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Sample records for tetramethylpyrazine attenuates spinal

  1. Tetramethylpyrazine improves the recovery of spinal cord injury via Akt/Nrf2/HO-1 pathway.

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    Wang, Chao; Wang, Peng; Zeng, Wen; Li, Weixin

    2016-02-15

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most severe traumatic conditions, resulting in postoperative complications. Our results and other reports have shown that tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) is able to exhibit neuro-protective effects after SCI. In the current study, we aimed to examine the possible mechanism underlying the neuro-protective effect of TMP in rat model of SCI. TMP improved locomotor functions and decreased permeability of blood-spinal cord barrier in rats with SCI, as evidenced by increase of Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan scores and decrease of Evans blue leakage. In addition, TMP decreased the expression of several proinflammatory cytokines, including IL-1β, TNFα and IL-18, reduced TUNEL-positive cells and caspase 3 and 9 activities, decreased thiobarbituric acid reactive substances content and increased glutathione level and superoxide dismutase activity in rats. All these effects were inhibited by zinc protoporphyrin IX (ZnPP), an inhibitor of HO-1, and LY294002, an inhibitor of Akt. Moreover, TMP inhibited the decrease of mRNA expression of HO-1 which was suppressed by ZnPP and LY294002. TMP inhibited the decrease of Akt phosphorylation in rats after SCI, which was suppressed by LY294002, but not ZnPP. Furthermore, LY294002, but not ZnPP, significantly inhibited TMP-induced increase of mRNA expression of Nrf2 and DNA binding activity of Nrf2 in HO-1 promoters in rat model of SCI. The data suggested that TMP induced neuro-protective effects against injury of spinal cord through the activation of Akt/Nrf2/HO-1 signaling pathway. These results have appointed a new path toward the understanding of pathogenesis and TMP-related therapy of SCI and associated neurodegenerative diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Spinal histamine in attenuation of mechanical hypersensitivity in the spinal nerve ligation-induced model of experimental neuropathy.

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    Wei, Hong; Viisanen, Hanna; You, Hao-Jun; Pertovaara, Antti

    2016-02-05

    Here we studied whether and through which mechanisms spinal administration of histamine dihydrochloride (histamine) attenuates pain behavior in neuropathic animals. Experiments were performed in rats with spinal nerve ligation-induced neuropathy and a chronic intrathecal catheter for spinal drug delivery. Mechanical hypersensitivity was assessed with monofilaments while radiant heat was used for assessing nociception. Ongoing neuropathic pain and its attenuation by histamine was assessed using conditioned place-preference test. Following spinal administration, histamine at doses 0.1-10µg produced a dose-related mechanical antihypersensitivity effect. With prolonged treatment (twice daily 10µg for five days), the antihypersensitivity effect of spinal histamine was reduced. In place-preference test, neuropathic animals preferred the chamber paired with histamine (10µg). Histamine (10µg) failed to influence heat nociception in neuropathic animals or mechanically induced pain behavior in a group of healthy control rats. Histamine-induced mechanical antihypersensitivity effect was prevented by spinal pretreatment with zolantidine (histamine H2 receptor antagonist), prazosine (α1-adrenoceptor antagonist) and bicuculline (γ-aminobutyric acid subtype A, GABA(A), receptor antagonist), but not by pyrilamine (histamine H1 receptor antagonist), atipamezole (α2-adrenoceptor antagonist), or raclopride (dopamine D2 receptor antagonist). A-960656, a histamine H3 receptor antagonist alone that presumably increased endogenous histamine levels reduced hypersensitivity. Additionally, histamine prevented central (presumably postsynaptically-induced) facilitation of hypersensitivity induced by N-methyl-d-aspartate. The results indicate that spinal histamine at the dose range of 0.1-10µg selectively attenuates mechanical hypersensitivity and ongoing pain in neuropathy. The spinal histamine-induced antihypersensitivity effect involves histamine H2 and GABA(A) receptors and

  3. [Assay of Tetramethylpyrazine in Szechwan Lovage Rhizome and Cnidium Rhizome by HPLC-DAD-MS].

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    Hong, Yuan-lin; Jin, Yu-qing; Yao, Yi-xin; Lin, Mao-yi; Wei, Bo-ping; Jiang, Wei-dong; Lu, Guang-hua

    2015-01-01

    To quantity the amount of tetramethylpyrazine in Szechwan Lovage Rhizome (Chuanxiong, the rhizome of Ligusticum chuanxiong Hort., CX) and Cnidium Rhizome(Japanese Chuanxiong, the rhizome of Cnidium officinale Makino, JCX) for quality assessment. An HPLC-DAD-MS technique was employed to detect tetramethylpyrazine in 27 CX and 10 JCX samples. Tetramethylpyrazine was separated on a Waters Symmetry C,, column (250 mm x 4. 6 mm, 5 µm). The mobile phase was methanol-acetonitrile-water(27: 1: 72) at a flow rate of 1. 0 mL/min. The column temperature was 35 °C. DAD detection wavelength was 280 nm, while electrospray ionization detector was set at positive mode to collect MS spectrum. In the total of 37 herb samples, 11 samples were found to contain tetramethylpyrazine with the mean amount of 2. 19 µg/g(n = 11). 6 of 27 CX samples and 5 of 10 JCX sample were found the existence of tetramethylpyrazine with the amount of 0. 60 - 11. 75 µg and 0. 61 - 3. 05 µg/g,respectively. The correlation was not found between tetramethylpyrazine and the cultivation area, morphological character, processing or storage method for CX and JCX samples. It was possible that tetramethylpyrazine resulted from the microbes in soil. The developed method is accurate to quantify tetramethylpyrazine in CX and JCX herbs. Both the two herbs indeed contain tetramethylpyrazine, but it is not suitable to be a chemical marker to assess the quality of CX and JCX owing to low content.

  4. Tetramethylpyrazine attenuates oleic acid-induced acute lung injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... Tris·HCl, pH 7.5; 100 mmol/l NaCl; 1% Triton X-100; 1 mmol/l. EDTA; 1 mmol/l DTT; 0.1% SDS; 1× protease inhibitor cocktail) and protein concentration was determined using the BCA protein assay kit. Protein (50 µg) was solubilized in SDS sample buffer (50 mmol/l. Tris·HCl, pH 6.8; containing 5% ...

  5. Tetramethylpyrazine attenuates oleic acid-induced acute lung injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The protein expression of NF-kB in the lung was measured by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. The results showed an increase in tumor necrosis factor α and interleukin 1β in the ALI/ARDS rat models. The activation of NF-kB was suppressed by TMP in the ALI/ARDS rats. The suppression of those molecules is ...

  6. Spinal SIRT1 activation attenuates neuropathic pain in mice.

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    Haijun Shao

    Full Text Available Abnormal histone acetylation occurs during neuropathic pain through an epigenetic mechanism. Silent information regulator 1 (sir2 or SIRT1, a NAD-dependent deacetylase, plays complex systemic roles in a variety of processes through deacetylating acetylated histone and other specific substrates. But the role of SIRT1 in neuropathic pain is not well established yet. The present study was intended to detect SIRT1 content and activity, nicotinamide (NAM and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD in the spinal cord using immunoblotting or mass spectroscopy over time in mice following chronic constriction injury (CCI or sham surgery. In addition, the effect of intrathecal injection of NAD or resveratrol on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia was evaluated in CCI mice. Finally, we investigated whether SIRT1 inhibitor EX-527 could reverse the anti-nociceptive effect of NAD or resveratrol. It was found that spinal SIRT1 expression, deacetylase activity and NAD/NAM decreased significantly 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 days after CCI surgery as compared with sham group. In addition, daily intrathecal injection of 5 µl 800 mM NAD 1 h before and 1 day after CCI surgery or single intrathecal injection of 5 µl 90 mM resveratrol 1 h before CCI surgery produced a transient inhibitory effect on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia in CCI mice. Finally, an intrathecal injection of 5 µl 1.2 mM EX-527 1 h before NAD or resveratrol administration reversed the anti-nociceptive effect of NAD or resveratrol. These data indicate that the reduction in SIRT1 deacetylase activity may be a factor contributing to the development of neuropathic pain in CCI mice. Our findings suggest that the enhancement of spinal NAD/NAM and/or SIRT1 activity may be a potentially promising strategy for the prevention or treatment of neuropathic pain.

  7. Cortistatin attenuates inflammatory pain via spinal and peripheral actions.

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    Morell, María; Camprubí-Robles, María; Culler, Michael D; de Lecea, Luis; Delgado, Mario

    2014-03-01

    Clinical pain, as a consequence of inflammation or injury of peripheral organs (inflammatory pain) or nerve injury (neuropathic pain), represents a serious public health issue. Treatment of pain-related suffering requires knowledge of how pain signals are initially interpreted and subsequently transmitted and perpetuated. To limit duration and intensity of pain, inhibitory signals participate in pain perception. Cortistatin is a cyclic-neuropeptide that exerts potent inhibitory actions on cortical neurons and immune cells. Here, we found that cortistatin is a natural analgesic component of the peripheral nociceptive system produced by peptidergic nociceptive neurons of the dorsal root ganglia in response to inflammatory and noxious stimuli. Moreover, cortistatin is produced by GABAergic interneurons of deep layers of dorsal horn of spinal cord. By using cortistatin-deficient mice, we demonstrated that endogenous cortistatin critically tunes pain perception in physiological and pathological states. Furthermore, peripheral and spinal injection of cortistatin potently reduced nocifensive behavior, heat hyperalgesia and tactile allodynia in experimental models of clinical pain evoked by chronic inflammation, surgery and arthritis. The analgesic effects of cortistatin were independent of its anti-inflammatory activity and directly exerted on peripheral and central nociceptive terminals via Gαi-coupled somatostatin-receptors (mainly sstr2) and blocking intracellular signaling that drives neuronal plasticity including protein kinase A-, calcium- and Akt/ERK-mediated release of nociceptive peptides. Moreover, cortistatin could modulate, through its binding to ghrelin-receptor (GHSR1), pain-induced sensitization of secondary neurons in spinal cord. Therefore, cortistatin emerges as an anti-inflammatory factor with potent analgesic effects that offers a new approach to clinical pain therapy, especially in inflammatory states. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights

  8. Stat3 inhibition attenuates mechanical allodynia through transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression in spinal astrocytes.

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    Xiaodong Liu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3 is known to induce cell proliferation and inflammation by regulating gene transcription. Recent studies showed that Stat3 modulates nociceptive transmission by reducing spinal astrocyte proliferation. However, it is unclear whether Stat3 also contributes to the modulation of nociceptive transmission by regulating inflammatory response in spinal astrocytes. This study aimed at investigating the role of Stat3 on neuroinflammation during development of pain in rats after intrathecal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS. METHODS: Stat3 specific siRNA oligo and synthetic selective inhibitor (Stattic were applied to block the activity of Stat3 in primary astrocytes or rat spinal cord, respectively. LPS was used to induce the expression of proinflammatory genes in all studies. Immunofluorescence staining of cells and slices of spinal cord was performed to monitor Stat3 activation. The impact of Stat3 inhibition on proinflammatory genes expression was determined by cytokine antibody array, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction. Mechanical allodynia, as determined by the threshold pressure that could induce hind paw withdrawal after application of standardized von Frey filaments, was used to detect the effects of Stat3 inhibition after pain development with intrathecal LPS injection. RESULTS: Intrathecal injection of LPS activated Stat3 in reactive spinal astrocytes. Blockade of Stat3 activity attenuated mechanical allodynia significantly and was correlated with a lower number of reactive astrocytes in the spinal dorsal horn. In vitro study demonstrated that Stat3 modulated inflammatory response in primary astrocytes by transcriptional regulation of chemokine expression including Cx3cl1, Cxcl5, Cxcl10 and Ccl20. Similarly, inhibition of Stat3 reversed the expression of these chemokines in the spinal dorsal horn. CONCLUSIONS: Stat3 acted as a

  9. Spinal cord stimulation attenuates temporal summation in patients with neuropathic pain.

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    Eisenberg, Elon; Burstein, Yulia; Suzan, Erica; Treister, Roi; Aviram, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Evidence has shown that electrical stimulation at the dorsal columns attenuated the "wind-up" phenomenon in dorsal horn neurons in nerve-injured rats. This study was aimed to test the effect of spinal cord stimulation (SCS) on temporal summation (TS), the clinical correlate of the wind-up phenomenon in patients with radicular leg pain. Eighteen patients with SCS implants were tested both 30 minutes after SCS activation ("ON") and 2 hours after turning it off ("OFF"), in a random order. Temporal summation was evaluated in the most painful site in the affected leg and in the corresponding area in the contralateral leg by applying a tonic painful heat stimulus (46.5°C; 120 seconds) and simultaneous recording of the perceived heat pain intensity. Patients were also requested to report their clinical pain intensity (0-100 numerical pain scale) during SCS "ON" and "OFF". The Wilcoxon signed rank test was used in the comparisons between SCS "ON" and "OFF". Spinal cord stimulation activation significantly attenuated clinical pain intensity (from 66 ± 18 to 27 ± 31, P spinal cord neurons, is a possible mechanism underlying SCS analgesia in patients with neuropathic pain.

  10. Chronic spinal cord injury attenuates influenza virus-specific antiviral immunity.

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    Bracchi-Ricard, Valerie; Zha, Ji; Smith, Annalise; Lopez-Rodriguez, Darlah M; Bethea, John R; Andreansky, Samita

    2016-05-31

    Individuals suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI) are at higher risk for respiratory-related viral infections such as influenza. In a previous study (Zha et al., J Neuroinflammation 11:65, 2014), we demonstrated that chronic spinal cord injury caused impairment in CD8(+)T cell function with increased expression of the immunosuppressive protein, programmed cell death 1 (PD-1). The present study was undertaken to establish whether chronic SCI-induced immune deficits would affect antiviral immunity directed against primary and secondary infections. Six to seven weeks following a SCI contusion at thoracic level T9, mice were infected intranasally with influenza virus. Virus-specific immunity was analyzed at various time points post-infection and compared to uninjured controls. We report that chronic thoracic SCI impairs the ability of the animals to mount an adequate antiviral immune response. While all uninjured control mice cleared the virus from their lungs by day 10 post-infection, a significant number (approximately 70 %) of chronic SCI mice did not clear the virus and succumbed to infection-induced mortality. This was attributed to severe deficits in both virus-specific antibody production and CD8(+) T cell response in injured mice after primary infection. We also determined that previously acquired humoral immunity was maintained after spinal cord injury as vaccination against influenza A prior to injury-protected mice from a homologous viral challenge. In contrast, prior immunization did not protect mice from a heterotypic challenge with a different strain of influenza virus. Taken together, our data demonstrate that chronic SCI attenuates virus-specific humoral and cellular immunity during the establishment of primary response and impairs the development of memory CD8(+) T cells. In contrast, B cell memory acquired through vaccination prior to SCI is preserved after injury which demonstrates that antigen-specific memory cells are refractory following injury

  11. Polyamidoamine dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide attenuates nerve injury-induced spinal cord microglia activation and mechanical allodynia.

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    Kim, Hwisung; Choi, Boomin; Lim, Hyoungsub; Min, Hyunjung; Oh, Jae Hoon; Choi, Sunghyun; Cho, Joung Goo; Park, Jong-Sang; Lee, Sung Joong

    2017-01-01

    Background Accumulating evidence on the causal role of spinal cord microglia activation in the development of neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury suggests that microglial activation inhibitors might be useful analgesics for neuropathic pain. Studies also have shown that polyamidoamine dendrimer may function as a drug delivery vehicle to microglia in the central nervous system. In this regard, we developed polyamidoamine dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide, a previously identified microglial activation inhibitor, and tested its analgesic efficacy in a mouse peripheral nerve injury model. Result Polyamidoamine dendrimer was delivered selectively to spinal cord microglia upon intrathecal administration. Dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide inhibited lipoteichoic acid-induced proinflammatory gene expression in primary glial cells. In addition, dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide administration (intrathecal) inhibited peripheral nerve injury-induced spinal cord microglial activation and the expression of pain-related genes in the spinal cord, including Nox2, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6. Dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide administration right after nerve injury almost completely reversed peripheral nerve injury-induced mechanical allodynia for up to three days. Meanwhile, dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide administration 1.5 days post injury significantly attenuated mechanical allodynia. Conclusion Our data demonstrate that dendrimer-conjugated triamcinolone acetonide inhibits spinal cord microglia activation and attenuates neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury, which has therapeutic implications for the treatment of neuropathic pain.

  12. Angelica Sinensis attenuates inflammatory reaction in experimental rat models having spinal cord injury.

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    Xu, Jun; E, Xiao-Qiang; Liu, Hui-Yong; Tian, Jun; Yan, Jing-Long

    2015-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the effect of Angelica Sinensis on experimental rat models in which spinal cord injury was induced by studying different factors. Different factors causing inflammation play a key role in pathophysiology of SCI. Here three groups of rats (n=15, each was used). These included a sham control group where only laminectomy was performed, SCI group where SCI was induced and AS/SCI group where although SCI was induced but Angelica Sinensis was also administered to study its effect and draw a comparison with control. The expression of I-kBα and NF-kB p65 was also studied using western blotting and after recording optical density (OD) values of western blots. MPO activity was used to measure the effect of 20 mg/kg Angelica Sinensis. The levels of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IL-1β and IL-6 were also studied. As compared with SCI group and sham control it was observed that Angelica Sinensis significantly reduced the expression of I-kBα and NF-kB p65, (PSinensis in rat models can attenuate the secondary damage caused by SCI and thus help in controlling the pathology of SCI in rats.

  13. Tachykinin NK₁ receptor antagonist co-administration attenuates opioid withdrawal-mediated spinal microglia and astrocyte activation.

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    Tumati, Suneeta; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Keresztes, Attila I; Yamamoto, Takashi; Vanderah, Todd W; Roeske, William R; Hruby, Victor J; Varga, Eva V

    2012-06-05

    Prolonged morphine treatment increases pain sensitivity in many patients. Enhanced spinal Substance P release is one of the adaptive changes associated with sustained opioid exposure. In addition to pain transmitting second order neurons, spinal microglia and astrocytes also express functionally active Tachykinin NK₁ (Substance P) receptors. In the present work we investigated the role of glial Tachykinin NK₁ receptors in morphine withdrawal-mediated spinal microglia and astrocyte activation. Our data indicate that intrathecal co-administration (6 days, twice daily) of a selective Tachykinin NK₁ receptor antagonist (N-acetyl-L-tryptophan 3,5-bis(trifluoromethyl)benzylester (L-732,138; 20 μg/injection)) attenuates spinal microglia and astrocyte marker and pro-inflammatory mediator immunoreactivity as well as hyperalgesia in withdrawn rats. Furthermore, covalent linkage of the opioid agonist with a Tachykinin NK₁ antagonist pharmacophore yielded a bivalent compound that did not augment spinal microglia or astrocyte marker or pro-inflammatory mediator immunoreactivity and did not cause paradoxical pain sensitization upon drug withdrawal. Thus, bivalent opioid/Tachykinin NK₁ receptor antagonists may provide a novel paradigm for long-term pain management.

  14. Systematic administration of B vitamins attenuates neuropathic hyperalgesia and reduces spinal neuron injury following temporary spinal cord ischaemia in rats.

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    Yu, C-Z; Liu, Y-P; Liu, S; Yan, M; Hu, S-J; Song, X-J

    2014-01-01

    B vitamins have been demonstrated to be effective in treating chronic pain due to peripheral nerve injury. We investigated whether B vitamins could alleviate neuropathic pain and reduce neuron injury following temporary ischaemia in a rat model of spinal cord ischaemia-reperfusion injury (SCII). SCII was produced by transiently blocking the unilateral lumbar arteries in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Behavioural and neurochemical signs of neuropathic pain and spinal neuron injury were analysed with and without B vitamin treatment. SCII caused behavioural thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia and neurochemical alterations, including increased expression of the vanilloid receptor 1 (VR1) and induction of c-Fos, as well as activation of the astrocytes and microglial cells in the spinal cord. Repetitive systemic administration of vitamin B complex (B1/B6/B12 at 33/33/0.5 mg/kg, i.p., daily, for 7-14 consecutive days) significantly reduced thermal hyperalgesia and the increased expression of VR1 and c-Fos, as well as activation of the astrocytes and microglial cells. SCII caused a dramatic decrease of the expression of the rate-limiting enzyme glutamic acid decarboxylase-65 (GAD65), which synthesizes γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in the axonal terminals, and β-III-tubulin, and also caused loss of Nissl bodies in the spinal cord. These alterations were largely prevented and rescued by the B vitamin treatment. These findings support the idea that the B vitamins are capable of neuroprotection and antinociception during spinal cord injury due to temporary ischaemia. Rescuing the loss of inhibitory GABAergic tone may reduce spinal central sensitization and contribute to B vitamin-induced analgesia. © 2013 European Pain Federation - EFIC®

  15. Cordycepin-enriched WIB-801C from Cordyceps militaris improves functional recovery by attenuating blood-spinal cord barrier disruption after spinal cord injury.

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    Lee, Jee Youn; Choi, Hye Young; Baik, Hyung Hwan; Ju, Bong G; Kim, Won-Ki; Yune, Tae Young

    2017-05-05

    Cordyceps militaris is an ingredient of traditional Chinese medicine and have been widely used for inflammatory diseases and cancer. Cordycepin is one of the major bioactive components of Cordyceps militaris, and has been known to have anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidant effects. In the present study, we examined whether WIB-801C, a standardized and cordycepin-enriched extract of caterpillar fungus (Cordyceps militaris), would attenuate blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption by inhibiting matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-9 activity, leading to improvement of functional outcomes after spinal cord injury (SCI). Male Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to contusive SCI using a New York University (NYU) impactor, and WIB-801C (50mg/kg) was administered at 2h and 8h after injury orally and further treated once a day for indicated time points. BSCB disruption, MMP-9 activity, blood infiltration, inflammation, neuronal apoptosis, axonal loss, demyelination, and neurological deficit were evaluated. We found that WIB-801C significantly attenuated BSCB disruption by inhibiting MMP-9 expression and activation after injury. The infiltration of neutrophils at 1 d and macrophage at 5 d after SCI was also ameliorated by WIB-801C as compared with vehicle control. In addition, the expression of inflammatory cytokines and mediators such as Tnf-α, IL-1β, IL-6, Cox-2, and inos as well as chemokines such as Gro-α and Mip-2α was significantly inhibited by WIB-801C. Furthermore, WIB-801C inhibits p38MAPK activation and proNGF production in microglia after injury. These events eventually led to the inhibition of apoptotic cell death of neurons and oligodendrocytes, improved functional recovery and attenuated demyelination and axon loss after SCI. Our results suggest that WIB-801C can be used as a therapeutic agent after SCI by attenuating BSCB disruption followed inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Tetramethylpyrazine potentiates arsenic trioxide activity against HL-60 cell lines

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    Wu, Yuni; Xu, Youhua; Shen, Yali; Wang, Cuicui; Guo, Gaili; Hu, Tiantian [Key Laboratory of Developmental Diseases in Childhood, Chongqing (China); Key Laboratory of Pediatrics in Chongqing, Chongqing (China); Chongqing International Science and Technology Cooperation Center for Child Development and Disorders, Chongqing (China)

    2012-02-17

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) in combination with arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) on the proliferation and differentiation of HL-60 cells. The HL-60 cells were treated with 300 µg/mL TMP, 0.5 µM As{sub 2}O{sub 3}, and 300 µg/mL TMP combined with 0.5 µM As{sub 2}O{sub 3}, respectively. The proliferative inhibition rates were determined with MTT. Differentiation was detected by the nitroblue tetrazolium (NBT) reduction test, Wright's staining and the distribution of CD11b and CD14. Flow cytometry was used to analyze cell cycle distribution. RT-PCR and Western blot assays were employed to detect the expressions of c-myc, p27, CDK2, and cyclin E1. Combination treatment had synergistic effects on the proliferative inhibition rates. The rates were increased gradually after the combination treatment, much higher than those treated with the corresponding concentration of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} alone. The cells exhibited characteristics of mature granulocytes and a higher NBT-reducing ability, being a 2.6-fold increase in the rate of NBT-positive ratio of HL-60 cells within the As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment versus almost a 13-fold increase in the TMP + As{sub 2}O{sub 3} group. Cells treated with both TMP and As{sub 2}O{sub 3} expressed far more CD11b antigens, almost 2-fold compared with the control group. Small doses of TMP potentiate As{sub 2}O{sub 3}-induced differentiation of HL-60 cells, possibly by regulating the expression and activity of G0/G1 phase-arresting molecules. Combination treatment of TMP with As{sub 2}O{sub 3} has significant synergistic effects on the proliferative inhibition of HL-60 cells.

  17. Curcumin attenuates morphine antinociceptive tolerance through suppressing up-regulation of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 in rats

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    Fei GAO

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective To investigate the effects of curcumin (Cur on activation of spinal Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 and on the chronic antinociceptive tolerance of morphine. Methods Sixty male Sprague-Dawley rats with successful intrathecal catheterization were randomly divided into four groups (n=15: saline (NS group; morphine (MOR group; curcumin (Cur group and morphine plus curcumin (MOR+Cur group. A morphine tolerance model of rats was induced by intrathecal injection of morphine 15μg, once a day for 7 consecutive days in MOR and MOR+Cur group; 100μg curcumin was administered intrathecally once a day for 7 consecutive days in Cur and MOR+Cur group, 10μl saline was administered intrathecally once a day for 7 consecutive days in NS group. The effect of curcumin intrathecal catheterization on morphine antinociceptive tolerance was explored by the tail flick latency (TFL method and mechanical withdrawal threshold (MWT, and then the maximum possible potential effect (MPE was calculated. The immunofluorescence staining method was applied to detect the effect of curcumin on the activation of lumbar spinal microglia. Real-time PCR and Western blotting were used to evaluate the effect of curcumin on the expression of mRNA and protein of spinal TLR4. Results The %MPE TFL and %MPE MWT increased significantly in MOR+Cur group than in MOR group (P0.05. The lumbar spinal microglia increased markedly and the expressions of polyclonal antibody IBA-1 and TLR4 were significantly up-regulated in MOR group than in NS group (P0.05. Conclusion Curcumin may attenuate chronic morphine antinociceptive tolerance through inhibiting spinal TLR4 up-regulation. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2017.12.06

  18. Idazoxan attenuates spinal cord injury by enhanced astrocytic activation and reduced microglial activation in rat experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

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    Wang, Xin-Shi; Chen, Yan-Yan; Shang, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Zhen-Guo; Chen, Guo-Qian; Han, Zhao; Shao, Bei; Yang, Hui-Min; Xu, Hui-Qin; Chen, Jiang-Fan; Zheng, Rong-Yuan

    2009-02-09

    Idazoxan, an imidazoline 2 receptor (I(2)R) ligand, has been shown to protect against brain injury in several animal models of neurological disorders. In the present study we investigated the effect of idazoxan on experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model of multiple sclerosis. EAE was induced by immunizing Wistar rats with guinea pig spinal cord homogenates emulsified in CFA, followed by daily treatment of idazoxan (0, 0.5 mg/kg, 1.5 mg/kg, 4.5 mg/kg, i.p, bid) for 10 days. The results showed that the treatment of idazoxan (1.5 mg/kg and 4.5 mg/kg) significantly decreased the incidence and alleviated inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination in spinal cords and cerebral cortex. Furthermore, the protective effect of idazoxan on EAE was associated with the enhanced astrocytic activation and attenuated microglial activation and with the subsequent down-regulated expression of proinflammatory cytokines IL-12p40 and IFN-gamma and up-regulated expression of anti-inflammatory cytokines IL-10 and TGF-beta(1). Thus, the daily treatment of the I(2)R ligand idazoxan for 10 days attenuates EAE pathology by differential modulation of astrocytic and microglial activations, raising a possibility that the I(2)R ligand may be a novel strategy for treating EAE.

  19. Neuroprotective role of hydralazine in rat spinal cord injury-attenuation of acrolein-mediated damage.

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    Park, Jonghyuck; Zheng, Lingxing; Marquis, Andrew; Walls, Michael; Duerstock, Brad; Pond, Amber; Vega-Alvarez, Sasha; Wang, He; Ouyang, Zheng; Shi, Riyi

    2014-04-01

    Acrolein, an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde and a reactive product of lipid peroxidation, has been suggested as a key factor in neural post-traumatic secondary injury in spinal cord injury (SCI), mainly based on in vitro and ex vivo evidence. Here, we demonstrate an increase of acrolein up to 300%; the elevation lasted at least 2 weeks in a rat SCI model. More importantly, hydralazine, a known acrolein scavenger can provide neuroprotection when applied systemically. Besides effectively reducing acrolein, hydralazine treatment also resulted in significant amelioration of tissue damage, motor deficits, and neuropathic pain. This effect was further supported by demonstrating the ability of hydralazine to reach spinal cord tissue at a therapeutic level following intraperitoneal application. This suggests that hydralazine is an effective neuroprotective agent not only in vitro, but in a live animal model of SCI as well. Finally, the role of acrolein in SCI was further validated by the fact that acrolein injection into the spinal cord caused significant SCI-like tissue damage and motor deficits. Taken together, available evidence strongly suggests a critical causal role of acrolein in the pathogenesis of spinal cord trauma. Since acrolein has been linked to a variety of illness and conditions, we believe that acrolein-scavenging measures have the potential to be expanded significantly ensuring a broad impact on human health. © 2013 International Society for Neurochemistry.

  20. Cell and molecular approaches to the attenuation of pain after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Mary J

    2006-01-01

    Recent experimental research to treat spinal cord injury (SCI) pain has greatly increased our understanding of how such chronic pain might be modulated in the human population. Neuropathic pain is caused by the structural and biochemical changes associated with the peripheral and central nervous system damage associated with nervous system trauma, often leading to an imbalance in endogenous excitatory and inhibitory spinal systems that modulate sensory processing. But current pharmacological therapies are often ineffective over time for the greater number of patients. Although there are a variety of useful surgical and pharmacologic interventions (including electric stimulation, implantable mechanical pumps and a myriad of drugs for pain relief) cell and molecular technologies are a new frontier in pain medicine. These other potential therapeutic agents of pain are based on current and developing treatment strategies elucidated from recent research, especially concerning central spinal sensitization, and the spinal mechanisms that are thought to be the origin and ongoing cause of chronic pain, even when the injury is peripheral in location. Newly developing translational strategies such as molecular agents, viral-mediated gene transfer or cellular transplants to treat chronic pain are being evaluated in a variety of peripheral and central injury models. They seek to address both the causes of neuropathic pain, to interfere with its development and maintenance over time, and give the injured person with pain an improved quality-of-life that allows them to better deal with the larger tasks of daily life and the strenuous rehabilitation that might also improve motor function after SCI.

  1. Inhibition of angiogenesis, fibrosis and thrombosis by tetramethylpyrazine: mechanisms contributing to the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

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    Xiaoxiao Cai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP is one of the active ingredients extracted from the Chinese herb Chuanxiong, which has been used to treat cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases, pulmonary diseases and cancer. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying the actions of TMP have not been fully elucidated. In a previous study we showed that TMP-mediated glioma suppression and neural protection involves the inhibition of CXCR4 expression. The SDF-1/CXCR4 axis plays a fundamental role in many physiological and pathological processes. In this study, we further investigated whether the regulation of the SDF-1/CXCR4 pathway is also involved in the TMP-mediated inhibition of neovascularization or fibrosis and improvement of microcirculation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a scratch-wound assay, we demonstrated that TMP significantly suppressed the migration and tubule formation of the human umbilical vein endothelial cell line ECV304 in vitro. The expression of CXCR4 in ECV304 cells is notably down-regulated after TMP treatment. In addition, TMP significantly suppresses corneal neovascularization in a rat model of corneal alkali burn injury. The expression of CXCR4 on days 1, 3 and 7 post-injury was determined through RT-PCR analysis. Consistent with our hypotheses, the expression of CXCR4 in the rat cornea is significantly increased with alkali burn and dramatically down-regulated with TMP treatment. Moreover, TMP treatment significantly attenuates bleomycin-induced rat pulmonary fibrosis, while immunofluorescence shows a notably decreased amount of CXCR4-positive cells in the TMP-treated group. Furthermore, TMP significantly down-regulates the expression of CXCR4 in platelets, lymphocytes and red blood cells. Whole-blood viscosity and platelet aggregation in rats are significantly decreased by TMP treatment. CONCLUSIONS: These results show that TMP exerts potent effects in inhibiting neovascularization, fibrosis and thrombosis under

  2. Inhibition of Spinal Oxidative Stress by Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction Attenuates the Development of Morphine Induced Tolerance and Hyperalgesia in Mice.

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    Filomena Lauro

    Full Text Available Citrus Bergamia Risso, commonly known as Bergamot, is a fruit whose Essential Oil and Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction have numerous medicinal properties. It is also an excellent antioxidant and in this study, for the first time, its potential effect on morphine induced tolerance in mice has been investigated. Our studies revealed that development of antinociceptive tolerance to repeated doses of morphine in mice is consistently associated with increased formation of superoxide, malondialdehyde and tyrosine-nitrated proteins in the dorsal horn of the spinal cord such as the enzyme glutamine synthase. Nitration of this protein is intimately linked to inactivation of its biological function and resulting increase of glutamate levels in the spinal cord. Administration of Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction (5-50 mg/kg attenuated tolerance development. This effect was accompanied by reduction of superoxide and malondialdehyde production, prevention of GS nitration, re-establishment of its activity and of glutamate levels. Our studies confirmed the main role of free radicals during the cascade of events induced by prolonged morphine treatment and the co-administration of natural derivatives antioxidant such as Bergamot Polyphenolic Fraction can be an important therapeutic approach to restore opioids analgesic efficacy.

  3. Salidroside attenuates neuroinflammation and improves functional recovery after spinal cord injury through microglia polarization regulation.

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    Wang, Chenggui; Wang, Qingqing; Lou, Yiting; Xu, Jianxiang; Feng, Zhenhua; Chen, Yu; Tang, Qian; Zheng, Gang; Zhang, Zengjie; Wu, Yaosen; Tian, Naifeng; Zhou, Yifei; Xu, Huazi; Zhang, Xiaolei

    2018-02-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is a severe neurological disease; however, few drugs have been proved to treat SCI effectively. Neuroinflammation is the major pathogenesis of SCI secondary injury and considered to be the therapeutic target of SCI. Salidroside (Sal) has been reported to exert anti-inflammatory effects in airway, adipose and myocardial tissue; however, the role of Sal in SCI therapeutics has not been clarified. In this study, we showed that Sal could improve the functional recovery of spinal cord in rats as revealed by increased BBB locomotor rating scale, angle of incline, and decreased cavity of spinal cord injury and apoptosis of neurons in vivo. Immunofluorescence double staining of microglia marker and M1/M2 marker demonstrated that Sal could suppress M1 microglia polarization and activate M2 microglia polarization in vivo. To verify how Sal exerts its effects on microglia polarization and neuron protection, we performed the mechanism study in vitro in microglia cell line BV-2 and neuron cell line PC12. The results showed that Sal prevents apoptosis of PC12 cells in coculture with LPS-induced M1 BV-2 microglia, also the inflammatory secretion phenotype of M1 BV-2 microglia was suppressed by Sal, and further studies demonstrated that autophagic flux regulation through AMPK/mTOR pathway was involved in Sal regulated microglia polarization after SCI. Overall, our study illustrated that Sal could promote spinal cord injury functional recovery in rats, and the mechanism may relate to its microglia polarization modulation through AMPK-/mTOR-mediated autophagic flux stimulation. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  4. Neuroprotective role of hydralazine in rat spinal cord injury-attenuation of acrolein-mediated damage

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    Park, Jonghyuck; Zheng, Lingxing; Marquis, Andrew; Walls, Michael; Duerstock, Brad; Pond, Amber; Alvarez, Sascha Vega; He, Wang; Ouyang, Zheng; Shi, Riyi

    2014-01-01

    Acrolein, an α,β-unsaturated aldehyde and a reactive product of lipid peroxidation, has been suggested as a key factor in neural post-traumatic secondary injury in SCI, mainly based on in vitro and ex vivo evidence. Here we demonstrate an increase of acrolein up to 300%; the elevation lasted at least two weeks in a rat SCI model. More importantly, hydralazine, a known acrolein scavenger can provide neuroprotection when applied systemically. Besides effectively reducing acrolein, hydralazine treatment also resulted in significant amelioration of tissue damage, motor deficits, and neuropathic pain. This effect was further supported by demonstrating the ability of hydralazine to reach spinal cord tissue at a therapeutic level following intraperitoneal application. This suggests that hydralazine is an effective neuroprotective agent not only in vitro, but in a live animal model of SCI as well. Finally, the role of acrolein in SCI was further validated by the fact that acrolein injection into the spinal cord caused significant SCI-like tissue damage and motor deficits. Taken together, available evidence strongly suggests a critical causal role of acrolein in the pathogenesis of spinal cord trauma. Since acrolein has been linked to a variety of illness and conditions, we believe that acrolein-scavenging measures have the potential to be expanded significantly ensuring a broad impact on human health. PMID:24286176

  5. Peripherally injected linalool and bergamot essential oil attenuate mechanical allodynia via inhibiting spinal ERK phosphorylation.

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    Kuwahata, Hikari; Komatsu, Takaaki; Katsuyama, Soh; Corasaniti, Maria Tiziana; Bagetta, Giacinto; Sakurada, Shinobu; Sakurada, Tsukasa; Takahama, Kazuo

    2013-02-01

    Bergamot essential oil (BEO) is one of the most common essential oil containing linalool and linalyl acetate as major volatile components. This study investigated the effect of intraplantar (i.pl.) bergamot essential oil (BEO) or linalool on neuropathic hypersensitivity induced by partial sciatic nerve ligation (PSNL) in mice. The i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool into the ipsilateral hindpaw to PSNL reduced PSNL-induced mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. Peripheral (i.pl.) injection of BEO or linalool into the contralateral hindpaw did not yield anti-allodynic effects, suggesting a local anti-mechanical allodynic effect of BEO or linalool in PSNL mice. Anti-mechanical hypersensitivity of morphine was enhanced by the combined injection of BEO or linalool at an ineffective dose when injected alone. We also examined the possible involvement of spinal extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) in BEO or linalool-induced anti-mechanical allodynia. In western blotting analysis, i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool resulted in a significant blockade of spinal ERK activation induced by PSNL. These results suggest that i.pl. injection of BEO or linalool may reduce PSNL-induced mechanical allodynia followed by decreasing spinal ERK activation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Chronic caffeine treatment attenuates experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis induced by guinea pig spinal cord homogenates in Wistar rats.

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    Chen, Guo Qian; Chen, Yan Yan; Wang, Xin Shi; Wu, Sai Zhen; Yang, Hui Min; Xu, Hui Qin; He, Jin Cai; Wang, Xiao Tong; Chen, Jiang Fan; Zheng, Rong Yuan

    2010-01-14

    Dysfunction of adenosinergic systems has been implicated in the development of multiple sclerosis in humans and experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) in animals. Caffeine, a non-selective antagonist of adenosine receptors, has been shown to provide protection against myelin oligodendroglia glycoprotein (MOG)-induced EAE in mice. In this study, we showed that chronic caffeine similarly imparts neuroprotection against EAE induced in rats by guinea pig spinal cord homogenates (GPSCH). GPSCH-induced EAE is characterized by extensive tissue inflammation with a typical chronic disease course. We showed that caffeine decreases the incidence of EAE and attenuates EAE pathology at behavioral, histological (inflammatory cell infiltration and demyelination) and neurochemical (expression of inflammatory cytokines) levels. The attenuation of GPSCH-induced pathology by chronic caffeine treatment was observed at doses of 10 and 30 mg/kg and during both peak and recovery phases of EAE. Furthermore, it was showed that chronic treatment with caffeine up-regulated A1 receptor and TGF-beta mRNAs and suppressed interferon-gamma mRNA in EAE rats. Together with previous reports, our data demonstrates that chronic treatment with caffeine exerts a neuroprotective effect against EAE, possibly through an A(1) receptor-mediated shift from Th1 to Th2 cell function, and provides a neurobiological basis for epidemiological investigation into the possible relationship between caffeine consumption and development of multiple sclerosis in humans.

  7. The Ketone Metabolite β-Hydroxybutyrate Attenuates Oxidative Stress in Spinal Cord Injury by Suppression of Class I Histone Deacetylases.

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    Kong, Ganggang; Huang, Zucheng; Ji, Wei; Wang, Xiaomeng; Liu, Junhao; Wu, Xiuhua; Huang, Zhiping; Li, Rong; Zhu, Qingan

    2017-09-15

    The ketone metabolite β-hydroxybutyrate (βOHB), is reported to be neuroprotective after spinal cord injury (SCI) in rats, but the underlying mechanism remains unknown. The present study aims to investigate effects of βOHB on suppression of oxidative stress and inhibition of class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) in in vivo and in vitro models. Rats were fed with ketogenic diet (KD) or standard diet (SD) for 3 weeks. A C5 hemi-contusion injury was applied to these animals on the 14th day of experiment, and spinal cord samples were harvested on the 1st, 3rd and 7th days after SCI, respectively. The blood ketone levels were significantly higher in the KD groups. KD reduced oxidative stress markers and reactive oxygen species (ROS) products, downregulated the expression of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase (NOX)2 and NOX4, and upregulated the expression of forkhead box group O (FOXO)3a, mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), and catalase after SCI. The in vitro study, performed on PC12 cells, indicated that βOHB inhibited H 2 O 2 -induced ROS production, decreased NOX2 and NOX4 protein levels, and upregulated FOXO3a, MnSOD, and catalase levels in a dose-dependent manner, which was consistent with the in vivo results. The ketone metabolite βOHB inhibited HDAC1, HDAC2, and HDAC3 activity, but not HDAC8 in SCI rats and PC12 cells. Depletion of HDAC1 or HDAC2 with small interfering RNA (siRNA) attenuated H 2 O 2 -induced ROS production and protein carbonylation and elevated FOXO3a protein levels, meanwhile reducing NOX2 and NOX4 protein expression in PC12 cells. Our results indicate that the ketone metabolite βOHB attenuates oxidative stress in SCI by inhibition of class I HDACs, and selected suppression of HDAC1 or HDAC2 regulates FOXO3a, NOX2, and NOX4 expression. Therefore, the ketone metabolite βOHB may be a novel promising therapeutic agent for SCI.

  8. Early applied electric field stimulation attenuates secondary apoptotic responses and exerts neuroprotective effects in acute spinal cord injury of rats.

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    Zhang, C; Zhang, G; Rong, W; Wang, A; Wu, C; Huo, X

    2015-04-16

    Injury potential, which refers to a direct current voltage between intact and injured nerve ends, is mainly caused by injury-induced Ca2+ influx. Our previous studies revealed that injury potential increased with the onset and severity of spinal cord injury (SCI), and an application of applied electric field stimulation (EFS) with the cathode distal to the lesion could delay and attenuate injury potential formation. As Ca2+ influx is also considered as a major trigger for secondary injury after SCI, we hypothesize that EFS would protect an injured spinal cord from secondary injury and consequently improve functional and pathological outcomes. In this study, rats were divided into three groups: (1) sham group, laminectomy only; (2) control group, subjected to SCI only; and (3) EFS group, received EFS immediately post-injury with the injury potential modulated to 0±0.5 mV by EFS. Functional recovery of the hind limbs was assessed using the Basso, Beattie, and Bresnahan (BBB) locomotor scale. Results revealed that EFS-treated rats exhibited significantly better locomotor function recovery. Luxol fast blue staining was performed to assess the spared myelin area. Immunofluorescence was used to observe the number of myelinated nerve fibers. Ultrastructural analysis was performed to evaluate the size of myelinated nerve fibers. Findings showed that the EFS group rats exhibited significantly less myelin loss and had larger and more myelinated nerve fibers than the control group rats in dorsal corticospinal tract (dCST) 8 weeks after SCI. Furthermore, we found that EFS inhibited the activation of calpain and caspase-3, as well as the expression of Bax, as detected by Western blot analysis. Moreover, EFS decreased cellular apoptosis, as measured by TUNEL, within 4 weeks post-injury. Results suggest that early EFS could significantly reduce spinal cord degeneration and improve functional and historical recovery. Furthermore, these neuroprotective effects may be related to

  9. Pretreatment with AQP4 and NKCC1 Inhibitors Concurrently Attenuated Spinal Cord Edema and Tissue Damage after Spinal Cord Injury in Rats.

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    Yan, Xiaodong; Liu, Juanfang; Wang, Xiji; Li, Wenhao; Chen, Jingyuan; Sun, Honghui

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) affects more than 2.5 million people worldwide. Spinal cord edema plays critical roles in the pathological progression of SCI. This study aimed to delineate the roles of aquaporin 4 (AQP4) and Na + -K + -Cl - cotransporter 1 (NKCC1) in acute phase edema and tissue destruction after SCI and to explore whether inhibiting both AQP4 and NKCC1 could improve SCI-induced spinal edema and damage. Rat SCI model was established by modified Allen's method. Spinal cord water content, cerebrospinal fluid lactose dehydrogenase (LDH) activity, AQP4 and NKCC1 expression, and spinal cord pathology from 30 min to 7 days after SCI were monitored. Additionally, aforementioned parameters in rats treated with AQP4 and/or NKCC1 inhibitors were assessed 2 days after SCI. Spinal cord water content was significantly increased 1 h after SCI while AQP4 and NKCC1 expression and spinal fluid LDH activity elevated 6 h after SCI. Spinal cord edema and spinal cord destruction peaked around 24 h after SCI and maintained at high levels thereafter. Treating rats with AQP4 inhibitor TGN-020 and NKCC1 antagonist bumetanide significantly reduced spinal cord edema, tissue destruction, and AQP4 and NKCC1 expression after SCI in an additive manner. These results demonstrated the benefits of simultaneously inhibiting both AQP4 and NKCC1 after SCI.

  10. Treatment with glial derived neurotropic factor (GDNF attenuates oxidative damages of spinal

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    Tao Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury (SCI is a serious and debilitating issue being suffered by wide population worldwide. Extensive treatment approaches have been tested and being verified for their efficacy. Owing to the nature of central nervous system (CNS, the resident stem cells would be triggered in response to any sort of trauma with nerve factors as their communication signals. Apart from physical injuries, damages due to oxidative stress also need to be addressed while CNS repair mechanism takes place. This study looks at the potential of glial derived nerve factor (GDNF in addressing the SCI in regard to oxidative damages. A total of 60 Wistar rats were clustered into five groups and GDNF at various concentrations was tested in each group. Assessments in terms of oxidative stress parameters were noted and analyzed accordingly. It was noted that GDNF had reduced oxidative damages and increased the levels of anti-oxidants in dose-dependent manner (p < 0.05. Though treatment with 10 mg/mL and 20 mg/mL showed significant changes as compared to control group, these treatment modalities remained insignificant among each other. In conclusion, we demonstrated that GDNF exerted a neuro-protective effect on CNS by inducing anti-oxidants and reducing the levels of oxidative stress in SCI induced rat models.

  11. Perineural pretreatment of bee venom attenuated the development of allodynia in the spinal nerve ligation injured neuropathic pain model; an experimental study.

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    Koh, Won Uk; Choi, Seong Soo; Lee, Jong Hyuk; Lee, So Hee; Lee, Sun Kyung; Lee, Yoon Kyung; Leem, Jeong Gil; Song, Jun Gol; Shin, Jin Woo

    2014-11-04

    Diluted bee venom (BV) is known to have anti-nociceptive and anti-inflammatory effects. We therefore assessed whether perineural bee venom pretreatment could attenuate the development of neuropathic pain in the spinal nerve ligation injured animal model. Neuropathic pain was surgically induced in 30 male Sprague Dawley rats by ligation of the L5 and L6 spinal nerves, with 10 rats each treated with saline and 0.05 and 0.1 mg BV. Behavioral testing for mechanical, cold, and thermal allodynia was conducted on postoperative days 3 to 29. Three rats in each group and 9 sham operated rats were sacrificed on day 9, and the expression of transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1), ankyrin type 1 (TRPA1), and melastatin type 8 (TRPM8) receptors in the ipsilateral L5 dorsal root ganglion was analyzed. The perineural administration of BV to the spinal nerves attenuated the development of mechanical, thermal, and cold allodynia, and the BV pretreatment reduced the expression of TRPV1, TRPA1, TRPM8 and c - Fos in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglion. The current study demonstrates that the perineural pretreatment with diluted bee venom before the induction of spinal nerve ligation significantly suppresses the development of neuropathic pain. Furthermore, this bee venom induced suppression was strongly related with the involvement of transient receptor potential family members.

  12. Intrathecal transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells attenuates blood-spinal cord barrier disruption induced by spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury in rabbits.

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    Fang, Bo; Wang, He; Sun, Xue-Jun; Li, Xiao-Qian; Ai, Chun-Yu; Tan, Wen-Fei; White, Paul F; Ma, Hong

    2013-10-01

    Intrathecal administration of bone marrow stromal cells has been found to produce beneficial effects on ischemia-reperfusion injury to the spinal cord. The blood-spinal cord barrier is critical to maintain spinal cord homeostasis and neurologic function. However, the effects of bone marrow stromal cells on the blood-spinal cord barrier after spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury are not well understood. This study investigated the effects and possible mechanisms of bone marrow stromal cells on blood-spinal cord barrier disruption induced by spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury. This was a prospective animal study conducted at the Central Laboratory of the First Affiliated Hospital, China Medical University. The study used 81 Japanese white rabbits (weight, 1.8-2.6 kg). Spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury was induced in rabbits by infrarenal aortic occlusion for 30 minutes. Two days before the injury was induced, bone marrow stromal cells (1 × 10(8) in 0.2-mL phosphate-buffered saline) were transplanted by intrathecal injection. Hind-limb motor function was assessed using Tarlov criteria, and motor neurons in the ventral gray matter were counted by histologic examination. The permeability of the blood-spinal cord barrier was examined using Evans blue (EB) and lanthanum nitrate as vascular tracers. The expression and localization of tight junction protein occludin were assessed by Western blot, real-time polymerase chain reaction, and immunofluorescence analysis. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression were also measured. Intrathecal transplantation of bone marrow stromal cells minimized the neuromotor dysfunction and histopathologic deficits (P spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury. In addition, bone marrow stromal cells treatment suppressed spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury-induced decreases in occludin (P bone marrow stromal cells reduced the excessive expression of MMP-9 and TNF-α (P bone marrow

  13. Deletion of mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 attenuates neuronal loss and improves locomotor function in a mouse model of spinal cord trauma.

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    Wang, Pan-Feng; Xu, Da-Yuan; Zhang, Yuntong; Liu, Xiao-Bin; Xia, Yan; Zhou, Pan-Yu; Fu, Qing-Ge; Xu, Shuo-Gui

    2017-07-01

    Neuronal cell death following spinal cord injury (SCI) is an important contributor to neurological deficits. The purpose of our work was to delineate the function of mammalian sterile 20-like kinase 1 (Mst1), a pro-apoptotic kinase and key mediator of apoptotic signaling, in the pathogenesis of an experimental mouse model of SCI. Male mice received a mid-thoracic spinal contusion injury, and it was found that phosphorylation of Mst1 at the injured site was enhanced significantly following SCI. Furthermore, when compared to the wild-type controls, Mst1-deficient mice displayed improved locomotor function by increased Basso mouse scale score. Deletion of Mst1 in mice attenuated loss of motor neurons and suppressed microglial and glial activation following SCI. Deletion of Mst1 in mice reduced apoptosis via suppressing cytochrome c release and caspase-3 activation following SCI. Deletion of Mst1 attenuated mitochondrial dysfunction and increased ATP formation following SCI. Deletion of Mst1 in mice inhibited local inflammation following SCI, evidenced by reduced activities of myeloperoxidase and protein levels of TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that deletion of Mst1 attenuated neuronal loss and improved locomotor function in a mouse model of SCI, via preserving mitochondrial function, attenuating mitochondria-mediated apoptotic pathway, and suppressing inflammation, at least in part.

  14. Evaluating the feasibility of fermentation starter inoculated with Bacillus amyloliquefaciens for improving acetoin and tetramethylpyrazine in Baoning bran vinegar.

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    Zhang, Liqiang; Huang, Jun; Zhou, Rongqing; Wu, Chongde

    2017-08-16

    Fermentation starters (Daqu) used in present study included traditional herb Daqu (C Daqu), modified Daqu without herbs (M Daqu) and S Daqu fermented by inoculating acetoin and tetramethylpyrazine high-producing bacterium Bacillus amyloliquefaciens into M Daqu. To evaluate the feasibility of S Daqu combined with M Daqu applied for improving contents of acetoin and tetramethylpyrazine in Baoning bran vinegar without remarkably changing the original microbial community and the other volatiles contents compared with C Daqu, vinegar Pei C, M, M1, M2 and S were correspondingly prepared in lab scale using C Daqu, M Daqu, M1 Daqu (S Daqu: M Daqu=1:9, w/w), M2 Daqu (S Daqu: M Daqu=5:5) and S Daqu. PCR-DGGE suggested that Bacillus, Lactobacillus, Oceanobacillus, Acetobacter, Pichia, Geotrichum and Trichoderma were dominant microbes. Microbial community of M were similar with M1, while that of the others were similar. Differences in physicochemical properties among samples may be ascribed to different enzymes activities of Daqu and bioactivities of microbial metabolism during fermentation. Moreover, total contents of organic acids in M, M1, M2 and S increased by 33.10%, 25.77%, 4.32% and 7.74% relative to C, respectively. Volatiles and PLS-DA analysis suggested that volatile profiles of M were similar with M1, that of M2 were similar with C, while that of S were significantly different with the others. Both M2 Daqu and S Daqu facilitated the formation of acetoin and tetramethylpyrazine. However, M2 Daqu was more efficient for enhancing acetoin and tetramethylpyrazine contents by 191.84% and 123.17% respectively, without significantly changing the other volatiles contents. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Autologous adipose-derived stem cells attenuate muscular atrophy and protect spinal cord ventral horn motor neurons in an animal model of burn injury.

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    Wu, Sheng-Hua; Huang, Shu-Hung; Lo, Yi-Ching; Chai, Chee-Yin; Lee, Su-Shin; Chang, Kao-Ping; Lin, Sin-Daw; Lai, Chung-Sheng; Yeh, Jwu-Lai; Kwan, Aij-Lie

    2015-08-01

    Burn injuries might increase muscle mass loss, but the mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, we demonstrated that burn injury induced spinal cord ventral horn motor neuron (VHMN) apoptosis and subsequently caused muscle atrophy and revealed the potential protection of autologous adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) transplantation on spinal cord VHMNs and muscle against burn injury. Third-degree hind-paw burns were established by contact with a 75°C metal surface for 10 seconds. Adipose tissues were harvested from the groin fat pad, expanded in culture and labeled with chloromethyl-benzamido/1,1'-dioctadecyl-3,3,3',3'- tetramethyl indocarbocyanine perchlorate. The ASCs were transplanted into the injured hind paw at 4 weeks after burn injury. The lumbar spinal cord, sciatic nerve, gastrocnemius muscle and hind-paw skin were processed for immunofluorescent staining at 4 weeks after transplantation, including terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TUNEL) assay, caspase-3, caspase-9, CD 90 and S100, and the gastrocnemius muscle was evaluated through the use of hematoxylin and eosin staining. Caspase-3-positive, caspase-9-positive and TUNEL-positive cells were significantly increased in the corresponding dermatome spinal cord VHMNs after burn injury. Moreover, the decrease of Schwann cells in sciatic nerve and the increase of denervation atrophy in gastrocnemius muscle were observed. Furthermore, ASCs transplantation significantly attenuated apoptotic death of VHMNs and the area of muscle denervation atrophy in the gastrocnemius muscle fibers. The animal model of third-degree burns in the hind paw showed significant apoptosis in the corresponding spinal cord VHMNs, which suggests that neuroprotection might be the potentially therapeutic target in burn-induced muscle atrophy. ASCs have potential neuroprotection against burn injuries through its anti-apoptotic effects. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  16. Intravenous granisetron attenuates hypotension during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery: A double-blind, prospective randomized controlled study

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    Eldaba, Ahmed A.; Amr, Yasser M.

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of intravenous (IV) granisetron in the prevention of hypotension and bradycardia during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery. Material and Methods: A total of 200 parturients scheduled for elective cesarean section were included in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group I was given 1 mg granisetron diluted in 10 ml normal saline slowly IV, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Group II was given 10 ml of normal saline, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR) were recorded every 3 min until the end of surgery (for 45 min). The total consumption of vasopressors and atropine were recorded. Apgar scores at 1 and 5 min were also assessed. Results: Serial mean arterial blood pressure and HR values for 45 min after onset of spinal anesthesia were decreased significantly in group II, P cesarean section significantly reduces hypotension, bradycardia and vasopressors usage. PMID:26330710

  17. Ultrasound-enhanced protective effect of tetramethylpyrazine against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion injury.

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    Chunbing Zhang

    Full Text Available In traditional Chinese medicine, Ligusticum wallichii (Chuan Xiong and its bioactive ingredient, tetramethylpyrazine (TMP, have been used to treat cardiovascular diseases and to relieve various neurological symptoms, such as those associated with ischemic injury. In the present study, we investigated whether ultrasound (US exposure could enhance the protective effect of TMP against cerebral ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury. Glutamate-induced toxicity to pheochromocytoma (PC12 cells was used to model I/R injury. TMP was paired with US to examine whether this combination could alleviate glutamate-induced cytotoxicity. The administration of TMP effectively protected cells against glutamate-induced apoptosis, which could be further enhanced by US-mediated sonoporation. The anti-apoptotic effect of TMP was associated with the inhibition of oxidative stress and a change in the levels of apoptosis-related proteins, Bcl-2 and Bax. Furthermore, TMP reduced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines such as TNF-α and IL-8, which likely also contributes to its cytoprotective effects. Taken together, our findings suggest that ultrasound-enhanced TMP treatment might be a promising therapeutic strategy for ischemic stroke. Further study is required to optimize ultrasound treatment parameters.

  18. Tanshinone IIA Attenuates Chronic Pancreatitis-Induced Pain in Rats via Downregulation of HMGB1 and TRL4 Expression in the Spinal Cord.

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    Wang, Ye-song; Li, Yuan-yuan; Wang, Li-hua; Kang, Ying; Zhang, Jie; Liu, Zi-quan; Wang, Kun; Kaye, Alan David; Chen, Lei

    2015-01-01

    pancreatitis and mechanical allodynia in rats. TSN IIA significantly attenuated TNBS-induced mechanical allodynia in a dose-dependent manner. TNBS significantly increased the spinal expression of HMGB1 and proinflammatory cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α, and IL-6. These TNBS-induced changes were significantly inhibited by TSN IIA in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, TSN IIA, but not the neutralizing anti-HMGB1 antibody, significantly inhibited TNBS-induced spinal TLR4 and GFAP expression. In addition to TLR4, HMGB1 can also bind to toll-like receptor-2 (TLR2) and the receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE). Additional studies are warranted to ascertain whether HMGB1 contributes to CP-induced pain through activation of these receptors. Our results suggest that spinal HMGB1 contributes to the development of CP-induced pain and can potentially be a therapeutic target. TSN IIA attenuates CP-induced pain via downregulation of spinal HMGB1 and TRL4 expression. Therefore, TSN IIA may be a potential anti-nociceptive drug for the treatment of CP-induced pain.

  19. Calpain inhibitor attenuates ER stress-induced apoptosis in injured spinal cord after bone mesenchymal stem cells transplantation.

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    Wang, Chao; Shi, Dongling; Song, Xinghui; Chen, Yingying; Wang, Linlin; Zhang, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) therapy for tissue repair is limited by low survival of cells transplanted in the recipient sites after spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, we investigated the effects of a calpain inhibitor (MDL28170) on BMSCs survival by a rat model of spinal cord injury in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned medium from hypoxia injured VSC4.1 motor neurons (Hypoxia-CM) were collected to mimic the micro-environment of injured spinal cord. Tunicamycin was also applied to induce endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in BMSCs. The CCK-8 assay, LDH leakage assay and flow cytometer assay demonstrated that MDL28170 could enhance BMSCs survival in response to Hypoxia-CM and tunicamycin. Moreover, MDL28170 significantly enhanced GFP-positive BMSCs survival in vivo after transplantation into the contused spinal cord of SCI rats. The protective effects of MDL28170 on BMSCs survival may inhibit the activation of calpain and the downstream ER stress-induced apoptosis. The present results suggested for the first time that MDL28170 with BMSCs transplant helped to rescue cells in injured spinal cord by modulating the ER stress-induced apoptosis. The calpain inhibitor, MDL28170 may have the promising new strategies for promoting the survival of transplanted BMSCs on cell-based regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intravenous granisetron attenuates hypotension during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery: A double-blind, prospective randomized controlled study

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    Ahmed A Eldaba

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This study was conducted to determine the effectiveness of intravenous (IV granisetron in the prevention of hypotension and bradycardia during spinal anesthesia in cesarean delivery. Material and Methods: A total of 200 parturients scheduled for elective cesarean section were included in this study. They were randomly divided into two groups. Group I was given 1 mg granisetron diluted in 10 ml normal saline slowly IV, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Group II was given 10 ml of normal saline, 5 min before spinal anesthesia. Mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate (HR were recorded every 3 min until the end of surgery (for 45 min. The total consumption of vasopressors and atropine were recorded. Apgar scores at 1 and 5 min were also assessed. Results: Serial mean arterial blood pressure and HR values for 45 min after onset of spinal anesthesia were decreased significantly in group II, P < 0.0001. The incidence of hypotension after spinal anesthesia was 64% in group II and 3% in group I (P < 0.0001. The total doses of ephedrine (4.07 ± 3.87 mg vs 10.7 ± 8.9 mg, P < 0.0001, phenylephrine (0.0 microg vs 23.2 ± 55.1 microg, P < 0.0001, and atropine (0.0 mg vs 0.35 ± 0.49 mg P < 0.0001 consumed in both the groups respectively, were significantly less in group I versus group II. Conclusion: Premedication with 1 mg IV granisetron before spinal anesthesia in an elective cesarean section significantly reduces hypotension, bradycardia and vasopressors usage.

  1. Combining Bone Marrow Stromal Cells with Green Tea Polyphenols Attenuates the Blood-Spinal Cord Barrier Permeability in Rats with Compression Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Yu, De-shui; Liu, Li-bo; Cao, Yang; Wang, Yan-song; Bi, Yun-long; Wei, Zi-Jian; Tong, Song-ming; Lv, Gang; Mei, Xi-fan

    2015-06-01

    This study was performed to investigate the effect of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) combined with green tea polyphenols (GTPs) on the blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) permeability after spinal cord injury (SCI) in the rat model. In the model of SCI rats, we found that the water content and the BSCB permeability were decreased by BMSCs and GTPs treatment, and their combination had a synergistic effect. Further, the motor function of rats was also greatly improved by BMSCs and GTPs administration. After treated by the combination of BMSCs and GTPs, SCI rats showed the up-regulated expression of tight junction (TJ) associated proteins claudin-5, occludin and ZO-1 by Western blot, which was more remarkable than that in the single treatment. The increased expression levels of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1 were the most obvious in the spinal cord microvessels using immunohistochemistry assay. This led to the conclusion that the combination of BMSCs and GTPs could decrease the BSCB permeability by up-regulating protein expression levels of claudin-5, occludin, and ZO-1. In addition, after BMSCs and GTPs administration, the results of Western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed a significant decrease in protein expression level and the activation of nuclear factor-кB (NF-кB) p65. Our results indicated that combination of BMSCs and GTPs could improve motor function after SCI, which might be correlated with improvements in BSCB integrity, and that NF-кB might be involved in the modulating process.

  2. Spinal injection of docosahexaenoic acid attenuates carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain through inhibition of microglia-mediated neuroinflammation in the spinal cord.

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    Lu, Y; Zhao, L-X; Cao, D-L; Gao, Y-J

    2013-06-25

    Neuroinflammation in the spinal cord plays a critical role in the processing of inflammatory pain. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a predominant omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid in the central nervous system, is known to modulate inflammatory responses in various neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we investigated whether DHA could reduce inflammatory pain and inhibit neuroinflammation in the spinal cord following carrageenan injection in mice. Intrathecal (i.t.) injection of DHA at 15min before carrageenan injection blocked carrageenan-induced pain hypersensitivity for more than 6h. In addition, i.t. injection of DHA at 3h after carrageenan transiently reversed carrageenan-induced heat hyperalgesia and mechanical allodynia. Furthermore, DHA treatment reduced carrageenan-induced activation of microglia, phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and production of proinflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosisfactor-α - TNF-α and interleukin-1β - IL-1β) in the L4-5 spinal cord. In cultured microglial cells, DHA dose-dependently reduced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced phosphorylation of p38, production of proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6) and chemokines (CCL2, CCL3 and CXCL10). p38 inhibitor SB203580 inhibited LPS-induced expression of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines in a dose-dependent manner. Taken together, these results provide evidence that DHA has antinociceptive effect in inflammatory pain, which may be attributed to, at least partially, suppressing a microglia-mediated inflammatory response through inhibition of p38 MAPK activation. Copyright © 2013 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Tetramethylpyrazine-mediated regulation of CXCR4 in retinoblastoma is sensitive to cell density.

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    Wu, Nandan; Xu, Lijun; Yang, Ying; Yu, Na; Zhang, Zhang; Chen, Pei; Zhang, Jing; Tang, Mingjun; Yuan, Meng; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2017-05-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common ocular tumor in children, and it causes extensive damage. Current treatment options for retinoblastoma include surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy and cryotherapy. However, the majority of chemotherapy medicines cause complications and side effects that lead to severe impairment of patient health. Previous studies have reported that tetramethylpyrazine (TMP), which is an extract of the Chinese herbal medicine Chuanxiong, reduces the risk of multidrug resistance in chemotherapy and inhibits the proliferation and metastasis of various types of cancer cells. However, the underlying molecular mechanism of TMP in retinoblastoma remains unclear. The current study demonstrated that C-X-C chemokine receptor type 4 (CXCR4) was expressed in WERI‑Rb1 cells and in retinoblastoma. Using reverse transcription‑quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western blotting techniques, the current study demonstrated that TMP significantly downregulated the expression of CXCR4 in WERI‑Rb1 cells cultured at high density, whereas it had a minor effect in low‑density WERI‑Rb1 cells; additionally, this effect occurred in a time‑dependent manner. TMP inhibited the proliferation of WERI‑Rb1 cells as effectively as a CXCR4 antagonist, AMD3100, consistent with a role of CXCR4 in cancer development. Notably, TMP did not affect the cell cycle of cells cultured at low density (1x105 cells/ml), whereas it induced G1‑phase arrest in high‑density cells (7.5x105 cells/ml; Pretinoblastoma, and also provides novel insights into the mechanisms of the anti‑cancer and neuroprotective effects of this extract.

  4. Rapid calpain I activation and cytoskeletal protein degradation following traumatic spinal cord injury: attenuation with riluzole pretreatment.

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    Springer, J E; Azbill, R D; Kennedy, S E; George, J; Geddes, J W

    1997-10-01

    Immunocytochemical and immunoblotting techniques were used to investigate calpain I activation and the stability of the calpain-sensitive cytoskeletal proteins microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and spectrin at 1, 4, and 24 h after contusion injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury resulted in the activation of calpain I at all time points examined, with the highest level of activation occurring at 1 h. At the same early time point, there was a loss of dendritic MAP2 staining in spinal cord sections, accompanied by pronounced perikaryal accumulation. The loss in MAP2 staining in the injured spinal cord progressed over the 24-h survival period to affect regions 3 mm distant to the site of injury. The presence of calpain I-specific spectrin degradation was apparent in neuronal cell bodies and fibers as early as 1 h after injury, with the most intense staining occurring within and juxtaposed to the injury site. Spectrin breakdown products in neuronal cell bodies declined rapidly at 4 h and were nearly undetectable at 24 h after injury. Immunoblot studies confirmed the immunocytochemical results by demonstrating a significant increase in calpain I activation, a significant decrease in MAP2 levels, and a significant increase in spectrin breakdown. Finally, treatment of animals with riluzole, an inhibitor of glutamate release, before surgery reduced significantly the loss of MAP2 levels observed at 24 h after injury. These results demonstrate that Ca2+-dependent protease activation and degradation of critical cytoskeletal proteins are early events after spinal cord injury and that treatments that minimize the actions of glutamate may limit their breakdown.

  5. Microneedle-Assisted Percutaneous Delivery of a Tetramethylpyrazine-Loaded Microemulsion

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    Qiang Zu

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the efficacy of the percutaneous delivery of a tetramethylpyrazine-loaded microemulsion (TMP-ME on skin pretreated with microneedles (MN. The TMP-ME formulation was optimized in vitro with skin permeation experiments, using a uniform experimental design, guided by a pseudo-ternary phase diagram, in which the TMP skin permeation level and mean particle size were indices. The effects of MN pretreatment on skin permeation by TMP-ME were assessed using in vitro skin permeation, in vivo skin microdialysis, and pharmacokinetic studies in rats. The influence of MN pretreatment on the skin barrier function was evaluated by measuring the electrical resistance of rat skin before and after MN insertion. In the optimal formulation of TMP-ME, the weight percentages of Maisine® 35-1 (oil phase, Labrasol® (surfactant, and Transcutol® P (co-surfactant were 7%, 30% and 10%, respectively, with 1.5% TMP loading. In the in vitro skin permeation study, MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a two-fold increase in a 24-h cumulative TMP permeation compared with TMP-ME alone (p < 0.05. In the skin microdialysis study, TMP in MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a 1.25-fold increase in Cmax, a 0.93-fold decrease in Tmax, and a 0.88-fold increase in AUC0–t (p < 0.05. Similarly, in the pharmacokinetic study, TMP in MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a 2.11-fold increase in Cmax, a 0.67-fold decrease in Tmax, and a 1.07-fold increase in AUC0–t (p < 0.05. The percutaneous electrical resistance of rat skin before and after MN insertion was 850 ± 50 Ω/cm2 and 283 ± 104 Ω/cm2 respectively, indicating that MN dramatically compromises the skin barrier. These results suggest that MN assistance increases the skin permeation rate and the extent of percutaneous absorption of TMP-ME, and that the mechanism may involve the reversible barrier perturbation effect. The rate and extent of percutaneous absorption of TMP-ME can be significantly enhanced by MN assistance, possibly

  6. Microneedle-Assisted Percutaneous Delivery of a Tetramethylpyrazine-Loaded Microemulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zu, Qiang; Yu, Yanyan; Bi, Xiaolin; Zhang, Ren; Di, Liuqing

    2017-11-21

    This study examined the efficacy of the percutaneous delivery of a tetramethylpyrazine-loaded microemulsion (TMP-ME) on skin pretreated with microneedles (MN). The TMP-ME formulation was optimized in vitro with skin permeation experiments, using a uniform experimental design, guided by a pseudo-ternary phase diagram, in which the TMP skin permeation level and mean particle size were indices. The effects of MN pretreatment on skin permeation by TMP-ME were assessed using in vitro skin permeation, in vivo skin microdialysis, and pharmacokinetic studies in rats. The influence of MN pretreatment on the skin barrier function was evaluated by measuring the electrical resistance of rat skin before and after MN insertion. In the optimal formulation of TMP-ME, the weight percentages of Maisine ® 35-1 (oil phase), Labrasol ® (surfactant), and Transcutol ® P (co-surfactant) were 7%, 30% and 10%, respectively, with 1.5% TMP loading. In the in vitro skin permeation study, MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a two-fold increase in a 24-h cumulative TMP permeation compared with TMP-ME alone ( p < 0.05). In the skin microdialysis study, TMP in MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a 1.25-fold increase in C max , a 0.93-fold decrease in T max , and a 0.88-fold increase in AUC 0-t ( p < 0.05). Similarly, in the pharmacokinetic study, TMP in MN-assisted TMP-ME exhibited a 2.11-fold increase in C max , a 0.67-fold decrease in T max , and a 1.07-fold increase in AUC 0-t ( p < 0.05). The percutaneous electrical resistance of rat skin before and after MN insertion was 850 ± 50 Ω/cm² and 283 ± 104 Ω/cm² respectively, indicating that MN dramatically compromises the skin barrier. These results suggest that MN assistance increases the skin permeation rate and the extent of percutaneous absorption of TMP-ME, and that the mechanism may involve the reversible barrier perturbation effect. The rate and extent of percutaneous absorption of TMP-ME can be significantly enhanced by MN assistance, possibly

  7. Tanshinone IIA attenuates the inflammatory response and apoptosis after traumatic injury of the spinal cord in adult rats.

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    Xin Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Spinal cord injury (SCI, including immediate mechanical injury and secondary injury, is associated with the inflammatory response, apoptosis and oxidative stress in response to traumatic injury. Tanshinone IIA (TIIA is one of the major extracts obtained from Salvia miltiorrhiza BUNGE, which has anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects on many diseases. However, little is known about the effects of TIIA treatment on SCI. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the pharmacological action of TIIA on secondary damage and the underlying mechanisms of experimental SCI in rats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: SCI was generated using a weight drop device on the dorsal spinal cord via a two-level T9-T11 laminectomy. SCI in rats resulted in severe trauma, characterized by locomotor disturbance, edema, neutrophil infiltration, the production of astrocytes and inflammatory mediators, apoptosis and oxidative stress. TIIA treatment (20 mg/kg, i.p. after SCI induced significant effects: (1 improved motor function (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores, (2 reduced the degree of tissue injury (histological score, neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity and the expression of astrocytes, (3 inhibited the activation of SCI-related pathways, such as NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, (4 decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 and iNOS, (5 reduced apoptosis (TUNEL staining, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression and (6 reversed the redox state imbalance. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results clearly show that TIIA has a prominent protective effect against SCI through inhibiting the inflammatory response and apoptosis in the spinal cord tissue after SCI.

  8. Tanshinone IIA attenuates the inflammatory response and apoptosis after traumatic injury of the spinal cord in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Xin; Yin, Yue; Cao, Fa-Le; Chen, Yu-Fei; Peng, Ye; Hou, Wu-Gang; Sun, Shu-Kai; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2012-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI), including immediate mechanical injury and secondary injury, is associated with the inflammatory response, apoptosis and oxidative stress in response to traumatic injury. Tanshinone IIA (TIIA) is one of the major extracts obtained from Salvia miltiorrhiza BUNGE, which has anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic effects on many diseases. However, little is known about the effects of TIIA treatment on SCI. Therefore, the aim of the present study is to evaluate the pharmacological action of TIIA on secondary damage and the underlying mechanisms of experimental SCI in rats. SCI was generated using a weight drop device on the dorsal spinal cord via a two-level T9-T11 laminectomy. SCI in rats resulted in severe trauma, characterized by locomotor disturbance, edema, neutrophil infiltration, the production of astrocytes and inflammatory mediators, apoptosis and oxidative stress. TIIA treatment (20 mg/kg, i.p.) after SCI induced significant effects: (1) improved motor function (Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores), (2) reduced the degree of tissue injury (histological score), neutrophil infiltration (myeloperoxidase activity) and the expression of astrocytes, (3) inhibited the activation of SCI-related pathways, such as NF-κB and MAPK signaling pathways, (4) decreased the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6) and iNOS, (5) reduced apoptosis (TUNEL staining, and Bcl-2 and caspase-3 expression) and (6) reversed the redox state imbalance. The results clearly show that TIIA has a prominent protective effect against SCI through inhibiting the inflammatory response and apoptosis in the spinal cord tissue after SCI.

  9. An Agonist of the Protective Factor SIRT1 Improves Functional Recovery and Promotes Neuronal Survival by Attenuating Inflammation after Spinal Cord Injury.

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    Chen, Haihong; Ji, Hao; Zhang, Ming; Liu, Zude; Lao, Lifeng; Deng, Chao; Chen, Jianwei; Zhong, Guibin

    2017-03-15

    Targeting posttraumatic inflammation is crucial for improving locomotor function. SIRT1 has been shown to play a critical role in disease processes such as hepatic inflammation, rheumatoid arthritis, and acute lung inflammation by regulating inflammation. However, the role of SIRT1 in spinal cord injury (SCI) is unknown. We hypothesized that SIRT1 plays an important role in improving locomotor function after SCI by regulating neuroinflammation. In this study, we investigate the effect of SIRT1 in SCI using pharmacological intervention (SRT1720) and the Mx1-Cre/loxP recombination system to knock out target genes. First, we found that SIRT1 expression at the injured lesion site of wild-type (WT) mice (C57BL/6) decreased 4 h after SCI and lasted for 3 d. Moreover, administration of SRT1720, an agonist of SIRT1, to WT mice significantly improved functional recovery for up to 28 d after injury by reducing the levels of proinflammatory cytokines, the number of M1 macrophages, the number of macrophages/microglia, and the accumulation of perivascular macrophages. In contrast, administration of SRT1720 to SIRT1 knock-out (KO) mice did not improve locomotor recovery or attenuate inflammation. Furthermore, SIRT1 KO mice exhibited worse locomotor recovery, increased levels of inflammatory cytokines, and more M1 macrophages and perivascular macrophages than those of WT mice after SCI. Together, these findings indicate that SRT1720, an SIRT1 agonist, can improve functional recovery by attenuating inflammation after SCI. Therefore, SIRT1 is not only a protective factor but also an anti-inflammatory molecule that exerts beneficial effects on locomotor function after SCI. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Posttraumatic inflammation plays a central role in regulating the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury (SCI). Here, new data show that administration of SRT1720, an SIRT1 agonist, to wild-type (WT) mice significantly improved outcomes after SCI, most likely by reducing the levels of

  10. Bilateral passive leg raising attenuates and delays tourniquet deflation-induced hypotension and tachycardia under spinal anaesthesia: a randomised controlled trial.

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    Huang, Go-Shine; Wang, Chih-Chien; Hu, Mei-Hua; Cherng, Chen-Hwan; Lee, Meei-Shyuan; Tsai, Chien-Sung; Chan, Wei-Hung; Hsieh, Xhang-Xian; Lin, Leou-Chyr

    2014-01-01

    The pneumatic tourniquet is frequently used in total knee arthroplasty. Tourniquet deflation may result in hypotension and tachycardia caused by the rapid shift of blood volume back to the ischaemic limb and a decrease in cardiac preload. Passive leg raising (PLR) represents a 'self-volume challenge' that can result in an increase in preload. Such a PLR-induced increase in preload was hypothesised to attenuate the decrease in preload resulting from tourniquet deflation. To evaluate the effect of PLR on hypotension and tachycardia following tourniquet deflation. A randomised controlled trial. Single medical centre. Seventy patients who underwent unilateral total knee arthroplasty were randomised into two groups: tourniquet deflation with PLR (n = 35) or without PLR (control group, n = 35). Patients in both groups were administered a single dose of plain bupivacaine for spinal anaesthesia. The pneumatic tourniquet was inflated on the thigh and the surgery was performed. The study composed of four steps: for the PLR group, step 1 - inflation of the tourniquet while the patient was supine; step 2 - the patient's legs were raised to a 45° angle; step 3 - the tourniquet was deflated while the patient's legs were still raised; and step 4 - the legs were returned to the supine position. In the control group, the same perioperative procedure was used, but PLR was not conducted. The patients' blood pressure and heart rate were measured before, during and after tourniquet deflation. After tourniquet deflation, the magnitude of the changes in blood pressure and heart rate was less in the PLR group than that in the control group. In addition, the blood pressure nadir also occurred later in the PLR group than in the controls. Bilateral PLR is a simple, reversible manoeuvre that mimics rapid fluid loading. Bilateral PLR attenuates the severity of, and delays the time to, hypotension and tachycardia following deflation of a lower limb tourniquet. ClinicalTrials.gov number

  11. Overexpression of HIPK2 attenuates spinal cord injury in rats by modulating apoptosis, oxidative stress, and inflammation.

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    Li, Renbo; Shang, Jingbo; Zhou, Wei; Jiang, Li; Xie, Donghui; Tu, Guanjun

    2018-04-09

    HIPK2 is considered to be a tumor suppressor. It also has been implicated in several functions such as apoptosis and inflammation that are linked to spinal cord injury (SCI). However, whether HIPK2 ameliorates the neurological pain of SCI remains unclear. Here, we investigated the effects of HIPK2 on neurological function, oxidative stress, levels of inflammatory cytokines and expression of Bcl-2/Bax in an SCI model. Firstly, we evaluated the therapeutic effects of HIPK2 on neurological pain in the SCI rat using the Basso, Beattie and Bresnahan scores and H & E staining. Overexpression of HIPK2 significantly elevated the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), and reduced the mRNA expression of Nogo-A and RhoA in SCI rats. Furthermore, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays showed that overexpression of HIPK2 significantly reduced the number of apoptotic cells. Overexpression of HIPK2 also decreased expression of Bax and Caspase-3 and elevated expression of Bcl-2 in the SCI model, indicating that HIPK2 exhibited its protective activity by inhibiting SCI-induced apoptosis. Then, we measured the serum concentrations of malondialdehyde (MDA), superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-PX). We also determined the mRNA and protein levels of nuclear factor-κB p65 unit, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), and interleukin (IL)-1β. HIPK2 overexpression reduced oxidative stress and the levels of inflammatory cytokines compared with SCI control animals. Additionally, acetylation of HIPK2 was reduced in SCI rats. Overexpression of HIPK2 could enhance autophagy by elevating the expression of Beclin-1 and LC3-II while autophagy is regarded as a beneficial regulator to improve spinal cord injury. Together, overexpression of HIPK2 improved contusive SCI induced pain by modulating oxidative stress, Bcl‑2 and Bax signaling, and

  12. Enhanced production of tetramethylpyrazine in Bacillus licheniformis BL1 by bdhA disruption and 2,3-butanediol supplementation.

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    Meng, Wu; Xiao, Dongguang; Wang, Ruiming

    2016-03-01

    The 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) dehydrogenase gene (bdhA) of Bacillus licheniformis BL1 was disrupted to construct the tetramethylpyrazine (TMP)-producing BLA strain. During microaerobic fermentation, the bdhA-disrupted BLA strain produced 46.98 g TMP/l, and this yield was 23.99% higher than that produced by the parent BL1 strain. In addition, the yield of acetoin, which is a TMP precursor, also increased by 28.98% in BLA. The TMP production by BL1 was enhanced by supplementing the fermentation medium with 2,3-BD. The yield of TMP improved from 37.89 to 44.77 g/l as the concentration of 2,3-BD increased from 0 to 2 g/l. The maximum TMP and acetoin yields increased by 18.16 and 17.87%, respectively with the increase in 2,3-BD concentration from 0 to 2 g/l. However, no increase was observed when the concentration of 2,3-BD in the matrix was ≥3 g/l. This study provides a valuable strategy to enhance TMP and acetoin productivity of mutagenic strains by gene manipulation and optimizing fermentation conditions.

  13. Microemulsion-based novel transdermal delivery system of tetramethylpyrazine: preparation and evaluation in vitro and in vivo

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    Zhao JH

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Ji-Hui Zhao, Li Ji, Hui Wang, Zhi-Qiang Chen, Yong-Tai Zhang, Ying Liu, Nian-Ping FengSchool of Pharmacy, Shanghai University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of ChinaObjective: To deliver 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine (TMP in a relatively large dose through a transdermal route and facilitate the practical application of microemulison in transdermal drug delivery.Methods: The pseudo-ternary phase diagram for microemulsion regions was constructed using isopropyl myristate as oil phase, Labrasol® as surfactant, and Plurol® Oleique CC 497 as cosurfactant. A uniform experimental design was applied for formulation optimization. In vitro skin permeation experiments of six formulations were undertaken with TMP transdermal patch (EUDRAGIT® E100 as matrix and TMP saturated solution as controls. We prepared TMP-oil dispersed in water-ethylene vinyl acetate-transdermal therapeutic system (TMP-O/W-EVA-TTS with microemulsion as reservoir and EVA membrane as release liner; pharmacokinetic and brain distribution studies in rats were conducted with TMP transdermal patches as control.Results: The skin fluxes of TMP from microemulsions were 8.2- to 26.7-fold and 0.9- to 4.7-fold higher than those of TMP transdermal patch and TMP saturated solution, respectively, and were strongly affected by the microemulsion composition. The improvement in TMP solubility as well as the skin permeation enhancement effect of microemulsion components contributed mainly to transdermal delivery facilitation. In the pharmacokinetic study, the relative bioavailability of TMP-O/W-EVA-TTS was 350.89% compared with the TMP transdermal patch. Higher and more stable TMP contents in rat plasma were obtained after administration of TMP-O/W-EVA-TTS than after application of TMP transdermal patch. In the brain distribution study, higher rate and extent of TMP distribution to brain, and lower rate of TMP clearance from brain were observed after transdermal

  14. Repetitive Treatment with Diluted Bee Venom Attenuates the Induction of Below-Level Neuropathic Pain Behaviors in a Rat Spinal Cord Injury Model

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    Suk-Yun Kang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The administration of diluted bee venom (DBV into an acupuncture point has been utilized traditionally in Eastern medicine to treat chronic pain. We demonstrated previously that DBV has a potent anti-nociceptive efficacy in several rodent pain models. The present study was designed to examine the potential anti-nociceptive effect of repetitive DBV treatment in the development of below-level neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury (SCI rats. DBV was applied into the Joksamli acupoint during the induction and maintenance phase following thoracic 13 (T13 spinal hemisection. We examined the effect of repetitive DBV stimulation on SCI-induced bilateral pain behaviors, glia expression and motor function recovery. Repetitive DBV stimulation during the induction period, but not the maintenance, suppressed pain behavior in the ipsilateral hind paw. Moreover, SCI-induced increase in spinal glia expression was also suppressed by repetitive DBV treatment in the ipsilateral dorsal spinal cord. Finally, DBV injection facilitated motor function recovery as indicated by the Basso–Beattie–Bresnahan rating score. These results indicate that the repetitive application of DBV during the induction phase not only decreased neuropathic pain behavior and glia expression, but also enhanced locomotor functional recovery after SCI. This study suggests that DBV acupuncture can be a potential clinical therapy for SCI management.

  15. Repetitive Treatment with Diluted Bee Venom Attenuates the Induction of Below-Level Neuropathic Pain Behaviors in a Rat Spinal Cord Injury Model.

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    Kang, Suk-Yun; Roh, Dae-Hyun; Choi, Jung-Wan; Ryu, Yeonhee; Lee, Jang-Hern

    2015-07-10

    The administration of diluted bee venom (DBV) into an acupuncture point has been utilized traditionally in Eastern medicine to treat chronic pain. We demonstrated previously that DBV has a potent anti-nociceptive efficacy in several rodent pain models. The present study was designed to examine the potential anti-nociceptive effect of repetitive DBV treatment in the development of below-level neuropathic pain in spinal cord injury (SCI) rats. DBV was applied into the Joksamli acupoint during the induction and maintenance phase following thoracic 13 (T13) spinal hemisection. We examined the effect of repetitive DBV stimulation on SCI-induced bilateral pain behaviors, glia expression and motor function recovery. Repetitive DBV stimulation during the induction period, but not the maintenance, suppressed pain behavior in the ipsilateral hind paw. Moreover, SCI-induced increase in spinal glia expression was also suppressed by repetitive DBV treatment in the ipsilateral dorsal spinal cord. Finally, DBV injection facilitated motor function recovery as indicated by the Basso-Beattie-Bresnahan rating score. These results indicate that the repetitive application of DBV during the induction phase not only decreased neuropathic pain behavior and glia expression, but also enhanced locomotor functional recovery after SCI. This study suggests that DBV acupuncture can be a potential clinical therapy for SCI management.

  16. GLT1 overexpression reverses established neuropathic pain-related behavior and attenuates chronic dorsal horn neuron activation following cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falnikar, Aditi; Hala, Tamara J; Poulsen, David J; Lepore, Angelo C

    2016-03-01

    Development of neuropathic pain occurs in a major portion of traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) patients, resulting in debilitating and often long-term physical and psychological burdens. Following SCI, chronic dysregulation of extracellular glutamate homeostasis has been shown to play a key role in persistent central hyperexcitability of superficial dorsal horn neurons that mediate pain neurotransmission, leading to various forms of neuropathic pain. Astrocytes express the major CNS glutamate transporter, GLT1, which is responsible for the vast majority of functional glutamate uptake, particularly in the spinal cord. In our unilateral cervical contusion model of mouse SCI that is associated with ipsilateral forepaw heat hypersensitivity (a form of chronic at-level neuropathic pain-related behavior), we previously reported significant and long-lasting reductions in GLT1 expression and functional GLT1-mediated glutamate uptake in cervical spinal cord dorsal horn. To therapeutically address GLT1 dysfunction following cervical contusion SCI, we injected an adeno-associated virus type 8 (AAV8)-Gfa2 vector into the superficial dorsal horn to increase GLT1 expression selectively in astrocytes. Compared to both contusion-only animals and injured mice that received AAV8-eGFP control injection, AAV8-GLT1 delivery increased GLT1 protein expression in astrocytes of the injured cervical spinal cord dorsal horn, resulting in a significant and persistent reversal of already-established heat hypersensitivity. Furthermore, AAV8-GLT1 injection significantly reduced expression of the transcription factor and marker of persistently increased neuronal activation, ΔFosB, in superficial dorsal horn neurons. These results demonstrate that focal restoration of GLT1 expression in the superficial dorsal horn is a promising target for treating chronic neuropathic pain following SCI. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation attenuates CFA-induced hyperalgesia and inhibits spinal ERK1/2-COX-2 pathway activation in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Jun-Fan; Liang, Yi; Du, Jun-Ying; Fang, Jian-Qiao

    2013-06-15

    Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) is a non-pharmacologic treatment for pain relief. In previous animal studies, TENS effectively alleviated Complete Freund's Adjuvant (CFA)- or carrageenan-induced inflammatory pain. Although TENS is known to produce analgesia via opioid activation in the brain and at the spinal level, few reports have investigated the signal transduction pathways mediated by TENS. Prior studies have verified the importance of the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signal transduction pathway in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) in acute and persistent inflammatory pains. Here, by using CFA rat model, we tested the efficacy of TENS on inhibiting the expressions of p-ERK1/2 and of its downstream cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and the level of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) at spinal level. Rats were randomly divided into control, model and TENS groups, and injected subcutaneously with 100 μl CFA or saline in the plantar surface of right hind paw. Rats in the TENS group were treated with TENS (constant aquare wave, 2 Hz and 100 Hz alternating frequencies, intensities ranging from 1 to 2 mA, lasting for 30 min each time) at 5 h and 24 h after injection. Paw withdrawal thresholds (PWTs) were measured with dynamic plantar aesthesiometer at 3d before modeling and 5 h, 6 h, and 25 h after CFA injection. The ipsilateral sides of the lumbar spinal cord dosral horns were harvested for detecting the expressions of p-ERK1/2 and COX-2 by western blot analysis and qPCR, and PGE2 by ELISA. CFA-induced periphery inflammation decreased PWTs and increased paw volume of rats. TENS treatment significantly alleviated mechanical hyperalgesia caused by CFA. However, no anti-inflammatory effect of TENS was observed. Expression of p-ERK1/2 protein and COX-2 mRNA was significantly up-regualted at 5 h and 6 h after CFA injection, while COX-2 and PGE2 protein level only increased at 6 h after modeling. Furthermore, the high expression of p-ERK1

  18. Attenuated Reactive Gliosis and Enhanced Functional Recovery Following Spinal Cord Injury in Null Mutant Mice of Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yuanyi; Gao, Zhongwen; Zhang, Yiping; Feng, Shi-Qing; Liu, Yulong; Shields, Lisa B E; Zhao, Ying-Zheng; Zhu, Qingsan; Gozal, David; Shields, Christopher B; Cai, Jun

    2016-07-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a unique phosphoglycerine that mediates the biological functions of both immune and nervous systems. Excessive PAF plays an important role in neural injury via its specific receptor (PAFR). In this study, we hypothesized that PAF signaling activates reactive gliosis after spinal cord injury (SCI), and blocking the PAF pathway would modify the glia scar formation and promote functional recovery. PAF microinjected into the normal wild-type spinal cord induced a dose-dependent activation of microglia and astrocytes. In the SCI mice, PAFR null mutant mice showed a better functional recovery in grip and rotarod performances than wild-type mice. Although both microglia and astrocytes were activated after SCI in wild-type and PAFR null mutant mice, expressions of IL-6, vimentin, nestin, and GFAP were not significantly elevated in PAFR null mutants. Disruption of PAF signaling inhibited the expressions of proteoglycan CS56 and neurocan (CSPG3). Intriguingly, compared to the wild-type SCI mice, less axonal retraction/dieback at 7 dpi but more NFH-labeled axons at 28 dpi was found in the area adjacent to the epicenter in PAFR null mutant SCI mice. Moreover, treatment with PAFR antagonist Ginkgolide B (GB) at the chronic phase rather than acute phase enhanced the functional recovery in the wild-type SCI mice. These findings suggest that PAF signaling participates in reactive gliosis after SCI, and blocking of this signaling enhances functional recovery and to some extent may promote axon regrowth.

  19. Delayed Influence of Spinal Cord Injury on the Amino Acids of NO• Metabolism in Rat Cerebral Cortex Is Attenuated by Thiamine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandra Boyko

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Severe spinal cord injuries (SCIs result in chronic neuroinflammation in the brain, associated with the development of cognitive and behavioral impairments. Nitric oxide (NO• is a gaseous messenger involved in neuronal signaling and inflammation, contributing to nitrosative stress under dysregulated production of reactive nitrogen species. In this work, biochemical changes induced in the cerebral cortex of rats 8 weeks after SCI are assessed by quantification of the levels of amino acids participating in the NO• and glutathione metabolism. The contribution of the injury-induced neurodegeneration is revealed by comparison of the SCI- and laminectomy (LE-subjected animals. Effects of the operative interventions are assessed by comparison of the operated (LE/SCI and non-operated animals. Lower ratios of citrulline (Cit to arginine (Arg or Cit to ornithine and a more profound decrease in the ratio of lysine to glycine distinguish SCI animals from those after LE. The data suggest decreased NO• production from both Arg and homoarginine in the cortex 8 weeks after SCI. Both LE and SCI groups show a strong decrease in the level of cortex glutathione. The neurotropic, anti-inflammatory, and antioxidant actions of thiamine (vitamin B1 prompted us to study the thiamine effects on the SCI-induced changes in the NO• and glutathione metabolism. A thiamine injection (400 mg/kg intraperitoneally within 24 h after SCI abrogates the changes in the cerebral cortex amino acids related to NO•. Thiamine-induced normalization of the brain glutathione levels after LE and SCI may involve increased supply of glutamate for glutathione biosynthesis. Thus, thiamine protects from sequelae of SCI on NO•-related amino acids and glutathione in cerebral cortex.

  20. Spinal fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Herniated disk - fusion; Spinal stenosis - fusion; Laminectomy - fusion Patient Instructions Bathroom safety - adults Preventing falls Preventing falls - what to ask your doctor Spine surgery - discharge Surgical wound care - open Images Scoliosis Spinal ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ... Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Pediatric Spinal ...

  2. X-ray diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering study of 1:1 tetramethylpyrazine chloranilic acid complex: temperature, isotope, and pressure effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, M; Pietraszko, A; Sobczyk, L; Pawlukojć, A; Grech, E; Seydel, T; Wischnewski, A; Zamponi, M

    2006-11-21

    The x-ray diffraction studies of the title complex were carried out at room temperature and 14 K for H/D (in hydrogen bridge) isotopomers. At 82 K a phase transition takes place leading to a doubling of unit cells and alternation of the hydrogen bond lengths linking tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) and chloranilic acid molecules. A marked H/D isotope effect on these lengths was found at room temperature. The elongation is much smaller at 14 K. The infrared isotopic ratio for O-H(D)...N bands equals to 1.33. The four tunnel splittings of methyl librational ground states of the protonated complex required by the structure are determined at a temperature T=4.2 K up to pressures P=4.7 kbars by high resolution neutron spectroscopy. The tunnel mode at 20.6 microeV at ambient pressure shifts smoothly to 12.2 microeV at P=3.4 kbars. This is attributed to an increase of the strength of the rotational potential proportional to r(-5.6). The three other tunnel peaks show no or weak shifts only. The increasing interaction with diminishing intermolecular distances is assumed to be compensated by a charge transfer between the constituents of deltae/e approximately 0.02 kbar(-1). The phase transition observed between 3.4 and 4.7 kbars leads to increased symmetry with only two more intense tunneling bands. In the isotopomer with deuterated hydrogen bonds and P=1 bar all tunnel intensities become equal in consistency with the low temperature crystal structure. The effect of charge transfer is confirmed by a weakening of rotational potentials for those methyl groups whose tunnel splittings were independent of pressure. Density functional theory calculations for the model TMP.(HF)2 complex and fully ionized molecule TMP+ point out that the intramolecular rotational potential of methyl groups is weaker in the charged species. They do not allow for the unequivocal conclusions about the role of the intermolecular charge transfer effect on the torsional frequencies.

  3. Novel Tandem Biotransformation Process for the Biosynthesis of a Novel Compound, 4-(2,3,5,6-Tetramethylpyrazine-1)-4′-Demethylepipodophyllotoxin▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Ya-Jie; Zhao, Wei; Li, Hong-Mei

    2011-01-01

    According to the structure of podophyllotoxin and its structure-function relationship, a novel tandem biotransformation process was developed for the directional modification of the podophyllotoxin structure to directionally synthesize a novel compound, 4-(2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine-1)-4′-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (4-TMP-DMEP). In this novel tandem biotransformation process, the starting substrate of podophyllotoxin was biotransformed into 4′-demethylepipodophyllotoxin (product 1) with the demethylation of the methoxyl group at the 4′ position by Gibberella fujikuroi SH-f13, which was screened out from Shennongjia prime forest humus soil (Hubei, China). 4′-Demethylepipodophyllotoxin (product 1) was then biotransformed into 4′-demethylpodophyllotoxone (product 2) with the oxidation of the hydroxyl group at the 4 position by Alternaria alternata S-f6, which was screened out from the gathered Dysosma versipellis plants in the Wuhan Botanical Garden, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Finally, 4′-demethylpodophyllotoxone (product 2) and ligustrazine were linked with a transamination reaction to synthesize the target product 4-TMP-DMEP (product 3) by Alternaria alternata S-f6. Compared with podophyllotoxin (i.e., a 50% effective concentration [EC50] of 529 μM), the EC50 of 4-TMP-DMEP against the tumor cell line BGC-823 (i.e., 0.11 μM) was significantly reduced by 5,199 times. Simultaneously, the EC50 of 4-TMP-DMEP against the normal human proximal tubular epithelial cell line HK-2 (i.e., 0.40 μM) was 66 times higher than that of podophyllotoxin (i.e., 0.006 μM). Furthermore, compared with podophyllotoxin (i.e., log P = 0.34), the water solubility of 4-TMP-DMEP (i.e., log P = 0.66) was significantly enhanced by 94%. For the first time, the novel compound 4-TMP-DMEP with superior antitumor activity was directionally synthesized from podophyllotoxin by the novel tandem biotransformation process developed in this work. PMID:21398491

  4. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 2016. Kaji AH, Newton EJ, Hockberger RS. Spinal injuries. In: Marx JA, Hockberger RS, Walls RM, eds. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice . 8th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier ...

  5. Spinal Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Epidural Steroid Injections Exercise: The Backbone of Spine Treatment Spondylolisthesis ... by bacteria or fungal organisms. Spinal infections may occur following surgery or spontaneously in patients with certain risk factors. ...

  6. Spinal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... images of the back and spinal canal A magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan of the spine to ... trigger or worsen pain and disability such as lifting heavy objects or walking long distances. Talk to ...

  7. Spinal infections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tali, E. Turgut; Gueltekin, Serap

    2005-01-01

    Spinal infections have an increasing prevalence among the general population. Definitive diagnosis based solely on clinical grounds is usually not possible and radiological imaging is used in almost all patients. The primary aim of the authors is to present an overview of spinal infections located in epidural, intradural and intramedullary compartments and to provide diagnostic clues regarding different imaging modalities, particularly MRI, to the practicing physicians and radiologists. (orig.)

  8. Spinal cysticercosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goedert, A.V.; Silva, S.H.F.

    1990-01-01

    Spinal cysticercosis is an extremely uncommon condition. We have examined four patients with complaints that resembled nervous root compression by disk herniation. Myelography was shown to be an efficient method to evaluate spinal involvement, that was characterized by findings of multiple filling defect images (cysts) plus signs of adhesive arachnoiditis. One cyst was found to be mobile. Because of the recent development of medical treatment, a quick and precise diagnosis is of high importance to determine the prognosis of this condition. (author)

  9. Spinal vascular malformations; Spinale Gefaessmalformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2012-05-15

    Spinal vascular malformations are a group of rare diseases with different clinical presentations ranging from incidental asymptomatic findings to progressive tetraplegia. This article provides an overview about imaging features as well as clinical and therapeutic aspects of spinal arteriovenous malformations, cavernomas and capillary telangiectasia. (orig.) [German] Spinale Gefaessmalformationen sind eine Gruppe seltener Erkrankungen mit unterschiedlichen klinischen Praesentationen, die vom asymptomatischen Zufallsbefund bis zur progredienten Tetraparese reichen. Dieser Artikel gibt einen Ueberblick ueber radiologische Befunde sowie klinische und therapeutische Aspekte von spinalen arteriovenoesen Malformationen, Kavernomen und kapillaeren Teleangiektasien. (orig.)

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available menu Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal Cord Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ... Cord Injury What is a Spinal Cord Injury Levels of Injury and What They Mean Animated Spinal ...

  13. Spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Hauwe, L. van den; Oezsarlak, Oe.; Schepper, A.M.A. de; Parizel, P.M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal tumors are uncommon lesions but may cause significant morbidity in terms of limb dysfunction. In establishing the differential diagnosis for a spinal lesion, location is the most important feature, but the clinical presentation and the patient's age and gender are also important. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging plays a central role in the imaging of spinal tumors, easily allowing tumors to be classified as extradural, intradural-extramedullary or intramedullary, which is very useful in tumor characterization. In the evaluation of lesions of the osseous spine both computed tomography (CT) and MR are important. We describe the most common spinal tumors in detail. In general, extradural lesions are the most common with metastasis being the most frequent. Intradural tumors are rare, and the majority is extramedullary, with meningiomas and nerve sheath tumors being the most frequent. Intramedullary tumors are uncommon spinal tumors. Astrocytomas and ependymomas comprise the majority of the intramedullary tumors. The most important tumors are documented with appropriate high quality CT or MR images and the characteristics of these tumors are also summarized in a comprehensive table. Finally we illustrate the use of the new World Health Organization (WHO) classification of neoplasms affecting the central nervous system

  14. Spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, R N; Ben Husien, M

    2018-04-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) remains endemic in many parts of the developing world and is increasingly seen in the developed world due to migration. A total of 1.3 million people die annually from the disease. Spinal TB is the most common musculoskeletal manifestation, affecting about 1 to 2% of all cases of TB. The coexistence of HIV, which is endemic in some regions, adds to the burden and the complexity of management. This review discusses the epidemiology, clinical presentation, diagnosis, impact of HIV and both the medical and surgical options in the management of spinal TB. Cite this article: Bone Joint J 2018;100-B:425-31.

  15. Effect of a weightlifting belt on spinal shrinkage.

    OpenAIRE

    Bourne, N D; Reilly, T

    1991-01-01

    Spinal loading during weightlifting results in a loss of stature which has been attributed to a decrease in height of the intervertebral discs--so-called 'spinal shrinkage'. Belts are often used during the lifting of heavy weights, purportedly to support, stabilize and thereby attenuate the load on the spine. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a standard weightlifting belt in attenuating spinal shrinkage. Eight male subjects with a mean age of 24.8 years performed two seq...

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 ... arrow What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising ...

  17. Spinal Muscular Atrophy FAQ

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SMA: Frequently Asked Questions What is Spinal Muscular Atrophy? Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is a genetic neuromuscular ... future trials in SMA. What is Spinal Muscular Atrophy with Respiratory Distress (SMARD)? SMARD and SMA are ...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 David ...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult ... LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By ...

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury ... Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Topic Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate Spinal Cord Injury Medical Expert Videos Topics menu Topics Spinal Cord Injury 101 Adult Injuries Spinal Cord Injury 101 ...

  2. Spinal Cord Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Your spinal cord is a bundle of nerves that runs down the middle of your back. It carries signals back ... of the spine, this can also injure the spinal cord. Other spinal cord problems include Tumors Infections such ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury ... a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injury? play_arrow What kind of surgery is common after a spinal cord injury? play_ ... How soon after a spinal cord injury should surgery be performed? play_arrow Is it common to ...

  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy ... Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric ...

  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions for Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW ...

  8. Spinal cord contusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ju, Gong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Yazhou; Zhao, Xianghui

    2014-04-15

    Spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability with devastating neurological outcomes and limited therapeutic opportunities, even though there are thousands of publications on spinal cord injury annually. There are two major types of spinal cord injury, transaction of the spinal cord and spinal cord contusion. Both can theoretically be treated, but there is no well documented treatment in human being. As for spinal cord contusion, we have developed an operation with fabulous result.

  9. Glutamate Increases In Vitro Survival and Proliferation and Attenuates Oxidative Stress-Induced Cell Death in Adult Spinal Cord-Derived Neural Stem/Progenitor Cells via Non-NMDA Ionotropic Glutamate Receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Laureen D; Mothe, Andrea J; Tator, Charles H

    2016-08-15

    Traumatic spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to a cascade of secondary chemical insults, including oxidative stress and glutamate excitotoxicity, which damage host neurons and glia. Transplantation of exogenous neural stem/progenitor cells (NSPCs) has shown promise in enhancing regeneration after SCI, although survival of transplanted cells remains poor. Understanding the response of NSPCs to the chemical mediators of secondary injury is essential in finding therapies to enhance survival. We examined the in vitro effects of glutamate and glutamate receptor agonists on adult rat spinal cord-derived NSPCs. NSPCs isolated from the periventricular region of the adult rat spinal cord were exposed to various concentrations of glutamate for 96 h. We found that glutamate treatment (500 μM) for 96 h significantly increased live cell numbers, reduced cell death, and increased proliferation, but did not significantly alter cell phenotype. Concurrent glutamate treatment (500 μM) in the setting of H2O2 exposure (500 μM) for 10 h increased NSPC survival compared to H2O2 exposure alone. The effects of glutamate on NSPCs were blocked by the α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA)/kainate receptor antagonist GYKI-52466, but not by the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor antagonist MK-801 or DL-AP5, or the mGluR3 antagonist LY-341495. Furthermore, treatment of NSPCs with AMPA, kainic acid, or the kainate receptor-specific agonist (RS)-2-amino-3-(3-hydroxy-5-tert-butylisoxazol-4-yl)propanoic acid mimicked the responses seen with glutamate both alone and in the setting of oxidative stress. These findings offer important insights into potential mechanisms to enhance NSPC survival and implicate a potential role for glutamate in promoting NSPC survival and proliferation after traumatic SCI.

  10. Spinal cord infarction; Spinaler Infarkt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naumann, N.; Shariat, K.; Ulmer, S.; Stippich, C.; Ahlhelm, F.J. [Universitaetsspital Basel, Abteilung fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Klinik fuer Radiologie und Nuklearmedizin, Basel (Switzerland)

    2012-05-15

    Infarction of the spinal cord can cause a variety of symptoms and neurological deficits because of the complex vascular supply of the myelon. The most common leading symptom is distal paresis ranging from paraparesis to tetraplegia caused by arterial ischemia or infarction of the myelon. Venous infarction, however, cannot always be distinguished from arterial infarction based on the symptoms alone. Modern imaging techniques, such as computed tomography angiography (CTA) and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) assist in preoperative planning of aortic operations to reliably identify not only the most important vascular structure supplying the spinal cord, the artery of Adamkiewicz, but also other pathologies such as tumors or infectious disorders. In contrast to CT, MRI can reliably depict infarction of the spinal cord. (orig.) [German] Die durch einen Rueckenmarkinfarkt verursachte Symptomatik kann aufgrund der komplexen Blutversorgung des Myelons zu unterschiedlichen neurologischen Ausfaellen fuehren. Dabei steht haeufig die durch eine arterielle Minderperfusion des Myelons bedingte Querschnittssymptomatik im Vordergrund. Venoes induzierte Mikrozirkulationsstoerungen sind anhand des neurologischen Befundes klinisch nicht immer von arteriellen Infarkten zu unterscheiden. Die moderne Bildgebung unter Einsatz der CT- (CTA) und MR-Angiographie (MRA) dient dem Ausschluss nichtvaskulaerer Ursachen fuer die Symptomatik wie Entzuendungen und Tumoren sowie der praeoperativen Planung vor der Aortenchirurgie zum Nachweis der fuer die Myelondurchblutung entscheidenden A. Adamkiewicz. Im Gegensatz zur CT kann mittels MRT ein Infarkt im Myelon mit hoher Verlaesslichkeit nachgewiesen werden. (orig.)

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, ... the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? ...

  13. Spinal pain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Izzo, R.; Popolizio, T.; D’Aprile, P.; Muto, M.

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  14. Spinal pain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Izzo, R., E-mail: roberto1766@interfree.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Naples (Italy); Popolizio, T., E-mail: t.popolizio1@gmail.com [Radiology Department, Casa Sollievo della Sofferenza Hospital, San Giovanni Rotondo (Fg) (Italy); D’Aprile, P., E-mail: paoladaprile@yahoo.it [Neuroradiology Department, San Paolo Hospital, Bari (Italy); Muto, M., E-mail: mutomar@tiscali.it [Neuroradiology Department, A. Cardarelli Hospital, Napoli (Italy)

    2015-05-15

    Highlights: • Purpose of this review is to address the current concepts on the pathophysiology of discogenic, radicular, facet and dysfunctional spinal pain, focusing on the role of the imaging in the diagnostic setting, to potentially address a correct approach also to minimally invasive interventional techniques. • Special attention will be given to the discogenic pain, actually considered as the most frequent cause of chronic low back pain. • The correct distinction between referred pain and radicular pain contributes to give a more correct approach to spinal pain. • The pathogenesis of chronic pain renders this pain a true pathology requiring a specific management. - Abstract: The spinal pain, and expecially the low back pain (LBP), represents the second cause for a medical consultation in primary care setting and a leading cause of disability worldwide [1]. LBP is more often idiopathic. It has as most frequent cause the internal disc disruption (IDD) and is referred to as discogenic pain. IDD refers to annular fissures, disc collapse and mechanical failure, with no significant modification of external disc shape, with or without endplates changes. IDD is described as a separate clinical entity in respect to disc herniation, segmental instability and degenerative disc desease (DDD). The radicular pain has as most frequent causes a disc herniation and a canal stenosis. Both discogenic and radicular pain also have either a mechanical and an inflammatory genesis. For to be richly innervated, facet joints can be a direct source of pain, while for their degenerative changes cause compression of nerve roots in lateral recesses and in the neural foramina. Degenerative instability is a common and often misdiagnosed cause of axial and radicular pain, being also a frequent indication for surgery. Acute pain tends to extinguish along with its cause, but the setting of complex processes of peripheral and central sensitization may influence its evolution in chronic

  15. Spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beale, S.; Pathria, M.N.; Ross, J.S.; Masaryk, T.J.; Modic, M.T.

    1988-01-01

    The authors studied 50 patients who had spinal stenosis by means of MR imaging. All patients had undergone myelography and CT. Thirty patients underwent surgery. MR imaging included T1-weighted spin echo sequences with repetition time = 600 msec, echo time = 20 (600/20) sagittal and axial sections 4 mm thick with 2 mm gap. T2-weighted 2,000/60 axial images were obtained on 14 patients. Examinations were retrospectively evaluated for central stenosis, lateral recess narrowing, and foraminal encroachment. Measurements of sagittal, interpedicular, interfacet, and recess dimensions were made at L3-5. On MR images, 20 patients had single-level and 30 had multiple-level stenosis. There was excellent agreement between modalities with central canal stenosis, but a discrepancy in six patients with bony foraminal stenosis. MR imaging was an accurate method for assessment of lumbar stenosis, but CT appears marginally better for detection of bony foraminal stenosis in certain cases

  16. Spinal infections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tali, E. Turgut E-mail: turguttali@gazi.edu.tr

    2004-05-01

    Spinal infections can be thought of as a spectrum of disease comprising spondylitis, discitis, spondylodiscitis, pyogenic facet arthropathy, epidural infections, meningitis, polyradiculopathy and myelitis. Radiological evaluations have gained importance in the diagnosis, treatment planning, treatment and treatment monitoring of the spinal infections. Conventional radiographs are usually the initial imaging study. The sensitivity and specificity of the plain radiographs are very low. The sensitivity of CT is higher while it lacks of specificity. Conventional CT has played minor role for the diagnosis of early spondylitis and disc space infection and for follow-up, researches are going on the value of MDCT. MRI is as sensitive, specific and accurate as combined nuclear medicine studies and the method of choice for the spondylitis. Low signal areas of the vertebral body, loss of definition of the end plates and interruption of the cortical continuity, destruction of the cortical margins are typical on T1WI whereas high signal of affected areas of the vertebral body and disc is typical on T2WI. Contrast is mandatory and increases conspicuity, specificity, and observer confidence in the diagnosis and facilitates the treatment planning. Contrast enhancement is the earliest sign and pathognomonic in the acute inflammatory episode and even in the subtle infection then persists to a varying degree for several weeks or months. The outcome of the treatment is influenced by the type of infection and by the degree of neurologic compromise before treatment. There is an increasing move away from surgical intervention towards conservative therapy, percutaneous drainage of abscess or both. It is therefore critical to monitor treatment response, particularly in the immuno-deficient population.

  17. Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The Spinal Cord Dysfunction (SCD) module supports the maintenance of local and national registries for the tracking of patients with spinal cord injury and disease...

  18. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Resources Peer Counseling Blog About Media Donate close search Understanding Spinal Cord Injury What is a Spinal ... health care products or services, or control the information found on external websites. The Hill Foundation is ...

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS Occupational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT ... does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, or control the information ...

  2. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect stem-cell treatments to become available for spinal cord injuries? ...

  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  4. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  5. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert Videos Contact Us Personal Experience Videos Blog Videos By Topic Media Resources Donate to support families facing spinal cord ...

  6. Spinal cord stimulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007560.htm Spinal cord stimulation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Spinal cord stimulation is a treatment for pain that uses ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation ... Rogers, PT Recreational Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Jennifer Piatt, PhD David Chen, MD Read Bio Medical ...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... program? play_arrow What are the most promising new treatments for spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, ... spinal cord injuries. The website does not provide medical advice, recommend or endorse health care products or services, ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a spinal cord injury important? play_arrow What role does “compression” play in a spinal cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow What is meant ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types of illnesses and disabilities Spinal cord injury Spinal cord injury Read advice from Dr. Jeffrey Rabin , a pediatric ... your health on a daily basis. Living with spinal cord injury — your questions answered top What are pediatric ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... forth between your body and your brain. A spinal cord injury disrupts the signals. Spinal cord injuries usually begin with a blow that fractures or ... down on the nerve parts that carry signals. Spinal cord injuries can be complete or incomplete. With a complete ...

  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Children with Spinal Cord Injury Patricia Mucia, RN Family Life After Pediatric Spinal Injury Dawn Sheaffer, MSW Rehabilitation ...

  16. Trauma: Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Matthew J; Martin, Matthew J

    2017-10-01

    Injuries to the spinal column and spinal cord frequently occur after high-energy mechanisms of injury, or with lower-energy mechanisms, in select patient populations like the elderly. A focused yet complete neurologic examination during the initial evaluation will guide subsequent diagnostic procedures and early supportive measures to help prevent further injury. For patients with injury to bone and/or ligaments, the initial focus should be spinal immobilization and prevention of inducing injury to the spinal cord. Spinal cord injury is associated with numerous life-threatening complications during the acute and long-term phases of care that all acute care surgeons must recognize. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. International Spinal Cord Injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dvorak, M F; Itshayek, E; Fehlings, M G

    2015-01-01

    STUDY DESIGN: Survey of expert opinion, feedback and final consensus. OBJECTIVE: To describe the development and the variables included in the International Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data set. SETTING: International working group. METHODS......: A committee of experts was established to select and define data elements. The data set was then disseminated to the appropriate committees and organizations for comments. All suggested revisions were considered and both the International Spinal Cord Society and the American Spinal Injury Association endorsed...... spinal intervention and procedure is coded (variables 1 through 7) and the spinal segment level is described (variables 8 and 9). Sample clinical cases were developed to illustrate how to complete it. CONCLUSION: The International SCI Spinal Interventions and Surgical Procedures Basic Data Set...

  18. Transmitters and pathways mediating inhibition of spinal itch-signaling neurons by scratching and other counterstimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tasuku Akiyama

    Full Text Available Scratching relieves itch, but the underlying neural mechanisms are poorly understood. We presently investigated a role for the inhibitory neurotransmitters GABA and glycine in scratch-evoked inhibition of spinal itch-signaling neurons in a mouse model of chronic dry skin itch. Superficial dorsal horn neurons ipsilateral to hindpaw dry skin treatment exhibited a high level of spontaneous firing that was significantly attenuated by cutaneous scratching, pinch and noxious heat. Scratch-evoked inhibition was nearly abolished by spinal delivery of the glycine antagonist, strychnine, and was markedly attenuated by respective GABA(A and GABA(B antagonists bicuculline and saclofen. Scratch-evoked inhibition was also significantly attenuated (but not abolished by interruption of the upper cervical spinal cord, indicating the involvement of both segmental and suprasegmental circuits that engage glycine- and GABA-mediated inhibition of spinal itch-signaling neurons by noxious counterstimuli.

  19. 2,3,5,6-Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) down-regulated arsenic-induced heme oxygenase-1 and ARS2 expression by inhibiting Nrf2, NF-κB, AP-1 and MAPK pathways in human proximal tubular cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gong, Xuezhong; Ivanov, Vladimir N.; Hei, Tom K.

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study demonstrated that sodium arsenite at a clinically relevant dose induced nephrotoxicity in human renal proximal tubular epithelial cell line HK-2, which could be inhibited by natural product 2,3,5,6-Tetramethylpyrazine (TMP) with antioxidant activity. The present study demonstrated that arsenic exposure resulted in protein and enzymatic induction of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) in dose- and time-dependent manners in HK-2 cells. Blocking HO-1enzymatic activity by Zinc protoporphyrin (ZnPP) augmented arsenic-induced apoptosis, ROS production and mitochondrial dysfunction, suggesting a critical role for HO-1 as a renal protectant in this procession. On the other hand, TMP, upstream of HO-1, inhibited arsenic-induced ROS production and ROS-dependent HO-1 expression. TMP also prevented mitochondria dysfunction and suppressed activation of the intrinsic apoptotic pathway in HK-2 cells. Our results revealed that the regulation of arsenic-induced HO-1 expression was performed through multiple ROS-dependent signal pathways and the corresponding transcription factors, including p38 MAPK and JNK (but not ERK), AP-1, Nrf2 and NF-κB. TMP inhibited arsenic-induced activations of JNK, p38 MAPK, ERK, AP-1 and Nrf2 and block HO-1 protein expression. The present study, furthermore, demonstrated arsenic-induced expression of Arsenic response protein 2 (ARS2) that was regulated by p38 MAPK, ERK and NF-κB. To our knowledge, this is the first report showing that ARS2 involved in arsenic-induced nephrotoxicity while TMP pretreatment prevented such an up-regulation of ARS2 in HK-2 cells. Given ARS2 and HO-1 sharing the similar regulation mechanism, we speculated that ARS2 might also mediate cell survival in this procession. In summary, our study highlighted a role of HO-1 in the protection against arsenic-induced cytotoxicity downstream from the primary targets of TMP and further indicated that TMP may be used as a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of arsenic

  20. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Is the Spinal Cord Damaged? The spine (spinal column) contains the spinal cord, which is divided into four sections: Cervical (neck) Thoracic (chest) Lumbar (lower back) Sacral (pelvis). Each section is referred ...

  1. MULTIPLE SPINAL CANAL MENINGIOMAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nandigama Pratap Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Meningiomas of the spinal canal are common tumours with the incidence of 25 percent of all spinal cord tumours. But multiple spinal canal meningiomas are rare in compare to solitary lesions and account for 2 to 3.5% of all spinal meningiomas. Most of the reported cases are both intra cranial and spinal. Exclusive involvement of the spinal canal by multiple meningiomas are very rare. We could find only sixteen cases in the literature to the best of our knowledge. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for single lesion. We analysed the literature, with illustration of our case. MATERIALS AND METHODS In September 2016, we performed a literature search for multiple spinal canal meningiomas involving exclusively the spinal canal with no limitation for language and publication date. The search was conducted through http://pubmed.com, a wellknown worldwide internet medical address. To the best of our knowledge, we could find only sixteen cases of multiple meningiomas exclusively confined to the spinal canal. Exclusive multiple spinal canal meningiomas occurring in the first two decades of life are seldom reported in the literature. We are presenting a case of multiple spinal canal meningiomas in a young patient of 17 years, who was earlier operated for solitary intradural extra medullary spinal canal meningioma at D4-D6 level, again presented with spastic quadriparesis of two years duration and MRI whole spine demonstrated multiple intradural extra medullary lesions, which were excised completely and the histopathological diagnosis was transitional meningioma. RESULTS Patient recovered from his weakness and sensory symptoms gradually and bladder and bowel symptoms improved gradually over a period of two to three weeks. CONCLUSION Multiple

  2. Spinal injury in sport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barile, Antonio [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)]. E-mail: antonio.barile@cc.univaq.it; Limbucci, Nicola [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Splendiani, Alessandra [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Gallucci, Massimo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy); Masciocchi, Carlo [Department of Radiology, University of L' Aquila, S. Salvatore Hospital, Via Vetoio, Coppito, 67100 L' Aquila (Italy)

    2007-04-15

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding.

  3. Spinal injury in sport

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barile, Antonio; Limbucci, Nicola; Splendiani, Alessandra; Gallucci, Massimo; Masciocchi, Carlo

    2007-01-01

    Spinal injuries are very common among professional or amateur athletes. Spinal sport lesions can be classified in overuse and acute injuries. Overuse injuries can be found after years of repetitive spinal load during sport activity; however specific overuse injuries can also be found in adolescents. Acute traumas are common in contact sports. Most of the acute injuries are minor and self-healing, but severe and catastrophic events are possible. The aim of this article is to review the wide spectrum of spinal injuries related to sport activity, with special regard to imaging finding

  4. Human spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens Bo

    2016-01-01

    interneurons and exert a direct (willful) muscle control with the aid of a context-dependent integration of somatosensory and visual information at cortical level. However, spinal networks also play an important role. Sensory feedback through spinal circuitries is integrated with central motor commands...... the central motor command by opening or closing sensory feedback pathways. In the future, human studies of spinal motor control, in close collaboration with animal studies on the molecular biology of the spinal cord, will continue to document the neural basis for human behavior. Expected final online...

  5. The safe spinal anaesthetic

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    anticoagulation. Refusal. Severe hypovolaemia or shock. Localised sepsis .... Side-effects and complications of spinal anaesthesia. Side-effect/complication. Mechanism. Treatment. Hypotension. Sympathetic block causes vasodilatation.

  6. Pressure surge attenuator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christie, Alan M.; Snyder, Kurt I.

    1985-01-01

    A pressure surge attenuation system for pipes having a fluted region opposite crushable metal foam. As adapted for nuclear reactor vessels and heads, crushable metal foam is disposed to attenuate pressure surges.

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Read Bio Medical Director, Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Program, Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago play_arrow What is ... What is the “Spinal Cord Injury Model Systems” program? play_arrow What are the most promising new ...

  8. Spinal pain in adolescents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aartun, Ellen; Hartvigsen, Jan; Wedderkopp, Niels

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The severity and course of spinal pain is poorly understood in adolescents. The study aimed to determine the prevalence and two-year incidence, as well as the course, frequency, and intensity of pain in the neck, mid back, and low back (spinal pain). METHODS: This study was a school...

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Heather Taylor, PhD Michelle Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, ... Cord Injury Katie Powell, OT Mary Jane Mulcahey, PhD, OTR/L Sarah Harrison, OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord ...

  10. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the Patient After Spinal Cord Injury Guy W. Fried, MD Substance Abuse and Spinal Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Cord Injury Allen Heinemann, PhD How Peer Counseling Works Julie Gassaway, MS, RN Pediatric Injuries Pediatric Spinal ... injury? play_arrow How does the spinal cord work? play_arrow Why is the level of a ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Spinal Cord Injury 101 Lawrence Vogel, MD The Basics of Pediatric SCI Rehabilitation Sara Klaas, MSW Transitions ... PhD Michelle Meade, PhD Jonathon Rose, PhD The Basics of Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation Kristine Cichowski, MS ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... from Hospital to Home Kim Eberhardt Muir, MS Coping with a New Injury Robin Dorman, PsyD Sex and Fertility After Spinal Cord Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, ...

  14. Humero-spinal dysostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortina, H; Vidal, J; Vallcanera, A; Alberto, C; Muro, D; Dominguez, F

    1979-07-24

    A 2 year old boy with humero-spinal dysostosis is described. This is the third case of this disease reported in the literature. Humero-spinal dysostosis is characterised radiologically by distal humeral bifurcation, elbow subluxation and coronal cleft vertebrae. Congenital, progressive heart disease, possibly with fatal outcome, is probably part of the syndrome.

  15. Spinal NF-κB and chemokine ligand 5 expression during spinal glial cell activation in a neuropathic pain model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin Yin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The NF-κB pathway and chemokine (C-C motif ligand 5 (CCL5 are involved in pain modulation; however, the precise mechanisms of their interactions in chronic neuropathic pain have yet to be established. METHODS: The present study examined the roles of spinal NF-κB and CCL5 in a neuropathic pain model after chronic constriction injury (CCI surgery. CCI-induced pain facilitation was evaluated using the Plantar and von Frey tests. The changes in NF-κB and CCL5 expression were analyzed by immunohistochemistry and Western blot analyses. RESULTS: Spinal NF-κB and CCL5 expression increased after CCI surgery. Repeated intrathecal infusions of pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC, a NF-κB inhibitor decreased CCL5 expression, inhibited the activation of microglia and astrocytes, and attenuated CCI-induced allodynia and hyperalgesia. Intrathecal injection of a CCL5-neutralizing antibody attenuated CCI-induced pain facilitation and also suppressed spinal glial cell activation after CCI surgery. However, the CCL5-neutralizing antibody did not affect NF-κB expression. Furthermore, selective glial inhibitors, minocycline and fluorocitrate, attenuated the hyperalgesia induced by intrathecal CCL5. CONCLUSIONS: The inhibition of spinal CCL5 expression may provide a new method to prevent and treat nerve injury-induced neuropathic pain.

  16. Nuclear magnetic imaging for MTRA. Spinal canal and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fritzsch, Dominik; Hoffmann, Karl-Titus

    2011-01-01

    The booklet covers the following topics: (1) Clinical indications for NMR imaging of spinal cord and spinal canal; (2) Methodic requirements: magnets and coils, image processing, contrast media: (3) Examination technology: examination conditions, sequences, examination protocols; (4) Disease pattern and indications: diseases of the myelin, the spinal nerves and the spinal canal (infections, tumors, injuries, ischemia and bleedings, malformations); diseases of the spinal cord and the intervertebral disks (degenerative changes, infections, injuries, tumors, malformations).

  17. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustai...

  18. Opioid administration following spinal cord injury: Implications for pain and locomotor recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Woller, Sarah A.; Hook, Michelle A.

    2013-01-01

    Approximately one-third of people with a spinal cord injury (SCI) will experience persistent neuropathic pain following injury. This pain negatively affects quality of life and is difficult to treat. Opioids are among the most effective drug treatments, and are commonly prescribed, but experimental evidence suggests that opioid treatment in the acute phase of injury can attenuate recovery of locomotor function. In fact, spinal cord injury and opioid administration share several common feature...

  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  20. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC Understanding Spinal Cord Injury About Us Expert ... With Disabilities Photography by Rona Talcott Website by Mobile Marketing LLC close close

  1. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  3. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  4. Spinal Injury: First Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... EmergencyManual/WhatToDoInMedicalEmergency/Default.aspx?id=258&terms=spinal+injuries. Accessed Jan. 8, 2015. Marx JA, et al. Rosen's Emergency Medicine: Concepts and Clinical Practice. 8th ed. Philadelphia, Pa.: Mosby ...

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  6. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... cord injury? play_arrow Why are high-dose steroids often used right after an injury? play_arrow ... arrow What are the latest developments in the use of electrical stimulation for spinal cord injuries? play_ ...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  8. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... SCI Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, ... OT Anne Bryden, OT The Role of the Social Worker after Spinal Cord Injury Patti Rogers, SW ...

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  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  15. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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    Full Text Available ... Injury Diane M. Rowles, MS, NP How Family Life Changes After Spinal Cord Injury Nancy Rosenberg, PsyD ... Rehabilitation Donald Peck Leslie, MD Adjusting to Social Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical ...

  17. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  19. Spinal Cord Injury 101

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  1. Poliovirus tropism and attenuation are determined after internal ribosome entry

    OpenAIRE

    Kauder, Steven E.; Racaniello, Vincent R.

    2004-01-01

    Poliovirus replication is limited to a few organs, including the brain and spinal cord. This restricted tropism may be a consequence of organ-specific differences in translation initiation by the poliovirus internal ribosome entry site (IRES). A C-to-U mutation at base 472 in the IRES of the Sabin type 3 poliovirus vaccine strain, known to attenuate neurovirulence, may further restrict tropism by eliminating viral replication in the CNS. To determine the relationship between IRES-mediated tra...

  2. Evaluation of spinal ultrasound in spinal dysraphism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hughes, J.A.; Bruyn, R. de; Patel, K.; Thompson, D

    2003-03-01

    AIMS: The aims of this study were to evaluate the role of spinal ultrasound in detecting occult spinal dysraphism (OSD) in neonates and infants, and to determine the degree of agreement between ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Eighty-five consecutive infants had spinal ultrasound over 31 months. Of these, 15 patients (age 1 day-7 months, mean 40 days; nine male) had follow-up MRI. Ultrasound and MRI findings were correlated retrospectively. RESULTS: Six out of 15 (40%) ultrasound examinations showed full agreement with MRI, seven of 15 (47%) had partial agreement, and two of 15 (13%) had no agreement. In the present series ultrasound failed to visualize: four of four dorsal dermal sinuses, three of four fatty filum terminales, one of one terminal lipoma, two of four partial sacral agenesis, three of four hydromyelia and one of 10 low-lying cords. CONCLUSION: Agreement between ultrasound and MRI was good, particularly for the detection of low-lying cord (90%). Therefore we recommend ultrasound as a first-line screening test for OSD. If ultrasound is abnormal, equivocal or technically limited, MRI is advised for full assessment.

  3. Congenital spinal malformations; Kongenitale spinale Malformationen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F. [Klinikum Grosshadern, Ludwig-Maximilians-Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Inst. fuer Klinische Radiologie

    2001-12-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [German] Kongenitale spinale Malformationen stellen eine komplexe Gruppe an Stoerungen dar, deren Genese sich am einfachsten aus der Embryologie heraus erklaeren laesst. Bei der klinisch-radiologischen Begutachtung ist zunaechst ihre korrekte Klassifikation im Rahmen der Erstdiagnose wichtig. Im weiteren Verlauf ist es jedoch zudem entscheidend, moegliche Komplikationen wie beispielsweise eine Hydromyelie oder ein Wiederanheften des Myelons nach Operation einer Spina bifida aperta zu erkennen. Zudem sollte bei der Diagnosestellung einer kongenitalen spinalen Malformation immer auch auf assoziierte Fehlbildungen, wie z.B. die Diastematomyelie oder das intraspinale Lipom bei der Spina bifida aperta, sowie auf eine moegliche syndromale Einordnung wie beispielsweise beim OEIS-oder VACTERL-Syndrom geachtet werden. (orig.)

  4. Activation of AMPK by OSU53 protects spinal cord neurons from oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jun; Wu, Liang; Zhang, Yiming; Gu, Huijie; Huang, Zhongyue; Zhou, Kaifeng; Yin, Xiaofan

    2017-12-22

    The present study tested the potential effect of OSU53, a novel AMPK activator, against hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced spinal cord neuron damages. Treatment with OSU53 attenuated H2O2-induced death and apoptosis of primary murine spinal cord neurons. OSU53 activated AMPK signaling, which is required for its actions in spinal cord neurons. The AMPK inhibitor Compound C or AMPKα1 siRNA almost abolished OSU53-mediated neuroprotection against H2O2. On the other hand, sustained-activation of AMPK by introducing the constitutive-active AMPKα1 mimicked OSU53's actions, and protected spinal cord neurons from oxidative stress. OSU53 significantly attenuated H2O2-induced reactive oxygen species production, lipid peroxidation and DNA damages in spinal cord neurons. Additionally, OSU53 increased NADPH content and heme oxygenase-1 mRNA expression in H2O2-treated spinal cord neurons. Together, we indicate that targeted-activation of AMPK by OSU53 protects spinal cord neurons from oxidative stress.

  5. Imaging in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium); Algemeen Ziekenhuis Maria Middelares, Department of Radiology, Sint-Niklaas (Belgium); Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M. [Universitair Ziekenhuis Antwerpen, University of Antwerp, Belgium, Department of Radiology, Edegem (Belgium)

    2005-03-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  6. Imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goethem, J.W.M. van; Maes, Menno; Oezsarlak, Oezkan; Hauwe, Luc van den; Parizel, Paul M.

    2005-01-01

    Because it may cause paralysis, injury to the spine is one of the most feared traumas, and spinal cord injury is a major cause of disability. In the USA approximately 10,000 traumatic cervical spine fractures and 4000 traumatic thoracolumbar fractures are diagnosed each year. Although the number of individuals sustaining paralysis is far less than those with moderate or severe brain injury, the socioeconomic costs are significant. Since most of the spinal trauma patients survive their injuries, almost one out of 1000 inhabitants in the USA are currently being cared for partial or complete paralysis. Little controversy exists regarding the need for accurate and emergent imaging assessment of the traumatized spine in order to evaluate spinal stability and integrity of neural elements. Because clinicians fear missing occult spine injuries, they obtain radiographs for nearly all patients who present with blunt trauma. We are influenced on one side by fear of litigation and the possible devastating medical, psychologic and financial consequences of cervical spine injury, and on the other side by pressure to reduce health care costs. A set of clinical and/or anamnestic criteria, however, can be very useful in identifying patients who have an extremely low probability of injury and who consequently have no need for imaging studies. Multidetector (or multislice) computed tomography (MDCT) is the preferred primary imaging modality in blunt spinal trauma patients who do need imaging. Not only is CT more accurate in diagnosing spinal injury, it also reduces imaging time and patient manipulation. Evidence-based research has established that MDCT improves patient outcome and saves money in comparison to plain film. This review discusses the use, advantages and disadvantages of the different imaging techniques used in spinal trauma patients and the criteria used in selecting patients who do not need imaging. Finally an overview of different types of spinal injuries is given

  7. Continuous spinal anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, James M

    2009-01-01

    Continuous spinal anesthesia (CSA) is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Compared with other techniques of neuraxial anesthesia, CSA allows incremental dosing of an intrathecal local anesthetic for an indefinite duration, whereas traditional single-shot spinal anesthesia usually involves larger doses, a finite, unpredictable duration, and greater potential for detrimental hemodynamic effects including hypotension, and epidural anesthesia via a catheter may produce lesser motor block and suboptimal anesthesia in sacral nerve root distributions. This review compares CSA with other anesthetic techniques and also describes the history of CSA, its clinical applications, concerns regarding neurotoxicity, and other pharmacologic implications of its use. CSA has seen a waxing and waning of its popularity in clinical practice since its initial description in 1907. After case reports of cauda equina syndrome were reported with the use of spinal microcatheters for CSA, these microcatheters were withdrawn from clinical practice in the United States but continued to be used in Europe with no further neurologic sequelae. Because only large-bore catheters may be used in the United States, CSA is usually reserved for elderly patients out of concern for the risk of postdural puncture headache in younger patients. However, even in younger patients, sometimes the unique clinical benefits and hemodynamic stability involved in CSA outweigh concerns regarding postdural puncture headache. Clinical scenarios in which CSA may be of particular benefit include patients with severe aortic stenosis undergoing lower extremity surgery and obstetric patients with complex heart disease. CSA is an underutilized technique in modern anesthesia practice. Perhaps more accurately termed fractional spinal anesthesia, CSA involves intermittent dosing of local anesthetic solution via an intrathecal catheter. Where traditional spinal anesthesia involves a single injection with a

  8. Depression and Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Urinary Tract Infections: Indwelling (Foley) Catheter Depression and Spinal Cord Injury [ Download this pamphlet: “Depression and Spinal Cord Injury” (PDF - 477KB)] Depression is a common illness that ...

  9. What Is Spinal Cord Injury?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Condition Information Share Facebook Twitter Pinterest Email Print Spinal Cord Injury (SCI): Condition Information What is SCI? SCI is ... 3 National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Spinal cord injury: Hope through research. Retrieved June 19 , 2013 , from ...

  10. Overview of Spinal Cord Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ... compressed by bone (which may result from cervical spondylosis or a fracture), an accumulation of blood (hematoma), ...

  11. Spinal vascular malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krings, Timo [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany); Mull, Michael; Thron, Armin [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neuroradiology, Aachen (Germany); Gilsbach, Joachim M. [University Hospital Aachen, Department of Neurosurgery, Aachen (Germany)

    2005-02-01

    Spinal vascular malformations are rare diseases that consist of true inborn cavernomas and arteriovenous malformations (including perimedullary fistulae, glomerular and juvenile AVMs) and presumably acquired dural arteriovenous fistulae. This review article gives an overview of the imaging features both on MRI and angiography, the differential diagnoses, the clinical symptomatology and the potential therapeutic approaches to these diseases. It is concluded that MRI is the diagnostic modality of first choice in suspected spinal vascular malformation and should be complemented by selective spinal angiography. Treatment in symptomatic patients offers an improvement in the prognosis, but should be performed in specialized centers. Patients with spinal cord cavernomas and perimedullary fistulae type I are surgical candidates. Dural arteriovenous fistulae can either be operated upon or can be treated by an endovascular approach, the former being a simple, quick and secure approach to obliterate the fistula, while the latter is technically demanding. In spinal arteriovenous malformations, the endovascular approach is the method of first choice; in selected cases, a combined therapy might be sensible. (orig.)

  12. Spinal canal stenosis; Spinalkanalstenose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papanagiotou, P.; Boutchakova, M. [Klinikum Bremen-Mitte/Bremen-Ost, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Bremen (Germany)

    2014-11-15

    Spinal stenosis is a narrowing of the spinal canal by a combination of bone and soft tissues, which can lead to mechanical compression of spinal nerve roots or the dural sac. The lumbal spinal compression of these nerve roots can be symptomatic, resulting in weakness, reflex alterations, gait disturbances, bowel or bladder dysfunction, motor and sensory changes, radicular pain or atypical leg pain and neurogenic claudication. The anatomical presence of spinal canal stenosis is confirmed radiologically with computerized tomography, myelography or magnetic resonance imaging and play a decisive role in optimal patient-oriented therapy decision-making. (orig.) [German] Die Spinalkanalstenose ist eine umschriebene, knoechern-ligamentaer bedingte Einengung des Spinalkanals, die zur Kompression der Nervenwurzeln oder des Duralsacks fuehren kann. Die lumbale Spinalkanalstenose manifestiert sich klinisch als Komplex aus Rueckenschmerzen sowie sensiblen und motorischen neurologischen Ausfaellen, die in der Regel belastungsabhaengig sind (Claudicatio spinalis). Die bildgebende Diagnostik mittels Magnetresonanztomographie, Computertomographie und Myelographie spielt eine entscheidende Rolle bei der optimalen patientenbezogenen Therapieentscheidung. (orig.)

  13. Potentialities of spinal liquor scanography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vlakhov, N.; Vylkanov, P.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown that spinal liquor scanography is a harmless and informative method for the examination of patients, permitting to detect injury foci for spinal cord tumours in 90% cases, for acute injuries of the vertebral column and spinal cord in 89.5% cases, for herniation of nucleus pulposus in 81% cases. The method of spinal liquor scanography can be used in neurology and neurosurgery to select the method of treatment and to evaluate its efficiency

  14. Diagnostic strategies in spinal trauma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heinemann, Uwe [Institut fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Aschaffenburg, Am Hasenkopf 1, 63739 Aschaffenburg (Germany); Freund, Michael [Institut fuer Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Aschaffenburg, Am Hasenkopf 1, 63739 Aschaffenburg (Germany)]. E-mail: michael.freund@klinikum-aschaffenburg.de

    2006-04-15

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if nerve roots or even the spinal cord are affected. Besides presenting the important anatomical and technical basis underlying the imaging findings of spinal injuries, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are discussed. Based on the current literature and recommendations of scientific organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic work up of spinal trauma. The different imaging modalities are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of the methods are discussed.

  15. Diagnostic strategies in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, Uwe; Freund, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if nerve roots or even the spinal cord are affected. Besides presenting the important anatomical and technical basis underlying the imaging findings of spinal injuries, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are discussed. Based on the current literature and recommendations of scientific organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic work up of spinal trauma. The different imaging modalities are presented. Advantages and disadvantages of the methods are discussed

  16. Landing gear noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  17. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-11-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was caused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunosuppressed cancer patient.

  18. Spinal cord swelling and candidiasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ho, K.; Gronseth, G.; Aldrich, M.; Williams, A.

    1982-01-01

    Fusiform swelling of the spinal cord was noted myelographically in a patient with Hodgkin's disease. Autopsy revealed that the swelling was cauused by Candida infection of the spinal cord. It is suggested that fungal infection be included in the differential diagnosis of spinal cord swelling in the immunsupporessed cancer patient. (orig.)

  19. Spinal segmental dysgenesis CASE SERIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Spinal segmental dysgenesis is a rare congenital spinal abnormality seen in neonates and infants, in which a segment of the spine and spinal cord fails to develop normally. The condition is segmental in nature, with vertebrae above and below the malformation. It is commonly associated with various abnormalities that ...

  20. Spinal CT scan, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroshi

    1982-01-01

    Plain CT described fairly accurately the anatomy and lesions of the lumbar and sacral spines on their transverse sections. Since hernia of the intervertebral disc could be directly diagnosed by CT, indications of myelography could be restricted. Spinal-canal stenosis of the lumbar spine occurs because of various factors, and CT not only demonstrated the accurate size and morphology of bony canals, but also elucidated thickening of the joints and yellow ligament. CT was also useful for the diagnosis of tumors in the lumbar and sacral spines, visualizing the images of bone changes and soft tissues on the trasverse sections. But the diagnosis of intradural tumors required myelography and metrizamide CT. CT has become important for the diagnosis of spinal and spinal-cord diseases and for selection of the route of surgical arrival. (Chiba, N.)

  1. Acute spinal cord injury (SCI) transforms how GABA affects nociceptive sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yung-Jen; Lee, Kuan H; Murphy, Lauren; Garraway, Sandra M; Grau, James W

    2016-11-01

    Noxious input can sensitize pain (nociceptive) circuits within the spinal cord, inducing a lasting increase in spinal cord neural excitability (central sensitization) that is thought to contribute to chronic pain. The development of spinally-mediated central sensitization is regulated by descending fibers and GABAergic interneurons. The current study provides evidence that spinal cord injury (SCI) transforms how GABA affects nociceptive transmission within the spinal cord, recapitulating an earlier developmental state wherein GABA has an excitatory effect. In spinally transected rats, noxious electrical stimulation and inflammation induce enhanced mechanical reactivity (EMR), a behavioral index of nociceptive sensitization. Pretreatment with the GABA A receptor antagonist bicuculline blocked these effects. Peripheral application of an irritant (capsaicin) also induced EMR. Both the induction and maintenance of this effect were blocked by bicuculline. Cellular indices of central sensitization [c-fos expression and ERK phosphorylation (pERK)] were also attenuated. In intact (sham operated) rats, bicuculline had the opposite effect. Pretreatment with a GABA agonist (muscimol) attenuated nociceptive sensitization in intact, but not spinally injured, rats. The effect of SCI on GABA function was linked to a reduction in the Cl - transporter, KCC2, leading to a reduction in intracellular Cl - that would attenuate GABA-mediated inhibition. Pharmacologically blocking the KCC2 channel (with i.t. DIOA) in intact rats mimicked the effect of SCI. Conversely, a pharmacological treatment (bumetanide) that should increase intracellular Cl - levels blocked the effect of SCI. The results suggest that GABAergic neurons drive, rather than inhibit, the development of nociceptive sensitization after spinal injury. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Spinal Neurocysticercosis: Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amaya P, Melina; Roa, Jose L

    2011-01-01

    Neurocysticercosis (NCC) is the most frequent parasitic illness of the central nervous system caused by the larval form of Taenia solium and its considered to be endemic in Latin America. Its diagnosis is based on imaging findings and epidemiological data; although its diagnosis can be made through the detection of specific IgG antibodies, these tests have limited availability in our environment. Central nervous system involvement is generally observed in the brain parenchyma, and less commonly in the ventricular system and subarachnoid space; only infrequently is reported to involve the structures within the spinal canal, in this article we review a case of a patient with spinal cysticercal involvement.

  3. [Congenital spinal malformations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertl-Wagner, B B; Reiser, M F

    2001-12-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered.

  4. Congenital spinal malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ertl-Wagner, B.B.; Reiser, M.F.

    2001-01-01

    Congenital spinal malformations form a complex and heterogeneous group of disorders whose pathogenesis is best explained embryologically. Radiologically, it is important to formulate a diagnosis when the disorder first becomes symptomatic. However, it is also crucial to detect complications of the disorder or of the respective therapeutic interventions in the further course of the disease such as hydromyelia or re-tethering after repair of a meningomyelocele. Moreover, once a congenital spinal malformation is diagnosed, associated malformations should be sought after. A possible syndromal classification such as in OEIS- or VACTERL-syndromes should also be considered. (orig.) [de

  5. Spinal Cord Stimulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain that is refractory to other treatment. Originally described by Shealy et al. in 1967(1), it is used to treat a range of conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS I)(2), angina pectoris(3), radicular...... pain after failed back surgery syndrome (FBSS)(4), pain due to peripheral nerve injury, stump pain(5), peripheral vascular disease(6) and diabetic neuropathy(7,8); whereas phantom pain(9), postherpetic neuralgia(10), chronic visceral pain(11), and pain after partial spinal cord injury(12) remain more...

  6. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI. Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. The mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain pathways in the spinal cord may emerge with certain patterns of activity, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after spinal cord injury. We review these basic phenomena, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and discuss implications of these findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after spinal cord injury.

  7. Nonenhancing spinal subdural metastatic tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirakov, S.; Penev, L.; Georgieva-Kozarova, G.

    2012-01-01

    Full text: We describe a case of a spinal subdural metastatic tumor that became rapidly symptomatic after a minor trauma, as a result of severe cord compression and cord haemorrhage. Spinal subdural hematomas are most commonly caused by anticoagulant therapy, lumbar puncture, blood dyscrasias, spinal trauma, or spinal vascular malformations. Subdural metastatic tumors are very uncommon, and their presentation as spinal subdural hematomas is exceedingly rare. We describe a case of 59 years old woman with quadriparesis and her preoperative findings on MRI and the follow up

  8. Anterior spinal cord syndrome of unknown etiology

    OpenAIRE

    Klakeel, Merrine; Thompson, Justin; Srinivasan, Rajashree; McDonald, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A spinal cord injury encompasses a physical insult to the spinal cord. In the case of anterior spinal cord syndrome, the insult is a vascular lesion at the anterior spinal artery. We present the cases of two 13-year-old boys with anterior spinal cord syndrome, along with a review of the anatomy and vasculature of the spinal cord and an explanation of how a lesion in the cord corresponds to anterior spinal cord syndrome.

  9. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  10. Lumbar Spinal Canal Stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... If you have lumbar spinal canal stenosis, your treatment will depend on how bad your symptoms are. If your pain is mild and you haven’t had it long, you can try an exercise program or a physical therapy program. This can strengthen your back muscles and ...

  11. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow ...

  12. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work ... cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can ...

  13. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Life in a Wheelchair Lisa Rosen, MS Spasticity, Physical Therapy-Lokomat T. George Hornby, PhD, PT Empowering the ... Rogers, SW Marguerite David, MSW Kathy Hulse, MSW Physical Therapy after Spinal Cord Injury Laura Wehrli, PT Isa ...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When can we expect ...

  15. Lumbar spinal stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1985-01-01

    Spinal stenosis, which has attracted increasing attention in recent years, represents an important group of clinical and radiologic entities. Recognition and ultimate surgical management of the many abnormalities found in this group require precise preoperative delineation of the morbid anatomy. Conventional axial tomography provided the first accurate picture of the sagittal dimension, but it was limited by poor contrast resolution. Computerized tomography and ultrasound have finally provided the means for accurate measurement of midsagittal diameter and surface area. It is now possible to provide a preoperative assessment of bony and soft-tissue canal compression and to guide surgical decompression by objective anatomic measurements. True spinal stenosis of the lumbar vertebral canal is a form of compression produced by the walls of the vertebral canal. It involves the whole of the vertebral canal by exerting compression at two of its opposite surfaces. There are two types of stenosis: (1) transport stenosis, wherein the clinical manifestations are due to impeded flow of fluid, which is dependent on the available cross-sectional area of the canal surface of the stenotic structure, and (2) compressive stenosis, which includes abnormal compression of opposing surfaces only. According to these definitions, indentation on the spinal canal by disc protrusion or localized tumor is not considered true spinal stenoses. In this chapter the authors discuss only those conditions that produce true canal stenosis

  16. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... What is “Braingate” research? play_arrow How would stem-cell therapies work in the treatment of spinal cord injuries? play_arrow What does stem-cell research on animals tell us? play_arrow When ...

  17. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Baumbauer, Kyle M.; Hook, Michelle A.; Garraway, Sandra M.; Lee, Kuan H.; Hoy, Kevin C.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI. PMID

  18. Maladaptive spinal plasticity opposes spinal learning and recovery in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Adam R; Huie, J Russell; Crown, Eric D; Baumbauer, Kyle M; Hook, Michelle A; Garraway, Sandra M; Lee, Kuan H; Hoy, Kevin C; Grau, James W

    2012-01-01

    Synaptic plasticity within the spinal cord has great potential to facilitate recovery of function after spinal cord injury (SCI). Spinal plasticity can be induced in an activity-dependent manner even without input from the brain after complete SCI. A mechanistic basis for these effects is provided by research demonstrating that spinal synapses have many of the same plasticity mechanisms that are known to underlie learning and memory in the brain. In addition, the lumbar spinal cord can sustain several forms of learning and memory, including limb-position training. However, not all spinal plasticity promotes recovery of function. Central sensitization of nociceptive (pain) pathways in the spinal cord may emerge in response to various noxious inputs, demonstrating that plasticity within the spinal cord may contribute to maladaptive pain states. In this review we discuss interactions between adaptive and maladaptive forms of activity-dependent plasticity in the spinal cord below the level of SCI. The literature demonstrates that activity-dependent plasticity within the spinal cord must be carefully tuned to promote adaptive spinal training. Prior work from our group has shown that stimulation that is delivered in a limb position-dependent manner or on a fixed interval can induce adaptive plasticity that promotes future spinal cord learning and reduces nociceptive hyper-reactivity. On the other hand, stimulation that is delivered in an unsynchronized fashion, such as randomized electrical stimulation or peripheral skin injuries, can generate maladaptive spinal plasticity that undermines future spinal cord learning, reduces recovery of locomotor function, and promotes nociceptive hyper-reactivity after SCI. We review these basic phenomena, how these findings relate to the broader spinal plasticity literature, discuss the cellular and molecular mechanisms, and finally discuss implications of these and other findings for improved rehabilitative therapies after SCI.

  19. Multiple actions of iontophoretically applied serotonin on motorneurones in the turtle spinal cord in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skydsgaard, Morten Arnika; Hounsgaard, J

    1996-01-01

    The effects of focal activation of serotonergic receptors in motorneurones were investigated in a slice preparation of the turtle spinal cord. The test response to glutamate evoked from a dendrite by iontophoresis was attenuated by serotonin or 8-hydroxy-dipropyl-aminotetralin (8-OH-DPAT) applied...

  20. Contribution of 5-HT2A receptors on diaphragmatic recovery after chronic cervical spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kun-Ze; Gonzalez-Rothi, Elisa J

    2017-10-01

    Unilateral C2 spinal cord hemisection (C2Hx) interrupts bulbospinal respiratory pathways innervating ipsilateral phrenic motoneurons, resulting in cessation of ipsilateral diaphragm motor output. Plasticity within the spinal neural circuitry controlling the diaphragm can induce partial recovery of phrenic bursting which correlates with the time-dependent return of spinal serotonin (5-HT) immunoreactivity in the vicinity of phrenic motoneurons. The 5-HT 2A receptor subtype is present on phrenic motoneurons and its expression is up-regulated after cervical spinal cord injury; however the functional role of these receptors following injury has not been clearly defined. The present study evaluated the functional role of 5-HT 2A receptors by testing the hypothesis that pharmacologic blockade would attenuate diaphragm activity in rats with chronic cervical spinal cord injury. Bilateral diaphragm electromyography (EMG) was performed in vagal-intact and spontaneously breathing rats before and after intravenous administration of the 5-HT 2A receptor antagonist Ketanserin (1mg/kg). Intravenous ketanserin significantly attenuated ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity in C2Hx animals but had no impact on diaphragm output in uninjured animals. We conclude that 5-HT 2A receptor activation contributes to the recovery of ipsilateral phrenic motor output after chronic cervical spinal cord injury. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Radiofrequency attenuator and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warner, Benjamin P [Los Alamos, NM; McCleskey, T Mark [Los Alamos, NM; Burrell, Anthony K [Los Alamos, NM; Agrawal, Anoop [Tucson, AZ; Hall, Simon B [Palmerston North, NZ

    2009-01-20

    Radiofrequency attenuator and method. The attenuator includes a pair of transparent windows. A chamber between the windows is filled with molten salt. Preferred molten salts include quarternary ammonium cations and fluorine-containing anions such as tetrafluoroborate (BF.sub.4.sup.-), hexafluorophosphate (PF.sub.6.sup.-), hexafluoroarsenate (AsF.sub.6.sup.-), trifluoromethylsulfonate (CF.sub.3SO.sub.3.sup.-), bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-), bis(perfluoroethylsulfonyl)imide ((CF.sub.3CF.sub.2SO.sub.2).sub.2N.sup.-) and tris(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)methide ((CF.sub.3SO.sub.2).sub.3C.sup.-). Radicals or radical cations may be added to or electrochemically generated in the molten salt to enhance the RF attenuation.

  2. Differential diagnoses of spinal tumors; Differenzialdiagnose spinaler Tumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yilmaz, U. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2011-12-15

    A wide variety of degenerative, inflammatory and vascular diseases can resemble the clinical presentation and imaging findings of spinal tumors. This article provides an overview of the most frequent diseases which are important to recognize for diagnostic imaging of the spine. (orig.) [German] Eine Vielzahl degenerativer, entzuendlicher und vaskulaerer Erkrankungen kann das klinische Bild und radiologische Befunde spinaler Tumoren imitieren. Dieser Artikel dient der Uebersicht ueber die haeufigsten dieser Erkrankungen, deren Kenntnis wichtig fuer die spinale Bildgebung ist. (orig.)

  3. Changes in spinal alignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veintemillas Aráiz, M T; Beltrán Salazar, V P; Rivera Valladares, L; Marín Aznar, A; Melloni Ribas, P; Valls Pascual, R

    2016-04-01

    Spinal misalignments are a common reason for consultation at primary care centers and specialized departments. Misalignment has diverse causes and is influenced by multiple factors: in adolescence, the most frequent misalignment is scoliosis, which is idiopathic in 80% of cases and normally asymptomatic. In adults, the most common cause is degenerative. It is important to know the natural history and to detect factors that might predict progression. The correct diagnosis of spinal deformities requires specific imaging studies. The degree of deformity determines the type of treatment. The aim is to prevent progression of the deformity and to recover the flexibility and balance of the body. Copyright © 2016 SERAM. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Spinal trauma in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, C.; Carty, H.

    2001-01-01

    Evaluation of the child with suspected spinal injury can be a difficult task for the radiologist. Added to the problems posed by lack of familiarity with the normal appearances of the paediatric spine is anxiety about missing a potentially significant injury resulting in neurological damage. Due to differences in anatomy and function, the pattern of injury in the paediatric spine is different from that in the adolescent or adult. Lack of appreciation of these differences may lead to over investigation and inappropriate treatment. This review attempts to clarify some of the problems frequently encountered. It is based on a review of the literature as well as personal experience. The normal appearances and variants of the spine in children, the mechanisms and patterns of injury are reviewed highlighting the differences between children and adults. Specific fractures, a practical scheme for the assessment of spinal radiographs in children, and the role of cross sectional imaging are discussed. (orig.)

  5. Acute spinal cord injuries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takahashi, M.; Izunaga, H.; Sato, R.; Shinzato, I.; Korogi, Y.; Yamashita, Y.

    1991-01-01

    This paper reports on sequential MR images and neurologic findings that were correlated in 40 acute spinal cord injuries. Within 1 week after injury, frequent initial MR changes appeared isointense on both T1- and T2-weighted images and isointense on T1- and hyperintense on T2-weighted images. After 2 months, hypointensity appeared on T1-weighted images and hyperintensity persisted or appeared on T2-weighted images. Clinical improvements were observed in patients with isointensity on both T1- and T2-weighted images at the initial examination. A larger area of hyperintensity on subsequent T2-weighted images was correlated with no neurologic improvement. MR findings were good indicators of the spinal cord injury

  6. Occult spinal dysraphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajpai, M; Kataria, R; Gupta, D K; Agarwala, S

    1997-01-01

    When spina bifida is associated with skin abnormalities such as dimples, sinus tracts hypertrichosis, or capillary hemangiomas, there is a high incidence of an occult intraspinal lesion such as epidermoid and dermoid tumours, lipomas, diastematomyelia, dural bands and tethered spinal cord. The present study consists of 50 patients with occult spinal dysraphism treated with the diagnosis of lipomeningomyelocoele (20), lumbosacral lipoma (15) and diastematomyelia (15). The clinical presentation varied from lipoma in the lumbosacral region, dermal sinus, cutaneous hemangioma and hypertrichosis. The age range varied from 2 months to 7 years with an average of 2 years. 40% patients had neurological deficit at the time of presentation which varied from lower limb weakness to bladder & bowel involvement. All patients underwent laminectomy of the lumbar and lumbo-sacral spine with excision of intraspinal lipoma, excision of bony or cartilaginous spur in diastematomyelia and detethering of the conus medullaris & cauda equina. No patient developed late neurological deficit.

  7. Imaging of Spinal Metastatic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubdha M. Shah

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastases to the spine can involve the bone, epidural space, leptomeninges, and spinal cord. The spine is the third most common site for metastatic disease, following the lung and the liver. Approximately 60–70% of patients with systemic cancer will have spinal metastasis. Materials/Methods. This is a review of the imaging techniques and typical imaging appearances of spinal metastatic disease. Conclusions. Awareness of the different manifestations of spinal metastatic disease is essential as the spine is the most common site of osseous metastatic disease. Imaging modalities have complimentary roles in the evaluation of spinal metastatic disease. CT best delineates osseous integrity, while MRI is better at assessing soft tissue involvement. Physiologic properties, particularly in treated disease, can be evaluated with other imaging modalities such as FDG PET and advanced MRI sequences. Imaging plays a fundamental role in not only diagnosis but also treatment planning of spinal metastatic disease.

  8. Two spinal arachnoid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puijlaert, J.B.C.M.; Vielvoye, G.J.; Dulken, H. van

    1985-05-01

    Two cases of spinal arachnoid cysts are reported. One is extradurally located, the other intradurally. The first is only documented with myelography, the second also by subsequent CT scanning. Some clinical and diagnostic aspects of the lesion are discussed. The aim of this report is to add two new cases to the literature and to emphasize the role of high-resolution CT scanning in the diagnosis of these lesions.

  9. Spontaneous spinal epidural abscess.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ellanti, P

    2011-10-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is an uncommon entity, the frequency of which is increasing. They occur spontaneously or as a complication of intervention. The classical triad of fever, back pain and neurological symptoms are not always present. High index of suspicion is key to diagnosis. Any delay in diagnosis and treatment can have significant neurological consequences. We present the case of a previously well man with a one month history of back pain resulting from an epidural abscess.

  10. Spinal brucellosis: a review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Chakroun, Mohamed; Chaabane, Skander [Institut M T Kassab d' orthopedie, Department of Radiology, Ksar Said (Tunisia)

    2008-09-15

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, relatively frequent in Mediterranean countries and in the Middle East. It is a systemic infection, caused by facultative intra-cellular bacteria of the genus Brucella, that can involve many organs and tissues. The spine is the most common site of musculoskeletal involvement, followed by the sacroiliac joints. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, biological and imaging features of spinal brucellosis. (orig.)

  11. Spinal brucellosis: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chelli Bouaziz, Mouna; Ladeb, Mohamed Fethi; Chakroun, Mohamed; Chaabane, Skander

    2008-01-01

    Brucellosis is a zoonosis of worldwide distribution, relatively frequent in Mediterranean countries and in the Middle East. It is a systemic infection, caused by facultative intra-cellular bacteria of the genus Brucella, that can involve many organs and tissues. The spine is the most common site of musculoskeletal involvement, followed by the sacroiliac joints. The aim of this study was to assess the clinical, biological and imaging features of spinal brucellosis. (orig.)

  12. Differential gene expression in the EphA4 knockout spinal cord and analysis of the inflammatory response following spinal cord injury.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn M Munro

    Full Text Available Mice lacking the axon guidance molecule EphA4 have been shown to exhibit extensive axonal regeneration and functional recovery following spinal cord injury. To assess mechanisms by which EphA4 may modify the response to neural injury a microarray was performed on spinal cord tissue from mice with spinal cord injury and sham injured controls. RNA was purified from spinal cords of adult EphA4 knockout and wild-type mice four days following lumbar spinal cord hemisection or laminectomy only and was hybridised to Affymetrix All-Exon Array 1.0 GeneChips™. While subsequent analyses indicated that several pathways were altered in EphA4 knockout mice, of particular interest was the attenuated expression of a number of inflammatory genes, including Arginase 1, expression of which was lower in injured EphA4 knockout compared to wild-type mice. Immunohistological analyses of different cellular components of the immune response were then performed in injured EphA4 knockout and wildtype spinal cords. While numbers of infiltrating CD3+ T cells were low in the hemisection model, a robust CD11b+ macrophage/microglial response was observed post-injury. There was no difference in the overall number or spread of macrophages/activated microglia in injured EphA4 knockout compared to wild-type spinal cords at 2, 4 or 14 days post-injury, however a lower proportion of Arginase-1 immunoreactive macrophages/activated microglia was observed in EphA4 knockout spinal cords at 4 days post-injury. Subtle alterations in the neuroinflammatory response in injured EphA4 knockout spinal cords may contribute to the regeneration and recovery observed in these mice following injury.

  13. Spinal arteriovenous shunts in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davagnanam, Indran; Toma, Ahmed K; Brew, Stefan

    2013-11-01

    Pediatric spinal arteriovenous shunts are rare and, in contrast to those in adults, are often congenital or associated with underlying genetic disorders. These are thought to be a more severe and complete phenotypic spectrum of all spinal arteriovenous shunts seen in the overall spinal shunt population. The pediatric presentation thus accounts for its association with significant morbidity and, in general, a more challenging treatment process compared with the adult presentation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. [Lumbar spinal angiolipoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isla, Alberto; Ortega Martinez, Rodrigo; Pérez López, Carlos; Gómez de la Riva, Alvaro; Mansilla, Beatriz

    2016-01-01

    Spinal angiolipomas are fairly infrequent benign tumours that are usually located in the epidural space of the thoracic column and represent 0.14% to 1.3% of all spinal tumours. Lumbar angiolipomas are extremely rare, representing only 9.6% of all spinal extradural angiolipomas. We report the case of a woman who complained of a lumbar pain of several months duration with no neurological focality and that had intensified in the last three days without her having had any injury or made a physical effort. The MR revealed an extradural mass L1-L2, on the posterior face of the medulla, decreasing the anteroposterior diameter of the canal. The patient symptoms improved after surgery. Total extirpation of the lesion is possible in most cases, and the prognosis is excellent even if the lesion is infiltrative. For this reason, excessively aggressive surgery is not necessary to obtain complete resection. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Neurocirugía. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Upregulation of GLT-1 by treatment with ceftriaxone alleviates radicular pain by reducing spinal astrocyte activation and neuronal hyperexcitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, K J; Gilliland, T M; Winkelstein, B A

    2014-01-01

    Cervical nerve root injury commonly leads to radicular pain. Normal sensation relies on regulation of extracellular glutamate in the spinal cord by glutamate transporters. The goal of this study was to define the temporal response of spinal glutamate transporters (glial glutamate transporter 1 [GLT-1], glutamate-aspartate transporter [GLAST], and excitatory amino acid carrier 1) following nerve root compressions that do or do not produce sensitivity in the rat and to evaluate the role of glutamate uptake in radicular pain by using ceftriaxone to upregulate GLT-1. Compression was applied to the C7 nerve root. Spinal glutamate transporter expression was evaluated at days 1 and 7. In a separate study, rats underwent a painful root compression and were treated with ceftriaxone or the vehicle saline. Glial glutamate transporter expression, astrocytic activation (glial fibrillary acidic protein [GFAP]), and neuronal excitability were assessed at day 7. Both studies measured behavioral sensitivity for 7 days after injury. Spinal GLT-1 significantly decreased (P ceftriaxone treatment (day 2), mechanical allodynia began to decrease; both mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia were attenuated (P Ceftriaxone also reduced (P < 0.024) spinal GFAP and GLAST expression, and neuronal hyperexcitability in the spinal dorsal horn, restoring the proportion of spinal neurons classified as wide dynamic range to that of normal. These findings suggest that nerve root-mediated pain is maintained jointly by spinal astrocytic reactivity and neuronal hyperexcitability and that these spinal modifications are associated with reduced glutamate uptake by GLT-1. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Embolization of spinal arteriovenous malformations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Son, Mi Young; Kim, Sun Yong; Park, Bok Hwan

    1990-01-01

    Recently, therapeutic embolization has been advocated as the treatment of choice for spinal AVM(arteriovenous malformations). The authors review our experience with two cases of spinal AVM treated by embolization using coaxial Tracker-18 microcatheter with Latvian. The patients included a 10 year old male with glomus type and a 14 year old female with juvenile type spinal AVM revealed recanalization 5 month later. Embolization provides curative or temporary treatment for spinal AVM. After embolic occlusion, delayed reassessment with arteriography is indicated, particularly if symptoms persist or recur

  17. Spinal cord mechanisms of pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Mello, R; Dickenson, A H

    2008-07-01

    The spinal cord is the first relay site in the transmission of nociceptive information from the periphery to the brain. Sensory signals are transmitted from the periphery by primary afferent fibres into the dorsal horn of the spinal cord, where these afferents synapse with intrinsic spinal dorsal horn neurones. Spinal projection neurones then convey this information to higher centres in the brain, where non-noxious and noxious signals can be perceived. During nociceptive transmission, the output of the spinal cord is dependent on various spinal mechanisms which can either increase or decrease the activity of dorsal horn neurones. Such mechanisms include local excitatory and inhibitory interneurones, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor activation, and descending influences from the brainstem, which can be both inhibitory and excitatory in nature. After nerve injury or conditions of inflammation, shifts can occur in these excitatory and inhibitory mechanisms which modulate spinal excitability, often resulting in the heightened response of dorsal neurones to incoming afferent signals, and increased output to the brain, a phenomenon known as central sensitization. In this review, we consider the ways in which spinal cord activity may be altered in chronic pain states. In addition, we discuss the spinal mechanisms which are targeted by current analgesics used in the management of chronic pain.

  18. Imaging procedures in spinal infectious diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodiek, S.O.

    2001-01-01

    A targeted successful treatment of spinal infectious diseases requires clinical and laboratory data that are completed by the contribution of imaging procedures. Neuroimaging only provides essential informations on the correct topography, localisation, acuity and differential diagnosis of spinal infectious lesions. MRI with its sensitivity concerning soft tissue lesions is a useful tool in detecting infectious alterations of spinal bone marrow, intervertebral disks, leptomeninges and the spinal cord itself. Crucial imaging patterns of typical spinal infections are displayed and illustrated by clinical case studies. We present pyogenic, granulomatous and postoperative variants of spondylodicitis, spinal epidural abscess, spinal meningitis and spinal cord infections. The importance of intravenous contrastmedia application is pointed out. (orig.) [de

  19. Computed tomography of the spinal canal for the cervical spine and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura, Isao; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Nasu, Kichiro; Shioya, Akihide; Ohhama, Mitsuru

    1983-01-01

    The cervical spinal canal and cervical spinal cord were measured in normal cases and 34 cases of spinal or spinal cord injury. The anteroposterior diameter and area of the normal cervical spinal canal showed a high correlation. The area ratio of the normal cervical spinal canal to the cervical spinal cord showed that the proportion of the cervical spinal cord in the spinal canal was 1/3 - 1/5, Csub(4,5) showing a particularly large proportion. In acute and subacute spinal or spinal cord injury, CT visualized in more details of the spinal canal in cases that x-ray showed definite bone injuries. Computer assisted myelography visualized more clearly the condition of the spinal cord in cases without definite findings bone injuries on x-ray. Demonstrating the morphology of spinal injury in more details, CT is useful for selection of therapy for injured spines. (Chiba, N.)

  20. Management of Penetrating Spinal Cord Injuries in a Non Spinal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Penetrating injuries of the spinal cord are among the most dangerous of injuries. They are often associated with injuries to other vital organs of the body, which may demand priority attention. The objectives of this study were to determine the pattern of the penetrating spinal cord injuries and to evaluate outcome ...

  1. Ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates chronic morphine-induced gliosis in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milne Brian

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of analgesic tolerance following chronic morphine administration can be a significant clinical problem. Preclinical studies demonstrate that chronic morphine administration induces spinal gliosis and that inhibition of gliosis prevents the development of analgesic tolerance to opioids. Many studies have also demonstrated that ultra-low doses of naltrexone inhibit the development of spinal morphine antinociceptive tolerance and clinical studies demonstrate that it has opioid sparing effects. In this study we demonstrate that ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates glial activation, which may contribute to its effects on attenuating tolerance. Results Spinal cord sections from rats administered chronic morphine showed significantly increased immuno-labelling of astrocytes and microglia compared to saline controls, consistent with activation. 3-D images of astrocytes from animals administered chronic morphine had significantly larger volumes compared to saline controls. Co-injection of ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuated this increase in volume, but the mean volume differed from saline-treated and naltrexone-treated controls. Astrocyte and microglial immuno-labelling was attenuated in rats co-administered ultra-low dose naltrexone compared to morphine-treated rats and did not differ from controls. Glial activation, as characterized by immunohistochemical labelling and cell size, was positively correlated with the extent of tolerance developed. Morphine-induced glial activation was not due to cell proliferation as there was no difference observed in the total number of glial cells following chronic morphine treatment compared to controls. Furthermore, using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, no increase in spinal cord cell proliferation was observed following chronic morphine administration. Conclusion Taken together, we demonstrate a positive correlation between the prevention of analgesic tolerance and the inhibition of

  2. Ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates chronic morphine-induced gliosis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattioli, Theresa-Alexandra M; Milne, Brian; Cahill, Catherine M

    2010-04-16

    The development of analgesic tolerance following chronic morphine administration can be a significant clinical problem. Preclinical studies demonstrate that chronic morphine administration induces spinal gliosis and that inhibition of gliosis prevents the development of analgesic tolerance to opioids. Many studies have also demonstrated that ultra-low doses of naltrexone inhibit the development of spinal morphine antinociceptive tolerance and clinical studies demonstrate that it has opioid sparing effects. In this study we demonstrate that ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuates glial activation, which may contribute to its effects on attenuating tolerance. Spinal cord sections from rats administered chronic morphine showed significantly increased immuno-labelling of astrocytes and microglia compared to saline controls, consistent with activation. 3-D images of astrocytes from animals administered chronic morphine had significantly larger volumes compared to saline controls. Co-injection of ultra-low dose naltrexone attenuated this increase in volume, but the mean volume differed from saline-treated and naltrexone-treated controls. Astrocyte and microglial immuno-labelling was attenuated in rats co-administered ultra-low dose naltrexone compared to morphine-treated rats and did not differ from controls. Glial activation, as characterized by immunohistochemical labelling and cell size, was positively correlated with the extent of tolerance developed. Morphine-induced glial activation was not due to cell proliferation as there was no difference observed in the total number of glial cells following chronic morphine treatment compared to controls. Furthermore, using 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine, no increase in spinal cord cell proliferation was observed following chronic morphine administration. Taken together, we demonstrate a positive correlation between the prevention of analgesic tolerance and the inhibition of spinal gliosis by treatment with ultra-low dose naltrexone

  3. Post spinal meningitis and asepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Videira, Rogerio L R; Ruiz-Neto, P P; Brandao Neto, M

    2002-07-01

    Post spinal meningitis (PSM) is a complication still currently being reported. After two PSM cases in our hospital an epidemiological study was initiated, which included a survey of techniques for asepsis that are applied in our department. Cases defined as PSM comprised meningitis within a week after spinal anesthesia. Anesthesia records, anesthesia complication files and the records of the Hospital Commission for Infection Control from 1997 to 2000 were reviewed. Asepsis techniques applied were surveyed by a questionnaire answered by all our department's anesthesiologists. The equipment and procedures for spinal anesthesia were listed. Current anesthesia textbooks were reviewed for recommendations regarding asepsis techniques in conjunction with spinal anesthesia. Three cases of PSM were identified following 38,128 spinal anesthesias whereas none was observed in 12,822 patients subjected to other types of regional or general anesthesia (P>0.05). Culture of cerebrospinal fluid yielded Streptococcus in two patients and was negative in the other patient. The asepsis technique applied by the anesthesiologists varied considerably. The literature review showed that aspects on asepsis for spinal anesthesia are poorly covered. The incidence of meningitis was similar in patients subjected to spinal anesthesia and in those subjected to other anesthetic techniques. Asepsis techniques were found to differ considerably among our staff members, reflecting the lack of well-defined published standards for this procedure. We recommend that asepsis for spinal anesthesia should not be less rigorous than for surgical asepsis.

  4. Spinal lipomatous malformations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jindal, A; Mahapatra, A K

    2000-05-01

    Spinal lipomatous malformations (SLM) include all the closed neural tube defects (NTD) with excessive lipomatous tissue in the spinal cord or filum terminale. We evaluated 65 cases of SLM seen & operated at our department in the last 7 years. Of these only 9 were asymptomatic and 8 were below 2 years of age. There were more males than females. In addition to subcutaneous lipoma many patients also had hypertrichiosis and dermal sinus as cutaneous makes. Twenty patients had foot deformity and 5 had unilateral limb shortening. Sixty-two patients had MRI and 3 had CT myelogram for evaluation. These revealed 7 patients with Chiari malformations, 10 with focal syrinx and 2 patients underwent VP shunt for hydrocephalus. Sacral agenesis was seen in 5 patients. Clinical features were similar to other cases of spinal dysraphism except that sensory loss and trophic ulcer were more frequent. Intradural lipoma and tethering was seen in 18 cases whereas intramedullary lipoma & conus lipoma was seen in 40 & 7 cases respectively. Additional tethering lesion was seen in 1/3 cases and was treated simultaneously. Preoperative deficits improved in 28 cases and stabilized in 33 cases. Three patients developed fresh deficits after surgery. We observed 8 CSF leaks and 4 wound infections in postoperative period. It is very clear from our data that a patient has about 95% chances that his neurological status may improve or stabilize following surgery and the risk of developing fresh deficits is about 5%. We, therefore, suggest that all patients of SLM should be treated with aggressive surgical management for best results.

  5. [Closed spinal dysraphism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollini, G; Cottalorda, J; Jouve, J L; Labriet, C; Choux, M

    1993-04-01

    This retrospective review included 133 patients with one or several of the following defects: diastematomyelia, neurenteric cyst, dermal sinus or cyst, meningeal malformation, sacral agenesis, tethering of the spinal cord, and lumbosacral lipoma. Physical evaluation readily identified most lumbosacral lipomas, as well as most cases of diastematomyelia since hypertrichosis over the defect was common. Some patients developed life-threatening clinical manifestations, e.g., meningitis due to a dermal sinus. On the basis of this retrospective review and a review of the literature, the clinical and therapeutic aspects of each defect are discussed.

  6. Control algorithms for dynamic attenuators

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsieh, Scott S.; Pelc, Norbert J.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The authors describe algorithms to control dynamic attenuators in CT and compare their performance using simulated scans. Dynamic attenuators are prepatient beam shaping filters that modulate the distribution of x-ray fluence incident on the patient on a view-by-view basis. These attenuators can reduce dose while improving key image quality metrics such as peak or mean variance. In each view, the attenuator presents several degrees of freedom which may be individually adjusted. The total number of degrees of freedom across all views is very large, making many optimization techniques impractical. The authors develop a theory for optimally controlling these attenuators. Special attention is paid to a theoretically perfect attenuator which controls the fluence for each ray individually, but the authors also investigate and compare three other, practical attenuator designs which have been previously proposed: the piecewise-linear attenuator, the translating attenuator, and the double wedge attenuator. Methods: The authors pose and solve the optimization problems of minimizing the mean and peak variance subject to a fixed dose limit. For a perfect attenuator and mean variance minimization, this problem can be solved in simple, closed form. For other attenuator designs, the problem can be decomposed into separate problems for each view to greatly reduce the computational complexity. Peak variance minimization can be approximately solved using iterated, weighted mean variance (WMV) minimization. Also, the authors develop heuristics for the perfect and piecewise-linear attenuators which do not requirea priori knowledge of the patient anatomy. The authors compare these control algorithms on different types of dynamic attenuators using simulated raw data from forward projected DICOM files of a thorax and an abdomen. Results: The translating and double wedge attenuators reduce dose by an average of 30% relative to current techniques (bowtie filter with tube current

  7. MR imaging of spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchberger, W.; Springer, P.; Birbamer, G.; Judmaier, W.; Kathrein, A.; Daniaux, H.

    1995-01-01

    To assess the value of MR imaging in the acute and chronic stages of spinal trauma. 126 MR examinations of 120 patients were evaluated retrospectively. In 15 cases of acute spinal cord injury, correlation of MR findings with the degree of neurological deficit and eventual recovery was undertaken. Cord anomalies in the acute stage were seen in 16 patients. Intramedullary haemorrhage (n=6) and cord transection (n=2) were associated with complete injuries and poor prognosis, whereas patients with cord oedema (n=7) had incomplete injuries and recovered significant neurological function. In the chronic stage, MR findings included persistent cord compression in 8 patients, syringomyelia or post-traumatic cyst in 12, myelomalacia in 6, cord atrophy in 9, and cord transection in 7 patients. In acute spinal trauma, MR proved useful in assessing spinal cord compression and instability. In addition, direct visualisation and characterisation of posttraumatic changes within the spinal cord may offer new possibilities in establishing the prognosis for neurological recovery. In the later stages, potentially remediable causes of persistent or progressive symptoms, such as chronic spinal cord compression or syringomyelia can be distinguished from other sequelae of spinal trauma, such as myelomalacia, cord transection or atrophy. (orig.) [de

  8. Diagnosis of spinal cord diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halimi, P.; Sigal, R.; Doyon, D.; David, P.

    1989-01-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) nowadays plays a predominant role in the diagnosis and evaluation of spinal canal pathologies and has reduced the other exploratory methods, including computerized tomography (CT) and myelography, to an ancillary role. These pathologies are divided into three groups: those where MRI is the only imaging method (syringomyela, tumours in the spinal canal, phakomatoses, external pachimeningitis, spinal cord injuries, myelitis); those where MRI is the initial method and is completed by other examinations (vascular malformations, dysraphism, myelopathies due to cervical osteoarthritis) and those where MRI still play a lesser role than CT (degenerative lesions of the lumbar column) [fr

  9. Modern spinal instrumentation. Part 1: Normal spinal implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davis, W.; Allouni, A.K.; Mankad, K.; Prezzi, D.; Elias, T.; Rankine, J.; Davagnanam, I.

    2013-01-01

    The general radiologist frequently encounters studies demonstrating spinal instrumentation, either as part of the patient's postoperative evaluation or as incidental to a study performed for another purpose. There are various surgical approaches and devices used in spinal surgery with an increased understanding of spinal and spinal implant biomechanics drives development of modern fixation devices. It is, therefore, important that the radiologist can recognize commonly used devices and identify their potential complications demonstrated on imaging. The aim of part 1 of this review is to familiarize the reader with terms used to describe surgical approaches to the spine, review the function and normal appearances of commonly used instrumentations, and understand the importance of the different fixation techniques. The second part of this review will concentrate on the roles that the different imaging techniques play in assessing the instrumented spine and the recognition of complications that can potentially occur.

  10. Role of spinal microglia in rat models of peripheral nerve injury and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Anna K; Gentry, Clive; Bradbury, Elizabeth J; McMahon, Stephen B; Malcangio, Marzia

    2007-02-01

    Mounting evidence supports the hypothesis that spinal microglia modulate the development and maintenance of some chronic pain states. Here we examined the role of spinal microglia following both peripheral inflammatory insult and peripheral nerve injury. We observed significant ipsilateral dorsal horn microglia activation 2 weeks after injury and bilateral activation 50 days following nerve injury as well as 24 h following intraplantar zymosan but not intraplantar complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA). Ipsilateral but not contralateral microglia activation was associated with hind paw mechanical hyperalgesia. Spinal injection of the glial metabolic inactivator fluorocitrate attenuated ipsilateral hyperalgesia and bilateral spinal microglia activation after peripheral nerve injury. Intrathecal fluorocitrate reversed hyperalgesia after intraplantar zymosan and produced no reversal of CFA-induced hyperalgesia. These data suggest a role for spinal glia in the persistence of mechanical hyperalgesia following peripheral nerve injury. However, activation of spinal microglia contralaterally did not correlate to nociception. Furthermore, it would appear that the time course of microglia activation and their contribution to inflammatory pain is dependent on the inflammatory stimulus administered.

  11. Radiology of spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kassel, E.E.; Cooper, P.W.; Rubenstein, J.D.

    1983-01-01

    The early diagnostic management of patients with acute spinal canal trauma may be among the most difficult injuries referred to a trauma centre. No standardized protocol exists. Radiographic examinations commence with plain films, including special views. Further radiographic studies, if required, vary and include CT, myelography and conventional tomography. CT and metrizamide myelography are complementary. In more complicated fracture-dislocations, all of the above investigations may be necessary. Recent advances, including water-soluble contrast media, the lateral C1-2 puncture and CT, now offer faster, safer and more thorough follow-up investigations with less radiation exposure. Patients with multiple injuries, previously considered too severely injured to undergo further neurologic investigations, may now be more adequately assessed early in the acute phase of injury such that appropriate surgical decompression or stabilization may be performed. The maximum attainable neurologic improvement for such individuals may be better realized with the improved radio-diagnostic capabilities available

  12. Chronic spinal subdural hematoma; Spinales chronisches subdurales Haematom

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hagen, T.; Lensch, T. [Radiologengemeinschaft, Augsburg (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    Compared with spinal epidural hematomas, spinal subdural hematomas are rare; chronic forms are even more uncommon. These hematomas are associated not only with lumbar puncture and spinal trauma, but also with coagulopathies, vascular malformations and tumors. Compression of the spinal cord and the cauda equina means that the patients develop increasing back or radicular pain, followed by paraparesis and bladder and bowel paralysis, so that in most cases surgical decompression is carried out. On magnetic resonance imaging these hematomas present as thoracic or lumbar subdural masses, their signal intensity varying with the age of the hematoma. We report the clinical course and the findings revealed by imaging that led to the diagnosis in three cases of chronic spinal subdural hematoma. (orig.) [German] Spinale subdurale Haematome sind im Vergleich zu epiduralen Haematomen selten, chronische Verlaufsformen noch seltener. Ursaechlich sind neben Lumbalpunktionen und traumatischen Verletzungen auch Blutgerinnungsstoerungen, Gefaessmalformationen und Tumoren. Aufgrund der Kompression von Myelon und Cauda equina kommt es zu zunehmenden Ruecken- oder radikulaeren Schmerzen mit anschliessender Paraparese sowie einer Darm- und Blasenstoerung, weshalb in den meisten Faellen eine operative Entlastung durchgefuehrt wird. Magnetresonanztomographisch stellen sich die Haematome meist als thorakale bzw. lumbale subdurale Raumforderungen dar, die Signalintensitaet variiert mit dem Blutungsalter. Wir berichten ueber den klinischen Verlauf und die bildgebende Diagnostik von 3 Patienten mit spinalen chronischen subduralen Haematomen. (orig.)

  13. Spinal cord giant arteriovenous fistulae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aymard, A.; Reizine, D.; Marciano, S.; Cervigon, E.G.; Gelbert, F.; Merland, J.J.

    1988-01-01

    Giant extramedullary arteriovenous fistulas fed by spinal arteries are a rare type of spinal cord arteriovenous malformation. Among 11 patient (mean age, 20 years) with spinal hemorrhage in childhood, progressive paraplegia, and myelographic and angiographic diagnosis, magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated the precised extramedulary location and complications (thrombosis 1). Angiography showed dilated spinal arteries feeding giant, high flow fistulas with much venous drainage. Endovascular treatment was performed in 11 cases, with balloons in seven, particulate embolization in three, and polymerizing agents in one. Complete closures of the shunt with clinical improvement was achieved in seven cases and partial closure with partial clinical recovery in two; there was one case each of paraplegia due to involuntary venous blockage by the balloon, and fatal bulbomedullary stroke in particulate embolization of cervical location. Careful endovascular techniques represent a valuable treatment in this severe pathology

  14. Imaging of extradural spinal lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahlhelm, F.; Schulte-Altedorneburg, G.; Naumann, N.; Reith, W.; Nabhan, A.

    2006-01-01

    There is a wide variety of spinal extradural tumors. In addition to real neoplasms, degenerative diseases, congenital abnormalities and inflammatory disorders can be causes of extradural masses. Due to the bony boundary of the spinal canal, both benign as well as malignant masses can cause progressive neurological deficits including paraplegia. Most of the spinal tumors are benign (hemangioma of the vertebral body, degenerative diseases). In younger patients congenital abnormalities and primary tumors of the spine have to be considered, whereas in adults the list of differential diagnoses should include secondary malignancies such as metastases and lymphomas as well as metabolic disorders such as osteoporotic vertebral compression fracture and Paget's disease. Cross-sectional imaging techniques such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and computed tomography (CT) of the spine often help to make a specific diagnosis of extradural spinal lesions and represent important tools for tumor staging and preoperative evaluation. (orig.) [de

  15. Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003428.htm Cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) collection To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) collection is a test to look at the fluid ...

  16. Assessing attitudes toward spinal immobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouland, Andrew J; Jenkins, J Lee; Levy, Matthew J

    2013-10-01

    Prospective studies have improved knowledge of prehospital spinal immobilization. The opinion of Emergency Medical Services (EMS) providers regarding spinal immobilization is unknown, as is their knowledge of recent research advances. To examine the attitudes, knowledge, and comfort of prehospital and Emergency Department (ED) EMS providers regarding spinal immobilization performed under a non-selective protocol. An online survey was conducted from May to July of 2011. Participants were drawn from the Howard County Department of Fire and Rescue Services and the Howard County General Hospital ED. The survey included multiple choice questions and responses on a modified Likert scale. Correlation analysis and descriptive data were used to analyze results. Comfort using the Kendrick Extrication Device was low among ED providers. Experienced providers were more likely to indicate comfort using this device. Respondents often believed that spinal immobilization is appropriate in the management of penetrating trauma to the chest and abdomen. Reported use of padding decreased along with the frequency with which providers practice and encounter immobilized patients. Respondents often indicated that they perform spinal immobilization due solely to mechanism of injury. Providers who feel as if spinal immobilization is often performed unnecessarily were more likely to agree that immobilization causes an unnecessary delay in patient care. The results demonstrate the need for improved EMS education in the use of the Kendrick Extrication Device, backboard padding, and spinal immobilization in the management of penetrating trauma. The attitudes highlighted in this study are relevant to the implementation of a selective spinal immobilization protocol. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Anatomy of the Spinal Meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakka, Laurent; Gabrillargues, Jean; Coll, Guillaume

    2016-06-01

    The spinal meninges have received less attention than the cranial meninges in the literature, although several points remain debatable and poorly understood, like their phylogenesis, their development, and their interactions with the spinal cord. Their constancy among the chordates shows their crucial importance in central nervous system homeostasis and suggests a role far beyond mechanical protection of the neuraxis. This work provides an extensive study of the spinal meninges, from an overview of their phylogenesis and embryology to a descriptive and topographic anatomy with clinical implications. It examines their involvement in spinal cord development, functioning, and repair. This work is a review of the literature using PubMed as a search engine on Medline. The stages followed by the meninges along the phylogenesis could not be easily compared with their development in vertebrates for methodological aspects and convergence processes throughout evolution. The distinction between arachnoid and pia mater appeared controversial. Several points of descriptive anatomy remain debatable: the functional organization of the arterial network, and the venous and lymphatic drainages, considered differently by classical anatomic and neuroradiological approaches. Spinal meninges are involved in neurodevelopment and neurorepair producing neural stem cells and morphogens, in cerebrospinal fluid dynamics and neuraxis functioning by the synthesis of active molecules, and the elimination of waste products of central nervous system metabolism. The spinal meninges should be considered as dynamic functional formations evolving over a lifetime, with ultrastructural features and functional interactions with the neuraxis remaining not fully understood.

  18. Protein translation, proteolysis and autophagy in human skeletal muscle atrophy after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundell, L S; Savikj, M; Kostovski, E; Iversen, P O; Zierath, J R; Krook, A; Chibalin, A V; Widegren, U

    2018-02-08

    Spinal cord injury-induced loss of skeletal muscle mass does not progress linearly. In humans, peak muscle loss occurs during the first 6 weeks postinjury, and gradually continues thereafter. The aim of this study was to delineate the regulatory events underlying skeletal muscle atrophy during the first year following spinal cord injury. Key translational, autophagic and proteolytic proteins were analysed by immunoblotting of human vastus lateralis muscle obtained 1, 3 and 12 months following spinal cord injury. Age-matched able-bodied control subjects were also studied. Several downstream targets of Akt signalling decreased after spinal cord injury in skeletal muscle, without changes in resting Akt Ser 473 and Akt Thr 308 phosphorylation or total Akt protein. Abundance of mTOR protein and mTOR Ser 2448 phosphorylation, as well as FOXO1 Ser 256 phosphorylation and FOXO3 protein, decreased in response to spinal cord injury, coincident with attenuated protein abundance of E3 ubiquitin ligases, MuRF1 and MAFbx. S6 protein and Ser 235/236 phosphorylation, as well as 4E-BP1 Thr 37/46 phosphorylation, increased transiently after spinal cord injury, indicating higher levels of protein translation early after injury. Protein abundance of LC3-I and LC3-II decreased 3 months postinjury as compared with 1 month postinjury, but not compared to able-bodied control subjects, indicating lower levels of autophagy. Proteins regulating proteasomal degradation were stably increased in response to spinal cord injury. Together, these data provide indirect evidence suggesting that protein translation and autophagy transiently increase, while whole proteolysis remains stably higher in skeletal muscle within the first year after spinal cord injury. © 2018 Scandinavian Physiological Society. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. Syrinx of the Spinal Cord and Brain Stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ... Blockage of the Spinal Cord’s Blood Supply Cervical Spondylosis Compression of the Spinal Cord Hereditary Spastic Paraparesis ...

  20. [Reaction of spinal epidural venous plexuses of the spinal canal in low back spinal discopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gongal'skiĭ, V V; Prokopovich, E V

    2002-01-01

    Clinical ultrasonic investigations have shown dependence of blood-stream in spinal epidural venous plexuses on the character of low back spinal diskopathy. The leading starting factor of epiduritis is a disk protrusion or large size hernia. Epiduritis in disscopathy can run a chronic course, become a cause of (or complicate) development of vertebral neurological reflex or compression syndromes. One of acceptable diagnostic methods for local epiduritis is an ultrasonic technique which is a valuable adjunct to clinical studies.

  1. MR imaging and spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azar-Kia, B.; Fine, M.; Naheedy, M.; Elias, D.

    1987-01-01

    MR imaging has significantly improved diagnostic capability of spinal cord injuries. Other available diagnostic modalities such as plain films, myelography, CT, and post-CT myelography have failed to consistently show the secific evidence of spinal cord injuries and their true extent. The authors are presenting our experiences with MR imaging in spinal column injury. They have found MR imaging to be the procedure of choice for prognostic evaluation of spinal cord trauma. They are showing examples of recent and old spinal cord injury such as hematomyelia, myelomalacia, transection, spinal cord edema, and cavitation

  2. Effect of a weightlifting belt on spinal shrinkage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, N D; Reilly, T

    1991-01-01

    Spinal loading during weightlifting results in a loss of stature which has been attributed to a decrease in height of the intervertebral discs--so-called 'spinal shrinkage'. Belts are often used during the lifting of heavy weights, purportedly to support, stabilize and thereby attenuate the load on the spine. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a standard weightlifting belt in attenuating spinal shrinkage. Eight male subjects with a mean age of 24.8 years performed two sequences of circuit weight-training, one without a belt and on a separate occasion with a belt. The circuit training regimen consisted of six common weight-training exercises. These were performed in three sets of ten with a change of exercise after each set of ten repetitions. A stadiometer sensitive to within 0.01 mm was used to record alterations in stature. Measurements of stature were taken before and after completion of the circuit. The absolute visual analogue scale (AVAS) was used to measure the discomfort and pain intensity resulting from each of the two conditions. The circuit weight-training caused stature losses of 3.59mm without the belt and 2.87 mm with the belt (P greater than 0.05). The subjects complained of significantly less discomfort when the belt was worn (P less than 0.05). The degree of shrinkage was significantly correlated (r = 0.752, P less than 0.05) with perceived discomfort but only when the belt was not worn. These results suggest the potential benefits of wearing a weightlifting belt and support the hypothesis that the belt can help in stabilizing the trunk. Images Figure 1 PMID:1810615

  3. Spinal release of tumour necrosis factor activates c-Jun N-terminal kinase and mediates inflammation-induced hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bas, D B; Abdelmoaty, S; Sandor, K; Codeluppi, S; Fitzsimmons, B; Steinauer, J; Hua, X Y; Yaksh, T L; Svensson, C I

    2015-02-01

    Mounting evidence points to individual contributions of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF) and the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway to the induction and maintenance of various pain states. Here we explore the role of spinal TNF and JNK in carrageenan-induced hypersensitivity. As links between TNF and JNK have been demonstrated in vitro, we investigated if TNF regulates spinal JNK activity in vivo. TNF levels in lumbar cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, spinal TNF gene expression by real-time polymerase chain reaction and TNF protein expression, JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation by western blotting. The role of spinal TNF and JNK in inflammation-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity was assessed by injecting the TNF inhibitor etanercept and the JNK inhibitors SP600125 and JIP-1 intrathecally (i.t.). TNF-mediated regulation of JNK activity was examined by assessing the effect of i.t. etanercept on inflammation-induced spinal JNK activity. TNF levels were increased in CSF and spinal cord following carrageenan-induced inflammation. While JNK phosphorylation followed the same temporal pattern as TNF, c-jun was only activated at later time points. Intrathecal injection of TNF and JNK inhibitors attenuated carrageenan-induced mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity. TNF stimulation induced JNK phosphorylation in cultured spinal astrocytes and blocking the spinal actions of TNF in vivo by i.t. injection of etanercept reduced inflammation-induced spinal JNK activity. Here we show that spinal JNK activity is dependent on TNF and that both TNF and the JNK signalling pathways modulate pain-like behaviour induced by peripheral inflammation. © 2014 The Authors. European Journal of Pain published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of European Pain Federation - EFIC®.

  4. Spinal trauma. Pathophysiology and management of traumatic spinal injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shores, A

    1992-07-01

    Spinal trauma can originate from internal or external sources. Injuries to the spinal cord can be classified as either concussive or compressive and concussive. The pathophysiologic events surrounding spinal cord injury include the primary injury (compression, concussion) and numerous secondary injury mechanisms (vascular, biochemical, electrolyte), which are mediated by excessive oxygen free radicles, neurotransmitter and electrolyte alterations in cell membrane permeability, excitotoxic amino acids, and various other biochemical factors that collectively result in reduced SCBF, ischemia, and eventual necrosis of the gray and white matter. Management of acute spinal cord injuries includes the use of a high-dose corticosteroid regimen within the initial 8 hours after trauma. Sodium prednisolone and methylprednisolone, at recommended doses, act as oxygen radical scavengers and are anti-inflammatory. Additional considerations are the stability of the vertebral column, other conditions associated with trauma (i.e., pneumothorax), and the presence or absence of spinal cord compression, which may warrant surgical therapy. Vertebral fractures or luxations can occur in any area of the spine but most commonly occur at the junction of mobile and immobile segments. Dorsal and dorsolateral surgical approaches are applicable to the lumbosacral and thoracolumbar spine and dorsal and ventral approaches to the cervical spine. Indications for surgical intervention include spinal cord compression and vertebral instability. Instability can be determined from the type of fracture, how many of the three compartments of the vertebrae are disrupted, and on occasion, by carefully positioned stress studies of fluoroscopy. Decompression (dorsal laminectomy, hemilaminectomy, or ventral cervical slot) is employed when compression of the spinal cord exists. The hemilaminectomy (unilateral or bilateral) causes less instability than dorsal laminectomy and therefore should be used when practical

  5. Light distribution properties in spinal cord for optogenetic stimulation (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    GÄ secka, Alicja; Bahdine, Mohamed; Lapointe, Nicolas; Rioux, Veronique; Perez-Sanchez, Jimena; Bonin, Robert P.; De Koninck, Yves; Côté, Daniel

    2016-03-01

    Optogenetics is currently one of the most popular technique in neuroscience. It enables cell-selective and temporally-precise control of neuronal activity. Good spatial control of the stimulated area and minimized tissue damage requires a specific knowledge about light scattering properties. Light propagation in cell cultures and brain tissue is relatively well documented and allows for a precise and reliable delivery of light to the neurons. In spinal cord, light must pass through highly organized white matter before reaching cell bodies present in grey matter, this heterogenous structure makes it difficult to predict the propagation pattern. In this work we investigate the light distribution properties through mouse and monkey spinal cord. The light propagation depends on a fibers orientation, leading to less deep penetration profile in the direction perpendicular to the fibers and lower attenuation in the direction parallel to the fibers. Additionally, the use of different illumination wavelengths results in variations of the attenuation coefficient. Next, we use Monte-Carlo simulation to study light transport. The model gives a full 3-D simulation of light distribution in spinal cord and takes into account different scattering properties related to the fibers orientation. These studies are important to estimate the minimum optical irradiance required at the fiber tip to effectively excite the optogenetic proteins in a desired region of spinal cord.

  6. Simulation in spinal diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aso Escario, José; Martínez Quiñones, José Vicente; Aso Vizán, Alberto; Arregui Calvo, Ricardo; Bernal Lafuente, Marta; Alcázar Crevillén, Andrés

    2014-01-01

    Simulation is frequent in spinal disease, resulting in problems for specialists like Orthopedic Surgeons, Neurosurgeons, Reumathologists, etc. Simulation requires demonstration of the intentional production of false or exaggerated symptoms following an external incentive. The clinician has difficulties in demonstrating these criteria, resulting in misdiagnosis of simulation or misinterpretation of the normal patient as a simulator, with the possibility of iatrogenic distress and litigation. We review simulation-related problems in spine, proposing a terminological, as well as a diagnostic strategy including clinical and complementary diagnosis, as a way to avoid misinterpretation and minimize the iatrogenic distress and liability Based on the clinical-Forensic author's expertise, the literature is analyzed and the terminology readdressed to develop new terms (inconsistences, incongruences, discrepancies and contradictions). Clinical semiology and complementary test are adapted to the new scenario. Diagnostic strategy relies on anamnesis, clinical and complementary tests, adapting them to a uniform terminology with clear meaning of signs and symptoms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. FAQs about Spinal Cord Injury (SCI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What is paralysis? What is paraplegia? What is tetraplegia? What is a “complete” spinal cord injury? What ... What is paralysis? What is paraplegia? What is tetraplegia? What is a “complete” spinal cord injury? What ...

  8. Spinal Manipulation for Low-Back Pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the United States—including lost wages and reduced productivity—are more than $100 billion. About Spinal Manipulation ... one or both legs, and bowel or bladder problems, may be an extremely rare complication of spinal ...

  9. How Is Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Research Information Find a Study Resources and Publications Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Condition Information NICHD Research Information Find a ... Care Providers Home Health A to Z List Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Condition Information How is it diagnosed? Share ...

  10. Suicide in a spinal cord injured population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hartkopp, A; Brønnum-Hansen, Henrik; Seidenschnur, A M

    1998-01-01

    To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI).......To determine the relation between functional status and risk of suicide among individuals with spinal cord injury (SCI)....

  11. Pericytes Make Spinal Cord Breathless after Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Viviani M; Paiva, Ana E; Sena, Isadora F G; Mintz, Akiva; Magno, Luiz Alexandre V; Birbrair, Alexander

    2017-09-01

    Traumatic spinal cord injury is a devastating condition that leads to significant neurological deficits and reduced quality of life. Therapeutic interventions after spinal cord lesions are designed to address multiple aspects of the secondary damage. However, the lack of detailed knowledge about the cellular and molecular changes that occur after spinal cord injury restricts the design of effective treatments. Li and colleagues using a rat model of spinal cord injury and in vivo microscopy reveal that pericytes play a key role in the regulation of capillary tone and blood flow in the spinal cord below the site of the lesion. Strikingly, inhibition of specific proteins expressed by pericytes after spinal cord injury diminished hypoxia and improved motor function and locomotion of the injured rats. This work highlights a novel central cellular population that might be pharmacologically targeted in patients with spinal cord trauma. The emerging knowledge from this research may provide new approaches for the treatment of spinal cord injury.

  12. How Is Spinal Cord Injury (SCI) Diagnosed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a pinprick. Doctors use the standard ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) Impairment Scale for this diagnosis. X-rays, ... National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. (2012). Spinal cord injury: Hope through research . Retrieved June 26, 2012, from ...

  13. Case report: humero-spinal dysostosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, M J; Gaines, P A; Levick, R K

    1994-11-01

    We report a case of humero-spinal dysostosis which is only the fourth reported in the literature. The condition is characterized by distal bifurcation of humeri, elbow joint dislocation, spinal malformation, widened iliac bones and talipes equinovarus.

  14. Stem Cells in Spinal Fusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Michael A; Haudenschild, Dominik R; Wegner, Adam M; Klineberg, Eric O

    2017-12-01

    Review of literature. This review of literature investigates the application of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in spinal fusion, highlights potential uses in the development of bone grafts, and discusses limitations based on both preclinical and clinical models. A review of literature was conducted looking at current studies using stem cells for augmentation of spinal fusion in both animal and human models. Eleven preclinical studies were found that used various animal models. Average fusion rates across studies were 59.8% for autograft and 73.7% for stem cell-based grafts. Outcomes included manual palpation and stressing of the fusion, radiography, micro-computed tomography (μCT), and histological analysis. Fifteen clinical studies, 7 prospective and 8 retrospective, were found. Fusion rates ranged from 60% to 100%, averaging 87.1% in experimental groups and 87.2% in autograft control groups. It appears that there is minimal clinical difference between commercially available stem cells and bone marrow aspirates indicating that MSCs may be a good choice in a patient with poor marrow quality. Overcoming morbidity and limitations of autograft for spinal fusion, remains a significant problem for spinal surgeons and further studies are needed to determine the efficacy of stem cells in augmenting spinal fusion.

  15. Extramedullary spinal cysts in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowrie, Mark L; Platt, Simon R; Garosi, Laurent S

    2014-08-01

    To (1) synthesize the terminology used to classify extramedullary spinal cysts in dogs to clarify some of the commonly reported misconceptions, and (2) propose a classification scheme to limit confusion with terminology. Literature review. An online bibliographic search was performed in January 2013 for articles relating to extramedullary spinal cysts in dogs using PubMed (http://www.pubmed.gov/) and Google Scholar (http://scholar.google.com/) databases. Only peer-reviewed clinical literature describing cystic lesions pertaining to the spinal cord and associated structures was included. From 1962 to 2013, 42 articles were identified; 25 (95 dogs) reported meningeal cysts, 10 (24 dogs) described 60 extradural cysts, 3 reports (18 dogs) described discal cysts or acute compressive hydrated nucleus pulposus extrusions (HNPE). Spinal cysts were categorized by location based on cross-sectional imaging as meningeal or extradural non-meningeal. Sub-classification was then performed based on surgical findings and pathology. Meningeal cysts included arachnoid diverticulae and Tarlov (perineural) cysts. Extradural non-meningeal cysts included intraspinal cysts of the vertebral joints, ligaments and discs. Discal cysts also fit this category and have been reported extensively in humans but appear rare in dogs. Extramedullary spinal cysts should be first classified according to location with a sub-classification according to pathologic and surgical findings. Previous canine cases of discal cysts appear to represent a different disease entity and the term acute compressive HNPE is therefore preferred. © Copyright 2014 by The American College of Veterinary Surgeons.

  16. Spinal infection: Evaluation with MR imaging and intraoperative spinal US

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Donovan Post, M.J.; Montalvo, B.M.; Quencer, R.M.; Katz, B.H.; Green, B.A.; Elsmont, F.

    1987-01-01

    MR spine images and/or intraoperative US scans in 15 patients were reviewed retrospectively and correlated with clinical and pathologic data to determine the diagnostic value of these modalities in spinal infection. In osteomyelitis and retrospinal abscess MR imaging was definitive; in myelitis it was positive but nonspecific. In epidural abscess concomitant with meningitis, myelography with CT and intraoperative US were superior to MR imaging. Intraoperative US could be used to distinguish these processes and to monitor surgical decompression. The authors recommend that MR imaging be performed at the screening examination in cases of spinal infection, accompanied by intraoperative US in all surgical cases

  17. Unusual causes of spinal foraminal widening

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zibis, A.H.; Markonis, A.; Karantanas, A.H.

    2000-01-01

    Spinal neural foraminal widening is usually caused by benign lesions, most commonly neurofibromas. Rare lesions can also cause spinal neural foraminal widening. Computed tomography and/or MRI are the modalities of choice for studying the spinal foraminal widening. The present pictorial review describes six rare lesions, namely a lateral thoracic meningocele, a malignant fibrous histiocytoma, a tuberculous abscess, an osteoblastoma, a chondrosarcoma and a malignant tumour of the lung which caused spinal neural foraminal widening. (orig.)

  18. Functional outcome after a spinal fracture

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Post, Richard Bernardus

    2008-01-01

    This thesis takes a closer look at the functional outcome after a spinal fracture. An introduction to different aspects regarding spinal fractures is presented in Chapter 1. The incidence of traumatic thoracolumbar spinal fractures without neurological deficit in the Netherlands is approximately 1.2

  19. Spinal cord involvement in tuberculous meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, R K; Malhotra, H S; Gupta, R

    2015-09-01

    To summarize the incidence and spectrum of spinal cord-related complications in patients of tuberculous meningitis. Reports from multiple countries were included. An extensive review of the literature, published in English, was carried out using Scopus, PubMed and Google Scholar databases. Tuberculous meningitis frequently affects the spinal cord and nerve roots. Initial evidence of spinal cord involvement came from post-mortem examination. Subsequent advancement in neuroimaging like conventional lumbar myelography, computed tomographic myelography and gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance-myelography have contributed immensely. Spinal involvement manifests in several forms, like tuberculous radiculomyelitis, spinal tuberculoma, myelitis, syringomyelia, vertebral tuberculosis and very rarely spinal tuberculous abscess. Frequently, tuberculous spinal arachnoiditis develops paradoxically. Infrequently, spinal cord involvement may even be asymptomatic. Spinal cord and spinal nerve involvement is demonstrated by diffuse enhancement of cord parenchyma, nerve roots and meninges on contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging. High cerebrospinal fluid protein content is often a risk factor for arachnoiditis. The most important differential diagnosis of tuberculous arachnoiditis is meningeal carcinomatosis. Anti-tuberculosis therapy is the main stay of treatment for tuberculous meningitis. Higher doses of corticosteroids have been found effective. Surgery should be considered only when pathological confirmation is needed or there is significant spinal cord compression. The outcome in these patients has been unpredictable. Some reports observed excellent recovery and some reported unfavorable outcomes after surgical decompression and debridement. Tuberculous meningitis is frequently associated with disabling spinal cord and radicular complications. Available treatment options are far from satisfactory.

  20. Spinal cord injuries in Ilorin, Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    passenger and load carriage, use of manual or motorised wheel barrow as against bearing heavy load on the head, principles of moving spinal injured patients taught every road traveller and establishment of spinal centres and training of specialised personnel. Keywords: Spinal Cord, Injury, Poraplegia, Quadriplegia.

  1. Historical perspective: history of spinal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knoeller, S M; Seifried, C

    2000-11-01

    The surgical treatment of spinal disorders did not develop before the 1970s of the last century. Previously limited technical possibilities and the danger of infections spinal surgery could not spread wider. This article reviews the history of spinal surgery from first trials as mentioned in the papyrus Smith in 1550 B.C. in Egypt to advanced techniques of today.

  2. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  3. Recurrent Primary Spinal Hydatid Cyst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Okan Turk

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Primary hydatid disease of spine is rare and spinal hydatitosis constitute only 1% of all hydatitosis. We report a case of recurrent primary intraspinal extradural hydatid cyst of the thoracic region causing progressive paraparesis. The patient was operated 16 years ago for primary spinal hydatid disease involvement and was instrumented dorsally for stabilization. The magnetic resonance imaging (MRI of thoracic spine showed a cystic lesion at T11-12 level and compressed spinal cord posterolaterally. Intraspinal cyst was excised through T11-12 laminectomy which made formerly. The early postoperative period showed a progressive improvement of his neurological deficit and he was discharged with antihelmintic treatment consisting of albendazole and amoxicillin-sulbactam combination. [Cukurova Med J 2015; 40(Suppl 1: 84-89

  4. Hydralazine inhibits compression and acrolein-mediated injuries in ex vivo spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamann, Kristin; Nehrt, Genevieve; Ouyang, Hui; Duerstock, Brad; Shi, Riyi

    2008-02-01

    We have previously shown that acrolein, a lipid peroxidation byproduct, is significantly increased following spinal cord injury in vivo, and that exposure to neuronal cells results in oxidative stress, mitochondrial dysfunction, increased membrane permeability, impaired axonal conductivity, and eventually cell death. Acrolein thus may be a key player in the pathogenesis of spinal cord injury, where lipid peroxidation is known to be involved. The current study demonstrates that the acrolein scavenger hydralazine protects against not only acrolein-mediated injury, but also compression in guinea pig spinal cord ex vivo. Specifically, hydralazine (500 mumol/L to 1 mmol/L) can significantly alleviate acrolein (100-500 mumol/L)-induced superoxide production, glutathione depletion, mitochondrial dysfunction, loss of membrane integrity, and reduced compound action potential conduction. Additionally, 500 mumol/L hydralazine significantly attenuated compression-mediated membrane disruptions at 2 and 3 h following injury. This was consistent with our findings that acrolein-lys adducts were increased following compression injury ex vivo, an effect that was prevented by hydralazine treatment. These findings provide further evidence for the role of acrolein in spinal cord injury, and suggest that acrolein-scavenging drugs such as hydralazine may represent a novel therapy to effectively reduce oxidative stress in disorders such as spinal cord injury and neurodegenerative diseases, where oxidative stress is known to play a role.

  5. Spinal Microgliosis Due to Resident Microglial Proliferation Is Required for Pain Hypersensitivity after Peripheral Nerve Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nan Gu

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve injury causes neuropathic pain accompanied by remarkable microgliosis in the spinal cord dorsal horn. However, it is still debated whether infiltrated monocytes contribute to injury-induced expansion of the microglial population. Here, we found that spinal microgliosis predominantly results from local proliferation of resident microglia but not from infiltrating monocytes after spinal nerve transection (SNT by using two genetic mouse models (CCR2RFP/+:CX3CR1GFP/+ and CX3CR1creER/+:R26tdTomato/+ mice as well as specific staining of microglia and macrophages. Pharmacological inhibition of SNT-induced microglial proliferation correlated with attenuated neuropathic pain hypersensitivities. Microglial proliferation is partially controlled by purinergic and fractalkine signaling, as CX3CR1−/− and P2Y12−/− mice show reduced spinal microglial proliferation and neuropathic pain. These results suggest that local microglial proliferation is the sole source of spinal microgliosis, which represents a potential therapeutic target for neuropathic pain management.

  6. Intradural spinal neurocysticercosis: case illustration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balderrama Jorge

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Neurocysticercosis (NCC is a common parasitic infection of the central nervous system caused by the larvae of the Taenia solium. Spinal cord involvement is very uncommon. Clinical case: A female patient with a history of NCC presented with chronic and recurrent headache associated with motor and sensory deficit, which develops tonic-clonic convulsion, with spatial disorientation. She also had intracranial hypertension syndrome, meningitis syndrome, and pyramidal sygns suggestive of spinal NCC. Conclusions: Neurocysticercosis usually occurs in developing countries and should be considered as a differential diagnosis of neurological diseases. Early diagnosis and treatment are mandatory, as well as education to the community to primary prevention.

  7. [Spinal column: implants and revisions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieg, S M; Meyer, H S; Meyer, B

    2016-03-01

    Non-fusion spinal implants are designed to reduce the commonly occurring risks and complications of spinal fusion surgery, e.g. long duration of surgery, high blood loss, screw loosening and adjacent segment disease, by dynamic or movement preserving approaches. This principle could be shown for interspinous spacers, cervical and lumbar total disc replacement and dynamic stabilization; however, due to the continuing high rate of revision surgery, the indications for surgery require as much attention and evidence as comparative data on the surgical technique itself.

  8. Influence of internal fixation systems on radiation therapy for spinal tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jingfeng; Yan, Lei; Wang, Jianping; Cai, Lin; Hu, Dongcai

    2015-07-08

    In this study, the influence of internal fixation systems on radiation therapy for spinal tumor was investigated in order to derive a theoretical basis for adjustment of radiation dose for patients with spinal tumor and internal fixation. Based on a common method of internal fixation after resection of spinal tumor, different models of spinal internal fixation were constructed using the lumbar vertebra of fresh domestic pigs and titanium alloy as the internal fixation system. Variations in radiation dose in the vertebral body and partial spinal cord in different types of internal fixation were studied under the same radiation condition (6 MV and 600 mGy) in different fixation models and compared with those irradiated based on the treatment planning system (TPS). Our results showed that spinal internal fixation materials have great impact on the radiation dose absorbed by spinal tumors. Under the same radiation condition, the influence of anterior internal fixation material or combined anterior and posterior approach on radiation dose at the anterior border of the vertebral body was the greatest. Regardless of the kinds of internal fixation method employed, radiation dose at the anterior border of the vertebral body was significantly different from that at other positions. Notably, the influence of posterior internal fixation material on the anterior wall of the vertebral canal was the greatest. X-ray attenuation and scattering should be taken into consideration for most patients with bone metastasis that receive fixation of metal implants. Further evaluation should then be conducted with modified TPS in order to minimize the potentially harmful effects of inappropriate radiation dose.

  9. P2X7 Receptor Mediates Spinal Microglia Activation of Visceral Hyperalgesia in a Rat Model of Chronic Pancreatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pei-Yi; Lee, I-Hui; Tan, Ping-Heng; Wang, Yen-Po; Tsai, Chia-Fen; Lin, Han-Chieh; Lee, Fa-Yauh; Lu, Ching-Liang

    2015-11-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the activated spinal microglia in association with the pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP) remain unknown. We tested whether P2X7R on spinal microglia mediates the pathogenesis of visceral pain using a CP rat model. The CP model was induced via intraductal injection of 2% trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid into male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hyperalgesia was assessed based on the mechanical sensitivity to Von-Frey filaments (VFFs), and nocifensive behaviors were measured in response to electrical stimulation of the pancreas. Three weeks after CP induction, spinal cord samples were harvested for immunostaining, immunoblot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses of the P2X7R. Changes in nocifensive behaviors and associated molecular effectors were assessed by blocking spinal cord P2X7R pharmacologically using the selective P2X7R antagonist brilliant blue G (BBG) or genetically using short interfering RNA (siRNA). CP induced a significant up-regulation of spinal P2X7R expression, which colocalized with a microglial marker (OX-42). Intrathecal administration of BBG significantly attenuated CP-related visceral hyperalgesia in response to VFF-mediated or electrical stimulation of the pancreas, which was associated with suppressed spinal expression of P2X7R and inhibited activation of spinal microglia. Intrathecal injection of siRNA to knock down P2X7R expression in the spinal cord would suppress the nociceptive behaviors in CP rats. Spinal microglia P2X7R mediates central sensitization of chronic visceral pain in CP. BBG may represent an effective drug for the treatment of chronic pain in CP patients.

  10. CT diagnosis of acute spinal injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohhama, Mitsuru; Niimiya, Hikosuke; Kimura, Ko; Yamazaki, Gyoji; Nasu, Yoshiro; Shioya, Akihide

    1982-01-01

    CT pictures of 22 acute spinal injuries with damage of the spinal cord were evaluated. In the cases of spinal cord damage with bone injury, changes in the vertebral canal were fully observed by CT. In some of spinal cord damages without bone injury, narrowing of the vertebral canal was demonstrated by CT combined with CT myelography and reconstruction. Evaluation of CT number showed a high density area in damaged spinal cord in some cases. CT was thus considered to be useful as an adjunct diagnostic aid. (Ueda, J.)

  11. Increased probability of repetitive spinal motoneuron activation by transcranial magnetic stimulation after muscle fatigue in healthy subjects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Birgit; Felding, Ulrik Ascanius; Krarup, Christian

    2012-01-01

    probability of repetitive spinal MN activation during exercise even if some MNs failed to discharge by the brain stimulus. Here we used a modified TST (Quadruple stimulation; QuadS and Quintuple stimulation; QuintS) to examine the influence of fatiguing exercise on second and third MN discharges after...... the muscle is fatigued. Repetitive MN firing may provide an adaptive mechanism to maintain motor unit activation and task performance during sustained voluntary activity.......Triple stimulation technique (TST) has previously shown that transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) fails to activate a proportion of spinal motoneurons (MNs) during motor fatigue. The TST response depression without attenuation of the conventional motor evoked potential suggested increased...

  12. Imaging in spine and spinal cord malformations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rossi, Andrea E-mail: a.rossi@panet.itandrearossi@ospedale-gaslini.ge.it; Biancheri, Roberta; Cama, Armando; Piatelli, Gianluca; Ravegnani, Marcello; Tortori-Donati, Paolo

    2004-05-01

    Spinal and spinal cord malformations are collectively named spinal dysraphisms. They arise from defects occurring in the early embryological stages of gastrulation (weeks 2-3), primary neurulation (weeks 3-4), and secondary neurulation (weeks 5-6). Spinal dysraphisms are categorized into open spinal dysraphisms (OSDs), in which there is exposure of abnormal nervous tissues through a skin defect, and closed spinal dysraphisms (CSD), in which there is a continuous skin coverage to the underlying malformation. Open spinal dysraphisms basically include myelomeningocele and other rare abnormalities such as myelocele and hemimyelo(meningo)cele. Closed spinal dysraphisms are further categorized based on the association with low-back subcutaneous masses. Closed spinal dysraphisms with mass are represented by lipomyelocele, lipomyelomeningocele, meningocele, and myelocystocele. Closed spinal dysraphisms without mass comprise simple dysraphic states (tight filum terminale, filar and intradural lipomas, persistent terminal ventricle, and dermal sinuses) and complex dysraphic states. The latter category further comprises defects of midline notochordal integration (basically represented by diastematomyelia) and defects of segmental notochordal formation (represented by caudal agenesis and spinal segmental dysgenesis). Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is the preferred modality for imaging these complex abnormalities. The use of the aforementioned classification scheme is greatly helpful to make the diagnosis.

  13. Spinal cord injury arising in anaesthesia practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewson, D W; Bedforth, N M; Hardman, J G

    2018-01-01

    Spinal cord injury arising during anaesthetic practice is a rare event, but one that carries a significant burden in terms of morbidity and mortality. In this article, we will review the pathophysiology of spinal cord injury. We will then discuss injuries relating to patient position, spinal cord hypoperfusion and neuraxial techniques. The most serious causes of spinal cord injury - vertebral canal haematoma, spinal epidural abscess, meningitis and adhesive arachnoiditis - will be discussed in turn. For each condition, we draw attention to practical, evidence-based measures clinicians can undertake to reduce their incidence, or mitigate their severity. Finally, we will discuss transient neurological symptoms. Some cases of spinal cord injury during anaesthesia can be ascribed to anaesthesia itself, arising as a direct consequence of its conduct. The injury to a spinal nerve root by inaccurate and/or incautious needling during spinal anaesthesia is an obvious example. But in many cases, spinal cord injury during anaesthesia is not caused by, related to, or even associated with, the conduct of the anaesthetic. Surgical factors, whether direct (e.g. spinal nerve root damage due to incorrect pedicle screw placement) or indirect (e.g. cord ischaemia following aortic surgery) are responsible for a significant proportion of spinal cord injuries that occur concurrently with the delivery of regional or general anaesthesia. © 2018 The Association of Anaesthetists of Great Britain and Ireland.

  14. Spinal cord injury at birth

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fenger-Gron, Jesper; Kock, Kirsten; Nielsen, Rasmus G

    2008-01-01

    UNLABELLED: A case of perinatally acquired spinal cord injury (SCI) is presented. The foetus was vigorous until birth, the breech presented and delivery was performed by a non-traumatic Caesarean section. The infant displayed symptoms of severe SCI but diagnosis was delayed due to severe co...

  15. Spinal cord toxoplasmosis in AIDS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carteret, M.; Petit, E.; Granat, O.; Marichez, M.; Gilquin, J.

    1995-01-01

    Toxoplasmosis is the most common brain parasitic infection in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). Spinal cord localizations are still rare (2 cases with cerebral involvement, 2 cases without). A case of both spinal cord and cerebral involvement is reported. Magnetic resonance imaging (MR imaging) was performed because of sensory level (L 1). A focal conus medullaris enlargement was seen, iso intense on T 1 weighted images. This lesion was hyperintense on T 2 weighted sequence, and was homogeneously enhanced after Gadolinium on T 1 weighted images. A medullary oedema was noted. A toxoplasmosis treatment was initiated, without cortico therapy. MR imaging performed one month later (D 30), while important clinical improvements were seen, pointed out normal thickness of conus medullaris, without enhancement after Gadolinium. Disease lesions in AIDS with focal spinal cord processes are reviewed, and diagnostic work-up is discussed. Spinal cord single lesion, associated or not with brain involvements should be treated as a toxoplasmic infection, with MR imaging follow up. This work up should avoid medullary biopsy, still required in case of treatment failure. Cerebral involvements, with multiples lesions can mask medullary localization. (authors). 8 refs., 2 figs

  16. Controlled hypotension for spinal surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Dutton, Richard P.

    2004-01-01

    Controlled, deliberate hypotension during anesthesia for major spinal surgery reduces intraoperative blood loss and transfusion requirement. Hypotension may be achieved with increased doses of volatile anesthetic agents or by continuous infusion of vasodilating drugs. Safe application of this technique requires knowledge of the physiology of hemorrhagic shock and close intraoperative monitoring to avoid vasoconstriction and end-organ ischemia.

  17. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N.; Imhof, H.

    2006-01-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  18. Early afferent activity from the facet joint after painful trauma to its capsule potentiates neuronal excitability and glutamate signaling in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosby, Nathan D; Gilliland, Taylor M; Winkelstein, Beth A

    2014-09-01

    Cervical facet joint injury induces persistent pain and central sensitization. Preventing the peripheral neuronal signals that initiate sensitization attenuates neuropathic pain. Yet, there is no clear relationship among facet joint afferent activity, development of central sensitization, and pain, which may be hindering effective treatments for this pain syndrome. This study investigates how afferent activity from the injured cervical facet joint affects induction of behavioral sensitivity and central sensitization. Intra-articular bupivacaine was administered to transiently suppress afferent activity immediately or 4 days after facet injury. Mechanical hyperalgesia was monitored after injury, and spinal neuronal hyperexcitability and spinal expression of proteins that promote neuronal excitability were measured on day 7. Facet injury with saline vehicle treatment induced significant mechanical hyperalgesia (Pinjury significantly attenuated hyperalgesia (Pinjury. This study suggests that early afferent activity from the injured facet induces development of spinal sensitization via spinal excitatory glutamatergic signaling. Peripheral intervention blocking afferent activity is effective only over a short period of time early after injury and before spinal modifications develop, and is independent of modulating spinal glial activation. Copyright © 2014 International Association for the Study of Pain. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Glial TNFα in the spinal cord regulates neuropathic pain induced by HIV gp120 application in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ouyang Handong

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-associated sensory neuropathy (HIV-SN is one of the most common forms of peripheral neuropathy, affecting about 30% of people with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS. The symptoms of HIV-SN are dominated by neuropathic pain. Glia activation in the spinal cord has become an attractive target for attenuating chronic pain. This study will investigate the role of spinal TNFα released from glia in HIV-related neuropathic pain. Results Peripheral gp120 application into the rat sciatic nerve induced mechanical allodynia for more than 7 weeks, and upregulated the expression of spinal TNFα in the mRNA and the protein levels at 2 weeks after gp120 application. Spinal TNFα was colocalized with GFAP (a marker of astrocytes and Iba1 (a marker of microglia in immunostaining, suggesting that glia produce TNFα in the spinal cord in this model. Peripheral gp120 application also increased TNFα in the L4/5 DRG. Furthermore, intrathecal administration of TNFα siRNA or soluble TNF receptor reduced gp120 application-induced mechanical allodynia. Conclusions Our results indicate that TNFα in the spinal cord and the DRG are involved in neuropathic pain, following the peripheral HIV gp120 application, and that blockade of the glial product TNFα reverses neuropathic pain induced by HIV gp120 application.

  20. Attenuation in Superconducting Circular Waveguides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. H. Yeap

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We present an analysis on wave propagation in superconducting circular waveguides. In order to account for the presence of quasiparticles in the intragap states of a superconductor, we employ the characteristic equation derived from the extended Mattis-Bardeen theory to compute the values of the complex conductivity. To calculate the attenuation in a circular waveguide, the tangential fields at the boundary of the wall are first matched with the electrical properties (which includes the complex conductivity of the wall material. The matching of fields with the electrical properties results in a set of transcendental equations which is able to accurately describe the propagation constant of the fields. Our results show that although the attenuation in the superconducting waveguide above cutoff (but below the gap frequency is finite, it is considerably lower than that in a normal waveguide. Above the gap frequency, however, the attenuation in the superconducting waveguide increases sharply. The attenuation eventually surpasses that in a normal waveguide. As frequency increases above the gap frequency, Cooper pairs break into quasiparticles. Hence, we attribute the sharp rise in attenuation to the increase in random collision of the quasiparticles with the lattice structure.

  1. Neuroimaging for spine and spinal cord surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyanagi, Izumi [Hokkaido Neurosurgical Memorial Hospital (Japan); Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Hida, Kazutoshi

    2001-01-01

    Recent advances in neuroimaging of the spine and spinal cord are described based upon our clinical experiences with spinal disorders. Preoperative neuroradiological examinations, including magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and computerized tomography (CT) with three-dimensional reconstruction (3D-CT), were retrospectively analyzed in patients with cervical spondylosis or ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament (130 cases), spinal trauma (43 cases) and intramedullary spinal cord tumors (92 cases). CT scan and 3D-CT were useful in elucidating the spine pathology associated with degenerative and traumatic spine diseases. Visualization of the deformity of the spine or fracture-dislocation of the spinal column with 3D-CT helped to determine the correct surgical treatment. MR imaging was most important in the diagnosis of both spine and spinal cord abnormalities. The axial MR images of the spinal cord were essential in understanding the laterality of the spinal cord compression in spinal column disorders and in determining surgical approaches to the intramedullary lesions. Although non-invasive diagnostic modalities such as MR imaging and CT scans are adequate for deciding which surgical treatment to use in the majority of spine and spinal cord disorders, conventional myelography is still needed in the diagnosis of nerve root compression in some cases of cervical spondylosis. (author)

  2. Comparisons of MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hong, Myung Sun; Lee, Kil Woo; Kang, Ik Won; Yun, Ku Sub; Choi, Chul Sun; Bae, Sang Hoon

    1994-01-01

    MR findings of the spinal metastasis and the tuberculosis are well known, but sometimes it might be difficult to differentiate these lesions. Therefore we reviewed and analyzed the MR findings which would be useful for the differentiation. T1- and T2- weighted spin echo images and gadolinium-enhanced T1- weighted images were obtained with 1.5 T and 1.0 T superconductive MR imager. We reviewed MR findings in 16 cases of spinal metastases and 24 cases of spinal tuberculosis in terms of signal intensity, contrast enhancement pattern, disc space involvement, spinal canal compressing feature and paraspinal soft tissue mass. The signal intensities of both lesions were hypointense on T1WI and hyperintense on T2WI except those of the metastatic lesions from the prostatic carcinoma. Heterogeneous enhancement was noted in 63% of metastasis, whereas peripheral rim enhancement was noted 83% of spinal tuberculosis(p < .001). Spinal canal compression by collapsed vertebra was only noted in spinal metastasis, and that by paraspinal soft tissue was noted in both spinal metastasis and tuberculosis(p<.001). Disc space invasion was noted in 19% of spinal metastasis and 88% of spinal tuberculosis. Spinal tuberculosis was common at lower thoracic spine(T10) and typically involved two or more adjacent vertebral bodies(96%). The important differential point between spinal metastasis and tuberculosis was the enhancement pattern, involvement of two or more contiguous vertebral bodies and the feature of spinal canal compressing. The secondary importance was the disc space involvement pattern

  3. Prolonged spinal myoclonus following spinal anaesthesia with bupivacaine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal myoclonus occurring after spinal anaesthesia is very rare and characterised by sudden involuntary jerks of the back and limbs. A 34 year old male without any comorbidities underwent a subarachnoid block with bupivacaine heavy for laminectomy of L4-L5. Within minutes he developed pain and severe myoclonic jerks of lower back radiating to lower and upper limbs which lasted for 48 hours. Another 65 year old obese lady, known diabetic and hypertensive who presented for a percutaneous nephrolithotomy underwent an epidural catheter placement at L2-L3 and a subarachnoid block with bupivacaine heavy at L3-L4. Within minutes she developed severe myoclonic jerks of the lower limbs and back radiating to upper limbs which again lasted for 48 hours. Both cases ofprolonged acute propriospinal myoclonus following subarachnoid block occurred within a period of six months at a tertiary care centre and were managed with sedation, muscle relaxation, mechanical ventilation and anti epileptics.

  4. Josephson tunnel junction microwave attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koshelets, V. P.; Shitov, S. V.; Shchukin, A. V.

    1993-01-01

    A new element for superconducting electronic circuitry-a variable attenuator-has been proposed, designed, and successfully tested. The principle of operation is based on the change in the microwave impedance of a superconductor-insulator-superconductor (SIS) Josephson tunnel junction when dc biased...... at different points in the current-voltage characteristic. Both numerical calculations based on the Tien-Gordon theory and 70-GHz microwave experiments have confirmed the wide dynamic range (more than 15-dB attenuation for one stage) and the low insertion loss in the ''open'' state. The performance of a fully...... integrated submillimeter receiver circuit which comprises a flux-flow oscillator (FFO) as local oscillator, a superconducting variable attenuator, and a microwave SIS detector with tuned-out capacitance is also reported....

  5. Spinal cord injury, dendritic spine remodeling, and spinal memory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Andrew M; Waxman, Stephen G

    2012-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) often results in the development of neuropathic pain, which can persist for months and years after injury. Although many aberrant changes to sensory processing contribute to the development of chronic pain, emerging evidence demonstrates that mechanisms similar to those underlying classical learning and memory can contribute to central sensitization, a phenomenon of amplified responsiveness to stimuli in nociceptive dorsal horn neurons. Notably, dendritic spines have emerged as major players in learning and memory, providing a structural substrate for how the nervous system modifies connections to form and store information. Until now, most information regarding dendritic spines has been obtained from studies in the brain. Recent experimental data in the spinal cord, however, demonstrate that Rac1-regulated dendritic spine remodeling occurs on second-order wide dynamic range neurons and accompanies neuropathic pain after SCI. Thus, SCI-induced synaptic potentiation engages a putative spinal memory mechanism. A compelling, novel possibility for pain research is that a synaptic model of long-term memory storage could explain the persistent nature of neuropathic pain. Such a conceptual bridge between pain and memory could guide the development of more effective strategies for treatment of chronic pain after injury to the nervous system. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The LCLS Gas Attenuator Revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryutov, D

    2005-01-01

    In the report ''X-ray attenuation cell'' [1] a preliminary analysis of the gas attenuator for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS) was presented. This analysis was carried out for extremely stringent set of specifications. In particular, a very large diameter for the unobstructed beam was set (1 cm) to accommodate the spontaneous radiation; the attenuator was supposed to cover the whole range of energies of the coherent radiation, from 800 eV to 8000 eV; the maximum attenuation was set at the level of 10 4 ; the use of solid attenuators was not allowed, as well as the use of rotating shutters. The need to reach a sufficient absorption at the high-energy end of the spectrum predetermined the choice of Xe as the working gas (in order to have a reasonable absorption at a not-too-high pressure). A sophisticated differential pumping system that included a Penning-type ion pump was suggested in order to minimize the gas leak into the undulator/accelerator part of the facility. A high cost of xenon meant also that an efficient (and expensive) gas-recovery system would have to be installed. The main parameter that determined the high cost and the complexity of the system was a large radius of the orifice. The present viewpoint allows for much smaller size of the orifice, r 0 = 1.5 mm. (1) The use of solid attenuators is also allowed (R.M. Bionta, private communication). It is, therefore, worthwhile to reconsider various parameters of the gas attenuator for these much less stringent conditions. This brief study should be considered as a physics input for the engineering design. As a working gas we consider now the argon, which, on the one hand, provides a reasonable absorption lengths and, on the other hand, is inexpensive enough to be exhausted into the atmosphere (no recovery). The absorption properties of argon are illustrated by Fig.1 where the attenuation factor A is shown for various beam energies, based on Ref. [2]. The other relevant parameters for argon are

  7. Axon-somatic back-propagation in detailed models of spinal alpha motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro eBalbi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Antidromic action potentials following distal stimulation of motor axons occasionally fail to invade the soma of alpha motoneurons in spinal cord, due to their passing through regions of high non-uniformity.Morphologically detailed conductance-based models of cat spinal alpha motoneurons have been developed, with the aim to reproduce and clarify some aspects of the electrophysiological behavior of the antidromic axon-somatic spike propagation. Fourteen 3D morphologically detailed somata and dendrites of cat spinal alpha motoneurons have been imported from an open-access web-based database of neuronal morphologies, NeuroMorpho.org, and instantiated in neurocomputational models. An axon hillock, an axonal initial segment and a myelinated axon are added to each model.By sweeping the diameter of the axonal initial segment (AIS and the axon hillock, as well as the maximal conductances of sodium channels at the AIS and at the soma, the developed models are able to show the relationships between different geometric and electrophysiological configurations and the voltage attenuation of the antidromically travelling wave.In particular, a greater than usually admitted sodium conductance at AIS is necessary and sufficient to overcome the dramatic voltage attenuation occurring during antidromic spike propagation both at the myelinated axon-AIS and at the AIS-soma transitions.

  8. Involvement of spinal glutamate transporter-1 in the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia associated with type 2 diabetes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shi J

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Jinshan Shi,1,* Ke Jiang,2,* Zhaoduan Li,3 1Department of Anesthesiology, Guizhou Provincial People’s Hospital, 2Department of Anesthesiology, The Affiliated Hospital of Guizhou Medical University, Guiyang, 3Department of Anesthesiology, Tianjin Nankai Hospital, Tianjin, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Little is known about the effects of the development of type 2 diabetes on glutamate homeostasis in the spinal cord. Therefore, we quantified the extracellular levels of glutamate in the spinal cord of Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF rats using in vivo microdialysis. In addition, protein levels of glutamate transporter-1 (GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were measured using Western blot. Finally, the effects of repeated intrathecal injections of ceftriaxone, which was previously shown to enhance GLT-1 expression, on the development of mechanical allodynia and hyperalgesia as well as on basal extracellular level of glutamate and the expression of GLT-1 in the spinal cord of ZDF rats were evaluated. It was found that ZDF rats developed mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia, which were associated with increased basal extracellular levels of glutamate and attenuated levels of GLT-1 expression in the spinal cord, particularly in the dorsal horn. Furthermore, repeated intrathecal administrations of ceftriaxone dose-dependently prevented the development of mechanical hyperalgesia and allodynia in ZDF rats, which were correlated with enhanced GLT-1 expression without altering the basal glutamate levels in the spinal cord of ZDF rats. Overall, the results suggested that impaired glutamate reuptake in the spinal cord may contribute to the development of neuropathic pains in type 2 diabetes. Keywords: diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, spinal cord, Zucker diabetic fatty rats, glutamate, glutamate transporter-1

  9. Spinal pseudarthrosis in ankylosing spondylitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan, F.L.; Ho, E.K.W.; Fang, D.; Hsu, L.C.S.; Leong, J.C.Y.; Ngan, H.

    Spinal pseudarthrosis is an important mechanical complication in longstanding ankylosing spondylitis. Thirty-five patients with 40 lesions were studied. Three lesions through vertebral bodies resulted from complete fractures. The rest occured at interspaces, more common at the lower thoracic and upper lumbar segments. Double pseudarthrotic lesions were observed in 5 patients. Progressive osteolysis of the anterior elements was prominent, with variable sclerosis, osteophytes, vacuum phenomenon, subluxation and fragmentation. A posterior element weak link, as a bony break or facet joint non-fusion, was an essential component in every lesion, playing an initiating or perpetuating role in its pathogenesis. Mechanical derangement from trauma, severe round kyphosis, spondylodiscitis, hip disease, spinal operation and unusual activities may be contributing factors. Initial treatment is conservative, but 16 patients required operative stabilisation.

  10. Computed tomography in spinal osteoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torricelli, P.; Martinelli, P.; Boriani, S.; Ferraro, A.

    1986-01-01

    In order to stress the role of computed tomography (CT) in the evaluation of benign spinal osteoblastoma, the authors examined by CT 10 patients with surgically and histologically proved osteoblastomas of the spine. Basing on surgical and histopathological findings CT proved to be a very important method for attesting the presence of the tumors (usually showed by radiographic examination), and specially for their staging and follow-up. CT in fact showed the real extent of the tumor into the spinal canal and towards the paraspinal soft tissues, and allowed the aerly detection of post surgical relapses. The authors conclude that CT is a primary diagnostic modality for preoperative planning and follow-up of benign osteoblastoma

  11. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon [University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Sang Jin [Sanggyepaik Hospital, Inje University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-12-15

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance ({rho} > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury.

  12. Non-contiguous spinal injury in cervical spinal trauma: evaluation with cervical spine MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Soo Jung; Shin, Myung Jin; Kim, Sung Moon; Bae, Sang Jin

    2004-01-01

    We wished to evaluate the incidence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the cervicothoracic junction (CTJ) or the upper thoracic spines on cervical spinal MR images in the patients with cervical spinal injuries. Seventy-five cervical spine MR imagings for acute cervical spinal injury were retrospectively reviewed (58 men and 17 women, mean age: 35.3, range: 18-81 years). They were divided into three groups based on the mechanism of injury; axial compression, hyperflexion or hyperextension injury, according to the findings on the MR and CT images. On cervical spine MR images, we evaluated the presence of non-contiguous spinal injury in the CTJ or upper thoracic spine with regard to the presence of marrow contusion or fracture, ligament injury, traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury. Twenty-one cases (28%) showed CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries (C7-T5) on cervical spinal MR images that were separated from the cervical spinal injuries. Seven of 21 cases revealed overt fractures in the CTJs or upper thoracic spines. Ligament injury in these regions was found in three cases. Traumatic disc herniation and spinal cord injury in these regions were shown in one and two cases, respectively. The incidence of the non-contiguous spinal injuries in CTJ or upper thoracic spines was higher in the axial compression injury group (35.5%) than in the hyperflexion injury group (26.9%) or the hyperextension (25%) injury group. However, there was no statistical significance (ρ > 0.05). Cervical spinal MR revealed non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injuries in 28% of the patients with cervical spinal injury. The mechanism of cervical spinal injury did not significantly affect the incidence of the non-contiguous CTJ or upper thoracic spinal injury

  13. Gain attenuation of gated framing camera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xiao Shali; Liu Shenye; Cao Zhurong; Li Hang; Zhang Haiying; Yuan Zheng; Wang Liwei

    2009-01-01

    The theoretic model of framing camera's gain attenuation is analyzed. The exponential attenuation curve of the gain along the pulse propagation time is simulated. An experiment to measure the coefficient of gain attenuation based on the gain attenuation theory is designed. Experiment result shows that the gain follows an exponential attenuation rule with a quotient of 0.0249 nm -1 , the attenuation coefficient of the pulse is 0.00356 mm -1 . The loss of the pulse propagation along the MCP stripline is the leading reason of gain attenuation. But in the figure of a single stripline, the gain dose not follow the rule of exponential attenuation completely, instead, there is a gain increase at the stripline bottom. That is caused by the reflection of the pulse. The reflectance is about 24.2%. Combining the experiment and theory, which design of the stripline MCP can improved the gain attenuation. (authors)

  14. Tiger mauling: fatal spinal injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohout, M P; Percy, J; Sears, W; Yeo, J D

    1989-06-01

    A 33 year old zoo keeper was attacked by a Sumatran tiger in captivity. Apart from severe lacerations and penetrating wounds to the head and neck, the patient sustained comminuted fractures of C1 and C2 vertebrae with resultant high laceration of the spinal cord. Major vascular injury as well as trauma to pharynx also occurred. The patient survived these injuries for 15 h.

  15. Spinal trauma. An imaging approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassar-Pullicino, V.N. [The Robert Jones and Agnes Hunt Orthopaedic Hospital, Oswestry, Shropshire (United Kingdom). Dept. of Radiology; Imhof, H. [University and General Hospital Vienna (Austria). Dept. of Radiodiagnostics

    2006-07-01

    The diagnosis of trauma to the spine - where the slightest oversight may have catastrophic results - requires a thorough grasp of the spectrum of resultant pathology as well as the imaging modalities used in making an accurate diagnosis. In Spinal Trauma, the internationally renowned team of experts provides a comprehensive, cutting-edge exposition of the current vital role of imaging in the diagnosis and treatment of injuries to the axial skeleton. Beginning with a valuable clinical perspective of spinal trauma, the book offers the reader a unique overview of the biomechanics underlying the pathology of cervical trauma. Acute trauma topics include: - Optimization of imaging modalities - Malalignment - signs and significance - Vertebral fractures - detection and implications - Classification of thoraco-lumbar fractures - rationale and relevance - Neurovascular injury. Distilling decades of clinical and teaching expertise, the contributors further discuss the current role of imaging in special focus topics, which include: - The pediatric spine - Sports injuries - The rigid spine - Trauma in the elderly - Vertebral collapse, benign and malignant - Spinal trauma therapy - Vertebral fractures and osteoporosis - Neuropathic spine. All throughout the book, the focus is on understanding the injury, and its implications and complications, through 'an imaging approach'. Lavishly illustrated with hundreds of superb MR images and CT scans, and clear full-color drawings, the authors conclude with a look into the future, defining clinical trends and research directions. Spinal Trauma - with its broad scope, practical imaging approach, and current focus - is designed to enhance confidence and accuracy, making it essential reading for clinicians and radiologists at all levels. (orig.)

  16. Effectiveness of intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring during spinal surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina А. Kuzmina

    2016-12-01

    Conclusions. The application of IONM minimized the need for the wake-up test and significantly decreased the incidence of neurological complications caused by injury to the spinal cord and spinal roots during execution of spinal manipulations.

  17. Testosterone Plus Finasteride Treatment After Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-14

    Spinal Cord Injury; Spinal Cord Injuries; Trauma, Nervous System; Wounds and Injuries; Central Nervous System Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Spinal Cord Diseases; Gonadal Disorders; Endocrine System Diseases; Hypogonadism; Genital Diseases, Male

  18. Spinal Gap Junction Channels in Neuropathic Pain

    OpenAIRE

    Jeon, Young Hoon; Youn, Dong Ho

    2015-01-01

    Damage to peripheral nerves or the spinal cord is often accompanied by neuropathic pain, which is a complex, chronic pain state. Increasing evidence indicates that alterations in the expression and activity of gap junction channels in the spinal cord are involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Thus, this review briefly summarizes evidence that regulation of the expression, coupling, and activity of spinal gap junction channels modulates pain signals in neuropathic pain states induced...

  19. Spinal cord injury drives chronic brain changes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio Jure

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Only a few studies have considered changes in brain structures other than sensory and motor cortex after spinal cord injury, although cognitive impairments have been reported in these patients. Spinal cord injury results in chronic brain neuroinflammation with consequent neurodegeneration and cognitive decline in rodents. Regarding the hippocampus, neurogenesis is reduced and reactive gliosis increased. These long-term abnormalities could explain behavioral impairments exhibited in humans patients suffering from spinal cord trauma.

  20. Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation in Nepal

    OpenAIRE

    Nabina Shah; Binav Shrestha; Kamana Subba

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord injury is a major trauma, with its short and long term effects and consequences to the patient, his friends and family. Spinal cord injury is addressed in the developed countries with standard trauma care system commencing immediately after injury and continuing to the specialized rehabilitation units. Rehabilitation is important to those with spinal injury for both functional and psychosocial reintegration. It has been an emerging concept in Nepal, which has been evident with the...

  1. Contrast enhanced CT of spinal cord angioma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakamura, Takahiko; Ebitani, Tsutomu; Honma, Takao; Sofue, Muroto; Nakamura, Shigeru

    1982-01-01

    Contrast enhanced CT on 6 patients with spinal cord angioma showed enhancement in 2 of them. The conditions to produce contrast enhancement were the window width of 100 - 200, and the window level of 0 - 50. In spinal cord angioma, contrast enhanced CT is presently only an adjunct to angiography and myelography. Nevertheless, contrast enhanced CT is useful in the screening test for spinal cord angioma, in the patients who are nonindicated to angiography, and in the postoperative follow-up. (Ueda, J.)

  2. Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anil K Jain

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis (TB is an emerging health problem in both developing and developed countries. In this review article, we aim to define management protocols for suspicion, diagnosis, and treatment of such patients. Spinal TB is a deep-seated paucibacillary lesion, and the demonstration of acid-fast bacilli on Ziehl-Neelsen staining is possible only in 10%–30% of cases. Drug resistance is suspected in patients showing the failure of clinicoradiological improvement or appearance of a fresh lesion of osteoarticular TB while on anti tubercular therapy (ATT for a minimum period of 5 months. The conventional culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the gold standard for both bacteriological diagnosis and drug sensitivity testing (DST; however, the high turn around time of 2–6 weeks for detection with added 3 weeks for DST is a major limitation. To overcome this problem, rapid culture methods and molecular methods have been introduced. From a public health perspective, reducing the period between diagnosis and treatment initiation has direct benefits for both the patient and the community. For all patients of drug-resistant spinal TB, a complete Drug-O-Gram should be prepared which includes details of all drugs, their doses, and duration. Patients with confirmed multidrug-resistant TB strains should receive a regimen with at least five effective drugs, including pyrazinamide and one injectable. Patients with resistance to additional antitubercular drugs should receive individualized ATT as per their DST results.

  3. Drug-resistant Spinal Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anil K; Jaggi, Karan Raj; Bhayana, Himanshu; Saha, Rumpa

    2018-01-01

    Drug-resistant spinal tuberculosis (TB) is an emerging health problem in both developing and developed countries. In this review article, we aim to define management protocols for suspicion, diagnosis, and treatment of such patients. Spinal TB is a deep-seated paucibacillary lesion, and the demonstration of acid-fast bacilli on Ziehl-Neelsen staining is possible only in 10%-30% of cases. Drug resistance is suspected in patients showing the failure of clinicoradiological improvement or appearance of a fresh lesion of osteoarticular TB while on anti tubercular therapy (ATT) for a minimum period of 5 months. The conventional culture of Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains the gold standard for both bacteriological diagnosis and drug sensitivity testing (DST); however, the high turn around time of 2-6 weeks for detection with added 3 weeks for DST is a major limitation. To overcome this problem, rapid culture methods and molecular methods have been introduced. From a public health perspective, reducing the period between diagnosis and treatment initiation has direct benefits for both the patient and the community. For all patients of drug-resistant spinal TB, a complete Drug-O-Gram should be prepared which includes details of all drugs, their doses, and duration. Patients with confirmed multidrug-resistant TB strains should receive a regimen with at least five effective drugs, including pyrazinamide and one injectable. Patients with resistance to additional antitubercular drugs should receive individualized ATT as per their DST results.

  4. Experimental contusion of spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nemecek, S.; Suba, P.

    1982-01-01

    In 34 rabbits with intensive acute spinal trauma caused by an impact, 125 I-labelled human albumin (IHSA) was i.v. administered before injury and the animals were killed after 3 and 24 hours. In another series of experiments, IHSA was administered after injury, i.e., one hour before killing the animals, if they survived, and after 3, 24 and 48 hours. The radioactivity was measured in 1 cm long portions of the spinal cord and compared with serum values. The outflow of plasma from blood vessels was restricted to the site of the injury proper and declined with the period of survival. Exudation was minimal, but still present 48 hours after injury. From this site, as revealed by administration of IHSA before injury, the vasogenic oedema was propagated longitudinally by the spine to neighbouring segments. After 24 hours it proceeded further than after 3 hours. This investigation confirms and supplements former findings pertaining to the microscopic evaluation of spinal trauma after administration of Evans blue. Radioisotope labelled albumin revealed more sensitively the presence of albumin in tissue than Evans blue. (author)

  5. Modeling trans-spinal direct current stimulation for the modulation of the lumbar spinal motor pathways

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuck, A.; Stegeman, D. F.; Van Asseldonk, E. H.F.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Trans-spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS) is a potential new technique for the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI). TsDCS aims to facilitate plastic changes in the neural pathways of the spinal cord with a positive effect on SCI recovery. To establish tsDCS as a possible treatment

  6. A RARE CASE OF QUADRIPLEGIA DUE TO SPINAL EPIDURAL HAEMATOMA FOLLOWING SPINAL ANAESTHESIA

    OpenAIRE

    Meher Kumar; Rakesh

    2015-01-01

    Quadriplegia following spinal anaesthesia due to spinal epidural haematoma is a rare but critical complication that usually occurs within 24 hours to a few days of the procedure. I report a case of a 32 year old male who underwent Uretero - Renal Scopy (URS) and double ‘J’ (DJ) stenting for right ureteric calculus under spinal ...

  7. B Vitamins Potentiate Acute Morphine Antinociception and Attenuate the Development of Tolerance to Chronic Morphine in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xue-Ting; Han, Yuan; Liu, Wen-Tao; Song, Xue-Jun

    2017-10-01

    Opiate analgesics are the most effective treatments for severe pain, but their clinical utility is often hampered by the development of analgesic tolerance. There are striking similarities between morphine actions and neuropathic pain. We have demonstrated that B vitamins can attenuate neuropathic pain after peripheral nerve injury, sensory neuron inflammation/compression, and transient spinal cord ischemia. Given this similarity, the present study investigated whether B vitamins might be able to modify the antinociceptive effect of morphine as well as morphine tolerance in mice. Cell signaling was assayed by Western blot and immunohistochemistry. Antinociception was assessed in ICR mice using the tail flick. The effects of B vitamins on acute morphine-induced antinociception and chronic morphine tolerance were studied. 1) Co-administration of B vitamins with morphine potentiates acute morphine antinociception. 2) B vitamins attenuate the development of antinociceptive tolerance to chronic morphine administration and inhibit morphine-induced p-NR1, p-PKC in the spinal cord. 3) Morphine induces microglial activation, as evidenced by increased p38 MAPK phosphorylation, IBA1, and IL-1β in the spinal cord, and these changes are inhibited by B vitamins. 4) Treatment of B vitamins alone shows no notable effects on pain threshold and activity of microglia invivo. B vitamins potentiate acute morphine antinociception and attenuate chronic morphine tolerance. © 2017 American Academy of Pain Medicine. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  8. A new pharmacological role for donepezil: attenuation of morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in rat central nervous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Tolerance to the analgesic effect of opioids is a pharmacological phenomenon that occurs after their prolonged administration. It has been shown that morphine-induced tolerance is associated with apoptosis in the central nervous system and neuroprotective agents which prevented apoptosis signaling could attenuate tolerance to the analgesic effects. On the other hand donepezil, an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, has been reported to have neuroprotective effects. Therefore in this study, the effect of systemic administration of donepezil on morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in the rat cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord was evaluated. Various groups of rats received morphine (ip) and different doses of donepezil (0, 0.5, 1, 1.5 mg/kg/day). Nociception was assessed using tail flick apparatus. Tail flick latency was recorded when the rat shook its tail. For apoptosis assay other groups of rats received the above treatment and apoptosis was evaluated by in situ terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end-labeling (TUNEL) method. Results The results showed that administration of donepezil (0.5, 1, 1.5 mg/kg, ip) delayed the morphine tolerance for 9, 12 and 17 days, respectively. Furthermore pretreatment injection of donepezil attenuated the number of apoptotic cells in the cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord compared to the control group. Conclusion In conclusion, we found that systemic administration of donepezil attenuated morphine-induced tolerance and apoptosis in the rat cerebral cortex and lumbar spinal cord. PMID:24455992

  9. Spinal epidural hematomas examined on MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rejnowski, G.; Poniatowska, R.; Kozlowski, P.

    1995-01-01

    Spinal epidural hematomas are rare pathology, caused by trauma or spontaneous. In clinical examination acute spinal cord compression is observed. MRI designations appear entirely particular. In sagittal projection, biconvex mass in the dorsal, or sometimes ventral part of the spinal canal is clearly visible. This is well delineated by the thecal sac from the cord and cauda equina. MRI investigations in 3 patients revealed corresponding with spinal bone injuries and cord edema epidural hematomas. Differential diagnosis must contain subdural hematoma and epidural neoplasms or abscess. (author)

  10. Distribution of elements in human spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Masae; Kobayashi, T.; Qiu, Y.; Kameda, N.; Ito, Y.; Otomo, E.

    1992-01-01

    The distribution of elements in human spinal cord was investigated on unfixed frozen cord material using PIXE technique. Distribution of Cu, Zn and Fe were not uniform in the cross section of the spinal cord and concentrations of these elements were higher in the anterior gray horn than in the other areas, while K and Cl distributed uniformly. The content of K changed along the spinal cord from the cervical to the lumbar level. These findings are discussed in relation to current understanding of the physiology of the spinal cord. (author)

  11. MR imaging of spinal epidural sepsis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angtuaco, E.; McConnell, J.; Chadduck, W.; Flanigan, S.; Binet, E.

    1987-01-01

    Spinal epidural abscess is uncommonly found in adults and children. Early diagnosis and treatment improves prognosis and prevents serious neurologic sequelae. Four patients with spinal epidural infections were recently evaluated with MR and CT of the spine. In all cases, MR and CT localized the site of infection accurately and showed adjacent bony osteomyelitis. MR proved superior in characterizing infection (abscess vs. inflammatory edema) and demonstrating epidural involvement and spinal cord compression. In all cases, MR obviated the need for myelography. Early recognition by MR of spinal epidural sepsis led to expeditious treatment and better clinical outcome

  12. Ultrasonic attenuation in cuprate superconductors

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ultrasonic attenuation in cuprate superconductors. T GUPTA1,∗ and D M GAITONDE1,2. 1Harish-Chandra Research Institute, Allahabad 211 019, India. 2High Pressure Physics Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai 400 085, India. ∗. Email: gupta@mri.ernet.in. Abstract. We calculate the longitudinal ...

  13. A Generalized Correction for Attenuation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, Anne C.; Bock, R. Darrell

    Use of the usual bivariate correction for attenuation with more than two variables presents two statistical problems. This pairwise method may produce a covariance matrix which is not at least positive semi-definite, and the bivariate procedure does not consider the possible influences of correlated errors among the variables. The method described…

  14. Attenuation of Vrancea events revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radulian, M.; Popa, M.; Grecu, B.; Panza, G.F.

    2003-11-01

    New aspects of the frequency-dependent attenuation of the seismic waves traveling from Vrancea subcrustal sources toward NW (Transylvanian Basin) and SE (Romanian Plain) are evidenced by the recent experimental data made available by the CALIXTO'99 tomography experiment. The observations validate the previous theoretical computations performed for the assessment, by means of a deterministic approach, of the seismic hazard in Romania. They reveal an essential aspect of the seismic ground motion attenuation, that has important implications on the probabilistic assessment of seismic hazard from Vrancea intermediate-depth earthquakes. The attenuation toward NW is shown to be a much stronger frequency-dependent effect than the attenuation toward SE and the seismic hazard computed by the deterministic approach fits satisfactorily well the observed ground motion distribution in the low-frequency band (< 1 Hz). The apparent contradiction with the historically-based intensity maps arises mainly from a systematic difference in the vulnerability (buildings eigenperiod) of the buildings in the intra- and extra-Carpathians regions. (author)

  15. Compact plasmonic variable optical attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leosson, Kristjan; Rosenzveig, Tiberiu; Hermannsson, Pétur Gordon

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate plasmonic nanowire-based thermo-optic variable optical attenuators operating in the 1525-1625 nm wavelength range. The devices have a footprint as low as 1 mm, extinction ratio exceeding 40 dB, driving voltage below 3 V, and full modulation bandwidth of 1 kHz. The polarization...

  16. Chronic subdural hematoma following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metin, Kübra Mehel; Güzel, Is Il; Oskovi, Aslı; Guzel, Ali Irfan

    2017-09-01

    Intracranial subdural hematoma after spinal anesthesia is a rare and life-threatening complication of spinal anesthesia. The most common complication of spinal anesthesia is the postdural puncture headache. When severe and persistent headache after spinal anesthesia occur, differential diagnosis can be explored. In this report, we aimed to evaluate a patient with persistent headache following spinal anesthesia for cesarean section in a 31-year-old woman ,and emphasize a rare complication of spinal anesthesia which is subdural hematoma.

  17. Early protective effects of iloprost after experimental spinal cord ischemia in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskun, K; Attar, A; Tuna, H; Sargon, M F; Yüceer, N; Türker, R K; Egemen, N

    2000-01-01

    The potential role of Iloprost, a stable analogue of prostocyclin, in treating spinal cord ischemia was investigated in rabbits subjected to aortic occlusion for 15 minutes. Ten adult rabbits weighing 2-2.5 kg received an intravenous infusion of saline (SF) as a control group and 14 rabbits received an intravenous infusion of Iloprost, 25 microg/kg/h. Iloprost infusion was started immediately after clamping of the aorta and continued 60 minutes thereafter. Cortical somatosensorial evoked potentials (CSEP) were recorded during the pre-ischemic period as a baseline and post-ischemic readings were taken at 15, 30 and 60 minutes. There was no statistically significant difference between CSEP of the saline and Iloprost treated groups (p < 0.05). All animals were examined neurologically by using a modification of Tarlov scale and all subjects were then deeply anesthetized and their spinal cords were removed for light and electron microscopic examinations at 24 h after spinal cord ischemia. In order to obtain an accurate comparison of ultrastructural changes between saline treated and Iloprost treated groups, a grading scale was performed. The light microscopic and ultrastructural analysis of the Iloprost treated group revealed that there was moderate protection of the myelin and axons and edema was attenuated. Findings of this study suggest that Iloprost exerts a protective effect on spinal cord ischemia. However, further studies are needed to reveal possible mechanisms of protection provided by Iloprost.

  18. Hydroxysafflor Yellow A protects spinal cords from ischemia/reperfusion injury in rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan Le-qun

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Hydroxysafflor Yellow A (HSYA, which is one of the most important active ingredients of the Chinese herb Carthamus tinctorius L, is widely used in the treatment of cerebrovascular and cardiovascular diseases. However, the potential protective effect of HSYA in spinal cord ischemia/reperfusion (I/R injury is still unknown. Methods Thirty-nine rabbits were randomly divided into three groups: sham group, I/R group and HSYA group. All animals were sacrificed after neurological evaluation with modified Tarlov criteria at the 48th hour after reperfusion, and the spinal cord segments (L4-6 were harvested for histopathological examination, biochemical analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP-biotin nick end labeling (TUNEL staining. Results Neurological outcomes in HSYA group were slightly improved compared with those in I/R group. Histopathological analysis revealed that HSYA treatment attenuated I/R induced necrosis in spinal cords. Similarly, alleviated oxidative stress was indicated by decreased malondialdehyde (MDA level and increased superoxide dismutase (SOD activity after HSYA treatment. Moreover, as seen from TUNEL results, HSYA also protected neurons from I/R-induced apoptosis in rabbits. Conclusions These findings suggest that HSYA may protect spinal cords from I/R injury by alleviating oxidative stress and reducing neuronal apoptosis in rabbits.

  19. Opioid administration following spinal cord injury: implications for pain and locomotor recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woller, Sarah A; Hook, Michelle A

    2013-09-01

    Approximately one-third of people with a spinal cord injury (SCI) will experience persistent neuropathic pain following injury. This pain negatively affects quality of life and is difficult to treat. Opioids are among the most effective drug treatments, and are commonly prescribed, but experimental evidence suggests that opioid treatment in the acute phase of injury can attenuate recovery of locomotor function. In fact, spinal cord injury and opioid administration share several common features (e.g. central sensitization, excitotoxicity, aberrant glial activation) that have been linked to impaired recovery of function, as well as the development of pain. Despite these effects, the interactions between opioid use and spinal cord injury have not been fully explored. A review of the literature, described here, suggests that caution is warranted when administering opioids after SCI. Opioid administration may synergistically contribute to the pathology of SCI to increase the development of pain, decrease locomotor recovery, and leave individuals at risk for infection. Considering these negative implications, it is important that guidelines are established for the use of opioids following spinal cord and other central nervous system injuries. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  20. Hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma as a complication of lumbar spinal anaesthesia: MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pedraza Gutierrez, S.; Suescun, M.; Rovira Canellas, A.; Coll Masfarre, S.; Castano Duque, C.H.

    1999-01-01

    We report two cases of hyperacute spinal subdural haematoma secondary to lumbar spinal anaesthesia, identified with MRI. Prompt diagnosis of this infrequent, potentially serious complication of spinal anaesthesia is essential, as early surgical evacuation may be needed. Suggestive MRI findings in this early phase include diffuse occupation filling of the spinal canal with poor delineation of the spinal cord on T1-weighted images, and a poorly-defined high-signal lesion with a low-signal rim on T2-weighted images. (orig.)

  1. Influence of attenuation correction and reconstruction techniques on the detection of hypoperfused lesions in brain SPECT studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghoorun, S.; Groenewald, W.A.; Baete, K.; Nuyts, J.; Dupont, P.

    2004-01-01

    Full text: Aim: To study the influence of attenuation correction and the reconstruction technique on the detection of hypoperfused lesions in brain SPECT imaging, Material and Methods: A simulation experiment was used in which the effects of attenuation and reconstruction were decoupled, A high resolution SPECT phantom was constructed using the BrainWeb database, In this phantom, activity values were assigned to grey and white matter (ratio 4:1) and scaled to obtain counts of the same magnitude as in clinical practice, The true attenuation map was generated by assigning attenuation coefficients to each tissue class (grey and white matter, cerebral spinal fluid, skull, soft and fatty tissue and air) to create a non-uniform attenuation map, The uniform attenuation map was calculated using an attenuation coefficient of 0.15 cm-1, Hypoperfused lesions of varying intensities and sizes were added. The phantom was then projected as typical SPECT projection data, taking into account attenuation and collimator blurring with the addition of Poisson noise, The projection data was reconstructed using four different methods of reconstruction: (1) filtered backprojection (FBP) with the uniform attenuation map; (2) FBP using the true attenuation map; (3) ordered subset expectation maximization (OSEM) (equivalent to 423 iterations) with a uniform attenuation map; and (4) OSEM with a true attenuation map. Different Gaussian postsmooth kernels were applied to the reconstructed images. Results: The analysis of the reconstructed data was performed using figures of merit such as signal to noise ratio (SNR), bias and variance. The results illustrated that uniform attenuation correction offered slight deterioration (less than 2%) with regard to SNR when compared to the ideal attenuation map. which in reality is not known. The iterative techniques produced superior signal to noise ratios (increase of 5 - 20 % depending on the lesion and the postsmooth) in comparison to the FBP methods

  2. Complete spinal cord injury (SCI) transforms how brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) affects nociceptive sensitization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yung-Jen; Lee, Kuan H; Grau, James W

    2017-02-01

    Noxious stimulation can induce a lasting increase in neural excitability within the spinal cord (central sensitization) that can promote pain and disrupt adaptive function (maladaptive plasticity). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to regulate the development of plasticity and has been shown to impact the development of spinally-mediated central sensitization. The latter effect has been linked to an alteration in GABA-dependent inhibition. Prior studies have shown that, in spinally transected rats, exposure to regular (fixed spaced) stimulation can counter the development of maladaptive plasticity and have linked this effect to an up-regulation of BDNF. Here it is shown that application of the irritant capsaicin to one hind paw induces enhanced mechanical reactivity (EMR) after spinal cord injury (SCI) and that the induction of this effect is blocked by pretreatment with fixed spaced shock. This protective effect was eliminated if rats were pretreated with the BDNF sequestering antibody TrkB-IgG. Intrathecal (i.t.) application of BDNF prevented, but did not reverse, capsaicin-induced EMR. BDNF also attenuated cellular indices (ERK and pERK expression) of central sensitization after SCI. In uninjured rats, i.t. BDNF enhanced, rather than attenuated, capsaicin-induced EMR and ERK/pERK expression. These opposing effects were related to a transformation in GABA function. In uninjured rats, BDNF reduced membrane-bound KCC2 and the inhibitory effect of the GABA A agonist muscimol. After SCI, BDNF increased KCC2 expression, which would help restore GABAergic inhibition. The results suggest that SCI transforms how BDNF affects GABA function and imply that the clinical usefulness of BDNF will depend upon the extent of fiber sparing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Predicting spinal hypotension during Caesarean section

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    weight) was a risk factor for altered heart rate variability patterns and hypotension under spinal anaesthesia. 26 Patients with an abnormal antenatal BMI were excluded from this study. Maternal heart rate. The use of baseline heart rate as a predictor for the development of hypotension under spinal anaesthesia has ...

  4. Therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Fogaça Cristante

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study reviews the literature concerning possible therapeutic approaches for spinal cord injury. Spinal cord injury is a disabling and irreversible condition that has high economic and social costs. There are both primary and secondary mechanisms of damage to the spinal cord. The primary lesion is the mechanical injury itself. The secondary lesion results from one or more biochemical and cellular processes that are triggered by the primary lesion. The frustration of health professionals in treating a severe spinal cord injury was described in 1700 BC in an Egyptian surgical papyrus that was translated by Edwin Smith; the papyrus reported spinal fractures as a ''disease that should not be treated.'' Over the last biological or pharmacological treatment method. Science is unraveling the mechanisms of cell protection and neuroregeneration, but clinically, we only provide supportive care for patients with spinal cord injuries. By combining these treatments, researchers attempt to enhance the functional recovery of patients with spinal cord injuries. Advances in the last decade have allowed us to encourage the development of experimental studies in the field of spinal cord regeneration. The combination of several therapeutic strategies should, at minimum, allow for partial functional recoveries for these patients, which could improve their quality of life.

  5. Complement elevation in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebhun, J; Botvin, J

    1980-05-01

    Laboratory studies revealed an elevated complement in 66% of patients with spinal cord injury. It is postulated that the activated complement may be a component of self-feeding immunological mechanism responsible for the failure of regeneration of a mature mammalian spinal cord. There was no evidence that such an injury had any effect on pre-existing atopy.

  6. Polymeric implant of methylprednisolone for spinal injury ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Polymeric implant of methylprednisolone for spinal injury: preparation and characterization. Bo Yin, Jian-Jun Ji, Ming Yang. Abstract. Purpose: To improve the effectiveness and reduce the systemic side effects of methylprednisolone in traumatic spinal injuries, its polymeric implants were prepared using chitosan and sodium ...

  7. Chronic subdural haematoma complicating spinal anaesthesia: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Subdural haematoma is a rare but serious complication of dural puncture. We report a case of chronic subdural haematoma, which occurred following spinal anaesthesia for elective caesarean section. A 34-year-old multiparous woman presented with a post-dural puncture headache (PDPH) following spinal anaesthesia.

  8. SPEXOR : Towards a passive spinal exoskeleton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Rijcke, L.; Näf, M.; Rodriguez-Guerrero, C.; Graimann, B.; Houdijk, H.; van Dieën, J.; Mombaur, K.; Russold, M.; Sarabon, N.; Babič, J.; Lefeber, D.

    2017-01-01

    Most assistive robotic devices are exoskeletons which assist or augment the motion of the limbs and neglect the role of the spinal column in transferring load from the upper body and arms to the legs. In this part of the SPEXOR project we will fill this gap and design a novel, passive spinal

  9. Risk factors in iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montalva-Iborra, A; Alcanyis-Alberola, M; Grao-Castellote, C; Torralba-Collados, F; Giner-Pascual, M

    2017-09-01

    In the last years, there has been a change in the aetiology of spinal cord injury. There has been an increase in the number of elderly patients with spinal cord injuries caused by diseases or medical procedures. The aim of this study is to investigate the frequency of the occurrence of iatrogenic spinal cord injury in our unit. The secondary aim is to study what variables can be associated with a higher risk of iatrogenesis. A retrospective, descriptive, observational study of patients with acute spinal cord injury admitted from June 2009 to May 2014 was conducted. The information collected included the patient age, aetiology, neurological level and grade of injury when admitted and when discharged, cardiovascular risk factors, a previous history of depression and any prior treatment with anticoagulant or antiplatelet drugs. We applied a logistic regression. The grade of statistical significance was established as Pinjury was the thoracic level (48%). The main aetiology of spinal cord injury caused by iatrogenesis was surgery for degenerative spine disease, in patients under the age of 30 were treated with intrathecal chemotherapy. Iatrogenic spinal cord injury is a frequent complication. A statistically significant association between a patient history of depression and iatrogenic spinal cord injury was found as well as with anticoagulant and antiplatelet drug use prior to iatrogenic spinal cord injury.

  10. Spinal Cord Injury Model System Information Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the UAB-SCIMS Contact the UAB-SCIMS UAB Spinal Cord Injury Model System Newly Injured Health Daily Living Consumer ... Information Network The University of Alabama at Birmingham Spinal Cord Injury Model System (UAB-SCIMS) maintains this Information Network ...

  11. Spinal (Intrathecal) Ketamine Anaesthesia for Upper Abdominal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Intravenous ketamine is usually administered for the induction of general anaesthesia. Spinal ketamine for lower abdominal and lower limb surgery is sporadically reported in the literature. However, the use of spinal ketamine for upper body surgery is rare. We describe the case of a 35-year old man, with a retroperitoneal ...

  12. Serotonergic modulation of spinal motor control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Perrier, Jean-Francois Marie; Cotel, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Serotonin (5-HT) is a monoamine that powerfully modulates spinal motor control by acting on intrasynaptic and extrasynaptic receptors. Here we review the diversity of 5-HT actions on locomotor and motoneuronal activities. Two approaches have been used on in vitro spinal cord preparations: either...

  13. Remote cerebellar hemorrhage after lumbar spinal surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cevik, Belma [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)], E-mail: belmac@baskent-ank.edu.tr; Kirbas, Ismail; Cakir, Banu; Akin, Kayihan; Teksam, Mehmet [Baskent University Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Fevzi Cakmak Cad. 10. sok. No: 45, Bahcelievler, Ankara 06490 (Turkey)

    2009-04-15

    Background: Postoperative remote cerebellar hemorrhage (RCH) as a complication of lumbar spinal surgery is an increasingly recognized clinical entity. The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery and to describe diagnostic imaging findings of RCH. Methods: Between October 1996 and March 2007, 2444 patients who had undergone lumbar spinal surgery were included in the study. Thirty-seven of 2444 patients were scanned by CT or MRI due to neurologic symptoms within the first 7 days of postoperative period. The data of all the patients were studied with regard to the following variables: incidence of RCH after lumbar spinal surgery, gender and age, coagulation parameters, history of previous arterial hypertension, and position of lumbar spinal surgery. Results: The retrospective study led to the identification of two patients who had RCH after lumbar spinal surgery. Of 37 patients who had neurologic symptoms, 29 patients were women and 8 patients were men. CT and MRI showed subarachnoid hemorrhage in the folia of bilateral cerebellar hemispheres in both patients with RCH. The incidence of RCH was 0.08% among patients who underwent lumbar spinal surgery. Conclusion: RCH is a rare complication of lumbar spinal surgery, self-limiting phenomenon that should not be mistaken for more ominous pathologic findings such as hemorrhagic infarction. This type of bleeding is thought to occur secondary to venous infarction, but the exact pathogenetic mechanism is unknown. CT or MRI allowed immediate diagnosis of this complication and guided conservative management.

  14. [Postraumatic epidural arachnoid spinal cyst: case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-León, O; Pérez-Nogueira, F R; Corrales, N

    2011-06-01

    Extradural arachnoid spinal cysts are unfrequent lesions that are associated with spinal trauma, surgery and less frequently with congenital anomalies. The clinical manifestations are similar to those seen with other compressive spinal cord lesions. Magnetic resonance techniques allow to diagnose correctly this pathology and to define its thopographic situation. The pathologic history of the patient is essencial to establish the ethiology. Surgery is the elective treatment in most cases. The patient is a 35 years old man who has a medical history of penetrating spinal trauma two years ago. In that instance he suffered an unilateral spinal cord section at D2-D3 level with the corresponding Brown Sequard syndrome. A small wound was detected at the skin dorsal level and it was closed without difficulties. At the beginning, he improved his motor right leg function with rehabilitation and vitamins. After two years of good recovery he came to our hospital suffering a neurological deterioration of six months of evolution. The physical examination revealed an spastic paraparesis. Magnetic resonance was performed demonstrating a cystic extradural collection compressing the spinal cord at D3-D4 level. Surgical decompressive treatment allowed to excise the cyst and it was possible to define a dural tear that was closed successfully. The outcome was good with restoration of the initial motor function that he had after the spinal trauma. Surgical management of postraumatic epidural arachnoid spinal cyst allows to detect the meningeal tear and to close it, which is highly effective on these kinds of lesions.

  15. Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation in Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabina Shah

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Spinal cord injury is a major trauma, with its short and long term effects and consequences to the patient, his friends and family. Spinal cord injury is addressed in the developed countries with standard trauma care system commencing immediately after injury and continuing to the specialized rehabilitation units. Rehabilitation is important to those with spinal injury for both functional and psychosocial reintegration. It has been an emerging concept in Nepal, which has been evident with the establishment of the various hospitals with rehabilitation units, rehabilitation centres and physical therapy units in different institutions. However, the spinal cord injury rehabilitation setting and scenario is different in Nepal from those in the developed countries since spinal cord injury rehabilitation care has not been adequately incorporated into the health care delivery system nor its importance has been realized within the medical community of Nepal. To name few, lack of human resource for the rehabilitation care, awareness among the medical personnel and general population, adequate scientific research evidence regarding situation of spinal injury and exorbitant health care policy are the important hurdles that has led to the current situation. Hence, it is our responsibility to address these apparent barriers to successful implementation and functioning of rehabilitation so that those with spinal injury would benefit from enhanced quality of life. Keywords: rehabilitation; spinal injury.

  16. Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Mahfoudh, Rafid; Chan, Yuen; Chong, Hsu Pheen; Farah, Jibril Osman

    2016-01-01

    The aims are to present a case series of Twiddler's syndrome in spinal cord stimulators with analysis of the possible mechanism of this syndrome and discuss how this phenomenon can be prevented. Data were collected retrospectively between 2007 and 2013 for all patients presenting with failure of spinal cord stimulators. The diagnostic criterion for Twiddler's syndrome is radiological evidence of twisting of wires in the presence of failure of spinal cord stimulation. Our unit implants on average 110 spinal cord stimulators a year. Over the 5-year study period, all consecutive cases of spinal cord stimulation failure were studied. Three patients with Twiddler's syndrome were identified. Presentation ranged from 4 to 228 weeks after implantation. Imaging revealed repeated rotations and twisting of the wires of the spinal cord stimulators leading to hardware failure. To the best of our knowledge this is the first reported series of Twiddler's syndrome with implantable pulse generators (IPGs) for spinal cord stimulation. Hardware failure is not uncommon in spinal cord stimulation. Awareness and identification of Twiddler's syndrome may help prevent its occurrence and further revisions. This may be achieved by implanting the IPG in the lumbar region subcutaneously above the belt line. Psychological intervention may have a preventative role for those who are deemed at high risk of Twiddler's syndrome from initial psychological screening.

  17. Spinal xanthomatosis: a variant of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verrips, A.; Nijeholt, G. J.; Barkhof, F.; van Engelen, B. G.; Wesseling, P.; Luyten, J. A.; Wevers, R. A.; Stam, J.; Wokke, J. H.; van den Heuvel, L. P.; Keyser, A.; Gabreëls, F. J.

    1999-01-01

    We describe seven Dutch patients from six families with a slowly progressive, mainly spinal cord syndrome that remained for many years the sole expression of cerebrotendinous xanthomatosis (CTX). MRI demonstrated white matter abnormalities in the lateral and dorsal columns of the spinal cord.

  18. Predicting spinal hypotension during Caesarean section | Bishop ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hypotension under spinal anaesthesia for Caesarean section remains a common problem with attendant maternal and foetal morbidity attached to it. This review examines some of the issues surrounding the prediction of spinal hypotension, including concerns with current evidence, debate regarding the mechanism of ...

  19. ENHANCEMENTS TO NATURAL ATTENUATION: SELECTED CASE STUDIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vangelas, K; W. H. Albright, W; E. S. Becvar, E; C. H. Benson, C; T. O. Early, T; E. Hood, E; P. M. Jardine, P; M. Lorah, M; E. Majche, E; D. Major, D; W. J. Waugh, W; G. Wein, G; O. R. West, O

    2007-05-15

    In 2003 the US Department of Energy (DOE) embarked on a project to explore an innovative approach to remediation of subsurface contaminant plumes that focused on introducing mechanisms for augmenting natural attenuation to achieve site closure. Termed enhanced attenuation (EA), this approach has drawn its inspiration from the concept of monitored natural attenuation (MNA).

  20. Oxycodone Plus Ultra-Low-Dose Naltrexone Attenuates Neuropathic Pain and Associated μ-Opioid Receptor–Gs Coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Largent-Milnes, Tally M.; Guo, Wenhong; Wang, Hoau-Yan; Burns, Lindsay H.; Vanderah, Todd W.

    2017-01-01

    Both peripheral nerve injury and chronic opioid treatment can result in hyperalgesia associated with enhanced excitatory neurotransmission at the level of the spinal cord. Chronic opioid administration leads to a shift in μ-opioid receptor (MOR)–G protein coupling from Gi/o to Gs that can be prevented by cotreatment with an ultra-low-dose opioid antagonist. In this study, using lumbar spinal cord tissue from rats with L5/L6 spinal nerve ligation (SNL), we demonstrated that SNL injury induces MOR linkage to Gs in the damaged (ipsilateral) spinal dorsal horn. This MOR-Gs coupling occurred without changing Gi/o coupling levels and without changing the expression of MOR or Gα proteins. Repeated administration of oxycodone alone or in combination with ultra-low-dose naltrexone (NTX) was assessed on the SNL-induced MOR-Gs coupling as well as on neuropathic pain behavior. Repeated spinal oxycodone exacerbated the SNL-induced MOR-Gs coupling, whereas ultra-low-dose NTX cotreatment slightly but significantly attenuated this Gs coupling. Either spinal or oral administration of oxycodone plus ultra-low-dose NTX markedly enhanced the reductions in allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia produced by oxycodone alone and minimized tolerance to these effects. The MOR-Gs coupling observed in response to SNL may in part contribute to the excitatory neurotransmission in spinal dorsal horn in neuropathic pain states. The antihyperalgesic and antiallodynic effects of oxycodone plus ultra-low-dose NTX (Oxytrex, Pain Therapeutics, Inc., San Mateo, CA) suggest a promising new treatment for neuropathic pain. PMID:18468954

  1. Macroseismic intensity attenuation in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaghmaei-Sabegh, Saman

    2018-01-01

    Macroseismic intensity data plays an important role in the process of seismic hazard analysis as well in developing of reliable earthquake loss models. This paper presents a physical-based model to predict macroseismic intensity attenuation based on 560 intensity data obtained in Iran in the time period 1975-2013. The geometric spreading and energy absorption of seismic waves have been considered in the proposed model. The proposed easy to implement relation describes the intensity simply as a function of moment magnitude, source to site distance and focal depth. The prediction capability of the proposed model is assessed by means of residuals analysis. Prediction results have been compared with those of other intensity prediction models for Italy, Turkey, Iran and central Asia. The results indicate the higher attenuation rate for the study area in distances less than 70km.

  2. Muscle after spinal cord injury

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biering-Sørensen, Bo; Kristensen, Ida Bruun; Kjaer, Michael

    2009-01-01

    The morphological and contractile changes of muscles below the level of the lesion after spinal cord injury (SCI) are dramatic. In humans with SCI, a fiber-type transformation away from type I begins 4-7 months post-SCI and reaches a new steady state with predominantly fast glycolytic IIX fibers...... years after the injury. There is a progressive drop in the proportion of slow myosin heavy chain (MHC) isoform fibers and a rise in the proportion of fibers that coexpress both the fast and slow MHC isoforms. The oxidative enzymatic activity starts to decline after the first few months post-SCI. Muscles...

  3. Spinal intracellular metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) contributes to pain and c-fos expression in a rat model of inflammatory pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Kathleen; Wang, Shu Fan; Laferrière, André; Kumar, Naresh; Coderre, Terence J

    2017-04-01

    Metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5) is an excitatory G-protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) present in the spinal cord dorsal horn (SCDH) where it has a well-established role in pain. In addition to its traditional location on the cytoplasmic membrane, recent evidence shows that these receptors are present intracellularly on the nuclear membrane in the spinal cord dorsal horn and are implicated in neuropathic pain. Nuclear mGluR5 is a functional receptor that binds glutamate entering the cell through the neuronal glutamate transporter (GT) EAAT3 and activates transcription factor c-fos, whereas plasma membrane mGluR5 is responsible for c-jun activation. Here, we extend these findings to a model of inflammatory pain using complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) and show that nuclear mGluR5 is also upregulated in the spinal cord dorsal horn following inflammation. We also show that pretreatment with an excitatory amino acid transporter (EAAT) inhibitor attenuates pain and decreases Fos, but not Jun, expression in complete Freund's adjuvant rats. In contrast, selective glial glutamate transporter inhibitors are pronociceptive and increase spinal glutamate concentrations. Additionally, we found that permeable mGluR5 antagonists are more effective at attenuating pain and Fos expression than nonpermeable group I mGluR antagonists. Taken together, these results suggest that under inflammatory conditions, intracellular mGluR5 is actively involved in the relay of nociceptive information in the spinal cord.

  4. IKK/NF-κB-dependent satellite glia activation induces spinal cord microglia activation and neuropathic pain after nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyoungsub; Lee, Hyunkyoung; Noh, Kyungchul; Lee, Sung Joong

    2017-09-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that both microglia and satellite glial cell (SGC) activation play causal roles in neuropathic pain development after peripheral nerve injury; however, the activation mechanisms and their contribution to neuropathic pain remain elusive. To address this issue, we generated Ikkβ conditional knockout mice (Cnp-Cre/Ikkβ; cIkkβ) in which IKK/NF-κB-dependent proinflammatory SGC activation was abrogated. In these mice, nerve injury-induced spinal cord microglia activation and pain hypersensitivity were significantly attenuated compared to those in control mice. In addition, nerve injury-induced proinflammatory gene expression and macrophage infiltration into the dorsal root ganglion (DRG) were severely compromised. However, macrophages recruited into the DRG had minimal effects on spinal cord microglia activation, suggesting a causal effect for SGC activation on spinal cord microglia activation. In an effort to elucidate the molecular mechanisms, we measured Csf1 expression in the DRG, which is implicated in spinal cord microglia activation after nerve injury. In cIkkβ mice, nerve injury-induced Csf1 upregulation was ameliorated indicating that IKK/NF-κΒ-dependent SGC activation induced Csf1 expression in sensory neurons. Taken together, our data suggest that nerve injury-induced SGC activation triggers Csf1 induction in sensory neurons, spinal cord microglia activation, and subsequent central pain sensitization.

  5. TRPV1 in GABAergic interneurons mediates neuropathic mechanical allodynia and disinhibition of the nociceptive circuitry in the spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yong Ho; Back, Seung Keun; Davies, Alexander J; Jeong, Heejin; Jo, Hyun Jung; Chung, Geehoon; Na, Heung Sik; Bae, Yong Chul; Kim, Sang Jeong; Kim, Joong Soo; Jung, Sung Jun; Oh, Seog Bae

    2012-05-24

    Neuropathic pain and allodynia may arise from sensitization of central circuits. We report a mechanism of disinhibition-based central sensitization resulting from long-term depression (LTD) of GABAergic interneurons as a consequence of TRPV1 activation in the spinal cord. Intrathecal administration of TRPV1 agonists led to mechanical allodynia that was not dependent on peripheral TRPV1 neurons. TRPV1 was functionally expressed in GABAergic spinal interneurons and activation of spinal TRPV1 resulted in LTD of excitatory inputs and a reduction of inhibitory signaling to spinothalamic tract (STT) projection neurons. Mechanical hypersensitivity after peripheral nerve injury was attenuated in TRPV1(-/-) mice but not in mice lacking TRPV1-expressing peripheral neurons. Mechanical pain was reversed by a spinally applied TRPV1 antagonist while avoiding the hyperthermic side effect of systemic treatment. Our results demonstrate that spinal TRPV1 plays a critical role as a synaptic regulator and suggest the utility of central nervous system-specific TRPV1 antagonists for treating neuropathic pain. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun; Bae, Ji Yoon

    2015-01-01

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis

  7. Contiguous spinal metastasis mimicking infectious spondylodiscitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Chul Min; Lee, Seung Hun [Dept. of Radiology, Hanyang University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Bae, Ji Yoon [Dept. of Pathology, National Police Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    Differential diagnosis between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis is one of the occasional challenges in daily clinical practice. We encountered an unusual case of spinal metastasis in a 75-year-old female breast cancer patient that mimicked infectious spondylodiscitis. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed diffuse bone marrow infiltrations with paraspinal soft tissue infiltrative changes in 5 contiguous cervical vertebrae without significant compression fracture or cortical destruction. These MRI findings made it difficult to differentiate between spinal metastasis and infectious spondylodiscitis. Infectious spondylodiscitis such as tuberculous spondylodiscitis was regarded as the more appropriate diagnosis due to the continuous involvement of > 5 cervical vertebrae. The patient's clinical presentation also supported the presumptive diagnosis of infectious spondylodiscitis rather than spinal metastasis. Intravenous antibiotics were administered, but clinical symptoms worsened despite treatment. After pathologic confirmation by computed tomography-guided biopsy, we were able to confirm a final diagnosis of spinal metastasis.

  8. Oriental Medical Treatment of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Yeon Lee

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Lumbar spinal stenosis results from the progressive combined narrowing of the central spinal canal, the neurorecesses, and the neuroforaminal canals. In the absence of prior surgery, tumor, or infection, the spinal canal may become narrowed by bulging or protrusion of the intervertebral disc annulus, herniation of the nucleus pulposis posteriorly, thickening of the posterior longitudinal ligament, hypertrophy of the ligamentum flavum, epidural fat deposition, spondylosis of the intervertebral disc margins, or a combination of two or more of the above factors. Patients with spinal stenosis become symptomatic when pain, motor weakness, paresthesia, or other neurologic compromise causes distress. In one case, we administrated oriental medical treatment with acupuncture treatment and herb-medicine. Oriental medical treatment showed desirable effect on lumbar spinal stenosis.

  9. M.R. imaging of spinal disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akino, Minoru; Isu, Toyohiko; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu; Abe, Hiroshi; Abe, Satoru; Miyasaka, Kazuo; Nomura, Mikio; Saito, Hisatoshi.

    1987-01-01

    In many papers about the M.R. imaging of spinal disorders, almost all the diagnoses have been carried out using only the sagittal image. However, we ourselves have thus for diagnosed about 500 cases of spinal disorders using the resistive type of MRI (0.15 T). On the basis of our experience, we have established two main principles as regards the MRI diagnosis of spinal disorders: 1) a surface coil must be used in the diagnosis of spinal disorders, and 2) diagnosis must be carried out by the use of both sagittal and axial images. We present some typical cases of spinal disorders in this paper. From these cases, we see that MRI has advantages and disadvantages as regards the diagnosis of spinal disorders compared with X-ray diagnostic apparatus. The first advantageous point is that we can directly obtain an image of the spinal cord without the intrathecal injection of a contrast material. The second point is that MRI can avoid the bone artifacts which often occur when using the X-ray CT; moreover, there is none of the hazard connected with the use of X-rays. The biggest disadvantage is that the spatial resolution of the resistive type of MRI is slightly inferior to that of the high-resolutional X-ray CT. The second disadvantage is that the ability to detect an ossificative process, such as disc disease or OPLL, is very restricted because of the low signal intensity from the cortical bone. We propose two points for the improvement of the MR imaging of spinal disorders. One is the production of a high-sensitivity surface coil. The other is the application of Gd-DTPA, which is thought to have a high potential to detect spinal disorders. If we can realize these points, the images of spinal disorders produced by the resistive type of MRI will be clearer and more informative. (J.P.N.)

  10. Topologically preserving straightening of spinal cord MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Leener, Benjamin; Mangeat, Gabriel; Dupont, Sara; Martin, Allan R; Callot, Virginie; Stikov, Nikola; Fehlings, Michael G; Cohen-Adad, Julien

    2017-10-01

    To propose a robust and accurate method for straightening magnetic resonance (MR) images of the spinal cord, based on spinal cord segmentation, that preserves spinal cord topology and that works for any MRI contrast, in a context of spinal cord template-based analysis. The spinal cord curvature was computed using an iterative Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) approximation. Forward and inverse deformation fields for straightening were computed by solving analytically the straightening equations for each image voxel. Computational speed-up was accomplished by solving all voxel equation systems as one single system. Straightening accuracy (mean and maximum distance from straight line), computational time, and robustness to spinal cord length was evaluated using the proposed and the standard straightening method (label-based spline deformation) on 3T T 2 - and T 1 -weighted images from 57 healthy subjects and 33 patients with spinal cord compression due to degenerative cervical myelopathy (DCM). The proposed algorithm was more accurate, more robust, and faster than the standard method (mean distance = 0.80 vs. 0.83 mm, maximum distance = 1.49 vs. 1.78 mm, time = 71 vs. 174 sec for the healthy population and mean distance = 0.65 vs. 0.68 mm, maximum distance = 1.28 vs. 1.55 mm, time = 32 vs. 60 sec for the DCM population). A novel image straightening method that enables template-based analysis of quantitative spinal cord MRI data is introduced. This algorithm works for any MRI contrast and was validated on healthy and patient populations. The presented method is implemented in the Spinal Cord Toolbox, an open-source software for processing spinal cord MRI data. 1 Technical Efficacy: Stage 1 J. Magn. Reson. Imaging 2017;46:1209-1219. © 2017 International Society for Magnetic Resonance in Medicine.

  11. Neonatal bladder inflammation induces long-term visceral pain and altered responses of spinal neurons in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kannampalli, Pradeep; Babygirija, Reji; Zhang, Jiang; Poe, Michael M; Li, Guanguan; Cook, James M; Shaker, Reza; Banerjee, Banani; Sengupta, Jyoti N

    2017-03-27

    Painful events early in life have been shown to increase the incidence of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome in adulthood. However, the intrinsic mechanism is not well studied. We previously reported that neonatal bladder inflammation causes chronic visceral hypersensitivity along with molecular disruption of spinal GABAergic system in rats. The present study investigates whether these molecular changes affect the integrative function and responses of bladder-sensitive primary afferent and spinal neurons. Neonatal bladder inflammation was induced by intravesicular injection of zymosan during postnatal (P) days 14-16. In adulthood (P60), the viscero-motor response (VMR) to visceral stimuli was significantly inhibited by intrathecal (i.t) HZ166 (GABA Aα-2 agonist) only in neonatally saline-treated, but not in neonatally zymosan-treated rats. HZ166 significantly inhibited the responses of bladder-responsive lumbosacral (LS) spinal neurons to urinary bladder distension (UBD) and slow infusion (SI) in neonatally saline-treated rats. Similar results were also observed in naïve adult rats where HZ166 produced significant inhibition of bladder-responsive spinal neurons. However, HZ166 did not inhibit responses of UBD-responsive spinal neurons from neonatally zymosan-treated rats. The drug did not attenuate the responses of UBD-sensitive pelvic nerve afferent (PNA) fibers to UBD and SI in either group of rats tested. Immunohistochemical studies showed a significantly lower level of GABA Aα-2 receptor expression in the LS spinal cord of neonatally zymosan-treated rats compared to saline-treated rats. These findings indicate that neonatal bladder inflammation leads to functional and molecular alteration of spinal GABA Aα-2 receptor subtypes, which may result in chronic visceral hyperalgesia in adulthood. Copyright © 2017 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Inflammatory response to Escherichia coli urinary tract infection in the neurogenic bladder of the spinal cord injured host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Rajeev; Madden-Fuentes, Ramiro J; Ortiz, Tara K; Balsara, Zarine; Tang, Yuping; Nseyo, Unwanaobong; Wiener, John S; Ross, Sherry S; Seed, Patrick C

    2014-05-01

    Urinary tract infections cause significant morbidity in patients with spinal cord injury. An in vivo spinal cord injured rat model of experimental Escherichia coli urinary tract infection mimics human disease with enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection compared to controls. We hypothesized that a dysregulated inflammatory response contributes to enhanced susceptibility to urinary tract infection. Spinal cord injured and sham injured rats were inoculated transurethrally with E. coli. Transcript levels of 84 inflammatory pathway genes were measured in bladder tissue of each group before infection, 24 hours after infection and after 5 days of antibiotic therapy. Before infection quantitative polymerase chain reaction array revealed greater than twofold up-regulation in the proinflammatory factor transcripts slc11a1, ccl4 and il1β, and down-regulation of the antimicrobial peptides lcn2 and mpo in spinal cord injured vs control bladders. At 24 hours after infection spinal cord injured bladders showed an attenuated innate immune response with decreased expression of il6, slc11a1, il1β and lcn2, and decreased il10 and slpi expression compared to controls. Despite clearance of bacteriuria with antibiotics spinal cord injured rats had delayed induction of il6 transcription and a delayed anti-inflammatory response with decreased il10 and slpi transcript levels relative to controls. Spinal cord injured bladders fail to mount a characteristic inflammatory response to E. coli infection and cannot suppress inflammation after infection is eliminated. This may lead to increased susceptibility to urinary tract infection and persistent chronic inflammation through neural mediated pathways, which to our knowledge remain to be defined. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Neuroprotection and secondary damage following spinal cord injury: concepts and methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilton, Brett J; Moulson, Aaron J; Tetzlaff, Wolfram

    2017-06-23

    Neuroprotection refers to the attenuation of pathophysiological processes triggered by acute injury to minimize secondary damage. The development of neuroprotective treatments represents a major goal in the field of spinal cord injury (SCI) research. In this review, we discuss the strengths and limitations of the methodologies employed to assess secondary damage and neuroprotection in preclinical models of traumatic SCI. We also discuss modelling issues and how new tools might be exploited to study secondary damage and neuroprotection. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Inhibition of spinal astrocytic c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK activation correlates with the analgesic effects of ketamine in neuropathic pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Wen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that inhibition of astrocytic activation contributes to the analgesic effects of intrathecal ketamine on spinal nerve ligation (SNL-induced neuropathic pain. However, the underlying mechanisms are still unclear. c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, a member of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK family, has been reported to be critical for spinal astrocytic activation and neuropathic pain development after SNL. Ketamine can decrease lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced phosphorylated JNK (pJNK expression and could thus exert its anti-inflammatory effect. We hypothesized that inhibition of astrocytic JNK activation might be involved in the suppressive effect of ketamine on SNL-induced spinal astrocytic activation. Methods Immunofluorescence histochemical staining was used to detect SNL-induced spinal pJNK expression and localization. The effects of ketamine on SNL-induced mechanical allodynia were confirmed by behavioral testing. Immunofluorescence histochemistry and Western blot were used to quantify the SNL-induced spinal pJNK expression after ketamine administration. Results The present study showed that SNL induced ipsilateral pJNK up-regulation in astrocytes but not microglia or neurons within the spinal dorsal horn. Intrathecal ketamine relieved SNL-induced mechanical allodynia without interfering with motor performance. Additionally, intrathecal administration of ketamine attenuated SNL-induced spinal astrocytic JNK activation in a dose-dependent manner, but not JNK protein expression. Conclusions The present results suggest that inhibition of JNK activation may be involved in the suppressive effects of ketamine on SNL-induced spinal astrocyte activation. Therefore, inhibition of spinal JNK activation may be involved in the analgesic effects of ketamine on SNL-induced neuropathic pain.

  15. P2X7 Receptor Mediates Spinal Microglia Activation of Visceral Hyperalgesia in a Rat Model of Chronic PancreatitisSummary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Yi Liu

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background & Aims: Molecular mechanisms underlying the activated spinal microglia in association with the pain in chronic pancreatitis (CP remain unknown. We tested whether P2X7R on spinal microglia mediates the pathogenesis of visceral pain using a CP rat model. Methods: The CP model was induced via intraductal injection of 2% trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid into male Sprague-Dawley rats. Hyperalgesia was assessed based on the mechanical sensitivity to Von-Frey filaments (VFFs, and nocifensive behaviors were measured in response to electrical stimulation of the pancreas. Three weeks after CP induction, spinal cord samples were harvested for immunostaining, immunoblot, and real-time polymerase chain reaction analyses of the P2X7R. Changes in nocifensive behaviors and associated molecular effectors were assessed by blocking spinal cord P2X7R pharmacologically using the selective P2X7R antagonist brilliant blue G (BBG or genetically using short interfering RNA (siRNA. Results: CP induced a significant up-regulation of spinal P2X7R expression, which colocalized with a microglial marker (OX-42. Intrathecal administration of BBG significantly attenuated CP-related visceral hyperalgesia in response to VFF-mediated or electrical stimulation of the pancreas, which was associated with suppressed spinal expression of P2X7R and inhibited activation of spinal microglia. Intrathecal injection of siRNA to knock down P2X7R expression in the spinal cord would suppress the nociceptive behaviors in CP rats. Conclusions: Spinal microglia P2X7R mediates central sensitization of chronic visceral pain in CP. BBG may represent an effective drug for the treatment of chronic pain in CP patients. Keywords: Brilliant Blue G, Chronic Visceral Pain, Purinergic Receptors, siRNA Knockdown

  16. CT of metastatic spinal tumor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sakata, Tsunehiko

    1980-01-01

    CT findings of metastatic spinal tumor were classified into 6 types, i.e., consolidation, dissolution, mottle, doughnut, and ring types, and mixed type of these, and that of no findings. Some statistically significant relationship was found between prostatic cancer and consolidation type, and unknown primary cancer and dissolution type. Abnormal findings of bone scintigraphy was suspected to have metastatic spinal tumor by plain radiography and CT scan in 64/128 (50.0%) and 113/145 (78.6%), respectively. There was some relationship between plain radiographic findings and CT findings; between consolidation type of the former and consolidation type of the latter, dissolution type and dissolution type, compression fracture type and mixed type, the type of no findings and consolidation or mixed type. The most of lesions detected by CT as consolidation or mixed type were revealed by plain radiography. Changes in Ca ammount was not detected by plain radiography and CT scan if it was approximately less than 30% and 18% of the initial Ca respectively. (Ueda, J.)

  17. Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieberman, Andrew P

    2018-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA) is an adult-onset degenerative disorder of the neuromuscular system resulting in slowly progressive weakness and atrophy of the proximal limb and bulbar muscles. The disease is caused by the expansion of a CAG/glutamine tract in the amino-terminus of the androgen receptor. That SBMA exclusively affects males reflects the fact that critical pathogenic events are hormone-dependent. These include translocation of the polyglutamine androgen receptor from the cytoplasm to the nucleus and unfolding of the mutant protein. Studies of the pathology of SBMA subjects have revealed nuclear aggregates of the mutant androgen receptor, loss of lower motor neurons in the brainstem and spinal cord, and both neurogenic and myopathic changes in skeletal muscle. Mechanisms underlying disease pathogenesis include toxicity in both lower motor neurons and skeletal muscle, where effects on transcription, intracellular transport, and mitochondrial function have been documented. Therapies to treat SBMA patients remain largely supportive, although experimental approaches targeting androgen action or promoting degradation of the mutant androgen receptor protein or the encoding RNA are under active study. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Discopathy in lumbar spinal stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kłosiński, Piotr; Gilis-Januszewska, Maciej; Serafin, Witold; Płomiński, Daniel

    2004-06-30

    Background. In a group of patients treated surgically for stenosis in the lumbar spine, we compared the pre-operative nature of the pathology of the intervertebral disc as measured by MRI to the treatment outcome. Material and methods. In 30 persons ranging in age from 39 to 68 who reported at least 60% subjective improvement in quality of life after surgery (wide decompression of the spinal canal in the lumbar segment, spondylodesis, transpedicular fixation) the character of the discopathy was evaluated by MRI. Results. In MRI studies from the study group, feature of dehydratation and protrusion of the nucleus pulposus occurred among all patients, while the most common clinical symptom was neurogenic claudication. Non-removal of intervertebral discs protruding less than 6 mm into the lumen of the spinal canal did not cause worse outcome. Conclusion. In this group of patients treated surgically for lumbar stenosis with wide decompression, the fact that a slight protrusion of the intervertebral disc (prolapse <6mm) persists after surgery, in the absence of conflict between the disc and nerve elements, has no influence on treatment outcome.

  19. Gliopathy ensures persistent inflammation and chronic pain after spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hulsebosch, Claire E

    2008-11-01

    Research focused on improving recovery of function, including the reduction of central neuropathic pain (CNP) after spinal cord injury (SCI) is essential. After SCI, regional neuropathic pain syndromes above, at and below the level or spinal injury develop and are thought to have different mechanisms, but may share common dysfunctional glial mechanisms. Detloff et al., [Detloff, M.R., Fisher, L.C., McGaughy, V., Longbrake, E.E., Popovich, P.G., Basso, D.M., Remote activation of microglia and pro-inflammatory cytokines predict the onset and severity of below-level neuropathic pain after spinal cord injury in rats. Exp. Neurol. (2008), doi: 10.1016/j.expneurol.2008.04.009.] describe events in the lumbar region of the spinal cord after a midthoracic SCI injury, the so called "below-level" pain and compares the findings to peripheral nerve lesion findings. This commentary briefly reviews glial contributions and intracellular signaling mechanisms, both neuronal and glial, that provide the substrate for CNP after SCI, including the persistent glial production of factors that can maintain sensitization of dorsal horn neurons in segments remote from the spinal injury; ie. dorsal horn hyperexcitability to formerly non noxious stimuli that become noxious after SCI resulting in allodynia. The term "gliopathy" is proposed to describe the dysfunctional and maladaptive response of glial cells, specifically astrocytes and microglia, to neural injury that is initiated by the sudden injury induced increase in extracellular concentrations of glutamate and concomitant production of several proinflammatory molecules. It is important to understand the roles that different glia play in "gliopathy", a condition that appears to persist after SCI. Furthermore, targeted treatment of gliopathy will attenuate mechanical allodynia in both central and peripheral neuropathic pain syndromes.

  20. Spinal cord lesions - The rehabilitation perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faria, Filipa

    2006-02-01

    The present study provides an overview of the spinal cord injury focusing mainly on aspects related to rehabilitation. Spinal cord injury affects young people in an active phase of life, determining severe handicaps. Most of the lesions are traumatic, caused by car accidents. Until fifty years ago, the survival of individuals with spinal cord injury was very reduced and the leading cause of death was renal failure. Due to developments in medical knowledge and technical advances, the survival rates have significantly improved. The causes of death have also changed being respiratory complications, particularly pneumonia, the leading causes. Immediately after a spinal cord lesion there is a phase of spinal shock which is characterized by flaccid paralysis and bladder and bowel retention. Progressively there is a return of the spinal cord automatism with the beginning of some reflex activities. Based on neurological evaluation it is pos-sible to predict motor and functional recovery and establish the rehabilitation program. We can consider three phases on the rehabilitation program: the first while the patient is still in bed, directed to prevent or treat complications due to immobility and begin sphincters reeducation; the second phase is intended to achieve wheelchair autonomy; the last phase is training in ortostatism. The rehabilitation program also comprises sports and recreational activities, psychological and social support in order to achieve an integral of the individual with a spinal cord injury. © 2006 Sociedade Portuguesa de Pneumologia/SPP.

  1. Arteriovenous malformations of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagasawa, Shiro; Yoshida, Shinzo; Ishikawa, Masatsune; Yonekawa, Yasuhiro; Handa, Hajime

    1984-01-01

    Arteriovenous malformation (AVM) of the cervical spinal cord has been known to constitute 5-13% of all spinal AVMs. In contrast to the AVMs located in thoracic or thoraco-lumbar regions, cervical AVM has several characteristic features such as preponderance in younger generation, high incidence of subarachnoid hemorrhage, intramedullary location of the nidus usually fed by the anterior spinal arterial system. We reported three cases of cervical AVMs, which located intramedullary at the levels of C 4 -C 6 , C 1 -C 4 and C 1 -C 2 , respectively. Although selective angiography (vertebral artery, thyrocervical artery, costocervical artery) was essential for the diagnosis of these lesions, computerized tomographic (CT) study with both intrathecal injection of metrizamide and intravenous infusion of contrast material (dynamic and static study) was found to be extremely advantageous in detecting the topography of AVMs in the concerned horizontal planes of the spinal cord. Removal of AVM was given up in one case because of its possible involvement of the anterior spinal artery and central artery shown by CT scan. Removal of AVMs were performed in other two cases. A lateral approach was tried in one case with the AVM located in C 1 -C 2 level, in which CT scan revealed not only an intramedullary but the associated extramedullary AVM in ventrolateral surface of the spinal cord. This operative approach was found to involve less bone removal and markedly reduce spinal cord manipulation necessary to deal with ventrally situated high cervical lesions, compared with a posterior approach with laminectomy. (author)

  2. What is different about spinal pain?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernon Howard

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanisms subserving deep spinal pain have not been studied as well as those related to the skin and to deep pain in peripheral limb structures. The clinical phenomenology of deep spinal pain presents unique features which call for investigations which can explain these at a mechanistic level. Methods Targeted searches of the literature were conducted and the relevant materials reviewed for applicability to the thesis that deep spinal pain is distinctive from deep pain in the peripheral limb structures. Topics related to the neuroanatomy and neurophysiology of deep spinal pain were organized in a hierarchical format for content review. Results Since the 1980’s the innervation characteristics of the spinal joints and deep muscles have been elucidated. Afferent connections subserving pain have been identified in a distinctive somatotopic organization within the spinal cord whereby afferents from deep spinal tissues terminate primarily in the lateral dorsal horn while those from deep peripheral tissues terminate primarily in the medial dorsal horn. Mechanisms underlying the clinical phenomena of referred pain from the spine, poor localization of spinal pain and chronicity of spine pain have emerged from the literature and are reviewed here, especially emphasizing the somatotopic organization and hyperconvergence of dorsal horn “low back (spinal neurons”. Taken together, these findings provide preliminary support for the hypothesis that deep spine pain is different from deep pain arising from peripheral limb structures. Conclusions This thesis addressed the question “what is different about spine pain?” Neuroanatomic and neurophysiologic findings from studies in the last twenty years provide preliminary support for the thesis that deep spine pain is different from deep pain arising from peripheral limb structures.

  3. Spinal cord evolution in early Homo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Marc R; Haeusler, Martin

    2015-11-01

    The discovery at Nariokotome of the Homo erectus skeleton KNM-WT 15000, with a narrow spinal canal, seemed to show that this relatively large-brained hominin retained the primitive spinal cord size of African apes and that brain size expansion preceded postcranial neurological evolution. Here we compare the size and shape of the KNM-WT 15000 spinal canal with modern and fossil taxa including H. erectus from Dmanisi, Homo antecessor, the European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, and Pan troglodytes. In terms of shape and absolute and relative size of the spinal canal, we find all of the Dmanisi and most of the vertebrae of KNM-WT 15000 are within the human range of variation except for the C7, T2, and T3 of KNM-WT 15000, which are constricted, suggesting spinal stenosis. While additional fossils might definitively indicate whether H. erectus had evolved a human-like enlarged spinal canal, the evidence from the Dmanisi spinal canal and the unaffected levels of KNM-WT 15000 show that unlike Australopithecus, H. erectus had a spinal canal size and shape equivalent to that of modern humans. Subadult status is unlikely to affect our results, as spinal canal growth is complete in both individuals. We contest the notion that vertebrae yield information about respiratory control or language evolution, but suggest that, like H. antecessor and European middle Pleistocene hominins from Sima de los Huesos, early Homo possessed a postcranial neurological endowment roughly commensurate to modern humans, with implications for neurological, structural, and vascular improvements over Pan and Australopithecus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Frequency Dependent Attenuation in Rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-20

    WORK UNIT ELEMENT NO NO NO ACCESSION NO 62714E 7A10 DA DA 1𔃻 T. ,E (Incude Security Clasification ) Frequency Dependent Attenuation in Rocks Ŗ 0E;SO’.A_...P., and L. Peselnick, Investigation of internal friction in fused quartz, steel , plexiglass, and Westerly granite from 0.01 to 1.00 Hertz at 10- to 10...P., and L. Peselnick, Investigation of internal friction in fused quartz, steel , plexiglas, and Westerly granite from 0.01 to 1.00 Hertz at 10-8 to 10

  5. Cellular Scaling Rules for Primate Spinal Cords

    OpenAIRE

    Burish, Mark J.; Peebles, J. Klint; Baldwin, Mary K.; Tavares, Luciano; Kaas, Jon H.; Herculano-Houzel, Suzana

    2010-01-01

    The spinal cord can be considered a major sensorimotor interface between the body and the brain. How does the spinal cord scale with body and brain mass, and how are its numbers of neurons related to the number of neurons in the brain across species of different body and brain sizes? Here we determine the cellular composition of the spinal cord in eight primate species and find that its number of neurons varies as a linear function of cord length, and accompanies body mass raised to an expone...

  6. Post-traumatic recto-spinal fistula

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lantsberg, L.; Greenberg, G.; Laufer, L.; Hertzanu, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Acquired recto-spinal fistula has been described elsewhere as a rare complication of colorectal malignancy and Crohn's enterocolitis. We treated a young man who developed a recto-spinal fistula as a result of a high fall injury. The patient presented with meningeal signs, sepsis and perianal laceration. Computerized axial tomography revealed air in the supersellar cistern. Gastrografin enema showed that contrast material was leaking from the rectum into the spinal canal. Surgical management included a diverting sigmoid colostomy, sacral bone curettage and wide presacral drainage. To the best of our knowledge, rectospinal fistula of traumatic origin has not been previously reported in the English literature. (orig.)

  7. Nanomedicine for treating spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyler, Jacqueline Y.; Xu, Xiao-Ming; Cheng, Ji-Xin

    2013-09-01

    Spinal cord injury results in significant mortality and morbidity, lifestyle changes, and difficult rehabilitation. Treatment of spinal cord injury is challenging because the spinal cord is both complex to treat acutely and difficult to regenerate. Nanomaterials can be used to provide effective treatments; their unique properties can facilitate drug delivery to the injury site, enact as neuroprotective agents, or provide platforms to stimulate regrowth of damaged tissues. We review recent uses of nanomaterials including nanowires, micelles, nanoparticles, liposomes, and carbon-based nanomaterials for neuroprotection in the acute phase. We also review the design and neural regenerative application of electrospun scaffolds, conduits, and self-assembling peptide scaffolds.

  8. Therapeutics development for spinal muscular atrophy

    OpenAIRE

    Sumner, Charlotte J.

    2006-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy is an autosomal recessive motor neuron disease that is the leading inherited cause of infant and early childhood mortality. Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by mutation of the telomeric copy of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1), but all patients retain a centromeric copy of the gene,SMN2. SMN2 produces reduced amounts of full-length SMN mRNA, and spinal muscular atrophy likely results from insufficient levels of SMN protein in motor neurons. The SMN protein plays ...

  9. Computed tomography of the spinal disorders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohkubo, K.; Ueki, K.; Shinohara, S.; Sakoh, T. (Kagoshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Medicine)

    1981-03-01

    A comprehensive study of all spinal CT scans was performed to evaluate the diagnostic usefulness of this technique. CT scan was performed on 108 cases, including cases of ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament, spondylosis deformans, disc herniation, caries, spondylolisthesis, spinal fracture, and others. CT scan is apparently useful in demonstrating spinal canal stenosis, bony lesion, and surrounding soft tissue abnormality. In this study, we also identify the herniated intervertebral disc, so CT scan will become the primary modes of evaluation in patients with low back pain.

  10. Magnetic resonance imaging of spinal diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakatani, Mariko; Sekiya, Toru; Harada, Junta; Kawakami, Kenji; Tada, Shimpei

    1985-01-01

    Twenty-two patients were examined to determine the clinical value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in the spinal disease. Using different pulse sequences T 1 value was obtained from 38 spines; the result showed that increased T 1 value indicated spinal marrow abnormalities. A comparative study of MRI and bone scintigraphy was performed in 18 patients. Although it was not feasible to evaluate effect of therapy in metastatic disease by MRI, diffuse bone marrow disease, such as diffuse bone marrow metastases and blood dyscrasia could be detected by MRI. This limited study will suggest applicability of MRI in the spinal disease. (author)

  11. Spinal sonography in newborns and infants - part II: spinal dysraphism and tethered cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeg, K-H; Lode, H-M; Gassner, I

    2008-02-01

    Patients with cutaneous markers in the lumbo-sacral region as well as infants with bladder and bowel dysfunction, orthopedic anomalies and progressive neurological dysfunction are at risk for spinal dysraphism and tethered cord. Three types of spinal dysraphism can be distinguished: Type I - open spinal dysraphisms with a non-skin covered back mass; type II - closed spinal dysraphisms with a skin covered back mass; type III - occult spinal dysraphisms without a back mass. All spinal dysraphisms can be associated with a tethered cord, characterized by a low position of the conus medullaris below L3. Type I dysraphisms are meningomyeloceles and myeloceles, which are associated with CHIARI-II malformations characterized by the low position of the cerebellar vermis within the foramen magnum. Type II dysraphisms are lipomyeloceles, lipomyelomeningoceles, posterior meningoceles and myelocystoceles. Lipomeningoceles and lipomyelomeningoceles are characterized by a subcutaneous echogenic mass which communicates with the spinal canal and may cause tethered cord. Posterior meningoceles are, dorsal cystic space occupying lesions without internal neural tissue. Myelocystoceles are characterized by a cystic dorsal mass which communicates with a dilated central canal characteristic of syringo-hydromyelia. Type III dysraphisms without a back mass are frequently associated with cutaneous markers in the lumbo-sacral region. Sonographically dermal sinus tracts, diastematomyelia, tight filum and lipoma of the filum terminale and the caudal regression syndrome have to be distinguished. Dermal sinuses are characterized by an echogenic tract from the skin to the spinal canal, often associated with a spinal dermoid. Diastematomyelia is characterized by a complete or partial duplication of the spinal cord which can only be shown on axial images. Tight filum terminale or lipoma of the filum terminale is characterized by a thick echogenic filum with a diameter of more than 2 mm, and a conus

  12. Effect of lidocaine on spinal cord lipid peroxide levels after acute spinal cord trauma in rats

    OpenAIRE

    Yalçın, A.S.; Özer, F.; Pamir, N.; Emerk, K.

    1991-01-01

    A standard spinal cord trauma was performed on control and lidocaine-treated (5 mg/kg. i.p.) rats. Spinal cord lipid peroxide levels in the lidocaine-trcaled group were significantly lower than those of controls. No significant difference was observed in plasma lipid peroxide levels. Our results suggest a protective role of lidocaine against lipid peroxidation after experimental spinal cord trauma in rats.

  13. Non osseous intra-spinal tumors in children and adolescents: spinal column deformity (in french)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghanem, I.; Zeller, R.; Dubousset, J.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose of the study. The delay in diagnosis of spinal tumors is not rare. The chief complaint may include pain, walking disability and spinal or limb deformities. The purpose of our study is to analyze the spinal deformities associated with non osseous intra-spinal tumors, to assess the complications of treatment, and to set out a preventive protocol. Methods. The incidence and pattern of spinal deformity was assessed before tumor treatment and ultimately after laminectomy or osteoplastic laminotomy (or lamino-plasty). Results. Among the 9 cases with preexisting spinal deformity, the curve magnitude increased after laminectomy in 4. A kyphotic, kyphoscoliotic or scoliotic deformity developed in 18 cases after surgery for tumor resection. Among these 18 patients, only one had bad an adequate osteoplastic laminotomy. The treatment of spinal deformities was surgical in 12 cases, and done by either posterior or anterior and posterior combined arthrodesis. Discussion. Spinal deformity may be the main complaint of a patient who has intraspinal tumor. Prevention of post-laminectomy spinal deformity is mandatory, and could be done by osteoplastic laminotomy and the use of a brace during a minimum period of 4 to 6 months after surgery. Conclusion. Diagnosis of intraspinal tumors in children and adolescents should be done early, and lamino-arthrectomy should be replaced by osteoplastic laminotomy. (authors)

  14. Spinal Cord Independence Measure, version III: applicability to the UK spinal cord injured population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glass, Clive A; Tesio, Luigi; Itzkovich, Malka; Soni, Bakul M; Silva, Pedro; Mecci, Munawar; Chadwick, Raymond; el Masry, Waghi; Osman, Aheed; Savic, Gordana; Gardner, Brian; Bergström, Ebba; Catz, Amiram

    2009-09-01

    To examine the validity, reliability and usefulness of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure for the UK spinal cord injury population. Multi-centre cohort study. Four UK regional spinal cord injury centres. Eighty-six people with spinal cord injury. Spinal Cord Independence Measure and Functional Independence Measure on admission analysed using inferential statistics, and Rasch analysis of Spinal Cord Independence Measure. Internal consistency, inter-rater reliability, discriminant validity; Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscale match between distribution of item difficulty and patient ability measurements; reliability of patient ability measures; fit of data to Rasch model; unidimensionality of subscales; hierarchical ordering of categories within items; differential item functioning across patient groups. Scale reliability (kappa coefficients range 0.491-0.835; (p Spinal Cord Independence Measure subscales compatible with stringent Rasch requirements; mean infit indices high; distinct strata of abilities identified; most thresholds ordered; item hierarchy stable across clinical groups and centres. Misfit and differences in item hierarchy identified. Difficulties assessing central cord injuries highlighted. Conventional statistical and Rasch analyses justify the use of the Spinal Cord Independence Measure in clinical practice and research in the UK. Cross-cultural validity may be further improved.

  15. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Ferguson, Adam R.; Huie, J. Russell; Crown, Eric D.; Grau, James W.

    2012-01-01

    The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive) stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI) field in...

  16. Interleukin-33 treatment reduces secondary injury and improves functional recovery after contusion spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomeshchik, Yuriy; Kidin, Iurii; Korhonen, Paula; Savchenko, Ekaterina; Jaronen, Merja; Lehtonen, Sarka; Wojciechowski, Sara; Kanninen, Katja; Koistinaho, Jari; Malm, Tarja

    2015-02-01

    Interleukin-33 (IL-33) is a member of the interleukin-1 cytokine family and highly expressed in the naïve mouse brain and spinal cord. Despite the fact that IL-33 is known to be inducible by various inflammatory stimuli, its cellular localization in the central nervous system and role in pathological conditions is controversial. Administration of recombinant IL-33 has been shown to attenuate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis progression in one study, yet contradictory reports also exist. Here we investigated for the first time the pattern of IL-33 expression in the contused mouse spinal cord and demonstrated that after spinal cord injury (SCI) IL-33 was up-regulated and exhibited a nuclear localization predominantly in astrocytes. Importantly, we found that treatment with recombinant IL-33 alleviated secondary damage by significantly decreasing tissue loss, demyelination and astrogliosis in the contused mouse spinal cord, resulting in dramatically improved functional recovery. We identified both central and peripheral mechanisms of IL-33 action. In spinal cord, IL-33 treatment reduced the expression of pro-inflammatory tumor necrosis factor-alpha and promoted the activation of anti-inflammatory arginase-1 positive M2 microglia/macrophages, which chronically persisted in the injured spinal cord for up to at least 42 days after the treatment. In addition, IL-33 treatment showed a tendency towards reduced T-cell infiltration into the spinal cord. In the periphery, IL-33 treatment induced a shift towards the Th2 type cytokine profile and reduced the percentage and absolute number of cytotoxic, tumor necrosis factor-alpha expressing CD4+ cells in the spleen. Additionally, IL-33 treatment increased expression of T-regulatory cell marker FoxP3 and reduced expression of M1 marker iNOS in the spleen. Taken together, these results provide the first evidence that IL-33 administration is beneficial after CNS trauma. Treatment with IL33 may offer a novel therapeutic

  17. Evaluation of artificial sweat in athletes with spinal cord injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchett, R C; Bishop, P A; Yang, Z; Pritchett, K L; Green, J M; Katica, C P; Del Pozzi, A T

    2010-05-01

    Athletes with spinal cord injury often experience high heat storage due to reduced sweating capacity below the spinal injury. Spray bottle (SB) may be used to apply mist for evaporative cooling during breaks in competitions. This study examined the efficacy of SB during rest breaks. Seven participants, four female and three males, (mean +/- SD age 24 +/- 4.1 year, weight 56.2 +/- 7.0 kg, upper-body VO(2) peak 2.4 +/- 0.6 l/min) volunteered for the study. Participants were paraplegic athletes (T3-T12/L1) with both complete and incomplete lesions. Participants arm-cranked using a ramp protocol in an environment of 21 +/- 1.5 degrees C and 55 +/- 3% rh once using a SB during 1-min rest between 7-min stages of increasing intensity and once without the SB (CON). Mean total work was similar (p = 0.86) for the SB and CON (2495.7 +/- 914.6 vs. 2407.1 +/- 982.3 kJ, respectively). Likewise, the mean work times were similar between trials (27 +/- 6 and 26 +/- 7 min for SB and CON, respectively). Furthermore, there were no significant differences detected between trials for skin temperature, rectal temperature, esophageal temperature (p > 0.05). There were no statistically significant differences detected between trials for RPE (p > 0.05). In conclusion, the application of artificial sweat via SB was ineffective in attenuating the onset of uncompensable heat strain during high-intensity arm exercise in a comfortable environment.

  18. Spinal antinflammatory action of Diclofenac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandri, Alberto

    2016-06-01

    Diclofenac is a non-steroidal antinflammatory drug (NSAID) that finds indication in the treatment of debilitating pathologies characterized by chronic pain sustained by inflammation, such as in rheumatic disease (rheumatoid arthritis or osteoarthritis) or periarthritis, bursitis, tendonitis, myositis and sciatica. Its properties differentiate it from other NSAIDs. In fact, diclofenac's increased effect on spinal nociception and chronic neuro-inflammatory pain may be referred to: 1) its synergistic effects on peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR- γ) activation and prostaglandin synthesis inhibition (COX-2 inhibition); 2) its capacity of suppressing neuronal hyperexcitability through the blockage of neuronal K+ channels in a concentration-dependant manner; and 3) its facility to cross the blood-brain barrier.

  19. Spinal imaging and image analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Jianhua

    2015-01-01

    This book is instrumental to building a bridge between scientists and clinicians in the field of spine imaging by introducing state-of-the-art computational methods in the context of clinical applications.  Spine imaging via computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and other radiologic imaging modalities, is essential for noninvasively visualizing and assessing spinal pathology. Computational methods support and enhance the physician’s ability to utilize these imaging techniques for diagnosis, non-invasive treatment, and intervention in clinical practice. Chapters cover a broad range of topics encompassing radiological imaging modalities, clinical imaging applications for common spine diseases, image processing, computer-aided diagnosis, quantitative analysis, data reconstruction and visualization, statistical modeling, image-guided spine intervention, and robotic surgery. This volume serves a broad audience as  contributions were written by both clinicians and researchers, which reflects the inte...

  20. Spinal instability in ankylosing spondylitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badve Siddharth

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Unstable spinal lesions in patients with ankylosing spondylitis are common and have a high incidence of associated neurological deficit. The evolution and presentation of these lesions is unclear and the management strategies can be confusing. We present retrospective analysis of the cases of ankylosing spondylitis developing spinal instability either due to spondylodiscitis or fractures for mechanisms of injury, presentations, management strategies and outcome. Materials and Methods: In a retrospective analysis of 16 cases of ankylosing spondylitis, treated surgically for unstable spinal lesions over a period of 12 years (1995-2007; 87.5% (n=14 patients had low energy (no obvious/trivial trauma while 12.5% (n=2 patients sustained high energy trauma. The most common presentation was pain associated with neurological deficit. The surgical indications included neurological deficit, chronic pain due to instability and progressive deformity. All patients were treated surgically with anterior surgery in 18.8% (n=3 patients, posterior in 56.2% (n=9 patients and combined approach in 25% (n=4 patients. Instrumented fusion was carried out in 87.5% (n=14 patients. Average surgical duration was 3.84 (Range 2-7.5 hours, blood loss 765.6 (± 472.5 ml and follow-up 54.5 (Range 18-54 months. The patients were evaluated for pain score, Frankel neurological grading, deformity progression and radiological fusion. One patient died of medical complications a week following surgery. Results: Intra-operative adverse events like dural tears and inadequate deformity correction occurred in 18.7% (n=3 patients (Cases 6, 7 and 8 which could be managed conservatively. There was a significant improvement in the Visual analogue score for pain from a pre-surgical median of 8 to post-surgical median of 2 (P=0.001, while the neurological status improved in 90% (n=9 patients among those with preoperative neurological deficit who could be followed-up (n =10. Frankel

  1. SEISMIC ATTENUATION FOR RESERVOIR CHARACTERIZATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel Walls; M.T. Taner; Naum Derzhi; Gary Mavko; Jack Dvorkin

    2003-12-01

    We have developed and tested technology for a new type of direct hydrocarbon detection. The method uses inelastic rock properties to greatly enhance the sensitivity of surface seismic methods to the presence of oil and gas saturation. These methods include use of energy absorption, dispersion, and attenuation (Q) along with traditional seismic attributes like velocity, impedance, and AVO. Our approach is to combine three elements: (1) a synthesis of the latest rock physics understanding of how rock inelasticity is related to rock type, pore fluid types, and pore microstructure, (2) synthetic seismic modeling that will help identify the relative contributions of scattering and intrinsic inelasticity to apparent Q attributes, and (3) robust algorithms that extract relative wave attenuation attributes from seismic data. This project provides: (1) Additional petrophysical insight from acquired data; (2) Increased understanding of rock and fluid properties; (3) New techniques to measure reservoir properties that are not currently available; and (4) Provide tools to more accurately describe the reservoir and predict oil location and volumes. These methodologies will improve the industry's ability to predict and quantify oil and gas saturation distribution, and to apply this information through geologic models to enhance reservoir simulation. We have applied for two separate patents relating to work that was completed as part of this project.

  2. Chlorine signal attenuation in concrete.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naqvi, A A; Maslehuddin, M; Ur-Rehman, Khateeb; Al-Amoudi, O S B

    2015-11-01

    The intensity of prompt gamma-ray was measured at various depths from chlorine-contaminated silica fume (SF) concrete slab concrete specimens using portable neutron generator-based prompt gamma-ray setup. The intensity of 6.11MeV chloride gamma-rays was measured from the chloride contaminated slab at distance of 15.25, 20.25, 25.25, 30.25 and 35.25cm from neutron target in a SF cement concrete slab specimens. Due to attenuation of thermal neutron flux and emitted gamma-ray intensity in SF cement concrete at various depths, the measured intensity of chlorine gamma-rays decreases non-linearly with increasing depth in concrete. A good agreement was noted between the experimental results and the results of Monte Carlo simulation. This study has provided useful experimental data for evaluating the chloride contamination in the SF concrete utilizing gamma-ray attenuation method. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Spinal and Paraspinal Ewing Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R.; Shahlaee, Amir H.; Morris, Christopher G.; Gibbs, C. Parker; Scarborough, Mark T.; Pincus, David W.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To perform a review of the 40-year University of Florida experience treating spinal and paraspinal Ewing tumors. Patients and Methods: A total of 27 patients were treated between 1965 and 2007. For local management, 21 patients were treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 6 with surgery plus RT. All patients with metastatic disease were treated with RT alone. The risk profiles of each group were otherwise similar. The median age was 17 years, and the most frequent subsite was the sacral spine (n = 9). The median potential follow-up was 16 years. Results: The 5-year actuarial overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rate was 62%, 62%, and 90%, respectively. For the nonmetastatic subset (n = 22), the 5-year overall survival, cause-specific survival, and local control rate was 71%, 71%, and 89%, respectively. The local control rate was 84% for patients treated with RT alone vs. 100% for those treated with surgery plus RT. Patients who were >14 years old and those who were treated with intensive therapy demonstrated superior local control. Of 9 patients in our series with Frankel C or greater neurologic deficits at presentation, 7 experienced a full recovery with treatment. Of the 27 patients, 37% experienced Common Toxicity Criteria Grade 3 or greater toxicity, including 2 deaths from sepsis. Conclusion: Aggressive management of spinal and paraspinal Ewing tumors with RT with or without surgery results in high toxicity but excellent local control and neurologic outcomes. Efforts should be focused on identifying disease amenable to combined modality local therapy and improving RT techniques.

  4. Instrumented stabilization in spinal tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Anil Kumar; Jain, Saurabh

    2012-02-01

    Spinal tuberculosis (TB) produces neurological complications and grotesque spinal deformity, which in children increases even with treatment and after achieving healing. Long-standing, severe deformity leads to painful costo-pelvic impingement, respiratory distress, risk of developing late-onset paraplegia and consequent reduction in quality and longevity of life. The treatment objective is to avoid the sequelae of neural complications and achieve the healed status with a near-normal spine. In TB, the spine may become unstable if all three columns are diseased. Pathological fracture/dislocation of a diseased vertebral body may occur secondary to mechanical insult. Surgical decompression adds further instability, as part of the diseased vertebral body is excised. The insertion of a metallic implant is to provide mechanical stability and the use of an implant in tubercular infection is safe. Indications for instrumented stabilisation can be categorised as: (a) pan vertebral disease, in which all three columns are diseased; (b) long-segment disease, in which after surgical decompression a bone graft >5 cm is inserted with instrumentation to prevent graft-related complications and consequent progression of kyphosis and neural complications and (c) when surgical correction of a kyphosis is performed when both anterior decompression and posterior column shortening is required. The implant choice should be individualised according to the case. Pedicle screw fixation in kyphus correction in healed disease is a most suitable implant. Hartshill sublaminar wiring stabilisation in active disease is a suitable implant to stabilise the spine, taking purchase against healthy posterior complex of the vertebral body to save a segment.

  5. Beam Attenuators and the Risk of Unrecognized Large-Fraction Irradiation of Critical Tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luka, S.; Marks, J.E.

    2015-01-15

    The use of radiation beam attenuators led to radiation injury of the spinal cord in one patient and of the peripheral nerve in another due to unsuspected large-fraction irradiation. The anatomic distribution of radiation dose was reconstructed in the sagittal plane for the patient who developed radiation myelopathy and in the axial plane for the patient who developed peripheral neuropathy. The actual dose delivered to the injured structure in each patient was taken from the dose distribution and recorded along with the time, number of fractions, and dose per fraction. The patient who developed radiation myelopathy received a total of 46.5 Gy in twenty-three 2.1 Gy fractions in 31 days to the upper cervical spinal cord where the thickness of the neck was less than the central axis thickness due to cervical lordosis and absence of a posterior compensating filter. The patient who developed peripheral neuropathy received 55 Gy in twenty-five 2.2 Gy fractions in 50 days to the femoral nerve using bolus over the groins and an anterior one-half value layer Cerrobend pelvic block to bias the dose anteriorly. Compensating filters and other beam attenuators should be used with caution because they may result in unsuspected large-fraction irradiation and total doses of radiation that exceed the tolerance of critical structures.

  6. The CT findings of spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yizhao; Liu Jianming; Ke Yong; XiaoYong; Liu Rihua

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the CT diagnosis and differential diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis. Methods: CT manifestations were retrospectively analyzed in 43 cases of spinal tuberculosis. This series included 24 males and 19 females, aged 10-57 years. 15 cases were confirmed by operation and pathology; 18 cases were confirmed by biopsy and 10 cases were cured by antituberculosis therapy. Results: The CT manifestations of spinal tuberculosis were: 1) mottling, patchy, caved or faveolate bone destructions (43/43 cases); 2) elevated density of the involved vertebrae (13/43 cases); 3) destruction of intervertebral discs (32/43 cases); 4) formation of sequester (30/43 cases); 5) para-vertebral abscess, often with calcification (38/43 cases); 6) osseous vertebral canal narrowing (8/43 cases); 7) vertebrae compression (28/43 cases). Conclusion: CT scan is a valuable modality for the diagnosis and differential diagnosis of spinal tuberculosis

  7. An ergonomic task analysis of spinal anaesthesia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ajmal, Muhammad

    2009-12-01

    Ergonomics is the study of physical interaction between humans and their working environment. The objective of this study was to characterize the performance of spinal anaesthesia in an acute hospital setting, applying ergonomic task analysis.

  8. Types of SMA (Spinal Muscular Atrophy)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... genes other than the SMN1 gene. Spinal Muscular Atrophy Respiratory Distress (SMARD) SMARD is a very rare ... and 50. It causes muscle weakness and wasting (atrophy) throughout the body, which is most noticeable in ...

  9. Simulation and resident education in spinal neurosurgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohm, Parker E; Arnold, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    A host of factors have contributed to the increasing use of simulation in neurosurgical resident education. Although the number of simulation-related publications has increased exponentially over the past two decades, no studies have specifically examined the role of simulation in resident education in spinal neurosurgery. We performed a structured search of several databases to identify articles detailing the use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education in an attempt to catalogue potential applications for its use. A brief history of simulation in medicine is given, followed by current trends of spinal simulation utilization in residency programs. General themes from the literature are identified that are integral for implementing simulation into neurosurgical residency curriculum. Finally, various applications are reported. The use of simulation in spinal neurosurgery education is not as ubiquitous in comparison to other neurosurgical subspecialties, but many promising methods of simulation are available for augmenting resident education.

  10. Cervical spinal cord injury in abused children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Kenneth W; Avellino, Anthony M; Sugar, Naomi F; Ellenbogen, Richard G

    2008-04-01

    Five infants and toddlers who sustained cervical spinal cord injury as the result of child abuse are described. Three cases are previously unreported. Diagnosis was complicated by coexistent brain injuries and their treatments, subtle and/or evolving paralysis, and central cord syndrome, in which arm function is diminished but leg function is preserved. Definitive spinal imaging by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography, and plain radiographs was delayed because of life support efforts. When completed, the MRI was most sensitive to cord injury. Evidence of associated bony spinal injury was often absent or unapparent until healing occurred; 4 children had spinal cord injury without (or with minimal) radiological abnormality. The 3 children presenting to our hospital with cord injury represent 1% of the estimated cases of inflicted head injury seen during a 23-year period.

  11. Factors associated with myelopathy in spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitada, Yuki; Izawa, Kazutaka; Imoto, Kazuhiko; Yonenobu, Kazuo

    2009-01-01

    To identity factors associated with Pott's disease, 49 spinal tuberculosis patients were classified into a group of 22 patients with a neurological deficit and a group of 27 patients with no neurological deficits, and their clinical findings (gender, age, pulmonary tuberculosis, antituberculous chemotherapy, C reactive protein (CRP), nutritional status, and duration of disease) and radiographic findings (degree of canal encroachment, pathology and level of dural compression, number of affected vertebral bodies, range of paravertebral abscesses, signals in the spinal cord on MRI, kyphotic angle, and spinal instability) were compared. The results showed that malnutrition, severe canal encroachment, and abnormal signal within the spinal cord on MRI were associated with neurological complications. Factors associated with the degree of neurological deficit were unclear because the study population was too small. (author)

  12. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Pro56Ser VAPB mutation: proximal SMA with dysautonomia. Muscle Nerve. 2006 Dec;34(6):731-9. Citation on PubMed Monani UR. Spinal muscular atrophy: a deficiency in a ubiquitous protein; a motor ...

  13. Spinal cord stimulation: Background and clinical application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Kaare

    2014-01-01

    Background Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is a surgical treatment for chronic neuropathic pain refractory to conventional treatment. SCS treatment consists of one or more leads implanted in the epidural space of the spinal canal, connected to an implantable pulse generator (IPG). Each lead carries...... a number of contacts capable of delivering a weak electrical current to the spinal cord, evoking a feeling of peripheral paresthesia. With correct indication and if implanted by an experienced implanter, success rates generally are in the range of about 50–75%. Common indications include complex regional...... is described in detail and illustrated with a series of intraoperative pictures. Finally, indications for SCS are discussed along with some of the controversies surrounding the therapy. Implications The reader is presented with a broad overview of spinal cord stimulation, including the historical...

  14. Spinal Cord Injury: Hope through Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... I get more information? Glossary Introduction Until World War II, a serious spinal cord injury (SCI) usually ... counseling to provide social and emotional support. The education and active involvement of the newly injured person ...

  15. Estimating Rain Attenuation In Satellite Communication Links

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manning, R. M.

    1991-01-01

    Attenuation computed with help of statistical model and meteorological data. NASA Lewis Research Center Satellite Link Attenuation Model (SLAM) program QuickBASIC computer program evaluating static and dynamic statistical assessment of impact of rain attenuation on communication link established between Earth terminal and geosynchronous satellite. Application in specification, design, and assessment of satellite communication links for any terminal location in continental United States. Written in Microsoft QuickBASIC.

  16. Attenuation correction in SPECT images using attenuation map estimation with its emission data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakoli, Meysam; Naji, Maryam; Abdollahi, Ali; Kalantari, Faraz

    2017-03-01

    Photon attenuation during SPECT imaging significantly degrades the diagnostic outcome and the quantitative accuracy of final reconstructed images. It is well known that attenuation correction can be done by using iterative reconstruction methods if we access to attenuation map. Two methods have been used to calculate the attenuation map: transmission-based and transmissionless techniques. In this phantom study, we evaluated the importance of attenuation correction by quantitative evaluation of errors associated with each method. For transmissionless approach, the attenuation map was estimated from the emission data only. An EM algorithm with attenuation model was developed and used for attenuation correction during image reconstruction. Finally, a comparison was done between reconstructed images using our OSEM code and analytical FBP method before and after attenuation correction. The results of measurements showed that: our programs are capable to reconstruct SPECT images and correct the attenuation effects. Moreover, to evaluate reconstructed image quality before and after attenuation correction we applied a novel approach using Image Quality Index. Attenuation correction increases the quality and quantitative accuracy in both methods. This increase is independent of activity in quantity factor and decreases with activity in quality factor. In EM algorithm, it is necessary to use regularization to obtain true distribution of attenuation coefficients.

  17. Extradural spinal meningioma: Revisiting a rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guruprasad Bettaswamy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Spinal meningiomas are mostly intradural in location although at times these are associated with some extradural extensions. Purely extradural spinal meningiomas (EDSMs are however, extremely rare and when present, may cause diagnostic dilemma preoperatively. Only seven cases of pure EDSM have been reported till date. In this paper, we describe two cases of EDSM affecting the cervical spine and present their clinical profiles, radiological findings, operative management, and follow-up data, along with a review of the literature.

  18. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Wei; Qin, Wen; Hao, Nanxin; Wang, Yibin; Zong, Genlin

    2012-01-01

    Background Although diffusion tensor imaging has been successfully applied in brain research for decades, several main difficulties have hindered its extended utilization in spinal cord imaging. Purpose To assess the feasibility and clinical value of diffusion tensor imaging and tractography for evaluating chronic spinal cord compression. Material and Methods Single-shot spin-echo echo-planar DT sequences were scanned in 42 spinal cord compression patients and 49 healthy volunteers. The mean values of the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy were measured in region of interest at the cervical and lower thoracic spinal cord. The patients were divided into two groups according to the high signal on T2WI (the SCC-HI group and the SCC-nHI group for with or without high signal). A one-way ANOVA was used. Diffusion tensor tractography was used to visualize the morphological features of normal and impaired white matter. Results There were no statistically significant differences in the apparent diffusion coefficient and fractional anisotropy values between the different spinal cord segments of the normal subjects. All of the patients in the SCC-HI group had increased apparent diffusion coefficient values and decreased fractional anisotropy values at the lesion level compared to the normal controls. However, there were no statistically significant diffusion index differences between the SCC-nHI group and the normal controls. In the diffusion tensor imaging maps, the normal spinal cord sections were depicted as fiber tracts that were color-encoded to a cephalocaudal orientation. The diffusion tensor images were compressed to different degrees in all of the patients. Conclusion Diffusion tensor imaging and tractography are promising methods for visualizing spinal cord tracts and can provide additional information in clinical studies in spinal cord compression

  19. Cell Therapy To Obtain Spinal Fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    and allografts have been commonly used in spinal fusion, revision total hip arthroplasty , maxillofacial reconstruction, and repair of segmental...Goldberg VM. Selection of bone grafts for revision total hip arthroplasty . Clin Orthop Relat Res 2000 Dec(381):68-76. 3. Nishida J, Shimamura T. Methods...require bone grafting(4), as do millions of total joint arthroplasties , spinal arthrodeses, maxillofacial surgeries and implant fixations(5). In

  20. Radiosurgery of spinal meningiomas and schwannomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kufeld, M; Wowra, B; Muacevic, A; Zausinger, Stefan; Tonn, Jörg-Christian

    2012-02-01

    Purpose of this study is to analyze local control, clinical symptoms and toxicity after image-guided radiosurgery of spinal meningiomas and schwannomas. Standard treatment of benign spinal lesions is microsurgical resection. While a few publications have reported about radiosurgery for benign spinal lesions, this is the first study analyzing the outcome of robotic radiosurgery for benign spinal tumors, treated exclusively with a non-invasive, fiducial free, single-fraction setup. Thirty-six patients with spinal meningiomas or schwannomas were treated, utilizing a robotic radiosurgery system (CyberKnife®, Accuray Inc. Sunnyvale CA), and were followed prospectively. Medical history, histology, clinical symptoms and radiographic outcome were recorded. Thirty-nine spinal lesions were treated because of tumor recurrence, remnants after microsurgery, multiple lesions, or rejection of open surgery. Median age was 45 years (range 18-80 years). Median target volume was 3.4 cm(3) (range 0.2-43.4 cm(3)). Histology revealed 28 schwannomas and 11 meningiomas (WHO grade I). All spinal levels were affected. Median prescription dose was 14 Gray (95% C.I. 13.4-14 Gy) to the 70% isodose. After a median follow-up of 18 months (range 6-50 months) no local tumor progression was detected. 20 lesions (51%) remained stable, 19 tumors (49%) decreased in size. One patient with schwannomatosis was treated repeatedly for three new tumor locations. Pain was the initial symptom in 16 of 25 schwannoma patients, and in 3 of 11 patients with meningiomas. Pain levels decreased in 8/19 patients. All but one patient with motor deficits remained clinically stable. No myelopathic signs where found. Single-session radiosurgery for benign spinal tumors in selected patients has proven to inhibit tumor progression within the observed period without signs of early toxicity. Radiosurgery offers an additional treatment option, if microsurgery is not feasible in cases of tumor recurrence, post

  1. Noiseless attenuation using an optical parametric amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewster, R. A.; Nodurft, I. C.; Pittman, T. B.; Franson, J. D.

    2017-10-01

    The process of heralded noiseless amplification, and the inverse process of heralded noiseless attenuation, have potential applications in the context of quantum communications. Although several different physical implementations of heralded noiseless amplifiers have now been demonstrated, the research on heralded noiseless attenuators has been largely confined to a beam-splitter based approach. Here we show that an optical parametric amplifier (OPA), combined with appropriate heralding, can also serve as a heralded noiseless attenuator. The counterintuitive use of an optical amplifier as an attenuator is only possible due to the probabilistic nature of the device.

  2. Attenuation corrected SPECT using transmission measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziegler, S.I.; Ficaro, E.P.; Boening, G.; Schwaiger, M.

    1996-01-01

    Modern SPECT instrumentation allows attenuation correction in cardiac scans by using transmission measurements. Simultaneous transmission and emission measurements are feasible with different geometries in multihead SPECT systems and are already commercially available. The selection of the transmission nuclide affects the quality of data, depending on the emission nuclide used. Iterative reconstruction methods have to be implemented to get accurate results in the case of heterogeneous attenuation distributions. Methodological aspects concerning simultaneous scatter and attenuation correction have to be studied in future. The clinical significance of routine attenuation correction measurements for myocardial perfusion has to be shown in a large patient population. (orig.) [de

  3. Characterizing the location of spinal and vertebral levels in the human cervical spinal cord.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadotte, D W; Cadotte, A; Cohen-Adad, J; Fleet, D; Livne, M; Wilson, J R; Mikulis, D; Nugaeva, N; Fehlings, M G

    2015-04-01

    Advanced MR imaging techniques are critical to understanding the pathophysiology of conditions involving the spinal cord. We provide a novel, quantitative solution to map vertebral and spinal cord levels accounting for anatomic variability within the human spinal cord. For the first time, we report a population distribution of the segmental anatomy of the cervical spinal cord that has direct implications for the interpretation of advanced imaging studies most often conducted across groups of subjects. Twenty healthy volunteers underwent a T2-weighted, 3T MRI of the cervical spinal cord. Two experts marked the C3-C8 cervical nerve rootlets, C3-C7 vertebral bodies, and pontomedullary junction. A semiautomated algorithm was used to locate the centerline of the spinal cord and measure rostral-caudal distances from a fixed point in the brain stem, the pontomedullary junction, to each of the spinal rootlets and vertebral bodies. Distances to each location were compared across subjects. Six volunteers had 2 additional scans in neck flexion and extension to measure the effects of patient positioning in the scanner. We demonstrated that substantial variation exists in the rostral-caudal position of spinal cord segments among individuals and that prior methods of predicting spinal segments are imprecise. We also show that neck flexion or extension has little effect on the relative location of vertebral-versus-spinal levels. Accounting for spinal level variation is lacking in existing imaging studies. Future studies should account for this variation for accurate interpretation of the neuroanatomic origin of acquired MR signals. © 2015 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  4. Granulocyte colony stimulating factor attenuates inflammation in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giniatullina Raisa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Granulocyte colony stimulating factor (GCSF is protective in animal models of various neurodegenerative diseases. We investigated whether pegfilgrastim, GCSF with sustained action, is protective in a mouse model of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS. ALS is a fatal neurodegenerative disease with manifestations of upper and lower motoneuron death and muscle atrophy accompanied by inflammation in the CNS and periphery. Methods Human mutant G93A superoxide dismutase (SOD1 ALS mice were treated with pegfilgrastim starting at the presymptomatic stage and continued until the end stage. After long-term pegfilgrastim treatment, the inflammation status was defined in the spinal cord and peripheral tissues including hematopoietic organs and muscle. The effect of GCSF on spinal cord neuron survival and microglia, bone marrow and spleen monocyte activation was assessed in vitro. Results Long-term pegfilgrastim treatment prolonged mutant SOD1 mice survival and attenuated both astro- and microgliosis in the spinal cord. Pegfilgrastim in SOD1 mice modulated the inflammatory cell populations in the bone marrow and spleen and reduced the production of pro-inflammatory cytokine in monocytes and microglia. The mobilization of hematopoietic stem cells into the circulation was restored back to basal level after long-term pegfilgrastim treatment in SOD1 mice while the storage of Ly6C expressing monocytes in the bone marrow and spleen remained elevated. After pegfilgrastim treatment, an increased proportion of these cells in the degenerative muscle was detected at the end stage of ALS. Conclusions GCSF attenuated inflammation in the CNS and the periphery in a mouse model of ALS and thereby delayed the progression of the disease. This mechanism of action targeting inflammation provides a new perspective of the usage of GCSF in the treatment of ALS.

  5. [Spinal accessory nerve and lymphatic neck dissection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinsolle, V; Michelet, V; Majoufre, C; Caix, P; Siberchicot, F; Pinsolle, J

    1997-09-01

    Radical neck dissection was the golden standard of treatment for cervical nodes in head and neck tumors. From the seventies, the preservation of the spinal accessory nerve has become increasingly popular in order to improve the functional result of the neck dissections. The aim of this study was to assess the degree of functional disability associated with each type of neck dissection and the value of anatomical references for dissection of the spinal accessory nerve. One hundred twenty seven patients were evaluated 1 month and 1 year after radical, functional or supraomohyoid neck dissection with a questionnaire and a physical examination. Anatomical measurements of the spinal accessory nerve were performed in 20 patients. We found considerable or severe shoulder dysfunction in 7%, 34% and 51% respectively of patients in whom supraomohyoid, functional and radical neck dissections were performed. Furthermore 49% of patients having undergone a radical neck dissection had little or no symptoms. Sacrifice of the spinal accessory nerve in radical neck dissection may lead to shoulder dysfunction. A functional disability may also be associated, although in a less extent, with any neck dissection in which the spinal accessory nerve is dissected and placed in traction. There is a large variation in the degree of functional disability and pain in patients with similar neck dissections. The course of the spinal accessory nerve in the neck makes it particularly vulnerable to injury during the dissection near the sternocleidomastoid muscle and in the posterior cervical triangle.

  6. Diffusion tensor imaging in spinal cord injury

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamble, Ravindra B; Venkataramana, Neelam K; Naik, Arun L; Rao, Shailesh V

    2011-01-01

    To assess the feasibility of spinal tractography in patients of spinal cord injury vs a control group and to compare fractional anisotropy (FA) values between the groups. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) was performed in the spinal cord of 29 patients (18 patients and 11 controls). DTI was done in the cervical region if the cord injury was at the dorsal or lumbar region and in the conus region if cord injury was in the cervical or dorsal region. FA was calculated for the patients and the controls and the values were compared. The mean FA value was 0.550±0.09 in the control group and 0.367±0.14 in the patients; this difference was statistically significant (P=0.001). Spinal tractography is a feasible technique to assess the extent of spinal cord injury by FA, which is reduced in patients of spinal cord injury, suggesting possible Wallerian degeneration. In future, this technique may become a useful tool for assessing cord injury patients after stem cell therapy, with improvement in FA values indicating axonal regeneration

  7. Spinal motoneurone distress during experimental allergic encephalomyelitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giardino, L; Giuliani, A; Fernandez, M; Calzà, L

    2004-10-01

    The main pathophysiological feature characterizing multiple sclerosis (MS) is demyelination. However, the possibility of neural damage has recently been proposed as a mechanism in chronic disease. Experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) is the most widely used experimental model for MS. We investigated occurrences of microglial activation and astrocytosis in the spinal cord, choline acetyl-transferase (ChAT) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA regulation in spinal motoneurones during EAE. EAE was induced in female Lewis rats by injecting guinea pig spinal cord tissue in complete Freund's adjuvant (CFA) to which heat-inactivated Mycobacterium had been added. Rats injected with CFA and uninjected rats were used as controls. ChAT and CGRP mRNAs were studied by in situ hybridization in the lumbar spinal cord and a computerized grain counting procedure was used for quantification. No differences in ChAT mRNA level were found between control and CFA-injected rats. ChAT mRNA level was strongly reduced in EAE 14 days after immunization and then recovered (29 days after immunization). CGRP mRNA increased 14 days after immunization, and then recovered to control level. Extensive long-lasting gliosis developed in the spinal cord and around motoneurones and a transient expression of p75LNGFR in motoneurones was also found. These data suggest that during EAE, gliosis induces distress in spinal cord neurones involving the synthesis enzyme for the main transmitter.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells promote augmented response of endogenous neural stem cells in spinal cord injury of rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Rocha Araujo

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Traumatic spinal cord injury results in severe neurological deficits, mostly irreversible. The cell therapy represents a strategy for treatment particularly with the use of stem cells with satisfactory results in several experimental models. The aim of the study was to compare the treatment of spinal cord injury (SCI with and without mesenchymal stem cells (MSC, to investigate whether MSCs migrate and/or remain at the site of injury, and to analyze the effects of MSCs on inflammation, astrocytic reactivity and activation of endogenous stem cells. Three hours after SCI, animals received bone marrow-derived MSCs (1×107 in 1mL PBS, IV. Animals were euthanized 24 hours, 7 and 21 days post-injury. The MSC were not present in the site of the lesion and the immunofluorescent evaluation showed significant attenuation of inflammatory response with reduction in macrophages labeled with anti-CD68 antibody (ED1, decreased immunoreactivity of astrocytes (GFAP+ and greater activation of endogenous stem cells (nestin+ in the treated groups. Therefore, cell transplantation have a positive effect on recovery from traumatic spinal cord injury possibly due to the potential of MSCs to attenuate the immune response.

  9. Serotonin(2) receptors mediate respiratory recovery after cervical spinal cord hemisection in adult rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, S Y; Basura, G J; Goshgarian, H G

    2001-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to specifically investigate the involvement of serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT(2))] receptors in 5-HT-mediated respiratory recovery after cervical hemisection. Experiments were conducted on C(2) spinal cord-hemisected, anesthetized (chloral hydrate, 400 mg/kg ip), vagotomized, pancuronium- paralyzed, and artificially ventilated female Sprague-Dawley rats in which CO(2) levels were monitored and maintained. Twenty-four hours after spinal hemisection, the ipsilateral phrenic nerve displayed no respiratory-related activity indicative of a functionally complete hemisection. Intravenous administration of the 5-HT(2A/2C)-receptor agonist (+/-)-2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine hydrochloride (DOI) induced respiratory-related activity in the phrenic nerve ipsilateral to hemisection under conditions in which CO(2) was maintained at constant levels and augmented the activity induced under conditions of hypercapnia. The effects of DOI were found to be dose dependent, and the recovery of activity could be maintained for up to 2 h after a single injection. DOI-induced recovery was attenuated by the 5-HT(2)-receptor antagonist ketanserin but not with the 5-HT(2C)-receptor antagonist RS-102221, suggesting that 5-HT(2A) and not necessarily 5-HT(2C) receptors may be involved in the induction of respiratory recovery after cervical spinal cord injury.

  10. Decrease of PPARδ in Type-1-Like Diabetic Rat for Higher Mortality after Spinal Cord Injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Chia Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors-δ (PPARδ expression in rats after spinal cord injury (SCI have been previously reported. Diabetic animals show a higher mortality after SCI. However, the relationship between the progress of diabetes and PPARδ in SCI remains unknown. In the present study, we used compressive SCI in streptozotocin-(STZ- induced diabetic rats. GW0742, a PPARδ agonist, was used to evaluate its merit in STZ rats after SCI. Changes in PPARδ expression were detected by Western blot. Survival rates were also estimated. A lower expression of PPARδ in spinal cords of STZ-diabetic rats was observed. In addition, the survival times in two-week induction diabetes were longer than those in eight-week induction group, which is consistent with the expression of PPARδ in the spinal cord. Moreover, GW0742 significantly increased the survival time of STZ rats. Furthermore, their motor function and pain response were attenuated by GSK0660, a selective PPARδ antagonist, but were enhanced by GW0742. In conclusion, the data suggest that higher mortality rate in STZ-diabetic rats with SCI is associated with the decrease of PPARδ expression. Thus, change of PPARδ expression with the progress of diabetes seems responsible for the higher mortality rate after SCI.

  11. Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics at the lumbosacral level in patients with spinal stenosis: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chun, Se-Woong; Lee, Hack-Jin; Nam, Koong-Ho; Sohn, Chul-Ho; Kim, Kwang Dong; Jeong, Eun-Jin; Chung, Sun G; Kim, Keewon; Kim, Dong-Joo

    2017-01-01

    Spinal stenosis is a common degenerative condition. However, how neurogenic claudication develops has not been clearly elucidated. Moreover, cerebrospinal fluid physiology at the lumbosacral level has not received adequate attention. This study was conducted to compare cerebrospinal fluid hydrodynamics at the lumbosacral spinal level between patients with spinal stenosis and healthy controls. Twelve subjects (four patients and eight healthy controls; 25-77 years old; seven males) underwent phase-contrast magnetic resonance imaging to quantify cerebrospinal fluid dynamics. The cerebrospinal fluid flow velocities were measured at the L2 and S1 levels. All subjects were evaluated at rest and after walking (to provoke neurogenic claudication in the patients). The caudal peak flow velocity in the sacral spine (-0.25 ± 0.28 cm/s) was attenuated compared to that in the lumbar spine (-0.93 ± 0.46 cm/s) in both patients and controls. The lumbar caudal peak flow velocity was slower in patients (-0.65 ± 0.22 cm/s) than controls (-1.07 ± 0.49 cm/s) and this difference became more pronounced after walking (-0.66 ± 0.37 cm/s in patients, -1.35 ± 0.52 cm/s in controls; p = 0.028). The sacral cerebrospinal fluid flow after walking was barely detectable in patients (caudal peak flow velocity: -0.09 ± 0.03 cm/s). Cerebrospinal fluid dynamics in the lumbosacral spine were more attenuated in patients with spinal stenosis than healthy controls. After walking, the patients experiencing claudication did not exhibit an increase in the cerebrospinal fluid flow rate as the controls did. Altered cerebrospinal fluid dynamics may partially explain the pathophysiology of spinal stenosis. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 35:104-112, 2017. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Mesoporous silica nanoparticles for treating spinal cord injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    White-Schenk, Désirée.; Shi, Riyi; Leary, James F.

    2013-02-01

    An estimated 12,000 new cases of spinal cord injury (SCI) occur every year in the United States. A small oxidative molecule responsible for secondary injury, acrolein, is an important target in SCI. Acrolein attacks essential proteins and lipids, creating a feed-forward loop of oxidative stress in both the primary injury area and the surrounding areas. A small molecule used and FDA-approved for hypertension, hydralazine, has been found to "scavenge" acrolein after injury, but its delivery and short half-life, as well as its hypertension effects, hinder its application for SCI. Nanomedical systems broaden the range of therapeutic availability and efficacy over conventional medicine. They allow for targeted delivery of therapeutic molecules to tissues of interest, reducing side effects of untargeted therapies in unwanted areas. Nanoparticles made from silica form porous networks that can carry therapeutic molecules throughout the body. To attenuate the acrolein cascade and improve therapeutic availability, we have used a one-step, modified Stober method to synthesize two types of silica nanoparticles. Both particles are "stealth-coated" with poly(ethylene) glycol (PEG) (to minimize interactions with the immune system and to increase circulation time), which is also a therapeutic agent for SCI by facilitating membrane repair. One nanoparticle type contains an amine-terminal PEG (SiNP-mPEG-Am) and the other possesses a terminal hydrazide group (SiNP-mPEG-Hz). The former allows for exploration of hydralazine delivery, loading, and controlled release. The latter group has the ability to react with acrolein, allowing the nanoparticle to scavenge directly. The nanoparticles have been characterized and are being explored using neuronal PC-12 cells in vitro, demonstrating the potential of novel silica nanoparticles for use in attenuating secondary injury after SCI.

  13. The effect of spinal manipulative therapy on spinal range of motion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Millan, Mario; Leboeuf-Yde, Charlotte; Budgell, Brian

    2012-01-01

    Spinal manipulative therapy (SMT) has been shown to have an effect on spine-related pain, both clinically and in experimentally induced pain. However, it is unclear if it has an immediate noticeable biomechanical effect on spinal motion that can be measured in terms of an increased range of motion...

  14. Optogenetics of the Spinal Cord: Use of Channelrhodopsin Proteins for Interrogation of Spinal Cord Circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahman, Habibur; Nam, Youngpyo; Kim, Jae-Hong; Lee, Won-Ha; Suk, Kyoungho

    2017-12-29

    Spinal cord circuits play a key role in receiving and transmitting somatosensory information from the body and the brain. They also contribute to the timing and coordination of complex patterns of movement. Under disease conditions, such as spinal cord injury and neuropathic pain, spinal cord circuits receive pain signals from peripheral nerves, and are involved in pain development via neurotransmitters and inflammatory mediators released from neurons and glial cells. Despite the importance of spinal cord circuits in sensory and motor functions, many questions remain regarding the relationship between activation of specific cells and behavioral responses. Optogenetics offers the possibility of understanding the complex cellular activity and mechanisms of spinal cord circuits, as well as having therapeutic potential for addressing spinal cord-related disorders. In this review, we discuss recent findings in optogenetic research employing the channelrhodopsin protein to assess the function of specific neurons and glia in spinal cord circuits ex vivo and in vivo. We also explore the possibilities and challenges of employing optogenetics technology in future therapeutic strategies for the treatment of spinal disorders. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. MR imaging of spinal factors and compression of the spinal cord in cervical myelopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kokubun, Shoichi; Ozawa, Hiroshi; Sakurai, Minoru; Ishii, Sukenobu; Tani, Shotaro; Sato, Tetsuaki.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic resonance (MR) images of surgical 109 patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy were retrospectively reviewed to examine whether MR imaging would replace conventional radiological procedures in determining spinal factors and spinal cord compression in this disease. MR imaging was useful in determining spondylotic herniation, continuous type of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament, and calcification of yellow ligament, probably replacing CT myelography, discography, and CT discography. When total defect of the subarachnoid space on T2-weighted images and block on myelograms were compared in determining spinal cord compression, the spinal cord was affected more extensively by 1.3 intervertebral distance (IVD) on T2-weighted images. When indentation of one third or more in anterior and posterior diameter of the spinal cord was used as spinal cord compression, the difference in the affected extension between myelography and MR imaging was 0.2 IVD on T1-weighted images and 0.6 IVD on T2-weighted images. However, when block was seen in 3 or more IVD on myelograms, the range of spinal cord compression tended to be larger on T1-weighted images. For a small range of spinal cord compression, T1-weighted imaging seems to be helpful in determining the range of decompression. When using T2-weighted imaging, the range of decompression becomes large, frequently including posterior decompression. (N.K.)

  16. Arterial Blood Supply to the Spinal Cord in Animal Models of Spinal Cord Injury. A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazensky, David; Flesarova, Slavka; Sulla, Igor

    2017-12-01

    Animal models are used to examine the results of experimental spinal cord injury. Alterations in spinal cord blood supply caused by complex spinal cord injuries contribute significantly to the diversity and severity of the spinal cord damage, particularly ischemic changes. However, the literature has not completely clarified our knowledge of anatomy of the complex three-dimensional arterial system of the spinal cord in experimental animals, which can impede the translation of experimental results to human clinical applications. As the literary sources dealing with the spinal cord arterial blood supply in experimental animals are limited and scattered, the authors performed a review of the anatomy of the arterial blood supply to the spinal cord in several experimental animals, including pigs, dogs, cats, rabbits, guinea pigs, rats, and mice and created a coherent format discussing the interspecies differences. This provides researchers with a valuable tool for the selection of the most suitable animal model for their experiments in the study of spinal cord ischemia and provides clinicians with a basis for the appropriate translation of research work to their clinical applications. Anat Rec, 300:2091-2106, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Acute injuries of the spinal cord and spine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heinemann, U.; Freund, M.

    2004-01-01

    Spinal injuries may result in severe neurological deficits, especially if the spinal cord or spinal nerve roots are involved. Patients may even die of a spinal shock. Besides presenting the important embryologic and anatomical basis underlying the typical radiological findings of spinal trauma, the trauma mechanisms and the resulting injuries are correlated. Special situations, such as the involvement of the alar ligaments and typical injuries in children, will be discussed as well as specific traumatic patters relevant for imaging. Based on the actual literature and recommendations of professional organizations, an approach is provided to the radiologic evaluation of spinal injuries. Advantages and disadvantages of the individual imaging modalities are presented and discussed. (orig.)

  18. Role of allografts in spinal surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aziz Nather

    1999-01-01

    With development of more tissue banks in the region and internationally, allografts are increasingly being used in orthopaedic surgery including spinal surgery. Two groups of patients will particularly benefit from the use of allografts. The first group is young children in whom iliac crest is cartilaginous and cannot provide sufficient quantity of autografts. The second is the elderly where bones from iliac crest are porotic and fatty. Allografts are used to fulfill two distinct functions in Spinal Surgery. One is to act as a buttress for anterior spinal surgery using cortical allografts. The other is to enhance fusion for posterior spinal surgery. Up to December 1997, 71 transplantations have been performed using allografts from NUH Tissue Bank. Anterior Spinal Surgery has been performed in 15 cases. The indications are mainly Trauma-Burst Fractures and Spinal Secondaries to the Spine. All cases are in thoracic and thoracolumbar region. Allografts used are deep frozen and freeze-dried cortical allografts. Femur is used for thoraco-lumbar region and humerus for upper thoracic region. Instrumentation used ranged from anterior devices (Canada, DCP, Synergy etc) to posterior devices (ISOLA). Deep frozen allografts and more recently freeze-dried allografts are preferred especially for osteoporotic spines. Cortical allografts are packed with autografts from ribs in the medullary canal. Allograft-autograft composites are always used to ensure better incorporation. Postero-lateral fusion has been performed for 56 cases. The indications include congenital and idiopathic scoliosis, degenerative stenosis, degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylolytic spondylolisthesis, fracture-dislocation, osteoporotic burst fracture, spinal secondaries with cord compression and traumatic spondylolisthesis. Deep frozen bone allografts are used in combination with patient's own autografts from spinous processes to provide a 50% mix. Instrumentation used include Hartshill, Steffee, Isola

  19. Perinatal testosterone exposure is critical for the development of the male-specific sexually dimorphic gastrin-releasing peptide system in the lumbosacral spinal cord that mediates erection and ejaculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oti, Takumi; Takanami, Keiko; Katayama, Nao; Edey, Tomoca; Satoh, Keita; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    In rats, a sexually dimorphic spinal gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) system in the lumbosacral spinal cord projects to spinal centers that control erection and ejaculation. This system controls the sexual function of adult males in an androgen-dependent manner. In the present study, we assessed the influence of androgen exposure on the spinal GRP system during a critical period of the development of sexual dimorphism. Immunohistochemistry was used to determine if the development of the spinal GRP system is regulated by the perinatal androgen surge. We first analyzed the responses of neonates administered with anti-androgen flutamide. To remove endogenous androgens, rats were castrated at birth. Further, neonatal females were administered androgens during a critical period to evaluate the development of the male-specific spinal GRP system. Treatment of neonates with flutamide on postnatal days 0 and 1 attenuated the spinal GRP system during adulthood. Castrating male rats at birth resulted in a decrease in the number of GRP neurons and the intensity of neuronal GRP in the spinal cord during adulthood despite testosterone supplementation during puberty. This effect was prevented if the rats were treated with testosterone propionate immediately after castration. Moreover, treating female rats with androgens on the day of birth and the next day, masculinized the spinal GRP system during adulthood, which resembled the masculinized phenotype of adult males and induced a hypermasculine appearance. The perinatal androgen surge plays a key role in masculinization of the spinal GRP system that controls male sexual behavior. Further, the present study provides potentially new approaches to treat sexual disorders of males.

  20. Postoperative spinal column; Postoperative Wirbelsaeule

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaefer, W. [Westpfalzklinikum GmbH, Standort II, Abteilung fuer Wirbelsaeulenchirurgie, Kusel (Germany); Heumueller, I. [Westpfalzklinikum GmbH, Standort II, Institut fuer Radiologie II, Kusel (Germany); Harsch, N.; Kraus, C.; Reith, W. [Universitaetsklinikum des Saarlandes, Klinik fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Neuroradiologie, Homburg/Saar (Germany)

    2016-08-15

    As a rule, postoperative imaging is carried out after spinal interventions to document the exact position of the implant material. Imaging is absolutely necessary when new clinical symptoms occur postoperatively. In this case a rebleeding or an incorrect implant position abutting a root or the spinal cord must be proven. In addition to these immediately occurring postoperative clinical symptoms, there are a number of complications that can occur several days, weeks or even months later. These include the failed back surgery syndrome, implant loosening or breakage of the material and relapse of a disc herniation and spondylodiscitis. In addition to knowledge of the original clinical symptoms, it is also important to know the operation details, such as the access route and the material used. In almost all postoperative cases, imaging with contrast medium administration and corresponding correction of artefacts by the implant material, such as the dual energy technique, correction algorithms and the use of special magnetic resonance (MR) sequences are necessary. In order to correctly assess the postoperative imaging, knowledge of the surgical procedure and the previous clinical symptoms are mandatory besides special computed tomography (CT) techniques and MR sequences. (orig.) [German] In der Regel erfolgt bei spinalen Eingriffen eine postoperative Bildgebung, um die exakte Lage des Implantatmaterials zu dokumentieren. Unbedingt notwendig ist die Bildgebung, wenn postoperativ neue klinische Symptome aufgetreten sind. Hier muessen eine Nachblutung bzw. inkorrekte, eine Wurzel oder das Myelon tangierende Implantatlage nachgewiesen werden. Neben diesen direkt postoperativ auftretenden klinischen Symptomen gibt es eine Reihe von Komplikationen, die erst nach mehreren Tagen, Wochen oder sogar nach Monaten auftreten koennen. Hierzu zaehlen das Failed-back-surgery-Syndrom, die Implantatlockerung oder -bruch, aber auch ein Rezidivvorfall und die Spondylodiszitis. Neben der

  1. Shock attenuation in the human lumbar spine during walking and running.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Eric R; Lieberman, Daniel E

    2018-04-05

    During locomotion, each step generates a shock wave that travels through the body toward the head. Without mechanisms for attenuation, repeated shocks can lead to pathology. Shock attenuation (SA) in the lower limb has been well studied, but little is known about how posture affects SA in the spine. To test the hypothesis that lumbar lordosis (LL) contributes to SA, 27 adults (14 male, 13 female) walked and ran on a treadmill. Two lightweight, tri-axial accelerometers were affixed to the skin overlying T12/L1 and L5/S1. Sagittal plane accelerations were analyzed using power spectral density analysis, and lumbar SA was assessed within the impact-related frequency range. 3-D kinematics quantified dynamic and resting LL. To examine the effects of intervertebral discs on spinal SA, supine MRI scans were used to measure disc morphology. Results showed no associations between LL and SA during walking, but LL correlated with SA during running (p<0.01, R 2 =0.30) resulting in as much as 64% reduction in shock signal power among individuals with the highest LL. Patterns of lumbar spinal motion partially explain differences in SA: larger amplitudes of LL angular displacement and slower angular displacement velocity during running were associated with greater lumbar SA (p=0.008, R 2 =0.41). Intervertebral discs were associated with greater SA during running (p=0.02, R 2 =0.22), but after controlling for disc thickness, LL remained strongly associated with SA (p=0.001, R 2 =0.44). These findings support the hypothesis that LL plays an important role in attenuating impact shocks transmitted through the human spine during high-impact, dynamic activities such as running. © 2018. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  2. Precision Model for Microwave Rotary Vane Attenuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Guldbrandsen, Tom

    1979-01-01

    A model for a rotary vane attenuator is developed to describe the attenuator reflection and transmission coefficients in detail. All the parameters of the model can be measured in situ, i.e., without diassembling any part. The tranmission errors caused by internal reflections are calculated from ...

  3. Vertical diffuse attenuation coefficient (Kd) based optical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    mary production and diffuse attenuation coeffi- cient (Austin 1981; Sathyendranath et al 2000). The Indian IRS-P3 ... oceanic and coastal production of phytoplank- ton (Tyler 1975; Pennock and Sharp 1986). As a result basic ... cient to the plant pigment content. The term dif- fuse attenuation coefficient, most commonly used.

  4. The effect of spinal osteotomies on spinal cord tension and dural buckling: a cadaveric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safain, Mina G; Burke, Shane M; Riesenburger, Ron I; Zerris, Vasilios; Hwang, Steven W

    2015-07-01

    The standard surgical release of a tethered cord may result in recurrent scar formation and occasionally be associated with retethering. The application of spinal shortening procedures to this challenging problem potentially can reduce tension on the retethered spinal cord while minimizing the difficulties inherent in traditional lumbosacral detethering revision. Although spinal shortening procedures have proven clinical benefit in patients with a recurrent tethered cord, it is unclear how much shortening is required to achieve adequate reduction in spinal cord tension or what impact these osteotomies have on dural buckling. The authors calculated mean values from 4 human cadavers to evaluate the effect of 3 different spinal shortening procedures--Smith-Petersen osteotomy (SPO), pedicle subtraction osteotomy (PSO), and vertebral column resection (VCR)--on spinal cord tension and dural buckling. Three cadavers were dedicated to the measurement of spinal cord tension, and 3 other cadavers were devoted to myelography to measure dural buckling parameters. The SPO was associated with a maximal decrease in spinal cord tension of 16.1% from baseline and no dural buckling with any degree of closure. The PSO led to a mean maximal decrease in spinal cord tension of 63.1% from baseline at 12 mm of closure and demonstrated a direct linear relationship between dural buckling and increasing osteotomy closure. Finally, VCR closure correlated with a mean maximal decrease in spinal cord tension of 87.2% from baseline at 10 mm of closure and also showed a direct linear relationship between dural buckling and increases in osteotomy closure. In this cadaveric experiment, the SPO did not lead to appreciable tension reduction, while a substantial response was seen with both the PSO and VCR. The rate of tension reduction may be steeper for the VCR than the PSO. Adequate tension relief while minimizing dural buckling may be optimal with 12-16 mm of posterior osteotomy closure based on

  5. Sonographic findings of normal newborn spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Chan Sup; Kim, Dong Gyu

    1988-01-01

    The authors performed spinal cord ultrasonography of 21 healthy newborn infants in Gyeongsang National University Hospital. Normal spinal cord revealed low echogenecity at that of cerebrospinal fluid and was demarcated by intense reflections from its dorsal and ventral surfaces. The central canal was routinely seen as a thin linear reflection in the center of the cord. The nerve roots making up the cauda equina formed a poorly defined collection of intense linear echoes extending from the conus. On real time image, the normal spinal cord exhibited rather slow and rhythmical anteroposterior movement within the subarachnoid fluid. A distinct and rapid vascular pulsation of the spinal cord was usually recognizable. The approximate level of vertebral bodies was determined as follows; most ventrally located vertebral body was thought to be L5 and S1 was seen slightly posterior to the L5 directed inferoposteriorly. According to the above criteria terminal portions of spinal cord were seen around the L2 body in 5 MHz and pointed termination of conus medullaris was clearly seen at L2-3 junction and in upper body of L3 by 7.5 MHz. So it would be better to examine by 5 MHz for spatial orientation and then by 7.5 MHz for more accurate examination. High-resolution, real-time ultrasonography was a safe, rapid screening technique for evaluation of the spinal cord in infants. Additional applications of spinal sonography may be possible in the evaluation of neonatal syringohydromyelia and meningocele as well as intraspinal cyst localization for possible percutaneous puncture by ultrasound guidance

  6. Role of fetal surgery in spinal dysraphism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Martina Messing-Jünger

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Open spinal dysraphism is a common and clinically challenging organo-genetic malformation. Due to the well-known multi-organ affection with significant implication on the lives of patients and their families, abortion after prenatal diagnosis became reality in most parts of the world. After publication of the Management of Myelomeningocele Study (MOMS results fetal surgery seems to be a new option and a broad discussion arose regarding advantages and risks of in utero treatment of spina bifida. This paper tries to evaluate objectively the actual state of knowledge and experience. This review article gives a historical overview as well as the experimental and pathophysiological background of fetal surgery in open spinal dysraphism. Additionally clinical follow-up experience of foetoscopically treated patients are presented and discussed. After carefully outweighing all available information on fetal surgery for spina bifida, one has to conclude, in accordance with the MOMS investigators, that in utero surgery cannot be considered a standard option at present time. But there is clear evidence of the hypothesis that early closure of the spinal canal has a positive influence on spinal cord function and severity of Chiari malformation type II, has been proven. A persisting problem is the fetal risk of prematurity and the maternal risk of uterus damage. There is also evidence that due to technical restrictions, fetal closure of the spinal canal bears unsolved problems leading to a higher postnatal incidence of complication surgery. Finally, missing long-term results make a definite evaluation impossible so far. At the moment, fetal surgery in open spinal dysraphism is not a standard of care despite promising results regarding central nervous system protection due to early spinal canal closure. Many technical problems need to be solved in the future in order to make this option a safe and standard one.

  7. Characteristics and rehabilitation for patients with spinal cord stab injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Fangyong; Zhang, Junwei; Tang, Hehu; Li, Xiang; Jiang, Shudong; Lv, Zhen; Liu, Shujia; Chen, Shizheng; Liu, Jiesheng; Hong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The objective of the study was to compare the incidence, diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of patients with spinal cord stab injury to those with the more common spinal cord contusion injury. [Subjects] Of patients hospitalized in China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1994 to 2014, 40 of those having a spinal cord stab injury and 50 with spinal cord contusion were selected. [Methods] The data of all patients were analyzed retrospectively. The cases were evaluated by collecting admission and discharge ASIA (American Spinal Injury Association) and ADL (activity of daily living) scores. [Results] After a comprehensive rehabilitation program, ASIA and ADL scores of patients having both spinal cord stab injury and spinal cord contusion significantly increase. However, the increases were noted to be higher in patients having a spinal cord stab injury than those having spinal cord contusion. [Conclusion] Comprehensive rehabilitation is effective both for patients having spinal cord stab injury and those with spinal cord contusion injury. However, the prognosis of patients having spinal cord stab injury is better than that of patients with spinal cord contusion. PMID:26834329

  8. Ultrasound fields in an attenuating medium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jørgen Arendt; Gandhi,, D; O'Brien,, W.D., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    of the rectangles and sums all contributions to arrive at the spatial impulse response for the aperture and field point. This approach makes it possible to model all transducer apertures, and the program can readily calculate the emitted, pulse-echo and continuous wave field. Attenuation is included by splitting...... it into a frequency dependent part and frequency independent part. The latter results in an attenuation factor that is multiplied onto the responses from the individual elements, and the frequency dependent part is handled by attenuating the basic one-dimensional pulse. The influence on ultrasound fields from......Ultrasound fields propagating in tissue will undergo changes in shape not only due to diffraction, but also due to the frequency dependent attenuation. Linear fields can be fairly well predicted for a non-attenuating medium like water by using the Tupholme-Stepanishen method for calculating...

  9. Histoplasmosis mimicking metastatic spinal tumour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bing; Qu, Liyan; Zhu, Jian; Yang, Zhengming; Yan, Shigui

    2017-08-01

    Histoplasmosis is an infection caused by a fungus called Histoplasma. Diagnosis of histoplasmosis is based on the culture of biological samples and detection of fungus in tissues. Histoplasmosis can mimic malignant lesions. We report a 65-year-old, immunocompetent, male patient with back pain. We describe the main clinical and radiological characteristics in our patient who had vertebral histoplasmosis that mimicked cancer. A computed tomography scan showed lytic lesions of the right side of T4, T5, and T6 vertebral bodies. Magnetic resonance imaging displayed abnormal marrow signals in T4, T5, and T6 vertebral bodies (low signal on T1, high on T2 and short time inversion recovery (STIR)). Which was mimicking malignancy, such as haematological malignancy and metastatic bone cancer. Therefore, thoracic spinal surgery using the anterior approach was performed. An intraoperative frozen section examination and routine postoperative pathology showed thoracic histoplasmosis infection. Treatment of histoplasmosis was performed with oral itraconazole. The lesions did not progress and the patient symptomatically improved at a follow-up of 26 months.

  10. Helical CT for lumbosacral spinal

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatsuno, Satoshi; Fukuda, Kunihiko [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the efficacy of helical CT for lumbosacral pathology. We performed helical CT with multiplanar reconstruction, including the formation of oblique transaxial and coronal images, in 62 patients with various lumboscral disorders, including 32 non-enhanced CT and 36 CT after myelography. We correlated the appearance of the stenotic spinal canal and neoplastic disease with the findings on MRI obtained at nearly the same time. We obtained helical CT images in all cases in about 30 seconds. The diagnostic ability of helical CT was roughly equal to that of MRI in patients with spondylosis deformans, spondylolisthesis and herniated nucleus pulposus. There was no significant difference in diagnostic value for degenerative lumbosacral disease with canal and foraminal stenosis between non-enhanced and post-myelography helical CT. However, non-enhanced helical CT could not clearly demonstrate neoplastic disease because of the poor contrast resolution. Helical CT was useful in evaluating degenerative disorder and its diagnostic value was nearly equal to that of MRI. We considered that helical CT may be suitable for the assessment of patients with severe lumbago owing to the markedly shortened examination time. However, if helical CT is used as a screening method for lumbosacral disease, one must be careful of its limitations, for example, poor detectability of neoplastic disease, vascular anomalies and so on. (author)

  11. Brain and spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Bragg, D.G.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional means of detecting CNS neoplasms include plain film studies, isotope brain scans, angiography, pneumoencephalography, and myelography. Computed tomography (CT) scanning has replaced nearly all of these studies in both the initial detection and follow-up of brain tumors. Air studies (pneumoencephalography and ventriculography) have been virtually eliminated, except in certain unusual circumstances when two positions need to be checked, or hydrocephalus followed. The nuclear brain scan has a very limited role at present, being useful primarily for detecting skull or meningeal metastases. Myelography, however, remains a valuable imaging tool for the assessment of tumors of the spinal canal. CT scanning has not only improved our ability to detect smaller brain tumors, but also CT guided stereotactic biopsy techniques provide a safer means of obtaining tissue from these smaller lesions, regardless of location. Surgical techniques, guided by CT sterotactic techniques, show promise as well, but the impact of these therapeutic techniques on survival statistics remains to be defined. CT has revolutionized the approach to the detection and diagnosis of space-occupying lesions in the brain. Tumors can be detected at a smaller site

  12. CCL-1 in the spinal cord contributes to neuropathic pain induced by nerve injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akimoto, N; Honda, K; Uta, D; Beppu, K; Ushijima, Y; Matsuzaki, Y; Nakashima, S; Kido, M A; Imoto, K; Takano, Y; Noda, M

    2013-06-20

    Cytokines such as interleukins are known to be involved in the development of neuropathic pain through activation of neuroglia. However, the role of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 1 (CCL-1), a well-characterized chemokine secreted by activated T cells, in the nociceptive transmission remains unclear. We found that CCL-1 was upregulated in the spinal dorsal horn after partial sciatic nerve ligation. Therefore, we examined actions of recombinant CCL-1 on behavioural pain score, synaptic transmission, glial cell function and cytokine production in the spinal dorsal horn. Here we show that CCL-1 is one of the key mediators involved in the development of neuropathic pain. Expression of CCL-1 mRNA was mainly detected in the ipsilateral dorsal root ganglion, and the expression of specific CCL-1 receptor CCR-8 was upregulated in the superficial dorsal horn. Increased expression of CCR-8 was observed not only in neurons but also in microglia and astrocytes in the ipsilateral side. Recombinant CCL-1 injected intrathecally (i.t.) to naive mice induced allodynia, which was prevented by the supplemental addition of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonist, MK-801. Patch-clamp recordings from spinal cord slices revealed that application of CCL-1 transiently enhanced excitatory synaptic transmission in the substantia gelatinosa (lamina II). In the long term, i.t. injection of CCL-1 induced phosphorylation of NMDA receptor subunit, NR1 and NR2B, in the spinal cord. Injection of CCL-1 also upregulated mRNA level of glial cell markers and proinflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α and IL-6). The tactile allodynia induced by nerve ligation was attenuated by prophylactic and chronic administration of neutralizing antibody against CCL-1 and by knocking down of CCR-8. Our results indicate that CCL-1 is one of the key molecules in pathogenesis, and CCL-1/CCR-8 signaling system can be a potential target for drug development in the treatment for neuropathic pain.

  13. Blocking mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) improves neuropathic pain evoked by spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoping; Li, Xiaojia; Huang, Bin; Ma, Shuai

    2016-01-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) is an extremely serious type of physical trauma observed in clinics. Neuropathic pain resulting from SCI has a lasting and significant impact on most aspects of daily life. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular pathways responsible for the cause of neuropathic pain observed in SCI is important to develop effective therapeutic agents and treatment strategies. Mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is well known for its critical roles in regulating protein synthesis and growth. Furthermore, compelling evidence supports the notion that widespread dysregulation of mTOR and its downstream pathways are involved in neuropathic pain. Thus, in this study we specifically examined the underlying mechanisms by which mTOR and its signaling pathways are involved in SCI-evoked neuropathic pain in a rat model. Overall, we demonstrated that SCI increased the protein expression of p-mTOR, and mTORmediated- phosphorylation of 4E-binding protein 4 (4E-BP1) and p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase 1 (S6K1) in the superficial dorsal horn of the spinal cord. Also, we showed that blocking spinal mTOR by intrathecal injection of rapamycin significantly inhibited pain responses induced by mechanical and thermal stimulation. In addition, blocking spinal phosphatidylinositide 3-kinase (p-PI3K) pathway significantly attenuated activities of p-mTOR pathways as well as mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in SCI rats. Moreover, blocking mTOR and PI3K decreased the enhanced levels of substance P and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the dorsal horn of SCI rats. We revealed specific signaling pathways leading to SCI-evoked neuropathic pain, including the activation of PI3K, mTOR and its downstream signaling pathways. Targeting one or more of these signaling molecules may present new opportunities for treatment and management of neuropathic pain often observed in patients with SCI.

  14. Reactive astrocytes undergo M1 microglia/macrohpages-induced necroptosis in spinal cord injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Hong; Zhang, Kun; Shan, Lequn; Kuang, Fang; Chen, Kun; Zhu, Keqing; Ma, Heng; Ju, Gong; Wang, Ya-Zhou

    2016-02-03

    A unique feature of the pathological change after spinal cord injury (SCI) is the progressive enlargement of lesion area, which usually results in cavity formation and is accompanied by reactive astrogliosis and chronic inflammation. Reactive astrocytes line the spinal cavity, walling off the lesion core from the normal spinal tissue, and are thought to play multiple important roles in SCI. The contribution of cell death, particularly the apoptosis of neurons and oligodendrocytes during the process of cavitation has been extensively studied. However, how reactive astrocytes are eliminated following SCI remains largely unclear. By immunohistochemistry, in vivo propidium iodide (PI)-labeling and electron microscopic examination, here we reported that in mice, reactive astrocytes died by receptor-interacting protein 3 and mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (RIP3/MLKL) mediated necroptosis, rather than apoptosis or autophagy. Inhibiting receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP1) or depleting RIP3 not only significantly attenuated astrocyte death but also rescued the neurotrophic function of astrocytes. The astrocytic expression of necroptotic markers followed the polarization of M1 microglia/macrophages after SCI. Depleting M1 microglia/macrophages or transplantation of M1 macrophages could significantly reduce or increase the necroptosis of astrocytes. Further, the inflammatory responsive genes Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88) are induced in necroptotic astrocytes. In vitro antagonizing MyD88 in astrocytes could significantly alleviate the M1 microglia/macrophages-induced cell death. Finally, our data showed that in human, necroptotic markers and TLR4/MyD88 were co-expressed in astrocytes of injured, but not normal spinal cord. Taken together, these results reveal that after SCI, reactive astrocytes undergo M1 microglia/macrophages-induced necroptosis, partially through TLR/MyD88 signaling, and suggest that

  15. [Urinary incontinence in degenerative spinal disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Riggo, J; Benčo, M; Kolarovszki, B; Lupták, J; Svihra, J

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of urinary incontinence in patients with chronic degenerative spinal disease and to identify factors affecting the occurrence and changes in urinary incontinence after surgery. The group evaluated comprised 214 patients undergoing surgery for degenerative spinal disease at our department between January 1 and December 31, 2008. The patients were categorised according to the type of their degenerative disease (cervical disc herniation, lumbar disc herniation, spinal stenosis, spinal instability or olisthesis) and the spine level involved (cervical or lumbar spine). The symptoms of urinary incontinence included leakage of urine and non-obstructive chronic urinary retention developing in association with the manifestation of vertebrogenic disorder. Patients with diseases known to increase the risk of incontinence were not included in the study. Based on a retrospective analysis of the patients' clinical notes, the occurrence of urinary incontinence in each type of degenerative spinal disease was assessed. The effect of gender, age, body mass index (BMI), neurological status and spinal disease type on the development of incontinence was statistically evaluated. The efficacy of surgical treatment was assessed on the basis of the patients' subjective complaints at the first follow-up one month after surgery. The data were evaluated by the statistical programme InSTAT (analysis of variance ANOVA, t-test). All tests were two-sided; a 0.05 level of statistical significance was used. Of the 214 patients with degenerative spinal disease, 27 (12.6%) had urinary incontinence. A higher risk of developing incontinence was found in women (p = 0.008) and in patients with radicular weakness (p = 0.023). The patients with urinary incontinence had their BMI significantly lower than patients without this disorder (p = 0.019). Age had no effect. The differences in the occurrence of urinary incontinence amongst the different types of

  16. Central nociceptive sensitization vs. spinal cord training: Opposing forms of plasticity that dictate function after complete spinal cord injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam R Ferguson

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The spinal cord demonstrates several forms of plasticity that resemble brain-dependent learning and memory. Among the most studied form of spinal plasticity is spinal memory for noxious (nociceptive stimulation. Numerous papers have described central pain as a spinally-stored memory that enhances future responses to cutaneous stimulation. This phenomenon, known as central sensitization, has broad relevance to a range of pathological conditions. Work from the spinal cord injury (SCI field indicates that the lumbar spinal cord demonstrates several other forms of plasticity, including formal learning and memory. After complete thoracic SCI, the lumbar spinal cord can be trained by delivering stimulation to the hindleg when the leg is extended. In the presence of this response-contingent stimulation the spinal cord rapidly learns to hold the leg in a flexed position, a centrally mediated effect that meets the formal criteria for instrumental (response-outcome learning. Instrumental flexion training produces a central change in spinal plasticity that enables future spinal learning on both the ipsilateral and contralateral leg. However, if stimulation is given in a response-independent manner, the spinal cord develops central maladaptive plasticity that undermines future spinal learning on both legs. The present paper tests for interactions between spinal cord training and central nociceptive sensitization after complete spinal cord transection. We found that spinal training alters future central sensitization by intradermal formalin (24 h post-training. Conversely intradermal formalin impaired future spinal learning (24 h post-injection. Because the NMDA receptor has been implicated in formalin-induced central sensitization, we tested whether pretreatment with NMDA affects spinal learning. We found intrathecal NMDA impaired learning in a dose-dependent fashion, and that this effect endures for at least 24h. These data provide strong evidence for an

  17. Spinal Cord Injury: Facts and Figures at a Glance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures at a Glance https://www.nscisc.uab.edu February 2012 This is a publication of the National Spinal Cord Injury Statistical Center, Birmingham, Alabama. I ncidence : It is ...

  18. Effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during spinal anesthesia on ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of dexmedetomidine infusion during spinal anesthesia on hemodynamics and sedation. ... Libyan Journal of Medicine ... evaluated the effects of intravenous dexmedetomidine during spinal anesthesia on hemodynamics, respiratory rate, oxygen saturation, sedpain, and compared them with those of saline infusion.

  19. Seminal plasma PSA in spinal cord injured men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brasso, K; Sønksen, J; Sommer, P

    1998-01-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration.......The aim of the study was to evaluate the impact of spinal cord injury on seminal plasma PSA concentration....

  20. Genetics Home Reference: spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... myoclonic epilepsy Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy Printable PDF Open All Close All Enable Javascript ... boxes. Description Spinal muscular atrophy with progressive myoclonic epilepsy (SMA-PME) is a neurological condition that causes ...

  1. Spinal injuries in skiers and snowboarders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarazi, F; Dvorak, M F; Wing, P C

    1999-01-01

    Spinal injuries are among the most devastating injuries associated with recreational sports. Snowboarding spinal injury patterns have not been described. During two seasons (1994 to 1995 and 1995 to 1996), 34 skiers and 22 snowboarders suffered serious spinal injuries (fracture or neurologic deficit or both) at two ski areas in British Columbia, Canada. Ski patrol records, the Provincial Trauma Database, and hospital records were reviewed. Injury rates were based on computerized lift-ticket data and a population estimate of 15% snowboarders (ski patrol observation). The incidence of spinal injury among skiers was 0.01 per 1000 skier-days, and among snowboarders was 0.04 per 1000 snowboarder-days. Mean age was 34.5 years for skiers and 22.4 years for snowboarders. Seventy percent of the skiers were men, whereas all of the snowboarders were men. Jumping (intentional jump > 2 meters) was the cause of injury in 20% of skiers and 77% of snowboarders. Neither age nor sex accounted for any significant portion of this difference. The rate of spinal injuries among snowboarders is fourfold that among skiers. Although jumping is the primary cause of injury, it is an intrinsic element of snowboarding. Until research defines effective injury-prevention strategies, knowledge of the risk of snowboarding should be disseminated and techniques for safe jumping should be taught.

  2. Radiation tolerance of the cervical spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McCunniff, A.J.; Liang, M.J.

    1989-01-01

    The incidence of permanent injury to the spinal cord as a complication of radiation therapy generally correlates positively with total radiation dosage. However, several reports in the literature have indicated that fraction size is also an important factor in the development or nondevelopment of late injuries in normal tissue. To determine the effect of fraction size on the incidence of radiation-induced spinal cord injuries, we reviewed 144 cases of head and neck cancer treated at our institution between 1971 and 1980 with radiation greater than 5600 cGy to a portion of the cervical spinal cord. Most of these patients received greater than or equal to 6000 cGy, with fraction sizes ranging from 133 cGy to 200 cGy. Fifty-three of the 144 patients have been followed up for 2 years or more. Nearly half of these (26 patients) received greater than 6000 cGy with fraction sizes of 133 cGy to 180 cGy. Only 1 of the 53 (1.9%) has sustained permanent spinal cord injury; 20 months after completion of radiation treatments he developed Brown-Sequard syndrome. Our experience suggests that radiation injuries to the spinal cord correlate not only with total radiation dosage, but also with fraction size; low fraction sizes appear to decrease the incidence of such injuries

  3. Radiation effects in brain and spinal cord

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franke, H.D.; Lierse, W.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity of both the brain and spinal cord in prenatal and postnatal stages, in infancy and adult age is represented also in consideration of a combined treatment with methotrexate. In adults, application of important doses of high-energy radiation increases the risk of injurious effects to the central nervous system. If the spinal cord is involved, more than 60% of the radiolesions have a progredient course ending with death. The pathogenesis and disposing factors are referred to, and the incidence of radiation necrosis with regard to age and sex, the degrees of injury and their frequence within different ranges of dosage are analyzed on the basis of data from universal literature. An examination of 'tolerance doses' for the spinal cord is made by means of Strandquist-diagrams and of the Ellis-formula. The slopes of regression lines are reported for various 'degrees of response' in skin, brain and spinal cord following radiation therapy. In the Strandquist-diagram, slopes of regression lines are dependent on the 'degree of response', flattening if skin and spinal cord are affected by radiation in the same degree, necroses having the same slope for both the organs. (orig./MG) [de

  4. Radiologic analysis of the spinal tuberculosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Kyoung Sang; Suh, Jin Suck; Park, Chang Yun

    1986-01-01

    Tuberculosis remains high incidental disease in Korea with an estimated incidence of 2.5% in general population. Among the tuberculosis of bone, spinal tuberculous is high incidence and curable disease, but early treatment demands early diagnosis. Authors reviewed clinical aspects of 376 cases, and reviewed conventional films of 74 cases and computed tomography of 8 cases, confirmed histopathologically as spinal tuberculosis from Jan. 1976 to May 1985 at Yonsei medical center, Yonsei University. The results were as follows: 1. The frequent site of involvement were lower thoracic and lumbar vertebra, 4th lumbar vertebra was the most common lesion site among them. 2. The separated lesions were 10.2% among spinal lesion. 3. The most common type and pattern of bone density was intervertebral type and mixed pattern each other. 4. Paravertebral abscess, kyphosis and narrowing of intervertebral disc space were discovered more than 80% in reviewed conventional films. 5. In children, there is no predilection site. 6. Spinal computed tomography was more accurate diagnostic method than conventional study in the evaluation of following aspects; 1) extent of lesion 2) degree of spinal canal involvement 3) change of surrounding organ

  5. Schwann cells for spinal cord repair

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Oudega

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The complex nature of spinal cord injury appears to demand a multifactorial repair strategy. One of the components that will likely be included is an implant that will fill the area of lost nervous tissue and provide a growth substrate for injured axons. Here we will discuss the role of Schwann cells (SCs in cell-based, surgical repair strategies of the injured adult spinal cord. We will review key studies that showed that intraspinal SC grafts limit injury-induced tissue loss and promote axonal regeneration and myelination, and that this response can be improved by adding neurotrophic factors or anti-inflammatory agents. These results will be compared with several other approaches to the repair of the spinal cord. A general concern with repair strategies is the limited functional recovery, which is in large part due to the failure of axons to grow across the scar tissue at the distal graft-spinal cord interface. Consequently, new synaptic connections with spinal neurons involved in motor function are not formed. We will highlight repair approaches that did result in growth across the scar and discuss the necessity for more studies involving larger, clinically relevant types of injuries, addressing this specific issue. Finally, this review will reflect on the prospect of SCs for repair strategies in the clinic.

  6. An interesting case of primary spinal arachnoiditis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Vaughan, Denis

    2012-02-27

    Spinal arachnoiditis describes inflammation of the meninges, subarachnoid space and, in most cases, also involve the pial layer. The vast majority of cases described are secondary and are preceded by a known event, for example,. trauma, infections or irritative substances. Here, we present the case of primary spinal arachnoiditis. A 35-year-old lady was referred to the neurosurgical services in Dublin, Ireland with a 15-month history of progressive, right lower limb weakness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed cystic distortion of the lumbar spinal canal extending up to the conus. Initially, an L2-L4 laminectomy was performed revealing thickened and adherent arachnoid with a large cyst in the spinal canal. Four months after initial operation, the patient represented with bilateral lower limb weakness and loss of detrusor function. Repeat magnetic resonance imaging was performed, which showed the development of a syrinx in the patient\\'s thoracic spine. We then performed a T9-T10 laminectomy, midline myelotomy and insertion of a syringe-arachnoid shunt. Post-operative imaging showed resolution of the syrinx and a vast improvement in lower limb power. The patient also regained bladder control. In conclusion, spinal arachnoiditis is a clearly defined pathological and radiological entity with a highly variable clinical presentation. It is exceedingly difficult to treat as there is no recognised treatment currently, with most interventions aimed at symptomatic relief.

  7. Transport and attenuation of radiations

    CERN Document Server

    Nimal, J C

    2003-01-01

    This article treats of the calculation methods used for the dimensioning of the protections against radiations. The method consists in determining for a given point the flux of particles coming from a source at a given time. A strong attenuation (of about some few mu Sv.h sup - sup 1) is in general expected between the source and the areas accessible to the personnel or the public. The calculation has to take into account a huge number of radiation-matter interactions and to solve the integral-differential transport equation which links the particles flux to the source. Several methods exist from the simplified physical model with numerical developments to the more or less precise resolution of the transport equation. These methods allows also the calculation of the uncertainties of equivalent dose rates, heat sources, structure damages using the data covariances (efficient cross-sections, modeling, etc..): 1 - transport equation; 2 - Monte-Carlo method; 3 - semi-numerical methods S sub N; 4 - methods based o...

  8. Beta attenuation transmission system (BATS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagan, R.C.; Fullbright, H.J.

    1977-01-01

    The beta attenuation transmission system (BATS) is an automated radiation gauge designed for quantitative measurement of component thickness in explosive detonators. The BATS was designed and built by Group M-1, the Nondestructive Testing Group, of the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory to measure the areal thickness, in mg/cm 2 , of a cylinder of high explosive (HE) enclosed within a plastic holder. The problem is to determine the density of the HE. A 90 Sr source is collimated by a 0.25 x 1.59-mm slit, and the transmitted beta-particle flux is detected by a plastic scintillator, coupled to a photomultiplier tube. The detonator is transported through the radiation beam by a leadscrew, ballnut, stepping-motor combination. Continuous analog position data are available, derived from the output from a linear-actuated potentiometer attached to the scanner. A linear electrometer amplifies the detected signal, which is then integrated for a preselected time, to obtain the desired statistical accuracy. A microprocessor (μP) is used to control the scanner position and to make the data readings at the assigned positions. The data are stored, and, at the completion of the scan, are processed into the desired format. The final answer is displayed to the operator or output to a peripheral device for permanent record. The characteristics of the radiation source, the collimator, the signal detection and conditioning, and the final results are described in detail. The scanner and the microprocessor control system are briefly outlined

  9. Transient Spinal Cord Ischemia as Presenting Manifestation of Polycythemia Vera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Costa

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Spinal arterial vascularization is supplied by a large anastomotic net, making spinal ischemic events far less common than ischemic cerebral strokes. Polycythemia vera, due to blood hyperviscosity and activated platelet aggregation, is associated with a higher risk of arterial and venous thrombotic events. We report a patient with spinal cord transient ischemic attacks, a rarely presenting manifestation, and polycythemia vera, which highlights the thrombotic potential of this disease, and the requirement of exhaustive diagnostic workout of a spinal ischemic event.

  10. Prognosis by tumor location for pediatric spinal cord Ependymomas

    OpenAIRE

    Oh, MC; Sayegh, ET; Safaee, M; Sun, MHZ; Kaur, G; Kim, JM; Aranda, D; Molinaro, AM; Gupta, N; Parsa, AT

    2013-01-01

    Object. Ependymoma is a common CNS tumor in children, with spinal cord ependymomas making up 13.1% of all ependymomas in this age group. The clinical features that affect prognosis in pediatric spinal cord ependymomas are not well understood. A comprehensive literature review was performed to determine whether a tumor location along the spinal cord is prognostically significant in children undergoing surgery for spinal cord ependymomas. Methods. A PubMed search was performed to identify all p...

  11. Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    inflammation. 15. SUBJECT TERMS traumatic spinal cord injury, spinal cord , spontaneous recovery, functional recovery, inflammation, biomarkers, trauma 16...Award Number: W81XWH-15-1-0614 TITLE: Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Ona Bloom...SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-15-1-0614 W81XWH-15-1-0614 Biomarkers of Spontaneous Recovery from Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  12. Mechanisms of symptomatic spinal cord ischemia after TEVAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Czerny, Martin; Eggebrecht, Holger; Sodeck, Gottfried

    2012-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that simultaneous closure of at least 2 independent vascular territories supplying the spinal cord and/or prolonged hypotension may be associated with symptomatic spinal cord ischemia (SCI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR).......To test the hypothesis that simultaneous closure of at least 2 independent vascular territories supplying the spinal cord and/or prolonged hypotension may be associated with symptomatic spinal cord ischemia (SCI) after thoracic endovascular aortic repair (TEVAR)....

  13. Drug distribution in spinal cord during administration with spinal loop dialysis probes in anaesthetized rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uustalu, Maria; Abelson, Klas S P

    2007-01-01

    The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H]Epibatid......The present investigation aimed to study two methodological concerns of an experimental model, where a spinal loop dialysis probe is used for administration of substances to the spinal cord and sampling of neurotransmitters by microdialysis from the same area of anaesthetized rats. [(3)H......]Epibatidine in concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 nM was dissolved in Ringer's solution and administered through the dialysis membrane into the dorsal region of the cervical spinal cord. First, the outflow of [(3)H]epibatidine from the probe into the spinal cord was examined with respect to different concentrations and changes....... The administered [(3)H]epibatidine was found to be distributed to the area closest to the dialysis probe and not dispersed along the spinal cord, and the distribution was equal for all concentrations. The data presented in this investigation provide information, which is important for interpretation of data from...

  14. MRI Evaluation of Spinal Length and Vertebral Body Angle During Loading with a Spinal Compression Harness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, James A.; Hargens, Alan R.; Murthy, G.; Ballard, R. E.; Watenpaugh, D. E.; Hargens, Alan, R.; Sanchez, E.; Yang, C.; Mitsui, I.; Schwandt, D.; hide

    1998-01-01

    Weight bearing by the spinal column during upright posture often plays a role in the common problem of low back pain. Therefore, we developed a non-ferromagnetic spinal compression harness to enable MRI investigations of the spinal column during axial loading. Human subjects were fitted with a Nest and a footplate which were connected by adjustable straps to an analog load cell. MRI scans of human subjects (5 males and 1 female with age range of 27-53 yrs) during loaded and unloaded conditions were accomplished with a 1.5 Tesla GE Signa scanner. Studies of two subjects undergoing sequentially increasing spinal loads revealed significant decreases (r(sup 2) = 0.852) in spinal length between T4 and L5 culminating in a 1.5 to 2% length decrease during loading with 75% body weight. Sagittal vertebral body angles of four subjects placed under a constant 50% body weight load for one hour demonstrated increased lordotic and kyphotic curvatures. In the lumbar spine, the L2 vertebral body experienced the greatest angular change (-3 deg. to -5 deg.) in most subjects while in the thoracic spine, T4 angles increased from the unloaded state by +2 deg. to +9 deg. Overall, our studies demonstrate: 1) a progressive, although surprisingly small, decrease in spinal length with increasing load and 2) relatively large changes in spinal column angulation with 50% body weight.

  15. Spinal Cord Tolerance in the Age of Spinal Radiosurgery: Lessons From Preclinical Studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medin, Paul M.; Boike, Thomas P.

    2011-01-01

    Clinical implementation of spinal radiosurgery has increased rapidly in recent years, but little is known regarding human spinal cord tolerance to single-fraction irradiation. In contrast, preclinical studies in single-fraction spinal cord tolerance have been ongoing since the 1970s. The influences of field length, dose rate, inhomogeneous dose distributions, and reirradiation have all been investigated. This review summarizes literature regarding single-fraction spinal cord tolerance in preclinical models with an emphasis on practical clinical significance. The outcomes of studies that incorporate uniform irradiation are surprisingly consistent among multiple small- and large-animal models. Extensive investigation of inhomogeneous dose distributions in the rat has demonstrated a significant dose-volume effect while preliminary results from one pig study are contradictory. Preclinical spinal cord dose-volume studies indicate that dose distribution is more critical than the volume irradiated suggesting that neither dose-volume histogram analysis nor absolute volume constraints are effective in predicting complications. Reirradiation data are sparse, but results from guinea pig, rat, and pig studies are consistent with the hypothesis that the spinal cord possesses a large capacity for repair. The mechanisms behind the phenomena observed in spinal cord studies are not readily explained and the ability of dose response models to predict outcomes is variable underscoring the need for further investigation. Animal studies provide insight into the phenomena and mechanisms of radiosensitivity but the true significance of animal studies can only be discovered through clinical trials.

  16. Experimental spinal cord trauma: a review of mechanically induced spinal cord injury in rat models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdullahi, Dauda; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; Mohamad, Masro; Aziz, Izzuddin; Sanusi, Junedah

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that animal spinal cord compression (using methods such as clips, balloons, spinal cord strapping, or calibrated forceps) mimics the persistent spinal canal occlusion that is common in human spinal cord injury (SCI). These methods can be used to investigate the effects of compression or to know the optimal timing of decompression (as duration of compression can affect the outcome of pathology) in acute SCI. Compression models involve prolonged cord compression and are distinct from contusion models, which apply only transient force to inflict an acute injury to the spinal cord. While the use of forceps to compress the spinal cord is a common choice due to it being inexpensive, it has not been critically assessed against the other methods to determine whether it is the best method to use. To date, there is no available review specifically focused on the current compression methods of inducing SCI in rats; thus, we performed a systematic and comprehensive publication search to identify studies on experimental spinalization in rat models, and this review discusses the advantages and limitations of each method.

  17. Dose-effects of aorta-infused clenbuterol on spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury in rabbits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binbin Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR plays an important role in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R injury in various organs. Recently, a selective β2AR agonist clenbuterol was suggested to protect against cerebral I/R injury. This study was designed to investigate changes of β2ARs after spinal cord I/R injury and dose-effects of aorta-infused clenbuterol on spinal cord I/R injury in rabbits. METHODS: Spinal cord ischemia was induced in New Zealand white rabbits by infrarenal abdominal aortic occlusion with a balloon catheter for 30 minutes except the sham group. During occlusion, nothing (I/R group, normal saline (NS group or clenbuterol at different doses of 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, or 1 mg/kg (C0.005, C0.01, C0.05, C0.1, C0.5, and C1 groups was infused into the occluded aortic segments. The hemodynamic data, blood glucose and serum electrolytes were measured during experimental period. Neurological function was assessed according to the modified Tarlov scales until 48 hours after reperfusion. After that, the lumbar spinal cord was harvested for β2AR immunohistochemistry and histopathologic evaluation in the anterior horns. RESULTS: The β2AR expression in the anterior horns of the spinal cord was significantly higher in the I/R group than in the sham group. Tarlov scores and the number of viable α-motor neurons were higher in C0.01-C0.5 groups than in the NS group, C0.005 and C1 groups and were highest in the C0.1 group. Hypotension and hyperglycemia were found in the C1 group. CONCLUSION: β2ARs in the anterior horn were upregulated after spinal cord I/R injury. Aortic-infused clenbuterol (0.01-0.5 mg/kg can attenuate spinal cord I/R injury dose-dependently during the ischemic period. The Optimal dosage was 0.1 mg/kg. Activation of β2AR could be a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of spinal cord I/R injury.

  18. Dose-effects of aorta-infused clenbuterol on spinal cord ischemia-reperfusion injury in rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binbin; Zhang, Yi; Chen, Lianhua; Huang, Shiwei; Li, Shitong; Yao, Junyan

    2013-01-01

    The β2 adrenergic receptor (β2AR) plays an important role in ischemia-reperfusion (I/R) injury in various organs. Recently, a selective β2AR agonist clenbuterol was suggested to protect against cerebral I/R injury. This study was designed to investigate changes of β2ARs after spinal cord I/R injury and dose-effects of aorta-infused clenbuterol on spinal cord I/R injury in rabbits. Spinal cord ischemia was induced in New Zealand white rabbits by infrarenal abdominal aortic occlusion with a balloon catheter for 30 minutes except the sham group. During occlusion, nothing (I/R group), normal saline (NS group) or clenbuterol at different doses of 0.005, 0.01, 0.05, 0.1, 0.5, or 1 mg/kg (C0.005, C0.01, C0.05, C0.1, C0.5, and C1 groups) was infused into the occluded aortic segments. The hemodynamic data, blood glucose and serum electrolytes were measured during experimental period. Neurological function was assessed according to the modified Tarlov scales until 48 hours after reperfusion. After that, the lumbar spinal cord was harvested for β2AR immunohistochemistry and histopathologic evaluation in the anterior horns. The β2AR expression in the anterior horns of the spinal cord was significantly higher in the I/R group than in the sham group. Tarlov scores and the number of viable α-motor neurons were higher in C0.01-C0.5 groups than in the NS group, C0.005 and C1 groups and were highest in the C0.1 group. Hypotension and hyperglycemia were found in the C1 group. β2ARs in the anterior horn were upregulated after spinal cord I/R injury. Aortic-infused clenbuterol (0.01-0.5 mg/kg) can attenuate spinal cord I/R injury dose-dependently during the ischemic period. The Optimal dosage was 0.1 mg/kg. Activation of β2AR could be a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of spinal cord I/R injury.

  19. Study and therapeutic progress on spinal cord perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Tiefeng; Guo, Yunbao; Shi, Lei; Yu, Jinlu

    2017-09-01

    Spinal cord perimedullary arteriovenous fistulas (PMAVFs) are rare and belong to type IV spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Little is known regarding the treatment and prognosis of spinal cord PMAVFs. In the present study the relevant literature from PubMed was reviewed, and it was found that these fistulas can occur at all ages but are more common in children. In children, most spinal cord PMAVFs are large and with high flow, begin with bleeding and are frequently associated with hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia. However, in adults, most spinal cord PMAVFs are small and with low flow and begin with progressive spinal cord dysfunction. The early diagnosis of spinal cord PMAVFs is generally difficult, and symptoms can be very severe at the time of diagnosis. Digital subtraction angiography remains the gold standard; however, computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance angiography are also promising. Spinal cord PMAVFs can be treated by endovascular embolization, surgical removal or a combination of the two methods. Most spinal cord PMAVFs show good outcomes after the appropriate treatment, and the prognosis is primarily associated with the blood flow of the PMAVF. For high-flow spinal cord PMAVFs, endovascular embolization is more effective and can lead to a good outcome; however, for low-flow spinal cord PMAVFs, surgical removal or the combination with endovascular embolization is the optimal choice. The prognosis for low-flow types is slightly worse than for high-flow spinal cord PMAVFs in children, but the outcome is acceptable.

  20. Prehospital transport of spinal cord-injured patients in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    that the means of transport are generally not optimal for those with spinal cord injury. The aim of the present study was therefore to highlight the importance of prehospital transport of spinal cord-injured patients and the contribution of these injuries to mortality in Nigeria. Patients, materials and methods. The records of spinal ...

  1. Levetiracetam in spinal cord injury pain: a randomized controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finnerup, N B; Grydehøj, J; Bing, J

    2009-01-01

    . OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was primarily to evaluate the efficacy of the anticonvulsant levetiracetam in patients with spinal cord injury (SCI) at- and below-level pain and secondarily to evaluate the effect on spasm severity. SETTING: Outpatients at two spinal cord units and a pain center...... severity following spinal cord injury....

  2. Incidence of spinal fractures in the Netherlands 1997-2012

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Brinke, J. G.; Saltzherr, T. P.; Panneman, M. J. M.; Hogervorst, M.; Goslings, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    : To determine time trends of emergency department (ED) visits, hospitalization rates, spinal cord lesions and characteristics of patients with spinal fractures in the Netherlands. In an observational database study we used the Dutch Injury Surveillance System to analyse spinal fracture-related ED

  3. Spontaneous herniation of the thoracic spinal cord : a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Sung Chan; Lee, Seong Ro; Park, Dong Woo; Joo, Kyung Bin

    2001-01-01

    Spontaneous herniation of the spinal cord is a rare disease entity in which spinal cord substance is herniated through a previously uninjured and/or untouched dural. It is a cause of myelopathy that is treatable but difficult to diagnose. We report the CT and MR findings of a case of spontaneous thoracic spinal cord through a dural defect

  4. 21 CFR 880.2500 - Spinal fluid manometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Spinal fluid manometer. 880.2500 Section 880.2500 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... Devices § 880.2500 Spinal fluid manometer. (a) Identification. A spinal fluid manometer is a device used...

  5. Neuroprotective effect corilagin in spinal cord injury rat model by ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Neurological functions get altered in a patient suffering from spinal cord injury (SCI). Present study evaluates the neuroprotective effect of corilagin in spinal cord injury rats by inhibiting nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), inflammatory mediators and apoptosis. Materials and method: Spinal cord injury was ...

  6. Simultaneous Intracranial and Spinal Subdural Hematoma: Two Case Reports

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Chung Dae; Song, Chang Joon; Lee, Jeong Eun; Choi, Seung Won [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    Spinal subdural hematoma is a rare disease. Simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma is extremely rare and only 14 such cases have been reported. We report here on two cases of simultaneous intracranial and spinal subdural hematoma that occurred following a fall-down head injury and intracranial surgery, and we discuss the pathogenesis of the disease.

  7. Costs and effects in lumbar spinal fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soegaard, Rikke; Christensen, Finn Bjarke; Christiansen, Terkel

    2007-01-01

    consecutive patients with chronic low back pain, who were surgically treated from January 2001 through January 2003, was followed until 2 years postoperatively. Operations took place at University Hospital of Aarhus and all patients had either (1) non-instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, (2......) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion, or (3) instrumented posterolateral lumbar spinal fusion + anterior intervertebral support. Analysis of costs was performed at the patient-level, from an administrator's perspective, by means of Activity-Based-Costing. Clinical effects were measured by means...... of the Dallas Pain Questionnaire and the Low Back Pain Rating Scale at baseline and 2 years postoperatively. Regression models were used to reveal determinants for costs and effects. Costs and effects were analyzed as a net-benefit measure to reveal determinants for cost-effectiveness, and finally, adjusted...

  8. Transient Neurological Symptoms after Spinal Anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Hatipoglu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Lidocaine has been used for more than 50 years for spinal anesthesia and has a remarkable safety record. In 1993, a new adverse effect, transient neurologic toxicity was described in patients recovering from spinal anesthesia with lidocaine. Transient neurological symptoms have been defined as pain in the lower extremities (buttocks, thighs and legs after an uncomplicated spinal anesthesia and after an initial full recovery during the immediate postoperative period (less than 24 h. The incidence of transient neurological symptoms reported in prospective, randomized trials varies from 4% to 37%. The etiology of transient neurological symptoms remains unkonwn. Despite the transient nature of this syndrome, it has proven to be difficult to treat effectively. Drug or some interventional therapy may be necessary. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2013; 22(1.000: 33-44

  9. Surgical Strategies for Cervical Spinal Neurinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kiyoshi; Aoyama, Tatsuro; Miyaoka, Yoshinari; Horiuchi, Tetsuyoshi; Hongo, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Cervical spinal neurinomas are benign tumors that arise from nerve roots. Based on their location, these tumors can also take the form of a dumbbell-shaped mass. Treatment strategies for these tumors have raised several controversial issues such as appropriate surgical indications and selection of surgical approaches for cervical dumbbell-shaped spinal neurinomas. In this report, we review previous literature and retrospectively analyze cervical spinal neurinoma cases that have been treated at our hospital. Surgical indications and approaches based on tumor location and severity are discussed in detail. Thus, with advances in neuroimaging and neurophysiological monitoring, we conclude that appropriate surgical approaches and intraoperative surgical manipulations should be chosen on a case-by-case basis.

  10. Somatostatin in the caudal spinal cord

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of somatostatin in the rat spinal cord was studied immunohistochemically with particular reference to the localization in the caudal centers that innervate the pelvic organs. For detailed studies of the laminar distribution of somatostatin the combination of immunohistochemistry...... and acetylcholinesterase enzyme histochemistry was employed. Deafferentation experiments were carried out to shed light on the origin of the somatostatin-containing axons. These experiments showed that the bulk of the spinal somatostatin has a spinal origin. The structures showing somatostatin immunoreactivity formed...... in the sacral parasympathetic intermediolateral nucleus. In contrast, very few appeared in the sympathetic nuclei. Immunoreactive somata were present in the surroundings of the central canal at all levels. Moreover, positive neurons were found in the intermediolateral nucleus of the sacral cord. By combined...

  11. Primary multifocal gliosarcoma of the spinal cord

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramesh M. Kumar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Gliosarcoma (GS is a rare and exceedingly malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system. It displays clinical features similar to glioblastoma, yet is histologically unique as it harbors both gliomatous and sarcomatous cellular components. Involvement of the neuroaxis is predominantly limited to the cerebral parenchyma and meninges. Primary GS of the spinal cord is rarely encountered. We report a case of a 54 year old male who presented with 2 months of progressive, bilateral lower extremity sensory deficits. Magnetic resonance imaging of the neuro-axis revealed multiple intradural lesions involving the cervical and thoracic spinal cord without evidence of intracranial involvement. Surgical resection of a dural based, extramedullary cervical lesion and two exophytic, intramedullary thoracic lesions revealed gliosarcoma, WHO grade IV. The patient died approximately 11 months after presentation. This report confirms that GS is not limited to supratentorial involvement and can primarily affect the spinal cord.

  12. The transformation of spinal curvature into spinal deformity: pathological processes and implications for treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hawes Martha C

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This review summarizes what is known about the pathological processes (e.g. structural and functional changes, by which spinal curvatures develop and evolve into spinal deformities. Methods Comprehensive review of articles (English language only published on 'scoliosis,' whose content yielded data on the pathological changes associated with spinal curvatures. Medline, Science Citation Index and other searches yielded > 10,000 titles each of which was surveyed for content related to 'pathology' and related terms such as 'etiology,' 'inheritance,' 'pathomechanism,' 'signs and symptoms.' Additional resources included all books published on 'scoliosis' and available through the Arizona Health Sciences Library, Interlibrary Loan, or through direct contact with the authors or publishers. Results A lateral curvature of the spine–'scoliosis'–can develop in association with postural imbalance due to genetic defects and injury as well as pain and scarring from trauma or surgery. Irrespective of the factor that triggers its appearance, a sustained postural imbalance can result, over time, in establishment of a state of continuous asymmetric loading relative to the spinal axis. Recent studies support the longstanding hypothesis that spinal deformity results directly from such postural imbalance, irrespective of the primary trigger, because the dynamics of growth within vertebrae are altered by continuous asymmetric mechanical loading. These data suggest that, as long as growth potential remains, evolution of a spinal curvature into a spinal deformity can be prevented by reversing the state of continuous asymmetric loading. Conclusion Spinal curvatures can routinely be diagnosed in early stages, before pathological deformity of the vertebral elements is induced in response to asymmetric loading. Current clinical approaches involve 'watching and waiting' while mild reversible spinal curvatures develop into spinal deformities with

  13. Melatonin Inhibits Neural Cell Apoptosis and Promotes Locomotor Recovery via Activation of the Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling Pathway After Spinal Cord Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhaoliang; Zhou, Zipeng; Gao, Shuang; Guo, Yue; Gao, Kai; Wang, Haoyu; Dang, Xiaoqian

    2017-08-01

    The spinal cord is highly sensitive to spinal cord injury (SCI) by external mechanical damage, resulting in irreversible neurological damage. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway can effectively reduce apoptosis and protect against SCI. Melatonin, an indoleamine originally isolated from bovine pineal tissue, exerts neuroprotective effects after SCI through activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. In this study, we demonstrated that melatonin exhibited neuroprotective effects on neuronal apoptosis and supported functional recovery in a rat SCI model by activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. We found that melatonin administration after SCI significantly upregulated the expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor related protein 6 phosphorylation (p-LRP-6), lymphoid enhancer factor-1 (LEF-1) and β-catenin protein in the spinal cord. Melatonin enhanced motor neuronal survival in the spinal cord ventral horn and improved the locomotor functions of rats after SCI. Melatonin administration after SCI also reduced the expression levels of Bax and cleaved caspase-3 in the spinal cord and the proportion of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (TUNEL) positive cells, but increased the expression level of Bcl-2. These results suggest that melatonin attenuated SCI by activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

  14. Spinal CCL2 Promotes Central Sensitization, Long-Term Potentiation, and Inflammatory Pain via CCR2: Further Insights into Molecular, Synaptic, and Cellular Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Rou-Gang; Gao, Yong-Jing; Park, Chul-Kyu; Lu, Ning; Luo, Ceng; Wang, Wen-Ting; Wu, Sheng-Xi; Ji, Ru-Rong

    2018-02-01

    Mounting evidence supports an important role of chemokines, produced by spinal cord astrocytes, in promoting central sensitization and chronic pain. In particular, CCL2 (C-C motif chemokine ligand 2) has been shown to enhance N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA)-induced currents in spinal outer lamina II (IIo) neurons. However, the exact molecular, synaptic, and cellular mechanisms by which CCL2 modulates central sensitization are still unclear. We found that spinal injection of the CCR2 antagonist RS504393 attenuated CCL2- and inflammation-induced hyperalgesia. Single-cell RT-PCR revealed CCR2 expression in excitatory vesicular glutamate transporter subtype 2-positive (VGLUT2 + ) neurons. CCL2 increased NMDA-induced currents in CCR2 + /VGLUT2 + neurons in lamina IIo; it also enhanced the synaptic NMDA currents evoked by dorsal root stimulation; and furthermore, it increased the total and synaptic NMDA currents in somatostatin-expressing excitatory neurons. Finally, intrathecal RS504393 reversed the long-term potentiation evoked in the spinal cord by C-fiber stimulation. Our findings suggest that CCL2 directly modulates synaptic plasticity in CCR2-expressing excitatory neurons in spinal lamina IIo, and this underlies the generation of central sensitization in pathological pain.

  15. Activation of c-jun N-terminal kinase in spinal cord contributes to breast cancer induced bone pain in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Xiao-Wei

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The most frequent pain in patients with metastatic breast and prostate cancer is bone pain, which can be severe and difficult to treat. The mechanisms underlying this pain remain unclear. Here we investigated the role of c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK pathway in the spinal cord in cancer-induced bone pain (CIBP. Results In this study, we used an established rat CIBP model to investigate the possible role of JNK activation in the spinal cord. After intra-tibial inoculation with Walker 256 rat mammary gland carcinoma cells, the rats displayed mechanical allodynia on day 5, which lasted to day 16. The activation of JNK in neurons and astrocytes in the spinal cord was found on day 12 and day 16 after intra-tibial inoculation with carcinoma cells. A single intrathecal injection with JNK inhibitor SP600125 by lumbar puncture attenuated mechanical allodynia on day 12, and repeated intrathecal injection of SP600126 from day 10 to day 14 had a cumulative analgesic effect on CIBP. Conclusions Taken together, our results demonstrated for the first time that JNK activation in the spinal cord is required in the maintenance of CIBP. Inhibition of the spinal JNK pathway may provide a new therapy for CIBP management.

  16. Suppressive Effects of Bee Venom Acupuncture on Paclitaxel-Induced Neuropathic Pain in Rats: Mediation by Spinal α₂-Adrenergic Receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jiho; Jeon, Changhoon; Lee, Ji Hwan; Jang, Jo Ung; Quan, Fu Shi; Lee, Kyungjin; Kim, Woojin; Kim, Sun Kwang

    2017-10-31

    Paclitaxel, a chemotherapy drug for solid tumors, induces peripheral painful neuropathy. Bee venom acupuncture (BVA) has been reported to have potent analgesic effects, which are known to be mediated by activation of spinal α-adrenergic receptor. Here, we investigated the effect of BVA on mechanical hyperalgesia and spinal neuronal hyperexcitation induced by paclitaxel. The role of spinal α-adrenergic receptor subtypes in the analgesic effect of BVA was also observed. Administration of paclitaxel (total 8 mg/kg, intraperitoneal) on four alternate days (days 0, 2, 4, and 6) induced significant mechanical hyperalgesic signs, measured using a von Frey filament. BVA (1 mg/kg, ST36) relieved this mechanical hyperalgesia for at least two hours, and suppressed the hyperexcitation in spinal wide dynamic range neurons evoked by press or pinch stimulation. Both melittin (0.5 mg/kg, ST36) and phospholipase A2 (0.12 mg/kg, ST36) were shown to play an important part in this analgesic effect of the BVA, as they significantly attenuated the pain. Intrathecal pretreatment with the α₂-adrenergic receptor antagonist (idazoxan, 50 µg), but not α₁-adrenergic receptor antagonist (prazosin, 30 µg), blocked the analgesic effect of BVA. These results suggest that BVA has potent suppressive effects against paclitaxel-induced neuropathic pain, which were mediated by spinal α₂-adrenergic receptor.

  17. SPINAL DEFORMITIES AFTER SELECTIVE DORSAL RHIZOTOMY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PATRICIO PABLO MANZONE

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: Selective dorsal rhizotomy (SDR used for spasticity treatment could worsen or develop spinal deformities. Our goal is to describe spinal deformities seen in patients with cerebral palsy (CP after being treated by SDR. Methods: Retrospective study of patients operated on (SDR between January/1999 and June/2012. Inclusion criteria: spinal Rx before SDR surgery, spinography, and assessment at follow-up. We evaluated several factors emphasizing level and type of SDR approach, spinal deformity and its treatment, final Risser, and follow-up duration. Results: We found 7 patients (6 males: mean age at SDR 7.56 years (4.08-11.16. Mean follow-up: 6.64 years (2.16-13, final age: 14.32 years (7.5-19. No patient had previous deformity. GMFCS: 2 patients level IV, 2 level III, 3 level II. Initial walking status: 2 community walkers, 2 household walkers, 2 functional walkers, 1 not ambulant, at the follow-up, 3 patients improved, and 4 kept their status. We found 4 TL/L laminotomies, 2 L/LS laminectomies, and 1 thoracic laminectomy. Six spinal deformities were observed: 2 sagittal, 3 mixed, and 1 scoliosis. There was no association among the type of deformity, final gait status, topographic type, GMFCS, age, or SDR approach. Three patients had surgery indication for spinal deformity at skeletal maturity, while those patients with smaller deformities were still immature (Risser 0 to 2/3 although with progressive curves. Conclusions: After SDR, patients should be periodically evaluated until they reach Risser 5. The development of a deformity does not compromise functional results but adds morbidity because it may require surgical treatment.

  18. Cervical spinal canal narrowing in idiopathic syringomyelia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struck, Aaron F. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Department of Neurology, Boston, MA (United States); Carr, Carrie M. [Mayo Clinic, Department of Radiology, Rochester, MN (United States); Shah, Vinil [University of California San Francisco, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Hesselink, John R. [University of California San Diego, Department of Radiology, San Diego, CA (United States); Haughton, Victor M. [University of Wisconsin, Department of Radiology, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-08-15

    The cervical spine in Chiari I patient with syringomyelia has significantly different anteroposterior diameters than it does in Chiari I patients without syringomyelia. We tested the hypothesis that patients with idiopathic syringomyelia (IS) also have abnormal cervical spinal canal diameters. The finding in both groups may relate to the pathogenesis of syringomyelia. Local institutional review boards approved this retrospective study. Patients with IS were compared to age-matched controls with normal sagittal spine MR. All subjects had T1-weighted spin-echo (500/20) and T2-weighted fast spin-echo (2000/90) sagittal cervical spine images at 1.5 T. Readers blinded to demographic data and study hypothesis measured anteroposterior diameters at each cervical level. The spinal canal diameters were compared with a Mann-Whitney U test. The overall difference was assessed with a Friedman test. Seventeen subjects were read by two reviewers to assess inter-rater reliability. Fifty IS patients with 50 age-matched controls were studied. IS subjects had one or more syrinxes varying from 1 to 19 spinal segments. Spinal canal diameters narrowed from C1 to C3 and then enlarged from C5 to C7 in both groups. Diameters from C2 to C4 were narrower in the IS group (p < 0.005) than in controls. The ratio of the C3 to the C7 diameters was also smaller (p = 0.004) in IS than controls. Collectively, the spinal canal diameters in the IS were significantly different from controls (Friedman test p < 0.0001). Patients with IS have abnormally narrow upper and mid cervical spinal canal diameters and greater positive tapering between C3 and C7. (orig.)

  19. Guillain-Barre syndrome following spinal anaesthesia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayin, R.; Kati, I.; Gunes, M.

    2013-01-01

    Guillain-Barre Syndrome (GBS) is the most common disease resulting in acute diffuse flaccid paralysis. It is an autoimmune disease that can occur at any age. The clinical course is characterized by weakness in the arms and legs, areflexia and the progression of muscle weakness from the lower limbs to the upper limbs. The most common causes of GBS include infections, vaccinations, surgery and some medicines. We present the case of a 48 years old male patient, who developed GBS after undergoing surgery for renal calculus, under spinal anaesthesia. In this case report, we presented a rather rare case of GBS occurring following spinal anaesthesia. (author)

  20. Breaking the News in Spinal Cord Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirshblum, Steven; Fichtenbaum, Joyce

    2008-01-01

    Summary: Breaking the bad news in terms of prognosis for significant motor recovery following a neurologically complete spinal cord injury (SCI) is one of the most difficult tasks for the spinal cord medicine specialist. Learning the skills to facilitate this communication is extremely important to better assist patients to understand their prognosis as well as foster hope for their future. If bad news is delivered poorly it can cause confusion and long-lasting distress and resentment; if done well, it may assist understanding, adjustment, and acceptance. This article provides the physician who cares for patients with SCI with some concepts to consider when discussing prognosis with patients and their families. PMID:18533406

  1. Spinal cord testing: auditing for quality assurance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, J A; Reid, B

    1991-04-01

    A quality assurance audit of spinal cord testing as documented by staff nurses was carried out. Twenty-five patient records were examined for accuracy of documented testing and compared to assessments performed by three investigators. A pilot study established interrater reliability of a tool that was designed especially for this study. Results indicated staff nurses failed to meet pre-established 100% standard in all categories of testing when compared with investigator's findings. Possible reasons for this disparity are discussed as well as indications for modifications in the spinal testing record, teaching program and preset standards.

  2. Spinal myoclonus: report of four cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Pitágoras de Mattos

    1993-11-01

    Full Text Available Four cases of spinal myoclonus are described, three males and one female. The mean age was 51 years (28-75 years. The mean time between the onset of the myelopathy and the myoclonic jerks was 4.3 months (1-8 months. The involuntary movements were determined by trauma, Devic's disease, tuberculous myelopathy and tumor. Three patients had spastic paraplegia with bilateral myoclonus more evident on the right side. The fourth patient had a flaccid paraplegia with symmetrical jerks. The data suggest that different processes (trauma, demyelinating, infection and tumor affecting the spinal cord may cause the same type of involuntary movements.

  3. Spinal Cord Ischemia after Thoracoabdominal Aortic Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupesh George

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Overall prevalence of Thoraco abdominal aneurysm has increased due to widespread use of imaging techniques and aging population. Surgical aneurysm repair and endovascular stent graft repair have refined as successful treatment modalities in preventing aneurysm progression and rupture. Since spinal cord depends on branches of thoracoabdominal aorta for blood supply ,spinal cord ischaemia is a dreadful complication of these procedures. However recent animal experiments and surgical series thrown light in tackling this anatomical obstructions by physiologic means. The adoption of techniques for avoiding hypovolumea, hypotension, CSF pressure has reduced this complication rate from 23% to 2-6%.

  4. Multiple, primary spinal-paraspinal hydatid cysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sener, R.N.; Calli, C.; Kitis, O.; Yalman, O. [Dept. of Radiology, Ege University Hospital, Izmir (Turkey)

    2001-11-01

    A patient is presented with widespread primary hydatid cysts in spinal-paraspinal locations, secondary to Echinococcus granulosus. An alternative mechanism to explain how the embryos gained access to the body is proposed: The embryos penetrated the intestinal muscle and may have directly entered into the inferior vena cava system through small venous connections between this system and portal circulation. Various conditions in daily life associated with Valsalva maneuver might have caused such an atypical passage of the embryos to the inferior caval system toward the retroperitoneum and spinal-paraspinal structures via lumber epidural venous plexuses. (orig.)

  5. Fast magnetic resonance imaging in spinal trauma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silberstein, M.; McLean, K.

    1995-01-01

    In a prospective comparison between fast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences and conventional spin-echo in a series of 20 patients, gradient-echo imaging was found to be inferior to spin-echo, especially in the visualization of: spinal cord oedema, and the use of a rapid spin-echo sequence was limited by inferior visualization of hemorrhage. While the use of a combination of these two fast imaging techniques resulted in equivalent results to conventional spin-echo, the increased imaging time suggests that fast MRI cannot, as yet, replace conventional spin-echo techniques in acute spinal trauma. 15 refs., 3 tabs., 5 figs

  6. Diagnosis and therapy of spinal tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Algra, P.R.; Valk, J.; Heimans, J.J.

    1998-01-01

    Many different opinions exist as to the appropriate diagnostic workup and therapy for spinal tumors. With the advent of new imaging techniques and therapeutic regimens, an up-to-date reference work has become an urgent requirement. This book is designed to meet this need, and is the first of its kind to offer an overview of the opinions of internationally renowned specialists in the field. By addressing in detail all of the relevant topics and areas of contention, it should prove of great value in establishing rational imaging and therapeutic protocols for spinal tumors. (orig.)

  7. Attenuation caused by infrequently updated covariates in survival analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Per Kragh; Liestøl, Knut

    2003-01-01

    Attenuation; Cox regression model; Measurement errors; Survival analysis; Time-dependent covariates......Attenuation; Cox regression model; Measurement errors; Survival analysis; Time-dependent covariates...

  8. Lithium chloride contributes to blood-spinal cord barrier integrity and functional recovery from spinal cord injury by stimulating autophagic flux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Minji; He, Zili; Lin, Xiaoxiao; Zhou, Yulong; Wang, Qingqing; Zheng, Zengming; Chen, Jian; Xu, Huazi; Tian, Naifeng

    2018-01-22

    Blood-spinal cord barrier (BSCB) disruption following spinal cord injury (SCI) significantly compromises functional neuronal recovery. Autophagy is a potential therapeutic target when seeking to protect the BSCB. We explored the effects of lithium chloride (LiCl) on BSCB permeability and autophagy-induced SCI both in a rat model of SCI and in endothelial cells subjected to oxygen-glucose deprivation. We evaluated BSCB status using the Evans Blue dye extravasation test and measurement of tight junction (TJ) protein levels; we also assessed functional locomotor recovery. We detected autophagy-associated proteins in vivo and in vitro using both Western blotting and immunofluorescence staining. We found that, in a rat model of SCI, LiCl attenuated the elevation in BSCB permeability, improved locomotor recovery, and inhibited the degradation of TJ proteins including occludin and claudin-5. LiCl significantly induced the extent of autophagic flux after SCI by increasing LC3-II and ATG-5 levels, and abolishing p62 accumulation. In addition, a combination of LiCl and the autophagy inhibitor chloroquine not only partially eliminated the BSCB-protective effect of LiCl, but also exacerbated TJ protein degradation both in vivo and in vitro. Together, these findings suggest that LiCl treatment alleviates BSCB disruption and promotes locomotor recovery after SCI, partly by stimulating autophagic flux. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Erythropoietin attenuates motor neuron programmed cell death in a burn animal model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Hua Wu

    Full Text Available Burn-induced neuromuscular dysfunction may contribute to long-term morbidity; therefore, it is imperative to develop novel treatments. The present study investigated whether erythropoietin (EPO administration attenuates burn-induced motor neuron apoptosis and neuroinflammatory response. To validate our hypothesis, a third-degree hind paw burn rat model was developed by bringing the paw into contact with a metal surface at 75°C for 10 s. A total of 24 male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups: Group A, sham-control; Group B, burn-induced; Group C, burn + single EPO dose (5000 IU/kg i.p. at D0; and Group D, burn + daily EPO dosage (3000 IU/kg/day i.p. at D0-D6. Two treatment regimens were used to evaluate single versus multiple doses treatment effects. Before sacrifice, blood samples were collected for hematological parameter examination. The histological analyses of microglia activation, iNOS, and COX-2 in the spinal cord ventral horn were performed at week 1 post-burn. In addition, we examined autophagy changes by biomarkers of LC3B and ATG5. The expression of BCL-2, BAX, cleaved caspase-3, phospho-AKT, and mTOR was assessed simultaneously through Western blotting. EPO administration after burn injury attenuated neuroinflammation through various mechanisms, including the reduction of microglia activity as well as iNOS and COX-2 expression in the spinal cord ventral horn. In addition, the expression of phospho-AKT, mTOR and apoptotic indicators, such as BAX, BCL-2, and cleaved caspase-3, was modulated. Furthermore, the activity of burn-induced autophagy in the spinal cord ventral horn characterized by the expression of autophagic biomarkers, LC3B and ATG5, was reduced after EPO administration. The present results indicate that EPO inhibits the AKT-mTOR pathway to attenuate burn-induced motor neuron programmed cell death and microglia activation. EPO can modulate neuroinflammation and programmed cell death and may be a

  10. Comparison of dexmedetomidine and lignocaine on attenuation of airway and pressor responses during tracheal extubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Bharti Sharma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Haemodynamic stability and rapid emergence after general anaesthesia used in spinal surgery is a common practice, the goal of which is to permit early neurological motor and sensory examination. Extubation is almost always associated with hypertension, increased airway response and arrhythmias. We have compared the effects of the α-2 agonist Dexmedetomidine and Lignocaine given at the end of the procedure on attenuation of airway and pressor responses following tracheal extubation. This study is a randomised, placebo-controlled, double-blinded study. Materials and Methods: Sixty ASA I-III patients, aged 18-70 years, scheduled to undergo spinal surgery at the level of thoracic, lumbar or sacral region were randomly divided into three groups. Balanced general anaesthesia comprising standard procedures and drugs were used for monitoring, induction and maintenance. At the last skin suture, inhalation anaesthetic was discontinued. After turning the patient supine and return of spontaneous efforts, in Group D Dexmedetomidine 0.5 μg/kg, in Group L Lignocaine 1.5 mg/kg and in Group P normal saline (10 ml were administered as bolus intravenously over 60 seconds. Systolic, diastolic and mean arterial pressures and heart rate were recorded before intravenous administration and also every minute for 3 minutes, at 5, 10 and 15 minutes post-extubation. Duration of emergence and extubation were noted and attenuation of airway response and quality of extubation was evaluated on cough grading. Results: Mean arterial pressures and heart rate were higher in Group L and Group P than in Group D but not statistically significant. The duration of emergence, extubation and recovery were comparable in all the groups (P > 0.05. Extubation Quality Scores was 1 in 80%, 2 in 20% in Group D; in Group L, the quality scores were 1 for 55%, 2 for 45% and I Group P 1 for 35%, 2 for 45% and 3 for 20% of the patients. The requirement of rescue analgesia was also less

  11. Chronic mild hypoxia promotes profound vascular remodeling in spinal cord blood vessels, preferentially in white matter, via an α5β1 integrin-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halder, Sebok K; Kant, Ravi; Milner, Richard

    2018-05-01

    Spinal cord injury (SCI) leads to rapid destruction of neuronal tissue, resulting in devastating motor and sensory deficits. This is exacerbated by damage to spinal cord blood vessels and loss of vascular integrity. Thus, approaches that protect existing blood vessels or stimulate the growth of new blood vessels might present a novel approach to minimize loss or promote regeneration of spinal cord tissue following SCI. In light of the remarkable power of chronic mild hypoxia (CMH) to stimulate vascular remodeling in the brain, the goal of this study was to examine how CMH (8% O 2 for up to 7 days) affects blood vessel remodeling in the spinal cord. We found that CMH promoted the following: (1) endothelial proliferation and increased vascularity as a result of angiogenesis and arteriogenesis, (2) increased vascular expression of the angiogenic extracellular matrix protein fibronectin as well as concomitant increases in endothelial expression of the fibronectin receptor α5β1 integrin, (3) strongly upregulated endothelial expression of the tight junction proteins claudin-5, ZO-1 and occludin and (4) astrocyte activation. Of note, the vascular remodeling changes induced by CMH were more extensive in white matter. Interestingly, hypoxic-induced vascular remodeling in spinal cord blood vessels was markedly attenuated in mice lacking endothelial α5 integrin expression (α5-EC-KO mice). Taken together, these studies demonstrate the considerable remodeling potential of spinal cord blood vessels and highlight an important angiogenic role for the α5β1 integrin in promoting endothelial proliferation. They also imply that stimulation of the α5β1 integrin or controlled use of mild hypoxia might provide new approaches for promoting angiogenesis and improving vascular integrity in spinal cord blood vessels.

  12. The dynamic evaluation of the cervical spinal canal and spinal cord by magnetic resonance imaging during movement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koschorek, F.; Jensen, H.P.; Terwey, B.

    1987-01-01

    The authors present results of in vivo measurements of the cervical canal and spinal cord. They indicate that tension in the spinal cord increases during flexion. They conclude that, as the dorsal approach avoids this increased tension of the spinal cord, the surgical treatment in chronic cervical myelopathy using this route seems to be preferable

  13. Seismic attenuation system for a nuclear reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liszkai, Tamas; Cadell, Seth

    2018-01-30

    A system for attenuating seismic forces includes a reactor pressure vessel containing nuclear fuel and a containment vessel that houses the reactor pressure vessel. Both the reactor pressure vessel and the containment vessel include a bottom head. Additionally, the system includes a base support to contact a support surface on which the containment vessel is positioned in a substantially vertical orientation. An attenuation device is located between the bottom head of the reactor pressure vessel and the bottom head of the containment vessel. Seismic forces that travel from the base support to the reactor pressure vessel via the containment vessel are attenuated by the attenuation device in a direction that is substantially lateral to the vertical orientation of the containment vessel.

  14. Ultrasonic attenuation in glassy crystalline cyclohexanol

    OpenAIRE

    Saint Paul , M.; Nava , R.

    1983-01-01

    Ultrasonic attenuation measurements at 100 MHz on the orientationally disordered crystalline phase of cyclohexanol are reported. The results provide additional evidence that the freezing process of the orientational disorder of the molecules in the crystal lattice is a relaxational phenomenon.

  15. Attenuation measurements in solutions of some carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagandeep; Singh, K.; Lark, B.S.; Sahota, H.S.

    2000-01-01

    The linear attenuation coefficients in aqueous solutions of three carbohydrates, glucose (C 6 H 12 O 6 ), maltose monohydrate (C 12 H 22 O 11 ·H 2 O), and sucrose (C 12 H 22 O 11 ), were determined at 81, 356, 511, 662, 1,173, and 1,332 keV by the gamma-ray transmission method in a good geometry setup. From the precisely measured densities of these solutions, mass attenuation coefficients were then obtained that varied systematically with the corresponding changes in the concentrations (g/cm 3 ) of these solutions. The experimental results were used in terms of effective atomic numbers and electron densities. A comparison between experimental and theoretical values of attenuation coefficients has proven that the study has a potential application for the determination of attenuation coefficients of solid solutes from their solutions without obtaining them in pure crystalline form

  16. Attenuation Measurements in Solutions of Some Carbohydrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gagandeep; Singh, Kulwant; Lark, B.S.; Sahota, H.S.

    2000-01-01

    The linear attenuation coefficients in aqueous solutions of three carbohydrates, glucose (C 6 H 12 O 6 ), maltose monohydrate (C 12 H 22 O 11 .H 2 O), and sucrose (C 12 H 22 O 11 ), were determined at 81, 356, 511, 662, 1173, and 1332 keV by the gamma-ray transmission method in a good geometry setup. From the precisely measured densities of these solutions, mass attenuation coefficients were then obtained that varied systematically with the corresponding changes in the concentrations (g/cm 3 ) of these solutions. The experimental results were used in terms of effective atomic numbers and electron densities. A comparison between experimental and theoretical values of attenuation coefficients has proven that the study has a potential application for the determination of attenuation coefficients of solid solutes from their solutions without obtaining them in pure crystalline form

  17. Radiation-attenuated vaccine for lungworm disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, C.M.

    1977-01-01

    The work done at the Indian Veternary Research Institute, Izatnagar, on the development of a vaccine for lungworm diseases is reported. Research work done includes: (1) studies on the epidemiology and the incidence of the lungworm infections, (ii) studies on the radiation-attenuated lungworm Dictyocaulus filaria vaccine, (iii) studies on other parasites using ionizing radiation, (iv) incidence of lungworm infection in sheep in Jammu and Kashmir State, (v) suitable dose of gamma radiation for attenuation, (vi) laboratory studies with radiation-attenuated D. filaria vaccine, (vii) serology of D. filaria infection, (viii) field trials with the radiation-attenuated vaccine, (ix) immune response of previously exposed lambs to vaccination, (x) comparative susceptibility of sheep and goats to infection with D. filaria, (xi) quantitative studies of D. filaria in lambs and (xii) production and supply of lungworm vaccine. (A.K.)

  18. Spinal myoclonus following a peripheral nerve injury: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkol Gokhan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Spinal myoclonus is a rare disorder characterized by myoclonic movements in muscles that originate from several segments of the spinal cord and usually associated with laminectomy, spinal cord injury, post-operative, lumbosacral radiculopathy, spinal extradural block, myelopathy due to demyelination, cervical spondylosis and many other diseases. On rare occasions, it can originate from the peripheral nerve lesions and be mistaken for peripheral myoclonus. Careful history taking and electrophysiological evaluation is important in differential diagnosis. The aim of this report is to evaluate the clinical and electrophysiological characteristics and treatment results of a case with spinal myoclonus following a peripheral nerve injury without any structural lesion.

  19. Transcutaneous spinal stimulation as a therapeutic strategy for spinal cord injury: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grecco LH

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Leandro H Grecco,1,3,4,* Shasha Li,1,5,* Sarah Michel,1,6,* Laura Castillo-Saavedra,1 Andoni Mourdoukoutas,7 Marom Bikson,7 Felipe Fregni1,21Spaulding Neuromodulation Center, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA, 2Spaulding-Harvard Spinal Cord Injury Model System, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Charlestown, MA, USA; 3Special Laboratory of Pain and Signaling, Butantan Institute, 4Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Biomedical Science, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 5Department of Rehabilitation Medicine, West China Hospital, Sichuan University, Chengdu, Sichuan, People's Republic of China; 6Department of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Namur, Belgium; 7Department of Biomedical Engineering, The City College of New York, New York, NY, USA*These authors contributed equally to this workAbstract: Treatments for spinal cord injury (SCI still have limited effects. Electrical stimulation might facilitate plastic changes in affected spinal circuitries that may be beneficial in improving motor function and spasticity or SCI-related neuropathic pain. Based on available animal and clinical evidence, we critically reviewed the physiological basis and therapeutic action of transcutaneous spinal cord stimulation in SCI. We analyzed the literature published on PubMed to date, looking for the role of three main noninvasive stimulation techniques in the recovery process of SCI and focusing mainly on transcutaneous spinal stimulation. This review discusses the main clinical applications, latest advances, and limitations of noninvasive electrical stimulation of the spinal cord. Although most recent research in this topic has focused on transcutaneous spinal direct current stimulation (tsDCS, we also reviewed the technique of transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation (TENS and neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES as potential methods to modulate spinal cord

  20. MRI of anterior spinal artery syndrome of the cervical spinal cord

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, S. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Yamada, T. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Ishii, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Saito, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Tanji, H. (Dept. of Neurology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan)); Kobayashi, T. (Inst. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Miyagi (Japan)); Soma, Y. (Div. of Neurology, Takeda Hospital, Aizuwakamatsu (Japan)); Sakamoto, K. (Dept. of Radiology, Tohoku Univ. School of Medicine, Sendai (Japan))

    1992-12-01

    Cervical spinal cord lesions in the anterior spinal artery syndrome were delineated on magnetic resonance images (MRI) in four patients. The lesion was always seen anteriorly in the cervical cord. On T2-weighted images, the lesions appeared hyperintense relative to the normal spinal cord, while on T1-weighted images, two chronic lesions appeared hypointense, with local atrophy of the cord. In one case, repeated T1-weighted images showed no signal abnormality 4 days after the ictus, but the lesion became hypointense 18 days later, when contrast enhancement was also recognized after injection of Gd-DTPA; this sequence of intensity changes was similar to that of cerebral infarction. The extent of the lesion seen MRI correlated closely with neurological findings in all cases. Although the findings may not be specific, MRI is now the modality of choice for confirming the diagnosis in patients suspected of having an anterior spinal artery syndrome. (orig.)