WorldWideScience

Sample records for text search engines

  1. Chemical-text hybrid search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yingyao; Zhou, Bin; Jiang, Shumei; King, Frederick J

    2010-01-01

    As the amount of chemical literature increases, it is critical that researchers be enabled to accurately locate documents related to a particular aspect of a given compound. Existing solutions, based on text and chemical search engines alone, suffer from the inclusion of "false negative" and "false positive" results, and cannot accommodate diverse repertoire of formats currently available for chemical documents. To address these concerns, we developed an approach called Entity-Canonical Keyword Indexing (ECKI), which converts a chemical entity embedded in a data source into its canonical keyword representation prior to being indexed by text search engines. We implemented ECKI using Microsoft Office SharePoint Server Search, and the resultant hybrid search engine not only supported complex mixed chemical and keyword queries but also was applied to both intranet and Internet environments. We envision that the adoption of ECKI will empower researchers to pose more complex search questions that were not readily attainable previously and to obtain answers at much improved speed and accuracy.

  2. NASA Indexing Benchmarks: Evaluating Text Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esler, Sandra L.; Nelson, Michael L.

    1997-01-01

    The current proliferation of on-line information resources underscores the requirement for the ability to index collections of information and search and retrieve them in a convenient manner. This study develops criteria for analytically comparing the index and search engines and presents results for a number of freely available search engines. A product of this research is a toolkit capable of automatically indexing, searching, and extracting performance statistics from each of the focused search engines. This toolkit is highly configurable and has the ability to run these benchmark tests against other engines as well. Results demonstrate that the tested search engines can be grouped into two levels. Level one engines are efficient on small to medium sized data collections, but show weaknesses when used for collections 100MB or larger. Level two search engines are recommended for data collections up to and beyond 100MB.

  3. Evaluating Open-Source Full-Text Search Engines for Matching ICD-10 Codes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurcău, Daniel-Alexandru; Stoicu-Tivadar, Vasile

    2016-01-01

    This research presents the results of evaluating multiple free, open-source engines on matching ICD-10 diagnostic codes via full-text searches. The study investigates what it takes to get an accurate match when searching for a specific diagnostic code. For each code the evaluation starts by extracting the words that make up its text and continues with building full-text search queries from the combinations of these words. The queries are then run against all the ICD-10 codes until a match indicates the code in question as a match with the highest relative score. This method identifies the minimum number of words that must be provided in order for the search engines choose the desired entry. The engines analyzed include a popular Java-based full-text search engine, a lightweight engine written in JavaScript which can even execute on the user's browser, and two popular open-source relational database management systems.

  4. A Full-Text-Based Search Engine for Finding Highly Matched Documents Across Multiple Categories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung D.; Steele, Gynelle C.

    2016-01-01

    This report demonstrates the full-text-based search engine that works on any Web-based mobile application. The engine has the capability to search databases across multiple categories based on a user's queries and identify the most relevant or similar. The search results presented here were found using an Android (Google Co.) mobile device; however, it is also compatible with other mobile phones.

  5. Key word placing in Web page body text to increase visibility to search engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. T. Kritzinger

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available The growth of the World Wide Web has spawned a wide variety of new information sources, which has also left users with the daunting task of determining which sources are valid. Many users rely on the Web as an information source because of the low cost of information retrieval. It is also claimed that the Web has evolved into a powerful business tool. Examples include highly popular business services such as Amazon.com and Kalahari.net. It is estimated that around 80% of users utilize search engines to locate information on the Internet. This, by implication, places emphasis on the underlying importance of Web pages being listed on search engines indices. Empirical evidence that the placement of key words in certain areas of the body text will have an influence on the Web sites' visibility to search engines could not be found in the literature. The result of two experiments indicated that key words should be concentrated towards the top, and diluted towards the bottom of a Web page to increase visibility. However, care should be taken in terms of key word density, to prevent search engine algorithms from raising the spam alarm.

  6. Sound Search Engine Concept

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2006-01-01

    Sound search is provided by the major search engines, however, indexing is text based, not sound based. We will establish a dedicated sound search services with based on sound feature indexing. The current demo shows the concept of the sound search engine. The first engine will be realased June...

  7. Usability evaluation of an experimental text summarization system and three search engines: implications for the reengineering of health care interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Kan, Min-Yem; McKeown, Kathleen; Klavans, Judith; Jordan, Desmond; LaFlamme, Mark; Patel, Vimia L

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the comparative evaluation of an experimental automated text summarization system, Centrifuser and three conventional search engines - Google, Yahoo and About.com. Centrifuser provides information to patients and families relevant to their questions about specific health conditions. It then produces a multidocument summary of articles retrieved by a standard search engine, tailored to the user's question. Subjects, consisting of friends or family of hospitalized patients, were asked to "think aloud" as they interacted with the four systems. The evaluation involved audio- and video recording of subject interactions with the interfaces in situ at a hospital. Results of the evaluation show that subjects found Centrifuser's summarization capability useful and easy to understand. In comparing Centrifuser to the three search engines, subjects' ratings varied; however, specific interface features were deemed useful across interfaces. We conclude with a discussion of the implications for engineering Web-based retrieval systems.

  8. Internet Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Fatmaa El Zahraa Mohamed Abdou

    2004-01-01

    A general study about the internet search engines, the study deals main 7 points; the differance between search engines and search directories, components of search engines, the percentage of sites covered by search engines, cataloging of sites, the needed time for sites appearance in search engines, search capabilities, and types of search engines.

  9. Meta Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garman, Nancy

    1999-01-01

    Describes common options and features to consider in evaluating which meta search engine will best meet a searcher's needs. Discusses number and names of engines searched; other sources and specialty engines; search queries; other search options; and results options. (AEF)

  10. Design considerations for a large-scale image-based text search engine in historical manuscript collections

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schomaker, Lambertus

    2016-01-01

    This article gives an overview of design considerations for a handwriting search engine based on pattern recognition and high-performance computing, “Monk”. In order to satisfy multiple and often conflicting technological requirements, an architecture is used which heavily relies on high-performance

  11. Myanmar Language Search Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Pann Yu Mon; Yoshiki Mikami

    2011-01-01

    With the enormous growth of the World Wide Web, search engines play a critical role in retrieving information from the borderless Web. Although many search engines are available for the major languages, but they are not much proficient for the less computerized languages including Myanmar. The main reason is that those search engines are not considering the specific features of those languages. A search engine which capable of searching the Web documents written in those languages is highly n...

  12. Is searching full text more effective than searching abstracts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Jimmy

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the growing availability of full-text articles online, scientists and other consumers of the life sciences literature now have the ability to go beyond searching bibliographic records (title, abstract, metadata to directly access full-text content. Motivated by this emerging trend, I posed the following question: is searching full text more effective than searching abstracts? This question is answered by comparing text retrieval algorithms on MEDLINE® abstracts, full-text articles, and spans (paragraphs within full-text articles using data from the TREC 2007 genomics track evaluation. Two retrieval models are examined: bm25 and the ranking algorithm implemented in the open-source Lucene search engine. Results Experiments show that treating an entire article as an indexing unit does not consistently yield higher effectiveness compared to abstract-only search. However, retrieval based on spans, or paragraphs-sized segments of full-text articles, consistently outperforms abstract-only search. Results suggest that highest overall effectiveness may be achieved by combining evidence from spans and full articles. Conclusion Users searching full text are more likely to find relevant articles than searching only abstracts. This finding affirms the value of full text collections for text retrieval and provides a starting point for future work in exploring algorithms that take advantage of rapidly-growing digital archives. Experimental results also highlight the need to develop distributed text retrieval algorithms, since full-text articles are significantly longer than abstracts and may require the computational resources of multiple machines in a cluster. The MapReduce programming model provides a convenient framework for organizing such computations.

  13. Is searching full text more effective than searching abstracts?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jimmy

    2009-02-03

    With the growing availability of full-text articles online, scientists and other consumers of the life sciences literature now have the ability to go beyond searching bibliographic records (title, abstract, metadata) to directly access full-text content. Motivated by this emerging trend, I posed the following question: is searching full text more effective than searching abstracts? This question is answered by comparing text retrieval algorithms on MEDLINE abstracts, full-text articles, and spans (paragraphs) within full-text articles using data from the TREC 2007 genomics track evaluation. Two retrieval models are examined: bm25 and the ranking algorithm implemented in the open-source Lucene search engine. Experiments show that treating an entire article as an indexing unit does not consistently yield higher effectiveness compared to abstract-only search. However, retrieval based on spans, or paragraphs-sized segments of full-text articles, consistently outperforms abstract-only search. Results suggest that highest overall effectiveness may be achieved by combining evidence from spans and full articles. Users searching full text are more likely to find relevant articles than searching only abstracts. This finding affirms the value of full text collections for text retrieval and provides a starting point for future work in exploring algorithms that take advantage of rapidly-growing digital archives. Experimental results also highlight the need to develop distributed text retrieval algorithms, since full-text articles are significantly longer than abstracts and may require the computational resources of multiple machines in a cluster. The MapReduce programming model provides a convenient framework for organizing such computations.

  14. Web Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Rajashekar, TB

    1998-01-01

    The World Wide Web is emerging as an all-in-one information source. Tools for searching Web-based information include search engines, subject directories and meta search tools. We take a look at key features of these tools and suggest practical hints for effective Web searching.

  15. Vertical Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Curran, Kevin; Mc Glinchey, Jude

    2017-01-01

    This paper outlines the growth in popularity of vertical search engines, their origins, the differences between them and well-known broad based search engines such as Google and Yahoo. We also discuss their use in business-to-business, their marketing and advertising costs, what the revenue streams are and who uses them.

  16. Search engine optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Marolt, Klemen

    2013-01-01

    Search engine optimization techniques, often shortened to “SEO,” should lead to first positions in organic search results. Some optimization techniques do not change over time, yet still form the basis for SEO. However, as the Internet and web design evolves dynamically, new optimization techniques flourish and flop. Thus, we looked at the most important factors that can help to improve positioning in search results. It is important to emphasize that none of the techniques can guarantee high ...

  17. Custom Search Engines: Tools & Tips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Notess, Greg R.

    2008-01-01

    Few have the resources to build a Google or Yahoo! from scratch. Yet anyone can build a search engine based on a subset of the large search engines' databases. Use Google Custom Search Engine or Yahoo! Search Builder or any of the other similar programs to create a vertical search engine targeting sites of interest to users. The basic steps to…

  18. The Weaknesses of Full-Text Searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beall, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    This paper provides a theoretical critique of the deficiencies of full-text searching in academic library databases. Because full-text searching relies on matching words in a search query with words in online resources, it is an inefficient method of finding information in a database. This matching fails to retrieve synonyms, and it also retrieves…

  19. [Development of domain specific search engines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takai, T; Tokunaga, M; Maeda, K; Kaminuma, T

    2000-01-01

    As cyber space exploding in a pace that nobody has ever imagined, it becomes very important to search cyber space efficiently and effectively. One solution to this problem is search engines. Already a lot of commercial search engines have been put on the market. However these search engines respond with such cumbersome results that domain specific experts can not tolerate. Using a dedicate hardware and a commercial software called OpenText, we have tried to develop several domain specific search engines. These engines are for our institute's Web contents, drugs, chemical safety, endocrine disruptors, and emergent response for chemical hazard. These engines have been on our Web site for testing.

  20. New generation of the multimedia search engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijes Cruz, Mario Humberto; Soto Aldaco, Andrea; Maldonado Cano, Luis Alejandro; López Rodríguez, Mario; Rodríguez Vázqueza, Manuel Antonio; Amaya Reyes, Laura Mariel; Cano Martínez, Elizabeth; Pérez Rosas, Osvaldo Gerardo; Rodríguez Espejo, Luis; Flores Secundino, Jesús Abimelek; Rivera Martínez, José Luis; García Vázquez, Mireya Saraí; Zamudio Fuentes, Luis Miguel; Sánchez Valenzuela, Juan Carlos; Montoya Obeso, Abraham; Ramírez Acosta, Alejandro Álvaro

    2016-09-01

    Current search engines are based upon search methods that involve the combination of words (text-based search); which has been efficient until now. However, the Internet's growing demand indicates that there's more diversity on it with each passing day. Text-based searches are becoming limited, as most of the information on the Internet can be found in different types of content denominated multimedia content (images, audio files, video files). Indeed, what needs to be improved in current search engines is: search content, and precision; as well as an accurate display of expected search results by the user. Any search can be more precise if it uses more text parameters, but it doesn't help improve the content or speed of the search itself. One solution is to improve them through the characterization of the content for the search in multimedia files. In this article, an analysis of the new generation multimedia search engines is presented, focusing the needs according to new technologies. Multimedia content has become a central part of the flow of information in our daily life. This reflects the necessity of having multimedia search engines, as well as knowing the real tasks that it must comply. Through this analysis, it is shown that there are not many search engines that can perform content searches. The area of research of multimedia search engines of new generation is a multidisciplinary area that's in constant growth, generating tools that satisfy the different needs of new generation systems.

  1. Multimedia Search Engines : Concept, Performance, and Types

    OpenAIRE

    Sayed Rabeh Sayed

    2005-01-01

    A Research about multimedia search engines, it starts with definition of search engines at general and multimedia search engines, then explains how they work, and divided them into: Video search engines, Images search engines, and Audio search engines. Finally, it reviews a samples to multimedia search engines.

  2. Full text and figure display improves bioscience literature search.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Divoli

    Full Text Available When reading bioscience journal articles, many researchers focus attention on the figures and their captions. This observation led to the development of the BioText literature search engine, a freely available Web-based application that allows biologists to search over the contents of Open Access Journals, and see figures from the articles displayed directly in the search results. This article presents a qualitative assessment of this system in the form of a usability study with 20 biologist participants using and commenting on the system. 19 out of 20 participants expressed a desire to use a bioscience literature search engine that displays articles' figures alongside the full text search results. 15 out of 20 participants said they would use a caption search and figure display interface either frequently or sometimes, while 4 said rarely and 1 said undecided. 10 out of 20 participants said they would use a tool for searching the text of tables and their captions either frequently or sometimes, while 7 said they would use it rarely if at all, 2 said they would never use it, and 1 was undecided. This study found evidence, supporting results of an earlier study, that bioscience literature search systems such as PubMed should show figures from articles alongside search results. It also found evidence that full text and captions should be searched along with the article title, metadata, and abstract. Finally, for a subset of users and information needs, allowing for explicit search within captions for figures and tables is a useful function, but it is not entirely clear how to cleanly integrate this within a more general literature search interface. Such a facility supports Open Access publishing efforts, as it requires access to full text of documents and the lifting of restrictions in order to show figures in the search interface.

  3. Full text and figure display improves bioscience literature search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divoli, Anna; Wooldridge, Michael A; Hearst, Marti A

    2010-04-14

    When reading bioscience journal articles, many researchers focus attention on the figures and their captions. This observation led to the development of the BioText literature search engine, a freely available Web-based application that allows biologists to search over the contents of Open Access Journals, and see figures from the articles displayed directly in the search results. This article presents a qualitative assessment of this system in the form of a usability study with 20 biologist participants using and commenting on the system. 19 out of 20 participants expressed a desire to use a bioscience literature search engine that displays articles' figures alongside the full text search results. 15 out of 20 participants said they would use a caption search and figure display interface either frequently or sometimes, while 4 said rarely and 1 said undecided. 10 out of 20 participants said they would use a tool for searching the text of tables and their captions either frequently or sometimes, while 7 said they would use it rarely if at all, 2 said they would never use it, and 1 was undecided. This study found evidence, supporting results of an earlier study, that bioscience literature search systems such as PubMed should show figures from articles alongside search results. It also found evidence that full text and captions should be searched along with the article title, metadata, and abstract. Finally, for a subset of users and information needs, allowing for explicit search within captions for figures and tables is a useful function, but it is not entirely clear how to cleanly integrate this within a more general literature search interface. Such a facility supports Open Access publishing efforts, as it requires access to full text of documents and the lifting of restrictions in order to show figures in the search interface.

  4. Google Patents: The global patent search engine

    OpenAIRE

    Noruzi, Alireza; Abdekhoda, Mohammadhiwa

    2014-01-01

    Google Patents (www.google.com/patents) includes over 8 million full-text patents. Google Patents works in the same way as the Google search engine. Google Patents is the global patent search engine that lets users search through patents from the USPTO (United States Patent and Trademark Office), EPO (European Patent Office), etc. This study begins with an overview of how to use Google Patent and identifies advanced search techniques not well-documented by Google Patent. It makes several sug...

  5. Search Engine Optimization

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Harold

    2006-01-01

    SEO--short for Search Engine Optimization--is the art, craft, and science of driving web traffic to web sites. Web traffic is food, drink, and oxygen--in short, life itself--to any web-based business. Whether your web site depends on broad, general traffic, or high-quality, targeted traffic, this PDF has the tools and information you need to draw more traffic to your site. You'll learn how to effectively use PageRank (and Google itself); how to get listed, get links, and get syndicated; and much more. The field of SEO is expanding into all the possible ways of promoting web traffic. This

  6. Augmenting Oracle Text with the UMLS for enhanced searching of free-text medical reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jing; Erdal, Selnur; Dhaval, Rakesh; Kamal, Jyoti

    2007-10-11

    The intrinsic complexity of free-text medical reports imposes great challenges for information retrieval systems. We have developed a prototype search engine for retrieving clinical reports that leverages the powerful indexing and querying capabilities of Oracle Text, and the rich biomedical domain knowledge and semantic structures that are captured in the UMLS Metathesaurus.

  7. Search Engine For Ebook Portal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prashant Kanade

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to establish the textual analytics involved in developing a search engine for an ebook portal. We have extracted our dataset from Project Gutenberg using a robot harvester. Textual Analytics is used for efficient search retrieval. The entire dataset is represented using Vector Space Model where each document is a vector in the vector space. Further for computational purposes we represent our dataset in the form of a Term Frequency- Inverse Document Frequency tf-idf matrix. The first step involves obtaining the most coherent sequence of words of the search query entered. The entered query is processed using Front End algorithms this includes-Spell Checker Text Segmentation and Language Modeling. Back End processing includes Similarity Modeling Clustering Indexing and Retrieval. The relationship between documents and words is established using cosine similarity measured between the documents and words in Vector Space. Clustering performed is used to suggest books that are similar to the search query entered by the user. Lastly the Lucene Based Elasticsearch engine is used for indexing on the documents. This allows faster retrieval of data. Elasticsearch returns a dictionary and creates a tf-idf matrix. The processed query is compared with the dictionary obtained and tf-idf matrix is used to calculate the score for each match to give most relevant result.

  8. Self-learning search engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuth, A.

    2015-01-01

    How does a search engine such as Google know which search results to display? There are many competing algorithms that generate search results, but which one works best? We developed a new probabilistic method for quickly comparing large numbers of search algorithms by examining the results users

  9. Da "Search engines" a "Shop engines"

    OpenAIRE

    Lupi, Mauro

    2001-01-01

    The change occuring related to “search engines” is going towards e-commerce, transforming all the main search engines into information and commercial suggestion conveying means, basing their businnes on this activity. In a next future we will find two main series of search engines: from one side, the portals that will offer a general orientation guide being convoying means for services and to-buy products; from the other side, vertical portals able to offer information and products on specifi...

  10. [Advanced online search techniques and dedicated search engines for physicians].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nahum, Yoav

    2008-02-01

    In recent years search engines have become an essential tool in the work of physicians. This article will review advanced search techniques from the world of information specialists, as well as some advanced search engine operators that may help physicians improve their online search capabilities, and maximize the yield of their searches. This article also reviews popular dedicated scientific and biomedical literature search engines.

  11. Comparative analysis of some search engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taiwo O. Edosomwan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available We compared the information retrieval performances of some popular search engines (namely, Google, Yahoo, AlltheWeb, Gigablast, Zworks and AltaVista and Bing/MSN in response to a list of ten queries, varying in complexity. These queries were run on each search engine and the precision and response time of the retrieved results were recorded. The first ten documents on each retrieval output were evaluated as being ‘relevant’ or ‘non-relevant’ for evaluation of the search engine’s precision. To evaluate response time, normalised recall ratios were calculated at various cut-off points for each query and search engine. This study shows that Google appears to be the best search engine in terms of both average precision (70% and average response time (2 s. Gigablast and AlltheWeb performed the worst overall in this study.

  12. INTERFACING GOOGLE SEARCH ENGINE TO CAPTURE USER WEB SEARCH BEHAVIOR

    OpenAIRE

    Fadhilah Mat Yamin; T. Ramayah

    2013-01-01

    The behaviour of the searcher when using the search engine especially during the query formulation is crucial. Search engines capture users’ activities in the search log, which is stored at the search engine server. Due to the difficulty of obtaining this search log, this paper proposed and develops an interface framework to interface a Google search engine. This interface will capture users’ queries before redirect them to Google. The analysis of the search log will show that users are utili...

  13. Market Dominance and Search Quality in the Search Engine Market

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lianos, I.; Motchenkova, E.I.

    2013-01-01

    We analyze a search engine market from a law and economics perspective and incorporate the choice of quality-improving innovations by a search engine platform in a two-sided model of Internet search engine. In the proposed framework, we first discuss the legal issues the search engine market raises

  14. Teknik Perangkingan Meta-search Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Puspitaningrum, Diyah

    2014-01-01

    Meta-search engine mengorganisasikan penyatuan hasil dari berbagai search engine dengan tujuan untuk meningkatkan presisi hasil pencarian dokumen web. Pada survei teknik perangkingan meta-search engine ini akan didiskusikan isu-isu pra-pemrosesan, rangking, dan berbagai teknik penggabungan hasil pencarian dari search engine yang berbeda-beda (multi-kombinasi). Isu-isu implementasi penggabungan 2 search engine dan 3 search engine juga menjadi sorotan. Pada makalah ini juga dibahas arahan penel...

  15. Next-Gen Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Amardeep

    2005-01-01

    Current search engines--even the constantly surprising Google--seem unable to leap the next big barrier in search: the trillions of bytes of dynamically generated data created by individual web sites around the world, or what some researchers call the "deep web." The challenge now is not information overload, but information overlook.…

  16. BIOMedical Search Engine Framework: Lightweight and customized implementation of domain-specific biomedical search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jácome, Alberto G; Fdez-Riverola, Florentino; Lourenço, Anália

    2016-07-01

    Text mining and semantic analysis approaches can be applied to the construction of biomedical domain-specific search engines and provide an attractive alternative to create personalized and enhanced search experiences. Therefore, this work introduces the new open-source BIOMedical Search Engine Framework for the fast and lightweight development of domain-specific search engines. The rationale behind this framework is to incorporate core features typically available in search engine frameworks with flexible and extensible technologies to retrieve biomedical documents, annotate meaningful domain concepts, and develop highly customized Web search interfaces. The BIOMedical Search Engine Framework integrates taggers for major biomedical concepts, such as diseases, drugs, genes, proteins, compounds and organisms, and enables the use of domain-specific controlled vocabulary. Technologies from the Typesafe Reactive Platform, the AngularJS JavaScript framework and the Bootstrap HTML/CSS framework support the customization of the domain-oriented search application. Moreover, the RESTful API of the BIOMedical Search Engine Framework allows the integration of the search engine into existing systems or a complete web interface personalization. The construction of the Smart Drug Search is described as proof-of-concept of the BIOMedical Search Engine Framework. This public search engine catalogs scientific literature about antimicrobial resistance, microbial virulence and topics alike. The keyword-based queries of the users are transformed into concepts and search results are presented and ranked accordingly. The semantic graph view portraits all the concepts found in the results, and the researcher may look into the relevance of different concepts, the strength of direct relations, and non-trivial, indirect relations. The number of occurrences of the concept shows its importance to the query, and the frequency of concept co-occurrence is indicative of biological relations

  17. Guided Text Search Using Adaptive Visual Analytics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steed, Chad A [ORNL; Symons, Christopher T [ORNL; Senter, James K [ORNL; DeNap, Frank A [ORNL

    2012-10-01

    This research demonstrates the promise of augmenting interactive visualizations with semi- supervised machine learning techniques to improve the discovery of significant associations and insights in the search and analysis of textual information. More specifically, we have developed a system called Gryffin that hosts a unique collection of techniques that facilitate individualized investigative search pertaining to an ever-changing set of analytical questions over an indexed collection of open-source documents related to critical national infrastructure. The Gryffin client hosts dynamic displays of the search results via focus+context record listings, temporal timelines, term-frequency views, and multiple coordinate views. Furthermore, as the analyst interacts with the display, the interactions are recorded and used to label the search records. These labeled records are then used to drive semi-supervised machine learning algorithms that re-rank the unlabeled search records such that potentially relevant records are moved to the top of the record listing. Gryffin is described in the context of the daily tasks encountered at the US Department of Homeland Security s Fusion Center, with whom we are collaborating in its development. The resulting system is capable of addressing the analysts information overload that can be directly attributed to the deluge of information that must be addressed in the search and investigative analysis of textual information.

  18. Automatic Planning of External Search Engine Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vita Jasevičiūtė

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes an investigation of the external search engine optimization (SEO action planning tool, dedicated to automatically extract a small set of most important keywords for each month during whole year period. The keywords in the set are extracted accordingly to external measured parameters, such as average number of searches during the year and for every month individually. Additionally the position of the optimized web site for each keyword is taken into account. The generated optimization plan is similar to the optimization plans prepared manually by the SEO professionals and can be successfully used as a support tool for web site search engine optimization.

  19. Searching for Suicide Information on Web Search Engines in Chinese

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Feng Lee

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Recently, suicide prevention has been an important public health issue. However, with the growing access to information in cyberspace, the harmful information is easily accessible online. To investigate the accessibility of potentially harmful suicide-related information on the internet, we discuss the following issue about searching suicide information on the internet to draw attention to it. Methods: We use five search engines (Google, Yahoo, Bing, Yam, and Sina and four suicide-related search queries (suicide, how to suicide, suicide methods, and want to die in traditional Chinese in April 2016. We classified the first thirty linkages of the search results on each search engine by a psychiatric doctor into suicide prevention, pro-suicide, neutral, unrelated to suicide, or error websites. Results: Among the total 352 unique websites generated, the suicide prevention websites were the most frequent among the search results (37.8%, followed by websites unrelated to suicide (25.9% and neutral websites (23.0%. However, pro-suicide websites were still easily accessible (9.7%. Besides, compared with the USA and China, the search engine originating in Taiwan had the lowest accessibility to pro-suicide information. The results of ANOVA showed a significant difference between the groups, F = 8.772, P < 0.001. Conclusions: This study results suggest a need for further restrictions and regulations of pro-suicide information on the internet. Providing more supportive information online may be an effective plan for suicidal prevention.

  20. Start Your Engines: Surfing with Search Engines for Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerly, Greg; Brodie, Carolyn S.

    1999-01-01

    Suggests that to be an effective educator and user of the Web it is essential to know the basics about search engines. Presents tips for using search engines. Describes several search engines for children and young adults, as well as some general filtered search engines for children. (AEF)

  1. Search engines that learn from their users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuth, A.G.

    2016-01-01

    More than half the world’s population uses web search engines, resulting in over half a billion search queries every single day. For many people web search engines are among the first resources they go to when a question arises. Moreover, search engines have for many become the most trusted route to

  2. The effective use of search engines on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younger, P

    This article explains how nurses can get the most out of researching information on the internet using the search engine Google. It also explores some of the other types of search engines that are available. Internet users are shown how to find text, images and reports and search within sites. Copyright issues are also discussed.

  3. TECHNIQUES USED IN SEARCH ENGINE MARKETING

    OpenAIRE

    Assoc. Prof. Liviu Ion Ciora Ph. D; Lect. Ion Buligiu Ph. D

    2010-01-01

    Search engine marketing (SEM) is a generic term covering a variety of marketing techniques intended for attracting web traffic in search engines and directories. SEM is a popular tool since it has the potential of substantial gains with minimum investment. On the one side, most search engines and directories offer free or extremely cheap listing. On the other side, the traffic coming from search engines and directories tends to be motivated for acquisitions, making these visitors some of the ...

  4. ROLE AND IMPORTANCE OF SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION

    OpenAIRE

    Gurneet Kaur

    2017-01-01

    Search Engines are an indispensible platform for users all over the globe to search for relevant information online. Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is the exercise of improving the position of a website in search engine rankings, for a chosen set of keywords. SEO is divided into two parts: On-Page and Off-Page SEO. In order to be successful, both the areas require equal attention. This paper aims to explain the functioning of the search engines along with the role and importance of search e...

  5. Children's Search Engines from an Information Search Process Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broch, Elana

    2000-01-01

    Describes cognitive and affective characteristics of children and teenagers that may affect their Web searching behavior. Reviews literature on children's searching in online public access catalogs (OPACs) and using digital libraries. Profiles two Web search engines. Discusses some of the difficulties children have searching the Web, in the…

  6. Search across Different Media: Numeric Data Sets and Text Files

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Buckland

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Digital technology encourages the hope of searching across and between different media forms (text, sound, image, numeric data. Topic searches are described in two different media: text files and socioeconomic numeric databases and also for transverse searching, whereby retrieved text is used to find topically related numeric data and vice versa. Direct transverse searching across different media is impossible. Descriptive metadata provide enabling infrastructure, but usually require mappings between different vocabularies and a search-term recommender system. Statistical association techniques and natural-language processing can help. Searches in socioeconomic numeric databases ordinarily require that place and time be specified.

  7. Search Engines: Gateway to a New ``Panopticon''?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosta, Eleni; Kalloniatis, Christos; Mitrou, Lilian; Kavakli, Evangelia

    Nowadays, Internet users are depending on various search engines in order to be able to find requested information on the Web. Although most users feel that they are and remain anonymous when they place their search queries, reality proves otherwise. The increasing importance of search engines for the location of the desired information on the Internet usually leads to considerable inroads into the privacy of users. The scope of this paper is to study the main privacy issues with regard to search engines, such as the anonymisation of search logs and their retention period, and to examine the applicability of the European data protection legislation to non-EU search engine providers. Ixquick, a privacy-friendly meta search engine will be presented as an alternative to privacy intrusive existing practices of search engines.

  8. Assessment and Comparison of Search capabilities of Web-based Meta-Search Engines: A Checklist Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alireza Isfandiyari Moghadam

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available   The present investigation concerns evaluation, comparison and analysis of search options existing within web-based meta-search engines. 64 meta-search engines were identified. 19 meta-search engines that were free, accessible and compatible with the objectives of the present study were selected. An author’s constructed check list was used for data collection. Findings indicated that all meta-search engines studied used the AND operator, phrase search, number of results displayed setting, previous search query storage and help tutorials. Nevertheless, none of them demonstrated any search options for hypertext searching and displaying the size of the pages searched. 94.7% support features such as truncation, keywords in title and URL search and text summary display. The checklist used in the study could serve as a model for investigating search options in search engines, digital libraries and other internet search tools.

  9. Copyright over Works Reproduced and Published Online by Search Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ernesto Rengifo García

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Search engines are an important technological tool that facilitates the dissemination and access to information on the Internet. However, when it comes to works protected by authors rights, in the case of continental law, or Copyright, for the Anglo-Saxon tradition, it is difficult to define if search engines infringe the rights of the owners of these works. In the face of this situation, the US and Europe have employed the exceptions to autorights and Fair Use to decide whether search engines infringes owners rights. This article carries out a comparative analysis of the different judicial decisions in the US and Europe on search engines and protected works.

  10. Search Engine Liability for Copyright Infringement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, B.; O'Brien, D.; Fitzgerald, A.

    The chapter provides a broad overview to the topic of search engine liability for copyright infringement. In doing so, the chapter examines some of the key copyright law principles and their application to search engines. The chapter also provides a discussion of some of the most important cases to be decided within the courts of the United States, Australia, China and Europe regarding the liability of search engines for copyright infringement. Finally, the chapter will conclude with some thoughts for reform, including how copyright law can be amended in order to accommodate and realise the great informative power which search engines have to offer society.

  11. Database Search Engines: Paradigms, Challenges and Solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheggen, Kenneth; Martens, Lennart; Berven, Frode S; Barsnes, Harald; Vaudel, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The first step in identifying proteins from mass spectrometry based shotgun proteomics data is to infer peptides from tandem mass spectra, a task generally achieved using database search engines. In this chapter, the basic principles of database search engines are introduced with a focus on open source software, and the use of database search engines is demonstrated using the freely available SearchGUI interface. This chapter also discusses how to tackle general issues related to sequence database searching and shows how to minimize their impact.

  12. Searching Harvard Business Review Online. . . Lessons in Searching a Full Text Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenopir, Carol

    1985-01-01

    This article examines the Harvard Business Review Online (HBRO) database (bibliographic description fields, abstracts, extracted information, full text, subject descriptors) and reports on 31 sample HBRO searches conducted in Bibliographic Retrieval Services to test differences between searching full text and searching bibliographic record. Sample…

  13. PlateRunner: A Search Engine to Identify EMR Boilerplates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Divita, Guy; Workman, T Elizabeth; Carter, Marjorie E; Redd, Andrew; Samore, Matthew H; Gundlapalli, Adi V

    2016-01-01

    Medical text contains boilerplated content, an artifact of pull-down forms from EMRs. Boilerplated content is the source of challenges for concept extraction on clinical text. This paper introduces PlateRunner, a search engine on boilerplates from the US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) EMR. Boilerplates containing concepts should be identified and reviewed to recognize challenging formats, identify high yield document titles, and fine tune section zoning. This search engine has the capability to filter negated and asserted concepts, save and search query results. This tool can save queries, search results, and documents found for later analysis.

  14. Subject Gateway Sites and Search Engine Ranking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thelwall, Mike

    2002-01-01

    Discusses subject gateway sites and commercial search engines for the Web and presents an explanation of Google's PageRank algorithm. The principle question addressed is the conditions under which a gateway site will increase the likelihood that a target page is found in search engines. (LRW)

  15. Human Flesh Search Engine and Online Privacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yang; Gao, Hong

    2016-04-01

    Human flesh search engine can be a double-edged sword, bringing convenience on the one hand and leading to infringement of personal privacy on the other hand. This paper discusses the ethical problems brought about by the human flesh search engine, as well as possible solutions.

  16. Music Search Engines: Specifications and Challenges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nanopoulos, Alexandros; Rafilidis, Dimitrios; Manolopoulos, Yannis

    2009-01-01

    Nowadays we have a proliferation of music data available over the Web. One of the imperative challenges is how to search these vast, global-scale musical resources to find preferred music. Recent research has envisaged the notion of music search engines (MSEs) that allow for searching preferred...

  17. Search Engines for Tomorrow's Scholars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2011-01-01

    Today's scholars face an outstanding array of choices when choosing search tools: Google Scholar, discipline-specific abstracts and index databases, library discovery tools, and more recently, Microsoft's re-launch of their academic search tool, now dubbed Microsoft Academic Search. What are these tools' strengths for the emerging needs of…

  18. Users' Understanding of Search Engine Advertisements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewandowski, Dirk

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a large-scale study on users' understanding of search-based advertising is presented. It is based on (1 a survey, (2 a task-based user study, and (3 an online experiment. Data were collected from 1,000 users representative of the German online population. Findings show that users generally lack an understanding of Google's business model and the workings of search-based advertising. 42% of users self-report that they either do not know that it is possible to pay Google for preferred listings for one's company on the SERPs or do not know how to distinguish between organic results and ads. In the task-based user study, we found that only 1.3 percent of participants were able to mark all areas correctly. 9.6 percent had all their identifications correct but did not mark all results they were required to mark. For none of the screenshots given were more than 35% of users able to mark all areas correctly. In the experiment, we found that users who are not able to distinguish between the two results types choose ads around twice as often as users who can recognize the ads. The implications are that models of search engine advertising and of information seeking need to be amended, and that there is a severe need for regulating search-based advertising.

  19. PFTijah: text search in an XML database system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hiemstra, Djoerd; Rode, H.; van Os, R.; Flokstra, Jan

    2006-01-01

    This paper introduces the PFTijah system, a text search system that is integrated with an XML/XQuery database management system. We present examples of its use, we explain some of the system internals, and discuss plans for future work. PFTijah is part of the open source release of MonetDB/XQuery.

  20. Enhancing discovery in spatial data infrastructures using a search engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Corti

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available A spatial data infrastructure (SDI is a framework of geospatial data, metadata, users and tools intended to provide an efficient and flexible way to use spatial information. One of the key software components of an SDI is the catalogue service which is needed to discover, query and manage the metadata. Catalogue services in an SDI are typically based on the Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC Catalogue Service for the Web (CSW standard which defines common interfaces for accessing the metadata information. A search engine is a software system capable of supporting fast and reliable search, which may use ‘any means necessary’ to get users to the resources they need quickly and efficiently. These techniques may include full text search, natural language processing, weighted results, fuzzy tolerance results, faceting, hit highlighting, recommendations and many others. In this paper we present an example of a search engine being added to an SDI to improve search against large collections of geospatial datasets. The Centre for Geographic Analysis (CGA at Harvard University re-engineered the search component of its public domain SDI (Harvard WorldMap which is based on the GeoNode platform. A search engine was added to the SDI stack to enhance the CSW catalogue discovery abilities. It is now possible to discover spatial datasets from metadata by using the standard search operations of the catalogue and to take advantage of the new abilities of the search engine, to return relevant and reliable content to SDI users.

  1. Clinician search behaviors may be influenced by search engine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Annie Y S; Coiera, Enrico; Zrimec, Tatjana; Compton, Paul

    2010-06-30

    Searching the Web for documents using information retrieval systems plays an important part in clinicians' practice of evidence-based medicine. While much research focuses on the design of methods to retrieve documents, there has been little examination of the way different search engine capabilities influence clinician search behaviors. Previous studies have shown that use of task-based search engines allows for faster searches with no loss of decision accuracy compared with resource-based engines. We hypothesized that changes in search behaviors may explain these differences. In all, 75 clinicians (44 doctors and 31 clinical nurse consultants) were randomized to use either a resource-based or a task-based version of a clinical information retrieval system to answer questions about 8 clinical scenarios in a controlled setting in a university computer laboratory. Clinicians using the resource-based system could select 1 of 6 resources, such as PubMed; clinicians using the task-based system could select 1 of 6 clinical tasks, such as diagnosis. Clinicians in both systems could reformulate search queries. System logs unobtrusively capturing clinicians' interactions with the systems were coded and analyzed for clinicians' search actions and query reformulation strategies. The most frequent search action of clinicians using the resource-based system was to explore a new resource with the same query, that is, these clinicians exhibited a "breadth-first" search behaviour. Of 1398 search actions, clinicians using the resource-based system conducted 401 (28.7%, 95% confidence interval [CI] 26.37-31.11) in this way. In contrast, the majority of clinicians using the task-based system exhibited a "depth-first" search behavior in which they reformulated query keywords while keeping to the same task profiles. Of 585 search actions conducted by clinicians using the task-based system, 379 (64.8%, 95% CI 60.83-68.55) were conducted in this way. This study provides evidence that

  2. The end of meta search engines in Europe?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Husovec, Martin

    2015-01-01

    The technology behind the meta search engines supports countless number of Internet services ranging from the price and quality comparison websites to more sophisticated traffic connection finders and general search engines like Google. Meta search engines generally increase market transparency,

  3. Semantic interpretation of search engine resultant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nasution, M. K. M.

    2018-01-01

    In semantic, logical language can be interpreted in various forms, but the certainty of meaning is included in the uncertainty, which directly always influences the role of technology. One results of this uncertainty applies to search engines as user interfaces with information spaces such as the Web. Therefore, the behaviour of search engine results should be interpreted with certainty through semantic formulation as interpretation. Behaviour formulation shows there are various interpretations that can be done semantically either temporary, inclusion, or repeat.

  4. Oscillating feature subset search algorithm for text categorization

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Novovičová, Jana; Somol, Petr; Pudil, Pavel

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 44, č. 4225 (2006), s. 578-587 ISSN 0302-9743 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA2075302; GA MŠk 2C06019 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 507752 - MUSCLE Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10750506 Keywords : text classification * feature selection * oscillating search algorithm * Bhattacharyya distance Subject RIV: BB - Applied Statistics, Operational Research Impact factor: 0.402, year: 2005

  5. Combining Search Engines for Comparative Proteomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabb, David

    2012-01-01

    Many proteomics laboratories have found spectral counting to be an ideal way to recognize biomarkers that differentiate cohorts of samples. This approach assumes that proteins that differ in quantity between samples will generate different numbers of identifiable tandem mass spectra. Increasingly, researchers are employing multiple search engines to maximize the identifications generated from data collections. This talk evaluates four strategies to combine information from multiple search engines in comparative proteomics. The “Count Sum” model pools the spectra across search engines. The “Vote Counting” model combines the judgments from each search engine by protein. Two other models employ parametric and non-parametric analyses of protein-specific p-values from different search engines. We evaluated the four strategies in two different data sets. The ABRF iPRG 2009 study generated five LC-MS/MS analyses of “red” E. coli and five analyses of “yellow” E. coli. NCI CPTAC Study 6 generated five concentrations of Sigma UPS1 spiked into a yeast background. All data were identified with X!Tandem, Sequest, MyriMatch, and TagRecon. For both sample types, “Vote Counting” appeared to manage the diverse identification sets most effectively, yielding heightened discrimination as more search engines were added.

  6. Building a semantic search engine with games and crowdsourcing

    OpenAIRE

    Wieser, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    Semantic search engines aim at improving conventional search with semantic information, or meta-data, on the data searched for and/or on the searchers. So far, approaches to semantic search exploit characteristics of the searchers like age, education, or spoken language for selecting and/or ranking search results. Such data allow to build up a semantic search engine as an extension of a conventional search engine. The crawlers of well established search engines like Google, Yahoo! or Bing ...

  7. The AXES-lite video search engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, Shu; McGuinness, Kevin; Aly, Robin; de Jong, Franciska M.G.; O' Connor, Noel E.

    The aim of AXES is to develop tools that provide various types of users with new engaging ways to interact with audiovisual libraries, helping them discover, browse, navigate, search, and enrich archives. This paper describes the initial (lite) version of the AXES search engine, which is targeted at

  8. Short-term Internet search using makes people rely on search engines when facing unknown issues.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yifan Wang

    Full Text Available The Internet search engines, which have powerful search/sort functions and ease of use features, have become an indispensable tool for many individuals. The current study is to test whether the short-term Internet search training can make people more dependent on it. Thirty-one subjects out of forty subjects completed the search training study which included a pre-test, a six-day's training of Internet search, and a post-test. During the pre- and post- tests, subjects were asked to search online the answers to 40 unusual questions, remember the answers and recall them in the scanner. Un-learned questions were randomly presented at the recalling stage in order to elicited search impulse. Comparing to the pre-test, subjects in the post-test reported higher impulse to use search engines to answer un-learned questions. Consistently, subjects showed higher brain activations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex in the post-test than in the pre-test. In addition, there were significant positive correlations self-reported search impulse and brain responses in the frontal areas. The results suggest that a simple six-day's Internet search training can make people dependent on the search tools when facing unknown issues. People are easily dependent on the Internet search engines.

  9. [Formula: see text]: Oblivious similarity based searching for encrypted data outsourced to an untrusted domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pervez, Zeeshan; Ahmad, Mahmood; Khattak, Asad Masood; Ramzan, Naeem; Khan, Wajahat Ali

    2017-01-01

    Public cloud storage services are becoming prevalent and myriad data sharing, archiving and collaborative services have emerged which harness the pay-as-you-go business model of public cloud. To ensure privacy and confidentiality often encrypted data is outsourced to such services, which further complicates the process of accessing relevant data by using search queries. Search over encrypted data schemes solve this problem by exploiting cryptographic primitives and secure indexing to identify outsourced data that satisfy the search criteria. Almost all of these schemes rely on exact matching between the encrypted data and search criteria. A few schemes which extend the notion of exact matching to similarity based search, lack realism as those schemes rely on trusted third parties or due to increase storage and computational complexity. In this paper we propose Oblivious Similarity based Search ([Formula: see text]) for encrypted data. It enables authorized users to model their own encrypted search queries which are resilient to typographical errors. Unlike conventional methodologies, [Formula: see text] ranks the search results by using similarity measure offering a better search experience than exact matching. It utilizes encrypted bloom filter and probabilistic homomorphic encryption to enable authorized users to access relevant data without revealing results of search query evaluation process to the untrusted cloud service provider. Encrypted bloom filter based search enables [Formula: see text] to reduce search space to potentially relevant encrypted data avoiding unnecessary computation on public cloud. The efficacy of [Formula: see text] is evaluated on Google App Engine for various bloom filter lengths on different cloud configurations.

  10. IBRI-CASONTO: Ontology-based semantic search engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awny Sayed

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The vast availability of information, that added in a very fast pace, in the data repositories creates a challenge in extracting correct and accurate information. Which has increased the competition among developers in order to gain access to technology that seeks to understand the intent researcher and contextual meaning of terms. While the competition for developing an Arabic Semantic Search systems are still in their infancy, and the reason could be traced back to the complexity of Arabic Language. It has a complex morphological, grammatical and semantic aspects, as it is a highly inflectional and derivational language. In this paper, we try to highlight and present an Ontological Search Engine called IBRI-CASONTO for Colleges of Applied Sciences, Oman. Our proposed engine supports both Arabic and English language. It is also employed two types of search which are a keyword-based search and a semantics-based search. IBRI-CASONTO is based on different technologies such as Resource Description Framework (RDF data and Ontological graph. The experiments represent in two sections, first it shows a comparison among Entity-Search and the Classical-Search inside the IBRI-CASONTO itself, second it compares the Entity-Search of IBRI-CASONTO with currently used search engines, such as Kngine, Wolfram Alpha and the most popular engine nowadays Google, in order to measure their performance and efficiency.

  11. Document Clustering Approach for Meta Search Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Naresh, Dr.

    2017-08-01

    The size of WWW is growing exponentially with ever change in technology. This results in huge amount of information with long list of URLs. Manually it is not possible to visit each page individually. So, if the page ranking algorithms are used properly then user search space can be restricted up to some pages of searched results. But available literatures show that no single search system can provide qualitative results from all the domains. This paper provides solution to this problem by introducing a new meta search engine that determine the relevancy of query corresponding to web page and cluster the results accordingly. The proposed approach reduces the user efforts, improves the quality of results and performance of the meta search engine.

  12. Evaluating search effectiveness of some selected search engines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    With advancement in technology, many individuals are getting familiar with the internet a lot of users seek for information on the World Wide Web (WWW) using variety of search engines. This research work evaluates the retrieval effectiveness of Google, Yahoo, Bing, AOL and Baidu. Precision, relative recall and response ...

  13. Adding a visualization feature to web search engines: it's time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Pak Chung

    2008-01-01

    It's widely recognized that all Web search engines today are almost identical in presentation layout and behavior. In fact, the same presentation approach has been applied to depicting search engine results pages (SERPs) since the first Web search engine launched in 1993. In this Visualization Viewpoints article, I propose to add a visualization feature to Web search engines and suggest that the new addition can improve search engines' performance and capabilities, which in turn lead to better Web search technology.

  14. Evidence-based Medicine Search: a customizable federated search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bracke, Paul J; Howse, David K; Keim, Samuel M

    2008-04-01

    This paper reports on the development of a tool by the Arizona Health Sciences Library (AHSL) for searching clinical evidence that can be customized for different user groups. The AHSL provides services to the University of Arizona's (UA's) health sciences programs and to the University Medical Center. Librarians at AHSL collaborated with UA College of Medicine faculty to create an innovative search engine, Evidence-based Medicine (EBM) Search, that provides users with a simple search interface to EBM resources and presents results organized according to an evidence pyramid. EBM Search was developed with a web-based configuration component that allows the tool to be customized for different specialties. Informal and anecdotal feedback from physicians indicates that EBM Search is a useful tool with potential in teaching evidence-based decision making. While formal evaluation is still being planned, a tool such as EBM Search, which can be configured for specific user populations, may help lower barriers to information resources in an academic health sciences center.

  15. Estimating Search Engine Index Size Variability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Bosch, Antal; Bogers, Toine; De Kunder, Maurice

    2016-01-01

    One of the determining factors of the quality of Web search engines is the size of their index. In addition to its influence on search result quality, the size of the indexed Web can also tell us something about which parts of the WWW are directly accessible to the everyday user. We propose a novel...... method of estimating the size of a Web search engine’s index by extrapolating from document frequencies of words observed in a large static corpus of Web pages. In addition, we provide a unique longitudinal perspective on the size of Google and Bing’s indices over a nine-year period, from March 2006...... until January 2015. We find that index size estimates of these two search engines tend to vary dramatically over time, with Google generally possessing a larger index than Bing. This result raises doubts about the reliability of previous one-off estimates of the size of the indexed Web. We find...

  16. Evaluating a Federated Medical Search Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belden, J.; Williams, J.; Richardson, B.; Schuster, K.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Federated medical search engines are health information systems that provide a single access point to different types of information. Their efficiency as clinical decision support tools has been demonstrated through numerous evaluations. Despite their rigor, very few of these studies report holistic evaluations of medical search engines and even fewer base their evaluations on existing evaluation frameworks. Objectives To evaluate a federated medical search engine, MedSocket, for its potential net benefits in an established clinical setting. Methods This study applied the Human, Organization, and Technology (HOT-fit) evaluation framework in order to evaluate MedSocket. The hierarchical structure of the HOT-factors allowed for identification of a combination of efficiency metrics. Human fit was evaluated through user satisfaction and patterns of system use; technology fit was evaluated through the measurements of time-on-task and the accuracy of the found answers; and organization fit was evaluated from the perspective of system fit to the existing organizational structure. Results Evaluations produced mixed results and suggested several opportunities for system improvement. On average, participants were satisfied with MedSocket searches and confident in the accuracy of retrieved answers. However, MedSocket did not meet participants’ expectations in terms of download speed, access to information, and relevance of the search results. These mixed results made it necessary to conclude that in the case of MedSocket, technology fit had a significant influence on the human and organization fit. Hence, improving technological capabilities of the system is critical before its net benefits can become noticeable. Conclusions The HOT-fit evaluation framework was instrumental in tailoring the methodology for conducting a comprehensive evaluation of the search engine. Such multidimensional evaluation of the search engine resulted in recommendations for

  17. Regulating Search Engines: Taking Stock And Looking Ahead

    OpenAIRE

    Gasser, Urs

    2006-01-01

    Since the creation of the first pre-Web Internet search engines in the early 1990s, search engines have become almost as important as email as a primary online activity. Arguably, search engines are among the most important gatekeepers in today's digitally networked environment. Thus, it does not come as a surprise that the evolution of search technology and the diffusion of search engines have been accompanied by a series of conflicts among stakeholders such as search operators, content crea...

  18. The LAILAPS Search Engine: Relevance Ranking in Life Science Databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lange Matthias

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Search engines and retrieval systems are popular tools at a life science desktop. The manual inspection of hundreds of database entries, that reflect a life science concept or fact, is a time intensive daily work. Hereby, not the number of query results matters, but the relevance does. In this paper, we present the LAILAPS search engine for life science databases. The concept is to combine a novel feature model for relevance ranking, a machine learning approach to model user relevance profiles, ranking improvement by user feedback tracking and an intuitive and slim web user interface, that estimates relevance rank by tracking user interactions. Queries are formulated as simple keyword lists and will be expanded by synonyms. Supporting a flexible text index and a simple data import format, LAILAPS can easily be used both as search engine for comprehensive integrated life science databases and for small in-house project databases.

  19. Research Trends with Cross Tabulation Search Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Chengjiu; Hirokawa, Sachio; Yau, Jane Yin-Kim; Hashimoto, Kiyota; Tabata, Yoshiyuki; Nakatoh, Tetsuya

    2013-01-01

    To help researchers in building a knowledge foundation of their research fields which could be a time-consuming process, the authors have developed a Cross Tabulation Search Engine (CTSE). Its purpose is to assist researchers in 1) conducting research surveys, 2) efficiently and effectively retrieving information (such as important researchers,…

  20. Quality Dimensions of Internet Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, M.; Wang, H.; Goh, T. N.

    1998-01-01

    Reviews commonly used search engines (AltaVista, Excite, infoseek, Lycos, HotBot, WebCrawler), focusing on existing comparative studies; considers quality dimensions from the customer's point of view based on a SERVQUAL framework; and groups these quality expectations in five dimensions: tangibles, reliability, responsiveness, assurance, and…

  1. Information retrieval implementing and evaluating search engines

    CERN Document Server

    Büttcher, Stefan; Cormack, Gordon V

    2016-01-01

    Information retrieval is the foundation for modern search engines. This textbook offers an introduction to the core topics underlying modern search technologies, including algorithms, data structures, indexing, retrieval, and evaluation. The emphasis is on implementation and experimentation; each chapter includes exercises and suggestions for student projects. Wumpus -- a multiuser open-source information retrieval system developed by one of the authors and available online -- provides model implementations and a basis for student work. The modular structure of the book allows instructors to use it in a variety of graduate-level courses, including courses taught from a database systems perspective, traditional information retrieval courses with a focus on IR theory, and courses covering the basics of Web retrieval. In addition to its classroom use, Information Retrieval will be a valuable reference for professionals in computer science, computer engineering, and software engineering.

  2. Multiple Presents: How Search Engines Re-write the Past

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hellsten, I; Leydesdorff, L.; Wouters, P.

    2006-01-01

    Internet search engines function in a present which changes continuously. The search engines update their indices regularly, overwriting webpages with newer ones, adding new pages to the index and losing older ones. Some search engines can be used to search for information on the internet for

  3. The Use of Web Search Engines in Information Science Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Ilan, Judit

    2004-01-01

    Reviews the literature on the use of Web search engines in information science research, including: ways users interact with Web search engines; social aspects of searching; structure and dynamic nature of the Web; link analysis; other bibliometric applications; characterizing information on the Web; search engine evaluation and improvement; and…

  4. An Exploratory Survey of Student Perspectives Regarding Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshare, Khaled; Miller, Don; Wenger, James

    2005-01-01

    This study explored college students' perceptions regarding their use of search engines. The main objective was to determine how frequently students used various search engines, whether advanced search features were used, and how many search engines were used. Various factors that might influence student responses were examined. Results showed…

  5. Sexual information seeking on web search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spink, Amanda; Koricich, Andrew; Jansen, B J; Cole, Charles

    2004-02-01

    Sexual information seeking is an important element within human information behavior. Seeking sexually related information on the Internet takes many forms and channels, including chat rooms discussions, accessing Websites or searching Web search engines for sexual materials. The study of sexual Web queries provides insight into sexually-related information-seeking behavior, of value to Web users and providers alike. We qualitatively analyzed queries from logs of 1,025,910 Alta Vista and AlltheWeb.com Web user queries from 2001. We compared the differences in sexually-related Web searching between Alta Vista and AlltheWeb.com users. Differences were found in session duration, query outcomes, and search term choices. Implications of the findings for sexual information seeking are discussed.

  6. Reflections on New Search Engine 新型搜索引擎畅想

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Jiannian

    2007-01-01

    English abstract]Quick increment of need on internet information resources leads to a rush of search engines. This article introduces some new type of search engines which is appearing and will appear. These search engines includes as follows: grey document search engine, invisible web search engine, knowledge discovery search engine, clustering meta search engine, academic clustering search engine, conception comparison and conception analogy search engine, consultation search engine, teachi...

  7. On development of search engine for geodata

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Procházka

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Effective management and sharing of geodata is one of the priorities of the European Union (INSPIRE activity and companies all around the world. Many different companies and organisations publish their geodata using web mapping services. This situation leads to a multiple publishing of similar or completely same geodata. On the other hand, there is frequently a problem how to determine an appropriate mapserver with the required data. This paper presents a geodata search engine which solves the problem how to access geodata more effectively. Presented solution aggregates data from the different mapservers and provides an interface according to the Open Geospatial Consortium Web Map Server specification. This allows to use our solution in the standard GIS tools as common mapserver. Completely new feature is a request which allows to select map layers which fulfills specified criteria. Selection could be given by keywords in a map layer description and by defining a bounding box on Earth surface. Response is a list of appropriate layers sorted according to their relevance. Presented solution could be among other applications significant source of information for many data mining techniques. It allows to interconnect processed data with their space-temporal context.

  8. Chemical Information in Scirus and BASE (Bielefeld Academic Search Engine)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bendig, Regina B.

    2009-01-01

    The author sought to determine to what extent the two search engines, Scirus and BASE (Bielefeld Academic Search Engines), would be useful to first-year university students as the first point of searching for chemical information. Five topics were searched and the first ten records of each search result were evaluated with regard to the type of…

  9. Building a better search engine for earth science data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, E. M.; Yang, C. P.; Moroni, D. F.; McGibbney, L. J.; Jiang, Y.; Huang, T.; Greguska, F. R., III; Li, Y.; Finch, C. J.

    2017-12-01

    Free text data searching of earth science datasets has been implemented with varying degrees of success and completeness across the spectrum of the 12 NASA earth sciences data centers. At the JPL Physical Oceanography Distributed Active Archive Center (PO.DAAC) the search engine has been developed around the Solr/Lucene platform. Others have chosen other popular enterprise search platforms like Elasticsearch. Regardless, the default implementations of these search engines leveraging factors such as dataset popularity, term frequency and inverse document term frequency do not fully meet the needs of precise relevancy and ranking of earth science search results. For the PO.DAAC, this shortcoming has been identified for several years by its external User Working Group that has assigned several recommendations to improve the relevancy and discoverability of datasets related to remotely sensed sea surface temperature, ocean wind, waves, salinity, height and gravity that comprise a total count of over 500 public availability datasets. Recently, the PO.DAAC has teamed with an effort led by George Mason University to improve the improve the search and relevancy ranking of oceanographic data via a simple search interface and powerful backend services called MUDROD (Mining and Utilizing Dataset Relevancy from Oceanographic Datasets to Improve Data Discovery) funded by the NASA AIST program. MUDROD has mined and utilized the combination of PO.DAAC earth science dataset metadata, usage metrics, and user feedback and search history to objectively extract relevance for improved data discovery and access. In addition to improved dataset relevance and ranking, the MUDROD search engine also returns recommendations to related datasets and related user queries. This presentation will report on use cases that drove the architecture and development, and the success metrics and improvements on search precision and recall that MUDROD has demonstrated over the existing PO.DAAC search

  10. Experience of Developing a Meta-Semantic Search Engine

    OpenAIRE

    Mukhopadhyay, Debajyoti; Sharma, Manoj; Joshi, Gajanan; Pagare, Trupti; Palwe, Adarsha

    2013-01-01

    Thinking of todays web search scenario which is mainly keyword based, leads to the need of effective and meaningful search provided by Semantic Web. Existing search engines are vulnerable to provide relevant answers to users query due to their dependency on simple data available in web pages. On other hand, semantic search engines provide efficient and relevant results as the semantic web manages information with well defined meaning using ontology. A Meta-Search engine is a search tool that ...

  11. Searching for Significance in Unstructured Data: Text Mining with Leximancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, David A.

    2014-01-01

    Scholars in many knowledge domains rely on sophisticated information technologies to search for and retrieve records and publications pertinent to their research interests. But what is a scholar to do when a search identifies hundreds of documents, any of which might be vital or irrelevant to his or her work? The problem is further complicated by…

  12. Dyniqx: a novel meta-search engine for metadata based cross search

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jianhan; Song, Dawei; Eisenstadt, Marc; Barladeanu, Cristi; Rüger, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    The effect of metadata in collection fusion has not been sufficiently studied. In response to this, we present a novel meta-search engine called Dyniqx for metadata based cross search. Dyniqx exploits the availability of metadata in academic search services such as PubMed and Google Scholar etc for fusing search results from heterogeneous search engines. In addition, metadata from these search engines are used for generating dynamic query controls such as sliders and tick boxes etc which are ...

  13. Search Engine : an effective tool for exploring the Internet

    OpenAIRE

    Ranasinghe, W.M. Tharanga Dilruk

    2006-01-01

    The Internet has become the largest source of information. Today, millions of Websites exist and this number continuous to grow. Finding the right information at the right time is the challenge in the Internet age. Search engine is searchable database which allows locating the information on the Internet by submitting the keywords. Search engines can be divided into two categories as the Individual and Meta Search engines. This article discusses the features of these search engines in detail.

  14. An Innovative Approach for online Meta Search Engine Optimization

    OpenAIRE

    Manral, Jai; Hossain, Mohammed Alamgir

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to identify efficient techniques used in Web Search Engine Optimization (SEO). Understanding SEO factors which can influence page ranking in search engine is significant for webmasters who wish to attract large number of users to their website. Different from previous relevant research, in this study we developed an intelligent Meta search engine which aggregates results from various search engines and ranks them based on several important SEO parameters. The r...

  15. TOWARDS ACTIVE SEO (SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles-Victor Boutet

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the age of writable web, new skills and new practices are appearing. In an environment that allows everyone to communicate information globally, internet referencing (or SEO is a strategic discipline that aims to generate visibility, internet traffic and a maximum exploitation of sites publications. Often misperceived as a fraud, SEO has evolved to be a facilitating tool for anyone who wishes to reference their website with search engines. In this article we show that it is possible to achieve the first rank in search results of keywords that are very competitive. We show methods that are quick, sustainable and legal; while applying the principles of active SEO 2.0. This article also clarifies some working functions of search engines, some advanced referencing techniques (that are completely ethical and legal and we lay the foundations for an in depth reflection on the qualities and advantages of these techniques.

  16. ERRATUM: TOWARDS ACTIVE SEO (SEARCH ENGINE OPTIMIZATION 2.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles-Victor Boutet

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the age of writable web, new skills and new practices are appearing. In an environment that allows everyone to communicate information globally, internet referencing (or SEO is a strategic discipline that aims to generate visibility, internet traffic and a maximum exploitation of sites publications. Often misperceived as a fraud, SEO has evolved to be a facilitating tool for anyone who wishes to reference their website with search engines. In this article we show that it is possible to achieve the first rank in search results of keywords that are very competitive. We show methods that are quick, sustainable and legal; while applying the principles of active SEO 2.0. This article also clarifies some working functions of search engines, some advanced referencing techniques (that are completely ethical and legal and we lay the foundations for an in depth reflection on the qualities and advantages of these techniques.

  17. A Literature Review of Indexing and Searching Techniques Implementation in Educational Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Guemmat, Kamal; Ouahabi, Sara

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this article is to analyze the searching and indexing techniques of educational search engines' implementation while treating future challenges. Educational search engines could greatly help in the effectiveness of e-learning if used correctly. However, these engines have several gaps which influence the performance of e-learning…

  18. Search Engine Customization and Data Set Builder

    OpenAIRE

    Arias Moreno, Fco Javier

    2009-01-01

    There are two core objectives in this work: firstly, to build a data set, and secondly, to customize a search engine. The first objective is to design and implement a data set builder. There are two steps required for this. The first step is to build a crawler. The second step is to include a cleaner. The crawler collects Web links. The cleaner extracts the main content and removes noise from the files crawled. The goal of this application is crawling Web news sites to find the...

  19. Search Engines : Some Data Protection Issues

    OpenAIRE

    Unger, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    The thesis elaborates on a topic which has attracted a lot of discussion in recent years and is the subject of an ongoing debate. A big controversy has flourished between the company Google Inc. and several privacy groups' ostensibly led by the "Working Party on the Protection of Individuals with regard to the Processing of Personal Data". Deep data protection concerns have been raised in this debate by the use of a search engine and its storing of personal data belonging to the data subject....

  20. Analysis of Search Engines and Meta Search Engines\\\\\\' Position by University of Isfahan Users Based on Rogers\\\\\\' Diffusion of Innovation Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maryam Akbari

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated the analysis of search engines and meta search engines adoption process by University of Isfahan users during 2009-2010 based on the Rogers' diffusion of innovation theory. The main aim of the research was to study the rate of adoption and recognizing the potentials and effective tools in search engines and meta search engines adoption among University of Isfahan users. The research method was descriptive survey study. The cases of the study were all of the post graduate students of the University of Isfahan. 351 students were selected as the sample and categorized by a stratified random sampling method. Questionnaire was used for collecting data. The collected data was analyzed using SPSS 16 in both descriptive and analytic statistic. For descriptive statistic frequency, percentage and mean were used, while for analytic statistic t-test and Kruskal-Wallis non parametric test (H-test were used. The finding of t-test and Kruscal-Wallis indicated that the mean of search engines and meta search engines adoption did not show statistical differences gender, level of education and the faculty. Special search engines adoption process was different in terms of gender but not in terms of the level of education and the faculty. Other results of the research indicated that among general search engines, Google had the most adoption rate. In addition, among the special search engines, Google Scholar and among the meta search engines Mamma had the most adopting rate. Findings also showed that friends played an important role on how students adopted general search engines while professors had important role on how students adopted special search engines and meta search engines. Moreover, results showed that the place where students got the most acquaintance with search engines and meta search engines was in the university. The finding showed that the curve of adoption rate was not normal and it was not also in S-shape. Morover

  1. Searching for Bill and Jane: Electronic Full-Text Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Still, Julie; Kassabian, Vibiana

    1998-01-01

    Examines electronic full-text literature available on the World Wide Web and on CD-ROM. Discusses authors and genres, electronic texts, and fees. Highlights Shakespeare, Jane Austen, and nature writing. Provides a bibliography of Web guides, specialized Shakespeare pages, and pages dealing with the Shakespeare authorship debate and secondary…

  2. LOTUS: Adaptive text search for big linked data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ilievski, F.; Beek, Wouter; van Erp, Marieke; Rietveld, Laurens; Schlobach, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Finding relevant resources on the Semantic Web today is a dirty job: no centralized query service exists and the support for natural language access is limited. We present LOTUS: Linked Open Text Un- leaShed, a text-based entry point to a massive subset of today’s Linked Open Data Cloud. Recognizing

  3. The Effect of Internet Searches on Afforestation: The Case of a Green Search Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Palos-Sanchez

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Ecosia is an Internet search engine that plants trees with the income obtained from advertising. This study explored the factors that affect the adoption of Ecosia.org from the perspective of technology adoption and trust. This was done by using the Unified Theory of Acceptance and Use of Technology (UTAUT2 and then analyzing the results with PLS-SEM (Partial Least Squares-Structural Equation Modeling. Subsequently, a survey was conducted with a structured questionnaire on search engines, which yielded the following results: (1 the idea of a company helping to mitigate the effects of climate change by planting trees is well received by Internet users. However, few people accept the idea of changing their habits from using traditional search engines; (2 Ecosia is a search engine believed to have higher compatibility rates, and needing less hardware resources, and (3 ecological marketing is an appropriate and future strategy that can increase the intention to use a technological product. Based on the results obtained, this study shows that a search engine or other service provided by the Internet, which can be audited (visits, searches, files, etc., can also contribute to curb the effects of deforestation and climate change. In addition, companies, and especially technological start-ups, are advised to take into account that users feel better using these tools. Finally, this study urges foundations and non-governmental organizations to fight against the effects of deforestation by supporting these initiatives. The study also urges companies to support technological services, and follow the behavior of Ecosia.org in order to positively influence user satisfaction by using ecological marketing strategies.

  4. "Free full text articles": where to search for them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ashish; Singh, Manish; Singh, Ajai Kumar; Singh, Deepti; Singh, Pratibha; Sharma, Abhishek

    2011-07-01

    References form the backbone of any medical literature. Presently, because of high inflation, it is very difficult for any library/organization/college to purchase all journals. The condition is even worse for an individual person, such as private practitioners. The solution lies in the free availability of full-text articles. Here, the authors share their experiences about the accessibility of free full-text articles.

  5. The EBI search engine: EBI search as a service-making biological data accessible for all.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young M; Squizzato, Silvano; Buso, Nicola; Gur, Tamer; Lopez, Rodrigo

    2017-07-03

    We present an update of the EBI Search engine, an easy-to-use fast text search and indexing system with powerful data navigation and retrieval capabilities. The interconnectivity that exists between data resources at EMBL-EBI provides easy, quick and precise navigation and a better understanding of the relationship between different data types that include nucleotide and protein sequences, genes, gene products, proteins, protein domains, protein families, enzymes and macromolecular structures, as well as the life science literature. EBI Search provides a powerful RESTful API that enables its integration into third-party portals, thus providing 'Search as a Service' capabilities, which are the main topic of this article. © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  6. The EBI search engine: EBI search as a service—making biological data accessible for all

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Young M.; Squizzato, Silvano; Buso, Nicola; Gur, Tamer

    2017-01-01

    Abstract We present an update of the EBI Search engine, an easy-to-use fast text search and indexing system with powerful data navigation and retrieval capabilities. The interconnectivity that exists between data resources at EMBL–EBI provides easy, quick and precise navigation and a better understanding of the relationship between different data types that include nucleotide and protein sequences, genes, gene products, proteins, protein domains, protein families, enzymes and macromolecular structures, as well as the life science literature. EBI Search provides a powerful RESTful API that enables its integration into third-party portals, thus providing ‘Search as a Service’ capabilities, which are the main topic of this article. PMID:28472374

  7. Searching for Intertextual Connections in Small Group Text Discussion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Feng-ming

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the sources for and intentions of intertextuality made by 10 groups of Taiwanese university students in the process of discussing two American stories. Two types of data, small group text discussions and oral interviews, were gathered. The results indicated that participants used diverse sources of intertextual links, and with…

  8. People searching for people: analysis of a people search engine log

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weerkamp, W.; Berendsen, R.; Kovachev, B.; Meij, E.; Balog, K.; de Rijke, M.

    2011-01-01

    Recent years show an increasing interest in vertical search: searching within a particular type of information. Understanding what people search for in these "verticals" gives direction to research and provides pointers for the search engines themselves. In this paper we analyze the search logs of

  9. Understanding and modeling users of modern search engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chuklin, A.

    2017-01-01

    As search is being used by billions of people, modern search engines are becoming more and more complex. And complexity does not just come from the algorithms. Richer and richer content is being added to search engine result pages: news and sports results, definitions and translations, images and

  10. Search Engine Advertising Effectiveness in a Multimedia Campaign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zenetti, German; Bijmolt, Tammo H. A.; Leeflang, Peter S. H.; Klapper, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Search engine advertising has become a multibillion-dollar business and one of the dominant forms of advertising on the Internet. This study examines the effectiveness of search engine advertising within a multimedia campaign, with explicit consideration of the interaction effects between search

  11. Comparative Study on Three Major Internet Search Engines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Google and ask.com search engines. Experimental method was used with ten reference questions which were used to query each of the search engines . Yahoo obtained the highest results (521,801,043) among the three Web search ...

  12. Information access in the art history domain. Evaluating a federated search engine for Rembrandt research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verberne, S.; Boves, L.W.J.; Bosch, A.P.J. van den

    2016-01-01

    The art history domain is an interesting case for search engines tailored to the digital humanities, because the domain involves different types of sources (primary and secondary; text and images). One example of an art history search engine is RemBench, which provides access to information in four

  13. Query Log Analysis of an Electronic Health Record Search Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lei; Mei, Qiaozhu; Zheng, Kai; Hanauer, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We analyzed a longitudinal collection of query logs of a full-text search engine designed to facilitate information retrieval in electronic health records (EHR). The collection, 202,905 queries and 35,928 user sessions recorded over a course of 4 years, represents the information-seeking behavior of 533 medical professionals, including frontline practitioners, coding personnel, patient safety officers, and biomedical researchers for patient data stored in EHR systems. In this paper, we present descriptive statistics of the queries, a categorization of information needs manifested through the queries, as well as temporal patterns of the users’ information-seeking behavior. The results suggest that information needs in medical domain are substantially more sophisticated than those that general-purpose web search engines need to accommodate. Therefore, we envision there exists a significant challenge, along with significant opportunities, to provide intelligent query recommendations to facilitate information retrieval in EHR. PMID:22195150

  14. Survey of formal and informal citation in Google search engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Afsaneh Teymourikhani

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Informal citations is bibliographic information (title or Internet address, citing sources of information resources for informal scholarly communication and always neglected in traditional citation databases. This study is done, in order to answer the question of whether informal citations in the web environment are traceable. The present research aims to determine what proportion of web citations of Google search engine is related to formal and informal citation. Research method: Webometrics is the method used. The study is done on 1344 research articles of 98 open access journal, and the method that is used to extract the web citation from Google search engine is “Web / URL citation extraction". Findings: The findings showed that ten percent of the web citations of Google search engine are formal and informal citations. The highest formal citation in the Google search engine with 19/27% is in the field of library and information science and the lowest official citation by 1/54% is devoted to the field of civil engineering. The highest percentage of informal citations with 3/57% is devoted to sociology and the lowest percentage of informal citations by 0/39% is devoted to the field of civil engineering. Journal Citation is highest with 94/12% in the surgical field and lowest with 5/26 percent in the philosophy filed. Result: Due to formal and informal citations in the Google search engine which is about 10 percent and the reduction of this amount compared to previous research, it seems that track citations by this engine should be treated with more caution. We see that the amount of formal citation is variable in different disciplines. Cited journals in the field of surgery, is highest and in the filed of philosophy is lowest, this indicates that in the filed of philosophy, that is a subset of the social sciences, journals in scientific communication do not play a significant role. On the other hand, book has a key role in this filed

  15. Toward two-dimensional search engines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ermann, L; Shepelyansky, D L; Chepelianskii, A D

    2012-01-01

    We study the statistical properties of various directed networks using ranking of their nodes based on the dominant vectors of the Google matrix known as PageRank and CheiRank. On average PageRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of ingoing links, while CheiRank orders nodes proportionally to a number of outgoing links. In this way, the ranking of nodes becomes two dimensional which paves the way for the development of two-dimensional search engines of a new type. Statistical properties of information flow on the PageRank–CheiRank plane are analyzed for networks of British, French and Italian universities, Wikipedia, Linux Kernel, gene regulation and other networks. A special emphasis is done for British universities networks using the large database publicly available in the UK. Methods of spam links control are also analyzed. (paper)

  16. Utilization of a radiology-centric search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Richard E; Sharpe, Megan; Siegel, Eliot; Siddiqui, Khan

    2010-04-01

    Internet-based search engines have become a significant component of medical practice. Physicians increasingly rely on information available from search engines as a means to improve patient care, provide better education, and enhance research. Specialized search engines have emerged to more efficiently meet the needs of physicians. Details about the ways in which radiologists utilize search engines have not been documented. The authors categorized every 25th search query in a radiology-centric vertical search engine by radiologic subspecialty, imaging modality, geographic location of access, time of day, use of abbreviations, misspellings, and search language. Musculoskeletal and neurologic imagings were the most frequently searched subspecialties. The least frequently searched were breast imaging, pediatric imaging, and nuclear medicine. Magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography were the most frequently searched modalities. A majority of searches were initiated in North America, but all continents were represented. Searches occurred 24 h/day in converted local times, with a majority occurring during the normal business day. Misspellings and abbreviations were common. Almost all searches were performed in English. Search engine utilization trends are likely to mirror trends in diagnostic imaging in the region from which searches originate. Internet searching appears to function as a real-time clinical decision-making tool, a research tool, and an educational resource. A more thorough understanding of search utilization patterns can be obtained by analyzing phrases as actually entered as well as the geographic location and time of origination. This knowledge may contribute to the development of more efficient and personalized search engines.

  17. evaluating search effectiveness of some selected search engines

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Precision, relative recall and response time were considered for this ... a total of 24 search queries were sampled based on information queries, .... searching process and results, although there are other ... Q3.2 Software prototype model.

  18. RNA search engines empower the bacterial intranet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dendooven, Tom; Luisi, Ben F

    2017-08-15

    RNA acts not only as an information bearer in the biogenesis of proteins from genes, but also as a regulator that participates in the control of gene expression. In bacteria, small RNA molecules (sRNAs) play controlling roles in numerous processes and help to orchestrate complex regulatory networks. Such processes include cell growth and development, response to stress and metabolic change, transcription termination, cell-to-cell communication, and the launching of programmes for host invasion. All these processes require recognition of target messenger RNAs by the sRNAs. This review summarizes recent results that have provided insights into how bacterial sRNAs are recruited into effector ribonucleoprotein complexes that can seek out and act upon target transcripts. The results hint at how sRNAs and their protein partners act as pattern-matching search engines that efficaciously regulate gene expression, by performing with specificity and speed while avoiding off-target effects. The requirements for efficient searches of RNA patterns appear to be common to all domains of life. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Virtual Reference Services through Web Search Engines: Study of Academic Libraries in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubia Khan

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Web search engines (WSE are powerful and popular tools in the field of information service management. This study is an attempt to examine the impact and usefulness of web search engines in providing virtual reference services (VRS within academic libraries in Pakistan. The study also attempts to investigate the relevant expertise and skills of library professionals in providing digital reference services (DRS efficiently using web search engines. Methodology used in this study is quantitative in nature. The data was collected from fifty public and private sector universities in Pakistan using a structured questionnaire. Microsoft Excel and SPSS were used for data analysis. The study concludes that web search engines are commonly used by librarians to help users (especially research scholars by providing digital reference services. The study also finds a positive correlation between use of web search engines and quality of digital reference services provided to library users. It is concluded that although search engines have increased the expectations of users and are really big competitors to a library’s reference desk, they are however not an alternative to reference service. Findings reveal that search engines pose numerous challenges for librarians and the study also attempts to bring together possible remedial measures. This study is useful for library professionals to understand the importance of search engines in providing VRS. The study also provides an intellectual comparison among different search engines, their capabilities, limitations, challenges and opportunities to provide VRS effectively in libraries.

  20. Applying Russian Search Engines to market Finnish Corporates

    OpenAIRE

    Pankratovs, Vladimirs

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this thesis work is to provide basic knowledge of Russia-based Search Engines marketing capabilities. After reading this material, the user is able to diverge different kinds of Search Engine Marketing tools and can perform advertising campaigns. This study includes information about the majority of tools available to the user and provides up to date screenshots of Russian Search engines front-end, which can be useful in further work. Study discusses the main principles and ba...

  1. Improvement of natural image search engines results by emotional filtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrice Denis

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available With the Internet 2.0 era, managing user emotions is a problem that more and more actors are interested in. Historically, the first notions of emotion sharing were expressed and defined with emoticons. They allowed users to show their emotional status to others in an impersonal and emotionless digital world. Now, in the Internet of social media, every day users share lots of content with each other on Facebook, Twitter, Google+ and so on. Several new popular web sites like FlickR, Picassa, Pinterest, Instagram or DeviantArt are now specifically based on sharing image content as well as personal emotional status. This kind of information is economically very valuable as it can for instance help commercial companies sell more efficiently. In fact, with this king of emotional information, business can made where companies will better target their customers needs, and/or even sell them more products. Research has been and is still interested in the mining of emotional information from user data since then. In this paper, we focus on the impact of emotions from images that have been collected from search image engines. More specifically our proposition is the creation of a filtering layer applied on the results of such image search engines. Our peculiarity relies in the fact that it is the first attempt from our knowledge to filter image search engines results with an emotional filtering approach.

  2. The Little Engines That Could: Modeling the Performance of World Wide Web Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Eric T. Bradlow; David C. Schmittlein

    2000-01-01

    This research examines the ability of six popular Web search engines, individually and collectively, to locate Web pages containing common marketing/management phrases. We propose and validate a model for search engine performance that is able to represent key patterns of coverage and overlap among the engines. The model enables us to estimate the typical additional benefit of using multiple search engines, depending on the particular set of engines being considered. It also provides an estim...

  3. FindZebra: A search engine for rare diseases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dragusin, Radu; Petcu, Paula; Lioma, Christina Amalia

    2013-01-01

    Background: The web has become a primary information resource about illnesses and treatments for both medical and non-medical users. Standard web search is by far the most common interface for such information. It is therefore of interest to find out how well web search engines work for diagnostic...... approach for web search engines for rare disease diagnosis which includes 56 real life diagnostic cases, state-of-the-art evaluation measures, and curated information resources. In addition, we introduce FindZebra, a specialized (vertical) rare disease search engine. FindZebra is powered by open source...... medical concepts to demonstrate different ways of displaying the retrieved results to medical experts. Conclusions: Our results indicate that a specialized search engine can improve the diagnostic quality without compromising the ease of use of the currently widely popular web search engines. The proposed...

  4. Combining results of multiple search engines in proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteynberg, David; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Moritz, Robert L; Deutsch, Eric W

    2013-09-01

    A crucial component of the analysis of shotgun proteomics datasets is the search engine, an algorithm that attempts to identify the peptide sequence from the parent molecular ion that produced each fragment ion spectrum in the dataset. There are many different search engines, both commercial and open source, each employing a somewhat different technique for spectrum identification. The set of high-scoring peptide-spectrum matches for a defined set of input spectra differs markedly among the various search engine results; individual engines each provide unique correct identifications among a core set of correlative identifications. This has led to the approach of combining the results from multiple search engines to achieve improved analysis of each dataset. Here we review the techniques and available software for combining the results of multiple search engines and briefly compare the relative performance of these techniques.

  5. Combining Results of Multiple Search Engines in Proteomics*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shteynberg, David; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I.; Moritz, Robert L.; Deutsch, Eric W.

    2013-01-01

    A crucial component of the analysis of shotgun proteomics datasets is the search engine, an algorithm that attempts to identify the peptide sequence from the parent molecular ion that produced each fragment ion spectrum in the dataset. There are many different search engines, both commercial and open source, each employing a somewhat different technique for spectrum identification. The set of high-scoring peptide-spectrum matches for a defined set of input spectra differs markedly among the various search engine results; individual engines each provide unique correct identifications among a core set of correlative identifications. This has led to the approach of combining the results from multiple search engines to achieve improved analysis of each dataset. Here we review the techniques and available software for combining the results of multiple search engines and briefly compare the relative performance of these techniques. PMID:23720762

  6. Variability of patient spine education by Internet search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghobrial, George M; Mehdi, Angud; Maltenfort, Mitchell; Sharan, Ashwini D; Harrop, James S

    2014-03-01

    Patients are increasingly reliant upon the Internet as a primary source of medical information. The educational experience varies by search engine, search term, and changes daily. There are no tools for critical evaluation of spinal surgery websites. To highlight the variability between common search engines for the same search terms. To detect bias, by prevalence of specific kinds of websites for certain spinal disorders. Demonstrate a simple scoring system of spinal disorder website for patient use, to maximize the quality of information exposed to the patient. Ten common search terms were used to query three of the most common search engines. The top fifty results of each query were tabulated. A negative binomial regression was performed to highlight the variation across each search engine. Google was more likely than Bing and Yahoo search engines to return hospital ads (P=0.002) and more likely to return scholarly sites of peer-reviewed lite (P=0.003). Educational web sites, surgical group sites, and online web communities had a significantly higher likelihood of returning on any search, regardless of search engine, or search string (P=0.007). Likewise, professional websites, including hospital run, industry sponsored, legal, and peer-reviewed web pages were less likely to be found on a search overall, regardless of engine and search string (P=0.078). The Internet is a rapidly growing body of medical information which can serve as a useful tool for patient education. High quality information is readily available, provided that the patient uses a consistent, focused metric for evaluating online spine surgery information, as there is a clear variability in the way search engines present information to the patient. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Web Feet Guide to Search Engines: Finding It on the Net.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Web Feet, 2001

    2001-01-01

    This guide to search engines for the World Wide Web discusses selecting the right search engine; interpreting search results; major search engines; online tutorials and guides; search engines for kids; specialized search tools for various subjects; and other specialized engines and gateways. (LRW)

  8. LAILAPS: the plant science search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esch, Maria; Chen, Jinbo; Colmsee, Christian; Klapperstück, Matthias; Grafahrend-Belau, Eva; Scholz, Uwe; Lange, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    With the number of sequenced plant genomes growing, the number of predicted genes and functional annotations is also increasing. The association between genes and phenotypic traits is currently of great interest. Unfortunately, the information available today is widely scattered over a number of different databases. Information retrieval (IR) has become an all-encompassing bioinformatics methodology for extracting knowledge from complex, heterogeneous and distributed databases, and therefore can be a useful tool for obtaining a comprehensive view of plant genomics, from genes to traits. Here we describe LAILAPS (http://lailaps.ipk-gatersleben.de), an IR system designed to link plant genomic data in the context of phenotypic attributes for a detailed forward genetic research. LAILAPS comprises around 65 million indexed documents, encompassing >13 major life science databases with around 80 million links to plant genomic resources. The LAILAPS search engine allows fuzzy querying for candidate genes linked to specific traits over a loosely integrated system of indexed and interlinked genome databases. Query assistance and an evidence-based annotation system enable time-efficient and comprehensive information retrieval. An artificial neural network incorporating user feedback and behavior tracking allows relevance sorting of results. We fully describe LAILAPS's functionality and capabilities by comparing this system's performance with other widely used systems and by reporting both a validation in maize and a knowledge discovery use-case focusing on candidate genes in barley. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  9. Brief Report: Consistency of Search Engine Rankings for Autism Websites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichow, Brian; Naples, Adam; Steinhoff, Timothy; Halpern, Jason; Volkmar, Fred R.

    2012-01-01

    The World Wide Web is one of the most common methods used by parents to find information on autism spectrum disorders and most consumers find information through search engines such as Google or Bing. However, little is known about how the search engines operate or the consistency of the results that are returned over time. This study presents the…

  10. Considerations for the development of task-based search engines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petcu, Paula; Dragusin, Radu

    2013-01-01

    Based on previous experience from working on a task-based search engine, we present a list of suggestions and ideas for an Information Retrieval (IR) framework that could inform the development of next generation professional search systems. The specific task that we start from is the clinicians......' information need in finding rare disease diagnostic hypotheses at the time and place where medical decisions are made. Our experience from the development of a search engine focused on supporting clinicians in completing this task has provided us valuable insights in what aspects should be considered...... by the developers of vertical search engines....

  11. IntegromeDB: an integrated system and biological search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baitaluk, Michael; Kozhenkov, Sergey; Dubinina, Yulia; Ponomarenko, Julia

    2012-01-19

    With the growth of biological data in volume and heterogeneity, web search engines become key tools for researchers. However, general-purpose search engines are not specialized for the search of biological data. Here, we present an approach at developing a biological web search engine based on the Semantic Web technologies and demonstrate its implementation for retrieving gene- and protein-centered knowledge. The engine is available at http://www.integromedb.org. The IntegromeDB search engine allows scanning data on gene regulation, gene expression, protein-protein interactions, pathways, metagenomics, mutations, diseases, and other gene- and protein-related data that are automatically retrieved from publicly available databases and web pages using biological ontologies. To perfect the resource design and usability, we welcome and encourage community feedback.

  12. MuZeeker - Adapting a music search engine for mobile phones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jakob Eg; Halling, Søren Christian; Sigurdsson, Magnus Kristinn

    2010-01-01

    We describe MuZeeker, a search engine with domain knowledge based on Wikipedia. MuZeeker enables the user to refine a search in multiple steps by means of category selection. In the present version we focus on multimedia search related to music and we present two prototype search applications (web......-based and mobile) and discuss the issues involved in adapting the search engine for mobile phones. A category based filtering approach enables the user to refine a search through relevance feedback by category selection instead of typing additional text, which is hypothesized to be an advantage in the mobile Mu......Zeeker application. We report from two usability experiments using the think aloud protocol, in which N=20 participants performed tasks using MuZeeker and a customized Google search engine. In both experiments web-based and mobile user interfaces were used. The experiment shows that participants are capable...

  13. [Biomedical information on the internet using search engines. A one-year trial].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrao, Salvatore; Leone, Francesco; Arnone, Sabrina

    2004-01-01

    The internet is a communication medium and content distributor that provide information in the general sense but it could be of great utility regarding as the search and retrieval of biomedical information. Search engines represent a great deal to rapidly find information on the net. However, we do not know whether general search engines and meta-search ones are reliable in order to find useful and validated biomedical information. The aim of our study was to verify the reproducibility of a search by key-words (pediatric or evidence) using 9 international search engines and 1 meta-search engine at the baseline and after a one year period. We analysed the first 20 citations as output of each searching. We evaluated the formal quality of Web-sites and their domain extensions. Moreover, we compared the output of each search at the start of this study and after a one year period and we considered as a criterion of reliability the number of Web-sites cited again. We found some interesting results that are reported throughout the text. Our findings point out an extreme dynamicity of the information on the Web and, for this reason, we advice a great caution when someone want to use search and meta-search engines as a tool for searching and retrieve reliable biomedical information. On the other hand, some search and meta-search engines could be very useful as a first step searching for defining better a search and, moreover, for finding institutional Web-sites too. This paper allows to know a more conscious approach to the internet biomedical information universe.

  14. Information Retrieval for Education: Making Search Engines Language Aware

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Niels; Meurers, Detmar

    2010-01-01

    Search engines have been a major factor in making the web the successful and widely used information source it is today. Generally speaking, they make it possible to retrieve web pages on a topic specified by the keywords entered by the user. Yet web searching currently does not take into account which of the search results are comprehensible for…

  15. A fuzzy-match search engine for physician directories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rastegar-Mojarad, Majid; Kadolph, Christopher; Ye, Zhan; Wall, Daniel; Murali, Narayana; Lin, Simon

    2014-11-04

    A search engine to find physicians' information is a basic but crucial function of a health care provider's website. Inefficient search engines, which return no results or incorrect results, can lead to patient frustration and potential customer loss. A search engine that can handle misspellings and spelling variations of names is needed, as the United States (US) has culturally, racially, and ethnically diverse names. The Marshfield Clinic website provides a search engine for users to search for physicians' names. The current search engine provides an auto-completion function, but it requires an exact match. We observed that 26% of all searches yielded no results. The goal was to design a fuzzy-match algorithm to aid users in finding physicians easier and faster. Instead of an exact match search, we used a fuzzy algorithm to find similar matches for searched terms. In the algorithm, we solved three types of search engine failures: "Typographic", "Phonetic spelling variation", and "Nickname". To solve these mismatches, we used a customized Levenshtein distance calculation that incorporated Soundex coding and a lookup table of nicknames derived from US census data. Using the "Challenge Data Set of Marshfield Physician Names," we evaluated the accuracy of fuzzy-match engine-top ten (90%) and compared it with exact match (0%), Soundex (24%), Levenshtein distance (59%), and fuzzy-match engine-top one (71%). We designed, created a reference implementation, and evaluated a fuzzy-match search engine for physician directories. The open-source code is available at the codeplex website and a reference implementation is available for demonstration at the datamarsh website.

  16. Search Engines for Tomorrow's Scholars, Part Two

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagan, Jody Condit

    2012-01-01

    This two-part article considers how well some of today's search tools support scholars' work. The first part of the article reviewed Google Scholar and Microsoft Academic Search using a modified version of Carole L. Palmer, Lauren C. Teffeau, and Carrier M. Pirmann's framework (2009). Microsoft Academic Search is a strong contender when…

  17. REPTREE CLASSIFIER FOR IDENTIFYING LINK SPAM IN WEB SEARCH ENGINES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.K. Jayanthi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Search Engines are used for retrieving the information from the web. Most of the times, the importance is laid on top 10 results sometimes it may shrink as top 5, because of the time constraint and reliability on the search engines. Users believe that top 10 or 5 of total results are more relevant. Here comes the problem of spamdexing. It is a method to deceive the search result quality. Falsified metrics such as inserting enormous amount of keywords or links in website may take that website to the top 10 or 5 positions. This paper proposes a classifier based on the Reptree (Regression tree representative. As an initial step Link-based features such as neighbors, pagerank, truncated pagerank, trustrank and assortativity related attributes are inferred. Based on this features, tree is constructed. The tree uses the feature inference to differentiate spam sites from legitimate sites. WEBSPAM-UK-2007 dataset is taken as a base. It is preprocessed and converted into five datasets FEATA, FEATB, FEATC, FEATD and FEATE. Only link based features are taken for experiments. This paper focus on link spam alone. Finally a representative tree is created which will more precisely classify the web spam entries. Results are given. Regression tree classification seems to perform well as shown through experiments.

  18. The EBI Search engine: providing search and retrieval functionality for biological data from EMBL-EBI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squizzato, Silvano; Park, Young Mi; Buso, Nicola; Gur, Tamer; Cowley, Andrew; Li, Weizhong; Uludag, Mahmut; Pundir, Sangya; Cham, Jennifer A; McWilliam, Hamish; Lopez, Rodrigo

    2015-07-01

    The European Bioinformatics Institute (EMBL-EBI-https://www.ebi.ac.uk) provides free and unrestricted access to data across all major areas of biology and biomedicine. Searching and extracting knowledge across these domains requires a fast and scalable solution that addresses the requirements of domain experts as well as casual users. We present the EBI Search engine, referred to here as 'EBI Search', an easy-to-use fast text search and indexing system with powerful data navigation and retrieval capabilities. API integration provides access to analytical tools, allowing users to further investigate the results of their search. The interconnectivity that exists between data resources at EMBL-EBI provides easy, quick and precise navigation and a better understanding of the relationship between different data types including sequences, genes, gene products, proteins, protein domains, protein families, enzymes and macromolecular structures, together with relevant life science literature. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  19. Search for an additional, heavy Higgs boson in the [Formula: see text] decay channel at [Formula: see text] in [Formula: see text] collision data with the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Agricola, J; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Álvarez Piqueras, D; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Baca, M J; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Baldin, E M; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Basalaev, A; Bassalat, A; Basye, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Beccherle, R; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Becker, S; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bee, C P; Beemster, L J; Beermann, T A; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bell, W H; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez Garcia, J A; Benjamin, D P; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Berghaus, F; Beringer, J; Bernard, C; Bernard, N R; Bernius, C; Bernlochner, F U; Berry, T; Berta, P; Bertella, C; Bertoli, G; Bertolucci, F; Bertsche, C; Bertsche, D; Besana, M I; Besjes, G J; Bessidskaia Bylund, O; Bessner, M; Besson, N; Betancourt, C; Bethke, S; Bevan, A J; Bhimji, W; Bianchi, R M; Bianchini, L; Bianco, M; Biebel, O; Biedermann, D; Bieniek, S P; Biglietti, M; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J; Bilokon, H; Bindi, M; Binet, S; Bingul, A; Bini, C; Biondi, S; Black, C W; Black, J E; Black, K M; Blackburn, D; Blair, R E; Blanchard, J-B; Blanco, J E; Blazek, T; Bloch, I; Blocker, C; Blum, W; Blumenschein, U; Bobbink, G J; Bobrovnikov, V S; Bocchetta, S S; Bocci, A; Bock, C; Boehler, M; Bogaerts, J A; Bogavac, D; Bogdanchikov, A G; Bohm, C; Boisvert, V; Bold, T; Boldea, V; Boldyrev, A S; Bomben, M; Bona, M; Boonekamp, M; Borisov, A; Borissov, G; Borroni, S; Bortfeldt, J; Bortolotto, V; Bos, K; Boscherini, D; Bosman, M; Boudreau, J; Bouffard, J; Bouhova-Thacker, E V; Boumediene, D; Bourdarios, C; Bousson, N; Boveia, A; Boyd, J; Boyko, I R; Bozic, I; Bracinik, J; Brandt, A; Brandt, G; Brandt, O; Bratzler, U; Brau, B; Brau, J E; Braun, H M; Brazzale, S F; Breaden Madden, W D; Brendlinger, K; Brennan, A J; Brenner, L; Brenner, R; Bressler, S; Bristow, K; Bristow, T M; Britton, D; Britzger, D; Brochu, F M; Brock, I; Brock, R; Bronner, J; Brooijmans, G; Brooks, T; Brooks, W K; Brosamer, J; Brost, E; Brown, J; Bruckman de Renstrom, P A; Bruncko, D; Bruneliere, R; Bruni, A; Bruni, G; Bruschi, M; Bruscino, N; Bryngemark, L; Buanes, T; Buat, Q; Buchholz, P; Buckley, A G; Buda, S I; Budagov, I A; Buehrer, F; Bugge, L; Bugge, M K; Bulekov, O; Bullock, D; Burckhart, H; Burdin, S; Burgard, C D; Burghgrave, B; Burke, S; Burmeister, I; Busato, E; Büscher, D; Büscher, V; Bussey, P; Butler, J M; Butt, A I; Buttar, C M; Butterworth, J M; Butti, P; Buttinger, W; Buzatu, A; Buzykaev, A R; Cabrera Urbán, S; Caforio, D; Cairo, V M; Cakir, O; Calace, N; Calafiura, P; Calandri, A; Calderini, G; Calfayan, P; Caloba, L P; Calvet, D; Calvet, S; Camacho Toro, R; Camarda, S; Camarri, P; Cameron, D; Caminal Armadans, R; Campana, S; Campanelli, M; Campoverde, A; Canale, V; Canepa, A; Cano Bret, M; Cantero, J; Cantrill, R; Cao, T; Capeans Garrido, M D M; Caprini, I; Caprini, M; Capua, M; Caputo, R; Cardarelli, R; Cardillo, F; Carli, T; Carlino, G; Carminati, L; Caron, S; Carquin, E; Carrillo-Montoya, G D; Carter, J R; Carvalho, J; Casadei, D; Casado, M P; Casolino, M; Castaneda-Miranda, E; Castelli, A; Castillo Gimenez, V; Castro, N F; Catastini, P; Catinaccio, A; Catmore, J R; Cattai, A; Caudron, J; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cavasinni, V; Ceradini, F; Cerio, B C; Cerny, K; Cerqueira, A S; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Cerutti, F; Cerv, M; Cervelli, A; Cetin, S A; Chafaq, A; Chakraborty, D; Chalupkova, I; Chang, P; Chapman, J D; Charlton, D G; Chau, C C; Chavez Barajas, C A; Cheatham, S; Chegwidden, A; Chekanov, S; Chekulaev, S V; Chelkov, G A; Chelstowska, M A; Chen, C; Chen, H; Chen, K; Chen, L; Chen, S; Chen, X; Chen, Y; Cheng, H C; Cheng, Y; Cheplakov, A; Cheremushkina, E; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R; Chernyatin, V; Cheu, E; Chevalier, L; Chiarella, V; Chiarelli, G; Chiodini, G; Chisholm, A S; Chislett, R T; Chitan, A; Chizhov, M V; Choi, K; Chouridou, S; Chow, B K B; Christodoulou, V; Chromek-Burckhart, D; Chudoba, J; Chuinard, A J; Chwastowski, J J; Chytka, L; Ciapetti, G; Ciftci, A K; Cinca, D; Cindro, V; Cioara, I A; Ciocio, A; Cirotto, F; Citron, Z H; Ciubancan, M; Clark, A; Clark, B L; Clark, P J; Clarke, R N; Cleland, W; Clement, C; Coadou, Y; Cobal, M; Coccaro, A; Cochran, J; Coffey, L; Cogan, J G; Colasurdo, L; Cole, B; Cole, S; Colijn, A P; Collot, J; Colombo, T; Compostella, G; Conde Muiño, P; Coniavitis, E; Connell, S H; Connelly, I A; Consorti, V; Constantinescu, S; Conta, C; Conti, G; Conventi, F; Cooke, M; Cooper, B D; Cooper-Sarkar, A M; Cornelissen, T; Corradi, M; Corriveau, F; Corso-Radu, A; Cortes-Gonzalez, A; Cortiana, G; Costa, G; Costa, M J; Costanzo, D; Côté, D; Cottin, G; Cowan, G; Cox, B E; Cranmer, K; Cree, G; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Crescioli, F; Cribbs, W A; Crispin Ortuzar, M; Cristinziani, M; Croft, V; Crosetti, G; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T; Cummings, J; Curatolo, M; Cuthbert, C; Czirr, H; Czodrowski, P; 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    A search is presented for a high-mass Higgs boson in the [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], and [Formula: see text] decay modes using the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The search uses proton-proton collision data at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb[Formula: see text]. The results of the search are interpreted in the scenario of a heavy Higgs boson with a width that is small compared with the experimental mass resolution. The Higgs boson mass range considered extends up to [Formula: see text] for all four decay modes and down to as low as 140 [Formula: see text], depending on the decay mode. No significant excess of events over the Standard Model prediction is found. A simultaneous fit to the four decay modes yields upper limits on the production cross-section of a heavy Higgs boson times the branching ratio to [Formula: see text] boson pairs. 95 % confidence level upper limits range from 0.53 pb at [Formula: see text] GeV to 0.008 pb at [Formula: see text] GeV for the gluon-fusion production mode and from 0.31 pb at [Formula: see text] GeV to 0.009 pb at [Formula: see text] GeV for the vector-boson-fusion production mode. The results are also interpreted in the context of Type-I and Type-II two-Higgs-doublet models.

  20. Design search and optimization in aerospace engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keane, A J; Scanlan, J P

    2007-10-15

    In this paper, we take a design-led perspective on the use of computational tools in the aerospace sector. We briefly review the current state-of-the-art in design search and optimization (DSO) as applied to problems from aerospace engineering, focusing on those problems that make heavy use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This ranges over issues of representation, optimization problem formulation and computational modelling. We then follow this with a multi-objective, multi-disciplinary example of DSO applied to civil aircraft wing design, an area where this kind of approach is becoming essential for companies to maintain their competitive edge. Our example considers the structure and weight of a transonic civil transport wing, its aerodynamic performance at cruise speed and its manufacturing costs. The goals are low drag and cost while holding weight and structural performance at acceptable levels. The constraints and performance metrics are modelled by a linked series of analysis codes, the most expensive of which is a CFD analysis of the aerodynamics using an Euler code with coupled boundary layer model. Structural strength and weight are assessed using semi-empirical schemes based on typical airframe company practice. Costing is carried out using a newly developed generative approach based on a hierarchical decomposition of the key structural elements of a typical machined and bolted wing-box assembly. To carry out the DSO process in the face of multiple competing goals, a recently developed multi-objective probability of improvement formulation is invoked along with stochastic process response surface models (Krigs). This approach both mitigates the significant run times involved in CFD computation and also provides an elegant way of balancing competing goals while still allowing the deployment of the whole range of single objective optimizers commonly available to design teams.

  1. New Architectures for Presenting Search Results Based on Web Search Engines Users Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, F. J.; Pastor, J. A.; Rodriguez, J. V.; Lopez, Rosana; Rodriguez, J. V., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: The Internet is a dynamic environment which is continuously being updated. Search engines have been, currently are and in all probability will continue to be the most popular systems in this information cosmos. Method: In this work, special attention has been paid to the series of changes made to search engines up to this point,…

  2. Translation Analysis on Civil Engineering Text Produced by Machine Translator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sutopo Anam

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Translation is extremely needed in communication since people have serious problem in the language used. Translation activity is done by the person in charge for translating the material. Translation activity is also able to be done by machine. It is called machine translation, reflected in the programs developed by programmer. One of them is Transtool. Many people used Transtool for helping them in solving the problem related with translation activities. This paper wants to deliver how important is the Transtool program, how effective is Transtool program and how is the function of Transtool for human business. This study applies qualitative research. The sources of data were document and informant. This study used documentation and in dept-interviewing as the techniques for collecting data. The collected data were analyzed by using interactive analysis. The results of the study show that, first; Transtool program is helpful for people in translating the civil engineering text and it functions as the aid or helper, second; the working of Transtool software program is effective enough and third; the result of translation produced by Transtool is good for short and simple sentences and not readable, not understandable and not accurate for long sentences (compound, complex and compound complex thought the result is informative. The translated material must be edited by the professional translator.

  3. Dermatological image search engines on the Internet: do they work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cutrone, M; Grimalt, R

    2007-02-01

    Atlases on CD-ROM first substituted the use of paediatric dermatology atlases printed on paper. This permitted a faster search and a practical comparison of differential diagnoses. The third step in the evolution of clinical atlases was the onset of the online atlas. Many doctors now use the Internet image search engines to obtain clinical images directly. The aim of this study was to test the reliability of the image search engines compared to the online atlases. We tested seven Internet image search engines with three paediatric dermatology diseases. In general, the service offered by the search engines is good, and continues to be free of charge. The coincidence between what we searched for and what we found was generally excellent, and contained no advertisements. Most Internet search engines provided similar results but some were more user friendly than others. It is not necessary to repeat the same research with Picsearch, Lycos and MSN, as the response would be the same; there is a possibility that they might share software. Image search engines are a useful, free and precise method to obtain paediatric dermatology images for teaching purposes. There is still the matter of copyright to be resolved. What are the legal uses of these 'free' images? How do we define 'teaching purposes'? New watermark methods and encrypted electronic signatures might solve these problems and answer these questions.

  4. Search engine competition with network externalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Argenton, C.; Prüfer, J.

    2012-01-01

    The market for Internet search is not only economically and socially important, it is also highly concentrated. Is this a problem? We study the question of whether “competition is only a free click away.” We argue that the market for Internet search is characterized by indirect network externalities

  5. Search Engine Competition with Network Externalities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Argenton, C.; Prüfer, J.

    2011-01-01

    The market for Internet search is not only economically and socially important, it is also highly concentrated. Is this a problem? We study the question whether "competition is only a free click away". We argue that the market for Internet search is characterized by indirect network externalities

  6. Global Journal of Engineering Research: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  7. Journal of Civil Engineering, JKUAT: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  8. Development and Evaluation of Thesauri-Based Bibliographic Biomedical Search Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghoson, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Due to the large volume and exponential growth of biomedical documents (e.g., books, journal articles), it has become increasingly challenging for biomedical search engines to retrieve relevant documents based on users' search queries. Part of the challenge is the matching mechanism of free-text indexing that performs matching based on…

  9. Search Engine Marketing (SEM: Financial & Competitive Advantages of an Effective Hotel SEM Strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leora Halpern Lanz

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Search Engine Marketing and Optimization (SEO, SEM are keystones of a hotels marketing strategy, in fact research shows that 90% of travelers start their vacation planning with a Google search. Learn five strategies that can enhance a hotels SEO and SEM strategies to boost bookings.

  10. Translation Analysis on Civil Engineering Text Produced by Machine Translator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutopo, Anam

    2018-02-01

    Translation is extremely needed in communication since people have serious problem in the language used. Translation activity is done by the person in charge for translating the material. Translation activity is also able to be done by machine. It is called machine translation, reflected in the programs developed by programmer. One of them is Transtool. Many people used Transtool for helping them in solving the problem related with translation activities. This paper wants to deliver how important is the Transtool program, how effective is Transtool program and how is the function of Transtool for human business. This study applies qualitative research. The sources of data were document and informant. This study used documentation and in dept-interviewing as the techniques for collecting data. The collected data were analyzed by using interactive analysis. The results of the study show that, first; Transtool program is helpful for people in translating the civil engineering text and it functions as the aid or helper, second; the working of Transtool software program is effective enough and third; the result of translation produced by Transtool is good for short and simple sentences and not readable, not understandable and not accurate for long sentences (compound, complex and compound complex) thought the result is informative. The translated material must be edited by the professional translator.

  11. Impact of Glaucoma and Dry Eye on Text-Based Searching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Michelle J.; Rubin, Gary S.; Akpek, Esen K.; Ramulu, Pradeep Y.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We determine if visual field loss from glaucoma and/or measures of dry eye severity are associated with difficulty searching, as judged by slower search times on a text-based search task. Methods Glaucoma patients with bilateral visual field (VF) loss, patients with clinically significant dry eye, and normally-sighted controls were enrolled from the Wilmer Eye Institute clinics. Subjects searched three Yellow Pages excerpts for a specific phone number, and search time was recorded. Results A total of 50 glaucoma subjects, 40 dry eye subjects, and 45 controls completed study procedures. On average, glaucoma patients exhibited 57% longer search times compared to controls (95% confidence interval [CI], 26%–96%, P Dry eye subjects demonstrated similar search times compared to controls, though worse Ocular Surface Disease Index (OSDI) vision-related subscores were associated with longer search times (P dry eye (P > 0.08 for Schirmer's testing without anesthesia, corneal fluorescein staining, and tear film breakup time). Conclusions Text-based visual search is slower for glaucoma patients with greater levels of VF loss and dry eye patients with greater self-reported visual difficulty, and these difficulties may contribute to decreased quality of life in these groups. Translational Relevance Visual search is impaired in glaucoma and dry eye groups compared to controls, highlighting the need for compensatory strategies and tools to assist individuals in overcoming their deficiencies. PMID:28670502

  12. Text mining for search term development in systematic reviewing: A discussion of some methods and challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansfield, Claire; O'Mara-Eves, Alison; Thomas, James

    2017-09-01

    Using text mining to aid the development of database search strings for topics described by diverse terminology has potential benefits for systematic reviews; however, methods and tools for accomplishing this are poorly covered in the research methods literature. We briefly review the literature on applications of text mining for search term development for systematic reviewing. We found that the tools can be used in 5 overarching ways: improving the precision of searches; identifying search terms to improve search sensitivity; aiding the translation of search strategies across databases; searching and screening within an integrated system; and developing objectively derived search strategies. Using a case study and selected examples, we then reflect on the utility of certain technologies (term frequency-inverse document frequency and Termine, term frequency, and clustering) in improving the precision and sensitivity of searches. Challenges in using these tools are discussed. The utility of these tools is influenced by the different capabilities of the tools, the way the tools are used, and the text that is analysed. Increased awareness of how the tools perform facilitates the further development of methods for their use in systematic reviews. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Short-term Internet search using makes people rely on search engines when facing unknown issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yifan; Wu, Lingdan; Luo, Liang; Zhang, Yifen; Dong, Guangheng

    2017-01-01

    The Internet search engines, which have powerful search/sort functions and ease of use features, have become an indispensable tool for many individuals. The current study is to test whether the short-term Internet search training can make people more dependent on it. Thirty-one subjects out of forty subjects completed the search training study which included a pre-test, a six-day's training of Internet search, and a post-test. During the pre- and post- tests, subjects were asked to search online the answers to 40 unusual questions, remember the answers and recall them in the scanner. Un-learned questions were randomly presented at the recalling stage in order to elicited search impulse. Comparing to the pre-test, subjects in the post-test reported higher impulse to use search engines to answer un-learned questions. Consistently, subjects showed higher brain activations in dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex in the post-test than in the pre-test. In addition, there were significant positive correlations self-reported search impulse and brain responses in the frontal areas. The results suggest that a simple six-day's Internet search training can make people dependent on the search tools when facing unknown issues. People are easily dependent on the Internet search engines.

  14. Improving e-book access via a library-developed full-text search tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Jill E; Bergen, Phillip; Maxeiner, Gretchen L; Pawlowski, Peter N

    2007-01-01

    This paper reports on the development of a tool for searching the contents of licensed full-text electronic book (e-book) collections. The Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) provides services to the University of Pittsburgh's medical programs and large academic health system. The HSLS has developed an innovative tool for federated searching of its e-book collections. Built using the XML-based Vivísimo development environment, the tool enables a user to perform a full-text search of over 2,500 titles from the library's seven most highly used e-book collections. From a single "Google-style" query, results are returned as an integrated set of links pointing directly to relevant sections of the full text. Results are also grouped into categories that enable more precise retrieval without reformulation of the search. A heuristic evaluation demonstrated the usability of the tool and a web server log analysis indicated an acceptable level of usage. Based on its success, there are plans to increase the number of online book collections searched. This library's first foray into federated searching has produced an effective tool for searching across large collections of full-text e-books and has provided a good foundation for the development of other library-based federated searching products.

  15. Improving e-book access via a library-developed full-text search tool*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foust, Jill E.; Bergen, Phillip; Maxeiner, Gretchen L.; Pawlowski, Peter N.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reports on the development of a tool for searching the contents of licensed full-text electronic book (e-book) collections. Setting: The Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) provides services to the University of Pittsburgh's medical programs and large academic health system. Brief Description: The HSLS has developed an innovative tool for federated searching of its e-book collections. Built using the XML-based Vivísimo development environment, the tool enables a user to perform a full-text search of over 2,500 titles from the library's seven most highly used e-book collections. From a single “Google-style” query, results are returned as an integrated set of links pointing directly to relevant sections of the full text. Results are also grouped into categories that enable more precise retrieval without reformulation of the search. Results/Evaluation: A heuristic evaluation demonstrated the usability of the tool and a web server log analysis indicated an acceptable level of usage. Based on its success, there are plans to increase the number of online book collections searched. Conclusion: This library's first foray into federated searching has produced an effective tool for searching across large collections of full-text e-books and has provided a good foundation for the development of other library-based federated searching products. PMID:17252065

  16. Design of an On-Line Query Language for Full Text Patent Search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glantz, Richard S.

    The design of an English-like query language and an interactive computer environment for searching the full text of the U.S. patent collection are discussed. Special attention is paid to achieving a transparent user interface, to providing extremely broad search capabilities (including nested substitution classes, Kleene star events, and domain…

  17. Real-time earthquake monitoring using a search engine method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Zhang, Haijiang; Chen, Enhong; Zheng, Yi; Kuang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Xiong

    2014-12-04

    When an earthquake occurs, seismologists want to use recorded seismograms to infer its location, magnitude and source-focal mechanism as quickly as possible. If such information could be determined immediately, timely evacuations and emergency actions could be undertaken to mitigate earthquake damage. Current advanced methods can report the initial location and magnitude of an earthquake within a few seconds, but estimating the source-focal mechanism may require minutes to hours. Here we present an earthquake search engine, similar to a web search engine, that we developed by applying a computer fast search method to a large seismogram database to find waveforms that best fit the input data. Our method is several thousand times faster than an exact search. For an Mw 5.9 earthquake on 8 March 2012 in Xinjiang, China, the search engine can infer the earthquake's parameters in <1 s after receiving the long-period surface wave data.

  18. A Taxonomic Search Engine: Federating taxonomic databases using web services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Page Roderic DM

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The taxonomic name of an organism is a key link between different databases that store information on that organism. However, in the absence of a single, comprehensive database of organism names, individual databases lack an easy means of checking the correctness of a name. Furthermore, the same organism may have more than one name, and the same name may apply to more than one organism. Results The Taxonomic Search Engine (TSE is a web application written in PHP that queries multiple taxonomic databases (ITIS, Index Fungorum, IPNI, NCBI, and uBIO and summarises the results in a consistent format. It supports "drill-down" queries to retrieve a specific record. The TSE can optionally suggest alternative spellings the user can try. It also acts as a Life Science Identifier (LSID authority for the source taxonomic databases, providing globally unique identifiers (and associated metadata for each name. Conclusion The Taxonomic Search Engine is available at http://darwin.zoology.gla.ac.uk/~rpage/portal/ and provides a simple demonstration of the potential of the federated approach to providing access to taxonomic names.

  19. Searching for a New Way to Reach Patrons: A Search Engine Optimization Pilot Project at Binghamton University Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rushton, Erin E.; Kelehan, Martha Daisy; Strong, Marcy A.

    2008-01-01

    Search engine use is one of the most popular online activities. According to a recent OCLC report, nearly all students start their electronic research using a search engine instead of the library Web site. Instead of viewing search engines as competition, however, librarians at Binghamton University Libraries decided to employ search engine…

  20. How do radiologists use the human search engine?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, Jeremy M.; Evans, Karla K.; Drew, Trafton; Aizenman, Avigael; Josephs, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Radiologists perform many 'visual search tasks' in which they look for one or more instances of one or more types of target item in a medical image (e.g. cancer screening). To understand and improve how radiologists do such tasks, it must be understood how the human 'search engine' works. This article briefly reviews some of the relevant work into this aspect of medical image perception. Questions include how attention and the eyes are guided in radiologic search? How is global (image-wide) information used in search? How might properties of human vision and human cognition lead to errors in radiologic search? (authors)

  1. Practical and Efficient Searching in Proteomics: A Cross Engine Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulo, Joao A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Analysis of large datasets produced by mass spectrometry-based proteomics relies on database search algorithms to sequence peptides and identify proteins. Several such scoring methods are available, each based on different statistical foundations and thereby not producing identical results. Here, the aim is to compare peptide and protein identifications using multiple search engines and examine the additional proteins gained by increasing the number of technical replicate analyses. Methods A HeLa whole cell lysate was analyzed on an Orbitrap mass spectrometer for 10 technical replicates. The data were combined and searched using Mascot, SEQUEST, and Andromeda. Comparisons were made of peptide and protein identifications among the search engines. In addition, searches using each engine were performed with incrementing number of technical replicates. Results The number and identity of peptides and proteins differed across search engines. For all three search engines, the differences in proteins identifications were greater than the differences in peptide identifications indicating that the major source of the disparity may be at the protein inference grouping level. The data also revealed that analysis of 2 technical replicates can increase protein identifications by up to 10-15%, while a third replicate results in an additional 4-5%. Conclusions The data emphasize two practical methods of increasing the robustness of mass spectrometry data analysis. The data show that 1) using multiple search engines can expand the number of identified proteins (union) and validate protein identifications (intersection), and 2) analysis of 2 or 3 technical replicates can substantially expand protein identifications. Moreover, information can be extracted from a dataset by performing database searching with different engines and performing technical repeats, which requires no additional sample preparation and effectively utilizes research time and effort. PMID:25346847

  2. Auditing Search Engines for Differential Satisfaction Across Demographics

    OpenAIRE

    Mehrotra, R.; Anderson, A.; Diaz, F.; Sharma, A.; Wallach, H. M.; Yilmaz, E.

    2017-01-01

    Many online services, such as search engines, social media platforms, and digital marketplaces, are advertised as being available to any user, regardless of their age, gender, or other demographic factors. However, there are growing concerns that these services may systematically underserve some groups of users. In this paper, we present a framework for internally auditing such services for differences in user satisfaction across demographic groups, using search engines as a case study. We fi...

  3. Search engines and the production of academic knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    van Dijck, J.

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that search engines in general, and Google Scholar in particular, have become significant co-producers of academic knowledge. Knowledge is not simply conveyed to users, but is co-produced by search engines’ ranking systems and profiling systems, none of which are open to the rules of transparency, relevance and privacy in a manner known from library scholarship in the public domain. Inexperienced users tend to trust proprietary engines as neutral mediators of knowledge and...

  4. Using Internet search engines to estimate word frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Irene V; Urland, Geoffrey R; Ma, Jennifer E

    2002-05-01

    The present research investigated Internet search engines as a rapid, cost-effective alternative for estimating word frequencies. Frequency estimates for 382 words were obtained and compared across four methods: (1) Internet search engines, (2) the Kucera and Francis (1967) analysis of a traditional linguistic corpus, (3) the CELEX English linguistic database (Baayen, Piepenbrock, & Gulikers, 1995), and (4) participant ratings of familiarity. The results showed that Internet search engines produced frequency estimates that were highly consistent with those reported by Kucera and Francis and those calculated from CELEX, highly consistent across search engines, and very reliable over a 6-month period of time. Additional results suggested that Internet search engines are an excellent option when traditional word frequency analyses do not contain the necessary data (e.g., estimates for forenames and slang). In contrast, participants' familiarity judgments did not correspond well with the more objective estimates of word frequency. Researchers are advised to use search engines with large databases (e.g., AltaVista) to ensure the greatest representativeness of the frequency estimates.

  5. Textpresso Central: a customizable platform for searching, text mining, viewing, and curating biomedical literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H-M; Van Auken, K M; Li, Y; Sternberg, P W

    2018-03-09

    The biomedical literature continues to grow at a rapid pace, making the challenge of knowledge retrieval and extraction ever greater. Tools that provide a means to search and mine the full text of literature thus represent an important way by which the efficiency of these processes can be improved. We describe the next generation of the Textpresso information retrieval system, Textpresso Central (TPC). TPC builds on the strengths of the original system by expanding the full text corpus to include the PubMed Central Open Access Subset (PMC OA), as well as the WormBase C. elegans bibliography. In addition, TPC allows users to create a customized corpus by uploading and processing documents of their choosing. TPC is UIMA compliant, to facilitate compatibility with external processing modules, and takes advantage of Lucene indexing and search technology for efficient handling of millions of full text documents. Like Textpresso, TPC searches can be performed using keywords and/or categories (semantically related groups of terms), but to provide better context for interpreting and validating queries, search results may now be viewed as highlighted passages in the context of full text. To facilitate biocuration efforts, TPC also allows users to select text spans from the full text and annotate them, create customized curation forms for any data type, and send resulting annotations to external curation databases. As an example of such a curation form, we describe integration of TPC with the Noctua curation tool developed by the Gene Ontology (GO) Consortium. Textpresso Central is an online literature search and curation platform that enables biocurators and biomedical researchers to search and mine the full text of literature by integrating keyword and category searches with viewing search results in the context of the full text. It also allows users to create customized curation interfaces, use those interfaces to make annotations linked to supporting evidence statements

  6. Search engines, the new bottleneck for content access

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eijk, N.; Preissl, B.; Haucap, J.; Curwen, P.

    2009-01-01

    The core function of a search engine is to make content and sources of information easily accessible (although the search results themselves may actually include parts of the underlying information). In an environment with unlimited amounts of information available on open platforms such as the

  7. Search engines and the production of academic knowledge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijck, J.

    2010-01-01

    This article argues that search engines in general, and Google Scholar in particular, have become significant co-producers of academic knowledge. Knowledge is not simply conveyed to users, but is co-produced by search engines’ ranking systems and profiling systems, none of which are open to the

  8. A longitudinal analysis of search engine index size

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosch, A.P.J. van den; Bogers, T.; Kunder, M. de; Salah, A. A.; Tonta, Y.; Salah, A. A. A.; Sugimoto, C.; Al, U.

    2015-01-01

    One of the determining factors of the quality of Web search engines is the size and quality of their index. In addition to its influence on search result quality, the size of the indexed Web can also tell us something about which parts of the WWW are directly accessible to the everyday user. We

  9. PubData: search engine for bioinformatics databases worldwide

    OpenAIRE

    Vand, Kasra; Wahlestedt, Thor; Khomtchouk, Kelly; Sayed, Mohammed; Wahlestedt, Claes; Khomtchouk, Bohdan

    2016-01-01

    We propose a search engine and file retrieval system for all bioinformatics databases worldwide. PubData searches biomedical data in a user-friendly fashion similar to how PubMed searches biomedical literature. PubData is built on novel network programming, natural language processing, and artificial intelligence algorithms that can patch into the file transfer protocol servers of any user-specified bioinformatics database, query its contents, retrieve files for download, and adapt to the use...

  10. Can electronic search engines optimize screening of search results in systematic reviews: an empirical study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sampson, Margaret; Barrowman, Nicholas J; Moher, David; Clifford, Tammy J; Platt, Robert W; Morrison, Andra; Klassen, Terry P; Zhang, Li

    2006-02-24

    Most electronic search efforts directed at identifying primary studies for inclusion in systematic reviews rely on the optimal Boolean search features of search interfaces such as DIALOG and Ovid. Our objective is to test the ability of an Ultraseek search engine to rank MEDLINE records of the included studies of Cochrane reviews within the top half of all the records retrieved by the Boolean MEDLINE search used by the reviewers. Collections were created using the MEDLINE bibliographic records of included and excluded studies listed in the review and all records retrieved by the MEDLINE search. Records were converted to individual HTML files. Collections of records were indexed and searched through a statistical search engine, Ultraseek, using review-specific search terms. Our data sources, systematic reviews published in the Cochrane library, were included if they reported using at least one phase of the Cochrane Highly Sensitive Search Strategy (HSSS), provided citations for both included and excluded studies and conducted a meta-analysis using a binary outcome measure. Reviews were selected if they yielded between 1000-6000 records when the MEDLINE search strategy was replicated. Nine Cochrane reviews were included. Included studies within the Cochrane reviews were found within the first 500 retrieved studies more often than would be expected by chance. Across all reviews, recall of included studies into the top 500 was 0.70. There was no statistically significant difference in ranking when comparing included studies with just the subset of excluded studies listed as excluded in the published review. The relevance ranking provided by the search engine was better than expected by chance and shows promise for the preliminary evaluation of large results from Boolean searches. A statistical search engine does not appear to be able to make fine discriminations concerning the relevance of bibliographic records that have been pre-screened by systematic reviewers.

  11. Grooker, KartOO, Addict-o-Matic and More: Really Different Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Descy, Don E.

    2009-01-01

    There are hundreds of unique search engines in the United States and thousands of unique search engines around the world. If people get into search engines designed just to search particular web sites, the number is in the hundreds of thousands. This article looks at: (1) clustering search engines, such as KartOO (www.kartoo.com) and Grokker…

  12. In search of the original text in Mark 9:38 | Hendriks | Acta Theologica

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The question remains which text appears to be the more original one. Several scholars – such as Vaganay, Duplacy, Amphoux, and others – in search of the original text of Mark – opt for a so called Western text, the main stream still prefers the Neutral text of Westcott and Hort. A text-critical analysis of Mark 9:38 may provide ...

  13. FindZebra: a search engine for rare diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragusin, Radu; Petcu, Paula; Lioma, Christina; Larsen, Birger; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Cox, Ingemar J; Hansen, Lars Kai; Ingwersen, Peter; Winther, Ole

    2013-06-01

    The web has become a primary information resource about illnesses and treatments for both medical and non-medical users. Standard web search is by far the most common interface to this information. It is therefore of interest to find out how well web search engines work for diagnostic queries and what factors contribute to successes and failures. Among diseases, rare (or orphan) diseases represent an especially challenging and thus interesting class to diagnose as each is rare, diverse in symptoms and usually has scattered resources associated with it. We design an evaluation approach for web search engines for rare disease diagnosis which includes 56 real life diagnostic cases, performance measures, information resources and guidelines for customising Google Search to this task. In addition, we introduce FindZebra, a specialized (vertical) rare disease search engine. FindZebra is powered by open source search technology and uses curated freely available online medical information. FindZebra outperforms Google Search in both default set-up and customised to the resources used by FindZebra. We extend FindZebra with specialized functionalities exploiting medical ontological information and UMLS medical concepts to demonstrate different ways of displaying the retrieved results to medical experts. Our results indicate that a specialized search engine can improve the diagnostic quality without compromising the ease of use of the currently widely popular standard web search. The proposed evaluation approach can be valuable for future development and benchmarking. The FindZebra search engine is available at http://www.findzebra.com/. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. An advanced search engine for patent analytics in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasche, Emilie; Gobeill, Julien; Teodoro, Douglas; Gaudinat, Arnaud; Vishnykova, Dina; Lovis, Christian; Ruch, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Patent collections contain an important amount of medical-related knowledge, but existing tools were reported to lack of useful functionalities. We present here the development of TWINC, an advanced search engine dedicated to patent retrieval in the domain of health and life sciences. Our tool embeds two search modes: an ad hoc search to retrieve relevant patents given a short query and a related patent search to retrieve similar patents given a patent. Both search modes rely on tuning experiments performed during several patent retrieval competitions. Moreover, TWINC is enhanced with interactive modules, such as chemical query expansion, which is of prior importance to cope with various ways of naming biomedical entities. While the related patent search showed promising performances, the ad-hoc search resulted in fairly contrasted results. Nonetheless, TWINC performed well during the Chemathlon task of the PatOlympics competition and experts appreciated its usability.

  15. Use of search engine optimization factors for Google page rank prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Tvrdi, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Over the years, search engines have become an important tool for finding information. It is known that users select the link on the first page of search results in 62% of the cases. Search engine optimization techniques enable website improvement and therefore a better ranking in search engines. The exact specification of the factors that affect website ranking is not disclosed by search engine owners. In this thesis we tried to choose some most frequently mentioned search engine optimizatio...

  16. DRUMS: a human disease related unique gene mutation search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zuofeng; Liu, Xingnan; Wen, Jingran; Xu, Ye; Zhao, Xin; Li, Xuan; Liu, Lei; Zhang, Xiaoyan

    2011-10-01

    With the completion of the human genome project and the development of new methods for gene variant detection, the integration of mutation data and its phenotypic consequences has become more important than ever. Among all available resources, locus-specific databases (LSDBs) curate one or more specific genes' mutation data along with high-quality phenotypes. Although some genotype-phenotype data from LSDB have been integrated into central databases little effort has been made to integrate all these data by a search engine approach. In this work, we have developed disease related unique gene mutation search engine (DRUMS), a search engine for human disease related unique gene mutation as a convenient tool for biologists or physicians to retrieve gene variant and related phenotype information. Gene variant and phenotype information were stored in a gene-centred relational database. Moreover, the relationships between mutations and diseases were indexed by the uniform resource identifier from LSDB, or another central database. By querying DRUMS, users can access the most popular mutation databases under one interface. DRUMS could be treated as a domain specific search engine. By using web crawling, indexing, and searching technologies, it provides a competitively efficient interface for searching and retrieving mutation data and their relationships to diseases. The present system is freely accessible at http://www.scbit.org/glif/new/drums/index.html. © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  17. Sundanese ancient manuscripts search engine using probability approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryani, Mira; Hadi, Setiawan; Paulus, Erick; Nurma Yulita, Intan; Supriatna, Asep K.

    2017-10-01

    Today, Information and Communication Technology (ICT) has become a regular thing for every aspect of live include cultural and heritage aspect. Sundanese ancient manuscripts as Sundanese heritage are in damage condition and also the information that containing on it. So in order to preserve the information in Sundanese ancient manuscripts and make them easier to search, a search engine has been developed. The search engine must has good computing ability. In order to get the best computation in developed search engine, three types of probabilistic approaches: Bayesian Networks Model, Divergence from Randomness with PL2 distribution, and DFR-PL2F as derivative form DFR-PL2 have been compared in this study. The three probabilistic approaches supported by index of documents and three different weighting methods: term occurrence, term frequency, and TF-IDF. The experiment involved 12 Sundanese ancient manuscripts. From 12 manuscripts there are 474 distinct terms. The developed search engine tested by 50 random queries for three types of query. The experiment results showed that for the single query and multiple query, the best searching performance given by the combination of PL2F approach and TF-IDF weighting method. The performance has been evaluated using average time responds with value about 0.08 second and Mean Average Precision (MAP) about 0.33.

  18. D-score: a search engine independent MD-score.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaudel, Marc; Breiter, Daniela; Beck, Florian; Rahnenführer, Jörg; Martens, Lennart; Zahedi, René P

    2013-03-01

    While peptides carrying PTMs are routinely identified in gel-free MS, the localization of the PTMs onto the peptide sequences remains challenging. Search engine scores of secondary peptide matches have been used in different approaches in order to infer the quality of site inference, by penalizing the localization whenever the search engine similarly scored two candidate peptides with different site assignments. In the present work, we show how the estimation of posterior error probabilities for peptide candidates allows the estimation of a PTM score called the D-score, for multiple search engine studies. We demonstrate the applicability of this score to three popular search engines: Mascot, OMSSA, and X!Tandem, and evaluate its performance using an already published high resolution data set of synthetic phosphopeptides. For those peptides with phosphorylation site inference uncertainty, the number of spectrum matches with correctly localized phosphorylation increased by up to 25.7% when compared to using Mascot alone, although the actual increase depended on the fragmentation method used. Since this method relies only on search engine scores, it can be readily applied to the scoring of the localization of virtually any modification at no additional experimental or in silico cost. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Enhanced identification of eligibility for depression research using an electronic medical record search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyfried, Lisa; Hanauer, David A; Nease, Donald; Albeiruti, Rashad; Kavanagh, Janet; Kales, Helen C

    2009-12-01

    Electronic medical records (EMRs) have become part of daily practice for many physicians. Attempts have been made to apply electronic search engine technology to speed EMR review. This was a prospective, observational study to compare the speed and clinical accuracy of a medical record search engine vs. manual review of the EMR. Three raters reviewed 49 cases in the EMR to screen for eligibility in a depression study using the electronic medical record search engine (EMERSE). One week later raters received a scrambled set of the same patients including 9 distractor cases, and used manual EMR review to determine eligibility. For both methods, accuracy was assessed for the original 49 cases by comparison with a gold standard rater. Use of EMERSE resulted in considerable time savings; chart reviews using EMERSE were significantly faster than traditional manual review (p=0.03). The percent agreement of raters with the gold standard (e.g. concurrent validity) using either EMERSE or manual review was not significantly different. Using a search engine optimized for finding clinical information in the free-text sections of the EMR can provide significant time savings while preserving clinical accuracy. The major power of this search engine is not from a more advanced and sophisticated search algorithm, but rather from a user interface designed explicitly to help users search the entire medical record in a way that protects health information.

  20. Penerapan Teknik Seo (Search Engine Optimization pada Website dalam Strategi Pemasaran melalui Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rony Baskoro Lukito

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research is how to optimize a web design that can increase the number of visitors. The number of Internet users in the world continues to grow in line with advances in information technology. Products and services marketing media do not just use the printed and electronic media. Moreover, the cost of using the Internet as a medium of marketing is relatively inexpensive when compared to the use of television as a marketing medium. The penetration of the internet as a marketing medium lasted for 24 hours in different parts of the world. But to make an internet site into a site that is visited by many internet users, the site is not only good from the outside view only. Web sites that serve as a medium for marketing must be built with the correct rules, so that the Web site be optimal marketing media. One of the good rules in building the internet site as a marketing medium is how the content of such web sites indexed well in search engines like google. Search engine optimization in the index will be focused on the search engine Google for 83% of internet users across the world using Google as a search engine. Search engine optimization commonly known as SEO (Search Engine Optimization is an important rule that the internet site is easier to find a user with the desired keywords.

  1. Adaptive Engineering of an Embedded System, Engineered for use by Search and Rescue Canines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Ribeiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available In Urban Search and Rescue (US&R operations, canine teams are deployed to find live patients, and save lives. US&R may benefit from increased levels of situational awareness, through information made available through the use of embedded systems attached to the dogs. One of these is the Canine Pose Estimation (CPE system. There are many challenges faced with such embedded systems including the engineering of such devices for use in disaster environments. Durability and wireless connectivity in areas with materials that inhibit wireless communications, the safety of the dog wearing the devices, and form factor must be accommodated. All of these factors must be weighed without compromising the accuracy of the application and the timely delivery of its data. This paper discusses the adaptive engineering process and how each of the unique challenges of emergency response embedded systems can be defined and overcome through effective design methods.

  2. Interest in Anesthesia as Reflected by Keyword Searches using Common Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Renyu; García, Paul S; Fleisher, Lee A

    2012-01-23

    Since current general interest in anesthesia is unknown, we analyzed internet keyword searches to gauge general interest in anesthesia in comparison with surgery and pain. The trend of keyword searches from 2004 to 2010 related to anesthesia and anaesthesia was investigated using Google Insights for Search. The trend of number of peer reviewed articles on anesthesia cited on PubMed and Medline from 2004 to 2010 was investigated. The average cost on advertising on anesthesia, surgery and pain was estimated using Google AdWords. Searching results in other common search engines were also analyzed. Correlation between year and relative number of searches was determined with psearch engines may provide different total number of searching results (available posts), the ratios of searching results between some common keywords related to perioperative care are comparable, indicating similar trend. The peer reviewed manuscripts on "anesthesia" and the proportion of papers on "anesthesia and outcome" are trending up. Estimates for spending of advertising dollars are less for anesthesia-related terms when compared to that for pain or surgery due to relative smaller number of searching traffic. General interest in anesthesia (anaesthesia) as measured by internet searches appears to be decreasing. Pain, preanesthesia evaluation, anesthesia and outcome and side effects of anesthesia are the critical areas that anesthesiologists should focus on to address the increasing concerns.

  3. The Theory of Planned Behaviour Applied to Search Engines as a Learning Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liaw, Shu-Sheng

    2004-01-01

    Search engines have been developed for helping learners to seek online information. Based on theory of planned behaviour approach, this research intends to investigate the behaviour of using search engines as a learning tool. After factor analysis, the results suggest that perceived satisfaction of search engine, search engines as an information…

  4. LoyalTracker: Visualizing Loyalty Dynamics in Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Conglei; Wu, Yingcai; Liu, Shixia; Zhou, Hong; Qu, Huamin

    2014-12-01

    The huge amount of user log data collected by search engine providers creates new opportunities to understand user loyalty and defection behavior at an unprecedented scale. However, this also poses a great challenge to analyze the behavior and glean insights into the complex, large data. In this paper, we introduce LoyalTracker, a visual analytics system to track user loyalty and switching behavior towards multiple search engines from the vast amount of user log data. We propose a new interactive visualization technique (flow view) based on a flow metaphor, which conveys a proper visual summary of the dynamics of user loyalty of thousands of users over time. Two other visualization techniques, a density map and a word cloud, are integrated to enable analysts to gain further insights into the patterns identified by the flow view. Case studies and the interview with domain experts are conducted to demonstrate the usefulness of our technique in understanding user loyalty and switching behavior in search engines.

  5. Health literacy and usability of clinical trial search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utami, Dina; Bickmore, Timothy W; Barry, Barbara; Paasche-Orlow, Michael K

    2014-01-01

    Several web-based search engines have been developed to assist individuals to find clinical trials for which they may be interested in volunteering. However, these search engines may be difficult for individuals with low health and computer literacy to navigate. The authors present findings from a usability evaluation of clinical trial search tools with 41 participants across the health and computer literacy spectrum. The study consisted of 3 parts: (a) a usability study of an existing web-based clinical trial search tool; (b) a usability study of a keyword-based clinical trial search tool; and (c) an exploratory study investigating users' information needs when deciding among 2 or more candidate clinical trials. From the first 2 studies, the authors found that users with low health literacy have difficulty forming queries using keywords and have significantly more difficulty using a standard web-based clinical trial search tool compared with users with adequate health literacy. From the third study, the authors identified the search factors most important to individuals searching for clinical trials and how these varied by health literacy level.

  6. A Longitudinal Analysis of Search Engine Index Size

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Van den Bosch, Antal; Bogers, Toine; De Kunder, Maurice

    2015-01-01

    One of the determining factors of the quality of Web search engines is the size of their index. In addition to its influence on search result quality, the size of the indexed Web can also tell us something about which parts of the WWW are directly accessible to the everyday user. We propose a novel...... method of estimating the size of a Web search engine’s index by extrapolating from document frequencies of words observed in a large static corpus of Web pages. In addition, we provide a unique longitudinal perspective on the size of Google and Bing’s indexes over a nine-year period, from March 2006...... until January 2015. We find that index size estimates of these two search engines tend to vary dramatically over time, with Google generally possessing a larger index than Bing. This result raises doubts about the reliability of previous one-off estimates of the size of the indexed Web. We find...

  7. The internet and intelligent machines: search engines, agents and robots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Achenbach, S.; Alfke, H.

    2000-01-01

    The internet plays an important role in a growing number of medical applications. Finding relevant information is not always easy as the amount of available information on the Web is rising quickly. Even the best Search Engines can only collect links to a fraction of all existing Web pages. In addition, many of these indexed documents have been changed or deleted. The vast majority of information on the Web is not searchable with conventional methods. New search strategies, technologies and standards are combined in Intelligent Search Agents (ISA) an Robots, which can retrieve desired information in a specific approach. Conclusion: The article describes differences between ISAs and conventional Search Engines and how communication between Agents improves their ability to find information. Examples of existing ISAs are given and the possible influences on the current and future work in radiology is discussed. (orig.) [de

  8. New Capabilities in the Astrophysics Multispectral Archive Search Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, C. Y.; Kelley, S.; Roussopoulos, N.

    The Astrophysics Multispectral Archive Search Engine (AMASE) uses object-oriented database techniques to provide a uniform multi-mission and multi-spectral interface to search for data in the distributed archives. We describe our experience of porting AMASE from Illustra object-relational DBMS to the Informix Universal Data Server. New capabilities and utilities have been developed, including a spatial datablade that supports Nearest Neighbor queries.

  9. MUSE: An Efficient and Accurate Verifiable Privacy-Preserving Multikeyword Text Search over Encrypted Cloud Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhu Xiangyang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of cloud computing, services outsourcing in clouds has become a popular business model. However, due to the fact that data storage and computing are completely outsourced to the cloud service provider, sensitive data of data owners is exposed, which could bring serious privacy disclosure. In addition, some unexpected events, such as software bugs and hardware failure, could cause incomplete or incorrect results returned from clouds. In this paper, we propose an efficient and accurate verifiable privacy-preserving multikeyword text search over encrypted cloud data based on hierarchical agglomerative clustering, which is named MUSE. In order to improve the efficiency of text searching, we proposed a novel index structure, HAC-tree, which is based on a hierarchical agglomerative clustering method and tends to gather the high-relevance documents in clusters. Based on the HAC-tree, a noncandidate pruning depth-first search algorithm is proposed, which can filter the unqualified subtrees and thus accelerate the search process. The secure inner product algorithm is used to encrypted the HAC-tree index and the query vector. Meanwhile, a completeness verification algorithm is given to verify search results. Experiment results demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms the existing works, DMRS and MRSE-HCI, in efficiency and accuracy, respectively.

  10. Development and tuning of an original search engine for patent libraries in medicinal chemistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasche, Emilie; Gobeill, Julien; Kreim, Olivier; Oezdemir-Zaech, Fatma; Vachon, Therese; Lovis, Christian; Ruch, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    The large increase in the size of patent collections has led to the need of efficient search strategies. But the development of advanced text-mining applications dedicated to patents of the biomedical field remains rare, in particular to address the needs of the pharmaceutical & biotech industry, which intensively uses patent libraries for competitive intelligence and drug development. We describe here the development of an advanced retrieval engine to search information in patent collections in the field of medicinal chemistry. We investigate and combine different strategies and evaluate their respective impact on the performance of the search engine applied to various search tasks, which covers the putatively most frequent search behaviours of intellectual property officers in medical chemistry: 1) a prior art search task; 2) a technical survey task; and 3) a variant of the technical survey task, sometimes called known-item search task, where a single patent is targeted. The optimal tuning of our engine resulted in a top-precision of 6.76% for the prior art search task, 23.28% for the technical survey task and 46.02% for the variant of the technical survey task. We observed that co-citation boosting was an appropriate strategy to improve prior art search tasks, while IPC classification of queries was improving retrieval effectiveness for technical survey tasks. Surprisingly, the use of the full body of the patent was always detrimental for search effectiveness. It was also observed that normalizing biomedical entities using curated dictionaries had simply no impact on the search tasks we evaluate. The search engine was finally implemented as a web-application within Novartis Pharma. The application is briefly described in the report. We have presented the development of a search engine dedicated to patent search, based on state of the art methods applied to patent corpora. We have shown that a proper tuning of the system to adapt to the various search tasks

  11. Research on the User Interest Modeling of Personalized Search Engine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Zhengwei; XIA Shixiong; NIU Qiang; XIA Zhanguo

    2007-01-01

    At present, how to enable Search Engine to construct user personal interest model initially, master user's personalized information timely and provide personalized services accurately have become the hotspot in the research of Search Engine area.Aiming at the problems of user model's construction and combining techniques of manual customization modeling and automatic analytical modeling, a User Interest Model (UIM) is proposed in the paper. On the basis of it, the corresponding establishment and update algorithms of User Interest Profile (UIP) are presented subsequently. Simulation tests proved that the UIM proposed and corresponding algorithms could enhance the retrieval precision effectively and have superior adaptability.

  12. BioCarian: search engine for exploratory searches in heterogeneous biological databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaki, Nazar; Tennakoon, Chandana

    2017-10-02

    There are a large number of biological databases publicly available for scientists in the web. Also, there are many private databases generated in the course of research projects. These databases are in a wide variety of formats. Web standards have evolved in the recent times and semantic web technologies are now available to interconnect diverse and heterogeneous sources of data. Therefore, integration and querying of biological databases can be facilitated by techniques used in semantic web. Heterogeneous databases can be converted into Resource Description Format (RDF) and queried using SPARQL language. Searching for exact queries in these databases is trivial. However, exploratory searches need customized solutions, especially when multiple databases are involved. This process is cumbersome and time consuming for those without a sufficient background in computer science. In this context, a search engine facilitating exploratory searches of databases would be of great help to the scientific community. We present BioCarian, an efficient and user-friendly search engine for performing exploratory searches on biological databases. The search engine is an interface for SPARQL queries over RDF databases. We note that many of the databases can be converted to tabular form. We first convert the tabular databases to RDF. The search engine provides a graphical interface based on facets to explore the converted databases. The facet interface is more advanced than conventional facets. It allows complex queries to be constructed, and have additional features like ranking of facet values based on several criteria, visually indicating the relevance of a facet value and presenting the most important facet values when a large number of choices are available. For the advanced users, SPARQL queries can be run directly on the databases. Using this feature, users will be able to incorporate federated searches of SPARQL endpoints. We used the search engine to do an exploratory search

  13. Aplikasi Search Engine Perpustakaan Petra Berbasis Android dengan Apache SOLR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Handojo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstrak: Pendidikan merupakan kebutuhan yang penting bagi manusia untuk meningkatkan kemampuan serta taraf hidupnya.Selain melalui pendidikan formal, ilmu juga dapat diperoleh melalui media cetak atau buku.Perpustakaan merupakan salah satu sarana yang penting dalam menunjang hal tersebut.Meskipun sangat bermanfaat, terdapat kesulitan penggunaan layanan perpustakaan, karena terlalu banyaknya koleksi pustaka yang ada (buku, jurnal, majalah, dan sebagainya sehingga sulit untuk menemukan buku yang ingin dicari.Oleh sebab itu, selain harus berkembang dengan penyediaan koleksi pustaka, perpustakaan harus dapat mengikuti perkembangan zaman yang ada sehingga mempermudah penggunaan layanan perpustakaan.Saat iniperpustakaan Universitas Kristen Petra memiliki perpustakaan dengan kurang lebih 230.000 koleksi fisik maupun digital (berdasarkan data 2014.Dimana daftar koleksi fisik dan dokumen digital dapat diakses melalui website perpustakaan.Adanya koleksi pustaka yang sangat banyak ini menyebabkan kesulitan pengguna dalam melakukan proses pencarian. Sehingga guna menambah fitur layanan yang diberikan maka pada penelitian ini dibuatlah sebuah aplikasi layanan search engine perpustakaan menggunakan platform Apache SOLR dan database PostgreSQL. Selain itu, guna lebih meningkatkan kemudahan akses maka aplikasi ini dibuat dengan menggunakan platform mobile device berbasis Android.Selain pengujian terhadap aplikasi dilakukan juga pengujian dengan mengedarkan kuesioner terhadap 50 calon pengguna.Dari hasil kuestioner tersebut menunjukkan bahwa fitur-fitur yang dibuat telah sesuai dengan kebutuhan pengguna (78%. Kata kunci: SOLR, Mesin Pencarian, Perpustakaan, PostgreSQL Abstract: Education is an essential requirement for people to improve their standard of living. Other than through formal education, science can also be obtained through the print media or books. Library is one important tool supporting it. Although it is useful, there are difficulties use library

  14. Exploring the Relevance of Search Engines: An Overview of Google as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Beltrán-Alfonso

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The huge amount of data on the Internet and the diverse list of strategies used to try to link this information with relevant searches through Linked Data have generated a revolution in data treatment and its representation. Nevertheless, the conventional search engines like Google are kept as strategies with good reception to do search processes. The following article presents a study of the development and evolution of search engines, more specifically, to analyze the relevance of findings based on the number of results displayed in paging systems with Google as a case study. Finally, it is intended to contribute to indexing criteria in search results, based on an approach to Semantic Web as a stage in the evolution of the Web.

  15. HOW DO RADIOLOGISTS USE THE HUMAN SEARCH ENGINE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Jeremy M; Evans, Karla K; Drew, Trafton; Aizenman, Avigael; Josephs, Emilie

    2016-06-01

    Radiologists perform many 'visual search tasks' in which they look for one or more instances of one or more types of target item in a medical image (e.g. cancer screening). To understand and improve how radiologists do such tasks, it must be understood how the human 'search engine' works. This article briefly reviews some of the relevant work into this aspect of medical image perception. Questions include how attention and the eyes are guided in radiologic search? How is global (image-wide) information used in search? How might properties of human vision and human cognition lead to errors in radiologic search? © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  16. PolySearch2: a significantly improved text-mining system for discovering associations between human diseases, genes, drugs, metabolites, toxins and more.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yifeng; Liang, Yongjie; Wishart, David

    2015-07-01

    PolySearch2 (http://polysearch.ca) is an online text-mining system for identifying relationships between biomedical entities such as human diseases, genes, SNPs, proteins, drugs, metabolites, toxins, metabolic pathways, organs, tissues, subcellular organelles, positive health effects, negative health effects, drug actions, Gene Ontology terms, MeSH terms, ICD-10 medical codes, biological taxonomies and chemical taxonomies. PolySearch2 supports a generalized 'Given X, find all associated Ys' query, where X and Y can be selected from the aforementioned biomedical entities. An example query might be: 'Find all diseases associated with Bisphenol A'. To find its answers, PolySearch2 searches for associations against comprehensive collections of free-text collections, including local versions of MEDLINE abstracts, PubMed Central full-text articles, Wikipedia full-text articles and US Patent application abstracts. PolySearch2 also searches 14 widely used, text-rich biological databases such as UniProt, DrugBank and Human Metabolome Database to improve its accuracy and coverage. PolySearch2 maintains an extensive thesaurus of biological terms and exploits the latest search engine technology to rapidly retrieve relevant articles and databases records. PolySearch2 also generates, ranks and annotates associative candidates and present results with relevancy statistics and highlighted key sentences to facilitate user interpretation. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Comparing image search behaviour in the ARRS GoldMiner search engine and a clinical PACS/RIS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De-Arteaga, Maria; Eggel, Ivan; Do, Bao; Rubin, Daniel; Kahn, Charles E; Müller, Henning

    2015-08-01

    Information search has changed the way we manage knowledge and the ubiquity of information access has made search a frequent activity, whether via Internet search engines or increasingly via mobile devices. Medical information search is in this respect no different and much research has been devoted to analyzing the way in which physicians aim to access information. Medical image search is a much smaller domain but has gained much attention as it has different characteristics than search for text documents. While web search log files have been analysed many times to better understand user behaviour, the log files of hospital internal systems for search in a PACS/RIS (Picture Archival and Communication System, Radiology Information System) have rarely been analysed. Such a comparison between a hospital PACS/RIS search and a web system for searching images of the biomedical literature is the goal of this paper. Objectives are to identify similarities and differences in search behaviour of the two systems, which could then be used to optimize existing systems and build new search engines. Log files of the ARRS GoldMiner medical image search engine (freely accessible on the Internet) containing 222,005 queries, and log files of Stanford's internal PACS/RIS search called radTF containing 18,068 queries were analysed. Each query was preprocessed and all query terms were mapped to the RadLex (Radiology Lexicon) terminology, a comprehensive lexicon of radiology terms created and maintained by the Radiological Society of North America, so the semantic content in the queries and the links between terms could be analysed, and synonyms for the same concept could be detected. RadLex was mainly created for the use in radiology reports, to aid structured reporting and the preparation of educational material (Lanlotz, 2006) [1]. In standard medical vocabularies such as MeSH (Medical Subject Headings) and UMLS (Unified Medical Language System) specific terms of radiology are often

  18. Study of Search Engine Transaction Logs Shows Little Change in How Users use Search Engines. A review of: Jansen, Bernard J., and Amanda Spink. “How Are We Searching the World Wide Web? A Comparison of Nine Search Engine Transaction Logs.” Information Processing & Management 42.1 (2006: 248‐263.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Hook

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective – To examine the interactions between users and search engines, and how they have changed over time. Design – Comparative analysis of search engine transaction logs. Setting – Nine major analyses of search engine transaction logs. Subjects – Nine web search engine studies (4 European, 5 American over a seven‐year period, covering the search engines Excite, Fireball, AltaVista, BWIE and AllTheWeb. Methods – The results from individual studies are compared by year of study for percentages of single query sessions, one term queries, operator (and, or, not, etc. usage and single result page viewing. As well, the authors group the search queries into eleven different topical categories and compare how the breakdown has changed over time. Main Results – Based on the percentage of single query sessions, it does not appear that the complexity of interactions has changed significantly for either the U.S.‐based or the European‐based search engines. As well, there was little change observed in the percentage of one‐term queries over the years of study for either the U.S.‐based or the European‐based search engines. Few users (generally less than 20% use Boolean or other operators in their queries, and these percentages have remained relatively stable. One area of noticeable change is in the percentage of users viewing only one results page, which has increased over the years of study. Based on the studies of the U.S.‐based search engines, the topical categories of ‘People, Place or Things’ and ‘Commerce, Travel, Employment or Economy’ are becoming more popular, while the categories of ‘Sex and Pornography’ and ‘Entertainment or Recreation’ are declining. Conclusions – The percentage of users viewing only one results page increased during the years of the study, while the percentages of single query sessions, oneterm sessions and operator usage remained stable. The increase in single result page viewing

  19. PR Students' Perceptions and Readiness for Using Search Engine Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Mia; Bates, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Enough evidence is available to support the idea that public relations professionals must possess search engine optimization (SEO) skills to assist clients in a full-service capacity; however, little research exists on how much college students know about the tactic and best practices for incorporating SEO into course curriculum. Furthermore, much…

  20. Categorization of web pages - Performance enhancement to search engine

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Lakshminarayana, S.

    of Artificial Intelligence, Volume III. Los Altos, CA.: William Kaufmann. pp 1-74. 18. Brin, S. & Page, L. (1998). The anatomy of a large scale hyper-textual web search engine. In Proceedings of the seventh World Wide Web conference, Brisbane, Australia. 19...

  1. A Competitive and Experiential Assignment in Search Engine Optimization Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Theresa B.; Clarke, Irvine, III

    2014-01-01

    Despite an increase in ad spending and demand for employees with expertise in search engine optimization (SEO), methods for teaching this important marketing strategy have received little coverage in the literature. Using Bloom's cognitive goals hierarchy as a framework, this experiential assignment provides a process for educators who may be new…

  2. GTNDSE: The GA Tech nuclear data search engine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kulp, W.D.; Wood, J.L.

    2004-01-01

    The function of the search engine is to retrieve data from ENSDF-formatted files and to write data in user-selected format. The purposes are horizontal systematics of nuclear mass surface, comparison with experimental data and to assist in data analysis and evaluation

  3. The Role of Exploratory Talk in Classroom Search Engine Tasks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Simon; Mercer, Neil

    2015-01-01

    While search engines are commonly used by children to find information, and in classroom-based activities, children are not adept in their information seeking or evaluation of information sources. Prior work has explored such activities in isolated, individual contexts, failing to account for the collaborative, discourse-mediated nature of search…

  4. Teaching Search Engine Marketing through the Google Ad Grants Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Theresa B.; Murphy, Jamie; Wetsch, Lyle R.; Boeck, Harold

    2018-01-01

    Instructors may find it difficult to stay abreast of the rapidly changing nature of search engine marketing (SEM) and to incorporate hands-on, practical classroom experiences. One solution is Google Ad Grants, a nonprofit edition of Google AdWords that provides up to $10,000 monthly in free advertising. A quasi-experiment revealed no differences…

  5. A World Wide Web Region-Based Image Search Engine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kompatsiaris, Ioannis; Triantafyllou, Evangelia; Strintzis, Michael G.

    2001-01-01

    In this paper the development of an intelligent image content-based search engine for the World Wide Web is presented. This system will offer a new form of media representation and access of content available in WWW. Information Web Crawlers continuously traverse the Internet and collect images...

  6. Pyndri: a Python Interface to the Indri Search Engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Gysel, C.; Kanoulas, E.; de Rijke, M.; Jose, J.M.; Hauff, C.; Altıngovde, I.S.; Song, D.; Albakour, D.; Watt, S.; Tait, J.

    2017-01-01

    We introduce pyndri, a Python interface to the Indri search engine. Pyndri allows to access Indri indexes from Python at two levels: (1) dictionary and tokenized document collection, (2) evaluating queries on the index. We hope that with the release of pyndri, we will stimulate reproducible, open

  7. Search for lepton flavour violating decays of heavy resonances and quantum black holes to an [Formula: see text] pair in proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text].

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    Khachatryan, V; Sirunyan, A M; Tumasyan, A; Adam, W; Asilar, E; Bergauer, T; Brandstetter, J; Brondolin, E; Dragicevic, M; Erö, J; Flechl, M; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hartl, C; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Knünz, V; König, A; Krammer, M; Krätschmer, I; Liko, D; Matsushita, T; Mikulec, I; Rabady, D; Rad, N; Rahbaran, B; Rohringer, H; Schieck, J; Schöfbeck, R; Strauss, J; Treberer-Treberspurg, W; Waltenberger, W; Wulz, C-E; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Alderweireldt, S; Cornelis, T; De Wolf, E A; Janssen, X; Knutsson, A; Lauwers, J; Luyckx, S; Van De Klundert, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Van Spilbeeck, A; Abu Zeid, S; Blekman, F; D'Hondt, J; Daci, N; De Bruyn, I; Deroover, K; Heracleous, N; Keaveney, J; Lowette, S; Moreels, L; Olbrechts, A; Python, Q; Strom, D; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Van Onsem, G P; Van Parijs, I; Barria, P; Brun, H; Caillol, C; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Fang, W; Fasanella, G; 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Bunn, J; Chen, Y; Duarte, J; Mott, A; Newman, H B; Pena, C; Spiropulu, M; Vlimant, J R; Xie, S; Zhu, R Y; Andrews, M B; Azzolini, V; Calamba, A; Carlson, B; Ferguson, T; Paulini, M; Russ, J; Sun, M; Vogel, H; Vorobiev, I; Cumalat, J P; Ford, W T; Gaz, A; Jensen, F; Johnson, A; Krohn, M; Mulholland, T; Nauenberg, U; Stenson, K; Wagner, S R; Alexander, J; Chatterjee, A; Chaves, J; Chu, J; Dittmer, S; Eggert, N; Mirman, N; Nicolas Kaufman, G; Patterson, J R; Rinkevicius, A; Ryd, A; Skinnari, L; Soffi, L; Sun, W; Tan, S M; Teo, W D; Thom, J; Thompson, J; Tucker, J; Weng, Y; Wittich, P; Abdullin, S; Albrow, M; Apollinari, G; Banerjee, S; Bauerdick, L A T; Beretvas, A; Berryhill, J; Bhat, P C; Bolla, G; Burkett, K; Butler, J N; Cheung, H W K; Chlebana, F; Cihangir, S; Elvira, V D; Fisk, I; Freeman, J; Gottschalk, E; Gray, L; Green, D; Grünendahl, S; Gutsche, O; Hanlon, J; Hare, D; Harris, R M; Hasegawa, S; Hirschauer, J; Hu, Z; Jayatilaka, B; Jindariani, S; Johnson, M; Joshi, U; Klima, B; Kreis, B; Lammel, S; Lewis, J; Linacre, J; Lincoln, D; Lipton, R; Liu, T; Lopes De Sá, R; Lykken, J; Maeshima, K; Marraffino, J M; Maruyama, S; Mason, D; McBride, P; Merkel, P; Mrenna, S; Nahn, S; Newman-Holmes, C; O'Dell, V; Pedro, K; Prokofyev, O; Rakness, G; Sexton-Kennedy, E; Soha, A; Spalding, W J; Spiegel, L; Stoynev, S; Strobbe, N; Taylor, L; Tkaczyk, S; Tran, N V; Uplegger, L; Vaandering, E W; Vernieri, C; Verzocchi, M; Vidal, R; Wang, M; Weber, H A; Whitbeck, A; Acosta, D; Avery, P; Bortignon, P; Bourilkov, D; Brinkerhoff, A; Carnes, A; Carver, M; Curry, D; Das, S; Field, R D; Furic, I K; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotov, K; Ma, P; Matchev, K; Mei, H; Milenovic, P; Mitselmakher, G; Rank, D; Rossin, R; Shchutska, L; Snowball, M; Sperka, D; Terentyev, N; Thomas, L; Wang, J; Wang, S; Yelton, J; Hewamanage, S; Linn, S; Markowitz, P; Martinez, G; Rodriguez, J L; Ackert, A; Adams, J R; Adams, T; Askew, A; Bein, S; Bochenek, J; Diamond, B; Haas, J; Hagopian, S; Hagopian, V; Johnson, K F; Khatiwada, A; Prosper, H; Weinberg, M; Baarmand, M M; Bhopatkar, V; Colafranceschi, S; Hohlmann, M; Kalakhety, H; Noonan, D; Roy, T; Yumiceva, F; Adams, M R; Apanasevich, L; Berry, D; Betts, R R; Bucinskaite, I; Cavanaugh, R; Evdokimov, O; Gauthier, L; Gerber, C E; Hofman, D J; Kurt, P; O'Brien, C; Sandoval Gonzalez, L D; Turner, P; Varelas, N; Wu, Z; Zakaria, M; Zhang, J; Bilki, B; Clarida, W; Dilsiz, K; Durgut, S; Gandrajula, R P; Haytmyradov, M; Khristenko, V; Merlo, J-P; Mermerkaya, H; Mestvirishvili, A; Moeller, A; Nachtman, J; Ogul, H; Onel, Y; Ozok, F; Penzo, A; Snyder, C; Tiras, E; Wetzel, J; Yi, K; Anderson, I; Barnett, B A; Blumenfeld, B; Cocoros, A; Eminizer, N; Fehling, D; Feng, L; Gritsan, A V; Maksimovic, P; Osherson, M; Roskes, J; Sarica, U; Swartz, M; Xiao, M; Xin, Y; You, C; Baringer, P; Bean, A; Bruner, C; Kenny, R P; Majumder, D; Malek, M; Mcbrayer, W; Murray, M; Sanders, S; Stringer, R; Wang, Q; Ivanov, A; Kaadze, K; Khalil, S; Makouski, M; Maravin, Y; Mohammadi, A; Saini, L K; Skhirtladze, N; Toda, S; Lange, D; Rebassoo, F; Wright, D; Anelli, C; Baden, A; Baron, O; Belloni, A; Calvert, B; Eno, S C; Ferraioli, C; Gomez, J A; Hadley, N J; Jabeen, S; Kellogg, R G; Kolberg, T; Kunkle, J; Lu, Y; Mignerey, A C; Shin, Y H; Skuja, A; Tonjes, M B; Tonwar, S C; Apyan, A; Barbieri, R; Baty, A; Bi, R; Bierwagen, K; Brandt, S; Busza, W; Cali, I A; Demiragli, Z; Di Matteo, L; Gomez Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gulhan, D; Iiyama, Y; Innocenti, G M; Klute, M; Kovalskyi, D; Lai, Y S; Lee, Y-J; Levin, A; Luckey, P D; Marini, A C; Mcginn, C; Mironov, C; Narayanan, S; Niu, X; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Salfeld-Nebgen, J; Stephans, G S F; Sumorok, K; Tatar, K; Varma, M; Velicanu, D; Veverka, J; Wang, J; Wang, T W; Wyslouch, B; Yang, M; Zhukova, V; Benvenuti, A C; Dahmes, B; Evans, A; Finkel, A; Gude, A; Hansen, P; Kalafut, S; Kao, S C; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Lesko, Z; Mans, J; Nourbakhsh, S; Ruckstuhl, N; Rusack, R; Tambe, N; Turkewitz, J; Acosta, J G; Oliveros, S; Avdeeva, E; Bartek, R; Bloom, K; Bose, S; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Fangmeier, C; Gonzalez Suarez, R; Kamalieddin, R; Knowlton, D; Kravchenko, I; Meier, F; Monroy, J; Ratnikov, F; Siado, J E; Snow, G R; Alyari, M; Dolen, J; George, J; Godshalk, A; Harrington, C; Iashvili, I; Kaisen, J; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Rappoccio, S; Roozbahani, B; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Baumgartel, D; Chasco, M; Hortiangtham, A; Massironi, A; Morse, D M; Nash, D; Orimoto, T; Teixeira De Lima, R; Trocino, D; Wang, R-J; Wood, D; Zhang, J; Bhattacharya, S; Hahn, K A; Kubik, A; Low, J F; Mucia, N; Odell, N; Pollack, B; Schmitt, M; Sung, K; Trovato, M; Velasco, M; Dev, N; Hildreth, M; Jessop, C; Karmgard, D J; Kellams, N; Lannon, K; Marinelli, N; Meng, F; Mueller, C; Musienko, Y; Planer, M; Reinsvold, A; Ruchti, R; Smith, G; Taroni, S; Valls, N; Wayne, M; Wolf, M; Woodard, A; Antonelli, L; Brinson, J; Bylsma, B; Durkin, L S; Flowers, S; Hart, A; Hill, C; Hughes, R; Ji, W; Ling, T Y; Liu, B; Luo, W; Puigh, D; Rodenburg, M; Winer, B L; Wulsin, H W; Driga, O; Elmer, P; Hardenbrook, J; Hebda, P; Koay, S A; Lujan, P; Marlow, D; Medvedeva, T; Mooney, M; Olsen, J; Palmer, C; Piroué, P; Stickland, D; Tully, C; Zuranski, A; Malik, S; Barker, A; Barnes, V E; Benedetti, D; Bortoletto, D; Gutay, L; Jha, M K; Jones, M; Jung, A W; Jung, K; Kumar, A; Miller, D H; Neumeister, N; Radburn-Smith, B C; Shi, X; Shipsey, I; Silvers, D; Sun, J; Svyatkovskiy, A; Wang, F; Xie, W; Xu, L; Parashar, N; Stupak, J; Adair, A; Akgun, B; Chen, Z; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Guilbaud, M; Li, W; Michlin, B; Northup, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Rorie, J; Tu, Z; Zabel, J; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Eshaq, Y; Ferbel, T; Galanti, M; Garcia-Bellido, A; Han, J; Hindrichs, O; Khukhunaishvili, A; Lo, K H; Tan, P; Verzetti, M; Chou, J P; Contreras-Campana, E; Ferencek, D; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Heindl, M; Hidas, D; Hughes, E; Kaplan, S; Kunnawalkam Elayavalli, R; Lath, A; Nash, K; Saka, H; Salur, S; Schnetzer, S; Sheffield, D; Somalwar, S; 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Hervé, A; Klabbers, P; Lanaro, A; Levine, A; Long, K; Loveless, R; Mohapatra, A; Ojalvo, I; Perry, T; Pierro, G A; Polese, G; Ruggles, T; Sarangi, T; Savin, A; Sharma, A; Smith, N; Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Verwilligen, P; Woods, N; Collaboration, Authorinst The Cms

    2016-01-01

    A search for narrow resonances decaying to an electron and a muon is presented. The [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] mass spectrum is also investigated for non-resonant contributions from the production of quantum black holes (QBHs). The analysis is performed using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7[Formula: see text] collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8[Formula: see text] with the CMS detector at the LHC. With no evidence for physics beyond the standard model in the invariant mass spectrum of selected [Formula: see text] pairs, upper limits are set at 95 [Formula: see text] confidence level on the product of cross section and branching fraction for signals arising in theories with charged lepton flavour violation. In the search for narrow resonances, the resonant production of a [Formula: see text] sneutrino in R-parity violating supersymmetry is considered. The [Formula: see text] sneutrino is excluded for masses below 1.28[Formula: see text] for couplings [Formula: see text], and below 2.30[Formula: see text] for [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text]. These are the most stringent limits to date from direct searches at high-energy colliders. In addition, the resonance searches are interpreted in terms of a model with heavy partners of the [Formula: see text] boson and the photon. In a framework of TeV-scale quantum gravity based on a renormalization of Newton's constant, the search for non-resonant contributions to the [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] mass spectrum excludes QBH production below a threshold mass [Formula: see text] of 1.99[Formula: see text]. In models that invoke extra dimensions, the bounds range from 2.36[Formula: see text] for one extra dimension to 3.63[Formula: see text] for six extra dimensions. This is the first search for QBHs decaying into the [Formula: see text] [Formula: see text] final state.

  8. Through the Google Goggles: Sociopolitical Bias in Search Engine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaz, A.

    Search engines like Google are essential to navigating the Web's endless supply of news, political information, and citizen discourse. The mechanisms and conditions under which search results are selected should therefore be of considerable interest to media scholars, political theorists, and citizens alike. In this chapter, I adopt a "deliberative" ideal for search engines and examine whether Google exhibits the "same old" media biases of mainstreaming, hypercommercialism, and industry consolidation. In the end, serious objections to Google are raised: Google may favor popularity over richness; it provides advertising that competes directly with "editorial" content; it so overwhelmingly dominates the industry that users seldom get a second opinion, and this is unlikely to change. Ultimately, however, the results of this analysis may speak less about Google than about contradictions in the deliberative ideal and the so-called "inherently democratic" nature of the Web.

  9. GeneView: a comprehensive semantic search engine for PubMed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Philippe; Starlinger, Johannes; Vowinkel, Alexander; Arzt, Sebastian; Leser, Ulf

    2012-07-01

    Research results are primarily published in scientific literature and curation efforts cannot keep up with the rapid growth of published literature. The plethora of knowledge remains hidden in large text repositories like MEDLINE. Consequently, life scientists have to spend a great amount of time searching for specific information. The enormous ambiguity among most names of biomedical objects such as genes, chemicals and diseases often produces too large and unspecific search results. We present GeneView, a semantic search engine for biomedical knowledge. GeneView is built upon a comprehensively annotated version of PubMed abstracts and openly available PubMed Central full texts. This semi-structured representation of biomedical texts enables a number of features extending classical search engines. For instance, users may search for entities using unique database identifiers or they may rank documents by the number of specific mentions they contain. Annotation is performed by a multitude of state-of-the-art text-mining tools for recognizing mentions from 10 entity classes and for identifying protein-protein interactions. GeneView currently contains annotations for >194 million entities from 10 classes for ∼21 million citations with 271,000 full text bodies. GeneView can be searched at http://bc3.informatik.hu-berlin.de/.

  10. Alephweb: a search engine based on the federated structure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Revue d'Information Scientifique et Technique. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 7, No 1 (1997) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  11. GEMINI: a computationally-efficient search engine for large gene expression datasets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeFreitas, Timothy; Saddiki, Hachem; Flaherty, Patrick

    2016-02-24

    Low-cost DNA sequencing allows organizations to accumulate massive amounts of genomic data and use that data to answer a diverse range of research questions. Presently, users must search for relevant genomic data using a keyword, accession number of meta-data tag. However, in this search paradigm the form of the query - a text-based string - is mismatched with the form of the target - a genomic profile. To improve access to massive genomic data resources, we have developed a fast search engine, GEMINI, that uses a genomic profile as a query to search for similar genomic profiles. GEMINI implements a nearest-neighbor search algorithm using a vantage-point tree to store a database of n profiles and in certain circumstances achieves an [Formula: see text] expected query time in the limit. We tested GEMINI on breast and ovarian cancer gene expression data from The Cancer Genome Atlas project and show that it achieves a query time that scales as the logarithm of the number of records in practice on genomic data. In a database with 10(5) samples, GEMINI identifies the nearest neighbor in 0.05 sec compared to a brute force search time of 0.6 sec. GEMINI is a fast search engine that uses a query genomic profile to search for similar profiles in a very large genomic database. It enables users to identify similar profiles independent of sample label, data origin or other meta-data information.

  12. SERVICES OF FULL-TEXT SEARCHING IN A DISTRIBUTED INFORMATION ENVIRONMENT (PROJECT HUMANITARIANA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Lyapin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement. We justify the possibility of full-text search services application in both universal and specialized (in terms of resource base digital libraries for the extraction and analysis of the context knowledge in the humanities. The architecture and services of virtual information and resource center for extracting knowledge from the humanitarian texts generated by «Humanitariana» project are described. The functional integration of the resources and services for a full-text search in a distributed decentralized environment, organized in the Internet / Intranet architecture under the control of the client (user browser accessing a variety of independent servers. An algorithm for a distributed full-text query implementation is described. Methods. Method of combining requency-ranked and paragraph-oriented full-text queries is used: the first are used for the preliminary analysis of the subject area or a combination product (explication of "vertical" context, or macro context, the second - for the explication of "horizontal" context, or micro context within copyright paragraph. The results of the frequency-ranked queries are used to compile paragraph-oriented queries. Results. The results of textual research are shown on the topics "The question of fact in Russian philosophy", "The question of loneliness in Russian philosophy and culture". About 50 pieces of context knowledge on the total resource base of about 2,500 full-text resources have been explicated and briefly described to their further expert investigating. Practical significance. The proposed technology (advanced full-text searching services in a distributed information environment can be used for the information support of humanitarian studies and education in the humanities, for functional integration of resources and services of various organizations, for carrying out interdisciplinary research.

  13. A Search Engine That's Aware of Your Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Internet research can be compared to trying to drink from a firehose. Such a wealth of information is available that even the simplest inquiry can sometimes generate tens of thousands of leads, more information than most people can handle, and more burdensome than most can endure. Like everyone else, NASA scientists rely on the Internet as a primary search tool. Unlike the average user, though, NASA scientists perform some pretty sophisticated, involved research. To help manage the Internet and to allow researchers at NASA to gain better, more efficient access to the wealth of information, the Agency needed a search tool that was more refined and intelligent than the typical search engine. Partnership NASA funded Stottler Henke, Inc., of San Mateo, California, a cutting-edge software company, with a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract to develop the Aware software for searching through the vast stores of knowledge quickly and efficiently. The partnership was through NASA s Ames Research Center.

  14. Comparison of the most popular Czech and German lexemes in the global Internet search engine Google

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dana Gálová

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Most widely used search engine Google represents the most current language databank in the world. It publishes annually the statistics of the most popular words that indicate interest preferences of a particular population in a given year. The aim of this paper is a comparative analysis of the most popular lexemes in Czech and German versions of search engine Google in 2015. Lexeme segmentation into different thematic fields enabled the identification of correspondences and differences and thus the comparison of interest preferences of Czech and German population. The paper also offers mutual interpretation of differences and reflection on the causes of different extents of civic engagement in both populations.

  15. Developing as new search engine and browser for libraries to search and organize the World Wide Web library resources

    OpenAIRE

    Sreenivasulu, V.

    2000-01-01

    Internet Granthalaya urges world wide advocates and targets at the task of creating a new search engine and dedicated browseer. Internet Granthalaya may be the ultimate search engine exclusively dedicated for every library use to search and organize the world wide web libary resources

  16. An empirical study on website usability elements and how they affect search engine optimisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene B. Visser

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this research project was to identify and investigate the website usability attributes which are in contradiction with search engine optimisation elements. The secondary objective was to determine if these usability attributes affect conversion. Although the literature review identifies the contradictions, experts disagree about their existence.An experiment was conducted, whereby the conversion and/or traffic ratio results of an existing control website were compared to a usability-designed version of the control website,namely the experimental website. All optimisation elements were ignored, thus implementing only usability. The results clearly show that inclusion of the usability attributes positively affect conversion,indicating that usability is a prerequisite for effective website design. Search engine optimisation is also a prerequisite for the very reason that if a website does not rank on the first page of the search engine result page for a given keyword, then that website might as well not exist. According to this empirical work, usability is in contradiction to search engine optimisation best practices. Therefore the two need to be weighed up in terms of importance towards search engines and visitors.

  17. Predicting Drug Recalls From Internet Search Engine Queries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom-Tov, Elad

    2017-01-01

    Batches of pharmaceuticals are sometimes recalled from the market when a safety issue or a defect is detected in specific production runs of a drug. Such problems are usually detected when patients or healthcare providers report abnormalities to medical authorities. Here, we test the hypothesis that defective production lots can be detected earlier by monitoring queries to Internet search engines. We extracted queries from the USA to the Bing search engine, which mentioned one of the 5195 pharmaceutical drugs during 2015 and all recall notifications issued by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) during that year. By using attributes that quantify the change in query volume at the state level, we attempted to predict if a recall of a specific drug will be ordered by FDA in a time horizon ranging from 1 to 40 days in future. Our results show that future drug recalls can indeed be identified with an AUC of 0.791 and a lift at 5% of approximately 6 when predicting a recall occurring one day ahead. This performance degrades as prediction is made for longer periods ahead. The most indicative attributes for prediction are sudden spikes in query volume about a specific medicine in each state. Recalls of prescription drugs and those estimated to be of medium-risk are more likely to be identified using search query data. These findings suggest that aggregated Internet search engine data can be used to facilitate in early warning of faulty batches of medicines.

  18. Searching with Experience - A Search Engine for Product Information that Learns from its Users

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, van J.P.; Jessurun, A.J.; Jansen, G.; Martens, B.; Brown, A.

    2005-01-01

    This paper describes the motivation and development of a new algorithm for ranking web pages. This development aims to enable the implementation of a search engine that can provide highly personalised results to queries. It was initiated by a request from the Dutch CAD industry, but has generic

  19. Finding Business Information on the "Invisible Web": Search Utilities vs. Conventional Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Brenda

    Researchers for small businesses, which may have no access to expensive databases or market research reports, must often rely on information found on the Internet, which can be difficult to find. Although current conventional Internet search engines are now able to index over on billion documents, there are many more documents existing in…

  20. Respiratory syncytial virus tracking using internet search engine data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oren, Eyal; Frere, Justin; Yom-Tov, Eran; Yom-Tov, Elad

    2018-04-03

    Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) is the leading cause of hospitalization in children less than 1 year of age in the United States. Internet search engine queries may provide high resolution temporal and spatial data to estimate and predict disease activity. After filtering an initial list of 613 symptoms using high-resolution Bing search logs, we used Google Trends data between 2004 and 2016 for a smaller list of 50 terms to build predictive models of RSV incidence for five states where long-term surveillance data was available. We then used domain adaptation to model RSV incidence for the 45 remaining US states. Surveillance data sources (hospitalization and laboratory reports) were highly correlated, as were laboratory reports with search engine data. The four terms which were most often statistically significantly correlated as time series with the surveillance data in the five state models were RSV, flu, pneumonia, and bronchiolitis. Using our models, we tracked the spread of RSV by observing the time of peak use of the search term in different states. In general, the RSV peak moved from south-east (Florida) to the north-west US. Our study represents the first time that RSV has been tracked using Internet data results and highlights successful use of search filters and domain adaptation techniques, using data at multiple resolutions. Our approach may assist in identifying spread of both local and more widespread RSV transmission and may be applicable to other seasonal conditions where comprehensive epidemiological data is difficult to collect or obtain.

  1. Search for charged Higgs bosons in e+e- collisions at [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbiendi, G; Ainsley, C; Åkesson, P F; Alexander, G; Anagnostou, G; Anderson, K J; Asai, S; Axen, D; Bailey, I; Barberio, E; Barillari, T; Barlow, R J; Batley, R J; Bechtle, P; Behnke, T; Bell, K W; Bell, P J; Bella, G; Bellerive, A; Benelli, G; Bethke, S; Biebel, O; Boeriu, O; Bock, P; Boutemeur, M; Braibant, S; Brown, R M; Burckhart, H J; Campana, S; Capiluppi, P; Carnegie, R K; Carter, A A; Carter, J R; Chang, C Y; Charlton, D G; Ciocca, C; Csilling, A; Cuffiani, M; Dado, S; Dallavalle, M; De Roeck, A; De Wolf, E A; Desch, K; Dienes, B; Dubbert, J; Duchovni, E; Duckeck, G; Duerdoth, I P; Etzion, E; Fabbri, F; Ferrari, P; Fiedler, F; Fleck, I; Ford, M; Frey, A; Gagnon, P; Gary, J W; Geich-Gimbel, C; Giacomelli, G; Giacomelli, P; Giunta, M; Goldberg, J; Gross, E; Grunhaus, J; Gruwé, M; Gupta, A; Hajdu, C; Hamann, M; Hanson, G G; Harel, A; Hauschild, M; Hawkes, C M; Hawkings, R; Herten, G; Heuer, R D; Hill, J C; Hoffman, K; Horváth, D; Igo-Kemenes, P; Ishii, K; Jeremie, H; Jovanovic, P; Junk, T R; Kanzaki, J; Karlen, D; Kawagoe, K; Kawamoto, T; Keeler, R K; Kellogg, R G; Kennedy, B W; Kluth, S; Kobayashi, T; Kobel, M; Komamiya, S; Krämer, T; Krasznahorkay, A; Krieger, P; von Krogh, J; Kuhl, T; Kupper, M; Lafferty, G D; Landsman, H; Lanske, D; Lellouch, D; Letts, J; Levinson, L; Lillich, J; Lloyd, S L; Loebinger, F K; Lu, J; Ludwig, A; Ludwig, J; Mader, W; Marcellini, S; Marchant, T E; Martin, A J; Mashimo, T; Mättig, P; McKenna, J; McPherson, R A; Meijers, F; Menges, W; Merritt, F S; Mes, H; Meyer, N; Michelini, A; Mihara, S; Mikenberg, G; Miller, D J; Mohr, W; Mori, T; Mutter, A; Nagai, K; Nakamura, I; Nanjo, H; Neal, H A; O'Neale, S W; Oh, A; Okpara, A; Oreglia, M J; Orito, S; Pahl, C; Pásztor, G; Pater, J R; Pilcher, J E; Pinfold, J; Plane, D E; Pooth, O; Przybycień, M; Quadt, A; Rabbertz, K; Rembser, C; Renkel, P; Roney, J M; Rossi, A M; Rozen, Y; Runge, K; Sachs, K; Saeki, T; Sarkisyan, E K G; Schaile, A D; Schaile, O; Scharff-Hansen, P; Schieck, J; Schörner-Sadenius, T; Schröder, M; Schumacher, M; Seuster, R; Shears, T G; Shen, B C; Sherwood, P; Skuja, A; Smith, A M; Sobie, R; Söldner-Rembold, S; Spano, F; Stahl, A; Strom, D; Ströhmer, R; Tarem, S; Tasevsky, M; Teuscher, R; Thomson, M A; Torrence, E; Toya, D; Trigger, I; Trócsányi, Z; Tsur, E; Turner-Watson, M F; Ueda, I; Ujvári, B; Vollmer, C F; Vannerem, P; Vértesi, R; Verzocchi, M; Voss, H; Vossebeld, J; Ward, C P; Ward, D R; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, N K; Wells, P S; Wengler, T; Wermes, N; Wilson, G W; Wilson, J A; Wolf, G; Wyatt, T R; Yamashita, S; Zer-Zion, D; Zivkovic, L

    A search is made for charged Higgs bosons predicted by Two-Higgs-Doublet extensions of the Standard Model (2HDM) using electron-positron collision data collected by the OPAL experiment at [Formula: see text], corresponding to an integrated luminosity of approximately 600 pb -1 . Charged Higgs bosons are assumed to be pair-produced and to decay into [Formula: see text], τν τ or AW ± . No signal is observed. Model-independent limits on the charged Higgs-boson production cross section are derived by combining these results with previous searches at lower energies. Under the assumption [Formula: see text], motivated by general 2HDM type II models, excluded areas on the [Formula: see text] plane are presented and charged Higgs bosons are excluded up to a mass of 76.3 GeV at 95 % confidence level, independent of the branching ratio BR(H ± → τν τ ). A scan of the 2HDM type I model parameter space is performed and limits on the Higgs-boson masses [Formula: see text] and m A are presented for different choices of tan β .

  2. Querying archetype-based EHRs by search ontology-based XPath engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kropf, Stefan; Uciteli, Alexandr; Schierle, Katrin; Krücken, Peter; Denecke, Kerstin; Herre, Heinrich

    2018-05-11

    Legacy data and new structured data can be stored in a standardized format as XML-based EHRs on XML databases. Querying documents on these databases is crucial for answering research questions. Instead of using free text searches, that lead to false positive results, the precision can be increased by constraining the search to certain parts of documents. A search ontology-based specification of queries on XML documents defines search concepts and relates them to parts in the XML document structure. Such query specification method is practically introduced and evaluated by applying concrete research questions formulated in natural language on a data collection for information retrieval purposes. The search is performed by search ontology-based XPath engineering that reuses ontologies and XML-related W3C standards. The key result is that the specification of research questions can be supported by the usage of search ontology-based XPath engineering. A deeper recognition of entities and a semantic understanding of the content is necessary for a further improvement of precision and recall. Key limitation is that the application of the introduced process requires skills in ontology and software development. In future, the time consuming ontology development could be overcome by implementing a new clinical role: the clinical ontologist. The introduced Search Ontology XML extension connects Search Terms to certain parts in XML documents and enables an ontology-based definition of queries. Search ontology-based XPath engineering can support research question answering by the specification of complex XPath expressions without deep syntax knowledge about XPaths.

  3. How Will Online Affiliate Marketing Networks Impact Search Engine Rankings?

    OpenAIRE

    Janssen, David; Heck, Eric

    2007-01-01

    textabstractIn online affiliate marketing networks advertising web sites offer their affiliates revenues based on provided web site traffic and associated leads and sales. Advertising web sites can have a network of thousands of affiliates providing them with web site traffic through hyperlinks on their web sites. Search engines such as Google, MSN, and Yahoo, consider hyperlinks as a proof of quality and/or reliability of the linked web sites, and therefore use them to determine the relevanc...

  4. Full Text Searching and Customization in the NASA ADS Abstract Service

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichhorn, G.; Accomazzi, A.; Grant, C. S.; Kurtz, M. J.; Henneken, E. A.; Thompson, D. M.; Murray, S. S.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA-ADS Abstract Service provides a sophisticated search capability for the literature in Astronomy, Planetary Sciences, Physics/Geophysics, and Space Instrumentation. The ADS is funded by NASA and access to the ADS services is free to anybody worldwide without restrictions. It allows the user to search the literature by author, title, and abstract text. The ADS database contains over 3.6 million references, with 965,000 in the Astronomy/Planetary Sciences database, and 1.6 million in the Physics/Geophysics database. 2/3 of the records have full abstracts, the rest are table of contents entries (titles and author lists only). The coverage for the Astronomy literature is better than 95% from 1975. Before that we cover all major journals and many smaller ones. Most of the journal literature is covered back to volume 1. We now get abstracts on a regular basis from most journals. Over the last year we have entered basically all conference proceedings tables of contents that are available at the Harvard Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics library. This has greatly increased the coverage of conference proceedings in the ADS. The ADS also covers the ArXiv Preprints. We download these preprints every night and index all the preprints. They can be searched either together with the other abstracts or separately. There are currently about 260,000 preprints in that database. In January 2004 we have introduced two new services, full text searching and a personal notification service called "myADS". As all other ADS services, these are free to use for anybody.

  5. Searching Choices: Quantifying Decision-Making Processes Using Search Engine Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moat, Helen Susannah; Olivola, Christopher Y; Chater, Nick; Preis, Tobias

    2016-07-01

    When making a decision, humans consider two types of information: information they have acquired through their prior experience of the world, and further information they gather to support the decision in question. Here, we present evidence that data from search engines such as Google can help us model both sources of information. We show that statistics from search engines on the frequency of content on the Internet can help us estimate the statistical structure of prior experience; and, specifically, we outline how such statistics can inform psychological theories concerning the valuation of human lives, or choices involving delayed outcomes. Turning to information gathering, we show that search query data might help measure human information gathering, and it may predict subsequent decisions. Such data enable us to compare information gathered across nations, where analyses suggest, for example, a greater focus on the future in countries with a higher per capita GDP. We conclude that search engine data constitute a valuable new resource for cognitive scientists, offering a fascinating new tool for understanding the human decision-making process. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Topics in Cognitive Science published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Cognitive Science Society.

  6. Modification site localization scoring integrated into a search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Peter R; Trinidad, Jonathan C; Chalkley, Robert J

    2011-07-01

    Large proteomic data sets identifying hundreds or thousands of modified peptides are becoming increasingly common in the literature. Several methods for assessing the reliability of peptide identifications both at the individual peptide or data set level have become established. However, tools for measuring the confidence of modification site assignments are sparse and are not often employed. A few tools for estimating phosphorylation site assignment reliabilities have been developed, but these are not integral to a search engine, so require a particular search engine output for a second step of processing. They may also require use of a particular fragmentation method and are mostly only applicable for phosphorylation analysis, rather than post-translational modifications analysis in general. In this study, we present the performance of site assignment scoring that is directly integrated into the search engine Protein Prospector, which allows site assignment reliability to be automatically reported for all modifications present in an identified peptide. It clearly indicates when a site assignment is ambiguous (and if so, between which residues), and reports an assignment score that can be translated into a reliability measure for individual site assignments.

  7. Collection of Medical Original Data with Search Engine for Decision Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orthuber, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Medicine is becoming more and more complex and humans can capture total medical knowledge only partially. For specific access a high resolution search engine is demonstrated, which allows besides conventional text search also search of precise quantitative data of medical findings, therapies and results. Users can define metric spaces ("Domain Spaces", DSs) with all searchable quantitative data ("Domain Vectors", DSs). An implementation of the search engine is online in http://numericsearch.com. In future medicine the doctor could make first a rough diagnosis and check which fine diagnostics (quantitative data) colleagues had collected in such a case. Then the doctor decides about fine diagnostics and results are sent (half automatically) to the search engine which filters a group of patients which best fits to these data. In this specific group variable therapies can be checked with associated therapeutic results, like in an individual scientific study for the current patient. The statistical (anonymous) results could be used for specific decision support. Reversely the therapeutic decision (in the best case with later results) could be used to enhance the collection of precise pseudonymous medical original data which is used for better and better statistical (anonymous) search results.

  8. Retrieval of publications addressing shared decision making: an evaluation of full-text searches on medical journal websites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Xavier; Collet, Tinh-Hai; Auer, Reto; Iriarte, Pablo; Krause, Jan; Légaré, France; Cornuz, Jacques; Clair, Carole

    2015-04-07

    Full-text searches of articles increase the recall, defined by the proportion of relevant publications that are retrieved. However, this method is rarely used in medical research due to resource constraints. For the purpose of a systematic review of publications addressing shared decision making, a full-text search method was required to retrieve publications where shared decision making does not appear in the title or abstract. The objective of our study was to assess the efficiency and reliability of full-text searches in major medical journals for identifying shared decision making publications. A full-text search was performed on the websites of 15 high-impact journals in general internal medicine to look up publications of any type from 1996-2011 containing the phrase "shared decision making". The search method was compared with a PubMed search of titles and abstracts only. The full-text search was further validated by requesting all publications from the same time period from the individual journal publishers and searching through the collected dataset. The full-text search for "shared decision making" on journal websites identified 1286 publications in 15 journals compared to 119 through the PubMed search. The search within the publisher-provided publications of 6 journals identified 613 publications compared to 646 with the full-text search on the respective journal websites. The concordance rate was 94.3% between both full-text searches. Full-text searching on medical journal websites is an efficient and reliable way to identify relevant articles in the field of shared decision making for review or other purposes. It may be more widely used in biomedical research in other fields in the future, with the collaboration of publishers and journals toward open-access data.

  9. The Searchbench - Combining Sentence-semantic, Full-text and Bibliographic Search in Digital Libraries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrich Schäfer

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available We describe a novel approach to precise searching in the full content of digital libraries. The Searchbench (for search workbench is based on sentence-wise syntactic and semantic natural language processing (NLP of both born-digital and scanned publications in PDF format. The term born-digital means natively digital, i.e. prepared electronically using typesetting systems such as LaTeX, OpenOffice, and the like. In the Searchbench, queries can be formulated as (possibly underspecified statements, consisting of simple subject-predicate-object constructs such as ‘algorithm improves word alignment’. This reduces the number of false hits in large document collections when the search words happen to appear close to each other, but are not semantically related. The method also abstracts from passive voice and predicate synonyms. Moreover, negated statements can be excluded from the search results, and negated antonym predicates again count as synonyms (e.g. not include = exclude.In the Searchbench, a sentence-semantic search can be combined with search filters for classical full-text, bibliographic metadata and automatically computed domain terms. Auto-suggest fields facilitate text input. Queries can be bookmarked or emailed. Furthermore, a novel citation browser in the Searchbench allows graphical navigation in citation networks. These have been extracted automatically from metadata and paper texts. The citation browser displays short phrases from citation sentences at the edges in the citation graph and thus allows students and researchers to quickly browse publications and immerse into a new research field. By clicking on a citation edge, the original citation sentence is shown in context, and optionally also in the original PDF layout.To showcase the usefulness of our research, we have a applied it to a collection of currently approx. 25,000 open access research papers in the field of computational linguistics and language technology, the ACL

  10. LIVIVO - the Vertical Search Engine for Life Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Bernd; Poley, Christoph; Pössel, Jana; Hagelstein, Alexandra; Gübitz, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The explosive growth of literature and data in the life sciences challenges researchers to keep track of current advancements in their disciplines. Novel approaches in the life science like the One Health paradigm require integrated methodologies in order to link and connect heterogeneous information from databases and literature resources. Current publications in the life sciences are increasingly characterized by the employment of trans-disciplinary methodologies comprising molecular and cell biology, genetics, genomic, epigenomic, transcriptional and proteomic high throughput technologies with data from humans, plants, and animals. The literature search engine LIVIVO empowers retrieval functionality by incorporating various literature resources from medicine, health, environment, agriculture and nutrition. LIVIVO is developed in-house by ZB MED - Information Centre for Life Sciences. It provides a user-friendly and usability-tested search interface with a corpus of 55 Million citations derived from 50 databases. Standardized application programming interfaces are available for data export and high throughput retrieval. The search functions allow for semantic retrieval with filtering options based on life science entities. The service oriented architecture of LIVIVO uses four different implementation layers to deliver search services. A Knowledge Environment is developed by ZB MED to deal with the heterogeneity of data as an integrative approach to model, store, and link semantic concepts within literature resources and databases. Future work will focus on the exploitation of life science ontologies and on the employment of NLP technologies in order to improve query expansion, filters in faceted search, and concept based relevancy rankings in LIVIVO.

  11. GeNemo: a search engine for web-based functional genomic data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yongqing; Cao, Xiaoyi; Zhong, Sheng

    2016-07-08

    A set of new data types emerged from functional genomic assays, including ChIP-seq, DNase-seq, FAIRE-seq and others. The results are typically stored as genome-wide intensities (WIG/bigWig files) or functional genomic regions (peak/BED files). These data types present new challenges to big data science. Here, we present GeNemo, a web-based search engine for functional genomic data. GeNemo searches user-input data against online functional genomic datasets, including the entire collection of ENCODE and mouse ENCODE datasets. Unlike text-based search engines, GeNemo's searches are based on pattern matching of functional genomic regions. This distinguishes GeNemo from text or DNA sequence searches. The user can input any complete or partial functional genomic dataset, for example, a binding intensity file (bigWig) or a peak file. GeNemo reports any genomic regions, ranging from hundred bases to hundred thousand bases, from any of the online ENCODE datasets that share similar functional (binding, modification, accessibility) patterns. This is enabled by a Markov Chain Monte Carlo-based maximization process, executed on up to 24 parallel computing threads. By clicking on a search result, the user can visually compare her/his data with the found datasets and navigate the identified genomic regions. GeNemo is available at www.genemo.org. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. The Effectiveness of Web Search Engines to Index New Sites from Different Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirkola, Ari

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Investigates how effectively Web search engines index new sites from different countries. The primary interest is whether new sites are indexed equally or whether search engines are biased towards certain countries. If major search engines show biased coverage it can be considered a significant economic and political problem because…

  13. Archiving, ordering and searching: search engines, algorithms, databases and deep mediatization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jack

    2018-01-01

    This article argues that search engines, algorithms, and databases can be considered as a way of understanding deep mediatization (Couldry & Hepp, 2016). They are embedded in a variety of social and cultural practices and as such they change our communicative actions to be shaped by their logic o...... reviewed recent trends in mediatization research, the argument is discussed and unfolded in-between the material and social constructivist-phenomenological interpretations of mediatization. In conclusion, it is discussed how deep this form of mediatization can be taken to be.......This article argues that search engines, algorithms, and databases can be considered as a way of understanding deep mediatization (Couldry & Hepp, 2016). They are embedded in a variety of social and cultural practices and as such they change our communicative actions to be shaped by their logic...

  14. Search engine imaginary: Visions and values in the co-production of search technology and Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mager, Astrid

    2017-04-01

    This article discusses the co-production of search technology and a European identity in the context of the EU data protection reform. The negotiations of the EU data protection legislation ran from 2012 until 2015 and resulted in a unified data protection legislation directly binding for all European member states. I employ a discourse analysis to examine EU policy documents and Austrian media materials related to the reform process. Using the concept 'sociotechnical imaginary', I show how a European imaginary of search engines is forming in the EU policy domain, how a European identity is constructed in the envisioned politics of control, and how national specificities contribute to the making and unmaking of a European identity. I discuss the roles that national technopolitical identities play in shaping both search technology and Europe, taking as an example Austria, a small country with a long history in data protection and a tradition of restrained technology politics.

  15. Cross-system evaluation of clinical trial search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Silis Y; Weng, Chunhua

    2014-01-01

    Clinical trials are fundamental to the advancement of medicine but constantly face recruitment difficulties. Various clinical trial search engines have been designed to help health consumers identify trials for which they may be eligible. Unfortunately, knowledge of the usefulness and usability of their designs remains scarce. In this study, we used mixed methods, including time-motion analysis, think-aloud protocol, and survey, to evaluate five popular clinical trial search engines with 11 users. Differences in user preferences and time spent on each system were observed and correlated with user characteristics. In general, searching for applicable trials using these systems is a cognitively demanding task. Our results show that user perceptions of these systems are multifactorial. The survey indicated eTACTS being the generally preferred system, but this finding did not persist among all mixed methods. This study confirms the value of mixed-methods for a comprehensive system evaluation. Future system designers must be aware that different users groups expect different functionalities.

  16. A cognitive evaluation of four online search engines for answering definitional questions posed by physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Hong; Kaufman, David

    2007-01-01

    The Internet is having a profound impact on physicians' medical decision making. One recent survey of 277 physicians showed that 72% of physicians regularly used the Internet to research medical information and 51% admitted that information from web sites influenced their clinical decisions. This paper describes the first cognitive evaluation of four state-of-the-art Internet search engines: Google (i.e., Google and Scholar.Google), MedQA, Onelook, and PubMed for answering definitional questions (i.e., questions with the format of "What is X?") posed by physicians. Onelook is a portal for online definitions, and MedQA is a question answering system that automatically generates short texts to answer specific biomedical questions. Our evaluation criteria include quality of answer, ease of use, time spent, and number of actions taken. Our results show that MedQA outperforms Onelook and PubMed in most of the criteria, and that MedQA surpasses Google in time spent and number of actions, two important efficiency criteria. Our results show that Google is the best system for quality of answer and ease of use. We conclude that Google is an effective search engine for medical definitions, and that MedQA exceeds the other search engines in that it provides users direct answers to their questions; while the users of the other search engines have to visit several sites before finding all of the pertinent information.

  17. ParaText : scalable solutions for processing and searching very large document collections : final LDRD report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crossno, Patricia Joyce; Dunlavy, Daniel M.; Stanton, Eric T.; Shead, Timothy M.

    2010-09-01

    This report is a summary of the accomplishments of the 'Scalable Solutions for Processing and Searching Very Large Document Collections' LDRD, which ran from FY08 through FY10. Our goal was to investigate scalable text analysis; specifically, methods for information retrieval and visualization that could scale to extremely large document collections. Towards that end, we designed, implemented, and demonstrated a scalable framework for text analysis - ParaText - as a major project deliverable. Further, we demonstrated the benefits of using visual analysis in text analysis algorithm development, improved performance of heterogeneous ensemble models in data classification problems, and the advantages of information theoretic methods in user analysis and interpretation in cross language information retrieval. The project involved 5 members of the technical staff and 3 summer interns (including one who worked two summers). It resulted in a total of 14 publications, 3 new software libraries (2 open source and 1 internal to Sandia), several new end-user software applications, and over 20 presentations. Several follow-on projects have already begun or will start in FY11, with additional projects currently in proposal.

  18. NEWordS A News Search Engine for English Vocabulary Learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuejing Huang

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Vocabulary is the first hurdle for English learners to over- come. Instead of simply showing a word again and again we come up with an idea to develop an English news article search engine based on users word-reciting record on Shanbay.com. It is designed for advanced English learners to find suitable reading materials. The search engine consists of Crawling Module Document Normalizing module Indexing Module Querying Module and Interface Module. We propose three sorting amp ranking algorithms for Querying Module. For the basic algorithm five crucial principles are taken into consideration. Term frequency inverse document frequency familiarity degree and article freshness degree are factors in this algorithm. Then we think of a improved algorithm for the scene in which a user read multiple articles in the searching result list. Here we adopt a iterative amp greedy method. The essential idea is to select English news articles one by one according to the query meanwhile dynamically update the unfamiliarity of the words during each iterative step. Moreover we develop an advanced algorithm to take article difficulty in to account. Interface Module is designed as a website meanwhile some data visualization technologies e.g. word cloud are applied here. Furthermore we conduct both applicability check and performance evaluation. Metrics such as searching time word-covering ratio and minimum number of articles that completely cover all the queried vocabulary are randomly sampled and profoundly analyzed. The result shows that our search engine works very well with satisfying performance.

  19. Adding a Visualization Feature to Web Search Engines: It’s Time

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Pak C.

    2008-11-11

    Since the first world wide web (WWW) search engine quietly entered our lives in 1994, the “information need” behind web searching has rapidly grown into a multi-billion dollar business that dominates the internet landscape, drives e-commerce traffic, propels global economy, and affects the lives of the whole human race. Today’s search engines are faster, smarter, and more powerful than those released just a few years ago. With the vast investment pouring into research and development by leading web technology providers and the intense emotion behind corporate slogans such as “win the web” or “take back the web,” I can’t help but ask why are we still using the very same “text-only” interface that was used 13 years ago to browse our search engine results pages (SERPs)? Why has the SERP interface technology lagged so far behind in the web evolution when the corresponding search technology has advanced so rapidly? In this article I explore some current SERP interface issues, suggest a simple but practical visual-based interface design approach, and argue why a visual approach can be a strong candidate for tomorrow’s SERP interface.

  20. Noesis: Ontology based Scoped Search Engine and Resource Aggregator for Atmospheric Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran, R.; Movva, S.; Li, X.; Cherukuri, P.; Graves, S.

    2006-12-01

    The goal for search engines is to return results that are both accurate and complete. The search engines should find only what you really want and find everything you really want. Search engines (even meta search engines) lack semantics. The basis for search is simply based on string matching between the user's query term and the resource database and the semantics associated with the search string is not captured. For example, if an atmospheric scientist is searching for "pressure" related web resources, most search engines return inaccurate results such as web resources related to blood pressure. In this presentation Noesis, which is a meta-search engine and a resource aggregator that uses domain ontologies to provide scoped search capabilities will be described. Noesis uses domain ontologies to help the user scope the search query to ensure that the search results are both accurate and complete. The domain ontologies guide the user to refine their search query and thereby reduce the user's burden of experimenting with different search strings. Semantics are captured by refining the query terms to cover synonyms, specializations, generalizations and related concepts. Noesis also serves as a resource aggregator. It categorizes the search results from different online resources such as education materials, publications, datasets, web search engines that might be of interest to the user.

  1. Quantitative evaluation of recall and precision of CAT Crawler, a search engine specialized on retrieval of Critically Appraised Topics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loh Marie

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Critically Appraised Topics (CATs are a useful tool that helps physicians to make clinical decisions as the healthcare moves towards the practice of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM. The fast growing World Wide Web has provided a place for physicians to share their appraised topics online, but an increasing amount of time is needed to find a particular topic within such a rich repository. Methods A web-based application, namely the CAT Crawler, was developed by Singapore's Bioinformatics Institute to allow physicians to adequately access available appraised topics on the Internet. A meta-search engine, as the core component of the application, finds relevant topics following keyword input. The primary objective of the work presented here is to evaluate the quantity and quality of search results obtained from the meta-search engine of the CAT Crawler by comparing them with those obtained from two individual CAT search engines. From the CAT libraries at these two sites, all possible keywords were extracted using a keyword extractor. Of those common to both libraries, ten were randomly chosen for evaluation. All ten were submitted to the two search engines individually, and through the meta-search engine of the CAT Crawler. Search results were evaluated for relevance both by medical amateurs and professionals, and the respective recall and precision were calculated. Results While achieving an identical recall, the meta-search engine showed a precision of 77.26% (±14.45 compared to the individual search engines' 52.65% (±12.0 (p Conclusion The results demonstrate the validity of the CAT Crawler meta-search engine approach. The improved precision due to inherent filters underlines the practical usefulness of this tool for clinicians.

  2. A search engine for the engineering and equipment data management system (EDMS) at CERN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsyganov, A; Amerigo, S M; Petit, S; Pettersson, T; Suwalska, A

    2008-01-01

    CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, located in Geneva -Switzerland, is currently building the LHC (Large Hadron Collider), a 27 km particle accelerator. The equipment life-cycle management of this project is provided by the Engineering and Equipment Data Management System (EDMS) Service. Using an Oracle database, it supports the management and follow-up of different kinds of documentation through the whole life cycle of the LHC project: design, manufacturing, installation, commissioning data etc... The equipment data collection phase is now slowing down and the project is getting closer to the 'As-Built' phase: the phase of the project consuming and exploring the large volumes of data stored since 1996. Searching through millions of items of information (documents, equipment parts, operations...) multiplied by dozens of points of view (operators, maintainers...) requires an efficient and flexible search engine. This paper describes the process followed by the team to implement the search engine for the LHC As-built project in the EDMS Service. The emphasis is put on the design decision to decouple the search engine from any user interface, potentially enabling other systems to also use it. Projections, algorithms, and the planned implementation are described in this paper. The implementation of the first version started in early 2007

  3. Stochastic background search correlating ALLEGRO with LIGO engineering data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whelan, John T [Department of Physics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Daw, Edward [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, Louisiana 70803 (United States); Heng, Ik Siong [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Albert-Einstein-Institut, Aussenstelle Hannover, D-30167 Hannover (Germany); McHugh, Martin P [Department of Physics, Loyola University, New Orleans, Louisiana 70118 (United States); Lazzarini, Albert [LIGO Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States)

    2003-09-07

    We describe the role of correlation measurements between the LIGO interferometer in Livingston, LA, and the ALLEGRO resonant bar detector in Baton Rouge, LA, in searches for a stochastic background of gravitational waves. Such measurements provide a valuable complement to correlations between interferometers at the two LIGO sites, since they are sensitive in a different, higher, frequency band. Additionally, the variable orientation of the ALLEGRO detector provides a means to distinguish gravitational wave correlations from correlated environmental noise. We describe the analysis underway to set a limit on the strength of a stochastic background at frequencies near 900 Hz using ALLEGRO data and data from LIGO's E7 Engineering Run.

  4. Stochastic background search correlating ALLEGRO with LIGO engineering data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whelan, John T; Daw, Edward; Heng, Ik Siong; McHugh, Martin P; Lazzarini, Albert

    2003-01-01

    We describe the role of correlation measurements between the LIGO interferometer in Livingston, LA, and the ALLEGRO resonant bar detector in Baton Rouge, LA, in searches for a stochastic background of gravitational waves. Such measurements provide a valuable complement to correlations between interferometers at the two LIGO sites, since they are sensitive in a different, higher, frequency band. Additionally, the variable orientation of the ALLEGRO detector provides a means to distinguish gravitational wave correlations from correlated environmental noise. We describe the analysis underway to set a limit on the strength of a stochastic background at frequencies near 900 Hz using ALLEGRO data and data from LIGO's E7 Engineering Run

  5. Using vegetable oils and animal fats in Diesel Engines: chemical analyses and engine texts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marmino, I.; Verhelst, S.; Sierens, R.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, some vegetable oils (rapeseed oil, palm oil) and animal fat were tested in a Diesel engine at a range of engine spreads and torque settings, after preheating at 70 0 C. Engine performance, fuel consumption and NOx, unburnt hydrocarbons and soot emissions have been recorded. The results have been compared to those obtained with diesel fuel in the same test conditions. The oils and fats were also analyzed for their physical and chemical properties (viscosity, composition, unsaturation, heating value). NOx emissions were found to be lower for the oils than for the diesel fuel. This, combined with higher HC emissions, can probably be explained through less effective atomization due to the higher viscosity of the oils and fat. On the other hand, soot emissions were found to decrease. [it

  6. Teen smoking cessation help via the Internet: a survey of search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Christine C; Elliott, Sean P; Conway, Terry L; Woodruff, Susan I

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study was to assess Web sites related to teen smoking cessation on the Internet. Seven Internet search engines were searched using the keywords teen quit smoking. The top 20 hits from each search engine were reviewed and categorized. The keywords teen quit smoking produced between 35 and 400,000 hits depending on the search engine. Of 140 potential hits, 62% were active, unique sites; 85% were listed by only one search engine; and 40% focused on cessation. Findings suggest that legitimate on-line smoking cessation help for teens is constrained by search engine choice and the amount of time teens spend looking through potential sites. Resource listings should be updated regularly. Smoking cessation Web sites need to be picked up on multiple search engine searches. Further evaluation of smoking cessation Web sites need to be conducted to identify the most effective help for teens.

  7. Talking to Texts and Sketches: The Function of Written and Graphic Mediation in Engineering Design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Barbara

    2000-01-01

    Describes the author's research that explores the role of language, particularly texts, in the engineering design process. Notes that results of this case study support a new "mediated" model of engineering design as an inventional activity in which designers use talk, written language, and other symbolic representations as tools to think about…

  8. The LAILAPS search engine: a feature model for relevance ranking in life science databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Matthias; Spies, Karl; Colmsee, Christian; Flemming, Steffen; Klapperstück, Matthias; Scholz, Uwe

    2010-03-25

    Efficient and effective information retrieval in life sciences is one of the most pressing challenge in bioinformatics. The incredible growth of life science databases to a vast network of interconnected information systems is to the same extent a big challenge and a great chance for life science research. The knowledge found in the Web, in particular in life-science databases, are a valuable major resource. In order to bring it to the scientist desktop, it is essential to have well performing search engines. Thereby, not the response time nor the number of results is important. The most crucial factor for millions of query results is the relevance ranking. In this paper, we present a feature model for relevance ranking in life science databases and its implementation in the LAILAPS search engine. Motivated by the observation of user behavior during their inspection of search engine result, we condensed a set of 9 relevance discriminating features. These features are intuitively used by scientists, who briefly screen database entries for potential relevance. The features are both sufficient to estimate the potential relevance, and efficiently quantifiable. The derivation of a relevance prediction function that computes the relevance from this features constitutes a regression problem. To solve this problem, we used artificial neural networks that have been trained with a reference set of relevant database entries for 19 protein queries. Supporting a flexible text index and a simple data import format, this concepts are implemented in the LAILAPS search engine. It can easily be used both as search engine for comprehensive integrated life science databases and for small in-house project databases. LAILAPS is publicly available for SWISSPROT data at http://lailaps.ipk-gatersleben.de.

  9. A Taxonomic Search Engine: federating taxonomic databases using web services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Roderic D M

    2005-03-09

    The taxonomic name of an organism is a key link between different databases that store information on that organism. However, in the absence of a single, comprehensive database of organism names, individual databases lack an easy means of checking the correctness of a name. Furthermore, the same organism may have more than one name, and the same name may apply to more than one organism. The Taxonomic Search Engine (TSE) is a web application written in PHP that queries multiple taxonomic databases (ITIS, Index Fungorum, IPNI, NCBI, and uBIO) and summarises the results in a consistent format. It supports "drill-down" queries to retrieve a specific record. The TSE can optionally suggest alternative spellings the user can try. It also acts as a Life Science Identifier (LSID) authority for the source taxonomic databases, providing globally unique identifiers (and associated metadata) for each name. The Taxonomic Search Engine is available at http://darwin.zoology.gla.ac.uk/~rpage/portal/ and provides a simple demonstration of the potential of the federated approach to providing access to taxonomic names.

  10. General vs health specialized search engine: a blind comparative evaluation of top search results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pletneva, Natalia; Ruiz de Castaneda, Rafael; Baroz, Frederic; Boyer, Celia

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a blind comparison of top ten search results retrieved by Google.ch (French) and Khresmoi for everyone, a health specialized search engine. Participants--students of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Geneva had to complete three tasks and select their preferred results. The majority of the participants have largely preferred Google results while Khresmoi results showed potential to compete in specific topics. The coverage of the results seems to be one of the reasons. The second being that participants do not know how to select quality and transparent health web pages. More awareness, tools and education about the matter is required for the students of Medicine to be able to efficiently distinguish trustworthy online health information.

  11. In Search of Search Engine Marketing Strategy Amongst SME's in Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Chris; Charleton, Debbie

    Researchers have identified the Web as a searchers first port of call for locating information. Search Engine Marketing (SEM) strategies have been noted as a key consideration when developing, maintaining and managing Websites. A study presented here of SEM practices of Irish small to medium enterprises (SMEs) reveals they plan to spend more resources on SEM in the future. Most firms utilize an informal SEM strategy, where Website optimization is perceived most effective in attracting traffic. Respondents cite the use of ‘keywords in title and description tags’ as the most used SEM technique, followed by the use of ‘keywords throughout the whole Website’; while ‘Pay for Placement’ was most widely used Paid Search technique. In concurrence with the literature, measuring SEM performance remains a significant challenge with many firms unsure if they measure it effectively. An encouraging finding is that Irish SMEs adopt a positive ethical posture when undertaking SEM.

  12. A search engine to find the best data?

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2014-01-01

    What if you could see your experiment’s results in a “page rank” style? How would your workflow change if you could collaborate with your colleagues on a single platform? What if you could search all your event data for certain specifications? All of these ideas (and more) are being explored at the LHCb experiment in collaboration with Internet giant Yandex.   An extremely rare B0s → μμ decay candidate event observed in the LHCb detector. As the leading search provider in Russia, with over 60% of the market share, Yandex is to East what Google is to West. Their collaboration with CERN began back in 2011, when Yandex co-founder Ilya Segalovich was approached by then-LHCb spokesperson Andrei Golutvin. “Just as Yandex's search engines sift through thousands of websites to find the right page, our experimentalists apply algorithms to find the best result in our data," says Andrei Golutvin. "Perhaps the techn...

  13. Search engines, news wires and digital epidemiology: Presumptions and facts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaveh-Yazdy, Fatemeh; Zareh-Bidoki, Ali-Mohammad

    2018-07-01

    Digital epidemiology tries to identify diseases dynamics and spread behaviors using digital traces collected via search engines logs and social media posts. However, the impacts of news on information-seeking behaviors have been remained unknown. Data employed in this research provided from two sources, (1) Parsijoo search engine query logs of 48 months, and (2) a set of documents of 28 months of Parsijoo's news service. Two classes of topics, i.e. macro-topics and micro-topics were selected to be tracked in query logs and news. Keywords of the macro-topics were automatically generated using web provided resources and exceeded 10k. Keyword set of micro-topics were limited to a numerable list including terms related to diseases and health-related activities. The tests are established in the form of three studies. Study A includes temporal analyses of 7 macro-topics in query logs. Study B considers analyzing seasonality of searching patterns of 9 micro-topics, and Study C assesses the impact of news media coverage on users' health-related information-seeking behaviors. Study A showed that the hourly distribution of various macro-topics followed the changes in social activity level. Conversely, the interestingness of macro-topics did not follow the regulation of topic distributions. Among macro-topics, "Pharmacotherapy" has highest interestingness level and wider time-window of popularity. In Study B, seasonality of a limited number of diseases and health-related activities were analyzed. Trends of infectious diseases, such as flu, mumps and chicken pox were seasonal. Due to seasonality of most of diseases covered in national vaccination plans, the trend belonging to "Immunization and Vaccination" was seasonal, as well. Cancer awareness events caused peaks in search trends of "Cancer" and "Screening" micro-topics in specific days of each year that mimic repeated patterns which may mistakenly be identified as seasonality. In study C, we assessed the co-integration and

  14. Using Internet search engines to obtain medical information: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liupu; Wang, Juexin; Wang, Michael; Li, Yong; Liang, Yanchun; Xu, Dong

    2012-05-16

    The Internet has become one of the most important means to obtain health and medical information. It is often the first step in checking for basic information about a disease and its treatment. The search results are often useful to general users. Various search engines such as Google, Yahoo!, Bing, and Ask.com can play an important role in obtaining medical information for both medical professionals and lay people. However, the usability and effectiveness of various search engines for medical information have not been comprehensively compared and evaluated. To compare major Internet search engines in their usability of obtaining medical and health information. We applied usability testing as a software engineering technique and a standard industry practice to compare the four major search engines (Google, Yahoo!, Bing, and Ask.com) in obtaining health and medical information. For this purpose, we searched the keyword breast cancer in Google, Yahoo!, Bing, and Ask.com and saved the results of the top 200 links from each search engine. We combined nonredundant links from the four search engines and gave them to volunteer users in an alphabetical order. The volunteer users evaluated the websites and scored each website from 0 to 10 (lowest to highest) based on the usefulness of the content relevant to breast cancer. A medical expert identified six well-known websites related to breast cancer in advance as standards. We also used five keywords associated with breast cancer defined in the latest release of Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) and analyzed their occurrence in the websites. Each search engine provided rich information related to breast cancer in the search results. All six standard websites were among the top 30 in search results of all four search engines. Google had the best search validity (in terms of whether a website could be opened), followed by Bing, Ask.com, and Yahoo!. The search results highly overlapped between the

  15. Improving sensitivity in proteome studies by analysis of false discovery rates for multiple search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Andrew R; Siepen, Jennifer A; Hubbard, Simon J; Paton, Norman W

    2009-03-01

    LC-MS experiments can generate large quantities of data, for which a variety of database search engines are available to make peptide and protein identifications. Decoy databases are becoming widely used to place statistical confidence in result sets, allowing the false discovery rate (FDR) to be estimated. Different search engines produce different identification sets so employing more than one search engine could result in an increased number of peptides (and proteins) being identified, if an appropriate mechanism for combining data can be defined. We have developed a search engine independent score, based on FDR, which allows peptide identifications from different search engines to be combined, called the FDR Score. The results demonstrate that the observed FDR is significantly different when analysing the set of identifications made by all three search engines, by each pair of search engines or by a single search engine. Our algorithm assigns identifications to groups according to the set of search engines that have made the identification, and re-assigns the score (combined FDR Score). The combined FDR Score can differentiate between correct and incorrect peptide identifications with high accuracy, allowing on average 35% more peptide identifications to be made at a fixed FDR than using a single search engine.

  16. A search engine to identify pathway genes from expression data on multiple organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zambon Alexander C

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The completion of several genome projects showed that most genes have not yet been characterized, especially in multicellular organisms. Although most genes have unknown functions, a large collection of data is available describing their transcriptional activities under many different experimental conditions. In many cases, the coregulatation of a set of genes across a set of conditions can be used to infer roles for genes of unknown function. Results We developed a search engine, the Multiple-Species Gene Recommender (MSGR, which scans gene expression datasets from multiple organisms to identify genes that participate in a genetic pathway. The MSGR takes a query consisting of a list of genes that function together in a genetic pathway from one of six organisms: Homo sapiens, Drosophila melanogaster, Caenorhabditis elegans, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis thaliana, and Helicobacter pylori. Using a probabilistic method to merge searches, the MSGR identifies genes that are significantly coregulated with the query genes in one or more of those organisms. The MSGR achieves its highest accuracy for many human pathways when searches are combined across species. We describe specific examples in which new genes were identified to be involved in a neuromuscular signaling pathway and a cell-adhesion pathway. Conclusion The search engine can scan large collections of gene expression data for new genes that are significantly coregulated with a pathway of interest. By integrating searches across organisms, the MSGR can identify pathway members whose coregulation is either ancient or newly evolved.

  17. A Webometric Analysis of ISI Medical Journals Using Yahoo, AltaVista, and All the Web Search Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohreh Zahedi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The World Wide Web is an important information source for scholarly communications. Examining the inlinks via webometrics studies has attracted particular interests among information researchers. In this study, the number of inlinks to 69 ISI medical journals retrieved by Yahoo, AltaVista, and All The web Search Engines were examined via a comparative and Webometrics study. For data analysis, SPSS software was employed. Findings revealed that British Medical Journal website attracted the most links of all in the three search engines. There is a significant correlation between the number of External links and the ISI impact factor. The most significant correlation in the three search engines exists between external links of Yahoo and AltaVista (100% and the least correlation is found between external links of All The web & the number of pages of AltaVista (0.51. There is no significant difference between the internal links & the number of pages found by the three search engines. But in case of impact factors, significant differences are found between these three search engines. So, the study shows that journals with higher impact factor attract more links to their websites. It also indicates that the three search engines are significantly different in terms of total links, outlinks and web impact factors

  18. Search for Higgs boson pair production in the [Formula: see text] final state from pp collisions at [Formula: see text] TeVwith the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Aben, R; Abolins, M; AbouZeid, O S; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adamczyk, L; Adams, D L; Adelman, J; Adomeit, S; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimoto, G; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albrand, S; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Alimonti, G; Alio, L; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Altheimer, A; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Álvarez Piqueras, D; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amako, K; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amram, N; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, G; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Anger, P; Angerami, A; Anghinolfi, F; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antos, J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Arce, A T H; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Arnaez, O; Arnal, V; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Åsman, B; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Auerbach, B; Augsten, K; Aurousseau, M; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baak, M A; Baas, A E; Bacci, C; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagiacchi, P; Bagnaia, P; Bai, Y; Bain, T; Baines, J T; Baker, O K; Balek, P; Balestri, T; Balli, F; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Bansil, H S; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisonzi, M; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; 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Wang, J; Wang, J; Wang, K; Wang, R; Wang, S M; Wang, T; Wang, X; Wanotayaroj, C; Warburton, A; Ward, C P; Wardrope, D R; Warsinsky, M; Washbrook, A; Wasicki, C; Watkins, P M; Watson, A T; Watson, I J; Watson, M F; Watts, G; Watts, S; Waugh, B M; Webb, S; Weber, M S; Weber, S W; Webster, J S; Weidberg, A R; Weinert, B; Weingarten, J; Weiser, C; Weits, H; Wells, P S; Wenaus, T; Wengler, T; Wenig, S; Wermes, N; Werner, M; Werner, P; Wessels, M; Wetter, J; Whalen, K; Wharton, A M; White, A; White, M J; White, R; White, S; Whiteson, D; Wickens, F J; Wiedenmann, W; Wielers, M; Wienemann, P; Wiglesworth, C; Wiik-Fuchs, L A M; Wildauer, A; Wilkens, H G; Williams, H H; Williams, S; Willis, C; Willocq, S; Wilson, A; Wilson, J A; Wingerter-Seez, I; Winklmeier, F; Winter, B T; Wittgen, M; Wittkowski, J; Wollstadt, S J; Wolter, M W; Wolters, H; Wosiek, B K; Wotschack, J; Woudstra, M J; Wozniak, K W; Wu, M; Wu, M; Wu, S L; Wu, X; Wu, Y; Wyatt, T R; Wynne, B M; Xella, S; Xu, D; Xu, L; Yabsley, B; Yacoob, S; Yakabe, R; Yamada, M; Yamaguchi, Y; Yamamoto, A; Yamamoto, S; Yamanaka, T; Yamauchi, K; Yamazaki, Y; Yan, Z; Yang, H; Yang, H; Yang, Y; Yao, W-M; Yasu, Y; Yatsenko, E; Yau Wong, K H; Ye, J; Ye, S; Yeletskikh, I; Yen, A L; Yildirim, E; Yorita, K; Yoshida, R; Yoshihara, K; Young, C; Young, C J S; Youssef, S; Yu, D R; Yu, J; Yu, J M; Yu, J; Yuan, L; Yurkewicz, A; Yusuff, I; Zabinski, B; Zaidan, R; Zaitsev, A M; Zalieckas, J; Zaman, A; Zambito, S; Zanello, L; Zanzi, D; Zeitnitz, C; Zeman, M; Zemla, A; Zengel, K; Zenin, O; Ženiš, T; Zerwas, D; Zhang, D; Zhang, F; Zhang, H; Zhang, J; Zhang, L; Zhang, R; Zhang, X; Zhang, Z; Zhao, X; Zhao, Y; Zhao, Z; Zhemchugov, A; Zhong, J; Zhou, B; Zhou, C; Zhou, L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhu, C G; Zhu, H; Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhukov, K; Zibell, A; Zieminska, D; Zimine, N I; Zimmermann, C; Zimmermann, S; Zinonos, Z; Zinser, M; Ziolkowski, M; Živković, L; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zurzolo, G; Zwalinski, L

    A search for Higgs boson pair production [Formula: see text] is performed with 19.5 fb[Formula: see text] of proton-proton collision data at [Formula: see text] TeV, which were recorded by the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider in 2012. The decay products of each Higgs boson are reconstructed as a high-momentum [Formula: see text] system with either a pair of small-radius jets or a single large-radius jet, the latter exploiting jet substructure techniques and associated b -tagged track-jets. No evidence for resonant or non-resonant Higgs boson pair production is observed. The data are interpreted in the context of the Randall-Sundrum model with a warped extra dimension as well as the two-Higgs-doublet model. An upper limit on the cross-section for [Formula: see text] of 3.2 (2.3) fb is set for a Kaluza-Klein graviton [Formula: see text] mass of 1.0 (1.5) TeV, at the 95 % confidence level. The search for non-resonant Standard Model hh production sets an observed 95 % confidence level upper limit on the production cross-section [Formula: see text] of 202 fb, compared to a Standard Model prediction of [Formula: see text] fb.

  19. EIIS: An Educational Information Intelligent Search Engine Supported by Semantic Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chang-Qin; Duan, Ru-Lin; Tang, Yong; Zhu, Zhi-Ting; Yan, Yong-Jian; Guo, Yu-Qing

    2011-01-01

    The semantic web brings a new opportunity for efficient information organization and search. To meet the special requirements of the educational field, this paper proposes an intelligent search engine enabled by educational semantic support service, where three kinds of searches are integrated into Educational Information Intelligent Search (EIIS)…

  20. Preliminary Comparison of Three Search Engines for Point of Care Access to MEDLINE® Citations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauser, Susan E.; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Ford, Glenn M.; Jacobs, Joshua L.; Thoma, George

    2006-01-01

    Medical resident physicians used MD on Tap in real time to search for MEDLINE citations relevant to clinical questions using three search engines: Essie, Entrez and Google™, in order of performance. PMID:17238564

  1. Predicting user click behaviour in search engine advertisements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daryaie Zanjani, Mohammad; Khadivi, Shahram

    2015-10-01

    According to the specific requirements and interests of users, search engines select and display advertisements that match user needs and have higher probability of attracting users' attention based on their previous search history. New objects such as user, advertisement or query cause a deterioration of precision in targeted advertising due to their lack of history. This article surveys this challenge. In the case of new objects, we first extract similar observed objects to the new object and then we use their history as the history of new object. Similarity between objects is measured based on correlation, which is a relation between user and advertisement when the advertisement is displayed to the user. This method is used for all objects, so it has helped us to accurately select relevant advertisements for users' queries. In our proposed model, we assume that similar users behave in a similar manner. We find that users with few queries are similar to new users. We will show that correlation between users and advertisements' keywords is high. Thus, users who pay attention to advertisements' keywords, click similar advertisements. In addition, users who pay attention to specific brand names might have similar behaviours too.

  2. Cumulative query method for influenza surveillance using search engine data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Dong-Woo; Jo, Min-Woo; Sohn, Chang Hwan; Shin, Soo-Yong; Lee, JaeHo; Yu, Maengsoo; Kim, Won Young; Lim, Kyoung Soo; Lee, Sang-Il

    2014-12-16

    Internet search queries have become an important data source in syndromic surveillance system. However, there is currently no syndromic surveillance system using Internet search query data in South Korea. The objective of this study was to examine correlations between our cumulative query method and national influenza surveillance data. Our study was based on the local search engine, Daum (approximately 25% market share), and influenza-like illness (ILI) data from the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A quota sampling survey was conducted with 200 participants to obtain popular queries. We divided the study period into two sets: Set 1 (the 2009/10 epidemiological year for development set 1 and 2010/11 for validation set 1) and Set 2 (2010/11 for development Set 2 and 2011/12 for validation Set 2). Pearson's correlation coefficients were calculated between the Daum data and the ILI data for the development set. We selected the combined queries for which the correlation coefficients were .7 or higher and listed them in descending order. Then, we created a cumulative query method n representing the number of cumulative combined queries in descending order of the correlation coefficient. In validation set 1, 13 cumulative query methods were applied, and 8 had higher correlation coefficients (min=.916, max=.943) than that of the highest single combined query. Further, 11 of 13 cumulative query methods had an r value of ≥.7, but 4 of 13 combined queries had an r value of ≥.7. In validation set 2, 8 of 15 cumulative query methods showed higher correlation coefficients (min=.975, max=.987) than that of the highest single combined query. All 15 cumulative query methods had an r value of ≥.7, but 6 of 15 combined queries had an r value of ≥.7. Cumulative query method showed relatively higher correlation with national influenza surveillance data than combined queries in the development and validation set.

  3. Making a search engine for Indocean - A database of abstracts: An experience

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Tapaswi, M.P.; Haravu, L.J.

    stream_size 23701 stream_content_type text/plain stream_name Inf_Manage_Trends_Issues_2003_307.pdf.txt stream_source_info Inf_Manage_Trends_Issues_2003_307.pdf.txt Content-Encoding UTF-8 Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8... Information Mallagement : Trends and Issues (Festschrift ill honour of Prof S. Seetharama) 52 . Making a Search Engine for Indocean - A Database of Abstracts : An Experience Murari P Tapaswi* and L J Haravu** *Documentation Officer. National Information...

  4. An open-source, mobile-friendly search engine for public medical knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samwald, Matthias; Hanbury, Allan

    2014-01-01

    The World Wide Web has become an important source of information for medical practitioners. To complement the capabilities of currently available web search engines we developed FindMeEvidence, an open-source, mobile-friendly medical search engine. In a preliminary evaluation, the quality of results from FindMeEvidence proved to be competitive with those from TRIP Database, an established, closed-source search engine for evidence-based medicine.

  5. Google chemtrails: a methodology to analyze topic representation in search engine results

    OpenAIRE

    Ballatore, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Search engine results influence the visibility of different viewpoints in political, cultural, and scientific debates. Treating search engines as editorial products with intrinsic biases can help understand the structure of information flows in new media. This paper outlines an empirical methodology to analyze the representation of topics in search engines, reducing the spatial and temporal biases in the results. As a case study, the methodology is applied to 15 popular conspiracy theories, e...

  6. Dynamics of a macroscopic model characterizing mutualism of search engines and web sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanshi; Wu, Hong

    2006-05-01

    We present a model to describe the mutualism relationship between search engines and web sites. In the model, search engines and web sites benefit from each other while the search engines are derived products of the web sites and cannot survive independently. Our goal is to show strategies for the search engines to survive in the internet market. From mathematical analysis of the model, we show that mutualism does not always result in survival. We show various conditions under which the search engines would tend to extinction, persist or grow explosively. Then by the conditions, we deduce a series of strategies for the search engines to survive in the internet market. We present conditions under which the initial number of consumers of the search engines has little contribution to their persistence, which is in agreement with the results in previous works. Furthermore, we show novel conditions under which the initial value plays an important role in the persistence of the search engines and deduce new strategies. We also give suggestions for the web sites to cooperate with the search engines in order to form a win-win situation.

  7. Durham Zoo: Powering a Search-&-Innovation Engine with Collective Intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Absalom

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose – Durham Zoo (hereinafter – DZ is a project to design and operate a concept search engine for science and technology. In DZ, a concept includes a solution to a problem in a particular context.Design – Concept searching is rendered complex by the fuzzy nature of a concept, the many possible implementations of the same concept, and the many more ways that the many implementations can be expressed in natural language. An additional complexity is the diversity of languages and formats, in which the concepts can be disclosed.Humans understand language, inference, implication and abstraction and, hence, concepts much better than computers, that in turn are much better at storing and processing vast amounts of data.We are 7 billion on the planet and we have the Internet as the backbone for Collective Intelligence. So, our concept search engine uses humans to store concepts via a shorthand that can be stored, processed and searched by computers: so, humans IN and computers OUT.The shorthand is classification: metadata in a structure that can define the content of a disclosure. The classification is designed to be powerful in terms of defining and searching concepts, whilst suited to a crowdsourcing effort. It is simple and intuitive to use. Most importantly, it is adapted to restrict ambiguity, which is the poison of classification, without imposing a restrictive centralised management.In the classification scheme, each entity is shown together in a graphical representation with related entities. The entities are arranged on a sliding scale of similarity. This sliding scale is effectively fuzzy classification.Findings – The authors of the paper have been developing a first classification scheme for the technology of traffic cones, this in preparation for a trial of a working system. The process has enabled the authors to further explore the practicalities of concept classification. The CmapTools knowledge modelling kit to develop the

  8. Engineering Bacteria to Search for Specific Concentrations of Molecules by a Systematic Synthetic Biology Design Method.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin-Ming Tien

    Full Text Available Bacteria navigate environments full of various chemicals to seek favorable places for survival by controlling the flagella's rotation using a complicated signal transduction pathway. By influencing the pathway, bacteria can be engineered to search for specific molecules, which has great potential for application to biomedicine and bioremediation. In this study, genetic circuits were constructed to make bacteria search for a specific molecule at particular concentrations in their environment through a synthetic biology method. In addition, by replacing the "brake component" in the synthetic circuit with some specific sensitivities, the bacteria can be engineered to locate areas containing specific concentrations of the molecule. Measured by the swarm assay qualitatively and microfluidic techniques quantitatively, the characteristics of each "brake component" were identified and represented by a mathematical model. Furthermore, we established another mathematical model to anticipate the characteristics of the "brake component". Based on this model, an abundant component library can be established to provide adequate component selection for different searching conditions without identifying all components individually. Finally, a systematic design procedure was proposed. Following this systematic procedure, one can design a genetic circuit for bacteria to rapidly search for and locate different concentrations of particular molecules by selecting the most adequate "brake component" in the library. Moreover, following simple procedures, one can also establish an exclusive component library suitable for other cultivated environments, promoter systems, or bacterial strains.

  9. The Gaze of the Perfect Search Engine: Google as an Infrastructure of Dataveillance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmer, M.

    Web search engines have emerged as a ubiquitous and vital tool for the successful navigation of the growing online informational sphere. The goal of the world's largest search engine, Google, is to "organize the world's information and make it universally accessible and useful" and to create the "perfect search engine" that provides only intuitive, personalized, and relevant results. While intended to enhance intellectual mobility in the online sphere, this chapter reveals that the quest for the perfect search engine requires the widespread monitoring and aggregation of a users' online personal and intellectual activities, threatening the values the perfect search engines were designed to sustain. It argues that these search-based infrastructures of dataveillance contribute to a rapidly emerging "soft cage" of everyday digital surveillance, where they, like other dataveillance technologies before them, contribute to the curtailing of individual freedom, affect users' sense of self, and present issues of deep discrimination and social justice.

  10. Partial index replicated and distributed scheme for full-text search on ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2Department of Computer Application, Krishna Institute of Engineering & .... In the wireless data broadcast system, many researchers have used the ..... Graph 3 depicts decrement of tuning time as the repeatability increases in the proposed.

  11. Groundwork: An Intermediate-Level Text of ESL for Petroleum Engineers, Geologists, and Geophysicists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellersberger, Gail; Rippert-Davila, Susan

    The negotiation, development, testing, and publishing of a specialized text for instructing Chinese geologists and petroleum engineers in English as a second language are chronicled. Aspects of the process discussed include the initial contact and oral agreement with the corporate representative who had requested the training materials, scheduling…

  12. Lexical bundles in an advanced INTOCSU writing class and engineering texts: A functional analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alquraishi, Mohammed Abdulrahman

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the functions of lexical bundles in two corpora: a corpus of engineering academic texts and a corpus of IEP advanced writing class texts. This study is concerned with the nature of formulaic language in Pathway IEPs and engineering texts, and whether those types of texts show similar or distinctive formulaic functions. Moreover, the study looked into lexical bundles found in an engineering 1.26 million-word corpus and an ESL 65000-word corpus using a concordancing program. The study then analyzed the functions of those lexical bundles and compared them statistically using chi-square tests. Additionally, the results of this investigation showed 236 unique frequent lexical bundles in the engineering corpus and 37 bundles in the pathway corpus. Also, the study identified several differences between the density and functions of lexical bundles in the two corpora. These differences were evident in the distribution of functions of lexical bundles and the minimal overlap of lexical bundles found in the two corpora. The results of this study call for more attention to formulaic language at ESP and EAP programs.

  13. Development of a Google-based search engine for data mining radiology reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erinjeri, Joseph P; Picus, Daniel; Prior, Fred W; Rubin, David A; Koppel, Paul

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study is to develop a secure, Google-based data-mining tool for radiology reports using free and open source technologies and to explore its use within an academic radiology department. A Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA)-compliant data repository, search engine and user interface were created to facilitate treatment, operations, and reviews preparatory to research. The Institutional Review Board waived review of the project, and informed consent was not required. Comprising 7.9 GB of disk space, 2.9 million text reports were downloaded from our radiology information system to a fileserver. Extensible markup language (XML) representations of the reports were indexed using Google Desktop Enterprise search engine software. A hypertext markup language (HTML) form allowed users to submit queries to Google Desktop, and Google's XML response was interpreted by a practical extraction and report language (PERL) script, presenting ranked results in a web browser window. The query, reason for search, results, and documents visited were logged to maintain HIPAA compliance. Indexing averaged approximately 25,000 reports per hour. Keyword search of a common term like "pneumothorax" yielded the first ten most relevant results of 705,550 total results in 1.36 s. Keyword search of a rare term like "hemangioendothelioma" yielded the first ten most relevant results of 167 total results in 0.23 s; retrieval of all 167 results took 0.26 s. Data mining tools for radiology reports will improve the productivity of academic radiologists in clinical, educational, research, and administrative tasks. By leveraging existing knowledge of Google's interface, radiologists can quickly perform useful searches.

  14. The Role of Domain and System Knowledge on Text Comprehension and Information Search in Hypermedia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniek, Jacqueline; Schafer, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to examine the role of domain and system knowledge on learner performance in reading and information search in hypermedia. Previous studies have shown that prior knowledge is an important individual factor for effective hypermedia use. However, current research lacks a full understanding of how these two aspects of prior…

  15. An ontology-based search engine for protein-protein interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byungkyu; Han, Kyungsook

    2010-01-18

    Keyword matching or ID matching is the most common searching method in a large database of protein-protein interactions. They are purely syntactic methods, and retrieve the records in the database that contain a keyword or ID specified in a query. Such syntactic search methods often retrieve too few search results or no results despite many potential matches present in the database. We have developed a new method for representing protein-protein interactions and the Gene Ontology (GO) using modified Gödel numbers. This representation is hidden from users but enables a search engine using the representation to efficiently search protein-protein interactions in a biologically meaningful way. Given a query protein with optional search conditions expressed in one or more GO terms, the search engine finds all the interaction partners of the query protein by unique prime factorization of the modified Gödel numbers representing the query protein and the search conditions. Representing the biological relations of proteins and their GO annotations by modified Gödel numbers makes a search engine efficiently find all protein-protein interactions by prime factorization of the numbers. Keyword matching or ID matching search methods often miss the interactions involving a protein that has no explicit annotations matching the search condition, but our search engine retrieves such interactions as well if they satisfy the search condition with a more specific term in the ontology.

  16. Semantic similarity measure in biomedical domain leverage web search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Huang; Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Weng, Yung-Ching; Chang, Wen-Yung; Lai, Feipei

    2010-01-01

    Semantic similarity measure plays an essential role in Information Retrieval and Natural Language Processing. In this paper we propose a page-count-based semantic similarity measure and apply it in biomedical domains. Previous researches in semantic web related applications have deployed various semantic similarity measures. Despite the usefulness of the measurements in those applications, measuring semantic similarity between two terms remains a challenge task. The proposed method exploits page counts returned by the Web Search Engine. We define various similarity scores for two given terms P and Q, using the page counts for querying P, Q and P AND Q. Moreover, we propose a novel approach to compute semantic similarity using lexico-syntactic patterns with page counts. These different similarity scores are integrated adapting support vector machines, to leverage the robustness of semantic similarity measures. Experimental results on two datasets achieve correlation coefficients of 0.798 on the dataset provided by A. Hliaoutakis, 0.705 on the dataset provide by T. Pedersen with physician scores and 0.496 on the dataset provided by T. Pedersen et al. with expert scores.

  17. GOseek: a gene ontology search engine using enhanced keywords.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taha, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    We propose in this paper a biological search engine called GOseek, which overcomes the limitation of current gene similarity tools. Given a set of genes, GOseek returns the most significant genes that are semantically related to the given genes. These returned genes are usually annotated to one of the Lowest Common Ancestors (LCA) of the Gene Ontology (GO) terms annotating the given genes. Most genes have several annotation GO terms. Therefore, there may be more than one LCA for the GO terms annotating the given genes. The LCA annotating the genes that are most semantically related to the given gene is the one that receives the most aggregate semantic contribution from the GO terms annotating the given genes. To identify this LCA, GOseek quantifies the contribution of the GO terms annotating the given genes to the semantics of their LCAs. That is, it encodes the semantic contribution into a numeric format. GOseek uses microarray experiment data to rank result genes based on their significance. We evaluated GOseek experimentally and compared it with a comparable gene prediction tool. Results showed marked improvement over the tool.

  18. Design of personalized search engine based on user-webpage dynamic model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jihan; Li, Shanglin; Zhu, Yingke; Xiao, Bo

    2013-12-01

    Personalized search engine focuses on establishing a user-webpage dynamic model. In this model, users' personalized factors are introduced so that the search engine is better able to provide the user with targeted feedback. This paper constructs user and webpage dynamic vector tables, introduces singular value decomposition analysis in the processes of topic categorization, and extends the traditional PageRank algorithm.

  19. MOMFER: A Search Engine of Thompson's Motif-Index of Folk Literature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karsdorp, F.B.; van der Meulen, Marten; Meder, Theo; van den Bosch, Antal

    2015-01-01

    More than fifty years after the first edition of Thompson's seminal Motif-Indexof Folk Literature, we present an online search engine tailored to fully disclose the index digitally. This search engine, called MOMFER, greatly enhances the searchability of the Motif-Index and provides exciting new

  20. Taking It to the Top: A Lesson in Search Engine Optimization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydenberg, Mark; Miko, John S.

    2011-01-01

    Search engine optimization (SEO), the promoting of a Web site so it achieves optimal position with a search engine's rankings, is an important strategy for organizations and individuals in order to promote their brands online. Techniques for achieving SEO are relevant to students of marketing, computing, media arts, and other disciplines, and many…

  1. Index Compression and Efficient Query Processing in Large Web Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Shuai

    2013-01-01

    The inverted index is the main data structure used by all the major search engines. Search engines build an inverted index on their collection to speed up query processing. As the size of the web grows, the length of the inverted list structures, which can easily grow to hundreds of MBs or even GBs for common terms (roughly linear in the size of…

  2. Evaluation of Proteomic Search Engines for the Analysis of Histone Modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Identification of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) is challenging for proteomics search engines. Including many histone PTMs in one search increases the number of candidate peptides dramatically, leading to low search speed and fewer identified spectra. To evaluate database search engines on identifying histone PTMs, we present a method in which one kind of modification is searched each time, for example, unmodified, individually modified, and multimodified, each search result is filtered with false discovery rate less than 1%, and the identifications of multiple search engines are combined to obtain confident results. We apply this method for eight search engines on histone data sets. We find that two search engines, pFind and Mascot, identify most of the confident results at a reasonable speed, so we recommend using them to identify histone modifications. During the evaluation, we also find some important aspects for the analysis of histone modifications. Our evaluation of different search engines on identifying histone modifications will hopefully help those who are hoping to enter the histone proteomics field. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001118. PMID:25167464

  3. Evaluation of proteomic search engines for the analysis of histone modifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zuo-Fei; Lin, Shu; Molden, Rosalynn C; Garcia, Benjamin A

    2014-10-03

    Identification of histone post-translational modifications (PTMs) is challenging for proteomics search engines. Including many histone PTMs in one search increases the number of candidate peptides dramatically, leading to low search speed and fewer identified spectra. To evaluate database search engines on identifying histone PTMs, we present a method in which one kind of modification is searched each time, for example, unmodified, individually modified, and multimodified, each search result is filtered with false discovery rate less than 1%, and the identifications of multiple search engines are combined to obtain confident results. We apply this method for eight search engines on histone data sets. We find that two search engines, pFind and Mascot, identify most of the confident results at a reasonable speed, so we recommend using them to identify histone modifications. During the evaluation, we also find some important aspects for the analysis of histone modifications. Our evaluation of different search engines on identifying histone modifications will hopefully help those who are hoping to enter the histone proteomics field. The mass spectrometry proteomics data have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange Consortium with the data set identifier PXD001118.

  4. Obstacles of Search Engines Used by Graduate Students at The Faculty of Education, The Islamic University in Gaza

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fayez Kamal Shaladan

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to identify obstacles of search engines used by graduate students at the Faculty of Education, the Islamic University in Gaza, and to overcome them. The researchers utilized the analytical descriptive approach to achieve the goal of the study. They used the interview tool and designed a questionnaire to collect data for the study. The sample of the study was (164 male and female postgraduate students enrolled in the College of Education. The study results were as follows: The degree of obstacles to the use of search engines among postgraduate students at the Faculty of Education at the Islamic University in Gaza was high with a percentage of (%71.05.There were no statistically significant differences between the averages of the study sample for the obstacles of the use of the search engines among the postgraduate students in the Faculty of Education, the Islamic University due to the gender and academic variables, the cumulative average. An exception to this was the third theme which was personal constraints which had differences in favor of students whose cumulative rates were less than (%85. The study concluded with these recommendations: The university should subscribe to various search engines revise admission terms and conditions for postgraduate studies whereby English and computer courses can be included. Keywords: Search engines, Students, Postgraduate studies, Islamic University.

  5. A Two-Level Cache for Distributed Information Retrieval in Search Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weizhe Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To improve the performance of distributed information retrieval in search engines, we propose a two-level cache structure based on the queries of the users’ logs. We extract the highest rank queries of users from the static cache, in which the queries are the most popular. We adopt the dynamic cache as an auxiliary to optimize the distribution of the cache data. We propose a distribution strategy of the cache data. The experiments prove that the hit rate, the efficiency, and the time consumption of the two-level cache have advantages compared with other structures of cache.

  6. Developing a search engine for pharmacotherapeutic information that is not published in biomedical journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Do Pazo-Oubiña, F; Calvo Pita, C; Puigventós Latorre, F; Periañez-Párraga, L; Ventayol Bosch, P

    2011-01-01

    To identify publishers of pharmacotherapeutic information not found in biomedical journals that focuses on evaluating and providing advice on medicines and to develop a search engine to access this information. Compiling web sites that publish information on the rational use of medicines and have no commercial interests. Free-access web sites in Spanish, Galician, Catalan or English. Designing a search engine using the Google "custom search" application. Overall 159 internet addresses were compiled and were classified into 9 labels. We were able to recover the information from the selected sources using a search engine, which is called "AlquimiA" and available from http://www.elcomprimido.com/FARHSD/AlquimiA.htm. The main sources of pharmacotherapeutic information not published in biomedical journals were identified. The search engine is a useful tool for searching and accessing "grey literature" on the internet. Copyright © 2010 SEFH. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. An assessment of the visibility of MeSH-indexed medical web catalogs through search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zweigenbaum, P; Darmoni, S J; Grabar, N; Douyère, M; Benichou, J

    2002-01-01

    Manually indexed Internet health catalogs such as CliniWeb or CISMeF provide resources for retrieving high-quality health information. Users of these quality-controlled subject gateways are most often referred to them by general search engines such as Google, AltaVista, etc. This raises several questions, among which the following: what is the relative visibility of medical Internet catalogs through search engines? This study addresses this issue by measuring and comparing the visibility of six major, MeSH-indexed health catalogs through four different search engines (AltaVista, Google, Lycos, Northern Light) in two languages (English and French). Over half a million queries were sent to the search engines; for most of these search engines, according to our measures at the time the queries were sent, the most visible catalog for English MeSH terms was CliniWeb and the most visible one for French MeSH terms was CISMeF.

  8. Curating the Web: Building a Google Custom Search Engine for the Arts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennesy, Cody; Bowman, John

    2008-01-01

    Google's first foray onto the web made search simple and results relevant. With its Co-op platform, Google has taken another step toward dramatically increasing the relevancy of search results, further adapting the World Wide Web to local needs. Google Custom Search Engine, a tool on the Co-op platform, puts one in control of his or her own search…

  9. GeoSearcher: Location-Based Ranking of Search Engine Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Carolyn; Amoudi, Ghada

    2003-01-01

    Discussion of Web queries with geospatial dimensions focuses on an algorithm that assigns location coordinates dynamically to Web sites based on the URL. Describes a prototype search system that uses the algorithm to re-rank search engine results for queries with a geospatial dimension, thus providing an alternative ranking order for search engine…

  10. Balancing Efficiency and Effectiveness for Fusion-Based Search Engines in the "Big Data" Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jieyu; Huang, Chunlan; Wang, Xiuhong; Wu, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: In the big data age, we have to deal with a tremendous amount of information, which can be collected from various types of sources. For information search systems such as Web search engines or online digital libraries, the collection of documents becomes larger and larger. For some queries, an information search system needs to…

  11. ASCOT: a text mining-based web-service for efficient search and assisted creation of clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Clinical trials are mandatory protocols describing medical research on humans and among the most valuable sources of medical practice evidence. Searching for trials relevant to some query is laborious due to the immense number of existing protocols. Apart from search, writing new trials includes composing detailed eligibility criteria, which might be time-consuming, especially for new researchers. In this paper we present ASCOT, an efficient search application customised for clinical trials. ASCOT uses text mining and data mining methods to enrich clinical trials with metadata, that in turn serve as effective tools to narrow down search. In addition, ASCOT integrates a component for recommending eligibility criteria based on a set of selected protocols. PMID:22595088

  12. A search for [Formula: see text] resonances with the ATLAS detector in 2.05 fb-1 of proton-proton collisions at [Formula: see text].

    Science.gov (United States)

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Shibata, A; Shimizu, S; Shimojima, M; Shin, T; Shiyakova, M; Shmeleva, A; Shochet, M J; Short, D; Shrestha, S; Shulga, E; Shupe, M A; Sicho, P; Sidoti, A; Siegert, F; Sijacki, Dj; Silbert, O; Silva, J; Silver, Y; Silverstein, D; Silverstein, S B; Simak, V; Simard, O; Simic, Lj; Simion, S; Simioni, E; Simmons, B; Simoniello, R; Simonyan, M; Sinervo, P; Sinev, N B; Sipica, V; Siragusa, G; Sircar, A; Sisakyan, A N; Sivoklokov, S Yu; Sjölin, J; Sjursen, T B; Skinnari, L A; Skottowe, H P; Skovpen, K; Skubic, P; Slater, M; Slavicek, T; Sliwa, K; Smakhtin, V; Smart, B H; Smirnov, S Yu; Smirnov, Y; Smirnova, L N; Smirnova, O; Smith, B C; Smith, D; Smith, K M; Smizanska, M; Smolek, K; Snesarev, A A; Snow, S W; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Sobie, R; Sodomka, J; Soffer, A; Solans, C A; Solar, M; Solc, J; Soldatov, E Yu; Soldevila, U; Solfaroli Camillocci, E; Solodkov, A A; Solovyanov, O V; Soni, N; Sopko, V; Sopko, B; Sosebee, M; Soualah, R; Soukharev, A; Spagnolo, S; Spanò, F; Spighi, R; Spigo, G; Spila, F; Spiwoks, R; Spousta, M; Spreitzer, T; Spurlock, B; St Denis, R D; Stahlman, J; Stamen, R; Stanecka, E; Stanek, R W; Stanescu, C; Stanescu-Bellu, M; Stapnes, S; Starchenko, E A; Stark, J; Staroba, P; Starovoitov, P; Staszewski, R; Staude, A; Stavina, P; Steele, G; Steinbach, P; Steinberg, P; Stekl, I; Stelzer, B; Stelzer, H J; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stenzel, H; Stern, S; Stewart, G A; Stillings, J A; Stockton, M C; Stoerig, K; Stoicea, G; Stonjek, S; Strachota, P; Stradling, A R; Straessner, A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strandlie, A; Strang, M; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Strizenec, P; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D M; Strong, J A; Stroynowski, R; Strube, J; Stugu, B; Stumer, I; Stupak, J; Sturm, P; Styles, N A; Soh, D A; Su, D; Subramania, Hs; Succurro, A; Sugaya, Y; Suhr, C; Suk, M; Sulin, V V; Sultansoy, S; Sumida, T; Sun, X; Sundermann, J E; Suruliz, K; Susinno, G; Sutton, M R; Suzuki, Y; Suzuki, Y; Svatos, M; Swedish, S; Sykora, I; Sykora, T; Sánchez, J; Ta, D; Tackmann, K; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Taiblum, N; Takahashi, Y; Takai, H; Takashima, R; Takeda, H; Takeshita, T; Takubo, Y; Talby, M; Talyshev, A; Tamsett, M C; Tanaka, J; Tanaka, R; Tanaka, S; Tanaka, S; Tanasijczuk, A J; Tani, K; Tannoury, N; Tapprogge, S; Tardif, D; Tarem, S; Tarrade, F; Tartarelli, G F; Tas, P; Tasevsky, M; Tassi, E; Tatarkhanov, M; Tayalati, Y; Taylor, C; Taylor, F E; Taylor, G N; Taylor, W; Teinturier, M; Teixeira Dias Castanheira, M; Teixeira-Dias, P; Temming, K K; Ten Kate, H; Teng, P K; Terada, S; Terashi, K; Terron, J; Testa, M; Teuscher, R J; Therhaag, J; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T; Thoma, S; Thomas, J P; Thompson, E N; Thompson, P D; Thompson, P D; Thompson, A S; Thomsen, L A; Thomson, E; Thomson, M; Thun, R P; Tian, F; Tibbetts, M J; Tic, T; Tikhomirov, V O; Tikhonov, Y A; Timoshenko, S; Tipton, P; Tique Aires Viegas, F J; Tisserant, S; Todorov, T; Todorova-Nova, S; Toggerson, B; Tojo, J; Tokár, S; Tokushuku, K; Tollefson, K; Tomoto, M; Tompkins, L; Toms, K; Tonoyan, A; Topfel, C; Topilin, N D; Torchiani, I; Torrence, E; Torres, H; Torró Pastor, E; Toth, J; Touchard, F; Tovey, D R; Trefzger, T; Tremblet, L; Tricoli, A; Trigger, I M; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tripiana, M F; Trischuk, W; Trocmé, B; Troncon, C; Trottier-McDonald, M; Trzebinski, M; Trzupek, A; Tsarouchas, C; Tseng, J C-L; Tsiakiris, M; Tsiareshka, P V; Tsionou, D; Tsipolitis, G; Tsiskaridze, V; Tskhadadze, E G; Tsukerman, I I; Tsulaia, V; Tsung, J-W; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Tua, A; Tudorache, A; Tudorache, V; Tuggle, J M; Turala, M; Turecek, D; Turk Cakir, I; Turlay, E; Turra, R; Tuts, P M; Tykhonov, A; Tylmad, M; Tyndel, M; Tzanakos, G; Uchida, K; Ueda, I; Ueno, R; Ugland, M; Uhlenbrock, M; Uhrmacher, M; Ukegawa, F; Unal, G; Undrus, A; Unel, G; Unno, Y; Urbaniec, D; Usai, G; Uslenghi, M; Vacavant, L; Vacek, V; Vachon, B; Vahsen, S; Valenta, J; Valente, P; Valentinetti, S; Valero, A; Valkar, S; Valladolid Gallego, E; Vallecorsa, S; Valls Ferrer, J A; van der Graaf, H; van der Kraaij, E; Van Der Leeuw, R; van der Poel, E; van der Ster, D; van Eldik, N; van Gemmeren, P; van Vulpen, I; Vanadia, M; Vandelli, W; Vaniachine, A; Vankov, P; Vannucci, F; Vari, R; Varol, T; Varouchas, D; Vartapetian, A; Varvell, K E; Vassilakopoulos, V I; Vazeille, F; Vazquez Schroeder, T; Vegni, G; Veillet, J J; Veloso, F; Veness, R; Veneziano, S; Ventura, A; Ventura, D; Venturi, M; Venturi, N; Vercesi, V; Verducci, M; Verkerke, W; Vermeulen, J C; Vest, A; Vetterli, M C; Vichou, I; Vickey, T; Vickey Boeriu, O E; Viehhauser, G H A; Viel, S; Villa, M; Villaplana Perez, M; Vilucchi, E; Vincter, M G; Vinek, E; Vinogradov, V B; Virchaux, M; Virzi, J; Vitells, O; Viti, M; Vivarelli, I; Vives Vaque, F; Vlachos, S; Vladoiu, D; Vlasak, M; Vogel, A; Vokac, P; Volpi, G; Volpi, M; Volpini, G; von der Schmitt, H; von Loeben, J; von Radziewski, H; von Toerne, E; Vorobel, V; Vorwerk, V; Vos, M; Voss, R; Voss, T T; Vossebeld, J H; Vranjes, N; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M; Vrba, V; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Vuillermet, R; Vukotic, I; Wagner, W; Wagner, P; Wahlen, H; 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Zhu, J; Zhu, Y; Zhuang, X; Zhuravlov, V; Zieminska, D; Zimin, N I; Zimmermann, R; Zimmermann, S; Zimmermann, S; Ziolkowski, M; Zitoun, R; Živković, L; Zmouchko, V V; Zobernig, G; Zoccoli, A; Zur Nedden, M; Zutshi, V; Zwalinski, L

    A search for top quark pair resonances in final states containing at least one electron or muon has been performed with the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The search uses a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.05 fb -1 , which was recorded in 2011 at a proton-proton centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV. No evidence for a resonance is found and limits are set on the production cross-section times branching ratio to [Formula: see text] for narrow and wide resonances. For narrow Z ' bosons, the observed 95 % Bayesian credibility level limits range from 9.3 pb to 0.95 pb for masses in the range of m Z ' =500 GeV to m Z ' =1300 GeV. The corresponding excluded mass region for a leptophobic topcolour Z ' boson (Kaluza-Klein gluon excitation in the Randall-Sundrum model) is m Z ' <880 GeV ([Formula: see text]).

  13. Social Work Literature Searching: Current Issues with Databases and Online Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGinn, Tony; Taylor, Brian; McColgan, Mary; McQuilkan, Janice

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To compare the performance of a range of search facilities; and to illustrate the execution of a comprehensive literature search for qualitative evidence in social work. Context: Developments in literature search methods and comparisons of search facilities help facilitate access to the best available evidence for social workers.…

  14. Federated Search in the Wild: the combined power of over a hundred search engines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, Dong-Phuong; Demeester, Thomas; Trieschnigg, Rudolf Berend; Hiemstra, Djoerd

    2012-01-01

    Federated search has the potential of improving web search: the user becomes less dependent on a single search provider and parts of the deep web become available through a unified interface, leading to a wider variety in the retrieved search results. However, a publicly available dataset for

  15. Parallel local search for solving Constraint Problems on the Cell Broadband Engine (Preliminary Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvator Abreu

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We explore the use of the Cell Broadband Engine (Cell/BE for short for combinatorial optimization applications: we present a parallel version of a constraint-based local search algorithm that has been implemented on a multiprocessor BladeCenter machine with twin Cell/BE processors (total of 16 SPUs per blade. This algorithm was chosen because it fits very well the Cell/BE architecture and requires neither shared memory nor communication between processors, while retaining a compact memory footprint. We study the performance on several large optimization benchmarks and show that this achieves mostly linear time speedups, even sometimes super-linear. This is possible because the parallel implementation might explore simultaneously different parts of the search space and therefore converge faster towards the best sub-space and thus towards a solution. Besides getting speedups, the resulting times exhibit a much smaller variance, which benefits applications where a timely reply is critical.

  16. A unified architecture for biomedical search engines based on semantic web technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalali, Vahid; Matash Borujerdi, Mohammad Reza

    2011-04-01

    There is a huge growth in the volume of published biomedical research in recent years. Many medical search engines are designed and developed to address the over growing information needs of biomedical experts and curators. Significant progress has been made in utilizing the knowledge embedded in medical ontologies and controlled vocabularies to assist these engines. However, the lack of common architecture for utilized ontologies and overall retrieval process, hampers evaluating different search engines and interoperability between them under unified conditions. In this paper, a unified architecture for medical search engines is introduced. Proposed model contains standard schemas declared in semantic web languages for ontologies and documents used by search engines. Unified models for annotation and retrieval processes are other parts of introduced architecture. A sample search engine is also designed and implemented based on the proposed architecture in this paper. The search engine is evaluated using two test collections and results are reported in terms of precision vs. recall and mean average precision for different approaches used by this search engine.

  17. HOW DO RADIOLOGISTS USE THE HUMAN SEARCH ENGINE?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Jeremy M.; Evans, Karla K.; Drew, Trafton; Aizenman, Avigael; Josephs, Emilie

    2016-01-01

    Radiologists perform many ‘visual search tasks’ in which they look for one or more instances of one or more types of target item in a medical image (e.g. cancer screening). To understand and improve how radiologists do such tasks, it must be understood how the human ‘search engine’ works. This article briefly reviews some of the relevant work into this aspect of medical image perception. Questions include how attention and the eyes are guided in radiologic search? How is global (image-wide) information used in search? How might properties of human vision and human cognition lead to errors in radiologic search? PMID:26656078

  18. The Emdros Text Database Engine as a Platform for Persuasive Computing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandborg-Petersen, Ulrik

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the nature and scope of Emdros, a text database engine for annotated text. Three case-studies of persuasive learning systems using Emdros as an important architectural component are described, and their status as to participation in the three legs of BJ Fogg's Functional Triad...... of Persuasive Design is assessed. Various properties of Emdros are discussed, both with respect to competing systems, and with respect to the three case studies. It is argued that these properties together enable Emdros to form part of the foundation for a large class of systems whose primary function involves...

  19. Selecting Information to Answer Questions: Strategic Individual Differences when Searching Texts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerdan, Raquel; Gilabert, Ramiro; Vidal-Abarca, Eduardo

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore students' selection of information strategies in a task-oriented reading situation. 72 secondary school students read two texts and answered six questions per text, three of which were manipulated to induce a misleading matching between the wording of the question and distracting pieces of information in the…

  20. Using Internet Search Engines to Obtain Medical Information: A Comparative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liupu; Wang, Juexin; Wang, Michael; Li, Yong; Liang, Yanchun

    2012-01-01

    Background The Internet has become one of the most important means to obtain health and medical information. It is often the first step in checking for basic information about a disease and its treatment. The search results are often useful to general users. Various search engines such as Google, Yahoo!, Bing, and Ask.com can play an important role in obtaining medical information for both medical professionals and lay people. However, the usability and effectiveness of various search engines for medical information have not been comprehensively compared and evaluated. Objective To compare major Internet search engines in their usability of obtaining medical and health information. Methods We applied usability testing as a software engineering technique and a standard industry practice to compare the four major search engines (Google, Yahoo!, Bing, and Ask.com) in obtaining health and medical information. For this purpose, we searched the keyword breast cancer in Google, Yahoo!, Bing, and Ask.com and saved the results of the top 200 links from each search engine. We combined nonredundant links from the four search engines and gave them to volunteer users in an alphabetical order. The volunteer users evaluated the websites and scored each website from 0 to 10 (lowest to highest) based on the usefulness of the content relevant to breast cancer. A medical expert identified six well-known websites related to breast cancer in advance as standards. We also used five keywords associated with breast cancer defined in the latest release of Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine-Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT) and analyzed their occurrence in the websites. Results Each search engine provided rich information related to breast cancer in the search results. All six standard websites were among the top 30 in search results of all four search engines. Google had the best search validity (in terms of whether a website could be opened), followed by Bing, Ask.com, and Yahoo!. The search

  1. Performances of $E_T^{\\text{miss}}$ trigger for heavy diboson searches in 2017 data

    CERN Document Server

    CMS Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    Performances of a $E_T^{\\text{miss}}$ trigger path have been studied on 2017 data collected by the CMS detector, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.9 $\\text{fb}^{-1}$, as a function of the offline missing transverse momentum, after the transverse momenta of the muons are removed from the computation, and as a function of the number of primary vertices reconstructed offline.

  2. MSblender: A probabilistic approach for integrating peptide identifications from multiple database search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Taejoon; Choi, Hyungwon; Vogel, Christine; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Marcotte, Edward M

    2011-07-01

    Shotgun proteomics using mass spectrometry is a powerful method for protein identification but suffers limited sensitivity in complex samples. Integrating peptide identifications from multiple database search engines is a promising strategy to increase the number of peptide identifications and reduce the volume of unassigned tandem mass spectra. Existing methods pool statistical significance scores such as p-values or posterior probabilities of peptide-spectrum matches (PSMs) from multiple search engines after high scoring peptides have been assigned to spectra, but these methods lack reliable control of identification error rates as data are integrated from different search engines. We developed a statistically coherent method for integrative analysis, termed MSblender. MSblender converts raw search scores from search engines into a probability score for every possible PSM and properly accounts for the correlation between search scores. The method reliably estimates false discovery rates and identifies more PSMs than any single search engine at the same false discovery rate. Increased identifications increment spectral counts for most proteins and allow quantification of proteins that would not have been quantified by individual search engines. We also demonstrate that enhanced quantification contributes to improve sensitivity in differential expression analyses.

  3. An approach in building a chemical compound search engine in oracle database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H; Volarath, P; Harrison, R

    2005-01-01

    A searching or identifying of chemical compounds is an important process in drug design and in chemistry research. An efficient search engine involves a close coupling of the search algorithm and database implementation. The database must process chemical structures, which demands the approaches to represent, store, and retrieve structures in a database system. In this paper, a general database framework for working as a chemical compound search engine in Oracle database is described. The framework is devoted to eliminate data type constrains for potential search algorithms, which is a crucial step toward building a domain specific query language on top of SQL. A search engine implementation based on the database framework is also demonstrated. The convenience of the implementation emphasizes the efficiency and simplicity of the framework.

  4. Using Search Engines to Investigate Shared Migraine Experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Sara M; Turner, Dana P; Sexton, Katherine E; Deng, Hao; Houle, Timothy T

    2017-09-01

    To investigate migraine patterns in the United States using Google search data and utilize this information to better understand societal-level trends. Additionally, we aimed to evaluate time-series relationships between migraines and social factors. Extensive research has been done on clinical factors associated with migraines, yet population-level social factors have not been widely explored. Migraine internet search data may provide insight into migraine trends beyond information that can be gleaned from other sources. In this longitudinal analysis of open access data, we performed a time-series analysis in which about 12 years of Google Trends data (January 1, 2004 to August 15, 2016) were assessed. Data points were captured at a daily level and Google's 0-100 adjusted scale was used as the primary outcome to enable the comparison of relative popularity in the migraine search term. We hypothesized that the volume of relative migraine Google searches would be affected by societal aspects such as day of the week, holidays, and novel social events. Several recurrent social factors that drive migraine searches were identified. Of these, day of the week had the most significant impact on the volume of Google migraine searches. On average, Mondays accumulated 13.31 higher relative search volume than Fridays (95% CI: 11.12-15.51, P ≤ .001). Surprisingly, holidays were associated with lower relative migraine search volumes. Christmas Day had 13.84 lower relative search volumes (95% CI: 6.26-21.43, P ≤ .001) and Thanks giving had 20.18 lower relative search volumes (95% CI: 12.55-27.82, P ≤ .001) than days that were not holidays. Certain novel social events and extreme weather also appear to be associated with relative migraine Google search volume. Social factors play a crucial role in explaining population level migraine patterns, and thus, warrant further exploration. © 2017 American Headache Society.

  5. Using anchor text, spam filtering and Wikipedia for web search and entity ranking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kamps, J.; Kaptein, R.; Koolen, M.; Voorhees, E.M.; Buckland, L.P.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we document our efforts in participating to the TREC 2010 Entity Ranking and Web Tracks. We had multiple aims: For the Web Track we wanted to compare the effectiveness of anchor text of the category A and B collections and the impact of global document quality measures such as

  6. Preparing College Students To Search Full-Text Databases: Is Instruction Necessary?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Cheryl; Wales, Barbara

    Full-text databases allow Central Missouri State University's clients to access some of the serials that libraries have had to cancel due to escalating subscription costs; EbscoHost, the subject of this study, is one such database. The database is available free to all Missouri residents. A survey was designed consisting of 21 questions intended…

  7. Win the game of Googleopoly unlocking the secret strategy of search engines

    CERN Document Server

    Bradley, Sean V

    2015-01-01

    Rank higher in search results with this guide to SEO and content building supremacy Google is not only the number one search engine in the world, it is also the number one website in the world. Only 5 percent of site visitors search past the first page of Google, so if you're not in those top ten results, you are essentially invisible. Winning the Game of Googleopoly is the ultimate roadmap to Page One Domination. The POD strategy is what gets you on that super-critical first page of Google results by increasing your page views. You'll learn how to shape your online presence for Search Engine

  8. Poster for EPS conference: Search for Dark Matter Produced in Association with a Higgs Boson Decaying into \\textbf{$\\text{b} \\bar{\\text{b}}$} at $\\sqrt{\\text{s}}~\\text{= 13~TeV}$ with the ATLAS Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Rohrig, Rainer; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The existence of Dark Matter is inferred from several astrophysical and cosmological observations. Several extensions of the Standard Model accommodating Dark Matter constraints predict associated production of Dark Matter particles with the Standard Model Higgs boson. Such models are searched for in final states with large missing transverse momentum and a Higgs boson decaying to a pair of $b$-quarks with the ATLAS detector using 36.1~fb$^{-1}$ of $pp$ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 13~TeV at the LHC. An optimized selection together with an improved Higgs boson identification in boosted topologies leads to a significant improvement in sensitivity compared to previous searches. The observed data are in good agreement with the Standard Model predictions. Thus, limits are placed on the production cross-section of Dark Matter particles with a Higgs boson for a simplified model with two Higgs doublets and a heavy vector mediator. In addition, stringent model-independent limits are placed on the producti...

  9. Journal of the Ghana Institution of Engineers: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  10. The MediaMill TRECVID 2010 semantic video search engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, C.G.M.; van de Sande, K.E.A.; de Rooij, O.; Huurnink, B.; Gavves, E.; Odijk, D.; de Rijke, M.; Gevers, T.; Worring, M.; Koelma, D.C.; Smeulders, A.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we describe our TRECVID 2010 video retrieval experiments. The MediaMill team participated in three tasks: semantic indexing, known-item search, and instance search. The starting point for the MediaMill concept detection approach is our top-performing bag-of-words system of TRECVID

  11. Journal of Civil Engineering Research and Practice: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  12. Towards Identifying and Reducing the Bias of Disease Information Extracted from Search Engine Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Da-Cang; Wang, Jin-Feng; Huang, Ji-Xia; Sui, Daniel Z; Zhang, Hong-Yan; Hu, Mao-Gui; Xu, Cheng-Dong

    2016-06-01

    The estimation of disease prevalence in online search engine data (e.g., Google Flu Trends (GFT)) has received a considerable amount of scholarly and public attention in recent years. While the utility of search engine data for disease surveillance has been demonstrated, the scientific community still seeks ways to identify and reduce biases that are embedded in search engine data. The primary goal of this study is to explore new ways of improving the accuracy of disease prevalence estimations by combining traditional disease data with search engine data. A novel method, Biased Sentinel Hospital-based Area Disease Estimation (B-SHADE), is introduced to reduce search engine data bias from a geographical perspective. To monitor search trends on Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease (HFMD) in Guangdong Province, China, we tested our approach by selecting 11 keywords from the Baidu index platform, a Chinese big data analyst similar to GFT. The correlation between the number of real cases and the composite index was 0.8. After decomposing the composite index at the city level, we found that only 10 cities presented a correlation of close to 0.8 or higher. These cities were found to be more stable with respect to search volume, and they were selected as sample cities in order to estimate the search volume of the entire province. After the estimation, the correlation improved from 0.8 to 0.864. After fitting the revised search volume with historical cases, the mean absolute error was 11.19% lower than it was when the original search volume and historical cases were combined. To our knowledge, this is the first study to reduce search engine data bias levels through the use of rigorous spatial sampling strategies.

  13. FROM TEXT TO STAGE PERFORMANCE (IN SEARCH OF PATHS OF COMMUNICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dubravka Crnojević-Carić

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the acting in an interdisciplinary way, linking the insights that come from theory and pedagogy of acting and theater studies (Branko Gavella, Michail Chekhov, Konstantin Stanislavsky, Lee Strasberg, Cicely Berry, Antonin Artaud, as well as from contemporary insights of neuroscience (Antonio Damasio, Michel Lacroix, Rosa Alice Branco. By analysing the creative process of the actor, I’ll speak about the nature of speech acts. The actor has the privilege to explore different forms of the communication, as well as speech acts. The creative process of the actor will be analysed through the several work phases (the process of text reading, the individual introduction with the text, the group reading rehearsal, the misenscene rehearsal, tech rehearsal, as well as public performance. During the work processes on a play, communication participants are changing and they adopt the various strategies of communication. An actor is the one who practices how to re-direct his attention, as well as speech act: he pays attention to the partner, to the director, technical staff, imaginary ideal spectators and real present auditorium. The paper thematises so-called “attention circles” which are defining the speech of actor. Nature of “attention circle” is changing during the performance. All of the above (the creative process of the actor is somehow connected with the everydays communication and with the communication during the public presentation of the default topics. A separate part of this paper will be dedicated to those differences. In this paper I will also consider distinction between the speech act which has pragmatic function in the form of so-called “civil honesty” and position which requires “credibility and organic truth” in order to maintain the interplay between the actors/speakers and spectators /listeners.

  14. The History of the Internet Search Engine: Navigational Media and the Traffic Commodity

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Couvering, E.

    This chapter traces the economic development of the search engine industry over time, beginning with the earliest Web search engines and ending with the domination of the market by Google, Yahoo! and MSN. Specifically, it focuses on the ways in which search engines are similar to and different from traditional media institutions, and how the relations between traditional and Internet media have changed over time. In addition to its historical overview, a core contribution of this chapter is the analysis of the industry using a media value chain based on audiences rather than on content, and the development of traffic as the core unit of exchange. It shows that traditional media companies failed when they attempted to create vertically integrated portals in the late 1990s, based on the idea of controlling Internet content, while search engines succeeded in creating huge "virtually integrated" networks based on control of Internet traffic rather than Internet content.

  15. Internet Search Engines: Copyright's "Fair Use" in Reproduction and Public Display Rights

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jeweler, Robin

    2007-01-01

    .... If so, is the activity a "fair use" protected by the Copyright Act? These issues frequently implicate search engines, which scan the web to allow users to find content for uses, both legitimate and illegitimate...

  16. Research on the optimization strategy of web search engine based on data mining

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ronghua

    2018-04-01

    With the wide application of search engines, web site information has become an important way for people to obtain information. People have found that they are growing in an increasingly explosive manner. Web site information is verydifficult to find the information they need, and now the search engine can not meet the need, so there is an urgent need for the network to provide website personalized information service, data mining technology for this new challenge is to find a breakthrough. In order to improve people's accuracy of finding information from websites, a website search engine optimization strategy based on data mining is proposed, and verified by website search engine optimization experiment. The results show that the proposed strategy improves the accuracy of the people to find information, and reduces the time for people to find information. It has an important practical value.

  17. Optimizing Online Suicide Prevention: A Search Engine-Based Tailored Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendt, Florian; Scherr, Sebastian

    2017-11-01

    Search engines are increasingly used to seek suicide-related information online, which can serve both harmful and helpful purposes. Google acknowledges this fact and presents a suicide-prevention result for particular search terms. Unfortunately, the result is only presented to a limited number of visitors. Hence, Google is missing the opportunity to provide help to vulnerable people. We propose a two-step approach to a tailored optimization: First, research will identify the risk factors. Second, search engines will reweight algorithms according to the risk factors. In this study, we show that the query share of the search term "poisoning" on Google shows substantial peaks corresponding to peaks in actual suicidal behavior. Accordingly, thresholds for showing the suicide-prevention result should be set to the lowest levels during the spring, on Sundays and Mondays, on New Year's Day, and on Saturdays following Thanksgiving. Search engines can help to save lives globally by utilizing a more tailored approach to suicide prevention.

  18. Parallel search engine optimisation and pay-per-click campaigns: A comparison of cost per acquisition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter T. Kritzinger

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is imperative that commercial websites should rank highly in search engine result pages because these provide the main entry point to paying customers. There are two main methods to achieve high rankings: search engine optimisation (SEO and pay-per-click (PPC systems. Both require a financial investment – SEO mainly at the beginning, and PPC spread over time in regular amounts. If marketing budgets are applied in the wrong area, this could lead to losses and possibly financial ruin. Objectives: The objective of this research was to investigate, using three real-world case studies, the actual expenditure on and income from both SEO and PPC systems. These figures were then compared, and specifically, the cost per acquisition (CPA was used to decide which system yielded the best results. Methodology: Three diverse websites were chosen, and analytics data for all three were compared over a 3-month period. Calculations were performed to reduce the figures to single ratios, to make comparisons between them possible. Results: Some of the resultant ratios varied widely between websites. However, the CPA was shown to be on average 52.1 times lower for SEO than for PPC systems. Conclusion: It was concluded that SEO should be the marketing system of preference for e-commerce-based websites. However, there are cases where PPC would yield better results – when instant traffic is required, and when a large initial expenditure is not possible.

  19. Search for H $\\to$ b$\\bar{\\text{b}}$ in association with a single top quark at CMS

    CERN Document Server

    Mueller, Denise

    2017-01-01

    A search for the production of a Higgs boson in association with a single top quark (tH) is performed using the decay H $\\to$ b$\\bar{\\text{b}}$. This Higgs boson production mode is sensitive to the coupling modifiers of the Higgs boson to top quarks ($\\kappa_{\\text{t}}$) and to weak gauge bosons ($\\kappa_{\\text{V}}$) and thus can be used to lift the degeneracy regarding the sign of the top quark Yukawa coupling. The 2015 pp collisions data at a center-of-mass energy of 13 TeV are analyzed. Boosted decision trees are used to reconstruct and classify the events. Upper limits on the tH production cross section are determined at 51 different points in the $\\kappa_{\\text{t}}-\\kappa_{\\text{V}}$ plane.

  20. Seasonal trends in sleep-disordered breathing: evidence from Internet search engine query data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, David G; Matthews, Camilla K; Plante, David T

    2015-03-01

    The primary aim of the current study was to test the hypothesis that there is a seasonal component to snoring and obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) through the use of Google search engine query data. Internet search engine query data were retrieved from Google Trends from January 2006 to December 2012. Monthly normalized search volume was obtained over that 7-year period in the USA and Australia for the following search terms: "snoring" and "sleep apnea". Seasonal effects were investigated by fitting cosinor regression models. In addition, the search terms "snoring children" and "sleep apnea children" were evaluated to examine seasonal effects in pediatric populations. Statistically significant seasonal effects were found using cosinor analysis in both USA and Australia for "snoring" (p search term in Australia (p = 0.13). Seasonal patterns for "snoring children" and "sleep apnea children" were observed in the USA (p = 0.002 and p search volume to examine these search terms in Australia. All searches peaked in the winter or early spring in both countries, with the magnitude of seasonal effect ranging from 5 to 50 %. Our findings indicate that there are significant seasonal trends for both snoring and sleep apnea internet search engine queries, with a peak in the winter and early spring. Further research is indicated to determine the mechanisms underlying these findings, whether they have clinical impact, and if they are associated with other comorbid medical conditions that have similar patterns of seasonal exacerbation.

  1. Calling, texting, and searching for information while riding a motorcycle: A study of university students in Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Long T; De Gruyter, Chris; Nguyen, Hang T T

    2017-08-18

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of calling, texting, and searching for information while riding a motorcycle among university students and the influences of sociodemographic characteristics, social norms, and risk perceptions on these behaviors. Students at 2 university campuses in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City, the 2 largest cities in Vietnam, were invited to participate in an anonymous online survey. Data collection was conducted during March and May 2016. There were 741 respondents, of whom nearly 90% of students (665) were motorcycle riders. Overall prevalence of mobile phone use while riding is 80.9% (95% confidence interval [CI], 77.9-83.9%) with calling having a higher level of prevalence than texting or searching for information while riding: 74% (95% CI, 70.7-77.3%) vs. 51.7% (95% CI, 47.9-55.5%) and 49.9% (95% CI, 46.1-53.7%), respectively. Random parameter ordered probit modeling results indicate that mobile phone use while riding is associated with gender, motorcycle license duration, perceived crash risk, perceived risk of mobile phone snatching, and perceptions of friends' mobile phone use while riding. Mobile phone use while riding a motorcycle is highly prevalent among university students. Educational programs should focus on the crash and economic risk of all types of mobile phone use while riding, including calling, texting, and searching for information. In addition, they should consider targeting the influence of social norms and peers on mobile phone use while riding.

  2. Determination of geographic variance in stroke prevalence using Internet search engine analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walcott, Brian P; Nahed, Brian V; Kahle, Kristopher T; Redjal, Navid; Coumans, Jean-Valery

    2011-06-01

    Previous methods to determine stroke prevalence, such as nationwide surveys, are labor-intensive endeavors. Recent advances in search engine query analytics have led to a new metric for disease surveillance to evaluate symptomatic phenomenon, such as influenza. The authors hypothesized that the use of search engine query data can determine the prevalence of stroke. The Google Insights for Search database was accessed to analyze anonymized search engine query data. The authors' search strategy utilized common search queries used when attempting either to identify the signs and symptoms of a stroke or to perform stroke education. The search logic was as follows: (stroke signs + stroke symptoms + mini stroke--heat) from January 1, 2005, to December 31, 2010. The relative number of searches performed (the interest level) for this search logic was established for all 50 states and the District of Columbia. A Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient was calculated from the statespecific stroke prevalence data previously reported. Web search engine interest level was available for all 50 states and the District of Columbia over the time period for January 1, 2005-December 31, 2010. The interest level was highest in Alabama and Tennessee (100 and 96, respectively) and lowest in California and Virginia (58 and 53, respectively). The Pearson correlation coefficient (r) was calculated to be 0.47 (p = 0.0005, 2-tailed). Search engine query data analysis allows for the determination of relative stroke prevalence. Further investigation will reveal the reliability of this metric to determine temporal pattern analysis and prevalence in this and other symptomatic diseases.

  3. PubMed-EX: a web browser extension to enhance PubMed search with text mining features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Richard Tzong-Han; Dai, Hong-Jie; Lai, Po-Ting; Huang, Chi-Hsin

    2009-11-15

    PubMed-EX is a browser extension that marks up PubMed search results with additional text-mining information. PubMed-EX's page mark-up, which includes section categorization and gene/disease and relation mark-up, can help researchers to quickly focus on key terms and provide additional information on them. All text processing is performed server-side, freeing up user resources. PubMed-EX is freely available at http://bws.iis.sinica.edu.tw/PubMed-EX and http://iisr.cse.yzu.edu.tw:8000/PubMed-EX/.

  4. Sagace: A web-based search engine for biomedical databases in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morita Mizuki

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the big data era, biomedical research continues to generate a large amount of data, and the generated information is often stored in a database and made publicly available. Although combining data from multiple databases should accelerate further studies, the current number of life sciences databases is too large to grasp features and contents of each database. Findings We have developed Sagace, a web-based search engine that enables users to retrieve information from a range of biological databases (such as gene expression profiles and proteomics data and biological resource banks (such as mouse models of disease and cell lines. With Sagace, users can search more than 300 databases in Japan. Sagace offers features tailored to biomedical research, including manually tuned ranking, a faceted navigation to refine search results, and rich snippets constructed with retrieved metadata for each database entry. Conclusions Sagace will be valuable for experts who are involved in biomedical research and drug development in both academia and industry. Sagace is freely available at http://sagace.nibio.go.jp/en/.

  5. Use of Web Search Engines and Personalisation in Information Searching for Educational Purposes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehi, Sara; Du, Jia Tina; Ashman, Helen

    2018-01-01

    Introduction: Students increasingly depend on Web search for educational purposes. This causes concerns among education providers as some evidence indicates that in higher education, the disadvantages of Web search and personalised information are not justified by the benefits. Method: One hundred and twenty university students were surveyed about…

  6. 'Sciencenet'--towards a global search and share engine for all scientific knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lütjohann, Dominic S; Shah, Asmi H; Christen, Michael P; Richter, Florian; Knese, Karsten; Liebel, Urban

    2011-06-15

    Modern biological experiments create vast amounts of data which are geographically distributed. These datasets consist of petabytes of raw data and billions of documents. Yet to the best of our knowledge, a search engine technology that searches and cross-links all different data types in life sciences does not exist. We have developed a prototype distributed scientific search engine technology, 'Sciencenet', which facilitates rapid searching over this large data space. By 'bringing the search engine to the data', we do not require server farms. This platform also allows users to contribute to the search index and publish their large-scale data to support e-Science. Furthermore, a community-driven method guarantees that only scientific content is crawled and presented. Our peer-to-peer approach is sufficiently scalable for the science web without performance or capacity tradeoff. The free to use search portal web page and the downloadable client are accessible at: http://sciencenet.kit.edu. The web portal for index administration is implemented in ASP.NET, the 'AskMe' experiment publisher is written in Python 2.7, and the backend 'YaCy' search engine is based on Java 1.6.

  7. Inefficiency and Bias of Search Engines in Retrieving References Containing Scientific Names of Fossil Amphibians

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lauren E.; Dubois, Alain; Shepard, Donald B.

    2008-01-01

    Retrieval efficiencies of paper-based references in journals and other serials containing 10 scientific names of fossil amphibians were determined for seven major search engines. Retrievals were compared to the number of references obtained covering the period 1895-2006 by a Comprehensive Search. The latter was primarily a traditional…

  8. Impact of Internet Search Engines on OPAC Users: A Study of Punjabi University, Patiala (India)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Shiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this paper is to study the impact of internet search engine usage with special reference to OPAC searches in the Punjabi University Library, Patiala, Punjab (India). Design/methodology/approach: The primary data were collected from 352 users comprising faculty, research scholars and postgraduate students of the university. A…

  9. Search Engine Marketing (SEM): Financial & Competitive Advantages of an Effective Hotel SEM Strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Leora Halpern Lanz

    2015-01-01

    Search Engine Marketing and Optimization (SEO, SEM) are keystones of a hotels marketing strategy, in fact research shows that 90% of travelers start their vacation planning with a Google search. Learn five strategies that can enhance a hotels SEO and SEM strategies to boost bookings.

  10. Search Engine Optimization for Flash Best Practices for Using Flash on the Web

    CERN Document Server

    Perkins, Todd

    2009-01-01

    Search Engine Optimization for Flash dispels the myth that Flash-based websites won't show up in a web search by demonstrating exactly what you can do to make your site fully searchable -- no matter how much Flash it contains. You'll learn best practices for using HTML, CSS and JavaScript, as well as SWFObject, for building sites with Flash that will stand tall in search rankings.

  11. SpEnD: Linked Data SPARQL Endpoints Discovery Using Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Yumusak, Semih; Dogdu, Erdogan; Kodaz, Halife; Kamilaris, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a novel metacrawling method is proposed for discovering and monitoring linked data sources on the Web. We implemented the method in a prototype system, named SPARQL Endpoints Discovery (SpEnD). SpEnD starts with a "search keyword" discovery process for finding relevant keywords for the linked data domain and specifically SPARQL endpoints. Then, these search keywords are utilized to find linked data sources via popular search engines (Google, Bing, Yahoo, Yandex). By using this ...

  12. Reconsidering the Rhizome: A Textual Analysis of Web Search Engines as Gatekeepers of the Internet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hess, A.

    Critical theorists have often drawn from Deleuze and Guattari's notion of the rhizome when discussing the potential of the Internet. While the Internet may structurally appear as a rhizome, its day-to-day usage by millions via search engines precludes experiencing the random interconnectedness and potential democratizing function. Through a textual analysis of four search engines, I argue that Web searching has grown hierarchies, or "trees," that organize data in tracts of knowledge and place users in marketing niches rather than assist in the development of new knowledge.

  13. The invisible Web uncovering information sources search engines can't see

    CERN Document Server

    Sherman, Chris

    2001-01-01

    Enormous expanses of the Internet are unreachable with standard web search engines. This book provides the key to finding these hidden resources by identifying how to uncover and use invisible web resources. Mapping the invisible Web, when and how to use it, assessing the validity of the information, and the future of Web searching are topics covered in detail. Only 16 percent of Net-based information can be located using a general search engine. The other 84 percent is what is referred to as the invisible Web-made up of information stored in databases. Unlike pages on the visible Web, informa

  14. The MediaMill TRECVID 2012 semantic video search engine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Snoek, C.G.M.; van de Sande, K.E.A.; Habibian, A.; Kordumova, S.; Li, Z.; Mazloom, M.; Pintea, S.L.; Tao, R.; Koelma, D.C.; Smeulders, A.W.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we describe our TRECVID 2012 video retrieval experiments. The MediaMill team participated in four tasks: semantic indexing, multimedia event detection, multimedia event recounting and instance search. The starting point for the MediaMill detection approach is our top-performing

  15. ClinicalKey: a point-of-care search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardell, Emily

    2013-01-01

    ClinicalKey is a new point-of-care resource for health care professionals. Through controlled vocabulary, ClinicalKey offers a cross section of resources on diseases and procedures, from journals to e-books and practice guidelines to patient education. A sample search was conducted to demonstrate the features of the database, and a comparison with similar tools is presented.

  16. Using Search Engine Data as a Tool to Predict Syphilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Sean D; Torrone, Elizabeth A; Urata, John; Aral, Sevgi O

    2018-07-01

    Researchers have suggested that social media and online search data might be used to monitor and predict syphilis and other sexually transmitted diseases. Because people at risk for syphilis might seek sexual health and risk-related information on the internet, we investigated associations between internet state-level search query data (e.g., Google Trends) and reported weekly syphilis cases. We obtained weekly counts of reported primary and secondary syphilis for 50 states from 2012 to 2014 from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. We collected weekly internet search query data regarding 25 risk-related keywords from 2012 to 2014 for 50 states using Google Trends. We joined 155 weeks of Google Trends data with 1-week lag to weekly syphilis data for a total of 7750 data points. Using the least absolute shrinkage and selection operator, we trained three linear mixed models on the first 10 weeks of each year. We validated models for 2012 and 2014 for the following 52 weeks and the 2014 model for the following 42 weeks. The models, consisting of different sets of keyword predictors for each year, accurately predicted 144 weeks of primary and secondary syphilis counts for each state, with an overall average R of 0.9 and overall average root mean squared error of 4.9. We used Google Trends search data from the prior week to predict cases of syphilis in the following weeks for each state. Further research could explore how search data could be integrated into public health monitoring systems.

  17. FOAMSearch.net: A custom search engine for emergency medicine and critical care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Todd; Thoma, Brent; Chan, Teresa M; Lin, Michelle

    2015-08-01

    The number of online resources read by and pertinent to clinicians has increased dramatically. However, most healthcare professionals still use mainstream search engines as their primary port of entry to the resources on the Internet. These search engines use algorithms that do not make it easy to find clinician-oriented resources. FOAMSearch, a custom search engine (CSE), was developed to find relevant, high-quality online resources for emergency medicine and critical care (EMCC) clinicians. Using Google™ algorithms, it searches a vetted list of >300 blogs, podcasts, wikis, knowledge translation tools, clinical decision support tools and medical journals. Utilisation has increased progressively to >3000 users/month since its launch in 2011. Further study of the role of CSEs to find medical resources is needed, and it might be possible to develop similar CSEs for other areas of medicine. © 2015 Australasian College for Emergency Medicine and Australasian Society for Emergency Medicine.

  18. Andromeda - a peptide search engine integrated into the MaxQuant environment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Jurgen; Neuhauser, Nadin; Michalski, Annette

    2011-01-01

    A key step in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is the identification of peptides in sequence databases by their fragmentation spectra. Here we describe Andromeda, a novel peptide search engine using a probabilistic scoring model. On proteome data Andromeda performs as well as Mascot......, a widely used commercial search engine, as judged by sensitivity and specificity analysis based on target decoy searches. Furthermore, it can handle data with arbitrarily high fragment mass accuracy, is able to assign and score complex patterns of post-translational modifications, such as highly...... phosphorylated peptides and accommodates extremely large databases. The algorithms of Andromeda are provided. Andromeda can function independently or as an integrated search engine of the widely used MaxQuant computational proteomics platform and both are freely available at www.maxquant.org. The combination...

  19. APLIKASI SEARCH ENGINE PAPER KARYA ILMIAH BERBASIS WEB DENGAN METODE FUZZY RELATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard Adytia Darmadi

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of paper collected by an educational institution is incresing each year. The increasing number of paper collected demand a method in order to find the right paper everytime there is someone who needs a reference. By far, most search engine still depend on keyword matching / string maching to find the apropriate result. This method will only find the apropriate paper based on the occurance of the inserted keyword on the paper. This research will discuss a searching system using fuzzy relation, by using fuzzy relation the relation between keyword and paper is found and determined. Searching system using fuzzy relation allows the search result include paper that do not have the keyword to be shown as a result. This result is made posssible because the word which occur in the paper is related to keyword inserted. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Banyaknya jumlah paper yang dikoleksi sebuah lembaga pendidikan setiap tahun akan bertambah. Seiring dengan pertambahan jumlah paper tersebut maka diperlukan sebuah metode untuk mencari paper agar bila membutuhkan referensi maka paper/dokumen yang diperlukan dapat dengan mudah dapat ditemukan. Sejauh yang ada saat ini, kebanyakan mesin pencari masih mengandalkan pencarian dengan menggunakan keyword matching/string matching sehingga mengakibatkan hasil pencarian hanya akan menampilkan paper-paper yang mempunyai keyword/kata kunci yang dicari. Penelitan ini membahas sebuah sistem pencarian dengan menggunakan metode fuzzy relation, dimana dengan fuzzy relation didapatkan hubungan antara keyword dan paper. Dengan metode fuzzy relation maka sebuah pencarian mempunyai kemungkinan menampilkan hasil berupa paper yang tidak mengandung keyword yang dicari. Karena kata yang mengakibatkan paper (yang tidak mengandung keyword muncul mempunyai hubungan dengan keyword yang dimasukkan. Kata kunci: mesin pencari, relasi fuzzy, sistem cerdas.

  20. Complex dynamics of our economic life on different scales: insights from search engine query data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preis, Tobias; Reith, Daniel; Stanley, H Eugene

    2010-12-28

    Search engine query data deliver insight into the behaviour of individuals who are the smallest possible scale of our economic life. Individuals are submitting several hundred million search engine queries around the world each day. We study weekly search volume data for various search terms from 2004 to 2010 that are offered by the search engine Google for scientific use, providing information about our economic life on an aggregated collective level. We ask the question whether there is a link between search volume data and financial market fluctuations on a weekly time scale. Both collective 'swarm intelligence' of Internet users and the group of financial market participants can be regarded as a complex system of many interacting subunits that react quickly to external changes. We find clear evidence that weekly transaction volumes of S&P 500 companies are correlated with weekly search volume of corresponding company names. Furthermore, we apply a recently introduced method for quantifying complex correlations in time series with which we find a clear tendency that search volume time series and transaction volume time series show recurring patterns.

  1. An autonomous organic reaction search engine for chemical reactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dragone, Vincenza; Sans, Victor; Henson, Alon B.; Granda, Jaroslaw M.; Cronin, Leroy

    2017-06-01

    The exploration of chemical space for new reactivity, reactions and molecules is limited by the need for separate work-up-separation steps searching for molecules rather than reactivity. Herein we present a system that can autonomously evaluate chemical reactivity within a network of 64 possible reaction combinations and aims for new reactivity, rather than a predefined set of targets. The robotic system combines chemical handling, in-line spectroscopy and real-time feedback and analysis with an algorithm that is able to distinguish and select the most reactive pathways, generating a reaction selection index (RSI) without need for separate work-up or purification steps. This allows the automatic navigation of a chemical network, leading to previously unreported molecules while needing only to do a fraction of the total possible reactions without any prior knowledge of the chemistry. We show the RSI correlates with reactivity and is able to search chemical space using the most reactive pathways.

  2. IBRI-CASONTO: Ontology-based semantic search engine

    OpenAIRE

    Awny Sayed; Amal Al Muqrishi

    2017-01-01

    The vast availability of information, that added in a very fast pace, in the data repositories creates a challenge in extracting correct and accurate information. Which has increased the competition among developers in order to gain access to technology that seeks to understand the intent researcher and contextual meaning of terms. While the competition for developing an Arabic Semantic Search systems are still in their infancy, and the reason could be traced back to the complexity of Arabic ...

  3. Thumbnail Images:Uncertainties, Infrastructures and Search Engines

    OpenAIRE

    Thylstrup, Nanna; Teilmann, Stina

    2017-01-01

    This article argues that thumbnail images are infrastructural images that raise issues of uncertainty in two distinct, but interrelated, areas: a legal question of how to define, understand and govern visual information infrastructures, in particular image search systems in epistemological and strategic terms; and a cultural question of how human-computer interaction design works with navigational uncertainty, both as an experience to be managed and a resource to be exploited. This paper cons...

  4. `Googling' Terrorists: Are Northern Irish Terrorists Visible on Internet Search Engines?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, P.

    In this chapter, the analysis suggests that Northern Irish terrorists are not visible on Web search engines when net users employ conventional Internet search techniques. Editors of mass media organisations traditionally have had the ability to decide whether a terrorist atrocity is `newsworthy,' controlling the `oxygen' supply that sustains all forms of terrorism. This process, also known as `gatekeeping,' is often influenced by the norms of social responsibility, or alternatively, with regard to the interests of the advertisers and corporate sponsors that sustain mass media organisations. The analysis presented in this chapter suggests that Internet search engines can also be characterised as `gatekeepers,' albeit without the ability to shape the content of Websites before it reaches net users. Instead, Internet search engines give priority retrieval to certain Websites within their directory, pointing net users towards these Websites rather than others on the Internet. Net users are more likely to click on links to the more `visible' Websites on Internet search engine directories, these sites invariably being the highest `ranked' in response to a particular search query. A number of factors including the design of the Website and the number of links to external sites determine the `visibility' of a Website on Internet search engines. The study suggests that Northern Irish terrorists and their sympathisers are unlikely to achieve a greater degree of `visibility' online than they enjoy in the conventional mass media through the perpetration of atrocities. Although these groups may have a greater degree of freedom on the Internet to publicise their ideologies, they are still likely to be speaking to the converted or members of the press. Although it is easier to locate Northern Irish terrorist organisations on Internet search engines by linking in via ideology, ideological description searches, such as `Irish Republican' and `Ulster Loyalist,' are more likely to

  5. Development of health information search engine based on metadata and ontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tae-Min; Park, Hyeoun-Ae; Jin, Dal-Lae

    2014-04-01

    The aim of the study was to develop a metadata and ontology-based health information search engine ensuring semantic interoperability to collect and provide health information using different application programs. Health information metadata ontology was developed using a distributed semantic Web content publishing model based on vocabularies used to index the contents generated by the information producers as well as those used to search the contents by the users. Vocabulary for health information ontology was mapped to the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine Clinical Terms (SNOMED CT), and a list of about 1,500 terms was proposed. The metadata schema used in this study was developed by adding an element describing the target audience to the Dublin Core Metadata Element Set. A metadata schema and an ontology ensuring interoperability of health information available on the internet were developed. The metadata and ontology-based health information search engine developed in this study produced a better search result compared to existing search engines. Health information search engine based on metadata and ontology will provide reliable health information to both information producer and information consumers.

  6. Google's pagerank and beyond the science of search engine rankings

    CERN Document Server

    Langville, Amy N

    2006-01-01

    Why doesn't your home page appear on the first page of search results, even when you query your own name? How do other Web pages always appear at the top? What creates these powerful rankings? And how? The first book ever about the science of Web page rankings, Google's PageRank and Beyond supplies the answers to these and other questions and more. The book serves two very different audiences: the curious science reader and the technical computational reader. The chapters build in mathematical sophistication, so that the first five are accessible to the general academic reader. While other cha

  7. A real-time all-atom structural search engine for proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Gabriel; Hannigan, Brett; DeGrado, William F

    2014-07-01

    Protein designers use a wide variety of software tools for de novo design, yet their repertoire still lacks a fast and interactive all-atom search engine. To solve this, we have built the Suns program: a real-time, atomic search engine integrated into the PyMOL molecular visualization system. Users build atomic-level structural search queries within PyMOL and receive a stream of search results aligned to their query within a few seconds. This instant feedback cycle enables a new "designability"-inspired approach to protein design where the designer searches for and interactively incorporates native-like fragments from proven protein structures. We demonstrate the use of Suns to interactively build protein motifs, tertiary interactions, and to identify scaffolds compatible with hot-spot residues. The official web site and installer are located at http://www.degradolab.org/suns/ and the source code is hosted at https://github.com/godotgildor/Suns (PyMOL plugin, BSD license), https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-cmd (command line client, BSD license), and https://github.com/Gabriel439/suns-search (search engine server, GPLv2 license).

  8. IdentiPy: an extensible search engine for protein identification in shotgun proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitsky, Lev I; Ivanov, Mark V; Lobas, Anna A; Bubis, Julia A; Tarasova, Irina A; Solovyeva, Elizaveta M; Pridatchenko, Marina L; Gorshkov, Mikhail V

    2018-04-23

    We present an open-source, extensible search engine for shotgun proteomics. Implemented in Python programming language, IdentiPy shows competitive processing speed and sensitivity compared with the state-of-the-art search engines. It is equipped with a user-friendly web interface, IdentiPy Server, enabling the use of a single server installation accessed from multiple workstations. Using a simplified version of X!Tandem scoring algorithm and its novel ``auto-tune'' feature, IdentiPy outperforms the popular alternatives on high-resolution data sets. Auto-tune adjusts the search parameters for the particular data set, resulting in improved search efficiency and simplifying the user experience. IdentiPy with the auto-tune feature shows higher sensitivity compared with the evaluated search engines. IdentiPy Server has built-in post-processing and protein inference procedures and provides graphic visualization of the statistical properties of the data set and the search results. It is open-source and can be freely extended to use third-party scoring functions or processing algorithms, and allows customization of the search workflow for specialized applications.

  9. The search engine manipulation effect (SEME) and its possible impact on the outcomes of elections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Epstein, Robert; Robertson, Ronald E

    2015-08-18

    Internet search rankings have a significant impact on consumer choices, mainly because users trust and choose higher-ranked results more than lower-ranked results. Given the apparent power of search rankings, we asked whether they could be manipulated to alter the preferences of undecided voters in democratic elections. Here we report the results of five relevant double-blind, randomized controlled experiments, using a total of 4,556 undecided voters representing diverse demographic characteristics of the voting populations of the United States and India. The fifth experiment is especially notable in that it was conducted with eligible voters throughout India in the midst of India's 2014 Lok Sabha elections just before the final votes were cast. The results of these experiments demonstrate that (i) biased search rankings can shift the voting preferences of undecided voters by 20% or more, (ii) the shift can be much higher in some demographic groups, and (iii) search ranking bias can be masked so that people show no awareness of the manipulation. We call this type of influence, which might be applicable to a variety of attitudes and beliefs, the search engine manipulation effect. Given that many elections are won by small margins, our results suggest that a search engine company has the power to influence the results of a substantial number of elections with impunity. The impact of such manipulations would be especially large in countries dominated by a single search engine company.

  10. Defining Algorithmic Ideology: Using Ideology Critique to Scrutinize Corporate Search Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Astrid Mager

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This article conceptualizes “algorithmic ideology” as a valuable tool to understand and critique corporate search engines in the context of wider socio-political developments. Drawing on critical theory it shows how capitalist value-systems manifest in search technology, how they spread through algorithmic logics and how they are stabilized in society. Following philosophers like Althusser, Marx and Gramsci it elaborates how content providers and users contribute to Google’s capital accumulation cycle and exploitation schemes that come along with it. In line with contemporary mass media and neoliberal politics they appear to be fostering capitalism and its “commodity fetishism” (Marx. It further reveals that the capitalist hegemony has to be constantly negotiated and renewed. This dynamic notion of ideology opens up the view for moments of struggle and counter-actions. “Organic intellectuals” (Gramsci can play a central role in challenging powerful actors like Google and their algorithmic ideology. To pave the way towards more democratic information technology, however, requires more than single organic intellectuals. Additional obstacles need to be conquered, as I finally discuss.

  11. Towards iconic language for patient records, drug monographs, guidelines and medical search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamy, Jean-Baptiste; Duclos, Catherine; Hamek, Saliha; Beuscart-Zéphir, Marie-Catherine; Kerdelhué, Gaetan; Darmoni, Stefan; Favre, Madeleine; Falcoff, Hector; Simon, Christian; Pereira, Suzanne; Serrot, Elisabeth; Mitouard, Thierry; Hardouin, Etienne; Kergosien, Yannick; Venot, Alain

    2010-01-01

    Practicing physicians have limited time for consulting medical knowledge and records. We have previously shown that using icons instead of text to present drug monographs may allow contraindications and adverse effects to be identified more rapidly and more accurately. These findings were based on the use of an iconic language designed for drug knowledge, providing icons for many medical concepts, including diseases, antecedents, drug classes and tests. In this paper, we describe a new project aimed at extending this iconic language, and exploring the possible applications of these icons in medicine. Based on evaluators' comments, focus groups of physicians and opinions of academic, industrial and associative partners, we propose iconic applications related to patient records, for example summarizing patient conditions, searching for specific clinical documents and helping to code structured data. Other applications involve the presentation of clinical practice guidelines and improving the interface of medical search engines. These new applications could use the same iconic language that was designed for drug knowledge, with a few additional items that respect the logic of the language.

  12. Building Internet Search Engines Internet'te Tarama Sistemlerinin Kurulması

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Akgül

    1996-09-01

    Full Text Available Internet search engines are powerful tools to find electronics objects such as addresses of individuals and institutions, documents, statistics of all kinds, dictionaries, catalogs, product information etc. This paper explains how to build and run some verycommon search engines on Unix platforms, so as to serve documents through the Web. Internet üzerinde var olan çeşitli tarama mekanizmaları, kullanıcılara birey ve kurum adreslerinden doküman adreslerine, istatistiklerden sözlüklere, kitap kataloglarından ürün fiyatlarına kadar bir yelpazede elektronik nesnelerin aranıp bulunması ve sunulmas��nda yararlı olmaktadır. Hiyerarşik şekilde örgütlenen sanal kütüphanelerle birlikte, tarama mekanizmaları kullanıcıya bu çok büyük dağıtık kütüphane üzerinde yolunu bulmasına yardımcı olmaktadır. Bu makalede çok yaygın olarak kullanılan tarama motorlarının özellikle Unix ortamında kurulması ve çalıştırılması için yapılması gerekenler anlatılmaktadır.

  13. Where are the Search Engines for Handwritten Documents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Zant, Tijn; Schomaker, Lambert; Zinger, Svitlana; van Schie, Henny

    Although the problems of optical character recognition for contemporary printed text have been resolved, for historical printed and handwritten connected cursive text (i.e. western style writing), they have not. This does not mean that scanning historical documents is not useful. This article

  14. Where are the search engines for handwritten documents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zant, T.; Schomaker, L.; Zinger, S.; Schie, H.

    2009-01-01

    Although the problems of optical character recognition for contemporary printed text have been resolved, for historical printed and handwritten connected cursive text (i.e. western style writing), they have not. This does not mean that scanning historical documents is not useful. This article

  15. Global polar geospatial information service retrieval based on search engine and ontology reasoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Nengcheng; E, Dongcheng; Di, Liping; Gong, Jianya; Chen, Zeqiang

    2007-01-01

    In order to improve the access precision of polar geospatial information service on web, a new methodology for retrieving global spatial information services based on geospatial service search and ontology reasoning is proposed, the geospatial service search is implemented to find the coarse service from web, the ontology reasoning is designed to find the refined service from the coarse service. The proposed framework includes standardized distributed geospatial web services, a geospatial service search engine, an extended UDDI registry, and a multi-protocol geospatial information service client. Some key technologies addressed include service discovery based on search engine and service ontology modeling and reasoning in the Antarctic geospatial context. Finally, an Antarctica multi protocol OWS portal prototype based on the proposed methodology is introduced.

  16. Evaluating a federated medical search engine: tailoring the methodology and reporting the evaluation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saparova, D; Belden, J; Williams, J; Richardson, B; Schuster, K

    2014-01-01

    Federated medical search engines are health information systems that provide a single access point to different types of information. Their efficiency as clinical decision support tools has been demonstrated through numerous evaluations. Despite their rigor, very few of these studies report holistic evaluations of medical search engines and even fewer base their evaluations on existing evaluation frameworks. To evaluate a federated medical search engine, MedSocket, for its potential net benefits in an established clinical setting. This study applied the Human, Organization, and Technology (HOT-fit) evaluation framework in order to evaluate MedSocket. The hierarchical structure of the HOT-factors allowed for identification of a combination of efficiency metrics. Human fit was evaluated through user satisfaction and patterns of system use; technology fit was evaluated through the measurements of time-on-task and the accuracy of the found answers; and organization fit was evaluated from the perspective of system fit to the existing organizational structure. Evaluations produced mixed results and suggested several opportunities for system improvement. On average, participants were satisfied with MedSocket searches and confident in the accuracy of retrieved answers. However, MedSocket did not meet participants' expectations in terms of download speed, access to information, and relevance of the search results. These mixed results made it necessary to conclude that in the case of MedSocket, technology fit had a significant influence on the human and organization fit. Hence, improving technological capabilities of the system is critical before its net benefits can become noticeable. The HOT-fit evaluation framework was instrumental in tailoring the methodology for conducting a comprehensive evaluation of the search engine. Such multidimensional evaluation of the search engine resulted in recommendations for system improvement.

  17. Objective and automated protocols for the evaluation of biomedical search engines using No Title Evaluation protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campagne, Fabien

    2008-02-29

    The evaluation of information retrieval techniques has traditionally relied on human judges to determine which documents are relevant to a query and which are not. This protocol is used in the Text Retrieval Evaluation Conference (TREC), organized annually for the past 15 years, to support the unbiased evaluation of novel information retrieval approaches. The TREC Genomics Track has recently been introduced to measure the performance of information retrieval for biomedical applications. We describe two protocols for evaluating biomedical information retrieval techniques without human relevance judgments. We call these protocols No Title Evaluation (NT Evaluation). The first protocol measures performance for focused searches, where only one relevant document exists for each query. The second protocol measures performance for queries expected to have potentially many relevant documents per query (high-recall searches). Both protocols take advantage of the clear separation of titles and abstracts found in Medline. We compare the performance obtained with these evaluation protocols to results obtained by reusing the relevance judgments produced in the 2004 and 2005 TREC Genomics Track and observe significant correlations between performance rankings generated by our approach and TREC. Spearman's correlation coefficients in the range of 0.79-0.92 are observed comparing bpref measured with NT Evaluation or with TREC evaluations. For comparison, coefficients in the range 0.86-0.94 can be observed when evaluating the same set of methods with data from two independent TREC Genomics Track evaluations. We discuss the advantages of NT Evaluation over the TRels and the data fusion evaluation protocols introduced recently. Our results suggest that the NT Evaluation protocols described here could be used to optimize some search engine parameters before human evaluation. Further research is needed to determine if NT Evaluation or variants of these protocols can fully substitute

  18. Google and Women's Health-Related Issues: What Does the Search Engine Data Reveal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baazeem, Mazin; Abenhaim, Haim

    2014-01-01

    Identifying the gaps in public knowledge of women's health related issues has always been difficult. With the increasing number of Internet users in the United States, we sought to use the Internet as a tool to help us identify such gaps and to estimate women's most prevalent health concerns by examining commonly searched health-related keywords in Google search engine. We collected a large pool of possible search keywords from two independent practicing obstetrician/gynecologists and classified them into five main categories (obstetrics, gynecology, infertility, urogynecology/menopause and oncology), and measured the monthly average search volume within the United States for each keyword with all its possible combinations using Google AdWords tool. We found that pregnancy related keywords were less frequently searched in general compared to other categories with an average of 145,400 hits per month for the top twenty keywords. Among the most common pregnancy-related keywords was "pregnancy and sex' while pregnancy-related diseases were uncommonly searched. HPV alone was searched 305,400 times per month. Of the cancers affecting women, breast cancer was the most commonly searched with an average of 247,190 times per month, followed by cervical cancer then ovarian cancer. The commonly searched keywords are often issues that are not discussed in our daily practice as well as in public health messages. The search volume is relatively related to disease prevalence with the exception of ovarian cancer which could signify a public fear.

  19. What Major Search Engines Like Google, Yahoo and Bing Need to Know about Teachers in the UK?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedarabi, Faezeh

    2014-01-01

    This article briefly outlines the current major search engines' approach to teachers' web searching. The aim of this article is to make Web searching easier for teachers when searching for relevant online teaching materials, in general, and UK teacher practitioners at primary, secondary and post-compulsory levels, in particular. Therefore, major…

  20. Using internet search engines and library catalogs to locate toxicology information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wukovitz, L D

    2001-01-12

    The increasing importance of the Internet demands that toxicologists become aquainted with its resources. To find information, researchers must be able to effectively use Internet search engines, directories, subject-oriented websites, and library catalogs. The article will explain these resources, explore their benefits and weaknesses, and identify skills that help the researcher to improve search results and critically evaluate sources for their relevancy, validity, accuracy, and timeliness.

  1. Using Google Scholar to Search for Online Availability of a Cited Article in Engineering Disciplines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Virginia A.

    2009-01-01

    Many published studies examine the effectiveness of Google Scholar (Scholar) as an index for scholarly articles. This paper analyzes the value of Scholar in finding and labeling online full text of articles using titles from the citations of engineering faculty publications. For the fields of engineering and the engineering colleges in the study,…

  2. Estimating search engine index size variability: a 9-year longitudinal study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, Antal; Bogers, Toine; de Kunder, Maurice

    One of the determining factors of the quality of Web search engines is the size of their index. In addition to its influence on search result quality, the size of the indexed Web can also tell us something about which parts of the WWW are directly accessible to the everyday user. We propose a novel method of estimating the size of a Web search engine's index by extrapolating from document frequencies of words observed in a large static corpus of Web pages. In addition, we provide a unique longitudinal perspective on the size of Google and Bing's indices over a nine-year period, from March 2006 until January 2015. We find that index size estimates of these two search engines tend to vary dramatically over time, with Google generally possessing a larger index than Bing. This result raises doubts about the reliability of previous one-off estimates of the size of the indexed Web. We find that much, if not all of this variability can be explained by changes in the indexing and ranking infrastructure of Google and Bing. This casts further doubt on whether Web search engines can be used reliably for cross-sectional webometric studies.

  3. Web Spam, Social Propaganda and the Evolution of Search Engine Rankings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metaxas, Panagiotis Takis

    Search Engines have greatly influenced the way we experience the web. Since the early days of the web, users have been relying on them to get informed and make decisions. When the web was relatively small, web directories were built and maintained using human experts to screen and categorize pages according to their characteristics. By the mid 1990's, however, it was apparent that the human expert model of categorizing web pages does not scale. The first search engines appeared and they have been evolving ever since, taking over the role that web directories used to play.

  4. Gaming, texting, learning? Teaching engineering ethics through students' lived experiences with technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Georgina

    2013-09-01

    This paper examines how young peoples' lived experiences with personal technologies can be used to teach engineering ethics in a way which facilitates greater engagement with the subject. Engineering ethics can be challenging to teach: as a form of practical ethics, it is framed around future workplace experience in a professional setting which students are assumed to have no prior experience of. Yet the current generations of engineering students, who have been described as 'digital natives', do however have immersive personal experience with digital technologies; and experiential learning theory describes how students learn ethics more successfully when they can draw on personal experience which give context and meaning to abstract theories. This paper reviews current teaching practices in engineering ethics; and examines young people's engagement with technologies including cell phones, social networking sites, digital music and computer games to identify social and ethical elements of these practices which have relevance for the engineering ethics curricula. From this analysis three case studies are developed to illustrate how facets of the use of these technologies can be drawn on to teach topics including group work and communication; risk and safety; and engineering as social experimentation. Means for bridging personal experience and professional ethics when teaching these cases are discussed. The paper contributes to research and curriculum development in engineering ethics education, and to wider education research about methods of teaching 'the net generation'.

  5. Seasonal trends in tinnitus symptomatology: evidence from Internet search engine query data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, David T; Ingram, David G

    2015-10-01

    The primary aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that the symptom of tinnitus demonstrates a seasonal pattern with worsening in the winter relative to the summer using Internet search engine query data. Normalized search volume for the term 'tinnitus' from January 2004 through December 2013 was retrieved from Google Trends. Seasonal effects were evaluated using cosinor regression models. Primary countries of interest were the United States and Australia. Secondary exploratory analyses were also performed using data from Germany, the United Kingdom, Canada, Sweden, and Switzerland. Significant seasonal effects for 'tinnitus' search queries were found in the United States and Australia (p search volume in the winter relative to the summer. Our findings indicate that there are significant seasonal trends for Internet search queries for tinnitus, with a zenith in winter months. Further research is indicated to determine the biological mechanisms underlying these findings, as they may provide insights into the pathophysiology of this common and debilitating medical symptom.

  6. Profiles of Automotive Suppliers Industries--Engineered Mechanical Components and Systems : Volume I, Text.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    This profile describes and analyzes that segment of the automotive supplier industry which provides engineered mechanical components/assemblies/systems to the prime auto manufacturers. It presents an overview of the role and structure of this industr...

  7. A Multimodal Search Engine for Medical Imaging Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Eduardo; Godinho, Tiago; Valente, Frederico; Costa, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    The use of digital medical imaging systems in healthcare institutions has increased significantly, and the large amounts of data in these systems have led to the conception of powerful support tools: recent studies on content-based image retrieval (CBIR) and multimodal information retrieval in the field hold great potential in decision support, as well as for addressing multiple challenges in healthcare systems, such as computer-aided diagnosis (CAD). However, the subject is still under heavy research, and very few solutions have become part of Picture Archiving and Communication Systems (PACS) in hospitals and clinics. This paper proposes an extensible platform for multimodal medical image retrieval, integrated in an open-source PACS software with profile-based CBIR capabilities. In this article, we detail a technical approach to the problem by describing its main architecture and each sub-component, as well as the available web interfaces and the multimodal query techniques applied. Finally, we assess our implementation of the engine with computational performance benchmarks.

  8. Änderungsanalyse in den Suchergebnissen einer fachspezifischen Recherche mit den Suchmaschinen Google und Scirus: Vergleich der Jahre 2004 und 2005 für eine Fragestellung aus dem Bereich der Biotechnologie / Changes in query results from selected search engines over a time span: a comparison between 2004 and 2005 for a specific search in the field of biotechnology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doldi, M. Luisa

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of this work was the analysis of the changes occurring in hit lists of selected search engines at two different points of time.The same search query was applied to the search engine Google and to the science search engine Scirus in August 2004 and in April 2005. The first 40 hits of each search have been analysed on the basis of predefined qualitative and quantitative parameters. Further an analysis of overlapping between search hits at the above mentioned time points has been carried out for each search engine separately. The results of this study has shown on one hand the existence of positive trends in the result lists of both search engines (less dead links, a higher precision in results and on the other hand the role played by search engines themselves in the dynamic of result lists. The method applied here has shown to be useful for describing and measuring trends and changes in the search results of search engines over a time span.

  9. SeqWare Query Engine: storing and searching sequence data in the cloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merriman Barry

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the introduction of next-generation DNA sequencers the rapid increase in sequencer throughput, and associated drop in costs, has resulted in more than a dozen human genomes being resequenced over the last few years. These efforts are merely a prelude for a future in which genome resequencing will be commonplace for both biomedical research and clinical applications. The dramatic increase in sequencer output strains all facets of computational infrastructure, especially databases and query interfaces. The advent of cloud computing, and a variety of powerful tools designed to process petascale datasets, provide a compelling solution to these ever increasing demands. Results In this work, we present the SeqWare Query Engine which has been created using modern cloud computing technologies and designed to support databasing information from thousands of genomes. Our backend implementation was built using the highly scalable, NoSQL HBase database from the Hadoop project. We also created a web-based frontend that provides both a programmatic and interactive query interface and integrates with widely used genome browsers and tools. Using the query engine, users can load and query variants (SNVs, indels, translocations, etc with a rich level of annotations including coverage and functional consequences. As a proof of concept we loaded several whole genome datasets including the U87MG cell line. We also used a glioblastoma multiforme tumor/normal pair to both profile performance and provide an example of using the Hadoop MapReduce framework within the query engine. This software is open source and freely available from the SeqWare project (http://seqware.sourceforge.net. Conclusions The SeqWare Query Engine provided an easy way to make the U87MG genome accessible to programmers and non-programmers alike. This enabled a faster and more open exploration of results, quicker tuning of parameters for heuristic variant calling filters

  10. Comparison of Four Search Engines and their efficacy With Emphasis on Literature Research in Addiction (Prevention and Treatment).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samadzadeh, Gholam Reza; Rigi, Tahereh; Ganjali, Ali Reza

    2013-01-01

    Surveying valuable and most recent information from internet, has become vital for researchers and scholars, because every day, thousands and perhaps millions of scientific works are brought out as digital resources which represented by internet and researchers can't ignore this great resource to find related documents for their literature search, which may not be found in any library. With regard to variety of documents presented on the internet, search engines are one of the most effective search tools for finding information. The aim of this study is to evaluate the three criteria, recall, preciseness and importance of the four search engines which are PubMed, Science Direct, Google Scholar and federated search of Iranian National Medical Digital Library in addiction (prevention and treatment) to select the most effective search engine for offering the best literature research. This research was a cross-sectional study by which four popular search engines in medical sciences were evaluated. To select keywords, medical subject heading (Mesh) was used. We entered given keywords in the search engines and after searching, 10 first entries were evaluated. Direct observation was used as a mean for data collection and they were analyzed by descriptive statistics (number, percent number and mean) and inferential statistics, One way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and post hoc Tukey in Spss. 15 statistical software. P Value search engines had different operations with regard to the evaluated criteria. Since P Value was 0.004 search engines. PubMed, Science Direct and Google Scholar were the best in recall, preciseness and importance respectively. As literature research is one of the most important stages of research, it's better for researchers, especially Substance-Related Disorders scholars to use different search engines with the best recall, preciseness and importance in that subject field to reach desirable results while searching and they don't depend on just one

  11. Development and Acceptability of the Simplified Text with Workbook in Differential Equations as an Instructional Material for Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harold Jan R. Terano, ECE, MET

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available – Instructional material is a very important tool in the teaching-learning process in a classroom situation. This is in a form of textbooks, reference texts, the chalk and blackboard, computer aided presentations and other materials that are important and useful during discussions and teachings. This study focused on the development and evaluation of an instructional material in Differential Equations for engineering programs. The simplified text with workbook in differential equations for engineering was developed for the purpose of giving the students quality material for their learning processes. The developed material was based in accordance with the minimum requirements of the Philippine Commission on Higher Education (CHED for engineering programs in the course Differential Equations. The acceptability of the material was evaluated in terms of its contents and structure and format. It was evaluated by two categories of evaluators namely, engineering professors and engineering students. The average weighted means are 4.85 in terms of the contents and 4.83 in terms of the structure and format. Based on these results, the researcher found out that the developed material is highly acceptable for use in engineering programs and responsive of the high requirement for engineering curriculum.

  12. BioTCM-SE: A Semantic Search Engine for the Information Retrieval of Modern Biology and Traditional Chinese Medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the functional mechanisms of the complex biological system as a whole is drawing more and more attention in global health care management. Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM, essentially different from Western Medicine (WM, is gaining increasing attention due to its emphasis on individual wellness and natural herbal medicine, which satisfies the goal of integrative medicine. However, with the explosive growth of biomedical data on the Web, biomedical researchers are now confronted with the problem of large-scale data analysis and data query. Besides that, biomedical data also has a wide coverage which usually comes from multiple heterogeneous data sources and has different taxonomies, making it hard to integrate and query the big biomedical data. Embedded with domain knowledge from different disciplines all regarding human biological systems, the heterogeneous data repositories are implicitly connected by human expert knowledge. Traditional search engines cannot provide accurate and comprehensive search results for the semantically associated knowledge since they only support keywords-based searches. In this paper, we present BioTCM-SE, a semantic search engine for the information retrieval of modern biology and TCM, which provides biologists with a comprehensive and accurate associated knowledge query platform to greatly facilitate the implicit knowledge discovery between WM and TCM.

  13. Search engine advertisements : The impact of advertising statements on click-through and conversion rates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haans, A.J.; Raassens, N.; van Hout, R.M.W.M.

    2013-01-01

    Search engine advertising has emerged as the predominant form of advertising on the Internet. Despite its increasing importance academic research on this topic is scarce. Several authors have called for more research on how the content of the ad influences its evaluation. This exploratory study

  14. A novel algorithm for validating peptide identification from a shotgun proteomics search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Ling; Niu, Xinnan; Xia, Zhonghang; Samir, Parimal; Sumanasekera, Chiranthani; Mu, Zheng; Jennings, Jennifer L; Hoek, Kristen L; Allos, Tara; Howard, Leigh M; Edwards, Kathryn M; Weil, P Anthony; Link, Andrew J

    2013-03-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has revolutionized the proteomics analysis of complexes, cells, and tissues. In a typical proteomic analysis, the tandem mass spectra from a LC-MS/MS experiment are assigned to a peptide by a search engine that compares the experimental MS/MS peptide data to theoretical peptide sequences in a protein database. The peptide spectra matches are then used to infer a list of identified proteins in the original sample. However, the search engines often fail to distinguish between correct and incorrect peptides assignments. In this study, we designed and implemented a novel algorithm called De-Noise to reduce the number of incorrect peptide matches and maximize the number of correct peptides at a fixed false discovery rate using a minimal number of scoring outputs from the SEQUEST search engine. The novel algorithm uses a three-step process: data cleaning, data refining through a SVM-based decision function, and a final data refining step based on proteolytic peptide patterns. Using proteomics data generated on different types of mass spectrometers, we optimized the De-Noise algorithm on the basis of the resolution and mass accuracy of the mass spectrometer employed in the LC-MS/MS experiment. Our results demonstrate De-Noise improves peptide identification compared to other methods used to process the peptide sequence matches assigned by SEQUEST. Because De-Noise uses a limited number of scoring attributes, it can be easily implemented with other search engines.

  15. Method and electronic database search engine for exposing the content of an electronic database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stappers, P.J.

    2000-01-01

    The invention relates to an electronic database search engine comprising an electronic memory device suitable for storing and releasing elements from the database, a display unit, a user interface for selecting and displaying at least one element from the database on the display unit, and control

  16. Changes in users' mental models of Web search engines after ten ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ward's Cluster analyses including the Pseudo T² Statistical analyses were used to determine the mental model clusters for the seventeen salient design features of Web search engines at each time point. The cubic clustering criterion (CCC) and the dendogram were conducted for each sample to help determine the number ...

  17. A study of medical and health queries to web search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spink, Amanda; Yang, Yin; Jansen, Jim; Nykanen, Pirrko; Lorence, Daniel P; Ozmutlu, Seda; Ozmutlu, H Cenk

    2004-03-01

    This paper reports findings from an analysis of medical or health queries to different web search engines. We report results: (i). comparing samples of 10000 web queries taken randomly from 1.2 million query logs from the AlltheWeb.com and Excite.com commercial web search engines in 2001 for medical or health queries, (ii). comparing the 2001 findings from Excite and AlltheWeb.com users with results from a previous analysis of medical and health related queries from the Excite Web search engine for 1997 and 1999, and (iii). medical or health advice-seeking queries beginning with the word 'should'. Findings suggest: (i). a small percentage of web queries are medical or health related, (ii). the top five categories of medical or health queries were: general health, weight issues, reproductive health and puberty, pregnancy/obstetrics, and human relationships, and (iii). over time, the medical and health queries may have declined as a proportion of all web queries, as the use of specialized medical/health websites and e-commerce-related queries has increased. Findings provide insights into medical and health-related web querying and suggests some implications for the use of the general web search engines when seeking medical/health information.

  18. Which Search Engine Is the Most Used One among University Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavus, Nadire; Alpan, Kezban

    2010-01-01

    The importance of information is increasing in the information age that we are living in with internet becoming the major information resource for people with rapidly increasing number of documents. This situation makes finding information on the internet without web search engines impossible. The aim of the study is revealing most widely used…

  19. Use of search engines for academic activities by the academic staff ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The research was designed to investigate the Internet Search Engine use behaviour and experiences of lecturers at the University of Jos, using the academics of the Faculty of Natural Sciences in the University as a focal population. The entire population of 148 academic staff members in the Faculty was adopted for the ...

  20. Andromeda: a peptide search engine integrated into the MaxQuant environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jürgen; Neuhauser, Nadin; Michalski, Annette; Scheltema, Richard A; Olsen, Jesper V; Mann, Matthias

    2011-04-01

    A key step in mass spectrometry (MS)-based proteomics is the identification of peptides in sequence databases by their fragmentation spectra. Here we describe Andromeda, a novel peptide search engine using a probabilistic scoring model. On proteome data, Andromeda performs as well as Mascot, a widely used commercial search engine, as judged by sensitivity and specificity analysis based on target decoy searches. Furthermore, it can handle data with arbitrarily high fragment mass accuracy, is able to assign and score complex patterns of post-translational modifications, such as highly phosphorylated peptides, and accommodates extremely large databases. The algorithms of Andromeda are provided. Andromeda can function independently or as an integrated search engine of the widely used MaxQuant computational proteomics platform and both are freely available at www.maxquant.org. The combination enables analysis of large data sets in a simple analysis workflow on a desktop computer. For searching individual spectra Andromeda is also accessible via a web server. We demonstrate the flexibility of the system by implementing the capability to identify cofragmented peptides, significantly improving the total number of identified peptides.

  1. Global trends in the awareness of sepsis: insights from search engine data between 2012 and 2017.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jabaley, Craig S; Blum, James M; Groff, Robert F; O'Reilly-Shah, Vikas N

    2018-01-17

    Sepsis is an established global health priority with high mortality that can be curtailed through early recognition and intervention; as such, efforts to raise awareness are potentially impactful and increasingly common. We sought to characterize trends in the awareness of sepsis by examining temporal, geographic, and other changes in search engine utilization for sepsis information-seeking online. Using time series analyses and mixed descriptive methods, we retrospectively analyzed publicly available global usage data reported by Google Trends (Google, Palo Alto, CA, USA) concerning web searches for the topic of sepsis between 24 June 2012 and 24 June 2017. Google Trends reports aggregated and de-identified usage data for its search products, including interest over time, interest by region, and details concerning the popularity of related queries where applicable. Outlying epochs of search activity were identified using autoregressive integrated moving average modeling with transfer functions. We then identified awareness campaigns and news media coverage that correlated with epochs of significantly heightened search activity. A second-order autoregressive model with transfer functions was specified following preliminary outlier analysis. Nineteen significant outlying epochs above the modeled baseline were identified in the final analysis that correlated with 14 awareness and news media events. Our model demonstrated that the baseline level of search activity increased in a nonlinear fashion. A recurrent cyclic increase in search volume beginning in 2012 was observed that correlates with World Sepsis Day. Numerous other awareness and media events were correlated with outlying epochs. The average worldwide search volume for sepsis was less than that of influenza, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Analyzing aggregate search engine utilization data has promise as a mechanism to measure the impact of awareness efforts. Heightened information-seeking about sepsis

  2. Eczema, Atopic Dermatitis, or Atopic Eczema: Analysis of Global Search Engine Trends.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shuai; Thyssen, Jacob P; Paller, Amy S; Silverberg, Jonathan I

    The lack of standardized nomenclature for atopic dermatitis (AD) creates challenges for scientific communication, patient education, and advocacy. We sought to determine the relative popularity of the terms eczema, AD, and atopic eczema (AE) using global search engine volumes. A retrospective analysis of average monthly search volumes from 2014 to 2016 of Google, Bing/Yahoo, and Baidu was performed for eczema, AD, and AE in English and 37 other languages. Google Trends was used to determine the relative search popularity of each term from 2006 to 2016 in English and the top foreign languages, German, Turkish, Russian, and Japanese. Overall, eczema accounted for 1.5 million monthly searches (84%) compared with 247 000 searches for AD (14%) and 44 000 searches for AE (2%). For English language, eczema accounted for 93% of searches compared with 6% for AD and 1% for AE. Search popularity for eczema increased from 2006 to 2016 but remained stable for AD and AE. Given the ambiguity of the term eczema, we recommend the universal use of the next most popular term, AD.

  3. Whiplash Syndrome Reloaded: Digital Echoes of Whiplash Syndrome in the European Internet Search Engine Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Background In many Western countries, after a motor vehicle collision, those involved seek health care for the assessment of injuries and for insurance documentation purposes. In contrast, in many less wealthy countries, there may be limited access to care and no insurance or compensation system. Objective The purpose of this infodemiology study was to investigate the global pattern of evolving Internet usage in countries with and without insurance and the corresponding compensation systems for whiplash injury. Methods We used the Internet search engine analytics via Google Trends to study the health information-seeking behavior concerning whiplash injury at national population levels in Europe. Results We found that the search for “whiplash” is strikingly and consistently often associated with the search for “compensation” in countries or cultures with a tort system. Frequent or traumatic painful injuries; diseases or disorders such as arthritis, headache, radius, and hip fracture; depressive disorders; and fibromyalgia were not associated similarly with searches on “compensation.” Conclusions In this study, we present evidence from the evolving viewpoint of naturalistic Internet search engine analytics that the expectations for receiving compensation may influence Internet search behavior in relation to whiplash injury. PMID:28347974

  4. Whiplash Syndrome Reloaded: Digital Echoes of Whiplash Syndrome in the European Internet Search Engine Context.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll-Hussong, Michael

    2017-03-27

    In many Western countries, after a motor vehicle collision, those involved seek health care for the assessment of injuries and for insurance documentation purposes. In contrast, in many less wealthy countries, there may be limited access to care and no insurance or compensation system. The purpose of this infodemiology study was to investigate the global pattern of evolving Internet usage in countries with and without insurance and the corresponding compensation systems for whiplash injury. We used the Internet search engine analytics via Google Trends to study the health information-seeking behavior concerning whiplash injury at national population levels in Europe. We found that the search for "whiplash" is strikingly and consistently often associated with the search for "compensation" in countries or cultures with a tort system. Frequent or traumatic painful injuries; diseases or disorders such as arthritis, headache, radius, and hip fracture; depressive disorders; and fibromyalgia were not associated similarly with searches on "compensation." In this study, we present evidence from the evolving viewpoint of naturalistic Internet search engine analytics that the expectations for receiving compensation may influence Internet search behavior in relation to whiplash injury. ©Michael Noll-Hussong. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 27.03.2017.

  5. Tooth engineering: searching for dental mesenchymal cells sources.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laetitia eKeller

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The implantation of cultured re-associations between embryonic dental mesenchymal cells and epithelial cells from mouse molars at ED14 allowed making full teeth with crown, root, periodontal ligament fibers and bone. Although representing valuable tools to set up methodologies embryonic cells are not easily available. This work thus aimed to replace the embryonic cells by dental mesenchymal cell lines or cultured expanded embryonic cells, and to test their ability to mediate tooth development in vitro when re-associated with a competent dental epithelium. Histology, immunostaining and RT-PCR allowed getting complementary sets of results. Two different immortalized cell lines from ED18 dental mesenchyme failed in mediating tooth formation. The potentialities of embryonic dental mesenchymal cells decreased from ED14 to ED16 and were lost at ED18. This is likely related to a change in the mesenchymal cell phenotype and/or populations during development. Attempts to cultivate ED14 or ED16 embryonic dental mesenchymal cells prior to re-association led to the loss of their ability to support tooth development. This was accompanied by a down-regulation of Fgf3 transcription. Supplementation of the culture medium with FGF2 allowed restoring Fgf3 expression, but not the ability of mesenchymal cells to engage in tooth formation. Altogether, these observations suggest that a competent cell population exists in the dental mesenchyme at ED14, progressively decreases during development, and cannot as such be maintained in vitro. This study evidenced the need for specific conditions to maintain the ability of dental mesenchymal cells to initiate whole tooth formation, when re-associated with an odontogenic epithelium. Efforts to improve the culture conditions will have to be combined with attempts to characterize the competent cells within the dental mesenchyme.

  6. Surfing for suicide methods and help: content analysis of websites retrieved with search engines in Austria and the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Till, Benedikt; Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas

    2014-08-01

    The Internet provides a variety of resources for individuals searching for suicide-related information. Structured content-analytic approaches to assess intercultural differences in web contents retrieved with method-related and help-related searches are scarce. We used the 2 most popular search engines (Google and Yahoo/Bing) to retrieve US-American and Austrian search results for the term suicide, method-related search terms (e.g., suicide methods, how to kill yourself, painless suicide, how to hang yourself), and help-related terms (e.g., suicidal thoughts, suicide help) on February 11, 2013. In total, 396 websites retrieved with US search engines and 335 websites from Austrian searches were analyzed with content analysis on the basis of current media guidelines for suicide reporting. We assessed the quality of websites and compared findings across search terms and between the United States and Austria. In both countries, protective outweighed harmful website characteristics by approximately 2:1. Websites retrieved with method-related search terms (e.g., how to hang yourself) contained more harmful (United States: P search engines generally had more protective characteristics (P search engines. Resources with harmful characteristics were better ranked than those with protective characteristics (United States: P < .01, Austria: P < .05). The quality of suicide-related websites obtained depends on the search terms used. Preventive efforts to improve the ranking of preventive web content, particularly regarding method-related search terms, seem necessary. © Copyright 2014 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  7. Semantic similarity measures in the biomedical domain by leveraging a web search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Sheau-Ling; Chang, Wen-Yung; Chen, Chi-Huang; Weng, Yung-Ching

    2013-07-01

    Various researches in web related semantic similarity measures have been deployed. However, measuring semantic similarity between two terms remains a challenging task. The traditional ontology-based methodologies have a limitation that both concepts must be resided in the same ontology tree(s). Unfortunately, in practice, the assumption is not always applicable. On the other hand, if the corpus is sufficiently adequate, the corpus-based methodologies can overcome the limitation. Now, the web is a continuous and enormous growth corpus. Therefore, a method of estimating semantic similarity is proposed via exploiting the page counts of two biomedical concepts returned by Google AJAX web search engine. The features are extracted as the co-occurrence patterns of two given terms P and Q, by querying P, Q, as well as P AND Q, and the web search hit counts of the defined lexico-syntactic patterns. These similarity scores of different patterns are evaluated, by adapting support vector machines for classification, to leverage the robustness of semantic similarity measures. Experimental results validating against two datasets: dataset 1 provided by A. Hliaoutakis; dataset 2 provided by T. Pedersen, are presented and discussed. In dataset 1, the proposed approach achieves the best correlation coefficient (0.802) under SNOMED-CT. In dataset 2, the proposed method obtains the best correlation coefficient (SNOMED-CT: 0.705; MeSH: 0.723) with physician scores comparing with measures of other methods. However, the correlation coefficients (SNOMED-CT: 0.496; MeSH: 0.539) with coder scores received opposite outcomes. In conclusion, the semantic similarity findings of the proposed method are close to those of physicians' ratings. Furthermore, the study provides a cornerstone investigation for extracting fully relevant information from digitizing, free-text medical records in the National Taiwan University Hospital database.

  8. Using search engine query data to track pharmaceutical utilization: a study of statins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuster, Nathaniel M; Rogers, Mary A M; McMahon, Laurence F

    2010-08-01

    To examine temporal and geographic associations between Google queries for health information and healthcare utilization benchmarks. Retrospective longitudinal study. Using Google Trends and Google Insights for Search data, the search terms Lipitor (atorvastatin calcium; Pfizer, Ann Arbor, MI) and simvastatin were evaluated for change over time and for association with Lipitor revenues. The relationship between query data and community-based resource use per Medicare beneficiary was assessed for 35 US metropolitan areas. Google queries for Lipitor significantly decreased from January 2004 through June 2009 and queries for simvastatin significantly increased (P patent (P global revenues from 2004 to 2008 (P search engine queries for medical information correlate with pharmaceutical revenue and with overall healthcare utilization in a community. This suggests that search query data can track community-wide characteristics in healthcare utilization and have the potential for informing payers and policy makers regarding trends in utilization.

  9. PubMed vs. HighWire Press: a head-to-head comparison of two medical literature search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhecke, Thomas E; Barnes, Michael A; Zimmerman, Janet; Shoichet, Sandor

    2007-09-01

    PubMed and HighWire Press are both useful medical literature search engines available for free to anyone on the internet. We measured retrieval accuracy, number of results generated, retrieval speed, features and search tools on HighWire Press and PubMed using the quick search features of each. We found that using HighWire Press resulted in a higher likelihood of retrieving the desired article and higher number of search results than the same search on PubMed. PubMed was faster than HighWire Press in delivering search results regardless of search settings. There are considerable differences in search features between these two search engines.

  10. Visibiome: an efficient microbiome search engine based on a scalable, distributed architecture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azman, Syafiq Kamarul; Anwar, Muhammad Zohaib; Henschel, Andreas

    2017-07-24

    Given the current influx of 16S rRNA profiles of microbiota samples, it is conceivable that large amounts of them eventually are available for search, comparison and contextualization with respect to novel samples. This process facilitates the identification of similar compositional features in microbiota elsewhere and therefore can help to understand driving factors for microbial community assembly. We present Visibiome, a microbiome search engine that can perform exhaustive, phylogeny based similarity search and contextualization of user-provided samples against a comprehensive dataset of 16S rRNA profiles environments, while tackling several computational challenges. In order to scale to high demands, we developed a distributed system that combines web framework technology, task queueing and scheduling, cloud computing and a dedicated database server. To further ensure speed and efficiency, we have deployed Nearest Neighbor search algorithms, capable of sublinear searches in high-dimensional metric spaces in combination with an optimized Earth Mover Distance based implementation of weighted UniFrac. The search also incorporates pairwise (adaptive) rarefaction and optionally, 16S rRNA copy number correction. The result of a query microbiome sample is the contextualization against a comprehensive database of microbiome samples from a diverse range of environments, visualized through a rich set of interactive figures and diagrams, including barchart-based compositional comparisons and ranking of the closest matches in the database. Visibiome is a convenient, scalable and efficient framework to search microbiomes against a comprehensive database of environmental samples. The search engine leverages a popular but computationally expensive, phylogeny based distance metric, while providing numerous advantages over the current state of the art tool.

  11. Thermodynamics for engineers. Text- and workbook for university students. 2. tot. rev. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Langeheinecke, K.; Sapper, E.

    1999-01-01

    Technical thermodynamics is part of the basics of engineering. This book lays the foundation needed to understand the real thermal processes. Extensive explanations with a large number of diagrams, examples, problems and exercises illustrate the theory, philosophy, methods and tools of thermodynamics and make this book a valuable instrument of self-study. Specially taken into account is the imparting of technical terminology. The added CDrom presents computer codes for heat transfer, gas-vapor mixtures, combustion and material values, a formula collection THERMODYNAMIK MEMORY and an extensive alphabetic THERMODYNAMIK GLOSSAR. The content in brief: Sytems and their description, material properties, energy, the second fundamental sentence, ideal gases, gas- and gas-vapor-mixtures, heat engines, heat transfer and combustion [de

  12. Developing a distributed HTML5-based search engine for geospatial resource discovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ZHOU, N.; XIA, J.; Nebert, D.; Yang, C.; Gui, Z.; Liu, K.

    2013-12-01

    With explosive growth of data, Geospatial Cyberinfrastructure(GCI) components are developed to manage geospatial resources, such as data discovery and data publishing. However, the efficiency of geospatial resources discovery is still challenging in that: (1) existing GCIs are usually developed for users of specific domains. Users may have to visit a number of GCIs to find appropriate resources; (2) The complexity of decentralized network environment usually results in slow response and pool user experience; (3) Users who use different browsers and devices may have very different user experiences because of the diversity of front-end platforms (e.g. Silverlight, Flash or HTML). To address these issues, we developed a distributed and HTML5-based search engine. Specifically, (1)the search engine adopts a brokering approach to retrieve geospatial metadata from various and distributed GCIs; (2) the asynchronous record retrieval mode enhances the search performance and user interactivity; (3) the search engine based on HTML5 is able to provide unified access capabilities for users with different devices (e.g. tablet and smartphone).

  13. GeneRank: Using search engine technology for the analysis of microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Breitling Rainer

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interpretation of simple microarray experiments is usually based on the fold-change of gene expression between a reference and a "treated" sample where the treatment can be of many types from drug exposure to genetic variation. Interpretation of the results usually combines lists of differentially expressed genes with previous knowledge about their biological function. Here we evaluate a method – based on the PageRank algorithm employed by the popular search engine Google – that tries to automate some of this procedure to generate prioritized gene lists by exploiting biological background information. Results GeneRank is an intuitive modification of PageRank that maintains many of its mathematical properties. It combines gene expression information with a network structure derived from gene annotations (gene ontologies or expression profile correlations. Using both simulated and real data we find that the algorithm offers an improved ranking of genes compared to pure expression change rankings. Conclusion Our modification of the PageRank algorithm provides an alternative method of evaluating microarray experimental results which combines prior knowledge about the underlying network. GeneRank offers an improvement compared to assessing the importance of a gene based on its experimentally observed fold-change alone and may be used as a basis for further analytical developments.

  14. Modified Backtracking Search Optimization Algorithm Inspired by Simulated Annealing for Constrained Engineering Optimization Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Wang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The backtracking search optimization algorithm (BSA is a population-based evolutionary algorithm for numerical optimization problems. BSA has a powerful global exploration capacity while its local exploitation capability is relatively poor. This affects the convergence speed of the algorithm. In this paper, we propose a modified BSA inspired by simulated annealing (BSAISA to overcome the deficiency of BSA. In the BSAISA, the amplitude control factor (F is modified based on the Metropolis criterion in simulated annealing. The redesigned F could be adaptively decreased as the number of iterations increases and it does not introduce extra parameters. A self-adaptive ε-constrained method is used to handle the strict constraints. We compared the performance of the proposed BSAISA with BSA and other well-known algorithms when solving thirteen constrained benchmarks and five engineering design problems. The simulation results demonstrated that BSAISA is more effective than BSA and more competitive with other well-known algorithms in terms of convergence speed.

  15. Real Time Search Algorithm for Observation Outliers During Monitoring Engineering Constructions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latos Dorota

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Real time monitoring of engineering structures in case of an emergency of disaster requires collection of a large amount of data to be processed by specific analytical techniques. A quick and accurate assessment of the state of the object is crucial for a probable rescue action. One of the more significant evaluation methods of large sets of data, either collected during a specified interval of time or permanently, is the time series analysis. In this paper presented is a search algorithm for those time series elements which deviate from their values expected during monitoring. Quick and proper detection of observations indicating anomalous behavior of the structure allows to take a variety of preventive actions. In the algorithm, the mathematical formulae used provide maximal sensitivity to detect even minimal changes in the object’s behavior. The sensitivity analyses were conducted for the algorithm of moving average as well as for the Douglas-Peucker algorithm used in generalization of linear objects in GIS. In addition to determining the size of deviations from the average it was used the so-called Hausdorff distance. The carried out simulation and verification of laboratory survey data showed that the approach provides sufficient sensitivity for automatic real time analysis of large amount of data obtained from different and various sensors (total stations, leveling, camera, radar.

  16. GGRNA: an ultrafast, transcript-oriented search engine for genes and transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Yuki; Bono, Hidemasa

    2012-07-01

    GGRNA (http://GGRNA.dbcls.jp/) is a Google-like, ultrafast search engine for genes and transcripts. The web server accepts arbitrary words and phrases, such as gene names, IDs, gene descriptions, annotations of gene and even nucleotide/amino acid sequences through one simple search box, and quickly returns relevant RefSeq transcripts. A typical search takes just a few seconds, which dramatically enhances the usability of routine searching. In particular, GGRNA can search sequences as short as 10 nt or 4 amino acids, which cannot be handled easily by popular sequence analysis tools. Nucleotide sequences can be searched allowing up to three mismatches, or the query sequences may contain degenerate nucleotide codes (e.g. N, R, Y, S). Furthermore, Gene Ontology annotations, Enzyme Commission numbers and probe sequences of catalog microarrays are also incorporated into GGRNA, which may help users to conduct searches by various types of keywords. GGRNA web server will provide a simple and powerful interface for finding genes and transcripts for a wide range of users. All services at GGRNA are provided free of charge to all users.

  17. Refining comparative proteomics by spectral counting to account for shared peptides and multiple search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yao-Yi; Dasari, Surendra; Ma, Ze-Qiang; Vega-Montoto, Lorenzo J; Li, Ming; Tabb, David L

    2012-09-01

    Spectral counting has become a widely used approach for measuring and comparing protein abundance in label-free shotgun proteomics. However, when analyzing complex samples, the ambiguity of matching between peptides and proteins greatly affects the assessment of peptide and protein inventories, differentiation, and quantification. Meanwhile, the configuration of database searching algorithms that assign peptides to MS/MS spectra may produce different results in comparative proteomic analysis. Here, we present three strategies to improve comparative proteomics through spectral counting. We show that comparing spectral counts for peptide groups rather than for protein groups forestalls problems introduced by shared peptides. We demonstrate the advantage and flexibility of this new method in two datasets. We present four models to combine four popular search engines that lead to significant gains in spectral counting differentiation. Among these models, we demonstrate a powerful vote counting model that scales well for multiple search engines. We also show that semi-tryptic searching outperforms tryptic searching for comparative proteomics. Overall, these techniques considerably improve protein differentiation on the basis of spectral count tables.

  18. Design implications for task-specific search utilities for retrieval and re-engineering of code

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, Rahat; Grzywaczewski, Adam; Halloran, John; Doctor, Faiyaz; Iqbal, Kashif

    2017-05-01

    The importance of information retrieval systems is unquestionable in the modern society and both individuals as well as enterprises recognise the benefits of being able to find information effectively. Current code-focused information retrieval systems such as Google Code Search, Codeplex or Koders produce results based on specific keywords. However, these systems do not take into account developers' context such as development language, technology framework, goal of the project, project complexity and developer's domain expertise. They also impose additional cognitive burden on users in switching between different interfaces and clicking through to find the relevant code. Hence, they are not used by software developers. In this paper, we discuss how software engineers interact with information and general-purpose information retrieval systems (e.g. Google, Yahoo!) and investigate to what extent domain-specific search and recommendation utilities can be developed in order to support their work-related activities. In order to investigate this, we conducted a user study and found that software engineers followed many identifiable and repeatable work tasks and behaviours. These behaviours can be used to develop implicit relevance feedback-based systems based on the observed retention actions. Moreover, we discuss the implications for the development of task-specific search and collaborative recommendation utilities embedded with the Google standard search engine and Microsoft IntelliSense for retrieval and re-engineering of code. Based on implicit relevance feedback, we have implemented a prototype of the proposed collaborative recommendation system, which was evaluated in a controlled environment simulating the real-world situation of professional software engineers. The evaluation has achieved promising initial results on the precision and recall performance of the system.

  19. Towards a portal and search engine to facilitate academic and research collaboration in engineering and education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonilla Villarreal, Isaura Nathaly

    While international academic and research collaborations are of great importance at this time, it is not easy to find researchers in the engineering field that publish in languages other than English. Because of this disconnect, there exists a need for a portal to find Who's Who in Engineering Education in the Americas. The objective of this thesis is to built an object-oriented architecture for this proposed portal. The Unified Modeling Language (UML) model developed in this thesis incorporates the basic structure of a social network for academic purposes. Reverse engineering of three social networks portals yielded important aspects of their structures that have been incorporated in the proposed UML model. Furthermore, the present work includes a pattern for academic social networks..

  20. Environmental engineering: Saving a threatened resource--In search of solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Linaweaver, F.P.

    1992-01-01

    This proceedings, Environmental Engineering: Saving a Threatened Resource--In search of solutions, contains papers presented at the 1992 National Conference on Environmental Engineering, a component of Water Forum '92, Baltimore, Maryland, August 2-5, 1992. Some of the topics addressed include air quality; environmental assessment; sludge management and disposal; solid waste, toxic and hazardous materials; water supply and treatment; and water/wastewater infrastructure. In addition, key areas explored are toxicity reduction; urban nonpoint source pollution; incineration; landfills; leachate control; and VOC emissions from wastewater treatment plants. This publication provides the environmental engineer with state-of-the-art information on practical environmental engineering and results from recent advancements in scientific knowledge in this field. Individual papers are processed separately for inclusion in the appropriate data bases

  1. Impact of Commercial Search Engines and International Databases on Engineering Teaching and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanson, Hubert

    2007-01-01

    For the last three decades, the engineering higher education and professional environments have been completely transformed by the "electronic/digital information revolution" that has included the introduction of personal computer, the development of email and world wide web, and broadband Internet connections at home. Herein the writer compares…

  2. FPS-RAM: Fast Prefix Search RAM-Based Hardware for Forwarding Engine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitsu, Kazuya; Yamamoto, Koji; Kuroda, Yasuto; Inoue, Kazunari; Ata, Shingo; Oka, Ikuo

    Ternary content addressable memory (TCAM) is becoming very popular for designing high-throughput forwarding engines on routers. However, TCAM has potential problems in terms of hardware and power costs, which limits its ability to deploy large amounts of capacity in IP routers. In this paper, we propose new hardware architecture for fast forwarding engines, called fast prefix search RAM-based hardware (FPS-RAM). We designed FPS-RAM hardware with the intent of maintaining the same search performance and physical user interface as TCAM because our objective is to replace the TCAM in the market. Our RAM-based hardware architecture is completely different from that of TCAM and has dramatically reduced the costs and power consumption to 62% and 52%, respectively. We implemented FPS-RAM on an FPGA to examine its lookup operation.

  3. Crescendo: A Protein Sequence Database Search Engine for Tandem Mass Spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianqi; Zhang, Yajie; Yu, Yonghao

    2015-07-01

    A search engine that discovers more peptides reliably is essential to the progress of the computational proteomics. We propose two new scoring functions (L- and P-scores), which aim to capture similar characteristics of a peptide-spectrum match (PSM) as Sequest and Comet do. Crescendo, introduced here, is a software program that implements these two scores for peptide identification. We applied Crescendo to test datasets and compared its performance with widely used search engines, including Mascot, Sequest, and Comet. The results indicate that Crescendo identifies a similar or larger number of peptides at various predefined false discovery rates (FDR). Importantly, it also provides a better separation between the true and decoy PSMs, warranting the future development of a companion post-processing filtering algorithm.

  4. Origin of Disagreements in Tandem Mass Spectra Interpretation by Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tessier, Dominique; Lollier, Virginie; Larré, Colette; Rogniaux, Hélène

    2016-10-07

    Several proteomic database search engines that interpret LC-MS/MS data do not identify the same set of peptides. These disagreements occur even when the scores of the peptide-to-spectrum matches suggest good confidence in the interpretation. Our study shows that these disagreements observed for the interpretations of a given spectrum are almost exclusively due to the variation of what we call the "peptide space", i.e., the set of peptides that are actually compared to the experimental spectra. We discuss the potential difficulties of precisely defining the "peptide space." Indeed, although several parameters that are generally reported in publications can easily be set to the same values, many additional parameters-with much less straightforward user access-might impact the "peptide space" used by each program. Moreover, in a configuration where each search engine identifies the same candidates for each spectrum, the inference of the proteins may remain quite different depending on the false discovery rate selected.

  5. Using Search Engine Query Data to Explore the Epidemiology of Common Gastrointestinal Symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassid, Benjamin G; Day, Lukejohn W; Awad, Mohannad A; Sewell, Justin L; Osterberg, E Charles; Breyer, Benjamin N

    2017-03-01

    Internet searches are an increasingly used tool in medical research. To date, no studies have examined Google search data in relation to common gastrointestinal symptoms. The aim of this study was to compare trends in Internet search volume with clinical datasets for common gastrointestinal symptoms. Using Google Trends, we recorded relative changes in volume of searches related to dysphagia, vomiting, and diarrhea in the USA between January 2008 and January 2011. We queried the National Inpatient Sample (NIS) and the National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey (NHAMCS) during this time period and identified cases related to these symptoms. We assessed the correlation between Google Trends and these two clinical datasets, as well as examined seasonal variation trends. Changes to Google search volume for all three symptoms correlated significantly with changes to NIS output (dysphagia: r = 0.5, P = 0.002; diarrhea: r = 0.79, P search engine query volume over time. These data demonstrate that the prevalence of common GI symptoms is rising over time.

  6. GIGGLE: a search engine for large-scale integrated genome analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, Ryan M; Pedersen, Brent S; DiSera, Tonya; Marth, Gabor T; Gertz, Jason; Quinlan, Aaron R

    2018-01-01

    GIGGLE is a genomics search engine that identifies and ranks the significance of genomic loci shared between query features and thousands of genome interval files. GIGGLE (https://github.com/ryanlayer/giggle) scales to billions of intervals and is over three orders of magnitude faster than existing methods. Its speed extends the accessibility and utility of resources such as ENCODE, Roadmap Epigenomics, and GTEx by facilitating data integration and hypothesis generation. PMID:29309061

  7. GIGGLE: a search engine for large-scale integrated genome analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Layer, Ryan M; Pedersen, Brent S; DiSera, Tonya; Marth, Gabor T; Gertz, Jason; Quinlan, Aaron R

    2018-02-01

    GIGGLE is a genomics search engine that identifies and ranks the significance of genomic loci shared between query features and thousands of genome interval files. GIGGLE (https://github.com/ryanlayer/giggle) scales to billions of intervals and is over three orders of magnitude faster than existing methods. Its speed extends the accessibility and utility of resources such as ENCODE, Roadmap Epigenomics, and GTEx by facilitating data integration and hypothesis generation.

  8. An empirical study on website usability elements and how they affect search engine optimisation

    OpenAIRE

    Eugene B. Visser; Melius Weideman

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this research project was to identify and investigate the website usability attributes which are in contradiction with search engine optimisation elements. The secondary objective was to determine if these usability attributes affect conversion. Although the literature review identifies the contradictions, experts disagree about their existence.An experiment was conducted, whereby the conversion and/or traffic ratio results of an existing control website were compared...

  9. NEW METHOD FOR REACHING CONSUMERS OVER THE INTERNET: "SEARCH ENGINE MARKETING”

    OpenAIRE

    Ergezer, Çağrı

    2018-01-01

    Internet has become a platform which reached millions of users momentarily with increased use, also become a place where people spent most of their time during the day by gaining consumer and potential customer ID in addition to just being ordinary Internet users. Search engines also have earned the distinction of being the preferred reference for users in the Internet sea which draws attention with usage rate and allowing you to easily reach the sought-after content where millions of content...

  10. SpEnD: Linked Data SPARQL Endpoints Discovery Using Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yumusak, Semih; Dogdu, Erdogan; Kodaz, Halife; Kamilaris, Andreas; Vandenbussche, Pierre-Yves

    In this study, a novel metacrawling method is proposed for discovering and monitoring linked data sources on the Web. We implemented the method in a prototype system, named SPARQL Endpoints Discovery (SpEnD). SpEnD starts with a "search keyword" discovery process for finding relevant keywords for the linked data domain and specifically SPARQL endpoints. Then, these search keywords are utilized to find linked data sources via popular search engines (Google, Bing, Yahoo, Yandex). By using this method, most of the currently listed SPARQL endpoints in existing endpoint repositories, as well as a significant number of new SPARQL endpoints, have been discovered. Finally, we have developed a new SPARQL endpoint crawler (SpEC) for crawling and link analysis.

  11. Search engine ranking, quality, and content of webpages that are critical vs noncritical of HPV vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Linda Y.; Zook, Kathleen; Spoehr-Labutta, Zachary; Hu, Pamela; Joseph, Jill G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Online information can influence attitudes toward vaccination. The aim of the present study is to provide a systematic evaluation of the search engine ranking, quality, and content of webpages that are critical versus noncritical of HPV vaccination. Methods We identified HPV vaccine-related webpages with the Google search engine by entering 20 terms. We then assessed each webpage for critical versus noncritical bias as well as for the following quality indicators: authorship disclosure, source disclosure, attribution of at least one reference, currency, exclusion of testimonial accounts, and readability level less than 9th grade. We also determined webpage comprehensiveness in terms of mention of 14 HPV vaccine relevant topics. Results Twenty searches yielded 116 unique webpages. HPV vaccine-critical webpages comprised roughly a third of the top, top 5 and top 10-ranking webpages. The prevalence of HPV vaccine-critical webpages was higher for queries that included term modifiers in addition to root terms. Compared with noncritical webpages, webpages critical of HPV vaccine overall had a lower quality score than those with a noncritical bias (psearch engine queries despite being of lower quality and less comprehensive than noncritical webpages. PMID:26559742

  12. Using the open Web as an information resource and scholarly Web search engines as retrieval tools for academic and research purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filistea Naude

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available This study provided insight into the significance of the open Web as an information resource and Web search engines as research tools amongst academics. The academic staff establishment of the University of South Africa (Unisa was invited to participate in a questionnaire survey and included 1188 staff members from five colleges. This study culminated in a PhD dissertation in 2008. One hundred and eighty seven respondents participated in the survey which gave a response rate of 15.7%. The results of this study show that academics have indeed accepted the open Web as a useful information resource and Web search engines as retrieval tools when seeking information for academic and research work. The majority of respondents used the open Web and Web search engines on a daily or weekly basis to source academic and research information. The main obstacles presented by using the open Web and Web search engines included lack of time to search and browse the Web, information overload, poor network speed and the slow downloading speed of webpages.

  13. Using the open Web as an information resource and scholarly Web search engines as retrieval tools for academic and research purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filistea Naude

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This study provided insight into the significance of the open Web as an information resource and Web search engines as research tools amongst academics. The academic staff establishment of the University of South Africa (Unisa was invited to participate in a questionnaire survey and included 1188 staff members from five colleges. This study culminated in a PhD dissertation in 2008. One hundred and eighty seven respondents participated in the survey which gave a response rate of 15.7%. The results of this study show that academics have indeed accepted the open Web as a useful information resource and Web search engines as retrieval tools when seeking information for academic and research work. The majority of respondents used the open Web and Web search engines on a daily or weekly basis to source academic and research information. The main obstacles presented by using the open Web and Web search engines included lack of time to search and browse the Web, information overload, poor network speed and the slow downloading speed of webpages.

  14. Hydra: a scalable proteomic search engine which utilizes the Hadoop distributed computing framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Steven; Csordas, Attila; Killcoyne, Sarah; Hermjakob, Henning; Hoopmann, Michael R; Moritz, Robert L; Deutsch, Eric W; Boyle, John

    2012-12-05

    For shotgun mass spectrometry based proteomics the most computationally expensive step is in matching the spectra against an increasingly large database of sequences and their post-translational modifications with known masses. Each mass spectrometer can generate data at an astonishingly high rate, and the scope of what is searched for is continually increasing. Therefore solutions for improving our ability to perform these searches are needed. We present a sequence database search engine that is specifically designed to run efficiently on the Hadoop MapReduce distributed computing framework. The search engine implements the K-score algorithm, generating comparable output for the same input files as the original implementation. The scalability of the system is shown, and the architecture required for the development of such distributed processing is discussed. The software is scalable in its ability to handle a large peptide database, numerous modifications and large numbers of spectra. Performance scales with the number of processors in the cluster, allowing throughput to expand with the available resources.

  15. Engineering Bacteria to Search for Specific Concentrations of Molecules by a Systematic Synthetic Biology Design Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tien, Shin-Ming; Hsu, Chih-Yuan; Chen, Bor-Sen

    2016-01-01

    Bacteria navigate environments full of various chemicals to seek favorable places for survival by controlling the flagella's rotation using a complicated signal transduction pathway. By influencing the pathway, bacteria can be engineered to search for specific molecules, which has great potential for application to biomedicine and bioremediation. In this study, genetic circuits were constructed to make bacteria search for a specific molecule at particular concentrations in their environment through a synthetic biology method. In addition, by replacing the "brake component" in the synthetic circuit with some specific sensitivities, the bacteria can be engineered to locate areas containing specific concentrations of the molecule. Measured by the swarm assay qualitatively and microfluidic techniques quantitatively, the characteristics of each "brake component" were identified and represented by a mathematical model. Furthermore, we established another mathematical model to anticipate the characteristics of the "brake component". Based on this model, an abundant component library can be established to provide adequate component selection for different searching conditions without identifying all components individually. Finally, a systematic design procedure was proposed. Following this systematic procedure, one can design a genetic circuit for bacteria to rapidly search for and locate different concentrations of particular molecules by selecting the most adequate "brake component" in the library. Moreover, following simple procedures, one can also establish an exclusive component library suitable for other cultivated environments, promoter systems, or bacterial strains.

  16. On the Use of Interactive Texts in Undergraduate Chemical Reaction Engineering Courses: A Pedagogical Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asensio, Daniela A.; Barassi, Francisca J.; Zambon, Mariana T.; Mazza, Germán D.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the results of a pedagogical experience carried out at the University of Comahue, Argentina, with an interactive text (IT) concerning Homogeneous Chemical Reactors Analysis. The IT was built on the frame of the "Mathematica" software with the aim of providing students with a robust computational tool. Students'…

  17. An Evaluation of Text Mining Tools as Applied to Selected Scientific and Engineering Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trybula, Walter J.; Wyllys, Ronald E.

    2000-01-01

    Addresses an approach to the discovery of scientific knowledge through an examination of data mining and text mining techniques. Presents the results of experiments that investigated knowledge acquisition from a selected set of technical documents by domain experts. (Contains 15 references.) (Author/LRW)

  18. Quantitative evaluation of recall and precision of CAT Crawler, a search engine specialized on retrieval of Critically Appraised Topics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Peng; Wong, Ling Ling; Ng, Sarah; Loh, Marie; Mondry, Adrian

    2004-01-01

    Background Critically Appraised Topics (CATs) are a useful tool that helps physicians to make clinical decisions as the healthcare moves towards the practice of Evidence-Based Medicine (EBM). The fast growing World Wide Web has provided a place for physicians to share their appraised topics online, but an increasing amount of time is needed to find a particular topic within such a rich repository. Methods A web-based application, namely the CAT Crawler, was developed by Singapore's Bioinformatics Institute to allow physicians to adequately access available appraised topics on the Internet. A meta-search engine, as the core component of the application, finds relevant topics following keyword input. The primary objective of the work presented here is to evaluate the quantity and quality of search results obtained from the meta-search engine of the CAT Crawler by comparing them with those obtained from two individual CAT search engines. From the CAT libraries at these two sites, all possible keywords were extracted using a keyword extractor. Of those common to both libraries, ten were randomly chosen for evaluation. All ten were submitted to the two search engines individually, and through the meta-search engine of the CAT Crawler. Search results were evaluated for relevance both by medical amateurs and professionals, and the respective recall and precision were calculated. Results While achieving an identical recall, the meta-search engine showed a precision of 77.26% (±14.45) compared to the individual search engines' 52.65% (±12.0) (p search engine approach. The improved precision due to inherent filters underlines the practical usefulness of this tool for clinicians. PMID:15588311

  19. Fingerprinting Keywords in Search Queries over Tor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oh Se Eun

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Search engine queries contain a great deal of private and potentially compromising information about users. One technique to prevent search engines from identifying the source of a query, and Internet service providers (ISPs from identifying the contents of queries is to query the search engine over an anonymous network such as Tor.

  20. Search and rescue in collapsed structures: engineering and social science aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Tawil, Sherif; Aguirre, Benigno

    2010-10-01

    This paper discusses the social science and engineering dimensions of search and rescue (SAR) in collapsed buildings. First, existing information is presented on factors that influence the behaviour of trapped victims, particularly human, physical, socioeconomic and circumstantial factors. Trapped victims are most often discussed in the context of structural collapse and injuries sustained. Most studies in this area focus on earthquakes as the type of disaster that produces the most extensive structural damage. Second, information is set out on the engineering aspects of urban search and rescue (USAR) in the United States, including the role of structural engineers in USAR operations, training and certification of structural specialists, and safety and general procedures. The use of computational simulation to link the engineering and social science aspects of USAR is discussed. This could supplement training of local SAR groups and USAR teams, allowing them to understand better the collapse process and how voids form in a rubble pile. A preliminary simulation tool developed for this purpose is described. © 2010 The Author(s). Journal compilation © Overseas Development Institute, 2010.

  1. Tracking search engine queries for suicide in the United Kingdom, 2004-2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, V S; Stuckler, D; McKee, M

    2016-08-01

    First, to determine if a cyclical trend is observed for search activity of suicide and three common suicide risk factors in the United Kingdom: depression, unemployment, and marital strain. Second, to test the validity of suicide search data as a potential marker of suicide risk by evaluating whether web searches for suicide associate with suicide rates among those of different ages and genders in the United Kingdom. Cross-sectional. Search engine data was obtained from Google Trends, a publicly available repository of information of trends and patterns of user searches on Google. The following phrases were entered into Google Trends to analyse relative search volume for suicide, depression, job loss, and divorce, respectively: 'suicide'; 'depression + depressed + hopeless'; 'unemployed + lost job'; 'divorce'. Spearman's rank correlation coefficient was employed to test bivariate associations between suicide search activity and official suicide rates from the Office of National Statistics (ONS). Cyclical trends were observed in search activity for suicide and depression-related search activity, with peaks in autumn and winter months, and a trough in summer months. A positive, non-significant association was found between suicide-related search activity and suicide rates in the general working-age population (15-64 years) (ρ = 0.164; P = 0.652). This association is stronger in younger age groups, particularly for those 25-34 years of age (ρ = 0.848; P = 0.002). We give credence to a link between search activity for suicide and suicide rates in the United Kingdom from 2004 to 2013 for high risk sub-populations (i.e. male youth and young professionals). There remains a need for further research on how Google Trends can be used in other areas of disease surveillance and for work to provide greater geographical precision, as well as research on ways of mitigating the risk of internet use leading to suicide ideation in youth. Copyright © 2015 The Royal

  2. Open-Source Tools for Enhancing Full-Text Searching of OPACs: Use of Koha, Greenstone and Fedora

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuradha, K. T.; Sivakaminathan, R.; Kumar, P. Arun

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: There are many library automation packages available as open-source software, comprising two modules: staff-client module and online public access catalogue (OPAC). Although the OPAC of these library automation packages provides advanced features of searching and retrieval of bibliographic records, none of them facilitate full-text…

  3. OrChem - An open source chemistry search engine for Oracle®

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Background Registration, indexing and searching of chemical structures in relational databases is one of the core areas of cheminformatics. However, little detail has been published on the inner workings of search engines and their development has been mostly closed-source. We decided to develop an open source chemistry extension for Oracle, the de facto database platform in the commercial world. Results Here we present OrChem, an extension for the Oracle 11G database that adds registration and indexing of chemical structures to support fast substructure and similarity searching. The cheminformatics functionality is provided by the Chemistry Development Kit. OrChem provides similarity searching with response times in the order of seconds for databases with millions of compounds, depending on a given similarity cut-off. For substructure searching, it can make use of multiple processor cores on today's powerful database servers to provide fast response times in equally large data sets. Availability OrChem is free software and can be redistributed and/or modified under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation. All software is available via http://orchem.sourceforge.net. PMID:20298521

  4. OrChem - An open source chemistry search engine for Oracle(R).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijnbeek, Mark; Steinbeck, Christoph

    2009-10-22

    Registration, indexing and searching of chemical structures in relational databases is one of the core areas of cheminformatics. However, little detail has been published on the inner workings of search engines and their development has been mostly closed-source. We decided to develop an open source chemistry extension for Oracle, the de facto database platform in the commercial world. Here we present OrChem, an extension for the Oracle 11G database that adds registration and indexing of chemical structures to support fast substructure and similarity searching. The cheminformatics functionality is provided by the Chemistry Development Kit. OrChem provides similarity searching with response times in the order of seconds for databases with millions of compounds, depending on a given similarity cut-off. For substructure searching, it can make use of multiple processor cores on today's powerful database servers to provide fast response times in equally large data sets. OrChem is free software and can be redistributed and/or modified under the terms of the GNU Lesser General Public License as published by the Free Software Foundation. All software is available via http://orchem.sourceforge.net.

  5. Seasonal trends in hypertension in Poland: evidence from Google search engine query data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Płatek, Anna E; Sierdziński, Janusz; Krzowski, Bartosz; Szymański, Filip M

    2018-01-01

    Various conditions, including arterial hypertension, exhibit seasonal trends in their occurrence and magnitude. Those trends correspond to an interest exhibited in the number of Internet searches for the specific conditions per month. The aim of the study was to show seasonal trends in the hypertension prevalence in Poland relate to the data from the Google Trends tool. Internet search engine query data were retrieved from Google Trends from January 2008 to November 2017. Data were calculated as a monthly normalised search volume from the nine-year period. Data was presented for specific geographic regions, including Poland, the United States of America, Australia, and worldwide for the following search terms: "arterial hypertension (pol. nadciśnienie tętnicze)", "hypertension (pol. nadciśnienie)" and "hypertension medical condition". Seasonal effects were calculated using regression models and presented graphically. In Poland the search volume is the highest between November and May, while patients exhibit the least interest in arterial hypertension during summer holidays (p Google.

  6. Adverse Reactions Associated With Cannabis Consumption as Evident From Search Engine Queries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yom-Tov, Elad; Lev-Ran, Shaul

    2017-10-26

    Cannabis is one of the most widely used psychoactive substances worldwide, but adverse drug reactions (ADRs) associated with its use are difficult to study because of its prohibited status in many countries. Internet search engine queries have been used to investigate ADRs in pharmaceutical drugs. In this proof-of-concept study, we tested whether these queries can be used to detect the adverse reactions of cannabis use. We analyzed anonymized queries from US-based users of Bing, a widely used search engine, made over a period of 6 months and compared the results with the prevalence of cannabis use as reported in the US National Survey on Drug Use in the Household (NSDUH) and with ADRs reported in the Food and Drug Administration's Adverse Drug Reporting System. Predicted prevalence of cannabis use was estimated from the fraction of people making queries about cannabis, marijuana, and 121 additional synonyms. Predicted ADRs were estimated from queries containing layperson descriptions to 195 ICD-10 symptoms list. Our results indicated that the predicted prevalence of cannabis use at the US census regional level reaches an R 2 of .71 NSDUH data. Queries for ADRs made by people who also searched for cannabis reveal many of the known adverse effects of cannabis (eg, cough and psychotic symptoms), as well as plausible unknown reactions (eg, pyrexia). These results indicate that search engine queries can serve as an important tool for the study of adverse reactions of illicit drugs, which are difficult to study in other settings. ©Elad Yom-Tov, Shaul Lev-Ran. Originally published in JMIR Public Health and Surveillance (http://publichealth.jmir.org), 26.10.2017.

  7. Estimating Influenza Outbreaks Using Both Search Engine Query Data and Social Media Data in South Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woo, Hyekyung; Cho, Youngtae; Shim, Eunyoung; Lee, Jong-Koo; Lee, Chang-Gun; Kim, Seong Hwan

    2016-07-04

    As suggested as early as in 2006, logs of queries submitted to search engines seeking information could be a source for detection of emerging influenza epidemics if changes in the volume of search queries are monitored (infodemiology). However, selecting queries that are most likely to be associated with influenza epidemics is a particular challenge when it comes to generating better predictions. In this study, we describe a methodological extension for detecting influenza outbreaks using search query data; we provide a new approach for query selection through the exploration of contextual information gleaned from social media data. Additionally, we evaluate whether it is possible to use these queries for monitoring and predicting influenza epidemics in South Korea. Our study was based on freely available weekly influenza incidence data and query data originating from the search engine on the Korean website Daum between April 3, 2011 and April 5, 2014. To select queries related to influenza epidemics, several approaches were applied: (1) exploring influenza-related words in social media data, (2) identifying the chief concerns related to influenza, and (3) using Web query recommendations. Optimal feature selection by least absolute shrinkage and selection operator (Lasso) and support vector machine for regression (SVR) were used to construct a model predicting influenza epidemics. In total, 146 queries related to influenza were generated through our initial query selection approach. A considerable proportion of optimal features for final models were derived from queries with reference to the social media data. The SVR model performed well: the prediction values were highly correlated with the recent observed influenza-like illness (r=.956; Psearch queries to enhance influenza surveillance in South Korea. In addition, an approach for query selection using social media data seems ideal for supporting influenza surveillance based on search query data.

  8. An Examination of the Debate Over the Regulation for Safe Internet Service in Turkey in the Print Media and Search Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhan Kavakli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We live in an age that the sources citizens need for news and information are not limited to traditional media. Other than traditional media, internet and internet-based information and communication technologies offer citizens new alternatives in various forms. Internet search engines, which are one of these new technologies, play a significant role in the circulation of news and information regarding social debates, right along with any kind of news and information. However, this brings about the question how search engines’ role plays out in the reflection and conformation of social debates. To investigate this question, this paper examines how the public debate on the “Procedures and Principles for Safe Internet Service” that was taken place in 2011 and 2012 in Turkey, was structured and framed in search engines and the print press by using content analysis.

  9. Anatomy and evolution of database search engines-a central component of mass spectrometry based proteomic workflows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheggen, Kenneth; Raeder, Helge; Berven, Frode S; Martens, Lennart; Barsnes, Harald; Vaudel, Marc

    2017-09-13

    Sequence database search engines are bioinformatics algorithms that identify peptides from tandem mass spectra using a reference protein sequence database. Two decades of development, notably driven by advances in mass spectrometry, have provided scientists with more than 30 published search engines, each with its own properties. In this review, we present the common paradigm behind the different implementations, and its limitations for modern mass spectrometry datasets. We also detail how the search engines attempt to alleviate these limitations, and provide an overview of the different software frameworks available to the researcher. Finally, we highlight alternative approaches for the identification of proteomic mass spectrometry datasets, either as a replacement for, or as a complement to, sequence database search engines. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Evaluation of Quality and Readability of Health Information Websites Identified through India’s Major Search Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Raj

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The available health information on websites should be reliable and accurate in order to make informed decisions by community. This study was done to assess the quality and readability of health information websites on World Wide Web in India. Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out in June 2014. The key words “Health” and “Information” were used on search engines “Google” and “Yahoo.” Out of 50 websites (25 from each search engines, after exclusion, 32 websites were evaluated. LIDA tool was used to assess the quality whereas the readability was assessed using Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES, Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL, and SMOG. Results. Forty percent of websites (n=13 were sponsored by government. Health On the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode certification was present on 50% (n=16 of websites. The mean LIDA score (74.31 was average. Only 3 websites scored high on LIDA score. Only five had readability scores at recommended sixth-grade level. Conclusion. Most health information websites had average quality especially in terms of usability and reliability and were written at high readability levels. Efforts are needed to develop the health information websites which can help general population in informed decision making.

  11. Search for scalar dark energy in $t\\bar{t}+E_{T}^{\\text{miss}}$ and mono-jet final states with the ATLAS detector

    CERN Document Server

    The ATLAS collaboration

    2018-01-01

    This note presents the first collider search for light scalar particles that could contribute to the accelerating expansion of the observable universe. The results are based on a re-interpretation of a search for top super-partners using the $t\\bar{t}+E_{T}^{\\text{miss}}$ signature and a search for dark matter using the mono-jet signature. The analysis uses a dataset of LHC $pp$ collision events collected with the ATLAS detector at $\\sqrt{s}=13$ TeV corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 36.1~fb$^{-1}$. No significant excess over the predicted background is observed. The search allows to set the most stringent constraints on the suppression scale of conformal and disformal couplings of dark energy to standard model matter in the context of an effective field theory of dark energy.

  12. Knowledge-based personalized search engine for the Web-based Human Musculoskeletal System Resources (HMSR) in biomechanics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dao, Tien Tuan; Hoang, Tuan Nha; Ta, Xuan Hien; Tho, Marie Christine Ho Ba

    2013-02-01

    Human musculoskeletal system resources of the human body are valuable for the learning and medical purposes. Internet-based information from conventional search engines such as Google or Yahoo cannot response to the need of useful, accurate, reliable and good-quality human musculoskeletal resources related to medical processes, pathological knowledge and practical expertise. In this present work, an advanced knowledge-based personalized search engine was developed. Our search engine was based on a client-server multi-layer multi-agent architecture and the principle of semantic web services to acquire dynamically accurate and reliable HMSR information by a semantic processing and visualization approach. A security-enhanced mechanism was applied to protect the medical information. A multi-agent crawler was implemented to develop a content-based database of HMSR information. A new semantic-based PageRank score with related mathematical formulas were also defined and implemented. As the results, semantic web service descriptions were presented in OWL, WSDL and OWL-S formats. Operational scenarios with related web-based interfaces for personal computers and mobile devices were presented and analyzed. Functional comparison between our knowledge-based search engine, a conventional search engine and a semantic search engine showed the originality and the robustness of our knowledge-based personalized search engine. In fact, our knowledge-based personalized search engine allows different users such as orthopedic patient and experts or healthcare system managers or medical students to access remotely into useful, accurate, reliable and good-quality HMSR information for their learning and medical purposes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Predicting the hand, foot, and mouth disease incidence using search engine query data and climate variables: an ecological study in Guangdong, China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhicheng; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Wangjian; Zhang, Dingmei; Yu, Shicheng; Hao, Yuantao

    2017-10-06

    Hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD) has caused a substantial burden in China, especially in Guangdong Province. Based on the enhanced surveillance system, we aimed to explore whether the addition of temperate and search engine query data improves the risk prediction of HFMD. Ecological study. Information on the confirmed cases of HFMD, climate parameters and search engine query logs was collected. A total of 1.36 million HFMD cases were identified from the surveillance system during 2011-2014. Analyses were conducted at aggregate level and no confidential information was involved. A seasonal autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) model with external variables (ARIMAX) was used to predict the HFMD incidence from 2011 to 2014, taking into account temperature and search engine query data (Baidu Index, BDI). Statistics of goodness-of-fit and precision of prediction were used to compare models (1) based on surveillance data only, and with the addition of (2) temperature, (3) BDI, and (4) both temperature and BDI. A high correlation between HFMD incidence and BDI ( r =0.794, pengine query data significantly improved the prediction of HFMD. Further studies are warranted to examine whether including search engine query data also improves the prediction of other infectious diseases in other settings. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  14. Quality of Health Information on the Internet for Urolithiasis on the Google Search Engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Dwayne T S; Abouassaly, Robert; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2016-01-01

    Purpose . To compare the quality of health information on the Internet for keywords related to urolithiasis, to assess for difference in information quality across four main Western languages, and to compare the source of sponsorship in these websites. Methods . Health On the Net (HON) Foundation principles were utilised to determine quality information. Fifteen keywords related to urolithiasis were searched on the Google search engine. The first 150 websites were assessed against the HON principles and the source of sponsorship determined. Results . A total of 8986 websites were analysed. A proportion of HON-accredited websites for individual search terms range between 2.5% and 12.0%. The first 50 websites were more likely to be HON-positive compared to websites 51-100 and 101-150. French websites searched were more likely to be HON-positive whereas German websites were less likely to be HON-positive than English websites. There was no statistically significant difference between the rate of HON-positive English and Spanish websites. The three main website sponsors were from government/educational sources (40.2%), followed by commercial (29.9%) and physician/surgeon sources (18.6%). Conclusions . Health information on most urolithiasis websites was not validated. Nearly one-third of websites in this study have commercial sponsorship. Doctors should recognise the need for more reliable health websites for their patients.

  15. Is It "Writing on Water" or "Strike It Rich?" The Experiences of Prospective Teachers in Using Search Engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahin, Abdurrahman; Cermik, Hulya; Dogan, Birsen

    2010-01-01

    Information searching skills have become increasingly important for prospective teachers with the exponential growth of learning materials on the web. This study is an attempt to understand the experiences of prospective teachers with search engines through metaphoric images and to further investigate whether their experiences are related to the…

  16. Metadata Effectiveness in Internet Discovery: An Analysis of Digital Collection Metadata Elements and Internet Search Engine Keywords

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Le

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed digital item metadata and keywords from Internet search engines to learn what metadata elements actually facilitate discovery of digital collections through Internet keyword searching and how significantly each metadata element affects the discovery of items in a digital repository. The study found that keywords from Internet…

  17. Supporting information retrieval from electronic health records: A report of University of Michigan's nine-year experience in developing and using the Electronic Medical Record Search Engine (EMERSE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanauer, David A; Mei, Qiaozhu; Law, James; Khanna, Ritu; Zheng, Kai

    2015-06-01

    This paper describes the University of Michigan's nine-year experience in developing and using a full-text search engine designed to facilitate information retrieval (IR) from narrative documents stored in electronic health records (EHRs). The system, called the Electronic Medical Record Search Engine (EMERSE), functions similar to Google but is equipped with special functionalities for handling challenges unique to retrieving information from medical text. Key features that distinguish EMERSE from general-purpose search engines are discussed, with an emphasis on functions crucial to (1) improving medical IR performance and (2) assuring search quality and results consistency regardless of users' medical background, stage of training, or level of technical expertise. Since its initial deployment, EMERSE has been enthusiastically embraced by clinicians, administrators, and clinical and translational researchers. To date, the system has been used in supporting more than 750 research projects yielding 80 peer-reviewed publications. In several evaluation studies, EMERSE demonstrated very high levels of sensitivity and specificity in addition to greatly improved chart review efficiency. Increased availability of electronic data in healthcare does not automatically warrant increased availability of information. The success of EMERSE at our institution illustrates that free-text EHR search engines can be a valuable tool to help practitioners and researchers retrieve information from EHRs more effectively and efficiently, enabling critical tasks such as patient case synthesis and research data abstraction. EMERSE, available free of charge for academic use, represents a state-of-the-art medical IR tool with proven effectiveness and user acceptance. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Search for stopped long-lived particles produced in pp collisions at $ \\sqrt {s} = {\\text{7 TeV}} $

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

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M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Mishra, K.; Mrenna, S.; Musienko, Y.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O’Dell, V.; Prokofyev, O.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Sharma, S.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Tan, P.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vidal, R.; Whitmore, J.; Wu, W.; Yang, F.; Yumiceva, F.; Yun, J. C.; Acostav, D.; Avery, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Chen, M.; Das, S.; De Gruttola, M.; Di Giovanni, G. P.; Dobur, D.; Drozdetskiy, A.; Field, R. D.; Fisher, M.; Fu, Y.; Furic, I. K.; Gartner, J.; Hugon, J.; Kim, B.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Kypreos, T.; Low, J. F.; Matchev, K.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Muniz, L.; Remington, R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Sellers, P.; Skhirtladze, N.; Snowball, M.; Yelton, J.; Zakaria, M.; Gaultney, V.; Lebolo, L. M.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bochenek, J.; Chen, J.; Diamond, B.; Gleyzer, S. V.; Haas, J.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Jenkins, M.; Johnson, K. F.; Prosper, H.; Veeraraghavan, V.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Dorney, B.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Vodopiyanov, I.; Adams, M. R.; Anghel, I. M.; Apanasevich, L.; Bai, Y.; Bazterra, V. E.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Callner, J.; Cavanaugh, R.; Dragoiu, C.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Khalatyan, S.; Lacroix, F.; Malek, M.; O’Brien, C.; Silkworth, C.; Strom, D.; Varelas, N.; Akgun, U.; Albayrak, E. A.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Duru, F.; Griffiths, S.; Merlo, J. -P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Newsom, C. R.; Norbeck, E.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Sen, S.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yetkin, T.; Yi, K.; Barnett, B. A.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bolognesi, S.; Fehling, D.; Giurgiu, G.; Gritsan, A. V.; Guo, Z. J.; Hu, G.; Maksimovic, P.; Rappoccio, S.; Swartz, M.; Whitbeck, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Grachov, O.; Kenny, R. P.; Murray, M.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tinti, G.; Wood, J. S.; Zhukova, V.; Barfuss, A. F.; Bolton, T.; Chakaberia, I.; Ivanov, A.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Shrestha, S.; Svintradze, I.; Gronberg, J.; Lange, D.; Wright, D.; Baden, A.; Boutemeur, M.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kirn, M.; Kolberg, T.; Lu, Y.; Marionneau, M.; Mignerey, A. C.; Pedro, K.; Peterman, A.; Skuja, A.; Temple, J.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Twedt, E.; Bauer, G.; Bendavid, J.; Busza, W.; Butz, E.; Cali, I. A.; Chan, M.; Dutta, V.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Hahn, K. A.; Kim, Y.; Klute, M.; Krajczar, K.; Li, W.; Luckey, P. D.; Ma, T.; Nahn, S.; Paus, C.; Ralph, D.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Rudolph, M.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Stöckli, F.; Sumorok, K.; Sung, K.; Velicanu, D.; Wenger, E. A.; Wolf, R.; Wyslouch, B.; Xie, S.; Yang, M.; Yilmaz, Y.; Yoon, A. S.; Zanetti, M.; Cooper, S. I.; Dahmes, B.; De Benedetti, A.; Franzoni, G.; Gude, A.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Mans, J.; Pastika, N.; Rusack, R.; Sasseville, M.; Singovsky, A.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Kroeger, R.; Perera, L.; Rahmat, R.; Sanders, D. A.; Avdeeva, E.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Butt, J.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Eads, M.; Keller, J.; Kravchenko, I.; Lazo-Flores, J.; Malbouisson, H.; Malik, S.; Snow, G. R.; Baur, U.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Jain, S.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Shipkowski, S. P.; Smith, K.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Haley, J.; Nash, D.; Trocino, D.; Wood, D.; Zhang, J.; Anastassov, A.; Kubik, A.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Ofierzynski, R. A.; Pollack, B.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Schmitt, M.; Stoynev, S.; Velasco, M.; Won, S.; Antonelli, L.; Berry, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Hildreth, M.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kolb, J.; Lannon, K.; Luo, W.; Lynch, S.; Marinelli, N.; Morse, D. M.; Pearson, T.; Ruchti, R.; Slaunwhite, J.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Kotov, K.; Ling, T. Y.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Vuosalo, C.; Williams, G.; Winer, B. L.; Adam, N.; Berry, E.; Elmer, P.; Gerbaudo, D.; Halyo, V.; Hebda, P.; Hegeman, J.; Hunt, A.; Jindal, P.; Lopes Pegna, D.; Lujan, P.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Piroué, P.; Quan, X.; Raval, A.; Safdi, B.; Saka, H.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Werner, J. S.; Zuranski, A.; Acosta, J. G.; Brownson, E.; Huang, X. T.; Lopez, A.; Mendez, H.; Oliveros, S.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Alagoz, E.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; De Mattia, M.; Everett, A.; Hu, Z.; Jones, M.; Koybasi, O.; Kress, M.; Laasanen, A. T.; Leonardo, N.; Maroussov, V.; Merkel, P.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Shipsey, I.; Silvers, D.; Svyatkovskiy, A.; Vidal Marono, M.; Yoo, H. D.; Zablocki, J.; Zheng, Y.; Guragain, S.; Parashar, N.; Adair, A.; Boulahouache, C.; Ecklund, K. M.; Geurts, F. J. M.; Padley, B. P.; Redjimi, R.; Roberts, J.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Bodek, A.; Chung, Y. S.; Covarelli, R.; de Barbaro, P.; Demina, R.; Eshaq, Y.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; Goldenzweig, P.; Han, J.; Harel, A.; Miner, D. C.; Vishnevskiy, D.; Zielinski, M.; Bhatti, A.; Ciesielski, R.; Demortier, L.; Goulianos, K.; Lungu, G.; Malik, S.; Mesropian, C.; Arora, S.; Barker, A.; Chou, J. P.; Contreras-Campana, C.; Contreras-Campana, E.; Duggan, D.; Ferencek, D.; Gershtein, Y.; Gray, R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hidas, D.; Lath, A.; Panwalkar, S.; Park, M.; Patel, R.; Rekovic, V.; Robles, J.; Rose, K.; Salur, S.; Schnetzer, S.; Seitz, C.; Somalwar, S.; Stone, R.; Thomas, S.; Cerizza, G.; Hollingsworth, M.; Spanier, S.; Yang, Z. C.; York, A.; Eusebi, R.; Flanagan, W.; Gilmore, J.; Kamon, T.; Khotilovich, V.; Montalvo, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Pakhotin, Y.; Perloff, A.; Roe, J.; Safonov, A.; Sakuma, T.; Sengupta, S.; Suarez, I.; Tatarinov, A.; Toback, D.; Akchurin, N.; Damgov, J.; Dudero, P. R.; Jeong, C.; Kovitanggoon, K.; Lee, S. W.; Libeiro, T.; Roh, Y.; Volobouev, I.; Appelt, E.; Florez, C.; Greene, S.; Gurrola, A.; Johns, W.; Johnston, C.; Kurt, P.; Maguire, C.; Melo, A.; Sheldon, P.; Snook, B.; Tuo, S.; Velkovska, J.; Arenton, M. W.; Balazs, M.; Boutle, S.; Cox, B.; Francis, B.; Goodell, J.; Hirosky, R.; Ledovskoy, A.; Lin, C.; Neu, C.; Wood, J.; Yohay, R.; Gollapinni, S.; Harr, R.; Karchin, P. E.; Kottachchi Kankanamge Don, C.; Lamichhane, P.; Sakharov, A.; Anderson, M.; Bachtis, M.; Belknap, D.; Borrello, L.; Carlsmith, D.; Cepeda, M.; Dasu, S.; Gray, L.; Grogg, K. S.; Grothe, M.; Hall-Wilton, R.; Herndon, M.; Hervé, A.; Klabbers, P.; Klukas, J.; Lanaro, A.; Lazaridis, C.; Leonard, J.; Loveless, R.; Mohapatra, A.; Ojalvo, I.; Palmonari, F.; Pierro, G. A.; Ross, I.; Savin, A.; Smith, W. H.; Swanson, J.

    2012-08-01

    A search has been performed for long-lived particles that have stopped in the CMS detector, during 7 TeV proton-proton operations of the CERN LHC. The existence of such particles could be inferred from observation of their decays when there were no proton-proton collisions in the CMS detector, namely during gaps between LHC beam crossings. Using a data set in which CMS recorded an integrated luminosity of 4.0 inverse femtobarns, and a search interval corresponding to 246 hours of trigger live time, 12 events are observed, with a mean background prediction of 8.6 +/- 2.4 events. Limits are presented at 95% confidence level on long-lived gluino and stop production, over 13 orders of magnitude of particle lifetime. Assuming the "cloud model" of R-hadron interactions, a gluino with mass below 640 GeV and a stop with mass below 340 GeV are excluded, for lifetimes between 10 microseconds and 1000 seconds.

  19. Surveillance Tools Emerging From Search Engines and Social Media Data for Determining Eye Disease Patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiner, Michael S; Lietman, Thomas M; McLeod, Stephen D; Chodosh, James; Porco, Travis C

    2016-09-01

    Internet-based search engine and social media data may provide a novel complementary source for better understanding the epidemiologic factors of infectious eye diseases, which could better inform eye health care and disease prevention. To assess whether data from internet-based social media and search engines are associated with objective clinic-based diagnoses of conjunctivitis. Data from encounters of 4143 patients diagnosed with conjunctivitis from June 3, 2012, to April 26, 2014, at the University of California San Francisco (UCSF) Medical Center, were analyzed using Spearman rank correlation of each weekly observation to compare demographics and seasonality of nonallergic conjunctivitis with allergic conjunctivitis. Data for patient encounters with diagnoses for glaucoma and influenza were also obtained for the same period and compared with conjunctivitis. Temporal patterns of Twitter and Google web search data, geolocated to the United States and associated with these clinical diagnoses, were compared with the clinical encounters. The a priori hypothesis was that weekly internet-based searches and social media posts about conjunctivitis may reflect the true weekly clinical occurrence of conjunctivitis. Weekly total clinical diagnoses at UCSF of nonallergic conjunctivitis, allergic conjunctivitis, glaucoma, and influenza were compared using Spearman rank correlation with equivalent weekly data on Tweets related to disease or disease-related keyword searches obtained from Google Trends. Seasonality of clinical diagnoses of nonallergic conjunctivitis among the 4143 patients (2364 females [57.1%] and 1776 males [42.9%]) with 5816 conjunctivitis encounters at UCSF correlated strongly with results of Google searches in the United States for the term pink eye (ρ, 0.68 [95% CI, 0.52 to 0.78]; P < .001) and correlated moderately with Twitter results about pink eye (ρ, 0.38 [95% CI, 0.16 to 0.56]; P < .001) and with clinical diagnosis of influenza (ρ, 0

  20. Internet Search Engines: Copyright’s Fair Use in Reproduction and Public Display Rights

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-07-12

    asks, in other words, whether and to what extent the new work is transformative.” Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music , Inc., 510 U.S. 569, 579 (1994). 10...purposes. It cited the U.S. Supreme Court’s decision in Sony Corp. v. Universal Studios, Inc.22 and Kelly, supra, as examples where copying of an...image may have been created originally to serve an entertainment , aesthetic, or informative function, a search engine transforms the image into a pointer

  1. A two-level cache for distributed information retrieval in search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Weizhe; He, Hui; Ye, Jianwei

    2013-01-01

    To improve the performance of distributed information retrieval in search engines, we propose a two-level cache structure based on the queries of the users' logs. We extract the highest rank queries of users from the static cache, in which the queries are the most popular. We adopt the dynamic cache as an auxiliary to optimize the distribution of the cache data. We propose a distribution strategy of the cache data. The experiments prove that the hit rate, the efficiency, and the time consumption of the two-level cache have advantages compared with other structures of cache.

  2. Decision making in family medicine: randomized trial of the effects of the InfoClinique and Trip database search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labrecque, Michel; Ratté, Stéphane; Frémont, Pierre; Cauchon, Michel; Ouellet, Jérôme; Hogg, William; McGowan, Jessie; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre; Njoya, Merlin; Légaré, France

    2013-10-01

    To compare the ability of users of 2 medical search engines, InfoClinique and the Trip database, to provide correct answers to clinical questions and to explore the perceived effects of the tools on the clinical decision-making process. Randomized trial. Three family medicine units of the family medicine program of the Faculty of Medicine at Laval University in Quebec city, Que. Fifteen second-year family medicine residents. Residents generated 30 structured questions about therapy or preventive treatment (2 questions per resident) based on clinical encounters. Using an Internet platform designed for the trial, each resident answered 20 of these questions (their own 2, plus 18 of the questions formulated by other residents, selected randomly) before and after searching for information with 1 of the 2 search engines. For each question, 5 residents were randomly assigned to begin their search with InfoClinique and 5 with the Trip database. The ability of residents to provide correct answers to clinical questions using the search engines, as determined by third-party evaluation. After answering each question, participants completed a questionnaire to assess their perception of the engine's effect on the decision-making process in clinical practice. Of 300 possible pairs of answers (1 answer before and 1 after the initial search), 254 (85%) were produced by 14 residents. Of these, 132 (52%) and 122 (48%) pairs of answers concerned questions that had been assigned an initial search with InfoClinique and the Trip database, respectively. Both engines produced an important and similar absolute increase in the proportion of correct answers after searching (26% to 62% for InfoClinique, for an increase of 36%; 24% to 63% for the Trip database, for an increase of 39%; P = .68). For all 30 clinical questions, at least 1 resident produced the correct answer after searching with either search engine. The mean (SD) time of the initial search for each question was 23.5 (7

  3. MEASURING THE PERFORMANCE OF SIMILARITY PROPAGATION IN AN SEMANTIC SEARCH ENGINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. K. Jayanthi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In the current scenario, web page result personalization is playing a vital role. Nearly 80 % of the users expect the best results in the first page itself without having any persistence to browse longer in URL mode. This research work focuses on two main themes: Semantic web search through online and Domain based search through offline. The first part is to find an effective method which allows grouping similar results together using BookShelf Data Structure and organizing the various clusters. The second one is focused on the academic domain based search through offline. This paper focuses on finding documents which are similar and how Vector space can be used to solve it. So more weightage is given for the principles and working methodology of similarity propagation. Cosine similarity measure is used for finding the relevancy among the documents.

  4. [On the seasonality of dermatoses: a retrospective analysis of search engine query data depending on the season].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, M J; Springer, S; Kaatz, M

    2014-09-01

    The volume of search engine queries about disease-relevant items reflects public interest and correlates with disease prevalence as proven by the example of flu (influenza). Other influences include media attention or holidays. The present work investigates if the seasonality of prevalence or symptom severity of dermatoses correlates with search engine query data. The relative weekly volume of dermatological relevant search terms was assessed by the online tool Google Trends for the years 2009-2013. For each item, the degree of seasonality was calculated via frequency analysis and a geometric approach. Many dermatoses show a marked seasonality, reflected by search engine query volumes. Unexpected seasonal variations of these queries suggest a previously unknown variability of the respective disease prevalence. Furthermore, using the example of allergic rhinitis, a close correlation of search engine query data with actual pollen count can be demonstrated. In many cases, search engine query data are appropriate to estimate seasonal variability in prevalence of common dermatoses. This finding may be useful for real-time analysis and formation of hypotheses concerning pathogenetic or symptom aggravating mechanisms and may thus contribute to improvement of diagnostics and prevention of skin diseases.

  5. The accuracy of Internet search engines to predict diagnoses from symptoms can be assessed with a validated scoring system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenker, Bennett S

    2014-02-01

    To validate a scoring system that evaluates the ability of Internet search engines to correctly predict diagnoses when symptoms are used as search terms. We developed a five point scoring system to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Internet search engines. We identified twenty diagnoses common to a primary care setting to validate the scoring system. One investigator entered the symptoms for each diagnosis into three Internet search engines (Google, Bing, and Ask) and saved the first five webpages from each search. Other investigators reviewed the webpages and assigned a diagnostic accuracy score. They rescored a random sample of webpages two weeks later. To validate the five point scoring system, we calculated convergent validity and test-retest reliability using Kendall's W and Spearman's rho, respectively. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test to look for differences in accuracy scores for the three Internet search engines. A total of 600 webpages were reviewed. Kendall's W for the raters was 0.71 (psearch engines is a valid and reliable instrument. The scoring system may be used in future Internet research. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Comparative case study on website traffic generated by search engine optimisation and a pay-per-click campaign, versus marketing expenditure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wouter T. Kritzinger

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: No empirical work was found on how marketing expenses compare when used solely for either the one or the other of the two main types of search engine marketing. Objectives: This research set out to determine how the results of the implementation of a pay-per-click campaign compared to those of a search engine optimisation campaign, given the same website and environment. At the same time, the expenses incurred on both these marketing methods were recorded and compared. Method: The active website of an existing, successful e-commerce concern was used as platform. The company had been using pay-per-click only for a period, whilst traffic was monitored. This system was decommissioned on a particular date and time, and an alternative search engine optimisation system was started at the same time. Again, both traffic and expenses were monitored. Results: The results indicate that the pay-per-click system did produce favourable results, but on the condition that a monthly fee has to be set aside to guarantee consistent traffic. The implementation of search engine optimisation required a relatively large investment at the outset, but it was once-off. After a drop in traffic owing to crawler visitation delays, the website traffic bypassed the average figure achieved during the pay-per-click period after a little over three months, whilst the expenditure crossed over after just six months. Conclusion: Whilst considering the specific parameters of this study, an investment in search engine optimisation rather than a pay-per-click campaign appears to produce better results at a lower cost, after a given period of time. [PDF to follow

  7. Maximizing the sensitivity and reliability of peptide identification in large-scale proteomic experiments by harnessing multiple search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wen; Taylor, J Alex; Davis, Michael T; Bonilla, Leo E; Lee, Kimberly A; Auger, Paul L; Farnsworth, Chris C; Welcher, Andrew A; Patterson, Scott D

    2010-03-01

    Despite recent advances in qualitative proteomics, the automatic identification of peptides with optimal sensitivity and accuracy remains a difficult goal. To address this deficiency, a novel algorithm, Multiple Search Engines, Normalization and Consensus is described. The method employs six search engines and a re-scoring engine to search MS/MS spectra against protein and decoy sequences. After the peptide hits from each engine are normalized to error rates estimated from the decoy hits, peptide assignments are then deduced using a minimum consensus model. These assignments are produced in a series of progressively relaxed false-discovery rates, thus enabling a comprehensive interpretation of the data set. Additionally, the estimated false-discovery rate was found to have good concordance with the observed false-positive rate calculated from known identities. Benchmarking against standard proteins data sets (ISBv1, sPRG2006) and their published analysis, demonstrated that the Multiple Search Engines, Normalization and Consensus algorithm consistently achieved significantly higher sensitivity in peptide identifications, which led to increased or more robust protein identifications in all data sets compared with prior methods. The sensitivity and the false-positive rate of peptide identification exhibit an inverse-proportional and linear relationship with the number of participating search engines.

  8. Discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures using a flow reaction array as a search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zang, Hong-Ying; de la Oliva, Andreu Ruiz; Miras, Haralampos N; Long, De-Liang; McBurney, Roy T; Cronin, Leroy

    2014-04-28

    The discovery of gigantic molecular nanostructures like coordination and polyoxometalate clusters is extremely time-consuming since a vast combinatorial space needs to be searched, and even a systematic and exhaustive exploration of the available synthetic parameters relies on a great deal of serendipity. Here we present a synthetic methodology that combines a flow reaction array and algorithmic control to give a chemical 'real-space' search engine leading to the discovery and isolation of a range of new molecular nanoclusters based on [Mo(2)O(2)S(2)](2+)-based building blocks with either fourfold (C4) or fivefold (C5) symmetry templates and linkers. This engine leads us to isolate six new nanoscale cluster compounds: 1, {Mo(10)(C5)}; 2, {Mo(14)(C4)4(C5)2}; 3, {Mo(60)(C4)10}; 4, {Mo(48)(C4)6}; 5, {Mo(34)(C4)4}; 6, {Mo(18)(C4)9}; in only 200 automated experiments from a parameter space spanning ~5 million possible combinations.

  9. Evaluation of Quality and Readability of Health Information Websites Identified through India's Major Search Engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raj, S; Sharma, V L; Singh, A J; Goel, S

    2016-01-01

    Background. The available health information on websites should be reliable and accurate in order to make informed decisions by community. This study was done to assess the quality and readability of health information websites on World Wide Web in India. Methods. This cross-sectional study was carried out in June 2014. The key words "Health" and "Information" were used on search engines "Google" and "Yahoo." Out of 50 websites (25 from each search engines), after exclusion, 32 websites were evaluated. LIDA tool was used to assess the quality whereas the readability was assessed using Flesch Reading Ease Score (FRES), Flesch-Kincaid Grade Level (FKGL), and SMOG. Results. Forty percent of websites (n = 13) were sponsored by government. Health On the Net Code of Conduct (HONcode) certification was present on 50% (n = 16) of websites. The mean LIDA score (74.31) was average. Only 3 websites scored high on LIDA score. Only five had readability scores at recommended sixth-grade level. Conclusion. Most health information websites had average quality especially in terms of usability and reliability and were written at high readability levels. Efforts are needed to develop the health information websites which can help general population in informed decision making.

  10. Characterizing interdisciplinarity of researchers and research topics using web search engines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayama, Hiroki; Akaishi, Jin

    2012-01-01

    Researchers' networks have been subject to active modeling and analysis. Earlier literature mostly focused on citation or co-authorship networks reconstructed from annotated scientific publication databases, which have several limitations. Recently, general-purpose web search engines have also been utilized to collect information about social networks. Here we reconstructed, using web search engines, a network representing the relatedness of researchers to their peers as well as to various research topics. Relatedness between researchers and research topics was characterized by visibility boost-increase of a researcher's visibility by focusing on a particular topic. It was observed that researchers who had high visibility boosts by the same research topic tended to be close to each other in their network. We calculated correlations between visibility boosts by research topics and researchers' interdisciplinarity at the individual level (diversity of topics related to the researcher) and at the social level (his/her centrality in the researchers' network). We found that visibility boosts by certain research topics were positively correlated with researchers' individual-level interdisciplinarity despite their negative correlations with the general popularity of researchers. It was also found that visibility boosts by network-related topics had positive correlations with researchers' social-level interdisciplinarity. Research topics' correlations with researchers' individual- and social-level interdisciplinarities were found to be nearly independent from each other. These findings suggest that the notion of "interdisciplinarity" of a researcher should be understood as a multi-dimensional concept that should be evaluated using multiple assessment means.

  11. The influence that JavaScript(TM has on the visibility of a Website to search engines - a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Weideman

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. In this research project, an empirical pilot study on the relationship between JavaScript(TM usage and Website visibility was carried out. The main purpose was to establish whethe JavaScript(TM-based hyperlinks attract or repel crawlers, resulting in an increase or decrease in Website visibility. Method. A literature survey has established that there appears to be contradiction amongst claims by various authors as to whether or not crawlers can parse or interpret JavaScript(TM. The chosen methodology involved the creation of a Website that contains different kinds of links to other pages, where actual data files were stored. Search engine crawler visits to the page pointed to by the different kinds of links were monitored and recorded. Analysis. This experiment took into account the fact that JavaScript(TM can be embedded within the HTML of a Web page or referenced as an external '.js' file. It also considered different ways of specifying links within JavaScript(TM. Results. The results obtained indicated that text links provide the highest level of opportunity for crawlers to discover and index non-homepages. In general, crawlers did not follow Javascript(TM-based links to Web pages blindly. Conclusion. . Most crawlers evade Javascript(TM links, implying that Web pages using forms of this technology, for example in pop-up/pull-down menus, could be jeopardising their chances of achieving high search engine rankings. Certain Javascript(TM links were not followed at all, which has serious implications for designers of e-Commerce Websites.

  12. A comparison of three design tree based search algorithms for the detection of engineering parts constructed with CATIA V5 in large databases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Roj

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents three different search engines for the detection of CAD-parts in large databases. The analysis of the contained information is performed by the export of the data that is stored in the structure trees of the CAD-models. A preparation program generates one XML-file for every model, which in addition to including the data of the structure tree, also owns certain physical properties of each part. The first search engine is specializes in the discovery of standard parts, like screws or washers. The second program uses certain user input as search parameters, and therefore has the ability to perform personalized queries. The third one compares one given reference part with all parts in the database, and locates files that are identical, or similar to, the reference part. All approaches run automatically, and have the analysis of the structure tree in common. Files constructed with CATIA V5, and search engines written with Python have been used for the implementation. The paper also includes a short comparison of the advantages and disadvantages of each program, as well as a performance test.

  13. Search for dark matter at [Formula: see text] in final states containing an energetic photon and large missing transverse momentum with the ATLAS detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aaboud, M; Aad, G; Abbott, B; Abdallah, J; Abdinov, O; Abeloos, B; Abidi, S H; AbouZeid, O S; Abraham, N L; Abramowicz, H; Abreu, H; Abreu, R; Abulaiti, Y; Acharya, B S; Adachi, S; Adamczyk, L; Adelman, J; Adersberger, M; Adye, T; Affolder, A A; Agatonovic-Jovin, T; Agheorghiesei, C; Aguilar-Saavedra, J A; Ahlen, S P; Ahmadov, F; Aielli, G; Akatsuka, S; Akerstedt, H; Åkesson, T P A; Akimov, A V; Alberghi, G L; Albert, J; Albicocco, P; Alconada Verzini, M J; Aleksa, M; Aleksandrov, I N; Alexa, C; Alexander, G; Alexopoulos, T; Alhroob, M; Ali, B; Aliev, M; Alimonti, G; Alison, J; Alkire, S P; Allbrooke, B M M; Allen, B W; Allport, P P; Aloisio, A; Alonso, A; Alonso, F; Alpigiani, C; Alshehri, A A; Alstaty, M; Alvarez Gonzalez, B; Álvarez Piqueras, D; Alviggi, M G; Amadio, B T; Amaral Coutinho, Y; Amelung, C; Amidei, D; Amor Dos Santos, S P; Amorim, A; Amoroso, S; Amundsen, G; Anastopoulos, C; Ancu, L S; Andari, N; Andeen, T; Anders, C F; Anders, J K; Anderson, K J; Andreazza, A; Andrei, V; Angelidakis, S; Angelozzi, I; Angerami, A; Anisenkov, A V; Anjos, N; Annovi, A; Antel, C; Antonelli, M; Antonov, A; Antrim, D J; Anulli, F; Aoki, M; Aperio Bella, L; Arabidze, G; Arai, Y; Araque, J P; Araujo Ferraz, V; Arce, A T H; Ardell, R E; Arduh, F A; Arguin, J-F; Argyropoulos, S; Arik, M; Armbruster, A J; Armitage, L J; Arnaez, O; Arnold, H; Arratia, M; Arslan, O; Artamonov, A; Artoni, G; Artz, S; Asai, S; Asbah, N; Ashkenazi, A; Asquith, L; Assamagan, K; Astalos, R; Atkinson, M; Atlay, N B; Aubry, L; Augsten, K; Avolio, G; Axen, B; Ayoub, M K; Azuelos, G; Baas, A E; Baca, M J; Bachacou, H; Bachas, K; Backes, M; Backhaus, M; Bagnaia, P; Bahrasemani, H; Baines, J T; Bajic, M; Baker, O K; Baldin, E M; Balek, P; Balli, F; Balunas, W K; Banas, E; Banerjee, Sw; Bannoura, A A E; Barak, L; Barberio, E L; Barberis, D; Barbero, M; Barillari, T; Barisits, M-S; Barklow, T; Barlow, N; Barnes, S L; Barnett, B M; Barnett, R M; Barnovska-Blenessy, Z; Baroncelli, A; Barone, G; Barr, A J; Barranco Navarro, L; Barreiro, F; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J; Bartoldus, R; Barton, A E; Bartos, P; Basalaev, A; Bassalat, A; Bates, R L; Batista, S J; Batley, J R; Battaglia, M; Bauce, M; Bauer, F; Bawa, H S; Beacham, J B; Beattie, M D; Beau, T; Beauchemin, P H; Bechtle, P; Beck, H P; Becker, K; Becker, M; Beckingham, M; Becot, C; Beddall, A J; Beddall, A; Bednyakov, V A; Bedognetti, M; Bee, C P; Beermann, T A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Behr, J K; Bell, A S; Bella, G; Bellagamba, L; Bellerive, A; Bellomo, M; Belotskiy, K; Beltramello, O; Belyaev, N L; Benary, O; Benchekroun, D; Bender, M; Bendtz, K; Benekos, N; Benhammou, Y; Benhar Noccioli, E; Benitez, J; Benjamin, D P; Benoit, M; Bensinger, J R; Bentvelsen, S; Beresford, L; Beretta, M; Berge, D; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E; Berger, N; Beringer, J; Berlendis, S;