided strong indication that mild INOV occurs in radio-quiet QSOs (amplitude up to 3 – 5 % and duty cycle 10%) and, moreover, has demonstrated that similarly mild INOV is exhibited even by the vast majority of radio-loud quasars which possess powerful relativistic jets (even including many that are beamed towards us). The solitary outliers are blazars, the tiny strongly polarized subset of powerful AGN, which frequently exhibit a pronounced INOV. Among the blazars, BL Lac objects often show a bluer-when-brighter chromatic behavior, while the flat spectrum radio quasars seem not to. Quantifying any differences of INOV among the major subclasses of non-blazar type AGNs will require dedicated monitoring programs using 2 - 3 metre class telescopes.

  7. Optical spectral properties of active galactic nuclei and quasars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yee, H.K.C.

    1981-01-01

    Four separate investigations dealing with the properties of optical continuum and emission-lines of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and quasars are presented. Multichannel scans of 3CR radio galaxies are decomposed by using a two-component model-an elliptical galaxy and a power-law nonthermal component. It is found that there is a strong correlation between the luminosity of the power-law component and the strength of the Balmer emission-lines. In most cases, by extrapolating to the Lyman continuum, the power-law models derived provide enough ionizing radiation to account for the Balmer line strengths. Extending the study of radio galaxies to include Seyfert galaxies and quasars, it is found that there is a strong continuity between broad-line AGN's and quasars in terms of similarities in the correlations between line luminosities and nonthermal continuum luminosity. Next, a study of the variability of absolute optical energy distribution and emission-lines of the N-galaxies 3C382 and 3C390.3 is made. Lastly, a preliminary study of surface photometry of Markarian Seyfert galaxies are presented. It is found that the properties of the underlying galaxies such as scale-length and surface brightness of the disk, color, and total brightness, do not depart systematically from those of luminous normal spiral galaxies

  8. Expanding the Therapeutic Spectrum of Artemisinin: Activity Against Infectious Diseases Beyond Malaria and Novel Pharmaceutical Developments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Efferth

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The interest of Western medicine in Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM as a source of drug leads/new drugs to treat diseases without available efficient therapies has been dramatically augmented in the last decades by the extensive work and the outstanding findings achieved within this kind of medicine. The practice of TCM over thousands of years has equipped scientists with substantial experience with hundreds of plants that led to the discovery of artemisinin (qinghaosu, which is extracted from the medicinal plant Artemisia annua L. (qinghao. The unexpected success of artemisinin in combating malaria has drawn strong attention from the scientific community towards TCM. Artemisinin was discovered by Youyou Tu in 1972. Since then, several novel pharmacological activities based on the well-known properties of the sesquiterpene lactone structure with the oxepane ring and an endoperoxide bridge have been unravelled. Beyond malaria, artemisinin and its derivatives (artemisinins exert profound activities towards other protozoans (Leishmania, Trypanosoma, amoebas, Neospora caninum, and Eimeria tenella, trematodes (Schistosoma, liver flukes, and viruses (human cytomegalovirus, hepatitis B and C viruses. Less clear is the effect against bacteria and fungi. Based on the promising results of artemisinin and the first generation derivatives (artesunate, artemether, arteether, novel drug development strategies have been pursued. These included the synthesis of acetal- and non-acetal-type artemisinin dimeric molecules as well as developing nanotechnological approaches, e.g. artemisinin-based liposomes, niosomes, micelles, solid lipid nanocarriers, nanostructured lipid carriers, nanoparticles, fullerenes and nanotubes. The current review presents an overview on different aspects of artemisinins, including sources, chemistry, biological/pharmacological properties, types of infectious pathogens that are susceptible to artemisinins in vitro and in vivo, in

  9. Therapeutic activity of multiple common γ-chain cytokine inhibition in acute and chronic GVHD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hechinger, Anne-Kathrin; Smith, Benjamin A H; Flynn, Ryan; Hanke, Kathrin; McDonald-Hyman, Cameron; Taylor, Patricia A; Pfeifer, Dietmar; Hackanson, Björn; Leonhardt, Franziska; Prinz, Gabriele; Dierbach, Heide; Schmitt-Graeff, Annette; Kovarik, Jiri; Blazar, Bruce R; Zeiser, Robert

    2015-01-15

    The common γ chain (CD132) is a subunit of the interleukin (IL) receptors for IL-2, IL-4, IL-7, IL-9, IL-15, and IL-21. Because levels of several of these cytokines were shown to be increased in the serum of patients developing acute and chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), we reasoned that inhibition of CD132 could have a profound effect on GVHD. We observed that anti-CD132 monoclonal antibody (mAb) reduced acute GVHD potently with respect to survival, production of tumor necrosis factor, interferon-γ, and IL-6, and GVHD histopathology. Anti-CD132 mAb afforded protection from GVHD partly via inhibition of granzyme B production in CD8 T cells, whereas exposure of CD8 T cells to IL-2, IL-7, IL-15, and IL-21 increased granzyme B production. Also, T cells exposed to anti-CD132 mAb displayed a more naive phenotype in microarray-based analyses and showed reduced Janus kinase 3 (JAK3) phosphorylation upon activation. Consistent with a role of JAK3 in GVHD, Jak3(-/-) T cells caused less severe GVHD. Additionally, anti-CD132 mAb treatment of established chronic GVHD reversed liver and lung fibrosis, and pulmonary dysfunction characteristic of bronchiolitis obliterans. We conclude that acute GVHD and chronic GVHD, caused by T cells activated by common γ-chain cytokines, each represent therapeutic targets for anti-CD132 mAb immunomodulation. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  10. Laser metrology and optic active control system for GAIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Angelo, F.; Bonino, L.; Cesare, S.; Castorina, G.; Mottini, S.; Bertinetto, F.; Bisi, M.; Canuto, E.; Musso, F.

    2017-11-01

    The Laser Metrology and Optic Active Control (LM&OAC) program has been carried out under ESA contract with the purpose to design and validate a laser metrology system and an actuation mechanism to monitor and control at microarcsec level the stability of the Basic Angle (angle between the lines of sight of the two telescopes) of GAIA satellite. As part of the program, a breadboard (including some EQM elements) of the laser metrology and control system has been built and submitted to functional, performance and environmental tests. In the followings we describe the mission requirements, the system architecture, the breadboard design, and finally the performed validation tests. Conclusion and appraisals from this experience are also reported.

  11. Reverberation Mapping of Optical Emission Lines in Five Active Galaxies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fausnaugh, M. M.; Denney, K. D.; Peterson, B. M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Pogge, R. W.; Brown, Jonathan S.; Coker, C. T. [Department of Astronomy, The Ohio State University, 140 W. 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43210 (United States); Grier, C. J.; Beatty, Thomas G. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, 525 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bentz, M. C. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA 30303 (United States); Rosa, G. De [Space Telescope Science Institute, 3700 San Martin Drive, Baltimore, MD 21218 (United States); Adams, S. M. [Cahill Center for Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Barth, A. J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, University of California, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Bhattacharjee, A.; Brotherton, M. S. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, 1000 E. University Avenue, Laramie, WY (United States); Borman, G. A. [Crimean Astrophysical Observatory, P/O Nauchny, Crimea 298409 (Russian Federation); Boroson, T. A. [Las Cumbres Global Telescope Network, 6740 Cortona Drive, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93117 (United States); Bottorff, M. C. [Fountainwood Observatory, Department of Physics FJS 149, Southwestern University, 1011 E. University Avenue, Georgetown, TX 78626 (United States); Brown, Jacob E. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia (United States); Crawford, S. M. [South African Astronomical Observatory, P.O. Box 9, Observatory 7935, Cape Town (South Africa); and others

    2017-05-10

    We present the first results from an optical reverberation mapping campaign executed in 2014 targeting the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) MCG+08-11-011, NGC 2617, NGC 4051, 3C 382, and Mrk 374. Our targets have diverse and interesting observational properties, including a “changing look” AGN and a broad-line radio galaxy. Based on continuum-H β lags, we measure black hole masses for all five targets. We also obtain H γ and He ii λ 4686 lags for all objects except 3C 382. The He ii λ 4686 lags indicate radial stratification of the BLR, and the masses derived from different emission lines are in general agreement. The relative responsivities of these lines are also in qualitative agreement with photoionization models. These spectra have extremely high signal-to-noise ratios (100–300 per pixel) and there are excellent prospects for obtaining velocity-resolved reverberation signatures.

  12. Laser Polarimeter for Measurement of Optical Activity of Biological Objects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Protasov, E. A.; Protasov, D. E.; Ryzhkova, A. V.

    In this paper has been described the polarimetric device for measurement of optical activity of biological tissues, where the source of radiation is an infrared laser with a wave λ=0.808 micron. The polarizers used are polarizing prisms of Glan - Taylor. To obtain required angular resolution (0.180/cm) has been developed a device that converts the angle of rotation of the analyzer into electrical signal, which is fed to the appropriate scan digital oscilloscope. The passage of the polarized light through the fingers of the hand was established and the angles of rotation of the polarization vector of the transmitted radiation were measured, the values of which may be determined by the content of hemoglobin in the blood.

  13. Reverberation Mapping of Optical Emission Lines in Five Active Galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fausnaugh, M. M.; Denney, K. D.; Peterson, B. M.; Kochanek, C. S.; Pogge, R. W.; Brown, Jonathan S.; Coker, C. T.; Grier, C. J.; Beatty, Thomas G.; Bentz, M. C.; Rosa, G. De; Adams, S. M.; Barth, A. J.; Bhattacharjee, A.; Brotherton, M. S.; Borman, G. A.; Boroson, T. A.; Bottorff, M. C.; Brown, Jacob E.; Crawford, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    We present the first results from an optical reverberation mapping campaign executed in 2014 targeting the active galactic nuclei (AGNs) MCG+08-11-011, NGC 2617, NGC 4051, 3C 382, and Mrk 374. Our targets have diverse and interesting observational properties, including a “changing look” AGN and a broad-line radio galaxy. Based on continuum-H β lags, we measure black hole masses for all five targets. We also obtain H γ and He ii λ 4686 lags for all objects except 3C 382. The He ii λ 4686 lags indicate radial stratification of the BLR, and the masses derived from different emission lines are in general agreement. The relative responsivities of these lines are also in qualitative agreement with photoionization models. These spectra have extremely high signal-to-noise ratios (100–300 per pixel) and there are excellent prospects for obtaining velocity-resolved reverberation signatures.

  14. Contamination control research activities for space optics in JAXA RANDD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimoto, Y.

    2017-11-01

    Contamination control research activities for space optics projects in JAXA R&D are described. More accurate contamination control techniques are requested because of intensified recent science mission requirements. One approach to control the contamination effects is analysis by software. JAXA has been developing a contamination analytical tool "J-SPICE" (Japanese Spacecraft Induced Contamination analysis software) as well as experiment facilities to improve the J-SPICE. A reflection model in J-SPICE has been experimentally verified and outgassing model data has been acquired by a facility. JAXA has developed a facility which could determine the influence of the contamination at a specific wavelength by combining a vacuum chamber with an I-R spectrometer and performed an experiment to inspect the effect of baking. Space material exposure experiment results reveal the actual thickness of the contamination layer in ISS orbit.

  15. Active fiber optic technologies used as tamper-indicating devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horton, P.R.V.; Waddoups, I.G.

    1995-11-01

    The Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Safeguards and Seals Evaluation Program is evaluating new fiber optic active seal technologies for use at Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The goal of the program is to investigate active seal technologies that can monitor secured containers storing special nuclear materials (SNM) within DOE vaults. Specifically investigated were active seal technologies that can be used as tamper-indicating devices to monitor secured containers within vaults while personnel remain outside the vault area. Such a system would allow minimal access into vaults while ensuring container content accountability. The purpose of this report is to discuss tamper-indicating devices that were evaluated for possible DOE use. While previous seal evaluations (Phase I and II) considered overall facility applications, this discussion focuses specifically on their use in vault storage situations. The report will highlight general background information, specifications and requirements, and test procedures. Also discussed are the systems available from four manufacturers: Interactive Technologies, Inc., Fiber SenSys, Inc., Inovonics, Inc., and Valve Security Systems

  16. Rapid optical determination of β-lactamase and antibiotic activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The absence of rapid tests evaluating antibiotic susceptibility results in the empirical prescription of antibiotics. This can lead to treatment failures due to escalating antibiotic resistance, and also furthers the emergence of drug-resistant bacteria. This study reports a rapid optical method to detect β-lactamase and thereby assess activity of β-lactam antibiotics, which could provide an approach for targeted prescription of antibiotics. The methodology is centred on a fluorescence quenching based probe (β-LEAF – β-Lactamase Enzyme Activated Fluorophore) that mimics the structure of β-lactam antibiotics. Results The β-LEAF assay was performed for rapid determination of β-lactamase production and activity of β-lactam antibiotic (cefazolin) on a panel of Staphylococcus aureus ATCC strains and clinical isolates. Four of the clinical isolates were determined to be lactamase producers, with the capacity to inactivate cefazolin, out of the twenty-five isolates tested. These results were compared against gold standard methods, nitrocefin disk test for β-lactamase detection and disk diffusion for antibiotic susceptibility, showing results to be largely consistent. Furthermore, in the sub-set of β-lactamase producers, it was demonstrated and validated that multiple antibiotics (cefazolin, cefoxitin, cefepime) could be assessed simultaneously to predict the antibiotic that would be most active for a given bacterial isolate. Conclusions The study establishes the rapid β-LEAF assay for β-lactamase detection and prediction of antibiotic activity using S. aureus clinical isolates. Although the focus in the current study is β-lactamase-based resistance, the overall approach represents a broad diagnostic platform. In the long-term, these studies form the basis for the development of assays utilizing a broader variety of targets, pathogens and drugs. PMID:24708478

  17. AMP-activated protein kinase at the nexus of therapeutic skeletal muscle plasticity in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ljubicic, Vladimir; Jasmin, Bernard J

    2013-10-01

    Recent studies have highlighted the potential of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) to act as a central therapeutic target in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Here, we review the role of AMPK as an important integrator of cell signaling pathways that mediate phenotypic plasticity within the context of dystrophic skeletal muscle. Pharmacological AMPK activation remodels skeletal muscle towards a slower, more oxidative phenotype, which is more pathologically resistant to the lack of dystrophin. Moreover, recent studies suggest that AMPK-activated autophagy may be beneficial for myofiber structure and function in mice with muscular dystrophy. Thus, AMPK may represent an ideal target for intervention because clinically approved pharmacological agonists exist, and because benefits can be derived via two independent yet, complementary biological pathways. The availability of several AMPK activators could therefore lead to the rapid development and implementation of novel and highly effective therapeutics aimed at altering the relentless progression of DMD. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Systematically Altering Bacterial SOS Activity under Stress Reveals Therapeutic Strategies for Potentiating Antibiotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mo, Charlie Y; Manning, Sara A; Roggiani, Manuela; Culyba, Matthew J; Samuels, Amanda N; Sniegowski, Paul D; Goulian, Mark; Kohli, Rahul M

    2016-01-01

    The bacterial SOS response is a DNA damage repair network that is strongly implicated in both survival and acquired drug resistance under antimicrobial stress. The two SOS regulators, LexA and RecA, have therefore emerged as potential targets for adjuvant therapies aimed at combating resistance, although many open questions remain. For example, it is not well understood whether SOS hyperactivation is a viable therapeutic approach or whether LexA or RecA is a better target. Furthermore, it is important to determine which antimicrobials could serve as the best treatment partners with SOS-targeting adjuvants. Here we derived Escherichia coli strains that have mutations in either lexA or recA genes in order to cover the full spectrum of possible SOS activity levels. We then systematically analyzed a wide range of antimicrobials by comparing the mean inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and induced mutation rates for each drug-strain combination. We first show that significant changes in MICs are largely confined to DNA-damaging antibiotics, with strains containing a constitutively repressed SOS response impacted to a greater extent than hyperactivated strains. Second, antibiotic-induced mutation rates were suppressed when SOS activity was reduced, and this trend was observed across a wider spectrum of antibiotics. Finally, perturbing either LexA or RecA proved to be equally viable strategies for targeting the SOS response. Our work provides support for multiple adjuvant strategies, while also suggesting that the combination of an SOS inhibitor with a DNA-damaging antibiotic could offer the best potential for lowering MICs and decreasing acquired drug resistance. IMPORTANCE Our antibiotic arsenal is becoming depleted, in part, because bacteria have the ability to rapidly adapt and acquire resistance to our best agents. The SOS pathway, a widely conserved DNA damage stress response in bacteria, is activated by many antibiotics and has been shown to play central role in

  19. Evaluation of Fibroblast Activation Protein-Alpha (FAP) as a Diagnostic Marker and Therapeutic Target in Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    low molecular weight recombinant human gelatin: development of a substitute for animal- derived gelatin with superior features, Protein Expr. Purif...by the honey - bee , could be modified to a form that was no longer hydro- lyzed by the native activator protease DPP4 but, instead, was hydrolyzed by...TITLE: Evaluation of Fibroblast Activation Protein -Alpha (FAP) as a Diagnostic Marker and Therapeutic Target in Prostate Cancer PRINCIPAL

  20. Polarization ray tracing in anisotropic optically active media. II. Theory and physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McClain, S.C.; Hillman, L.W.; Chipman, R.A.

    1993-01-01

    Refraction, reflection, and amplitude relations are derived that apply to polarization ray tracing in anisotropic, optically active media such as quartz. The constitutive relations for quartz are discussed. The refractive indices and polarization states associated with the two modes of propagation are derived as a function of wave direction. A procedure for refracting at any uniaxial or optically active interface is derived that computes both the ray direction and the wave direction. A method for computing the optical path length is given, and Fresnel transmission and ref lection equations are derived from boundary conditions on the electromagnetic fields. These ray-tracing formulas apply to uniaxial, optically active media and therefore encompass uniaxial, non-optically active materials and isotropic, optically active materials

  1. Macromolecular therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiyuan; Kopeček, Jindřich

    2014-09-28

    This review covers water-soluble polymer-drug conjugates and macromolecules that possess biological activity without attached low molecular weight drugs. The main design principles of traditional and backbone degradable polymer-drug conjugates as well as the development of a new paradigm in nanomedicines - (low molecular weight) drug-free macromolecular therapeutics are discussed. To address the biological features of cancer, macromolecular therapeutics directed to stem/progenitor cells and the tumor microenvironment are deliberated. Finally, the future perspectives of the field are briefly debated. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Mathieu, Jean Paul

    1975-01-01

    Optics, Parts 1 and 2 covers electromagnetic optics and quantum optics. The first part of the book examines the various of the important properties common to all electromagnetic radiation. This part also studies electromagnetic waves; electromagnetic optics of transparent isotropic and anisotropic media; diffraction; and two-wave and multi-wave interference. The polarization states of light, the velocity of light, and the special theory of relativity are also examined in this part. The second part is devoted to quantum optics, specifically discussing the classical molecular theory of optical p

  3. Assessment of refractive astigmatism and simulated therapeutic refractive surgery strategies in coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Wen; Stojanovic, Aleksandar; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study is to raise the awareness of the influence of coma-like higher-order aberrations (HOAs) on power and orientation of refractive astigmatism (RA) and to explore how to account for that influence in the planning of topography-guided refractive surgery in eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics. Eleven eyes with coma-like-aberrations-dominant corneal optics and with low lenticular astigmatism (LA) were selected for astigmatism analysis and for treatment simulations with topography-guided custom ablation. Vector analysis was used to evaluate the contribution of coma-like corneal HOAs to RA. Two different strategies were used for simulated treatments aiming to regularize irregular corneal optics: With both strategies correction of anterior corneal surface irregularities (corneal HOAs) were intended. Correction of total corneal astigmatism (TCA) and RA was intended as well with strategies 1 and 2, respectively. Axis of discrepant astigmatism (RA minus TCA minus LA) correlated strongly with axis of coma. Vertical coma influenced RA by canceling the effect of the with-the-rule astigmatism and increasing the effect of the against-the-rule astigmatism. After simulated correction of anterior corneal HOAs along with TCA and RA (strategies 1 and 2), only a small amount of anterior corneal astigmatism (ACA) and no TCA remained after strategy 1, while considerable amount of ACA and TCA remained after strategy 2. Coma-like corneal aberrations seem to contribute a considerable astigmatic component to RA in eyes with coma-like-aberrations dominant corneal optics. If topography-guided ablation is programmed to correct the corneal HOAs and RA, the astigmatic component caused by the coma-like corneal HOAs will be treated twice and will result in induced astigmatism. Disregarding RA and treating TCA along with the corneal HOAs is recommended instead.

  4. Adenosine can thwart antitumor immune responses elicited by radiotherapy. Therapeutic strategies alleviating protumor ADO activities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaupel, Peter [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Multhoff, Gabriele [Klinikum rechts der Isar, Technische Universitaet Muenchen (TUM), Department of Radiation Oncology, Munich (Germany); Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, Institute for innovative Radiotherapy (iRT), Experimental Immune Biology, Neuherberg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    By studying the bioenergetic status we could show that the development of tumor hypoxia is accompanied, apart from myriad other biologically relevant effects, by a substantial accumulation of adenosine (ADO). ADO has been shown to act as a strong immunosuppressive agent in tumors by modulating the innate and adaptive immune system. In contrast to ADO, standard radiotherapy (RT) can either stimulate or abrogate antitumor immune responses. Herein, we present ADO-mediated mechanisms that may thwart antitumor immune responses elicited by RT. An overview of the generation, accumulation, and ADO-related multifaceted inhibition of immune functions, contrasted with the antitumor immune effects of RT, is provided. Upon hypoxic stress, cancer cells release ATP into the extracellular space where nucleotides are converted into ADO by hypoxia-sensitive, membrane-bound ectoenzymes (CD39/CD73). ADO actions are mediated upon binding to surface receptors, mainly A2A receptors on tumor and immune cells. Receptor activation leads to a broad spectrum of strong immunosuppressive properties facilitating tumor escape from immune control. Mechanisms include (1) impaired activity of CD4 + T and CD8 + T, NK cells and dendritic cells (DC), decreased production of immuno-stimulatory lymphokines, and (2) activation of Treg cells, expansion of MDSCs, promotion of M2 macrophages, and increased activity of major immunosuppressive cytokines. In addition, ADO can directly stimulate tumor proliferation and angiogenesis. ADO mechanisms described can thwart antitumor immune responses elicited by RT. Therapeutic strategies alleviating tumor-promoting activities of ADO include respiratory hyperoxia or mild hyperthermia, inhibition of CD39/CD73 ectoenzymes or blockade of A2A receptors, and inhibition of ATP-release channels or ADO transporters. (orig.) [German] Untersuchungen des bioenergetischen Status ergaben, dass Tumorhypoxie neben vielen anderen bedeutsamen biologischen Effekten zu einem starken

  5. Curcumin as therapeutics for the treatment of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by activating SIRT1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, An; Huang, Jing-Juan; Li, Rui-Lin; Lu, Zhao-Yang; Duan, Jun-Li; Xu, Wei-Hua; Chen, Xiao-Ping; Fan, Jing-Ping

    2015-01-01

    SIRT1 is one of seven mammalian homologs of Sir2 that catalyzes NAD+-dependent protein deacetylation. The aim of the present study is to explore the effect of SIRT1 small molecule activator on the anticancer activity and the underlying mechanism. We examined the anticancer activity of a novel oral agent, curcumin, which is the principal active ingredient of the traditional Chinese herb Curcuma Longa. Treatment of FaDu and Cal27 cells with curcumin inhibited growth and induced apoptosis. Mechanistic studies showed that anticancer activity of curcumin is associated with decrease in migration of HNSCC and associated angiogenesis through activating of intrinsic apoptotic pathway (caspase-9) and extrinsic apoptotic pathway (caspase-8). Our data demonstrating that anticancer activity of curcumin is linked to the activation of the ATM/CHK2 pathway and the inhibition of nuclear factor-κB. Finally, increasing SIRT1 through small molecule activator curcumin has shown beneficial effects in xenograft mouse model, indicating that SIRT1 may represent an attractive therapeutic target. Our studies provide the preclinical rationale for novel therapeutics targeting SIRT1 in HNSCC. PMID:26299580

  6. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Ninth Edition Optics: Ninth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommen

  7. Optical Breath Gas Sensor for Extravehicular Activity Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Vakhtin, Andrei B.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Chullen, Cinda; Falconi, Eric A.; McMillin, Summer

    2013-01-01

    The function of the infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity in the current space suit is to measure and report the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. The next generation portable life support system (PLSS) requires next generation CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use on the Space Shuttle/International Space Station extravehicular mobility unit (EMU). Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. A laser diode spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy is being developed for this purpose by Vista Photonics, Inc. Two prototype devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in September 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode-based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement and a separate oxygen channel using a vertical cavity surface emitting laser. Both prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array/microcontroller architecture. The present development extends and upgrades the earlier hardware to the Advanced PLSS 2.0 test article being constructed and tested at JSC. Various improvements to the electronics and gas sampling are being advanced by this project. The combination of low power electronics with the performance of a long wavelength laser spectrometer enables multi-gas sensors with significantly increased performance over that presently offered in the EMU.

  8. Oleanolic Acid and Its Derivatives: Biological Activities and Therapeutic Potential in Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo Betty Ayeleso

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The increasing demand for natural products as an alternative therapy for chronic diseases has encouraged research into the pharmacological importance of bioactive compounds from plants. Recently, there has been a surge of interest in the therapeutic potential of oleanolic acid (OA in the prevention and management of chronic diseases. Oleanolic acid is a pentacyclic triterpenoid widely found in plants, including fruits and vegetables with different techniques and chromatography platforms being employed in its extraction and isolation. Several studies have demonstrated the potential therapeutic effects of OA on different diseases and their symptoms. Furthermore, oleanolic acid also serves as a framework for the development of novel semi-synthetic triterpenoids that could prove vital in finding therapeutic modalities for various ailments. There are recent advances in the design and synthesis of chemical derivatives of OA to enhance its solubility, bioavailability and potency. Some of these derivatives have also been therapeutic candidates in a number of clinical trials. This review consolidates and expands on recent reports on the biological effects of oleanolic acid from different plant sources and its synthetic derivatives as well as their mechanisms of action in in vitro and in vivo study models. This review suggests that oleanolic acid and its derivatives are important candidates in the search for alternative therapy in the treatment and management of chronic diseases.

  9. SU-F-T-174: Patient-Specific Point Dose Measurement Using Fiber Optic Radiation Sensor Using Cerenkov Radiation for Proton Therapeutic Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, J [Korea University, Seoul, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of); Kim, M [Dongnam Institute of Radiological & Medical Sciences, Busan, Busan (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, M [Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Shin, D [National Cancer Center, Goyang-si (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: A fiber-optic radiation sensor using Cerenkov radiation (FOCR) has been widely studied for use as a dosimeter for proton therapeutic beam. We developed the FOCR, and it applied to patient-specific point dose measurement in order to evaluate the effectiveness of the FOCR system for proton therapy QA. Methods: Calibration of FOCR was performed with an ionization chamber whose absolute doses were determined according to the IAEA TRS-398 protocol. To determine the calibration curve, the FOCR was irradiated perpendicularly to the proton beam at the 13 dose levels steps. We selected five actual patient treatment plans performed at proton therapy center and compared the resulting FOCR measurements with the ionization chamber measurements. Results: The Cerenkov light yield of the FOCR increases linearly with as the dose measured using the ionization chamber increases from 0 cGy to 500 cGy. The results indicate that the fitting curve is linear, suggesting that dose measurement based on the light yield of the FOCR is possible. The results of proton radiation dose QA performed using the FOCR for 10 proton fields and five patients are good agreement with an ionization chamber. Conclusion: We carried out the patient QA using the FOCR for proton therapeutic beam and evaluated the effectiveness of the FOCR as a proton therapy QA tool. Our results indicate that the FOCR is suitable for use in patient QA of clinical proton beams.

  10. The fiber-optic imaging and manipulation of neural activity during animal behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Daisuke; Murayama, Masanori

    2016-02-01

    Recent progress with optogenetic probes for imaging and manipulating neural activity has further increased the relevance of fiber-optic systems for neural circuitry research. Optical fibers, which bi-directionally transmit light between separate sites (even at a distance of several meters), can be used for either optical imaging or manipulating neural activity relevant to behavioral circuitry mechanisms. The method's flexibility and the specifications of the light structure are well suited for following the behavior of freely moving animals. Furthermore, thin optical fibers allow researchers to monitor neural activity from not only the cortical surface but also deep brain regions, including the hippocampus and amygdala. Such regions are difficult to target with two-photon microscopes. Optogenetic manipulation of neural activity with an optical fiber has the advantage of being selective for both cell-types and projections as compared to conventional electrophysiological brain tissue stimulation. It is difficult to extract any data regarding changes in neural activity solely from a fiber-optic manipulation device; however, the readout of data is made possible by combining manipulation with electrophysiological recording, or the simultaneous application of optical imaging and manipulation using a bundle-fiber. The present review introduces recent progress in fiber-optic imaging and manipulation methods, while also discussing fiber-optic system designs that are suitable for a given experimental protocol. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. p38 Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK): A New Therapeutic Target for Reducing the Risk of Adverse Pregnancy Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Ramkumar; Papaconstantinou, John

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Spontaneous preterm birth (PTB) and preterm premature rupture of the membranes (pPROM) remain as a major clinical and therapeutic problem for intervention and management. Current strategies, based on our knowledge of pathways of preterm labor, have only been effective, in part, due to major gaps in our existing knowledge of risks and risk specific pathways. Areas covered Recent literature has identified physiologic aging of fetal tissues as a potential mechanistic feature of normal parturition. This process is affected by telomere dependent and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) induced senescence activation. Pregnancy associated risk factors can cause pathologic activation of this pathway that can cause oxidative stress induced p38 MAPK activation leading to senescence and premature aging of fetal tissues. Premature aging is associated with sterile inflammation capable of triggering preterm labor or preterm premature rupture of membranes. Preterm activation of p38MAPK can be considered as a key contributor to adverse pregnancies. Expert Opinion This review considers p38MAPK activation as a potential target for therapeutic interventions to prevent adverse pregnancy outcomes mediated by stress factors. In this review, we propose multiple strategies to prevent p38MAPK activation and its functional effects. PMID:27459026

  12. Optics

    CERN Document Server

    Fincham, W H A

    2013-01-01

    Optics: Eighth Edition covers the work necessary for the specialization in such subjects as ophthalmic optics, optical instruments and lens design. The text includes topics such as the propagation and behavior of light; reflection and refraction - their laws and how different media affect them; lenses - thick and thin, cylindrical and subcylindrical; photometry; dispersion and color; interference; and polarization. Also included are topics such as diffraction and holography; the limitation of beams in optical systems and its effects; and lens systems. The book is recommended for engineering st

  13. Evaluation of the healing activity of therapeutic clay in rat skin wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dário, Giordana Maciel; da Silva, Geovana Gomes; Gonçalves, Davi Ludvig; Silveira, Paulo; Junior, Adilson Teixeira; Angioletto, Elidio; Bernardin, Adriano Michael

    2014-10-01

    The use of clays for therapeutic practice is widespread in almost all regions of the world. In this study the physicochemical and microbiological healing characteristics of a clay from Ocara, Brazil, popularly used for therapeutic uses, were analyzed. The presence of Ca, Mg, Al, Fe, and Si was observed, which initially indicated that the clay had potential for therapeutic use. The average particle size of the clay (26.3 μm) can induce the microcirculation of the skin and the XRD analysis shows that the clay is formed by kaolinite and illite, a swelling clay. During the microbiological evaluation there was the need to sterilize the clay for later incorporation into the pharmaceutical formula. The accelerated stability test at 50°C for 3 months has showed that the pharmaceutical formula remained stable with a shelf life of two years. After the stability test the wound-healing capacity of the formulation in rats was evaluated. It was observed that the treatment made with the formulation containing the Ocara clay showed the best results since the formula allowed greater formation of collagen fibers and consequent regeneration of the deep dermis after seven days of treatment and reepithelialization and continuous formation of granulation tissue at the 14th day. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Optical Counterparts of Undetermined Type γ-Ray Active Galactic

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-09-30

    Sep 30, 2015 ... of this optical spectroscopic analysis is to identify the AGN class for the source asso- .... absorption lines of an old stellar population, typical of ellipticals. .... AGNs is a fundamental science case for instruments designed to ...

  15. Active composite waveguides with a suppressed competition of optical modes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vysotskii, D V; Elkin, N N; Napartovich, A P

    2008-01-01

    The possibilities of separating the fundamental optical mode in composite waveguides by selecting the structure of amplifying regions are analysed. Conditions are presented under which the fundamental mode preserves the highest gain at any saturation. (letters)

  16. Accurate measurement of the optical activity of alanine crystals and the determination of their absolute chirality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Terasawa, Yukana; Tanaka, Masahito; Asahi, Toru

    2017-05-01

    Wavelength dependence measurements of the chiroptical properties in alanine crystals have so far been unsuccessful using conventional spectroscopic techniques. We describe our attempts to measure the wavelength dependence of the optical activity in L- and D-alanine crystals along each crystallographic axis, and to determine the absolute chirality of alanine crystals by correlating the absolute structure to the optical activity using an x-ray diffractometer and a generalized high accuracy universal polarimeter. We have succeeded in accurately measuring the optical rotatory dispersion in the direction, which shows that the optical rotation of the D-alanine crystal is dextrorotatory and that of the L-alanine crystal is laevorotatory, thereby determining the absolute chirality. Furthermore, comparison with the optical activity in solution shows that the optical activity in alanine crystals is different not only in value, but also in the sign. These results have led us to conclude that the optical rotatory power in the crystalline state should not be simply the summation of molecular optical rotatory power values. We propose the necessity of a theory, which contains the contribution of molecular interactions within the crystal, in order to calculate the optical rotatory power of the crystalline state.

  17. Targeting activator protein 1 signaling pathway by bioactive natural agents: Possible therapeutic strategy for cancer prevention and intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tewari, Devesh; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Sureda, Antoni; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Atanasov, Atanas G; Vacca, Rosa Anna; Sethi, Gautam; Bishayee, Anupam

    2018-02-01

    Activator protein 1 (AP-1) is a key transcription factor in the control of several cellular processes responsible for cell survival proliferation and differentiation. Dysfunctional AP-1 expression and activity are involved in several severe diseases, especially inflammatory disorders and cancer. Therefore, targeting AP-1 has recently emerged as an attractive therapeutic strategy for cancer prevention and therapy. This review summarizes our current understanding of AP-1 biology and function as well as explores and discusses several natural bioactive compounds modulating AP-1-associated signaling pathways for cancer prevention and intervention. Current limitations, challenges, and future directions of research are also critically discussed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. [Clinical presentation, therapeutic approach and outcomes in acute poisoning treated with activated charcoal. Are there differences between men and women?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amigó-Tadín, Montserrat; Nogué-Xarau, Santiago; Miró-Andreu, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    To determine whether there are gender-based differences in the clinical presentation, therapeutic approaches and outcomes in acute poisoning treated with activated charcoal. A descriptive study conducted in the Emergency Department of the Hospital Clínic de Barcelona over the 7 years between the years 2001 and 2008. The study included poisoned patients who had received activated charcoal. The variables included, epidemiological data, clinical and toxicological presentation, therapeutic approach, time in emergency department and outcomes. A total of 575 patients were included in the study. The mean age was 37.8 (SD 14.8) years and 65.7% were females. No differences were observed between males and females with respect to age, number of drugs involved in the poisoning or the number of tablets ingested, but a higher prevalence of benzodiazepine poisoning was observed in females compared to males (69.8 vs. 61.2%; Ppoisoning was more common in males than in females (32.4 vs.18.8%; Ppoisoning was also more common in males than in females (7.9 vs. 3.2%; Ppoisonings, delays in care, hours of emergency department stay, treatment or outcome. Benzodiazepine poisoning was more prevalent in females than in males. Non-drug poisonings and alcohol combined with drug ingestion were more common in males. The clinical outcomes of the poisonings, delays in care, therapeutic requirements and admissions were similar between genders. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  19. Nicotinic Acid-Mediated Activation of Both Membrane and Nuclear Receptors towards Therapeutic Glucocorticoid Mimetics for Treating Multiple Sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Todd Penberthy

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute attacks of multiple sclerosis (MS are most commonly treated with glucocorticoids, which can provide life-saving albeit only temporary symptomatic relief. The mechanism of action (MOA is now known to involve induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO and interleukin-10 (IL-10, where IL-10 requires subsequent heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX-1 induction. Ectopic expression studies reveal that even small changes in expression of IDO, HMOX-1, or mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2 can prevent demyelination in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE animal models of MS. An alternative to glucocorticoids is needed for a long-term treatment of MS. A distinctly short list of endogenous activators of both membrane G-protein-coupled receptors and nuclear peroxisome proliferating antigen receptors (PPARs demonstrably ameliorate EAE pathogenesis by MOAs resembling that of glucocorticoids. These dual activators and potential MS therapeutics include endocannabinoids and the prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2. Nicotinamide profoundly ameliorates and prevents autoimmune-mediated demyelination in EAE via maintaining levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD, without activating PPAR nor any G-protein-coupled receptor. By comparison, nicotinic acid provides even greater levels of NAD than nicotinamide in many tissues, while additionally activating the PPAR-dependent pathway already shown to provide relief in animal models of MS after activation of GPR109a/HM74a. Thus nicotinic acid is uniquely suited for providing therapeutic relief in MS. However nicotinic acid is unexamined in MS research. Nicotinic acid penetrates the blood brain barrier, cures pellagric dementia, has been used for over 50 years clinically without toxicity, and raises HDL concentrations to a greater degree than any pharmaceutical, thus providing unparalleled benefits against lipodystrophy. Summary analysis reveals that the expected therapeutic benefits of high-dose nicotinic

  20. MMP-10 Is Overexpressed, Proteolytically Active, and a Potential Target for Therapeutic Intervention in Human Lung Carcinomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason H. Gill

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP-mediated degradation of the extracellular matrix is a major factor for tumor development and expansion. This study analysed MMP-10 protein expression and activity in human lung tumors of various grade, stage, and type to address the relationship between MMP-10 and tumor characteristics and to evaluate MMP-10 as a therapeutic target in non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC. Unlike the majority of MMPs, MMP-10 was located in the tumor mass as opposed to tumor stroma. MMP-10 protein was observed at low levels in normal human lung tissues and at significantly higher levels in all types of NSCLC. No correlation was observed between MMP-10 protein expression and tumor type, stage, or lymph node invasion. To discriminate between active and inactive forms of MMP-10 in samples of human NSCLC, we have developed an ex vivo fluorescent assay. Measurable MMP-10 activity was detected in 42 of 50 specimens of lung cancer and only 2 of 10 specimens of histologically normal lung tissue. No relationship was observed between MMP-10 activity levels and clinicopathologic characteristics. Our results suggest that MMP-10 is expressed and active at high levels in human NSCLC compared to normal lung tissues, and, as such, is a potential target for the development of novel therapeutics for lung cancer treatment.

  1. Optical rectification, circular photogalvanic effect, and five-wave mixing in optically active liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koroteev, Nikolai I.

    1996-05-01

    A phenomenological analysis is carried out of novel nonlinear optical processes taking place in macroscopically noncentrosymmetric isotropic solutions of chiral (lift-ring mirror asymmetric) macromolecules, which are the primary elements of living organisms and their metabolic products. Among the most interesting and potentially useful for spectroscopic purposes are: optical rectification/photogalvanic effects consisting in electrostatic field/direct electrical current generation in such liquids under irradiation with the intense circularly polarized laser beam and the five-wave mixing phase-matched process of BioCARS to selectively record, background-free, vibrational spectra of chiral molecules.

  2. Circumventing Therapeutic Resistance and the Emergence of Disseminated Breast Cancer Cells Through Non-Invasive Optical Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    Investigator (1992-1994); National Science Foundation Young Investigator (1993-1998); E. I. DuPont de Nemours Young Faculty Award (1995-1997); Alfred P. Sloan...address of the Funding Agency’s Procuring Contracting/Grants Officer: Amber Stilh·ich U.S . Almy Medical Resem·ch Acquisition Activity, 820 Chandler

  3. Functionalized bioengineered spider silk spheres improve nuclease resistance and activity of oligonucleotide therapeutics providing a strategy for cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowska, Anna Karolina; Florczak, Anna; Smialek, Maciej; Dondajewska, Ewelina; Mackiewicz, Andrzej; Kortylewski, Marcin; Dams-Kozlowska, Hanna

    2017-09-01

    Cell-selective delivery and sensitivity to serum nucleases remain major hurdles to the clinical application of RNA-based oligonucleotide therapeutics, such as siRNA. Spider silk shows great potential as a biomaterial due to its biocompatibility and biodegradability. Self-assembling properties of silk proteins allow for processing into several different morphologies such as fibers, scaffolds, films, hydrogels, capsules and spheres. Moreover, bioengineering of spider silk protein sequences can functionalize silk by adding peptide moieties with specific features including binding or cell recognition domains. We demonstrated that modification of silk protein by adding the nucleic acid binding domain enabled the development of a novel oligonucleotide delivery system that can be utilized to improve pharmacokinetics of RNA-based therapeutics, such as CpG-siRNA. The MS2 bioengineered silk was functionalized with poly-lysine domain (KN) to generate hybrid silk MS2KN. CpG-siRNA efficiently bound to MS2KN in contrary to control MS2. Both MS2KN complexes and spheres protected CpG-siRNA from degradation by serum nucleases. CpG-siRNA molecules encapsulated into MS2KN spheres were efficiently internalized and processed by TLR9-positive macrophages. Importantly, CpG-STAT3siRNA loaded in silk spheres showed delayed and extended target gene silencing compared to naked oligonucleotides. The prolonged Stat3 silencing resulted in the more pronounced downregulation of interleukin 6 (IL-6), a proinflammatory cytokine and upstream activator of STAT3, which limits the efficacy of TLR9 immunostimulation. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of using spider silk spheres as a carrier of therapeutic nucleic acids. Moreover, the modified kinetic and activity of the CpG-STAT3siRNA embedded into silk spheres is likely to improve immunotherapeutic effects in vivo. We demonstrated that modification of silk protein by adding the nucleic acid binding domain enabled the development of a novel

  4. Therapeutic activity of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based probiotic and inactivated whole yeast on vaginal candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pericolini, Eva; Gabrielli, Elena; Ballet, Nathalie; Sabbatini, Samuele; Roselletti, Elena; Cayzeele Decherf, Amélie; Pélerin, Fanny; Luciano, Eugenio; Perito, Stefano; Jüsten, Peter; Vecchiarelli, Anna

    2017-01-02

    Vulvovaginal candidiasis is the most prevalent vaginal infection worldwide and Candida albicans is its major agent. Vulvovaginal candidiasis is characterized by disruption of the vaginal microbiota composition, as happens following large spectrum antibiotic usage. Recent studies support the effectiveness of oral and local probiotic treatment for prevention of recurrent vulvovaginal candidiasis. Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a safe yeast used as, or for, the production of ingredients for human nutrition and health. Here, we demonstrate that vaginal administration of probiotic Saccharomyces cerevisiae live yeast (GI) and, in part, inactivated whole yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (IY), used as post-challenge therapeutics, was able to positively influence the course of vaginal candidiasis by accelerating the clearance of the fungus. This effect was likely due to multiple interactions of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with Candida albicans. Both live and inactivated yeasts induced coaggregation of Candida and consequently inhibited its adherence to epithelial cells. However, only the probiotic yeast was able to suppress some major virulence factors of Candida albicans such as the ability to switch from yeast to mycelial form and the capacity to express several aspartyl proteases. The effectiveness of live yeast was higher than that of inactivated whole yeast suggesting that the synergy between mechanical effects and biological effects were dominant over purely mechanical effects. The protection of epithelial cells to Candida-induced damage was also observed. Overall, our data show for the first time that Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based ingredients, particularly the living cells, can exert beneficial therapeutic effects on a widespread vaginal mucosal infection.

  5. Optical gain of LaF3:Nd nanoparticle doped polymers for active integrated optical devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stouwdam, J.W.; Klunder, D.J.W.; Borreman, A.; Diemeer, Mart; Worhoff, Kerstin; Driessen, A.; de Ridder, R.M.; de Ridder, R.M; Altena, G; Altena, G.; Geuzebroek, D.H.; Dekker, R; Dekker, R.

    2003-01-01

    We report on rare earth doped LaF3 nanoparticles dispersed in PMMA and SU-8 photosensitive polymers. We observed optical gain after we applied these materials for waveguides. Experimental results on various samples will be discussed. We theoretically discuss the improvements that can be obtained and

  6. Analysis technique for controlling system wavefront error with active/adaptive optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genberg, Victor L.; Michels, Gregory J.

    2017-08-01

    The ultimate goal of an active mirror system is to control system level wavefront error (WFE). In the past, the use of this technique was limited by the difficulty of obtaining a linear optics model. In this paper, an automated method for controlling system level WFE using a linear optics model is presented. An error estimate is included in the analysis output for both surface error disturbance fitting and actuator influence function fitting. To control adaptive optics, the technique has been extended to write system WFE in state space matrix form. The technique is demonstrated by example with SigFit, a commercially available tool integrating mechanical analysis with optical analysis.

  7. Therapeutic horticulture for clinical depression in a Green Care context : prospective studies on mental health benefits, active components and existential issues

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez, Marianne Thorsen

    2010-01-01

    Historically, asylums were surrounded by gardens, parks and open landscapes, and patients often participated in horticultural activities. Horticultural therapy and therapeutic horticulture are today widely known therapeutic strategies within mental health, despite the fact that formal research in this field is scarce. Depressed individuals suffer from impaired mood, attentional impairment, rumination, reduced interest, inactivity and social withdrawal. Depression is further highly co-morbi...

  8. Activities of radiopharmaceuticals administered for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine in Argentina: results of a national survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bomben, Ana M.; Chiliutti, Claudia A.

    2004-01-01

    Nuclear medicine in Argentine is carried out at 292 centres, distributed all over the country, mainly concentrated in the capital cities of the provinces. With the purpose of knowing the activity levels of radiopharmaceuticals that were administered to patients for diagnostic and therapeutic procedures in nuclear medicine, a national survey was conducted, during 2001 and 2002. This survey was answered voluntarily by 107 centres. Sixty-four percent of the participants centres are equipped with SPECT system while the other centres have a gamma camera or scintiscanner. There were 37 nuclear medicine procedures, chosen among those most frequently performed, were included in the survey. In those diagnostic procedures were included tests for: bone, brain, thyroid, kidney, liver, lung and cardiovascular system; and also activities administered for some therapeutic procedures. The nuclear medicine physicians reported the different radiopharmaceutical activities administered to typical adult patients. In this paper are presented the average radiopharmaceutical activity administered for each of the diagnostic and therapeutic procedures included in the survey and the range and distribution of values. In order to place these data in a frame of reference, these average values were compared to the guidance levels for diagnostic procedures in nuclear medicine mentioned at the Safety Series no. 115. From this comparison it was noticed that the activities administered in the 40% of the diagnostic procedures included in the survey were between ±30% of the reference values. For those nuclear medicine procedures that could not be compared with the above mentioned guidance levels, the comparison was made with values published by UNSCEAR or standards recommended by international bodies. As a result of this study, it is important to point out the need to continue the gathering of data in a wider scale survey to increase the knowledge about national trends. It is also essential to widely

  9. Recent optical activity of the blazar OT 355

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachev, R.; Kurtenkov, A.; Nikolov, Y.; Spassov, B.; Boeva, S.; Latev, G.; Dimitrova, R. V. Munoz

    2017-06-01

    The Flat Spectrum Radio Quasar OT 355 (also known as 7C 173240.70+385949.00, z=0.975) was typically observed to be in the optical between 16th and 21th magnitude (CRTS, http://nesssi.cacr.caltech.edu/catalina/20011332/113321380764100137p.html).

  10. Active control of electromagnetic radiation through an enhanced thermo-optic effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheng, Chong; Liu, Hui; Zhu, Shining; Genov, Dentcho A.

    2015-01-01

    The control of electromagnetic radiation in transformation optical metamaterials brings the development of vast variety of optical devices. Of a particular importance is the possibility to control the propagation of light with light. In this work, we use a structured planar cavity to enhance the thermo-optic effect in a transformation optical waveguide. In the process, a control laser produces apparent inhomogeneous refractive index change inside the waveguides. The trajectory of a second probe laser beam is then continuously tuned in the experiment. The experimental results agree well with the developed theory. The reported method can provide a new approach toward development of transformation optical devices where active all-optical control of the impinging light can be achieved. PMID:25746689

  11. DNA replication and cancer: From dysfunctional replication origin activities to therapeutic opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Anne-Sophie; Walter, David; Sørensen, Claus Storgaard

    2016-06-01

    A dividing cell has to duplicate its DNA precisely once during the cell cycle to preserve genome integrity avoiding the accumulation of genetic aberrations that promote diseases such as cancer. A large number of endogenous impacts can challenge DNA replication and cells harbor a battery of pathways to promote genome integrity during DNA replication. This includes suppressing new replication origin firing, stabilization of replicating forks, and the safe restart of forks to prevent any loss of genetic information. Here, we describe mechanisms by which oncogenes can interfere with DNA replication thereby causing DNA replication stress and genome instability. Further, we describe cellular and systemic responses to these insults with a focus on DNA replication restart pathways. Finally, we discuss the therapeutic potential of exploiting intrinsic replicative stress in cancer cells for targeted therapy. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Allele-Specific Chromatin Recruitment and Therapeutic Vulnerabilities of ESR1 Activating Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeselsohn, Rinath; Bergholz, Johann S; Pun, Matthew; Cornwell, MacIntosh; Liu, Weihan; Nardone, Agostina; Xiao, Tengfei; Li, Wei; Qiu, Xintao; Buchwalter, Gilles; Feiglin, Ariel; Abell-Hart, Kayley; Fei, Teng; Rao, Prakash; Long, Henry; Kwiatkowski, Nicholas; Zhang, Tinghu; Gray, Nathanael; Melchers, Diane; Houtman, Rene; Liu, X Shirley; Cohen, Ofir; Wagle, Nikhil; Winer, Eric P; Zhao, Jean; Brown, Myles

    2018-02-12

    Estrogen receptor α (ER) ligand-binding domain (LBD) mutations are found in a substantial number of endocrine treatment-resistant metastatic ER-positive (ER + ) breast cancers. We investigated the chromatin recruitment, transcriptional network, and genetic vulnerabilities in breast cancer models harboring the clinically relevant ER mutations. These mutants exhibit both ligand-independent functions that mimic estradiol-bound wild-type ER as well as allele-specific neomorphic properties that promote a pro-metastatic phenotype. Analysis of the genome-wide ER binding sites identified mutant ER unique recruitment mediating the allele-specific transcriptional program. Genetic screens identified genes that are essential for the ligand-independent growth driven by the mutants. These studies provide insights into the mechanism of endocrine therapy resistance engendered by ER mutations and potential therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Curcumin: A review of anti-cancer properties and therapeutic activity in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is a polyphenol derived from the Curcuma longa plant, commonly known as turmeric. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries, as it is nontoxic and has a variety of therapeutic properties including anti-oxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory and antiseptic activity. More recently curcumin has been found to possess anti-cancer activities via its effect on a variety of biological pathways involved in mutagenesis, oncogene expression, cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, tumorigenesis and metastasis. Curcumin has shown anti-proliferative effect in multiple cancers, and is an inhibitor of the transcription factor NF-κB and downstream gene products (including c-myc, Bcl-2, COX-2, NOS, Cyclin D1, TNF-α, interleukins and MMP-9). In addition, curcumin affects a variety of growth factor receptors and cell adhesion molecules involved in tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) is the sixth most common cancer worldwide and treatment protocols include disfiguring surgery, platinum-based chemotherapy and radiation, all of which may result in tremendous patient morbidity. As a result, there is significant interest in developing adjuvant chemotherapies to augment currently available treatment protocols, which may allow decreased side effects and toxicity without compromising therapeutic efficacy. Curcumin is one such potential candidate, and this review presents an overview of the current in vitro and in vivo data supporting its therapeutic activity in head and neck cancer as well as some of the challenges concerning its development as an adjuvant chemotherapeutic agent. PMID:21299897

  14. Single Molecule Instrument for Surface Enhanced Raman Optical Activity of Biomolecules, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stereochemistry is an essential element of our organic life. Only certain enantiomers are useful as drugs for the human body. Raman optical activity (ROA) provides...

  15. Single Molecule Instrument for Surface Enhanced Raman Optical Activity of Biomolecules, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Stereochemistry is an essential element of our organic life. Only certain enantiomers are useful as drugs for the human body. Raman Optical Activity (ROA) and...

  16. Strong Broadband Terahertz Optical Activity through Control of the Blaschke Phase with Chiral Metasurfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Michael A.; Chen, Wen-chen; Liu, Mingkai; Kruk, Sergey S.; Padilla, Willie J.; Shadrivov, Ilya V.; Powell, David A.

    2017-07-01

    We demonstrate terahertz chiral metamaterials that achieve resonant transmission and strong optical activity. This response is realized in a metasurface coupled to its Babinet complement, with additional twist. Uniquely, the optical activity achieved in this type of metamaterial is weakly dispersive around the resonant transmission maxima, but it can be highly dispersive around the transmission minima. It has recently been shown that this unique optical activity response is closely related to zeros in the transmission spectra of circular polarizations through the Kramers-Kronig relations and strong resonant features in the optical activity spectrum corresponding to the Blaschke phase terms. Here we demonstrate how modifying the meta-atom geometry greatly affects the location and magnitude of these Blaschke phase terms. We study three different meta-atoms, which are variations on the simple cross structure. Their responses are measured using terahertz time-domain spectroscopy and analyzed via numerical simulations.

  17. Importance of Therapeutic Drug Monitoring in the Treatment of Active Tuberculosis - A Retrospective Study of 4 Cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanaa HAMMI

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: In the treatment of active tuberculosis, therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM is used to optimize dosing that maximizes therapeutic benefit while minimizing toxicity. In Morocco, TDM is not routinely used, yet low levels of anti-TB drugs can be associated with poorer treatment outcomes.Methods: We retrospectively checked our archives for patients with active TB for whom TDM was performed during 2014. Medical records were reviewed to abstract demographic, clinical, radiographic and microbiological data including time until smear and culture conversion. Then, we looked for cases with delay of TB conversion.Results: In total, 24 patients were identified, for whom TDM was performed, they all had low serum drug levels. Among them, 4 patients showed delayed bacteriological conversion.Conclusions: Our study cases are showing the benefit of serum dosage in the follow-up of the patients showing a delay of sputum examination conversion, both direct and culture, during their evolutions. TDM is potentially useful for the treatment of active TB, but is currently underused in Morocco.

  18. Coherent phonon optics in a chip with an electrically controlled active device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poyser, Caroline L; Akimov, Andrey V; Campion, Richard P; Kent, Anthony J

    2015-02-05

    Phonon optics concerns operations with high-frequency acoustic waves in solid media in a similar way to how traditional optics operates with the light beams (i.e. photons). Phonon optics experiments with coherent terahertz and sub-terahertz phonons promise a revolution in various technical applications related to high-frequency acoustics, imaging, and heat transport. Previously, phonon optics used passive methods for manipulations with propagating phonon beams that did not enable their external control. Here we fabricate a phononic chip, which includes a generator of coherent monochromatic phonons with frequency 378 GHz, a sensitive coherent phonon detector, and an active layer: a doped semiconductor superlattice, with electrical contacts, inserted into the phonon propagation path. In the experiments, we demonstrate the modulation of the coherent phonon flux by an external electrical bias applied to the active layer. Phonon optics using external control broadens the spectrum of prospective applications of phononics on the nanometer scale.

  19. Optical rotation and electron spin resonance of an electro-optically active polythiophene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goto, Hiromasa

    2010-01-01

    Graphical abstract: The electro-chiroptical polythiophene displays optical rotation at wavelengths corresponding to the doping band observable in the absorption spectra. The formation of polarons on the main-chain is confirmed by electron spin resonance measurements. - Abstract: A chiroptical polythiophene, is synthesized by electrolytic polymerization in a cholesteric liquid crystal electrolyte solution. The polymer displays a fingerprint texture similar to that of the cholesteric electrolyte solution. Upon electrochemical doping, the polymer displays optical rotation at wavelengths corresponding to the doping band observable in the absorption spectra. The formation of polarons on the main-chain is confirmed by electron spin resonance measurements. The results demonstrate the intermolecular chirality of polarons in this π-conjugated polymer, indicating continuum delocalized polarons are in a three-dimensional helical environment.

  20. Temperature dependent investigation on optically active process of higher-order bands in irradiated silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi Yi; Nanjing Univ., JS; Wu Fengmei; Nanjing Univ., JS; Zheng Youdou; Nanjing Univ., JS; Suezawa, M.; Imai, M.; Sumino, K.

    1996-01-01

    Optically active processes of the higher-order bands (HOB) are investigated at different temperatures in fast neutron irradiated silicon using Fourier transform infrared absorption measurement. It is shown that the optically active process is nearly temperature independent below 80 K, the slow decay process remains up to a heating temperature of 180 K. The observations are analyzed in terms of the relaxation behavior of photoexcited carriers governed by fast neutron radiation induced defect clusters. (orig.)

  1. Integrated Active and Passive Polymer Optical Components with nm to mm Features

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Mads Brøkner; Schøler, Mikkel; Kristensen, Anders

    2007-01-01

    We present wafer-scale fabrication of integrated active and passive polymer optics with nm to mm features. First order DFB lasers, defined in dye doped SU-8 resist are integrated with SU-8 waveguides.......We present wafer-scale fabrication of integrated active and passive polymer optics with nm to mm features. First order DFB lasers, defined in dye doped SU-8 resist are integrated with SU-8 waveguides....

  2. Photo-induced optical activity in phase-change memory materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisenko, Konstantin B; Shanmugam, Janaki; Williams, Benjamin A O; Ewart, Paul; Gholipour, Behrad; Hewak, Daniel W; Hussain, Rohanah; Jávorfi, Tamás; Siligardi, Giuliano; Kirkland, Angus I

    2015-03-05

    We demonstrate that optical activity in amorphous isotropic thin films of pure Ge2Sb2Te5 and N-doped Ge2Sb2Te5N phase-change memory materials can be induced using rapid photo crystallisation with circularly polarised laser light. The new anisotropic phase transition has been confirmed by circular dichroism measurements. This opens up the possibility of controlled induction of optical activity at the nanosecond time scale for exploitation in a new generation of high-density optical memory, fast chiroptical switches and chiral metamaterials.

  3. Optical activity of oriented molecular systems in terms of the magnetoelectric tensor of gyrotropy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arteaga, Oriol

    2014-01-01

    The optical activity of oriented molecular systems is investigated using bianisotropic material constitutives for Maxwell's equations. It is shown that the circular birefringence and circular dichroism for an oriented system can be conveniently expressed in terms of the two components of the symmetric magnetoelectric tensor of gyrotropy that are perpendicular to this direction of light propagation. This description establishes a direct link between the optical activity measured at a certain direction and the tensors that describe the oscillating electric and magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole moments induced by the optical wave. (paper)

  4. Enzyme activity assays within microstructured optical fibers enabled by automated alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warren-Smith, Stephen C; Nie, Guiying; Schartner, Erik P; Salamonsen, Lois A; Monro, Tanya M

    2012-12-01

    A fluorescence-based enzyme activity assay has been demonstrated within a small-core microstructured optical fiber (MOF) for the first time. To achieve this, a reflection-based automated alignment system has been developed, which uses feedback and piezoelectric actuators to maintain optical alignment. The auto-alignment system provides optical stability for the time required to perform an activity assay. The chosen assay is based on the enzyme proprotein convertase 5/6 (PC6) and has important applications in women's health.

  5. Minimal-effort planning of active alignment processes for beam-shaping optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haag, Sebastian; Schranner, Matthias; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel; Schlette, Christian; Losch, Daniel; Brecher, Christian; Roßmann, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    In science and industry, the alignment of beam-shaping optics is usually a manual procedure. Many industrial applications utilizing beam-shaping optical systems require more scalable production solutions and therefore effort has been invested in research regarding the automation of optics assembly. In previous works, the authors and other researchers have proven the feasibility of automated alignment of beam-shaping optics such as collimation lenses or homogenization optics. Nevertheless, the planning efforts as well as additional knowledge from the fields of automation and control required for such alignment processes are immense. This paper presents a novel approach of planning active alignment processes of beam-shaping optics with the focus of minimizing the planning efforts for active alignment. The approach utilizes optical simulation and the genetic programming paradigm from computer science for automatically extracting features from a simulated data basis with a high correlation coefficient regarding the individual degrees of freedom of alignment. The strategy is capable of finding active alignment strategies that can be executed by an automated assembly system. The paper presents a tool making the algorithm available to end-users and it discusses the results of planning the active alignment of the well-known assembly of a fast-axis collimator. The paper concludes with an outlook on the transferability to other use cases such as application specific intensity distributions which will benefit from reduced planning efforts.

  6. Nonlinear optical activity in Bridgman growth layered compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miah, M.I., E-mail: m.miah@griffith.edu.au [Queensland Micro- and Nanotechnology Centre, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Biomolecular and Physical Sciences, Griffith University, Nathan, Brisbane, QLD 4111 (Australia); Department of Physics, University of Chittagong, Chittagong 4331 (Bangladesh)

    2010-02-15

    Layered semiconductor compound CdI{sub 2} has been grown with the Bridgman technique and studied by nonlinear transmittance spectroscopy. The optical absorption in CdI{sub 2} shows a nonlinear transmission of the incident laser power (P{sub 0}) within a lower power limit. The transmission, however, is found to saturate at high powers, giving a clamped output. The value of the incident power (P{sub 0C}) at which clamping starts is also found to depend on the crystal temperature (T{sub L}). The values of P{sub OC} ranges from 55 to 65 MW cm{sup -2} for T{sub L} = 4.2-180 K. The dynamic range (D{sub R}) as a function of T{sub L} is calculated and the values are found to range from D{sub R} = 2 to 1.6. The optical limiting mechanisms are discussed. The two-photon absorption (TPA) coefficient ({beta}) of the optical nonlinear process in CdI{sub 2} is estimated. The values are found to be within a range from {beta} = 47 to 25 cm GW{sup -1} and be decreasing with increasing T{sub L}. As expected for the TPA process, the experimental data within a certain range follows the linear relation: log (P{sub 0}/P{sub T}) = A{sub G} + {Omega}(P{sub 0} - P{sub T}), where P{sub T} is the transmitted power, A{sub G} is the absorbance of the ground state and {Omega} is a constant depending on the absorption cross-section and the relaxation time. The values of A{sub G} and {Omega} estimated from the fits to the measured data vary with T{sub L}. The findings resulting from this investigation might have potential applications in optical sensors protection.

  7. Drug and Therapeutics (D & T) committees in Dutch hospitals : a nation-wide survey of structure, activities, and drug selection procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fijn, R; Brouwers, JRBJ; Knaap, RJ; De Jong-Van den Berg, LTW

    Aims To determine structure, activities and drug selection processes used by Dutch hospital drug and therapeutics (D & T) committees. Methods A pretested structured survey questionnaire based on the Australian process and impact indicators, previous research, and consultation of professionals was

  8. Histatin 5-spermidine conjugates have enhanced fungicidal activity and efficacy as a topical therapeutic for oral candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tati, Swetha; Li, Rui; Puri, Sumant; Kumar, Rohitashw; Davidow, Peter; Edgerton, Mira

    2014-01-01

    Oropharyngeal candidiasis (OPC) is caused by the opportunistic fungi Candida albicans and is prevalent in immunocompromised patients, individuals with dry mouth, or patients with prolonged antibiotic therapies that reduce oral commensal bacteria. Human salivary histatins, including histatin 5 (Hst 5), are small cationic proteins that are the major source of fungicidal activity of saliva. However, Hsts are rapidly degraded in vivo, limiting their usefulness as therapeutic agents despite their lack of toxicity. We constructed a conjugate peptide using spermidine (Spd) linked to the active fragment of Hst 5 (Hst 54-15), based upon our findings that C. albicans spermidine transporters are required for Hst 5 uptake and fungicidal activity. We found that Hst 54-15-Spd was significantly more effective in killing C. albicans and Candida glabrata than Hst 5 alone in both planktonic and biofilm growth and that Hst 54-15-Spd retained high activity in both serum and saliva. Hst 54-15-Spd was not bactericidal against streptococcal oral commensal bacteria and had no hemolytic activity. We tested the effectiveness of Hst 54-15-Spd in vivo by topical application to tongue surfaces of immunocompromised mice with OPC. Mice treated with Hst 54-15-Spd had significant clearance of candidal tongue lesions macroscopically, which was confirmed by a 3- to 5-log fold reduction of C. albicans colonies recovered from tongue tissues. Hst 54-15-Spd conjugates are a new class of peptide-based drugs with high selectivity for fungi and potential as topical therapeutic agents for oral candidiasis.

  9. Optical Design of COATLI: A Diffraction-Limited Visible Imager with Fast Guiding and Active Optics Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuentes-Fernández, J.; Cuevas, S.; Watson, A. M.

    2018-04-01

    We present the optical design of COATLI, a two channel visible imager for a comercial 50 cm robotic telescope. COATLI will deliver diffraction-limited images (approximately 0.3 arcsec FWHM) in the riz bands, inside a 4.2 arcmin field, and seeing limited images (approximately 0.6 arcsec FWHM) in the B and g bands, inside a 5 arcmin field, by means of a tip-tilt mirror for fast guiding, and a deformable mirror for active optics, both located on two optically transferred pupil planes. The optical design is based on two collimator-camera systems plus a pupil transfer relay, using achromatic doublets of CaF2 and S-FTM16 and one triplet of N-BK7 and CaF2. We discuss the effciency, tolerancing, thermal behavior and ghosts. COATLI will be installed at the Observatorio Astronómico Nacional in Sierra San Pedro Mártir, Baja California, Mexico, in 2018.

  10. Therapeutic drug monitoring of flucytosine in serum using a SERS-active membrane system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Adam G.; White, Ian M.

    2017-02-01

    A need exists for near real-time therapeutic drug monitoring (TDM), in particular for antibiotics and antifungals in patient samples at the point-of-care. To truly fit the point-of-care need, techniques must be rapid and easy to use. Here we report a membrane system utilizing inkjet-fabricated surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) sensors that allows sensitive and specific analysis despite the elimination of sophisticated chromatography equipment, expensive analytical instruments, and other systems relegated to the central lab. We utilize inkjet-fabricated paper SERS sensors as substrates for 5FC detection; the use of paper-based SERS substrates leverages the natural wicking ability and filtering properties of microporous membranes. We investigate the use of microporous membranes in the vertical flow assay to allow separation of the flucytosine from whole blood. The passive vertical flow assay serves as a valuable method for physical separation of target analytes from complex biological matrices. This work further establishes a platform for easy, sensitive, and specific TDM of 5FC from whole blood.

  11. The Effect of Active Creation on Psychological Health: A Feasibility Study on (Therapeutic Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gudrun Lange

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Creation is an important part of many interventions in creative arts therapies (art, music, dance, and drama therapy. This active part of art-making in arts therapies has not yet been closely investigated. The present study commits to this field of research using a mixed-methods design to investigate the effects of active creation on health-related psychological outcomes. In an artistic inquiry within an experimental design, N = 44 participants engaged in active art-making for eight minutes in the presence of the researcher (first author with a choice of artistic materials: paper and colors for drawing and writing, musical instruments, space for moving or performing. Before and after the creation, participants completed a well-being, a self-efficacy and an experience of creation scale, and in addition found their own words to express the experiences during the activity. We hypothesized that the experience of empowerment, freedom, impact, and creativity (Experience of Creation Scale mediates the positive effect of active creation on the outcomes of self-efficacy and well-being, and evaluated this assumption with a mediation analysis. Results suggest that the effect of active creation on both self-efficacy and well-being is significantly mediated by the Experience of Creation Scale. This article focuses on the quantitative side of the investigation. During the process, qualitative and quantitative results were triangulated for a more valid evaluation and jointly contribute to the emerging theory frame of embodied aesthetics.

  12. The Effect of Active Creation on Psychological Health: A Feasibility Study on (Therapeutic) Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Gudrun; Leonhart, Rainer; Gruber, Harald; Koch, Sabine C

    2018-02-12

    Creation is an important part of many interventions in creative arts therapies (art, music, dance, and drama therapy). This active part of art-making in arts therapies has not yet been closely investigated. The present study commits to this field of research using a mixed-methods design to investigate the effects of active creation on health-related psychological outcomes. In an artistic inquiry within an experimental design, N = 44 participants engaged in active art-making for eight minutes in the presence of the researcher (first author) with a choice of artistic materials: paper and colors for drawing and writing, musical instruments, space for moving or performing. Before and after the creation, participants completed a well-being, a self-efficacy and an experience of creation scale, and in addition found their own words to express the experiences during the activity. We hypothesized that the experience of empowerment, freedom, impact, and creativity (Experience of Creation Scale) mediates the positive effect of active creation on the outcomes of self-efficacy and well-being, and evaluated this assumption with a mediation analysis. Results suggest that the effect of active creation on both self-efficacy and well-being is significantly mediated by the Experience of Creation Scale. This article focuses on the quantitative side of the investigation. During the process, qualitative and quantitative results were triangulated for a more valid evaluation and jointly contribute to the emerging theory frame of embodied aesthetics.

  13. THE TEAM BUILDING IN COLLECTIVES AS PREVENTIVE AND THERAPEUTIC ACTIVITY IN ACUTE AND CHRONIC STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsvetelina Mihaylova

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The stress contributes to almost all medical illnesses while the acute and chronic stress - related to work - is a primary cause of such life-threatening conditions as myocardial infarction, brain stroke, etc. The aim of the current study is an investigation of the methods for team building related to prevention and therapy in connection with acute or chronic stress. The accomplishment of the aim set is achieved by means of assessment of the applicability of laughter therapy, as a method for team building suitable in practice. It was found that the laughter therapy may help reduction of stress and tension, improvement of the quality of work, strengthening of the social relations and interrelations, etc. Increasingly more studies maintain the theory that the laughter may have therapeutic value and brings about physical benefits to the particular individual, as a member of the personnel. The laughter is a part of human behavior, and it helps people to clarify their intentions in the social interaction. The laughter is used as a signal for accepting the positive interactions with other people and is a precondition for friendly attitude in the working environment as well. Conclusions may be drawn that the laughter therapy is a suitable method for team building; the laughter therapy is appropriate for everyone as a means for the alleviation of stress, and it has a positive impact on the working process. In terms of business, a positive assessment of the methods for pulling together of members of the collective (team building may be given by a way which has subsequent positive consequences on their work.

  14. Two optically active molybdenum disulfide quantum dots as tetracycline sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhuosen; Lin, Jintai [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Gao, Jinwei [Institute for Advanced Materials, Academy of Advanced Optoelectronics, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Qianming, E-mail: qmwang@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Guangzhou Key Laboratory of Materials for Energy Conversion and Storage, 510006 (China)

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we use the hydrothermal method to develop two luminescent MoS{sub 2} quantum dots (QDs) from L-cysteine and glutathione as sulfur precursors. The special blue emissions give rise to an instantaneous determination of tetracycline (TC) through the quenching of its luminescence. The accessibility of the optical materials and recognition mechanism have been extensively studied. This strategy demonstrated that MoS{sub 2} could act as a new platform for anchoring bioactive species or particular functional moieties. - Highlights: • MoS{sub 2} nanostructures with water solubility have been fabricated. • Blue emission has been achieved. • It displays selective detection to tetracyclines in water.

  15. Aqueous synthesis of ZnTe/dendrimer nanocomposites and their antimicrobial activity: implications in therapeutics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, S.; Ghosh, D.; Bag, P. K.; Bhattacharya, S. C.; Saha, A.

    2011-03-01

    The present strategy proposes a simple and single step aqueous route for synthesizing stable, fluorescent ZnTe/dendrimer nanocomposites with varying dendrimer terminal groups. In these hybrid materials, the fluorescence of the semiconductor combines with the biomimetic properties of the dendrimer making them suitable for various biomedical applications. The ZnTe nanocomposites thus obtained demonstrate bactericidal activity against enteropathogenic bacteria without having toxic effects on the human erythrocytes. The average size of the ZnTe nanoparticles within the dendrimer matrix was in the range of 2.9-6.0 nm, and they have a good degree of crystallinity with a hexagonal crystal phase. The antibacterial activities of the ZnTe/dendrimer nanocomposites (ZnTe DNCs) as well other semiconductor nanocomposites were evaluated against enteropathogenic bacteria including multi-drug resistant Vibrio cholerae serogroup O1 and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC). ZnTe DNCs had significant antibacterial activity against strains of V. cholerae and ETEC with minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 64 to 512 μg ml-1 and minimum bactericidal concentrations ranging from 128 to 1000 μg ml-1. Thus, the observed results suggest that these water-soluble active nanocomposites have potential for the treatment of enteric diseases like diarrhoea and cholera.The present strategy proposes a simple and single step aqueous route for synthesizing stable, fluorescent ZnTe/dendrimer nanocomposites with varying dendrimer terminal groups. In these hybrid materials, the fluorescence of the semiconductor combines with the biomimetic properties of the dendrimer making them suitable for various biomedical applications. The ZnTe nanocomposites thus obtained demonstrate bactericidal activity against enteropathogenic bacteria without having toxic effects on the human erythrocytes. The average size of the ZnTe nanoparticles within the dendrimer matrix was in the range of 2.9-6.0 nm, and they

  16. Acoustically active lipospheres containing paclitaxel: a new therapeutic ultrasound contrast agent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unger, E C; McCreery, T P; Sweitzer, R H; Caldwell, V E; Wu, Y

    1998-12-01

    Paclitaxel-carrying lipospheres (MRX-552) were developed and evaluated as a new ultrasound contrast agent for chemotherapeutic drug delivery. Paclitaxel was suspended in soybean oil and added to an aqueous suspension of phospholipids in vials. The headspace of the vials was replaced with perfluorobutane gas; the vials were sealed, and they were agitated at 4200 rpm on a shaking device. The resulting lipospheres containing paclitaxel were studied for concentration, size, acute toxicity in mice, and acoustic activity and drug release with ultrasound. Lipospheres containing sudan black dye were produced to demonstrate the acoustically active liposphere (AAL)-ultrasound release concept. Acoustically active lipospheres containing paclitaxel had a mean particle count of approximately 1 x 10(9) particles per mL and a mean size of 2.9 microns. Acute toxicity studies in mice showed a 10-fold reduction in toxicity for paclitaxel in AALs compared with free paclitaxel. The AALs reflected ultrasound as a contrast agent. Increasing amounts of ultrasound energy selectively ruptured the AALs and released the paclitaxel. Acoustically active lipospheres represent a new class of acoustically active drug delivery vehicles. Future studies will assess efficacy of AALs for ultrasound-mediated drug delivery.

  17. AMP-activated protein kinase: Role in metabolism and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmack, Greg; Defronzo, Ralph A; Musi, Nicolas

    2006-11-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an enzyme that works as a fuel gauge which becomes activated in situations of energy consumption. AMPK functions to restore cellular ATP levels by modifying diverse metabolic and cellular pathways. In the skeletal muscle, AMPK is activated during exercise and is involved in contraction-stimulated glucose transport and fatty acid oxidation. In the heart, AMPK activity increases during ischaemia and functions to sustain ATP, cardiac function and myocardial viability. In the liver, AMPK inhibits the production of glucose, cholesterol and triglycerides and stimulates fatty acid oxidation. Recent studies have shown that AMPK is involved in the mechanism of action of metformin and thiazolidinediones, and the adipocytokines leptin and adiponectin. These data, along with evidence that pharmacological activation of AMPK in vivo improves blood glucose homeostasis, cholesterol concentrations and blood pressure in insulin-resistant rodents, make this enzyme an attractive pharmacological target for the treatment of type 2 diabetes, ischaemic heart disease and other metabolic diseases.

  18. Actively stabilized optical fiber interferometry technique for online/in-process surface measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Kaiwei; Martin, Haydn; Jiang Xiangqian

    2008-01-01

    In this paper, we report the recent progress in optical-beam scanning fiber interferometry for potential online nanoscale surface measurement based on the previous research. It attempts to generate a robust and miniature measurement device for future development into a multiprobe array measurement system. In this research, both fiber-optic-interferometry and the wavelength-division-multiplexing techniques have been used, so that the optical probe and the optical interferometer are well spaced and fast surface scanning can be carried out, allowing flexibility for online measurement. In addition, this system provides a self-reference signal to stabilize the optical detection with high common-mode noise suppression by adopting an active phase tracking and stabilization technique. Low-frequency noise was significantly reduced compared with unstabilized result. The measurement of a sample surface shows an attained repeatability of 3.3 nm

  19. IL-8 as antibody therapeutic target in inflammatory diseases: Reduction of clinical activity in palmoplantar pustulosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skov, L.; Beurskens, F.J.; Reitamo, S.

    2008-01-01

    IL-8 is a chemokine that has been implicated in a number of inflammatory diseases involving neutrophil activation. HuMab 10F8 is a novel fully human mAb against IL-8, which binds a discontinuous epitope on IL-8 overlapping the receptor binding site, and which effectively neutralizes IL-8-dependent...... human neutrophil activation and migration. We investigated whether interference in the cytokine network by HuMab 10F8 might benefit patients suffering from palmoplantar pustulosis, a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Treatment of patients with HuMab 10F8 was well tolerated and significantly reduced...... clinical disease activity at all five endpoints, which included a >= 50% reduction in the formation of fresh pustules. IL-8 neutralization was monitored at the site of inflammation by assessing exudates of palmoplantar pustulosis lesions. HuMab 10F8 sequestered IL-8 in situ, as observed by rapid dose...

  20. Changing University Students' Alternative Conceptions of Optics by Active Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadžibegovic, Zalkida; Sliško, Josip

    2013-01-01

    Active learning is individual and group participation in effective activities such as in-class observing, writing, experimenting, discussion, solving problems, and talking about to-be-learned topics. Some instructors believe that active learning is impossible, or at least extremely difficult to achieve in large lecture sessions. Nevertheless, the…

  1. Monocular distance estimation from optic flow during active landing maneuvers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Breugel, Floris; Morgansen, Kristi; Dickinson, Michael H

    2014-01-01

    Vision is arguably the most widely used sensor for position and velocity estimation in animals, and it is increasingly used in robotic systems as well. Many animals use stereopsis and object recognition in order to make a true estimate of distance. For a tiny insect such as a fruit fly or honeybee, however, these methods fall short. Instead, an insect must rely on calculations of optic flow, which can provide a measure of the ratio of velocity to distance, but not either parameter independently. Nevertheless, flies and other insects are adept at landing on a variety of substrates, a behavior that inherently requires some form of distance estimation in order to trigger distance-appropriate motor actions such as deceleration or leg extension. Previous studies have shown that these behaviors are indeed under visual control, raising the question: how does an insect estimate distance solely using optic flow? In this paper we use a nonlinear control theoretic approach to propose a solution for this problem. Our algorithm takes advantage of visually controlled landing trajectories that have been observed in flies and honeybees. Finally, we implement our algorithm, which we term dynamic peering, using a camera mounted to a linear stage to demonstrate its real-world feasibility. (paper)

  2. The use of Nintendo Wii as therapeutic resource for elderly: an activity analysis from the Occupational Therapy perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica Bueno de Moraes

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Intervention through gametherapy is applied to Occupational Therapy domains in different practical contexts. Objective: This study aimed to analyze the videogame Nintendo Wii, with a view to its use as a therapeutic activity for elderly population. Method: 15 mini-games in Wii Party were selected based on criteria of execution time and the activity level of complexity, for the feasibility of use with the elderly. The analysis was based on the theoretical framework adopted by the American Association of Occupational Therapy, and consists of seven steps: I activity identification; II time and sequencing; III social demands, objects and space; IV body functions required; V body structures required; VI required actions, VII skill performance; analysis for intervention. Results: indications of possibilities related to cognitive functions and specific skills were identified, evidencing thus, the game potential for use with older people who have cognitive functions problems. It is also considered the importance of monitoring user behavior, proposing a form for monitoring and evaluation of their performance in the activity. Conclusion: This study provides indicators for the systematic monitoring of Nintendo Wii videogame games use as an intervention activity of occupational therapy, contributing to clinical practice in the care of the elderly population and its consequences in the formation of occupational therapist and research in the elderly health.

  3. Redox-active and Redox-silent Compounds: Synergistic Therapeutics in Cancer

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tomasetti, M.; Santarelli, L.; Alleva, R.; Dong, L.F.; Neužil, Jiří

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 5 (2015), s. 552-568 ISSN 0929-8673 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109 Institutional support: RVO:86652036 Keywords : Apoptosis * autophagy * redox-active agents Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.455, year: 2015

  4. Vagus nerve stimulation for epilepsy activates the vocal folds maximally at therapeutic levels.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ardesch, J.J.; Sikken, J.R.; Veltink, Petrus H.; van der Aa, H.E.; Hageman, G.; Buschman, H.P.J.

    Purpose Vagus nerve stimulation (VNS) for medically refractory epilepsy can give hoarseness due to stimulation of the recurrent laryngeal nerve. For a group of VNS-therapy users this side-effect interferes severely with their daily activities. Our goal was to investigate the severity of

  5. (Glyco)-protein drug carriers with an intrinsic therapeutic activity : The concept of dual targeting

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, D.K F; Molema, Ingrid; Moolenaar, Frits; de Zeeuw, D; Swart, P.J

    Dual targeting can in principle be achieved by using intrinsically active carriers that not only deliver the conjugated drug but also otherwise influence the pathological process. Potential carriers of this kind are monoclonal antibodies, certain interferons and interleukins, as well as certain

  6. PI3K-independent AKT activation in cancers: a treasure trove for novel therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Kiran; Mahajan, Nupam P

    2012-09-01

    AKT/PKB serine threonine kinase, a critical signaling molecule promoting cell growth and survival pathways, is frequently dysregulated in many cancers. Although phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase (PI3K), a lipid kinase, is well characterized as a major regulator of AKT activation in response to a variety of ligands, recent studies highlight a diverse group of tyrosine (Ack1/TNK2, Src, PTK6) and serine/threonine (TBK1, IKBKE, DNAPKcs) kinases that activate AKT directly to promote its pro-proliferative signaling functions. While some of these alternate AKT activating kinases respond to growth factors, others respond to inflammatory and genotoxic stimuli. A common theme emerging from these studies is that aberrant or hyperactivation of these alternate kinases is often associated with malignancy. Consequently, evaluating the use of small molecular inhibitors against these alternate AKT activating kinases at earlier stages of cancer therapy may overcome the pressing problem of drug resistance surfacing especially in patients treated with PI3K inhibitors. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Increased activity of vascular adenosine deaminase in atherosclerosis and therapeutic potential of its inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutryb-Zajac, Barbara; Mateuszuk, Lukasz; Zukowska, Paulina; Jasztal, Agnieszka; Zabielska, Magdalena A; Toczek, Marta; Jablonska, Patrycja; Zakrzewska, Agnieszka; Sitek, Barbara; Rogowski, Jan; Lango, Romuald; Slominska, Ewa M; Chlopicki, Stefan; Smolenski, Ryszard T

    2016-11-01

    Extracellular nucleotides and adenosine that are formed or degraded by membrane-bound ecto-enzymes could affect atherosclerosis by regulating the inflammation and thrombosis. This study aimed to evaluate a relation between ecto-enzymes that convert extracellular adenosine triphosphate to adenine dinucleotide phosphate, adenosine monophosphate, adenosine, and inosine on the surface of the vessel wall with the severity or progression of experimental and clinical atherosclerosis. Furthermore, we tested whether the inhibition of adenosine deaminase will block the development of experimental atherosclerosis. Vascular activities of ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1, ecto-5'-nucleotidase, and ecto-adenosine deaminase (eADA) were measured in aortas of apolipoprotein E-/- low density lipoprotein receptor (ApoE-/-LDLR-/-) and wild-type mice as well as in human aortas. Plaques were analysed in the entire aorta, aortic root, and brachiocephalic artery by Oil-Red O and Orcein Martius Scarlet Blue staining and vascular accumulation of macrophages. The cellular location of ecto-enzymes was analysed by immunofluorescence. The effect of eADA inhibition on atherosclerosis progression was studied by a 2-month deoxycoformycin treatment of ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice. The vascular eADA activity prominently increased in ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice when compared with wild type already at the age of 1 month and progressed along atherosclerosis development, reaching a 10-fold difference at 10 months. The activity of eADA correlated with atherosclerotic changes in human aortas. High abundance of eADA in atherosclerotic vessels originated from activated endothelial cells and macrophages. There were no changes in ecto-nucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolase 1 activity, whereas ecto-5'-nucleotidase was moderately decreased in ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice. Deoxycoformycin treatment attenuated plaque development in aortic root and brachiocephalic artery of ApoE-/-LDLR-/- mice, suppressed vascular

  8. The in vivo activation of persistent nanophosphors for optical imaging of vascularization, tumours and grafted cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maldiney, Thomas; Bessière, Aurélie; Seguin, Johanne; Teston, Eliott; Sharma, Suchinder K.; Viana, Bruno; Bos, Adrie J. J.; Dorenbos, Pieter; Bessodes, Michel; Gourier, Didier; Scherman, Daniel; Richard, Cyrille

    2014-04-01

    Optical imaging for biological applications requires more sensitive tools. Near-infrared persistent luminescence nanoparticles enable highly sensitive in vivo optical detection and complete avoidance of tissue autofluorescence. However, the actual generation of persistent luminescence nanoparticles necessitates ex vivo activation before systemic administration, which prevents long-term imaging in living animals. Here, we introduce a new generation of optical nanoprobes, based on chromium-doped zinc gallate, whose persistent luminescence can be activated in vivo through living tissues using highly penetrating low-energy red photons. Surface functionalization of this photonic probe can be adjusted to favour multiple biomedical applications such as tumour targeting. Notably, we show that cells can endocytose these nanoparticles in vitro and that, after intravenous injection, we can track labelled cells in vivo and follow their biodistribution by a simple whole animal optical detection, opening new perspectives for cell therapy research and for a variety of diagnosis applications.

  9. Revisiting polarimetry near the isotropic point of an optically active, non-enantiomorphous, molecular crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Alexander T; Tan, Melissa; Nichols, Shane M; Timothy, Emily; Kahr, Bart

    2018-07-01

    Accurate polarimetric measurements of the optical activity of crystals along low symmetry directions are facilitated by isotropic points, frequencies where dispersion curves of eigenrays cross and the linear birefringence disappears. We report here the optical properties and structure of achiral, uniaxial (point group D 2d ) potassium trihydrogen di-(cis-4-cyclohexene-1,2-dicarboxylate) dihydrate, whose isotropic point was previously detected (S. A. Kim, C. Grieswatch, H. Küppers, Zeit. Krist. 1993; 208:219-222) and exploited for a singular measurement of optical activity normal to the optic axis. The crystal structure associated with the aforementioned study was never published. We report it here, confirming the space group assignment I 4¯c2, along with the frequency dependence of the fundamental optical properties and the constitutive tensors by fitting optical dispersion relations to measured Mueller matrix spectra. k-Space maps of circular birefringence and of the Mueller matrix near the isotropic wavelength are measured and simulated. The signs of optical rotation are correlated with the absolute crystallographic directions. © 2018 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Human antibodies to the dengue virus E-dimer epitope have therapeutic activity against Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Estefania; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Cao, Bin; Scheaffer, Suzanne M; Supasa, Piyada; Wongwiwat, Wiyada; Esakky, Prabagaran; Drury, Andrea; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Moley, Kelle H; Mysorekar, Indira U; Screaton, Gavin R; Diamond, Michael S

    2017-11-01

    The Zika virus (ZIKV) epidemic has resulted in congenital abnormalities in fetuses and neonates. Although some cross-reactive dengue virus (DENV)-specific antibodies can enhance ZIKV infection in mice, those recognizing the DENV E-dimer epitope (EDE) can neutralize ZIKV infection in cell culture. We evaluated the therapeutic activity of human monoclonal antibodies to DENV EDE for their ability to control ZIKV infection in the brains, testes, placentas, and fetuses of mice. A single dose of the EDE1-B10 antibody given 3 d after ZIKV infection protected against lethality, reduced ZIKV levels in brains and testes, and preserved sperm counts. In pregnant mice, wild-type or engineered LALA variants of EDE1-B10, which cannot engage Fcg receptors, diminished ZIKV burden in maternal and fetal tissues, and protected against fetal demise. Because neutralizing antibodies to EDE have therapeutic potential against ZIKV, in addition to their established inhibitory effects against DENV, it may be possible to develop therapies that control disease caused by both viruses.

  11. Cathodoluminescence-activated nanoimaging: noninvasive near-field optical microscopy in an electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischak, Connor G; Hetherington, Craig L; Wang, Zhe; Precht, Jake T; Kaz, David M; Schlom, Darrell G; Ginsberg, Naomi S

    2015-05-13

    We demonstrate a new nanoimaging platform in which optical excitations generated by a low-energy electron beam in an ultrathin scintillator are used as a noninvasive, near-field optical scanning probe of an underlying sample. We obtain optical images of Al nanostructures with 46 nm resolution and validate the noninvasiveness of this approach by imaging a conjugated polymer film otherwise incompatible with electron microscopy due to electron-induced damage. The high resolution, speed, and noninvasiveness of this "cathodoluminescence-activated" platform also show promise for super-resolution bioimaging.

  12. Absorbed dose to active red bone marrow from diagnostic and therapeutic uses of radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solomon, S.B.

    1980-06-01

    The bone-marrow dose arising from radiological procedures as carried out in Australia have been determined as part of a survey of population doses. This paper describes the method of calculation of the radiation doses to the active bone marrow from diagnostic radiography, fluoroscopy and radiotherapy. The results of the calculations are compared with the results of other models of bone-marrow dose for a number of diagnostic X-ray procedures

  13. Research based activities in teacher professional development on optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Michelini, Marisa; Stefanel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to understand how teachers take ownership of content given them in formative intervention modules and transform it into suggestions and materials for teaching. To this end a module on optics was designed for a group of kindergarten, primary and lower secondary school teachers which sought to integrate meta-cultural, experiential and situated approaches with various context specific factors. The study investigated how teachers deal with conceptual difficulties in the module and how they adapt it to their school situations with data being gathered through a variety of tools. It emerged that the most difficult concepts teachers encountered at the formative stage were those they most often incorporated into their materials. The steps taken in this process of appropriation were then reviewed via a collaborative discussion among the teachers themselves on the materials they had produced.

  14. Therapeutic ultrasound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crum, Lawrence A

    2004-01-01

    The use of ultrasound in medicine is now quite commonplace, especially with the recent introduction of small, portable and relatively inexpensive, hand-held diagnostic imaging devices. Moreover, ultrasound has expanded beyond the imaging realm, with methods and applications extending to novel therapeutic and surgical uses. These applications broadly include: tissue ablation, acoustocautery, lipoplasty, site-specific and ultrasound mediated drug activity, extracorporeal lithotripsy, and the enhancement of natural physiological functions such as wound healing and tissue regeneration. A particularly attractive aspect of this technology is that diagnostic and therapeutic systems can be combined to produce totally non-invasive, imageguided therapy. This general lecture will review a number of these exciting new applications of ultrasound and address some of the basic scientific questions and future challenges in developing these methods and technologies for general use in our society. We shall particularly emphasize the use of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) in the treatment of benign and malignant tumors as well as the introduction of acoustic hemostasis, especially in organs which are difficult to treat using conventional medical and surgical techniques. (amum lecture)

  15. Developments of a bonding technique for optical materials by a surface activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Akira; Oda, Tomohiro; Abe, Tomoyuki; Kusunoki, Isao

    2005-01-01

    We started developing the laser crystal bounding by the surface activation method which can splice crystals together without using hydrogen bonding. For the surface activation, neutral argon beams were used for irradiation of specimens. In the bonding trials with sapphire crystals, we recognized possibility of the bonding method for optical elements. (author)

  16. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey; Van Duyne, Rachel; Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao; Romerio, Fabio; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2015-01-01

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4"+ T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4"+ T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4"+ T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation (IR) increases

  17. Therapeutic Activity of an Engineered Synthetic Killer Antiidiotypic Antibody Fragment against Experimental Mucosal and Systemic Candidiasis

    OpenAIRE

    Polonelli, Luciano; Magliani, Walter; Conti, Stefania; Bracci, Luisa; Lozzi, Luisa; Neri, Paolo; Adriani, Daniela; De Bernardis, Flavia; Cassone, Antonio

    2003-01-01

    Peptides derived from the sequence of a single-chain, recombinant, antiidiotypic antibody (IdAb; KT-scFv) acting as a functional internal image of a microbicidal, wide-spectrum yeast killer toxin (KT) were synthesized and studied for their antimicrobial activity by using the KT-susceptible Candida albicans as model organism. A decapeptide containing the first three amino acids (SAS) of the light chain CDR1 was selected and optimized by alanine replacement of a single residue. This peptide exe...

  18. Therapeutic doses of irradiation activate viral transcription and induce apoptosis in HIV-1 infected cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iordanskiy, Sergey [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Van Duyne, Rachel [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Center for Cancer Research, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Frederick, MD 21702 (United States); Sampey, Gavin C; Woodson, Caitlin M; Fry, Kelsi; Saifuddin, Mohammed; Guo, Jia; Wu, Yuntao [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States); Romerio, Fabio [Department of Medicine, University of Maryland School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 21201 (United States); Kashanchi, Fatah, E-mail: fkashanc@gmu.edu [School of Systems Biology, Laboratory of Molecular Virology, George Mason University, Manassas, VA 20110 (United States)

    2015-11-15

    The highly active antiretroviral therapy reduces HIV-1 RNA in plasma to undetectable levels. However, the virus continues to persist in the long-lived resting CD4{sup +} T cells, macrophages and astrocytes which form a viral reservoir in infected individuals. Reactivation of viral transcription is critical since the host immune response in combination with antiretroviral therapy may eradicate the virus. Using the chronically HIV-1 infected T lymphoblastoid and monocytic cell lines, primary quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells and humanized mice infected with dual-tropic HIV-1 89.6, we examined the effect of various X-ray irradiation (IR) doses (used for HIV-related lymphoma treatment and lower doses) on HIV-1 transcription and viability of infected cells. Treatment of both T cells and monocytes with IR, a well-defined stress signal, led to increase of HIV-1 transcription, as evidenced by the presence of RNA polymerase II and reduction of HDAC1 and methyl transferase SUV39H1 on the HIV-1 promoter. This correlated with the increased GFP signal and elevated level of intracellular HIV-1 RNA in the IR-treated quiescent CD4{sup +} T cells infected with GFP-encoding HIV-1. Exposition of latently HIV-1infected monocytes treated with PKC agonist bryostatin 1 to IR enhanced transcription activation effect of this latency-reversing agent. Increased HIV-1 replication after IR correlated with higher cell death: the level of phosphorylated Ser46 in p53, responsible for apoptosis induction, was markedly higher in the HIV-1 infected cells following IR treatment. Exposure of HIV-1 infected humanized mice with undetectable viral RNA level to IR resulted in a significant increase of HIV-1 RNA in plasma, lung and brain tissues. Collectively, these data point to the use of low to moderate dose of IR alone or in combination with HIV-1 transcription activators as a potential application for the “Shock and Kill” strategy for latently HIV-1 infected cells. - Highlights: • X-ray irradiation

  19. New Advances in Nanotechnology-Based Diagnosis and Therapeutics for Breast Cancer: An Assessment of Active-Targeting Inorganic Nanoplatforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagan-Lotsch, Priscila; Grzincic, Elissa M; Murphy, Catherine J

    2017-01-18

    Breast cancer is a major cause of suffering and mortality among women. Limitations in the current diagnostic methods and treatment approaches have led to new strategies to positively impact the survival rates and quality of life of breast cancer patients. Nanotechnology offers a real possibility of mitigating breast cancer mortality by early-stage cancer detection and more precise diagnosis as well as more effective treatments with minimal side effects. The current nanoplatforms approved for breast cancer therapeutics are based on passive tumor targeting using organic nanoparticles and have not provided the expected significant improvements in the clinic. In this review, we present the emerging approaches in breast cancer nanomedicine based on active targeting using versatile inorganic nanoplatforms with biomedical relevance, such as gold, silica, and iron oxide nanoparticles, as well as their efficacy in breast cancer imaging, drug and gene delivery, thermal therapy, combinational therapy, and theranostics in preclinical studies. The main challenges for clinical translation and perspectives are discussed.

  20. Development of FGI-106 as a broad-spectrum therapeutic with activity against members of the family Bunyaviridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darci R Smith

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Darci R Smith1, Monica Ogg1, Aura Garrison1, Abdul Yunus2, Anna Honko1, Josh Johnson1, Gene Olinger1, Lisa E Hensley1, Michael S Kinch1United States Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRII D, Fort Detrick, MD, USA; 2Functional Genetics, Inc., Gaithersburg, MD, USAAbstract: The family Bunyaviridae is a diverse group of negative-strand RNA viruses that infect a wide range of arthropod vectors and animal hosts. Based on the continuing need for new therapeutics to treat bunyavirus infections, we evaluated the potential efficacy of FGI-106, a small-molecular compound that previously demonstrated activity against different RNA viruses. FGI-106 displayed substantial antiviral activity in cell-based assays of different bunyavirus family members, including Asian and South American hantaviruses (Hantaan virus and Andes virus, Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus, La Crosse virus, and Rift Valley fever virus. The pharmacokinetic profile of FGI-106 revealed sufficient exposure of the drug to critical target organs (lung, liver, kidney, and spleen, which are frequently the sites of bunyavirus replication. Consistent with these findings, FGI-106 treatment delivered via intraperitoneal injection prior to virus exposure was sufficient to delay the onset of Rift Valley fever virus infection in mouse-based models and to enhance survival in the face of an otherwise lethal infection. Altogether, these results suggest a potential opportunity for the use of FGI-106 to treat infections by members of the family Bunyaviridae.Keywords: Rift Valley fever virus, bunyavirus, hantavirus, antiviral, therapeutic

  1. Phospholipase A2 activation as a therapeutic approach for cognitive enhancement in early-stage Alzheimer disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeffer, Evelin L; Forlenza, Orestes V; Gattaz, Wagner F

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is the leading cause of dementia in the elderly and has no known cure. Evidence suggests that reduced activity of specific subtypes of intracellular phospholipases A2 (cPLA2 and iPLA2) is an early event in AD and may contribute to memory impairment and neuropathology in the disease. The objective of this study was to review the literature focusing on the therapeutic role of PLA2 stimulation by cognitive training and positive modulators, or of supplementation with arachidonic acid (PLA2 product) in facilitating memory function and synaptic transmission and plasticity in either research animals or human subjects. MEDLINE database was searched (no date restrictions) for published articles using the keywords Alzheimer disease (mild, moderate, severe), mild cognitive impairment, healthy elderly, rats, mice, phospholipase A(2), phospholipid metabolism, phosphatidylcholine, arachidonic acid, cognitive training, learning, memory, long-term potentiation, protein kinases, dietary lipid compounds, cell proliferation, neurogenesis, and neuritogenesis. Reference lists of the identified articles were checked to select additional studies of interest. Overall, the data suggest that PLA2 activation is induced in the healthy brain during learning and memory. Furthermore, learning seems to regulate endogenous neurogenesis, which has been observed in AD brains. Finally, PLA2 appears to be implicated in homeostatic processes related to neurite outgrowth and differentiation in both neurodevelopmental processes and response to neuronal injury. The use of positive modulators of PLA2 (especially of cPLA2 and iPLA2) or supplementation with dietary lipid compounds (e.g., arachidonic acid) in combination with cognitive training could be a valuable therapeutic strategy for cognitive enhancement in early-stage AD.

  2. An influenza A virus (H7N9) anti-neuraminidase monoclonal antibody with prophylactic and therapeutic activity in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jason R.; Guo, Zhu; Reber, Adrian; Kamal, Ram P.; Music, Nedzad; Gansebom, Shane; Bai, Yaohui; Levine, Min; Carney, Paul; Tzeng, Wen-Pin; Stevens, James; York, Ian A.

    2017-01-01

    Zoonotic A(H7N9) avian influenza viruses emerged in China in 2013 and continue to be a threat to human public health, having infected over 800 individuals with a mortality rate approaching 40%. Treatment options for people infected with A(H7N9) include the use of neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors. However, like other influenza viruses, A(H7N9) can become resistant to these drugs. The use of monoclonal antibodies is a rapidly developing strategy for controlling influenza virus infection. Here we generated a murine monoclonal antibody (3c10-3) directed against the NA of A(H7N9) and show that prophylactic systemic administration of 3c10-3 fully protected mice from lethal challenge with wild-type A/Anhui/1/2013 (H7N9). Further, post-infection treatment with a single systemic dose of 3c10-3 at either 24, 48 or 72 h post A(H7N9) challenge resulted in both dose- and time-dependent protection of up to 100% of mice, demonstrating therapeutic potential for 3c10-3. Epitope mapping revealed that 3c10-3 binds near the enzyme active site of NA, and functional characterization showed that 3c10-3 inhibits the enzyme activity of NA and restricts the cell-to-cell spread of the virus in cultured cells. Affinity analysis also revealed that 3c10-3 binds equally well to recombinant NA of wild-type A/Anhui/1/2013 and to a variant NA carrying a R289K mutation known to infer NAI resistance. These results suggest that 3c10-3 has the potential to be used as a therapeutic to treat A(H7N9) infections either as an alternative to, or in combination with, current NA antiviral inhibitors. PMID:27713074

  3. Optically-Induced Neuronal Activity Is Sufficient to Promote Functional Motor Axon Regeneration In Vivo.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia J Ward

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injuries are common, and functional recovery is very poor. Beyond surgical repair of the nerve, there are currently no treatment options for these patients. In experimental models of nerve injury, interventions (such as exercise and electrical stimulation that increase neuronal activity of the injured neurons effectively enhance axon regeneration. Here, we utilized optogenetics to determine whether increased activity alone is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration. In thy-1-ChR2/YFP transgenic mice in which a subset of motoneurons express the light-sensitive cation channel, channelrhodopsin (ChR2, we activated axons in the sciatic nerve using blue light immediately prior to transection and surgical repair of the sciatic nerve. At four weeks post-injury, direct muscle EMG responses evoked with both optical and electrical stimuli as well as the ratio of these optical/electrical evoked EMG responses were significantly greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, significantly more ChR2+ axons successfully re-innervated the gastrocnemius muscle in mice that received optical treatment. Sections of the gastrocnemius muscles were reacted with antibodies to Synaptic Vesicle Protein 2 (SV2 to quantify the number of re-occupied motor endplates. The number of SV2+ endplates was greater in mice that received optical treatment. The number of retrogradely-labeled motoneurons following intramuscular injection of cholera toxin subunit B (conjugated to Alexa Fluor 555 was greater in mice that received optical treatment. Thus, the acute (1 hour, one-time optical treatment resulted in robust, long-lasting effects compared to untreated animals as well as untreated axons (ChR2-. We conclude that neuronal activation is sufficient to promote motor axon regeneration, and this regenerative effect is specific to the activated neurons.

  4. Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 is a therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kung-Chao Chang

    Full Text Available Lymphoma-specific biomarkers contribute to therapeutic strategies and the study of tumorigenesis. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL is the most common type of malignant lymphoma. However, only 50% of patients experience long-term survival after current treatment; therefore, developing novel therapeutic strategies is warranted. Comparative proteomic analysis of two DLBCL lines with a B-lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL showed differential expression of Ran GTPase-activating protein 1 (RanGAP1 between them, which was confirmed using immunoblotting. Immunostaining showed that the majority of DLBCLs (92%, 46/50 were RanGAP1(+, while reactive lymphoid hyperplasia (n = 12 was RanGAP1(+ predominantly in germinal centers. RanGAP1 was also highly expressed in other B-cell lymphomas (BCL, n = 180 with brisk mitotic activity (B-lymphoblastic lymphoma/leukemia: 93%, and Burkitt lymphoma: 95% or cell-cycle dysregulation (mantle cell lymphoma: 83%, and Hodgkin's lymphoma 91%. Interestingly, serum RanGAP1 level was higher in patients with high-grade BCL (1.71 ± 2.28 ng/mL, n = 62 than in low-grade BCL (0.75 ± 2.12 ng/mL, n = 52 and healthy controls (0.55 ± 1.58 ng/mL, n = 75 (high-grade BCL vs. low-grade BCL, p = 0.002; high-grade BCL vs. control, p < 0.001, Mann-Whitney U test. In vitro, RNA interference of RanGAP1 showed no effect on LCL but enhanced DLBCL cell death (41% vs. 60%; p = 0.035 and cell-cycle arrest (G0/G1: 39% vs. 49%, G2/M: 19.0% vs. 7.5%; p = 0.030 along with decreased expression of TPX2 and Aurora kinases, the central regulators of mitotic cell division. Furthermore, ON 01910.Na (Estybon, a multikinase inhibitor induced cell death, mitotic cell arrest, and hyperphosphorylation of RanGAP1 in DLBCL cell lines but no effects in normal B and T cells. Therefore, RanGAP1 is a promising marker and therapeutic target for aggressive B-cell lymphoma, especially DLBCL.

  5. Therapeutic Effect of Activated Carbon-Induced Constipation Mice with Lactobacillus fermentum Suo on Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huayi Suo

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of Lactobacillus fermentum Suo (LF-Suo on activated carbon-induced constipation in ICR (Institute of Cancer Research mice. ICR mice were orally administered with lactic acid bacteria for 9 days. Body weight, diet intake, drinking amount, defecation status, gastrointestinal transit and defecation time, and the serum levels of MTL (motilin, Gas (gastrin, ET (endothelin, SS (somatostatin, AChE (acetylcholinesterase, SP (substance P, VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide were used to evaluate the preventive effects of LF-Suo on constipation. Bisacodyl, a laxative drug, was used as a positive control. The normal, control, 100 mg/kg bisacodyl treatment, LB (Lactobacillus bulgaricus-, LF-Suo (L- and LF-Suo (H-treated mice showed the time to the first black stool defecation at 90, 218, 117, 180, 155 and 137 min, respectively. By the oral administration of LB-, LF-Suo (L, LF-Suo (H or bisacodyl (100 mg/kg, the gastrointestinal transit was reduced to 55.2%, 72.3%, 85.5% and 94.6%, respectively, of the transit in normal mice, respectively. In contrast to the control mice, the serum levels of MTL, Gas, ET, AChE, SP and VIP were significantly increased and the serum levels of SS were reduced in the mice treated with LF-Suo (p < 0.05. By the RT-PCR (reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction and western blot assays, LF-Suo increased the c-Kit, SCF (stem cell factor, GDNF (glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor and decreased TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid 1, NOS (nitric oxide synthase expressions of small intestine tissue in mice. These results demonstrate that lactic acid bacteria has preventive effects on mouse constipation and LF-Suo demonstrated the best functional activity.

  6. Therapeutic Ultrasound Bypasses Canonical Syndecan-4 Signaling to Activate Rac1*S⃞

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahoney, Claire M.; Morgan, Mark R.; Harrison, Andrew; Humphries, Martin J.; Bass, Mark D.

    2009-01-01

    The application of pulsed, low intensity ultrasound is emerging as a potent therapy for the treatment of complex bone fractures and tissue damage. Ultrasonic stimuli accelerate fracture healing by up to 40% and enhance tendon and ligament healing by promoting cell proliferation, migration, and matrix synthesis through an unresolved mechanism. Ultrasound treatment also induces closure of nonunion fractures, at a success rate (85% of cases) similar to that of surgical intervention (68-96%) while avoiding the complications associated with surgery. The regulation of cell adhesion necessary for wound healing depends on cooperative engagement of the extracellular matrix receptors, integrin and syndecan, as exemplified by the wound healing defects observed in syndecan- and integrin-knock-out mice. This report distinguishes the influence of ultrasound on signals downstream of the prototypic fibronectin receptors, α5β1 integrin and syndecan-4, which cooperate to regulate Rac1 and RhoA. Ultrasonic stimulation fails to activate integrins or induce cell spreading on poor, electrostatic ligands. By contrast, ultrasound treatment overcomes the necessity of engagement or expression of syndecan-4 during the process of focal adhesion formation, which normally requires simultaneous engagement of both receptors. Ultrasound exerts an influence downstream of syndecan-4 and PKCα to specifically activate Rac1, itself a critical regulator of tissue repair, and to a lesser extent RhoA. The ability of ultrasound to bypass syndecan-4 signaling, which is known to facilitate efficient tissue repair, explains the reduction in healing times observed in ultrasound-treated patients. By substituting for one of the key axes of adhesion-dependent signaling, ultrasound therapy has considerable potential as a clinical technique. PMID:19147498

  7. Active locking and entanglement in type II optical parametric oscillators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Rivas, Joaquín; de Valcárcel, Germán J.; Navarrete-Benlloch, Carlos

    2018-02-01

    Type II optical parametric oscillators are amongst the highest-quality sources of quantum-correlated light. In particular, when pumped above threshold, such devices generate a pair of bright orthogonally-polarized beams with strong continuous-variable entanglement. However, these sources are of limited practical use, because the entangled beams emerge with different frequencies and a diffusing phase difference. It has been proven that the use of an internal wave-plate coupling the modes with orthogonal polarization is capable of locking the frequencies of the emerging beams to half the pump frequency, as well as reducing the phase-difference diffusion, at the expense of reducing the entanglement levels. In this work we characterize theoretically an alternative locking mechanism: the injection of a laser at half the pump frequency. Apart from being less invasive, this method should allow for an easier real-time experimental control. We show that such an injection is capable of generating the desired phase locking between the emerging beams, while still allowing for large levels of entanglement. Moreover, we find an additional region of the parameter space (at relatively large injections) where a mode with well defined polarization is in a highly amplitude-squeezed state.

  8. Passive radiation detection using optically active CMOS sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dosiek, Luke; Schalk, Patrick D.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there have been a number of small-scale and hobbyist successes in employing commodity CMOS-based camera sensors for radiation detection. For example, several smartphone applications initially developed for use in areas near the Fukushima nuclear disaster are capable of detecting radiation using a cell phone camera, provided opaque tape is placed over the lens. In all current useful implementations, it is required that the sensor not be exposed to visible light. We seek to build a system that does not have this restriction. While building such a system would require sophisticated signal processing, it would nevertheless provide great benefits. In addition to fulfilling their primary function of image capture, cameras would also be able to detect unknown radiation sources even when the danger is considered to be low or non-existent. By experimentally profiling the image artifacts generated by gamma ray and β particle impacts, algorithms are developed to identify the unique features of radiation exposure, while discarding optical interaction and thermal noise effects. Preliminary results focus on achieving this goal in a laboratory setting, without regard to integration time or computational complexity. However, future work will seek to address these additional issues.

  9. Stable aqueous dispersions of optically and electronically active phosphorene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Joohoon; Wells, Spencer A; Wood, Joshua D; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Liu, Xiaolong; Ryder, Christopher R; Zhu, Jian; Guest, Jeffrey R; Husko, Chad A; Hersam, Mark C

    2016-10-18

    Understanding and exploiting the remarkable optical and electronic properties of phosphorene require mass production methods that avoid chemical degradation. Although solution-based strategies have been developed for scalable exfoliation of black phosphorus, these techniques have thus far used anhydrous organic solvents in an effort to minimize exposure to known oxidants, but at the cost of limited exfoliation yield and flake size distribution. Here, we present an alternative phosphorene production method based on surfactant-assisted exfoliation and postprocessing of black phosphorus in deoxygenated water. From comprehensive microscopic and spectroscopic analysis, this approach is shown to yield phosphorene dispersions that are stable, highly concentrated, and comparable to micromechanically exfoliated phosphorene in structure and chemistry. Due to the high exfoliation efficiency of this process, the resulting phosphorene flakes are thinner than anhydrous organic solvent dispersions, thus allowing the observation of layer-dependent photoluminescence down to the monolayer limit. Furthermore, to demonstrate preservation of electronic properties following solution processing, the aqueous-exfoliated phosphorene flakes are used in field-effect transistors with high drive currents and current modulation ratios. Overall, this method enables the isolation and mass production of few-layer phosphorene, which will accelerate ongoing efforts to realize a diverse range of phosphorene-based applications.

  10. Combination of a Flipped Classroom Format and a Virtual Patient Case to Enhance Active Learning in a Required Therapeutics Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichvar, Alicia Beth; Hedges, Ashley; Benedict, Neal J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To design and evaluate the integration of a virtual patient activity in a required therapeutics course already using a flipped-classroom teaching format. Design. A narrative-branched, dynamic virtual-patient case was designed to replace the static written cases that students worked through during the class, which was dedicated to teaching the complications of liver disease. Students completed pre- and posttests before and after completing the virtual patient case. Examination scores were compared to those in the previous year. Assessment. Students’ posttest scores were higher compared to pretest scores (33% vs 50%). Overall median examination scores were higher compared to the historical control group (70% vs 80%), as well as scores on questions assessing higher-level learning (67% vs 83%). A majority of students (68%) felt the virtual patient helped them apply knowledge gained in the pre-class video lecture. Students preferred this strategy to usual in-class activities (33%) or indicated it was of equal value (37%). Conclusion. The combination of a pre-class video lecture with an in-class virtual patient case is an effective active-learning strategy. PMID:28179724

  11. Combination of a Flipped Classroom Format and a Virtual Patient Case to Enhance Active Learning in a Required Therapeutics Course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichvar, Alicia Beth; Hedges, Ashley; Benedict, Neal J; Donihi, Amy C

    2016-12-25

    Objective. To design and evaluate the integration of a virtual patient activity in a required therapeutics course already using a flipped-classroom teaching format. Design. A narrative-branched, dynamic virtual-patient case was designed to replace the static written cases that students worked through during the class, which was dedicated to teaching the complications of liver disease. Students completed pre- and posttests before and after completing the virtual patient case. Examination scores were compared to those in the previous year. Assessment. Students' posttest scores were higher compared to pretest scores (33% vs 50%). Overall median examination scores were higher compared to the historical control group (70% vs 80%), as well as scores on questions assessing higher-level learning (67% vs 83%). A majority of students (68%) felt the virtual patient helped them apply knowledge gained in the pre-class video lecture. Students preferred this strategy to usual in-class activities (33%) or indicated it was of equal value (37%). Conclusion. The combination of a pre-class video lecture with an in-class virtual patient case is an effective active-learning strategy.

  12. New procedures to measure synthase and phosphatase activities of bis-phosphoglycerate mutase. Interest for development of therapeutic drugs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravel, P.; Garel, M.C.; Toullec, D.

    1997-01-01

    In red blood cells, a modulation of the level of the allosteric effector of hemoglobin, 2,3-diphosphoglycerate (2,3-DPG) would have implications in the treatment of ischemia and sickle cell anemia. Its concentrations is determined by the relative activities of the synthase and phosphatase reactions of the multifunctional bis-phosphoglycerate mutase (BPGM). In this report we develop first a more direct synthase assay which uses glyceraldehyde phosphate to suppress the aldolase and triose phosphate isomerase reactions. Secondly we propose a radioactive phosphatase assay coupled to chromatographic separation and identification of the reaction products by paper electrophoresis. Such identification of these products allows us to show that the multifunctional BPGM expresses its mutase instead of its phosphatase activity in conditions of competition between the 3-phosphoglycerate and the 2-phospho-glycolate activator in the phosphatase reaction. These two more precise procedures could be used to study the effects of substrate and cofactor analogues regarding potential therapeutic approaches and could be used for clinical analyses to detect deficiency of BPGM. (author)

  13. Innovatively Therapeutic Strategy on Lung Cancer by Daily Drinking Antioxidative Plasmon-Induced Activated Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chien-Kai; Chen, Hsiao-Chien; Fang, Sheng-Uei; Ho, Chia-Wen; Tai, Cheng-Jeng; Yang, Chih-Ping; Liu, Yu-Chuan

    2018-04-20

    Many human diseases are inflammation-related, such as cancer and those associated with aging. Previous studies demonstrated that plasmon-induced activated (PIA) water with electron-doping character, created from hot electron transfer via decay of excited Au nanoparticles (NPs) under resonant illumination, owns reduced hydrogen-bonded networks and physchemically antioxidative properties. In this study, it is demonstrated PIA water dramatically induced a major antioxidative Nrf2 gene in human gingival fibroblasts which further confirms its cellular antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. Furthermore, mice implanted with mouse Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC-1) cells drinking PIA water alone or together with cisplatin treatment showed improved survival time compared to mice which consumed only deionized (DI) water. With the combination of PIA water and cisplatin administration, the survival time of LLC-1-implanted mice markedly increased to 8.01 ± 0.77 days compared to 6.38 ± 0.61 days of mice given cisplatin and normal drinking DI water. This survival time of 8.01 ± 0.77 days compared to 4.62 ± 0.71 days of mice just given normal drinking water is statistically significant (p = 0.009). Also, the gross observations and eosin staining results suggested that LLC-1-implanted mice drinking PIA water tended to exhibit less metastasis than mice given only DI water.

  14. Ratio Imaging of Enzyme Activity Using Dual Wavelength Optical Reporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moritz F. Kircher

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available The design of near-infrared fluorescent (NIRF probes that are activated by specific proteases has, for the first time, allowed enzyme activity to be imaged in vivo. In the current study, we report on a method of imaging enzyme activity using two fluorescent probes that, together, provide improved quantitation of enzymatic activity. The method employs two chemically similar probes that differ in their degradability by cathepsin B. One probe consists of the NIRF dye Cy5.5 attached to a particulate carrier, a crosslinked iron oxide nanoparticle (CLIO, through cathepsin B cleavable l-arginyl peptides. A second probe consists of Cy3.5 attached to a CLIO through proteolytically resistant d-arginyl peptides. Using mixtures of the two probes, we have shown that the ratio of Cy5.5 to Cy3.5 fluorescence can be used to determine levels of cathepsin B in the environment of nanoparticles with macrophages in suspension. After intravenous injection, tissue fluorescence from the nondegradable Cy3.5–d-arginyl probe reflected nanoparticle accumulation, while fluorescence of the Cy5.5–l-arginyl probe was dependent on both accumulation and activation by cathepsin B. Dual wavelength ratio imaging can be used for the quantitative imaging of a variety of enzymes in clinically important settings, while the magnetic properties of the probes allow their detection by MR imaging.

  15. Transposon activation mutagenesis as a screening tool for identifying resistance to cancer therapeutics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Li; Schmidt, Emmett V; Stuart, Lynda; Ohsumi, Toshiro K; Burgess, Shawn; Varshney, Gaurav K; Dastur, Anahita; Borowsky, Mark; Benes, Cyril; Lacy-Hulbert, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The development of resistance to chemotherapies represents a significant barrier to successful cancer treatment. Resistance mechanisms are complex, can involve diverse and often unexpected cellular processes, and can vary with both the underlying genetic lesion and the origin or type of tumor. For these reasons developing experimental strategies that could be used to understand, identify and predict mechanisms of resistance in different malignant cells would be a major advance. Here we describe a gain-of-function forward genetic approach for identifying mechanisms of resistance. This approach uses a modified piggyBac transposon to generate libraries of mutagenized cells, each containing transposon insertions that randomly activate nearby gene expression. Genes of interest are identified using next-gen high-throughput sequencing and barcode multiplexing is used to reduce experimental cost. Using this approach we successfully identify genes involved in paclitaxel resistance in a variety of cancer cell lines, including the multidrug transporter ABCB1, a previously identified major paclitaxel resistance gene. Analysis of co-occurring transposons integration sites in single cell clone allows for the identification of genes that might act cooperatively to produce drug resistance a level of information not accessible using RNAi or ORF expression screening approaches. We have developed a powerful pipeline to systematically discover drug resistance in mammalian cells in vitro. This cost-effective approach can be readily applied to different cell lines, to identify canonical or context specific resistance mechanisms. Its ability to probe complex genetic context and non-coding genomic elements as well as cooperative resistance events makes it a good complement to RNAi or ORF expression based screens

  16. Development and Mechanism of Small Activating RNA Targeting CEBPA, a Novel Therapeutic in Clinical Trials for Liver Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voutila, Jon; Reebye, Vikash; Roberts, Thomas C; Protopapa, Pantelitsa; Andrikakou, Pinelopi; Blakey, David C; Habib, Robert; Huber, Hans; Saetrom, Pal; Rossi, John J; Habib, Nagy A

    2017-12-06

    Small activating RNAs (saRNAs) are short double-stranded oligonucleotides that selectively increase gene transcription. Here, we describe the development of an saRNA that upregulates the transcription factor CCATT/enhancer binding protein alpha (CEBPA), investigate its mode of action, and describe its development into a clinical candidate. A bioinformatically directed nucleotide walk around the CEBPA gene identified an saRNA sequence that upregulates CEBPA mRNA 2.5-fold in human hepatocellular carcinoma cells. A nuclear run-on assay confirmed that this upregulation is a transcriptionally driven process. Mechanistic experiments demonstrate that Argonaute-2 (Ago2) is required for saRNA activity, with the guide strand of the saRNA shown to be associated with Ago2 and localized at the CEBPA genomic locus using RNA chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays. The data support a sequence-specific on-target saRNA activity that leads to enhanced CEBPA mRNA transcription. Chemical modifications were introduced in the saRNA duplex to prevent activation of the innate immunity. This modified saRNA retains activation of CEBPA mRNA and downstream targets and inhibits growth of liver cancer cell lines in vitro. This novel drug has been encapsulated in a liposomal formulation for liver delivery, is currently in a phase I clinical trial for patients with liver cancer, and represents the first human study of an saRNA therapeutic. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Investigations on therapeutic glucocerebrosidases through paired detection with fluorescent activity-based probes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter W Kallemeijn

    Full Text Available Deficiency of glucocerebrosidase (GBA causes Gaucher disease (GD. In the common non-neuronopathic GD type I variant, glucosylceramide accumulates primarily in the lysosomes of visceral macrophages. Supplementing storage cells with lacking enzyme is accomplished via chronic intravenous administration of recombinant GBA containing mannose-terminated N-linked glycans, mediating the selective uptake by macrophages expressing mannose-binding lectin(s. Two recombinant GBA preparations with distinct N-linked glycans are registered in Europe for treatment of type I GD: imiglucerase (Genzyme, contains predominantly Man(3 glycans, and velaglucerase (Shire PLC Man(9 glycans. Activity-based probes (ABPs enable fluorescent labeling of recombinant GBA preparations through their covalent attachment to the catalytic nucleophile E340 of GBA. We comparatively studied binding and uptake of ABP-labeled imiglucerase and velaglucerase in isolated dendritic cells, cultured human macrophages and living mice, through simultaneous detection of different GBAs by paired measurements. Uptake of ABP-labeled rGBAs by dendritic cells was comparable, as well as the bio-distribution following equimolar intravenous administration to mice. ABP-labeled rGBAs were recovered largely in liver, white-blood cells, bone marrow and spleen. Lungs, brain and skin, affected tissues in severe GD types II and III, were only poorly supplemented. Small, but significant differences were noted in binding and uptake of rGBAs in cultured human macrophages, in the absence and presence of mannan. Mannan-competed binding and uptake were largest for velaglucerase, when determined with single enzymes or as equimolar mixtures of both enzymes. Vice versa, imiglucerase showed more prominent binding and uptake not competed by mannan. Uptake of recombinant GBAs by cultured macrophages seems to involve multiple receptors, including several mannose-binding lectins. Differences among cells from different donors

  18. Solution structures of potato virus X and narcissus mosaic virus from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, Ewan W.; Robinson, David J.; Hecht, Lutz

    2002-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) and narcissus mosaic virus (NMV) were studied using vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) in order to obtain new information on the structures of their coat protein subunits. The ROA spectra of the two intact virions are very similar to each other and similar to that of to......Potato virus X (PVX) and narcissus mosaic virus (NMV) were studied using vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) in order to obtain new information on the structures of their coat protein subunits. The ROA spectra of the two intact virions are very similar to each other and similar...

  19. Chimeric microbial rhodopsins for optical activation of Gs-proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Kazuho; Yamashita, Takahiro; Sasaki, Kengo; Inoue, Keiichi; Shichida, Yoshinori; Kandori, Hideki

    2017-01-01

    We previously showed that the chimeric proteins of microbial rhodopsins, such as light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin (BR) and Gloeobacter rhodopsin (GR) that contain cytoplasmic loops of bovine rhodopsin, are able to activate Gt protein upon light absorption. These facts suggest similar protein structural changes in both the light-driven proton pump and animal rhodopsin. Here we report two trials to engineer chimeric rhodopsins, one for the inserted loop, and another for the microbial rhodopsin template. For the former, we successfully activated Gs protein by light through the incorporation of the cytoplasmic loop of β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR). For the latter, we did not observe any G-protein activation for the light-driven sodium pump from Indibacter alkaliphilus (IndiR2) or a light-driven chloride pump halorhodopsin from Natronomonas pharaonis (NpHR), whereas the light-driven proton pump GR showed light-dependent G-protein activation. This fact suggests that a helix opening motion is common to G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) and GR, but not to IndiR2 and NpHR. Light-induced difference FTIR spectroscopy revealed similar structural changes between WT and the third loop chimera for each light-driven pump. A helical structural perturbation, which was largest for GR, was further enhanced in the chimera. We conclude that similar structural dynamics that occur on the cytoplasmic side of GPCR are needed to design chimeric microbial rhodopsins. PMID:29362703

  20. Nano-Engineered Mesenchymal Stem Cells Increase Therapeutic Efficacy of Anticancer Drug Through True Active Tumor Targeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layek, Buddhadev; Sadhukha, Tanmoy; Panyam, Jayanth; Prabha, Swayam

    2018-06-01

    Tumor-targeted drug delivery has the potential to improve therapeutic efficacy and mitigate non-specific toxicity of anticancer drugs. However, current drug delivery approaches rely on inefficient passive accumulation of the drug carrier in the tumor. We have developed a unique, truly active tumor-targeting strategy that relies on engineering mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) with drug-loaded nanoparticles. Our studies using the A549 orthotopic lung tumor model show that nano-engineered MSCs carrying the anticancer drug paclitaxel (PTX) home to tumors and create cellular drug depots that release the drug payload over several days. Despite significantly lower doses of PTX, nano-engineered MSCs resulted in significant inhibition of tumor growth and superior survival. Anticancer efficacy of nano-engineered MSCs was confirmed in immunocompetent C57BL/6 albino female mice bearing orthotopic Lewis Lung Carcinoma (LL/2-luc) tumors. Furthermore, at doses that resulted in equivalent therapeutic efficacy, nano-engineered MSCs had no effect on white blood cell count, whereas PTX solution and PTX nanoparticle treatments caused leukopenia. Biodistribution studies showed that nano-engineered MSCs resulted in greater than 9-fold higher AUC lung of PTX (1.5 μg.day/g) than PTX solution and nanoparticles (0.2 and 0.1 μg.day/g tissue, respectively) in the target lung tumors. Furthermore, the lung-to-liver and the lung-to-spleen ratios of PTX were several folds higher for nano-engineered MSCs relative to those for PTX solution and nanoparticle groups, suggesting that nano-engineered MSCs demonstrate significantly less off-target deposition. In summary, our results demonstrate that nano-engineered MSCs can serve as an efficient carrier for tumor-specific drug delivery and significantly improved anti-cancer efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutic drugs. Mol Cancer Ther; 17(6); 1196-206. ©2018 AACR . ©2018 American Association for Cancer Research.

  1. Reduced risk of compressive optic neuropathy using orbital radiotherapy in patients with active thyroid eye disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Pari N; Ma, Roy; Pickles, Tom; Rootman, Jack; Dolman, Peter J

    2014-06-01

    To compare the risk of developing compressive optic neuropathy in patients with active thyroid eye disease (TED) treated with corticosteroids with or without orbital radiotherapy. Retrospective single-center case-control study. The clinical charts of 351 patients with active TED who received corticosteroids with or without orbital radiotherapy between 1999 and 2010 were reviewed. Patients with compressive optic neuropathy at the time of presentation were excluded. Group 1 received corticosteroids only and Group 2 received corticosteroids as well as orbital radiotherapy. The primary outcome measure was the development of compressive optic neuropathy. Secondary outcome measures were changes in other parameters indicating the activity of TED, including soft tissue inflammation, diplopia, ocular motility restriction, and appearance. There were 144 cases in Group 1 and 105 in Group 2. Both groups were matched for age, sex, and stability of thyroid function. The 2 groups differed only in the modality of treatment for active TED. The main indication for treatment in both groups was soft tissue inflammation. Corticosteroids were initiated an average of 2.6 months following symptom onset in Group 1 and 2.5 months in Group 2. Group 2 received orbital radiotherapy on average 4.2 months following the initiation of corticosteroid therapy and 8% (9/105) were intolerant to corticosteroids. At an average of 3.2 years follow-up, compressive optic neuropathy had developed in 17% (25/144) of Group 1 and 0% of Group 2 (P optic neuropathy was significantly lower and improvement in ocular motility greater in patients receiving orbital radiotherapy in addition to corticosteroids. Patients with active TED appear to have an effective and sustained response to orbital radiotherapy combined with corticosteroids that is protective against disease progression and the development of compressive optic neuropathy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Quantum dynamics of spin qubits in optically active quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bechtold, Alexander

    2017-01-01

    The control of solid-state qubits for quantum information processing requires a detailed understanding of the mechanisms responsible for decoherence. During the past decade a considerable progress has been achieved for describing the qubit dynamics in relatively strong external magnetic fields. However, until now it has been impossible to experimentally test many theoretical predictions at very low magnetic fields and uncover mechanisms associated with reduced coherence times of spin qubits in solids. In particular, the role of the quadrupolar coupling of nuclear spins in this process is to date poorly understood. In the framework of this thesis, a spin memory device is utilized to optically prepare individual electron spin qubits in a single InGaAs quantum dot. After storages over timescales extending into the microsecond range the qubit��s state is read out to monitor the impact of the environment on it the spin dynamics. By performing such pump-probe experiments, the dominant electron spin decoherence mechanisms are identified in a wide range of external magnetic fields (0-5 T) and lattice temperatures of ∝10 K. The results presented in this thesis show that, without application of external magnetic fields the initially orientated electron spin rapidly loses its polarization due to precession around the fluctuating Overhauser field with a dispersion of 10.5 mT. The inhomogeneous dephasing time associated with these hyperfine mediated dynamics is of the order of T * 2 =2 ns. Over longer timescales, an unexpected stage of central spin relaxation is observed, namely the appearance of a second feature in the relaxation curve around T Q =750 ns. By comparison with theoretical simulations, this additional decoherence channel is shown to arise from coherent dynamics in the nuclear spin bath itself. Such coherent dynamics are induced by a quadrupolar coupling of the nuclear spins to the strain induced electric field gradients in the quantum dot. These processes

  3. Expanded therapeutic potential in activity space of next-generation 5-nitroimidazole antimicrobials with broad structural diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyamoto, Yukiko; Kalisiak, Jarosław; Korthals, Keith; Lauwaet, Tineke; Cheung, Dae Young; Lozano, Ricardo; Cobo, Eduardo R.; Upcroft, Peter; Upcroft, Jacqueline A.; Berg, Douglas E.; Gillin, Frances D.; Fokin, Valery V.; Sharpless, K. Barry; Eckmann, Lars

    2013-01-01

    Metronidazole and other 5-nitroimidazoles (5-NI) are among the most effective antimicrobials available against many important anaerobic pathogens, but evolving resistance is threatening their long-term clinical utility. The common 5-NIs were developed decades ago, yet little 5-NI drug development has since taken place, leaving the true potential of this important drug class unexplored. Here we report on a unique approach to the modular synthesis of diversified 5-NIs for broad exploration of their antimicrobial potential. Many of the more than 650 synthesized compounds, carrying structurally diverse functional groups, have vastly improved activity against a range of microbes, including the pathogenic protozoa Giardia lamblia and Trichomonas vaginalis, and the bacterial pathogens Helicobacter pylori, Clostridium difficile, and Bacteroides fragilis. Furthermore, they can overcome different forms of drug resistance, and are active and nontoxic in animal infection models. These findings provide impetus to the development of structurally diverse, next-generation 5-NI drugs as agents in the antimicrobial armamentarium, thus ensuring their future viability as primary therapeutic agents against many clinically important infections. PMID:24101497

  4. The Relationship Between Brain Oscillatory Activity and Therapeutic Effectiveness of Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation in the Treatment of Major Depressive Disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Francis Leuchter

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Major Depressive Disorder (MDD is marked by disturbances in brain functional connectivity. This connectivity is modulated by rhythmic oscillations of brain electrical activity, which enable coordinated functions across brain regions. Oscillatory activity plays a central role in regulating thinking and memory, mood, cerebral blood flow, and neurotransmitter levels, and restoration of normal oscillatory patterns is associated with effective treatment of MDD. Repetitive Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation (rTMS is a robust treatment for MDD, but the mechanism of action (MOA of its benefits for mood disorders remains incompletely understood. Benefits of rTMS have been tied to enhanced neuroplasticity in specific brain pathways. We summarize here the evidence that rTMS entrains and resets thalamocortical oscillators, normalizes regulation and facilitates reemergence of intrinsic cerebral rhythms, and through this mechanism restores normal brain function. This entrainment and resetting may be a critical step in engendering neuroplastic changes and the antidepressant effects of rTMS. It may be possible to modify the method of rTMS administration to enhance this mechanism of action and achieve better antidepressant effectiveness. We propose that rTMS can be administered: 1 synchronized to a patient’s individual alpha rhythm (IAF, or synchronized rTMS (sTMS; 2 as a low magnetic field strength sinusoidal wave form; and, 3 broadly to multiple brain areas simultaneously. We present here the theory and evidence indicating that these modifications could enhance the therapeutic effectiveness of rTMS for the treatment of MDD.

  5. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma as a potential therapeutic target in the treatment of preeclampsia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McCarthy, Fergus P

    2012-01-31

    Preeclampsia is a multisystemic disorder of pregnancy characterized by hypertension, proteinuria, and maternal endothelial dysfunction. It is a major cause of maternal and perinatal morbidity and mortality and is thought to be attributable, in part, to inadequate trophoblast invasion. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-gamma) is a ligand-activated transcription factor expressed in trophoblasts, and the vasculature of which activation has been shown to improve endothelium-dependent vasodilatation in hypertensive conditions. We investigated the effects of the administration of a PPAR-gamma agonist using the reduced uterine perfusion pressure (RUPP) rat model of preeclampsia. The selective PPAR-gamma agonist, rosiglitazone, was administered to pregnant rats that had undergone RUPP surgery. To investigate whether any observed beneficial effects of PPAR-gamma activation were mediated by the antioxidant enzyme, heme oxygenase 1, rosiglitazone was administered in combination with the heme oxygenase 1 inhibitor tin-protoporphyrin IX. RUPP rats were characterized by hypertension, endothelial dysfunction, and elevated microalbumin:creatinine ratios. Rosiglitazone administration ameliorated hypertension, improved vascular function, and reduced the elevated microalbumin:creatinine ratio in RUPP rats. With the exception of microalbumin:creatinine ratio, these beneficial effects were abrogated in the presence of the heme oxygenase 1 inhibitor. Administration of a PPAR-gamma agonist prevented the development of several of the pathophysiological characteristics associated with the RUPP model of preeclampsia, via a heme oxygenase 1-dependent pathway. The findings from this study provide further insight into the underlying etiology of preeclampsia and a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of preeclampsia.

  6. Applications of inorganic nanoparticles as therapeutic agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Taeho; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, various functional nanostructured materials with interesting optical, magnetic, mechanical and chemical properties have been extensively applied to biomedical areas including imaging, diagnosis and therapy. In therapeutics, most research has focused on the application of nanoparticles as potential delivery vehicles for drugs and genes, because nanoparticles in the size range of 2-100 nm can interact with biological systems at the molecular level, and allow targeted delivery and passage through biological barriers. Recent investigations have even revealed that several kinds of nanomaterials are intrinsically therapeutic. Not only can they passively interact with cells, but they can also actively mediate molecular processes to regulate cell functions. This can be seen in the treatment of cancer via anti-angiogenic mechanisms as well as the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases by effectively controlling oxidative stress. This review will present recent applications of inorganic nanoparticles as therapeutic agents in the treatment of disease.

  7. Novel silica surface charge density mediated control of the optical properties of embedded optically active materials and its application for fiber optic pH sensing at elevated temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Congjun; Ohodnicki, Paul R; Su, Xin; Keller, Murphy; Brown, Thomas D; Baltrus, John P

    2015-02-14

    Silica and silica incorporated nanocomposite materials have been extensively studied for a wide range of applications. Here we demonstrate an intriguing optical effect of silica that, depending on the solution pH, amplifies or attenuates the optical absorption of a variety of embedded optically active materials with very distinct properties, such as plasmonic Au nanoparticles, non-plasmonic Pt nanoparticles, and the organic dye rhodamine B (not a pH indicator), coated on an optical fiber. Interestingly, the observed optical response to varying pH appears to follow the surface charge density of the silica matrix for all the three different optically active materials. To the best of our knowledge, this optical effect has not been previously reported and it appears universal in that it is likely that any optically active material can be incorporated into the silica matrix to respond to solution pH or surface charge density variations. A direct application of this effect is for optical pH sensing which has very attractive features that can enable minimally invasive, remote, real time and continuous distributed pH monitoring. Particularly, as demonstrated here, using highly stable metal nanoparticles embedded in an inorganic silica matrix can significantly improve the capability of pH sensing in extremely harsh environments which is of increasing importance for applications in unconventional oil and gas resource recovery, carbon sequestration, water quality monitoring, etc. Our approach opens a pathway towards possible future development of robust optical pH sensors for the most demanding environmental conditions. The newly discovered optical effect of silica also offers the potential for control of the optical properties of optically active materials for a range of other potential applications such as electrochromic devices.

  8. Optics outreach activities with elementary school kids from public education in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viera-González, P.; Sánchez-Guerrero, G.; Ruiz-Mendoza, J.; Cárdenas-Ortiz, G.; Ceballos-Herrera, D.; Selvas-Aguilar, R.

    2014-09-01

    This work shows the results obtained from the "O4K" Project supported by International Society for Optics and Photonis (SPIE) and the Universidad Autonoma de Nuevo Leon (UANL) through its SPIE Student Chapter and the Dr. Juan Carlos Ruiz-Mendoza, outreach coordinator of the Facultad de Ciencias Fisico Matematicas of the UANL. Undergraduate and graduate students designed Optics representative activities using easy-access materials that allow the interaction of children with optics over the exploration, observation and experimentation, taking as premise that the best way to learn Science is the interaction with it. Several activities were realized through the 2011-2013 events with 1,600 kids with ages from 10 to 12; the results were analyzed using surveys. One of the principal conclusions is that in most of the cases the children changed their opinions about Sciences in a positive way.

  9. The age of enlightenment: evolving opportunities in brain research through optical manipulation of neuronal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason eJerome

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Optical manipulation of neuronal activity has rapidly developed into the most powerful and widely used approach to study mechanisms related to neuronal connectivity over a range of scales. Since the early use of single site uncaging to map network connectivity, rapid technological development of light modulation techniques has added important new options, such as fast scanning photostimulation, massively parallel control of light stimuli, holographic uncaging and 2-photon stimulation techniques. Exciting new developments in optogenetics complement neurotransmitter uncaging techniques by providing cell-type specificity and in vivo usability, providing optical access to the neural substrates of behavior. Here we review the rapid evolution of methods for the optical manipulation of neuronal activity, emphasizing crucial recent developments.

  10. The age of enlightenment: evolving opportunities in brain research through optical manipulation of neuronal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jerome, Jason; Heck, Detlef H

    2011-01-01

    Optical manipulation of neuronal activity has rapidly developed into the most powerful and widely used approach to study mechanisms related to neuronal connectivity over a range of scales. Since the early use of single site uncaging to map network connectivity, rapid technological development of light modulation techniques has added important new options, such as fast scanning photostimulation, massively parallel control of light stimuli, holographic uncaging, and two-photon stimulation techniques. Exciting new developments in optogenetics complement neurotransmitter uncaging techniques by providing cell-type specificity and in vivo usability, providing optical access to the neural substrates of behavior. Here we review the rapid evolution of methods for the optical manipulation of neuronal activity, emphasizing crucial recent developments.

  11. Activation of muscarinic receptors protects against retinal neurons damage and optic nerve degeneration in vitro and in vivo models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Pan-Pan; Yuan, Hai-Hong; Zhu, Xu; Cui, Yong-Yao; Li, Hui; Feng, Xue-Mei; Qiu, Yu; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Zhou, Wei

    2014-03-01

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor agonist pilocarpine reduces intraocular pressure (IOP) of glaucoma mainly by stimulating ciliary muscle contraction and then increasing aqueous outflow. It is of our great interest to know whether pilocarpine has the additional properties of retinal neuroprotection independent of IOP lowering in vitro and in vivo models. In rat primary retinal cultures, cell viability was measured using an MTT assay and the trypan blue exclusion method, respectively. Retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) were identified by immunofluorescence and quantified by flow cytometry. For the in vivo study, the retinal damage after retinal ischemia/reperfusion injury in rats was evaluated by histopathological study using hematoxylin and eosin staining, transmission electron microscopy, and immunohistochemical study on cleaved caspase-3, caspase-3, and ChAT. Pretreatment of pilocarpine attenuated glutamate-induced neurotoxicity of primary retinal neurons in a dose-dependent manner. Protection of pilocarpine in both retinal neurons and RGCs was largely abolished by the nonselective muscarinic receptor antagonist atropine and the M1-selective muscarinic receptor antagonist pirenzepine. After ischemia/reperfusion injury in retina, the inner retinal degeneration occurred including ganglion cell layer thinning and neuron lost, and the optic nerve underwent vacuolar changes. These degenerative changes were significantly lessened by topical application of 2% pilocarpine. In addition, the protective effect of pilocarpine on the ischemic rat retina was favorably reflected by downregulating the expression of activated apoptosis marker cleaved caspase-3 and caspase-3 and upregulating the expression of cholinergic cell marker ChAT. Taken together, this highlights pilocarpine through the activation of muscarinic receptors appear to afford significant protection against retinal neurons damage and optic nerve degeneration at clinically relevant concentrations. These data also

  12. Transition dipole coupling modeling of optical activity enhancements in macromolecular protein systems

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Průša, Jiří; Bouř, Petr

    2018-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 1 (2018), s. 55-64 ISSN 0899-0042 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-09072S; GA MŠk(CZ) LTC17012 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : optical activity * vibrational circular dichroism * protein fibrils Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics OBOR OECD: Biophysics Impact factor: 1.956, year: 2016

  13. Derivation of a regional active-optical reflectance sensor corn algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Active-optical reflectance sensor (AORS) algorithms developed for in-season corn (Zea mays L.) N management have traditionally been derived using sub-regional scale information. However, studies have shown these previously developed AORS algorithms are not consistently accurate when used on a region...

  14. An optical tweezer-based study of antimicrobial activity of silver ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This is achieved by monitoring the fluctuations of an optically trapped polystyrene bead immersed in it. Examining the changes in the fluctuation pattern of the bead with time provides an accurate characterization of the reduction in the microbial activity. Here, we report on the effect of addition of silver nanoparticles on ...

  15. Synthesis and aggregation study of optically active tetra-β- [(S)-2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Administrator

    Abstract. The optically active tetra-β-[(S)-2-octanyloxy]-substituted copper and nickel phthalocyanines ... layer was washed by 100 mL water and dried with ... roform as mobile phase to give pure blue solid 4a: 2⋅26 g ... from the reaction mixtures by extraction with chlo- ... bonding with chiral carbon), 2⋅01–0⋅88 (H bonding.

  16. InP based lasers and optical amplifiers with wire-/dot-like active regions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reithmaier, J. P.; Somers, A.; Deubert, S.

    2005-01-01

    Long wavelength lasers and semiconductor optical amplifiers based on InAs quantum wire/dot-like active regions were developed on InP substrates dedicated to cover the extended telecommunication wavelength range between 1.4 - 1.65 mm. In a brief overview different technological approaches will be ...

  17. Monitoring of zwitterionic proline and alanine conformational space by raman optical activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kapitán, Josef; Bouř, Petr; Baumruk, V.

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 12, č. 1 (2005), s. 30 ISSN 1211-5894. [Meeting of Structural Biologists /4./. 10.03.2005-21.03.2005, Nové Hrady] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : proline * Raman optical activity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry

  18. Novel Chiroptical Analysis of Hemoglobin by Surface Enhanced Resonance Raman Optical Activity Spectroscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazhe, Nadezda; Brazhe, Alexey; Sosnovtseva, Olga

    2010-01-01

    The metalloprotein hemoglobin (Hb) was studied using surface enhanced resonance Raman spectroscopy (SERRS) and surface enhanced resonance Raman optical activity (SERROA). The SERROA results are analyzed and compared with the SERRS, and the later to the resonance Raman (RRS) performed on Hb...

  19. Active Learning of Geometrical Optics in High School: The ALOP Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alborch, Alejandra; Pandiella, Susana; Benegas, Julio

    2017-01-01

    A group comparison experiment of two high school classes with pre and post instruction testing has been carried out to study the suitability and advantages of using the active learning of optics and photonics (ALOP) curricula in high schools of developing countries. Two parallel, mixed gender, 12th grade classes of a high school run by the local…

  20. Nonplanar Tertiary Amides in Rigid Chiral Tricyclic Dilactams. Peptide Group Distortions and Vibrational Optical Activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pazderková, Markéta; Profant, V.; Hodačová, J.; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Pazderka, T.; Novotná, P.; Urbanová, M.; Šafařík, Martin; Buděšínský, Miloš; Tichý, Miloš; Bednárová, Lucie; Baumruk, V.; Maloň, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 33 (2013), s. 9626-9642 ISSN 1520-6106 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP205/10/1276 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : spirodilactams * amide bond * vibrational circular dichroism * non-planarity * Raman optical activity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.377, year: 2013

  1. Mosher Amides: Determining the Absolute Stereochemistry of Optically-Active Amines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Damian A.; Tomaso, Anthony E., Jr.; Priest, Owen P.; Hindson, David F.; Hurlburt, Jamie L.

    2008-01-01

    The use of chiral reagents for the derivatization of optically-active amines and alcohols for the purpose of determining their enantiomeric purity or absolute configuration is a tool used by many chemists. Among the techniques used, Mosher's amide and Mosher's ester analyses are among the most reliable and one of the most often used. Despite this,…

  2. Detection of Molecular Chirality by Induced Resonance Raman Optical Activity in Europium Complexes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Yamamoto, Shigeki; Bouř, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 44 (2012), s. 11058-11061 ISSN 1433-7851 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033; GA ČR GAP208/11/0105 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : europium * complexes * raman optical activity * resonance Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 13.734, year: 2012

  3. In situ beamline analysis and correction of active optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutter, John; Alcock, Simon; Sawhney, Kawal

    2012-11-01

    At the Diamond Light Source, pencil-beam measurements have enabled long-wavelength slope errors on X-ray mirror surfaces to be examined under ultra-high vacuum and beamline mounting without the need to remove the mirror from the beamline. For an active mirror an automated procedure has been implemented to calculate the actuator settings that optimize its figure. More recently, this in situ pencil-beam method has been applied to additional uses for which ex situ measurements would be inconvenient or simply impossible. First, it has been used to check the stability of the slope errors of several bimorph mirrors at intervals of several weeks or months. Then, it also proved useful for the adjustment of bender and sag compensation actuators on mechanically bent mirrors. Fits to the bending of ideal beams have been performed on the slope errors of a mechanically bent mirror in order to distinguish curvatures introduced by the bending actuators from gravitational distortion. Application of the optimization procedure to another mechanically bent mirror led to an improvement of its sag compensation mechanism.

  4. Developments of a bonding technique for optical materials by a surface activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugiyama, Akira; Oda, Tomohiro; Abe, Tomoyuki; Kusunoki, Isao

    2007-01-01

    We have been developing a pair of sample holder used for optics in the surface activation bonding equipment. The holder can adjust the relative position of samples in the order of sub mm. To study the degree of dislocation appearing crystal surface activated by a fast atomic beam, irradiated sapphire crystals were examined by RBS, XPS, and AFM analysis. The heat treatment recovered the surface roughness of irradiated sapphire when the heating temperature reached at 1573 K. (author)

  5. Optically and biologically active mussel protein-coated double-walled carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Yong Chae; Muramatsu, Hiroyuki; Fujisawa, Kazunori; Kim, Jin Hee; Hayashi, Takuya; Kim, Yoong Ahm; Endo, Morinobu; Terrones, Mauricio; Dresselhaus, Mildred S

    2011-12-02

    A method of dispersing strongly bundled double-walled carbon nanotubes (DWNTs) via a homogeneous coating of mussel protein in an aqueous solution is presented. Optical activity, mechanical strength, as well as electrical conductivity coming from the nanotubes and the versatile biological activity from the mussel protein make mussel-coated DWNTs promising as a multifunctional scaffold and for anti-fouling materials. Copyright © 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. MEK/ERK activation plays a decisive role in yellow fever virus replication: implication as an antiviral therapeutic target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarnaz, Jonas D; De Oliveira, Leonardo C; Torres, Alice A; Palhares, Rafael M; Casteluber, Marisa C; Rodrigues, Claudiney M; Cardozo, Pablo L; De Souza, Aryádina M R; Pacca, Carolina C; Ferreira, Paulo C P; Kroon, Erna G; Nogueira, Maurício L; Bonjardim, Cláudio A

    2014-11-01

    Exploiting the inhibition of host signaling pathways aiming for discovery of potential antiflaviviral compounds is clearly a beneficial strategy for the control of life-threatening diseases caused by flaviviruses. Here we describe the antiviral activity of the MEK1/2 inhibitor U0126 against Yellow fever virus 17D vaccine strain (YFV-17D). Infection of VERO cells with YFV-17D stimulates ERK1/2 phosphorylation early during infection. Pharmacological inhibition of MEK1/2 through U0126 treatment of VERO cells blockades not only the YFV-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation, but also inhibits YFV replication by ∼99%. U0126 was also effective against dengue virus (DENV-2 and -3) and Saint-Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). Levels of NS4AB, as detected by immunofluorescence, are diminished upon treatment with the inhibitor, as well as the characteristic endoplasmic reticulum membrane invagination stimulated during the infection. Though not protective, treatment of YFV-infected, adult BALB/c mice with U0126 resulted in significant reduction of virus titers in brains. Collectively, our data suggest the potential targeting of the MEK1/2 kinase as a therapeutic tool against diseases caused by flaviviruses such as yellow fever, adverse events associated with yellow fever vaccination and dengue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Lavandula angustifolia Essential Oil in Combination with Other Aroma-Therapeutic Oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rapper, Stephanie; Kamatou, Guy; Viljoen, Alvaro

    2013-01-01

    The antimicrobial activity of Lavandula angustifolia essential oil was assessed in combination with 45 other oils to establish possible interactive properties. The composition of the selected essential oils was confirmed using GC-MS with a flame ionization detector. The microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) assay was undertaken, whereby the fractional inhibitory concentration (ΣFIC) was calculated for the oil combinations. When lavender oil was assayed in 1 : 1 ratios with other oils, synergistic (26.7%), additive (48.9%), non-interactive (23.7%), and antagonistic (0.7%) interactions were observed. When investigating different ratios of the two oils in combination, the most favourable interactions were when L. angustifolia was combined with Cinnamomum zeylanicum or with Citrus sinensis, against C. albicans and S. aureus, respectively. In 1 : 1 ratios, 75.6% of the essential oils investigated showed either synergistic or additive results, lending in vitro credibility to the use of essential oil blends in aroma-therapeutic practices. Within the field of aromatherapy, essential oils are commonly employed in mixtures for the treatment of infectious diseases; however, very little evidence exists to support the use in combination. This study lends some credence to the concomitant use of essential oils blended with lavender. PMID:23737850

  8. The In Vitro Antimicrobial Activity of Lavandula angustifolia Essential Oil in Combination with Other Aroma-Therapeutic Oils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie de Rapper

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The antimicrobial activity of Lavandula angustifolia essential oil was assessed in combination with 45 other oils to establish possible interactive properties. The composition of the selected essential oils was confirmed using GC-MS with a flame ionization detector. The microdilution minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC assay was undertaken, whereby the fractional inhibitory concentration (ΣFIC was calculated for the oil combinations. When lavender oil was assayed in 1 : 1 ratios with other oils, synergistic (26.7%, additive (48.9%, non-interactive (23.7%, and antagonistic (0.7% interactions were observed. When investigating different ratios of the two oils in combination, the most favourable interactions were when L. angustifolia was combined with Cinnamomum zeylanicum or with Citrus sinensis, against C. albicans and S. aureus, respectively. In 1 : 1 ratios, 75.6% of the essential oils investigated showed either synergistic or additive results, lending in vitro credibility to the use of essential oil blends in aroma-therapeutic practices. Within the field of aromatherapy, essential oils are commonly employed in mixtures for the treatment of infectious diseases; however, very little evidence exists to support the use in combination. This study lends some credence to the concomitant use of essential oils blended with lavender.

  9. Rational screening of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists from natural products: potential therapeutics for heart failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Rui; Wan, Jing; Song, Jing; Qian, Yan; Liu, Yong; Gu, Shuiming

    2017-12-01

    biologically active compounds. The newly identified natural products with PPARγ agonistic potency are considered as promising lead scaffolds to develop novel chemical therapeutics for heart failure.

  10. Optical Activation of Germanium Plasmonic Antennas in the Mid-Infrared

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Marco P.; Schmidt, Christian; Sakat, Emilie; Stock, Johannes; Samarelli, Antonio; Frigerio, Jacopo; Ortolani, Michele; Paul, Douglas J.; Isella, Giovanni; Leitenstorfer, Alfred; Biagioni, Paolo; Brida, Daniele

    2016-07-01

    Impulsive interband excitation with femtosecond near-infrared pulses establishes a plasma response in intrinsic germanium structures fabricated on a silicon substrate. This direct approach activates the plasmonic resonance of the Ge structures and enables their use as optical antennas up to the mid-infrared spectral range. The optical switching lasts for hundreds of picoseconds until charge recombination redshifts the plasma frequency. The full behavior of the structures is modeled by the electrodynamic response established by an electron-hole plasma in a regular array of antennas.

  11. Broadband Optical Active Waveguides Written by Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Lithium Fluoride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiamenti, Ismael; Costa, Larissa N. da; Kalinowski, Hypolito J.; Bonfigli, Francesca; Montereali, Rosa Maria; Gomes Anderson, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Broadband waveguiding through light-emitting strips directly written in a blank lithium fluoride crystal with a femtosecond laser is reported. Light guiding was observed at several optical wavelengths, from blue, 458 nm, to near-infrared, at 1550 nm. Visible photoluminescence spectra of the optically active F 2 and F 3 + color centers produced by the fs laser writing process were measured. The wavelength-dependent refractive index increase was estimated to be in the order of 10 −3 −10 −4 in the visible and near-infrared spectral intervals, which is consistent with the stable formation of point defects in LiF

  12. Broadband Optical Active Waveguides Written by Femtosecond Laser Pulses in Lithium Fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismael, Chiamenti; Francesca, Bonfigli; Anderson, S. L. Gomes; Rosa, Maria Montereali; Larissa, N. da Costa; Hypolito, J. Kalinowski

    2014-01-01

    Broadband waveguiding through light-emitting strips directly written in a blank lithium fluoride crystal with a femtosecond laser is reported. Light guiding was observed at several optical wavelengths, from blue, 458 nm, to near-infrared, at 1550 nm. Visible photoluminescence spectra of the optically active F2 and F3+ color centers produced by the fs laser writing process were measured. The wavelength-dependent refractive index increase was estimated to be in the order of 10-3-10-4 in the visible and near-infrared spectral intervals, which is consistent with the stable formation of point defects in LiF.

  13. Active Figure Control Effects on Mounting Strategy for X-Ray Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Atkins, Carolyn; Roche, Jacqueline M.; ODell, Stephen L.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.

    2014-01-01

    As part of ongoing development efforts at MSFC, we have begun to investigate mounting strategies for highly nested xray optics in both full-shell and segmented configurations. The analytical infrastructure for this effort also lends itself to investigation of active strategies. We expect that a consequence of active figure control on relatively thin substrates is that errors are propagated to the edges, where they might affect the effective precision of the mounting points. Based upon modeling, we describe parametrically, the conditions under which active mounts are preferred over fixed ones, and the effect of active figure corrections on the required number, locations, and kinematic characteristics of mounting points.

  14. The Wound Healing and Antibacterial Activity of Five Ethnomedical Calophyllum inophyllum Oils: An Alternative Therapeutic Strategy to Treat Infected Wounds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teddy Léguillier

    Full Text Available Calophyllum inophyllum L. (Calophyllaceae is an evergreen tree ethno-medically used along the seashores and islands of the Indian and Pacific Oceans, especially in Polynesia. Oil extracted from the seeds is traditionally used topically to treat a wide range of skin injuries from burn, scar and infected wounds to skin diseases such as dermatosis, urticaria and eczema. However, very few scientific studies reported and quantified the therapeutic properties of Calophyllum inophyllum oil (CIO. In this work, five CIO from Indonesia (CIO1, Tahiti (CIO2, 3, Fiji islands (CIO4 and New Caledonia (CIO5 were studied and their cytotoxic, wound healing, and antibacterial properties were presented in order to provide a scientific support to their traditional use and verify their safety.The safety of the five CIO was ascertained using the Alamar blue assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO wound healing properties were determined using the scratch test assay on human keratinocyte cells. CIO-stimulated antibacterial innate immune response was evaluated using ELISA by measuring β defensin-2 release in human derivative macrophage cells. CIO antibacterial activity was tested using oilogramme against twenty aerobic Gram- bacteria species, twenty aerobic Gram+ bacteria species, including a multi-drug resistant Staphylococcus aureus strain and two anaerobic Gram+ bacteria species e.g. Propionibacterium acnes and Propionibacterium granulosum. To detect polarity profile of the components responsible of the antibacterial activity, we performed bioautography against a Staphylococcus aureus strain.Based on Alamar Blue assay, we showed that CIO can be safely used on keratinocyte cells between 2.7% and 11.2% depending on CIO origin. Concerning the healing activity, all the CIO tested accelerated in vitro wound closure, the healing factor being 1.3 to 2.1 higher compared to control when keratinocytes were incubated after scratch with CIO at 0.1%. Furthermore, our results

  15. Damage recovery and optical activity in europium implanted wide gap oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alves, E.; Marques, C.; Franco, N.; Alves, L.C.; Peres, M.; Soares, M.J.; Monteiro, T.

    2010-01-01

    In this study we compare and discuss the defects and optical behaviour of sapphire and magnesium oxide single crystals implanted at room temperature with different fluences (1 x 10 15 -1 x 10 16 cm -2 ) of europium ions. Rutherford backscattering channelling shows that for fluences above 5 x 10 15 cm -2 the surface disorder level in the Al-sublattice reaches the random level. Implantation damage recovers fast for annealing in oxidizing atmosphere but even for the highest fluence we recover almost completely all the damage after annealing at 1300 o C, independently of the annealing environment (reducing or oxidizing). Annealing above 1000 o C promotes the formation of Eu 2 O 3 in the samples with higher concentration of Eu. The optical activation of the rare earth ions at room temperature was observed after annealing at 800 o C by photoluminescence and ionoluminescence. In Al 2 O 3 lattice the highest intensity line of the Eu 3+ ions corresponds to the forced electric dipole 5 D 0 → 7 F 2 transition that occurs ∼616 nm. For the MgO samples the Eu 3+ optical activation was also achieved after implantation with different fluences. Here, the lanthanide recombination is dominated by the magnetic dipole 5 D 0 → 7 F 1 transition near by 590 nm commonly observed for samples were Eu 3+ is placed in a high symmetry local site. The results clearly demonstrate the possibility to get Eu incorporated in optical active regular lattice sites in wide gap oxides.

  16. Isotope effect of optical activity measurements on L-α-alanine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Darge, W.; Laczko, I.; Thiemann, W.

    1976-01-01

    If an optically active organic substance is labelled in the chirality center with another isotopic species (such as 15 N for 14 N) a pronounced variation of rotatory power is predicted. It was tried to varify this idea experimentally on L-α-alanine and found an isotope effect in ORD (optical rotatory dispersion). The magnitude of the rotation is mainly dependent on the pH of the solvent. The ratio of the optical activity alanine- 14 N/alanine- 15 N is about 1.02. It can be seen that the ratios of the molecular rotations are consistently lower than the corresponding ratios of the specific rotations. This is of course due to the fact that the molecular mass 15 M is larger than 14 M. This means tthat the mass difference is already taken into account so that the ratio of the molecular rotations could be defined as the ''net'' isotope effect in the ORDs of 15 N-substitued alanine. From the fact the ORD is different for the isotope-substitued alanine, one can reasonably assume that the absorption coefficient is also different. This leads to speculations about certain problems in the chemical evolution of the biosphere, such as the origin of optical activity. (T.G.)

  17. High-power fiber optic cable with integrated active sensors for live process monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomster, Ola; Blomqvist, Mats; Bergstrand, Hans; Pålsson, Magnus

    2012-03-01

    In industrial applications using high-brilliance lasers at power levels up to and exceeding 20 kW and similarly direct diode lasers of 10 kW, there is an increasing demand to continuously monitor component status even in passive components such as fiber-optic cables. With fiber-optic cables designed according to the European Automotive Industry fiber standard interface there is room for integrating active sensors inside the connectors. In this paper we present the integrated active sensors in the new Optoskand QD fiber-optic cable designed to handle extreme levels of power losses, and how these sensors can be employed in industrial manufacturing. The sensors include photo diodes for detection of scattered light inside the fiber connector, absolute temperature of the fiber connector, difference in temperature of incoming and outgoing cooling water, and humidity measurement inside the fiber connector. All these sensors are connected to the fiber interlock system, where interlock break enable functions can be activated when measured signals are higher than threshold levels. It is a very fast interlock break system as the control of the signals is integrated in the electronics inside the fiber connector. Also, since all signals can be logged it is possible to evaluate what happened inside the connector before the interlock break instance. The communication to the fiber-optic connectors is via a CAN interface. Thus it is straightforward to develop the existing laser host control to also control the CAN-messages from the QD sensors.

  18. The Comparison Among Antibacterial Activity of Mespilus germanica Extracts and Number of Common Therapeutic Antibiotics “In Vitro”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farideh Tabatabaei-Yazdi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Antibiotic resistance is a serious and growing phenomenon in contemporary medicine and has emerged as one of the pre-eminent public health concerns of the 21st century. Objectives: In this study, antibacterial activity of Mespilus germanica extract against some pathogenic bacterial strains (Streptococcus pyogene, Listeria innocua, Enterobacter aerogenes and Klebsiella pneumoniae was evaluated. Materials and Methods: In this experimental study, maceration extraction method was used for M. germanica extract. Disk diffusion method was used to evaluate the antimicrobial effect and broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum bactericidal concentration. Then, the data were entered into the SPSS-18 statistical software and analyzed using one-way ANOVA and Tukey test. Results: Antimicrobial activity was assessed by inhibition diameters which were found to range from 8 to 21.5 mm for the two extracts against all the bacterial strains tested. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC for the extracts were later determined by three fold serial dilutions method and they ranged 2 - 64 mg/mL against all the strains and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBC for the extracts were later determined by three fold serial dilutions method and they ranged 4 - 128 mg/mL against all the strains. Conclusions: The M. germanica extract showed the more effective impact on the growth S. pyogene and L. innocua than E. aerogenes and K. pneumoniae (P < 0.05. M. germanica in comparison with common therapeutic antibiotics had more inhibitory effect on some of the studied strains in vitro.

  19. Therapeutic advantage of pro-electrophilic drugs to activate the Nrf2/ARE pathway in Alzheimer's disease models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipton, Stuart A; Rezaie, Tayebeh; Nutter, Anthony; Lopez, Kevin M; Parker, James; Kosaka, Kunio; Satoh, Takumi; McKercher, Scott R; Masliah, Eliezer; Nakanishi, Nobuki

    2016-12-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is characterized by synaptic and neuronal loss, which occurs at least partially through oxidative stress induced by oligomeric amyloid-β (Aβ)-peptide. Carnosic acid (CA), a chemical found in rosemary and sage, is a pro-electrophilic compound that is converted to its active form by oxidative stress. The active form stimulates the Keap1/Nrf2 transcriptional pathway and thus production of phase 2 antioxidant enzymes. We used both in vitro and in vivo models. For in vitro studies, we evaluated protective effects of CA on primary neurons exposed to oligomeric Aβ. For in vivo studies, we used two transgenic mouse models of AD, human amyloid precursor protein (hAPP)-J20 mice and triple transgenic (3xTg AD) mice. We treated these mice trans-nasally with CA twice weekly for 3 months. Subsequently, we performed neurobehavioral tests and quantitative immunohistochemistry to assess effects on AD-related phenotypes, including learning and memory, and synaptic damage. In vitro, CA reduced dendritic spine loss in rat neurons exposed to oligomeric Aβ. In vivo, CA treatment of hAPP-J20 mice improved learning and memory in the Morris water maze test. Histologically, CA increased dendritic and synaptic markers, and decreased astrogliosis, Aβ plaque number, and phospho-tau staining in the hippocampus. We conclude that CA exhibits therapeutic benefits in rodent AD models and since the FDA has placed CA on the 'generally regarded as safe' (GRAS) list, thus obviating the need for safety studies, human clinical trials will be greatly expedited.

  20. Effect of therapeutic touch on brain activation of preterm infants in response to sensory punctate stimulus: a near-infrared spectroscopy-based study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honda, Noritsugu; Ohgi, Shohei; Wada, Norihisa; Loo, Kek Khee; Higashimoto, Yuji; Fukuda, Kanji

    2013-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether therapeutic touch in preterm infants can ameliorate their sensory punctate stimulus response in terms of brain activation measured by near-infrared spectroscopy. The study included 10 preterm infants at 34-40 weeks' corrected age. Oxyhaemoglobin (Oxy-Hb) concentration, heart rate (HR), arterial oxygen saturation (SaO2) and body movements were recorded during low-intensity sensory punctate stimulation for 1 s with and without therapeutic touch by a neonatal development specialist nurse. Each stimulation was followed by a resting phase of 30 s. All measurements were performed with the infants asleep in the prone position. sensory punctate stimulus exposure significantly increased the oxy-Hb concentration but did not affect HR, SaO2 and body movements. The infants receiving therapeutic touch had significantly decreased oxy-Hb concentrations over time. Therapeutic touch in preterm infants can ameliorate their sensory punctate stimulus response in terms of brain activation, indicated by increased cerebral oxygenation. Therefore, therapeutic touch may have a protective effect on the autoregulation of cerebral blood flow during sensory punctate stimulus in neonates.

  1. Quantum computer based on activated dielectric nanoparticles selectively interacting with short optical pulses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gadomskii, Oleg N; Kharitonov, Yu Ya

    2004-01-01

    The operation principle of a quantum computer is proposed based on a system of dielectric nanoparticles activated with two-level atoms - cubits, in which electric dipole transitions are excited by short intense optical pulses. It is proved that the logical operation (logical operator) CNOT (controlled NOT) is performed by means of time-dependent transfer of quantum information over 'long' (of the order of 10 4 nm) distances between spherical nanoparticles owing to the delayed interaction between them in the optical radiation field. It is shown that one-cubit and two-cubit logical operators required for quantum calculations can be realised by selectively exciting dielectric particles with short optical pulses. (quantum calculations)

  2. Recent research activities on functional ceramics for insulator, breeder and optical sensing systems in fusion reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nagata, S., E-mail: nagata@imr.tohoku.ac.jp [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Katsui, H.; Hoshi, K. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Tsuchiya, B. [Meijo University, Faculty of Science and Technology, Nagoya (Japan); Toh, K. [J-PARC Center Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai (Japan); Zhao, M.; Shikama, T. [Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Hodgson, E.R. [Euratom/CIEMAT Fusion Association, Madrid (Spain)

    2013-11-15

    The paper presents a brief overview of current research activities on functional ceramic materials for insulating components, tritium breeder and optical sensing systems, mainly carried out at Institute for Materials Research (IMR), Tohoku University. Topics include recent experimental results related to the electrical degradation and optical changes in typical oxide ceramics (e.g. Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and SiO{sub 2}) concerning radiolytic effects. Hydrogen effects on the electrical conductivity in the Perovskite-type oxide ceramics and the interaction between hydrogen and irradiation induced defects in ternary Li oxides used as breeder materials, were dynamically observed under the irradiation environment. Further attention is focused on several challenging qualifications required for an advanced sensing system using optical characteristics (e.g., thermoluminescence in SiO{sub 2} core fiber, neutron-induced long lasting emission from oxides doped with rare-earth elements, and gasochromic coloration phenomenon of WO{sub 3})

  3. CHARACTERIZING THE OPTICAL VARIABILITY OF BRIGHT BLAZARS: VARIABILITY-BASED SELECTION OF FERMI ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Becker, Andrew C.; Davenport, James R. A.; Ivezić, Željko; Burnett, T. H.; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Sesar, Branimir; Stuart, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the use of optical photometric variability to select and identify blazars in large-scale time-domain surveys, in part to aid in the identification of blazar counterparts to the ∼30% of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog still lacking reliable associations. Using data from the optical LINEAR asteroid survey, we characterize the optical variability of blazars by fitting a damped random walk model to individual light curves with two main model parameters, the characteristic timescales of variability τ, and driving amplitudes on short timescales σ-circumflex. Imposing cuts on minimum τ and σ-circumflex allows for blazar selection with high efficiency E and completeness C. To test the efficacy of this approach, we apply this method to optically variable LINEAR objects that fall within the several-arcminute error ellipses of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog. Despite the extreme stellar contamination at the shallow depth of the LINEAR survey, we are able to recover previously associated optical counterparts to Fermi active galactic nuclei with E ≥ 88% and C = 88% in Fermi 95% confidence error ellipses having semimajor axis r < 8'. We find that the suggested radio counterpart to Fermi source 2FGL J1649.6+5238 has optical variability consistent with other γ-ray blazars and is likely to be the γ-ray source. Our results suggest that the variability of the non-thermal jet emission in blazars is stochastic in nature, with unique variability properties due to the effects of relativistic beaming. After correcting for beaming, we estimate that the characteristic timescale of blazar variability is ∼3 years in the rest frame of the jet, in contrast with the ∼320 day disk flux timescale observed in quasars. The variability-based selection method presented will be useful for blazar identification in time-domain optical surveys and is also a probe of jet physics.

  4. OPTICAL STUDIES OF PENICILLIN GROUP IN RELATION TO THEIR MEDICAL ACTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Jeevan Kumar

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The study of Medical activity of antibiotics is gaining momentum now a days owing to the importance of their curative values.  The Medical Activity correlated to molecular interactions,can be studied by various physical techniques, at present optical methods like Refractometry and Polarization are used to study the activity of a few antibiotics like Penicillin.  The Refractive Indices Mean Molecular Polarizability Diamagnetic Susceptibilities and Electron Ionisation Cross Section are interpreted in terms of dosages and the toxic effects if any due to over dosages are discussed critically.

  5. Activity of the hypoxia-activated pro-drug TH-302 in hypoxic and perivascular regions of solid tumors and its potential to enhance therapeutic effects of chemotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saggar, Jasdeep K; Tannock, Ian F

    2014-06-01

    Many chemotherapy drugs have poor therapeutic activity in regions distant from tumor blood vessels because of poor tissue penetration and low cytotoxic activity against slowly-proliferating cells. The hypoxia-activated pro-drug TH-302 may have selective toxicity for hypoxic and neighboring cells in tumors. Here we characterize the spatial distribution and ability of TH-302 to selectively target hypoxic regions and complement the effect of doxorubicin and docetaxel by modifying biomarker distribution. Athymic nude mice bearing human breast MCF-7 or prostate PC-3 tumors were treated with doxorubicin or docetaxel respectively and TH-302 alone or in combination. Biomarkers of drug effect including γH2aX (a marker of DNA damage), cleaved caspase-3 or -6 (markers of apoptosis) and reduction in Ki-67 (a marker of cell proliferation) were quantified in tumor sections in relation to functional blood vessels (recognized by DiOC7) and hypoxia (recognized by EF5) using immunohistochemistry. γH2aX expression at 10 min and cleaved caspase-3 or -6 at 24 hr after doxorubicin or docetaxel decreased with increasing distance from tumor blood vessels, with minimal expression in hypoxic regions; maximum reduction in Ki67 levels was observed in regions closest to vasculature at 24 hr. TH-302 induced maximal cell damage in hypoxic and neighboring regions, but was also active in tumor regions closer to blood vessels. TH-302 given 4 hr before doxorubicin or docetaxel increased DNA damage and apoptosis throughout the tumor compared to chemotherapy alone. When given with doxorubicin or docetaxel, TH-302 complements and enhances anticancer effects in both perivascular and hypoxic regions but also increases toxicity. © 2013 UICC.

  6. Characterizing the Optical Variability of Bright Blazars: Variability-based Selection of Fermi Active Galactic Nuclei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, John J.; Anderson, Scott F.; MacLeod, Chelsea L.; Becker, Andrew C.; Burnett, T. H.; Davenport, James R. A.; Ivezić, Željko; Kochanek, Christopher S.; Plotkin, Richard M.; Sesar, Branimir; Stuart, J. Scott

    2012-11-01

    We investigate the use of optical photometric variability to select and identify blazars in large-scale time-domain surveys, in part to aid in the identification of blazar counterparts to the ~30% of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog still lacking reliable associations. Using data from the optical LINEAR asteroid survey, we characterize the optical variability of blazars by fitting a damped random walk model to individual light curves with two main model parameters, the characteristic timescales of variability τ, and driving amplitudes on short timescales \\hat{\\sigma }. Imposing cuts on minimum τ and \\hat{\\sigma } allows for blazar selection with high efficiency E and completeness C. To test the efficacy of this approach, we apply this method to optically variable LINEAR objects that fall within the several-arcminute error ellipses of γ-ray sources in the Fermi 2FGL catalog. Despite the extreme stellar contamination at the shallow depth of the LINEAR survey, we are able to recover previously associated optical counterparts to Fermi active galactic nuclei with E >= 88% and C = 88% in Fermi 95% confidence error ellipses having semimajor axis r beaming. After correcting for beaming, we estimate that the characteristic timescale of blazar variability is ~3 years in the rest frame of the jet, in contrast with the ~320 day disk flux timescale observed in quasars. The variability-based selection method presented will be useful for blazar identification in time-domain optical surveys and is also a probe of jet physics.

  7. Optical filter finesses enhancement based on nested coupled cavities and active medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adib, George A.; Sabry, Yasser M.; Khalil, Diaa

    2016-04-01

    Optical filters with relatively large FSR and narrow linewidth are simultaneously needed for different applications. The ratio between the FSR and the 3-dB linewidth is given by finesse of the filter, which is solely determined by the different energy loss mechanisms limited by the technology advancement. In this work, we present a novel coupled-cavity configuration embedding an optical filter and a gain medium; allowing an overall finesse enhancement and simultaneous FSR and 3-dB linewidth engineering beyond the technological limits of the filter fabrication method. The configuration consists of two resonators. An active ring resonator comprises an optical gain medium and a passive resonator. In one configuration, the optical filter is the passive resonator itself. In a second configuration, the passive resonator is another ring resonator that embeds the optical filter. The presented configurations using a semiconductor optical amplifier are applied one time to a mechanically Fabry-Perot filter in the first presented configuration; and a second time to a fiber ring filter in the second presented configuration. The mechanical filter has an original 3-dB linewidth of 1nm and an FSR that is larger than 100nm while the enhanced linewidth is about 0.3nm. The fiber ring filter length is 4 m and directional coupler ratios of 90/10corresponding to a 3-dBlinewidth of about 4MHz and an FSR of 47 MHz. The enhanced 3- dBlinewidth of the overall filter configuration is 200kHz, demonstrating finesse enhancement up to20 times the original finesse of the filter.

  8. Classification of Active Microwave and Passive Optical Data Based on Bayesian Theory and Mrf

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, F.; Li, H. T.; Han, Y. S.; Gu, H. Y.

    2012-08-01

    A classifier based on Bayesian theory and Markov random field (MRF) is presented to classify the active microwave and passive optical remote sensing data, which have demonstrated their respective advantages in inversion of surface soil moisture content. In the method, the VV, VH polarization of ASAR and all the 7 TM bands are taken as the input of the classifier to get the class labels of each pixel of the images. And the model is validated for the necessities of integration of TM and ASAR, it shows that, the total precision of classification in this paper is 89.4%. Comparing with the classification with single TM, the accuracy increase 11.5%, illustrating that synthesis of active and passive optical remote sensing data is efficient and potential in classification.

  9. CLASSIFICATION OF ACTIVE MICROWAVE AND PASSIVE OPTICAL DATA BASED ON BAYESIAN THEORY AND MRF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Yu

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available A classifier based on Bayesian theory and Markov random field (MRF is presented to classify the active microwave and passive optical remote sensing data, which have demonstrated their respective advantages in inversion of surface soil moisture content. In the method, the VV, VH polarization of ASAR and all the 7 TM bands are taken as the input of the classifier to get the class labels of each pixel of the images. And the model is validated for the necessities of integration of TM and ASAR, it shows that, the total precision of classification in this paper is 89.4%. Comparing with the classification with single TM, the accuracy increase 11.5%, illustrating that synthesis of active and passive optical remote sensing data is efficient and potential in classification.

  10. Vibrational spectroscopic and non-linear optical activity studies on nicotinanilide : A DFT approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premkumar, S.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-06-01

    The molecular structure of nicotinanilide was optimized by the DFT/B3LYP method with cc-pVTZ basis set using Gaussian 09 program. The first order hyperpolarizability of the molecule was calculated, which exhibits the higher nonlinear optical activity. The natural bond orbital analysis confirms the presence of intramolecular charge transfer and the hydrogen bonding interaction, which leads to the higher nonlinear optical activity of the molecule. The Frontier molecular orbitals analysis of the molecule shows that the delocalization of electron density occurs within the molecule. The lower energy gap indicates that the hydrogen bond formation between the charged species. The vibrational frequencies were calculated and assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using the VEDA 4.0 program and the corresponding vibrational spectra were simulated. Hence, the nicotinanilide molecule can be a good candidate for second-order NLO material.

  11. Circularly polarized infrared and visible sum-frequency-generation spectroscopy: Vibrational optical activity measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheon, Sangheon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2005-01-01

    Vibrational optical activity spectroscopies utilizing either circularly polarized ir or circularly polarized visible beams were theoretically investigated by considering the infrared and visible sum-frequency-generation (IV-SFG) schemes. In addition to the purely electric dipole-allowed chiral component of the IV-SFG susceptibility, the polarizability-electric quadrupole hyperpolarizability term also contributes to the vibrationally resonant IV-SFG susceptibility. The circular-intensity-difference signal is shown to be determined by the interferences between the all-electric dipole-allowed chiral component and the polarizability-electric-dipole or electric-dipole-electric-quadrupole Raman optical activity tensor components. The circularly polarized SFG methods are shown to be potentially useful coherent spectroscopic tools for determining absolute configurations of chiral molecules in condensed phases

  12. Do dopaminergic gene polymorphisms affect mesolimbic reward activation of music listening response? Therapeutic impact on Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blum, Kenneth; Chen, Thomas J H; Chen, Amanda L H; Madigan, Margaret; Downs, B William; Waite, Roger L; Braverman, Eric R; Kerner, Mallory; Bowirrat, Abdalla; Giordano, John; Henshaw, Harry; Gold, Mark S

    2010-03-01

    affected by an individual's D2 density in the VTA mediated interaction of the NAc. It is therefore hypothesized that carriers of DRD2 A1 allele may respond significantly differently to carriers of the DRD2 A2 genotype. In this regard, carriers of the D2 A1 allele have a blunted response to glucose and monetary rewards. In contrast powerful D2 agonists like bromocryptine show a heightened activation of the reward circuitry only in DRD2 A1 allele carriers. If music causes a powerful activation in spite of the DRD2 A1 allele due to a strong DA neuronal release which subsequently impinges on existing D2 receptors, then it is reasonable to assume that music is a strong indirect D2 agonist (by virtue of DA neuronal release in the NAc) and may have important therapeutic applicability in Reward Deficiency Syndrome (RDS) related behaviors including Substance Use Disorder (SUD). Ross et al. [18] found that music therapy appears to be a novel motivational tool in a severely impaired inpatient sample of patients with co-occurring mental illness and addiction. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Ramachandran Plot for Alanine Dipeptide as Determined from Raman Optical Activity

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Parchaňský, Václav; Kapitán, J.; Kaminský, Jakub; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Bouř, Petr

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 4, č. 16 (2013), s. 2763-2768 ISSN 1948-7185 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP208/11/0105; GA MŠk(CZ) LH11033 Grant - others:AV ČR(CZ) M200551205; GA MŠk(CZ) LM2010005 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Raman optical activity * Ramachandran plot * molecular modelling Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 6.687, year: 2013

  14. The Age of Enlightenment: Evolving Opportunities in Brain Research Through Optical Manipulation of Neuronal Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Jerome, Jason; Heck, Detlef H.

    2011-01-01

    Optical manipulation of neuronal activity has rapidly developed into the most powerful and widely used approach to study mechanisms related to neuronal connectivity over a range of scales. Since the early use of single site uncaging to map network connectivity, rapid technological development of light modulation techniques has added important new options, such as fast scanning photostimulation, massively parallel control of light stimuli, holographic uncaging, and two-photon stimulation techn...

  15. Tyrosine dephosphorylation enhances the therapeutic target activity of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) by disrupting its interaction with estrogen receptor (ER).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Shao; Yin, Ning; Qi, Xiaomei; Pfister, Sandra L; Zhang, Mei-Jie; Ma, Rong; Chen, Guan

    2015-05-30

    Protein-protein interactions can increase or decrease its therapeutic target activity and the determining factors involved, however, are largely unknown. Here, we report that tyrosine-dephosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) increases its therapeutic target activity by disrupting its interaction with estrogen receptor (ER). Protein tyrosine phosphatase H1 (PTPH1) dephosphorylates the tyrosine kinase EGFR, disrupts its interaction with the nuclear receptor ER, and increases breast cancer sensitivity to small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs). These effects require PTPH1 catalytic activity and its interaction with EGFR, suggesting that the phosphatase may increase the sensitivity by dephosphorylating EGFR leading to its dissociation with ER. Consistent with this notion, a nuclear-localization defective ER has a higher EGFR-binding activity and confers the resistance to TKI-induced growth inhibition. Additional analysis show that PTPH1 stabilizes EGFR, stimulates the membranous EGFR accumulation, and enhances the growth-inhibitory activity of a combination therapy of TKIs with an anti-estrogen. Since EGFR and ER both are substrates for PTPH1 in vitro and in intact cells, these results indicate that an inhibitory EGFR-ER protein complex can be switched off through a competitive enzyme-substrate binding. Our results would have important implications for the treatment of breast cancer with targeted therapeutics.

  16. Noncoherent Spectral Optical CDMA System Using 1D Active Weight Two-Code Keying Codes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bih-Chyun Yeh

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose a new family of one-dimensional (1D active weight two-code keying (TCK in spectral amplitude coding (SAC optical code division multiple access (OCDMA networks. We use encoding and decoding transfer functions to operate the 1D active weight TCK. The proposed structure includes an optical line terminal (OLT and optical network units (ONUs to produce the encoding and decoding codes of the proposed OLT and ONUs, respectively. The proposed ONU uses the modified cross-correlation to remove interferences from other simultaneous users, that is, the multiuser interference (MUI. When the phase-induced intensity noise (PIIN is the most important noise, the modified cross-correlation suppresses the PIIN. In the numerical results, we find that the bit error rate (BER for the proposed system using the 1D active weight TCK codes outperforms that for two other systems using the 1D M-Seq codes and 1D balanced incomplete block design (BIBD codes. The effective source power for the proposed system can achieve −10 dBm, which has less power than that for the other systems.

  17. Space Active Optics: toward optimized correcting mirrors for future large spaceborne observatories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laslandes, Marie; Hugot, Emmanuel; Ferrari, Marc; Lemaitre, Gérard; Liotard, Arnaud

    2011-10-01

    Wave-front correction in optical instruments is often needed, either to compensate Optical Path Differences, off-axis aberrations or mirrors deformations. Active optics techniques are developed to allow efficient corrections with deformable mirrors. In this paper, we will present the conception of particular deformation systems which could be used in space telescopes and instruments in order to improve their performances while allowing relaxing specifications on the global system stability. A first section will be dedicated to the design and performance analysis of an active mirror specifically designed to compensate for aberrations that might appear in future 3m-class space telescopes, due to lightweight primary mirrors, thermal variations or weightless conditions. A second section will be dedicated to a brand new design of active mirror, able to compensate for given combinations of aberrations with a single actuator. If the aberrations to be corrected in an instrument and their evolutions are known in advance, an optimal system geometry can be determined thanks to the elasticity theory and Finite Element Analysis.

  18. Semi-analytical Model for Estimating Absorption Coefficients of Optically Active Constituents in Coastal Waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, D.; Cui, Y.

    2015-12-01

    The objectives of this paper are to validate the applicability of a multi-band quasi-analytical algorithm (QAA) in retrieval absorption coefficients of optically active constituents in turbid coastal waters, and to further improve the model using a proposed semi-analytical model (SAA). The ap(531) and ag(531) semi-analytically derived using SAA model are quite different from the retrievals procedures of QAA model that ap(531) and ag(531) are semi-analytically derived from the empirical retrievals results of a(531) and a(551). The two models are calibrated and evaluated against datasets taken from 19 independent cruises in West Florida Shelf in 1999-2003, provided by SeaBASS. The results indicate that the SAA model produces a superior performance to QAA model in absorption retrieval. Using of the SAA model in retrieving absorption coefficients of optically active constituents from West Florida Shelf decreases the random uncertainty of estimation by >23.05% from the QAA model. This study demonstrates the potential of the SAA model in absorption coefficients of optically active constituents estimating even in turbid coastal waters. Keywords: Remote sensing; Coastal Water; Absorption Coefficient; Semi-analytical Model

  19. CK1δ in lymphoma: gene expression and mutation analyses and validation of CK1δ kinase activity for therapeutic application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brigitte Sophia Winkler

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The prognosis of lymphoid neoplasms has improved considerably during the last decades. However, treatment response for some lymphoid neoplasms is still poor, indicating the need for new therapeutic approaches. One promising new strategy is the inhibition of kinases regulating key signal transduction pathways, which are of central importance in tumorigenesis. Kinases of the CK1 family may represent an attractive drug target since CK1 expression and/or activity are associated with the pathogenesis of malignant diseases. Over the last years efforts were taken to develop highly potent and selective CK1-specific inhibitor compounds and their therapeutic potential has now to be proved in pre-clinical trials. Therefore, we analyzed expression and mutational status of CK1δ in several cell lines representing established lymphoma entities, and also measured the mRNA expression level in primary lymphoma tissue as well as non-neoplastic blood cells. For a selection of lymphoma cell lines we furthermore determined CK1δ kinase activity and demonstrated therapeutic potential of CK1-specific inhibitors as a putative therapeutic option in the treatment of lymphoid neoplasms.

  20. Combined effects of nonparaxiality, optical activity, and walk-off on rogue wave propagation in optical fibers filled with chiral materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Temgoua, D. D. Estelle; Tchokonte, M. B. Tchoula; Kofane, T. C.

    2018-04-01

    The generalized nonparaxial nonlinear Schrödinger (NLS) equation in optical fibers filled with chiral materials is reduced to the higher-order integrable Hirota equation. Based on the modified Darboux transformation method, the nonparaxial chiral optical rogue waves are constructed from the scalar model with modulated coefficients. We show that the parameters of nonparaxiality, third-order dispersion, and differential gain or loss term are the main keys to control the amplitude, linear, and nonlinear effects in the model. Moreover, the influence of nonparaxiality, optical activity, and walk-off effect are also evidenced under the defocusing and focusing regimes of the vector nonparaxial NLS equations with constant and modulated coefficients. Through an algorithm scheme of wider applicability on nonparaxial beam propagation methods, the most influential effect and the simultaneous controllability of combined effects are underlined, showing their properties and their potential applications in optical fibers and in a variety of complex dynamical systems.

  1. Dose-rate and the reciprocity law: TL response of Ge-doped SiO2 optical fibers at therapeutic radiation doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdul Rahman, A.T.; Nisbet, A.; Bradley, D.A.

    2011-01-01

    An investigation has been made on commercially available Ge-doped SiO 2 optical fibers as a novel thermoluminescence system for radiotherapy dosimetry. This dosimeter has previously been shown by the group to provide sensitive dosimetry over a wide range of electron and photon dose, suitable for the needs of radiotherapy. In addition the optical fiber offers small physical size (125 μm diameter) and hence high spatial resolution. The reciprocity between thermoluminescence (TL) yield of Ge-doped SiO 2 optical fibers and dose has been investigated for fixed radiation dose for a range of photon and electron dose rates. For electron beams of nominal energies in the range of 9-20 MeV, we have investigated the TL response of these fibers for dose rates between 100 and 1000 cGy min -1 . For photon beams of nominal energies in the range of 6-15 MV, we have used dose rates of 100-600 cGy min -1 . Reproducibility and fading at fixed absorbed dose (3 Gy) and dose rate for the optical fibers were also investigated. At fixed dose rates, the TL optical fibers were found to produce a flat TL yield within 4% (1σ) and 3% (1σ) for electron and photon beams, respectively. The optical fibers demonstrated good reproducibility (±1.5%), low residual signal for a readout temperature of 300 o C and negligible fading. A weak dependence on dose-rate has been observed in the range of 3.4-3.9% for electrons (with an associated uncertainty of 4%) and 2.4-2.9% for photons (with an associated uncertainty of <4%). For electron and photon energies we note a consistent trend towards lower response in the TL yield of between 3.4-3.9% and 2.4-2.7%, respectively, at the higher dose rates in comparison with the response at lower dose rates. In addition we note an appreciable systematic energy dependence for both electron and photon beams. It is important to take such factors into account for providing precise and accurate radiotherapy dosimetry. It is also apparent that the optical fibers can be re

  2. Dose-rate and the reciprocity law: TL response of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers at therapeutic radiation doses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abdul Rahman, A.T., E-mail: a.t.abdulrahman@surrey.ac.uk [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom); School of Physics and Material Studies, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Universiti Teknologi MARA Malaysia (UiTM), Campus of Negeri Sembilan, 72000 Kuala Pilah (Malaysia); Nisbet, A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom); Departments of Medical Physics, the Royal Surrey County Hospital (RSCH) NHS Trust, Edgerton Road, Guildford GU2 7XX, Surrey (United Kingdom); Bradley, D.A. [Centre for Nuclear and Radiation Physics, Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford GU2 7XH, Surrey (United Kingdom)

    2011-10-01

    An investigation has been made on commercially available Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers as a novel thermoluminescence system for radiotherapy dosimetry. This dosimeter has previously been shown by the group to provide sensitive dosimetry over a wide range of electron and photon dose, suitable for the needs of radiotherapy. In addition the optical fiber offers small physical size (125 {mu}m diameter) and hence high spatial resolution. The reciprocity between thermoluminescence (TL) yield of Ge-doped SiO{sub 2} optical fibers and dose has been investigated for fixed radiation dose for a range of photon and electron dose rates. For electron beams of nominal energies in the range of 9-20 MeV, we have investigated the TL response of these fibers for dose rates between 100 and 1000 cGy min{sup -1}. For photon beams of nominal energies in the range of 6-15 MV, we have used dose rates of 100-600 cGy min{sup -1}. Reproducibility and fading at fixed absorbed dose (3 Gy) and dose rate for the optical fibers were also investigated. At fixed dose rates, the TL optical fibers were found to produce a flat TL yield within 4% (1{sigma}) and 3% (1{sigma}) for electron and photon beams, respectively. The optical fibers demonstrated good reproducibility ({+-}1.5%), low residual signal for a readout temperature of 300 {sup o}C and negligible fading. A weak dependence on dose-rate has been observed in the range of 3.4-3.9% for electrons (with an associated uncertainty of 4%) and 2.4-2.9% for photons (with an associated uncertainty of <4%). For electron and photon energies we note a consistent trend towards lower response in the TL yield of between 3.4-3.9% and 2.4-2.7%, respectively, at the higher dose rates in comparison with the response at lower dose rates. In addition we note an appreciable systematic energy dependence for both electron and photon beams. It is important to take such factors into account for providing precise and accurate radiotherapy dosimetry. It is also

  3. Butt-joint integration of active optical components based on InP/AlInGaAsP alloys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kulkova, Irina; Kuznetsova, Nadezda; Semenova, Elizaveta

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate all-active planar high quality butt-joint (BJ) integration of a QW Semiconductor Optical Amplifier (SOA) and MQW Electro-Absorption Modulator (EAM) based on an InP/AlInGaAsP platform. The degradation of the optical properties in the vicinity of ~1 μm to the BJ interface was determi...

  4. Therapeutic implications of curcumin in the prevention of diabetic retinopathy via modulation of anti-oxidant activity and genetic pathways

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldebasi, Yousef H; Aly, Salah M; Rahmani, Arshad H

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic Retinopathy (DR) is one of the most common complications of diabetes mellitus that affects the blood vessels of the retina, leading to blindness. The current approach of treatment based on anti-inflammatory, anti-angiogenesis drugs and laser photocoagulation are effective but also shows adverse affect in retinal tissues and that can even worsen the visual abilities. Thus, a safe and effective mode of treatment is needed to control or delaying the DR. Based on the earlier evidence of the potentiality of natural products as anti-oxidants, anti-diabetic and antitumor, medicinal plants may constitute a good therapeutic approach in the prevention of DR. Curcumin, constituents of dietary spice turmeric, has been observed to have therapeutic potential in the inhibition or slow down progression of DR. In this review, we summarize the therapeutic potentiality of curcumin in the delaying the DR through antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth and nuclear transcription factors. The strength of involvement of curcumin in the modulation of genes action creates a strong optimism towards novel therapeutic strategy of diabetic retinopathy and important mainstay in the management of diabetes and its complications DR. PMID:24379904

  5. Molecular chaperone assisted expression systems: obtaining pure soluble and active recombinant proteins for structural and therapeutic purposes

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Makhoba, XH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available For many years recombinant protein production has been at the center of biosciences used for structural and therapeutic purposes. The production of recombinant proteins in foreign host system such as E. coli has been a biggest challenge. This has...

  6. Blockade of the intermediate-conductance calcium-activated potassium channel as a new therapeutic strategy for restenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köhler, Ralf; Wulff, Heike; Eichler, Ines

    2003-01-01

    hyperplasia was accompanied by decreased neointimal cell content, with no change in the rate of apoptosis or collagen content. CONCLUSIONS: The switch toward IKCa1 expression may promote excessive neointimal VSMC proliferation. Blockade of IKCa1 could therefore represent a new therapeutic strategy to prevent...

  7. Noticeable positive Doppler effect on optical bistability in an N-type active Raman gain atomic system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang Zeng-Guang; Zhang Jing-Tao; Niu Yue-Ping; Gong Shang-Qing

    2012-01-01

    We theoretically investigate the Doppler effect on optical bistability in an N-type active Raman gain atomic system inside an optical ring cavity. It is shown that the Doppler effect can greatly enhance the dispersion and thus create the bistable behaviour or greatly increase the bistable region, which has been known as the positive Doppler effect on optical bistability. In addition, we find that a positive Doppler effect can change optical bistability from the hybrid dispersion-gain type to a dispersive type

  8. Analysis of nearly simultaneous x-ray and optical observations of active galactic nuclei

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Webb, J.R.

    1988-01-01

    Rosemary Hill optical and EINSTEIN X-ray observations of a sample of 36 galactic nuclei (AGN) were reduced and analyzed. Seventy-two x-ray observations of these sources were reduced, nineteen of which yielded spectral information. Of these spectra observations, significant hydrogen column densities above the galactic value were required for nine of the active galactic nuclei. X-ray variability was detected in eight of the eleven sources which were observed more than once by EINSTEIN. Correlations between the x-ray and optical luminosities were investigated using the Jefferys method of least squares. This method allows for errors in both variables. The results indicate a strong correlation between the x-ray and optical luminosities for the entire sample. Division of the sample into groups with similar optical variability characteristics show that the less violently violent variable AGN are more highly correlated than the violently variable blazars. Infrared and radio observations were combined with the x-ray and optical observations of six AGN. These sources were modelled in terms of the synchrotron-self-Compton model. The turnover frequency falls between the infrared and radio data and reliable estimates of this parameter are difficult to estimate. Therefore the results were found as a function of the turnover frequency. Four sources required relativistic bulk motion or beaming. Multifrequency spectra made at different times for one individual source, 0235+164, required different amounts of beaming to satisfy the x-ray observations. Sizes of the emitting regions for the sources modelled ranged from 0.5 parsec to 1.0 parsec

  9. How to assess good candidate molecules for self-activated optical power limiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundén, Hampus; Glimsdal, Eirik; Lindgren, Mikael; Lopes, Cesar

    2018-03-01

    Reverse saturable absorbers have shown great potential to attenuate laser radiation. Good candidate molecules and various particles have successfully been incorporated into different glass matrices, enabling the creation of self-activated filters against damaging laser radiation. Although the performance of such filters has been impressive, work is still ongoing to improve the performance in a wider range of wavelengths and pulse widths. The purpose of this tutorial is, from an optical engineering perspective, to give an understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of this class of smart materials, how relevant photophysical parameters are measured and influence system performance and comment on the pitfalls in experimental evaluation of materials. A numerical population model in combination with simple physical formulas is used to demonstrate system behavior from a performance standpoint. Geometrical reasoning shows the advantage of reverse saturable absorption over nonlinear scattering due to a fraction of scattered light being recollected by imaging system optics. The numerical population model illustrates the importance of the optical power limiting performance during the leading edge of a nanosecond pulse, which is most strongly influenced by changes in the two-photon absorption cross section and the triplet linear absorption cross section for a modeled Pt-acetylide. This tutorial not only targets optical engineers evaluating reverse saturable absorbing materials but also aims to assist researchers with a chemistry background working on optical power limiting materials. We also present photophysical data for a series of coumarins that can be useful for the determination of quantum yields and two-photon cross sections and show examples of characterization of molecules with excited triplet states.

  10. Polarized excitons and optical activity in single-wall carbon nanotubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2018-05-01

    The polarized excitons and optical activity of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are studied theoretically by π -electron Hamiltonian and helical-rotational symmetry. By taking advantage of the symmetrization, the single-particle energy and properties of a SWNT are characterized with the corresponding helical band structure. The dipole-moment matrix elements, magnetic-moment matrix elements, and the selection rules can also be derived. Based on different selection rules, the optical transitions can be assigned as the parallel-polarized, left-handed circularly-polarized, and right-handed circularly-polarized transitions, where the combination of the last two gives the cross-polarized transition. The absorption and circular dichroism (CD) spectra are simulated by exciton calculation. The calculated results are well comparable with the reported measurements. Built on the foundation, magnetic-field effects on the polarized excitons and optical activity of SWNTs are studied. Dark-bright exciton splitting and interband Faraday effect in the CD spectrum of SWNTs under an axial magnetic field are predicted. The Faraday rotation dispersion can be analyzed according to the selection rules of circular polarizations and the helical band structure.

  11. Therapeutic Nanodevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Stephen; Ruegsegger, Mark; Barnes, Philip; Smith, Bryan; Ferrari, Mauro

    Therapeutic nanotechnology offers minimally invasive therapies with high densities of function concentrated in small volumes, features that may reduce patient morbidity and mortality. Unlike other areas of nanotechnology, novel physical properties associated with nanoscale dimensionality are not the raison d'être of therapeutic nanotechnology, whereas the aggregation of multiple biochemical (or comparably precise) functions into controlled nanoarchitectures is. Multifunctionality is a hallmark of emerging nanotherapeutic devices, and multifunctionality can allow nanotherapeutic devices to perform multistep work processes, with each functional component contributing to one or more nanodevice subroutine such that, in aggregate, subroutines sum to a cogent work process. Cannonical nanotherapeutic subroutines include tethering (targeting) to sites of disease, dispensing measured doses of drug (or bioactive compound), detection of residual disease after therapy and communication with an external clinician/operator. Emerging nanotherapeutics thus blur the boundaries between medical devices and traditional pharmaceuticals. Assembly of therapeutic nanodevices generally exploits either (bio)material self-assembly properties or chemoselective bioconjugation techniques, or both. Given the complexity, composition, and the necessity for their tight chemical and structural definition inherent in the nature of nanotherapeutics, their cost of goods (COGs) might exceed that of (already expensive) biologics. Early therapeutic nanodevices will likely be applied to disease states which exhibit significant unmet patient need (cancer and cardiovascular disease), while application to other disease states well-served by conventional therapy may await perfection of nanotherapeutic design and assembly protocols.

  12. Active Ground Optical Remote Sensing for Improved Monitoring of Seedling Stress in Nurseries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan U. H. Eitel

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Active ground optical remote sensing (AGORS devices mounted on overhead irrigation booms could help to improve seedling quality by autonomously monitoring seedling stress. In contrast to traditionally used passive optical sensors, AGORS devices operate independently of ambient light conditions and do not require spectral reference readings. Besides measuring red (590–670 nm and near-infrared (>760 nm reflectance AGORS devices have recently become available that also measure red-edge (730 nm reflectance. We tested the hypothesis that the additional availability of red-edge reflectance information would improve AGORS of plant stress induced chlorophyll breakdown in Scots pine (Pinus sylvestris. Our results showed that the availability of red-edge reflectance information improved AGORS estimates of stress induced variation in chlorophyll concentration (r2 > 0.73, RMSE < 1.69 when compared to those without (r2 = 0.57, RMSE = 2.11.

  13. Purcell effect for active tuning of light scattering from semiconductor optical antennas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holsteen, Aaron L; Raza, Søren; Fan, Pengyu; Kik, Pieter G; Brongersma, Mark L

    2017-12-15

    Subwavelength, high-refractive index semiconductor nanostructures support optical resonances that endow them with valuable antenna functions. Control over the intrinsic properties, including their complex refractive index, size, and geometry, has been used to manipulate fundamental light absorption, scattering, and emission processes in nanostructured optoelectronic devices. In this study, we harness the electric and magnetic resonances of such antennas to achieve a very strong dependence of the optical properties on the external environment. Specifically, we illustrate how the resonant scattering wavelength of single silicon nanowires is tunable across the entire visible spectrum by simply moving the height of the nanowires above a metallic mirror. We apply this concept by using a nanoelectromechanical platform to demonstrate active tuning. Copyright © 2017 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  14. Thermal Stability and Optical Activity of Erbium Doped Chalcogenide Glasses for Photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonchev, D.; Koughia, K.; Kasap, S. O.; Maeda, K.; Sakai, T.; Ikuta, J.; Ivanova, Z. G.

    The glass transition and crystallization temperatures (T g , T c ), heat capacity, thermal stability and glass uniformity of GeSGa, GeSeGa, Ge(SeTe)Ga chalcogenide glasses doped with Er3+ by the addition of Er2S3 have been investigated by conventional differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Temperature-Modulated DSC (TMDSC). While some of the glasses have two crystallization peaks, these glasses were nonetheless optically actively and uniform. Essential optical properties have been evaluated, such as the photoluminescence (PL) intensity and lifetime as a function of the glass composition. We present typical results to emphasize some of the important characteristics of these systems and discuss trends within a glass system; and also highlight differences between glass systems.

  15. Bio-optofluidics and Bio-photonics: Programmable Phase Optics activities at DTU Fotonik

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bañas, Andrew Rafael; Palima, Darwin; Pedersen, Finn

    We present ongoing research and development activities for constructing a compact next generation BioPhotonics Workstation and a Bio-optofluidic Cell Sorter (cell-BOCS) for all-optical micromanipulation platforms utilizing low numerical aperture beam geometries. Unlike conventional high NA optical...... tweezers, the BioPhotonics workstation is e.g. capable of long range 3D manipulation. This enables a variety of biological studies such as manipulation of intricate microfabricated assemblies or for automated and parallel optofluidic cell sorting. To further reduce its overhead, we propose ways of making...... the BioPhotonics Workstation platform more photon efficient by studying the 3D distribution of the counter propagating beams and utilizing the Generalized Phase Contrast (GPC) method for illuminating the applied spatial light modulators....

  16. Infrared-active optical phonons in LiFePO4 single crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanislavchuk, T. N.; Middlemiss, D. S.; Syzdek, J. S.; Janssen, Y.; Basistyy, R.; Sirenko, A. A.; Khalifah, P. G.; Grey, C. P.; Kostecki, R.

    2017-07-01

    Infrared-active optical phonons were studied in olivine LiFePO4 oriented single crystals by means of both rotating analyzer and rotating compensator spectroscopic ellipsometry in the spectral range between 50 and 1400 cm-1. The eigenfrequencies, oscillator strengths, and broadenings of the phonon modes were determined from fits of the anisotropic harmonic oscillator model to the data. Optical phonons in a heterosite FePO4 crystal were measured from the delithiated ab-surface of the LiFePO4 crystal and compared with the phonon modes of the latter. Good agreement was found between experimental data and the results of solid-state hybrid density functional theory calculations for the phonon modes in both LiFePO4 and FePO4.

  17. Synovial tissue and serum biomarkers of disease activity, therapeutic response and radiographic progression: analysis of a proof-of-concept randomised clinical trial of cytokine blockade.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Rooney, Terence

    2012-02-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate synovial tissue and serum biomarkers of disease activity, therapeutic response and radiographic progression during biological therapy for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). METHODS: Patients with active RA entered a randomised study of anakinra 100 mg\\/day, administered as monotherapy or in combination with pegsunercept 800 microg\\/kg twice a week. Arthroscopic synovial tissue biopsies were obtained at baseline and two further time points. Following immunohistochemical staining, selected mediators of RA pathophysiology were quantified using digital image analysis. Selected mediators were also measured in the serum. RESULTS: Twenty-two patients were randomly assigned: 11 received monotherapy and 11 combination therapy. American College of Rheumatology 20, 50 and 70 response rates were 64%, 64% and 46% with combination therapy and 36%, 9% and 0% with monotherapy, respectively. In synovial tissue, T-cell infiltration, vascularity and transforming growth factor beta (TGFbeta) expression demonstrated significant utility as biomarkers of disease activity and therapeutic response. In serum, interleukin 6 (IL-6), matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1, MMP-3 and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase 1 (TIMP-1) were most useful in this regard. An early decrease in serum levels of TIMP-1 was predictive of the later therapeutic outcome. Pretreatment tissue levels of T-cell infiltration and the growth factors vascular endothelial growth factor\\/TGFbeta, and serum levels of IL-6, IL-8, MMP-1, TIMP-1, soluble tumour necrosis factor receptor types I and II and IL-18 correlated with radiographic progression. CONCLUSIONS: Synovial tissue analysis identified biomarkers of disease activity, therapeutic response and radiographic progression. Biomarker expression in tissue was independent of the levels measured in the serum.

  18. Determining the Scattering Properties of Vertically-Structured Nepheloid Layers From the Fusion of Active and Passive Optical Sensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bissett, W. P; Kohler, David D

    2006-01-01

    ... from the bottom back toward the surface. The net result is that these layers reduce the ability of active and passive optical instruments to retrieve estimates of bathymetry and bottom classification, as well as reduce the abilities...

  19. Fiber-optic transmission system information for the testing of active phased antenna arrays in an anechoic chamber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saveleiv, I. K.; Sharova, N. V.; Tarasenko, M. Yu; Yalunina, T. R.; Davydov, V. V.; Rud', V. Yu

    2017-11-01

    The results of the research of the developed fiber-optic transmission systems for analog high frequency signal are represented. On its basis, a new method to identify various structural defects in the active phased antenna arrays is elaborated.

  20. Macro optical projection tomography for large scale 3D imaging of plant structures and gene activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Karen J I; Calder, Grant M; Hindle, Christopher R; Newman, Jacob L; Robinson, Simon N; Avondo, Jerome J H Y; Coen, Enrico S

    2017-01-01

    Optical projection tomography (OPT) is a well-established method for visualising gene activity in plants and animals. However, a limitation of conventional OPT is that the specimen upper size limit precludes its application to larger structures. To address this problem we constructed a macro version called Macro OPT (M-OPT). We apply M-OPT to 3D live imaging of gene activity in growing whole plants and to visualise structural morphology in large optically cleared plant and insect specimens up to 60 mm tall and 45 mm deep. We also show how M-OPT can be used to image gene expression domains in 3D within fixed tissue and to visualise gene activity in 3D in clones of growing young whole Arabidopsis plants. A further application of M-OPT is to visualise plant-insect interactions. Thus M-OPT provides an effective 3D imaging platform that allows the study of gene activity, internal plant structures and plant-insect interactions at a macroscopic scale. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Experimental Biology.

  1. Development of lutetium-labeled bombesin derivates: relationship between structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujatti, Priscilla Brunelli

    2009-01-01

    Bombesin (BBN) receptors - in particular, the gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) receptor peptide - have been shown to be massively over expressed in several human tumors types, including prostate cancer, and could be an alternative as target for its treatment by radionuclide therapy (RNT). A large number of BBN analogs had already been synthesized for this purpose and have shown to reduce tumor growth in mice. Nevertheless, most of the studied analogs exhibit high abdominal accumulation, especially in pancreas. This abdominal accumulation may represent a problem in clinical use of radiolabeled bombesin analogs probably due to serious side effects to patients. The goal of the present work was to radiolabel a novel series of bombesin derivatives with lutetium-177 and to evaluate the relationship between their structure and diagnostic-therapeutic activity for prostate tumor. The generic structure of studied peptides is DOTA-Phe-(Gly) n -BBN(6-14), where DOTA is the chelator, n is the number of glycine amino acids of Phe-(Gly) n spacer and BBN(6-14) is the bombesin sequence from the amino acid 6 to the amino acid 14. Preliminary studies were done to establish the ideal labeling conditions for obtaining the highest yield of labeled bombesin derivatives, determined by instant thin layer chromatography (ITLC-SG) and high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The stability of the preparations was evaluated either after storing at 2-8 degree C or incubation in human serum at 37 degree C and the partition coefficient was determined in n:octanol:water. In vivo studies were performed in both healthy Balb-c and Nude mice bearing PC-3 xenografts, in order to characterize the biological properties of labeled peptides. In vitro studies involved the evaluation of cold bombesin derivatives effect in PC-3 cells proliferation. Bombesin derivatives were successfully labeled with high yield at optimized conditions and exhibited high stability at 4 degree C. The analysis of the

  2. Disease Activity and Conversion into Multiple Sclerosis after Optic Neuritis Is Treated with Erythropoietin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt-Wolfram Sühs

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Changes in cerebral lesion load by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI in patients from a double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase II study on erythropoietin in clinically isolated optic neuritis (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT00355095 were analyzed. Therefore, patients with acute optic neuritis were assigned to receive either 33,000 IU of recombinant human erythropoietin (IV daily for three days, or a placebo, as an add-on to methylprednisolone. Of 35 patients, we investigated changes in cerebral lesion load in MRIs obtained at baseline and at weeks 4, 8, and 16. In 5 of the 35 patients, we found conversion into multiple sclerosis (MS based on MRI progression only. These five patients had received the placebo. Another five patients showed MRI progression together with relapses. Three of these patients had received erythropoietin, and two the placebo. Yet, analyzing the change in absolute numbers of periventricular, juxtacortical, and infratentorial lesions including gadolinium-enhancing lesions, there were no significant differences between the groups. Although effective in terms of retinal nerve fiber layer protection, erythropoietin treatment of acute isolated optic neuritis did not influence further evolution of MRI lesions in the brain when comparing absolute numbers. However, early conversion from clinically isolated syndrome to MS assessed by MRI activity seemed to occur more frequently in the placebo-treated group.

  3. DUST IN ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI: ANOMALOUS SILICATE TO OPTICAL EXTINCTION RATIOS?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyu, Jianwei; Hao, Lei [Key Laboratory for Research in Galaxies and Cosmology, Shanghai Astronomical Observatory, Chinese Academy of Sciences, 80 Nandan Road, Shanghai 200030 (China); Li, Aigen, E-mail: haol@shao.ac.cn [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65211 (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Dust plays a central role in the unification theory of active galactic nuclei (AGNs). However, little is known about the nature (e.g., size, composition) of the dust that forms a torus around the AGN. In this Letter, we report a systematic exploration of the optical extinction (A{sub V} ) and the silicate absorption optical depth (Δτ{sub 9.7}) of 110 type 2 AGNs. We derive A{sub V} from the Balmer decrement based on the Sloan Digital Sky Survey data, and Δτ{sub 9.7} from the Spitzer/InfraRed Spectrograph data. We find that with a mean ratio of (A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7}) ≲ 5.5, the optical-to-silicate extinction ratios of these AGNs are substantially lower than that of the Galactic diffuse interstellar medium (ISM) for which A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7} ≈ 18.5. We argue that the anomalously low A{sub V} /Δτ{sub 9.7} ratio could be due to the predominance of larger grains in the AGN torus compared to that in the Galactic diffuse ISM.

  4. Structural control of side-chain chromophores to achieve highly efficient electro-optic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuhui; Chen, Zhuo; Liu, Jialei; Xiao, Hongyan; Zhen, Zhen; Liu, Xinhou; Jiang, Guohua

    2017-05-10

    A series of chromophores J1-J4 have been synthesized based on julolidine donors modified with different rigid steric hindrance groups. Compared with the chromophore (J1) without the isolation group, chromophores J2, J3 and J4 show better stability. Structural analysis and photophysical property measurements were carried out to compare the molecular mobility and steric hindrance effect of the different donor-modified chromophores. All of these chromophores with isolation groups showed superb thermal stabilities with high thermal decomposition temperatures above 250 °C. Furthermore, with rigid steric hindrance, chromophores J3 and J4 showed more enhanced thermal stabilities with thermal decomposition temperatures of 269 °C and 275 °C, respectively. Density functional theory was used to calculate the hyperpolarizability (β), and the high molecular hyperpolarizability of these chromophores can be effectively translated into large electro-optic coefficients. The electro-optic coefficients of poled films containing 20 wt% of these new chromophores doped in amorphous polycarbonate were 127, 266 and 209 pm V -1 at 1310 nm for chromophores J1-J3, respectively, while the film containing chromophore J4 showed the largest r 33 value of only 97 pm V -1 at 25 wt%. These results indicated that the introduced isolation group can reduce intermolecular electrostatic interactions, thus enhancing the macroscopic electro-optic activity, while the size of the isolation group should be suitable.

  5. Application of Optical Biosensors in Small-Molecule Screening Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Knecht

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The last two decades have seen remarkable progress and improvements in optical biosensor systems such that those are currently seen as an important and value-adding component of modern drug screening activities. In particular the introduction of microplate-based biosensor systems holds the promise to match the required throughput without compromising on data quality thus representing a sought-after complement to traditional fluidic systems. This article aims to highlight the application of the two most prominent optical biosensor technologies, namely surface plasmon resonance (SPR and optical waveguide grating (OWG, in small-molecule screening and will present, review and discuss the advantages and disadvantages of different assay formats on these platforms. A particular focus will be on the specific advantages of the inhibition in solution assay (ISA format in contrast to traditional direct binding assays (DBA. Furthermore we will discuss different application areas for both fluidic as well as plate-based biosensor systems by considering the individual strength of the platforms.

  6. Thermally activated phase slips of one-dimensional Bose gases in shallow optical lattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunimi, Masaya; Danshita, Ippei

    2017-03-01

    We study the decay of superflow via thermally activated phase slips in one-dimensional Bose gases in a shallow optical lattice. By using the Kramers formula, we numerically calculate the nucleation rate of a thermally activated phase slip for various values of the filling factor and flow velocity in the absence of a harmonic trapping potential. Within the local density approximation, we derive a formula connecting the phase-slip nucleation rate with the damping rate of a dipole oscillation of the Bose gas in the presence of a harmonic trap. We use the derived formula to directly compare our theory with the recent experiment done by the LENS group [L. Tanzi et al., Sci. Rep. 6, 25965 (2016), 10.1038/srep25965]. From the comparison, the observed damping of dipole oscillations in a weakly correlated and small velocity regime is attributed dominantly to thermally activated phase slips rather than quantum phase slips.

  7. Laser-based optical activity detection of amino acids and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitsma, B.H.

    1987-08-01

    The optical activity detector (OAD) for HPLC is a selective detector for optically active substances including amino acids and proteins. Four free amino acids were resolved using cation-exchange chromatography followed by detection with refractive index detector (RI) for proline and threonine and the OAD to an ultraviolet absorbance detector (uv) for tyrosine and phenylalanine. Amino acid detection by refractive index is not sensitive and uv absorbance detects only three amino acids. Derivatization of amino acids to make them detectable by uv absorbance enhances the applicability of OA/uv for the determination of enantiomeric ratios. The separation of 16 dansyl-L-amino acids by RP-HPLC with detection by OA/uv is illustrated. Calculation of the specific rotation of 22 dansyl-L-amino acids shows that derivatization enhances the OA detectability of some amino acids but degrades that of others. RP-HPLC of proteins is a rapidly developing technique. Several researchers have reported the detection of multiple peaks when a pure protein is subjected to HPLC under certain conditions. These multiple peaks have been determined to be different conformations of the same protein. Since proteins are optically active, OA is a suitable detector. The RP-HPLC separation of conformers of soybean trypsin inhibitor is illustrated. Detection by OA/uv provides insights from the chromatogram unavailable from uv absorbance detection alone. In addition, identification of impurities is simplified with OA/uv. Specific rotations of the separated protein fractions show no significant change accompanying change in conformation. 163 refs., 13 figs., 9 tabs.

  8. The photochemical reflectance index provides an optical indicator of spring photosynthetic activation in evergreen conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Christopher Y S; Gamon, John A

    2015-04-01

    In evergreens, the seasonal down-regulation and reactivation of photosynthesis is largely invisible and difficult to assess with remote sensing. This invisible phenology may be changing as a result of climate change. To better understand the mechanism and timing of these hidden physiological transitions, we explored several assays and optical indicators of spring photosynthetic activation in conifers exposed to a boreal climate. The photochemical reflectance index (PRI), chlorophyll fluorescence, and leaf pigments for evergreen conifer seedlings were monitored over 1 yr of a boreal climate with the addition of gas exchange during the spring. PRI, electron transport rate, pigment levels, light-use efficiency and photosynthesis all exhibited striking seasonal changes, with varying kinetics and strengths of correlation, which were used to evaluate the mechanisms and timing of spring activation. PRI and pigment pools were closely timed with photosynthetic reactivation measured by gas exchange. The PRI provided a clear optical indicator of spring photosynthetic activation that was detectable at leaf and stand scales in conifers. We propose that PRI might provide a useful metric of effective growing season length amenable to remote sensing and could improve remote-sensing-driven models of carbon uptake in evergreen ecosystems. © 2015 The Authors. New Phytologist © 2015 New Phytologist Trust.

  9. Motionless active depth from defocus system using smart optics for camera autofocus applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin, M. Junaid; Riza, Nabeel A.

    2016-04-01

    This paper describes a motionless active Depth from Defocus (DFD) system design suited for long working range camera autofocus applications. The design consists of an active illumination module that projects a scene illuminating coherent conditioned optical radiation pattern which maintains its sharpness over multiple axial distances allowing an increased DFD working distance range. The imager module of the system responsible for the actual DFD operation deploys an electronically controlled variable focus lens (ECVFL) as a smart optic to enable a motionless imager design capable of effective DFD operation. An experimental demonstration is conducted in the laboratory which compares the effectiveness of the coherent conditioned radiation module versus a conventional incoherent active light source, and demonstrates the applicability of the presented motionless DFD imager design. The fast response and no-moving-parts features of the DFD imager design are especially suited for camera scenarios where mechanical motion of lenses to achieve autofocus action is challenging, for example, in the tiny camera housings in smartphones and tablets. Applications for the proposed system include autofocus in modern day digital cameras.

  10. Wide-field optical mapping of neural activity and brain haemodynamics: considerations and novel approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Shaik, Mohammed A.; Kozberg, Mariel G.; Thibodeaux, David N.; Zhao, Hanzhi T.; Yu, Hang

    2016-01-01

    Although modern techniques such as two-photon microscopy can now provide cellular-level three-dimensional imaging of the intact living brain, the speed and fields of view of these techniques remain limited. Conversely, two-dimensional wide-field optical mapping (WFOM), a simpler technique that uses a camera to observe large areas of the exposed cortex under visible light, can detect changes in both neural activity and haemodynamics at very high speeds. Although WFOM may not provide single-neuron or capillary-level resolution, it is an attractive and accessible approach to imaging large areas of the brain in awake, behaving mammals at speeds fast enough to observe widespread neural firing events, as well as their dynamic coupling to haemodynamics. Although such wide-field optical imaging techniques have a long history, the advent of genetically encoded fluorophores that can report neural activity with high sensitivity, as well as modern technologies such as light emitting diodes and sensitive and high-speed digital cameras have driven renewed interest in WFOM. To facilitate the wider adoption and standardization of WFOM approaches for neuroscience and neurovascular coupling research, we provide here an overview of the basic principles of WFOM, considerations for implementation of wide-field fluorescence imaging of neural activity, spectroscopic analysis and interpretation of results. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience’. PMID:27574312

  11. Wide-field optical mapping of neural activity and brain haemodynamics: considerations and novel approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ying; Shaik, Mohammed A; Kim, Sharon H; Kozberg, Mariel G; Thibodeaux, David N; Zhao, Hanzhi T; Yu, Hang; Hillman, Elizabeth M C

    2016-10-05

    Although modern techniques such as two-photon microscopy can now provide cellular-level three-dimensional imaging of the intact living brain, the speed and fields of view of these techniques remain limited. Conversely, two-dimensional wide-field optical mapping (WFOM), a simpler technique that uses a camera to observe large areas of the exposed cortex under visible light, can detect changes in both neural activity and haemodynamics at very high speeds. Although WFOM may not provide single-neuron or capillary-level resolution, it is an attractive and accessible approach to imaging large areas of the brain in awake, behaving mammals at speeds fast enough to observe widespread neural firing events, as well as their dynamic coupling to haemodynamics. Although such wide-field optical imaging techniques have a long history, the advent of genetically encoded fluorophores that can report neural activity with high sensitivity, as well as modern technologies such as light emitting diodes and sensitive and high-speed digital cameras have driven renewed interest in WFOM. To facilitate the wider adoption and standardization of WFOM approaches for neuroscience and neurovascular coupling research, we provide here an overview of the basic principles of WFOM, considerations for implementation of wide-field fluorescence imaging of neural activity, spectroscopic analysis and interpretation of results.This article is part of the themed issue 'Interpreting BOLD: a dialogue between cognitive and cellular neuroscience'. © 2016 The Authors.

  12. New insight into the solution structures of wheat gluten proteins from Raman optical activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blanch, E.W.; Kasarda, D.D.; Hecht, L.

    2003-01-01

    Vibrational Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra of the wheat proteins a-gliadin (A-gliadin), omega-liadin, and a 30 kDa peptide called T-A-1 from the high molecular weight glutenin subunit (HMW-GS) Dx5 were measured to obtain new information about their solution structures. The spectral data show...... that, under the conditions investigated, A-gliadin contains a considerable amount of hydrated alpha-helix, most of which probably lies within a relatively structured C-terminal domain. Smaller quantities of beta-structure and poly(L-proline) II (PPII) helix were also identified. Addition of methanol...

  13. Side Chain and Flexibility Contributions to the Raman Optical Activity Spectra of a Model Cyclic Hexapeptide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hudecová, J.; Kapitán, Josef; Baumruk, V.; Hammer, R. P.; Keiderling, T. A.; Bouř, Petr

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 114, č. 28 (2010), s. 7642-7651 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/06/0420; GA ČR GA202/07/0732; GA AV ČR IAA400550702 Grant - others:GA UK(CZ) 126310 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Raman optical activity * ab initio * side chain * flexibility * peptide Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.732, year: 2010

  14. Correlation between stereochemistry and optical activity of chiral dimolybdenum tetracarboxylates and related compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyagina, A.P.; Golovaneva, I.F.; Sadikova, G.G.

    1990-01-01

    Using one-electron model of optical activity sector rules for chiral tetracarboxylates of molybdenum and related compounds are derived. Correlation between the sign of the Cotton effect (CE) of δ-δ * -transition and stereochemistry of this type of binuclear clusters is expressed in the form of hexadecant rule, in which positive sign of CE corresponds to the negative sign of pseudoscalar function xyz(x 2 -y 2 ) of the cluster atoms. Negative sign of CE is predicted for δ-δ * -transition in cis-(L-isoleucine) 2 (NCS) 4 Mo 2

  15. Brain activation and connectivity of social cognition using diffuse optical imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Banghe; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2009-02-01

    In the current research, diffuse optical imaging (DOI) is used for the first time towards studies related to sociocommunication impairments, which is a characteristic feature of autism. DOI studies were performed on normal adult volunteers to determine the differences in the brain activation (cognitive regions) in terms of the changes in the cerebral blood oxygenation levels in response to joint and non-joint attention based stimulus (i.e. socio-communicative paradigms shown as video clips). Functional connectivity models are employed to assess the extent of synchronization between the left and right pre-frontal regions of the brain in response to the above stimuli.

  16. A two-in-one Faraday rotator mirror exempt of active optical alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Qiong; Wan, Zhujun; Liu, Hai; Liu, Deming

    2014-02-10

    A two-in-one Faraday rotator mirror was presented, which functions as two independent Faraday rotation mirrors with a single device. With the introduction of a reflection lens as substitution of the mirror in traditional structure, this device is characterized by exemption of active optical alignment for the designers and manufacturers of Faraday rotator mirrors. A sample was fabricated by passive mechanical assembly. The insertion loss was measured as 0.46 dB/0.50 dB for the two independent ports, respectively.

  17. Development of a fibre-optic dosemeter to measure the skin dose and percentage depth dose in the build-up region of therapeutic photon beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, K. A.; Yoo, W. J.; Jang, K. W.; Moon, J.; Han, K. T.; Jeon, D.; Park, J. Y.; Cha, E. J.; Lee, B.

    2013-01-01

    In this study, a fibre-optic dosemeter (FOD) using an organic scintillator with a diameter of 0.5 mm for photon-beam therapy dosimetry was fabricated. The fabricated dosemeter has many advantages, including water equivalence, high spatial resolution, remote sensing and real-time measurement. The scintillating light generated from an organic-dosemeter probe embedded in a solid-water stack phantom is guided to a photomultiplier tube and an electrometer via 20 m of plastic optical fibre. Using this FOD, the skin dose and the percentage depth dose in the build-up region according to the depths of a solid-water stack phantom are measured with 6- and 15-MV photon-beam energies with field sizes of 10310 and 20320 cm 2 , respectively. The results are compared with those measured using conventional dosimetry films. It is expected that the proposed FOD can be effectively used in radiotherapy dosimetry for accurate measurement of the skin dose and the depth dose distribution in the build-up region due to its high spatial resolution. (authors)

  18. Active learning of geometrical optics in high school: the ALOP approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alborch, Alejandra; Pandiella, Susana; Benegas, Julio

    2017-09-01

    A group comparison experiment of two high school classes with pre and post instruction testing has been carried out to study the suitability and advantages of using the active learning of optics and photonics (ALOP) curricula in high schools of developing countries. Two parallel, mixed gender, 12th grade classes of a high school run by the local university were chosen. One course was randomly selected to follow the experimental instruction, based on teacher and student activities contained in the ALOP Manual. The other course followed the traditional, teacher-centered, instruction previously practiced. Conceptual knowledge of the characteristics of image formation by plane mirrors and single convergent and divergent lenses was measured by applying, in both courses, the multiple-choice test, light and optics conceptual evaluation (LOCE). Measurement before instruction showed that initial knowledge was almost null, and therefore equivalent, in both courses. After instruction testing showed that the conceptual knowledge of students following the ALOP curricula more than doubled that achieved by students in the control course, a situation maintained throughout the six conceptual dimensions tested by the 34 questions of the LOCE test used in this experiment. Using a 60% performance level on the LOCE test as the threshold of satisfactory performance, most (about 90%) of the experimental group achieved this level—independent of initial knowledge, while no student following traditional instruction reached this level of understanding. Some considerations and recommendations for prospective users are also included.

  19. Optically active polyurethane@indium tin oxide nanocomposite: Preparation, characterization and study of infrared emissivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Yong; Zhou, Yuming; Ge, Jianhua; Yang, Xiaoming

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Silane coupling agent of KH550 was used to connect the ITO and polyurethanes. ► Infrared emissivity values of the hybrids were compared and analyzed. ► Interfacial synergistic action and orderly secondary structure were the key factors. -- Abstract: Optically active polyurethane@indium tin oxide and racemic polyurethane@indium tin oxide nanocomposites (LPU@ITO and RPU@ITO) were prepared by grafting the organics onto the surfaces of modified ITO nanoparticles. LPU@ITO and RPU@ITO composites based on the chiral and racemic tyrosine were characterized by FT-IR, UV–vis spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), SEM, TEM, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and the infrared emissivity values (8–14 μm) were investigated in addition. The results indicated that the polyurethanes had been successfully grafted onto the surfaces of ITO without destroying the crystalline structure. Both composites possessed the lower infrared emissivity values than the bare ITO nanoparticles, which indicated that the interfacial interaction had great effect on the infrared emissivity. Furthermore, LPU@ITO based on the optically active polyurethane had the virtue of regular secondary structure and more interfacial synergistic actions between organics and inorganics, thus it exhibited lower infrared emissivity value than RPU@ITO based on the racemic polyurethane.

  20. Helical polyurethane-attapulgite nanocomposite: Preparation, characterization and study of optical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Zhiqiang; Zhou Yuming; Sun Yanqing; Fan Kai; Guo Xingxing; Jiang Xiaolei

    2009-01-01

    Helical polyurethane-attapulgite (BM-ATT) based on R-1,1'-binaphthyl-2',2-diol (R-BINOL) composite was prepared after the surface modification of attapulgite (ATT). BM-ATT was characterized by Fourier-transform infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HTEM) and vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) spectroscopy. FT-IR and XRD analyses indicate that the helical polyurethane has been successfully grafted onto the surfaces of the modified ATT without destroying the original crystalline structure of ATT. BM-ATT exhibits the rod-like structure by SEM, TEM, and HTEM photographs. BM-ATT displays obvious Cotton effect for some absorbance in VCD spectrum, and its optical activity results from the singlehanded conformation of helical polyurethane. - Graphical Abstract: Helical polyurethane-attapulgite (BM-ATT) based on R-1,1'-binaphthyl-2',2-diol (R-BINOL) nanocomposite was prepared after surface modification of attapulgite (ATT). This rod-like composite is coated by the optically active polyurethane shell on the surfaces.

  1. Difference frequency generation spectroscopy as a vibrational optical activity measurement tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheon, Sangheon; Cho, Minhaeng

    2009-03-19

    Vibrational optical activity (VOA) of chiral molecules in condensed phases can be studied by using vibrational circular dichroism and Raman optical activity measurement techniques. Recently, IR-vis sum frequency generation has shown to be an alternative VOA measurement method. Such a three-wave-mixing method employing a polarization modulation technique can be a potentially useful VOA measurement tool. Here, a theoretical description of difference frequency generation (DFG) employing circularly polarized visible radiations is presented. Frequency scanning to obtain a VOA-DFG spectrum is achieved by controlling the difference between the two electronically nonresonant incident radiation frequencies. If the two incident beams are linearly polarized and their polarization directions are perpendicular to each other, one can selectively measure the all-electric-dipole-allowed chiral component of the DFG susceptibility. In addition, by using circularly polarized beams and taking the DFG difference intensity signal, which is defined as the difference between left and right circularly polarized DFG signals, additional chiral susceptibility components originating from the electric quadrupole transition can be measured. The DFG as a novel VOA measurement technique for solution samples containing chiral molecules will therefore be a useful coherent spectroscopic tool for determining absolute configuration of chiral molecules in condensed phases.

  2. Ring-shaped active mode-locked tunable laser using quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingxiao; Wang, Yongjun; Liu, Xinyu

    2018-03-01

    In this paper, a lot of simulations has been done for ring-shaped active mode-locked lasers with quantum-dot semiconductor optical amplifier (QD-SOA). Based on the simulation model of QD-SOA, we discussed about the influence towards mode-locked waveform frequency and pulse caused by QD-SOA maximum mode peak gain, active layer loss coefficient, bias current, incident light pulse, fiber nonlinear coefficient. In the meantime, we also take the tunable performance of the laser into consideration. Results showed QD-SOA a better performance than original semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA) in recovery time, line width, and nonlinear coefficients, which makes it possible to output a locked-mode impulse that has a higher impulse power, narrower impulse width as well as the phase is more easily controlled. After a lot of simulations, this laser can realize a 20GHz better locked-mode output pulse after 200 loops, where the power is above 17.5mW, impulse width is less than 2.7ps, moreover, the tunable wavelength range is between 1540nm-1580nm.

  3. Laser-based optical activity detection of amino acids and proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reitsma, B.H.

    1987-01-01

    The optical activity detector (OAD) for HPLC is a selective detector for optically active substances including amino acids and proteins. This study illustrates the use of the OAD in three related areas. Section I illustrates the separation of four free amino acids using cation-exchange chromatography. Detection by coupling the OAD to a refractive index detector (RI) for proline and threonine and the OAD to an ultraviolet absorbance detector (UV) for tyrosine and phenylalanine allows the calculation of enantiomeric (D/L) ratios of these amino acids without physical separation. Specific rotations of these four amino acids are also reported. Section II illustrates the separation of 16 dansyl-L-amino acids by RP-HPLC with detection by OA/UV. Section III illustrates the RP-HPLC separation of conformers of soybean trypsin inhibitor. Detection by OA/UV provides insights from the chromatogram unavailable for UV absorbance detection alone. In addition, identification of impurities is simplified with OA/UV. Specific rotations of the separated protein fractions show no significant change accompanying change in conformation.

  4. Nonplanar tertiary amides in rigid chiral tricyclic dilactams. Peptide group distortions and vibrational optical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazderková, Markéta; Profant, Václav; Hodačová, Jana; Sebestík, Jaroslav; Pazderka, Tomáš; Novotná, Pavlína; Urbanová, Marie; Safařík, Martin; Buděšínský, Miloš; Tichý, Miloš; Bednárová, Lucie; Baumruk, Vladimír; Maloň, Petr

    2013-08-22

    We investigate amide nonplanarity in vibrational optical activity (VOA) spectra of tricyclic spirodilactams 5,8-diazatricyclo[6,3,0,0(1,5)]undecan-4,9-dione (I) and its 6,6',7,7'-tetradeuterio derivative (II). These rigid molecules constrain amide groups to nonplanar geometries with twisted pyramidal arrangements of bonds to amide nitrogen atoms. We have collected a full range vibrational circular dichroism (VCD) and Raman optical activity (ROA) spectra including signals of C-H and C-D stretching vibrations. We report normal-mode analysis and a comparison of calculated to experimental VCD and ROA. The data provide band-to-band assignment and offer a possibility to evaluate roles of constrained nonplanar tertiary amide groups and rigid chiral skeletons. Nonplanarity shows as single-signed VCD and ROA amide I signals, prevailing the couplets expected to arise from the amide-amide interaction. Amide-amide coupling dominates amide II (mainly C'-N stretching, modified in tertiary amides by the absence of a N-H bond) transitions (strong couplet in VCD, no significant ROA) probably due to the close proximity of amide nitrogen atoms. At lower wavenumbers, ROA spectra exhibit another likely manifestation of amide nonplanarity, showing signals of amide V (δ(oop)(N-C) at ~570 cm(-1)) and amide VI (δ(oop)(C'═O) at ~700 cm(-1) and ~650 cm(-1)) vibrations.

  5. Severe Health-Related Quality of Life Impairment in Active Primary Sjögren's Syndrome and Patient-Reported Outcomes: Data From a Large Therapeutic Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornec, Divi; Devauchelle-Pensec, Valérie; Mariette, Xavier; Jousse-Joulin, Sandrine; Berthelot, Jean-Marie; Perdriger, Aleth; Puéchal, Xavier; Le Guern, Véronique; Sibilia, Jean; Gottenberg, Jacques-Eric; Chiche, Laurent; Hachulla, Eric; Yves Hatron, Pierre; Goeb, Vincent; Hayem, Gilles; Morel, Jacques; Zarnitsky, Charles; Dubost, Jean Jacques; Saliou, Philippe; Pers, Jacques Olivier; Seror, Raphaèle; Saraux, Alain

    2017-04-01

    To identify the principal determinants of health-related quality of life (HRQOL) impairment in patients with active primary Sjögren's syndrome (SS) participating in a large therapeutic trial, Tolerance and Efficacy of Rituximab in Primary Sjögren's Syndrome (TEARS). At the inclusion visit for the TEARS trial, 120 patients with active primary SS completed the Short Form 36 health survey (SF-36), a validated HRQOL assessment tool. Univariate then multivariate linear regression analyses were used to assess associations linking SF-36 physical and mental components to demographic data, patient-reported outcomes (symptom intensity assessments for dryness, pain, and fatigue, including the European League Against Rheumatism [EULAR] Sjögren's Syndrome Patient Reported Index [ESSPRI]), objective measures of dryness and autoimmunity, and physician evaluation of systemic activity (using the EULAR Sjögren's Syndrome Disease Activity Index [ESSDAI]). SF-36 scores indicated marked HRQOL impairments in our population with active primary SS. Approximately one-third of the patients had low, moderate, and high systemic activity according to the ESSDAI. ESSPRI and ESSDAI scores were moderately but significantly correlated. The factors most strongly associated with HRQOL impairment were patient-reported symptoms, best assessed using the ESSPRI, with pain and ocular dryness intensity showing independent associations with HRQOL. Conversely, systemic activity level was not associated with HRQOL impairment in multivariate analyses, even in the patient subset with ESSDAI values indicating moderate-to-high systemic activity. The cardinal symptoms of primary SS (dryness, pain, and fatigue, best assessed using the ESSPRI) are stronger predictors of HRQOL impairment than systemic involvement (assessed by the ESSDAI) and should be used as end points in future therapeutic trials focusing on patients' well-being. New consensual and data-driven response criteria are needed for primary SS

  6. Identification of prefrontal cortex (BA10) activation while performing Stroop test using diffuse optical tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khadka, Sabin; Chityala, Srujan R.; Tian, Fenghua; Liu, Hanli

    2011-03-01

    Stroop test is commonly used as a behavior-testing tool for psychological examinations that are related to attention and cognitive control of the human brain. Studies have shown activations in Broadmann area 10 (BA10) of prefrontal cortex (PFC) during attention and cognitive process. The use of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) for human brain mapping is becoming more prevalent. In this study we expect to find neural correlates between the performed cognitive tasks and hemodynamic signals detected by a DOT system. Our initial observation showed activation of oxy-hemoglobin concentration in BA 10, which is consistent with some results seen by positron emission tomography (PET) and functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). Our study demonstrates the possibility of combining DOT with Stroop test to quantitatively investigate cognitive functions of the human brain at the prefrontal cortex.

  7. Four-Wave Optical Parametric Amplification in a Raman-Active Gas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuichiro Kida

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Four-wave optical parametric amplification (FWOPA in a Raman-active medium is experimentally investigated by use of an air-filled hollow fiber. A femtosecond pump pulse shorter than the period of molecular motion excites the coherent molecular motion of the Raman-active molecules during the parametric amplification of a signal pulse. The excited coherent motion modulates the frequency of the signal pulse during the parametric amplification, and shifts it to lower frequencies. The magnitude of the frequency redshift depends on the pump intensity, resulting in intensity-dependent spectral characteristics that are different from those in the FWOPA induced in a noble-gas-filled hollow fiber.

  8. Impact of slow-light enhancement on optical propagation in active semiconductor photonic crystal waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Yaohui; de Lasson, Jakob Rosenkrantz; Gregersen, Niels

    2015-01-01

    We derive and validate a set of coupled Bloch wave equations for analyzing the reflection and transmission properties of active semiconductor photonic crystal waveguides. In such devices, slow-light propagation can be used to enhance the material gain per unit length, enabling, for example......, the realization of short optical amplifiers compatible with photonic integration. The coupled wave analysis is compared to numerical approaches based on the Fourier modal method and a frequency domain finite element technique. The presence of material gain leads to the build-up of a backscattered field, which...... is interpreted as distributed feedback effects or reflection at passive-active interfaces, depending on the approach taken. For very large material gain values, the band structure of the waveguide is perturbed, and deviations from the simple coupled Bloch wave model are found....

  9. Active functional devices using parity-time symmetry optics (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brac de la Perriere, Vincent; Benisty, Henri; Ramdane, Abderrahim; Lupu, Anatole

    2017-05-01

    The progress of nanotechnologies has triggered the emergence of many photonic artificial structures: photonic crystals, metamaterials, plasmonic resonators. Recently the intriguing class of PT-symmetric devices, referring to Parity-Time symmetry [1] has attracted much attention. The characteristic feature of PT-symmetry is that the structures' refractive index profile is complex-valued due to the presence of alternating gain and loss regions in the system. Apart from fundamental research motivations, the tremendous interest in these artificial systems is strongly driven by the practical outcomes expected to foster a new generation of tunable, reconfigurable and non-reciprocal devices. The principle of gain-loss modulation lying in the heart of PT-symmetry optics enables a range of innovative solutions in the field of integrated optics at 1.5μm [2-7]. By using PT-symmetric coupled waveguides and Bragg reflectors as fundamental building blocks, it is possible to build a wide variety of functional optical devices. The PT-symmetry principle provides an alternative way for the realization of active devices that could become functional in a new platform for integrated optics. For instance one major bottleneck of the III-V/Si hybrid integration approach is that each type of active devices (laser, modulator, etc) requires a specific composition of III-V semiconductor alloy, involving a variety of (re)growth challenges. The advantage of the PT-symmetry solution is that the fabrication of all these devices can be done with a single stack of III-V semiconductor alloys that greatly simplifies the technological process. The aim of the current contribution is to provide a survey of the most promising applications of PT-symmetry in photonics with a particular emphases on the transition from theoretical concepts to experimental devices. The intention is to draw attention to the risks and issues related to the practical implementation that are most often overlooked in the basic

  10. Emergence of Nonlinear Optical Activity by Incorporation of a Linker Carrying the p-Nitroaniline Motif in MIL-53 Frameworks

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Markey, Karen; Krüger, Martin; Seidler, Tomasz; Reinsch, Helge; Verbiest, Thierry; De Vos, Dirk E.; Champagne, Benoît; Stock, Norbert; van der Veen, M.A.

    2017-01-01

    p-Nitroaniline presents the typical motif of a second-order nonlinear optically (NLO) active molecule. However, because of its crystallization in an antiparallel and hence centrosymmetric structure, the NLO activity is lost. In this contribution, the p-nitroaniline motif was built successfully

  11. Active photonic sensor communication cable for field application of optical data and power transmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suthau, Eike; Rieske, Ralf; Zerna, Thomas

    2014-10-01

    Omitting electrically conducting wires for sensor communication and power supply promises protection for sensor systems and monitored structures against lightning or high voltages, prevention of explosion hazards, and reduction of susceptibility to tampering. The ability to photonically power remote systems opens up the full range of electrical sensors. Power-over-fiber is an attractive option in electromagnetically sensitive environments, particularly for longterm, maintenance-free applications. It can deliver uninterrupted power sufficient for elaborate sensors, data processing or even actuators alongside continuous high speed data communication for remote sensor application. This paper proposes an active photonic sensor communication system, which combines the advantages of optical data links in terms of immunity to electromagnetic interference (EMI), high bandwidth, hardiness against tampering or eavesdropping, and low cable weight with the robustness one has come to expect from industrial or military electrical connectors. An application specific integrated circuit (ASIC) is presented that implements a closed-loop regulation of the sensor power supply to guarantee continuous, reliable data communications while maintaining a highly efficient, adaptive sensor supply scheme. It is demonstrated that the resulting novel photonic sensor communication cable can handle sensors and actuators differing orders of magnitude with respect to power consumption. The miniaturization of the electro-optical converters and driving electronics is as important to the presented development as the energy efficiency of the detached, optically powered sensor node. For this reason, a novel photonic packaging technology based on wafer-level assembly of the laser power converters by means of passive alignment will be disclosed in this paper.

  12. Sleeping dendrites: fiber-optic measurements of dendritic calcium activity in freely moving and sleeping animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Seibt

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Dendrites are the post-synaptic sites of most excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the brain, making them the main location of cortical information processing and synaptic plasticity. Although current hypotheses suggest a central role for sleep in proper cognitive function and brain plasticity, virtually nothing is known about changes in dendritic activity across the sleep-wake cycle and how waking experience modifies this activity. To start addressing these questions, we developed a method that allows long-term recordings of EEGs/EMG combined with in vivo cortical calcium (Ca2+ activity in freely moving and sleeping rats. We measured Ca2+ activity from populations of dendrites of layer (L 5 pyramidal neurons (n = 13 rats that we compared with Ca2+ activity from populations of neurons in L2/3 (n = 11 rats. L5 and L2/3 neurons were labelled using bolus injection of OGB1-AM or GCaMP6 (1. Ca2+ signals were detected using a fiber-optic system (cannula diameter = 400µm, transmitting the changes in fluorescence to a photodiode. Ca2+ fluctuations could then be correlated with ongoing changes in brain oscillatory activity during 5 major brain states: active wake [AW], quiet wake [QW], NREM, REM and NREM-REM transition (or intermediate state, [IS]. Our Ca2+ recordings show large transients in L5 dendrites and L2/3 neurons that oscillate predominantly at frequencies In summary, we show that this technique is successful in monitoring fluctuations in ongoing dendritic Ca2+ activity during natural brain states and allows, in principle, to combine behavioral measurement with imaging from various brain regions (e.g. deep structures in freely behaving animals. Using this method, we show that Ca2+ transients from populations of L2/3 neurons and L5 dendrites are deferentially regulated across the sleep/wake cycle, with dendritic activity being the highest during the IS sleep. Our correlation analysis suggests that specific sleep EEG activity during NREM and IS

  13. Soil Water Measurement Using Actively Heated Fiber Optics at Field Scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidana Gamage, Duminda N; Biswas, Asim; Strachan, Ian B; Adamchuk, Viacheslav I

    2018-04-06

    Several studies have demonstrated the potential of actively heated fiber optics (AHFO) to measure soil water content (SWC) at high spatial and temporal resolutions. This study tested the feasibility of the AHFO technique to measure soil water in the surface soil of a crop grown field over a growing season using an in-situ calibration approach. Heat pulses of five minutes duration were applied at a rate of 7.28 W m -1 along eighteen fiber optic cable transects installed at three depths (0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 m) at six-hour intervals. Cumulative temperature increase (T cum ) during heat pulses was calculated at locations along the cable. While predicting commercial sensor measurements, the AHFO showed root mean square errors (RMSE) of 2.8, 3.7 and 3.7% for 0.05, 0.10 and 0.20 m depths, respectively. Further, the coefficients of determination (R²) for depth specific relationships were 0.87 (0.05 m depth), 0.46 (0.10 m depth), 0.86 (0.20 m depth) and 0.66 (all depths combined). This study showed a great potential of the AHFO technique to measure soil water at high spatial resolutions (<1 m) and to monitor soil water dynamics of surface soil in a crop grown field over a cropping season with a reasonable compromise between accuracy and practicality.

  14. Improvements in brain activation detection using time-resolved diffuse optical means

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montcel, Bruno; Chabrier, Renee; Poulet, Patrick

    2005-08-01

    An experimental method based on time-resolved absorbance difference is described. The absorbance difference is calculated over each temporal step of the optical signal with the time-resolved Beer-Lambert law. Finite element simulations show that each step corresponds to a different scanned zone and that cerebral contribution increases with the arrival time of photons. Experiments are conducted at 690 and 830 nm with a time-resolved system consisting of picosecond laser diodes, micro-channel plate photo-multiplier tube and photon counting modules. The hemodynamic response to a short finger tapping stimulus is measured over the motor cortex. Time-resolved absorbance difference maps show that variations in the optical signals are not localized in superficial regions of the head, which testify for their cerebral origin. Furthermore improvements in the detection of cerebral activation is achieved through the increase of variations in absorbance by a factor of almost 5 for time-resolved measurements as compared to non-time-resolved measurements.

  15. Development of a new catalase activity assay for biological samples using optical CUPRAC sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekdeşer, Burcu; Özyürek, Mustafa; Güçlü, Kubilay; Alkan, Fulya Üstün; Apak, Reşat

    2014-11-11

    A novel catalase activity assay was developed for biological samples (liver and kidney tissue homogenates) using a rapid and low-cost optical sensor-based 'cupric reducing antioxidant capacity' (CUPRAC) method. The reagent, copper(II)-neocuproine (Cu(II)-Nc) complex, was immobilized onto a cation-exchanger film of Nafion, and the absorbance changes associated with the formation of the highly-colored Cu(I)-Nc chelate as a result of reaction with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) was measured at 450 nm. When catalase was absent, H2O2 produced the CUPRAC chromophore, whereas catalase, being an effective H2O2 scavenger, completely annihilated the CUPRAC signal due to H2O2. Thus, the CUPRAC absorbance due to H2O2 oxidation concomitant with Cu(I)-Nc formation decreased proportionally with catalase. The developed sensor gave a linear response over a wide concentration range of H2O2 (0.68-78.6 μM). This optical sensor-based method applicable to tissue homogenates proved to be efficient for low hydrogen peroxide concentrations (physiological and nontoxic levels) to which the widely used UV method is not accurately responsive. Thus, conventional problems of the UV method arising from relatively low sensitivity and selectivity, and absorbance disturbance due to gaseous oxygen evolution were overcome. The catalase findings of the proposed method for tissue homogenates were statistically alike with those of HPLC. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Circular dichroism and Raman optical activity in antiferromagnetic transition metal fluorides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoffman, K.R.; Lockwood, D.J.; Yen, W.M.

    2005-01-01

    The Raman optical activity (ROA) of magnons in rutile-structure antiferromagnetic FeF 2 (T N = 78 K) has been studied as a function of temperature and applied magnetic field. For exciting light incident along the c axis, ROA is observed for magnons but not for phonons. In zero field, a small splitting (0.09 cm -1 ) of the two acoustic-magnon branches is observed for the first time by inelastic light scattering. The splitting in applied magnetic field is found to reduce with increasing temperature in accordance with theory. No ROA was detected for two-magnon excitations. In optical absorption measurements performed over thirty years ago, a very small circular dichroism (CD) was observed in the magnon sidebands of other simple rutile antiferromagnetic fluorides (MnF 2 and CoF 2 ). The origin of this CD was not understood at the time. The Raman studies of the one-magnon Raman scattering in FeF 2 have demonstrated that in zero field the degeneracy of the antiferromagnetic magnon branches is lifted by a weak magnetic dipole-dipole interaction, as predicted by Pincus and Loudon and by White four decades ago. The source of the observed CD in the magnon sidebands can now be traced to this same magnetic-dipole induced splitting

  17. Isotope effect in heavy/light water suspensions of optically active gold nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kutsenko, V. Y.; Artykulnyi, O. P.; Petrenko, V. I.; Avdeev, M. V.; Marchenko, O. A.; Bulavin, L. A.; Snegir, S. V.

    2018-04-01

    Aqueous suspensions of optically active gold nanoparticles coated with trisodium citrate were synthesized in light (H2O) water and mixture of light and heavy (H2O/D2O) water using the modified Turkevich protocol. The objective of the paper was to verify sensitivity of neutron scattering methods (in particular, neutron reflectometry) to the potential isotope H/D substitution in the stabilizing organic shell around particles in colloidal solutions. First, the isotope effect was studied with respect to the changes in the structural properties of metal particles (size, shape, crystalline morphology) in solutions by electron microscopy including high-resolution transmission electron microscopy from dried systems. The structural factors determining the variation in the adsorption spectra in addition to the change in the optical properties of surrounding medium were discussed. Then, neutron reflectometry was applied to the layered nanoparticles anchored on a silicon wafer via 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane molecules to reveal the presence of deuterated water molecules in the shell presumably formed by citrate molecules around the metallic core.

  18. Optical microscopy of targeted drug delivery and local distribution in skin of a topical minocycline: implications in translational research and guidance for therapeutic dose selection (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsmeier, Maiko; Sawant, Tanvee; Lac, Diana; Yamamoto, Akira; Chen, Xin; Huang, Susan Y.; Nagavarapu, Usha; Evans, Conor L.; Chan, Kin Foong; Daniels, AnnaMarie

    2017-02-01

    Acne vulgaris is a chronic inflammatory skin condition commonly resulting in negative aesthetic and social impacts on those affected. Minocycline, currently available as an oral antibiotic for moderate to severe acne, has a known minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) for the acne-causing bacterium Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) in vitro, with its anti-inflammatory properties also eliciting inhibitory effects on pro-inflammatory molecules. A novel topical gel composition containing solubilized minocycline (BPX-01) has been developed to directly deliver the drug to the skin. Because minocycline is a known fluorophore, fluorescence microscopy and concurrent quantitative measurements were performed on excised human facial skin dosed with different concentrations, in order to determine the spatial distribution of the drug and quantification of its local concentration in the epidermis and the pilosebaceous unit where P. acnes generally reside. Local minocycline delivery confirmed achievement of an adequate therapeutic dose to support clinical studies. Subsequently, a 4-week double-blind, randomized, vehicle controlled clinical study was performed to assess the safety and efficacy of 1% minocycline BPX-01 applied daily. No instances of cutaneous toxicity were reported, and a greater than 1 log reduction of P. acnes count was observed at week 4 with statistical significance from baseline and vehicle control. In addition, no detectable amounts of minocycline in the plasma were reported, suggesting the potential of this new formulation to diminish the known systemic adverse effects associated with oral minocycline. Follow-on clinical plans are underway to further establish the safety of BPX-01 and to evaluate its efficacy against inflammatory acne lesions in a 225 patient multi-center dose-finding study.

  19. Applied optics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orszag, A.; Antonetti, A.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report, of the Applied Optics laboratory, of the (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The optical fiber activities are focused on the development of an optical gyrometer, containing a resonance cavity. The following domains are included, in the research program: the infrared laser physics, the laser sources, the semiconductor physics, the multiple-photon ionization and the nonlinear optics. Investigations on the biomedical, the biological and biophysical domains are carried out. The published papers and the congress communications are listed [fr

  20. Robot-assisted motor activation monitored by time-domain optical brain imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkellner, O.; Wabnitz, H.; Schmid, S.; Steingräber, R.; Schmidt, H.; Krüger, J.; Macdonald, R.

    2011-07-01

    Robot-assisted motor rehabilitation proved to be an effective supplement to conventional hand-to-hand therapy in stroke patients. In order to analyze and understand motor learning and performance during rehabilitation it is desirable to develop a monitor to provide objective measures of the corresponding brain activity at the rehabilitation progress. We used a portable time-domain near-infrared reflectometer to monitor the hemodynamic brain response to distal upper extremity activities. Four healthy volunteers performed two different robot-assisted wrist/forearm movements, flexion-extension and pronation-supination in comparison with an unassisted squeeze ball exercise. A special headgear with four optical measurement positions to include parts of the pre- and postcentral gyrus provided a good overlap with the expected activation areas. Data analysis based on variance of time-of-flight distributions of photons through tissue was chosen to provide a suitable representation of intracerebral signals. In all subjects several of the four detection channels showed a response. In some cases indications were found of differences in localization of the activated areas for the various tasks.

  1. Embedded Active Fiber Optic Sensing Network for Structural Health Monitoring in Harsh Environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Anbo [Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ. (Virginia Tech), Blacksburg, VA (United States)

    2016-09-30

    This report summarizes technical progress on the program “Embedded Active Fiber Optic Sensing Network for Structural Health Monitoring in Harsh Environments” funded by the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the U.S. Department of Energy, and performed by the Center for Photonics Technology at Virginia Tech. The objective of this project is to develop a first-of-a-kind technology for remote fiber optic generation and detection of acoustic waves for structural health monitoring in harsh environments. During the project period, which is from April 1, 2013 to Septemeber 30, 2016, three different acoustic generation mechanisms were studied in detail for their applications in building a fiber optic acoustic generation unit (AGU), including laser induced plasma breakdown (LIP), Erbium-doped fiber laser absorption, and metal laser absorption. By comparing the performance of the AGUs designed based on these three mechanisms and analyzing the experimental results with simulations, the metal laser absorption method was selected to build a complete fiber optic structure health monitoring (FO-SHM) system for the proposed high temperature multi-parameter structure health monitoring application. Based on the simulation of elastic wave propagation and fiber Bragg grating acoustic pulse detection, an FO-SHM element together with a completed interrogation system were designed and built. This system was first tested on an aluminum piece in the low-temperature range and successfully demonstrated its capability of multi-parameter monitoring and multi-point sensing. In the later stages of the project, the research was focused on improving the surface attachment design and preparing the FO-SHM element for high temperature environment tests. After several upgrades to the surface attachment methods, the FO-SHM element was able to work reliably up to 600oC when attached to P91 pipes, which are the target material of this project. In the final stage of this project, this FO

  2. Application of activity pencil beam algorithm using measured distribution data of positron emitter nuclei for therapeutic SOBP proton beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyatake, Aya; Nishio, Teiji

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Recently, much research on imaging the clinical proton-irradiated volume using positron emitter nuclei based on target nuclear fragment reaction has been carried out. The purpose of this study is to develop an activity pencil beam (APB) algorithm for a simulation system for proton-activated positron-emitting imaging in clinical proton therapy using spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) beams.Methods: The target nuclei of activity distribution calculations are 12 C nuclei, 16 O nuclei, and 40 Ca nuclei, which are the main elements in a human body. Depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were obtained from the material information of ridge filter (RF) and depth activity distributions of compounds of the three target nuclei measured by BOLPs-RGp (beam ON-LINE PET system mounted on a rotating gantry port) with mono-energetic Bragg peak (MONO) beam irradiations. The calculated data of depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were sorted in terms of kind of nucleus, energy of proton beam, SOBP width, and thickness of fine degrader (FD), which were verified. The calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations were compared with the measured ones. APB kernels were made from the calculated depth activity distributions with SOBP beam irradiations to construct a simulation system using the APB algorithm for SOBP beams.Results: The depth activity distributions were prepared using the material information of RF and the measured depth activity distributions with MONO beam irradiations for clinical therapy using SOBP beams. With the SOBP width widening, the distal fall-offs of depth activity distributions and the difference from the depth dose distributions were large. The shapes of the calculated depth activity distributions nearly agreed with those of the measured ones upon comparison between the two. The APB kernels of SOBP beams were prepared by making use of the data on depth activity distributions with SOBP beam

  3. Electrically and magnetically controlled optical spanner based on the transfer of spin angular momentum of light in an optically active medium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Lixiang; Zheng Guoliang; She Weilong

    2007-01-01

    An optical spanner is a light beam that can exert a torque on an object. It is demonstrated in this Rapid Communication that, with the aid of applied electric and magnetic fields, a light beam with initially linear polarization and initially zero total spin angular momentum can interact with an optically active medium, resulting in a change of the ratio of left-handed circularly polarized photons to right-handed ones. Thus the total spin angular momentum of the light is changed, which leads to a torque, creating an electrically and magnetically controlled optical spanner on the medium. For a linearly polarized 632.8 nm laser beam incident on a 100-μm-long Ce:Bi 12 TiO 20 whisker crystal with 5 μm radius, if the magnetic field is fixed at -1.8 T, both the left- (right-)handed circularly polarized photon number and the total spin angular momentum vary with the applied electric field in a sinusoidal way, which means the torque exerted by the optical spanner on the crystal also varies sinusoidally with the electric field. It is found that at 50 (or-50) kV/cm, 56% right- (left-)handed circularly polarized photons are translated into left- (right-)handed ones, which corresponds to a transfer of 0.56(ℎ/2π) spin angular momentum contributed by each photon

  4. Śodhana: An Ayurvedic process for detoxification and modification of therapeutic activities of poisonous medicinal plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santosh Kumar Maurya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ayurveda involves the use of drugs obtained from plants, animals, and mineral origin. All the three sources of drugs can be divided under poisonous and nonpoisonous category. There are various crude drugs, which generally possess unwanted impurities and toxic substances, which can lead to harmful health problems. Many authors have reported that not all medicinal plants are safe to use since they can bear many toxic and harmful phytoconstituents in them. Śodhana (detoxification/purification is the process, which involves the conversion of any poisonous drug into beneficial, nonpoisonous/nontoxic ones. Vatsanābha (Aconitum species, Semecarpus anacardium, Strychnos nux-vomica, Acorus calamus, Abrus precatorius etc., are some of the interesting examples of toxic plants, which are still used in the Indian system of medicine. Aconite, bhilawanols, strychnine, β-asarone, abrin are some of the toxic components present in these plants and are relatively toxic in nature. Śodhana process involves the purification as well as reduction in the levels of toxic principles which sometimes results in an enhanced therapeutic efficacy. The present review is designed to extensively discuss and understand the scientific basis of the alternative use of toxic plants as a medicine after their purification process.

  5. Śodhana: An Ayurvedic process for detoxification and modification of therapeutic activities of poisonous medicinal plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurya, Santosh Kumar; Seth, Ankit; Laloo, Damiki; Singh, Narendra Kumar; Gautam, Dev Nath Singh; Singh, Anil Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Ayurveda involves the use of drugs obtained from plants, animals, and mineral origin. All the three sources of drugs can be divided under poisonous and nonpoisonous category. There are various crude drugs, which generally possess unwanted impurities and toxic substances, which can lead to harmful health problems. Many authors have reported that not all medicinal plants are safe to use since they can bear many toxic and harmful phytoconstituents in them. Śodhana (detoxification/purification) is the process, which involves the conversion of any poisonous drug into beneficial, nonpoisonous/nontoxic ones. Vatsanābha (Aconitum species), Semecarpus anacardium, Strychnos nux-vomica, Acorus calamus, Abrus precatorius etc., are some of the interesting examples of toxic plants, which are still used in the Indian system of medicine. Aconite, bhilawanols, strychnine, β–asarone, abrin are some of the toxic components present in these plants and are relatively toxic in nature. Śodhana process involves the purification as well as reduction in the levels of toxic principles which sometimes results in an enhanced therapeutic efficacy. The present review is designed to extensively discuss and understand the scientific basis of the alternative use of toxic plants as a medicine after their purification process. PMID:26283803

  6. Applications of inorganic nanoparticles as therapeutic agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Taeho; Hyeon, Taeghwan

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, various functional nanostructured materials with interesting optical, magnetic, mechanical and chemical properties have been extensively applied to biomedical areas including imaging, diagnosis and therapy. In therapeutics, most research has focused on the application of nanoparticles as potential delivery vehicles for drugs and genes, because nanoparticles in the size range of 2–100 nm can interact with biological systems at the molecular level, and allow targeted delivery and passage through biological barriers. Recent investigations have even revealed that several kinds of nanomaterials are intrinsically therapeutic. Not only can they passively interact with cells, but they can also actively mediate molecular processes to regulate cell functions. This can be seen in the treatment of cancer via anti-angiogenic mechanisms as well as the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases by effectively controlling oxidative stress. This review will present recent applications of inorganic nanoparticles as therapeutic agents in the treatment of disease. (topical review)

  7. One-Dimensional Chirality: Strong Optical Activity in Epsilon-Near-Zero Metamaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizza, Carlo; Di Falco, Andrea; Scalora, Michael; Ciattoni, Alessandro

    2015-07-31

    We suggest that electromagnetic chirality, generally displayed by 3D or 2D complex chiral structures, can occur in 1D patterned composites whose components are achiral. This feature is highly unexpected in a 1D system which is geometrically achiral since its mirror image can always be superposed onto it by a 180 deg rotation. We analytically evaluate from first principles the bianisotropic response of multilayered metamaterials and we show that the chiral tensor is not vanishing if the system is geometrically one-dimensional chiral; i.e., its mirror image cannot be superposed onto it by using translations without resorting to rotations. As a signature of 1D chirality, we show that 1D chiral metamaterials support optical activity and we prove that this phenomenon undergoes a dramatic nonresonant enhancement in the epsilon-near-zero regime where the magnetoelectric coupling can become dominant in the constitutive relations.

  8. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang-Hwan Kim

    2003-01-01

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms

  9. Chiral metamaterials: from optical activity and negative refractive index to asymmetric transmission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Zhaofeng; Mutlu, Mehmet; Ozbay, Ekmel

    2013-01-01

    We summarize the progress in the development and application of chiral metamaterials. After a brief review of the salient features of chiral metamaterials, such as giant optical activity, circular dichroism, and negative refractive index, the common method for the retrieval of effective parameters for chiral metamaterials is surveyed. Then, we introduce some typical chiral structures, e.g., chiral metamaterial consisting of split ring resonators, complementary chiral metamaterial, and composite chiral metamaterial, on the basis of the studies of the authors’ group. The coupling effect during the construction of bulk chiral metamaterials is mentioned and discussed. We introduce the application of bianisotropic chiral structures in the field of asymmetric transmission. Finally, we mention a few directions for future research on chiral metamaterials. (review article)

  10. High-fidelity optical reporting of neuronal electrical activity with an ultrafast fluorescent voltage sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    St-Pierre, François; Marshall, Jesse D; Yang, Ying; Gong, Yiyang; Schnitzer, Mark J; Lin, Michael Z

    2015-01-01

    Accurate optical reporting of electrical activity in genetically defined neuronal populations is a long-standing goal in neuroscience. Here we describe Accelerated Sensor of Action Potentials 1 (ASAP1), a novel voltage sensor design in which a circularly permuted green fluorescent protein is inserted within an extracellular loop of a voltage-sensing domain, rendering fluorescence responsive to membrane potential. ASAP1 demonstrates on- and off- kinetics of 2.1 and 2.0 ms, reliably detects single action potentials and subthreshold potential changes, and tracks trains of action potential waveforms up to 200 Hz in single trials. With a favorable combination of brightness, dynamic range, and speed, ASAP1 enables continuous monitoring of membrane potential in neurons at KHz frame rates using standard epifluorescence microscopy. PMID:24755780

  11. Effect of Etching on the Optical, Morphological Properties of Ag Thin Films for SERS Active Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desapogu Rajesh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural, optical, and morphological properties of Ag thin films before and after etching were investigated by using X-ray diffraction, UV-Vis spectrophotometer, and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM. The HNO3 roughened Ag thin films exhibit excellent enhancement features and better stability than pure Ag thin films. Further, the Ag nanostructures are covered with Rhodamine 6G (Rh6G and then tested with surface enhanced raman spectroscopy (SERS for active substrates. Etched Ag films were found to exhibit a strong SERS effect and excellent thermal stability. Hence, the present method is found to be useful in the development of plasmon-based analytical devices, especially SERS-based biosensors.

  12. Optically Detected Magnetic Resonance and Thermal Activation Spectroscopy Study of Organic Semiconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Chang-Hwan [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2003-01-01

    Organic electronic materials are a new class of emerging materials. Organic light emitting devices (OLEDs) are the most promising candidates for future flat panel display technologies. The photophysical characterization is the basic research step one must follow to understand this new class of materials and devices. The light emission properties are closely related to the transport properties of these materials. The objective of this dissertation is to probe the relation between transport and photophysical properties of organic semiconductors. The transport characteristics were evaluated by using thermally stimulated current and thermally stimulated luminescence techniques. The photoluminescence detected magnetic resonance and photoluminescence quantum yield studies provide valuable photophysical information on this class of materials. OLEDs are already in the market. However, detailed studies on the degradation mechanisms are still lacking. Since both optically detected magnetic resonance and thermal activation spectroscopy probe long-lived defect-related states in organic semiconductors, the combined study generates new insight on the OLED operation and degradation mechanisms.

  13. An investigation of the influence of reconceptualization of demonstrative experimental activities of optics in high school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jair Lúcio Prados Ribeiro

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we analyze the influence that the use of demonstrative experiments can bring to the learning of optics. It is assumed that the development of experimental activities, when reconceptualized according to Hodson proposal, tends to contribute to the generation of cognitive conflicts when compared to traditional didactic experience. Justifications are given for an analysis of changes under a Piagetian bias, reconciled with Hodson proposal. The methodology used to structure the topics presentations was quasi-experimental, contrasting an experimental group with a control group. The measuring of the effectiveness of the suggested working method was made from a quantitative analysis, which identified some of the topics discussed had better results in learning, being more tied to the experiments carried out.

  14. New Active Optical Technique Developed for Measuring Low-Earth-Orbit Atomic Oxygen Erosion of Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Bruce A.; deGroh, Kim K.; Demko, Rikako

    2003-01-01

    Polymers such as polyimide Kapton (DuPont) and Teflon FEP (DuPont, fluorinated ethylene propylene) are commonly used spacecraft materials because of desirable properties such as flexibility, low density, and in the case of FEP, a low solar absorptance and high thermal emittance. Polymers on the exterior of spacecraft in the low-Earth-orbit (LEO) environment are exposed to energetic atomic oxygen. Atomic oxygen reaction with polymers causes erosion, which is a threat to spacecraft performance and durability. It is, therefore, important to understand the atomic oxygen erosion yield E (the volume loss per incident oxygen atom) of polymers being considered in spacecraft design. The most common technique for determining E is a passive technique based on mass-loss measurements of samples exposed to LEO atomic oxygen during a space flight experiment. There are certain disadvantages to this technique. First, because it is passive, data are not obtained until after the flight is completed. Also, obtaining the preflight and postflight mass measurements is complicated by the fact that many polymers absorb water and, therefore, the mass change due to water absorption can affect the E data. This is particularly true for experiments that receive low atomic oxygen exposures or for samples that have a very low E. An active atomic oxygen erosion technique based on optical measurements has been developed that has certain advantages over the mass-loss technique. This in situ technique can simultaneously provide the erosion yield data on orbit and the atomic oxygen exposure fluence, which is needed for erosion yield determination. In the optical technique, either sunlight or artificial light can be used to measure the erosion of semitransparent or opaque polymers as a result of atomic oxygen attack. The technique is simple and adaptable to a rather wide range of polymers, providing that they have a sufficiently high optical absorption coefficient. If one covers a photodiode with a

  15. Therapeutic Response to Non-genotoxic Activation of p53 by Nutlin3a Is Driven by PUMA-Mediated Apoptosis in Lymphoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liz J. Valente

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nutlin3a is a small-molecule antagonist of MDM2 that promotes non-genotoxic activation of p53 through p53 protein stabilization and transactivation of p53 target genes. Nutlin3a is the forerunner of a class of cancer therapeutics that have reached clinical trials. Using transgenic and gene-targeted mouse models lacking the critical p53 target genes, p21, Puma, and Noxa, we found that only loss of PUMA conferred profound protection against Nutlin3a-induced killing in both non-transformed lymphoid cells and Eμ-Myc lymphomas in vitro and in vivo. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeting of the PUMA gene rendered human hematopoietic cancer cell lines markedly resistant to Nutlin3a-induced cell death. These results demonstrate that PUMA-mediated apoptosis, but not p21-mediated cell-cycle arrest or senescence, is a critical determinant of the therapeutic response to non-genotoxic p53 activation by Nutlin3a. Importantly, in human cancer, PUMA expression may predict patient responses to treatment with MDM2 antagonists.

  16. Therapeutic effects of anti-gravity treadmill (AlterG) training on reflex hyper-excitability, corticospinal tract activities, and muscle stiffness in children with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parvin, Sh; Taghiloo, A; Irani, A; Mirbagheri, M Mehdi

    2017-07-01

    We aimed to study therapeutic effects of antigravity treadmill (AlterG) training on reflex hyper-excitability, muscle stiffness, and corticospinal tract (CST) function in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy (CP). Three children received AlterG training 3 days per week for 8 weeks as experimental group. Each session lasted 45 minutes. One child as control group received typical occupational therapy for the same amount of time. We evaluated hyper-excitability of lower limb muscles by H-reflex response. We quantified muscle stiffness by sonoelastography images of the affected muscles. We quantified CST activity by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). We performed the evaluations before and after training for both groups. H response latency and maximum M-wave amplitude were improved in experimental group after training compared to control group. Two children of experimental group had TMS response. Major parameters of TMS (i.e. peak-to-peak amplitude of motor evoked potential (MEP), latency of MEP, cortical silent period, and intensity of pulse) improved for both of them. Three parameters of texture analysis of sonoelastography images were improved for experimental group (i.e. contrast, entropy, and shear wave velocity). These findings indicate that AlterG training can improve reflexes, muscle stiffness, and CST activity in children with spastic hemiplegic CP and can be considered as a therapeutic tool to improve neuromuscular abnormalities occurring secondary to CP.

  17. Use and effects of custom-made therapeutic footwear on lower-extremity-related pain and activity limitations in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: A prospective observational study of a cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahmen, Rutger; Buijsmann, Saskia; Siemonsma, Petra C; Boers, Maarten; Lankhorst, Gustaaf J; Roorda, Leo D

    2014-06-01

    An estimated 55-90% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis have foot problems. Therapeutic footwear is frequently prescribed as part of usual care, but data on its use and effect is incomplete. This study aimed to investigate the use and effects of therapeutic footwear. Patients with rheumatoid arthritis receiving custom-made therapeutic footwear for the first time formed an inception cohort. Patients reported their therapeutic footwear use on 3 consecutive days in activity diaries 14 and 20 weeks after delivery of the footwear. The Western Ontario and McMasters Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) was used as the primary outcome of lower-extremity-related pain and activity limitations, and the Health Assessment Questionnaire (HAQ) as a secondary outcome measure of activity limitations, both at baseline and 26 weeks after therapeutic footwear delivery. The cohort comprised 114 rheumatoid arthritis patients (median disease duration 10 years). Mean (standard deviation) therapeutic footwear use was 54 (25)% of the time patients were out of bed. The median (interquartile range) WOMAC score improved from 41 (27-59) to 31 (16-45) (p footwear was used with moderate intensity by most rheumatoid arthritis patients and was associated with a substantial decrease in pain and activity limitations. Therapeutic footwear is a relevant treatment option for patients with rheumatoid arthritis and foot problems.

  18. Antiaging Effects of an Intensive Mind and Body Therapeutic Program through Enhancement of Telomerase Activity and Adult Stem Cell Counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Krishna S; Chakraharti, Swarup K; Dongare, Vaishali S; Chetana, K; Ramirez, Christina M; Koka, Prasad S; Deb, Kaushik D

    2015-01-01

    Key modalities of integrative medicine known to rejuvenate the mind and body are meditation, yoga, and controlled diet. It has been shown previously that intensive or prolonged mind and body therapies (MBT) may have beneficial effects on the well-being of healthy people and in patients. Telomerase activity and levels of peripheral blood adult pluripotent stem cells (PB-APSC) are reliable markers of long-term well-being that are known to decrease with age. The objective of this study is to understand the effect of our MBT program on telomerase activity and stem cells in blood collected from the participants. Here, we have investigated the effects of an intensive three weeks MBT retreat on telomerase activity and the peripheral blood stem cells in participants before and after the MBT. A total of 108 people were enrolled in the study; 38 men and 70 women (aged 18-90) randomly assigned for the study. Telomerase activity was greater in retreat participants at the end of the MBT retreat. About 45% of people showed more than one-fold increase of telomerase activity after our MBT program. Furthermore, about 27% of people showed more pronounced fold increase (2-fold) in telomerase activity after the MBT. In addition, a substantial percentage of people (about 90%) exhibited increased stem cell counts after the MBT. The data suggest increased telomerase activity and stem cells count in peripheral blood from MBT retreat participants that may lead to increased longevity and better quality of life at latter age.

  19. A hybrid active optical system for wave front preservation and variable focal distance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cocco, Daniele, E-mail: daniele.cocco@elettra.trieste.i [Sincrotrone Trieste ScpA, 34012 Trieste (Italy); Bortoletto, Gianluca; Sergo, Rudi; Sostero, Giovanni; Cudin, Ivan [Sincrotrone Trieste ScpA, 34012 Trieste (Italy)

    2010-05-01

    A new Free Electron Laser (FEL) user facility, named FERMI-Elettra, is under construction at Sincrotrone Trieste (Italy). It is based on a seeded scheme to provide an almost perfect transform limited beam with fully spatial coherence. The wavelength range will be 100-3 nm with fundamental and will go down to 1 nm by using higher harmonics. It will be operative by autumn 2010. The exceptional characteristics of the source must be preserved until the experimental chamber, where a large set of different experiments will be performed. This condition poses very tight requirements to the design of the beamlines and, in particular, to the focusing optics. Here we will present the active optics system developed for Fermi but intended to be used also on the Elettra beamlines. It is based on the adoption of a hybrid active system composed by UHV compatible stepping motors and piezo ceramic actuators. These mirrors are supposed to provide focal distances from 0.8 m to infinity with an angle of incidence up to a few degrees and residual shape errors below 10 or 5 nm (depending on the wavelength). In this way it is possible to work with an almost perfect focused coherent beam as well as with a uniform defocused or unfocused image. The metrology results on the first 400 mm long mirror will be shown and the actuator system described. A strain gauge assembly, calibrated in Elettra by means of a long trace profiler, and controlled by a custom made electronic system developed by us, is used as a direct in situ encoder.

  20. In vivo electroporation enhances vaccine-mediated therapeutic control of human papilloma virus-associated tumors by the activation of multifunctional and effector memory CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sales, Natiely S; Silva, Jamile R; Aps, Luana R M M; Silva, Mariângela O; Porchia, Bruna F M M; Ferreira, Luís Carlos S; Diniz, Mariana O

    2017-12-19

    In vivo electroporation (EP) has reignited the clinical interest on DNA vaccines as immunotherapeutic approaches to control different types of cancer. EP has been associated with increased immune response potency, but its capacity in influencing immunomodulation remains unclear. Here we evaluated the impact of in vivo EP on the induction of cellular immune responses and therapeutic effects of a DNA vaccine targeting human papillomavirus-induced tumors. Our results demonstrate that association of EP with the conventional intramuscular administration route promoted a more efficient activation of multifunctional and effector memory CD8 + T cells with enhanced cytotoxic activity. Furthermore, EP increased tumor infiltration of CD8 + T cells and avoided tumor recurrences. Finally, our results demonstrated that EP promotes local migration of antigen presenting cells that enhances with vaccine co-delivery. Altogether the present evidences shed further light on the in vivo electroporation action and its impact on the immunogenicity of DNA vaccines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Insights into the Molecular Pathogenesis of Activated B-Cell-like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Its Therapeutic Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georg Lenz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Within the last couple of years, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL has significantly improved. Large-scale gene expression profiling studies have led to the discovery of several molecularly defined subtypes that are characterized by specific oncogene addictions and significant differences in their outcome. Next generation sequencing efforts combined with RNA interference screens frequently identify crucial oncogenes that lead to constitutive activation of various signaling pathways that drive lymphomagenesis. This review summarizes our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the activated B-cell-like (ABC DLBCL subtype that is characterized by poor prognosis. A special emphasis is put on findings that might impact therapeutic strategies of affected patients.

  2. Insights into the Molecular Pathogenesis of Activated B-Cell-like Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma and Its Therapeutic Implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenz, Georg [Translational Oncology, Department of Medicine A, Albert-Schweitzer Campus 1, University Hospital Münster, 48149 Münster (Germany); Cluster of Excellence EXC 1003, Cells in Motion, 48149 Münster (Germany)

    2015-05-22

    Within the last couple of years, the understanding of the molecular mechanisms that drive the pathogenesis of diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) has significantly improved. Large-scale gene expression profiling studies have led to the discovery of several molecularly defined subtypes that are characterized by specific oncogene addictions and significant differences in their outcome. Next generation sequencing efforts combined with RNA interference screens frequently identify crucial oncogenes that lead to constitutive activation of various signaling pathways that drive lymphomagenesis. This review summarizes our current understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of the activated B-cell-like (ABC) DLBCL subtype that is characterized by poor prognosis. A special emphasis is put on findings that might impact therapeutic strategies of affected patients.

  3. The Effects of Nicotinic and Muscarinic Receptor Activation on Patch-Clamped Cells in the Optic Tectum of Rana Pipiens

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, C.-J.; Debski, E. A.

    2003-01-01

    Both nicotinic and muscarinic cholinergic receptors are present in the optic tectum. To begin to understand how the activation of these receptors affects visual activity patterns, we have determined the types of physiological responses induced by their activation. Using tectal brain slices from the leopard frog, we found that application of nicotine (100 μM) evoked long-lasting responses in 60% of patch-clamped tectal cells. Thirty percent of these responses consisted of an increase in sponta...

  4. Synthesis of optically active α-Methylstyrene-N- phenyl maleamic acid copolymer via asymmetric induction by 1-menthol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khettab, F. A.; Korshid, C. A.

    1998-01-01

    Copolymerization of α-methylstyrene with N-phenyl maleamic acid was studied in the presence and absence of 1-menthol, using 2,2 ' - azobis (isobutyronitrils) AIBN as initiator in toluene. The optically active copolymer is formed by the addition of 1-menthol of the copolymerization system. The observed optical activity is presumed to be due to asymmetry induced in the backbone of the copolymer by the chirality of 1-menthol. The influence of 1-menthol is considered to be caused by an electrostatic interaction between N-phenyl maleamic acid and the polar group of 1-menthol. (author). 9 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs

  5. Transforming activity and therapeutic targeting of C-terminal-binding protein 2 in Apc-mutated neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumner, E T; Chawla, A T; Cororaton, A D; Koblinski, J E; Kovi, R C; Love, I M; Szomju, B B; Korwar, S; Ellis, K C; Grossman, S R

    2017-08-17

    Overexpression of the transcriptional coregulators C-terminal binding proteins 1 and 2 (CtBP1 and 2) occurs in many human solid tumors and is associated with poor prognosis. CtBP modulates oncogenic gene expression programs and is an emerging drug target, but its oncogenic role is unclear. Consistent with this oncogenic potential, exogenous CtBP2 transformed primary mouse and human cells to anchorage independence similarly to mutant H-Ras. To investigate CtBP's contribution to in vivo tumorigenesis, Apc min/+ mice, which succumb to massive intestinal polyposis, were bred to Ctbp2 +/- mice. CtBP interacts with adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) protein, and is stabilized in both APC-mutated human colon cancers and Apc min/+ intestinal polyps. Ctbp2 heterozygosity increased the median survival of Apc min/+ mice from 21 to 48 weeks, and reduced polyp formation by 90%, with Ctbp2 +/- polyps exhibiting reduced levels of β-catenin and its oncogenic transcriptional target, cyclin D1. CtBP's potential as a therapeutic target was studied by treating Apc min/+ mice with the CtBP small-molecule inhibitors 4-methylthio-2-oxobutyric acid and 2-hydroxy-imino phenylpyruvic acid, both of which reduced polyposis by more than half compared with vehicle treatment. Phenocopying Ctbp2 deletion, both Ctbp inhibitors caused substantial decreases in the protein level of Ctbp2, as well its oncogenic partner β-catenin, and the effects of the inhibitors on CtBP and β-catenin levels could be modeled in an APC-mutated human colon cancer cell line. CtBP2 is thus a druggable transforming oncoprotein critical for the evolution of neoplasia driven by Apc mutation.

  6. Antiviral cationic peptides as a strategy for innovation in global health therapeutics for dengue virus: high yield production of the biologically active recombinant plectasin peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothan, Hussin A; Mohamed, Zulqarnain; Suhaeb, Abdulrazzaq M; Rahman, Noorsaadah Abd; Yusof, Rohana

    2013-11-01

    Dengue virus infects millions of people worldwide, and there is no vaccine or anti-dengue therapeutic available. Antimicrobial peptides have been shown to possess effective antiviral activity against various viruses. One of the main limitations of developing these peptides as potent antiviral drugs is the high cost of production. In this study, high yield production of biologically active plectasin peptide was inexpensively achieved by producing tandem plectasin peptides as inclusion bodies in E. coli. Antiviral activity of the recombinant peptide towards dengue serotype-2 NS2B-NS3 protease (DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro) was assessed as a target to inhibit dengue virus replication in Vero cells. Single units of recombinant plectasin were collected after applying consecutive steps of refolding, cleaving by Factor Xa, and nickel column purification to obtain recombinant proteins of high purity. The maximal nontoxic dose (MNTD) of the recombinant peptide against Vero cells was 20 μM (100 μg/mL). The reaction velocity of DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro decreased significantly after increasing concentrations of recombinant plectasin were applied to the reaction mixture. Plectasin peptide noncompetitively inhibited DENV2 NS2B-NS3pro at Ki value of 5.03 ± 0.98 μM. The percentage of viral inhibition was more than 80% at the MNTD value of plectasin. In this study, biologically active recombinant plectasin which was able to inhibit dengue protease and viral replication in Vero cells was successfully produced in E. coli in a time- and cost- effective method. These findings are potentially important in the development of potent therapeutics against dengue infection.

  7. Scintigraphic criteria for administration of therapeutic activities of 131I for ablation of residual thyroid tissue in patients with differentiated thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dzhuzha, D.A.

    2003-01-01

    With the aim to determinate the optical scintigraphic criteria of radioablation of the small parts of residual thyroid tissue (RTT) after a thyroidectomy the results of postoperative monitoring of 29 women aged 23-60 with differentiated thyroid cancer, who did not get the radioiodine therapy, were analyzed. At the single postoperative scintigraphy with 131 I the optimal scintigraphic criteria for radioablation are the relative level of 131 I accumulation in RTT and the relative specific volume activity in RTT. At the values of these indices below 0.21% and 0.16%/sm 3 , respectively, only suppressive thyroid hormone therapy and standard monitoring are recommended

  8. Helix-sense-selective co-precipitation for preparing optically active helical polymer nanoparticles/graphene oxide hybrid nanocomposites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Huajun; Li, Weifei; Shi, Yan; Deng, Jianping

    2017-05-25

    Constructing optically active helical polymer based nanomaterials without using expensive and limited chirally helical polymers has become an extremely attractive research topic in both chemical and materials science. In this study, we prepared a series of optically active helical polymer nanoparticles/graphene oxide (OAHPNs/GO) hybrid nanocomposites through an unprecedented strategy-the co-precipitation of optically inactive helical polymers and chirally modified GO. This approach is named helix-sense-selective co-precipitation (HSSCP), in which the chirally modified GO acted as a chiral source for inducing and further stabilizing the predominantly one-handed helicity in the optically inactive helical polymers. SEM and TEM images show quite similar morphologies of all the obtained OAHPNs/GO nanocomposites; specifically, the chirally modified GO sheets were uniformly decorated with spherical polymer nanoparticles. Circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis absorption spectra confirmed the preferentially induced helicity in the helical polymers and the optical activity of the nanocomposites. The established HSSCP strategy is thus proven to be widely applicable and is expected to produce numerous functional OAHPNs/GO nanocomposites and even the analogues.

  9. Non Destructive Testing by active infrared thermography coupled with shearography under same optical heat excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theroux, Louis-Daniel; Dumoulin, Jean; Maldague, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    As infrastructures are aging, the evaluation of their health is becoming crucial. To do so, numerous Non Destructive Testing (NDT) methods are available. Among them, thermal shearography and active infrared thermography represent two full field and contactless methods for surface inspection. The synchronized use of both methods presents multiples advantages. Most importantly, both NDT are based on different material properties. Thermography depend on the thermal properties and shearography on the mechanical properties. The cross-correlation of both methods result in a more accurate and exact detection of the defects. For real site application, the simultaneous use of both methods is simplified due to the fact that the excitation method (thermal) is the same. Active infrared thermography is the measure of the temperature by an infrared camera of a surface subjected to heat flux. Observation of the variation of temperature in function of time reveal the presence of defects. On the other hand, shearography is a measure of out-of-plane surface displacement. This displacement is caused by the application of a strain on the surface which (in our case) take the form of a temperature gradient inducing a thermal stress To measure the resulting out-of-plane displacement, shearography exploit the relation between the phase difference and the optical path length. The phase difference is measured by the observation of the interference between two coherent light beam projected on the surface. This interference is due to change in optical path length as the surface is deformed [1]. A series of experimentation have been conducted in laboratory with various sample of concrete reinforced with CFRP materials. Results obtained reveal that with both methods it was possible to detect defects in the gluing. An infrared lamp radiating was used as the active heat source. This is necessary if measurements with shearography are to be made during the heating process. A heating lamp in the

  10. Environmental enrichment and brain repair: harnessing the therapeutic effects of cognitive stimulation and physical activity to enhance experience-dependent plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, A J

    2014-02-01

    Environmental enrichment (EE) increases levels of novelty and complexity, inducing enhanced sensory, cognitive and motor stimulation. In wild-type rodents, EE has been found to have a range of effects, such as enhancing experience-dependent cellular plasticity and cognitive performance, relative to standard-housed controls. Whilst environmental enrichment is of course a relative term, dependent on the nature of control environmental conditions, epidemiological studies suggest that EE has direct clinical relevance to a range of neurological and psychiatric disorders. EE has been demonstrated to induce beneficial effects in animal models of a wide variety of brain disorders. The first evidence of beneficial effects of EE in a genetically targeted animal model was generated using Huntington's disease transgenic mice. Subsequent studies found that EE was also therapeutic in mouse models of Alzheimer's disease, consistent with epidemiological studies of relevant environmental modifiers. EE has also been found to ameliorate behavioural, cellular and molecular deficits in animal models of various neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Parkinson's disease, stroke, traumatic brain injury, epilepsy, multiple sclerosis, depression, schizophrenia and autism spectrum disorders. This review will focus on the effects of EE observed in animal models of neurodegenerative brain diseases, at molecular, cellular and behavioural levels. The proposal that EE may act synergistically with other approaches, such as drug and cell therapies, to facilitate brain repair will be discussed. I will also discuss the therapeutic potential of 'enviromimetics', drugs which mimic or enhance the therapeutic effects of cognitive activity and physical exercise, for both neuroprotection and brain repair. © 2013 British Neuropathological Society.

  11. Bioelectronic modulation of carotid sinus nerve activity in the rat: a potential therapeutic approach for type 2 diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacramento, Joana F; Chew, Daniel J; Melo, Bernardete F; Donegá, Matteo; Dopson, Wesley; Guarino, Maria P; Robinson, Alison; Prieto-Lloret, Jesus; Patel, Sonal; Holinski, Bradley J; Ramnarain, Nishan; Pikov, Victor; Famm, Kristoffer; Conde, Silvia V

    2018-03-01

    A new class of treatments termed bioelectronic medicines are now emerging that aim to target individual nerve fibres or specific brain circuits in pathological conditions to repair lost function and reinstate a healthy balance. Carotid sinus nerve (CSN) denervation has been shown to improve glucose homeostasis in insulin-resistant and glucose-intolerant rats; however, these positive effects from surgery appear to diminish over time and are heavily caveated by the severe adverse effects associated with permanent loss of chemosensory function. Herein we characterise the ability of a novel bioelectronic application, classified as kilohertz frequency alternating current (KHFAC) modulation, to suppress neural signals within the CSN of rodents. Rats were fed either a chow or high-fat/high-sucrose (HFHSu) diet (60% lipid-rich diet plus 35% sucrose drinking water) over 14 weeks. Neural interfaces were bilaterally implanted in the CSNs and attached to an external pulse generator. The rats were then randomised to KHFAC or sham modulation groups. KHFAC modulation variables were defined acutely by respiratory and cardiac responses to hypoxia (10% O 2  + 90% N 2 ). Insulin sensitivity was evaluated periodically through an ITT and glucose tolerance by an OGTT. KHFAC modulation of the CSN, applied over 9 weeks, restored insulin sensitivity (constant of the insulin tolerance test [K ITT ] HFHSu sham, 2.56 ± 0.41% glucose/min; K ITT HFHSu KHFAC, 5.01 ± 0.52% glucose/min) and glucose tolerance (AUC HFHSu sham, 1278 ± 20.36 mmol/l × min; AUC HFHSu KHFAC, 1054.15 ± 62.64 mmol/l × min) in rat models of type 2 diabetes. Upon cessation of KHFAC, insulin resistance and glucose intolerance returned to normal values within 5 weeks. KHFAC modulation of the CSN improves metabolic control in rat models of type 2 diabetes. These positive outcomes have significant translational potential as a novel therapeutic modality for the purpose of treating metabolic

  12. Constitutive cannabinoid 1 and mu opioid receptor activity in the ventral tegmental area: occurrence, function and therapeutic relevance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meye, F.J.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabinoid 1 receptors (CB1Rs) play a crucial role in regulating systems dedicated to processing rewards and emotions. It was known that in artificial systems, CB1Rs can exhibit activity that is independent of the typical agonist-driven form. However, it remained largely unclear whether this

  13. Identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene: prognostic and therapeutic implications in non-small cell lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Gabriel Lima; Vattimo, Edoardo Filippo de Queiroz; Castro Junior, Gilberto de

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Promising new therapies have recently emerged from the development of molecular targeted drugs; particularly promising are those blocking the signal transduction machinery of cancer cells. One of the most widely studied cell signaling pathways is that of EGFR, which leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation, increased cell angiogenesis, and greater cell invasiveness. Activating mutations in the EGFR gene (deletions in exon 19 and mutation L858R in exon 21), first described in 2004, have been detected in approximately 10% of all non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in Western countries and are the most important predictors of a response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). Studies of the EGFR-TKIs gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib, in comparison with platinum-based regimens, as first-line treatments in chemotherapy-naïve patients have shown that the EGFR-TKIs produce gains in progression-free survival and overall response rates, although only in patients whose tumors harbor activating mutations in the EGFR gene. Clinical trials have also shown EGFR-TKIs to be effective as second- and third-line therapies in advanced NSCLC. Here, we review the main aspects of EGFR pathway activation in NSCLC, underscore the importance of correctly identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene, and discuss the main outcomes of EGFR-TKI treatment in NSCLC.

  14. Identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene: prognostic and therapeutic implications in non-small cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Lima Lopes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available AbstractLung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Promising new therapies have recently emerged from the development of molecular targeted drugs; particularly promising are those blocking the signal transduction machinery of cancer cells. One of the most widely studied cell signaling pathways is that of EGFR, which leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation, increased cell angiogenesis, and greater cell invasiveness. Activating mutations in the EGFR gene (deletions in exon 19 and mutation L858R in exon 21, first described in 2004, have been detected in approximately 10% of all non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients in Western countries and are the most important predictors of a response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs. Studies of the EGFR-TKIs gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib, in comparison with platinum-based regimens, as first-line treatments in chemotherapy-naïve patients have shown that the EGFR-TKIs produce gains in progression-free survival and overall response rates, although only in patients whose tumors harbor activating mutations in the EGFR gene. Clinical trials have also shown EGFR-TKIs to be effective as second- and third-line therapies in advanced NSCLC. Here, we review the main aspects of EGFR pathway activation in NSCLC, underscore the importance of correctly identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene, and discuss the main outcomes of EGFR-TKI treatment in NSCLC.

  15. Identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene: prognostic and therapeutic implications in non-small cell lung cancer *

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Gabriel Lima; Vattimo, Edoardo Filippo de Queiroz; de Castro, Gilberto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Promising new therapies have recently emerged from the development of molecular targeted drugs; particularly promising are those blocking the signal transduction machinery of cancer cells. One of the most widely studied cell signaling pathways is that of EGFR, which leads to uncontrolled cell proliferation, increased cell angiogenesis, and greater cell invasiveness. Activating mutations in the EGFR gene (deletions in exon 19 and mutation L858R in exon 21), first described in 2004, have been detected in approximately 10% of all non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients in Western countries and are the most important predictors of a response to EGFR tyrosine-kinase inhibitors (EGFR-TKIs). Studies of the EGFR-TKIs gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib, in comparison with platinum-based regimens, as first-line treatments in chemotherapy-naïve patients have shown that the EGFR-TKIs produce gains in progression-free survival and overall response rates, although only in patients whose tumors harbor activating mutations in the EGFR gene. Clinical trials have also shown EGFR-TKIs to be effective as second- and third-line therapies in advanced NSCLC. Here, we review the main aspects of EGFR pathway activation in NSCLC, underscore the importance of correctly identifying activating mutations in the EGFR gene, and discuss the main outcomes of EGFR-TKI treatment in NSCLC. PMID:26398757

  16. CXCL13 predicts disease activity in early rheumatoid arthritis and could be an indicator of the therapeutic 'window of opportunity'

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greisen, Stinne Ravn; Schelde, Karen Kræmmer; Rasmussen, Tue Kruse

    2014-01-01

    placebo (DMARD) (n¿=¿37) or methotrexate plus adalimumab (DMARD¿+¿ADA) (n¿=¿39). Treatment outcome was evaluated after 1 and 2 years. CXCL13 plasma levels in healthy volunteers (n¿=¿38) were also examined.ResultsBaseline CXCL13 plasma levels were increased in early rheumatoid arthritis patients...... in comparison with healthy volunteers. Also, plasma CXCL13 correlated positively with disease activity parameters; swollen joint count 28 (rho¿=¿0.34) and 40 (rho¿=¿0.39), visual analogue score (rho¿=¿0.38) and simplified disease activity index (rho¿=¿0.25) (all P¿... a significantly 2-fold more in the DMARD¿+¿ADA group than in the DMARD group. Baseline CXCL13 plasma levels in the DMARD group correlated inversely with disease activity parameters; disease activity score in 28 joints, four variables, C-reactive protein based (DAS28CRP) (rho¿=¿0.58, p¿

  17. Continuous outreach activities performed by a student project team of undergraduates and their program topics in optics and photonics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasegawa, Makoto; Tokumitsu, Seika

    2016-09-01

    The out-of-curriculum project team "Rika-Kobo", organized by undergraduate students, has been actively engaged in a variety of continuous outreach activities in the fields of science and technology including optics and photonics. The targets of their activities cover wide ranges of generations from kids to parents and elderly people, with aiming to promote their interests in various fields of science and technologies. This is an out-of-curriculum project team with about 30 to 40 undergraduate students in several grades and majors. The total number of their activities per year tends to reach 80 to 90 in recent years. Typical activities to be performed by the project team include science classes in elementary and/or secondary schools, science classes at other educational facilities such as science museums, and experiment demonstrations at science events. Popular topics cover wide ranges from explanations and demonstrations of nature phenomena, such as rainbow colors, blue sky, sunset color, to demonstration experiments related to engineering applications, such as polarization of light, LEDs, and optical communications. Experimental topics in optics and photonics are especially popular to the audiences. Those activities are very effective to enhance interests of the audiences in learning related knowledges, irrespective of their generations. Those activities are also helpful for the student members to achieve and/or renew scientific knowledges. In addition, each of the activities provides the student members with effective and advantageous Project-Based-Learning (PBL) style experiences including manufacturing experiences, which are advantageous to cultivate their engineering skills.

  18. Active and Passive Optical Imaging Modality for Unobtrusive Cardiorespiratory Monitoring and Facial Expression Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazek, Vladimir; Blanik, Nikolai; Blazek, Claudia R; Paul, Michael; Pereira, Carina; Koeny, Marcus; Venema, Boudewijn; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2017-01-01

    Because of their obvious advantages, active and passive optoelectronic sensor concepts are being investigated by biomedical research groups worldwide, particularly their camera-based variants. Such methods work noninvasively and contactless, and they provide spatially resolved parameter detection. We present 2 techniques: the active photoplethysmography imaging (PPGI) method for detecting dermal blood perfusion dynamics and the passive infrared thermography imaging (IRTI) method for detecting skin temperature distribution. PPGI is an enhancement of classical pulse oximetry. Approved algorithms from pulse oximetry for the detection of heart rate, heart rate variability, blood pressure-dependent pulse wave velocity, pulse waveform-related stress/pain indicators, respiration rate, respiratory variability, and vasomotional activity can easily be adapted to PPGI. Although the IRTI method primarily records temperature distribution of the observed object, information on respiration rate and respiratory variability can also be derived by analyzing temperature change over time, for example, in the nasal region, or through respiratory movement. Combined with current research areas and novel biomedical engineering applications (eg, telemedicine, tele-emergency, and telemedical diagnostics), PPGI and IRTI may offer new data for diagnostic purposes, including assessment of peripheral arterial and venous oxygen saturation (as well as their differences). Moreover, facial expressions and stress and/or pain-related variables can be derived, for example, during anesthesia, in the recovery room/intensive care unit and during daily activities. The main advantages of both monitoring methods are unobtrusive data acquisition and the possibility to assess vital variables for different body regions. These methods supplement each other to enable long-term monitoring of physiological effects and of effects with special local characteristics. They also offer diagnostic advantages for

  19. Effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs on the production of reactive oxygen species by activated rat neutrophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paino I.M.M.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The release of reactive oxygen specie (ROS by activated neutrophil is involved in both the antimicrobial and deleterious effects in chronic inflammation. The objective of the present investigation was to determine the effect of therapeutic plasma concentrations of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs on the production of ROS by stimulated rat neutrophils. Diclofenac (3.6 µM, indomethacin (12 µM, naproxen (160 µM, piroxicam (13 µM, and tenoxicam (30 µM were incubated at 37ºC in PBS (10 mM, pH 7.4, for 30 min with rat neutrophils (1 x 10(6 cells/ml stimulated by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (100 nM. The ROS production was measured by luminol and lucigenin-dependent chemiluminescence. Except for naproxen, NSAIDs reduced ROS production: 58 ± 2% diclofenac, 90 ± 2% indomethacin, 33 ± 3% piroxicam, and 45 ± 6% tenoxicam (N = 6. For the lucigenin assay, naproxen, piroxicam and tenoxicam were ineffective. For indomethacin the inhibition was 52 ± 5% and diclofenac showed amplification in the light emission of 181 ± 60% (N = 6. Using the myeloperoxidase (MPO/H2O2/luminol system, the effects of NSAIDs on MPO activity were also screened. We found that NSAIDs inhibited both the peroxidation and chlorinating activity of MPO as follows: diclofenac (36 ± 10, 45 ± 3%, indomethacin (97 ± 2, 100 ± 1%, naproxen (56 ± 8, 76 ± 3%, piroxicam (77 ± 5, 99 ± 1%, and tenoxicam (90 ± 2, 100 ± 1%, respectively (N = 3. These results show that therapeutic levels of NSAIDs are able to suppress the oxygen-dependent antimicrobial or oxidative functions of neutrophils by inhibiting the generation of hypochlorous acid.

  20. Vibrational spectroscopic, structural and nonlinear optical activity studies on 6-aminonicotinamide: A DFT approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asath, R. Mohamed; Premkumar, S.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin, E-mail: miltonfranklin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, N.M.S.S.V.N College, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India); Rekha, T. N. [PG & Research Department of Physics, Lady Doak College, Madurai 625002, Tamilnadu (India); Jawahar, A. [Department of Chemistry, N.M.S.S.V.N College, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India)

    2016-05-23

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 6-aminonicotinamide (ANA) using potential energy surface scan method and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The theoretical vibrational frequencies were calculated for the optimized geometry using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program. The Mulliken atomic charge values were calculated. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intermolecular charge transfer studies and the related molecular properties were calculated. The ultraviolet-visible spectrum was simulated for both in the gas phase and liquid phase (ethanol) and the π to π* electronic transition was predicted. The nonlinear optical (NLO) activity was studied by means of the first order hyperpolarizability value, which was 8.61 times greater than the urea and the natural bond orbital analysis was also performed to confirm the NLO activity of the molecule. Hence, the ANA molecule is a promising candidate for the NLO materials.

  1. Vibrational spectroscopic, structural and nonlinear optical activity studies on 6-aminonicotinamide: A DFT approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asath, R. Mohamed; Premkumar, S.; Rekha, T. N.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2016-05-01

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 6-aminonicotinamide (ANA) using potential energy surface scan method and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The theoretical vibrational frequencies were calculated for the optimized geometry using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program. The Mulliken atomic charge values were calculated. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intermolecular charge transfer studies and the related molecular properties were calculated. The ultraviolet-visible spectrum was simulated for both in the gas phase and liquid phase (ethanol) and the л to л* electronic transition was predicted. The nonlinear optical (NLO) activity was studied by means of the first order hyperpolarizability value, which was 8.61 times greater than the urea and the natural bond orbital analysis was also performed to confirm the NLO activity of the molecule. Hence, the ANA molecule is a promising candidate for the NLO materials.

  2. Broad-band spectral studies of optical lightnings and possible correlation with solar activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhat, C.L.; Sapru, M.L.; Kaul, R.K.; Razdan, H.

    1984-01-01

    Optical pulses from lightning discharges have been recorded in a ground-based experiment, meant primarily for the detection of cosmic X- and γ-ray bursts through the atmospheric fluorescence technique. It is shown that the spectral ratio Asub(v)/Asub(y), i.e. the ratio of pulse amplitudes in the violet to that in yellow wavelength bands (3400-4300 A and 4400-6000 A respectively) provides a good indication of the lightning channel temperature, the range of derived temperatures extending from 5.000 K to 60.000 K. Based on the distribution of observed Asub(v)/Asub(y) values on a daily basis, it has been possible to separate the observed lightning activity into two classes. One class of event is shown to be correlated with the peaking of the global atmospheric electric field and occurs preferentially on days when the ground-level cosmic ray intensity shows a significant decrease in association with an increase in geomagnetic activity. The results are discussed in terms of the contemporary views regarding solar control of atmospheric electricity and the various sun-weather correlations reported earlier. (author)

  3. Therapeutic Implications of Black Seed and Its Constituent Thymoquinone in the Prevention of Cancer through Inactivation and Activation of Molecular Pathways

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arshad H. Rahmani

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The cancer is probably the most dreaded disease in both men and women and also major health problem worldwide. Despite its high prevalence, the exact molecular mechanisms of the development and progression are not fully understood. The current chemotherapy/radiotherapy regime used to treat cancer shows adverse side effect and may alter gene functions. Natural products are generally safe, effective, and less expensive substitutes of anticancer chemotherapeutics. Based on previous studies of their potential therapeutic uses, Nigella sativa and its constituents may be proved as good therapeutic options in the prevention of cancer. Black seeds are used as staple food in the Middle Eastern Countries for thousands of years and also in the treatment of diseases. Earlier studies have shown that N. sativa and its constituent thymoquinone (TQ have important roles in the prevention and treatment of cancer by modulating cell signaling pathways. In this review, we summarize the role of N. sativa and its constituents TQ in the prevention of cancer through the activation or inactivation of molecular cell signaling pathways.

  4. Ibrutinib interferes with the cell-mediated anti-tumor activities of therapeutic CD20 antibodies: implications for combination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Da Roit, F.; Engelberts, P. J.; Taylor, R. P.

    2015-01-01

    The novel Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib and phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-delta inhibitor idelalisib are promising drugs for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, either alone or in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. We investigated...... the possible positive or negative impact of these drugs on all known mechanisms of action of both type I and type II anti-CD20 antibodies. Pretreatment with ibrutinib for 1 hour did not increase direct cell death of cell lines or chronic lymphocytic leukemia samples mediated by anti-CD20 antibodies. Pre......-treatment with ibrutinib did not inhibit complement activation or complement-mediated lysis. In contrast, ibrutinib strongly inhibited all cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies rituximab, ofatumumab or obinutuzumab, either in purified systems or whole blood assays. Activation of natural killer cells...

  5. RelA NF-κB subunit activation as a therapeutic target in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Mingzhi; Xu-Monette, Zijun Y; Li, Ling

    2016-01-01

    It has been well established that nuclear factor kappa-B (NF-κB) activation is important for tumor cell growth and survival. RelA/p65 and p50 are the most common NF-kB subunits and involved in the classical NF-kB pathway. However, the prognostic and biological significance of RelA/p65 is equivoca...

  6. APT drug R&D: the right active ingredient in the right presentation for the right therapeutic use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavalla, David

    2009-11-01

    Drug repurposing, in which an established active pharmaceutical ingredient is applied in a new way - for example, for a new indication, and often combined with an alternative method of presentation, such as a novel delivery route - is an evolving strategy for pharmaceutical R&D. This article discusses examples of the success of this strategy, and presents an analysis of sales of US pharmaceutical products that suggests that this low-risk approach to new product development retains substantial commercial value.

  7. Identifying Spectra of Activity and Therapeutic Niches for Ceftazidime-Avibactam and Imipenem-Relebactam against Carbapenem-Resistant Enterobacteriaceae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidar, Ghady; Clancy, Cornelius J; Chen, Liang; Samanta, Palash; Shields, Ryan K; Kreiswirth, Barry N; Nguyen, M Hong

    2017-09-01

    We determined imipenem, imipenem-relebactam, ceftazidime, and ceftazidime-avibactam MICs against 100 CRE isolates that underwent whole-genome sequencing. Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemases (KPCs) were the most common carbapenemases. Forty-six isolates carried extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). With the addition of relebactam, imipenem susceptibility increased from 8% to 88%. With the addition of avibactam, ceftazidime susceptibility increased from 0% to 85%. Neither imipenem-relebactam nor ceftazidime-avibactam was active against metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) producers. Ceftazidime-avibactam (but not imipenem-relebactam) was active against OXA-48-like producers, including a strain not harboring any ESBL. Major OmpK36 porin mutations were independently associated with higher imipenem-relebactam MICs ( P imipenem-relebactam and ceftazidime-avibactam had overlapping spectra of activity and niches in which each was superior. Major OmpK36 mutations in KPC- K. pneumoniae may provide a foundation for stepwise emergence of imipenem-relebactam and ceftazidime-avibactam resistance. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  8. A theoretical model for prescription of the patient-specific therapeutic activity for radioiodine therapy of Graves' disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Di Martino, F.; Traino, A.C.; Lazzeri, M.; Brill, A.B.; Stabin, M.G.

    2002-01-01

    A fundamental function of the thyroid is to extract iodine from the blood, synthesize it into thyroid hormones, and release it into the circulation under feedback control by pituitary-secreted hormones. This capability of the thyroid, termed as functionality, can in principle be related to the severity of hyperthyroidism in individual patients. In this paper the uptake and release of 131 I by the thyroid following the administration of 131 I therapy for Graves' disease has been theoretically studied. The kinetics of iodine in the thyroid and blood have been evaluated using a two-compartment model. This simplified model appears to be adequate for dosimetry purposes and allows one to correlate levels of increased thyroid functionality (hyperthyroidism) with clinically measurable kinetic parameters. An expression has been derived for the rate of change of thyroid mass following therapy; this has the same form as an empirical relationship described in an earlier work. A method is presented for calculation of the amount of radioiodine activity to be administered to individual patients in order to achieve the desired final functionality of the gland. The activity to be administered is based on measurements of 131 I kinetics after the administration of a 'low-activity' (1850 kBq) tracer for treatment planning. (author)

  9. Diffuse optical tomography activation in the somatosensory cortex: specific activation by painful vs. non-painful thermal stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lino Becerra

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Pain is difficult to assess due to the subjective nature of self-reporting. The lack of objective measures of pain has hampered the development of new treatments as well as the evaluation of current ones. Functional MRI studies of pain have begun to delineate potential brain response signatures that could be used as objective read-outs of pain. Using Diffuse Optical Tomography (DOT, we have shown in the past a distinct DOT signal over the somatosensory cortex to a noxious heat stimulus that could be distinguished from the signal elicited by innocuous mechanical stimuli. Here we further our findings by studying the response to thermal innocuous and noxious stimuli.Innocuous and noxious thermal stimuli were applied to the skin of the face of the first division (ophthalmic of the trigeminal nerve in healthy volunteers (N = 6. Stimuli temperatures were adjusted for each subject to evoke warm (equivalent to a 3/10 and painful hot (7/10 sensations in a verbal rating scale (0/10 = no/max pain. A set of 26 stimuli (5 sec each was applied for each temperature with inter-stimulus intervals varied between 8 and 15 sec using a Peltier thermode. A DOT system was used to capture cortical responses on both sides of the head over the primary somatosensory cortical region (S1. For the innocuous stimuli, group results indicated mainly activation on the contralateral side with a weak ipsilateral response. For the noxious stimuli, bilateral activation was observed with comparable amplitudes on both sides. Furthermore, noxious stimuli produced a temporal biphasic response while innocuous stimuli produced a monophasic response.These results are in accordance with fMRI and our other DOT studies of innocuous mechanical and noxious heat stimuli. The data indicate the differentiation of DOT cortical responses for pain vs. innocuous stimuli that may be useful in assessing objectively acute pain.

  10. Supramolecular Structure, Physical Properties, and Langmuir-Blodgett Film Formation of an Optically Active Liquid-Crystalline Phthalocyanine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nostrum, Cornelus F. van; Bosman, Anton W.; Gelinck, Gerwin H.; Schouten, Pieter G.; Warman, John M.; Devillers, Marinus A.C.; Meijerink, Andries; Picken, Stephen J.; Sohling, Ulrich; Schouten, Arend-Jan; Nolte, Roeland J.M.

    The structure and physical properties of optically active, metal-free 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octa(S-3,7-dimethyloctoxy)phthalocyanine ((S)-Pc(8,2)) are reported and compared with those of the phthalocyanine with (R,S) side chains (mixture of 43 stereoisomers). Unlike the latter compound, (S)-Pc(8,2)

  11. Quantitative analysis of sugar composition in honey using 532-nm excitation Raman and Raman optical activity spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šugar, Jan; Bouř, Petr

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 47, č. 11 (2016), s. 1298-1303 ISSN 0377-0486 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-09072S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : honey * sugar mixtures * spectral decompositions * Raman spectroscopy * Raman optical activity Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.969, year: 2016

  12. Optical coherence tomography angiography indicates associations of the retinal vascular network and disease activity in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feucht, Nikolaus; Maier, Mathias; Lepennetier, Gildas; Pettenkofer, Moritz; Wetzlmair, Carmen; Daltrozzo, Tanja; Scherm, Pauline; Zimmer, Claus; Hoshi, Muna-Miriam; Hemmer, Bernhard; Korn, Thomas; Knier, Benjamin

    2018-01-01

    Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) and clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) may show alterations of retinal layer architecture as measured by optical coherence tomography. Little is known about changes in the retinal vascular network during MS. To characterize retinal vessel structures in patients with MS and CIS and to test for associations with MS disease activity. In all, 42 patients with MS or CIS and 50 healthy controls underwent retinal optical coherence tomography angiography (OCT-A) with analysis of the superficial and deep vascular plexuses and the choriocapillaries. We tested OCT-A parameters for associations with retinal layer volumes, history of optic neuritis (ON), and the retrospective disease activity. Inner retinal layer volumes correlated positively with the density of both the superficial and deep vascular plexuses. Eyes of MS/CIS patients with a history of ON revealed reduced vessel densities of the superficial and deep vascular plexuses as compared to healthy controls. Higher choriocapillary vessel densities were associated with ongoing inflammatory disease activity during 24 months prior to OCT-A examination in MS and CIS patients. Optic neuritis is associated with rarefaction of the superficial and deep retinal vessels. Alterations of the choriocapillaries might be linked to disease activity in MS.

  13. All-optical flip-flop operation based on asymmetric active-multimode interferometer bi-stable laser diodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, H.; Chaen, Y.; Hagio, T.

    2011-01-01

    We demonstrate fast and low energy all optical flip-flop devices based on asymmetric active-multimode interferometer using high-mesa waveguide structure. The implemented devices showed high speed alloptical flip-flop operation with 25ps long pulses. The rising and falling times of the output sign...

  14. Research activity on NaxCoO2 single crystals: A brief review on optical conductivity and metamagnetic transition phenomenon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.L. Wang and J.L. Luo

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available NaxCoO2 material is of great interest because of its rich electronic phase diagram, as well as for displaying superconductivity when intercalated with water. This paper briefly reviews our research activity on its optical properties and a metamagnetic transition phenomenon.

  15. Conformational flexibility of L-alanine zwitterion determines shapes of Raman and Raman optical activity spectral bands

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kapitán, Josef; Baumruk, V.; Kopecký ml., V.; Bouř, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 14 (2006), s. 4689-4696 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA203/06/0420 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Raman optical activity * molecular flexibility * alanine Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 3.047, year: 2006

  16. Ibrutinib interferes with the cell-mediated anti-tumor activities of therapeutic CD20 antibodies: implications for combination therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roit, Fabio Da; Engelberts, Patrick J.; Taylor, Ronald P.; Breij, Esther C.W.; Gritti, Giuseppe; Rambaldi, Alessandro; Introna, Martino; Parren, Paul W.H.I.; Beurskens, Frank J.; Golay, Josée

    2015-01-01

    The novel Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib and phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-δ inhibitor idelalisib are promising drugs for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma, either alone or in combination with anti-CD20 antibodies. We investigated the possible positive or negative impact of these drugs on all known mechanisms of action of both type I and type II anti-CD20 antibodies. Pretreatment with ibrutinib for 1 hour did not increase direct cell death of cell lines or chronic lymphocytic leukemia samples mediated by anti-CD20 antibodies. Pre-treatment with ibrutinib did not inhibit complement activation or complement-mediated lysis. In contrast, ibrutinib strongly inhibited all cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies rituximab, ofatumumab or obinutuzumab, either in purified systems or whole blood assays. Activation of natural killer cells, and antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity by these cells, as well as phagocytosis by macrophages or neutrophils were inhibited by ibrutinib with a half maximal effective concentration of 0.3–3 μM. Analysis of anti-CD20 mediated activation of natural killer cells isolated from patients on continued oral ibrutinib treatment suggested that repeated drug dosing inhibits these cells in vivo. Finally we show that the phosphatidyl-4-5-biphosphate 3-kinase-δ inhibitor idelalisib similarly inhibited the immune cell-mediated mechanisms induced by anti-CD20 antibodies, although the effects of this drug at 10 μM were weaker than those observed with ibrutinib at the same concentration. We conclude that the design of combined treatment schedules of anti-CD20 antibodies with these kinase inhibitors should consider the multiple negative interactions between these two classes of drugs. PMID:25344523

  17. ADN-1184 a monoaminergic ligand with 5-HT(6/7) receptor antagonist activity: pharmacological profile and potential therapeutic utility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczkowski, M; Mierzejewski, P; Bieńkowski, P; Wesołowska, A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2014-02-01

    Many dementia patients exhibit behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) that include psychosis, aggressivity, depression and anxiety. Antipsychotic drugs are frequently prescribed but fail to significantly attenuate mood deficits, may interfere with cognitive function and are associated with motor and cardiac side effects, which are problematic in elderly patients. A need therefore exists for drugs that are better suited for the treatment of BPSD. We used in vitro cellular and in vivo behavioural tests to characterize ADN-1184, a novel arylsulfonamide ligand with potential utility for treatment of BPSD. ADN-1184 exhibits substantial 5-HT6 /5-HT7 /5-HT2A /D2 receptor affinity and antagonist properties in vitro. In tests of antipsychotic-like activity, it reversed MK-801-induced hyperactivity and stereotypies and inhibited conditioned avoidance response (MED = 3 mg·kg(-1) i.p.). Remarkably, ADN-1184 also reduced immobility time in the forced swim test at low doses (0.3 and 1 mg·kg(-1) i.p.; higher doses were not significantly active). Notably, up to 30 mg·kg(-1) ADN-1184 did not impair memory performance in the passive avoidance test or elicit significant catalepsy and only modestly inhibited spontaneous locomotor activity (MED = 30 mg·kg(-1) i.p.). ADN-1184 combines antipsychotic-like with antidepressant-like properties without interfering with memory function or locomotion. This profile is better than that of commonly used atypical antipsychotics tested under the same conditions and suggests that it is feasible to identify drugs that improve BPSD, without exacerbating cognitive deficit or movement impairment, which are of particular concern in patients with dementia. © 2013 The British Pharmacological Society.

  18. ADN-1184 a monoaminergic ligand with 5-HT6/7 receptor antagonist activity: pharmacological profile and potential therapeutic utility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kołaczkowski, M; Mierzejewski, P; Bieńkowski, P; Wesołowska, A; Newman-Tancredi, A

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Many dementia patients exhibit behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) that include psychosis, aggressivity, depression and anxiety. Antipsychotic drugs are frequently prescribed but fail to significantly attenuate mood deficits, may interfere with cognitive function and are associated with motor and cardiac side effects, which are problematic in elderly patients. A need therefore exists for drugs that are better suited for the treatment of BPSD. Experimental Approach We used in vitro cellular and in vivo behavioural tests to characterize ADN-1184, a novel arylsulfonamide ligand with potential utility for treatment of BPSD. Key Results ADN-1184 exhibits substantial 5-HT6/5-HT7/5-HT2A/D2 receptor affinity and antagonist properties in vitro. In tests of antipsychotic-like activity, it reversed MK-801-induced hyperactivity and stereotypies and inhibited conditioned avoidance response (MED = 3 mg·kg−1 i.p.). Remarkably, ADN-1184 also reduced immobility time in the forced swim test at low doses (0.3 and 1 mg·kg−1 i.p.; higher doses were not significantly active). Notably, up to 30 mg·kg−1 ADN-1184 did not impair memory performance in the passive avoidance test or elicit significant catalepsy and only modestly inhibited spontaneous locomotor activity (MED = 30 mg·kg−1 i.p.). Conclusions and Implications ADN-1184 combines antipsychotic-like with antidepressant-like properties without interfering with memory function or locomotion. This profile is better than that of commonly used atypical antipsychotics tested under the same conditions and suggests that it is feasible to identify drugs that improve BPSD, without exacerbating cognitive deficit or movement impairment, which are of particular concern in patients with dementia. PMID:24199650

  19. Characterization of inhibitory effects of the potential therapeutic inhibitors, benzoic acid and pyridine derivatives, on the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of tyrosinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheibi, Nematollah; Taherkhani, Negar; Ahmadi, Abolfazl; Haghbeen, Kamahldin; Ilghari, Dariush

    2015-02-01

    Involvement of tyrosinase in the synthesis of melanin and cell signaling pathway has made it an attractive target in the search for therapeutic inhibitors for treatment of different skin hyperpigmentation disorders and melanoma cancers. In the present study, we conducted a comprehensive kinetic analysis to understand the mechanisms of inhibition imposed by 2-amino benzoic acid, 4-amino benzoic acid, nicotinic acid, and picolinic acid on the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of the mushroom tyrosinase, and then MTT assay was exploited to evaluate their toxicity on the melanoma cells. Kinetic analysis revealed that nicotinic acid and picolinic acid competitively restricted the monophenolase activity with inhibition constants (Ki) of 1.21 mM and 1.97 mM and the diphenolase activity with Kis of 2.4 mM and 2.93 mM, respectively. 2-aminobenzoic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid inhibited the monophenolase activity in a non-competitive fashion with Kis of 5.15 µM and 3.8 µM and the diphenolase activity with Kis of 4.72 µM and 20 µM, respectively. Our cell-based data revealed that only the pyridine derivatives imposed cytotoxicity in melanoma cells. Importantly, the concentrations of the inhibitors leading to 50% decrease in the cell density (IC50) were comparable to those causing 50% drop in the enzyme activity, implying that the observed cytotoxicity is highly likely due to the tyrosinase inhibition. Moreover, our cell-based data exhibited that the pyridine derivatives acted as anti-proliferative agents, perhaps inducing cytotoxicity in the melanoma cells through inhibition of the tyrosinase activities.

  20. Characterization of inhibitory effects of the potential therapeutic inhibitors, benzoic acid and pyridine derivatives, on the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of tyrosinase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nematollah Gheibi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:Involvement of tyrosinase in the synthesis of melanin and cell signaling pathway has made it an attractive target in the search for therapeutic inhibitors for treatment of different skin hyperpigmentation disorders and melanoma cancers. Materials and Methods: In the present study, we conducted a comprehensive kinetic analysis to understand the mechanisms of inhibition imposed by 2-amino benzoic acid, 4-amino benzoic acid, nicotinic acid, and picolinic acid on the monophenolase and diphenolase activities of the mushroom tyrosinase, and then MTT assay was exploited to evaluate their toxicity on the melanoma cells. Results: Kinetic analysis revealed that nicotinic acid and picolinic acid competitively restricted the monophenolase activity with inhibition constants (Ki of 1.21 mM and 1.97 mM and the diphenolase activity with Kis of 2.4 mM and 2.93 mM, respectively. 2-aminobenzoic acid and 4-aminobenzoic acid inhibited the monophenolase activity in a non-competitive fashion with Kis of 5.15 µM and 3.8 µM and the diphenolase activity with Kis of 4.72 µM and 20 µM, respectively. Conclusion: Our cell-based data revealed that only the pyridine derivatives imposed cytotoxicity in melanoma cells. Importantly, the concentrations of the inhibitors leading to 50% decrease in the cell density (IC50 werecomparable to those causing 50% drop in the enzyme activity, implying that the observed cytotoxicity is highly likely due to the tyrosinase inhibition. Moreover, our cell-based data exhibited that the pyridine derivatives acted as anti-proliferative agents, perhaps inducing cytotoxicity in the melanoma cells through inhibition of the tyrosinase activities.

  1. Simultaneous Determination of Antipsychotic Drugs and Their Active Metabolites by LC-MS-MS and its Application to Therapeutic Drug Monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, Igor I; Baymeeva, Natalia V

    2018-04-07

    A quantitative method was developed to support therapeutic drug monitoring of eight antipsychotic drugs: chlorpromazine, haloperidol, zuclopenthixol, clozapine, risperidone, quetiapine, aripiprazole or olanzapine and some active metabolites (dehydroaripiprazole, N-desmethylclozapine and 9-hydroxyrisperidone) in human serum. Separation of the compounds was achieved using a Zorbax SB-C18 (150 mm × 4.6 mm, 5 μm) column and mass-spectrometric detection in multiple reaction monitoring mode. Human blood samples were collected in vacutainer tubes and the analytes were extracted with methyl-tert-butyl ether. The lower limits of quantitation were equal 0.5-1 ng/mL for all analytes. The method was applied with success to serum samples from schizophrenic patients undergoing polypharmacy with two or more different antipsychotic drugs. Precision data, accuracy results were satisfactory, and no interference from other psychotropic drugs was found. Hence, the method is suitable for the TDM of the analytes in psychotic patients' serum.

  2. Patient-controlled analgesia: therapeutic interventions using transdermal electro-activated and electro-modulated drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Indermun, Sunaina; Choonara, Yahya E; Kumar, Pradeep; Du Toit, Lisa C; Modi, Girish; Luttge, Regina; Pillay, Viness

    2014-02-01

    Chronic pain poses a major concern to modern medicine and is frequently undertreated, causing suffering and disability. Patient-controlled analgesia, although successful, does have limitations. Transdermal delivery is the pivot to which analgesic research in drug delivery has centralized, especially with the confines of needle phobias and associated pain related to traditional injections, and the existing limitations associated with oral drug delivery. Highlighted within is the possibility of further developing transdermal drug delivery for chronic pain treatment using iontophoresis-based microneedle array patches. A concerted effort was made to review critically all available therapies designed for the treatment of chronic pain. The drug delivery systems developed for this purpose and nondrug routes are elaborated on, in a systematic manner. Recent developments and future goals in transdermal delivery as a means to overcome the individual limitations of the aforementioned delivery routes are represented as well. The approval of patch-like devices that contain both the microelectronic-processing mechanism and the active medicament in a small portable device is still awaited by the pharmaceutical industry. This anticipated platform may provide transdermal electro-activated and electro-modulated drug delivery systems a feasible attempt in chronic pain treatment. Iontophoresis has been proven an effective mode used to administer ionized drugs in physiotherapeutic, diagnostic, and dermatological applications and may be an encouraging probability for the development of devices and aids in the treatment of chronic pain. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  3. Ethnopharmacological uses, phytochemistry, biological activities, and therapeutic applications of Clinacanthus nutans (Burm. f.) Lindau: A comprehensive review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamarudin, Muhamad Noor Alfarizal; Sarker, Md Moklesur Rahman; Kadir, Habsah Abdul; Ming, Long Chiau

    2017-07-12

    Clinacanthus nutans (Burm. f.) Lindau, a widely used medicinal plant, is extensively grown in tropical Asia and Southeast Asian countries. C. nutans, with its broad spectrum of pharmacological activities, has been traditionally used to treat cancer, inflammatory disorders, diabetes, insect bites, and skin problems, consumed as a vegetable, mixed with fresh juices, in concoctions, and as a whole plant. The present review analyzes the advances in the ethnopharmacology, phytochemistry, pharmacology, and toxicology of C. nutans. In addition, the needs and perspectives for future investigation of this plant are addressed. This review aims to provide a comprehensive report on the ethnomedicinal use, phytochemistry, pharmacological activities, molecular mechanisms, and nutritional values of C. nutans. The present review will open new avenues for further in-depth pharmacological studies of C. nutans for it to be developed as a potential nutraceutical and to improve the available products in the market. All the available information on C. nutans was collected using the key words "Clinacanthus nutans" and/or "ethnomedicine" and/or "phytochemicals" and/or "anticancer" and/or "anti-inflammatory" and/or "antiviral" through an electronic search of the following databases: PubMed, Web of Science, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Clinical Trials.org, SciFinder Scholar, Scopus, and Google Scholar. In addition, unpublished materials, Ph.D. and M.Sc. dissertations, conference papers, and ethnobotanical textbooks were used. The Plant List (www.theplantlist.org) and International Plant Name Index databases were used to validate the scientific name of the plant. The literature supported the ethnomedicinal uses of C. nutans as recorded in Thailand, Indonesia, and Malaysia for various purposes. Bioactivities experimentally proven for C. nutans include cytotoxic, anticancer, antiviral, anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, antidiabetic, antioxidant, antihyperlipidemic, antimicrobial, and

  4. Imaging of macrophage dynamics with optical coherence tomography in anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokona, Despina; Häner, Nathanael U; Ebneter, Andreas; Zinkernagel, Martin S

    2017-01-01

    Anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (AION) is a relatively common cause of visual loss and results from hypoperfusion of the small arteries of the anterior portion of the optic nerve. AION is the leading cause of sudden optic nerve related vision loss with approximately 10 cases per 100'000 in the population over 50 years. To date there is no established treatment for AION and therefore a better understanding of the events occurring at the level of the optic nerve head (ONH) would be important to design future therapeutic strategies. The optical properties of the eye allow imaging of the optic nerve in vivo, which is a part of the CNS, during ischemia. Experimentally laser induced optic neuropathy (eLiON) displays similar anatomical features as anterior ischemic optic neuropathy in humans. After laser induced optic neuropathy we show that hyperreflective dots in optical coherence tomography correspond to mononuclear cells in histology. Using fluorescence-activated flow cytometry (FACS) we found these cells to peak one week after eLiON. These observations were translated to OCT findings in patients with AION, where similar dynamics of hyperreflective dots at the ONH were identified. Our data suggests that activated macrophages can be identified as hyperreflective dots in OCT. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  5. Structural and functional outcomes of a therapeutic strategy targeting low disease activity in patients with elderly-onset rheumatoid arthritis: a prospective cohort study (CRANE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugihara, Takahiko; Ishizaki, Tatsuro; Hosoya, Tadashi; Iga, Shoko; Yokoyama, Waka; Hirano, Fumio; Miyasaka, Nobuyuki; Harigai, Masayoshi

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate structural damage and physical disability in patients with elderly-onset RA (EORA) who were treated in clinical practice with a therapeutic strategy targeting low disease activity (LDA). Data from 151 MTX-naive patients (mean age 74.9 years) with EORA from a prospective, monocentric registry were analysed. Treatment was adjusted every 3 months targeting LDA [28-joint DAS using ESR (DAS28-ESR) target strategy was observed in 83.4% of the 151 patients at week 24 and in 75.5% at week 52. At week 52, 67.6% of the patients were receiving a nbDMARD alone, 31.0% a TNFi with or without MTX and 1.4% tocilizumab. At week 52, structural remission (ΔmTSS/yr ≤0.5) was achieved in 49.7% of the patients, functional remission (HAQ-DI ≤0.5) in 63.4% and LDA in 51.0%. Clinical responses at weeks 12 and 24 were significant independent predictors of CRRP. Cumulative disease activity during the first 12 weeks predicted CRRP with a C-statistic of 0.888. Achieving structural remission, functional remission and LDA in clinical practice in EORA patients are realistic goals. Our results indicate significant benefits for a therapeutic strategy targeting LDA for EORA patients in clinical practice. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the British Society for Rheumatology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  6. EBNA1: Oncogenic Activity, Immune Evasion and Biochemical Functions Provide Targets for Novel Therapeutic Strategies against Epstein-Barr Virus- Associated Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joanna B. Wilson

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of the Epstein-Barr virus (EBV-encoded nuclear antigen-1 (EBNA1 protein in all EBV-carrying tumours constitutes a marker that distinguishes the virus-associated cancer cells from normal cells and thereby offers opportunities for targeted therapeutic intervention. EBNA1 is essential for viral genome maintenance and also for controlling viral gene expression and without EBNA1, the virus cannot persist. EBNA1 itself has been linked to cell transformation but the underlying mechanism of its oncogenic activity has been unclear. However, recent data are starting to shed light on its growth-promoting pathways, suggesting that targeting EBNA1 can have a direct growth suppressing effect. In order to carry out its tasks, EBNA1 interacts with cellular factors and these interactions are potential therapeutic targets, where the aim would be to cripple the virus and thereby rid the tumour cells of any oncogenic activity related to the virus. Another strategy to target EBNA1 is to interfere with its expression. Controlling the rate of EBNA1 synthesis is critical for the virus to maintain a sufficient level to support viral functions, while at the same time, restricting expression is equally important to prevent the immune system from detecting and destroying EBNA1-positive cells. To achieve this balance EBNA1 has evolved a unique repeat sequence of glycines and alanines that controls its own rate of mRNA translation. As the underlying molecular mechanisms for how this repeat suppresses its own rate of synthesis in cis are starting to be better understood, new therapeutic strategies are emerging that aim to modulate the translation of the EBNA1 mRNA. If translation is induced, it could increase the amount of EBNA1-derived antigenic peptides that are presented to the major histocompatibility (MHC class I pathway and thus, make EBV-carrying cancers better targets for the immune system. If translation is further suppressed, this would provide another

  7. A High-Performance Deformable Mirror with Integrated Driver ASIC for Space Based Active Optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Chris

    Direct imaging of exoplanets is key to fully understanding these systems through spectroscopy and astrometry. The primary impediment to direct imaging of exoplanets is the extremely high brightness ratio between the planet and its parent star. Direct imaging requires a technique for contrast suppression, which include coronagraphs, and nulling interferometers. Deformable mirrors (DMs) are essential to both of these techniques. With space missions in mind, Microscale is developing a novel DM with direct integration of DM and its electronic control functions in a single small envelope. The Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) is key to the shrinking of the electronic control functions to a size compatible with direct integration with the DM. Through a NASA SBIR project, Microscale, with JPL oversight, has successfully demonstrated a unique deformable mirror (DM) driver ASIC prototype based on an ultra-low power switch architecture. Microscale calls this the Switch-Mode ASIC, or SM-ASIC, and has characterized it for a key set of performance parameters, and has tested its operation with a variety of actuator loads, such as piezo stack and unimorph, and over a wide temperature range. These tests show the SM-ASIC's capability of supporting active optics in correcting aberrations of a telescope in space. Microscale has also developed DMs to go with the SM-ASIC driver. The latest DM version produced uses small piezo stack elements in an 8x8 array, bonded to a novel silicon facesheet structure fabricated monolithically into a polished mirror on one side and mechanical linkage posts that connect to the piezoelectric stack actuators on the other. In this Supporting Technology proposal we propose to further develop the ASIC-DM and have assembled a very capable team to do so. It will be led by JPL, which has considerable expertise with DMs used in Adaptive Optics systems, with high-contrast imaging systems for exoplanet missions, and with designing DM driver

  8. PSA-selective activation of cytotoxic human serine proteases within the tumor microenvironment as a therapeutic strategy to target prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Oliver C; Anthony, Lizamma; Rosen, D Marc; Brennen, W Nathaniel; Denmeade, Samuel R

    2018-04-27

    Prostate cancer is the most diagnosed malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer-related death in American men. While localized therapy is highly curative, treatments for metastatic prostate cancer are largely palliative. Thus, new innovative therapies are needed to target metastatic tumors. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA) is a chymotrypsin-like protease with a unique substrate specificity that is secreted by both normal and malignant prostate epithelial cells. Previous studies demonstrated the presence of high levels (μM-mM) of enzymatically active PSA is present in the extracellular fluid of the prostate cancer microenvironment. Because of this, PSA is an attractive target for a protease activated pro-toxin therapeutic strategy. Because prostate cancers typically grow very slowly, a strategy employing a proliferation-independent cytotoxic payload is preferred. Recently, it was shown that the human protease Granzyme B (GZMB), at low micromolar concentrations in the extracellular space, can cleave an array of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins thus perturbing cell growth, signaling, motility, and integrity. It is also well established that other human proteases such as trypsin can induce similar effects. Because both enzymes require N-terminal proteolytic activation, we propose to convert these proteins into PSA-activated cytotoxins. In this study, we examine the enzymatic and cell targeting parameters of these PSA-activated cytotoxic serine proteases. These pro-enzymes were activated robustly by PSA and induced ECM damage that led to the death of prostate cancer cells in vitro thus supporting the potential use of this strategy as means to target metastatic prostate cancers.

  9. Gold and silver thin film analysis by optical and neutron activation techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moharram, B.M.; El-Khatib, A.M.; Ammar, E.A.

    1989-01-01

    Thicknesses of gold and silver thin films have been determined by NAA technique. Reasonable agreement with conventional optical methods has been obtained, but the lower detection limit in the case of NAA is far better than in the optical method. (author)

  10. Solar optics-based active panel for solar energy storage and disinfection of greywater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, W; Song, J; Son, J H; Gutierrez, M P; Kang, T; Kim, D; Lee, L P

    2016-09-01

    Smart city and innovative building strategies are becoming increasingly more necessary because advancing a sustainable building system is regarded as a promising solution to overcome the depleting water and energy. However, current sustainable building systems mainly focus on energy saving and miss a holistic integration of water regeneration and energy generation. Here, we present a theoretical study of a solar optics-based active panel (SOAP) that enables both solar energy storage and photothermal disinfection of greywater simultaneously. Solar collector efficiency of energy storage and disinfection rate of greywater have been investigated. Due to the light focusing by microlens, the solar collector efficiency is enhanced from 25% to 65%, compared to that without the microlens. The simulation of greywater sterilization shows that 100% disinfection can be accomplished by our SOAP for different types of bacteria including Escherichia coli . Numerical simulation reveals that our SOAP as a lab-on-a-wall system can resolve the water and energy problem in future sustainable building systems.

  11. Optical Breath Gas Extravehicular Activity Sensor for the Advanced Portable Life Support System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, William R.; Casias, Miguel E.; Pilgrim, Jeffrey S.; Chullen, Cinda; Campbell, Colin

    2016-01-01

    The infrared gas transducer used during extravehicular activity (EVA) in the extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) measures and reports the concentration of carbon dioxide (CO2) in the ventilation loop. It is nearing its end of life and there are a limited number remaining. Meanwhile, the next generation advanced portable life support system (PLSS) now being developed requires CO2 sensing technology with performance beyond that presently in use. A laser diode (LD) spectrometer based on wavelength modulation spectroscopy (WMS) is being developed to address both applications by Vista Photonics, Inc. Accommodation within space suits demands that optical sensors meet stringent size, weight, and power requirements. Version 1.0 devices were delivered to NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) in 2011. The sensors incorporate a laser diode based CO2 channel that also includes an incidental water vapor (humidity) measurement. The prototypes are controlled digitally with a field-programmable gate array (FPGA)/microcontroller architecture. Version 2.0 devices with improved electronics and significantly reduced wetted volumes were delivered to JSC in 2012. A version 2.5 upgrade recently implemented wavelength stabilized operation, better humidity measurement, and much faster data analysis/reporting. A wholly reconfigured version 3.0 will maintain the demonstrated performance of earlier versions while being backwards compatible with the EMU and offering a radiation tolerant architecture.

  12. Three-dimensional rearrangement of single atoms using actively controlled optical microtraps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Woojun; Kim, Hyosub; Ahn, Jaewook

    2016-05-02

    We propose and demonstrate three-dimensional rearrangements of single atoms. In experiments performed with single 87Rb atoms in optical microtraps actively controlled by a spatial light modulator, we demonstrate various dynamic rearrangements of up to N = 9 atoms including rotation, 2D vacancy filling, guiding, compactification, and 3D shuffling. With the capability of a phase-only Fourier mask to generate arbitrary shapes of the holographic microtraps, it was possible to place single atoms at arbitrary geometries of a few μm size and even continuously reconfigure them by conveying each atom. For this purpose, we loaded a series of computer-generated phase masks in the full frame rate of 60 Hz of the spatial light modulator, so the animation of phase mask transformed the holographic microtraps in real time, driving each atom along the assigned trajectory. Possible applications of this method of transformation of single atoms include preparation of scalable quantum platforms for quantum computation, quantum simulation, and quantum many-body physics.

  13. Probing matrix and tumor mechanics with in situ calibrated optical trap based active microrheology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staunton, Jack Rory; Vieira, Wilfred; Tanner, Kandice; Tissue Morphodynamics Unit Team

    Aberrant extracellular matrix deposition and vascularization, concomitant with proliferation and phenotypic changes undergone by cancer cells, alter mechanical properties in the tumor microenvironment during cancer progression. Tumor mechanics conversely influence progression, and the identification of physical biomarkers promise improved diagnostic and prognostic power. Optical trap based active microrheology enables measurement of forces up to 0.5 mm within a sample, allowing interrogation of in vitro biomaterials, ex vivo tissue sections, and small organisms in vivo. We fabricated collagen I hydrogels exhibiting distinct structural properties by tuning polymerization temperature Tp, and measured their shear storage and loss moduli at frequencies 1-15k Hz at multiple amplitudes. Lower Tp gels, with larger pore size but thicker, longer fibers, were stiffer than higher Tp gels; decreasing strain increased loss moduli and decreased storage moduli at low frequencies. We subcutanously injected probes with metastatic murine melanoma cells into mice. The excised tumors displayed storage and loss moduli 40 Pa and 10 Pa at 1 Hz, increasing to 500 Pa and 1 kPa at 15 kHz, respectively.

  14. Combined experimental and theoretical study on the Raman and Raman optical activity signatures of pentamethylundecane diastereoisomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drooghaag, Xavier; Marchand-Brynaert, Jacqueline; Champagne, Benoît; Liégeois, Vincent

    2010-09-16

    The synthesis and the separation of the four stereoisomers of 2,4,6,8,10-pentamethylundecane (PMU) are described together with their characterization by Raman spectroscopy. In parallel, theoretical calculations of the Raman and vibrational Raman optical activity (VROA) spectra are reported and analyzed in relation with the recorded spectra. A very good agreement is found between the experimental and theoretical spectra. The Raman spectra are also shown to be less affected by the change of configuration than the VROA spectra. Nevertheless, by studying the overlap between the theoretical Raman spectra, we show clear relationships between the spectral fingerprints and the structures displaying a mixture of the TGTGTGTG conformation of the (4R,6s,8S)-PMU (isotactic compound) with the TTTTTTTT conformation of the (4R,6r,8S)-PMU (syndiotactic compound). Then, the fingerprints of the VROA spectra of the five conformers of the (4R,8R)-PMU have been related to the fingerprints of the regular (TG)(N) isotactic compound as a function of the torsion angles. Since the (TT)(N) syndiotactic compound has no VROA signatures, the VROA spectroscopy is very sensitive to the helical structures, as demonstrated here.

  15. High-speed linear optics quantum computing using active feed-forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prevedel, Robert; Walther, Philip; Tiefenbacher, Felix; Böhi, Pascal; Kaltenbaek, Rainer; Jennewein, Thomas; Zeilinger, Anton

    2007-01-04

    As information carriers in quantum computing, photonic qubits have the advantage of undergoing negligible decoherence. However, the absence of any significant photon-photon interaction is problematic for the realization of non-trivial two-qubit gates. One solution is to introduce an effective nonlinearity by measurements resulting in probabilistic gate operations. In one-way quantum computation, the random quantum measurement error can be overcome by applying a feed-forward technique, such that the future measurement basis depends on earlier measurement results. This technique is crucial for achieving deterministic quantum computation once a cluster state (the highly entangled multiparticle state on which one-way quantum computation is based) is prepared. Here we realize a concatenated scheme of measurement and active feed-forward in a one-way quantum computing experiment. We demonstrate that, for a perfect cluster state and no photon loss, our quantum computation scheme would operate with good fidelity and that our feed-forward components function with very high speed and low error for detected photons. With present technology, the individual computational step (in our case the individual feed-forward cycle) can be operated in less than 150 ns using electro-optical modulators. This is an important result for the future development of one-way quantum computers, whose large-scale implementation will depend on advances in the production and detection of the required highly entangled cluster states.

  16. Angolan Cymbopogon citratus used for therapeutic benefits: nutritional composition and influence of solvents in phytochemicals content and antioxidant activity of leaf extracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soares, Marta O; Alves, Rita C; Pires, Pedro C; Oliveira, M Beatriz P P; Vinha, Ana F

    2013-10-01

    Folk medicine is a relevant and effective part of indigenous healthcare systems which are, in practice, totally dependent on traditional healers. An outstanding coincidence between indigenous medicinal plant uses and scientifically proved pharmacological properties of several phytochemicals has been observed along the years. This work focused on the leaves of a medicinal plant traditionally used for therapeutic benefits (Angolan Cymbopogon citratus), in order to evaluate their nutritional value. The bioactive phytochemical composition and antioxidant activity of leaf extracts prepared with different solvents (water, methanol and ethanol) were also evaluated. The plant leaves contained ∼60% of carbohydrates, protein (∼20%), fat (∼5%), ash (∼4%) and moisture (∼9%). The phytochemicals screening revealed the presence of tannins, flavonoids, and terpenoids in all extracts. Methanolic extracts also contained alkaloids and steroids. Several methods were used to evaluate total antioxidant capacity of the different extracts (DPPH·, NO·, and H₂O₂ scavenging assays, reducing power, and FRAP). Ethanolic extracts presented a significantly higher antioxidant activity (p<0.05) except for FRAP, in which the best results were achieved by the aqueous extracts. Methanolic extracts showed the lowest radical scavenging activities for both DPPH· and NO· radicals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The Emerging Role of Complement Lectin Pathway in Trypanosomatids: Molecular Bases in Activation, Genetic Deficiencies, Susceptibility to Infection, and Complement System-Based Therapeutics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Evans-Osses

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The innate immune system is evolutionary and ancient and is the pivotal line of the host defense system to protect against invading pathogens and abnormal self-derived components. Cellular and molecular components are involved in recognition and effector mechanisms for a successful innate immune response. The complement lectin pathway (CLP was discovered in 1990. These new components at the complement world are very efficient. Mannan-binding lectin (MBL and ficolin not only recognize many molecular patterns of pathogens rapidly to activate complement but also display several strategies to evade innate immunity. Many studies have shown a relation between the deficit of complement factors and susceptibility to infection. The recently discovered CLP was shown to be important in host defense against protozoan microbes. Although the recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns by MBL and Ficolins reveal efficient complement activations, an increase in deficiency of complement factors and diversity of parasite strategies of immune evasion demonstrate the unsuccessful effort to control the infection. In the present paper, we will discuss basic aspects of complement activation, the structure of the lectin pathway components, genetic deficiency of complement factors, and new therapeutic opportunities to target the complement system to control infection.

  18. Therapeutics role of olive fruits/oil in the prevention of diseases via modulation of anti-oxidant, anti-tumour and genetic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, Arshad H; Albutti, Aqel S; Aly, Salah M

    2014-01-01

    The current mode of treatment for various diseases is based on synthetic drugs are effective but they show adverse effect and also alter the genetic and metabolic activity. Moreover, some drugs prepared from plants and their constituents show potentiality with more efficacy than synthetic agents used in clinical therapy. Earlier report has shown that regular consumption of fruits and vegetables is strongly related with reduced risk of developing various diseases. Several epidemiological studies has shown that, the incidence heart disease and cancers is lowest in the Mediterranean basin as compared to the part of the world because of their diet rich in olives and olive products. Olives are commonly consumed in Mediterranean and Arabian Peninsula and also have been documented in Holy Quran and modern scientific literatures. Earlier studies have shown that, the constituents from olive such as oleuropein, squalene and hydroxytyrosol modulate the genes functions and other activities. In this review, the medicinal value of olives and their constituents are summarized in terms of therapeutic approach in the diseases management through regulation of various activities.

  19. MMPI-2 profiles and illness perception in fibromyalgia syndrome: The role of therapeutic exercise as adapted physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolucci, Teresa; Vetrano, Mario; Zangrando, Federico; Vulpiani, Maria Chiara; Grasso, Maria Rosaria; Trifoglio, Domenica; Di Franco, Manuela; Iannuccelli, Cristina; Sorgi, Maria Laura; Reis, Victor; Saraceni, Vincenzo Maria; Guidetti, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Control of pain management is an important up-stream process in fibromyalgia (FM) mechanisms. To investigate whether adapted physical activity (APA) could change the illness perception in relation to the FM personality profile. Thirty-seven women with FM allocated randomly: 19 treatment group (TG) and 18 control group (CG). Interventions: exercises program included ten sessions, two times for week for one hour each and observation for CG. Scales: Illness Perception Questionnaire-revisited (IPQ-r) for the mental representation of the disease, Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory profiles (MMPI-2) for personality tool and Fibromyalgia Impact Questionnaire (FIQ) for function, impact and symptoms. Outcome assessments were performed before rehabilitation treatment (T0) than at the end (T1), and a follow-up 12 weeks after treatment (T2). APA was efficacy to improve FIQ values in TG at T1 and T2 test days (P = 0.014). Changes in IPQ-R values in T2 were not significant. All patients presented a baseline T-score≥65 in at least one of the basic and content MMPI-2 scales (Hy, D, Hs and Hea and Anx). APA was efficacy in FM, but further research to differentiate between illness experience rather than focus ona strict personality profile are necessary.

  20. Mononuclear Pd(II) complex as a new therapeutic agent: Synthesis, characterization, biological activity, spectral and DNA binding approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeidifar, Maryam; Mirzaei, Hamidreza; Ahmadi Nasab, Navid; Mansouri-Torshizi, Hassan

    2017-11-01

    The binding ability between a new water-soluble palladium(II) complex [Pd(bpy)(bez-dtc)]Cl (where bpy is 2,2‧-bipyridine and bez-dtc is benzyl dithiocarbamate), as an antitumor agent, and calf thymus DNA was evaluated using various physicochemical methods, such as UV-Vis absorption, Competitive fluorescence studies, viscosity measurement, zeta potential and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. The Pd(II) complex was synthesized and characterized using elemental analysis, molar conductivity measurements, FT-IR, 1H NMR, 13C NMR and electronic spectra studies. The anticancer activity against HeLa cell lines demonstrated lower cytotoxicity than cisplatin. The binding constants and the thermodynamic parameters were determined at different temperatures (300 K, 310 K and 320 K) and shown that the complex can bind to DNA via electrostatic forces. Furthermore, this result was confirmed by the viscosity and zeta potential measurements. The CD spectral results demonstrated that the binding of Pd(II) complex to DNA induced conformational changes in DNA. We hope that these results will provide a basis for further studies and practical clinical use of anticancer drugs.

  1. Therapeutic efficacy of interleukin-2 activated killer cells against adriamycin resistant mouse B16-BL6 melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, S C; Chikkala, N F; Lewis, I; Grabowski, D R; Finke, J H; Ganapathi, R

    1992-01-01

    Development of multidrug-resistance (MDR) remains a major cause of failure in the treatment of cancer with chemotherapeutic agents. In our efforts to explore alternative treatment regimens for multidrug-resistant tumors we have examined the sensitivity of MDR tumor cell lines to lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells. Adriamycin (ADM) resistant B16-BL6 melanoma, L1210 and P388 leukemic cell lines were tested for sensitivity to lysis by LAK cells in vitro. While ADM-resistant B16-BL6 and L1210 sublines were found to exhibit at least 2-fold greater susceptibility to lysis by LAK cells, sensitivity of ADM-resistant P388 cell was similar to that of parental cells. Since ADM-resistant B16-BL6 cells were efficiently lysed by LAK cells in vitro, the efficacy of therapy with LAK cells against the ADM-resistant B16-BL6 subline in vivo was evaluated. Compared to mice bearing parental B16-BL6 tumor cells, the adoptive transfer of LAK cells and rIL2 significantly reduced formation of experimental metastases (P less than 0.009) and extended median survival time (P less than 0.001) of mice bearing ADM-resistant B16-BL6 tumor cells. Results suggest that immunotherapy with LAK cells and rIL2 may be a useful modality in the treatment of cancers with the MDR phenotype.

  2. Syntheses of therapeutically active labelled molecules for metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies. Synthesis, preservation and radiochemical purity problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pichat, L.

    1977-01-01

    Molecules labelled with radioactive isotopes are without question an essential tool for metabolic and pharmacokinetic studies. Carbon 14 is often preferred to tritium since it allows better observation of the fate of carbonated structures. The fact that 14 CO 2 alone is used as basic material is the distinguishing feature of syntheses with isotopic carbon. In many cases the synthesis schemes of labelled drugs diverge considerably or entirely from those normally adopted for the unlabelled product. It is usually necessary to work on micro-quantities in order to maintain high specific activities, which implies the use of special synthesis techniques and of chromatographic separation and purification methods. Radiochemical purity tests are carried out by thin layer, column and gas phase chromatography, purity and identity checks by mass spectrometry and by 13 C and proton RMN. Labelled products are radiolysed by interaction of excited species with the molecules of the compound, a phenomenon much faster with tritiated than with 14 C-labelled molecules. The radiolysis rates may be reduced by molecule dilution. For ethical reasons it is not convenient to use 14 C molecules in human experiments, but molecular labelled with stable isotopes ( 13 C, 15 N, D) can serve instead [fr

  3. Wideband giant optical activity and negligible circular dichroism of near-infrared chiral metamaterial based on a complementary twisted configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu, Weiren; Rukhlenko, Ivan D; Premaratne, Malin; Huang, Yongjun; Wen, Guangjun

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically analyze the near-infrared properties of a chiral metamaterial constituting an array of twisted crosses and complementary crosses made of silver. Through rigorous full-wave numerical simulations, we demonstrate that this type of metamaterial exhibits wideband giant optical activity, with a polarization azimuth rotation angle reaching values as large as 1900 ∘ per wavelength. Owing to the negligible loss at optical frequencies in the dielectric (magnesium fluoride) making up the metamaterial, we observe negligible circular dichroism and low dispersion of the polarization azimuth rotation angle over a wide frequency band. We envision that this type of chiral metamaterial will find extensive applications in optical communication systems and biological sensing. (paper)

  4. Active control of residual tool marks for freeform optics functionalization by novel biaxial servo assisted fly cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Zhiwei; To, Suet; Zhang, Shaojian

    2015-09-01

    The inherent residual tool marks (RTM) with particular patterns highly affect optical functions of the generated freeform optics in fast tool servo or slow tool servo (FTS/STS) diamond turning. In the present study, a novel biaxial servo assisted fly cutting (BSFC) method is developed for flexible control of the RTM to be a functional micro/nanotexture in freeform optics generation, which is generally hard to achieve in FTS/STS diamond turning. In the BSFC system, biaxial servo motions along the z-axis and side-feeding directions are mainly adopted for primary surface generation and RTM control, respectively. Active control of the RTM from the two aspects, namely, undesired effect elimination or effective functionalization, are experimentally demonstrated by fabricating a typical F-theta freeform surface with scattering homogenization and two functional microstructures with imposition of secondary phase gratings integrating both reflective and diffractive functions.

  5. Activity status and future plans for the Optical Laboratory of the National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buisset, Christophe; Poshyachinda, Saran; Soonthornthum, Boonrucksar; Prasit, Apirat; Alagao, Mary Angelie; Choochalerm, Piyamas; Wanajaroen, Weerapot; Lepine, Thierry; Rabbia, Yves; Aukkaravittayapun, Suparerk; Leckngam, Apichat; Thummasorn, Griangsak; Ngernsujja, Surin; Inpan, Anuphong; Kaewsamoet, Pimon; Lhospice, Esther; Meemon, Panomsak; Artsang, Pornapa; Suwansukho, Kajpanya; Sirichote, Wichit; Paenoi, Jitsupa

    2018-03-01

    The National Astronomical Research Institute of Thailand (NARIT) has developed since June 2014 an optical laboratory that comprises all the activities and facilities related to the research and development of new instruments in the following areas: telescope design, high dynamic and high resolution imaging systems and spectrographs. The facilities include ZEMAX and Solidwork software for design and simulation activities as well as an optical room with all the equipment required to develop optical setup with cutting-edge performance. The current projects include: i) the development of a focal reducer for the 2.3 m Thai National Telescope (TNT), ii) the development of the Evanescent Wave Coronagraph dedicated to the high contrast observations of star close environment and iii) the development of low resolution spectrographs for the Thai National Telescope and for the 0.7 m telescopes of NARIT regional observatories. In each project, our activities start from the instrument optical and mechanical design to the simulation of the performance, the development of the prototype and finally to the final system integration, alignment and tests. Most of the mechanical parts are manufactured by using the facilities of NARIT precision mechanical workshop that includes a 3-axis Computer Numerical Control (CNC) to machine the mechanical structures and a Coordinate Measuring Machine (CMM) to verify the dimensions. In this paper, we give an overview of the optical laboratory activities and of the associated facilities. We also describe the objective of the current projects, present the specifications and the design of the instruments and establish the status of development and we present our future plans.

  6. The theoretical study of passive and active optical devices via planewave based transfer (scattering) matrix method and other approaches

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuo, Ye [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2011-01-01

    In this thesis, we theoretically study the electromagnetic wave propagation in several passive and active optical components and devices including 2-D photonic crystals, straight and curved waveguides, organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and etc. Several optical designs are also presented like organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells and solar concentrators. The first part of the thesis focuses on theoretical investigation. First, the plane-wave-based transfer (scattering) matrix method (TMM) is briefly described with a short review of photonic crystals and other numerical methods to study them (Chapter 1 and 2). Next TMM, the numerical method itself is investigated in details and developed in advance to deal with more complex optical systems. In chapter 3, TMM is extended in curvilinear coordinates to study curved nanoribbon waveguides. The problem of a curved structure is transformed into an equivalent one of a straight structure with spatially dependent tensors of dielectric constant and magnetic permeability. In chapter 4, a new set of localized basis orbitals are introduced to locally represent electromagnetic field in photonic crystals as alternative to planewave basis. The second part of the thesis focuses on the design of optical devices. First, two examples of TMM applications are given. The first example is the design of metal grating structures as replacements of ITO to enhance the optical absorption in OPV cells (chapter 6). The second one is the design of the same structure as above to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 7). Next, two design examples by ray tracing method are given, including applying a microlens array to enhance the light extraction of OLEDs (chapter 5) and an all-angle wide-wavelength design of solar concentrator (chapter 8). In summary, this dissertation has extended TMM which makes it capable of treating complex optical systems. Several optical designs by TMM and ray tracing method are also given as a full complement of this

  7. An exploratory study; the therapeutic effects of premixed activated charcoal-sorbitol administration in patients poisoned with organophosphate pesticide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Jeongmi; Chun, Byeongjo; Song, Kyounghwan

    2015-02-01

    The effects of activated charcoal (AC) mixed with cathartics for gastric decontamination in the management of organophosphate (OP) poisoning remain unknown due to limited clinical evidence. This exploratory study assessed the effectiveness of premixed AC-sorbitol as a treatment for OP poisoning. This retrospective observational case study included patients who either did not receive AC-sorbitol or received a single dose of AC-sorbitol within 24 h after OP ingestion. The patients were divided into three groups: no AC-sorbitol treatment, patients who received AC-sorbitol within 1 h of OP ingestion, and patients who received AC-sorbitol more than 1 h after OP ingestion. Mortality, the development of respiratory failure, and the duration of mechanical ventilation were used as outcome measurements for effectiveness, whereas aspiration pneumonia and electrolyte imbalance were employed as safety measurements. Among 262 patients with OP poisoning, 198 were included. Of these, 133 patients did not receive AC-sorbitol, whereas 14 and 51 patients received AC-sorbitol within 1 h or more than 1 h after ingestion, respectively. The time from ingestion to hospital arrival and time from ingestion to administration of atropine and pralidoxime differed among the groups, whereas other characteristics, including age, amount ingested, and type of ingested OP, were similar among the groups. Univariate and multivariate analysis demonstrated that the administration of AC-sorbitol was not associated with outcome measures for effectiveness and did not significantly increase either aspiration pneumonia or electrolyte imbalances during hospitalization. The administration of AC-sorbitol exerted neither beneficial nor harmful effects on the outcomes of OP-poisoned patients regardless of the time from OP ingestion to administration, compared with those of patients who did not receive AC-sorbitol. However, this study enrolled a small number of patients who received AC-sorbitol; further qualified

  8. Affective dysfunction in a mouse model of Rett syndrome: Therapeutic effects of environmental stimulation and physical activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, Mari A; Gray, Laura J; Pelka, Gregory J; Leang, Sook-Kwan; Christodoulou, John; Tam, Patrick P L; Hannan, Anthony J

    2016-02-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder associated with mutations in the X-linked gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2) and consequent dysregulation of brain maturation. Patients suffer from a range of debilitating physical symptoms, however, behavioral and emotional symptoms also severely affect their quality of life. Here, we present previously unreported and clinically relevant affective dysfunction in the female heterozygous Mecp2(tm1Tam) mouse model of RTT (129sv and C57BL6 mixed background). The affective dysfunction and aberrant anxiety-related behavior of the Mecp2(+/-) mice were found to be reversible with environmental enrichment (EE) from 4 weeks of age. The effect of exercise alone (via wheel running) was also explored, providing the first evidence that increased voluntary physical activity in an animal model of RTT is beneficial for some phenotypes. Mecp2(+/-) mutants displayed elevated corticosterone despite decreased Crh expression, demonstrating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis dysregulation. EE of Mecp2(+/-) mice normalized basal serum corticosterone and hippocampal BDNF protein levels. The enrichment-induced rescue appears independent of the transcriptional regulation of the MeCP2 targets Bdnf exon 4 and Crh. These findings provide new insight into the neurodevelopmental role of MeCP2 and pathogenesis of RTT, in particular the affective dysfunction. The positive outcomes of environmental stimulation and physical exercise have implications for the development of therapies targeting the affective symptoms, as well as behavioral and cognitive dimensions, of this devastating neurodevelopmental disorder. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Active optics and modified-Rumsey wide-field telescopes: MINITRUST demonstrators with vase- and tulip-form mirrors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemaître, Gérard R.; Montiel, Pierre; Joulié, Patrice; Dohlen, Kjetil; Lanzoni, Patrick

    2005-12-01

    Wide-field astronomy requires the development of larger aperture telescopes. The optical properties of a three-mirror modified-Rumsey design provide significant advantages when compared to other telescope designs: (i) at any wavelength, the design has a flat field and is anastigmatic; (ii) the system is extremely compact, i.e., it is almost four times shorter than a Schmidt. Compared to the equally compact flat-field Ritchey-Chrétien with a doublet-lens corrector, as developed for the Sloan digital sky survey - and which requires the polishing of six optical surfaces - the proposed modified-Rumsey design requires only a two-surface polishing and provides a better imaging quality. All the mirrors are spheroids of the hyperboloid type. Starting from the classical Rumsey design, it is shown that the use of all eight available free parameters allows the simultaneous aspherization of the primary and tertiary mirrors by active optics methods from a single deformable substrate. The continuity conditions between the primary and the tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by an intermediate narrow ring of constant thickness that is not optically used. After the polishing of a double vase form in a spherical shape, the primary-tertiary hyperbolizations are achieved by in situ stressing. The tulip-form secondary is hyperbolized by stress polishing. Other active optics alternatives are possible for a space telescope. The modified-Rumsey design is of interest for developing large space- and ground-based survey telescopes in UV, visible, or IR ranges, such as currently demonstrated with the construction of identical telescopes MINITRUST-1 and -2, f/5 - 2° field of view. Double-pass optical tests show diffraction-limited images.

  10. Correlation of pharmacodynamic activity, pharmacokinetics, and anti-product antibody responses to anti-IL-21R antibody therapeutics following IV administration to cynomolgus monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Spaulding Vikki

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Anti-IL-21R antibodies are potential therapeutics for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. This study evaluated correlations between the pharmacodynamic (PD activity, pharmacokinetics, and anti-product antibody responses of human anti-IL-21R antibodies Ab-01 and Ab-02 following IV administration to cynomolgus monkeys. Methods The PD assay was based on the ability of recombinant human IL-21 (rhuIL-21 to induce expression of the IL-2RA gene in cynomolgus monkey whole blood samples ex vivo. Monkeys screened for responsiveness to rhuIL-21 stimulation using the PD assay, were given a single 10 mg/kg IV dosage of Ab-01, Ab-02, or a control antibody (3/group, and blood samples were evaluated for PD activity (inhibition of IL-2RA expression for up to 148 days. Anti-IL-21R antibody concentrations and anti-product antibody responses were measured in serum using immunoassays and flow cytometry. Results Following IV administration of Ab-01 and Ab-02 to cynomolgus monkeys, PD activity was observed as early as 5 minutes (first time point sampled. This PD activity had good correlation with the serum concentrations and anti-product antibody responses throughout the study. The mean terminal half-life (t1/2 was ~10.6 and 2.3 days for Ab-01 and Ab-02, respectively. PD activity was lost at ~5-13 weeks for Ab-01 and at ~2 weeks for Ab-02, when serum concentrations were relatively low. The estimated minimum concentrations needed to maintain PD activity were ~4-6 nM for Ab-01 and ~2.5 nM for Ab-02, and were consistent with the respective KD values for binding to human IL-21R. For Ab-01, there was noticeable inter-animal variability in t1/2 values (~6-14 days and the resulting PD profiles, which correlated with the onset of anti-product antibody formation. While all three Ab-01-dosed animals were positive for anti-Ab-01 antibodies, only one monkey (with the shortest t1/2 and the earliest loss of PD activity had evidence of neutralizing anti-Ab-01

  11. Multispectral therapeutic endoscopy imaging and intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bala, John L.; Schwaitzberg, Steven D.

    2007-02-01

    With the debut of antibiotic drug therapy, and as a result of its ease of use and general success in treating infection, drugs have become the treatment of choice for most bacterial infections. However, the advent of multiple, very aggressive drug-resistant bacteria, an increasing population which cannot tolerate drugs, and the high cost of drug therapy suggest that a new modality for treating infections is needed. The complex interplay of clonal spread, persistence, transfer of resistance elements and cell-to-cell interaction all contribute to the difficulty in developing drugs to treat new antibiotic-resistant bacterial strains. A dynamic non-drug system, using extant pulsed ultraviolet lightwave technology to kill infection, is being developed to destroy pathogens. This paper theorizes that the shock effect of pulsed xenon's high energy ultraviolet pulses at wavelengths between 250-270nm separates the bacteria's DNA bands, and, subsequently, destroys them. Preliminary laboratory tests have demonstrated the ability of the technology to destroy Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Escherichia coli, Helicobacter pylori, Acinetobacter baumannii, Klebsiella punemonia, Bacillus subtillis, and Aspergillus fumigates at penetration depths of greater than 3mm in fluids with 100% effectiveness in less than five seconds of exposure to pulsed xenon lightwaves. Micro Invasive Technology, Inc is developing .pulsed xenon therapeutic catheters and endoscopic instruments for internal antimicrobial eradication and topographical devices for prophylactic wound, burn and surgical entrance/exit site sterilization. Pulsed Xenon light sources have a broad optical spectrum (190-1200nm), and can generate light pulses with sufficient energy for combined imaging and therapeutic intervention by multiplexing a fiber optic pathway into the body. In addition, Pulsed Xenon has proven ability to activate photo reactive dyes; share endoscopic lightguides with lasers while, simultaneously

  12. Therapeutic immunization with HIV-1 Tat reduces immune activation and loss of regulatory T-cells and improves immune function in subjects on HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Ensoli

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Although HAART suppresses HIV replication, it is often unable to restore immune homeostasis. Consequently, non-AIDS-defining diseases are increasingly seen in treated individuals. This is attributed to persistent virus expression in reservoirs and to cell activation. Of note, in CD4(+ T cells and monocyte-macrophages of virologically-suppressed individuals, there is continued expression of multi-spliced transcripts encoding HIV regulatory proteins. Among them, Tat is essential for virus gene expression and replication, either in primary infection or for virus reactivation during HAART, when Tat is expressed, released extracellularly and exerts, on both the virus and the immune system, effects that contribute to disease maintenance. Here we report results of an ad hoc exploratory interim analysis (up to 48 weeks on 87 virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals enrolled in a phase II randomized open-label multicentric clinical trial of therapeutic immunization with Tat (ISS T-002. Eighty-eight virologically-suppressed HAART-treated individuals, enrolled in a parallel prospective observational study at the same sites (ISS OBS T-002, served for intergroup comparison. Immunization with Tat was safe, induced durable immune responses, and modified the pattern of CD4(+ and CD8(+ cellular activation (CD38 and HLA-DR together with reduction of biochemical activation markers and persistent increases of regulatory T cells. This was accompanied by a progressive increment of CD4(+ T cells and B cells with reduction of CD8(+ T cells and NK cells, which were independent from the type of antiretroviral regimen. Increase in central and effector memory and reduction in terminally-differentiated effector memory CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cells were accompanied by increases of CD4(+ and CD8(+ T cell responses against Env and recall antigens. Of note, more immune-compromised individuals experienced greater therapeutic effects. In contrast, these changes were opposite

  13. Calculation of therapeutic activity of radioiodine in Graves' disease by means of Marinelli's formula, using technetium (99mTc) scintigraphy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szumowski, Piotr; Mojsak, Małgorzata; Abdelrazek, Saeid; Sykała, Monika; Amelian-Fiłonowicz, Anna; Jurgilewicz, Dorota; Myśliwiec, Janusz

    2016-12-01

    The therapeutic activity of 131 I administered to patients with Graves' disease can be calculated by means of Marinelli's formula. The thyroidal iodine uptake ( 131 IU max ) needed for the calculation is usually determined with the use of 131 I. The purpose of the paper was to estimate 131 IU max on the basis of technetium uptake in the thyroid at 20 min ( 99m TcU 20min ). Eighty patients suffering from Graves' disease were qualified for radioiodine therapy with measurement of fT 4 , fT 3 , thyroid-stimulating hormone and its receptor (TRAb). Prior to the treatment, all the patients were euthyroid. 131 IU max for each patient was determined according to the levels of 131 I after 24 h ( 131 IU 24h ), while effective half-life (T eff ) according to the measurements of 131 IU 24h and 131 I uptake after 48 h ( 131 IU 48h ). Additionally, on the day before measuring 131 IU 24h , 99m TcU 20min was calculated for each patient. It was demonstrated that there existed a correlation, with statistical significance at p  10 IU/ml. It is possible to predict thyroid iodine uptake 131 IU 24h in Graves' disease on the basis of measuring the uptake of 99m TcU 20min . This shortens the time necessary for diagnosis and enables the calculation of 131 I activity using Marinelli's formula.

  14. Transcriptional Control of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation by Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ: Therapeutic Implications for Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florence Gizard

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs is a critical process for the development of atherosclerosis and complications of procedures used to treat atherosclerotic diseases, including postangioplasty restenosis, vein graft failure, and transplant vasculopathy. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR γ is a member of the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily and the molecular target for the thiazolidinediones (TZD, used clinically to treat insulin resistance in patients with type 2 diabetes. In addition to their efficacy to improve insulin sensitivity, TZD exert a broad spectrum of pleiotropic beneficial effects on vascular gene expression programs. In SMCs, PPARγ is prominently upregulated during neointima formation and suppresses the proliferative response to injury of the arterial wall. Among the molecular target genes regulated by PPARγ in SMCs are genes encoding proteins involved in the regulation of cell-cycle progression, cellular senescence, and apoptosis. This inhibition of SMC proliferation is likely to contribute to the prevention of atherosclerosis and postangioplasty restenosis observed in animal models and proof-of-concept clinical studies. This review will summarize the transcriptional target genes regulated by PPARγ in SMCs and outline the therapeutic implications of PPARγ activation for the treatment and prevention of atherosclerosis and its complications.

  15. Inhibition of COX-2 does not affect therapeutical result of photodynamic therapy with hypericin despite of its increased activity and expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikes, J.; Kleban, J.; Kulikova, L.; Sackova, V.; Fedorocko, P.

    2006-01-01

    A photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a very promising, flexible and multifarious therapeutical approach for the treatment of malignant as well as non-malignant disorders. It is beholden on a nature of a photosensitive compound, its concentration and an incubation time, on a wavelength of light radiation, a fluence rate and a light dose as well as on a histological origin of the tissue and an oxygen pressure in it. Although PDT is of use in clinical practice, new promising photosensitive compounds with advantageous attributes are discovered continuously. PDT with hypericin, one of promising photosensitizers, activates p38 MAPK signalling pathway which induces expression of COX-2 and thereby increases concentration of its main product PGE2. Elevated activity of COX-2 as such is considered as contradictory to photo-cytotoxic effect of PDT with hypericin which should negatively influence an efficacy of PDT. In our experiment, effect of rofecoxib, a specific COX-2 inhibitor, as a post-treatment after PDT with hypericin in HeLa and HT29 cells have been evaluated. 24 as well as 48 hour treatment with 1 μM rofecoxib applied immediately after PDT did not induce significant decrease in cell proliferation, surprisingly. Purpose of failure to increase efficacy of PDT might be an activation of anti-apoptotic signalling pathways. Levels of Bcl-2 family proteins, especially Mcl-1 (HT29 and HeLa) and Bcl-2 (not expressed in HT29) have been evaluated. Considering our results, we can predict, that activity of COX-2 and its inhibition does not play crucial task in PDT experiments in vitro however its importance manifests in vivo as it affects angiogenesis of tumor. (authors)

  16. In vitro enzyme-mimic activity and in vivo therapeutic potential of HSJ-0017, a novel Mn porphyrin-based antioxidant enzyme mimic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bao-qiu; Dong, Xin; Li, Na; Gao, Ji-you; Yuan, Qiang; Fang, Shi-hong; Gong, Xian-chang; Wang, Shu-juan; Wang, Feng-shan

    2014-10-01

    Manganese (III) 5, 10, 15, 20-tetrakis [3-(2-(2-methoxy)-ethoxy) ethoxy] phenyl porphyrin chloride, designated HSJ-0017, is a novel antioxidant enzyme mimic. The aim of the present study was to investigate the enzyme-mimic activity and the therapeutic potential of HSJ-0017 in free radical-related diseases. Superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimic activity was measured by the nitroblue tetrazolium chloride monohydrate reduction assay. Catalase (CAT) mimic activity was measured based on the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. The antitumor, radioprotective and chemoprotective effects of HSJ-0017 were evaluated in H22 or S180 tumor-bearing Kunming mice. The anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects were, respectively, evaluated in histamine-induced edema model and CCl4-induced hepatic damage model in Wistar rats. HSJ-0017 over a concentration range of 0.001-10 µmol/L significantly inhibited the generation of superoxide anion. Significant hydrogen peroxide scavenging activity was observed when the concentration of HSJ-0017 was higher than 0.01 µmol/L. HSJ-0017 at a dose of 3.0 mg/kg exhibited significant antitumor effect on S180 tumor xenografts, whereas no significant antitumor effect was observed in H22 tumor xenografts. HSJ-0017 at a dose of 3.0 mg/kg enhanced the antitumor effects of radiotherapy and chemotherapy, and reduced their toxicity. However, HSJ-0017 counteracted the antitumor effects of radiotherapy when administered simultaneously with radiotherapy. HSJ-0017 showed significant anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective effects. Our results demonstrate that HSJ-0017 exhibits antioxidant, antitumor, anti-inflammatory, radioprotective, chemoprotective, and hepatoprotective effects. It is a potent dual SOD/CAT mimic. © 2014 by the Society for Experimental Biology and Medicine.

  17. PYTHIOSIS: A THERAPEUTIC APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. M. C. Falcão

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Pythiosis, a disease caused by the oomycete Pythium insidiosum, often presents inefficient response to chemotherapy. It is a consensus that, in spite the several therapeutic protocols, a combination of surgery, chemotherapy and immunotherapy should be used. Surgical excision requires the removal of the entire affected area, with a wide margin of safety. The use of antifungal drugs has resulted in variable results, both in vitro and in vivo, and presents low therapeutic efficiency due to differences in the agent characteristics, which differ from true fungi. Immunotherapy is a non-invasive alternative for the treatment of pythiosis, which aims at modifying the immune response of the host, thereby producing an effective response to the agent. Photodynamic therapy has emerged as a promising technique, with good activity against P. insidiosum in vitro and in vivo. However, more studies are necessary to increase the efficiency of the current treatment protocols and consequently improve the cure rates. This paper aims to conduct a review covering the conventional and recent therapeutic methods against P. insidiosum infections

  18. Outstanding effects on antithrombin activity of modified TBA diastereomers containing an optically pure acyclic nucleotide analogue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scuotto, M; Persico, M; Bucci, M; Vellecco, V; Borbone, N; Morelli, E; Oliviero, G; Novellino, E; Piccialli, G; Cirino, G; Varra, M; Fattorusso, C; Mayol, L

    2014-07-28

    Herein, we report optically pure modified acyclic nucleosides as ideal probes for aptamer modification. These new monomers offer unique advantages in exploring the role played in thrombin inhibition by a single residue modification at key positions of the TBA structure.

  19. Prognostic significance and therapeutic potential of the activation of anaplastic lymphoma kinase/protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling pathway in anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Ju; Yin, Minzhi; Zhu, Yiping; Gu, Ling; Zhang, Yanle; Li, Qiang; Jia, Cangsong; Ma, Zhigui

    2013-01-01

    Activation of the protein kinase B/mammalian target of rapamycin (AKT/mTOR) pathway has been demonstrated to be involved in nucleophosmin-anaplastic lymphoma kinase (NPM-ALK)-mediated tumorigenesis in anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL) and correlated with unfavorable outcome in certain types of other cancers. However, the prognostic value of AKT/mTOR activation in ALCL remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we aim to address this question from a clinical perspective by comparing the expressions of the AKT/mTOR signaling molecules in ALCL patients and exploring the therapeutic significance of targeting the AKT/mTOR pathway in ALCL. A cohort of 103 patients with ALCL was enrolled in the study. Expression of ALK fusion proteins and the AKT/mTOR signaling phosphoproteins was studied by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining. The pathogenic role of ALK fusion proteins and the therapeutic significance of targeting the ATK/mTOR signaling pathway were further investigated in vitro study with an ALK + ALCL cell line and the NPM-ALK transformed BaF3 cells. ALK expression was detected in 60% of ALCLs, of which 79% exhibited the presence of NPM-ALK, whereas the remaining 21% expressed variant-ALK fusions. Phosphorylation of AKT, mTOR, 4E-binding protein-1 (4E-BP1), and 70 kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase polypeptide 1 (p70S6K1) was detected in 76%, 80%, 91%, and 93% of ALCL patients, respectively. Both phospho-AKT (p-AKT) and p-mTOR were correlated to ALK expression, and p-mTOR was closely correlated to p-AKT. Both p-4E-BP1 and p-p70S6K1 were correlated to p-mTOR, but were not correlated to the expression of ALK and p-AKT. Clinically, ALK + ALCL occurred more commonly in younger patients, and ALK + ALCL patients had a much better prognosis than ALK-ALCL cases. However, expression of p-AKT, p-mTOR, p-4E-BP1, or p-p70S6K1 did not have an impact on the clinical outcome. Overexpression of NPM-ALK in a nonmalignant murine pro-B lymphoid cell line, BaF3, induced the

  20. Active 2D materials for on-chip nanophotonics and quantum optics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiue Ren-Jye

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Two-dimensional materials have emerged as promising candidates to augment existing optical networks for metrology, sensing, and telecommunication, both in the classical and quantum mechanical regimes. Here, we review the development of several on-chip photonic components ranging from electro-optic modulators, photodetectors, bolometers, and light sources that are essential building blocks for a fully integrated nanophotonic and quantum photonic circuit.

  1. Anharmonic effects in IR, Raman, and Raman optical activity spectra of alanine and proline zwitterions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danecek, Petr; Kapitán, Josef; Baumruk, Vladimír; Bednárová, Lucie; Kopecký, Vladimír; Bour, Petr

    2007-06-14

    The difference spectroscopy of the Raman optical activity (ROA) provides extended information about molecular structure. However, interpretation of the spectra is based on complex and often inaccurate simulations. Previously, the authors attempted to make the calculations more robust by including the solvent and exploring the role of molecular flexibility for alanine and proline zwitterions. In the current study, they analyze the IR, Raman, and ROA spectra of these molecules with the emphasis on the force field modeling. Vibrational harmonic frequencies obtained with 25 ab initio methods are compared to experimental band positions. The role of anharmonic terms in the potential and intensity tensors is also systematically explored using the vibrational self-consistent field, vibrational configuration interaction (VCI), and degeneracy-corrected perturbation calculations. The harmonic approach appeared satisfactory for most of the lower-wavelength (200-1800 cm(-1)) vibrations. Modern generalized gradient approximation and hybrid density functionals, such as the common B3LYP method, provided a very good statistical agreement with the experiment. Although the inclusion of the anharmonic corrections still did not lead to complete agreement between the simulations and the experiment, occasional enhancements were achieved across the entire region of wave numbers. Not only the transitional frequencies of the C-H stretching modes were significantly improved but also Raman and ROA spectral profiles including N-H and C-H lower-frequency bending modes were more realistic after application of the VCI correction. A limited Boltzmann averaging for the lowest-frequency modes that could not be included directly in the anharmonic calculus provided a realistic inhomogeneous band broadening. The anharmonic parts of the intensity tensors (second dipole and polarizability derivatives) were found less important for the entire spectral profiles than the force field anharmonicities (third

  2. The Impacts of Heating Strategy on Soil Moisture Estimation Using Actively Heated Fiber Optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Jianzhi; Agliata, Rosa; Steele-Dunne, Susan; Hoes, Olivier; Bogaard, Thom; Greco, Roberto; van de Giesen, Nick

    2017-09-13

    Several recent studies have highlighted the potential of Actively Heated Fiber Optics (AHFO) for high resolution soil moisture mapping. In AHFO, the soil moisture can be calculated from the cumulative temperature ( T cum ), the maximum temperature ( T max ), or the soil thermal conductivity determined from the cooling phase after heating ( λ ). This study investigates the performance of the T cum , T max and λ methods for different heating strategies, i.e., differences in the duration and input power of the applied heat pulse. The aim is to compare the three approaches and to determine which is best suited to field applications where the power supply is limited. Results show that increasing the input power of the heat pulses makes it easier to differentiate between dry and wet soil conditions, which leads to an improved accuracy. Results suggest that if the power supply is limited, the heating strength is insufficient for the λ method to yield accurate estimates. Generally, the T cum and T max methods have similar accuracy. If the input power is limited, increasing the heat pulse duration can improve the accuracy of the AHFO method for both of these techniques. In particular, extending the heating duration can significantly increase the sensitivity of T cum to soil moisture. Hence, the T cum method is recommended when the input power is limited. Finally, results also show that up to 50% of the cable temperature change during the heat pulse can be attributed to soil background temperature, i.e., soil temperature changed by the net solar radiation. A method is proposed to correct this background temperature change. Without correction, soil moisture information can be completely masked by the background temperature error.

  3. Estimation of operators’ fatigue using optical methods for determination of pupil activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Różanowski

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The purpose of this study was to develop and initially validate an objective, yet quick, method for assessment of human fatigue. This aim can be achieved by the use of an optical, non-contact method of analysis of pupil activity. The study involved 2 phenomena typical for the behavior of the human pupil: pupillary reflex and pupillary movements. The 1st phenomenon is related to the pupillary light reflex (PLR, which presents the results of physiological adaptation mechanisms of the human eye. The pupillary unrest index (PUI is an additional parameter referring to the tendency for instability of the pupil. Material and methods Indicators of these 2 mechanisms were assessed under the same experimental laboratory conditions. Assessment was conducted on a group of volunteers (N = 10 during 4 controlled series of measurements performed at night. Pupillary reflex parameters associated with PLR and pupillary unrest index (PUI were recorded using F²D Fit-For-Duty, a commercially available system made by AMTech Pupilknowlogy GmbH. Baseline pupil diameter, oscillations, reflex latency, maximum reaction time, pupil constriction time, pupil dilation time, and constriction amplitude were recorded. Results As a result of the study, we were able to demonstrate correlation and confirm the usefulness of PLR and PST methods in the assessment of sleep deprivation. Parameters of PLR that may indicate human fatigue were identified. The effect of light impulse sequences on the dynamics of pupillary reflex and the relationship between PUI (pupillary unrest index measurement duration and sleepiness assessment validity, were assessed. Conclusions The results of the pilot studies were sufficient to develop minimum requirements for a PLR sensor that would be capable of estimating the level of fatigue with accuracy of a PUI method, but at a 5 times faster rate.

  4. All-Optical Atom Trap Trace Analysis: Potential Use of 85Kr in Safeguards Activities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohler, M.; Sahling, P.; Sieveke, C.; Kirchner, G.

    2015-01-01

    Sensitive measurement techniques for the detection of anthropogenic tracers demand measurement resolutions down to single atoms, as it has been demonstrated by the first atom trap trace analysis experiments. However, technical limitations had lowered the sample throughput to about 200 per year per machine. We have developed an all-optical apparatus which allows higher sample throughput and small sample sizes at the same time. Krypton-85 as anthropogenic isotope is an ideal tracer for nuclear activities since the only relevant source term is fission. An increased 85Kr concentration in an air sample indicates, that a plume was passing by during sampling. In practice, however, its applicability may be limited by the global and regional background concentrations caused by the emissions of nuclear fuel reprocessing plants. The potential of 85Kr monitoring for safeguards applications has been discussed extensively. Among these is the short range detection of elevated concentrations of 85Kr in the vicinity of reprocessing plants. Our ATTA technique needs sample sizes of about 1 l of air only and thus for the first time will allow simple environmental sampling of 85Kr with high spatial and temporal resolution. The design of such a study including local sampling and tracer transport modelling in proximity to a reprocessing plants is outlined. In addition, such a study could be used also for validating near-field atmospheric dispersion models if the 85Kr source term is known. The potential of environmental analyzes of 85Kr during an IAEA short-notice access is discussed. It is shown that it crucially depends on the emission dynamics after shut-down of fuel dissolution which needs further study. (author)

  5. Chirality in nonlinear optics and optical switching

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, E.W.; Feringa, B.L.

    1993-01-01

    Chirality in molecular opto-electronics is limited sofar to the use of optically active liquid crystals and a number of optical phenomena are related to the helical macroscopic structure obtained by using one enantiomer, only. In this paper, the use of chirality in nonlinear optics and optical

  6. Optical modeling activities for NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST): IV. Overview and introduction of MATLAB based toolkits used to interface with optical design software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Joseph M.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is part four of a series on the ongoing optical modeling activities for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). The first two papers discussed modeling JWST on-orbit performance using wavefront sensitivities to predict line of sight motion induced blur, and stability during thermal transients. The third paper investigates the aberrations resulting from alignment and figure compensation of the controllable degrees of freedom (primary and secondary mirrors), which may be encountered during ground alignment and on-orbit commissioning of the observatory. The work here introduces some of the math software tools used to perform the work of the previous three papers of this series. NASA has recently approved these in-house tools for public release as open source, so this presentation also serves as a quick tutorial on their use. The tools are collections of functions written for use in MATLAB to interface with optical design software (CODE V, OSLO, and ZEMAX) using either COM or DDE communication protocol. The functions are discussed, and examples are given.

  7. Assessing sensory versus optogenetic network activation by combining (o)fMRI with optical Ca2+ recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Florian; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Schwalm, Miriam; Prouvot, Pierre-Hugues; Jubal, Eduardo Rosales; Fois, Consuelo; Pramanik, Gautam; Zimmer, Claus; Stroh, Albrecht

    2015-01-01

    Encoding of sensory inputs in the cortex is characterized by sparse neuronal network activation. Optogenetic stimulation has previously been combined with fMRI (ofMRI) to probe functional networks. However, for a quantitative optogenetic probing of sensory-driven sparse network activation, the level of similarity between sensory and optogenetic network activation needs to be explored. Here, we complement ofMRI with optic fiber-based population Ca2+ recordings for a region-specific readout of neuronal spiking activity in rat brain. Comparing Ca2+ responses to the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal upon sensory stimulation with increasing frequencies showed adaptation of Ca2+ transients contrasted by an increase of blood oxygenation level-dependent responses, indicating that the optical recordings convey complementary information on neuronal network activity to the corresponding hemodynamic response. To study the similarity of optogenetic and sensory activation, we quantified the density of cells expressing channelrhodopsin-2 and modeled light propagation in the tissue. We estimated the effectively illuminated volume and numbers of optogenetically stimulated neurons, being indicative of sparse activation. At the functional level, upon either sensory or optogenetic stimulation we detected single-peak short-latency primary Ca2+ responses with similar amplitudes and found that blood oxygenation level-dependent responses showed similar time courses. These data suggest that ofMRI can serve as a representative model for functional brain mapping. PMID:26661247

  8. Assessing sensory versus optogenetic network activation by combining (o)fMRI with optical Ca2+ recordings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid, Florian; Wachsmuth, Lydia; Schwalm, Miriam; Prouvot, Pierre-Hugues; Jubal, Eduardo Rosales; Fois, Consuelo; Pramanik, Gautam; Zimmer, Claus; Faber, Cornelius; Stroh, Albrecht

    2016-11-01

    Encoding of sensory inputs in the cortex is characterized by sparse neuronal network activation. Optogenetic stimulation has previously been combined with fMRI (ofMRI) to probe functional networks. However, for a quantitative optogenetic probing of sensory-driven sparse network activation, the level of similarity between sensory and optogenetic network activation needs to be explored. Here, we complement ofMRI with optic fiber-based population Ca 2+ recordings for a region-specific readout of neuronal spiking activity in rat brain. Comparing Ca 2+ responses to the blood oxygenation level-dependent signal upon sensory stimulation with increasing frequencies showed adaptation of Ca 2+ transients contrasted by an increase of blood oxygenation level-dependent responses, indicating that the optical recordings convey complementary information on neuronal network activity to the corresponding hemodynamic response. To study the similarity of optogenetic and sensory activation, we quantified the density of cells expressing channelrhodopsin-2 and modeled light propagation in the tissue. We estimated the effectively illuminated volume and numbers of optogenetically stimulated neurons, being indicative of sparse activation. At the functional level, upon either sensory or optogenetic stimulation we detected single-peak short-latency primary Ca 2+ responses with similar amplitudes and found that blood oxygenation level-dependent responses showed similar time courses. These data suggest that ofMRI can serve as a representative model for functional brain mapping. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Structural, vibrational spectroscopic and nonlinear optical activity studies on 2-hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine: A DFT approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asath, R. Mohamed; Premkumar, S.; Jawahar, A.; Mathavan, T.; Dhas, M. Kumara; Benial, A. Milton Franklin

    2015-06-01

    The conformational analysis was carried out for 2-Hydroxy- 3, 5-dinitropyridine molecule using potential energy surface scan and the most stable optimized conformer was predicted. The vibrational frequencies and Mulliken atomic charge distribution were calculated for the optimized geometry of the molecule using DFT/B3LYP cc-pVQZ basis set by Gaussian 09 Program. The vibrational frequencies were assigned on the basis of potential energy distribution calculation using VEDA 4.0 program. In the Frontier molecular orbitals analysis, the molecular reactivity, kinetic stability, intramolecular charge transfer studies and the calculation of ionization energy, electron affinity, global hardness, chemical potential, electrophilicity index and softness values of the title molecule were carried out. The nonlinear optical activity of the molecule was studied by means of first order hyperpolarizability, which was computed as 7.64 times greater than urea. The natural bond orbital analysis was performed to confirm the nonlinear optical activity of the molecule.

  10. Real-Time and High-Resolution 3D Face Measurement via a Smart Active Optical Sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Yong; Shen, Yang; Zhang, Guocai; Xing, Xiuwen

    2017-03-31

    The 3D measuring range and accuracy in traditional active optical sensing, such as Fourier transform profilometry, are influenced by the zero frequency of the captured patterns. The phase-shifting technique is commonly applied to remove the zero component. However, this phase-shifting method must capture several fringe patterns with phase difference, thereby influencing the real-time performance. This study introduces a smart active optical sensor, in which a composite pattern is utilized. The composite pattern efficiently combines several phase-shifting fringes and carrier frequencies. The method can remove zero frequency by using only one pattern. Model face reconstruction and human face measurement were employed to study the validity and feasibility of this method. Results show no distinct decrease in the precision of the novel method unlike the traditional phase-shifting method. The texture mapping technique was utilized to reconstruct a nature-appearance 3D digital face.

  11. Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Optics/Optical Diagnostics Laboratory supports graduate instruction in optics, optical and laser diagnostics and electro-optics. The optics laboratory provides...

  12. Novel mesostructured inclusions in the epidermal lining of Artemia franciscana ovisacs show optical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Hollergschwandtner

    2017-10-01

    previously reported. We hypothesize that their self-assembly was from proteinaceous polycrystalline units and carbohydrates. These mesostructured flakes displayed active optical properties, as an umbrella-like, reflective cover of the ovisac, which suggests a functional role in the reproduction of A. franciscana. In turn, studies into ovisac mesostructured inclusions could help to optimizing rearing Artemia as feed for fish farming. We propose Artemia ovisacs as an in vivo model system for studying mesostructure formation.

  13. L-Alanyl-L-alanine Conformational Changes Induced by pH As Monitored by the Raman Optical Activity Spectra

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šebek, Jiří; Kapitán, Josef; Šebestík, Jaroslav; Baumruk, V.; Bouř, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 113, č. 27 (2009), s. 7760-7768 ISSN 1089-5639 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/07/0732; GA ČR GA203/07/1517; GA AV ČR IAA400550702 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Raman optical activity * peptides * conformation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2009

  14. On the local field method with the account of spatial dispersion. Application to the optical activity theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyu, N. S.; Ekhilevsky, S. G.

    1992-07-01

    For the perfect molecular crystals the equations of the local field method (LFM) with the account of spatial dispersion are formulated. They are used to derive the expression for the crystal polarizability tensor. For the first time within the framework of this method the formula for the gyrotropy tensor of an arbitrary optically active molecular crystal is obtained. This formula is analog of well known relationships of Lorentz-Lorenz.

  15. Cancer gene profiling in non-small cell lung cancers reveals activating mutations in JAK2 and JAK3 with therapeutic implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shuyu D. Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Next-generation sequencing (NGS of cancer gene panels are widely applied to enable personalized cancer therapy and to identify novel oncogenic mutations. Methods We performed targeted NGS on 932 clinical cases of non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs using the Ion AmpliSeq™ Cancer Hotspot panel v2 assay. Results Actionable mutations were identified in 65% of the cases with available targeted therapeutic options, including 26% of the patients with mutations in National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN guideline genes. Most notably, we discovered JAK2 p.V617F somatic mutation, a hallmark of myeloproliferative neoplasms, in 1% (9/932 of the NSCLCs. Analysis of cancer cell line pharmacogenomic data showed that a high level of JAK2 expression in a panel of NSCLC cell lines is correlated with increased sensitivity to a selective JAK2 inhibitor. Further analysis of TCGA genomic data revealed JAK2 gain or loss due to genetic alterations in NSCLC clinical samples are associated with significantly elevated or reduced PD-L1 expression, suggesting that the activating JAK2 p.V617F mutation could confer sensitivity to both JAK inhibitors and anti-PD1 immunotherapy. We also detected JAK3 germline activating mutations in 6.7% (62/932 of the patients who may benefit from anti-PD1 treatment, in light of recent findings that JAK3 mutations upregulate PD-L1 expression. Conclusion Taken together, this study demonstrated the clinical utility of targeted NGS with a focused hotspot cancer gene panel in NSCLCs and identified activating mutations in JAK2 and JAK3 with clinical implications inferred through integrative analysis of cancer genetic, genomic, and pharmacogenomic data. The potential of JAK2 and JAK3 mutations as response markers for the targeted therapy against JAK kinases or anti-PD1 immunotherapy warrants further investigation.

  16. Atorvastatin acts synergistically with N-acetyl cysteine to provide therapeutic advantage against Fas-activated erythrocyte apoptosis during chronic arsenic exposure in rats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Sen, Gargi; Sarkar, Avik; Biswas, Tuli

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic is an environmental toxicant that reduces the lifespan of circulating erythrocytes during chronic exposure. Our previous studies had indicated involvement of hypercholesterolemia and reactive oxygen species (ROS) in arsenic-induced apoptotic death of erythrocytes. In this study, we have shown an effective recovery from arsenic-induced death signaling in erythrocytes in response to treatment with atorvastatin (ATV) and N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) in rats. Our results emphasized on the importance of cholesterol in the promotion of ROS-mediated Fas signaling in red cells. Arsenic-induced activation of caspase 3 was associated with phosphatidylserine exposure on the cell surface and microvesiculation of erythrocyte membrane. Administration of NAC in combination with ATV, proved to be more effective than either of the drugs alone towards the rectification of arsenic-mediated disorganization of membrane structural integrity, and this could be linked with decreased ROS accumulation through reduced glutathione (GSH) repletion along with cholesterol depletion. Moreover, activation of caspase 3 was capable of promoting aggregation of band 3 with subsequent binding of autologous IgG and opsonization by C3b that led to phagocytosis of the exposed cells by the macrophages. NAC-ATV treatment successfully amended these events and restored lifespan of erythrocytes from the exposed animals almost to the control level. This work helped us to identify intracellular membrane cholesterol enrichment and GSH depletion as the key regulatory points in arsenic-mediated erythrocyte destruction and suggested a therapeutic strategy against Fas-activated cell death related to enhanced cholesterol and accumulation of ROS.

  17. A simple dried blood spot method for therapeutic drug monitoring of the tricyclic antidepressants amitriptyline, nortriptyline, imipramine, clomipramine, and their active metabolites using LC-MS/MS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berm, E. J. J.; Paardekooper, J.; Brummel-Mulder, E.; Hak, E.; Wilffert, B.; Maring, J. G.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic drug monitoring (TOM) of tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) is considered useful in patients with major depressive disorder, since these drugs display large individual differences in clearance, and the therapeutic windows of these drugs are relatively small. We developed an assay for

  18. Chiral monolithic absorbent constructed by optically active helical-substituted polyacetylene and graphene oxide: preparation and chiral absorption capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weifei; Wang, Bo; Yang, Wantai; Deng, Jianping

    2015-02-01

    Chiral monolithic absorbent is successfully constructed for the first time by using optically active helical-substituted polyacetylene and graphene oxide (GO). The preparative strategy is facile and straightforward, in which chiral-substituted acetylene monomer (Ma), cross-linker (Mb), and alkynylated GO (Mc) undergo copolymerization to form the desired monolithic absorbent in quantitative yield. The resulting monoliths are characterized by circular dichroism, UV-vis absorption, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), FT-IR, Raman, energy-dispersive spectrometer (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), XPS, and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) techniques. The polymer chains derived from Ma form chiral helical structures and thus provide optical activity to the monoliths, while GO sheets contribute to the formation of porous structures. The porous structure enables the monolithic absorbents to demonstrate a large swelling ratio in organic solvents, and more remarkably, the helical polymer chains provide optical activity and further enantio-differentiating absorption ability. The present study establishes an efficient and versatile methodology for preparing novel functional materials, in particular monolithic chiral materials based on substituted polyacetylene and GO. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Optical activity and ultraviolet absorbance detection of dansyl L-amino acids separated by gradient liquid chromatography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1987-04-01

    Many scientific investigations (e.g., geochronology, pharmaceuticals) have the need to determine enantiometric ratios of amino acids and other compounds. It has been reported that OA/UV or OA/RI (refractive index) are ideal methods for the determination of enantiomeric ratios without the need for chiral columns, chiral eluents, or diasteromer preparation. Unfortunately, only three amino acids are naturally UV absorbing (254 nm), and RI sensitivity for amino acids is low. Derivatization by several methods (o-phthalaldehyde, dansyl, phenylisothiocyanate, fluorescamine, 2,4-dinitrofluorobenzene, and phenylthiohydantoin) renders all amino acids UV absorbing and makes UV or fluorescence viable techniques for amino acids determinations. A previously neglected aspect of derivatization is the effect on optical activity. These highly polar groups influence the chiral center of amino acids drastically (electronic and steric effects). The shifting of the absorption band to the proximity of the wavelength used for OA measurements further enhances the importance of the substituent. The authors report here the determination of 17 dansyl amino acids in a mixture by UV absorbance and optical activity. This involves gradient elution. Previously, the optical activity detector (OAD) has been used only with isocratic HPLC.

  20. THE RELATION OF OPTICAL/ULTRAVIOLET AND X-RAY EMISSION IN LOW-LUMINOSITY ACTIVE GALACTIC NUCLEI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Yadi

    2011-01-01

    We study the relation of optical/UV and X-ray emission in the low luminosity active galactic nuclei (LLAGNs), using a sample of 49 sources including 28 local Seyfert galaxies and 21 low-ionization nuclear emission-line regions with optical/UV spectral luminosity at wavelength λ = 2500 A, 23.0 ≤ log L ν(2500A) (erg s -1 Hz -1 ) ≤ 27.7, and X-ray spectral luminosity at 2 keV, 20.5 ≤ log L ν(2keV) ≤ 25.3. Strong correlations are found between the X-ray luminosity and the optical/UV-to-X-ray index, α ox , with the optical/UV luminosity, with slopes very similar to the findings for the luminous AGNs in previous works. The correlation between α ox and L ν(2keV) is very weak, as is that found for the luminous AGNs in the majority of previous similar works. We also study the relation between α ox and the Eddington ratio L bol /L Edd for our sample and find a significant anti-correlation for the sources with L bol /L Edd ∼ -3 , which is opposite to the correlation between the two variables for the luminous AGNs. Using the advection-dominated accretion flow (ADAF) model, we roughly reproduce this anti-correlationship for the two variables for the LLAGNs. This result strongly supports the ADAF as a candidate for the accretion mode in LLAGNs.