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Sample records for theileriosis

  1. Electrocardiographic findings in cattle with theileriosis

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    M Fartashvand

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Theileriosis is an important protozoal disease of domestic ruminants especially cattle, sheep and goats which is transmitted by various species of Theileria infected ticks. Anemia, electrolytic disorders and vasculitis are amongst the cardiovascular complications of theileriosis. In this study, 90 cows with theileriosis were evaluated by clinical examination, parasitologic tests and electrocardiography. In Theileria infected cattle, after 30 minutes of rest and any treatment, a 30 second ECG was recorded in lead I to determine the types of arrhythmias present. Based on electrocardiographic findings frequently observed arrhythmias included 62 cases of sinus tachycardia, 15 cases of sinus arrhythmia, 6 cases of first degree atrio-ventricular block, 1 case of ventricular extra systole and 1 case of atrial fibrillation. According to the type of arrhythmias, it can be concluded that arrhythmias in cows with theileriosis are functional and nonpathologic.

  2. Detection of Theileria lestoquardi cross infection in cattle with clinical theileriosis in Iran.

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    Jalali, Seyedeh Missagh; Jolodar, Abbas; Rasooli, Aria; Darabifard, Ameneh

    2016-12-01

    Theileriosis caused by Theileria lestoquardi (malignant ovine theileriosis) in sheep and Theileria annulata (tropical theileriosis) in cattle is an important hemoprotozoal tick-borne disease in Iran. Due to major biologic and phylogenic similarities of these two species, this study was carried out to investigate the occurrence of natural infections with T.lestoquardi and T.annulata in cattle with clinical theileriosis in Ahvaz, southwest Iran. Fifty one cattle were selected based on clinical signs of theileriosis and confirmation by microscopic examination of blood smears. Blood samples were collected from each animal and hematologic and microscopic examinations were performed. Theileria piroplasmic forms were detected in all affected cattle. Pale mucous membranes (43.14%), icterus (11.76%) and fever (70.6%) were also observed. PCR-RFLP analysis revealed T. annulata infection in all tested cattle while coinfections with T. lestoquardi were found in two samples (3.92%). All sampled cattle including the two with mixed species Theileria infection were anemic. This is the first report of Theileria species cross infections in cattle with clinical theileriosis in Iran. It can be concluded that cattle can be infected with both pathogenic Theileria species, T. lestoquardi and T. annulata which can be an important issue in the epidemiology and spread of ovine malignant theileriosis.

  3. First confirmed report of outbreak of malignant ovine theileriosis among goats in Sudan.

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    Taha, Khalid M; Salih, Diaeldin A; Ahmed, Bukhari M; Enan, Khalid A; Ali, Awadia M; Elhussein, Abdelrahim M

    2011-12-01

    An outbreak of malignant ovine theileriosis among goats was confirmed and documented. In this outbreak, 16 out of 22 (72.7%) goats died within 4 days showing clinical signs of malignant ovine theileriosis as well as in the postmortem findings. The goats were reared in a mixed flock with sheep in Atbara Town, Northern Sudan. The infection was detected microscopically and confirmed serologically by IFA test and molecularly by PCR technique using specific primer for Theileria lestoquardi. Hyalomma anatolicum was the most prevalent (dominant) tick species found in the farm. It is recommended to undertake future research on the role of goats on the epidemiology of malignant ovine theileriosis.

  4. The potential of heat shock response in the treatment of theileriosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although the actual mechanism of this approach remains enigmatic, it might be linked with the protective role of heat shock response observed in several conditions. This prompts for closer look into the possible protective mechanisms of heat shock response against theileriosis. By gaining insight into how the heat shock ...

  5. Attenuation of Theileria lestoquardi infected cells and immunization of sheep against malignant ovine theileriosis.

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    Ahmed, Bukhari M; Taha, Khalid M; Enan, Khalid A; Elfahal, Abdelghafar M; El Hussein, Abdel Rahim M

    2013-10-01

    Malignant ovine theileriosis caused by Theileria lestoquardi is an economically important disease infecting small ruminants in the Sudan. The disease causes massive losses among sheep in many regions of Northern Sudan. The present studies were done to isolate lymphoblastoid cells infected with malignant ovine theileriosis and attenuate them by passage using culture media to develop and produce schizonts candidate vaccine, then test its efficacy and safety by exposing immunized lambs to field challenge in an area endemic with T. lestoquardi. In the present experiments we isolated and established an in vitro culture of T. lestoquardi infected lymphoblast cell line. Long-term culture of T. lestoquardi infected lymphoplastoid cells was shown to result in attenuation of their virulence and lambs inoculated with different doses of such cells at passage 105 exhibited very mild reactions with fever that lasted for 1-5 days and parasitaemia of <0.2%. The experimental lambs immunized with this candidate vaccine were immune and protected when exposed to field challenge in an area endemic of ovine theileriosis, while morbidity and mortality among non-immunized animals reached 76.9% and 46.15%, respectively, and they exhibited the clinical signs of malignant ovine theileriosis that included, high fever, loss of appetite, enlargement of lymph nodes, jaundice, loss of weight and death. The present study demonstrates the efficacy and the safety of this attenuated cell line as a live attenuated candidate vaccine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Theileriosis in six dogs in South Africa and its potential clinical significance

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    Chantal T. Rosa

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Theileriosis is a tick-borne disease caused by a piroplasma of the genus Theileria that can causeanaemia and thrombocytopenia. Its clinical importance for dogs’ remains poorly understood,as only some develop clinical signs. In this study, physical and laboratory findings, treatment and outcomes of six client-owned diseased dogs presented at the Onderstepoort Veterinary Academic Hospital are described retrospectively. In the dogs, Theileria species (n = 4and Theileria equi (n = 2 were detected by a polymerase chain reaction (PCR-reverse blothybridisation assay in blood samples, whilst PCR for Babesia, Anaplasma and Ehrlichia were negative. The most common physical findings were pale mucous membranes (five out of six dogs, bleeding tendencies (five out of six dogs and lethargy (three out of six dogs. All dogs were thrombocytopenic [median 59.5 x 109/L (range 13–199] and five out of six dogs were anaemic [median haematocrit 18% (range 5–32]. Bone marrow core biopsies performed in two dogs showed myelofibrosis. Theileriosis was treated with imidocarb dipropionate and the suspected secondary immune-mediated haematological disorders with prednisolone and azathioprine. Five dogs achieved clinical cure and post-treatment PCR performed in three out of five dogs confirmed absence of circulating parasitaemia. An immune-mediated response to Theileria species is thought to result in anaemia and/or thrombocytopenia in diseased dogs with theileriosis. A bleeding tendency, most likely secondary to thrombocytopenia and/or thrombocytopathy, was the most significant clinical finding in these cases. The link between thrombocytopenia, anaemia and myelofibrosis in theileriosis requires further investigation and theileriosis should be considered a differential diagnosis for dogs presenting with anaemia and/or thrombocytopenia in endemic tick-borne disease areas.

  7. Oriental theileriosis in dairy cows causes a significant milk production loss

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Oriental theileriosis is a tick-borne, protozoan disease of cattle caused by members of the Theileria orientalis-complex. Recent outbreaks of this disease in eastern Australia have caused major concerns to the dairy and beef farming communities, but there are no published studies of the economic impact of this disease. On a farm in Victoria, Australia, we assessed whether oriental theileriosis has an impact on milk production and reproductive performance in dairy cows. Methods Blood samples collected from all 662 cows on the farm were tested using an established molecular test. For individual cows, milk production and reproductive performance data were collected. A clinical assessment of individual cows was performed. Based on clinical findings and molecular test results, the following groups of cows were classified: group 1, with cardinal clinical signs of oriental theileriosis and molecular test-positive for T. orientalis; group 2, with mild or suspected signs of theileriosis and test-positive; group 3, with no clinical signs and test-positive; and group 4, with no clinical signs and test-negative. Milk production and reproductive performance data for groups 1, 2 and 3 were each compared with those for group 4 using linear and logistic regression analyses, respectively. Results At 100 days of lactation, group 1 cows produced significantly less milk (288 l; P = 0.001), milk fat (16.8 kg; P cows produced significantly less milk (624 l; P = 0.004), milk fat (42.9 kg; P cows. Group 2 cows also produced significantly less milk fat (21.2 kg; P = 0.033) at this lactation point. No statistically significant difference in reproductive performance was found upon pairwise comparisons of groups 1–3 with group 4 cows. Conclusions The present findings demonstrate that clinical oriental theileriosis can cause significant milk production losses in dairy cattle. PMID:24552213

  8. Milk losses due to bovine tropical theileriosis (Theileria annulata infection in Algeria

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    Ouarda Ayadi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The authors studied the impact of tropical theileriosis onset on milk yield decrease in 10 local bred cows in Skikda (Northern Algeria during 2015 summer season. The milk yield decrease estimated weekly during two months was 2.76 L/day/cow corresponding to 31.92% of the total milk yield. This decrease corresponds to 110.5 Algerian Dinars (1.02 US$/day/diseased cow. The relative variation of milk yield showed a dramatic decrease from 82.72% to 0.76% at Day 21 then became constant. Further studies are needed to improve these estimations of financial losses due to bovine tropical theileriosis in Algeria.

  9. Hyalomma impeltatum (Acari: Ixodidae) as a potential vector of malignant theileriosis in sheep in Saudi Arabia.

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    El-Azazy, O M; El-Metenawy, T M; Wassef, H Y

    2001-08-31

    Little is known about tick-borne diseases in Saudi Arabia, particularly regarding the prevalence of theileriosis in small ruminants. This survey studied the potential vectors of malignant theileriosis in Saudi Arabian sheep. Blood, lymph node and tick samples were collected from animals being treated or necropsied at the Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory in Jeddah, Makkah (western region), and Bureida, Al-Qasim (central region). Blood and lymph node smears were prepared and examined for Theileria species. Theileria hirci (=T. lestoquardi) was found in lymph node smears of one out of 36 sheep (2.8%) in Jeddah and six of 25 sheep (24%) in Bureida. The erythrocytic forms were detected in 5-8% of RBCs. Ticks were found in relatively less number of sheep in Bureida and Jeddah, 17/180 and 26/125, respectively. All Theileria-infected sheep were infested with Hyalomma impeltatum except the one that carried Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum. This suggests that H. impeltatum is a potential vector of malignant theileriosis in Saudi Arabia.

  10. Oriental theileriosis in dairy cows causes a significant milk production loss.

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    Perera, Piyumali K; Gasser, Robin B; Firestone, Simon M; Anderson, Garry A; Malmo, Jakob; Davis, Gerry; Beggs, David S; Jabbar, Abdul

    2014-02-19

    Oriental theileriosis is a tick-borne, protozoan disease of cattle caused by members of the Theileria orientalis-complex. Recent outbreaks of this disease in eastern Australia have caused major concerns to the dairy and beef farming communities, but there are no published studies of the economic impact of this disease. On a farm in Victoria, Australia, we assessed whether oriental theileriosis has an impact on milk production and reproductive performance in dairy cows. Blood samples collected from all 662 cows on the farm were tested using an established molecular test. For individual cows, milk production and reproductive performance data were collected. A clinical assessment of individual cows was performed. Based on clinical findings and molecular test results, the following groups of cows were classified: group 1, with cardinal clinical signs of oriental theileriosis and molecular test-positive for T. orientalis; group 2, with mild or suspected signs of theileriosis and test-positive; group 3, with no clinical signs and test-positive; and group 4, with no clinical signs and test-negative. Milk production and reproductive performance data for groups 1, 2 and 3 were each compared with those for group 4 using linear and logistic regression analyses, respectively. At 100 days of lactation, group 1 cows produced significantly less milk (288 l; P = 0.001), milk fat (16.8 kg; P milk protein (12.6 kg; P milk fat (13.6 kg; P = 0.002) and milk protein (8.6 kg; P = 0.005) than group 4. At 305 days of lactation, group 1 cows produced significantly less milk (624 l; P = 0.004), milk fat (42.9 kg; P milk protein (26.0 kg; P cows. Group 2 cows also produced significantly less milk fat (21.2 kg; P = 0.033) at this lactation point. No statistically significant difference in reproductive performance was found upon pairwise comparisons of groups 1-3 with group 4 cows. The present findings demonstrate that clinical oriental theileriosis can cause significant milk production losses

  11. Effect of Peganum harmala (wild rue extract on experimental ovine malignant theileriosis : pathological and parasitological findings

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    A. Derakhshanfar

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Malignant theileriosis of sheep is a highly fatal, acute or subacute disease is caused by the tick-borne protozoan parasite, Theileria hirci. In this investigation ten healthy male lambs aged 5-6 months were randomly divided into two groups, A and B and were kept in isolated tick-proof pens. They were treated for internal and external parasite before commencement of the experiment. The lambs were experimentally infected with T. hirci by placing ticks Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum infected with T. hirci on them. The ticks used in this survey had originally been isolated from sheep and colonies of them were established in an insectarium. Before and after infection rectal temperatures and clinical signs of the lambs were recorded, blood and prescapular lymph node smears were prepared and examined to determine the extent of the parasitaemia, and blood samples were analyzed to evaluate their haemoglobin (Hb and packed cell volume (PCV rates. Three days after the commencement of a febrile reaction and appearance of the schizonts in the lymph node smears, treatment of the lambs in Group A with an extract containing the alkaloids of Peganum harmala (wild rue was commenced. Group B lambs were kept untreated controls. Before treatment there were no significant differences in the rectal temperature, parasitaemia rate, and the Hb and PCV values between animals in the two groups but after treatment significant differences in these values was detected (P < 0.05. After treatment, the clinical signs and parasites in the lymph node smears of the animals in Group A disappeared and they all animals recovered. These parameters in the animals of Group B progressed until their death. Pathological studies showed the characteristic lesions of theileriosis in lambs in Group B, but not in Group A. The results indicate a therapeutic effect of the alkaloids of P. harmala for treatment of ovine malignant theileriosis.

  12. Identification of tick vectors of ovine theileriosis in an endemic region of Iran.

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    Razmi, G R; Hosseini, M; Aslani, M R

    2003-08-29

    This study was made to determine the population of ticks in infected sheep and attempting to identify the tick vectors of ovine theileriosis in an endemic area of Iran from 2000 to 2001. A total of 188 suspected cases of ovine theileriosis from 28 flocks were clinically examined and investigated for the presence of Theileria lestoquardi in appropriate blood smears and any tick species on body of sheep. In this study, 36.17% of sheep were infected to T. lestoquardi with a parasitemia of 0.01-15%. There was no significant differences between the rate of parasitemia in sheep and the frequency of infected ticks. We found that 61.1% of the animals harboured Hyalomma a. anatolicum, 33.42% Rhipicephalus sanguineus and 0.05% Hyalomma m. marginatum. The examination of 345 tick salivary glands showed that (15%) of salivary glands of H.a. anatolicum and (4%) of R. sanguineus contained Feulgen positive bodies. Seasonally, the prevalence of Theileria infection and H.a. anatolicum infestation in sheep reached the highest level in July (62.5%) and June (23.6%), while a decrease was observed in September (24.5%) and August (17.39%), respectively. The prevalence of Theileria infection in all age groups and between male and female sheep was statistically non-significant.

  13. Vaccination of cattle against tropical theileriosis in Uzbekistan using autochthonous live vaccine.

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    Rasulov, Ilhan; Fish, L; Shkap, V

    2008-12-19

    In Uzbekistan, 1984 cattle were vaccinated with the TAU-219 autochthonous live Theileria annulata vaccine under field conditions. There were no post-vaccination reactions recorded in calves vaccinated with 10 times the recommended dose, under semi-field conditions. After vaccination 53.9% of the vaccinates developed fever over 39.5 degrees C that lasted for a few days, but none developed clinical theileriosis or required drug treatment during the 3-week follow-up. The numbers of animals in which piroplasms were detected before and after vaccination were similar (7.15% and 7.25%, respectively), indicating previous exposure to T. annulata tick infection. Following vaccination none of the 241 pregnant cows aborted. Milk production during 30-45 days was similar in non-vaccinated and vaccinated cows, at about 5.2-5.9L/day. During 1999-2006 a total of 11,000 field-grazing cattle were safely vaccinated in Uzbekistan.

  14. An experimental ovine Theileriosis: The effect of Theileria lestoquardi infection on cardiovascular system in sheep.

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    Yaghfoori, Saeed; Razmi, Gholam Reza; Mohri, Mehrdad; Razavizadeh, Ali Reza Taghavi; Movassaghi, Ahmad Reza

    2016-09-01

    The malignant ovine theileriosis is caused by Theileria lestoquardi, which is highly pathogenic in sheep. Theileriosis involves different organs in ruminants, but the effect of the disease on the cardiovascular system is unclear. To understand the pathogenesis of T. lestoquardi on the cardiovascular system, Baluchi breed sheep were infected with the mentioned parasite by releasing unfed adults of Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum, which were infected with T. lestoquardi. The infected sheep were clinically examined on days 0, 2, 5, 7, 10, 12, 14, 17, and 21, and the blood samples were collected for biochemical parameters measurement. At termination of the experiment, the infected sheep were euthanized and pathological examinations of heart tissue were conducted. During experimental infection of sheep with T. lestoquardi, activities of cardiac troponin I (cTnI), lactate dehydrogenase, and aspartate aminotransferase, were significantly increased (P˂0.05), while a conspicuous decrease (P˂0.05) was observed in creatine phosphokinase activities. Alterations made in biochemical factors almost coincided with the presence of piroplasm in the blood and schizont in lymph nodes. Maximum and minimum of parasitemia in the sheep stood between 3.3% and 0.28%, respectively. In addition, electrocardiography revealed sinus tachycardia, sinus arrhythmia, sino-atrial block and ST-elevation, atrial premature beat, and alteration in QRS and in T waves' amplitude. Heart histopathological examination showed hyperemia, infiltration of mononuclear inflammatory cells into interstitial tissue, endocarditis, and focal necrosis of cardiac muscle cells. In addition, in one of the sheep, definite occurrence of infarction was observed. The results indicate that T. lestoquardi infection has devastating pathological impacts on the cardiovascular system of sheep. Furthermore, measurement of the cTnI amount is a useful biochemical factor for diagnosis and for better understanding of the severity and

  15. Haematological and biochemical indicators of tropical theileriosis diseased cattle in wilaya of Sétif (North East Algeria).

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    Ayadi, Ouarda; Gharbi, Mohamed; Benchikh-Elfegoun, Mohammed Cherif

    2017-06-01

    The authors investigated biochemical and haematological parameters in 40 healthy and 40 tropical theileriosis (Theileria annulata) clinically infected cattle in El Eulma region (North East Algeria). The mean haematological and biochemical parameters including the number of erythrocytes, haemoglobin, haematocrit, mean corpuscular volume, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration and mean corpuscular haemoglobin were estimated. The mean hematological and biochemical parameters including the number of leukocytes, erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit, glucose, albumin, total proteins decreased significantly (p = 0.005; 0.008; 0.03 0.048; 0.002; 0.027 and 0.018; respectively) in Montbéliard breed clinically infected with T. annulata. In all diseased animals, the concentration of total and direct bilirubin increased significantly (p < 0.001). In cross breed cattle, the erythrocytes, hemoglobin, hematocrit means decreased significantly (p = 0.027; 0.003 and <0.001, respectively). Two types of anemia were detected: a microcytic hypochromic anemia in Montbéliard breed clinically infected cattle and normocytic normochromic anemia in local and cross breed cattle. Tropical theileriosis induces severe biochemical and haematological alterations that should be taken into consideration by field veterinarians for both the diagnosis of the disease and its treatment.

  16. A new recombinant protein-based ELISA for the diagnosis of malignant theileriosis of sheep and goats.

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    Bakheit, M A; Seitzer, U; Ahmed, J S

    2006-01-01

    Tick-borne diseases of small ruminants are of highly economic importance in many countries. Malignant theileriosis of sheep and goats caused by Theileria lestoquardi is considered among the most important of these diseases and constitutes an obstacle to the sheep industry in countries like the Sudan. Here the application of a newly discovered surface protein of T. lestoquardi (Clone-5) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and the potentials of the application of the test in epidemiological surveys and diagnosis are described. Clone-5 contains a predicted number of 20 antigenic determinant sites and two polypeptides derived from the protein were recombinantly produced, purified and tested with control serum samples in both ELISA and Western Blot. One of the polypeptides was further used in validation experiments that involved the testing of negative and positive field serum samples collected from an area that had witnessed an outbreak of malignant theileriosis in Northern Sudan. ELISA, based on this recombinant protein, demonstrated a satisfactory performance with a calculated sensitivity and specificity of 94.6 and 88%, respectively, when countertested with a standard indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT). Moreover, no cross-reactions could be demonstrated against Theileria species (China) nor Cowdria spp. This test is recommended for further field validation experiments.

  17. Genotyping of Theileria lestoquardi from sheep and goats in Sudan to support control of Malignant Ovine Theileriosis.

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    Ali, A M; Salih, D A; Njahira, M N; Hassan, S K; El Hussein, A M; Liu, Z; Yin, H; Pelle, R; Skilton, R A

    2017-05-30

    Theileriosis, caused by parasitic protozoa of the genus Theileria parasites, are among the major tick-borne diseases of ruminant livestock. The largest economic losses are attributed in particular to those caused by the leukoproliferative species of Theileria: T. parva, T. annulata and T. lestoquardi. Theileria lestoquardi is transmitted by Hyalomma ticks and causes malignant ovine theileriosis (MOT), a disease that is particularly prevalent in Sudan. The disease is considered of a high economic importance in Sudan, where export of sheep is a major component of the national economy. A live vaccine based on a Sudanese isolate of T. lestoquardi (Atbara strain) was previously developed for the control of MOT in Sudan, but not yet deployed in the field. The present study aims to genetically characterize and compare samples of T. lestoquardi circulating in Sudan as well as the live vaccine isolate in order to understand vaccine breakthroughs and failure that may occur. Sheep and goats blood samples were collected from six regions in Sudan that are known to be endemic for T. lestoquardi infection or have experienced outbreaks of MOT. Blood samples infected with T. lestoquardi were identified by PCR or RLB. Genotyping was carried out by (1) sequencing the homologues of two T. parva CD8+ T cell antigen genes, Tp1 and Tp2, and (2) using a panel of seven micro- and mini-satellite markers. A total of 100 T. lestoquardi positive field samples and the T. lestoquardi (Atbara) vaccine were genotyped. The results showed that all samples had mixed genotypes, with several alleles identified at one or more loci. The gene diversity ranged from 0.7840 (TS8) to 0.2133 (TS12) with mean values of 0.5470. PCA revealed three clusters of the parasite in Sudan; interestingly one independent cluster was clearly seen, corresponding to the vaccine isolate. The T. lestoquardi Tp1 homologue showed higher homology with T. annulata than with T. parva sequences included the defined single CD8+ T cell

  18. Identification of Theileria uilenbergi immunodominant protein for development of an indirect ELISA for diagnosis of ovine theileriosis.

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    Liu, Zhijie; Wang, Zijian; Yin, Hong; Luo, Jianxun; Zhang, Bao; Kullmann, Birgit; Abdo, Jassim; Salih, Dialeldin; Ahmed, Jabbar; Seitzer, Ulrike

    2010-04-01

    Theileriosis of small ruminants in the northwest of China is a protozoan disease that restricts the development of the livestock industry. The disease is caused by infection with Theileria uilenbergi and Theilerialuwenshuni, both of which are transmitted by ixodid Heamaphysalis ticks. The development of serological tools as a means of integrated control of the disease is an urgent and important requirement. Here we describe the identification and partial recombinant expression of a T.uilenbergi immunodominant protein (TuIP), which was identified by immunoscreening of a merozoite cDNA library. Using the recombinant TuIP (rTuIP), a novel indirect ELISA was established using 329 negative serum samples to determine the cut-off value. The internal quality control revealed satisfactory stability and repeatability of the assay. Preliminary validation using 128 positive and 48 negative reference samples demonstrated that the rTuIP ELISA is able to detect T. uilenbergi infection with high sensitivity and specificity. No cross-reactivity was found in sera from animals infected with Theileria lestoquardi, Babesia sp. China or Anaplasma ovis. Furthermore, circulating antibodies were detected in sera collected from endemic regions in China. Analyses of the antibody responses of experimentally infected animals demonstrated that tick infestation resulted in a sharply rising and stronger production of specific antibodies against TuIP while inoculation with infected blood induced an earlier production of TuIP-specific antibodies. The persistence of the TuIP-specific antibodies lasted more than 100days p.i. These data indicate the usefulness of the TuIP antigen for the development of diagnostic methods and as a potential candidate for vaccine design. 2009 Australian Society for Parasitology Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mediterranean theileriosis and other tick transmitted piroplasmoses in cattle in Minorca (Balearic Islands, Spain): the effect of tick control on prevalence levels analyzed by reverse line blot (RLB) macroarrays.

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    Almerìa, Sonia; Delgado-Neira, Yolanda; Adelantado, Carles; Huguet, Marian; Vinent, Joan; Nicolàs, Antoni

    2009-06-01

    Mediterranean theileriosis, caused by Theileria annulata, is endemic in Minorca (Balearic Islands, Spain). The present study analyzes the prevalence of piroplasm infections in cattle in Minorca using reverse line blot (RLB) macroarrays, as well as the effect of herd tick control on those prevalence levels. One hundred and nineteen animals from 12 herds were sampled in representative areas of the island. Information was gathered regarding tick control for the animals (frequency and acaricide used) in each herd. More than 87% of the animals were positive for the presence of piroplasm species. Theileria annulata and Theileria buffeli were observed in all sampled herds (mean prevalence 53.3% for T. annulata and 69.75% for T. buffeli). The mean prevalence was 5.7% for Babesia bigemina. A significantly higher prevalence of Theileria spp. was observed in herds that grazed in, or near, forested areas. Theileria annulata prevalence was significantly lower in herds that followed tick control and was related to the frequency of the applied treatments. Theileria buffeli and B. bigemina prevalences were not affected by tick control for the herds. The results indicate that despite tick control, Mediterranean theileriosis remains endemic in Minorca. Adequate control measures and vaccination approaches are required to improve the situation of Mediterranean theileriosis on the island.

  20. A quantitative risk assessment of bovine theileriosis entering Luapula Province from Central Province in Zambia via live cattle imports from traditional and commercial production sectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makungu, C; Mwacalimba, K K

    2014-09-01

    Theileriosis or East Coast Fever (ECF) is an important livestock disease widespread in Zambia except for some provinces such as Luapula. This freedom status has been achieved due to strict livestock movement regulations that only authorise cattle imports from commercial farms implementing strict ECF control regimens. Recent increases in both the demand and price of beef in Zambia are stimulating a policy change towards a more inclusive inter-provincial trade in live cattle. This may also encourage the introduction of breeding cattle from high production pastoral sectors such as Central Province to stimulate the beef industry in disease free low production areas such as the Luapula Province. To estimate and compare the risks linked with those potential introductions of cattle from the traditional or commercial production sectors of the Central Province, a quantitative risk assessment model was developed. This risk comparison was necessary because the traditional livestock production sector accounts for over 79% of breeding cattle trade in Central Province but is characterised by minimalistic tick-borne disease control and a higher prevalence of ECF. We estimate that should the importation of breeding cattle from Central into Luapula Province be permitted, we could expect to import ECF by the introduction of infected animals at a median rate (5th and 95th percentiles) of every 0.44 years (0.12, 2.60), from the traditional sector compared to every 3.57 years (0.37, 103.6) from the commercial sector. Infected ticks would be expected to enter every 3.46 (0.66, 43.8) years via traditional cattle imports. These risks are strongly influenced by the prevalence of infection, performance of pre-transport screening tests, and the effectiveness of pre-transport tick cleansing. This assessment is expected to provide a model for tick borne disease risk assessments in similar settings, as well as inform ECF control, cattle trade, and stock movement policies in Zambia. Copyright

  1. The aetiology, pathogenesis and control of theileriosis in domestic animals.

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    Morrison, W I

    2015-08-01

    The Theileria genus includes a large number of species of tick-borne parasites that infect domestic animals and wildlife species, predominantly ruminants. These range from species, such as T. parva and T. annulata, which cause acute lymphoproliferative diseases in cattle resulting in high levels of mortality, to others that are non-pathogenic. In the last decade, several new pathogenic species of Theileria have been identified and pathogenic strains of other previously low-pathogenic species have emerged. Theileria parasites are characterised by developmental stages within leukocytes and erythrocytes. The capacity of the most pathogenic species to undergo extensive multiplication during intra-leukocyte development is central to their ability to cause disease. However, this is not the sole property responsible for disease, as illustrated by T. parva, which grows in a similar mannerin buffalo cells butdoes notcause disease inthisspecies. Because of the highly pathogenic nature of these parasites in livestock and the susceptibility of young animals to disease, control of the diseases is challenging. Control by chemotherapy and prevention of tick infestation has proved expensive and difficult to sustain. Vaccines using live parasites are available for T. parva and T. annulata and have been used with some success in the field. However, their widespread use has been hampered by practical constraints in production and distribution of the vaccines. Studies of the immune responses in immune cattle have helped to elucidate the protective immune responses and identified a number of parasite antigens that are currently being explored for development of alternative vaccines.

  2. Effeciency of Various Supportive Treatments as A Cure for Anaemia in Cattle with Theileriosis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nuri Altug; Nazmi Yüksek; Ihsan Keles; Cumali Özkan; Ibrahim Hakki Yörük; Sezai Arslan

    2014-01-01

    ...) and were divided into 4 equal groups according to the different therapy options: whereas no supportive treatment was applied in group 1, administrations of vitamin B complex, antioxidant vitamins (A, D, E and C...

  3. Emergence of oriental theileriosis in cattle and its transmission through Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus in Assam, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit Kakati

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the present study was to investigate the presence of Theileria in blood samples of crossbred and indigenous adult cows raised under unorganized small scale farming system in a Babesia and Anaplasma endemic geographical area from Assam, India and to see its transmission through Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus ticks. Materials and Methods: For the present study, 57 clinical cases of cattle suspected to be of hemoparasitic infections were taken into consideration. The parasites were identified based on morphology in giemsa stained blood smear followed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Sera samples were tested for T. annulata antibodies in plate and Dot-ELISA. PCR was also conducted in eggs of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus microplus tick collected from a Theileria orientalis positive animal. Results: PCR amplified 1124, 776, and 160 bp DNA fragments of B. bigemina (64.91%,T. orientalis(21.05% and A. marginale (14.03%, respectively. This assay further conducted in 12 T. orientalis positive blood samples with primers of Buffeli, Chitose, and Ikeda variants of T. orientalis showed 3 samples positive to Ikeda type and none for Buffeli and Chitose. Babesia bovis and Theileria annulata specific primers also did not amplify any fragment during the PCR assay of the blood samples. Further, all sera samples tested negative to T. annulata antibodies in Plate and Dot-ELISA. PCR conducted in eggs of R (B.microplus tick collected from a T. orientalis positive animal revealed presence of the parasite DNA. Gradual improvement in physical condition leading to complete recovery in 10 out of 12 T. orientalis infected clinical cases treated with buparvaquone(at 2.5mg/kg.b.wt I/M was the feedback obtained from field veterinarians and the cattle owners. Conclusion: The present investigation represents the first report of occurrence of T. orientalis in cattle of Assam with involvement of pathogenic Ikeda strain in clinical outbreaks and its possible natural transmission by R (B. microplus through the transovarian mode.

  4. Treatment of natural ovine malignant theileriosis with a chloroform extract of the plant Peganum harmala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaiedehaghi, M

    2006-06-01

    One hundred sheep naturally infected with Theileria lestoquardi were treated with a chloroform extract of the plant Peganum harmala. The treatment was continued for 5 days, the dose of extract being 5 mg/kg per day. Sixty-five of the sheep responded to treatment and recovered but 35 did not and died. The cure rate was 65%.

  5. Molecular Study of Sheep Malignant Theileriosis at Barka Region in the Sultanate of Oman

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Shayan

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: We used the PCR technique based on the abovementioned primer pair and sequenc­ing to demonstrate the Theileria infection in the sheep samples collected from Sultanate of Oman.Methods: According to the frame work of "integrated control of ticks and tick borne diseases in global­ized world managed by EU-ICTTD-3 project, the samples from blood, liver, spleen, lymph node and lung were sent to the laboratory of Iranian Research Center for Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases (IRCTTD. Sam­ples from blood smear and impression smears from liver, spleen, lymph node, and lung were analyzed by Geimsa staining. The DNA was extracted from the abovemen­tioned samples and analyzed by PCR tech­nique using specific primers derived from the nucleo­tide sequences of 18S rRNA gene of T. lestoquardi, which can amplify the common region in other Theileria and Babesia spp. Subsequently the amplified DNA was sequenced.Results: The analysis of blood smears of the sheep was negative for piroplasmosis performed through the Giemsa staining. The impression smears prepared from liver, spleen, lymph node, and lung showed suspi­cious structures mimicking Theileria schizonts in some cells. The results showed an expected PCR prod­uct of 428 bp in length, which is specific for Theileria spp. The PCR products were subsequently se­quenced. The corresponding nucleotide sequence is registered under accession number JF309152 in Gen­Bank. The sequence alignment in GenBank showed that the PCR products had 99% homology to the known T. lestoquardi registered under accession number AF081135 in the GenBank. Conclusion: Oman sheep are highly susceptible for Theileria infection and the infected sheep mostly die before the microschizonts or erythrocytic form of Theileria appears in the nucleated or ery­trocytic cells respectively.

  6. Ovine theileriosis in China: a new look at an old story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Hong; Schnittger, Leonhard; Luo, Jianxun; Seitzer, Ulrike; Ahmed, Jabbar S

    2007-09-01

    A fatal disease of sheep and goats in the northwestern part of China has in the past been reported to be due to Theileria lestoquardi. However, some characteristics of the causative agent are not in accordance with attributes ascribed to this parasite. We therefore determined the nucleotide sequence of the 18 small subunit ribosomal RNA (18S rRNA) gene of T. lestoquardi and the parasite identified in China and compared it with that of other Theileria and Babesia species. In the inferred phylogenetic tree, the 18S rRNA sequence of the Chinese parasite falls inside the clade consisting of Theileria species evidencing that it belongs to this genus. The 18S rRNA sequence of the Chinese parasite was found to be most closely related to Theileria buffeli and clearly divergent to T. lestoquardi, suggesting that it was a yet unrecognized Theileria species. The phylogenetic relationship of Theileria species infecting sheep and goats on the basis of their 18S rRNA gene structure was addressed. We report on the existence of at least two additional ovine and caprine piroplasm species, designated T. luwenshuni and T. uilenbergi.

  7. Molecular study of sheep malignant theileriosis at barka region in the sultanate of oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shayan, P; Ebrahimzadeh, E; Tageldin, Mh; Amininia, N; Eckert, B

    2011-03-01

    We used the PCR technique based on the abovementioned primer pair and sequencing to demonstrate the Theileria infection in the sheep samples collected from Sultanate of Oman. According to the frame work of "integrated control of ticks and tick borne diseases in globalized world managed by EU-ICTTD-3 project, the samples from blood, liver, spleen, lymph node and lung were sent to the laboratory of Iranian Research Center for Ticks and Tick-borne Diseases (IRCTTD). Samples from blood smear and impression smears from liver, spleen, lymph node, and lung were analyzed by Geimsa staining. The DNA was extracted from the abovementioned samples and analyzed by PCR technique using specific primers derived from the nucleotide sequences of 18S rRNA gene of T. lestoquardi, which can amplify the common region in other Theileria and Babesia spp. Subsequently the amplified DNA was sequenced. The analysis of blood smears of the sheep was negative for piroplasmosis performed through the Giemsa staining. The impression smears prepared from liver, spleen, lymph node, and lung showed suspicious structures mimicking Theileria schizonts in some cells. The results showed an expected PCR product of 428 bp in length, which is specific for Theileria spp. The PCR products were subsequently sequenced. The corresponding nucleotide sequence is registered under accession number JF309152 in GenBank. The sequence alignment in GenBank showed that the PCR products had 99% homology to the known T. lestoquardi registered under accession number AF081135 in the GenBank. Oman sheep are highly susceptible for Theileria infection and the infected sheep mostly die before the microschizonts or erythrocytic form of Theileria appears in the nucleated or erytrocytic cells respectively.

  8. Theileriosis in a reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) associated with a potentially novel Theileria sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garner, Bridget C; Holman, Patricia; Berent, Linda M

    2012-12-01

    A 5-year-old male neutered reindeer (Rangifer tarandus tarandus) from Missouri was presented with a 3-week history of anorexia, respiratory distress, lethargy, and weight loss. Blood smear review revealed that a small percentage of RBCs contained small (1-2 μm in length) pleomorphic piroplasms (signet ring, rod- or pear-shaped, and elongate forms) with an eccentric magenta nucleus and basophilic cytoplasm. Nested PCR to specifically amplify a portion of the piroplasm small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene was performed on DNA extracted from an EDTA specimen of whole blood. Subsequent sequence analyses showed similarity between the reindeer hemoparasite and Theileria spp SSU rRNA gene sequences in the GenBank database, with highest similarity to those of a Theileria sp in a White-tailed deer from North Texas (AY735132, AY735133). The reindeer and North Texas Theileria sp are genetically distinct from, albeit closely related to, the White-tailed deer Theileria sp (subsequently referred to as T cervi). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first identification of Theileria of this genotype in a reindeer. Historically, T tarandirangiferis infection was found with associated mortality in reindeer in Russia, but reports predate molecular characterization. Hence, the relationship of T tarandirangiferis with either T cervi or this agent remains unknown. T cervi is not typically pathogenic in White-tailed deer in the US unless the animal is immune-compromised by stress or disease; however, mortality from T cervi infection in reindeer has been reported. © 2012 American Society for Veterinary Clinical Pathology.

  9. Treatment of natural ovine malignant theileriosis with a chloroform extract of the plant Peganum harmala : research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Mirzaiedehaghi

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available One hundred sheep naturally infected with Theileria lestoquardi were treated with a chloroform extract of the plant Peganum harmala. The treatment was continued for 5 days, the dose of extract being 5 mg/kg per day. Sixty-five of the sheep responded to treatment and recovered but 35 did not and died. The cure rate was 65 %

  10. The first genetic identification of Theileria ovis subtype KP019206 in sheep in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Khezri, M; Habibi, G.; K. Esmaeil-Nia; Afshari, A.

    2016-01-01

    Ticks and tick-borne diseases, including theileriosis, constitute a major constraint to livestock production. Two species, known as Theileria lestoquardi and Theileria ovis, are suspected to contribute to ovine theileriosis in Iran. However, the epidemiological aspects of ovine theileriosis are poorly understood in this country. In a survey, designed to identify Theileria species in sheep, 52 (47.27%) out of 110 blood samples were positive, based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) results. Am...

  11. First isolation and establishment of in vitro culture of Theileria lestoquardi from a naturally infected cow

    OpenAIRE

    M Namavari; Ezhdehakosh-pour, S.; Habibi, G. R.; A. Rahimian; F Namazi

    2013-01-01

    Theileria infected cell line was isolated from the prescapular lymph node of an adult crossbred cow. Molecular study confirmed this cell line of bovine lymphocyte has been transformed by the Theileria lestoquardi. This strain of T. lestoquardi designated Ka-6 and sheep were inoculated with this strain didn’t show any clinical signs of theileriosis which shows the significance of this cell line to develop a tissue-culture vaccine against malignant ovine theileriosis. Contrary to accepted belie...

  12. Comparison of molecular and microscopic technique for detection of Theileria annulata from the field cases of cattle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. C. Chauhan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Tropical theileriosis is fatal hemoprotozoal disease of dairy animals caused by Theileria annulata. The aim of the present study was to detect the T. annulata and comparison of results of molecular and microscopic techniques. Materials and Methods: A total of 52 blood samples were collected from the cattle suspected for theileriosis across the Banaskantha district. All the samples were screened for theileriosis using Giemsa’s staining technique and polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Results: Total of 17 (32.69% and 24 (46.15% samples were found positive for theileriosis by microscopic examination and PCR test, respectively. It revealed that the study area is endemic for theileriosis, and the microscopic technique has 70.83% sensitivity and 100% specificity with respect to PCR technique. Conclusion: It may be concluded from the present study that the PCR is comparatively sensitive technique than microscopic examination and may be recommended to use in the field for screening of theileriosis in the study area, where a high prevalence of diseases have been reported due to intensive dairy farming.

  13. First isolation and establishment of in vitro culture of Theileria lestoquardi from a naturally infected cow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namavari, M; Ezhdehakosh-Pour, S; Habibi, G R; Rahimian, A; Namazi, F

    2015-06-01

    Theileria infected cell line was isolated from the prescapular lymph node of an adult crossbred cow. Molecular study confirmed this cell line of bovine lymphocyte has been transformed by the Theileria lestoquardi. This strain of T. lestoquardi designated Ka-6 and sheep were inoculated with this strain didn't show any clinical signs of theileriosis which shows the significance of this cell line to develop a tissue-culture vaccine against malignant ovine theileriosis. Contrary to accepted belief that the T. lestoquardi not capable of causing disease in cattle, the present study describes the first isolation and establishment of in vitro culture of T. lestoquardi-infected cell line from a naturally infected cow with typical singes of acute theileriosis.

  14. Author Details

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adebayo, O.O. Vol 4, No 2 (2009) - Articles Haematology and serum biochemical alteration in stress induced Equine Theileriosis. A case report. Abstract PDF. ISSN: 1597-6343. AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians · for Authors · FAQ's · More about AJOL · AJOL's Partners ...

  15. Case Report

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Ahmed

    INTRODUCTION. Equine theileriosis is a tick borne haemoprotozoan disease caused by Theileria equi, a small piroplasm that is very pathogenic in horses. It is transmitted by various genera of ixodid ticks which include Dermacentor spp, Hyaloma spp and Rhipicephalus spp. (Urquhart et al., 1996). The disease is endemic ...

  16. The prevalence and clinico-haematological changes of protozoan ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    One hundred and fifty eight samples were collected from various species of food animals, namely bovine, ovine, porcine and caprine to investigate the prevalence of various natural haemoparasitic protozoan infections namely trypanosomosis, anaplasmosis, babesiosis and theileriosis. Most importantly, the bovine and ...

  17. Short communication Prevalence and infestation load of ixodid ticks ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    They reduce milk yield, skin and hide quality, cause a wide range of health problems including udder damage and predispose to mastitis, suppress immunity and increase ... vectors for diseases like babesiosis, anaplasmosis, theileriosis, and cowderiosis ..... borne diseases and their control in western Ethiopia, Insect Sci.

  18. A Delphi survey on expert opinion on key signs for clinical diagnosis ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Delphi survey on expert opinion on key signs for clinical diagnosis of bovine trypanosomosis, tick-borne diseases and helminthoses. ... For theileriosis, they included lymph node enlargement, pyrexia, age, breed and reduced milk yield. For trypanosomosis, they included, anaemia, weightloss, staring coat, lymph node ...

  19. Molecular study of Theileria camelensis and Theileria dromedarii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The breeding of camels in the world is growing expansionary due to increasing in consumption rate of its meat, milk and wool. Besides, The rise of profitability of this industry and importing of camels into the country through the South East borders make it important to recognize infectious diseases in this species. Theileriosis ...

  20. Comparative bioinformatics analysis of transcription factor genes indicates conservation of key regulatory domains among babesia bovis, babesia microti and theileria equi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apicomplexa tick borne hemoparasites including B. bovis, B. microti, and Theileria equi are responsible for bovine and human babesiosis and equine theileriosis respectively. These neglected parasites of vast medical, epidemiological, and economic impact have complex life cycles in their vertebrate a...

  1. Antitheilerial Chemical Drugs: A Review | Hayat | Bulletin of Animal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Synthetic or semi synthetic chemical drugs were used for treatment of Theileria species. These drugs include antimalarial, trypanocides and antibiotics, antiviral, etc. The aim of this study was to over-view chemical drugs tested for treatment of theileriosis. Keywords: Theileria, treatment, chemical drug ...

  2. Molecular epidemiology of Theileria parva in Eastern Zone of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... reported in previous studies. The significance of the different p67 alleles and the novel variants stocks detected by p104 PCR-RFLP in the epidemiology of theileriosis in Eastern Zone of Tanzania and the key aspects for vaccine developement is discussed. Keywords: p104, p67, molecular epidemiology, Theileria parva.

  3. Theileria lestoquardi and T. annulata in cattle, sheep, and goats. In vitro and in vivo studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, C G; Ilhan, T; Kirvar, E; Thomas, M; Wilkie, G; Leemans, I; Hooshmand-Rad, P

    1998-06-29

    Theileria annulata, causing bovine tropical theileriosis, and T. lestoquardi (syn T. hirci), the agent of malignant ovine theileriosis, are both transmitted by ticks of the genus Hyalomma. Their distribution is thus very similar and, should these parasites infect more than one ruminant species, the difficulty in interpreting epidemiological studies is magnified considerably. A pilot series of experiments was thus conducted in which cattle, sheep and goats were infected with sporozoites of a single stock of each of T. annulata and T. lestoquardi from a laboratory colony of H.a.anatolicum. Reciprocal cross-immunity and serological studies and in vitro culture isolations in mononuclear cells of each ruminant species illustrated both the similarity of these organisms and their differences. The importance of these findings in discriminating parasites in epidemiological studies and the control of these diseases with cell culture vaccines is emphasized.

  4. Establishment of an Artificial Tick Feeding System to Study Theileria lestoquardi Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Shahin Tajeri; Gholamreza Razmi; Alireza Haghparast

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of good experimental models for Theileria sp. infection is important for theileriosis research. Routinely, infection of ticks is accomplished by feeding on parasite-infected animals (sheep, cows and horses), which raises practical and ethical problems, driving the search for alternative methods of tick infection. Artificial tick feeding systems are based mainly on rearing ticks on host-derived or hand-made artificial membranes. We developed a modified feeding assay for infec...

  5. IMPORTANT PROTOZOAN DISEASES OF ANIMALS IN INDONESIA (A REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soeprapto Soekardono

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available An account on important protozoan diseases mostiy with obvious clinical symptoms are emphasized and their current status reviewed. Those diseases are surra, trichomonosis in catde, babesiosis, anaplasmosis, theileriosis, leucocyto-zoonosis in chicken, and coccidiosis. Toxoplasmosis, histomonosis, chicken malaria, balantidiosis and diseases caused by Giardia, Haemoproteus and Sarcocystis are not reviewed because significant problems caused by these parasites considered important economically do not appear in Indonesia.

  6. Theileria lestoquardi displays reduced genetic diversity relative to sympatric Theileria annulata in Oman

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; Weir, William; Kinnaird, Jane; Tagledeen, Mohammed; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Morrison, Ivan; Thompson, Joanne; Tait, Andy; Shiels, Brian; Babiker, Hamza A.

    2016-01-01

    The Apicomplexan parasites, Theileria lestoquardi and Theileria annulata, the causative agents of theileriosis in small and large ruminants, are widespread in Oman, in areas where cattle, sheep and goats co-graze. Genetic analysis can provide insight into the dynamics of the parasite and the evolutionary relationship between species. Here we identified ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites) spread across the T. lestoquardi genome, and confirmed their species specificity. We then gen...

  7. Phylogenetic study of Theileria lestoquardi based on 18SrRNA gene Isolated from sheep in the middle region of Iraq

    OpenAIRE

    M.J.A. Alkhaled; N.N. A’aiz; H.H. Naser

    2016-01-01

    Theileriosis is parasitic infection causes by obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Theileria. T. lestoquardi is the most virulent species in sheep and goats which causes a severe disease with a high morbidity and mortality rate. In this study the phylogenetic relationships between two local isolate of T. lestoquardi and nine T. lestoquardi global isolates as well as Babesia ovis out-group isolate were analyzed using the 18S rRNA gene sequence. The multiple sequence alignment ...

  8. Molecular surveillance of Theileria parasites of livestock in Oman

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Fahdi, Amira; Alqamashoui, Badar; Al-Hamidhi, Salama; Kose, Onur; Mohammed H Tageldin; Bobade, Patrick; Eugene H. Johnson; Hussain, Abdel-Rahim; Karagenc, Tulin; Tait, Andy; Shiels, Brian; Bilgic, Huseyin Bilgin; Babiker, Hamza

    2017-01-01

    Background: Theileriosis is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases of livestock in the Arabian Peninsula,\\ud and causes high rates of mortality and morbidity in sheep and cattle. However, there is a paucity of information\\ud on the distribution of Theileria spp. over the whole region and their impact on different hosts. The present study\\ud carried out a country-wide molecular survey for Theileria spp. of livestock in Oman across four governorates. The\\ud aim of the survey was to defin...

  9. First molecular evidence of the transplacental transmission of Theileria annulata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudan, Vikrant; Singh, Shanker Kumar; Jaiswal, Amit Kumar; Parashar, Rahul; Shanker, Daya

    2015-08-01

    Bovine tropical theileriosis (BTT) is a serious hindrance in the cattle upgradation programme using the exotic germplasm. There is a wide range of variations in the pathobiology alongside clinical symptoms of the animals suffering from BTT. The present paper communicates the first report about the transplacental transmission of T. annulata in a cross bred 2-day old calf. T. sergenti, T. lestoquardi and T. equi are known to undergo transplacental transmission, but baring a single citation in literature, there are no records about the transplacental transmission of T. annulata.

  10. Existence of splicing variants in homologues of Theileria lestoquardi clone-5 gene's transcripts in Theileria annulata and Theileria parva.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, Mohammed A; Ahmed, Jabbar S; Seitzer, Ulrike

    2008-12-01

    Clone 5 has been described as an immunogenic protein and was used to establish an ELISA for malignant theileriosis. Molecular characterization of the gene product revealed alternative splicing at the single intron resulting in two mRNA transcripts, translating into a long and a short protein form. Homologues of clone 5 exist in Theileria annulata and T. parva according to the available annotated GenBank sequences, showing however only the long protein forms in these parasites (GenBank accession numbers CAI73679, EAN33624). The present study aimed to determine whether two splice variants of homologues of clone 5 occur in T. annulata and T. parva.

  11. Pathogenic genotype of major piroplasm surface protein associated with anemia in Theileria orientalis infection in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suhee; Yu, Do-Hyeon; Chae, Jeong-Byoung; Choi, Kyoung-Seong; Kim, Hyeon-Cheol; Park, Bae-Keun; Chae, Joon-Seok; Park, Jinho

    2017-07-27

    Serious disease outbreaks in cattle caused by Theileria orientalis have emerged in the Asia-Pacific region. Genetic variables of the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) expressed on the surface of the piroplasm inside T. orientalis-infected erythrocytes are considered to be associated with variation in the pathogenicity of T. orientalis. Our study describes the clinically relevant MPSP types associated with anemia in Theileria-infected cattle. These results revealed that MPSP expression plays an important role in hematological alterations in Theileria-infected cattle, and that MPSP type 1 is strongly associated with bovine anemia, which can be a potential target for the prevention of bovine theileriosis.

  12. Global gene expression profile of peripheral blood mononuclear cells challenged with Theileria annulata in crossbred and indigenous cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Amod; Gaur, Gyanendra Kumar; Gandham, Ravi Kumar; Panigrahi, Manjit; Ghosh, Shrikant; Saravanan, B C; Bhushan, Bharat; Tiwari, Ashok Kumar; Sulabh, Sourabh; Priya, Bhuvana; V N, Muhasin Asaf; Gupta, Jay Prakash; Wani, Sajad Ahmad; Sahu, Amit Ranjan; Sahoo, Aditya Prasad

    2017-01-01

    Bovine tropical theileriosis is an important haemoprotozoan disease associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality particularly in exotic and crossbred cattle. It is one of the major constraints of the livestock development programmes in India and Southeast Asia. Indigenous cattle (Bos indicus) are reported to be comparatively less affected than exotic and crossbred cattle. However, genetic basis of resistance to tropical theileriosis in indigenous cattle is not well documented. Recent studies incited an idea that differentially expressed genes in exotic and indigenous cattle play significant role in breed specific resistance to tropical theileriosis. The present study was designed to determine the global gene expression profile in peripheral blood mononuclear cells derived from indigenous (Tharparkar) and cross-bred cattle following in vitro infection of T. annulata (Parbhani strain). Two separate microarray experiments were carried out each for cross-bred and Tharparkar cattle. The cross-bred cattle showed 1082 differentially expressed genes (DEGs). Out of total DEGs, 597 genes were down-regulated and 485 were up-regulated. Their fold change varied from 2283.93 to -4816.02. Tharparkar cattle showed 875 differentially expressed genes including 451 down-regulated and 424 up-regulated. The fold change varied from 94.93 to -19.20. A subset of genes was validated by qRT-PCR and results were correlated well with microarray data indicating that microarray results provided an accurate report of transcript level. Functional annotation study of DEGs confirmed their involvement in various pathways including response to oxidative stress, immune system regulation, cell proliferation, cytoskeletal changes, kinases activity and apoptosis. Gene network analysis of these DEGs plays an important role to understand the interaction among genes. It is therefore, hypothesized that the different susceptibility to tropical theileriosis exhibited by indigenous and crossbred cattle

  13. Clinical and hematological study on crossbred cattle and water buffaloes (Bubalus bubalis) naturally infected with Theileria annulata in Sharkia province, Egypt

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mahmmod, Yasser

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the clinical and hematological findings in crossbred cattle and water buffaloes naturally infected with Theileria annulata with special reference to the clinical picture of tropical theileriosis in Egyptian buffaloes. A total 50 field cases of cattle...... in infected buffaloes was more prominent than in infected cattle with persistence of some lesions after recovery as corneal opacity and pulmonary lesions. Hematological analysis revealed a significant decrease in RBCS count, PCV%, hemoglobin amount and WBCs in the infected animals comparing to the healthy...

  14. Prevalence and Molecular Diagnosis of Babesia ovis and Theileria ovis in Lohi Sheep at Livestock Experiment Station (LES, Bahadurnagar, Okara, Pakistan.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waseem Shahzad

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Babesia ovis and Theileria ovis are among the important and main etiological agents causing ovine babesiosis and ovine theileriosis, causing severe economic losses among sheep and goats. The aim of the present study was to determine the prevalence and molecular diagnosis of B. ovis and T. ovis in Lohi sheep at Livestock Experiment Station Bahadurnagar, Okara, Pakistan.The prevalence of B. ovis and T. ovis was investigated in 200 Lohi sheep of mixed age and sex by PCR during 2011. The assay was employed using primers Bbo-F & Bbo-R, specific for a 549-bp fragment in B. ovis genomic DNA and primers TSsr 170F & TSsr 670R, specific for a 520-bp fragment in T. ovis genomic DNA. The animals were also screened for both haemoparasites through stained thin blood smears.Thirty two (16%, 48 (24% and 26 (13% were the number of animals found positive for B. ovis, T. ovis and for mixed infection with both parasites, respectively, through microscopy. Sixty eight (34%, 73 (37% and 42 (21% were the number of animals found positive for B. ovis, T. ovis and for mixed infection with both parasites, respectively, through PCR test.The results indicate the high sensitivity of PCR for surveying babesiosis and theileriosis and there is noteworthy prevalence of these diseases in sheep at an experimental station where environmental conditions are relatively controlled as compared to field conditions.

  15. PCR based detection of Theileria lestoquardi in apparently healthy sheep and goats from two districts in Khyber Pukhtoon Khwa (Pakistan).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, S; Jahangir, M; Fatima, M; Shaikh, R S; Khattak, R M; Ali, M; Iqbal, F

    2015-06-01

    The present study was carried out to determine the prevalence of Theileria lestoquardi from two districts of Khyber Pukhtoon Khwa (Kohat and Peshawar) in Pakistan and also to report the risk factors associated with the spread of ovine theileriosis. A total of 165 blood samples were collected from sheep (N = 44) and goats (N = 121) from randomly selected herds. Data on the characteristics of animals and the herds were collected through questionnaires. Five (3%) out of total 165 samples produced 730 base pairs DNA fragment, through PCR amplification of 18S SSU rRNA gene, specific for T. lestoquardi. All positive samples were from district Kohat while samples from Peshawar were found negative for this parasite. Statistical analysis indicated a significant association (P = 0.005) between sampling site and prevalence of T. lestoquardi. It was observed that presence of tick on the ruminant (P = 0.0007) and the dogs associated with the herd (P = 0.001) were highly significant risk factor for the spread of ovine theileriosis. It was also observed that mixed herds (containing both sheep and goats) were more prone to the parasite. We have concluded that PCR is a sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for detection of T. lestoquardi in blood samples of small ruminants and can be used for the prophylactic screening and treatment of this blood parasite in order to increase the live stock production in Pakistan.

  16. Molecular detection, infection rate and vectors of Theileria lestoquardi in goats from West Azerbaijan province, Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammadi, Seyyed Mostafa; Esmaeilnejad, Bijan; Jalilzadeh-Amin, Ghader

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed to determine the infection rate and vectors of Theileria lestoquardi in goats from West Azerbaijan province, Iran. A total of 400 blood samples were collected from 40 randomly selected flocks in the study area from June to September, 2014. Out of 400 blood samples examined using microscopic examination, a number of 14 goats (3.50%) were positive for Theileria spp., whereas 25 goats (6.25%) yielded a specific T. lestoquardi SSU-rRNA fragment (235 bp). The prevalence of theileriosis in goats estimated by semi-nested PCR was significantly higher than the prevalence estimated by microscopic examination of the blood smears. The prevalence of Theileria infection in different age and sex groups of goats was not significantly different. The highest and lowest prevalence of Theileria infection was in July (12.00%) and September (2.00%), respectively. A number of 315 adult Ixodid ticks were also collected from naturally infested goats and they were characterized. Out of 315 examined ticks, a number of 37 ticks including Hyalomma marginatum (65.20%), Rhipicephalus turanicus (44.00%), and Dermacentor marginatus (68.70%) were infected by T. lestoquardi. Based on the obtained results, it was concluded that the semi-nested PCR assay based on SSU-rRNA gene is a valuable method for epidemiological investigation of caprine theileriosis. The results showed that H. marginatum, R. turanicus and D. marginatus can be considered as risk factor in the epidemiology of T. lestoquardi.

  17. Purification of macroschizonts of a Sudanese isolate of Theileria lestoquardi (T. lestoquardi [Atbara]).

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    Bakheit, Mohammed A; Endl, Elmar; Ahmed, Jabbar S; Seitzer, Ulrike

    2006-10-01

    Research on malignant theileriosis is affected by the limited access to biological materials required for studies aiming at controlling the disease through the establishment of diagnostic tools and vaccines. The main aims of this work were to isolate, establish, and characterize a Theileria lestoquardi-infected cell culture (line) as a source of biological material and to generate a schizont cDNA library for further studies aiming at the identification of antigenic proteins. The T. lestoquardi isolate used originated from a sheep showing typical signs of malignant theileriosis in Atbara town in northern Sudan, and was maintained as an infected cell culture. A high-quality representative schizont cDNA library was established by isolating and purifying the schizonts using a nocodazole/aerolysin protocol followed by Percoll gradient ultracentrifugation. As a parameter to assess the quality of the schizont library, a provisional estimation of the percentage of recombinant phage clones originating from T. lestoquardi (Atbara) was undertaken. Ten clones with inserts ranging in size between 600 and 1200 bp were selected randomly, sequenced, and subjected to BLAST similarity searches. As 6 of the 10 sequenced clones showed similarities to T. parva, T. annulata, and other apicomplexan genes, it was concluded that the majority of the library phage clones originated from the parasite and not from host cell transcripts. The cDNA library will be used for screening of antigenic proteins using sera from infected sheep.

  18. Molecular identification of ovine Theileria species by a new PCR-RFLP method.

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    Heidarpour Bami, M; Haddadzadeh, H R; Kazemi, B; Khazraiinia, P; Bandehpour, M; Aktas, M

    2009-05-12

    Theileria spp. infect wild and domestic ruminants in the tropical and subtropical regions of the world. Two species, T. lestoquardi and T. ovis, are suspected to cause ovine theileriosis in Iran. The epidemiological aspects of ovine theileriosis in Iran are poorly understood, and further investigations by sensitive and precise techniques are required. In this study, the use of a nested PCR for amplification of a fragment of the 18S ribosomal DNA from virtually all species of Theileria is described. For differentiation of various Theileria spp. a RFLP assay was developed as a diagnostic tool enabling direct, concurrent, highly specific and sensitive identification of Theileria spp. The sensitivity of the nested PCR for Theileria species was 10(-5)% parasitemia. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) of the PCR products allowed differentiation between three different Theileria species (T. annulata, T. lestoquardi and T. ovis) and seems to be useful for differentiation of other species such as T. separata and Theileria spp. china. From 100 field blood samples obtained from sheep in East and South-East Iran, 56% were positive for Theileria spp. by nested-PCR compared with 21% by microscopic examination. Out of 56 positive samples, 12.5% (7/56) were positive for T. ovis and 87/5% (49/56) were positive for T. lestoquardi. This is the first report in which T. ovis has been detected in Iran using molecular identification techniques.

  19. Piroplasmids of livestock in Tunisia.

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    Darghouth, M A

    2004-01-01

    Several species of piroplasms of livestock are present in Tunisia; some of them are of high veterinary importance. This paper reviews the species already reported in Tunisia on the basis of clinical observations, parasitological routine diagnostic and serological surveys, as well as those considered as potentially present according to epidemiological argumentations. The genus Theileria includes four species reported in Tunisia: T. annulata, T. buffeli, T. ovis, and T. equi. The ovine malignant theileriosis agent, T. lestoquardi, appears to be absent in Tunisia. Five species belonging to the genus Babesia were reported in the country, namely B. hovis, B. bigemina, B. divergens, B. caballi, and B. ovis. Furthermore, two more species, B. major and B. motasi, are potentially present in zones where their vectors of the genus Haemaphysalis occur.

  20. [How does the apicomplexan parasite Theileria control host cell identity?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsolier, Justine; Weitzman, Jonathan B

    2014-01-01

    Infectious agents, like bacteria or virus, are responsible for a large number of pathologies in mammals. Microbes have developed mechanisms for interacting with host cell pathways and hijacking cellular machinery to change the phenotypic state. In this review, we focus on an interesting apicomplexan parasite called Theileria. Infection by the tick-transmitted T. annulata parasite causes Tropical Theileriosis in North Africa and Asia, and the related T. parva parasite causes East Coast Fever in Sub-Saharan Africa. This parasite is the only eukaryote known to induce the transformation of its mammalian host cells. Indeed, T. annulata and T. parva infect bovine leukocytes leading to transforming phenotypes, which partially mirror human lymphoma pathologies. Theileria infection causes hyperproliferation, invasiveness and escape from apoptosis, presumably through the manipulation of host cellular pathways. Several host-signaling mechanisms have been implicated. Here we describe the mechanisms involved in parasite-induced transformation phenotypes. © Société de Biologie, 2015.

  1. Emerging status of anaplasmosis in cattle in Hisar

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    Tarun Kumar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Anaplasma marginale is a rickettsial pathogen responsible for progressive anemia in ruminants leading to huge economic losses. The objectives of this cross-sectional study were to determine the prevalence of anaplasmosis and therapeutic evaluation of traditional line of treatment. Materials and Methods: A total of 168 cattle presented to Teaching Veterinary Clinical Complex, Lala Lajpat Rai University of Veterinary & Animal Sciences, Hisar during the period of 3 months (July-September, 2014 with history of fever, anorexia, reduced milk yield and tick infestation were analyzed for prevalence of hemoprotozoan diseases using classical giemsa stained thin blood smear parasitological method. Results: Out of these 168 animals, 7 (4.17% were found to be suffering from anaplasmosis on the basis of presence of dense, rounded, intra-erythrocytic bodies situated on or near the margin of the erythrocytes. Overall prevalence of theileriosis and babesiosis were found to be 42.9% and 1.8%, respectively. Level of parasitemia was noticed to be 1.2%, 0.8% and 0.9% in babesiosis, theileriosis, and anaplasmosis, respectively. The most marked and common clinical signs reported in all the cases were severe anemia (hemoglobin=3-6 g/dl and history of fever, followed by normal body temperature. Following treatment with oxytetracycline parenterally along with supportive therapy out of seven cases six got recovered without any side-effects. Conclusion: The current study indicates the emerging status of anaplasmosis in this part of the country as during the past few years there are very few reports showing the prevalence of clinical cases of anaplasmosis. Treatment with oxytetracycline yielded excellent result showing recovery in most of the clinical cases.

  2. A comparison of the presence of Theileria ovis by PCR amplification of their SSU rRNA gene in small ruminants from two provinces of Pakistan

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    Sobia Durrani

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To compare the presence of Theileria ovis in small ruminants from two provinces of Pakistan and to determine the risk factors associated with the spread of theileriosis. Methods: In present study, a total of 210 blood samples were collected from sheep (n=99 and goats (n=111 from 5 sampling sites in Punjab (Dera Ghazi Khan, Layyah, Multan and Rahim Yar Khan districts and Khyber Pukhtoon Khwa (district Kohat provinces, in Pakistan, from randomly selected herds. Data on the characteristics of the animals (species, gender, age, tick presence or absence, prior treatment for babesiosis and the herd (location, size, species of animals, dogs associated with the herds, tick burden of dogs associated with the herds was collected through questionnaires. Results: Twelve blood samples (6% of total, 11 from district Kohat, produced the 520 base pairs DNA fragment specific for small subunit ribosomal RNA (ssu rRNA gene of Theileria ovis, by PCR amplification, of which 11 were sheep and 1 was goat indicating that sheep are more significantly (P=0.001 prone to this parasite. On the other hand parasite was detected only in 2 out of 210 samples (1% by blood smear screening confirming PCR as the reliable detection tool. Conclusions: PCR is more sensitive and reliable diagnostic tool for detection of Theileria sp. as compared to blood smear screening. Incidence of Theileria ovis is very high in Khyber Pukhtoon Khwa as compared to Punjab province. It was also observed that presence of ticks on animals was the only significant risk factor associated with the theileriosis in small ruminants.

  3. Experimental Theileria lestoquardi infection in sheep: Biochemical and hematological changes.

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    Yaghfoori, Saeed; Mohri, Mehrdad; Razmi, Gholamreza

    2017-09-01

    Malignant theileriosis (Theileria lestoquardi infection) is a hemoparasitic tick-borne disease that affects both wild and domestic small ruminants. The aim of this study was to evaluate biochemical and hematological characteristics of sheep after being experimentally infected by T. lestoquardi. T. lestoquardi infection was induced in seven Baluchi sheep of six-to-eight months old via experimentally-infected Hyalomma anatolicum adult ticks. Biochemical and hematological parameters were measured twice a week during the three weeks' post infection. Twenty-three biochemical analytes and seven hematological ones were measured. After three to four days infection, body temperature rose above 40(°)C. Maximum and minimum parasitaemia were 3.3% and 0.28%, respectively. Piroplasms and schizont were seen on average from days 7.2 and 4 post infection, respectively. The concentrations and activities of Alb, HDL, ALT, T3, T4, Ca, Fe, Mg, iP, WBC, RBC, PCV, Hb, Plt, neutrophil and lymphocytes significantly decreased (P≤0.05) during experimental infection. However, concentrations and activities of BT, GGT, Glu, BUN, Crea, FIB and Cu significantly increased (P≤0.05). There was no significant change in the serum amounts of Chol, LDL, TG, VLDL and Zn. The observed hypoalbuminemia and increase of FIB concentrations referred to pro-inflammatory cytokines production. Moreover, the raising of GGT activity indicates liver damage, cholestatic disorders or schizont infiltration. The disease stress and corticosteroids are suspected to cause the Glu concentration increase. The present study is aimed at improving the knowledge of malignant theileriosis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Detection of Theileria annulata carriers in Holstein-Friesian (Bos taurus taurus) and Sistani (Bos taurus indicus) cattle breeds by polymerase chain reaction in Sistan region, Iran.

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    Majidiani, Hamidreza; Nabavi, Reza; Ganjali, Maryam; Saadati, Dariush

    2016-12-01

    Theileria annulata is common in tropical and subtropical regions especially in Iran and causes great economic losses in cattle industry. In Iran the epidemiological aspects of bovine theileriosis in different breeds of cattle is poorly understood. The aim of present study is comparison of the number of T. annulata carriers in the two major cattle breeds (Holstein-Friesian and Sistani) in Sistan of Iran by giemsa and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. During winter 2013, 160 native cattle, from the two major breeds in Sistan, with the mean age of more than one year and without typical clinical symptoms of theileriosis were selected. At first, a thin layer smear was held from their ear sublime vein blood for Giemsa staining method. In order to do PCR assay, jugular vein blood sample of each cow was taken. The PCR employs primers specific for the 721-bp gene fragment encoding the 30-kDa major merozoite surface antigen of T. annulata. By PCR method, 38 (47.5 %) Holstein blood samples and 22 (27.5 %) Sistani blood samples had DNA of T. annulata and considered positive (The correlation was significant at values of P < 0.05). By checking 160 blood smears with light microscope and lens × 100, only 10 samples (6.25 %) were positive for T. annulata. Statistical comparison between PCR and smear method showed that the PCR method is more sensitive and accurate in comparison to Giemsa staining method to diagnose the asymptomatic carriers of T. annulata.

  5. Hematobiochemical alterations and direct blood polymerase chain reaction detection of Theileria annulata in naturally infected crossbred cows

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    Anita Ganguly

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim was to determine hemato-biochemical changes and rapid diagnosis of Theileria annulata in naturally infected crossbred cows. Materials and Methods: Blood samples from lactating crossbred cows (n=40 between 3 and 7 years of age and showing clinical signs of tropical theileriosis were collected, with or without anticoagulant, and analyzed for tropical theileriosis by direct smear, direct blood polymerase chain reaction (PCR detection of merozoite-piroplasm surface antigen (Tams1 gene specific amplicon, estimation of hematological and biochemical parameters. Healthy crossbred cows (n=6, examined free from hemoprotozoan infections were included as control. Results: The infected crossbred cows revealed significantly (p<0.001 lower values of total erythrocytic counts (4.46±0.2× 106/μL, hemoglobin (Hb 6.025±0.39 g%, packed cell volume (17.05±1.1%, mean corpuscular volume (37.94±1.70 fL and mean corpuscular Hb (13.5±0.48 pg; p<0.002 compared with healthy control. The serum samples of infected cows revealed profound (p<0.05 hyponatremia (Na 133.21±2.36 mEq/l and hypocalcemia (Ca 8.39±0.34 mg%. Infected crossbred cows showed a significant increase (p<0.05 of mean serum activity of alanine aminotransferase (61.45±13.36 U/L, aspartate aminotransferase (146.1±20.97 U/L, blood urea nitrogen (28.26±3.90 mg%, creatinine (1.55±0.13 mg%, direct bilirubin (0.33±0.04 mg%; p<0.001 and lactate dehydrogenase (3001.32±167.0 U/L; p<001. Blood direct PCR revealed a 721-bp fragment amplified from the target gene encoding 30-kDa major merozoite surface antigen of T. annulata using specific primer pairs. This assay was positive for all the infected animals. Conclusion: The assessments of hemato-biochemical parameters in T. annulata infected crossbred cows may be useful in understanding disease pathogenesis, prognosis and corrective measures for supportive therapy. Moreover, blood direct PCR can reliably be used for rapid detection of T. annulata

  6. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; H Tageldin, Mohammed; Weir, William; Al-Fahdi, Amira; Johnson, Eugene H; Bobade, Patrick; Alqamashoui, Badar; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Thompson, Joanne; Kinnaird, Jane; Shiels, Brian; Tait, Andy; Babiker, Hamza

    2015-01-01

    Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle. Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites) representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman. We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia). A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST' = 0.075, θ = 0.07) were

  7. Genetic Diversity and Population Structure of Theileria annulata in Oman.

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    Salama Al-Hamidhi

    Full Text Available Theileriosis, caused by a number of species within the genus Theileria, is a common disease of livestock in Oman. It is a major constraint to the development of the livestock industry due to a high rate of morbidity and mortality in both cattle and sheep. Since little is currently known about the genetic diversity of the parasites causing theileriosis in Oman, the present study was designed to address this issue with specific regard to T. annulata in cattle.Blood samples were collected from cattle from four geographically distinct regions in Oman for genetic analysis of the Theileria annulata population. Ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites representing all four chromosomes of T. annulata were applied to these samples using a combination of PCR amplification and fragment analysis. The resultant genetic data was analysed to provide a first insight into the structure of the T. annulata population in Oman.We applied ten micro- and mini-satellite markers to a total of 310 samples obtained from different regions (174 [56%] from Dhofar, 68 [22%] from Dhira, 44 [14.5%] from Batinah and 24 [8%] from Sharqia. A high degree of allelic diversity was observed among the four parasite populations. Expected heterozygosity for each site ranged from 0.816 to 0.854. A high multiplicity of infection was observed in individual hosts, with an average of 3.3 to 3.4 alleles per locus, in samples derived from Batinah, Dhofar and Sharqia regions. In samples from Dhira region, an average of 2.9 alleles per locus was observed. Mild but statistically significant linkage disequilibrium between pairs of markers was observed in populations from three of the four regions. In contrast, when the analysis was performed at farm level, no significant linkage disequilibrium was observed. Finally, no significant genetic differentiation was seen between the four populations, with most pair-wise FST values being less than 0.03. Slightly higher FST values (GST' = 0.075,

  8. Some observations on ticks (Acari : Ixodidae infesting sheep in River Nile Province of Northern Sudan

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    B.M. Ahmed

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Five species of ixodid ticks were found in a cross-sectional survey in which 200 sheep were examined for ticks in River Nile Province, Sudan. Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum was the predominant species (73.6 %, whereas ticks belonging to the Rhipicephalus sanguineus group (14.7 %, Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi (9.1 %, Rhipicephalus simus (2 % and Hyalomma dromedarii (0.5 % were also found. The mean tick load was 11.2 per animal. In a subsequent longitudinal survey ticks were collected on a monthly basis from eight sentinel sheep that were introduced into the area. It was found that H. a. anatolicum almost disappeared during the hot period between April and August, whereas it's highest numbers were present in winter between November and February. It is concluded that there is only one generation of H. a. anatolicum per year, which may explain the yearround appearance of clinical cases of malignant ovine theileriosis indicating endemic instability of this disease in River Nile Province.

  9. Parasitic infections in wild ruminants and wild boar

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    Ilić Tamara

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Wild ruminants and wild boar belong to the order Artiodactyla, the suborders Ruminantia and Nonruminantia and are classified as wild animals for big game hunting, whose breeding presents a very important branch of the hunting economy. Diseases caused by protozoa are rarely found in wild ruminants in nature. Causes of coccidiosis, cryptosporidiosis, toxoplasmosis, sarcocystiosis, giardiasis, babesiosis, and theileriosis have been diagnosed in deer. The most significant helminthoses in wild ruminants are fasciosis, dicrocoeliasis, paramphistomosis, fascioloidosis, cysticercosis, anoplocephalidosis, coenurosis, echinococcosis, pulmonary strongyloidiasis, parasitic gastroenteritis, strongyloidiasis and trichuriasis, with certain differences in the extent of prevalence of infection with certain species. The most frequent ectoparasitoses in wild deer and doe are diseases caused by ticks, mites, scabies mites, and hypoderma. The most represented endoparasitoses in wild boar throughout the world are coccidiosis, balantidiasis, metastrongyloidiasis, verminous gastritis, ascariasis, macracanthorhynchosis, trichinelosis, trichuriasis, cystecercosis, echinococcosis, and less frequently, there are also fasciolosis and dicrocoeliasis. The predominant ectoparasitoses in wild boar are ticks and scabies mites. Knowledge of the etiology and epizootiology of parasitic infections in wild ruminants and wild boar is of extreme importance for the process of promoting the health protection system for animals and humans, in particular when taking into account the biological and ecological hazard posed by zoonotic infections.

  10. Establishment of an Artificial Tick Feeding System to Study Theileria lestoquardi Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajeri, Shahin; Razmi, Gholamreza; Haghparast, Alireza

    2016-01-01

    The establishment of good experimental models for Theileria sp. infection is important for theileriosis research. Routinely, infection of ticks is accomplished by feeding on parasite-infected animals (sheep, cows and horses), which raises practical and ethical problems, driving the search for alternative methods of tick infection. Artificial tick feeding systems are based mainly on rearing ticks on host-derived or hand-made artificial membranes. We developed a modified feeding assay for infecting nymphal stages of Hyalomma anatolicum ticks with Theileria lestoquardi, a highly pathogenic parasite of sheep. We compared two different membranes: an artificial silicone membrane and a natural alternative using mouse skin. We observed high attachment rates with mouse skin, whereas in vitro feeding of H. anatolicum nymphs on silicone membranes was unsuccessful. We could infect H. anatolicum nymphs with T. lestoquardi and the emerging adult ticks transmitted infective parasites to sheep. In contrast, similar infections with Rhipicephalus bursa, a representative tick with short mouth-parts that was proposed as a vector for T. lestoquardi, appeared not to be a competent vector tick species. This is the first report of an experimentally controlled infection of H. anatolicum with T. lestoquardi and opens avenues to explore tick-parasite dynamics in detail.

  11. Repurposing of antiparasitic drugs: the hydroxy-naphthoquinone buparvaquone inhibits vertical transmission in the pregnant neosporosis mouse model.

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    Müller, Joachim; Aguado-Martínez, Adriana; Manser, Vera; Wong, Ho Ning; Haynes, Richard K; Hemphill, Andrew

    2016-02-17

    The three anti-malarial drugs artemiside, artemisone, and mefloquine, and the naphthoquinone buparvaquone known to be active against theileriosis in cattle and Leishmania infections in rodents, were assessed for activity against Neospora caninum infection. All four compounds inhibited the proliferation of N. caninum tachyzoites in vitro with IC50 in the sub-micromolar range, but artemisone and buparvaquone were most effective (IC50 = 3 and 4.9 nM, respectively). However, in a neosporosis mouse model for cerebral infection comprising Balb/c mice experimentally infected with the virulent isolate Nc-Spain7, the three anti-malarial compounds failed to exhibit any activity, since treatment did not reduce the parasite burden in brains and lungs compared to untreated controls. Thus, these compounds were not further evaluated in pregnant mice. On the other hand, buparvaquone, shown earlier to be effective in reducing the parasite load in the lungs in an acute neosporosis disease model, was further assessed in the pregnant mouse model. Buparvaquone efficiently inhibited vertical transmission in Balb/c mice experimentally infected at day 7 of pregnancy, reduced clinical signs in the pups, but had no effect on cerebral infection in the dams. This demonstrates proof-of-concept that drug repurposing may lead to the discovery of an effective compound against neosporosis that can protect offspring from vertical transmission and disease.

  12. Establishment of an Artificial Tick Feeding System to Study Theileria lestoquardi Infection.

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    Shahin Tajeri

    Full Text Available The establishment of good experimental models for Theileria sp. infection is important for theileriosis research. Routinely, infection of ticks is accomplished by feeding on parasite-infected animals (sheep, cows and horses, which raises practical and ethical problems, driving the search for alternative methods of tick infection. Artificial tick feeding systems are based mainly on rearing ticks on host-derived or hand-made artificial membranes. We developed a modified feeding assay for infecting nymphal stages of Hyalomma anatolicum ticks with Theileria lestoquardi, a highly pathogenic parasite of sheep. We compared two different membranes: an artificial silicone membrane and a natural alternative using mouse skin. We observed high attachment rates with mouse skin, whereas in vitro feeding of H. anatolicum nymphs on silicone membranes was unsuccessful. We could infect H. anatolicum nymphs with T. lestoquardi and the emerging adult ticks transmitted infective parasites to sheep. In contrast, similar infections with Rhipicephalus bursa, a representative tick with short mouth-parts that was proposed as a vector for T. lestoquardi, appeared not to be a competent vector tick species. This is the first report of an experimentally controlled infection of H. anatolicum with T. lestoquardi and opens avenues to explore tick-parasite dynamics in detail.

  13. Transforming Growth Factor β2 Promotes Transcription of COX2 and EP4, Leading to a Prostaglandin E2-Driven Autostimulatory Loop That Enhances Virulence of Theileria annulata-Transformed Macrophages

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echebli, Nadia; Ding, Ying; Kamau, Everlyn

    2015-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic cytokine known to regulate cell growth, differentiation, and motility and is a potent modulator of immune function. TGF-β consequently plays a central role in carcinogenesis, and a dampened TGF-β2 response by Theileria annulata-infected monocytes/macrophages underpins disease resistance to tropical theileriosis. Here, we show that concomitant with the loss of TGF-β2 production, there is ablated expression of COX2 and EP4, which leads to a drop in cyclic AMP (cAMP) levels and, consequently, reduced activation of protein kinase A (PKA) and EPAC. This ablated phenotype can be rescued in attenuated macrophages by the addition of exogenous TGF-β2, which reactivates the expression of COX2 and EP4 while repressing that of protein kinase inhibitor gamma (PKIG) to the levels in virulent macrophages. TGF-β2 therefore promotes the adhesion and invasiveness of virulent macrophages by modulating COX2, EP4, and PKIG transcription to initiate a prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-driven autostimulatory loop that augments PKA and EPAC activities. A virulence phenotype stemming from the double activation of PKA and EPAC is the induction of a CREB-mediated transcriptional program and the upregulation of JAM-L- and integrin 4αβ1-mediated adhesion of Theileria-infected macrophages. PMID:25690101

  14. Jumbled genomes: missing Apicomplexan synteny.

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    DeBarry, Jeremy D; Kissinger, Jessica C

    2011-10-01

    Whole-genome comparisons provide insight into genome evolution by informing on gene repertoires, gene gains/losses, and genome organization. Most of our knowledge about eukaryotic genome evolution is derived from studies of multicellular model organisms. The eukaryotic phylum Apicomplexa contains obligate intracellular protist parasites responsible for a wide range of human and veterinary diseases (e.g., malaria, toxoplasmosis, and theileriosis). We have developed an in silico protein-encoding gene based pipeline to investigate synteny across 12 apicomplexan species from six genera. Genome rearrangement between lineages is extensive. Syntenic regions (conserved gene content and order) are rare between lineages and appear to be totally absent across the phylum, with no group of three genes found on the same chromosome and in the same order within 25 kb up- and downstream of any orthologous genes. Conserved synteny between major lineages is limited to small regions in Plasmodium and Theileria/Babesia species, and within these conserved regions, there are a number of proteins putatively targeted to organelles. The observed overall lack of synteny is surprising considering the divergence times and the apparent absence of transposable elements (TEs) within any of the species examined. TEs are ubiquitous in all other groups of eukaryotes studied to date and have been shown to be involved in genomic rearrangements. It appears that there are different criteria governing genome evolution within the Apicomplexa relative to other well-studied unicellular and multicellular eukaryotes.

  15. Phylogenetic study of Theileria lestoquardi based on 18SrRNA gene Isolated from sheep in the middle region of Iraq

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    M.J.A. Alkhaled

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Theileriosis is parasitic infection causes by obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Theileria. T. lestoquardi is the most virulent species in sheep and goats which causes a severe disease with a high morbidity and mortality rate. In this study the phylogenetic relationships between two local isolate of T. lestoquardi and nine T. lestoquardi global isolates as well as Babesia ovis out-group isolate were analyzed using the 18S rRNA gene sequence. The multiple sequence alignment analysis and neighbor joining phylogenetic tree analysis were performed by using ClustalW multiple sequence alignment online based analysis of 1098bp 18S rRNA gene was amplified by polymerase chain reaction. Phylogenetic analysis results of these gene sequences revealed that T. lestoquardi local isolates were closely related to T. lestoquardi Iran isolate (JQ917458.1 and two Iraq Kurdistan isolates (KC778786.1 and KC778785.1 more than other countries. This study represents the first report on the use of molecular phylogeny to classify T. lestoquardi obtained in Middle Region of Iraq.

  16. Phylogenetic Analysis of Theileria annulata Infected Cell Line S15 Iran Vaccine Strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habibi, Gh

    2012-01-01

    Bovine theileriosis results from infection with obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Theileria. The phylogenetic relationships between two isolates of Theileria annulata, and 36 Theileria spp., as well as 6 outgroup including Babesia spp. and coccidian protozoa were analyzed using the 18S rRNA gene sequence. The target DNA segment was amplified by PCR. The PCR product was used for direct sequencing. The length of the 18S rRNA gene of all Theileria spp. involved in this study was around 1,400 bp. A phylogenetic tree was inferred based on the 18S rRNA gene sequence of the Iran and Iraq isolates, and other species of Theileria available in GenBank. In the constructed tree, Theileria annulata (Iran vaccine strain) was closely related to other T. annulata from Europe, Asia, as well as T. lestoquardi, T. parva and T. taurotragi all in one clade. Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit ribosomal RNA gene suggested that the percent identity of the sequence of Iran vaccine strain was completely the same as Iraq sequence (100% identical), but the similarity of Iran vaccine strain with other T. annulata reported from China, Spain and Italy determined the 97.9 to 99.9% identity.

  17. The pulmonary involvement in Theileria lestoquardi naturally infected sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Imam, Ahmed H; Hassan, Shawgi M; Gameel, Ahmed A; El Hussein, Abdelrahim M; Taha, Khalid M

    2016-01-01

    Malignant Ovine Theileriosis (MOT) caused by Theileria lestoquardi is considered a major constraint for sheep production in many areas of the world including Sudan. Pulmonary oedema is thought to be the main cause of animal death, but the mechanism, the cell types involved and/or the probable cause of this pneumonia has yet to be defined. The present study was carried out to investigate the pulmonary involvement post T. lestoquardi infection and to identify the cell types involved in pneumonia. Apparently healthy sheep were exposed to ticks challenge in T. lestoquardi endemic area. Lungs impression smears and tissue sections for histopathology were processed. At necropsy, fifteen infected sheep revealed severe pneumonia associated with oedema and accumulation of creamy-grayish frothy exudates. The microscopic findings of examined lungs showed emphysema, congestion, collapse and proliferation of immense amount of different kinds of cells. The current study indicates that T. lestoquardi infections are accompanied with remarkable pulmonary involvements and may lead to respiratory failure and death.

  18. Study on Theileria lestoquardi antigens as potential vaccine candidates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Namavari, Mehdi; Hosseini, Mohammad H; Seghatoleslam, Atefeh; Lotfi, Mohsen; Shirazi, Ali; Sparagano, Olivier A E

    2008-12-01

    Theileria lestoquardi is the causative agent of malignant theileriosis of sheep and goats, causing morbidity and mortality in these animals worldwide. Western blot analysis based on T. lestoquardi schizont antigens was carried out using sera collected from Iranian sheep, which had been immunized with T. lestoquardi schizont-infected cells. The results of Western blot analysis demonstrated that schizont-immunized animals produced antibodies reacting with protein bands at 73, 42, 20, 14, and 12 kDa. Comparison of the results of the current Western blotting test with earlier studies of Theileria spp. revealed two immunogenic schizont proteins with molecular weights of 73 and 42 kDa shared between T. annulata and T. lestoquardi. Two other proteins with molecular weights of 14 and 12 kDa have not been previously found in other Theileria species. Our results suggest that the 73-kDa protein could be a potential vaccine candidate and that the 14- and 12-kDa proteins could be considered as diagnostic antigens.

  19. Validation of an in vitro method to determine infectivity of cryopreserved sporozoites in stabilates of Theileria spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkie, G M; Kirvar, E; Brown, C G D

    2002-03-20

    The infectivity of 15 cryopreserved Theileria spp. sporozoite stabilates was assessed semi-quantitatively by titration using naive peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) in vitro in multi-well plates. Using the method described, the effective dilution, which would result in 50% of replicate wells infected (ED50), was calculated. The ED50 for 11 Theileria annulata stabilates in bovine PBM ranged from 10(-2.6) to 10(-4.2) dilutions of 1 tick equivalent (t.e.) ml(-1), one stabilate of Theileria parva 10(-2.2)t.e.ml(-1); and three Theileria lestoquardi stabilates in ovine PBM, from 10(-1.5) to 10(-1.8)t.e.ml(-1). Two of the T. annulata stabilates had been used individually to infect groups of calves: stabilate 52 produced more severe disease responses than stabilate 67, as measured by prepatent period, parasitosis, parasitaemia and death or recovery. This corresponded with the sixfold difference found in vitro between the ED50's of these two stabilates. This method is useful not only to measure the infection potential of the sporozoite stabilates but also as an in vitro model for chemotherapeutic and immunological studies of the early stages of theileriosis.

  20. Detection of Theileria ovis in naturally infected sheep by nested PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altay, Kursat; Dumanli, Nazir; Holman, Patricia J; Aktas, Munir

    2005-01-20

    A nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for the detection of Theileria ovis in sheep using oligonucleotide primers designed from the small subunit ribosomal RNA (SSU rRNA) gene sequence of T. ovis from sheep in eastern Turkey is described. A 398-bp DNA fragment was specifically amplified from blood samples from sheep, naturally infected with T. ovis. No PCR products resulted from T. lestoquardi, T. annulata, T. parva, T. buffeli and Babesia spp. DNA using these specific primers. The sensitivity of the nested PCR for T. ovis, which was assessed showed that one infected cell in 10(7) sheep erythrocytes, equivalent to a blood parasitemia of 0.00001%, could be detected. This is more sensitive than examining 200 fields under light microscopy. In addition, of the 124 field samples obtained from sheep in eastern Turkey tested, 19.35% (24/124) were positive for the presence of Theileria spp. by microscopic examination compared to 54.03% (67/124) positive for T. ovis by nested PCR. The primer pairs described in this study will be useful for epidemiological studies on ovine theileriosis and for discrimination between T. lestoquardi and T. ovis infections in sheep.

  1. First Molecular Identification and Genetic Characterization of Theileria lestoquardi in Sheep of the Maghreb Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rjeibi, M R; Darghouth, M A; Rekik, M; Amor, B; Sassi, L; Gharbi, M

    2016-06-01

    Theileria lestoquardi is the most prominent Theileria species in small ruminants that causes malignant theileriosis of sheep in Africa and Asia. In the present survey, blood samples and ticks were collected in Kebili (southern Tunisia) from 166 Queue Fine de l'Ouest sheep. Giemsa-stained blood smears, immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and PCR were performed. The DNA was extracted from blood and analysed by PCR targeting 18S rRNA gene of Theileria spp. and then sequenced. A total number of 140 ticks were collected from a total number of 166 sheep during the four seasons. The ticks belonged to two genera and 4 species; the most frequent tick was Hyalomma excavatum 84.3% (118/140) and then Rhipicephalus spp. 15.7% (22/140). Only two animals had positive Giemsa-stained blood smears, and they were also positive by IFAT. The amplicons had 99.3 and 99.6% homology with the BLAST published T. lestoquardi amplicons. To our knowledge, this is the first report of T. lestoquardi in small ruminants within the Maghreb region. © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  2. Phylogenetic Analysis of Theileria Annulata Infected Cell Line S15 Iran Vaccine Strain

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    Gh Habibi

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Bovine theileriosis results from infection with obligate intracellular protozoa of the genus Theileria. The phylogenetic relationships between two isolates of Theileria annulata, and 36 Theileria spp., as well as 6 outgroup including Babesia spp. and coccidian protozoa were analyzed using the 18S rRNA gene sequence.Methods: The target DNA segment was amplified by PCR. The PCR product was used for direct sequencing. The length of the 18S rRNA gene of all Theileria spp. involved in this study was around 1,400 bp. Results: A phylogenetic tree was inferred based on the 18S rRNA gene sequence of the Iran and Iraq isolates, and other species of Theileria available in GenBank. In the constructed tree, Theileria annulata (Iran vaccine strain was closely related to other T. annulata from Europe, Asia, as well as T. lestoquardi, T. parva and T. taurotragi all in one clade.Conclusion: Phylogenetic analyses based on small subunit ribosomal RNA gene suggested that the percent identity of the sequence of Iran vaccine strain was completely the same as Iraq sequence (100% identical, but the similarity of Iran vaccine strain with other T. annulata reported from China, Spain and Italy determined the 97.9 to 99.9% identity.

  3. Molecular characterization of a Theileria lestoquardi gene encoding for immunogenic protein splice variants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakheit, M A; Scholzen, T; Ahmed, J S; Seitzer, U

    2006-12-01

    A Theileria lestoquardi schizont cDNA library was screened using sera collected from sheep recovering from a natural malignant theileriosis infection. An immunogenic clone (clone-5) was isolated and its full sequence was obtained using rapid amplification of cDNA ends polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique. PCR experiments and sequencing demonstrated the presence of two transcript forms of the gene, resulting from splicing variation at the single intron found in the gene. Both gene products, clone-5 long and clone-5 short variants with calculated molecular weights of 99.9 and 72.7 kDa, respectively, were expressed in a T. lestoquardi-infected cell line. BLAST searches suggested the presence of homologues of the gene in both the Theileria parva and Theileria annulata genomes, with identities of 53 and 62% on the DNA level, respectively. The intron was preserved in size, sequence, and location within the gene in these parasites. Analysis of the subcellular localization of the clone-5 proteins showed a predominant parasite membrane association in T. lestoquardi-infected cells. Both recombinantly produced forms were found to be reactive with sera from infected animals. Bioinformatic analyses were employed to address the possible function of the gene products in the biology of T. lestoquardi.

  4. Detection of Theileria lestoquardi (hirci) in ticks, sheep, and goats using the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirvar, E; Ilhan, T; Katzer, F; Wilkie, G; Hooshmand-Rad, P; Brown, D

    1998-06-29

    Theileria lestoquardi (= T. hirci) is a protozoan parasite of sheep and goats that is morphologically and biologically similar to T. annulata, the causative agent of bovine tropical theileriosis. Both parasites are transmitted by ixodid ticks of the genus Hyalomma. However, because of their morphological similarity, they cannot be distinguished in the salivary glands of infected ticks by traditional staining methods such as Feulgen or Methyl green-pyronin. Thus a need has arisen for sensitive and specific diagnostic tests that will distinguish between the two species in the vector tick, allowing the epidemiology of both diseases to be clearly defined. A contribution to this has been the development of a polymerase chain reaction using specific primers which amplify, only in T. lestoquardi-infected ticks, a 785 bp fragment of the gene that codes for a 30 kD merozoite surface protein. The sensitivity of this test and its application to the detection of T. lestoquardi in infected H. anatolicum anatolicum ticks, in the blood of three species of domestic ruminants and in cell cultures established in mononuclear cells of sheep and goats is also discussed.

  5. Identification of clone-9 antigenic protein of Theileria uilenbergi and evaluation of its application for serodiagnosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdo, Jassim; Liu, Zhijie; Yin, Hong; Kullmann, Birgit; Ahmed, Jabbar S; Seitzer, Ulrike

    2010-08-01

    The pathogenic protozoan parasite Theileria uilenbergi is one of the causative agents of theileriosis in small ruminants in China. The infection results in great economical losses in the northwest part of China. Efforts are underway to establish an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) based on a T. uilenbergi immunodominant recombinantly expressed protein using different approaches in order to perform epidemiological studies in the area. In this study, we describe the possible use of the clone-9 protein for this purpose, which was identified as a potential immunogenic piroplasm protein by random sequencing of cDNA library clones followed by bioinformatic analyses. The clone-9 gene was partially recombinantly expressed and used for the development of an indirect ELISA for the detection of circulating antibodies in sera of T. uilenbergi-infected sheep. No cross-reactivity was observed in serum from animals infected with Theileria lestoquardi. The cut-off was calculated at 48.6% positivity using 25 serum samples from uninfected animals. A total of 101 field samples collected from an endemic area in China were used to evaluate the clone-9 ELISA for its use in the field.

  6. Guidelines for the Detection of Babesia and Theileria Parasites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lempereur, Laetitia; Beck, Relja; Fonseca, Isabel; Marques, Cátia; Duarte, Ana; Santos, Marcos; Zúquete, Sara; Gomes, Jacinto; Walder, Gernot; Domingos, Ana; Antunes, Sandra; Baneth, Gad; Silaghi, Cornelia; Holman, Patricia; Zintl, Annetta

    2017-01-01

    The genera Babesia and Theileria (phylum Apicomplexa, order Piroplasmida) are mainly transmitted by Ixodid ticks in which the sexual part of their life cycle followed by sporogony takes place. They include protozoan parasites that infect erythrocytes of a variety of vertebrate hosts, including domestic and wild animals, with some Babesia spp. also infecting humans. Babesia sporozoites transmitted in the tick's saliva during the bloodmeal directly infect erythrocytes, where they asexually multiply to produce pear-shaped merozoites in the process of merogony; whereas a pre-erythrocytic schizogonic life stage in leukocytes is found in Theileria and precedes merogony in the erythrocytes. The wide spectrum of Babesia and Theileria species and their dissimilar characteristics with relation to disease severity, transmission, epidemiology, and drug susceptibility stress the importance of accurate detection of babesiosis and theileriosis and their causative agents. These guidelines review the main methods currently used for the detection of Babesia and Theileria spp. for diagnostic purposes as well as epidemiological studies involving their vertebrate hosts and arthropod vectors. Serological methods were not included once they did not indicate current infection but rather exposure.

  7. The African buffalo: a villain for inter-species spread of infectious diseases in southern Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Anita L; Bengis, Roy G

    2012-06-20

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a large wild bovid which until recently ranged across all but the driest parts of sub-Saharan Africa, and their local range being limited to about 20 km from surface water. They are of high ecological value due to their important role as bulk feeders in the grazing hierarchy. They also have high economic value, because they are one of the sought after 'Big Five' in the eco-tourism industry. In Africa, buffaloes have been recognised for some time as an important role player in the maintenance and transmission of a variety of economically important livestock diseases at the wildlife and/or livestock interface. These include African strains of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD), Corridor disease (theileriosis), bovine tuberculosis and bovine brucellosis. For a number of other diseases of veterinary importance, African buffaloes may also serve as amplifier or incidental host, whereby infection with the causative pathogens may cause severe clinical signs such as death or abortion as in the case of anthrax and Rift Valley fever, or remain mild or subclinical for example heartwater. The long term health implications of most of those infections on the buffalo at a population level is usually limited, and they do not pose a threat on the population's survival. Because of their ability to harbour and transmit important diseases to livestock, their sustainable future in ecotourism, trade and transfrontier conservation projects become complex and costly and reliable diagnostic tools are required to monitor these infections in buffalo populations.

  8. In vivo comparison of susceptibility between Bos indicus and Bos taurus cattle types to Theileria parva infection

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    S.G. Ndungu

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine whether Bos taurus cattle differ form Bos indicus in their susceptibility to infection with the Muguga stabilate of Theileria parva and in their resistance to the resultant disease. Ten Friesians (B. taurus, ten improved Borans (B. indicus, ten unimproved Borans (B. indicus and ten Zebus (B. indicus born to dams from an East Coast fever (ECF endemic area were inoculated with an infective dose50 dilution of T. parva Muguga stabilate 147. All the animals except one Friesian and one Zebu developed schizont parasitosis. All the improved Borans, nine of the Friesians, eight of the unimproved Borans and six of the Zebus developed a febrile response. Four of the improved Borans, four of the Friesians and three of the unimproved Borans died of theileriosis. No significant difference (P > 0.05 in the prepatent period occurred between the groups, but the Zebus had a significantly shorter duration of schizont parasitosis (P > 0.05 and took a significantly shorter time to recover (P > 0.05 than the other three groups. There was no significant difference in the two parameters between the other three groups. The study showed that three B. indicus breds and a B. taurus breed are equally susceptible to T. parva infection. However, Zebus born to dams from an ECF endemic area showed a better ability to control the course of disease than cattle from ECF free areas.

  9. Buparvaquone is active against Neospora caninum in vitro and in experimentally infected mice

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    Joachim Müller

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The naphthoquinone buparvaquone is currently the only drug used against theileriosis. Here, the effects of buparvaquone were investigated in vitro and in an experimental mouse model for Neospora caninum infection. In 4-day proliferation assays, buparvaquone efficiently inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite replication (IC50 = 4.9 nM; IC100 = 100 nM. However, in the long term tachyzoites adapted and resumed proliferation in the presence of 100 nM buparvaquone after 20 days of cultivation. Parasiticidal activity was noted after 9 days of culture in 0.5 µM or 6 days in 1 µM buparvaquone. TEM of N. caninum infected fibroblasts treated with 1 µM buparvaquone showed that the drug acted rather slowly, and ultrastructural changes were evident only after 3–5 days of treatment, including severe alterations in the parasite cytoplasm, changes in the composition of the parasitophorous vacuole matrix and a diminished integrity of the vacuole membrane. Treatment of N. caninum infected mice with buparvaquone (100 mg/kg either by intraperitoneal injection or gavage prevented neosporosis symptoms in 4 out of 6 mice in the intraperitoneally treated group, and in 6 out of 7 mice in the group receiving oral treatment. In the corresponding controls, all 6 mice injected intraperitoneally with corn oil alone died of acute neosporosis, and 4 out of 6 mice died in the orally treated control group. Assessment of infection intensities in the treatment groups showed that, compared to the drug treated groups, the controls showed a significantly higher parasite load in the lungs while cerebral parasite load was higher in the buparvaquone-treated groups. Thus, although buparvaquone did not eliminate the parasites infecting the CNS, the drug represents an interesting lead with the potential to eliminate, or at least diminish, fetal infection during pregnancy.

  10. Biology, ecology and distribution of the tick, Haemaphysalis longicornis Neumann (Acari: Ixodidae) in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heath, Acg

    2016-01-01

    Haemaphysalis longicornis is the only tick in New Zealand that infests livestock. Throughout its range H. longicornis is exposed to and exhibits tolerance to a wide range of environmental conditions, although it flourishes more in moist, warm-temperate environments. This review examines aspects of the biology, physiology and ecology of H. longicornis that determine its distribution and seasonal activity in New Zealand, based on laboratory and field studies. Examples are also drawn from studies outside New Zealand for comparative purposes, especially in the context of seasonal activity as seen in less temperate latitudes. The tick is able to withstand a wide range of temperature, from its developmental threshold of ∼12°C to nearly 40°C at its lethal limit, but its tolerance of dehydration is less wide, especially in the larva and adult, the former especially being the stage that largely determines suitable biotopes for the tick and its present distributional limits. The importance of H. longicornis to the New Zealand livestock industry has recently increased through the establishment and spread of Theileria orientalis Ikeda among dairy and beef cattle, although the tick has always posed production-limiting problems for cattle, deer and to a lesser extent, sheep. The tick's role as a vector of theileriosis and how aspects of the tick's biology affect the spread and maintenance of this disease are discussed. It is proposed that, of available wildlife hosts, the brown hare with its wide-ranging habits, is an important disseminator of ticks. Currently control of ticks is difficult partly because of their wide host range, overlapping activity periods of stadia, and also because the greater part of their annual cycle is spent on pasture. This means that acaricides alone do not satisfactorily reduce tick populations or provide comprehensive protection to stock, so integrated management combining pasture management with good husbandry and chemical prophylaxis is

  11. Transcriptome and microRNome of Theileria annulata Host Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rchiad, Zineb

    2016-06-01

    Tropical Theileriosis is a parasitic disease of calves with a profound economic impact caused by Theileria annulata, an apicomplexan parasite of the genus Theileria. Transmitted by Hyalomma ticks, T. annulata infects and transforms bovine lymphocytes and macrophages into a cancer-like phenotype characterized by all six hallmarks of cancer. In the current study we investigate the transcriptional landscape of T. annulata-infected lymphocytes to define genes and miRNAs regulated by host cell transformation using next generation sequencing. We also define genes and miRNAs differentially expressed as a result of the attenuation of a T.annulata-infected macrophage cell line used as a vaccine. By comparing the transcriptional landscape of one attenuated and two transformed cell lines we identify four genes that we propose as key factors in transformation and virulence of the T. annulata host cells. We also identify miR- 126-5p as a key regulator of infected cells proliferation, adhesion, survival and invasiveness. In addition to the host cell trascriptome we studied T. annulata transcriptome and identified the role of ROS and TGF-β2 in controlling parasite gene expression. Moreover, we have used the deep parasite ssRNA-seq data to refine the available T. annulata annotation. Taken together, this study provides the full list of host cell’s genes and miRNAs transcriptionally perturbed after infection with T. annulata and after attenuation and describes genes and miRNAs never identified before as players in this type of host cell transformation. Moreover, this study provides the first database for the transcriptome of T. annulata and its host cells using next generation sequencing.

  12. Buparvaquone is active against Neospora caninum in vitro and in experimentally infected mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Joachim; Aguado-Martinez, Adriana; Manser, Vera; Balmer, Vreni; Winzer, Pablo; Ritler, Dominic; Hostettler, Isabel; Arranz-Solís, David; Ortega-Mora, Luis; Hemphill, Andrew

    2015-01-01

    The naphthoquinone buparvaquone is currently the only drug used against theileriosis. Here, the effects of buparvaquone were investigated in vitro and in an experimental mouse model for Neospora caninum infection. In 4-day proliferation assays, buparvaquone efficiently inhibited N. caninum tachyzoite replication (IC50 = 4.9 nM; IC100 = 100 nM). However, in the long term tachyzoites adapted and resumed proliferation in the presence of 100 nM buparvaquone after 20 days of cultivation. Parasiticidal activity was noted after 9 days of culture in 0.5 µM or 6 days in 1 µM buparvaquone. TEM of N. caninum infected fibroblasts treated with 1 µM buparvaquone showed that the drug acted rather slowly, and ultrastructural changes were evident only after 3–5 days of treatment, including severe alterations in the parasite cytoplasm, changes in the composition of the parasitophorous vacuole matrix and a diminished integrity of the vacuole membrane. Treatment of N. caninum infected mice with buparvaquone (100 mg/kg) either by intraperitoneal injection or gavage prevented neosporosis symptoms in 4 out of 6 mice in the intraperitoneally treated group, and in 6 out of 7 mice in the group receiving oral treatment. In the corresponding controls, all 6 mice injected intraperitoneally with corn oil alone died of acute neosporosis, and 4 out of 6 mice died in the orally treated control group. Assessment of infection intensities in the treatment groups showed that, compared to the drug treated groups, the controls showed a significantly higher parasite load in the lungs while cerebral parasite load was higher in the buparvaquone-treated groups. Thus, although buparvaquone did not eliminate the parasites infecting the CNS, the drug represents an interesting lead with the potential to eliminate, or at least diminish, fetal infection during pregnancy. PMID:25941626

  13. A review of reverse vaccinology approaches for the development of vaccines against ticks and tick borne diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lew-Tabor, A E; Rodriguez Valle, M

    2016-06-01

    The field of reverse vaccinology developed as an outcome of the genome sequence revolution. Following the introduction of live vaccinations in the western world by Edward Jenner in 1798 and the coining of the phrase 'vaccine', in 1881 Pasteur developed a rational design for vaccines. Pasteur proposed that in order to make a vaccine that one should 'isolate, inactivate and inject the microorganism' and these basic rules of vaccinology were largely followed for the next 100 years leading to the elimination of several highly infectious diseases. However, new technologies were needed to conquer many pathogens which could not be eliminated using these traditional technologies. Thus increasingly, computers were used to mine genome sequences to rationally design recombinant vaccines. Several vaccines for bacterial and viral diseases (i.e. meningococcus and HIV) have been developed, however the on-going challenge for parasite vaccines has been due to their comparatively larger genomes. Understanding the immune response is important in reverse vaccinology studies as this knowledge will influence how the genome mining is to be conducted. Vaccine candidates for anaplasmosis, cowdriosis, theileriosis, leishmaniasis, malaria, schistosomiasis, and the cattle tick have been identified using reverse vaccinology approaches. Some challenges for parasite vaccine development include the ability to address antigenic variability as well the understanding of the complex interplay between antibody, mucosal and/or T cell immune responses. To understand the complex parasite interactions with the livestock host, there is the limitation where algorithms for epitope mining using the human genome cannot directly be adapted for bovine, for example the prediction of peptide binding to major histocompatibility complex motifs. As the number of genomes for both hosts and parasites increase, the development of new algorithms for pan-genomic mining will continue to impact the future of parasite and

  14. Tick-Borne Diseases in Turkey: A Review Based on One Health Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inci, Abdullah; Yildirim, Alparslan; Duzlu, Onder; Doganay, Mehmet; Aksoy, Serap

    2016-12-01

    The importance of tick-borne diseases is increasing all over the world, including Turkey. Global warming, environmental and ecological changes and the existence of suitable habitats increase the impact of ticks and result in frequent emergence or re-emergence of tick-borne diseases (TBDs) with zoonotic characteristics. In Turkey, almost 19 TBDs have been reported in animals and men, involving four protozoa (babesiosis, theileriosis, cytauxzoonosis, hepatozoonosis), one filarial nematode (acanthocheilonemasis), ten bacterial agents (anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, aegyptianellosis, tick-borne typhus, Candidatus Rickettsia vini, Lyme borreliosis, tick-borne relapsing fever [TBRF], tularaemia, bartonellosis, and hemoplasmosis), and four viral infections (tick-borne encephalitis [TBE], Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever [CCHF], louping-ill [LI], and lumpy skin disease [LSD]). The growing number of TBD cases, in particular the fatal viral epidemics in humans, have led to increased public awareness and concern against TBDs in recent years. The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a new political concept, called the "One Health" initiative, which is especially relevant for developing strategies against tick infestations and TBD control in humans and animals. It would be beneficial for Turkey to adopt this new strategy and establish specific research and control programs in coordination with international organizations like WHO, the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE), the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), and the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC) to combat TBDs based on the "One Health Initiative" concept. In this article, we review the occurrence of primary TBDs in man and animals in Turkey in light of the "One Health" perspective.

  15. PCR diagnosis of tick-borne pathogens in Maharashtra state, India indicates fitness cost associated with carrier infections is greater for crossbreed than native cattle breeds.

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    Sunil W Kolte

    Full Text Available Tick-borne pathogens (TBP are responsible for significant economic losses to cattle production, globally. This is particularly true in countries like India where TBP constrain rearing of high yielding Bos taurus, as they show susceptibility to acute tick borne disease (TBD, most notably tropical theileriosis caused by Theileria annulata. This has led to a programme of cross breeding Bos taurus (Holstein-Friesian or Jersey with native Bos indicus (numerous breeds to generate cattle that are more resistant to disease. However, the cost to fitness of subclinical carrier infection in crossbreeds relative to native breeds is unknown, but could represent a significant hidden economic cost. In this study, a total of 1052 bovine blood samples, together with associated data on host type, sex and body score, were collected from apparently healthy animals in four different agro-climatic zones of Maharashtra state. Samples were screened by PCR for detection of five major TBPs: T. annulata, T. orientalis, B. bigemina, B. bovis and Anaplasma spp.. The results demonstrated that single and co-infection with TBP are common, and although differences in pathogen spp. prevalence across the climatic zones were detected, simplistic regression models predicted that host type, sex and location are all likely to impact on prevalence of TBP. In order to remove issues with autocorrelation between variables, a subset of the dataset was modelled to assess any impact of TBP infection on body score of crossbreed versus native breed cattle (breed type. The model showed significant association between infection with TBP (particularly apicomplexan parasites and poorer body condition for crossbreed animals. These findings indicate potential cost of TBP carrier infection on crossbreed productivity. Thus, there is a case for development of strategies for targeted breeding to combine productivity traits with disease resistance, or to prevent transmission of TBP in India for economic

  16. Partial characterization of a novel anti-inflammatory protein from salivary gland extract of Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum (Acari: Ixodidae ticks

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    Mayukh Ghosh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum ticks transmit Theileria annulata, causative agent of tropical theileriosis to cattle and buffaloes causing a major economic loss in terms of production and mortality in tropical countries. Ticks have evolved several immune evading strategies to circumvent hosts’ rejection and achieve engorgement. Successful feeding of ticks relies on a pharmacy of chemicals located in their complex salivary glands and secreted saliva. These chemicals in saliva could inhibit host inflammatory responses through modulating cytokine secretion and detoxifying reactive oxygen species. Therefore, the present study was aimed to characterize anti-inflammatory peptides from salivary gland extract (SGE of H. a. anatolicum ticks with a view that this information could be utilized in raising vaccines, designing synthetic peptides or peptidomimetics which can further be developed as novel therapeutics. Materials and Methods: Salivary glands were dissected out from partially fed adult female H. a. anatolicum ticks and homogenized under the ice to prepare SGE. Gel filtration chromatography was performed using Sephadex G-50 column to fractionate the crude extract. Protein was estimated in each fraction and analyzed for identification of anti-inflammatory activity. Sodium dodecyl sulfate - polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE was run for further characterization of protein in desired fractions. Results: A novel 28 kDa protein was identified in H. a. anatolicum SGE with pronounced anti-inflammatory activity. Conclusion: Purification and partial characterization of H. a. anatolicum SGE by size-exclusion chromatography and SDSPAGE depicted a 28 kDa protein with prominent anti-inflammatory activity.

  17. Tick-Borne Diseases in Turkey: A Review Based on One Health Perspective.

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    Abdullah Inci

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The importance of tick-borne diseases is increasing all over the world, including Turkey. Global warming, environmental and ecological changes and the existence of suitable habitats increase the impact of ticks and result in frequent emergence or re-emergence of tick-borne diseases (TBDs with zoonotic characteristics. In Turkey, almost 19 TBDs have been reported in animals and men, involving four protozoa (babesiosis, theileriosis, cytauxzoonosis, hepatozoonosis, one filarial nematode (acanthocheilonemasis, ten bacterial agents (anaplasmosis, ehrlichiosis, aegyptianellosis, tick-borne typhus, Candidatus Rickettsia vini, Lyme borreliosis, tick-borne relapsing fever [TBRF], tularaemia, bartonellosis, and hemoplasmosis, and four viral infections (tick-borne encephalitis [TBE], Crimean-Congo Haemorrhagic Fever [CCHF], louping-ill [LI], and lumpy skin disease [LSD]. The growing number of TBD cases, in particular the fatal viral epidemics in humans, have led to increased public awareness and concern against TBDs in recent years. The World Health Organization (WHO has developed a new political concept, called the "One Health" initiative, which is especially relevant for developing strategies against tick infestations and TBD control in humans and animals. It would be beneficial for Turkey to adopt this new strategy and establish specific research and control programs in coordination with international organizations like WHO, the World Organization for Animal Health (OIE, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, and the European Center for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC to combat TBDs based on the "One Health Initiative" concept. In this article, we review the occurrence of primary TBDs in man and animals in Turkey in light of the "One Health" perspective.

  18. The African buffalo: A villain for inter-species spread of infectious diseases in southern Africa

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    Anita L. Michel

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer is a large wild bovid which until recently ranged across all but the driest parts of sub-Saharan Africa, and their local range being limited to about 20 km from surface water. They are of high ecological value due to their important role as bulk feeders in the grazing hierarchy. They also have high economic value, because they are one of the sought after ‘Big Five’ in the eco-tourism industry. In Africa, buffaloes have been recognised for some time as an important role player in the maintenance and transmission of a variety of economically important livestock diseases at the wildlife and/or livestock interface. These include African strains of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD, Corridor disease (theileriosis, bovine tuberculosis and bovine brucellosis. For a number of other diseases of veterinary importance, African buffaloes may also serve as amplifier or incidental host, whereby infection with the causative pathogens may cause severe clinical signs such as death or abortion as in the case of anthrax and Rift Valley fever, or remain mild or subclinical for example heartwater. The long term health implications of most of those infections on the buffalo at a population level is usually limited, and they do not pose a threat on the population’s survival. Because of their ability to harbour and transmit important diseases to livestock, their sustainable future in ecotourism, trade and transfrontier conservation projects become complex and costly and reliable diagnostic tools are required to monitor these infections in buffalo populations.

  19. Identification and characterization of Theileria ovis surface protein (ToSp) resembled TaSp in Theileria annulata.

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    Shayan, P; Jafari, S; Fattahi, R; Ebrahimzade, E; Amininia, N; Changizi, E

    2016-05-01

    Ovine theileriosis is an important hemoprotozoal disease of sheep and goats in tropical and subtropical regions which caused high economic loses in the livestock industry. Theileria annulata surface protein (TaSp) was used previously as a tool for serological analysis in livestock. Since the amino acid sequences of TaSp is, at least, in part very conserved in T. annulata, Theileria lestoquardi and Theileria china I and II, it is very important to determine the amino acid sequence of this protein in Theileria ovis as well, to avoid false interpretation of serological data based on this protein in small animal. In the present study, the nucleotide sequence and amino acid sequence of T. ovis surface protein (ToSp) were determined. The comparison of the nucleotide sequence of ToSp showed 96, 96, 99, and 86 % homology to the corresponding nucleotide sequence of TaSp genes by T. annulata, T. China I, T. China II and T. lestoquardi, previously registered in GenBank under accession nos. AJ316260.1, AY274329.1, DQ120058.1, and EF092924.1 respectively. The amino acid sequence analysis showed 95, 81, 98 and 70 % homology to the corresponding amino acid sequence of T. annulata, T chinaI, T china II and T. lestoquardi, registered in GenBank under accession nos. CAC87478.1, AAP36993.1, AAZ30365.1 and AAP36999.11, respectively. Interestingly, in contrast to the C terminus, a significant difference in amino acid sequence in the N teminus of the ToSp protein could be determined compared to the other known corresponding TaSp sequences, which make this region attractive for designing of a suitable tool for serological diagnosis.

  20. Molecular Detection and Identification of Theileria Species by PCR-RFLP Method in Sheep from Ahvaz, Southern Iran.

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    Jalali, Seyedeh Missagh; Khaki, Zohreh; Kazemi, Bahram; Rahbari, Sadegh; Shayan, Parviz; Bandehpour, Mojgan; Yasini, Seyedeh Parastoo

    2014-03-01

    The present study was carried out to investigate the accurate status of ovine Theileria infection in sheep from Ahvaz and surrounding region, a tropical area southwest Iran. A PCR-RFLP method based on 18S ribosomal RNA gene was designed which could detect and differentiate Theileria and Babesia spp. and also differentiate main Theileria species in sheep at the same time. 119 sheep blood samples were collected from Ahvaz and surroundings. Microscopic examination of blood smears revealed 69.7% (83/119) infection with Theileria spp. Of the total samples subjected to PCR, 89% (106/119) were found to be positive, all of which were identified as Theileria by RFLP analysis using enzyme Hind II. In enzymatic digestion of PCR products by Vsp I, 91.5% (97/106) of Theileria positive samples were identified as T. ovis while mixed Theileria infections were found in 9 samples. The samples with mixed infections were analyzed with an additional nested PCR-RFLP method, by HpaII enzyme digestion. 3 samples with T. lestoquardi infection, 1 sample with T. ovis and T. annulata, 1 sample with T. lestoquardi and T. annulata, and 4 samples with T. ovis, T. lestoquardi and T. annulata mixed infections were detected. Ovine theileriosis caused by T. ovis is highly prevalent in southwest Iran while T. lestoquardi and T. annulata infection can be detected in a lesser propor-tion of sheep in this region. The new PCR-RFLP method that was designed in this study, can serve as a beneficial diagnostic tool, especially in T. ovis prevalent re-gions.

  1. Molecular Detection and Identification of Theileria Species by PCR-RFLP Method in Sheep from Ahvaz, Southern Iran.

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    Seyedeh Missagh Jalali

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study was carried out to investigate the accurate status of ovine Theileria infection in sheep from Ahvaz and surrounding region, a tropical area southwest Iran.A PCR-RFLP method based on 18S ribosomal RNA gene was designed which could detect and differentiate Theileria and Babesia spp. and also differentiate main Theileria species in sheep at the same time. 119 sheep blood samples were collected from Ahvaz and surroundings.Microscopic examination of blood smears revealed 69.7% (83/119 infection with Theileria spp. Of the total samples subjected to PCR, 89% (106/119 were found to be positive, all of which were identified as Theileria by RFLP analysis using enzyme Hind II. In enzymatic digestion of PCR products by Vsp I, 91.5% (97/106 of Theileria positive samples were identified as T. ovis while mixed Theileria infections were found in 9 samples. The samples with mixed infections were analyzed with an additional nested PCR-RFLP method, by HpaII enzyme digestion. 3 samples with T. lestoquardi infection, 1 sample with T. ovis and T. annulata, 1 sample with T. lestoquardi and T. annulata, and 4 samples with T. ovis, T. lestoquardi and T. annulata mixed infections were detected.Ovine theileriosis caused by T. ovis is highly prevalent in southwest Iran while T. lestoquardi and T. annulata infection can be detected in a lesser propor-tion of sheep in this region. The new PCR-RFLP method that was designed in this study, can serve as a beneficial diagnostic tool, especially in T. ovis prevalent re-gions.

  2. Identification of different Theileria species (Theileria lestoquardi, Theileria ovis, and Theileria annulata) in naturally infected sheep using nested PCR-RFLP.

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    Zaeemi, Mahdieh; Haddadzadeh, Hamidreza; Khazraiinia, Parvaneh; Kazemi, Bahram; Bandehpour, M

    2011-04-01

    Ovine theileriosis is an important hemoprotozoal disease of sheep and goats in tropical and subtropical regions that leads to economic losses in these animals. A nested PCR-restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) was carried out to identification Theileria species in sheep in some area in western half of Iran (Sari, Rasht, Urmia, Ilam, and Ahvaz). Two hundred and fifty blood samples were taken from sheep during tick activating season (summer of 2008). Microscopic examination revealed that 9.2% (23/250) sheep were infected by Theileria spp. piroplasms. Parasitemia ranged from 0.011% to 0.015%. In nested PCR assessment of DNA samples, 32.8% (82/250) sheep were positive. The negative samples were confirmed by amplifying of ovine beta-actin gene as an internal control. The differentiation of Theileria species was based on RFLP patterns using three restriction enzymes: HpaII, Rsa1, and Bsh 1285I. Out of 82 positive samples, 54.8% (45/82) and 40.2% (33/82) were positive for Theileria lestoquardi and Theileria ovis respectively. Mixed infection was detected in 4.8% (4/82) cases. Based on their PCR product digestion pattern with HpaII (1178, 900, 278, and 106 bp), it seemed to be mixture of Theileria annulata and T. lestoquardi. The presence of T. annulata was supported by sequence analysis. This is the first report of naturally infected sheep with T. annulata in Iran. Geographical distribution of Theileria species in sheep is shown according to the result of microscopy and nested PCR and RFLP data.

  3. Simultaneous differentiation between Theileria spp. and Babesia spp. on stained blood smear using PCR.

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    Shayan, Parviz; Rahbari, Sadegh

    2005-10-01

    The tick-borne diseases of livestock constitute a complex of several diseases with different etiological agents. Theileriosis and babesiosis belong to this complex and are severe and often fatal protozoan tick-borne diseases of ruminants worldwide. This results in high economical losses yearly in Iran. The most common diagnostic method for the identification of piroplasms in Iran is Giemsa staining of blood smear, which is unspecific, accompanied by some technical problems and, in some cases, impossible, due to the carriers. In contrast, immunostaining is more specific and can only be performed with suitably prepared blood smears, but cannot be used also for the carriers. The most specific method for the differential diagnosis of piroplasms is the method of polymerase chain reaction. We extracted DNA from different sources of blood samples, including from already stained blood smears. The extracted DNA was subsequently amplified using specific primers derived from Theileria heat shock protein hsp70, Theileria lestoquardi ms1-2 gene, Babesia rhoptry protein gene and piroplasms hyper variable region V4 of 18S rRNA gene. The results show that it is possible to detect piroplasms in already stained blood smears as well enabling a simpler method to be developed for the collection of the samples. Furthermore, it is possible to analyse the already stained and registered blood smears from the patients with unclear differential diagnosis, e.g. in the carriers. In addition, the results revealed that using a primer designed from the hyper variable region V4 of 18S rRNA, it is possible to detect and differentiate simultaneously the genera Theileria and Babesia in DNA samples isolated from already stained blood smears.

  4. Variations in free radical scavenging activities and antioxidant responses in salivary glands of Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum and Hyalomma dromedarii (Acari: Ixodidae ticks

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    Mayukh Ghosh

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Hyalomma anatolicum anatolicum and Hyalomma dromedarii ticks are of major economic importance in the livestock sector as the vector of tropical theileriosis causing huge production loss, mostly in tropical countries. The release of different reactive oxygen and nitrogen species by exogenous and endogenous means can potentially induce oxidative damage to the ticks during their prolonged feeding on their vertebrate hosts. Hence, ticks need an effective free radical scavenging and antioxidant defense system for their successful feeding of a blood meal. Therefore, the present study was undertaken to evaluate the interspecies variations in antioxidant response, free radical scavenging, and anti-inflammatory activities in salivary gland extracts (SGE of the two species as they differ considerably in relation to feeding behavior and host specificity. Materials and Methods: Tick salivary glands were dissected out under ice from semi-fed female ticks of both the species and homogenized at low temperature to prepare SGE. SGE was stored at −40°C for analysis of free radical scavenging activities and antioxidant status. Results: Significant depletion in reduced glutathione concentrations, malondialdehyde level and elevation in free radical scavenging activity, superoxide dismutase, anti-inflammatory activity were found in SGE of engorging female H. dromedarii ticks as compared to H. a. anatolicum. Conclusion: Higher antioxidant status and free radical scavenging activities in H. dromedarii might have enabled these ticks to suck more blood from the host in spite of continuous host’s immune responses. These findings about tick biology will help in improving tick control strategies.

  5. Transmisión de Anaplasma marginale por garrapatas

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    Kelly A. Brayton

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Anaplasma marginale, patógeno de distribución mundial, es transmitido por garrapatas Ixódidas. Comprender su complejo desarrollo dentro de la garrapata vector, permitirá la predicción de brotes y ofrecerá oportunidades para controlar su transmisión. En este trabajo se revisa su ciclo básico de desarrollo junto con los estudios recientes acerca de las diferencias de transmisión entre cepas, que delinean aspectos de la interacción patógeno - vector. Bacterias, virus o protozoarios transmitidos por artrópodos causan enfermedades severas, tanto en humanos como en animales. Las enfermedades infecciosas transmitidas por garrapatas, entre las que incluimos a la Anaplasmosis (A. marginale, babesiosis (Babesia bigemina, B. bovis, B. divergens y Theileriosis (Theileria annulata, T. parva, se encuentran entre las más importantes en el ámbito mundial, con pérdidas cercanas a los siete mil millones de dólares anualmente; y, a pesar de su impacto, permanecen escasamente bajo control, basado primordialmente en la aplicación de acaricidas, para interrumpir su transmisión. La aparición de garrapatas resistentes a múltiples sustancias acaricidas, representa una amenaza en este tipo de control y, como resultado, hay un resurgimiento de la investigación para el desarrollo de nuevas estrategias para su control. Nuevas opciones para prevenir la transmisión de patógenos de animales por garrapatas, será el resultado de entender las interacciones garrapata patógeno; proceso que culmina con el desarrollo de la infección y transmisión exitosa. En todos los casos de patógenos transmitidos por garrapatas, el desarrollo de la infección se realiza coordinamente a los momentos de adhesión y alimentación del vector sobre el animal. Esto sucede por la interdependencia en la señalización entre el patógeno y el vector al alimentarse y, por ello, será susceptible de intervención.

  6. Tick-borne haemoparasites in African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) from two wildlife areas in Northern Botswana.

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    Eygelaar, Dewald; Jori, Ferran; Mokopasetso, Mokganedi; Sibeko, Kgomotso P; Collins, Nicola E; Vorster, Ilse; Troskie, Milana; Oosthuizen, Marinda C

    2015-01-15

    The African buffalo (Syncerus caffer) is a host for many pathogens known to cause economically important diseases and is often considered an important reservoir for livestock diseases. Theileriosis, heartwater, babesiosis and anaplasmosis are considered the most important tick-borne diseases of livestock in sub-Saharan Africa, resulting in extensive economic losses to livestock farmers in endemic areas. Information on the distribution of tick-borne diseases and ticks is scarce in Northern Botswana. Nevertheless, this data is necessary for targeting surveillance and control measures in livestock production at national level. In order to address this gap, we analyzed 120 blood samples from buffalo herds for the presence of common tick-borne haemoparasites causing disease in livestock, collected in two of the main wildlife areas of Northern Botswana: the Chobe National Park (CNP, n=64) and the Okavango Delta (OD, n=56). Analysis of the reverse line blot (RLB) hybridization assay results revealed the presence of Theileria, Babesia, Anaplasma and Ehrlichia species, either as single or mixed infections. Among the Theileria spp. present, T. parva (60%) and T. mutans (37%) were the most prevalent. Other species of interest were Anaplasma marginale subsp. centrale (30%), A. marginale (20%), Babesia occultans (23%) and Ehrlichia ruminantium (6%). The indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFAT) indicated 74% of samples to be positive for the presence of T. parva antibodies. Quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) detected the highest level of animals infected with T. parva (81% of the samples). The level of agreement between the tests for detection of T. parva positive animals was higher between qPCR and IFAT (kappa=0.56), than between qPCR and RLB (kappa=0.26) or the latter and IFAT (kappa=0.15). This is the first report of tick-borne haemoparasites in African buffalo from northern Botswana, where animals from the CNP showed higher levels of infection than those from OD. Considering

  7. Experiences in tick control by acaricide in the traditional cattle sector in Zambia and Burkina Faso: possible environmental and public health implications

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    Daniele De Meneghi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Livestock, especially cattle, play a paramount role in agriculture production systems, particularly in poor countries throughout the world. Ticks and tick-borne diseases (TBDs have an important impact on livestock and agriculture production in Sub-Saharan Africa. The authors review the most common methods used for the control of ticks and TBDs. Special emphasis is given to the direct application of acaricides to the host animals. The possible environmental and public health adverse effects (i.e. risks for the workers, residues in the environment, and in food products of animal origin are mentioned. The authors present two case studies, describing different field experiences in controlling ticks in two African countries. In Zambia (Southern Africa, a strategic dipping regime was used to control Rhipicephalus appendiculatus ticks, vectors of theileriosis, a deadly disease affecting cattle in the traditional livestock sector in Southern Province. The dipping regime adopted allowed to reduce the tick challenge and cattle mortally rate, and at the same time, to employ less acaricide as compared to the intensive dipping used so far, without disrupting the building-up of enzootic stability. In Burkina Faso (West Africa, where dipping was never used for tick control, an acaricide footbath was employed as an alternative method to the traditional technique used locally (portable manual sprayers. This was developed from field observations on the invasion/attachment process of the Amblyomma variegatum ticks –vector of cowdriosis- on the animal hosts, leading to a control method aimed to kill ticks temporarily attached to the interdigital areas before their permanent attachment to the predilection sites. This innovative method has been overall accepted by the local farmers. It has the advantage of greatly reducing costs of treatments and has a minimal environmental impact, making footbath a sustainable and replicable method, adoptable also in other West

  8. Theileria lestoquardi displays reduced genetic diversity relative to sympatric Theileria annulata in Oman.

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    Al-Hamidhi, Salama; Weir, William; Kinnaird, Jane; Tageledin, Mohemmed; Beja-Pereira, Albano; Morrison, Ivan; Thompson, Joanne; Tait, Andy; Shiels, Brian; Babiker, Hamza A

    2016-09-01

    The Apicomplexan parasites, Theileria lestoquardi and Theileria annulata, the causative agents of theileriosis in small and large ruminants, are widespread in Oman, in areas where cattle, sheep and goats co-graze. Genetic analysis can provide insight into the dynamics of the parasite and the evolutionary relationship between species. Here we identified ten genetic markers (micro- and mini-satellites) spread across the T. lestoquardi genome, and confirmed their species specificity. We then genotyped T. lestoquardi in different regions in Oman. The genetic structures of T. lestoquardi populations were then compared with previously published data, for comparable panels of markers, for sympatric T. annulata isolates. In addition, we examined two antigen genes in T. annulata (Tams1 and Ta9) and their orthologues in T. lestoquardi (Tlms1 and Tl9). The genetic diversity and multiplicity of infection (MOI) were lower in T. lestoquardi (He=0.64-0.77) than T. annulata (He=0.83-0.85) in all populations. Very limited genetic differentiation was found among T. lestoquardi and T. annulata populations. In contrast, limited but significant linkage disequilibrium was observed within regional populations of each species. We identified eight T. annulata isolates in small ruminants; the diversity and MOI were lower among ovine/caprine compared to bovine. Sequence diversity of the antigen genes, Tams1 and Ta9 in T. annulata (π=0.0733 and π=0.155 respectively), was 10-fold and 3-fold higher than the orthologous Tlms1 and Tl9 in T. lestoquardi (π=0.006 and π=0.055, respectively). Despite a comparably high prevalence, T. lestoquardi has lower genetic diversity compared to sympatric T. annulata populations. There was no evidence of differentiation among populations of either species. In comparison to T. lestoquardi, T. annulata has a larger effective population size. While genetic exchange and recombination occur in both parasite species, the extent of diversity, overall, is less for T

  9. Epidemiology, diagnosis and therapy of Theileria equi infection in Giza, Egypt

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    Fayez A. Salib

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim: To study the prevalence of Theileria equi among horses in different age groups, both sexes, months and seasons of the year, and regions of Giza governourate. Studying the changes in the blood picture, blood chemistries, liver enzymes associate with T.equi infections in horses. Evaluating IFA and CFT at different dilutions in the serodiagnosis of T.equi infections in horses. Evaluating four anti-Theileria medication regimens (diminazine aceturate, imidiocarb 7%, buparvaquone and a combination of imidiocarb 7% and buparvaquone in treatment of T.equi infections in horses. Materials and Methods: Total of 149 horses were examined by clinical signs and blood smears. Fortey whole blood samples from T.equi infected horses were examined to measure haemoglobin, total RBCs count and PCV. Fortey serum samples from T.equi infected horses were examined to measure total bilirubin, direct bilirubin, ALT and AST enzymes. Serum samples from T.equi infected (40 and non infected (14 horses were tested by indirect fluorescent antibody test (IFA and complement fixation test (CFT at different dilutions. Four groups of T.equiinfected horses (A,B,C,D, each group was represented by 10 horses and was separately treated with diminazine aceturate, imidiocarb 7%, buparvaquone and a combination of imidiocarb 7% and buparvaquone respectively. Results: the prevalence of T.equi was 41.61% in totally examined horses. The prevalence was higher in males than females. The highest prevalence was among age group ranged from 5-10 years as (22.81%. The highest prevalence was in July and was recorded as (25.81% and the disease was more prevalent in summer than winter. The highest prevalence was recorded in Nazlet-alsamman as (51.61%. Equine theileriosis was clinically characterized by fever, haemoglobinuria, oedema, anaemia and icterus. The best dilution for IFA was 1/160 where sensitivity, specificity and accuracy were the highest for this test as (98%, (92.86% and (97

  10. Molecular surveillance of Theileria parasites of livestock in Oman.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Fahdi, Amira; Alqamashoui, Badar; Al-Hamidhi, Salama; Kose, Onur; Tageldin, Mohammed H; Bobade, Patrick; Johnson, Eugene H; Hussain, Abdel-Rahim; Karagenc, Tulin; Tait, Andy; Shiels, Brian; Bilgic, Huseyin Bilgin; Babiker, Hamza

    2017-08-01

    Theileriosis is one of the most prevalent infectious diseases of livestock in the Arabian Peninsula, and causes high rates of mortality and morbidity in sheep and cattle. However, there is a paucity of information on the distribution of Theileria spp. over the whole region and their impact on different hosts. The present study carried out a country-wide molecular survey for Theileria spp. of livestock in Oman across four governorates. The aim of the survey was to define the prevalence of Theileria spp. in cattle, sheep and goats, highlight risk factors for infection and identify the main tick species involved in parasite transmission. A total of 2020 animals were examined in the survey consisting of sheep [n=592], goats [n=981] and cattle [n=447]. All three species were raised and co-grazed on the same farms. Theileria parasites were detected using PCR-RFLP and RLB of the 18S rRNA gene. Cloning and sequencing of the 18S rRNA was carried out on 11 T. lestoquardi isolates from Ash-Sharqiyah, and Ad-Dhahira governorates, and phylogenetic relationships were inferred using additional sequences of T. lestoquardi, T. annulata and T. ovis available in GenBank. Theileria spp. prevalence was 72.3%, 36.7% and 2.7% among cattle, sheep and goats, respectively. Strong similarity in results was obtained using RLB and PCR-RFLP for detection of Theileria spp. however, RLB detected a higher rate of mixed infection than PCR-RFPL (PTheileria annulata was the only parasite detected in cattle, while sheep and goats carried T. ovis, T. lestoquardi and T. annulata as well as Theileria spp. OT1. Of the four Theileria spp. detected in small ruminants, overall T. ovis was most prevalent (sheep [33.4%], goats [2.0%]), whereas T. lestoquardi was less prevalent (sheep [22.0%], goats [0.5%]). A large proportion of infected sheep (19%) carried mixed infection of T. ovis and T. lestoquardi. However, single T. lestoquardi infections (3.0%) were less prevalent than T. ovis infections (14.5%). Risk