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Sample records for texas heart institute

  1. Texas Heart Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Symposium. Dr. Doris Taylor was interviewed by the Portuguese Society of Cardiology during the organization's annual congress ... education. Visit the THI Newsroom The Next First Learn more about how The Next First in cardiovascular ...

  2. Difference in patient profiles and outcomes in Japanese versus American patients undergoing coronary revascularization (collaborative study by CREDO-Kyoto and the Texas Heart Institute Research Database).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohsaka, Shun; Kimura, Takeshi; Goto, Masashi; Lee, Vei-Vei; Elayda, Macarthur; Furukawa, Yutaka; Fukushima, Masanori; Komeda, Masashi; Sakata, Ryuuzou; Willerson, James T; Wilson, James M; Kita, Toru

    2010-06-15

    Although coronary revascularization is common in both Japan and the United States (US), no direct comparison has been performed to demonstrate differences in the clinical characteristics and long-term outcomes of patients in these 2 countries. We analyzed the preprocedural, in-hospital, and long-term data from the Coronary Revascularization Demonstrating Outcome registry (Kyoto, Japan) and the Texas Heart Institute Research Database (Houston, Texas) of 16,100 patients who had undergone elective, initial percutaneous coronary intervention or coronary artery bypass grafting. The Japanese procedures were performed from 2000 to 2002 (n = 8,871, follow-up period 3.5 years, interquartile range 2.6 to 4.3) and the US procedures from 1999 to 2003 (n = 7,229, follow-up period 5.2 years, interquartile range 3.8 to 6.5). The Japanese patients tended to be older (mean age 67.2 vs 62.7 years; p <0.001), to smoke (52.9% vs 46.0%; p <0.001), and to have diabetes (39.2% vs 31.0%; p <0.001) and stroke (16.4% vs 5.0%; p <0.001). The US patients were more obese (body mass index 23.7 vs 29.3 kg/m(2); p <0.001), with greater rates of systemic atherosclerotic disease. Both groups had a similar in-hospital mortality rate (Japanese patients 0.9% vs US patients 1.1%; p = 0.19) and crude long-term mortality rate (Japanese patients 27.7/1,000 person-years, US patients 28.2/1,000 person-years; p = 0.35). After adjustment for known predictors, the US group had greater long-term mortality than the Japanese group (hazard ratio 1.71, 95% confidence interval 1.50 to 1.95; p <0.001). This finding was consistent among all high-risk subgroups. In conclusion, the 2 registries showed similar crude outcomes but important differences in patient risk factors such as obesity. In the adjusted analysis, the Japanese patients had better outcomes than did the US patients. Additional study is needed to assess the effect of ethnic and risk factor variations on coronary artery disease.

  3. Evaluating the longitudinal risk of social vigilance on atherosclerosis: study protocol for the North Texas Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz, John M; Taylor, Daniel J; Uchino, Bert N; Smith, Timothy W; Allison, Matthew; Ahn, Chul; Johnson, Jillian J; Smyth, Joshua M

    2017-08-14

    Psychosocial factors are increasingly recognised as important determinants of cardiovascular disease risk. The North Texas Heart Study aims to understand the mechanisms responsible for this association with a focus on social vigilance (ie, scanning the environment for social threats). There is also growing interest in supplementing traditional methods (eg, survey assessment of psychosocial risk paired with cross-sectional and longitudinal health outcomes) with daily or repeated momentary assessment of psychosocial factors. However, there are relatively few longitudinal studies directly comparing these approaches with hard endpoints. The North Texas Heart Study proposes a longitudinal measurement burst design to examine psychosocial determinants of subclinical atherosclerosis. A sample of 300 healthy community participants, stratified by age and gender, will complete survey measures, as well as 2 days of ecological momentary assessment at baseline and at a 2-year follow-up. A range of psychosocial and behavioural factors, objective biomarkers, as well as carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) will be assessed at both time points. Unadjusted and adjusted models will evaluate cross-sectional associations and determinants of change in the cIMT. The Institutional Review Board at the study coordinating institute (University of North Texas) has approved this study. Positive, negative or inconclusive primary and ancillary findings will be disseminated in scientific journals and conferences. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  4. Paediatric heart failure research: role of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kristin M

    2015-08-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, of the National Institutes of Health, is committed to supporting research in paediatric heart failure. The Institute's support of paediatric heart failure research includes both investigator-initiated grants and Institute initiatives. There were 107 funded grants in paediatric heart failure over the past 20 years in basic, translational and clinical research, technology development, and support of registries. Such research includes a broad diversity of scientific topics and approaches. The Institute also supports several initiatives for paediatric heart failure, including the Pediatric Circulatory Support Program, the Pumps for Kids, Infants, and Neonates (PumpKIN) Program, PediMACS, and the Pediatric Heart Network. This review article describes the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's past, present, and future efforts to promote a better understanding of paediatric heart failure, with the ultimate goal of improving outcomes.

  5. The History of Surgery at the Montreal Heart Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, Claude M; Cartier, Raymond; Roy, Denis; Perrault, Louis P

    2016-01-01

    The Montreal Heart Institute (MHI) is a specialty hospital dedicated to cardiology and heart surgery. Founded in 1954 by Paul David, it is currently affiliated with the Université de Montréal. The Montreal Heart Institute is a center that has rested on the shoulders of multiple pioneers over the past 63 years. Renowned for its sustained excellence and commitment to patient care, the MHI also focuses on research and innovation. It has become one of the leading heart institutions in modern cardiac surgery and also one of the busiest cardiac surgery centers in the country. Our leaders have impacted the treatment of patients with heart diseases through clinical care and education. Staff surgeons have been trained at top centers across the world for the benefit of Canadian patients. The MHI was a pioneer in heart transplantation and CABG surgery and focuses on evaluative research of new technology. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Archive of Geosample Data and Information from the University of Texas at Austin (UT) Institute of Geophysics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Metadata describing piston cores curated by Institute of Geophysics of the University of Texas at Austin (UT) collected from 1976 to 1978 were coded and contributed...

  7. The Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute at Texas A&M University

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudio A. Gariazzo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The Nuclear Security Science and Policy Institute (NSSPI is a multidisciplinary organization at Texas A&M University and was the first U.S. academic institution focused on technical graduate education, research, and service related to the safeguarding of nuclear materials and the reduction of nuclear threats. NSSPI employs science, engineering, and policy expertise to: (1 conduct research and development to help detect, prevent, and reverse nuclear and radiological proliferation and guard against nuclear terrorism; (2 educate the next generation of nuclear security and nuclear nonproliferation leaders; (3 analyze the interrelationships between policy and technology in the field of nuclear security; and (4 serve as a public resource for knowledge and skills to reduce nuclear threats. Since 2006, over 31 Doctoral and 73 Master degrees were awarded through NSSPI-sponsored research. Forty-one of those degrees are Master of Science in Nuclear Engineering with a specialization in Nuclear Nonproliferation and 16 were Doctorate of Philosophy degrees with a specific focus on nuclear nonproliferation. Over 200 students from both technical and policy backgrounds have taken classes provided by NSSPI at Texas A&M. The model for creating safeguards and security experts, which has in large part been replicated worldwide, was established at Texas A&M by NSSPI faculty and staff. In addition to conventional classroom lectures, NSSPI faculty have provided practical experiences; advised students on valuable research projects that have contributed substantially to the overall nuclear nonproliferation, safeguards and security arenas; and engaged several similar academic and research institutes around the world in activities and research for the benefit of Texas A&M students. NSSPI has had an enormous impact on the nuclear nonproliferation workforce (across the international community in the past 8 years, and this paper is an attempt to summarize the activities

  8. Accelerated Learning: Undergraduate Research Experiences at the Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yennello, S. J.

    The Texas A&M Cyclotron Institute (TAMU CI) has had an NSF funded Research Experiences for Undergraduates program since 2004. Each summer about a dozen students from across the country join us for the 10-week program. They are each imbedded in one of the research groups of the TAMU CI and given their own research project. While the main focus of their effort is their individual research project, we also have other activities to broaden their experience. For instance, one of those activities has been involvement in a dedicated group experiment. Because not every experimental group will run during those 10 weeks and the fact that some of the students are in theory research groups, a group research experience allows everyone to actually be involved in an experiment using the accelerator. In stark contrast to the REU students' very focused experience during the summer, Texas A&M undergraduates can be involved in research projects at the Cyclotron throughout the year, often for multiple years. This extended exposure enables Texas A&M students to have a learning experience that cannot be duplicated without a local accelerator. The motivation for the REU program was to share this accelerator experience with students who do not have that opportunity at their home institution.

  9. Engineering and management experience at Texas A&M Transportation Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Arif Tahjibul

    This manuscript presents the author's engineering and management experience during his internship in the Materials and Pavements (M&P) Division at the Texas A&M Transportation Institute (TTI), and is a record of study for the Doctor of Engineering at Texas A&M University. Through this internship, he met his established internship objectives of gaining technical knowledge as well as knowledge and skills in project management, organizational communication, and quality management of pavement condition data, and of attaining professional development. In meeting these objectives, the author describes the history, mission, and organizational structure of his workplace. He also presents his experience of developing and delivering a two-week training course on pavement design and construction in Kosovo. Participating in a number of professional development training courses and other activities prepared him for working as an engineering manager. These activities include Delta-T leadership training, an instructor development course, a time management and organizational skills course, and the M&P Division lecture series. Leadership and skills learned through the Delta-T program were beneficial for the employee as well as the employer. For the class project, the author and his teammates performed a study dealing with improving TTI's deliverables. The Delta-T team composed a report summarizing their efforts of examining the current state of TTI's project deliverables, the deliverables' shortcomings, and potential enhancements to expand the deliverables' appeal to additional types of potential users outside the traditional research community. The team also developed a prototype web-based model of deliverables and presented some implementation recommendations. Participating in the Texas Department of Transportation's (TxDOT's) pavement surface distress data collection program enabled the author to become familiar with pavement distress data quality management and thus attain the

  10. Developing a heart institute: the execution of a strategic plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczeski, Catherine D; McDonald, Mark B

    2013-01-01

    The Heart Institute at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center was chartered in July 2008 with the purpose of integrating clinical cardiovascular medicine with basic science research to foster innovations in care of patients with congenital heart problems. The initial administrative steering committee included representation from a basic scientist, a cardiologist, and a cardiothoracic surgeon and was charged with the development of a strategic plan for the evolution of the Institute over a five-year horizon. Using structured focus groups and staff interviews, the vision, mission, and goals were identified and refined. An integrated implementation plan addressing recruitment, capitalization, infrastructure, and market opportunities was created and executed. The preliminary results demonstrated clinical outcome improvements, increased scientific and academic productivity, and financial sustainability. All of the goals identified in the initial planning sequence were achieved within the five-year time frame, prompting an early evaluation and revision of the strategic plan.

  11. Petroleum Science and Technology Institute with the TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, H. C.; Olson, J. E.; Bryant, S. L.; Lake, L. W.; Bommer, P.; Torres-Verdin, C.; Jablonowski, C.; Willis, M.

    2009-12-01

    The TeXas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, a professional development program for 8th- thru 12th-grade Earth Science teachers, presented a one-week Petroleum Science and Technology Institute at The University of Texas at Austin campus. The summer program was a joint effort between the Jackson School of Geosciences and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering. The goal of the institute was to focus on the STEM components involved in the petroleum industry and to introduce teachers to the larger energy resources theme. The institute kicked off with a welcoming event and tour of a green, energy-efficient home (LEED Platinum certified) owned by one of the petroleum engineering faculty. Tours of the home included an introduction to rainwater harvesting, solar energy, sustainable building materials and other topics on energy efficiency. Classroom topics included drilling technology (including a simulator lab and an overview of the history of the technology), energy use and petroleum geology, well-logging technology and interpretation, reservoir engineering and volumetrics (including numerous labs combining chemistry and physics), risk assessment and economics, carbon capture and storage (CO2 sequestration technology) and hydraulic fracturing. A mid-week field trip included visiting the Ocean Star offshore platform in Galveston, the Weiss Energy Hall at the Houston Museum of Science and Schlumberger (to view 3-D visualization technology) in Houston. Teachers remarked that they really appreciated the focused nature of the institute and especially found the increased use of mathematics both a tool for professional growth, as well as a challenge for them to use more math in their science classes. STEM integration was an important feature of the summer institute, and teachers found the integration of science (earth sciences, geophysics), technology, engineering (petroleum, chemical and reservoir) and mathematics particularly valuable. Pre

  12. Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: A comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute?s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Zheyu; Zhang, Yefei; FRANZIN, LUISA; Cormier, Janice N.; Chan, Wenyaw; Xu, Hua; Du, Xianglin L.

    2015-01-01

    Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute?s Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute?s SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 ...

  13. Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course Offered by The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D.; Davis, M. B.; Allison, M. A.; Gulick, S. P.; Goff, J. A.; Saustrup, S.

    2012-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers an intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring-summer intersession. Now in year six, the course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in data acquisition, processing, interpretation, and visualization. Techniques covered include high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, several types of sediment coring, grab sampling, and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples (e.g., core description, grain size analysis, x-radiography, etc.). Students participate in an initial period of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area (which changes each year) along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work. Our field sites at Port Aransas and Galveston, Texas, and Grand Isle, Louisiana, have provided ideal locations for students to investigate coastal and sedimentary processes of the Gulf Coast and continental shelf through application of geophysical techniques. In the field, students rotate between two research vessels: one vessel, the 22' aluminum-hulled R/V Lake Itasca, owned and operated by UTIG, is used principally for multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and sediment sampling; the other, NOAA's R/V Manta or the R/V Acadiana, operated by the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, and is used primarily for high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibrocoring. While at sea, students assist with survey design, learn instrumentation set up, acquisition parameters, data quality control, and safe instrument deployment and retrieval. In teams of three, students work in onshore field labs preparing sediment samples for

  14. 78 FR 12766 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... of Committee: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Special Emphasis Panel; SBIR Topic 80... Emphasis Panel; Improving Safety and Efficiency of Red Blood Cell Products in Transfusions. Date: March 4... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed...

  15. Progress in research, April 1, 1991--March 31, 1992, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1992-06-01

    Reports on research activities, facility operation, and facility development of the Texas A and M Cyclotron Institute for the period 1 April 1991--31 March 1992 are presented in this document. During the report period, the ECR-K500 Cyclotron Combination operated 4,377 hours. Of this time, 832 hours was used for beam development, 942 hours was used for tuning and optics, and the beam was available for experiments 2,603 hours. This time was used in a variety of studies including elastic and inelastic scattering, projectile break-up, the production and decay of giant resonances, fusion and fission dynamics, intermediate mass fragment emission, e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} production and molecular dissociation. In addition, studies of surfaces and metastable states in highly charged ions were carried out using the ECR source. Completion of two 19-element BaF{sub 2} arrays, of the focal plane detector for the proton spectrometer and installation of the HiLi multidetector have provided significant new experimental capabilities which have been further enhanced by major additions to the computer network. Progress on the Mass Achromat Recoil Spectrometer (MARS) is such that first operation of that device should occur this summer. Funding for installation of the MDM spectrometer was obtained at the beginning of this year. As this report is being completed, the Enge Split Pole Spectrometer is being disassembled and removed to make room for the MDM spectrometer. The split-pole will be shipped to CEBAF for use in experiments there. Installation of the MDM should be completed within the next year. Also expected in the next year is a 92 element plastic-CsI ball.

  16. Preliminary production of 211At at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas Michael; Bhakta, Vihar; Al-Harbi, Abeer; Hackemack, Michael; Tabacaru, Gabriel; Tribble, Robert; Shankar, Sriram; Akabani, Gamal

    2014-07-01

    A feasibility study for the production of the alpha particle-emitting radionuclide At was performed at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute as part of the Interdisciplinary Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program. The mission of this program centers upon the production of radionuclides for use in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine with the primary focus on development of novel therapeutic strategies. As a first step in establishing this program, two goals were outlined: (i) verify production of At and compare results to published data, and (ii) evaluate shielding and radiological safety issues for large-scale implementation using an external target. The radionuclide At was produced via the Bi (α, 2n) At reaction using the K500 cyclotron. Two experiments were conducted, using beam energies of 27.8 MeV and 25.3 MeV, respectively. The resulting yields for At were found to be 36.0 MBq μA h and 12.4 MBq μA h, respectively, which fall within the range of published yield data. Strategies for increasing absolute yield and production efficiency were also evaluated, which focused chiefly on using a new target designed for use with the K150 cyclotron, which will enable the use of a higher beam current. Finally, neutron and gamma dose rates during production were evaluated by using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. It was determined that a simple structure consisting of 4-in thick borated polyethylene will reduce the neutron dose rate within the cyclotron production vault by approximately a factor of 2, thereby decreasing activation of equipment.

  17. Genetics Home Reference: progressive familial heart block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... in my area? Other Names for This Condition bundle branch block HBBD hereditary bundle branch defect hereditary bundle branch ... defect TeensHealth from Nemours: Arrhythmias Texas Heart Institute: Bundle Branch Block Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (3 links) American ...

  18. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group: An Integrated Network for Congenital Heart Disease Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Sara K; Jacobs, Jeffrey P; Farber, Gregory K; Bertoch, David; Blume, Elizabeth D; Burns, Kristin M; Campbell, Robert; Chang, Anthony C; Chung, Wendy K; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Curtis, Lesley H; Forrest, Christopher B; Gaynor, William J; Gaies, Michael G; Go, Alan S; Henchey, Paul; Martin, Gerard R; Pearson, Gail; Pemberton, Victoria L; Schwartz, Steven M; Vincent, Robert; Kaltman, Jonathan R

    2016-04-05

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a working group in January 2015 to explore issues related to an integrated data network for congenital heart disease research. The overall goal was to develop a common vision for how the rapidly increasing volumes of data captured across numerous sources can be managed, integrated, and analyzed to improve care and outcomes. This report summarizes the current landscape of congenital heart disease data, data integration methodologies used across other fields, key considerations for data integration models in congenital heart disease, and the short- and long-term vision and recommendations made by the working group. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  19. The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. B.; Gulick, S. P.; Allison, M. A.; Goff, J. A.; Duncan, D. D.; Saustrup, S.

    2011-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers an intensive three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring-summer intersession. Now in year five, the course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in data acquisition, processing, interpretation, and visualization. Techniques covered include high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, several types of sediment coring, grab sampling, and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples (e.g., core description, grain size analysis, x-radiography, etc.). Students seek to understand coastal and sedimentary processes of the Gulf Coast and continental shelf through application of these techniques in an exploratory mode. Students participate in an initial three days of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area (which changes each year) along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work. In the field, students rotate between two small research vessels: one vessel, the 22' aluminum-hulled R/V Lake Itasca, owned and operated by UTIG, is used principally for multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and sediment sampling; the other, NOAA's R/V Manta or the R/V Acadiana, operated by the Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium, is used primarily for high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, gravity coring, and vibracoring. While at sea, students assist with survey design, learn instrumentation set up, acquisition parameters, data quality control, and safe instrument deployment and retrieval. In teams of three, students work in onshore field labs preparing sediment samples for particle size analysis and initial data processing. During the course's final week, teams

  20. The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, D.; Davis, M. B.; Goff, J. A.; Gulick, S. P. S.; McIntosh, K. D.; Saustrup, S., Sr.

    2014-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, part of the Jackson School of Geosciences, annually offers a three-week marine geology and geophysics field course during the spring-summer intersession. The course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, several types of sediment coring, grab sampling, and the sedimentology of resulting seabed samples. Students participate in an initial three days of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work. Our field sites at Port Aransas, and Galveston, TX, and Grand Isle, LA, provide ideal locations for students to investigate coastal processes of the Gulf Coast and continental shelf through application of geophysical techniques in an exploratory mode. At sea, students assist with survey design and instrumentation set up while learning about acquisition parameters, data quality control, trouble-shooting, and safe instrument deployment and retrieval. In teams of four, students work in onshore field labs preparing sediment samples for particle size analysis and data processing. During the course's final week, teams return to the classroom where they integrate, interpret, and visualize data in a final project using industry-standard software such as Echos, Landmark, Caris, and Fledermaus. The course concludes with a series of final presentations and discussions in which students examine geologic history and/or sedimentary processes represented by the Gulf Coast continental shelf with academic and industry supporters. Students report a greater understanding of marine geology and geophysics through the course's intensive, hands-on, team approach and low instructor to student ratio (sixteen

  1. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Small Business Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt W. Marek, PhD

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Small companies working to develop products in the cardiovascular space face numerous challenges, from regulatory, intellectual property, and reimbursement barriers to securing funds to keep the lights on and reach the next development milestone. Most small companies that spin out from universities have the scientific knowledge, but product development expertise and business acumen are also needed to be successful. Other challenges include reduced interest in early-stage technologies and limited deal flow for cardiovascular products. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI small business program is a comprehensive ecosystem designed to address these critical challenges and to provide resources and expertise to assist early-stage companies developing cardiovascular and other products within the institute’s mission. This article describes steps that NHLBI has taken to enhance our small business program to more effectively translate basic discoveries into commercial products to benefit patients and public health, including enhancing internal expertise and developing nonfinancial resources to assist small businesses as they develop their products and seek private sector investment and partnership.

  2. Chocolate Consumption is Inversely Associated with Prevalent Coronary Heart Disease: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoussé, Luc; Hopkins, Paul N.; North, Kari E.; Pankow, James S.; Arnett, Donna K.; Ellison, R. Curtis

    2010-01-01

    Background and Aims Epidemiologic studies have suggested beneficial effects of flavonoids on cardiovascular disease. Cocoa and particularly dark chocolate are rich in flavonoids and recent studies have demonstrated blood pressure lowering effects of dark chocolate. However, limited data are available on the association of chocolate consumption and the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). We sought to examine the association between chocolate consumption and prevalent CHD. Methods We studied in a cross-sectional design 4,970 participants aged 25 to 93 years who participated in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Family Heart Study. Chocolate intake was assessed through a semi-quantitative food frequency questionnaire. We used generalized estimating equations to estimate adjusted odds ratios. Results Compared to subjects who did not report any chocolate intake, odds ratios (95% CI) for CHD were 1.01 (0.76-1.37), 0.74 (0.56-0.98), and 0.43 (0.28-0.67) for subjects consuming 1-3 times/month, 1-4 times/week, and 5+ times/week, respectively (p for trend chocolate candy intake, linolenic acid intake, smoking, alcohol intake, exercise, and fruit and vegetables. Consumption of non-chocolate candy was associated with a 49% higher prevalence of CHD comparing 5+/week vs. 0/week [OR=1.49 (0.96-2.32)]. Conclusions These data suggest that consumption of chocolate is inversely related with prevalent CHD in a general population. PMID:20858571

  3. 77 FR 16246 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-20

    ....233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  4. 76 FR 2128 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-12

    ... Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: January 6...

  5. 78 FR 9708 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-11

    ... Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 5, 2013...

  6. 75 FR 57971 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-23

    .... 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  7. 77 FR 30541 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ....233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  8. 76 FR 71580 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-18

    .... 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  9. 77 FR 59939 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-01

    .... 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  10. 78 FR 12073 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-21

    .... 93.233, National Center for ] Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  11. 78 FR 37836 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-24

    ....233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  12. 78 FR 63995 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-25

    ....233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  13. 77 FR 61421 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-09

    ... Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: October 2, 2012...

  14. 78 FR 17937 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-25

    ....233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  15. 77 FR 50517 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: August 15, 2012...

  16. 76 FR 29254 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: May 16...

  17. 77 FR 21787 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute: Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    .... 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  18. 77 FR 31863 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-30

    .... 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  19. 78 FR 32408 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-30

    .... 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  20. 78 FR 42970 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    .... 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  1. 77 FR 12599 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    ....233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  2. 76 FR 70462 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-14

    ... Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: November 7, 2011...

  3. 76 FR 71986 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    .... 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  4. 75 FR 34461 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: June 11, 2010...

  5. 78 FR 19725 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-02

    ... Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: March 27, 2013...

  6. 78 FR 55268 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-10

    ....233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of...

  7. 76 FR 30371 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-25

    ...). Contact Person: Shelley S. Sehnert, PhD, Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review/DERA..., (Virtual Meeting). Contact Person: Shelley S. Sehnert, PhD., Scientific Review Officer, Office of...: Shelley S. Sehnert, PhD., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review/DERA, National Heart...

  8. Texas motorcycle crash countermeasure workshop.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-01

    The Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) contracted with the Texas A&M : Transportation Institute (TTI) to develop a 5-year strategic plan for improving motorcycle safety : in the State of Texas. The Texas Strategic Action Plan for Motorcycl...

  9. Emerging Research Directions in Adult Congenital Heart Disease: A Report from a National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/Adult Congenital Heart Association Working Group

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurvitz, Michelle; Burns, Kristin M.; Brindis, Ralph; Broberg, Craig S.; Daniels, Curt J.; Fuller, Stephanie M.P.N.; Honein, Margaret A.; Khairy, Paul; Kuehl, Karen S.; Landzberg, Michael J.; Mahle, William T.; Mann, Douglas L.; Marelli, Ariane; Newburger, Jane W.; Pearson, Gail D.; Starling, Randall C.; Tringali, Glenn R.; Valente, Anne Marie; Wu, Joseph C.; Califf, Robert M.

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) is the most common birth defect, affecting about 0.8% of live births. Advances in recent decades have allowed >85% of children with CHD to survive to adulthood, creating a growing population of adults with CHD. Little information exists regarding survival, demographics, late outcomes, and comorbidities in this emerging group, and multiple barriers impede research in adult CHD (ACHD). The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the Adult Congenital Heart Association convened a multidisciplinary Working Group to identify high-impact research questions in ACHD. This report summarizes the meeting discussions in the broad areas of CHD-related heart failure, vascular disease and multisystem complications. High-priority subtopics identified included heart failure in tetralogy of Fallot, mechanical circulatory support/transplantation, sudden cardiac death, vascular outcomes in coarctation of the aorta, late outcomes in single ventricle disease, cognitive and psychiatric issues, and pregnancy. PMID:27102511

  10. Cogeneration institutional study in the Geismar, LA, and Orange, Texas areas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1978-12-01

    The objective of this report is to provide a better understanding of the institutional problems involved in the use of coal-fueled cogeneration. The viewpoints of industry, utilities, and government were probed extensively through indepth confidential interviews. To provide a real-life basis for this investigation, two existing industrial sites in the Gulf Coast area were studied. The projected effects of the installation of coal-burning cogeneration plants supplying steam and electricity to several industries, replacing existing oil and gas burning boilers, were studied for each site. This report provides insights into the overall institutional problem that will be useful at other locations. It covers the regulatory, economic, financial, engineering, operating, contractual, and corporate relations aspects of cogeneration. It concludes with suggestions for future action by the Federal government, state governments, industries, and utilities that should be helpful in removing the institutional constraints that are retarding cogeneration installations and the use of coal.

  11. Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Working Group: An Integrated Network for Congenital Heart Disease Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasquali, Sara K.; Jacobs, Jeffrey P.; Farber, Gregory K.; Bertoch, David; Blume, Elizabeth D.; Burns, Kristin M.; Campbell, Robert; Chang, Anthony C.; Chung, Wendy K.; Riehle-Colarusso, Tiffany; Curtis, Lesley H.; Forrest, Christopher B.; Gaynor, William J.; Gaies, Michael G.; Go, Alan S.; Henchey, Paul; Martin, Gerard R.; Pearson, Gail; Pemberton, Victoria L.; Schwartz, Steven M.; Vincent, Robert; Kaltman, Jonathan R.

    2016-01-01

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute convened a Working Group in January 2015 to explore issues related to an integrated data network for congenital heart disease (CHD) research. The overall goal was to develop a common vision for how the rapidly increasing volumes of data captured across numerous sources can be managed, integrated, and analyzed to improve care and outcomes. This report summarizes the current landscape of CHD data, data integration methodologies used across other fields, key considerations for data integration models in CHD, and the short- and long-term vision and recommendations made by the Working Group. PMID:27045129

  12. Institutional Goal Priorities in Texas: A Look at an Associate Degree Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leon, John E.

    A study examined the perceptions of four key constituent groups from the Southeast College Associate Degree Nursing (ADN) program regarding institutional goal priorities. (Southeast College manages the ADN program for the Houston Community College System.) The study involved 23 ADN faculty, 13 college administrators, 128 ADN students, and 5 ADN…

  13. AN ANALYSIS OF VALVULAR HEART DISEASE BY ECHOCARDIOGRAPHY- A TERTIARY CARE INSTITUTE STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perumal Jaisankar

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Diseases of heart valves constitute a major cause of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality worldwide. In developing countries, Rheumatic Heart Disease (RHD continues to be the predominant form of valvular heart disease. The current study was undertaken at a Tertiary Care Institute with an objective of establishing distribution and different patterns of valvular heart diseases by echocardiography. MATERIALS AND METHODS 17,625 consecutive first time Echocardiograms performed between January 2016 and December 2016 were analysed. Echo was performed by consultant cardiologists using Philips HD11XE and Aloka SSD4000 machine following ASE guidelines. Applying exclusion criteria of trivial and functional regurgitant lesions yielded a total of 632 cases of organic valvular heart diseases. RESULTS In our study 632 patients were diagnosed with valvular heart disease, out of which 428 patients (67.7% were diagnosed with Rheumatic Heart Disease. Mitral valve was the most commonly affected followed by aortic and tricuspid valves. The least commonly affected valve was pulmonary valve. In Rheumatic heart disease, most common isolated lesion reported was MS with MR, most commonly reported in females between 21 - 40 years’ age group. CONCLUSION In non-RHD group, mitral valve prolapse (21.3% was the commonest lesion reported followed by calcific degenerative aortic valve (6.17% and congenital bicuspid aortic valve (3.4%; 118 patients were reported with multivalvular lesion. MS + MR + AR was the commonest multivalvular lesion found in 65 patients (55.08%.

  14. Institutional Cost Comparison Between Heart Transplants and Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chimanji, Neeraj; Kilic, Arman; Hasan, Ayesha; Higgins, Robert S D; Whitson, Bryan A; Kilic, Ahmet

    2016-12-01

    Increased numbers of end-stage heart failure patients and improved technology have led to increased use of left ventricular assist devices as a viable alternative to heart transplants. Given the current economic climate, we compared costs of heart transplant versus device placement. Medical records of patients who received heart transplants or left ventricular assist devices were cross-referenced with institutional financial data. The device cohort was limited to those receiving durable (not temporary) devices. Index admission, 1-year readmission, and overall 1-year charges were compared using standard statistical methods. Of 184 identified patients with end-stage heart failure surgical therapy, 121 received left ventricular assist devices, 43 had heart transplants, and 20 received left ventricular assist devices as bridge to heart transplant; these latter patients were excluded from our analyses. At index admission, mean charges were $863 433 ± $398 427 for device patients and $725 877 ± $488 685 for transplant patients (P = .05). One-year mean readmission rates were similar (4.65/transplant patient and 4.53/device patient; P = .94), with corresponding 1-year survival rates of 87.8% and 78.0% (P = .04). Total readmission charges during year 1 were $169 732 ± $242 366 for device patients and $201 682 ± $297 565 for transplant patients (P = .08), with corresponding overall charges at 1 year of $1 029 732 ± $450 498 and $927 559 ± $562 404 (P = .49). During the first year, heart transplant and left ventricular assist device placement have similar costs. Initial index admission costs seem to favor heart transplant, with device pump costs accounting for some of the difference. From a 1-year survival perspective, heart transplant may be more effective; however, with lack of suitable donors, left ventricular assist devices are valuable in the armamentarium of advanced heart failure surgical options.

  15. The Montreal Heart Institute: the idea and the man behind it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grondin, Claude M

    2005-10-01

    The Montreal Heart Institute (MHI) opened on January 11, 1954. It was the work of a single individual, a young cardiologist with a vision. Paul David (1919-1999) trained in the late 1940s -- first, in Boston with Paul Dudley White and, second, in Paris with Jean Lenègre, two of the well-known cardiologists of the times. In the early 1950s, the only heart institute in the world was the one that Ignacio Chavez had founded in Mexico in 1944. Montreal had a medical institute of its own, the Montreal Neurological Institute, which Wilder Penfield had established in 1934. David probably got his inspiration from these two institutions. Two events also coincided somewhat at the time. In 1950, David attended the first meeting of the International Society of Cardiology in Paris where Alfred Blalock presented his experience with his operation for blue babies and Charles Bailey discussed valvular commissurotomy for mitral stenosis. Shortly after he returned from France, David was approached by the Sisters of Charity to lead the cardiology division of a new hospital under construction in Montreal. The young man, barely out of residency, insisted on having a full floor of the hospital to himself with complete administrative independence from the main hospital. He also indicated that he would call the place a Heart Institute, no less. The nuns took him seriously and, after two or three encounters, agreed with his requests, perhaps much to his surprise. The rest, as they say, is history.

  16. 75 FR 66771 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-29

    ... Cancer and COPD. Date: November 19, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant.... Time: 6 p.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place: Embassy Suites at the..., Scientific Review Officer, Office of Scientific Review, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, 6701...

  17. 76 FR 37134 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... Enhancement Grants for Stem Cell Research. Date: July 25, 2011. Time: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Blood Institute Special Emphasis Panel, Short Term Research Training Program. Date: July 20, 2011. Time... Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research...

  18. 78 FR 12767 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-25

    ... Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: February 15, 2013... Programs in Lung Diseases. Date: March 13, 2013. Time: 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. Agenda: To review and...

  19. Progress in research, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    This Institute annual report for the period 1 April 1992--31 March 1993 covers a period which has seen the initial runs of three new spectrometers which constitute a major portion of the new detection capabilities developed for this facility. These devices are the Proton Spectrometer (PSP), the Mass Achromat Recoil Mass Spectrometer (MARS), and the Multipole dipole Multipole (MDM) Particle Spectrometer. These devices are now available to pursue the studies of Gamow Teller states, reactions of astrophysical interest, and giant resonance studies for which they were constructed, as well as for other experiments. A beam analysis system which will deliver high resolution beams to the MDM spectrometer is currently under construction. With the completion of these spectrometer projects, the facility emphasis is now focused on the development of the full capabilities of the K500 cyclotron and on the research program. During the report period, the ECR-K500 cyclotron combination operated 5,849 hours. Theoretical work reported in this document ranges from nuclear structure calculations using the IBM-2 model to calculations of kaon production and the in-medium properties of the rho and phi mesons, the latter as a probe of the QCD phase transition. Nuclear dynamics and exotic shapes and fragmentation modes of hot nuclei are also addressed. In atomic physics, new measurements of x-ray emission from highly ionized ions, of molecular dissociation and of surface interactions are reported.

  20. Progress in research April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-07-01

    The period 1 April 1993--31 March 1994 has seen a number of significant developments of the research program as will be noted by the large increase in individual projects reviewed in this annual report. Among the highlights of the K500 experimental program in Sections 1, 2, and 4 are the investigations of excitation energy deposition and of fission dynamics employing both GDR and particle emission probes, measurements of isospin equilibration, studies of (d, {sup 2}He) reactions with the proton spectrometer and of the {beta} decay of {sup 57}Cu with MARS, and the precise studies of ionic charge state distributions using x-ray measurements. Progress in theoretical studies of the nuclear spectral function and the decay of many body systems, on the properties of mesons in hot hadronic matter and on the determination of astrophysical S-factors from experimental studies of very peripheral reactions are presented in Section 3. The status of the LAMPF based MEGA experiment and of the CERN based NA66 experiment, both of which involve institute scientists, is also briefly presented in this report. The shift to a seven day a week operation coupled with installation of cryopanels and more careful temperature control of the cooling water system have resulted in significant improvements in the operational efficiency and beam capabilities. Operating statistics are presented in Section 5.

  1. [30 years heart transplantation program in Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine in Prague].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hošková, Lenka; Málek, Ivan; Melenovský, Vojtěch; Podzimková, Marianna; Hegarová, Markéta; Dorazilová, Zora; Kautzner, Josef; Netuka, Ivan; Pirk, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Heart transplantation has become in recent decades an established method for the treatment of advanced heart failure. Precisely, it was in January 2014 when 30 years have passed since the start of clinical heart transplantation program at the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine. 936 heart transplants were performed by the end of 2013. The transplant program has reached considerable development since its beginnings. The knowledge of whole issue has deepened, indication criteria have been extended, new immunosuppressives are available and many of them are still in research. Life expectancy of patients has been prolonged and quality of life has improved. Nevertheless, the care of transplant patient is very complicated task for medical professionals and brings a lot of problems to solve.

  2. Acculturation and self-reported health among Hispanics using a socio-behavioral model: the North Texas Healthy Heart Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fulda Kimberly G

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acculturation is a continuous, firsthand contact with other cultures functioning at both group and individual levels and is reflected in our culturally diverse society, calling for a greater understanding of the environmental and cultural impact on health. Self-reported health (SRH, a robust and well validated predictor of future mortality for all racial/ethnic groups, has been differentially reported by Hispanics compared to whites, especially based on their acculturation status. This study investigated the relationship between acculturation and SRH among Hispanics. An adapted Andersen framework was used to develop logistic regression models to assess for an association between acculturation and general health status. Methods Hispanic participants (n = 135, as part of the North Texas Healthy Heart Study, were administered standardized questionnaires on acculturation, psychosocial measures which included sense of control, stress, depression and social support and a single item SRH measure. In addition, physiological measurements and demographic characteristics including age, gender, body mass index, medical history, and socioeconomic status were also obtained. Results Bivariate analyses found Mexican-oriented participants 3.16 times more likely to report fair/poor SRH compared to Anglo-oriented Hispanics. Acculturation was also associated with SRH in multiple regression models controlling for enabling, need, and predisposing factors together (OR: 3.53, 95% CI: 1.04, 11.97. Conclusions Acculturation status was associated with SRH after accounting for other underlying factors. Medical and public health professionals should promote the use of acculturation measures in order to better understand its role in Hispanic behaviors, health outcomes and health care use. Such research findings will contribute to the design of culturally sensitive prevention and treatment strategies for diverse and immigrant populations.

  3. A university system's approach to enhancing the educational mission of health science schools and institutions: the University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buja, L. Maximilian; Cox, Susan M.; Lieberman, Steven A.; MacClements, Jonathan; Williams, Janet F.; Esterl, Robert M.; Shine, Kenneth I.

    2013-01-01

    Background The academy movement developed in the United States as an important approach to enhance the educational mission and facilitate the recognition and work of educators at medical schools and health science institutions. Objectives Academies initially formed at individual medical schools. Educators and leaders in The University of Texas System (the UT System, UTS) recognized the academy movement as a means both to address special challenges and pursue opportunities for advancing the educational mission of academic health sciences institutions. Methods The UTS academy process was started by the appointment of a Chancellor's Health Fellow for Education in 2004. Subsequently, the University of Texas Academy of Health Science Education (UTAHSE) was formed by bringing together esteemed faculty educators from the six UTS health science institutions. Results Currently, the UTAHSE has 132 voting members who were selected through a rigorous, system-wide peer review and who represent multiple professional backgrounds and all six campuses. With support from the UTS, the UTAHSE has developed and sustained an annual Innovations in Health Science Education conference, a small grants program and an Innovations in Health Science Education Award, among other UTS health science educational activities. The UTAHSE represents one university system's innovative approach to enhancing its educational mission through multi- and interdisciplinary as well as inter-institutional collaboration. Conclusions The UTAHSE is presented as a model for the development of other consortia-type academies that could involve several components of a university system or coalitions of several institutions. PMID:23490406

  4. Proceedings of second geopressured geothermal energy conference, Austin, Texas, February 23--25, 1976. Volume V. Legal, institutional, and environmental

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanston, J.H.; Elmer, D.B.; Gustavson, T.C.; Kreitler, C.W.; Letlow, K.; Lopreato, S.C.; Meriwether, M.; Ramsey, P.; Rogers, K.E.; Williamson, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    Three separate abstracts were prepared for Volume V of the Proceedings of the Conference. Sections are entitled: Legal Issues in the Development of Geopressured--Geothermal Resources of Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast; The Development of Geothermal Energy in the Gulf Coast; Socio-economic, Demographic, and Political Considerations; and Geothermal Resources of the Texas Gulf Coast--Environmental Concerns arising from the Production and Disposal of Geothermal waters. (MCW)

  5. Transforming Developmental Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Developmental Education, 2014

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, with support from the Texas Legislature, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board has funded various developmental education initiatives, including research and evaluation efforts, to help Texas public institutions of higher education provide more effective programs and services to underprepared students. Based on evaluation…

  6. Trends and variations in breast and colorectal cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011: a comparative study between Texas Cancer Registry and National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zheyu; Zhang, Yefei; Franzin, Luisa; Cormier, Janice N; Chan, Wenyaw; Xu, Hua; Du, Xianglin L

    2015-04-01

    Few studies have examined the cancer incidence trends in the state of Texas, and no study has ever been conducted to compare the temporal trends of breast and colorectal cancer incidence in Texas with those of the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) in the United States. This study aimed to conduct a parallel comparison between the Texas Cancer Registry and the National Cancer Institute's SEER on cancer incidence from 1995 to 2011. A total of 951,899 breast and colorectal cancer patients were included. Age-adjusted breast cancer incidence was 134.74 per 100,000 in Texas and 131.78 per 100,000 in SEER in 1995-2011, whereas age-adjusted colorectal cancer incidence was 50.52 per 100,000 in Texas and 49.44 per 100,000 in SEER. Breast cancer incidence increased from 1995 to 2001, decreased from 2002 to 2006, and then remained relatively stable from 2007 to 2011. For colorectal cancer, the incidence increased in 1995-1997, and then decreased continuously from 1998 to 2011 in Texas and SEER areas. Incidence rates and relative risks by age, gender and ethnicity were identical between Texas and SEER.

  7. 1978 Army Library Institute, 22-26 May 1978. Fort Bliss, Texas. A report of the Proceedings

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-10-01

    Range._ Your host for this grand tour is Mr. Glenn Wilson, Sergeants Major Academy Learnvng Resources Center, Fort Bliss.) CAREER DAY SESSION 9...CA 93941 MINTER, Lyle W. Post Library Vint Hill Farms Station Warrenton, VA 22186 MORENO, Esperanza University Library University of Texas at El

  8. High Survival and Mortality Characteristics in Heart Transplant Patients at a National Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, Christian; De la Cruz-Ku, Gabriel; Yassen, Amr; Valcarcel-Valdivia, Bryan

    2017-07-11

    The identification of variables related to the survival of heart transplant patients is vital for a good medical practice. Few studies have examined this issue in a Latin American population. Therefore, the aim of this study was to analyze, retrospectively, the survival and mortality characteristics of patients after heart transplant. Information on patients was obtained through review of medical records; we collected information on all patients who underwent this procedure from 2010 to 2015. Sociodemographic, clinical, and surgical characteristics associated with posttransplant mortality were analyzed. Survival over 5 years was determined with the Kaplan-Meier method. The overall survival rate of the 35 patients who underwent heart transplant was 85%. Those with low total cholesterol values (survival at 5 years than patients with higher values (74% vs 100%; P = .044). The overall mortality was 14.3%, and the main cause of death was acutegraft rejection (40%). Lower total cholesterol level ( 600 mL; P = .013), and number of sepsis incidents (P = .03) were more frequent in patients who died. The survival in our institute at 5 years is higher than shown in the reported literature, and the mortality is lower. In addition, a low total cholesterol value negatively affects survival of heart transplant patients at 5 years.

  9. HeartMate II Left Ventricular Assist Device Pump Exchange: A Single-Institution Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaikh, Asad F; Joseph, Susan M; Lima, Brian; Hall, Shelley A; Malyala, Rajasekhar; Rafael, Aldo E; Gonzalez-Stawinski, Gonzalo V; Chamogeorgakis, Themistokles

    2017-08-01

    Background  Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) have revolutionized the treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure. These devices are replaced when pump complications arise if heart transplant is not possible. We present our experience with HeartMate II (HMII (Thoratec, Plesanton, California, United States)) LVAD pump exchange. Materials and Methods  We retrospectively reviewed all cases that required pump exchange due to LVAD complication from November 2011 until June 2016 at a single high-volume institution. The indications, demographics, and outcome were extracted and analyzed. Results  Of 250 total patients with implanted HMII LVADs, 16 (6%) required pump exchange during the study period. The initial indications for LVAD placement in these patients were bridge to transplantation ( n  = 6 [37.5%]) or destination therapy ( n  = 10 [62.5%]). Fifteen patients (93.8%) required pump exchange due to pump thrombosis and 1 (6.2%) due to refractory driveline infection. Nine patients (56.2%) underwent repeat median sternotomy while a left subcostal approach was used in the remaining seven patients. Fifteen patients (93.7%) survived until hospital discharge. During the follow-up period (median, 155 days), 11 patients remained alive and 4 of these underwent successful cardiac transplantation. Conclusion  HMII LVAD pump exchange can be safely performed for driveline infection or pump thrombosis when heart transplantation is not an option. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Dietary linolenic acid is inversely associated with plasma triacylglycerol: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djoussé, Luc; Hunt, Steven C; Arnett, Donna K; Province, Michael A; Eckfeldt, John H; Ellison, R Curtis

    2003-12-01

    Dietary intake of linolenic acid is associated with a decreased risk of cardiovascular disease mortality. However, the mechanisms by which dietary linolenic acid affects cardiovascular disease risk are not clearly understood. We examined the association between dietary linolenic acid and plasma triacylglycerol concentrations. In a cross-sectional design, we studied 4440 white subjects (2036 men and 2404 women) aged 25-93 y who participated in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study. We used generalized linear models to estimate adjusted mean triacylglycerol concentrations according to categories of total dietary linolenic acid (alpha- and gamma-linolenic acid) intake. The mean dietary linolenic acid intakes were 0.81 and 0.69 g/d for the men and the women, respectively. High consumption of dietary linolenic acid was associated with young age; high intakes of energy, fat, carbohydrates, fruit, vegetables, and fish; low HDL cholesterol; current smoking; and frequent consumption of creamy salad dressing. High consumption of dietary linolenic acid was also associated with low plasma triacylglycerol concentrations. From the lowest to the highest quintile of linolenic acid intake, the multivariate-adjusted mean triacylglycerol concentrations were 1.75 (95% CI: 1.65, 1.85), 1.74 (1.66, 1.82), 1.69 (1.61, 1.77), 1.66 (1.58, 1.74), and 1.54 (1.44, 1.64) mmol/L, respectively (P for linear trend = 0.007). When linolenic acid was used as a continuous variable, the corresponding regression coefficient was -0.2811 (-0.4922, -0.07001). Consumption of total linolenic acid is inversely related to plasma triacylglycerol concentrations in both white men and white women. This suggests a pathway by which dietary linolenic acid might reduce cardiovascular disease risk.

  11. 2015 proceedings of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine symposium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spitalnik, Steven L.; Triulzi, Darrell; Devine, Dana V.; Dzik, Walter H.; Eder, Anne F.; Gernsheimer, Terry; Josephson, Cassandra D.; Kor, Daryl J.; Luban, Naomi L. C.; Roubinian, Nareg H.; Mondoro, Traci; Welniak, Lisbeth A.; Zou, Shimian; Glynn, Simone; Hendrickson, Jeanne; Zimring, James C.; Yazdanbakhsh, Karina; Delaney, Megan; Ware, Russell E.; Tinmouth, Alan; Doctor, Allan; Migliaccio, Anna Rita; Fergusson, Dean A.; Widness, John A.; Carson, Jeffrey L.; Hess, John; Roback, John D.; Waters, Jonathan H.; Cancelas, Jose A.; Gladwin, Mark T.; Rogers, Mary A. M.; Ness, Paul M.; Rao, Sunil; Watkins, Timothy R.; Spinella, Philip C.; Kaufman, Richard M.; Slichter, Sherrill J.; McCullough, Jeffrey; Blumberg, Neil; Webert, Kathryn E.; Fitzpatrick, Michael; Shander, Aryeh; Corash, Laurence M.; Murphy, Michael; Silberstein, Leslie E.; Dumont, Larry J.; Mitchell, W. Beau; Macdonald, Victor W.; Hoffmeister, Karin M.; Italiano, Joseph E.; Gupta, Anirban Sen; Wu, Yanyun; Cap, Andrew P.; Li, Renhao; Goodrich, Raymond P.; Morrell, Craig N.; Semple, John W.; Kahr, Walter H. A.; Tanaka, Ken; Haas, Thorsten; Sperry, Jason L.; Callum, Jeannie L.; Porte, Robert J.; Mallett, Sue; Gajic, Ognjen; Juffermans, Nicole P.; Karam, Oliver; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.; Looney, Mark R.; Inaba, Ken; Shaz, Beth H.; Hunt, Beverly J.; Cohen, Mitchell J.; Kitchens, Craig S.; Stanworth, Simon J.; Bryant, Barbara J.; Kiss, Joseph E.; Busch, Michael P.; Dodd, Roger Y.; Heddle, Nancy M.; Spencer, Bryan R.; Keller, Anthony J.; Germain, Marc; Goldman, Mindy; Tomasulo, Peter A.; de Kort, Wim; Mast, Alan E.; Francis, Richard O.

    2015-01-01

    On March 25 and 26, 2015, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute sponsored a meeting on the State of the Science in Transfusion Medicine on the National Institutes of Health (NIH) campus in Bethesda, Maryland, which was attended by a diverse group of 330 registrants. The meeting's goal was to

  12. Sociodemographic and clinical profile of children with congenital heart disease assisted at a hospital institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirna Albuquerque Frota

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize the sociodemographic and clinical profile of children with congenital heart disease assisted at a hospital institution. Methods: A descriptive, crosssectional study conducted in the pediatric cardiology outpatient clinic of a hospital in Fortaleza, CE, Brazil, in the period from March to August 2012. It comprised a nonrandom convenience sample of 80 parents of children with heart disease aged 5 to 12 years. Information was obtained from primary data of medical records and through questionnaires covering the parent’s sociodemographic characteristics, family data and the children’s clinical aspects. Results: Regarding socioeconomic data, 77 (96.2% caregivers were female, 50 (62.5% were married or in a stable relationship, 39 (48.7% had 10-12 years of formal education, and 69 (82.6% reported a household income between 1 and 2 minimum wages. In the sample of children studied, 43 (53.8% were female. The median age of the children was 8.4 years, ranging from 5-13 years. As to the age at the heart disease diagnosis, 44 (55% occurred under the age of 6 months, regardless of the type of cardiopathy. It was detected that 19 (23.75% were related to the disease. Conclusion: Children’s caregivers were predominantly their mothers, with low income and satisfactory schooling. Early diagnosis was predominant, mainly among the children with cyanotic cardiopathy. doi:10.5020/18061230.2014.p239

  13. Texas Pulse Oximetry Project: A Multicenter Educational and Quality Improvement Project for Implementation of Critical Congenital Heart Disease Screening Using Pulse Oximetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillory, Charleta; Gong, Alice; Livingston, Judith; Creel, Liza; Ocampo, Elena; McKee-Garrett, Tiffany

    2017-07-01

    Objective  Critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) is a leading cause of death in infants. Newborn screening (NBS) by pulse oximetry allows early identification of CCHD in asymptomatic newborns. To improve readiness of hospital neonatal birthing facilities for mandatory screening in Texas, an educational and quality improvement (QI) project was piloted to identify an implementation strategy for CCHD NBS in a range of birthing hospitals. Study Design  Thirteen Texas hospitals implemented standardized CCHD screening by pulse oximetry. An educational program was devised and a tool kit was created to facilitate education and implementation. Newborn nursery nurses' knowledge was assessed using a pre- and posttest instrument. Results  The nurses' knowledge assessment improved from 71 to 92.5% ( p  educational program, including a tool kit, QI processes, and standardized pulse oximetry CCHD NBS, is applicable for a range of hospital birthing facilities and may facilitate wide-scale implementation, thereby improving newborn health. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  14. The Strength of Family Ties: Perceptions of Network Relationship Quality and Levels of C-Reactive Proteins in the North Texas Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchino, Bert N; Ruiz, John M; Smith, Timothy W; Smyth, Joshua M; Taylor, Daniel J; Allison, Matthew; Ahn, Chul

    2015-10-01

    Although the quality of one's social relationships has been linked to important physical health outcomes, less work has been conducted examining family and friends that differ in their underlying positivity and negativity. The main aim of this study was to examine the association between supportive, aversive, and ambivalent family/friends with levels of C-reactive proteins. Three hundred participants from the North Texas Heart Study completed the social relationships index and a blood draw to assess high-sensitivity C-reactive proteins (hs-CRPs). After standard controls, the number of supportive family members predicted lower hs-CRP levels, whereas the number of ambivalent family members predicted higher hs-CRP levels. These links were independent of depressive symptoms and perceived stress. These data highlight the importance of considering specific types of relationships and their underlying positive and negative aspects in research on social ties and physical health.

  15. An Interpretivism Perspective of Institutional Practices on Allied Health Program Student Retention at Public Community Colleges in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaus, Frances Gayle

    2017-01-01

    Over the past four decades there has been a great amount of research on retention of students in higher education institutions (Tinto, 2006); however, few studies have examined the effect of what institutions provide for student support, regarding retention, specifically allied health program students. Retention of community college students in…

  16. Self-reported racial discrimination, response to unfair treatment, and coronary calcification in asymptomatic adults - the North Texas Healthy Heart study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young Richard

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Accruing evidence supports the hypothesis that psychosocial factors are related to cardiovascular disease. However, a limited number of studies have investigated the pathophysiologic pathways through which these associations occur. The purpose of this study was to assess whether experiences of self-reported racial discrimination and reactions to unfair treatment were associated with coronary artery calcification (CAC, an indicator of subclinical coronary heart disease (CHD. Methods This cross-sectional study recruited 571 subjects (45 years and older who were asymptomatic of CHD from Fort Worth, Texas from 2006 to 2008. Subjects completed a questionnaire, a multi-slice computed tomography scan to assess for CAC presence (measured as Agatston score >0, and serum chemistries. Logistic regression was used to estimate odds ratios (ORs and 95% confidence intervals (CIs for the association between self-reported discrimination and CAC. Results were stratified by response to unfair treatment as it was found to significantly modify the relationship between discrimination and CAC. Results Among those who passively responded to unfair treatment, the odds of having CAC present were approximately 3 times higher for those experiencing discrimination (OR, 2.95; 95% CI, 1.19-7.32 after adjusting for age, gender, race/ethnicity, education, body mass index, hyperlipidemia, smoking status, hypertension, diabetes, and first degree relative with heart disease. Conclusions This is the first multi-racial/ethnic study to find racial discrimination associated with CAC, which differs based on how one responds to unfair treatment.

  17. Severe asthma: lessons learned from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Severe Asthma Research Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarjour, Nizar N; Erzurum, Serpil C; Bleecker, Eugene R; Calhoun, William J; Castro, Mario; Comhair, Suzy A A; Chung, Kian Fan; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Dweik, Raed A; Fain, Sean B; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Gaston, Benjamin M; Israel, Elliot; Hastie, Annette; Hoffman, Eric A; Holguin, Fernando; Levy, Bruce D; Meyers, Deborah A; Moore, Wendy C; Peters, Stephen P; Sorkness, Ronald L; Teague, W Gerald; Wenzel, Sally E; Busse, William W

    2012-02-15

    The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Severe Asthma Research Program (SARP) has characterized over the past 10 years 1,644 patients with asthma, including 583 individuals with severe asthma. SARP collaboration has led to a rapid recruitment of subjects and efficient sharing of samples among participating sites to conduct independent mechanistic investigations of severe asthma. Enrolled SARP subjects underwent detailed clinical, physiologic, genomic, and radiological evaluations. In addition, SARP investigators developed safe procedures for bronchoscopy in participants with asthma, including those with severe disease. SARP studies revealed that severe asthma is a heterogeneous disease with varying molecular, biochemical, and cellular inflammatory features and unique structure-function abnormalities. Priorities for future studies include recruitment of a larger number of subjects with severe asthma, including children, to allow further characterization of anatomic, physiologic, biochemical, and genetic factors related to severe disease in a longitudinal assessment to identify factors that modulate the natural history of severe asthma and provide mechanistic rationale for management strategies.

  18. 77 FR 16844 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-22

    ... Application in Congenital Heart Diseases (R24). Date: April 17, 2012. Time: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review... Assistance Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases ] and Resources Research...

  19. The influence of institutional volume on the incidence of complications and their effect on mortality after heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimm, Joshua C; Kilic, Arman; Shah, Ashish S; Trent Magruder, J; Valero, Vicente; Dungan, Samuel P; Russell, Stuart D; Tedford, Ryan J; Whitman, Glenn J R; Sciortino, Christopher M

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether institutional volume influenced the effect of postoperative complications on short-term and long-term survival after orthotopic heart transplantation (OHT). The United Network for Organ Sharing database was queried for adult patients (aged ≥18 years) undergoing OHT between 2000 and 2010. Average institutional volume was calculated during the study period and modeled as a categoric and as a continuous variable. Postoperative complications included rejection, dialysis dependence, infection, stroke, reoperation, and a composite event. Kaplan-Meier estimates and Cox regression modeling were performed for each complication to categorize the unadjusted and adjusted influence of institutional volume on survival. The analysis included 19,849 OHT recipients who were stratified into low-volume (≤14.5 per year), intermediate-volume (14.5-26.5 per year), and high-volume (>26.5 per year) tertiles. The overall incidences of postoperative complications were 10.2% for rejection, 7.8% for dialysis dependence, 12.0% for reoperation, 24.1% for infection, and 2.3% for stroke. Recipients in low-volume institutions experienced more complications after OHT than high-volume institutions (43.4% vs 36.2%; p incidence and effect on short-term and long-term survival at low-volume institutions. Accordingly, best practice guidelines established at high-volume institutions could better equip lower-volume hospitals to manage these events in hopes of optimizing transplant outcomes. Copyright © 2015 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Association of ideal cardiovascular health and calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Jeremy M; Petrone, Andrew B; Carr, J Jeffrey; Pankow, James S; Hunt, Steven C; Heiss, Gerardo; Arnett, Donna K; Ellison, R Curtis; Gaziano, J Michael; Djoussé, Luc

    2015-03-01

    The American Heart Association (AHA) established recommendations based on 7 ideal health behaviors and factors with the goal of improving cardiovascular health (CVH) and reducing both morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease by 20% by 2020. Few studies have investigated their association with subclinical coronary heart disease. We sought to examine whether the 7 AHA CVH metrics were associated with calcified atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries. In a cross-sectional design, we studied 1,731 predominantly white men and women from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Family Heart Study without prevalent coronary heart disease. Diet was assessed by a semiquantitative food frequency questionnaire. Coronary artery calcium (CAC) was measured by cardiac computed tomography. We defined prevalent CAC using an Agatston score of 100+ and fitted generalized estimating equations to calculate prevalence odds ratios of CAC. Mean age was 56.8 years, and 41% were male. The median number of ideal CVH metrics was 3, and no participant met all 7. There was a strong inverse relationship between number of ideal CVH metrics and prevalent CAC. Odds ratios (95% CI) for CAC of 100+ were 1.0 (reference), 0.37 (0.29-0.45), 0.35 (0.26-0.44), and 0.27 (0.20-0.36) among subjects with 0 to 1, 2, 3, and 4+ ideal CVH metrics, respectively (P = .0001), adjusting for sex, age, field center, alcohol, income, education, and energy consumption. These data demonstrate a strong and graded inverse relationship between AHA ideal CVH metrics and prevalent CAC in adult men and women. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics' Marine Geology and Geophysics Field Course: A Hand-On Education Approach to Applied Geophysics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, M. B.; Goff, J.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Fernandez, R.; Duncan, D.; Saustrup, S.

    2016-12-01

    The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics, Jackson School of Geosciences, offers a 3-week marine geology and geophysics field course. The course provides hands-on instruction and training for graduate and upper-level undergraduate students in high-resolution seismic reflection, CHIRP sub-bottom profiling, multibeam bathymetry, sidescan sonar, and sediment sampling and analysis. Students first participate in 3 days of classroom instruction designed to communicate geological context of the field area along with theoretical and technical background on each field method. The class then travels to the Gulf Coast for a week of at-sea field work at locations that provide an opportunity to investigate coastal and continental shelf processes. Teams of students rotate between UTIG's 26' R/V Scott Petty and NOAA's 82' R/V Manta. They assist with survey design, instrumentation set up, and learn about acquisition, quality control, and safe instrument deployment. Teams also process data and analyze samples in onshore field labs. During the final week teams integrate, interpret, and visualize data in a final project using industry-standard software. The course concludes with team presentations on their interpretations with academic and industry supporters. Students report a greater understanding of marine geology and geophysics through the course's intensive, hands-on, team approach and high instructor/student ratio (sixteen students, three faculty, and three teaching assistants). Post-class, students may incorporate course data in senior honors or graduate thesis and are encouraged to publish and present results at national meetings. This course (to our knowledge) remains the only one of its kind, satisfies field experience requirements for some degree programs, and provides an alternative to land-based field courses. Alumni note the course's applicability to energy, environmental, and geotechnical industries as well as coastal restoration/management fields.

  2. Assessing the scientific research productivity of a Brazilian healthcare institution: a case study at the Heart Institute of São Paulo, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tess, Beatriz Helena; Furuie, Sérgio Shiguemi; Castro, Regina Célia Figueiredo; Barreto, Maria do Carmo Cavarette; Nobre, Moacyr Roberto Cuce

    2009-01-01

    The present study was motivated by the need to systematically assess the research productivity of the Heart Institute (InCor), Medical School of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. To explore methodology for the assessment of institutional scientific research productivity. Bibliometric indicators based on searches for author affiliation of original scientific articles or reviews published in journals indexed in the databases Web of Science, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and SciELO from January 2000 to December 2003 were used in this study. The retrieved records were analyzed according to the index parameters of the journals and modes of access. The number of citations was used to calculate the institutional impact factor. Out of 1253 records retrieved from the five databases, 604 original articles and reviews were analyzed; of these, 246 (41%) articles were published in national journals and 221 (90%) of those were in journals with free online access through SciELO or their own websites. Of the 358 articles published in international journals, 333 (93%) had controlled online access and 223 (67%) were available through the Capes Portal of Journals. The average impact of each article for InCor was 2.224 in the period studied. A simple and practical methodology to evaluate the scientific production of health research institutions includes searches in the LILACS database for national journals and in MEDLINE and the Web of Science for international journals. The institutional impact factor of articles indexed in the Web of Science may serve as a measure by which to assess and review the scientific productivity of a research institution.

  3. Assessing the scientific research productivity of a Brazilian healthcare institution: a case study at the heart institute of São Paulo, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Helena Tess

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: The present study was motivated by the need to systematically assess the research productivity of the Heart Institute (InCor, Medical School of the University of São Paulo, Brazil. OBJECTIVE: To explore methodology for the assessment of institutional scientific research productivity. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Bibliometric indicators based on searches for author affiliation of original scientific articles or reviews published in journals indexed in the databases Web of Science, MEDLINE, EMBASE, LILACS and SciELO from January 2000 to December 2003 were used in this study. The retrieved records were analyzed according to the index parameters of the journals and modes of access. The number of citations was used to calculate the institutional impact factor. RESULTS: Out of 1253 records retrieved from the five databases, 604 original articles and reviews were analyzed; of these, 246 (41% articles were published in national journals and 221 (90% of those were in journals with free online access through SciELO or their own websites. Of the 358 articles published in international journals, 333 (93% had controlled online access and 223 (67% were available through the Capes Portal of Journals. The average impact of each article for InCor was 2.224 in the period studied. CONCLUSION: A simple and practical methodology to evaluate the scientific production of health research institutions includes searches in the LILACS database for national journals and in MEDLINE and the Web of Science for international journals. The institutional impact factor of articles indexed in the Web of Science may serve as a measure by which to assess and review the scientific productivity of a research institution.

  4. Transit Time Flowmetry in Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting-experience at Queen Alia Heart Institute, Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basel Harahsheh

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To assess the results of transit time flowmetry (TTF on a consecutive group of coronary artery bypass grafting (CABG patients at Queen Alia Heart Institute.Methods: Intraoperative flow measurements of a consecutive group of 436 CABG patients. The flow pattern for each coronary artery system was assessed including mean flows, pulsatility index (PI and the need for revision.Results: A total of 1394 grafts in 436 patients were assessed (3.2 grafts per patient, wherein 100 grafts showed inadequate flowmetry results (7.2%; most of which were in the circumflex and right coronary artery systems with a percentage of 9.4% and the least in the LAD system with a percentage of 4.4%. The mean flow of grafts to the LAD system was 33.4±5.3 mL/min with a PI of 2.4±0.4; while the mean for grafts to the circumflex artery systemwas 35.1±7.2 mL/min with a PI of 3.5±0.7. The mean for theright coronary artery was 38.4±5.9 mL/min with a PI of 2.6±0.6. Revisions occurred in five patients (1.1%. Suboptimal grafts to the LAD system exhibited a flow of 14.1±7.4 mL/min with a PI of 6.9±1.7. While for the circumflex system a flow of 5.5±3.6 mL/min was reported with a PI of 10.4±7.8; and for the right coronary system a flow of 7.2±5.3 mL/min with a PI of 9.1±5.7 was reported.Conclusion: Grafts to the LAD system showed the best flowmetry results compared to grafts to the circumflex and right coronary systems. A proportion of poor grafts were revised.

  5. 76 FR 72209 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-22

    ... Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  6. 78 FR 42967 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-18

    ... Vascular Disease Bioinformatics Clinical Coordinating Center. Date: August 29, 2013. Time: 9:30 a.m. to 12...; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases...

  7. 78 FR 20670 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung ] Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  8. 78 FR 39300 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    ... Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep, Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases, Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  9. 78 FR 42529 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-16

    ... Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  10. 77 FR 63844 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-17

    ... Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  11. 75 FR 65498 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-25

    ... Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  12. 75 FR 156 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-04

    ... Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  13. 78 FR 60299 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    ... Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  14. 76 FR 20358 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-12

    ... Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  15. 78 FR 45933 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  16. 78 FR 16859 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-19

    ... Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  17. 77 FR 54922 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-06

    ... Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National...

  18. 75 FR 9907 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-04

    ... Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research... Panel, Childhood Obesity Prevention and Treatment. Date: March 26, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda...

  19. 75 FR 28260 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-20

    ... Cardiovascular Disease Risk Through Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea. Date: June 3, 2010. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p... Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases...

  20. Texas Yehaa !!!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjellberg, Kurt

    2001-01-01

    Indtryk fra et besøg på SLA, Special Libraries Associations årlige konference, San Antonio, Texas, USA, 9.-13. juni 2001. "An Information Odyssey: Seizing the Competitive Advantage"......Indtryk fra et besøg på SLA, Special Libraries Associations årlige konference, San Antonio, Texas, USA, 9.-13. juni 2001. "An Information Odyssey: Seizing the Competitive Advantage"...

  1. Lack of association of apolipoprotein E (Apo E) polymorphism with the prevalence of metabolic syndrome: the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Family Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Lana Y H; Petrone, Andrew B; Pankow, James S; Arnett, Donna K; North, Kari E; Ellison, R Curtis; Hunt, Steven C; Rosenzweig, James L; Djoussé, Luc

    2015-09-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS), characterized by abdominal obesity, atherogenic dyslipidaemia, elevated blood pressure and insulin resistance, is a major public health concern in the United States. The effects of apolipoprotein E (Apo E) polymorphism on MetS are not well established. We conducted a cross-sectional study consisting of 1551 participants from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute Family Heart Study to assess the relation of Apo E polymorphism with the prevalence of MetS. MetS was defined according to the American Heart Association-National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-International Diabetes Federation-World Health Organization harmonized criteria. We used generalized estimating equations to estimate adjusted odds ratios (ORs) for prevalent MetS and the Bonferroni correction to account for multiple testing in the secondary analysis. Our study population had a mean age (standard deviation) of 56.5 (11.0) years, and 49.7% had MetS. There was no association between the Apo E genotypes and the MetS. The multivariable adjusted ORs (95% confidence interval) were 1.00 (reference), 1.26 (0.31-5.21), 0.89 (0.62-1.29), 1.13 (0.61-2.10), 1.13 (0.88-1.47) and 1.87 (0.91-3.85) for the Ɛ3/Ɛ3, Ɛ2/Ɛ2, Ɛ2/Ɛ3, Ɛ2/Ɛ4, Ɛ3/Ɛ4 and Ɛ4/Ɛ4 genotypes, respectively. In a secondary analysis, Ɛ2/Ɛ3 genotype was associated with 41% lower prevalence odds of low high-density lipoprotein [multivariable adjusted ORs (95% confidence interval) = 0.59 (0.36-0.95)] compared with Ɛ3/Ɛ3 genotype. Our findings do not support an association between Apo E polymorphism and MetS in a multicentre population-based study of predominantly White US men and women. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Peripartum cardiomyopathy: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and Office of Rare Diseases (National Institutes of Health) workshop recommendations and review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearson, G D; Veille, J C; Rahimtoola, S; Hsia, J; Oakley, C M; Hosenpud, J D; Ansari, A; Baughman, K L

    2000-03-01

    Peripartum cardiomyopathy (PPCM) is a rare life-threatening cardiomyopathy of unknown cause that occurs in the peripartum period in previously healthy women. In April 1997, the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) and the Office of Rare Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (NIH) convened a Workshop on Peripartum Cardiomyopathy to foster a systematic review of information and to develop recommendations for research and education. Fourteen workshop participants were selected by NHLBI staff and represented cardiovascular medicine, obstetrics, immunology, and pathology. A representative subgroup of 8 participants and NHLBI staff formed the writing group for this article and updated the literature on which the conclusions were based. The workshop was an open meeting, consistent with NIH policy. Data presented at the workshop were augmented by a MEDLINE search for English-language articles published from 1966 to July 1999, using the terms peripartum cardiomyopathy, cardiomyopathy, and pregnancy. Articles on the epidemiology, pathogenesis, pathophysiology, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of PPCM were included. RECOMMENDATION PROCESS: After discussion of data presented, workshop participants agreed on a standardized definition of PPCM, a general clinical approach, and the need for a registry to provide an infrastructure for future research. Peripartum cardiomyopathy is a rare lethal disease about which little is known. Diagnosis is confined to a narrow period and requires echocardiographic evidence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Symptomatic patients should receive standard therapy for heart failure, managed by a multidisciplinary team. If subsequent pregnancies occur, they should be managed in collaboration with a high-risk perinatal center. Systematic data collection is required to answer important questions about incidence, treatment, and prognosis.

  3. 78 FR 17419 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND.... Mockrin, Ph.D., Director, Division of Extramural Research Activities, National Heart, Lung, and Blood... to the timing limitations imposed by the review and funding cycle. Information is also available on...

  4. 77 FR 1941 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-12

    ... Enhancement Grants for Stem Cell Research. Date: February 1, 2012. Time: 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review... Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research...

  5. 77 FR 30542 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-23

    ... Enhancement Grants for Stem Cell Research Date: June 13, 2012. Time: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To review and... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and...

  6. 76 FR 27068 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-10

    ... Special Emphasis Panel, Resource Related Research Project in National Biological Sample Data Repository.... Date: June 2, 2011. Time: 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place... Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research...

  7. 77 FR 2739 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-19

    ... Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National..., Lung and Blood Diseases Review. Date: February 8, 2012. Time: 12 p.m. to 3 p.m. Agenda: To review and...

  8. 78 FR 31952 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-28

    ...; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases...-Related Research Projects in Blood Diseases. Date: June 18, 2013. Time: 12:00 p.m. to 2:00 p.m. Agenda: To...

  9. 78 FR 66754 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-06

    ..., Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and... Disease Model Resource Related Research Project. Date: December 4, 2013. Time: 11:00 a.m. to 1:30 p.m...

  10. 78 FR 17420 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-21

    ..., Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and... Outcomes and Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors Date: April 16, 2013. Time: 12:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m. Agenda...

  11. 78 FR 7795 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-04

    ... grant application in rat embryonic stem cell lines. Date: February 21, 2013. Time: 1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m... . (Catalogue of Federal Domestic Assistance Program Nos. 93.233, National Center for Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases...

  12. Do Bans on Affirmative Action Hurt Minority Students? Evidence from the Texas Top 10% Plan. Upjohn Institute Working Paper No. 10-168

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Kalena E.

    2010-01-01

    In light of the recent bans on affirmative action in higher education, this paper provides new evidence on the effects of alternative admissions policies on the persistence and college completion of minority students. I find that the change from affirmative action to the Top 10% Plan in Texas decreased both retention and graduation rates of…

  13. Race, Labor Repression, and Capitalist Agriculture: Notes from South Texas, 1920-1930. Institute for the Study of Social Change Working Papers Series #102.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montejano, David

    Racism and racial exploitation, rather than disappearing with the march of capitalist development, appear instead as its intimate companions. The racial experience of the Mexican in South Texas was shaped by the rapid development of agriculture there in the early part of the century, between 1900-1910 and 1920-1930. The agrarian land revolution…

  14. 77 FR 6571 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-08

    ... Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research... Institute Special Emphasis Panel; Utilization of a Human Lung Tissue Resource for Vascular Research. Date...

  15. Nuss repair of pectus excavatum after surgery for congenital heart disease: experience from a single institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shuai; Tang, Shao-tao; Tong, Qiangsong; Yang, Ying; Yang, Li; Li, Shiwang; Pu, Jiarui

    2014-08-01

    Pectus excavatum developing after surgery for congenital heart disease has its own clinical characteristics. The present study aimed to present our technique and outcomes for the Nuss procedure in the repair of these cases. We conducted a retrospective study of all patients who had not been diagnosed as pectus excavatum preoperatively but subsequently had developed pectus excavatum after surgery for congenital heart disease from February 2005 to November 2012. The Nuss procedure was applied using a series of perioperative management techniques. The data relating to the surgical technique, complications, and outcomes were analyzed. The clinical evaluation was performed using the Nuss criteria. A total of 30 cases (14 boys and 16 girls) were included. The mean operative time was 73.5 minutes (range, 58-82). The mean length of hospital stay was 6.0 days. Complications occurred in 5 patients (16.7%), including asymptomatic pneumothorax, hematoma in the wound, pericardial penetration, and bar displacement. The mean follow-up period was 32 months (range, 9-60). Initially, 29 patients (96.7%) had excellent results, and 1 patient had a good result. The mean point of bar removal was 35.8 months (range, 30-39) after implantation. The postoperative results after bar removal in 17 patients were also recorded, including excellent results in 14 (82.4%), good results in 2 (11.7%), and a fair result in 1 patient. The Nuss procedure has been shown to be a safe and effective approach for the repair of pectus excavatum after surgery for congenital heart disease, although dissection of substernal adhesions can increase the risk of heart injury. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Organizational Behavior Analysis Focusing on the University of Texas System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Bobby K.

    2011-01-01

    This project analyzes the organizational behavior of the University of Texas System. The University of Texas System is comprised of nine academic and six health institutions. The University of Texas System has over 85,000 employees; the student enrollment is 202,240 with a budget of $2.25 billion dollars. This project has a total of four parts and…

  17. 76 FR 37132 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-24

    ... COPD. Date: July 20, 2011. Time: 2 to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate grant applications. Place... review and evaluate grant applications. Place: National Institutes of Health, 6701 Rockledge Drive, Bethesda, MD 20892, (Telephone Conference Call). Contact Person: William J. Johnson, PhD, Scientific Review...

  18. Looking into the Hearts of Native Peoples: Nation Building as an Institutional Orientation for Graduate Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brayboy, Bryan McKinley Jones; Castagno, Angelina E.; Solyom, Jessica A.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we suggest that graduate programs in predominantly white institutions can and should be sites of self-education and tribal nation building. In arguing this, we examine how a particular graduate program and the participants of that program engaged tribal nation building, and then we suggest that graduate education writ large must…

  19. Types of social supports predicting health-related quality of life among adult patients with CHD in the Institut Jantung Negara (National Heart Institute), Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tye, Sue K; Kandavello, Geetha; Gan, Kah L

    2017-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to examine which types of social supports - emotional/informational support, tangible support, affectionate support, and positive interactions - are the predictors of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) in adult patients with CHD and to assess the influence of demographic variables and clinical factors on these variables. In total, 205 adult patients with CHD from the National Heart Institute, Malaysia, were recruited. Patients were first screened by cardiology consultants to ensure they fit the inclusion criteria before filling in questionnaires, which were medical outcome studies - social support survey and AQoL-8D. Results/conclusions All social supports and their subscales were found to have mild-to-moderate significant relationships with physical dimension, psychological dimension, and overall HRQoL; however, only positive interaction, marital status, and types of diagnosis were reported as predictors of HRQoL. Surprisingly, with regard to the physical dimension of quality of life, social supports were not significant predictors, but educational level, marital status, and types of diagnosis were significant predictors. Positive interaction, affectionate support, marital status, and types of diagnosis were again found to be predictors in the aspects of the psychological dimension of quality of life. In conclusion, positive interaction and affectionate support, which include elements of fun, relaxation, love, and care, should be included in the care of adult patients with CHD.

  20. Tracheostomy Following Surgery for Congenital Heart Disease: A 14-year Institutional Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benneyworth, Brian D; Shao, Jenny M; Cristea, A Ioana; Ackerman, Veda; Rodefeld, Mark D; Turrentine, Mark W; Brown, John W

    2016-05-01

    Tracheostomy following congenital heart disease (CHD) surgery is a rare event and associated with significant mortality. Hospital survival has been reported from 20% to 40%. Late mortality for these patients is not well characterized. We performed a retrospective observational study of patients who had a tracheostomy following CHD surgery (excluding isolated patent ductus arteriosus ligation) between January 2000 and December 2013. Patients were categorized into single-ventricle or biventricular physiology groups. Demographics, genetic syndromes, pulmonary disease, and comorbidities were collected. Outcomes including hospital survival, long-term survival, and weaning from positive pressure ventilation are reported. Bivariate and time-to-event models were used. Over a 14-year period, 61 children (0.9% incidence) had a tracheostomy placed following CHD surgery. There were 12 single-ventricle patients and 49 biventricular patients. Prematurity, genetic syndromes, lung/airway disease, and other comorbidities were common in both CHD groups. Gastrostomy tubes were used more frequently in biventricular physiology patients (91.8%) versus single-ventricle patients (66.7%, P = .04). Survival to hospital discharge was 50% in the single-ventricle group compared to 86% in biventricular patients (P = .01). Long-term survival continued to be poor in the single-ventricle group comparatively (three years, 27.8% vs 64.8%, P = .01). Gastrostomy tube placement was independently associated with survival in both groups (P = .002). Tracheostomy is performed following many types of surgery for CHD and is commonly associated with other comorbidities. Both hospital and long-term survival are substantially lower in children with single-ventricle physiology as compared to patients with biventricular physiology. © The Author(s) 2016.

  1. DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

  2. ENERGY-INTAKE AND PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY IN RELATION TO INDEXES OF BODY-FAT - THE NATIONAL-HEART,-LUNG,-AND-BLOOD-INSTITUTE GROWTH AND HEALTH STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    OBARZANEK, E; SCHREIBER, GB; CRAWFORD, PB; GOLDMAN, [No Value; BARRIER, PM; FREDERICK, MM; LAKATOS, E

    The relationship between energy intake, physical activity, and body fat was investigated in the baseline visit of 2379 black and white girls aged 9-10 y enrolled in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. Three-day food records, three-day physical activity diaries,

  3. American Heart Association Response to the 2015 Institute of Medicine Report on Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumar, Robert W; Eigel, Brian; Callaway, Clifton W; Estes, N A Mark; Jollis, James G; Kleinman, Monica E; Morrison, Laurie J; Peberdy, Mary Ann; Rabinstein, Alejandro; Rea, Thomas D; Sendelbach, Sue

    2015-09-15

    The American Heart Association (AHA) commends the recently released Institute of Medicine (IOM) report, Strategies to Improve Cardiac Arrest Survival: A Time to Act (2015). The AHA recognizes the unique opportunity created by the report to meaningfully advance the objectives of improving outcomes for sudden cardiac arrest. For decades, the AHA has focused on the goal of reducing morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease though robust support of basic, translational, clinical, and population research. The AHA also has developed a rigorous process using the best available evidence to develop scientific, advisory, and guideline documents. These core activities of development and dissemination of scientific evidence have served as the foundation for a broad range of advocacy initiatives and programs that serve as a foundation for advancing the AHA and IOM goal of improving cardiac arrest outcomes. In response to the call to action in the IOM report, the AHA is announcing 4 new commitments to increase cardiac arrest survival: (1) The AHA will provide up to $5 million in funding over 5 years to incentivize resuscitation data interoperability; (2) the AHA will actively pursue philanthropic support for local and regional implementation opportunities to increase cardiac arrest survival by improving out-of-hospital and in-hospital systems of care; (3) the AHA will actively pursue philanthropic support to launch an AHA resuscitation research network; and (4) the AHA will cosponsor a National Cardiac Arrest Summit to facilitate the creation of a national cardiac arrest collaborative that will unify the field and identify common goals to improve survival. In addition to the AHA's historic and ongoing commitment to improving cardiac arrest care and outcomes, these new initiatives are responsive to each of the IOM recommendations and demonstrate the AHA's leadership in the field. However, successful implementation of the IOM recommendations will require a timely

  4. Publication Speed, Reporting Metrics, and Citation Impact of Cardiovascular Trials Supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, David; Cooper-Arnold, Katharine; Lauer, Michael

    2015-07-31

    We previously demonstrated that cardiovascular (CV) trials funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) were more likely to be published in a timely manner and receive high raw citation counts if they focused on clinical endpoints. We did not examine the metrics of trial reports, and our citation measures were limited by failure to account for topic-related citation behaviors. Of 244 CV trials completed between 2000 and 2011, we identified 184 whose main results were published by August 20, 2014. One investigator who was blinded to rapidity of publication and citation data read each publication and characterized it according to modified Delphi criteria. There were 46 trials (25%) that had Delphi scores of 8 or 9 (of a possible 9); these trials published faster (median time from trial completion to publication, 12.6 [interquartile range {IQR}, 6.7 to 23.3] vs. 21.8 [IQR, 12.1 to 34.9] months; Pcitation impact (median citation percentile for topic and date of publication, with 0 best and 100 worst, 1.92 [IQR, 0.64 to 7.83] vs. 8.41 [IQR, 1.80 to 24.75]; P=0.002). By random forest regression, we found that the 3 most important predictors of normalized citation percentile values were total costs, intention-to-treat analyses (as a modified Delphi quality measure), and focus on clinical (not surrogate) endpoints. NHLBI CV trials were more likely to publish results quickly and yield higher topic-normalized citation impact if they reported results according to well-defined metrics, along with focus on clinical endpoints. © 2015 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley Blackwell.

  5. Motion of the American Council on Education and the National Institute of Independent Colleges and Universities for Leave to File Brief Amici Curiae and Brief Amici Curiae in Support of Petitioners. University of Texas, et al., Petitioners, v. Walter Camenisch, Respondent. In the Supreme Court of the United States, October Term, 1980. No. 80-317.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980

    The motion of the American Council of Education (ACE) and the National Institute of Independent Colleges and Universities (NIICU) to reverse the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals decision in The University of Texas vs. Walter Camenisch is presented. The decision had ordered the university to provide free interpreter services to Camenisch, a deaf…

  6. Heart Surgery: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blood Institute Start Here Cardiac Procedures and Surgeries (American Heart Association) What Is Heart Surgery? (National Heart, Lung, and ... How Will I Be Monitored After Heart Surgery? (American Heart Association) - PDF Also in Spanish What Happens After Heart ...

  7. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Workshop Summary: Enhancing Opportunities for Training and Retention of a Diverse Biomedical Workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Gregg A; Lockett, Angelia; Villegas, Leah R; Almodovar, Sharilyn; Gomez, Jose L; Flores, Sonia C; Wilkes, David S; Tigno, Xenia T

    2016-04-01

    Committed to its mission of conducting and supporting research that addresses the health needs of all sectors of the nation's population, the Division of Lung Diseases, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health (NHLBI/NIH) seeks to identify issues that impact the training and retention of underrepresented individuals in the biomedical research workforce. Early-stage investigators who received grant support through the NIH Research Supplements to Promote Diversity in Health Related Research Program were invited to a workshop held in Bethesda, Maryland in June, 2015, in order to (1) assess the effectiveness of the current NHLBI diversity program, (2) improve its strategies towards achieving its goal, and (3) provide guidance to assist the transition of diversity supplement recipients to independent NIH grant support. Workshop participants participated in five independent focus groups to discuss specific topics affecting underrepresented individuals in the biomedical sciences: (1) Socioeconomic barriers to success for diverse research scientists; (2) role of the academic research community in promoting diversity; (3) life beyond a research project grant: non-primary investigator career paths in research; (4) facilitating career development of diverse independent research scientists through NHLBI diversity programs; and (5) effectiveness of current NHLBI programs for promoting diversity of the biomedical workforce. Several key issues experienced by young, underrepresented biomedical scientists were identified, and solutions were proposed to improve on training and career development for diverse students, from the high school to postdoctoral trainee level, and address limitations of currently available diversity programs. Although some of the challenges mentioned, such as cost of living, limited parental leave, and insecure extramural funding, are also likely faced by nonminority scientists, these issues are magnified among diversity

  8. Zero-Based Budgeting: The Texas Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyd, William L.

    1982-01-01

    Zero-based budgeting was instituted in all Texas state-funded agencies in 1975-76, including colleges. The first two years of using this procedure are reviewed and its applicability to higher education institutions is examined in light of the need to consider educational quality as well as costs. (MSE)

  9. Impact of initial Norwood shunt type on young hypoplastic left heart syndrome patients listed for heart transplant: A multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlo, Waldemar F; West, Shawn C; McCulloch, Michael; Naftel, David C; Pruitt, Elizabeth; Kirklin, James K; Hubbard, Meloneysa; Molina, Kimberly M; Gajarski, Robert

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary blood flow during Stage 1 (Norwood) palliation for hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS) is achieved via modified Blalock-Taussig shunt (MBT) or right ventricle to pulmonary artery conduit (RVPA). Controversy exists regarding the differential impact of shunt type on outcome among those who require transplantation early in life. In this study we explored waitlist and post-transplant outcomes within this sub-population stratified by shunt type. Eligible patients were enrolled through the Pediatric Heart Transplant Study (PHTS) database. Patients included those listed for heart transplantation at 1 of 35 participating centers, all of whom were Glenn palliation (41% vs 73%, p Glenn palliation before listing had lower waitlist 3-month survival (76% vs 90%, p = 0.02). In MBT infants Glenn palliation compared to those without (100% vs 68%, p = 0.08). Early post-transplant mortality rates were similar between the RVPA and MBT groups (p = 0.4) with overall survival 84% at 1 year. Among HLHS patients, the need for transplant before Glenn palliation is associated with poorer waitlist survival. Waitlist survival is poorer in the MBT group, with this difference driven by pre-Glenn MBT infants. Post-transplant outcomes were unaffected by shunt type. Copyright © 2016 International Society for Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Living with Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Institute) Heart Attack: Interactive Tutorial (MedlinePlus—Patient Education Institute) RELATED NEWS March 13, 2017 | Research Feature NHLBI, nursing sorority team up to fight heart disease in ...

  11. What Causes Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Institute) Heart Attack: Interactive Tutorial (MedlinePlus—Patient Education Institute) RELATED NEWS March 13, 2017 | Research Feature NHLBI, nursing sorority team up to fight heart disease in ...

  12. The Association of Free Testosterone Levels in Men and Lifestyle Factors and Chronic Disease Status: A North Texas Healthy Heart Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardarelli, Roberto; Singh, Meharvan; Meyer, Jason; Balyakina, Elizabeth; Perez, Oscar; King, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Hypogonadism is highly prevalent in men older than 45 years and is associated with an increased risk of chronic diseases, including obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. The objective of this study was to determine whether lifestyle factors such as smoking, diet, and exercise are associated with reduced testosterone levels. In this cross-sectional study, 147 men older than 44 years were recruited from a collaborative network of primary care clinics in the Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas, metropolitan area. Free testosterone levels were measured in plasma samples via an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based method, and analyzed by simple and multiple linear regression in relationship to age, race/ethnicity, smoking, diet, exercise, obesity, diabetes, hypertension, and dyslipidemia. The participants had a mean free testosterone level of 3.1 ng/mL (standard deviation [SD] = 1.5) and mean age of 56.8 years (SD = 7.9). In simple regression analysis, free testosterone levels were associated with increased age (β = -0.04; P = .02), diet (β = -0.49; P = .05), diabetes (β = -0.9; P = .003), and hypertension (β = -0.55; P = .03) but not with race/ethnicity, smoking, exercise, obesity, or dyslipidemia. In multiple regression analysis, free testosterone values were significantly associated only with age (β = -0.05; P = .01) and diet (β = -0.72; P = .01). This study implicates diet, in addition to advanced age as a possible risk factor in the development of reduced testosterone levels. © The Author(s) 2014.

  13. Hirschsprung’s disease and associated congenital heart defects: a prospective observational study from a single institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia eTuo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: to define the prevalence and characteristics of associated congenital heart diseases in patients with Hirschsprung’s disease.Method: all patients with a histological diagnosis of Hirschsprung’s disease admitted to our hospital between January 2010 and December 2013 were included in this prospective observational study and underwent cardiovascular screening. Cardiac anatomy was assessed by a segmental echocardiographic approach. Measurements of aortic root and left ventricular dimensions, wall thickness and function were obtained. Congenital heart diseases requiring a percutaneous or surgical intervention were described as major hearts diseases.Results: 133 consecutive patients were enrolled at median age of 2.3 years. Eleven patients (8.3% presented an associated heart disease. Moreover five patients had mild dilatation of aortic root. 6/11 (4.5% patients had a major congenital heart diseases requiring surgical repair. Conclusions: prevalence of associated congenital heart diseases was slightly higher than in previous papers, and mostly represented by septal defects. 4/6 patients with major heart disease had also a chromosomal anomaly. If we do not consider the subpopulation of patients with a chromosomal anomaly, cardiac defects were present in 3.8% of the patients. Based on these results we suggest to perform routine echocardiogram in all Hirschsprung patients, with or without associated chromosomal syndromes.

  14. Treasured Texas Theaters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Anita

    2012-01-01

    Dallas artist Jon Flaming's deep love of Texas is evident in his paintings and sculpture. Although he has created one sculptural Texas theater, his work primarily showcases old Texas barbershops, vacant homes, and gas stations. In this article, the author describes how her students, inspired by Flaming's works, created three-dimensional historical…

  15. Priorities for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research: A Report of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute's Centers for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research Working Group.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanie, Prateeti; Krumholz, Harlan M; Kiefe, Catarina I; Kressin, Nancy R; Wells, Barbara; Wang, Tracy Y; Peterson, Eric D

    2017-07-01

    The Centers for Cardiovascular Outcomes Research (CCORs) held a meeting to review how cardiovascular outcomes research had evolved in the decade since the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute 2004 working group report and to consider future directions. The conference involved representatives from governmental agencies, outcomes research thought leaders, and public and private healthcare partners. The main purposes of this meeting were to (1) advance collaborative high-yield, high-impact outcomes research; (2) identify priorities and barriers to important cardiovascular outcomes research; and (3) define future needs for the field. This report highlights the key topics covered during the meeting, including an examination of the recent history of outcomes research, an evaluation of the current academic climate, and a vision for the future of cardiovascular outcomes research. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. 75 FR 18849 - Food and Drug Administration/National Heart Lung and Blood Institute/National Science Foundation...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-13

    ... Integration of Nonclinical and Clinical Models; Public Workshop AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/National Heart Lung and Blood...

  17. 76 FR 49775 - Food and Drug Administration/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute/National Science...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-11

    ... and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public workshop. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is announcing a public workshop entitled ``FDA/NHLBI/NSF Workshop on Computer Methods for... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Food and Drug Administration/National Heart, Lung, and Blood...

  18. Repair of congenital heart disease with associated pulmonary hypertension in children: what are the minimal investigative procedures? Consensus statement from the Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Task Forces, Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute (PVRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Antonio Augusto; Barst, Robyn J; Haworth, Sheila Glennis; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Al Dabbagh, Maha; Del Cerro, Maria Jesus; Ivy, Dunbar; Kashour, Tarek; Kumar, Krishna; Harikrishnan, S; D'Alto, Michele; Thomaz, Ana Maria; Zorzanelli, Leína; Aiello, Vera D; Mocumbi, Ana Olga; Santana, Maria Virginia T; Galal, Ahmed Nasser; Banjar, Hanaa; Tamimi, Omar; Heath, Alexandra; Flores, Patricia C; Diaz, Gabriel; Sandoval, Julio; Kothari, Shyam; Moledina, Shahin; Gonçalves, Rilvani C; Barreto, Alessandra C; Binotto, Maria Angélica; Maia, Margarida; Al Habshan, Fahad; Adatia, Ian

    2014-06-01

    Standardization of the diagnostic routine for children with congenital heart disease associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-CHD) is crucial, in particular since inappropriate assignment to repair of the cardiac lesions (e.g., surgical repair in patients with elevated pulmonary vascular resistance) may be detrimental and associated with poor outcomes. Thus, members of the Congenital Heart Disease and Pediatric Task Forces of the Pulmonary Vascular Research Institute decided to conduct a survey aimed at collecting expert opinion from different institutions in several countries, covering many aspects of the management of PAH-CHD, from clinical recognition to noninvasive and invasive diagnostic procedures and immediate postoperative support. In privileged communities, the vast majority of children with congenital cardiac shunts are now treated early in life, on the basis of noninvasive diagnostic evaluation, and have an uneventful postoperative course, with no residual PAH. However, a small percentage of patients (older at presentation, with extracardiac syndromes or absence of clinical features of increased pulmonary blood flow, thus suggesting elevated pulmonary vascular resistance) remain at a higher risk of complications and unfavorable outcomes. These patients need a more sophisticated diagnostic approach, including invasive procedures. The authors emphasize that decision making regarding operability is based not only on cardiac catheterization data but also on the complete diagnostic picture, which includes the clinical history, physical examination, and all aspects of noninvasive evaluation.

  19. Advancing the Science of Myocardial Recovery With Mechanical Circulatory Support: A Working Group of the National, Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drakos, Stavros G.; Pagani, Francis D.; Lundberg, Martha S.; Baldwin, J. Timothy

    2017-01-01

    SUMMARY The medical burden of heart failure (HF) has spurred interest in clinicians and scientists to develop therapies to restore the function of a failing heart. To advance this agenda, the National Heart Lung Blood Institute (NHLBI) convened a Working Group of experts on June 2–3, 2016 in Bethesda Maryland to develop recommendations for the NHLBI aimed at advancing the science of cardiac recovery in the setting of mechanical circulatory support (MCS). MSC devices effectively reduce volume and pressure overload that drives the cycle of progressive myocardial dysfunction, thereby triggering structural and functional reverse remodeling. Research in this field could be innovative in many ways and the Working Group specifically discussed opportunities associated with genome-phenome systems biology approaches, genetic epidemiology, bioinformatics and precision medicine at the population level, advanced imaging modalities including molecular and metabolic imaging, and developing minimally invasive surgical and percutaneous bioengineering approaches. These new avenues of investigations could lead to new treatments that target phylogenetically conserved pathways involved in cardiac reparative mechanisms. A central point that emerged from the NHLBI Working Group meeting was that the lessons learned from the MCS investigational setting can be extrapolated to the broader HF population. With the precedents set by the significant impact of studies of other well-controlled and tractable subsets on larger populations, such as the genetic work in both cancer and cardiovascular disease, the work to improve our understanding of cardiac recovery and resilience in MCS patients could be transformational for the greater HF population. PMID:28736756

  20. Predicting Productivity Returns on Investment: Thirty Years of Peer Review, Grant Funding, and Publication of Highly Cited Papers at the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauer, Michael S; Danthi, Narasimhan S; Kaltman, Jonathan; Wu, Colin

    2015-07-17

    There are conflicting data about the ability of peer review percentile rankings to predict grant productivity, as measured through publications and citations. To understand the nature of these apparent conflicting findings, we analyzed bibliometric outcomes of 6873 de novo cardiovascular R01 grants funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) between 1980 and 2011. Our outcomes focus on top-10% articles, meaning articles that were cited more often than 90% of other articles on the same topic, of the same type (eg, article, editorial), and published in the same year. The 6873 grants yielded 62 468 articles, of which 13 507 (or 22%) were top-10% articles. There was a modest association between better grant percentile ranking and number of top-10% articles. However, discrimination was poor (area under receiver operating characteristic curve [ROC], 0.52; 95% confidence interval, 0.51-0.53). Furthermore, better percentile ranking was also associated with higher annual and total inflation-adjusted grant budgets. There was no association between grant percentile ranking and grant outcome as assessed by number of top-10% articles per $million spent. Hence, the seemingly conflicting findings on peer review percentile ranking of grants and subsequent productivity largely reflect differing questions and outcomes. Taken together, these findings raise questions about how best National Institutes of Health (NIH) should use peer review assessments to make complex funding decisions. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  1. Rising Above the Storm: DIG TEXAS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Miller, K. C.; Bednarz, S. W.; Mosher, S.

    2011-12-01

    initial assistance of the American Geophysical Union, the alliance comprises earth scientists and educators at higher education institutions across the state, and science teachers, united to improve earth science literacy (geoscience-earth, ocean, atmospheric, planetary, and geography) among Texas science teachers in order to attract individuals from groups underrepresented in STEM fields to pursue earth science as a career. Members of the alliance are affiliated with one of eight regional DIG TEXAS hub institutions. With an NSF planning grant, DIG TEXAS leaders created the DIG TEXAS brand, developed a project website, organized and held the first community meeting in March, 2011 at Exxon Mobil's Training Center in Houston. DIG TEXAS members have also delivered testimony to the State Board for Educator Certification in support of a new earth science teacher certification and collaborated on proposals that seek funding to support recommendations formulated at the community meeting.

  2. Congenital Heart Defects

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of the heart. It is present at birth. Congenital heart defects are the most common type of birth defect. The defects can involve the ... and heart transplants. The treatment depends on the type of the defect, how ... and general health. NIH: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

  3. Life After a Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... been stable for a few weeks. Anxiety and Depression After a Heart Attack After a heart attack, ... 2009, this project provided six awards at five academic institutions to identify genetic connections to heart, lung, ...

  4. The impact of urbanization and institutions of higher education on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Devika

    713-313-7398; Fax: 713-313-7447; E-mail: akpan_ai@tsu.edu. The impact of urbanization and institutions of higher education on Houston Texas'. Third Ward Community. AKPAN I. AKPAN. Department of Urban Planning and Environmental Policy, Texas Southern University, 3100 Cleburne Avenue, Houston, Texas 77004, ...

  5. How Is Heart Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Institute) Heart Attack: Interactive Tutorial (MedlinePlus—Patient Education Institute) RELATED NEWS March 13, 2017 | Research Feature NHLBI, nursing sorority team up to fight heart disease in ...

  6. Evidence of Increased Hemolysis after Open Heart Surgery in Patients Heterozygous for Beta-Thalassemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cokkinou, Vana; Katsiyanni, Anna; Orkopoulou, Mary; Michalis, Alkis; Tolis, George; Cokkinos, Dennis V.

    1988-01-01

    To investigate hemolysis after open heart surgery in patients with and without the β-thalassemia trait, we prospectively studied 85 patients who underwent open heart surgery for various pathologic conditions. Hemoglobin electrophoresis showed that 20 of these patients had the β-thalassemia trait, whereas the other 65 were normal. To compare the degree of postoperative hemolysis in both groups, we evaluated the serum bilirubin, lactic dehydrogenase, haptoglobin, and plasma hemoglobin levels preoperatively and on the first and second postoperative days. Patients with the β-thalassemia trait had a significantly greater degree of hemolysis than did those without this trait. Hemolysis was more pronounced on the first postoperative day and was obviously caused by the passage of blood through the heart-lung machine. The degree of hemolysis was not affected by the patient's age or sex, or by the type and duration of the operation. (Texas Heart Institute Journal 1988;15:35-38) PMID:15227276

  7. Pricing and University Autonomy: Tuition Deregulation in Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongeun Kim

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates changes in tuition policies in the wake of tuition deregulation in Texas, which in 2003 transferred tuition-setting authority from the state legislature to institutions. We find that price increases accelerated, particularly at the most selective institutions. Institutions also began differentiating price by undergraduate program, raising relative prices for the most costly and lucrative majors, including engineering, business, nursing, and architecture. Price increases were particularly large for institutions with the highest initial costs and for programs with a high earnings premium within institutions, though lower for institutions with more low-income students. These distinctions suggest that public postsecondary institutions respond to microeconomic incentives when given greater autonomy to set price, and take some measures to alleviate impacts on low-income students. The Texas experience suggests that decentralized price-setting generates greater price differentiation within the public higher education system, both across and within institutions.

  8. Sylvatic trichinellosis in Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pence D.B.

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available There are no published reports of domestic or sylvatic trichinellosis in Texas. The aim of the present survey was to determine the presence of Trichinella species in selected representative species of potential wildlife reservoirs in southern Texas. In 1998-99, tongues of 211 wild mammals were collected in southern Texas: 154 coyotes (Canis latrans, three bobcats (Lynx rufus, 32 racoons (Procyon lotor, 1 3 opossum (Didelphis marsupialis, four ocelots (Leopardus pardalis and five wild boars (Sus scrofa. Presence of Trichinella sp. larvae was investigated by artificial digestion and larvae of positive samples were identified at the species level by a multiple-polymerase chain reaction analysis. Nine (5.8 % coyotes had trichinellosis ; in the muscles of seven of these coyotes, the larvae were identified as Trichinella murrelli. This is the first report of sylvatic trichinellosis in Texas.

  9. Texas MODIS Experiment 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Terra eXperiment 2001 was conducted from Kelly AFB San Antonio, Texas from March 14 to April 4 to improve calibration of the MODerate resolution Imaging...

  10. Short Term Survival after Admission for Heart Failure in Sweden: Applying Multilevel Analyses of Discriminatory Accuracy to Evaluate Institutional Performance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nermin Ghith

    Full Text Available Hospital performance is frequently evaluated by analyzing differences between hospital averages in some quality indicators. The results are often expressed as quality charts of hospital variance (e.g., league tables, funnel plots. However, those analyses seldom consider patients heterogeneity around averages, which is of fundamental relevance for a correct evaluation. Therefore, we apply an innovative methodology based on measures of components of variance and discriminatory accuracy to analyze 30-day mortality after hospital discharge with a diagnosis of Heart Failure (HF in Sweden.We analyzed 36,943 patients aged 45-80 treated in 565 wards at 71 hospitals during 2007-2009. We applied single and multilevel logistic regression analyses to calculate the odds ratios and the area under the receiver-operating characteristic (AUC. We evaluated general hospital and ward effects by quantifying the intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC and the increment in the AUC obtained by adding random effects in a multilevel regression analysis (MLRA. Finally, the Odds Ratios (ORs for specific ward and hospital characteristics were interpreted jointly with the proportional change in variance (PCV and the proportion of ORs in the opposite direction (POOR.Overall, the average 30-day mortality was 9%. Using only patient information on age and previous hospitalizations for different diseases we obtained an AUC = 0.727. This value was almost unchanged when adding sex, country of birth as well as hospitals and wards levels. Average mortality was higher in small wards and municipal hospitals but the POOR values were 15% and 16% respectively.Swedish wards and hospitals in general performed homogeneously well, resulting in a low 30-day mortality rate after HF. In our study, knowledge on a patient's previous hospitalizations was the best predictor of 30-day mortality, and this information did not improve by knowing the sex and country of birth of the patient or where the

  11. Typhus in Texas

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2017-07-06

    Dr. Kristy Murray, an associate professor in pediatrics and assistant dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine and Texas Children’s Hospital, discusses increased cases of typhus in southern Texas.  Created: 7/6/2017 by National Center for Emerging and Zoonotic Infectious Diseases (NCEZID).   Date Released: 7/6/2017.

  12. The TXESS Revolution: A Partnership to Advance Earth and Space Science in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellins, K. K.; Olson, H. C.; Willis, M.

    2007-12-01

    The Texas State Board of Education voted in 2006 to require a fourth year of science for graduation from high school and to authorize the creation of a new senior level Earth Systems and Space Science course as an option to fulfill that requirement. The new Earth Systems and Space Science course will be a capstone course for which three required science courses(biology, chemistry and physics)are prerequisites. Here, we summarize the collective efforts of business leaders, scientists and educators who worked collaboratively for almost a decade to successfully reinstate Earth science as part of Texas' standard high school curriculum and describe a new project, the Texas Earth and Space Science (TXESS) Revolution, a 5-year professional development program for 8th -12th grade minority and minority-serving science teachers and teacher mentors in Texas to help prepare them to teach the new capstone course. At the heart of TXESS Revolution is an extraordinary partnership, involving (1) two UT-Austin academic units, the Jackson School of Geosciences and the Department of Petroleum and Geosystems Engineering; (2) TERC, a not-for-profit educational enterprise in Massachusetts with 30 years experience in designing science curriculum; (3) the University of South Florida; and (4) the Texas Regional Collaboratives for Excellence in Science and Mathematics Teaching, a statewide network of teacher mentors and science teachers. With guidance from the Texas Education Agency, the state agency charged with overseeing education, the TXESS Revolution project will provide teachers with access to high quality materials and instruction aligned with the Texas educational standards for the new capstone course through: a program of eight different 3-day professional development academies offered to both teachers and teachers mentors; immersive summer institutes, field experiences, and a Petroleum Science and Technology Institute; training on how to implement Earth Science by Design, a teacher

  13. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Small Business Program: A Comprehensive Ecosystem for Biomedical Product Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marek, Kurt W

    2016-12-01

    Small companies working to develop products in the cardiovascular space face numerous challenges, from regulatory, intellectual property, and reimbursement barriers to securing funds to keep the lights on and reach the next development milestone. Most small companies that spin out from universities have the scientific knowledge, but product development expertise and business acumen are also needed to be successful. Other challenges include reduced interest in early stage technologies (Pharma & Biotech 2015 in Review, EP Vantage) and limited deal flow for cardiovascular products (Gormley B., Wall Street Journal, September 15, 2014). The NHLBI small business program is a comprehensive ecosystem designed to address these critical challenges and to provide resources and expertise to assist early stage companies developing cardiovascular and other products within the institute's mission. This article describes steps that NHLBI has taken to enhance our small business program to more effectively translate basic discoveries into commercial products to benefit patients and public health, including enhancing internal expertise and developing non-financial resources to assist small businesses as they develop their products and seek private sector investment and partnership.

  14. INDEXES OF OBESITY AND COMPARISONS WITH PREVIOUS NATIONAL SURVEY DATA IN 9-YEAR-OLD AND 10-YEAR-OLD BLACK-AND-WHITE GIRLS - THE NATIONAL HEART, LUNG, AND BLOOD INSTITUTE GROWTH AND HEALTH STUDY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    CAMPAIGNE, BN; MORRISON, JA; SCHUMANN, BC; FALKNER, F; LAKATOS, E; SPRECHER, D; SCHREIBER, GB

    Objective: To (I) describe anthropometric and body-size measurements in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study (NGHS) population at baseline and (2) examine potential secular trends in the prevalence of obesity in young black and white girls by comparing NGHS baseline

  15. Racial differences in the sums of skinfolds and percentage of body fat estimated from impedance in black and white girls, 9 to 19 years of age : The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, JA; Barton, BA; Obarzanek, E; Crawford, PB; Guo, SS; Schreiber, GB

    Objectives: This National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study report assesses racial differences in fat patterning in black and white girls ages 9 to 19 years, comparing the sum of triceps and subscapular skinfolds (SSFs) and percentage of body fat (%BF) from impedance as two

  16. [Demographic analysis of a congenital heart disease clinic of the Mexican Institute of Social Security, with special interest in the adult].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Márquez-González, Horacio; Yáñez-Gutiérrez, Lucelli; Rivera-May, Jimena Lucely; López-Gallegos, Diana; Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo

    2017-11-07

    Congenital heart disease (CHD) has an incidence of 8-10 cases per 1000 live births. In Mexico, there are 18,000-20,000 new cases per year. Most tertiary care centers for CHD attend only pediatric population; the Mexican Institute of Social Security (IMSS) has a clinic that attends pediatric and adult population. To analyze the demographic aspects of the CHD clinic of IMSS. From 2011 to 2016 a cross-sectional study of the CC clinic of a third level hospital of the IMSS, including all patients with confirmed structural heart disease of recent diagnosis was carried out. The sex, age, reference entity, antecedent of pregnancy and treatment were registered. The population was divided into age ranges (17.1 years). Descriptive statistics and χ 2 test were used in qualitative variables. 3,483 patients with CHD (male:female ratio, 0.8:1.2) were included. Increased pulmonary flow acyanogenic cardiopathies were the most frequent CHD group (47.2%), with atrial septal defect being the most frequent diagnosis overall; 25.6% were adults and 35% of women with a history of pregnancy. Chiapas was Federal entity with greater proportion of patients diagnosed in the adult stage (33.82%); 7% were not candidates for any treatment for complications of the disease. CHD is a late diagnosis; it is necessary to create a national register to promote new health policies and a rational distribution of resources for these patients. Copyright © 2017 Instituto Nacional de Cardiología Ignacio Chávez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  17. Report of a National Heart, Lung, And Blood Institute Workshop: heterogeneity in cardiometabolic risk in Asian Americans In the U.S. Opportunities for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayan, K M Venkat; Aviles-Santa, Larissa; Oza-Frank, Reena; Pandey, Mona; Curb, J David; McNeely, Marguerite; Araneta, Maria Rosario G; Palaniappan, Latha; Rajpathak, Swapnil; Barrett-Connor, Elizabeth

    2010-03-09

    The Asian and Pacific Islander population (Asian Americans) in the U.S. has increased dramatically in the last few decades. Yet, data on cardiovascular disease (CVD) in this population are scarce. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health conducted an Expert Workshop to: 1) assess the importance of studying CVD in Asian Americans in the U.S.; and 2) consider strategic options for further investigations of CVD in this population. There is considerable geographical, ethnic, cultural, and genetic diversity within this population. Limited data also suggest striking differences in the risk of CVD, obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus, and other CVD risk factors across the Asian-American population. The Asian-American population is a new diverse pool with less contemporary genetic and cultural admixture relative to groups that have lived in the U.S. for generations, plus it is diverse in lifestyle including culture, diet, and family structure. This diversity provides a window of opportunity for research on genes and gene-environment interactions and also to investigate how acculturation/assimilation to U.S. lifestyles affects health and CVD risk among relatively homogenous groups of recent immigrants. Given the heterogeneity in body weight, body size, and CVD risk, the Asian-American population in the U.S. offers a unique model to study the interaction and relationships between visceral adiposity and adipose tissue distribution and beta cell function, insulin resistance, and atherosclerosis. Copyright (c) 2010 American College of Cardiology Foundation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Forests of east Texas, 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerry J.W. Dooley

    2017-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in east Texas based on an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) program at the Southern Research Station (SRS) in cooperation with Texas A&M Forest Service. The 254 counties of Texas are consolidated into seven FIA survey units—Southeast (unit 1),...

  19. Education for Agricultural Improvement: Teacher Certification at the Agricultural and Mechanical College of Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlbaw, Lynn M.; Williams, Lauren; Kelly, Larry J.

    2017-01-01

    Texas A&M University has long been known for its engineering and agricultural programs. Only in the last 50 years has its reputation included the preparation of teachers for general education in the public schools of Texas. However, agricultural education has been an integral part of the institution's mandate since early in the 20th century.…

  20. The Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science: A 20-Year Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brent M.

    2011-01-01

    The Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science (TAMS) is a publicly financed, residential early college entrance institute at the University of North Texas at Denton. Created in 1987, TAMS enables high-achieving students planning STEM careers to complete their last 2 years of high school simultaneously with their first 2 years of college. Admission…

  1. An Analysis of the Effectiveness of Business Education Certification Programs in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sue Evelyn Joiner

    2014-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of preparation delivery programs available to those who seek business education teacher certification in Texas. There are three types of delivery programs in business education in Texas: (a) "traditional" certification programs delivered by institutions of higher…

  2. Creationism in the Grand Canyon, Texas Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folger, Peter

    2004-01-01

    AGU President Bob Dickinson, together with presidents of six other scientific societies, have written to Joseph Alston, Superintendent of Grand Canyon National Park, pointing out that a creationist book, The Grand Canyon: A Different View, is being sold in bookstores within the borders of the park as a scientific explanation about Grand Canyon geologic history. President Dickinson's 16 December letter urges that Alston clearly separate The Grand Canyon: A Different View from books and materials that discuss the legitimate scientific understanding of the origin of the Grand Canyon. The letter warns the Park Service against giving the impression that it approves of the anti-science movement known as young-Earth creationism, or that it endorses the advancement of religious tenets disguised as science. The text of the letter is on AGU's Web site http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/policy/sci_pol.html. Also, this fall, AGU sent an alert to Texas members about efforts by intelligent design creationists aimed at weakening the teaching of biological evolution in textbooks used in Texas schools. The alert pointed scientists to a letter, drafted by AGU, together with the American Institute of Physics, the American Physical Society, the Optical Society of America, and the American Astronomical Society, that urged the Texas State Board of Education to adopt textbooks that presented only accepted, peer-reviewed science and pedagogical expertise. Over 550 scientists in Texas added their names to the letter (http://www.agu.org/sci_soc/policy/texas_textbooks.pdf ), sent to the Board of Education on 1 November prior to their vote to adopt a slate of new science textbooks. The Board voted 11-5 in favor of keeping the textbooks free of changes advocated by groups supporting intelligent design creationism.

  3. Tornado from Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vail, Kathleen

    1996-01-01

    Santa Fe School Superintendent Yvonne Gonzales, the "Texas Tornado," was hired to fix a 40% student-dropout rate and a white/Hispanic gap in achievement test scores. Gonzales is an avid integrationist; relies on humor, appeasement, and persuasion tactics; and has alienated some school employees by increasing central office…

  4. Outdoor Education in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Ray H.

    In Dallas in 1970, high school outdoor education began as a cocurricular woods and waters boys' club sponsored by a community sportsman. Within one year, it grew into a fully accredited, coeducational, academic course with a curriculum devoted to the study of wildlife in Texas, ecology, conservation, hunting, firearm safety, fishing, boating and…

  5. Catalogue of Texas spiders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, David Allen

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This catalogue lists 1,084 species of spiders (three identified to genus only) in 311 genera from 53 families currently recorded from Texas and is based on the “Bibliography of Texas Spiders” published by Bea Vogel in 1970. The online list of species can be found at http://pecanspiders.tamu.edu/spidersoftexas.htm. Many taxonomic revisions have since been published, particularly in the families Araneidae, Gnaphosidae and Leptonetidae. Many genera in other families have been revised. The Anyphaenidae, Ctenidae, Hahniidae, Nesticidae, Sicariidae and Tetragnathidae were also revised. Several families have been added and others split up. Several genera of Corinnidae were transferred to Phrurolithidae and Trachelidae. Two genera from Miturgidae were transferred to Eutichuridae. Zoridae was synonymized under Miturgidae. A single species formerly in Amaurobiidae is now in the Family Amphinectidae. Some trapdoor spiders in the family Ctenizidae have been transferred to Euctenizidae. Gertsch and Mulaik started a list of Texas spiders in 1940. In a letter from Willis J. Gertsch dated October 20, 1982, he stated “Years ago a first listing of the Texas fauna was published by me based largely on Stanley Mulaik material, but it had to be abandoned because of other tasks.” This paper is a compendium of the spiders of Texas with distribution, habitat, collecting method and other data available from revisions and collections. This includes many records and unpublished data (including data from three unpublished studies). One of these studies included 16,000 adult spiders belonging to 177 species in 29 families. All specimens in that study were measured and results are in the appendix. Hidalgo County has 340 species recorded with Brazos County at 323 and Travis County at 314 species. These reflect the amount of collecting in the area. PMID:27103878

  6. Midlife moderation-quantified healthy diet and 40-year mortality risk from CHD: the prospective National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Twin Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Jun; Krasnow, Ruth E; Reed, Terry

    2016-07-01

    It is unknown whether influences of midlife whole diet on the long-term CHD mortality risk are independent of genetic and common environmental factors or familial predisposition. We addressed this question prospectively using data from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Twin Study. We included 910 male twins who were middle-aged and had usual diet assessed with nutritionist-administered, cross-checked dietary history interview at baseline (1969-1973). Moderation-quantified healthy diet (MQHD), a dietary pattern, was created to evaluate a whole diet. Primary outcome was time-to-CHD death. Hazard ratios (HR) were estimated using frailty survival model. Known CHD risk factors were controlled. During the follow-up of 40 years through 31 December 2009, 113 CHD deaths, 198 total cardiovascular deaths and 610 all-cause deaths occurred. In the entire cohort, the multivariable-adjusted HR for the overall association (equivalent to a general population association) was 0·76 (95 % CI 0·66, 0·88) per 10-unit increment in the MQHD score for CHD, and the multivariable-adjusted HR for a twin with a MQHD score ten units higher than his co-twin brother was 0·79 (95 % CI 0·64, 0·96, P=0·02) for CHD independent of familial predisposition. Similar results were found for a slightly more food-specified alternative moderation-quantified healthy diet (aMQHD). The between-pair association (reflecting familial influence) was significant for CHD for both MQHD and aMQHD. It is concluded that associations of MQHD and aMQHD with a lower long-term CHD mortality risk are both nutritionally and familially affected, supporting their use for dietary planning to prevent CHD mortality.

  7. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study (REDS-III): A research program striving to improve blood donor and transfusion recipient outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Steven; Busch, Michael P; Murphy, Edward L; Shan, Hua; Ness, Paul; Glynn, Simone A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study -III (REDS-III) is a 7-year multicenter transfusion safety research initiative launched in 2011 by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Study design The domestic component involves 4 blood centers, 12 hospitals, a data coordinating center, and a central laboratory. The international component consists of distinct programs in Brazil, China, and South Africa which involve US and in-country investigators. Results REDS-III is using two major methods to address key research priorities in blood banking/transfusion medicine. First, there will be numerous analyses of large “core” databases; the international programs have each constructed a donor/donation database while the domestic program has established a detailed research database that links data from blood donors and their donations, the components made from these donations, and data extracts from the electronic medical records of the recipients of these components. Secondly, there are more than 25 focused research protocols involving transfusion recipients, blood donors, or both that are either in progress or scheduled to begin within the next 3 years. Areas of study include transfusion epidemiology and blood utilization; transfusion outcomes; non-infectious transfusion risks; HIV-related safety issues (particularly in the international programs); emerging infectious agents; blood component quality; donor health and safety; and other donor issues. Conclusions It is intended that REDS-III serve as an impetus for more widespread recipient and linked donor-recipient research in the US as well as to help assure a safe and available blood supply in the US and in international locations. PMID:24188564

  8. Heart Health - Brave Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Brave Heart Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table of Contents For ... you can have a good life after a heart attack." Lifestyle Changes Surviving—and thriving—after such ...

  9. Who Is at Risk for Heart Disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Education Institute) Heart Attack: Interactive Tutorial (MedlinePlus—Patient Education Institute) RELATED NEWS March 13, 2017 | Research Feature NHLBI, nursing sorority team up to fight heart disease in ...

  10. How Community Colleges in Texas Prioritize Resources for Latino Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Sarah L.; Garbee, Kelty T.; Miller, Ryan A.; Saenz, Victor B.

    2018-01-01

    This study explored how administrators at community colleges conceptualized change related to resource allocation and managing competing priorities to support targeted programming for Latino men. The study included the perspectives of 39 administrators from seven community colleges across Texas using concepts associated with institutional change…

  11. Abandoned Texas oil fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-12-01

    Data for Texas abandoned oil fields were primarily derived from two sources: (1) Texas Railroad Commission (TRRC), and (2) Dwight's ENERGYDATA. For purposes of this report, abandoned oil fields are defined as those fields that had no production during 1977. The TRRC OILMASTER computer tapes were used to identify these abandoned oil fields. The tapes also provided data on formation depth, gravity of oil production, location (both district and county), discovery date, and the cumulative production of the field since its discovery. In all, the computer tapes identified 9211 abandoned fields, most of which had less than 250,000 barrel cumulative production. This report focuses on the 676 abandoned onshore Texas oil fields that had cumulative production of over 250,000 barrels. The Dwight's ENERGYDATA computer tapes provided production histories for approximately two-thirds of the larger fields abandoned in 1966 and thereafter. Fields which ceased production prior to 1966 will show no production history nor abandonment date in this report. The Department of Energy hopes the general availability of these data will catalyze the private sector recovery of this unproduced resource.

  12. A Reference Handbook of the Texas Health Professions and their Support Personnel; The Health Professions in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Nurses Association.

    The fields of dentistry, dietetics, medicine, medical technology, nursing, occupational therapy, pharmacy, physical therapy, and social work are defined in the handbook. The entrance requirements, educational institutions, and licensure regulations in Texas are treated for each major and allied support field. The functions or types of…

  13. Heart MRI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnetic resonance imaging - cardiac; Magnetic resonance imaging - heart; Nuclear magnetic resonance - cardiac; NMR - cardiac; MRI of the heart; Cardiomyopathy - MRI; Heart failure - MRI; Congenital heart disease - MRI

  14. Steven Hawking to visit Texas A&M in spring

    CERN Multimedia

    Xavier, D

    2002-01-01

    Stephen Hawking will visit Texas A&M University from Feb. 24 to March 21 2003 to participate in the inaugural meeting of the George P. and Cynthia W. Mitchell Institute for Fundamental Physics. This institute will bring several of the world's top physicists to A&M for a month-long exploration of the latest ideas on topics ranging from superstrings to M-theory and supergravity (1/2 page).

  15. Solar Hot Water for Motor Inn--Texas City, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    Final report describes solar domestic-hot-water heater installation at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas which furnished 63% of total hot-water load of new 98-unit inn. Report presents a description of system, drawings and photographs of collectors, operations and maintenance instructions, manufacturers' specifications for pumps, and an engineer's report on performance.

  16. Forests of East Texas, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas J. Brandeis

    2015-01-01

    This resource update provides an overview of forest resources in east Texas derived from an inventory conducted by the U.S. Forest Service, Forest Inventory and Analysis (FIA) Program at the Southern Research Station in cooperation with the Texas A&M Forest Service. These estimates are based on field data collected using the FIA annualized sample design and are...

  17. Heart transplant - slideshow

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/presentations/100086.htm Heart transplant - series—Normal anatomy To use the sharing features on this page, ... Bethesda, MD 20894 U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health Page last updated: ...

  18. Heart murmurs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chest sounds - murmurs; Heart sounds - abnormal; Murmur - innocent; Innocent murmur; Systolic heart murmur; Diastolic heart murmur ... The heart has 4 chambers: Two upper chambers (atria) Two lower chambers (ventricles) The heart has valves that close ...

  19. Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program: A Collaboration between the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board, South Texas College, and Texas A&M University-Commerce. CBE Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein-Collins, Rebecca; Glancey, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    This case study is part of a series on newer competency-based degree programs that have been emerging in recent years. In January 2014, the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), South Texas College (STC), and Texas A&M University-Commerce (A&M Commerce) launched the Texas Affordable Baccalaureate Program, the state's first…

  20. Water supply and needs for West Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    This presentation focused on the water supplies and needs of West Texas, Texas High Plains. Groundwater is the most commonly used water resources on the Texas High Plains, with withdrawals from the Ogallala Aquifer dominating. The saturation thickness of the Ogallala Aquifer in Texas is such that t...

  1. The Texas Advanced Directive Law: Unfinished Business.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapottos, Michael; Youngner, Stuart

    2015-01-01

    The Texas Advance Directive Act allows physicians and hospitals to overrule patient or family requests for futile care. Purposefully not defining futility, the law leaves its determination in specific cases to an institutional process. While the law has received several criticisms, it does seem to work constructively in the cases that come to the review process. We introduce a new criticism: While the law has been justified by an appeal to professional values such as avoiding harm to patients, avoiding the provision of unseemly care, and good stewardship of medical resources, it is applied incompletely. It allows physicians and institutional committees to refuse "futile" treatments desired by patients and families while at the same time providing no way of regulating physicians who recommend or even push "futile" treatments in similar cases. In this sense, the TADA is incomplete on its own terms.

  2. Institute for High Energy Density Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wootton, Alan [Univ. of Texas, Austin, TX (United States)

    2017-01-13

    The project objective was for the Institute of High Energy Density Science (IHEDS) at the University of Texas at Austin to help grow the High Energy Density (HED) science community, by connecting academia with the Z Facility (Z) and associated staff at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). IHEDS was originally motivated by common interests and complementary capabilities at SNL and the University of Texas System (UTX), in 2008.

  3. Surgery for complications of trans-catheter closure of atrial septal defects : a multi-institutional study from the European Congenital Heart Surgeons Association

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sarris, George E.; Kirvassilis, George; Zavaropoulos, Prodromos; Belli, Emre; Berggren, Hakan; Carrel, Thierry; Comas, Juan V.; Corno, Antonio F.; Daenen, Willem; Di Carlo, Duccio; Ebels, Tjark; Fragata, Jose; Hamilton, Leslie; Hraska, Viktor; Jacobs, Jeffrey; Lazarov, Stojan; Mavroudis, Constantine; Metras, Dominique; Rubay, Jean; Schreiber, Christian; Stellin, Giovanni

    Objective: This study aims to analyse the collective experience of participating European Congenital Heart Surgeons Association centres in the surgical management of complications resulting from trans-catheter closure of atrial septal defects (ASDs). Methods: The records of all (n = 56) patients,

  4. Texas floods of 1940

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding, Seth D.

    1948-01-01

    Floods occurred in Texas during, June, July, and November 1940 that exceeded known stages on many small streams and at a few places on the larger streams. Stages at several stream-gaging stations exceeded the maximum known at those places since the collection of daily records began. A storm, haying its axis generally on a north-south line from Cameron to Victoria and extending across the Brazos, Colorado, Lavaca, and Guadalupe River Basins, caused heavy rainfall over a large part of south-central Texas. The maximum recorded rain of 22.7 inches for the 2-day period June 29-30 occurred at Engle. Of this amount, 17.5 inches fell in the 12-hour period between 8 p.m. June 29, and 8 a.m. June 30. Light rains fell at a number of places on June 28, and additional light rains fell at many places within the area from July 1 to 4. During the period June 28 to July 4 more than 20 inches of rain fell over an area of 300 square miles, more than 15 inches over 1,920 square miles, and more than 10 inches over 5,100 square miles. The average annual rainfall for the area experiencing the heaviest rainfall during this storm is about 35 inches. Farming is largely confined to the fertile flood plains in much of the area subjected to the record-breaking floods in June and July. Therefore these floods, coming at the height of the growing season, caused severe losses to crops. Much damage was done also to highways and railways. The city of Hallettsville suffered the greatest damage of any urban area. The Lavaca River at that place reached a stage 8 feet higher than ever known before, drowned several people, destroyed many homes, and submerged almost the entire business district. The maximum discharge there was 93,100 second-feet from a drainage area of 101 square miles. Dry Creek near Smithville produced a maximum discharge of 1,879 second-feet from an area of 1.48 square miles and a runoff of 11.3 inches in a 2-day period from a rainfall of 19.5 inches. The area in the Colorado River

  5. Risk stratification to determine the impact of induction therapy on survival, rejection and adverse events after pediatric heart transplant: A multi-institutional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castleberry, Chesney; Pruitt, Elizabeth; Ameduri, Rebecca; Schowengerdt, Kenneth; Edens, Erik; Hagin, Nancy; Kirklin, James K; Naftel, David; Urschel, Simon

    2017-05-11

    Induction therapy is increasingly being used in pediatric heart transplantation. General versus risk-adapted use remains controversial. We aimed to determine the impact of induction therapy on outcomes after stratifying patients by diagnosis and risk. The Pediatric Heart Transplant Study (PHTS) database was used to identify patients (age ≤18 years) who underwent transplantation between January 1, 2001 and December 31, 2014. Patients were excluded if they survived induction agents. Patients were stratified using a multivariable model to predict 1-year mortality. Patients within the top 25% risk of predicted mortality were defined as high risk (HR) and the bottom 75% as low risk (LR). Of the 2,860 patients studied, 1,370 received anti-lymphocyte antibody (ALA), 707 received an interleukin-2 receptor antagonist (IL-2RA) and 783 received no induction (NI) therapy. Overall, patients with NI had lower survival (p induction therapy (p induction therapy. Although induction therapy is associated with decreased rejection, it was not found to directly influence survival on multivariable analysis. Lower risk patients may benefit the most from induction therapy, particularly IL-2RA, which may be correlated with decreased infection and rejection in this cohort. Copyright © 2017 International Society for the Heart and Lung Transplantation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Texas LPG fuel cell development and demonstration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None, None

    2004-07-26

    The State Energy Conservation Office has executed its first Fuel Cell Project which was awarded under a Department of Energy competitive grant process. The Texas LPG Fuel Processor Development and Fuel Cell Demonstration Program is a broad-based public/private partnership led by the Texas State Energy Conservation Office (SECO). Partners include the Alternative Fuels Research and Education Division (AFRED) of the Railroad Commission of Texas; Plug Power, Inc., Latham, NY, UOP/HyRadix, Des Plaines, IL; Southwest Research Institute (SwRI), San Antonio, TX; the Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC), and the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT). The team proposes to mount a development and demonstration program to field-test and evaluate markets for HyRadix's LPG fuel processor system integrated into Plug Power's residential-scale GenSys(TM) 5C (5 kW) PEM fuel cell system in a variety of building types and conditions of service. The program's primary goal is to develop, test, and install a prototype propane-fueled residential fuel cell power system supplied by Plug Power and HyRadix in Texas. The propane industry is currently funding development of an optimized propane fuel processor by project partner UOP/HyRadix through its national checkoff program, the Propane Education and Research Council (PERC). Following integration and independent verification of performance by Southwest Research Institute, Plug Power and HyRadix will produce a production-ready prototype unit for use in a field demonstration. The demonstration unit produced during this task will be delivered and installed at the Texas Department of Transportation's TransGuide headquarters in San Antonio, Texas. Simultaneously, the team will undertake a market study aimed at identifying and quantifying early-entry customers, technical and regulatory requirements, and other challenges and opportunities that need to be addressed in planning commercialization of the units

  7. Technical Training seminar: Texas Instruments

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    Monday 6 November TECHNICAL TRAINING SEMINAR 14:00 to 17:30 - Training Centre Auditorium (bldg. 593) Texas Instruments Technical Seminar Michael Scholtholt, Field Application Engineer / TEXAS INSTRUMENTS (US, D, CH) POWER - A short approach to Texas Instruments power products Voltage mode vs. current mode control Differentiating DC/DC converters by analyzing control and compensation schemes: line / load regulation, transient response, BOM, board space, ease-of-use Introduction to the SWIFT software FPGA + CPLD power solutions WIRELESS / CHIPCON Decision criteria when choosing a RF platform Introduction to Texas Instruments wireless products: standardized platforms proprietary platforms ( 2.4 GHz / sub 1 GHz) development tools Antenna design: example for 2.4 GHz questions, discussion Industrial partners: Robert Medioni, François Caloz / Spoerle Electronic, CH-1440 Montagny (VD), Switzerland Phone: +41 24 447 0137, email: RMedioni@spoerle.com, http://www.spoerle.com Language: English. Free s...

  8. Water Finance Forum-Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regional Finance Forum: Financing Resilient and Sustainable Water Infrastructure, held in Addison, Texas, September 10-11, 2015.Co-sponsored by EPA's Water Infrastructure and Resiliency Finance Center and the Environmental Finance Center Network.

  9. 2001 Harris County, Texas Lidar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set was received by the NOAA Coastal Services Center from the Texas Natural Resources Information System. The data was collected in October of 2001 by...

  10. Compensation for Overloads and Summer Employment: A Survey of Current Practice in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, James C.

    A survey was sent to 58 chief academic officers to gain information about compensation for instructional overloads and summer employment at public and private Texas colleges and universities. Responses were received from 42 institutions. Only two indicated that their institutions did not have a uniform policy guiding summer compensation amounts.…

  11. Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... type of heart disease you have. Symptoms of heart disease in your blood vessels (atherosclerotic disease) Cardiovascular disease ... can sometimes be found early with regular evaluations. Heart disease symptoms caused by abnormal heartbeats (heart arrhythmias) A ...

  12. Helping parents live with the hole in their heart: The role of health care providers and institutions in the bereaved parents' grief journeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snaman, Jennifer M; Kaye, Erica C; Torres, Carlos; Gibson, Deborah V; Baker, Justin N

    2016-09-01

    Bereaved parents experience significant psychosocial and health sequelae, suggesting that this population may benefit from the ongoing extension of support and resources throughout the grief journey. The interaction of hospital staff with patients and families at the end of a child's life and after death profoundly affects parental grief, offering a unique opportunity for the medical community to positively impact the bereavement experience. The current study was conducted to explore the role of the health care team and medical institutions in the grief journeys of parents whose child died a cancer-related death. Eleven bereaved parents participated in 2 focus groups. Responses to each of the 3 main prompts were coded and analyzed independently using semantic content analysis techniques. Four main concepts were identified within the parental narratives, including the importance of strong and ongoing relationships between providers and bereaved families, the importance of high-quality communication, the effect of negative experiences between providers and families on parental grief, and the importance of the institution's role in the grief journeys of bereaved parents. Bereaved parents consistently identified the critical role played by medical staff and medical institutions throughout the grief journey. Key components of bereavement support identified by parents should serve to guide the actions of providers as well as provide a template for the development of a comprehensive bereavement program within an institution. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2757-2765. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  13. Chagas disease risk in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Sahotra; Strutz, Stavana E; Frank, David M; Rivaldi, Chissa-Louise; Sissel, Blake; Sánchez-Cordero, Victor

    2010-10-05

    Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species) in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five-stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post-1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc-minute). The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence-based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag-York-Mollié model and post-1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This risk is concentrated in south Texas. 3. The

  14. Chagas disease risk in Texas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sahotra Sarkar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chagas disease, caused by Trypanosoma cruzi, remains a serious public health concern in many areas of Latin America, including México. It is also endemic in Texas with an autochthonous canine cycle, abundant vectors (Triatoma species in many counties, and established domestic and peridomestic cycles which make competent reservoirs available throughout the state. Yet, Chagas disease is not reportable in Texas, blood donor screening is not mandatory, and the serological profiles of human and canine populations remain unknown. The purpose of this analysis was to provide a formal risk assessment, including risk maps, which recommends the removal of these lacunae. METHODS AND FINDINGS: The spatial relative risk of the establishment of autochthonous Chagas disease cycles in Texas was assessed using a five-stage analysis. 1. Ecological risk for Chagas disease was established at a fine spatial resolution using a maximum entropy algorithm that takes as input occurrence points of vectors and environmental layers. The analysis was restricted to triatomine vector species for which new data were generated through field collection and through collation of post-1960 museum records in both México and the United States with sufficiently low georeferenced error to be admissible given the spatial resolution of the analysis (1 arc-minute. The new data extended the distribution of vector species to 10 new Texas counties. The models predicted that Triatoma gerstaeckeri has a large region of contiguous suitable habitat in the southern United States and México, T. lecticularia has a diffuse suitable habitat distribution along both coasts of the same region, and T. sanguisuga has a disjoint suitable habitat distribution along the coasts of the United States. The ecological risk is highest in south Texas. 2. Incidence-based relative risk was computed at the county level using the Bayesian Besag-York-Mollié model and post-1960 T. cruzi incidence data. This

  15. DNA contents in Texas bluegrass (Poa arachnifera) selected in Texas and Oklahoma determined by flow cytometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas bluegrass (Poa arachnifera Torr.) is a dioecious, perennial, cool-season grass native to southern Kansas, Oklahoma, western Arkansas and most of Texas. Its major use has been for forage on rangelands in Texas and Oklahoma. More recently, interspecific hybrids between Texas bluegrass and Kentuc...

  16. Regional Haze Plan for Texas and Oklahoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA partially approved and partially disapproved the Texas regional haze plan. EPA also finalized a plan to limit sulfur dioxide emissions from eight Texas coal-fired electricity generating facilities

  17. Texas Real Estate Curriculum Workshop Summary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Robert

    The Texas Real Estate Research Center-Texas Education Agency (TRERC-TEA) curriculum workshop was attended by over 40 participants representing 26 Texas community colleges. These participants divided into eight small groups by real estate specialty area and developed curriculum outlines and learning objectives for the following real estate courses:…

  18. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart failure is a condition in which the heart can't pump enough blood to meet the body's needs. Heart failure does not mean that your heart has stopped ... and shortness of breath Common causes of heart failure are coronary artery disease, high blood pressure and ...

  19. Heart Anatomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... kilometers), which is far enough to circle the earth more than twice! See also on other sites: ... For the Public Heart Information Center Project Heart Women’s Heart Health Clinical Trials 6770 Bertner Avenue Houston, ...

  20. Heart Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... your transplanted heart. You should also have routine medical checkups to maintain overall health. Activity Restrictions Heart transplant recipients have no specific activity restrictions. Discuss activity ideas with your ... to some medical and dental procedures to prevent endocarditis, most heart ...

  1. Residential Energy Efficiency Potential: Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilson, Eric J [National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2017-11-02

    Energy used by Texas single-family homes that can be saved through cost-effective improvements. Prepared by Eric Wilson and Noel Merket, NREL, and Erin Boyd, U.S. Department of Energy Office of Energy Policy and Systems Analysis.

  2. South Texas Maquiladora Suppliers Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick, J. Michael

    This project was undertaken to assist South Texas industries in improving export to nearby Mexican maquiladoras (factories). The maquiladora program is based on co-production by two plants under a single management, one on each side of the border. Activities addressed four objectives: (1) to determine the dollar value, quantity, and source of the…

  3. Correlations in heart beat data as quantitative characterization of heart pathology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ulbikas, J.; Cenys, A. [Semiconductor Physics Institute, Gostauto 11, 2600 Vilnius (Lithuania); Zemaityte, D.; Varoneckas, G. [Institute of Psychophysiology and Rehabilitation, Vyduno 4, 5720 Palanga (Lithuania)

    1996-06-01

    Correlation between heart pathology and statistical properties of heart beat data has been studied. It is shown that heart beat data has different scaling behavior for healthy and disease cases. Possibilities to develop new monitoring technique based on the permanent control of the correlations in heart beat data are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  4. Red Tide off Texas Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-01-01

    Red tides (algae) bloomed late this summer along a 300-mile stretch of Texas' Gulf Coast, killing millions of fish and shellfish as well as making some people sick. State officials are calling this the worst red tide bloom in 14 years. The algae produces a poison that paralyzes fish and prevents them from breathing. There is concern that the deadly algae could impact or even wipe out this year's oyster harvest in Texas, which usually peaks during the Thanksgiving and Christmas holidays. The red tides were first observed off the Texas coast in mid-August and have been growing steadily in size ever since. Red tides tend to bloom and subside rapidly, depending upon changes in wind speed and direction, water temperature, salinity, and rainfall patterns (as the algae doesn't do as well in fresher water). This true-color image of the Texas Gulf Coast was acquired on September 29, 2000, by the Moderate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) flying aboard NASA's Terra spacecraft. The red tide can be seen as the dark reddish discoloration in the ocean running southwest to northeast along the coast. In this scene, the bloom appears to be concentrated north and east of Corpus Christi, just off Matagorda Island. The image was made at 500-meter resolution using a combination of MODIS' visible bands 1 (red), 4 (green), and 3 (blue). The city of Houston can be seen clearly as the large, greyish cluster of pixels to the north and west of Galveston Bay, which is about mid-way up the coastline in this image. Also visible in this image are plumes of smoke, perhaps wildfires, both to the north and northeast of Houston. For more information about red tides, refer to the Texas Red Tide Web site. Image courtesy Andrey Savtchenko, MODIS Data Support Team, and the MODIS Ocean Team, NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center

  5. Heart Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... you're like most people, you think that heart disease is a problem for others. But heart disease is the number one killer in the ... of disability. There are many different forms of heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease ...

  6. Heart Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    A heart transplant removes a damaged or diseased heart and replaces it with a healthy one. The healthy heart comes from a donor who has died. It is the last resort for people with heart failure when all other treatments have failed. The ...

  7. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Each year almost 800,000 Americans have a heart attack. A heart attack happens when blood flow to the heart suddenly ... it's important to know the symptoms of a heart attack and call 9-1-1 if you or ...

  8. Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies (PACT): four-year experience from the United States National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) contract research program in cell and tissue therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, William; Noga, Stephen J; Gee, Adrian P; Rooney, Cliona M; Wagner, John E; McCullough, Jeffrey; McKenna, David H; Whiteside, Theresa L; Donnenberg, Albert D; Baker, Acacia K; Lindblad, Robert W; Wagner, Elizabeth L; Mondoro, Traci Heath

    2009-04-01

    In 2002, the US National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) conducted a workshop to determine needs of the cell therapy community. A consensus emerged that improved access to cGMP facilities, regulatory assistance, and training would foster the advancement of cellular therapy. A 2003 NHLBI request for proposals resulted in four contracts being awarded to three cell-manufacturing facilities (Baylor College of Medicine, University of Minnesota, and University of Pittsburgh) and one administrative center (The EMMES Corporation). As a result, Production Assistance for Cellular Therapies (PACT) was formed. As of October 1, 2008, PACT has received 65 preliminary applications of which 45 have been approved for product manufacture. A variety of cell therapies are represented including T-regulatory cells, natural killer cells, adipose-derived stem cells, cardiac progenitor cells for cardiac disease, hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs) for central nervous system applications, cytotoxic T lymphocytes, and dendritic cells. A total of 169 products have been administered under 12 applications and 2 reagents were manufactured and delivered. Fourteen peer-reviewed publications and 15 abstracts have resulted from the PACT project to date. A cell therapy textbook is nearly complete. PACT technical projects have addressed assay development, rapid endotoxin testing, shipping of cell products, and CD34+ HPC isolation from low-volume marrow. Educational Web seminars and on-site training through workshops have been conducted. PACT is an active and successful cell therapy manufacturing resource in the United States, addressing research and training while forging relationships among academia, industry, and participating institutions.

  9. 1982-83 Texas College and University Real Estate Course Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Robert

    In 1983, the Texas Real Estate Research Center conducted its eighth annual survey of the real estate offerings of the state's two- and four-year colleges. Survey findings, based on a 90% response rate, included the following: (1) 90 institutions (46 community colleges and 44 four-year colleges) offered real estate courses during the 1982-83…

  10. Community College Adjunct Faculty Inclusion: Variations by Institution Type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaniel, Suzann H.; Scott, Joyce A.

    2013-01-01

    The present article derives from a larger study about the academic and social inclusion of adjunct faculty at representative public, 2-year colleges in Texas. The research identified a significant difference in adjunct faculty inclusion by institution type. Subject institutions represented Basic Carnegie Classification categories: rural, suburban,…

  11. Labor Market Returns for Graduates of Hispanic-Serving Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Toby J.; Flores, Stella M.; Ryan, Christopher J., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    Latinos have become the largest minority group in American postsecondary education, a majority of whom attend two- or four-year Hispanic-Serving Institutions (HSIs). However, little is known about labor market outcomes as result of attending these institutions. Using a unique student-level administrative database in Texas, and accounting for…

  12. Oceanographic measurements from the Texas Automated Buoy System (TABS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Texas Automated Buoy System contains daily oceanographic measurements from seven buoys off the Texas coast from Brownsville to Sabine. The Texas General Land...

  13. The Texas A&M Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akabani, Gamal [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Engineering. Dept. of Veterinary Integrative Biosciences

    2016-10-28

    The main motivation of the project at Texas A&M University was to carry out the production of critically needed radioisotopes used in medicine for diagnostics and therapy, and to establish an academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods. After a lengthy battle with the Texas A&M University Radiation Safety Office, the Texas Department of State Health Services granted us a license for the production of radionuclides in July 2015, allowing us to work in earnest in our project objectives. Experiments began immediately after licensing, and we started the assembly and testing of our target systems. There were four analytical/theoretical projects and two experimental target systems. These were for At-211 production and for Zn-62/Cu-62 production. The theoretical projects were related to the production of Mo-99/Tc-99m using a) a subcritical aqueous target system and b) production of Tc-99m from accelerator-generated Mo-99 utilizing a photon-neutron interaction with enriched Mo-100 targets. The two experimental projects were the development of targetry systems and production of At-211 and Zn-62/Cu-62 generator. The targetry system for At-211 has been tested and production of At-211 is chronic depending of availability of beam time at the cyclotron. The installation and testing of the targetry system for the production of Zn-62/Cu-62 has not been finalized. A description of the systems is described. The academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods was initiated in the fall of 2011 and, due to the lack of a radiochemistry laboratory, it was suspended. We expect to re-start the academic program at the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies under the Molecular Imaging Program.

  14. The Texas A&M Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akabani, Gamal [Texas A & M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    2016-08-31

    The main motivation of the project at Texas A&M University was to carry out the production of critically needed radioisotopes used in medicine for diagnostic and therapy, and to establish an academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods. After a lengthy battle with the Texas A&M University Radiation Safety Office, the Texas Department of State Health Services granted us a license for the production of radionuclides in July 2015, allowing us to work in earnest in our project objectives. Experiments began immediately after licensing, and we started the assembly and testing of our target systems. There were four analytical/theoretical projects and two experimental target systems. These were for At-211 production and for Zn- 62/Cu-62 production. The theoretical projects were related to the production of Mo-99/Tc-99m using (a) a subcritical aqueous target system and (b) production of Tc-99m from accelerator-generated Mo-99 utilizing a photon-neutron interaction with enriched Mo-100 targets. The two experimental projects were the development of targetry systems and production of At-211 and Zn-62/Cu-62 generator. The targetry system for At-211 has been tested and production of At-211 is chronic depending of availability of beam time at the cyclotron. The installation and testing of the targetry system for the production of Zn-62/Cu-62 has not been finalized. A description of the systems is described. The academic program in radionuclide production and separation methods was initiated in the fall of 2011; due to the lack of a radiochemistry laboratory, it was suspended. We expect to re-start the academic program at the Texas A&M Institute for Preclinical Studies under the Molecular Imaging Program.

  15. Heart transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Allen; Slaughter, Mark S

    2014-08-01

    Heart failure remains a major global problem with approximately 6 million individuals suffering from heart failure in the United States alone. The surgical technique of heart transplantation, popularized by Dr. Norman Shumway, has led to its success and currently remains the best treatment options for patients with end-stage. However, with the continued limitation of donor organs and the rapid development of ventricular assist device technology, the number of patients bridged to transplant with mechanical circulatory support has increased significantly. This has created some new technical challenges for heart transplantation. Therefore, it is now important to be familiar with multiple new technical challenges associated with the surgical techniques of heart transplantation with an ultimate goal in reducing donor heart ischemic time, recipient cardiopulmonary bypass time and post-operative complications. In this review, we described our technique of heart transplantation including the timing of the operation, recipient cardiectomy and donor heart implantation.

  16. Enlarged Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the valves are damaged by conditions such as rheumatic fever, a heart defect, infections (infectious endocarditis), connective tissue disorders, certain medications or radiation treatments for cancer, your heart may ...

  17. Heart Truth

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... health! Get a free badge or banner to post to your website or blog. Are you at risk for heart disease? Here's how to find out . Planning to use The Heart Truth logo? Check out our logo guidelines and downloads. ...

  18. Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure due to systolic dysfunction. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ... patient with heart failure or cardiomyopathy. http://www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Sept. 26, 2014. Colucci WS. ...

  19. A Case of Chagas Cardiomyopathy Following Infection in South Central Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-24

    DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE 59TH MEDICAL WING (AETC) JOINT BASE SAN ANTONIO - LACKLAND TEXAS MEMORANDUM FOR SGVT AITN: MAJ KELVIN N BUSH FROM...OFFICE SYMBOL INSTITUTION (If not 59 MOW) a. Primary/Corresponding Author Kelvin N. V. Bush, MD 0-4/ Maj 959 CSPS/59MDW/ SGVT SA MMC b. Bryant J...Webber MD 0-4/ Maj 559 Trainee Hcalth/ 59MDW/SGIT c. Edward J. Wozniak, DVM, PhD, M~ 0-5/LtCol Texas State Guard Medical Brigade HQ d. David Chang , MD 0

  20. Cardiac Arrest: MedlinePlus Health Topic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Blood Institute Start Here About Cardiac Arrest (American Heart Association) Sudden Cardiac Arrest (Texas Heart Institute) Also in ... Blood Institute) Understand Your Risk for Cardiac Arrest (American Heart Association) Warning Signs of Heart Attack, Stroke and Cardiac ...

  1. Heart Failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jorsal, Anders; Wiggers, Henrik; McMurray, John J V

    2018-01-01

    This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint.......This article briefly discusses the epidemiology of heart failure and diabetes and summarizes the key findings from the recent cardiovascular outcome trials in patients with type 2 diabetes, with a focus on heart failure as an endpoint....

  2. National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... advancing research in sickle cell disease to improve treatment options and symptom management, with the goal of one day finding a widely ... and obesity rates are increasing in the US Description: Increases ...

  3. Your Guide to Physical Activity and Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    YOUR GUIDE TO Physical Activity and Your Heart U . S . DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute YOUR GUIDE TO Physical Activity and Your Heart U.S. DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND ...

  4. Angiostrongylus cantonensis Meningitis and Myelitis, Texas, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Hammoud, Roukaya; Nayes, Stacy L; Murphy, James R; Heresi, Gloria P; Butler, Ian J; Pérez, Norma

    2017-06-01

    Infection with Angiostrongylus cantonensis roundworms is endemic in Southeast Asia and the Pacific Basin. A. cantonensis meningitis and myelitis occurred in summer 2013 in a child with no history of travel outside of Texas, USA. Angiostrongyliasis is an emerging neurotropic helminthic disease in Texas and warrants increased awareness among healthcare providers.

  5. Twenty-year evolution of percutaneous coronary intervention and its impact on clinical outcomes: a report from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored, multicenter 1985-1986 PTCA and 1997-2006 Dynamic Registries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkitachalam, Lakshmi; Kip, Kevin E; Selzer, Faith; Wilensky, Robert L; Slater, James; Mulukutla, Suresh R; Marroquin, Oscar C; Block, Peter C; Williams, David O; Kelsey, Sheryl F

    2009-02-01

    Percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) has undergone rapid progress, both in technology and adjunct therapy. However, documentation of long-term temporal trends in relation to contemporary practice is lacking. We analyzed PCI use and outcomes in 8976 consecutive patients in the multicenter, National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored 1985-1986 percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA) and 1997-2006 Dynamic Registries waves (wave 1: 1997-1998, bare-metal stents; wave 2: 1999, uniform use of stents; wave 3: 2001-2002, brachytherapy; waves 4 and 5: 2004-2006, drug-eluting stents). Patients undergoing PCI in the recent waves were older and more often reported comorbidities than those in the balloon era. PCI was more often performed for acute coronary syndromes and, in spite of the greater disease burden, was more often selective. Procedural success was achieved and maintained more often in the stent era. Significant reductions were observed in in-hospital rates (%) of myocardial infarction (PTCA Registry: 4.9; wave 1, 2.7; wave 2, 2.8; wave 3, 1.9; wave 4, 2.6; wave 5, 2; P(trend)<0.001) and emergency coronary artery bypass surgery (PTCA Registry: 3.7; wave 1, 0.4; wave 2, 0.4; wave 3, 0.3; wave 4, 0.4; wave 5, 0; P(trend)<0.001). Compared with the PTCA Registry, risk for repeat revascularization (31 to 365 days after index PCI) was significantly lower in the dynamic waves (adjusted hazard ratio: wave 1, 0.72; wave 2, 0.51; wave 3, 0.51; wave 4, 0.30; wave 5, 0.36; P<0.05 for all). Percutaneous interventions, in the last 2 decades, have evolved to include more urgent, comorbid cases, despite achieving high success rates with significantly reduced need for repeat revascularization.

  6. Aortic Dilatation Associated With Bicuspid Aortic Valve: Relation to Sex, Hemodynamics, and Valve Morphology (the National Heart Lung and Blood Institute-Sponsored National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Mary J; Pugh, Norma L; Devereux, Richard B; Eagle, Kim A; Holmes, Kathryn; LeMaire, Scott A; Milewski, Rita K; Morris, Shaine A; Prakash, Siddharth K; Pyeritz, Reed E; Ravekes, William J; Shohet, Ralph V; Song, Howard K; Asch, Federico M

    2017-10-01

    This study analyzed the impact of sex, hemodynamic profile, and valve fusion pattern on aortopathy associated with bicuspid aortic valve (BAV). The National Heart Lung and Blood Institute-sponsored National Registry of Genetically Triggered Thoracic Aortic Aneurysms and Cardiovascular Conditions (GenTAC) provided comprehensive information on a large population of well-characterized patients with BAV. Of 969 enrolled patients with BAV, 551 (57%, 77% male) had already undergone valvular and/or aortic surgery. Echocardiographic imaging data were available on 339 unoperated or preoperative participants who formed the basis of this study. BAV function was normal in 45 (14%), with a predominant aortic regurgitation (AR) in 127 (41%) and a predominant aortic stenosis (AS) in 76 (22%). Moderate-severe AR was associated with larger sinus of Valsalva (SOV) diameters compared with normal function and AS (all p Right-left commissural fusion was associated with a larger SOV diameter (3.7 ± 0.7 vs 3.3 ± 0.6 cm, p right-noncoronary fusion pattern. Predominant AR was more common in men (45% vs 27%, p = 0.004), whereas AS was more common in women (29% vs 18%, p = 0.04). In conclusion, in the GenTAC Registry, AR was associated with diffuse (annular, SOV, and AscAo) enlargement, whereas moderate-severe AS was only associated with AscAo enlargement. Male sex and right-left cusp pattern of cusp fusion were associated with larger SOV diameters and a greater likelihood of AR, whereas women had a higher prevalence of AS. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute retrovirus epidemiology donor studies (Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study and Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study-II): twenty years of research to advance blood product safety and availability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinman, Steven; King, Melissa R; Busch, Michael P; Murphy, Edward L; Glynn, Simone A

    2012-10-01

    The Retrovirus Epidemiology Donor Study (REDS), conducted from 1989 to 2001, and the REDS-II, conducted from 2004 to 2012, were National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-funded, multicenter programs focused on improving blood safety and availability in the United States. The REDS-II also included international study sites in Brazil and China. The 3 major research domains of REDS/REDS-II have been infectious disease risk evaluation, blood donation availability, and blood donor characterization. Both programs have made significant contributions to transfusion medicine research methodology by the use of mathematical modeling, large-scale donor surveys, innovative methods of repository sample storage, and establishing an infrastructure that responded to potential emerging blood safety threats such as xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus. Blood safety studies have included protocols evaluating epidemiologic and/or laboratory aspects of human immunodeficiency virus, human T-lymphotropic virus 1/2, hepatitis C virus, hepatitis B virus, West Nile virus, cytomegalovirus, human herpesvirus 8, parvovirus B19, malaria, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, influenza, and Trypanosoma cruzi infections. Other analyses have characterized blood donor demographics, motivations to donate, factors influencing donor return, behavioral risk factors, donors' perception of the blood donation screening process, and aspects of donor deferral. In REDS-II, 2 large-scale blood donor protocols examined iron deficiency in donors and the prevalence of leukocyte antibodies. This review describes the major study results from over 150 peer-reviewed articles published by these 2 REDS programs. In 2011, a new 7-year program, the Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III, was launched. The Recipient Epidemiology and Donor Evaluation Study-III expands beyond donor-based research to include studies of blood transfusion recipients in the hospital setting and adds a third country, South Africa

  8. HEART RETRANSPLANTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sh. Saitgareev

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of patients with transplanted heart is continuously increasing; therefore, the number of patients requiring heart retransplantation grows. Analysis of the results of published studies focused on safety of cardiac retransplantation and risk factors for adverse events in perioperative, early and late postoperative periods is presented in our review. The results of published studies suggest that heart retransplantation is the main radical treatment option for cardiac allograft dysfunction, but the results of heart retransplantation are slightly worse than those of primary cardiac transplantation. On the other hand, the favorable long-term prognosis after heart retransplantation should be expected in carefully selected recipients. 

  9. Evolutionary institutionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fürstenberg, Dr Kai

    Institutions are hard to define and hard to study. Long prominent in political science have been two theories: Rational Choice Institutionalism (RCI) and Historical Institutionalism (HI). Arising from the life sciences is now a third: Evolutionary Institutionalism (EI). Comparative strengths and weaknesses of these three theories warrant review, and the value-to-be-added by expanding the third beyond Darwinian evolutionary theory deserves consideration. Should evolutionary institutionalism expand to accommodate new understanding in ecology, such as might apply to the emergence of stability, and in genetics, such as might apply to political behavior? Core arguments are reviewed for each theory with more detailed exposition of the third, EI. Particular attention is paid to EI's gene-institution analogy; to variation, selection, and retention of institutional traits; to endogeneity and exogeneity; to agency and structure; and to ecosystem effects, institutional stability, and empirical limitations in behavioral genetics. RCI, HI, and EI are distinct but complementary. Institutional change, while amenable to rational-choice analysis and, retrospectively, to criticaljuncture and path-dependency analysis, is also, and importantly, ecological. Stability, like change, is an emergent property of institutions, which tend to stabilize after change in a manner analogous to allopatric speciation. EI is more than metaphorically biological in that institutional behaviors are driven by human behaviors whose evolution long preceded the appearance of institutions themselves.

  10. Institutional advantage

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martin, Xavier

    Is there such a thing as institutional advantage—and what does it mean for the study of corporate competitive advantage? In this article, I develop the concept of institutional competitive advantage, as distinct from plain competitive advantage and from comparative institutional advantage. I first

  11. Institutional entrepreneurship:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gretzinger, Susanne

    2018-01-01

    of agents or organisations in the policy arena. The present chapter understands institutional entrepreneurship as the process of changing institutionalised practices. Based on a literature review, it describes the triggers, activities and potential effects of institutional entrepreneurs. The chapter......Institutional entrepreneurship pays specific attention to the process and outcomes of agents who are willing and capable of changing institutions. It has some common ground with the political entrepreneur, a concept that proposes change in norms and institutions because of commitment and activities...... concludes by tentatively arguing that political entrepreneurs can be institutional entrepreneurs, but institutional entrepreneurship can be considered as the broader concept that incorporates strategies and visions as well as interpretative-discursive power into the conceptual framework....

  12. 33 CFR 165.804 - Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels-safety zone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Snake Island, Texas City, Texas... Guard District § 165.804 Snake Island, Texas City, Texas; mooring and fleeting of vessels—safety zone. (a) The following is a safety zone: (1) The west and northwest shores of Snake Island; (2) The...

  13. 75 FR 36710 - The Texas Engineering Experiment Station/Texas A&M University System; Notice of Acceptance for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-28

    ... COMMISSION The Texas Engineering Experiment Station/Texas A&M University System; Notice of Acceptance for... Facility Operating License No. R-83 (``Application''), which currently authorizes the Texas Engineering Experiment Station/Texas A&M University System (TEES, the licensee) to operate the Nuclear Science Center...

  14. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    HLHS; Congenital heart - hypoplastic left heart; Cyanotic heart disease - hypoplastic left heart ... Hypoplastic left heart is a rare type of congenital heart disease. It is more common in males than in females. As ...

  15. Anthropometric measures, presence of metabolic syndrome, and adherence to physical activity guidelines among African American church members, Dallas, Texas, 2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; DeVahl, Julie; Tong, Liyue; Gimpel, Nora; Lee, Jenny J; DeHaven, Mark J

    2011-01-01

    The low prevalence of physical activity among African Americans and high risk of cardiovascular disease lends urgency to assessing the association between metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, and adherence to current physical activity guidelines. Few studies have examined this association among African American adults. We examined the association between demographic characteristics, anthropometric measures, and metabolic syndrome and adherence to the 2008 Department of Health and Human Services guidelines for moderate and vigorous physical activity. Participants were 392 African American church members from congregations in Dallas, Texas. Physical activity levels were assessed via a validated questionnaire (7-Day Physical Activity Recall), and metabolic syndrome was determined on the basis of the American Heart Association/National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute diagnostic criteria. We used bivariate and multinomial logistic regression to examine the associations. Meeting guidelines for vigorous physical activity was significantly and independently associated with the absence of metabolic syndrome among women (odds ratio, 4.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.63-13.14; P = .003), after adjusting for covariates. No association was found between meeting moderate or vigorous physical activity guidelines and metabolic syndrome among men. Meeting physical activity guidelines was not associated with body mass index or waist circumference among this sample of predominantly overweight and obese African American church members. Results indicate that meeting the 2008 guidelines for vigorous physical activity is associated with the absence of metabolic syndrome among African American women. This finding might suggest the need to integrate vigorous physical activity into interventions for African American women as a preventive therapy for cardiovascular risk. 

  16. 76 FR 44597 - National Institutes of Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-26

    ... Sleep Disorders Research; 93.837, Heart and Vascular Diseases Research; 93.838, Lung Diseases Research; 93.839, Blood Diseases and Resources Research, National Institutes of Health, HHS) Dated: July 20...

  17. The benefits of transportation investment in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report highlights the benefits and return on investment of transportation funding in Texas. In total, over : the next decade, Texans will invest $131 billion in statewide infrastructure with a total economic benefit of : an estimated $373 billio...

  18. Texas RPO workshop implementation project summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    This report documents rural planning organization (RPO) workshops conducted throughout Texas. An RPO is a voluntary organization created and governed by locally elected officials responsible for transportation decisions at the local level. RPOs addre...

  19. Achieving the Texas Higher Education Vision

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Benjamin, Roger

    2000-01-01

    The Texas higher education system faces severe challenges in responding to the twin demands placed on it by economic growth and by the increasing problems of access to higher education that many Texans experience...

  20. Heart transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... check for infections Tests of your kidney and liver Tests to evaluate your heart, such as EKG , echocardiogram , and cardiac catheterization Tests to look for cancer Tissue and blood typing , to help make sure your body will not reject the donated heart Ultrasound of your neck and legs You will want ...

  1. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... This substance travels to your heart. A special camera uses the substance to produce pictures. These show ... guard against certain diseases, including heart disease. New studies have shown ... If you have an acute case of angina (chest pain), your doctor will probably ...

  2. Regional tertiary cross sections: Texas Gulf Coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debout, D.G.; Luttrell, P.E.; Seo, J.H.

    1976-01-01

    Regional studies of the Frio Formation along the Texas Gulf Coast were conducted to evaluate potential geothermal energy from deep, geopressured sandstone reservoirs. Published regional cross sections, unpublished cross sections provided by several major oil companies, and extensive micropaleontological and electrical-log files at the Bureau of Economic Geology served as basic data. These sections are meant to show gross regional distribution of sand and shale facies both laterally and vertically throughout the entire Tertiary section along the Texas Gulf Coast.

  3. Making Texas Restaurants Healthier for Children

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2014-12-30

    Sylvia Crixell, PhD, RD, Professor of Nutrition at Texas State University, discusses her study which details the success of a community-based program in Texas aimed at combatting childhood obesity by improving children’s menus in restaurants.  Created: 12/30/2014 by Preventing Chronic Disease (PCD), National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 12/30/2014.

  4. Simple, heart-smart substitutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coronary artery disease - heart smart substitutions; Atherosclerosis - heart smart substitutions; Cholesterol - heart smart substitutions; Coronary heart disease - heart smart substitutions; Healthy diet - heart ...

  5. Institutions and Modernity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Witold Morawski

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Modernity consists of many confl icting aspects: It brings many empty promises, yet has resulted in new institutions that create bridges between the values and interests of millions of people who seek freedom, prosperity, quality of life, strengthened democracy and social justice. In this paper I attempt to a gain and loss account against modernity, because institutional rules are not only conducive to cooperative interactions, but to hostile interactions as well. People are not always guided by moral commitment, but rather more often driven by cold calculation or coercion.Methodology: Modernity has at least three defi nitions. The fi rst defi nition is based on ideas that took over the imagination of the era. The second defi nition is based on an analysis of the behavior of people who respond to reason as well as emotion and believe that they act more rationally than their ancestors or the traditional “others”. The third defi nition is the one closest to my heart, consisting of the use of institutional categories. Institutions offer practical ways of connecting ideas and people. The challenge for them is the result of deepening local and national interdependencies, but increasingly often also regional (e.g. European and global. Interdependencies are the result of the scientifi c and technological revolution, global markets, global governance mechanisms, the emergence of new social forces and cultural confl icts (against the background of reconciling identity and differences.Conclusions: The most important task is to identify the mechanisms of complex systems so that people know how to act under conditions of uncertainty, risk and crisis. Hence, the expectations toward institutions often exceed their abilities. Even though new institutions are being created and old ones are being fixed, we are witnessing and participating in, institutional paralysis and the decay (e.g. corruption. In this situation, it is imperative not only to

  6. Institutional actorhood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Christian Uhrenholdt

    In this paper I describe the changing role of intra-organizational experts in the face of institutional complexity of their field. I do this through a qualitative investigation of the institutional and organizational roles of actors in Danish organizations who are responsible for the efforts...... to comply with the Danish work environment regulation. And by doing so I also describe how institutional complexity and organizational responses to this complexity are particular important for the changing modes of governance that characterizes contemporary welfare states....

  7. Wine and heart health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health and wine; Wine and heart disease; Preventing heart disease - wine; Preventing heart disease - alcohol ... more often just to lower your risk of heart disease. Heavier drinking can harm the heart and ...

  8. What Is Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  9. What Causes Heart Failure?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  10. Living with Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  11. About Heart Attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More About Heart Attacks Updated:Jan 27,2017 A heart attack is ... coronary artery damage leads to a heart attack . Heart Attack Questions and Answers What is a heart attack? ...

  12. Men and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Men and Heart Disease Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Source: Interactive Atlas of Heart Disease and Stroke Heart Disease Facts in Men Heart disease is the leading ...

  13. Heart Disease (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... System Taking Care of Your Teeth Bad Breath Heart Disease KidsHealth > For Kids > Heart Disease Print A A ... chest pain, heart attacks, and strokes . What Is Heart Disease? The heart is the center of the cardiovascular ...

  14. Heart Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... pain Fatigue Heart attack Symptoms & causes Diagnosis & treatment Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  15. Heart pacemaker

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... rhythms Bleeding Punctured lung. This is rare. Infection Puncture of the heart, which can lead to bleeding ... Rinse your mouth with water if it feels dry, but be careful not to swallow. Take the ...

  16. Heart block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007658.htm Heart block To use the sharing features on this page, ... Date 4/16/2017 Updated by: Michael A. Chen, MD, PhD, Associate Professor of Medicine, Division of ...

  17. Heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart attack. A stent is a small, metal mesh tube that opens up (expands) inside a coronary ... e228. PMID: 25260718 www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25260718 . Anderson JL. ST segment elevation acute myocardial ...

  18. Institutional Controls

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — This dataset consists of institutional control data from multiple Superfund sites in U.S. EPA Region 8. These data were acquired from multiple sources at different...

  19. Institutional upbringing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulløv, Eva

    2008-01-01

    current testing of Danish language fluency levels among pre-school minority children. Testing language skills marks and defines distinctions that reinforce images of deviance that, in turn, legitimize initiatives to enrol children, specifically minority children, in child care institutions....

  20. Institutional ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rebecca; Tienari, Janne

    2016-01-01

    of managerial respondents. This leads to another bias in the study of M&As: an managerial one. These critiques are an important step in pinpointing some of the problematic aspects in the field, which we suggest can be part remedied by institutional ethnography developed by Dorothy Smith and her colleagues....... In institutional ethnography the notion of objectification is applied to describe research processes like those that have been found to dominate in scholarly work on M&As. In this chapter, we offer an outline of Smiths critique of objectification, elucidate how institutional ethnography seeks to address it......, and point to some of the problems in M&A studies identified through this lens. Finally, we argue why institutional ethnography, in comparison with other methods of inquiry, is particularly fruitful in the study of mergers and acquisitions....

  1. Institutional Investors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Birkmose, Hanne Søndergaard; Strand, Therese

    Research Question/Issue: Institutional investors are facing increased pressure and threats of legislation from the European Union to abandon passive ownership strategies. This study investigates the prerequisites for – and potential dissimilarities in the practice of, active ownership among....../Policy Implications: Regulators should be aware of the impact by local governance mechanisms, and how shareholders react under different legal and practical prerequisites. The paper also highlights legal elements that differ between Denmark and Sweden, and which might affect institutional activism....

  2. A heart within a heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carreras, Edward T; Barghash, Maya; Givertz, Michael M; Bhatt, Deepak L

    2017-06-01

    A 44-year-old man with a history of end-stage dilated cardiomyopathy status-post orthotopic cardiac transplant 14 years ago presented for coronary angiography in preparation for re-operative tricuspid valve replacement. Coronary angiography revealed an anomalous origin of the left coronary artery, with a common coronary trunk arising from the right coronary cusp and bifurcating into right and left main coronary arteries. Interestingly, the right and left coronary arteries coursed to form the shape of a heart, hence, a heart within a heart! © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Texas site selection and licensing status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avant, R.V. Jr.

    1989-11-01

    Texas has identified a potential site in Hudspeth County in far West Texas near the town of Fort Hancock. Over the past year the Texas Low-Level Radioactive Waste Disposal Authority has been conducting detailed geology, hydrology, meteorology, soils, and flora and fauna evaluations. An authorization by the Board of Directors of the Authority to proceed with a license application, assuming that the detailed evaluation indicates that the site is suitable, is expected by September. A prototype license has been prepared in anticipation of the order to proceed with licensing, and the formal license application is expected to be submitted to the Texas Department of Health-Bureau of Radiation Control in December, meeting the license application milestone. Although site selection processes in all siting areas across the country have experienced organized opposition, El Paso County has funded a particularly well-organized, well-financed program to legally and technically stop consideration of the Fort Hancock site prior to the licensing process. Many procedural, regulatory, and technical issues have been raised which have required responses from the Authority in order to proceed with licensing. This has provided a unique perspective of what to expect from well-organized opposition at the licensing stage. This paper presents an update on the Texas siting activity with detailed information on the site evaluation and license application. Experience of dealing with issues raised by opposition relating to NRC guidelines and rules is also discussed.

  4. Commercial truck platooning demonstration in Texas – level 2 automation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    Through this project, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) funded the creation of a comprehensive truck platooning demonstration in Texas, serving as a proactive effort in assessing innovative operational strategies to position TxDOT as a l...

  5. Obesity and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol in black and white 9- and 10-year-old girls : The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morrison, JA; Sprecher, D; McMahon, RP; Schreiber, GB; Khoury, PR

    It has been hypothesized that the role of obesity in the pathogenesis of coronary heart disease (CHD) may be mediated in part through its inverse relationship with high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C). Obesity is inversely correlated with HDL-C, and HDL-C has been shown to be protective

  6. Teachers and Teaching Conditions in Rural Texas: Policy Brief

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimerson, Lorna

    2004-01-01

    Over four milliion children go to public schools in Texas; of these, almost half a million (474,000) students attend school in rural areas. Thirty-six percent of rural Texas students are members of a minority group, 46% are poor, and more than 31,000 students in rural Texas do not speak English well. These are Texas-style large numbers that begin…

  7. Overview of the Texas Youth Fitness Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, James R; Martin, Scott B; Welk, Gregory J; Zhu, Weimo; Meredith, Marilu D

    2010-09-01

    This paper summarizes the historical and legislative backgrounds leading to statewide testing of health-related physical fitness in Texas children grades 3-12 as mandated by Texas Senate Bill 530. The rationale and goals for an associated research project (the Texas Youth Fitness Study, funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation) to evaluate data collected from the statewide initiative are provided. The study investigated the relations between health-related physical fitness and educational variables, including academic achievement, absenteeism, and negative school incidents. It also provides unique insights into the quality (both reliability and validity) of collected data and implications of large-scale school-based physical fitness testing. Teacher commentary and experiences add to the description of the data collection processes. Last, the relations between psychosocial variables and health-related fitness in middle school students are described.

  8. Texas coral snake (Micrurus tener) bites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, David L; Borys, Douglas J; Stanford, Rhandi; Kjar, Dean; Tobleman, William

    2007-02-01

    The clinical features of bites from Texas coral snakes (Micrurus tener) have not been well studied. Our goal was to review the largest number of victims of Texas coral snakebites to determine their characteristics, effects, treatment, and outcome. Retrospective case series of Micrurus tener exposures reported to the Texas Poison Center Network from 2000 to 2004. Eighty-two patients were included in the analysis. Most (57.3%) were 18 to 49-year-old men. Almost 90% had local swelling, pain, erythema, or paresthesias. Only 7.3% had systemic effects, and none of these were severe. Over half received coral snake antivenin, and 15.9% were given opioids for pain. No patient died and no patient required mechanical ventilation due to hypoventilation from the snakebite. There were more local findings and less severe systemic effects than previously reported. Antivenin is not needed for most of these patients, and opioids may be administered safely.

  9. 40 CFR 282.93 - Texas State-Administered Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Underground Storage Tank Program, Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, P.O. Box 13087, Austin, TX... reference herein for enforcement purposes. (A) The statutory provisions include: (1) Texas Water Code, Title... Resource Conservation Commission (2) 31 Texas Administrative Code, Chapter 337—Enforcement. (i) Subchapter...

  10. Institutional Awareness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlvik, Carina; Boxenbaum, Eva

    Drawing on dual-process theory and mindfulness research this article sets out to shed light on the conditions that need to be met to create “a reflexive shift in consciousness” argued to be a key foundational mechanism for agency in institutional theory. Although past research has identified diff...... in consciousness to emerge and argue for how the varying levels of mindfulness in the form of internal and external awareness may manifest as distinct responses to the institutional environment the actor is embedded in....

  11. Defining Mara Salvatrucha’s Texas Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    the prison gang Mexican Mafia , which ran the street gang Sureño 13 network. Both of those criminal groups are present in Texas. The Texas Department...additional four regions have listed associates of MS 13 as having a significant presence in each of them.9 With the Mexican Mafia having a major presence...the Mexican Mafia or “La Eme” as it is known in places it dominates.99 The number 13 is a reference to the letter “m,” which is the thirteenth letter

  12. [Heart arrest].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiarella, F; Giovannini, E; Bozzano, A; Caristo, G; Delise, P; Fedele, F; Fera, M S; Lavalle, C; Roghi, A; Valagussa, F

    2001-03-01

    Cardiac arrest is one of the leading causes of mortality in industrialized countries and is mainly due to ischemic heart disease. According to ISTAT estimates, approximately 45,000 sudden deaths occur annually in Italy whereas according to the World Health Organization, its incidence is 1 per 1000 persons. The most common cause of cardiac arrest is ventricular fibrillation due to an acute ischemic episode. During acute ischemia the onset of a ventricular tachyarrhythmia is sudden, unpredictable and often irreversible and lethal. Each minute that passes, the probability that the patient survives decreases by 10%. For this reason, the first 10 min are considered to be priceless for an efficacious first aid. The possibility of survival depends on the presence of witnesses, on the heart rhythm and on the resolution of the arrhythmia. In the majority of cases, the latter is possible by means of electrical defibrillation followed by the reestablishment of systolic function. An increase in equipment alone does not suffice for efficacious handling of cardiac arrest occurring outside the hospital premises. Above all, an adequate intervention strategy is required. Ambulance personnel must be well trained and capable of intervening rapidly, possibly within the first 5 min. The key to success lies in the diffusion and proper use of defibrillators. The availability of new generation instruments, the external automatic defibrillators, encourages their widespread use. On the territory, these emergencies are the responsibility of the 118 organization based, according to the characteristics specific to each country, on the regulated coordination between the operative command, the crews and the first-aid means. Strategies for the handling of these emergencies within hospitals have been proposed by the Conference of Bethesda and tend to guarantee an efficacious resuscitation with a maximum latency of 2 min between cardiac arrest and the first electric shock. The diffusion of external

  13. Acute Valvular Heart Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maheshwari, Varun; Barr, Brian; Srivastava, Mukta

    2018-02-01

    Valvular heart disease (VHD) is a common clinical entity. Recognition of decompensated VHD is crucial to instituting appropriate workup and management. Initial evaluation focuses on hemodynamics, peripheral perfusion, volume overload, and active myocardial ischemia. Initial therapy is targeted at improving hemodynamics, fluid status, and decreasing myocardial ischemia before intervention. Echocardiography can rapidly identify VHD etiology and severity along with physical examination findings. Owing to improved survival with cardiac surgery over the past several decades, prosthetic valve dysfunction should be recognized and initial treatment understood. Mechanical circulatory support is increasingly part of clinical practice in stabilizing patients with decompensated VHD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hypoplastic left heart syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thiagarajan Ravi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Hypoplastic left heart syndrome(HLHS refers to the abnormal development of the left-sided cardiac structures, resulting in obstruction to blood flow from the left ventricular outflow tract. In addition, the syndrome includes underdevelopment of the left ventricle, aorta, and aortic arch, as well as mitral atresia or stenosis. HLHS has been reported to occur in approximately 0.016 to 0.036% of all live births. Newborn infants with the condition generally are born at full term and initially appear healthy. As the arterial duct closes, the systemic perfusion becomes decreased, resulting in hypoxemia, acidosis, and shock. Usually, no heart murmur, or a non-specific heart murmur, may be detected. The second heart sound is loud and single because of aortic atresia. Often the liver is enlarged secondary to congestive heart failure. The embryologic cause of the disease, as in the case of most congenital cardiac defects, is not fully known. The most useful diagnostic modality is the echocardiogram. The syndrome can be diagnosed by fetal echocardiography between 18 and 22 weeks of gestation. Differential diagnosis includes other left-sided obstructive lesions where the systemic circulation is dependent on ductal flow (critical aortic stenosis, coarctation of the aorta, interrupted aortic arch. Children with the syndrome require surgery as neonates, as they have duct-dependent systemic circulation. Currently, there are two major modalities, primary cardiac transplantation or a series of staged functionally univentricular palliations. The treatment chosen is dependent on the preference of the institution, its experience, and also preference. Although survival following initial surgical intervention has improved significantly over the last 20 years, significant mortality and morbidity are present for both surgical strategies. As a result pediatric cardiologists continue to be challenged by discussions with families regarding initial decision

  15. 75 FR 45695 - Final Federal Agency Actions on Trans-Texas Corridor 35 (TTC-35) in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-03

    ...- 1342; Land and Water Conservation Fund (LWCF), 16 U.S.C. 4601-4604. 8. Executive Orders: E.O. 11990... Federal Highway Administration Final Federal Agency Actions on Trans-Texas Corridor 35 (TTC-35) in Texas..., extending from the Texas- Oklahoma line to the City of Laredo, generally paralleling existing I- 35 in the...

  16. The Best Choice for a Prosperous Texas: A Texas-Style Personal Income Tax. Policy Brief No. 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Center for Public Policy Priorities, 2006

    2006-01-01

    Part one of this trilogy of policy briefs explains the challenge facing Texas in funding public education. This policy brief explains why a Texas-style personal income tax is the best way to meet the needs of Texas. Only a personal income tax can significantly reduce reliance on property taxes--cutting the school operations tax from $1.50 to…

  17. Heart failure - tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - tests; Congestive heart failure - tests; Cardiomyopathy - tests; HF - tests ... the best test to: Identify which type of heart failure (systolic, diastolic, valvular) Monitor your heart failure and ...

  18. Heart attack - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... attack Heart bypass surgery Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive Heart pacemaker High blood cholesterol levels High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on how to ...

  19. Institutional Assessment

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Organizational incentives refer to the way an organization's system of rewards and punishments either encourages or discourages behaviours – in the case of research institutions, productivity and creativity. Incentives are important to individual research careers and to overall organizational success and can help ...

  20. European Institutions?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meacham, Darian

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article is to sketch a phenomenological theory of political institutions and to apply it to some objections and questions raised by Pierre Manent about the project of the European Union and more specifically the question of “European Construction”, i.e. what is the aim of the

  1. Solar domestic hot water system installed at Texas City, Texas. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1980-12-01

    The Solar Energy System located at LaQuinta Motor Inn, Texas City, Texas was designed to supply 63% of the total hot water load. The Solar Energy System consists of a 2100 square foot Raypack Liquid Flat Plate Collector Subsystem and a 2500 gallon storage subsystem circulating hot water producing 3.67 x 10/sup 8/ Btu/y. Abstracts from the site files, specification references, drawings, installation, operation and maintenance instructions are included.

  2. Heart failure in children - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Congestive heart failure - children; Cor pulmonale - children; Cardiomyopathy - children; CHF - children; Congenital heart defect - heart failure in children; Cyanotic heart disease - heart failure in children; Birth defect of the heart - heart ...

  3. Heart Health: The Heart Truth Campaign 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health The Heart Truth Campaign 2009 Past Issues / Winter 2009 Table ... one of the celebrities supporting this year's The Heart Truth campaign. Both R&B singer Ashanti (center) ...

  4. Heart Health - Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Heart Disease: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment Past Issues / Winter 2009 ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Most heart attacks happen when a clot in the coronary ...

  5. Women's Heart Disease: Heart Attack Symptoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Women's Heart Disease Heart Attack Symptoms Past Issues / Winter 2014 Table ... NHLBI has uncovered some of the causes of heart diseases and conditions, as well as ways to prevent ...

  6. Revealing Hearts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Saghaug, Kristin Falck; Pattison, George; Lindgren, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Some small business owners want to balance personal values as well as economic values. “I have to follow my heart” or “it must be meaningful” some of them say. But how might they be able to know what gives meaning to the heart? The philosophical theologian Paul Tillich finds that the problem...

  7. 77 FR 8144 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-14

    ... new definition for ``Previously mined land,'' adding new language on the effects of previous mining...-FOR. Texas proposed revisions in TX-061-FOR by ] adding language that no longer requires an operation... new language explaining performance standards for revegetation liability timeframes for coal mining...

  8. Texas FFA Officer Perceptions of Good Followership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, Susan Kate; Boyd, Barry L.; Rayfield, John

    2013-01-01

    This study examines Texas FFA officers' perceptions regarding the traits and characteristics that good followers possess. A content analysis of officer responses to an open-ended question found that these young leaders have a limited level of understanding of what constitutes a good follower. Furthermore, female respondents placed a greater…

  9. Teenage Pregnancy in the Texas Panhandle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galvez-Myles, Rosa; Myles, Thomas D.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: This study compares rural and small-city teenage and adult pregnancies, with respect to complication rates and pregnancy outcomes. Methods: Chart review of Medicaid patients (513 teenage [under 20 years] and 174 adult controls [ages 25-34]) delivered (excluding multiple gestation) in Amarillo, Texas, from January 1999 to April 2001.…

  10. The State of Education Reform in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirby, William N.

    1986-01-01

    A review is presented of recent educational changes affecting or taking place in Texas, including discussion regarding improved testing measures and results, remedial instruction, programs for students with special needs, grading and promotion standards for students, teacher salaries, teaching conditions, and funding. (CB)

  11. East Texas harvest and utilization study, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhonda M. Mathison; James W. Bentley; Tony G. Johnson

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, a harvest and utilization study was conducted on 80 operations throughout eastern Texas. There were 2,024 total trees measured: 1,335 or 66 percent were softwood, while 689 or 34 percent were hardwood. Results from this study showed that 86 percent of the total softwood volume measured was utilized for a product, and 14 percent was left as logging...

  12. The Texas Water Education Network Directory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Water Development Board, Austin.

    The resource persons and program descriptions in this directory came from answers supplied in a 1988 survey mailed to 135 entities having some relationship to or interest in promoting the distribution of water education materials suitable for use in Texas elementary or secondary schools. This directory includes an update on the programs submitted…

  13. 78 FR 48764 - Texas Disaster # TX-00413

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-09

    ... State of Texas (FEMA-4136- DR), dated 08/02/2013. Incident: Explosion. Incident Period: 04/17/2013 through 04/20/2013. Effective Date: 08/02/2013. Physical Loan Application Deadline Date: 10/01/2013. Economic Injury (EIDL) Loan Application Deadline Date: 05/02/2014. ADDRESSES: Submit completed loan...

  14. Galveston Island, Texas, Sand Management Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    labeled “Unavailable” is used for recreation but could possibly be scraped occasionally...the main navigation channel into Galveston Bay. This jettied, deep -draft channel, which provides access to the ports of Galveston and Houston, is...shoreline change statistics and cross-shore beach profiles. Texas Bureau of Economic Geology (BEG) supplies shoreline shapefiles via its web page

  15. Innovative Developmental Education Programs: A Texas Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Eric A.; Capraro, Mary Margaret; Capraro, Robert M.; Chaudhuri, Nandita; Dyer, James; Marchbanks, Miner P., III

    2014-01-01

    This article provides insights from a 2-year, cross-site evaluation of state funded developmental education sites and serves as a focus article for response by those sites. Receiving grants from the Texas Higher Education Coordinating Board (THECB), nine sites (5 community colleges and 4 universities) implemented innovative developmental education…

  16. West Nile virus, Texas, USA, 2012.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Kristy O; Ruktanonchai, Duke; Hesalroad, Dawn; Fonken, Eric; Nolan, Melissa S

    2013-11-01

    During the 2012 West Nile virus outbreak in Texas, USA, 1,868 cases were reported. Male patients, persons >65 years of age, and minorities were at highest risk for neuroinvasive disease. Fifty-three percent of counties reported a case; 48% of case-patients resided in 4 counties around Dallas/Fort Worth. The economic cost was >$47.6 million.

  17. 76 FR 50708 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-16

    ... established five years after the last year of augmented seeding, fertilizing, irrigation, or other work in... after the last year of augmented seeding, fertilizing, irrigation, or other work in order to assure... augmented seeding, fertilizing, irrigation, or other work, if the land is previously mined land. E. Texas...

  18. 75 FR 81122 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-27

    ... did not respond to our request. State Historical Preservation Officer (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) Under 30 CFR 732.17(h)(4), we are required to request comments from... Part 943, which codify decisions concerning the Texas program. We find that good cause exists under 5 U...

  19. 78 FR 11579 - Texas Regulatory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-19

    ... Preservation Officer (SHPO) and the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation (ACHP) Under 30 CFR 732.17(h)(4... codify decisions concerning the Texas program. We find that good cause exists under 5 U.S.C. 553(d)(3) to...

  20. The Energy-Water Nexus in Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashlynn S. Stillwell

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the nexus between energy and water - water used for energy and energy used for water - has become increasing important in a changing world. As growing populations demand more energy supplies and water resources, research aims to analyze the interconnectedness of these two resources. Our study sought to quantify the energy-water relationship in Texas, specifically the relationship between electricity generation and water resources as it pertains to policy and society. We examined the water requirements for various types of electricity generating facilities, for typical systems both nationwide and in Texas. We also addressed the energy requirements of water supply and wastewater treatment systems, comparing national averages with Texas-specific values. Analysis of available data for Texas reveals that approximately 595,000 megaliters of water annually - enough water for over three million people for a year - are consumed by cooling the state's thermoelectric power plants while generating approximately 400 terawatt-hours of electricity. At the same time, each year Texas uses an estimated 2.1 to 2.7 terawatt-hours of electricity for water systems and 1.8 to 2.0 terawatt-hours for wastewater systems - enough electricity for about 100,000 people for a year. In preparing our analysis, it became clear that substantially more site-specific data are necessary for a full understanding of the nature of the energy-water nexus and the sustainability of economic growth in Texas. We recommend that Texas increase efforts to collect accurate data on the withdrawal and consumption of cooling and process water at power plants, as well as data on electricity consumption for public water supply and wastewater treatment plants and distribution systems. The overarching conclusion of our work is that increased efficiency advances the sustainable use of both energy and water. Improving water efficiency will reduce power demand, and improving energy

  1. Issues Related to Technology in Teacher Education Programs and K-12 Public Schools in Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon Denton

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the support systems, financial support, current use of technology, and infrastructure issues at selected institutions of higher education (IHE and in K-12 public schools in the State of Texas, United States. Discussion is provided on how current practitioners in public schools and institutions of higher education that prepare pre-service teachers for these schools match regarding technology. In depth discussion is provided on two surveys--one of higher education institutions and one of public schools--along with a discussion of the findings as they relate to the ability of institutions of higher education to support K-12 schools through the preparation of future teachers well equipped to use and comfortable with current and emerging technologies.

  2. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  3. Heart Disease and Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... email updates Enter email Submit Heart Disease and Stroke Heart disease and stroke are important health issues ... Stroke risk factors View more Heart Disease and Stroke resources Related information Heart-healthy eating Stress and ...

  4. Heart failure - overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart failure; Right-sided heart failure - cor pulmonale; Cardiomyopathy - heart failure; HF ... Disease Section. Heart Failure as a newly approved diagnosis for cardiac rehabilitation: challenges and opportunities. J Am ...

  5. Pericarditis - after heart attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include: A previous heart attack Open heart surgery Chest trauma A heart attack that has affected the thickness of your heart muscle Symptoms Symptoms include: Anxiety Chest pain from the swollen pericardium rubbing on the ...

  6. Heart attack first aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    First aid - heart attack; First aid - cardiopulmonary arrest; First aid - cardiac arrest ... A heart attack occurs when the blood flow that carries oxygen to the heart is blocked. The heart muscle ...

  7. Heart disease - risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... disease Heart bypass surgery Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive Heart failure - overview Heart pacemaker High blood cholesterol levels High blood pressure Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator Smoking - tips on how to ...

  8. Heart Diseases and Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Back to Patient Resources Heart Diseases & Disorders Millions of people experience irregular or abnormal ... harmless and happen in healthy people free of heart disease. However, some abnormal heart rhythms can be serious ...

  9. Getting a New Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a procedure that opens clogged arteries. Repair the heart valve . This procedure can often make your heart function ... heart muscle. Ventricular assist devices (VAD) . These are mechanical pumps that surgeons insert to help the heart ...

  10. What the Joint Admission Medical Program (JAMP) can do for Texas physicians; what Texas physicians can do for JAMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podawiltz, Alan; Richardson, James; Gleason, Wallace; Fallon, Kathleen; Jones, David; Peck, Elizabeth Kimberli; Rabek, Jeffrey; Schydlower, Manuel; Thomson, William; Warne, Russell T; Mabry, Budge; Hermesmeyer, Paul; Smith, Quentin W

    2012-08-01

    Texas faces health challenges requiring a physician workforce with understanding of a broad range of issues -- including the role of culture, income level, and health beliefs -- that affect the health of individuals and communities. Building on previous successful physician workforce "pipeline" efforts, Texas established the Joint Admission Medical Program (JAMP), a first-of-its-kind program to encourage access to medical education by Texans who are economically disadvantaged. The program benefits those from racial and ethnic minority groups and involves all 31 public and 34 private Texas undergraduate colleges and universities offering life science degrees, as well as all 9 medical schools. Available program data indicate that JAMP has broadened enrollment diversity in Texas' medical schools. However, greater progress requires strengthened partnerships with professional colleagues practicing medicine in communities across Texas. This article explores how JAMP can help Texas physicians and how Texas physicians can help JAMP.

  11. Pediatric heart surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heart surgery - pediatric; Heart surgery for children; Acquired heart disease; Heart valve surgery - children ... There are many kinds of heart defects. Some are minor, and others are more serious. Defects can occur inside the heart or in the large blood vessels ...

  12. Explaining the Decline in Coronary Heart Disease Mortality in the Czech Republic between 1985 and 2007

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bruthans, J.; Cifková, R.; Lánská, V.; O'Flaherty, M.; Critchley, J.A.; Holub, J.; Janský, P.; Zvárová, Jana; Capewell, S.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 21, č. 7 (2014), s. 829-839 ISSN 2047-4873 Institutional support: RVO:67985807 Keywords : coronary heart disease * Czech MONICA and Czech post-MONICA * coronary heart disease management * coronary heart disease mortality * coronary heart disease risk factors Subject RIV: FA - Cardiovascular Diseases incl. Cardiotharic Surgery Impact factor: 3.319, year: 2014

  13. [Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF). Together against heart failure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl, Georg; Störk, Stefan; Börste, Rita

    2016-04-01

    Heart failure is one of the most urgent medical and socio-economic challenges of the 21(st) century. Up to three million people are affected in Germany; this means one in ten people over the age of 65  live with heart failure. The current demographic changes will accentuate the importance of this grave health problem. The care of patients with heart failure, as well as the associated research mandates a comprehensive, multidisciplinary approach. The Competence Network Heart Failure (CNHF) pursues this objective. CNHF is a research alliance with 11 sites in Germany and was funded by the Federal Ministry of Research (BMBF) from 2003 through 2014. Since January 2015, the network has been an associate cooperating partner of the German Centre for Cardiovascular Research (DZHK). During the 12-year funding period by the BMBF, scientists in the field of heart failure from 30 university hospitals, 5 research institutes, 7 heart centers, 17 cardiovascular clinics, over 200 general practitioners, 4 rehabilitation clinics, as well as numerous organizations and associations were involved in cooperative CNHF research. In the context of 22 projects, the CNHF covered basic, clinical, and health care research, and generated numerous groundbreaking insights into disease mechanisms, as well as diagnosis and treatment of heart failure, which are documented in more than 350 publications. With its central study database and bank of biomaterials, the network has set up a Europe-wide unique research resource, which can be used in the future for national and international cooperations with the DZHK and other partners. Furthermore, the CNHF strongly promotes nation- and Europe-wide public relations and heart failure awareness activities.

  14. Institutional ethnography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Rebecca; Tienari, Janne

    2016-01-01

    The study of M&As is dominated by positivist and functionalist world views and the use of quantitative methods. Although extant research also uses qualitative and mixed methods, it can be criticized for viewing its subject matter through an abstract and external lens. The researcher is placed in ......, and point to some of the problems in M&A studies identified through this lens. Finally, we argue why institutional ethnography, in comparison with other methods of inquiry, is particularly fruitful in the study of mergers and acquisitions....

  15. Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-11-01

    Joining the team A new member of staff has recently joined the Institute of Physics Education Department (Schools and Colleges) team. (Dr) Steven Chapman will have managerial responsibility for physics education issues in the 11 - 16 age range, particularly on the policy side. He will work closely with Mary Wood, who spends much of her time out and about doing the practical things to support physics education pre-16. Catherine Wilson will be spending more of her time working to support the Post-16 Physics Initiative but retains overall responsibility for the department. Steven graduated in Physics and Astronomy and then went on to do his doctorate at Sussex University. He stayed in the research field for a while, including a period at NPL. Then, having decided to train as a teacher, he taught for the last five years, most recently at a brand new school in Sutton where he was Head of Physics. Physics update Dates for `Physics Update' courses in 2000, intended for practising science teachers, are as follows: 1 - 3 April: Malvern College 9 - 10 June: Stirling University 8 - 10 July: York University 8 - 10 December: Oxford University The deadline for applications for the course to be held on 11 - 13 December 1999 at the School of Physics, Exeter University, is 12 November, so any late enquiries should be sent to Leila Solomon at The Institute of Physics, 76 Portland Place, London W1N 3DH (tel: 020 7470 4821) right away. Name that teacher! Late nominations are still welcome for the Teachers of Physics/Teachers of Primary Science awards for the year 2000. Closing date for nominations is `the last week in November'. Further details can be obtained from Catherine Wilson or Barbara Hill in the Institute's Education Department. Forward and back! The Education Group's one-day meeting on 13 November is accepting bookings until almost the last minute, so don't delay your application! The day is entitled `Post-16 physics: Looking forward, learning from the past' and it aims to

  16. Trends and variations in mantle cell lymphoma incidence from 1995 to 2013: A comparative study between Texas and National SEER areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Shuangshuang; Wang, Michael; Lairson, David R; Li, Ruosha; Zhao, Bo; Du, Xianglin L

    2017-12-22

    Few studies have assessed mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) incidence trends in the U.S. National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) areas. Previous studies were 5 to 9 years old and MCL incidence in Texas remains unknown. This study updated the temporal trends and variations of MCL incidence in the SEER areas and compared them with counterpart data in Texas. From 1995 to 2013, there were 2, 435 and 5, 193 newly diagnosed MCL patients in Texas and SEER areas. Age-adjusted MCL incidence was 0.91 per 100,000 persons per year in Texas and 1.01 in SEER areas. MCL incidence increased steadily with an annual percent change (APC) of 2.56% in SEER areas and an APC of 2.16% in Texas. In SEER areas, APCs for MCL incidence were significantly different from zero in patients with advanced stage tumor (3.33%), male (2.71%), elderly patients ≥ 80 years old (4.21%) and non-Hispanic white patients (2.83%) (all P areas, with increases being greater in male, non-Hispanic white, and elderly patient ≥70 years with advanced stage tumors. Texas has similar MCL incidence trends and disparities as the national SEER areas.

  17. Education Outreach Associated with Technology Transfer in a Colonia of South Texas: Green Valley Farms Science and Space Club for Middle School Aged Children in Green Valley Farms, San Benito, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potess, Marla D.; Rainwater, Ken; Muirhead, Dean

    2004-01-01

    Texas colonias are unincorporated subdivisions characterized by inadequate water and wastewater infrastructure, inadequate drainage and road infrastructure, substandard housing, and poverty. Since 1989 the Texas Legislature has implemented policies to halt further development of colonias and to address water and wastewater infrastructure needs in existing and new colonias along the border with Mexico. Government programs and non-government and private organization projects aim to address these infrastructure needs. Texas Tech University's Water Resources Center demonstrated the use of alternative on-site wastewater treatment in the Green Valley Farms colonia, San Benito, Texas. The work in Green Valley Farms was a component of a NASA-funded project entitled Evaluation of NASA's Advanced Life Support Integrated Water Recovery System for Non-Optimal Conditions and Terrestrial Applications. Two households within the colonia are demonstration sites for constructed wetlands. A colonia resident and activist identified educational opportunities for colonia children as a primary goal for many colonia residents. Colonia parents view education as the door to opportunity and escape from poverty for their children. The educational outreach component of the project in Green Valley Farms was a Science and Space Club for middle-school age students. Involved parents, schoolteachers, and school administrators enthusiastically supported the monthly club meetings and activities. Each month, students participated in interactive learning experiences about water use and reuse in space and on earth. Activities increased knowledge and interest in water resource issues and in science and engineering fields. The Institute for the Development and Enrichment of Advanced Learners (IDEAL) at Texas Tech University provided full scholarships for five students from Green Valley Farms to attend the Shake Hands With Your Future camp at Texas Tech University in June 2003. The educational outreach

  18. Biogenic emissions modeling for Southeastern Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, M.; Jacob, D.; Jarvie, J. [Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission, Austin, TX (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    The Texas Natural Resource Conservation Commission (TNRCC) modeling staff performed biogenic hydrocarbon emissions modeling in support of gridded photochemical modeling for ozone episodes in 1992 and 1993 for the Coastal Oxidant Assessment for Southeast Texas (COAST) modeling domain. This paper summarizes the results of the biogenic emissions modeling and compares preliminary photochemical modeling results to ambient air monitoring data collected during the 1993 COAST study. Biogenic emissions were estimated using BIOME, a gridded biogenic emissions model that uses region-specific land use and biomass density data, and plant species-specific emission factor data. Ambient air monitoring data were obtained by continuous automated gas chromatography at two sites, one-hour canister samples at 5 sites, and 24-hour canister samples at 13 other sites. The concentrations of Carbon Bond-IV species (as determined from urban airshed modeling) were compared to measured hydrocarbon concentrations. In this paper, we examined diurnal and seasonal variations, as well as spatial variations.

  19. Wind/solar resource in Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nelson, V.; Starcher, K.; Gaines, H. [West Texas A& M Univ., Canyon, TX (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Data are being collected at 17 sites to delineate a baseline for the wind and solar resource across Texas. Wind data are being collected at 10, 25, and 40 m (in some cases at 50 m) to determine wind shear and power at hub heights of large turbines. Many of the sites are located in areas of predicted terrain enhancement. The typical day in a month for power and wind turbine output was calculated for selected sites and combination of sites; distributed systems. Major result to date is that there is the possibility of load matching in South Texas during the summer months, even though the average values by month indicate a low wind potential.

  20. Sediment Management Options for Galveston Island, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Galveston Island is a major tourist and commercial center on the Gulf of Mexico at the mouth of Galveston Bay, Texas, USA. The shoreline along the...approximately 235°. The island is bordered by the Gulf of Mexico , the Galveston Entrance Channel to the northeast, West Bay to the northwest, and San...plants on both ends of the island are the best strategies to widen the beaches of Galveston Island, improve tourism , and better protect the island

  1. Austin Chalk trend, upper Gulf Coast, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holifield, R.

    1982-01-01

    The application of innovative geologic and geophysical interpretations and of carefully tailored well completion techniques has created the opportunity for profitable, low-risk drilling programs in the Austin Chalk Formation of S. Texas. This discussion focuses on selected information that should be beneficial for exploration and development activities in the Austin Chalk. The Giddings field is discussed in some detail, since this field is the center of the greatest activity in the Austin Chalk trend.

  2. The Energy-Water Nexus in Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Ashlynn S. Stillwell; Carey W. King; Michael E. Webber; Ian J. Duncan; Amy Hardberger

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the nexus between energy and water - water used for energy and energy used for water - has become increasing important in a changing world. As growing populations demand more energy supplies and water resources, research aims to analyze the interconnectedness of these two resources. Our study sought to quantify the energy-water relationship in Texas, specifically the relationship between electricity generation and water resources as it pertains to policy and society. We examined...

  3. Floods in central Texas, August 1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, E.E.; Massey, B.C.; Waddell, Kidd M.

    1979-01-01

    Catastrophic floods, which resulted in millions of dollars in property damages and the loss of 33 lives, occurred in Central Texas during August 1-4, 1978, as a result of intense rainfall produced by the remnants of tropical storm Amelia. Rainfall in excess of 30 inches was unofficially reported at several locations, while the highest 24-hour amount recorded by the National·Weather Service was 29.05 inches at Albany in Shackelford County.

  4. Reviews Book: Voyage to the Heart of the Matter: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN Equipment: SEP Spectroscope Books: Quantum Gods / The Universe Places to visit: The Royal Institution of Great Britain Book: What is this Thing Called Science? Book: Don't be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in the Age of Style Equipment: La Crosse Anemometer Book: Wonder and Delight Web Watch

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    WE RECOMMEND SEP Spectroscope Flatpacked classroom equipment for pupils aged 10 and over Quantum Gods Book attacks spiritualism and religion with physics The Universe Study of whether physics alone can explain origin of universe La Crosse Anemometer Handheld monitor is packed with useful features Wonder and Delight Essays in science education in honour of Eric Rogers WORTH A LOOK Voyage to the Heart of the Matter: The ATLAS Experiment at CERN Pop-up book explains background to complex physics The Royal Institution of Great Britain RI museum proves interesting but not ideal for teaching What is this Thing Called Science? Theory and history of science in an opinionated study Don't be Such a Scientist: Talking Substance in the Age of Style Explanation of how science is best communicated to the public WEB WATCH Particle physics simulations vary in complexity, usefulness and how well they work

  5. A Study of the Aquaculture Industry in Texas to Assist in Establishing Aquaculture as a Course Offering in Agricultural Science and Technology. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillingham, John; And Others

    A 1989-90 project determined the knowledge and skills necessary for employment in the aquaculture industry. The study identified technical materials and other resources available in private industry and higher education institutions. Two surveys determined the status of aquaculture in Texas school districts and identified tasks performed by…

  6. The Texas Youth Fitness Study: Looking at School Policies as They Relate to Physical Fitness and Academic Variables. Program Results Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feiden, Karyn

    2011-01-01

    In partnership with three universities, the Cooper Institute, Dallas, completed the Texas Youth Fitness Study from 2008 to 2009. The study explored three key questions: (1) Is physical fitness associated with academic performance?; (2) Can physical education teachers collect high-quality information on student fitness?; and (3) Are school policies…

  7. Redotex ingestions reported to Texas poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2010-09-01

    Although the multi-component weight loss supplement Redotex is banned in the United States, the supplement can be obtained in Mexico. The intent of this report was to describe the pattern of Redotex calls received by a statewide poison center system. Cases were all Redotex calls received by Texas poison centers during 2000-2008. The distribution of total calls and those involving ingestion of the supplement were determined for selected demographic and clinical factors. Of 34 total Redotex calls received, 55.9% came from the 14 Texas counties that border Mexico. Of the 22 reported Redotex ingestions, 77.3% of the patients were female and 45.5% 20 years or more. Of the 17 ingestions involving no co-ingestants, 52.9% were already at or en route to a health care facility, 41.2% were managed on site, and 5.9% was referred to a health care facility. The final medical outcome was no effect in 23.5% cases, minor effect in 5.9%, moderate effect in 11.8%, not followed but minimal clinical effects possible in 47.1%, and unable to follow but judged to be potentially toxic in 11.8%. Most Redotex calls to the Texas poison center system originated from counties bordering Mexico.

  8. Living with Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic Heart Disease What Is The term "diabetic heart ... Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD may include coronary heart disease ( ...

  9. Heart failure - surgeries and devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... surgery; HF - surgery; Intra-aortic balloon pumps - heart failure; IABP - heart failure; Catheter based assist devices - heart failure ... problem may cause heart failure or make heart failure worse. Heart valve surgery may be needed to repair or ...

  10. Heart rate control with adrenergic blockade: Clinical outcomes in cardiovascular medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Feldman, David; Elton, Terry S; Menachemi, Doron M; Wexler, Randy K

    2010-01-01

    David Feldman1, Terry S Elton2, Doron M Menachemi3, Randy K Wexler41Heart Failure/Transplant and VAD Programs, Minneapolis Heart Institute, Minneapolis, Minnesota, USA; 2Division of Pharmacology, College of Pharmacology, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USA; 3Heart Failure Services, Edith Wolfson Medical Center, The Heart Institute, Sakler School of Medicine, Tel-Aviv University, Holon, Israel; 4Department of Clinical Family Medicine, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, USAAb...

  11. RAP workshop : Buda-TxAPA, Texas, August 27, 2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-27

    Presentation Outline : RAP overview : RAP stockpile survey: state of practice : RAP processing and RAP variability : RAP characterization : RAP mix design : Field performance of Texas high RAP test sections

  12. Managing Asthma on the College Campus: Findings of a Texas Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Kevin P; Weiss-Randall, Debra N; Henry, Nicholas R

    2015-08-01

    Students attending institutions of higher education have the option of utilizing their student health center (SHC) for asthma management. However, a review of the available literature revealed no previous research as to how SHCs on college campuses in Texas manage students with asthma. This led to the following research questions; how are SHCs in Texas managing asthma for college students, and what are the SHC directors' attitudes and perceptions of the impact of asthma on their college campuses? This descriptive pilot study randomly selected 20 colleges in Texas; 17 institutions agreed to participate. The inclusion criteria consisted of 4-y colleges accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools with an undergraduate student population of greater than 1,000 full-time students, excluding online colleges. Once identified, the director of each institution's SHC was contacted by telephone and invited to complete the Managing Asthma on College Campuses Survey instrument via telephone interview (n = 14) or e-mail (n = 3). Descriptive statistics were used to analyze quantitative data and common themes were noted for the qualitative data. Quantitative data obtained through the survey revealed 23.5% of SHCs provide individualized asthma action plans to students and 35% of SHCs stated they have an emergency action plan for asthma exacerbations. Respondents noted 2 major barriers for effective asthma management on campus: lack of understanding of chronic disease management and underuse of the SHC due to a lack of awareness of its existence. Perceived barriers to visiting the SHC included access issues, money, and students self-medicating with short-acting β2 agonist inhalers and/or over-the-counter medications. The majority of directors were satisfied with asthma services provided to students; however, they felt more face-to-face asthma education was needed. Copyright © 2015 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  13. Types of Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects. Acquired heart block is more common than congenital heart block. Damage to the heart muscle or its electrical system causes acquired heart block. Diseases, surgery, or medicines can cause this damage. The three types of heart block are first degree, second degree, ...

  14. What Causes Heart Block?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects. Acquired heart block is more common than congenital heart block. Damage to the heart muscle or its electrical system causes acquired heart block. Diseases, surgery, or medicines can cause this damage. The three types of heart block are first degree, second degree, ...

  15. Living with Heart Block

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... defects. Acquired heart block is more common than congenital heart block. Damage to the heart muscle or its electrical system causes acquired heart block. Diseases, surgery, or medicines can cause this damage. The three types of heart block are first degree, second degree, ...

  16. Commercial Space Port Planning in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, L.; Looke, B.

    2002-01-01

    The Texas Legislature is providing funding to support research and planning activities aimed at creating a commercial spaceport in the state. These monies have been allocated to regional Spaceport Development Corporations that have been established in three countries containing candidate site locations: Willacy County (in South Texas); Brazoria County (East Texas); and Pecos County (West Texas). This program is being sponsored and coordinated by the Texas Aerospace Commission (TAC). The Sasakawa International Center for Space Architecture (SICSA) at the University of Houston is providing research, planning and design support to TAC and is a member of each of the three regional development teams. Planning must carefully consider special support requirements and operational characteristics of all prospective launch systems along with geographic, infrastructure and environmental factors at each site. Two of the candidate sites are in coastal areas; a priority for certain launch service providers; whereas the third inland site is more attractive to others. Candidate launch systems include winged horizontal takeoff air-launch vehicles, vertical multi-stage reusable launch vehicles, and expendable sub-orbital surrounding rockets. Important research and planning activities include environmental impact assessments, analyses of overflight hazards, investigations of economic impacts and business plan development. The results of these activities will guide master plan development for each site, including: a physical plan (site layout, infrastructure improvements and facility construction); and a strategic plan (user agreements, licenses, finance sources and participants). Commercial spaceport development demands compliance with stringent FAA regulations established by the Office of Commercial Space Transportation (OCST) which exceed minimum standards allowed for U.S. Government spaceport facilities. Key among these requirements are 15,000 ft. radius on-site clear zones

  17. Cardiac magnetic resonance myocardial perfusion reserve index is reduced in women with coronary microvascular dysfunction. A National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute-sponsored study from the Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Louise E J; Wei, Janet; Agarwal, Megha; Haft-Baradaran, Afsaneh; Shufelt, Chrisandra; Mehta, Puja K; Gill, Edward B; Johnson, B Delia; Kenkre, Tanya; Handberg, Eileen M; Li, Debiao; Sharif, Behzad; Berman, Daniel S; Petersen, John W; Pepine, Carl J; Bairey Merz, C Noel

    2015-04-01

    Women with signs and symptoms of ischemia and no obstructive coronary artery disease often have coronary microvascular dysfunction (CMD), diagnosed by invasive coronary reactivity testing (CRT). Although traditional noninvasive stress imaging is often normal in CMD, cardiac MRI may be able to detect CMD in this population. Vasodilator stress cardiac MRI was performed in 118 women with suspected CMD who had undergone CRT and 21 asymptomatic reference subjects. Semi-quantitative evaluation of the first-pass perfusion images was completed to determine myocardial perfusion reserve index (MPRI). The relationship between CRT findings and MPRI was examined by Pearson correlations, logistic regression, and sensitivity/specificity. Symptomatic women had lower mean pharmacological stress MPRI compared with reference subjects (1.71±0.43 versus 2.23±0.37; P<0.0001). Lower MPRI was predictive of ≥1 abnormal CRT variables (odds ratio =0.78 [0.70, 0.88], P<0.0001, c-statistic 0.78 [0.68, 0.88]). An MPRI threshold of 1.84 predicted CRT abnormality with sensitivity 73% and specificity 74%. Noninvasive cardiac MRI MPRI can detect CMD defined by invasive CRT. Further work is aimed to optimize the noninvasive identification and management of CMD patients. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00832702. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  18. Public Outreach of the South Texas Health Physic Society and Texas A&M University Nuclear Engineering Department

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berry, R. O.

    2003-02-24

    In a cooperative effort of the members of the South Texas Chapter of the Heath Physics Society (STC-HPS) and the Texas A&M University Nuclear Engineering Department, great efforts have been made to reach out and provide educational opportunities to members of the general public, school age children, and specifically teachers. These efforts have taken the form of Science Teacher Workshops (STW), visits to schools all over the state of Texas, public forums, and many other educational arenas. A major motivational factor for these most recent efforts can be directly tied to the attempt of the State of Texas to site a low-level radioactive waste facility near Sierra Blanca in West Texas. When the State of Texas first proposed to site a low level radioactive waste site after the Low-Level Radioactive Waste Policy Act of 1980 was passed, many years of political struggle ensued. Finally, a site at Sierra Blanca in far West Texas was selected for study and characterization for a disposal site for waste generated in the Texas Compact states of Maine, Vermont and Texas. During this process, the outreach to and education of the local public became a paramount issue.

  19. Authentic Learning Experiences for Educators through Summer Internships: Revising the DIG Texas Instructional Blueprints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, A. O.; Bohls-Graham, E.; Jacobs, B. E.; Ellins, K. K.

    2014-12-01

    Texas teachers have expressed a need for engaging activities for use in high school Earth science courses. With funding from the NSF, geoscience and education faculty from different institutions around the state collaborated with ten Earth science teachers to create five online Earth science instructional blueprints. The work is part of the DIG (Diversity and Innovation for Geosciences) Texas Instructional Blueprint project. A blueprint stitches together nine units for a yearlong Earth science course (scope and sequence). Each unit covers three weeks of teaching and contains lectures, readings, visualizations, lab investigations, learning activities, and other educational materials from credible sources, which are aligned with Texas state science standards for Earth and Space Science and the Earth Science Literacy Principles. Taken together, the collection of activities address the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS). During summer 2014, three minority-serving secondary teachers completed a six-week internship at The University of Texas Institute for Geophysics (UTIG). As DIG Texas Education Interns, we organized and revised the content of the units, created scaffolding notes, and built blueprints by selecting groups of nine units from the project's current collection of twenty-one units. Because fieldwork is an important element of geoscience learning, we integrated virtual field trips into each unit. We (1) gained expertise in selecting high quality activities that directly correlate with state standards and address the Earth Science Literacy Principles; (2) developed a keen awareness of the value of the NGSS; (3) learned how to navigate through the NGSS website to track the relationships between the Science and Engineering Practices, Disciplinary Core Ideas, and Crosscutting Concepts for Earth science, as well as connections to other disciplines in the same grade level. Collaborating with other secondary Earth science teachers introduced each of us to new

  20. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... about other tests and procedures, go to the diagnosis sections of the Health Topics Coronary Heart Disease , Heart Failure , and Cardiomyopathy articles. Treatment Diabetic heart disease (DHD) is treated ...

  1. Classes of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... second installment explains heart failure with muscle intact. Queen Latifah and her mom, Rita, share their personal ... a Heart Attack 10 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate *Red Dress ™ DHHS, Go Red ™ AHA ; National Wear Red ...

  2. Types of Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... second installment explains heart failure with muscle intact. Queen Latifah and her mom, Rita, share their personal ... a Heart Attack 10 Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate *Red Dress ™ DHHS, Go Red ™ AHA ; National Wear Red ...

  3. Heart failure - home monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000113.htm Heart failure - home monitoring To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Heart failure is a condition in which the heart is ...

  4. Heart disease and depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gov/ency/patientinstructions/000790.htm Heart disease and depression To use the sharing features on this page, ... a heart attack or heart surgery Signs of Depression It is pretty common to feel down or ...

  5. Who Needs Heart Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... children, go to the Health Topics articles about congenital heart defects , holes in the heart , and tetralogy of Fallot . Overview The most common type of heart surgery for adults is coronary artery ...

  6. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  7. Heart Health Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is easier to treat. Blood tests and heart health tests can help find heart diseases or identify ... diseases. There are several different types of heart health tests. Your doctor will decide which test or ...

  8. Hypertensive heart disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000163.htm Hypertensive heart disease To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hypertensive heart disease refers to heart problems that occur because of ...

  9. Congenital Heart Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart defects. Important Notice The Congenital Heart Information Network website is temporarily out of service. Please join ... and Uwe Baemayr for The Congenital Heart Information Network Exempt organization under Section 501(c)3. Copyright © ...

  10. The impact of the New Panama Canal Locks on Texas ports and the Texas economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    This report examines the first year transits through the new Panama Canal locks and its impact on Texas deep water ports. It finds that the canal is operating efficiently and can accommodate 14,000 TEU containerships and bulk vessels up to 125,000 to...

  11. Texas School Dropout Survey: A Report to the 69th Legislature, State of Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas State Dept. of Community Affairs, Austin. Training and Employment Development Div.

    As a response to legislative demands, the Texas School Dropout Survey described in this document attempted to identify the magnitude of the dropout problem, regional characteristics or causes of the problem, costs associated with dropping out, and programs currently available for serving the dropout population. Twenty-four major findings of the…

  12. Exercise treadmill testing using a modified exercise protocol in women with suspected myocardial ischemia: findings from the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute-sponsored Women's Ischemia Syndrome Evaluation (WISE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Jannet F; McGorray, Susan; Lin, Lang; Pepine, Carl J; Chaitman, Bernard; Doyle, Mark; Edmundowicz, Daniel; Sharaf, Barry L; Merz, C Noel Bairey

    2005-03-01

    Exercise testing, a major diagnostic modality in individuals with suspected coronary artery disease (CAD), has in general demonstrated less overall diagnostic accuracy in women compared to men. As part of the WISE, a modified protocol was examined with the intention of improving reliability of exercise testing. Criteria for entry in the WISE study include clinically indicated coronary angiography. Exercise testing was performed using a protocol modified to be more appropriate for women. The study population consisted of 96 women, mean age of 55.8 y (range 34-77), who completed exercise treadmill test (ETT). Most (78%) were postmenopausal; 96% had >or =2 risk factors for CAD. By core laboratory angiography, 29/96 women had stenosis > or =50% in at least one coronary artery. Of these 29 women, 9 had abnormal ETT, yielding overall sensitivity of 31%. The remaining 20 women had normal (12/29, 41%) or nondiagnostic (8/29, 28%) studies. Among the 67 women with minimal or no coronary stenosis, 35 had no ischemic ST-segment changes during ETT, yielding overall specificity of 52%. Analysis with exclusion of women with nondiagnostic studies yielded sensitivity and specificity of 43% and 66%, respectively. The presence of coronary artery stenosis and inability to perform ETT, but not results of testing, predicted the outcomes of myocardial infarction, heart failure, and death. Exercise treadmill test appears to be of limited diagnostic value in women with suspected myocardial ischemia referred for coronary angiography. Sensitivity and specificity remain poor even with modified exercise protocol and core laboratory angiographic analysis. These findings merit consideration in view of current guidelines that recommend exercise testing in women with suspected CAD.

  13. Heart bypass surgery - discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass - discharge; OPCAB - discharge; Beating heart surgery - discharge; Bypass surgery - heart - discharge; CABG - discharge; Coronary artery bypass graft - discharge; Coronary artery ...

  14. Heart failure - medicines

    Science.gov (United States)

    CHF - medicines; Congestive heart failure - medicines; Cardiomyopathy - medicines; HF - medicines ... You will need to take most of your heart failure medicines every day. Some medicines are taken once ...

  15. 78 FR 8960 - Texas (Splenetic) Fever in Cattle

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-07

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 72 Texas (Splenetic) Fever in Cattle AGENCY: Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service, USDA. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: We are amending the Texas... capable of transmitting microscopic parasites (Babesia) that cause bovine babesiosis. We are amending the...

  16. Facts about Texas Children. Excerpted from Children, Choice, and Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Lorwen Connie

    The environment in which Texas children grow up is crucial to their future and to the future of the state. Almost 500,000 Texas families were poor in 1985. Poverty sets the stage for numerous childhood maladies: infant mortality, health problems, child abuse, learning disabilities, malnutrition, and mental health problems. As poor children grow up…

  17. Labor Productivity Standards in Texas School Foodservice Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrin, A. Rachelle; Bednar, Carolyn; Kwon, Junehee

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Purpose of this research was to investigate utilization of labor productivity standards and variables that affect productivity in Texas school foodservice operations. Methods: A questionnaire was developed, validated, and pilot tested, then mailed to 200 randomly selected Texas school foodservice directors. Descriptive statistics for…

  18. Regulating Abortion: Impact on Patients and Providers in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colman, Silvie; Joyce, Ted

    2011-01-01

    The State of Texas began enforcement of the Woman's Right to Know (WRTK) Act on January 1, 2004. The law requires that all abortions at or after 16 weeks' gestation be performed in an ambulatory surgical center (ASC). In the month the law went into effect, not one of Texas's 54 nonhospital abortion providers met the requirements of a surgical…

  19. Texas Future Farmers of America Poultry Judging Handbook. Revised.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, J. W.; And Others

    This handbook is designed to help students in Texas prepare for Future Farmers of America (FFA) poultry judgings. The handbook is organized into five major sections that cover the following topics: organization of the Texas FFA poultry judging contest; judging production hens; judging production pullets; grading ready-to-cook broilers, fryers, or…

  20. 27 CFR 9.144 - Texas High Plains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Texas High Plains. 9.144 Section 9.144 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT... Mexico; Texas” 1954, revised 1973. (2) “Brownfield, Texas; New Mexico” 1954, revised 1973. (3) “Hobbs...

  1. Population trends of red-cockaded woodpeckers in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard N. Conner; Daniel Saenz; D. Craig Rudolph

    2006-01-01

    tracked population trends of Red-cockaded Woodpeckers (Picoides borealis) in eastern Texas from 1983 through 2004. After declining precipitously during the 1980s, woodpecker population trends on federal lands (National Forests and Grasslands in Texas, but excluding the Big Thicket National Preserve) increased between 1990 and 2000, and have been...

  2. A Model for Health Professional Education in South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie; Vela, Leonel; Cigarroa, Francisco G.

    2008-01-01

    In 1997, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio established the Regional Academic Health Center (RAHC) for the Lower Rio Grande Valley in south Texas. Through medical education programs, research facilities, and partnerships with health-care providers, the RAHC aims to improve the health status and access to health services…

  3. Instructional Technology Practices in Developmental Education in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martirosyan, Nara M.; Kennon, J. Lindsey; Saxon, D. Patrick; Edmonson, Stacey L.; Skidmore, Susan T.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the current state of technology integration in developmental education in Texas higher education. Analyzing survey data from developmental education faculty members in 70 2- and 4-year colleges in Texas, researchers identified instructor-reported best instructional technology practices in developmental…

  4. Developing and Planning a Texas Based Homeschool Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry, Bobby K.

    2011-01-01

    Texas has some of the lowest SAT scores in the nation. They are ranked 36th nationwide in graduation rates and teacher salaries rank at number 33. The public school system in Texas has problems with overcrowding, violence, and poor performance on standardized testing. Currently 300,000 families have opted out of the public school system in order…

  5. Kratom exposures reported to Texas poison centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2013-01-01

    Kratom use is a growing problem in the United States. Kratom exposures reported to Texas poison centers between January 1998 and September 2013 were identified. No kratom exposures were reported from 1998 to 2008 and 14 exposures were reported from 2009 to September 2013. Eleven patients were male, and 11 patients were in their 20s. The kratom was ingested in 12 patients, inhaled in 1, and both ingested and inhaled in 1. Twelve patients were managed at a healthcare facility and the remaining 2 were managed at home.

  6. Suspended sediment yield in Texas watersheds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coonrod, Julia Ellen Allred

    The Texas Water Development Board collected suspended sediment samples across the state of Texas for approximately 60 years. Until this research, no comprehensive analysis of the data had been conducted. This study compiles the suspended sediment data along with corresponding streamflow and rainfall. GIS programs are developed which characterize watersheds corresponding to the sediment gauging stations. The watersheds are characterized according to topography, climate, soils, and land use. All of the data is combined to form several SAS data sets which can subsequently be analyzed using regression. Annual data for all of the stations across the state are classified temporally and spatially to determine trends in the sediment yield. In general, the suspended sediment load increases with increasing runoff but no correlation exists with rainfall. However, the annual average rainfall can be used to classify the watersheds according to climate, which improves the correlation between sediment load and runoff. The watersheds with no dams have higher sediment loads than watersheds with dams. Dams in the drier parts of Texas reduce the sediment load more than dams in the wetter part of the state. Sediment rating curves are developed separately for each basin in Texas. All but one of the curves fall into a band which varies by about two orders of magnitude. The study analyzes daily time series data for the Lavaca River near Edna station. USGS data are used to improve the sediment rating curve by the addition of physically related variables and interaction terms. The model can explain an additional 41% of the variability in sediment concentration compared to a simple bivariate regression of sediment load and flow. The TWDB daily data for the Lavaca River near Edna station are used to quantify temporal trends. There is a high correlation between sediment load and flowrate for the Lavaca River. The correlation can be improved by considering a flow-squared term and by

  7. Lake Aquilla - Habitat Survey Hill County, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    the nest, which is typically situated about one meter from the ground (Grzybowski 1995). These shrublands are a product of climate in the arid ...Lake Aquilla, Texas. Plot LA22 was located near N 31.99525° W 97.1425° in a low, poorly drained area that is semi -permanently flooded, only... Climate Center website ERDC/EL TR-17-16 57 (http://www.wcc.nrcs.usda.gov/ climate /wetlands.html) or the Web- based, Water-Budget, Interactive

  8. Take heart!

    CERN Document Server

    Alizée Dauvergne

    2010-01-01

    Recently, ten new semi-automatic defibrillators were installed at various locations around CERN. This is a preventive measure intended to provide cardiac arrest victims with the best possible response. The first responder could be you!   The Director-General has welcomed the initiative of the Medical Service and Fire Brigade for the installation of ten new semi-automatic defibrillators. You have probably seen them on your way to the restaurant, for example:  brand new semi-automatic defibrillators, ready for an emergency. Housed in a white wall-mounted case, the bright red defibrillators are marked with a white heart symbol crossed by a lightning bolt (see photo). The defibrillator is designed so that anyone can use it. “Anyone can use it, you don’t need to be a health professional,” says Dr Reymond from CERN's Medical Service. Together with the CERN Fire Brigade, he is behind the initiative to have these units put in place. And with good reason, as the unit...

  9. Graduate Students Rate Institutional Websites: The Must Have, Nice to Have, and Delighted to Have Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Katrina A.; Jones, Stephanie J.

    2012-01-01

    The graduate students admitted to the online and blended programs in higher education at Texas Tech University and the University of Memphis were surveyed about their respective university websites, or the institution's "virtual face." A total of 42 students rated 30 web-based services as "must have," "nice to have," "delighted to have (but not…

  10. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and lifestyle Cholesterol - drug treatment Controlling your high blood pressure Dietary fats explained Fast food tips Heart attack - discharge Heart attack - what to ask your doctor Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge Heart disease - risk factors Heart pacemaker - discharge ...

  11. How Is Heart Failure Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  12. How Is Heart Failure Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Intramural Research Home / Heart Failure Heart Failure Also known as Congestive heart failure What ... diseases for many years that led to heart failure. Heart failure is a leading cause of hospital stays ...

  13. How Is Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Back To Health Topics / Heart Disease in Women Heart Disease in Women Leer en español How Does Heart ... about coronary MVD and broken heart syndrome. Coronary Heart Disease CHD is a disease in which plaque (plak) ...

  14. Unsustainable Home Telehealth: A Texas Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radhakrishnan, Kavita; Xie, Bo; Jacelon, Cynthia S

    2016-10-01

    Telehealth has emerged as an innovative approach to aid older individuals in managing chronic diseases in their homes and avoid hospitalizations and institutionalization. However, the sustainability of home telehealth programs remains a major challenge. This qualitative study explored the reasons for the initial adoption and the eventual decline of a decade-long home telehealth program at a Texas home health agency (HHA). Barriers to and facilitators for sustaining home telehealth programs were also explored. Semistructured interviews of 13 HHA nursing staff and administrators, 1 physician, and 9 patients aged >55 years and their informal caregivers who used telehealth were conducted in summer 2013. Interview transcripts were analyzed using conventional content analysis. Data analysis generated 5 themes representing the decline of the Texas home telehealth program: its impact on patient-centered outcomes, its cost-effectiveness, patient-clinician and interprofessional communication, technology usability, and home health management culture. Lack of significant impact on patient outcomes, in addition to financial, technical, management, and communication-related challenges, adversely affected the sustainability of this home telehealth program. A home telehealth program that attains patient-centered outcomes, improves cost-effectiveness of managing chronic diseases, improves quality of communication among patients and clinicians, is user-friendly for older adults, and involves end users in decision making is likely to be sustainable. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Assessment of Waco, Texas FLIR videotape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frankel, Donald S.

    2001-09-01

    The FLIR video recorded by the FBI on 19 April 1993, records the final assault on the Branch Davidian compound in Waco, Texas, and the fire in which some 80 members of the sect died. Attention has focused on a number of flashes recorded on the videotape. The author has examined the 1993 videotape and the recorded videotapes of the re-enactment conducted at Fort Hood, Texas on 19 March 2000. The following conclusions have been reached: 1) The flashes seen on the tape cannot be weapons muzzle flash. Their duration is far too long and their spatial extent is far too great. They are almost certainly the result of solar energy or heat energy form nearby vehicles reflected toward the FLIR by debris or puddles. 2) The FLIR video technology has a very low probability of detecting small arms muzzle flash. 3) As a consequence of 2) above, the absence of muzzle flash detection on the FLIR tape does not prove that no weapons were actually fired during the final assault. Indeed, there is ample evidence (not presented here) that the Davidians fired at the federal agents, but none of their muzzle flashes are detectable on the videotape.

  16. Persevering pays off in Texas restoration project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kucera, S.

    1993-06-01

    In 1984, all John McNeill wanted was to build a new ice manufacturing plant to expand his Victoria, Texas, ice business. At the time, an abandoned hydroelectric plant near Cuero, Texas, on the Guadalupe River east of San Antonio, seemed an inexpensive way to get his two most costly ingredients: energy and water. He could take water from the river, generate 175 to 200 kilowatt-hours of electricity for his own use, and sell the excess power. The 1.2-MW plant McNeill found had stood idle and in disrepair since 1965 when the owner, Central Power and Light, shut it down after a flood. McNeill bought the plant from the current owners, brothers Ralph and Raleigh Coppedge. The brothers financed McNeill's purchase. He began work on the project, but repeated periods of high water and financial difficulty inhibited progress. Five years later, McNeill teamed with Jimmy Parker, another Texan with an interest and experience in restoring old hydro plants. Together, they formed Cuero Hydroelectric, Inc. During the next four years, they faced floods and solved existing structural problems. They disassembled and repaired the turbines and governors and designed control systems using state-of-the-art technology. Finally, with financial and moral support received from family and friends, they succeeded in bringing the Cuero hydro plant into operation in the winter of 1993.

  17. Genetic evidence of enzootic leishmaniasis in a stray canine and Texas mouse from sites in west and central Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evan J Kipp

    Full Text Available We detected Leishmania mexicana in skin biopsies taken from a stray canine (Canis familiaris and Texas mouse (Peromyscus attwateri at two ecologically disparate sites in west and central Texas using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. A single PCR-positive dog was identified from a sample of 96 stray canines and was collected in a peri-urban area in El Paso County, Texas. The PCR-positive P. attwateri was trapped at a wildlife reserve in Mason County, Texas, from a convenience sample of 20 sylvatic mammals of different species. To our knowledge, this represents the first description of L. mexicana in west Texas and extends the known geographic range of the parasite to an area that includes the arid Chihuahuan Desert. Our finding of L. mexicana in P. attwateri represents a new host record and is the first description of the parasite in a wild peromyscid rodent in the United States.

  18. Genetic evidence of enzootic leishmaniasis in a stray canine and Texas mouse from sites in west and central Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipp, Evan J; Mariscal, Jacqueline; Armijos, Rodrigo X; Weigel, Margaret; Waldrup, Kenneth

    2016-10-01

    We detected Leishmania mexicana in skin biopsies taken from a stray canine (Canis familiaris) and Texas mouse (Peromyscus attwateri) at two ecologically disparate sites in west and central Texas using polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A single PCR-positive dog was identified from a sample of 96 stray canines and was collected in a peri-urban area in El Paso County, Texas. The PCR-positive P. attwateri was trapped at a wildlife reserve in Mason County, Texas, from a convenience sample of 20 sylvatic mammals of different species. To our knowledge, this represents the first description of L. mexicana in west Texas and extends the known geographic range of the parasite to an area that includes the arid Chihuahuan Desert. Our finding of L. mexicana in P. attwateri represents a new host record and is the first description of the parasite in a wild peromyscid rodent in the United States.

  19. Heart Disease Risk Perception in College Men and Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, John S.; Grant, Melinda; Hill, Kathy L.; Brizzolara, Jeff; Belmont, Barbara

    2003-01-01

    The authors sought to assess the perception of risks for coronary heart disease (CHD) in college men and women. They surveyed 470 undergraduates from 2 major 4-year institutions who completed a questionnaire that measured perceived risks for heart disease. Sixty-eight percent of the respondents rated their risks as lower or much lower than those…

  20. American Heart Association

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Giving for Heart.org Media for Heart.org American Heart Association Check out Scientific Sessions news — translated for you. ... with the Woman of Distinction Award at the American Heart Association's top science gathering. Nearly half of U.S. adults ...

  1. Advanced Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Advanced Heart Failure Updated:May 9,2017 When heart failure (HF) ... Making This content was last reviewed May 2017. Heart Failure • Home • About Heart Failure • Causes and Risks for ...

  2. What Is Heart Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... heart surgery that is becoming more common is robotic-assisted surgery. For this surgery, a surgeon uses a computer ... surgeon always is in total control of the robotic arms; they don't move on their own. Who Needs Heart Surgery? Heart surgery is used to treat many heart ...

  3. Quantitative assessment of different phenolic compounds in Texas olive oils versus foreign oils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Texas Olive Ranch is the first one to produce olive oil and has the sole product in the Texas market place; several growers are now starting to cultivate olive at various sites in Texas. The quality of olive oil produced and pressed in Texas has never been explored. This study was conducted to inv...

  4. E-cigarette use among Texas youth: Results from the 2014 Texas Youth Tobacco Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Maria; Case, Kathleen R; Loukas, Alexandra

    2015-11-01

    Several characteristics of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes), such as candy flavorings, are worrisome for attracting youth. The current cross-sectional study uses data on e-cigarette use from the 2014 Texas Youth Tobacco Survey (TYTS), a representative statewide sample of Texas middle school and high school students. This study's aims are to determine the prevalence of e-cigarette use, including rates of concurrent use with other tobacco products among Texas youth and to describe the demographic and tobacco use differences between e-cigarette users and non-users. Participants were 13,602 6th through 12th grade students in Texas. Descriptive statistics were generated to determine the prevalence of current and lifetime e-cigarette use and to determine the prevalence of demographic characteristics across e-cigarette usage groups. Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine differences in demographic characteristics, cigarette use in the home, and tobacco use behaviors for e-cigarette users versus non-users. Almost one quarter of all middle and high school students reported lifetime e-cigarette use and 14.0% were past 30-day users of these products. Current e-cigarette users were more likely to be high school students, white and male than non-current users. Both current and lifetime e-cigarette users were also more likely than their peers to use other tobacco products, although 24.2% of current e-cigarette users had never smoked conventional cigarettes, and 7.3% had never used any other type of tobacco product besides an e-cigarette. Findings highlight the urgency to regulate e-cigarettes as well as to include these products in tobacco prevention programs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The impact of Roman Catholic moral theology on end-of-life care under the Texas Advance Directives Act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zientek, David M

    2006-04-01

    This essay reviews the Roman Catholic moral tradition surrounding treatments at the end of life together with the challenges presented to that tradition by the Texas Advance Directives Act. The impact on Catholic health care facilities and physicians, and the way in which the moral tradition should be applied under this statute, particularly with reference to the provision dealing with conflicts over end-of-life treatments, will be critically assessed. I will argue, based on the traditional treatment of end-of-life issues, that Catholic physicians and institutions should appeal to the conflict resolution process of the Advance Directives Act only under a limited number of circumstances. The implications, under the Texas statute, of varied interpretations of Pope John Paul II's recent allocution on artificial feeding and hydration in the persistent vegetative state will also be considered.

  6. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  7. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  8. Renewable Energy Opportunities at Fort Hood, Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solana, Amy E.; Warwick, William M.; Orrell, Alice C.; Russo, Bryan J.; Parker, Kyle R.; Weimar, Mark R.; Horner, Jacob A.; Manning, Anathea

    2011-11-14

    This report presents the results of Pacific Northwest National Laboratory's (PNNL) follow-on renewable energy (RE) assessment of Fort Hood. Fort Hood receives many solicitations from renewable energy vendors who are interested in doing projects on site. Based on specific requests from Fort Hood staff so they can better understand these proposals, and the results of PNNL's 2008 RE assessment of Fort Hood, the following resources were examined in this assessment: (1) Municipal solid waste (MSW) for waste-to-energy (WTE); (2) Wind; (3) Landfill gas; (4) Solar photovoltaics (PV); and (5) Shale gas. This report also examines the regulatory issues, development options, and environmental impacts for the promising RE resources, and includes a review of the RE market in Texas.

  9. Biostratigraphy of Echinoid spines, Cretaceous of Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirkland, P.L.

    1984-04-01

    Echinoid (sea urchin) spines from Cretaceous strata have widely varying morphology. They are common, and most are small enough to be recovered from well cuttings. Many forms have restricted ranges; consequently, echinoid spine have substantial biostratigraphic utility. There have been established 115 form taxa of echinoid spines and 14 form taxa of ophiuroid-asteroid spines for the Cretaceous of Texas. The specimens used for establishing the form taxa were processed from 533 outcrop samples (78 localities) from 30 Cretaceous formations, each with a well-defined age based on faunal zones of ammonites and Foraminifera. A dichotomous key in 9 parts and a catalog of scanning electron micrographs (87 plates) have been set up to assist identification of the form taxa. Range charts for the echinoid and ophiuroid-asteroid form taxa have utility through the Cretaceous of much of the Gulf Coastal area. The most precise zonation has been possible for the Albian.

  10. Furthering critical institutionalism

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cleaver, Frances; Koning, De Jessica

    2015-01-01

    This special issue furthers the study of natural resource management from a critical institutional perspective. Critical institutionalism (CI) is a contemporary body of thought that explores how institutions dynamically mediate relationships between people, natural resources and society. It

  11. Heart rate index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haedersdal, C; Pedersen, F H; Svendsen, J H

    1992-01-01

    after the myocardial infarction. A significant correlation (Spearman's correlation coefficient rs, p less than 0.05) was found between LVEF at rest and the following variables assessed at exercise test: 1) the heart rate at rest, 2) rise in heart rate, 3) ratio between maximal heart rate and heart rate...... at rest, 4) rise in systolic blood pressure, 5) rate pressure product at rest, 6) rise in rate pressure product, 7) ratio (rHR) between maximal rate pressure product and rate pressure product at rest, 8) total exercise time. The heart rate was corrected for effects caused by age (heart index (HR...

  12. Texas transportation planning for future renewable energy projects : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-01

    There will be a significant increase in the number of renewable energy production facilities in Texas. The : construction of wind farms requires the transport of wind turbine components that create increased loads on : rural roads and bridges. These ...

  13. 76 FR 42573 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma and Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION 47 CFR Part 73 Radio Broadcasting Services; Oklahoma and Texas AGENCY: Federal Communications... Review filed by Rawhide Radio, LLC, Capstar TX Limited Partnership, Clear Channel Broadcasting Licenses...

  14. Contaminants investigation of the San Antonio River of Texas, 1995

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 1992, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service conducted a contaminants investigation on fish collected from the San Antonio and Guadalupe Rivers in southeast Texas....

  15. Parent-taught driver education in Texas : a comparative evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-04-01

    An evaluation of the Parent-Taught Driver Education (PTDE) program in Texas was conducted using three different research techniques: (1) focus groups with driver education instructors, teen drivers, and their parents; (2) statewide mail survey of you...

  16. National Status and Trends: Bioeffects Program - Sabine Lake, Texas Database

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The toxicity of sediments in Sabine Lake, Texas, and adjoining Intracoastal Waterway canals was determined as part of bioeffects assessment studies managed by NOAA's...

  17. Paris, Texas. Saksamaal ja sinu peas / Kairi Prints

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Prints, Kairi

    2010-01-01

    6.- 12. oktoobrini Tallinnas ja Tartus toimuval filmifestivalil "Uus Saksa Kino" saab vaadata Wim Wendersi muusikadokumentaale. "Film ja filosoofia" rubriigis koha- ja rahvusespetsiifika eksistentsist tänapäeva filmikunstis ja W. Wendersi filmist "Paris, Texas" (USA 1984)

  18. Performance evaluation of cable median barrier systems in Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-01

    Since 2003, the Texas Department of Transportation (TxDOT) has embarked on an aggressive campaign to install : median barriers to prevent cross-median crashes on freeway facilities statewide. In the few years prior to 2003, : virtually all fatalities...

  19. Texas cracking performance prediction, simulation, and binder recommendation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Recent studies show some mixes with softer binders used outside of Texas (e.g., Minnesotas Cold Weather Road Research Facility mixes) have both good rutting and cracking performance. However, the current binder performance grading (PG) system fail...

  20. Initial Contaminants Survey of Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge, Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — An initial contaminants survey was conducted at Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge (HNWR) in north central Texas. Contaminants from a variety of sources have the...

  1. Digital Geologic Map of Sherman Quadrangle, North-Central Texas

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This digital data set contains geologic formations for the 1:250,000-scale Sherman quadrangle, Texas and Oklahoma. The original data are from the Bureau of Economic...

  2. Groundwater Policy Research: Collaboration with Groundwater Conservation Districts in Texas

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Jeffrey W.; Johnson, Phillip N.; Guerrero, Bridget L.; Weinheimer, Justin; Amosson, Stephen H.; Almas, Lal K.; Golden, Bill B.; Wheeler-Cook, Erin

    2011-01-01

    The unique nature of the Ogallala Aquifer presents interesting and confounding problems for water policymakers who are coping with changing groundwater rules in Texas. The purpose of this article is to link previous efforts in water policy research for the Ogallala Aquifer in Texas with current collaborations that are ongoing with regional water planners. A chronological progression of economic water modeling efforts for the region is reviewed. The results of two recent collaborative studies ...

  3. Flash flood swift water rescues, Texas, 2005–2014

    OpenAIRE

    Vaidehi Shah; Katie R. Kirsch; Diana Cervantes; David F. Zane; Tracy Haywood; Jennifer A. Horney

    2017-01-01

    Although rainfall patterns are complex and difficult to predict, climate models suggest precipitation in Texas will occur less frequently and with greater intensity in the future. In combination with rapid population growth and development, extreme rainfall events are likely to lead to flash floods and necessitate swift water rescues. Swift water rescues are used to retrieve person(s) from swift water flowing at a rate of 1 knot or greater. Data were obtained from the Texas Fire Marshal’s Off...

  4. Texas' Child Population: More Kids, More Diversity, More Responsibility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deviney, Frances; Phillips, Pace

    2011-01-01

    Every 10 years, the U.S. Census Bureau counts every man, woman, and child to track the growth of our national, state, and local populations. Between 2000 and 2010, Texas' total population grew at twice the national rate to more than 25 million people. A large part of Texas' growth is due our child population, which grew by 16 percent to 6.9…

  5. Heart Health: Learn the Truth About Your Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Cover Story Heart Health Learn the Truth About Your Heart Past Issues / Winter ... minute. There are many ways that Americans can learn more about staying heart healthy and understanding heart ...

  6. Implantation of Total Artificial Heart in Congenital Heart Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Adachi, Iki; Morales, David S. L.

    2014-01-01

    In patients with end-stage heart failure (HF), a total artificial heart (TAH) may be implanted as a bridge to cardiac transplant. However, in congenital heart disease (CHD), the malformed heart presents a challenge to TAH implantation.

  7. Watershed Governance in South-Central Texas: Working from the Bottom up

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, V. L.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this presentation is to introduce a set of key concepts that can guide the development of ecological governance systems and briefly describe a watershed ecological governance project in south-central Texas. Ecological governance is a form of governance embedding ecological principles and values in all levels of decision making and action, from the personal to the global. The model of ecological governance discussed here incorporates ideas and approaches that are already being put into practice in many watershed governance projects in the US and abroad; it is based on the premise that contemporary governance systems will continue to evolve in this direction, incorporating more and more of the features of ecological governance. The watershed governance project described here was devised to ensure that the long-term ecological integrity of a small urbanazing waterhed in south-central Texas is preserved and that the water quality standards are maintained for present and future generations. The ecological integrity of small spring-fed watersheds in Texas are under serious threat due to rapid urban development dependent on groundwater supplies, continued drilling of personal wells that are exempt from pumping regulation, and lack of adequate legal jurisdiction for managing development in rural and semi-rural areas. The watershed governance project was motivated by a firm belief of local stakeholders that watershed protection is an individual as well as a community responsibility, and the recognition that a balance between growth and protection is essential to maintain watershed integrity. It is concluded that whereas emergent systems of ecological governance struggle to succeed in an institutional context oriented towards the pursuit of self-interest and competition, their acceptance will happen more readily as ecological principles and values diffuses throughout modern society.

  8. Heart Attack Payment - State

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – state data. This data set includes state-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  9. Heart Attack Payment - Hospital

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – provider data. This data set includes provider data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  10. Right heart ventriculography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angiography - right heart ... The catheter will be moved forward into the right side of the heart. As the catheter is advanced, the doctor can record pressures from the right atrium and right ventricle. Contrast material ("dye") is ...

  11. Types of Heart Surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... problems with the heart's function and valves. Cardiac Magnetic Resonance Imaging Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a ... To Expect After Heart Surgery Recovery in the Hospital You may spend a day or more in ...

  12. Tachycardia | Fast Heart Rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tachycardia occurs less commonly with: Heart attack Serious mitral valve disease Symptoms and Complications of Atrial or SVT Some ... tachycardia occurs less commonly with: Heart attack Serious mitral valve disease Symptoms and Complications of Atrial or SVT Some ...

  13. Heart bypass surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Off-pump coronary artery bypass; OPCAB; Beating heart surgery; Bypass surgery - heart; CABG; Coronary artery bypass graft; Coronary artery bypass surgery; Coronary bypass surgery; Coronary artery disease - CABG; CAD - CABG; Angina - ...

  14. Heart disease and intimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000540.htm Heart disease and intimacy To use the sharing features on ... Libby P, Bonow RO, Braunwald E, eds. Braunwald's Heart Disease: A Textbook of Cardiovascular Medicine . 10th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  15. Heart Information Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical and Surgical Procedures A Heart Surgery Overview Aneurysm Repair Balloon Angioplasty and Stents Carotid Artery Angioplasty and Stents Carotid Endarterectomy Coronary Artery Bypass Heart Transplantation Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillator (ICD) ...

  16. Heart Attack Payment - National

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Payment for heart attack patients measure – national data. This data set includes national-level data for payments associated with a 30-day episode of care for heart...

  17. Diabetic Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure and excess protein in the urine. Preeclampsia is linked to an increased lifetime risk of CHD, heart attack, heart failure , and high blood pressure. Screening and Prevention Taking action to control risk factors can help ...

  18. Heart valve surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valve replacement; Valve repair; Heart valve prosthesis; Mechanical valves; Prosthetic valves ... can relieve your symptoms and prolong your life. Mechanical heart valves do not often fail. However, blood clots can ...

  19. Transplant coronary heart disease: challenges and solutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jentzer JC

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Jacob C Jentzer,1 Gavin W Hickey,1 Sameer J Khandhar2,3 1Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA, USA; 2Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 3Heart and Vascular Institute, Penn-Presbyterian Medical Center, Philadelphia, PA, USAAbstract: Cardiac allograft vasculopathy (CAV remains one of the leading causes of death and graft failure after heart transplantation. A variety of causes, including donor heart characteristics, recipient risk factors, and immune-mediated influences, are associated with developing CAV. In this review, we will focus on the pathophysiology of developing CAV and various methods to screen for this condition. The pathogenesis of CAV likely involves repeated injuries to the endothelium from a variety of factors such as cellular-mediated rejection, and alloimmune factors, including antibody-mediated injury, ischemia-reperfusion injury at time of transplant, cytomegalovirus infections, immunosuppression medications, systemic inflammation, and traditional atherosclerosis risk factors. Patients with significant CAV are often asymptomatic, and therefore early detection by routine screening prior to graft dysfunction is crucial. There are a variety of invasive, noninvasive, and blood tests that have been studied as screening methods, and we will discuss the role of each of these in this review article. Although some treatment regimens have been established for CAV, this is an area where further studies and research are necessary.Keywords: cardiac allograft vasculopathy, orthotopic heart transplantation, intra-vascular imaging

  20. Risks for Heart Valve Problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Risks for Heart Valve Problems Updated:Jan 18,2017 Who is at risk ... content was last reviewed May 2016. Heart Valve Problems and Disease • Home • About Heart Valves • Heart Valve ...

  1. What Happens After Heart Surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ANSWERS by heart Treatments + Tests What Happens After Heart Surgery? What are the ICU and CCU? In a ... doctors. This is where patients go after open-heart surgery or a heart attack. You’re watched around ...

  2. Data and Statistics: Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... High Blood Pressure Salt Cholesterol Million Hearts® WISEWOMAN Heart Failure Fact Sheet Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir ... not mean that the heart has stopped beating. Heart Failure in the United States About 5.7 million ...

  3. Managing Feelings about Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Heart Failure Module 6: Managing Feelings About Heart Failure Download Module Order Hardcopy Heart failure can cause ... professional help for emotional problems. Common Feelings About Heart Failure It is common for people to feel depressed ...

  4. Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Media for Heart.org Heart and Stroke Association Statistics Each year, the American Heart Association, in conjunction ... health and disease in the population. Heart & Stroke Statistics FAQs What is Prevalence? Prevalence is an estimate ...

  5. Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Illegal Drugs and Heart Disease Updated:May 17,2017 Most illegal drugs can ... www.dea.gov/druginfo/factsheets.shtml Alcohol and Heart Disease Caffeine and Heart Disease Tobacco and Heart Disease ...

  6. What Is a Heart Attack?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood pressure and excess protein in the urine. Preeclampsia is linked to an increased lifetime risk of heart disease, including CHD, heart attack, heart failure , and high blood pressure. Screening and Prevention Lowering your risk factors for coronary heart disease ...

  7. Chronic heart failure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    admissions.3 Therefore, heart failure is also an expensive disease. Pathophysiology. The first step in the ... hypertrophy or injury due to a valvular problem. This myocardial injury leads to ... heart failure is also an expensive disease. Keywords: acute myocardial infarction, diabetes mellitus, heart failure, hypertension, obesity.

  8. Working Model Hearts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, David

    2009-01-01

    Despite student interest, the heart is often a poorly understood topic in biology. To help students understand this vital organ's physiology, the author created this investigation activity involving the mammalian heart and its role in the circulatory system. Students design, build, and demonstrate working artificial "hearts" to exhibit what they…

  9. Emergency Heart Valve Replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stinson, Edward B.; Shumway, Norman E.

    1968-01-01

    Sixteen patients with terminal cardiac failure due to valvular heart disease had emergency operation for value replacement. Four patients did not survive, because of irreversible myocardial or secondary organ involvement. The remainder, however, had immediate reversal of heart failure after operation, and all became fully active following discharge. Recognition of refractory decompensation in valvular heart disease demands prompt consideration of surgical intervention. PMID:5724875

  10. Heart Valve Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your heart has four valves. Normally, these valves open to let blood flow through or out of your heart, and then shut to keep it from flowing ... close tightly. It's one of the most common heart valve conditions. Sometimes it causes regurgitation. Stenosis - when ...

  11. Heart Disease in Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... United States, 1 in 4 women dies from heart disease. The most common cause of heart disease in both men and women is narrowing ... the blood vessels that supply blood to the heart itself. This is called coronary artery disease, and ...

  12. The Heart of Coaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docheff, Dennis M.; Gerdes, Dan

    2015-01-01

    This article challenges coaches to address the more personal, human elements of coaching--the HEART of coaching. While there is much research on numerous aspects of coaching, this article provides ideas that make a lasting impact on the hearts of athletes. Using HEART as an acronym, five elements of effective coaching are presented: Humility,…

  13. Heart Truth for Latinas

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... quit and, just one year later, your heart disease risk will drop by more than half. It’s not easy to quit but make a plan and you can do it. Or, try an organized program or ... your risk of heart disease, stroke, and con- gestive heart failure. Even levels ...

  14. What are Institutional Logics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg Johansen, Christina; Waldorff, Susanne Boch

    This study presents new insights into the explanatory power of the institutional logics perspective. With outset in a discussion of seminal theory texts, we identify two fundamental topics that frame institutional logics: overarching institutional orders guides by institutional logics, as well...... as change and agency generated by friction between logics. We use these topics as basis for an analysis of selected empirical papers, with the aim of understanding how institutional logics contribute to institutional theory at large, and which social matters institutional logics can and cannot explore...

  15. Institutional Logics in Action

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lounsbury, Michael; Boxenbaum, Eva

    2013-01-01

    This double volume presents state-of-the-art research and thinking on the dynamics of actors and institutional logics. In the introduction, we briefly sketch the roots and branches of institutional logics scholarship before turning to the new buds of research on the topic of how actors engage ins...... prolific stream of research on institutional logics by deepening our insight into the active use of institutional logics in organizational action and interaction, including the institutional effects of such (inter)actions....

  16. RCRA Facility Investigation Report Texas Solid Waste Management Units Fort Bliss El Paso, Texas. Volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    associations: the Pintura -Dona Ana of Otero Area, New Mexico, or the Hueco-Wink of El Paso County, Texas. 1.4.6.1 Description The five soil associations...by erosion (DOA, 1981). 1 1-28 I A. si. / -Z - W0 A i~ Pintura -Dona Ana ~r~*~>~ Tome-Mimbres IFI BlTuneyBeintOnieWn Fiur v- RCRA F....i. Soil Ma...material. Although the Pintura soils are the most 3 common and most extensive soils formed in this manner, all of the soils described contain undulating and

  17. 76 FR 21387 - National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute;

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-15

    .... Agenda: To review and evaluate contract proposals. Place: Ritz Carlton Hotel, 1150 22nd Street, NW... contract proposals and the discussions could disclose confidential trade secrets or commercial property... contract proposals, the disclosure of which would constitute a clearly unwarranted invasion of personal...

  18. Measuring energy-saving retrofits: Experiences from the Texas LoanSTAR program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haberl, J.S.; Reddy, T.A.; Claridge, D.E.; Turner, W.D.; O`Neal, D.L.; Heffington, W.M. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States). Energy Systems Lab.

    1996-02-01

    In 1988 the Governor`s Energy Management Center of Texas received approval from the US Department of Energy to establish a $98.6 million state-wide retrofit demonstration revolving loan program to fund energy-conserving retrofits in state, public school, and local government buildings. As part of this program, a first-of-its-kind, statewide Monitoring and Analysis Program (MAP) was established to verify energy and dollar savings of the retrofits, reduce energy costs by identifying operational and maintenance improvements, improve retrofit selection in future rounds of the LoanSTAR program, and initiate a data base of energy use in institutional and commercial buildings located in Texas. This report discusses the LoanSTAR MAP with an emphasis on the process of acquiring and analyzing data to measure savings from energy conservation retrofits when budgets are a constraint. This report includes a discussion of the program structure, basic measurement techniques, data archiving and handling, data reporting and analysis, and includes selected examples from LoanSTAR agencies. A summary of the program results for the first two years of monitoring is also included.

  19. Focusing on the "T" in LGBT: an online survey of related content in texas nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, David; Hendrickson, Sherry Garrett

    2015-06-01

    As nurses, we advocate for the most vulnerable and underserved, who, within the lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) community, are transgender individuals. Yet, the existence of LGBT education in nursing schools has not been examined. After approval by the university institutional review board, 113 nursing programs in Texas were surveyed between November 2013 and January 2014, with a 12-question, Web-based questionnaire. A Verisign certificate and 128-bit encryption program supported compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996. Nineteen percent of the surveys were returned. Ten (47.62%) of 21 respondents addressed transgender or transsexual individuals. Fifteen (71.43%) of 21 answered a free-text question to estimate the number of hours spent addressing LGBT content, reporting an average of 1.6 hours. Our study suggests that, in Texas, nursing students may not be receiving sufficient content, nor do they understand transgender health needs or how to best deliver competent, compassionate care to this population. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  20. Heart Age PSA (:60)

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2015-09-01

    This 60 second public service announcement is based on the September 2015 CDC Vital Signs report. Your heart age is the age of your heart and blood vessels as a result of your risk factors for heart attack and stroke. If you smoke or have high blood pressure, your heart age will be much higher than your actual age. Learn what you can do to lower your heart age and keep it low.  Created: 9/1/2015 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP).   Date Released: 9/1/2015.

  1. The Danish Heart Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Özcan, Cengiz; Juel, Knud; Lassen, Jens Flensted

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The Danish Heart Registry (DHR) seeks to monitor nationwide activity and quality of invasive diagnostic and treatment strategies in patients with ischemic heart disease as well as valvular heart disease and to provide data for research. STUDY POPULATION: All adult (≥15 years) patients...... undergoing coronary angiography (CAG), percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), coronary artery bypass grafting, and heart valve surgery performed across all Danish hospitals were included. MAIN VARIABLES: The DHR contains a subset of the data stored in the Eastern and Western Denmark Heart Registries (EDHR...

  2. CPRIT/Johnson Space Center, September, 2011 (Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Jeffrey; Lane, Helen; Baker, Tracey; Cucinotta, Francis; Wu, Honglu

    2011-01-01

    JSC researchers study carcinogenesis, cancer prevention and treatment along with epidemiological (primarily retrospective and longitudinal) studies, modeling, and interactions with the environment such as radiation, nutritional, and endocrine changes related to space flight along with behaviors such as smoking. Cancer research is a major focus for human space flight due to the exposure to space radiation which consists of particles of varying charges and energies, and secondary neutrons. The JSC laboratories collaborate with investigators from the U.S. as well as our European and Japanese partners. We use accelerator facilities at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, Loma Linda University and Los Alamos National Laboratory that generate high energy charged particles and neutrons to simulate cosmic radiation and solar particle events. The research using cultured cells and animals concentrates on damage and repair from the level of DNA to organ tissues, due to exposure to simulated space radiation exposure, that contribute to the induction of leukemia and solid tumors in most major tissues such as lung, colon, liver and breast. The goal of the research is to develop a mathematical model that can predict cancer morbidity and mortality risks with sufficient accuracy for a given space mission.

  3. International Students' Adjustment to American Higher Education Institutions in Northeast Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jiashi

    2013-01-01

    The rising number of international students studying in the United States makes the country a diverse educational region. Students from other countries who choose to study in the United States experience different learning systems, different social values, and different lifestyles from their home countries. According to Hofstede (1997),…

  4. The Myth of the Texas Miracle in Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walt Haney

    2000-08-01

    Full Text Available I summarize the recent history of education reform and statewide testing in Texas, which led to introduction of the Texas Assessment of Academic Skills (TAAS in 1990-91. A variety of evidence in the late 1990s led a number of observers to conclude that the state of Texas had made near miraculous progress in reducing dropouts and increasing achievement. The passing scores on TAAS tests were arbitrary and discriminatory. Analyses comparing TAAS reading, writing and math scores with one another and with relevant high school grades raise doubts about the reliability and validity of TAAS scores. I discuss problems of missing students and other mirages in Texas enrollment statistics that profoundly affect both reported dropout statistics and test scores. Only 50% of minority students in Texas have been progressing from grade 9 to high school graduation since the initiation of the TAAS testing program. Since about 1982, the rates at which Black and Hispanic students are required to repeat grade 9 have climbed steadily, such that by the late 1990s, nearly 30% of Black and Hispanic students were "failing" grade 9. Cumulative rates of grade retention in Texas are almost twice as high for Black and Hispanic students as for White students. Some portion of the gains in grade 10 TAAS pass rates are illusory. The numbers of students taking the grade 10 tests who were classified as "in special education" and hence not counted in schools' accountability ratings nearly doubled between 1994 and 1998. A substantial portion of the apparent increases in TAAS pass rates in the 1990s are due to such exclusions. In the opinion of educators in Texas, schools are devoting a huge amount of time and energy preparing students specifically for TAAS, and emphasis on TAAS is hurting more than helping teaching and learning in Texas schools, particularly with at-risk students, and TAAS contributes to retention in grade and dropping out. Five different sources of evidence about

  5. State Agency Applications of EOS Data in Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, G. L.

    2001-05-01

    Texas offers a good model for the introduction of remotely sensed data products into the daily operations of state agencies by virtue of its large size and population. The diversity of the Texas landscape coupled with the long distances traveled to perform site inspections place special burdens on the land resource agencies responsible for monitoring crop conditions, water availability, environmental hazards and other natural resource issues. To assist these agencies, the Texas Synergy team has adopted a two-phase approach that incorporates framework geospatial data products designed for the broad user community with remote sensing applications developed for user-specific analyses. A key element to the success of the effort is the development of remote sensing products within a Texas Reference Frame that corresponds to the components of the high-resolution National Spatial Data Infrastructure developed by the state, such as 1-meter CIR digital orthophotographs, digital elevation models, and vector layers for hypsography, hydrography, soils, transportation and boundaries. Users accustomed to working with NSDI products can easily begin to include recently-collected EOS data presented within the same reference frame. Examples of statewide data products made available through the Texas Synergy project are AVHRR NDVI and MODIS imagery, Landsat 7 ETM+ scenes and SPOT 10-meter panchromatic image tiles. Delivery of the products involves a number of mechanisms from CD distribution to Internet FTP downloads, but increasingly relies upon Internet map services, such as ESRI's ArcIMS. Beyond release of the base imagery products, the Texas Synergy team has worked with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, Texas Soil and Water Conservation Board, Texas Department of Agriculture, Texas Water Development Board, National Park Service and USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service on a wide range of data applications. Throughout 1999-2000, the magnitude of drought conditions was

  6. Avaliação do EuroSCORE como preditor de mortalidade em cirurgia cardíaca valvar no Instituto do Coração de Pernambuco Assesment of the EuroSCORE as a predictor for mortality in valve cardiac surgery at the Heart Institute of Pernambuco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isaac Newton Guimarães Andrade

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar a aplicabilidade do Sistema Europeu de Risco em Operações Cardíacas (EuroSCORE em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia valvar no Instituto do Coração de Pernambuco. MÉTODOS: Foram incluídos no estudo 840 pacientes operados entre 2001 e 2009. Os prontuários desses doentes continham todas as informações que permitiram calcular o EuroSCORE. O desfecho de interesse foi óbito na internação. Com o objetivo de avaliar a aplicabilidade do EuroSCORE, foi usado o teste não paramétrico de Mann-Whitney. A calibração do modelo foi medida pela comparação da mortalidade observada com a esperada, usando-se o teste de bondade de ajuste de Hosmer-Lemershow. A acurácia do modelo foi avaliada pela curva ROC (receiver operating characteristic curve. RESULTADOS: A comparação entre a mortalidade prevista e a observada, por meio do teste de Hosmer-Lemershow, evidenciou boa capacidade preditiva (P=0,767, assim como quando comparada para cada valor do EuroSCORE Aditivo (P=0,455. Obteve-se uma área sob a curva de ROC de 0,731 (IC95% 0,660 - 0,793, com valor de P6 incluiu 131 pacientes, com mortalidade foi 20,6%. A análise de regressão logística permitiu identificar os seguintes fatores de risco para o óbito: idade acima de 60 anos, sexo feminino, operação prévia, endocardite ativa, cirurgia associada da aorta torácica e arteriopatia extracardíaca. CONCLUSÕES: O EuroSCORE, um método simples e objetivo, revelou-se um preditor satisfatório de mortalidade operatória e, por ele, foram identificados fatores de risco para o óbito em pacientes submetidos à cirurgia valvar no Instituto do Coração de Pernambuco.OBJECTIVE: To assess the applicability of the European Rysk System in Cardiac Operations (EuroSCORE in patients undergoing cardiac valve surgery at the Heart Institute of Pernambuco. METHOD: 840 patients operated on between 2001 and 2009, who medical records contained all the informations to calculate the EuroSCORE were

  7. Mitchell Energy foam fracs tight zones. [Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bleakley, W.B.

    1980-12-01

    Wells that produced one billion cubic feet of gas over an 11-yr period could have produced that much in one year, according to results of recent massive foam frac jobs. Mitchell Energy and Development Corp. experienced that kind of performance from wells completed in the Cotton Valley Lime gas reservoir of Central Texas, just south of Mexia. One well, the No. 1 Stone, in Limestone County, was completed in Dec., 1969 at 11,200 ft, exposing a gross interval of 200 ft and a net pay of 26 ft. Cumulative production to early this year was approx. 578 mmcf and the well was producing at 50 to 75 mcfd through a full-open 2-in. choke with flowing tubing pressure of 640 psi. The formation was fractured in March, 1980, using foam, and present producing rate of 600 mcfd against 800-psi line pressure, in spite of a screen-out during the frac treatment that permitted only half of the designed-for one million pounds of sand to be put away. This is believed to be the first foam job at that depth, however, and the first to get 500,000 lb of sand into a fracture, using foam.

  8. Adderall abuse in Texas, 1998-2004.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Mathias B

    2007-04-01

    Adderall is used in the treatment of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children and is subject to abuse. This study describes the patterns of Adderall abuse calls received by several poison control centers in Texas during 1998-2004. Drug abuse calls were assessed by call year and geographic location. Drug abuse calls were then compared to all other human exposure (nonabuse) calls with respect to various factors. Of all Adderall exposure calls, 12% involved abuse. The number of drug abuse calls received per year increased during the first part of 7-yr period but then declined. Male patients accounted for almost 60% of both drug abuse and nonabuse calls. Adolescent patients comprised 69% of drug abuse calls and children less than 13 yr old comprised 66% of nonabuse calls. Although the majority of both types of human exposures occurred at the patient's own residence, drug abuse calls were more likely than nonabuse calls to involve exposures at another residence (6% vs. 3%), school (22% vs. 5%) and public areas (2% vs. 0.4%). Drug abuse calls were less likely than nonabuse calls to be managed outside of a health care facility (18% vs. 51%) and to be classified as no adverse effect (23% vs. 48%). Adderall abusers are more likely to be adolescents. Adderall abuse as compared to other exposures is more likely to occur outside of the person's home and involve more serious medical outcomes.

  9. Geothermal resources, Vicksburg Formation, Texas Gulf Coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loucks, R.G.

    1978-01-01

    The potential for discovering geopressured geothermal reservoirs in the Vicksburg Formation is limited to Hidalgo County along the Lower Texas Gulf Coast. In Hidalgo County, an area of approximately 385 square miles (designated the Vicksburg Fairway) contains up to 1,300 feet of geopressured sandstones with fluid temperatures greater than 300/sup 0/F. In-place effective permeability, however, averages less than 1 millidarcy in the Vicksburg sandstones because of fine grain size and extensive late carbonate cementation. Also, areal extent of individual reservoirs is limited in a dip direction by growth faults and in a strike direction by the lenticular morphology of the sandstone bodies. In conclusion, under the present specifications set for a geothermal fairway, the Vicksburg has minimal potential because of low reservoir deliverability, which is constrained by low permeability and somewhat limited reservoir continuity. If future tests indicate that lower permeabilities are acceptable, the Vicksburg Fairway should be reconsidered because of the presence of extremely thick sandstone bodies.

  10. New Institutional Theory and a Culture of Safety in Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, Brandi; Nonnenmann, Matthew W

    2017-01-01

    Health and safety professionals often call for an improved safety culture in agriculture. Such a shift would result in agricultural practices that prioritize safe work habits and see safety as both an effective means to improve production and a goal worth pursuing in its own right. This article takes an anthropological approach and demonstrates the potential for new institutional theory to conceptualize broader cultural change in agriculture. New institutional theory examines the roles of organizations and the ways that they inform and support broad social institutions. Using preliminary data from the agricultural lending industry in Iowa and integrated poultry production in Texas, this article considers the ability of these organizations to contribute to systemic change and an improved culture of safety in agriculture.

  11. A healthy heart is not a metronome: an integrative review of the heart's anatomy and heart rate variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Fred; McCraty, Rollin; Zerr, Christopher L

    2014-01-01

    Heart rate variability (HRV), the change in the time intervals between adjacent heartbeats, is an emergent property of interdependent regulatory systems that operate on different time scales to adapt to challenges and achieve optimal performance. This article briefly reviews neural regulation of the heart, and its basic anatomy, the cardiac cycle, and the sinoatrial and atrioventricular pacemakers. The cardiovascular regulation center in the medulla integrates sensory information and input from higher brain centers, and afferent cardiovascular system inputs to adjust heart rate and blood pressure via sympathetic and parasympathetic efferent pathways. This article reviews sympathetic and parasympathetic influences on the heart, and examines the interpretation of HRV and the association between reduced HRV, risk of disease and mortality, and the loss of regulatory capacity. This article also discusses the intrinsic cardiac nervous system and the heart-brain connection, through which afferent information can influence activity in the subcortical and frontocortical areas, and motor cortex. It also considers new perspectives on the putative underlying physiological mechanisms and properties of the ultra-low-frequency (ULF), very-low-frequency (VLF), low-frequency (LF), and high-frequency (HF) bands. Additionally, it reviews the most common time and frequency domain measurements as well as standardized data collection protocols. In its final section, this article integrates Porges' polyvagal theory, Thayer and colleagues' neurovisceral integration model, Lehrer et al.'s resonance frequency model, and the Institute of HeartMath's coherence model. The authors conclude that a coherent heart is not a metronome because its rhythms are characterized by both complexity and stability over longer time scales. Future research should expand understanding of how the heart and its intrinsic nervous system influence the brain.

  12. International Conference on Environmental Ergonomics (4th) Held in Austin, Texas on 1-5 October 1990

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-15

    Hollies, N.R.S., Custer , A.G., Morin, CJ. and Howard, M.E., A human perception analysis approach to clothing comfort, Text. Res. J., 49: 557-564, 1979. 8...399,1989. 113 A UK VIEW OF THE TEXAS MODEL A. J. Belyavin, P. J. Sowood, N. Stallard RAF Institute of Aviation Medicine, Farnborough, Hants., United...Facility, 1989. Technical Report NO. 164 1/1 AIR TEMPERATURES REQUIRED FOR COMFORT IN FIGHTER AJRCRAIF P J Sowood, A C Buxton. G Richardson RAF

  13. 76 FR 32978 - National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed Meetings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-07

    ..., Heart Failure Palliative Care. Date: July 8, 2011. Time: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Agenda: To review and evaluate... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health National Institute of Nursing Research; Notice of Closed... of Committee: National Institute of Nursing Research Special Emphasis Panel, HIV Risk-Avoidance...

  14. Neighborhood Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms among Mexican-descent residents of Texas City, Texas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shell, Alyssa Marie; Peek, M Kristen; Eschbach, Karl

    2013-12-01

    Substantial research shows that increased Hispanic neighborhood concentration is associated with several beneficial health outcomes including lower adult mortality, better self-rated health, and fewer respiratory problems. Literature on the relationship of Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms is more equivocal. In addition, few studies have directly investigated hypothesized mechanisms of this relationship. This study uses data from a probability sample of 1238 Mexican-descent adults living in 48 neighborhoods in Texas City, Texas. Multilevel regression models investigate whether Hispanic neighborhood composition is associated with fewer depressive symptoms. This study also investigates whether social support, perceived discrimination, and perceived stress mediate or moderate the relationship, and whether results differ by primary language used at home. We find that individuals living in high Hispanic composition neighborhoods experience fewer depressive symptoms than individuals in low Hispanic composition neighborhoods. In addition, we find that these beneficial effects only apply to respondents who speak English. Social support, perceived discrimination, and perceived stress mediate the Hispanic composition-depressive symptoms relationship. In addition, discrimination and stress moderate the relationship between Hispanic composition and depressive symptoms. Our findings support theories linking higher neighborhood Hispanic composition and better mental health, and suggest that Spanish language use, social support, discrimination and stress may play important roles in the Hispanic composition-depressive symptoms relationship. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Heart transplantation in adult congenital heart disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchill, Luke J

    2016-12-01

    Heart failure (HF) in adult congenital heart disease (ACHD) is vastly different to that observed in acquired heart disease. Unlike acquired HF in which pharmacological strategies are the cornerstone for protecting and improving ventricular function, ACHD-related HF relies heavily upon structural and other interventions to achieve these aims. patients with ACHD constitute a small percentage of the total adult heart transplant population (∼3%), although the number of ACHD heart transplant recipients is growing rapidly with a 40% increase over the last two decades. The worldwide experience to date has confirmed heart transplantation as an effective life-extending treatment option in carefully selected patients with ACHD with end-stage cardiac disease. Opportunities for improving outcomes in patients with ACHD-related HF include (i) earlier recognition and referral to centres with combined expertise in ACHD and HF, (ii) increased awareness of arrhythmia and sudden cardiac death risk in this population, (iii) greater collaboration between HF and ACHD specialists at the time of heart transplant assessment, (iv) expert surgical planning to reduce ischaemic time and bleeding risk at the time of transplant, (v) tailored immunosuppression in the post-transplant period and (vi) development and validation of ACHD-specific risk scores to predict mortality and guide patient selection. The purpose of this article is to review current approaches to diagnosing and treating advanced HF in patients with ACHD including indications, contraindications and clinical outcomes after heart transplantation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  16. Geopressured-geothermal energy development: government incentives and institutional structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frederick, D.O.; Prestwood, D.C.L.; Roberts, K.; Vanston, J.H. Jr.

    1979-01-01

    The following subjects are included: a geothermal resource overview, the evolution of the current Texas geopressured-geothermal institutional structure, project evaluation with uncertainty and the structure of incentives, the natural gas industry, the electric utility industry, potential governmental participants in resource development, industrial users of thermal energy, current government incentives bearing on geopressured-geothermal development, six profiles for utilization of the geopressured-geothermal resources in the mid-term, and probable impacts of new government incentives on mid-term resource utilization profiles. (MHR)

  17. Legal issues in the development of geopressured-geothermal resources of Texas and Louisiana Gulf Coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elmer, D.B.; Rogers, K.; Vanston, J.H.; Elmer, D.B.; Gustavson, T.C.; Kreitler, C.W.; Letlow, K.; Lopreato, S.C.; Meriwether, M.; Ramsey, P.; Rogers, K.E.; Williamson, J.K.

    1976-01-01

    The legal issues are discussed in two areas: legal scholarship and legal support. Scholorship is distinguished from support by concentration on abstract analyses of issue that include resource definition, ownership, taxation, and multistate reservoirs. Support is based entirely on those legal tasks called up by the technical work schedule in the areas of Resource Assessment, Advanced Research and Technology, Institutional and Environmental, and Resonance Utilization. The legal section will, in the future, make recommendations and implement procedures designed to assist in the rapid and orderly development of the resource. The PERT (Program Evaluation Review Techniques) chart for sequencing of legal scholarship and support tasks is included. An oral presentation on geothermal resources in Texas, a resource model for the resource utilization section, and some excerpts from legislation pertaining to geothermal energy are provided in an Appendix. (MCW)

  18. Capital offenders in Texas prisons: rates, correlates, and an actuarial analysis of violent misconduct.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Mark Douglas; Sorensen, Jon R

    2007-12-01

    This study analyzed the records of 136 recently incarcerated capital murder offenders in the initial phase (M = 2.37 years, range = 6-40 months) of their life sentences in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice. Prevalence rates of institutional violence were inversely related to severity: potentially violent misconduct (36.8%), assaultive violations (14%), serious assaults (5.1%), and homicides (0%). Consistent with prior studies, factors correlated with assaultive misconduct included age (inversely), prior prison confinement, and concurrent robbery or burglary in the capital offense. A simplified Burgess scale entitled the Risk Assessment Scale for Prison-Capital (RASP-Cap) was moderately successful in identifying varying levels of improbability of committing violence-related misconduct however defined (AUC = .715-.766).

  19. Institutional pressures and HRM: developing institutional fit

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boon, C.; Paauwe, J.; Boselie, P.; den Hartog, D.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose - Research in strategic human resource management (HRM) has focused mainly on the effects of HRM practices or systems on organizational effectiveness. However, institutional theory argues that besides being financially successful, organizations also need legitimacy to survive. Owing to the

  20. Institut de physique et institut de chimie

    OpenAIRE

    HAROCHE, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Au cœur de Paris et du quartier Latin Le 17 mars 2015, l'Institut de physique et l'Institut de chimie du Collège de France ont été inaugurés par le président de la République François Hollande. Dans un bâtiment entièrement rénové du Collège de France, prennent désormais place deux centres de recherche : l’Institut de physique et l’Institut de chimie. Chacun constitué de plusieurs chaires dévolues à ces disciplines, ainsi que de jeunes équipes, ils perpétuent la longue tradition de la physiq...

  1. FPG Child Development Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Development, Teaching, and Learning The Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute will partner with Zero to Three to ... Center October 6, 2017 More Frank Porter Graham Child Development Institute The University of North Carolina at Chapel ...

  2. Cost-Effectiveness Analysis of the Residential Provisions of the 2015 IECC for Texas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendon, Vrushali V. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Zhao, Mingjie [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Taylor, Zachary T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Poehlman, Eric A. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The 2015 IECC provides cost-effective savings for residential buildings in Texas. Moving to the 2015 IECC from the 2009 IECC base code is cost-effective for residential buildings in all climate zones in Texas.

  3. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Patchy Shapefile Map - Lower Laguna Madre

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Office for Coastal Management (OCM) requested the creation of benthic habitat data along the southern Texas coast to support the Texas Seagrass Monitoring...

  4. Coastal Bend Texas Benthic Habitat Mapping Patchy Shapefile Map - Lower Laguna Madre (NODC Accession 0070784)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The NOAA Coastal Services Center (CSC) requested the creation of benthic habitat data along the southern Texas coast to support the Texas Seagrass Monitoring...

  5. BLM/OCS South Texas Outer Continental Shelf (STOCS) Project Sediment Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The South Texas Outer Continental Shelf Project (STOCS) conducted by the University of Texas and the USGS with funding from BLM/NOAA. The USGS produced geochemical...

  6. Integrated Energy-Water Planning in the Western and Texas Interconnections (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidwell, V. C.

    2013-12-01

    While thermoelectric power generation accounts for less than one percent of total water consumption in the western U.S, steady growth in demand is projected for this sector. Complexities and heterogeneity in water supply, water demand, and institutional controls make water development a challenging proposition throughout the West. A consortium of National Laboratories, the University of Texas and the Electric Power Research Institute are working with the Western Governors' Association and Western States Water Council to assist the Western Electricity Coordinating Council and the Electric Reliability Council of Texas to integrate water related issues into long-term transmission planning. Specifically, water withdrawal and consumption have been estimated for each western power plant and their susceptibility to climate impacts assessed. To assist with transmission planning, water availability and cost data have been mapped at the 8-digit Hydrologic Unit Code level for the conterminous western U.S. (1208 watersheds). Five water sources were individually considered, including unappropriated surface water, unappropriated groundwater, appropriated water, municipal wastewater and brackish groundwater. Also mapped is projected growth in consumptive water demand to 2030. The relative costs (capital and O&M) to secure, convey, and treat the water as necessary have also been estimated for each source of water. These data configured into watershed level supply curves were subsequently used to constrain West-wide transmission planning. Results across a range of alternative energy futures indicate the impact of water availability and cost on the makeup and siting of future power generation. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000. Water budgets at a 8

  7. Canadian institute honours Hawking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durrani, Matin

    2009-11-01

    The Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Waterloo, Canada, has announced that a major new extension to its campus will be known as the Stephen Hawking Centre. The extension, which is currently being built, is due to open in 2011 and will double the size of the institute. It will also provide a home for the institute's Masters students, the first of whom joined the Perimeter Institute this autumn as part of its Perimeter Scholars international programme.

  8. Analyzing Local Institutional Change

    OpenAIRE

    Helmsing, A.H.J.

    2013-01-01

    Institutional development has attracted more attention in the past two decades. However, institutional theory finds itself in a pre-consolidated phase and there are various theoretical and methodological challenges. One is to respond to the question whether institutional change is a spontaneous evolutionary or a deliberately designed process or a combination of the two. Another question concerns institutional co-innovation: i.e. the interaction between technological innovations, changes in in...

  9. Institute of Dramatic Art

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenmakers, H.

    1976-01-01

    There is a fundamental difference between the courses given at university drama institutes in the Netherlands and those of the drama departments in the American universities. This is one of the points to emerge from this article on the University of Amsterdam's Institute of Dramatic Art written by a senior staff member of that institute.…

  10. Discipline as Institutional Maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasche, Andreas; Hommel, Ulrich; Cornuel, Eric

    Drawing on the case of business school rankings, we study how institutions are maintained and remain persistent despite their contested nature. We argue that rankings as institutions can be maintained through subtle disciplinary practices that freeze power relations in recipient organizations. Our...... of disciplinary effects within business schools which help to stabilize and diffuse the institution....

  11. NSF ADVANCE: Institutional Transformation to Achieve Faculty Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, E. Y.

    2004-12-01

    The NSF ADVANCE initiative is designed to enhance gender equity in academic science and engineering faculty. One of its components - Institutional Transformation - has the goal of establishing strategies and policies that will revolutionize institutional climate so that diverse faculty flourish. The University of Texas at El Paso is one of 19 institutions to currently hold a 5-year grant under the Institutional Transformation program. This poster presentation highlights practices from the participating institutions. Two general aspects of the program are: 1) co-principal investigators are a blend of administrators and active researchers. This blend ensures a bottom-up, top-down approach to presenting gender equity to faculty. 2) Many of the investigators have diversity as their research focus, which is intended to result in rigorous, peer-reviewed dissemination of institutional results. Specific effors for all institutions relate to recruitment, retention, and advancement of female faculty and, by establishing equitable conditions, to improvement of the workplace for all faculty. To aid recruitment, institutions have committed faculty involved in the search process, including training of search committees in diversity strategies and interaction with candidates. A close working relationship with the campus EO officer is essential. Retention strategies center on mentoring, monetary support for research, and policy implementation. Policies focus on work-family balance. Advancement of females to important administrative and non-administrative leadership roles is the third focus. Workshops and seminars on leadership skills are common in the various institutions. Finally, a central theme of the program is that, in addition to specific strategies, institutions must articulate diversity as a core value and reflect on the means to actualize this value. More information on the NSF ADVANCE program, including links to the Institutional Transformation grantees, may be found on

  12. "The Heart Game"

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dithmer, Marcus; Rasmussen, Jack Ord; Grönvall, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this article is to describe the development and testing of a prototype application (“The Heart Game”) using gamification principles to assist heart patients in their telerehabilitation process in the Teledialog project. Materials and Methods: A prototype game was developed via...... (interviews, participant observations, focus group interviews, and workshop) was used. Interviews with three healthcare professionals and 10 patients were carried out over a period of 2 weeks in order to evaluate the use of the prototype. Results: The heart patients reported the application to be a useful...... activities. Conclusions: “The Heart Game” concept presents a new way to motivate heart patients by using technology as a social and active approach to telerehabilitation. The findings show the potential of using gamification for heart patients as part of a telerehabilitation program. The evaluation indicated...

  13. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic Heart Disease What Is The term "diabetic heart ... Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD may include coronary heart disease ( ...

  14. How Is Diabetic Heart Disease Treated?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home / Diabetic Heart Disease Diabetic Heart Disease What Is The term "diabetic heart ... Web page. What Heart Diseases Are Involved in Diabetic Heart Disease? DHD may include coronary heart disease ( ...

  15. Lifestyle Changes for Heart Attack Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... help prevent your first heart attack. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes A heart-healthy lifestyle can help prevent ... to flow to the heart muscle. Heart-Healthy Lifestyle Changes Treatment for a heart attack usually includes ...

  16. Latest Guadalupian (Middle Permian) conodonts and foraminifers from West Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambert, L.L.; Wardlaw, B.R.; Nestell, M.K.; Nestell, G.P.

    2002-01-01

    Clarkina, which characterizes Upper Permian (Lopingian Series) strata, evolved from Jinogondolella altudaensis in the Delaware basin of West Texas as demonstrated by transitional continuity. The West Texas section is significantly more complete in the uppermost Guadalupian interval than that of the probable GSSP reference section in South China, and clarifies the phylogenetic relationships among other conodont taxa as well. Jinogondolella granti clearly evolved into J. artafrons new species, both characterized by Pa elements with a distinctive fused carina. Representatives of Jinogondolella crofti are limited to the uppermost part of the altudaensis zone, and are interpreted as terminal paedomorphs. The associated foraminifer (non-fusulinid) fauna has some species in common with Zechstein faunas, possibly presaging the evaporitic basin that would develop following this latest Guadalupian marine deposition in West Texas.

  17. Music and the heart

    OpenAIRE

    Koelsch, Stefan; Jäncke, Lutz

    2017-01-01

    Music can powerfully evoke and modulate emotions and moods, along with changes in heart activity, blood pressure (BP), and breathing. Although there is great heterogeneity in methods and quality among previous studies on effects of music on the heart, the following findings emerge from the literature: Heart rate (HR) and respiratory rate (RR) are higher in response to exciting music compared with tranquilizing music. During musical frissons (involving shivers and piloerection), both HR and RR...

  18. Heart and Athlete

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad Hossein Jadbabaei; Bita Omidvar; Mohammad Alasti

    2010-01-01

    Regular participation in intensive physical exercise is associated with electro-morphological changes in the heart. This benign process is called athlete’s heart. Athlete’s heart resembles few pathologic conditions in some aspects. So differentiation of these conditions is very important which otherwise may lead to a catastrophic event such as sudden death. The most common causes of sudden death in young athletes are cardiomyopathies, congenital coronary anomalies, and ion channelopathies. Th...

  19. High Trypanosoma cruzi infection prevalence associated with minimal cardiac pathology among wild carnivores in central Texas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Curtis-Robles

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Infection with the zoonotic vector-borne protozoal parasite Trypanosoma cruzi causes Chagas disease in humans and dogs throughout the Americas. Despite the recognized importance of various wildlife species for perpetuating Trypanosoma cruzi in nature, relatively little is known about the development of cardiac disease in infected wildlife. Using a cross-sectional study design, we collected cardiac tissue and blood from hunter-donated wildlife carcasses- including raccoon (Procyon lotor, coyote (Canis latrans, gray fox (Urocyon cinereoargenteus, and bobcat (Lynx rufus – from central Texas, a region with established populations of infected triatomine vectors and increasing diagnoses of Chagas disease in domestic dogs. Based on PCR analysis, we found that 2 bobcats (14.3%, 12 coyotes (14.3%, 8 foxes (13.8%, and 49 raccoons (70.0% were positive for T. cruzi in at least one sample (right ventricle, apex, and/or blood clot. Although a histologic survey of right ventricles showed that 21.1% of 19 PCR-positive hearts were characterized by mild lymphoplasmocytic infiltration, no other lesions and no amastigotes were observed in any histologic section. DNA sequencing of the TcSC5D gene revealed that raccoons were infected with T. cruzi strain TcIV, and a single racoon harbored a TcI/TcIV mixed infection. Relative to other wildlife species tested here, our data suggest that raccoons may be important reservoirs of TcIV in Texas and a source of infection for indigenous triatomine bugs. The overall high level of infection in this wildlife community likely reflects high levels of vector contact, including ingestion of bugs. Although the relationship between the sylvatic cycle of T. cruzi transmission and human disease risk in the United States has yet to be defined, our data suggest that hunters and wildlife professionals should take precautions to avoid direct contact with potentially infected wildlife tissues.

  20. Diabetes Research Institute Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Caring for Older People with Diabetes Checking Blood Sugar Diabetes at School Exercise and Diabetes Explaining Diabetes to ... Insulin Therapy Keeping Your Heart Healthy Low Blood Sugar Meal Planning Preventing Diabetes Complications Preventing Type 2 Diabetes Setting Goals Sick ...

  1. Gambling in Texas: 1995 Surveys of Adult and Adolescent Gambling Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallisch, Lynn S.

    The impact of the Texas State Lottery on gambling patterns, expenditures on gambling, and the prevalence of problem gambling in Texas is assessed. Background and methodology is presented in Part 1. Data are compared with a survey run prior to the introduction of the first state lottery. Part 2, "Gambling among Texas Adults," includes…

  2. 30 CFR 943.25 - Approval of Texas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Texas abandoned mine land... STATE TEXAS § 943.25 Approval of Texas abandoned mine land reclamation plan amendments. The following is... reclamation on all lands adversely impacted by past coal mining. August 24, 1997 January 30, 1997...

  3. Perceptions of Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassadors on Career Development, Higher Education, and Leadership Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanolini, William F.; Rayfield, John; Ripley, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    Selected 4-H youth participated in the Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassador program. Forty-five youth participated in the 3-day program delivered by university professors and staff, Texas AgriLife Extension faculty and industry representatives. An instrument was developed and administered to the Texas 4-H Livestock Ambassadors at the end of their first…

  4. Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science: 25 Years of Early College STEM Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayler, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    The University of North Texas's Texas Academy of Mathematics and Science began admitting students to its 2-year early college entrance science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) program in the fall of 1988. This program provided accelerated entry for top students in Texas in the areas of mathematics and science. Approximately 200…

  5. 7 CFR 457.106 - Texas citrus tree crop insurance provisions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Texas citrus tree crop insurance provisions. 457.106... INSURANCE CORPORATION, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMON CROP INSURANCE REGULATIONS § 457.106 Texas citrus tree crop insurance provisions. The Texas Citrus Tree Crop Insurance Provisions for the 1999 and...

  6. Chemical and physical characteristics of water in estuaries of Texas; October 1978-September 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, J.C.; Grozier, R.U.

    1985-01-01

    The Texas Water Plan (Texas Water Development Board, 1968) proposed development and utilization of water resources in Texas and included a provision for the use and preservation of water in the estuaries of the State. Management of estuarine waters requires knowledge of the hydrodynamics and of the continuing changes in the chemical and physical characteristics of water in the estuaries.

  7. 30 CFR 943.20 - Approval of Texas abandoned mine land reclamation plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... § 943.20 Approval of Texas abandoned mine land reclamation plan. The Secretary approved the Texas abandoned mine land reclamation plan, as submitted on April 24, 1980, and amended on May 30, 1980, June 2... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Approval of Texas abandoned mine land...

  8. From the Battlefront of the Texas History Wars: Contending with "American Exceptionalism"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noboa, Julio

    2011-01-01

    It was in late May of 2010 that the Texas State Board of Education (SBOE) took their final vote on the curriculum standards that will have an impact on what millions of students in Texas as well as dozens of other states will learn about history and social studies for the next 10 years. These "Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills" (TEKS)…

  9. 76 FR 20968 - Application To Export Electric Energy; DC Energy Texas, LLC

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-14

    ... energy that DCE Texas proposes to export to Mexico would be surplus energy purchased from electric... listed above. Comments on the DCE Texas application to export electric energy to Mexico should be clearly... Application To Export Electric Energy; DC Energy Texas, LLC AGENCY: Office of Electricity Delivery and Energy...

  10. 78 FR 56071 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Texas Golden...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-11

    ... local Soil and Water Conservation District, NRCS, Texas Forest Service, a private forestry services... critical habitat designation for the Texas golden gladecress would be an improvement to conservation... and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Designation of Critical Habitat for Texas Golden Gladecress and...

  11. 77 FR 50767 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Endangered Status for Four Central Texas...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-22

    ... primary threat to the four central Texas salamander species. Water quality degradation in salamander... the Texas State Data Center (2008, p. 1) estimate that Travis County will increase in population from... size over this 40-year period. The Texas State Data Center also estimates an increase in human...

  12. 76 FR 28885 - Brucellosis in Swine; Add Texas to List of Validated Brucellosis-Free States

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-19

    ... Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 78 Brucellosis in Swine; Add Texas to List of Validated Brucellosis- Free... comments. SUMMARY: We are amending the brucellosis regulations concerning the interstate movement of swine by adding Texas to the list of validated brucellosis-free States. We have determined that Texas meets...

  13. Grassland Birds Wintering at U.S. Navy Facilities in Southern Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    brevis Texas horned lizard* Phrynosoma cornutum Texas spiny lizard Sceloporus olivaceus Texas indigo snake * Drymarchon corais Southwestern rat snake ...Elaphe guttata Ribbon snake Thamnophis proximus Western diamondback rattlesnake Crotalus atrox Structural and Floristic Characteristics of Native and...months. Dry periods increase nutritional stress and, in turn, reduce the production of offspring, which commonly cause small mammal popula- tions to

  14. Heart and athlete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alasti, Mohammad; Omidvar, Bita; Jadbabaei, Mohammad Hossein

    2010-01-01

    Regular participation in intensive physical exercise is associated with electro-morphological changes in the heart. This benign process is called athlete's heart. Athlete's heart resembles few pathologic conditions in some aspects. So differentiation of these conditions is very important which otherwise may lead to a catastrophic event such as sudden death. The most common causes of sudden death in young athletes are cardiomyopathies, congenital coronary anomalies, and ion channelopathies. The appropriate screening strategy to prevent sudden cardiac death in athletes remains a challenging issue. The purpose of this review is to describe the characteristics of athlete's heart and demonstrate how to differentiate it from pathologic conditions that can cause sudden death.

  15. Hyperkalemia in Heart Failure

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sarwar, Chaudhry M S; Papadimitriou, Lampros; Pitt, Bertram; Piña, Ileana; Zannad, Faiez; Anker, Stefan D; Gheorghiade, Mihai; Butler, Javed

    2016-01-01

    .... Heart failure patients have a high prevalence of chronic kidney disease, which further heightens the risk of hyperkalemia, especially when renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system inhibitors are used...

  16. Fundamentals and Optimal Institutions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gonzalez-Eiras, Martin; Harmon, Nikolaj Arpe; Rossi, Martín

    2016-01-01

    of regulatory institutions such as revenue sharing, salary caps or luxury taxes. We show, theoretically and empirically, that these large differences in adopted institutions can be rationalized as optimal responses to differences in the fundamental characteristics of the sports being played. This provides......To shed light on the relation between fundamentals and adopted institutions we examine institutional choice across the ``Big Four'' US sports leagues. Despite having very similar business models and facing the same economic and legal environment, these leagues exhibit large differences in their use...... a cautionary tail against trying to transplant succesful institutions across different economic settings....

  17. NEWS: Institute news

    Science.gov (United States)

    2000-03-01

    -March onwards include Guildford, Brighton, Gosport, Leeds, Loughborough, Oakham, Wolverhampton, Framlingham (Suffolk), Hatfield and London. Further details from Catherine Wilson (catherine.wilson@iop.org ). Courses and conferences Physics Update courses will be held in four locations this year. Details of the Malvern course (1 - 3 April) have already been circulated to schools and colleges. Details of the York course (8 - 10 July) will be circulated early next term. An Update course for teachers in Scotland will be held at Stirling University on 9 - 10 June and the final Update of the year will be held at Oxford University on 8 - 10 December. Further details are available from Leila Solomon (leila.solomon@iop.org ). Entitled `Hands on, minds on: raising standards by sharing good practice', the Education Group's Annual Conference 2000 will be held at the University of Durham on 7 - 8 July. Further details can be obtained from Jasmina Bolfek-Radovani (jasmina.bolfek-radovani@iop.org ) in the Institute's Conference Department. Other dates: * Schools Physics Group annual one-day meeting, 8 June 2000, Rugby School. * Scottish Branch one-day meeting for physics teachers, 8 June 2000, Stirling University. Posters A set of four full-colour A2 posters has recently been produced, with another set of four in preparation. The aim is to get across the message `Physics at the heart of everything' by means of eye-catching images - and to brighten up school and college labs and corridors in the process. Further explanations of the physics depicted are printed on the back of the posters. Sets of the first four posters are being circulated to all schools but additional copies will be available on request from schools.education@iop.org . And finally ... The Institute's Schools and Colleges Affiliation Scheme is to be relaunched later this year, as a free scheme for all schools and colleges which will provide low-cost items on a regular basis. There will also be a second, subscription tier giving

  18. Furthering critical institutionalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Dalton Cleaver

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This special issue furthers the study of natural resource management from a critical institutional perspective. Critical institutionalism (CI is a contemporary body of thought that explores how institutions dynamically mediate relationships between people, natural resources and society. It focuses on the complexity of institutions entwined in everyday social life, their historical formation, the interplay between formal and informal, traditional and modern arrangements, and the power relations that animate them. In such perspectives a social justice lens is often used to scrutinise the outcomes of institutional processes. We argue here that critical institutional approaches have potentially much to offer commons scholarship, particularly through the explanatory power of the concept of bricolage for better understanding institutional change.  Critical institutional approaches, gathering momentum over the past 15 years or so, have excited considerable interest but the insights generated from different disciplinary perspectives remain insufficiently synthesised. Analyses emphasising complexity can be relatively illegible to policy-makers, a fact which lessens their reach. This special issue therefore aims to synthesise critical institutional ideas and so to lay the foundation for moving beyond the emergent stage to make meaningful academic and policy impact. In bringing together papers here we define and synthesise key themes of critical institutionalism, outline the concept of institutional bricolage and identity some key challenges facing this school of thought.

  19. Installation Restoration Program. Phase 1. Records Search, Lackland AFB, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-02-01

    governmental environ- mental projects. Environmental Engineering Department Head (1973-1976). Supervised staff involved in auditing environmental practices...V. -4 a a ; to- w w M, 4-. c* a a M - ~ a -- ~= a a a a a aa as-au ’- aC aCca - ~~~ - aa:0 a 0 24 X4 JU 2 a -- a. -~a - .wZ 2kD.4 4 ob0 m C C w 4a...Wells, Bexar County, Texas, Texas Department of Water Resources Report 237. McIntosh, W. E. and Behm, R. C., 1967. Geological and Foundation

  20. Energy Policy Case Study - Texas: Wind, Markets, and Grid Modernization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orrell, Alice C. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Homer, Juliet S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Bender, Sadie R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Weimar, Mark R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2016-09-19

    This document presents a case study of energy policies in Texas related to power system transformation, renewable energy and distributed energy resources (DERs). Texas has experienced a dramatic increase in installed wind capacity, from 116 MW in 2000 to over 15,000 MW in 2015. This achievement was enabled by the designation of Competitive Renewable Energy Zones (CREZs) and new transmission lines that transmit wind to load centers. This report highlights nascent efforts to include DERs in the ERCOT market. As costs decline and adoption rates increase, ERCOT expects distributed generation to have an increasing effect on grid operations, while bringing potentially valuable new resources to the wholesale markets.