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Sample records for tethered bilayer lipid

  1. Tethered and Polymer Supported Bilayer Lipid Membranes: Structure and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakob Andersson

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Solid supported bilayer lipid membranes are model systems to mimic natural cell membranes in order to understand structural and functional properties of such systems. The use of a model system allows for the use of a wide variety of analytical tools including atomic force microscopy, impedance spectroscopy, neutron reflectometry, and surface plasmon resonance spectroscopy. Among the large number of different types of model membranes polymer-supported and tethered lipid bilayers have been shown to be versatile and useful systems. Both systems consist of a lipid bilayer, which is de-coupled from an underlying support by a spacer cushion. Both systems will be reviewed, with an emphasis on the effect that the spacer moiety has on the bilayer properties.

  2. Physisorbed Polymer-Tethered Lipid Bilayer with Lipopolymer Gradient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph A. Naumann

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Physisorbed polymer-tethered lipid bilayers consisting of phospholipids and lipopolymers represent an attractive planar model membrane platform, in which bilayer fluidity and membrane elastic properties can be regulated through lipopolymer molar concentration. Herein we report a method for the fabrication of such a planar model membrane system with a lateral gradient of lipopolymer density. In addition, a procedure is described, which leads to a sharp boundary between regions of low and high lipopolymer molar concentrations. Resulting gradients and sharp boundaries are visualized on the basis of membrane buckling structures at elevated lipopolymer concentrations using epifluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy. Furthermore, results from spot photobleaching experiments are presented, which provide insight into the lipid lateral fluidity in these model membrane architectures. The presented experimental data highlight a planar, solid-supported membrane characterized by fascinating length scale-dependent dynamics and elastic properties with remarkable parallels to those observed in cellular membranes.

  3. Structure of functional Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin channels in tethered bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGillivray, Duncan J; Valincius, Gintaras; Heinrich, Frank; Robertson, Joseph W F; Vanderah, David J; Febo-Ayala, Wilma; Ignatjev, Ilja; Lösche, Mathias; Kasianowicz, John J

    2009-02-18

    We demonstrate a method for simultaneous structure and function determination of integral membrane proteins. Electrical impedance spectroscopy shows that Staphylococcus aureus alpha-hemolysin channels in membranes tethered to gold have the same properties as those formed in free-standing bilayer lipid membranes. Neutron reflectometry provides high-resolution structural information on the interaction between the channel and the disordered membrane, validating predictions based on the channel's x-ray crystal structure. The robust nature of the membrane enabled the precise localization of the protein within 1.1 A. The channel's extramembranous cap domain affects the lipid headgroup region and the alkyl chains in the outer membrane leaflet and significantly dehydrates the headgroups. The results suggest that this technique could be used to elucidate molecular details of the association of other proteins with membranes and may provide structural information on domain organization and stimuli-responsive reorganization for transmembrane proteins in membrane mimics.

  4. Combined electrochemistry and surface-enhanced infrared absorption spectroscopy of gramicidin A incorporated into tethered bilayer lipid membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kozuch, J.; Steinem, C.; Hildebrandt, P.; Millo, D.

    2012-01-01

    Support from the support: Tethered bilayer lipid membranes containing the cation-channel-forming peptide gramicidin A were assembled on nanostructured Au films. The combination of surface-enhanced infrared absorption (SEIRA) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) was used for the in situ

  5. A New and Robust Method of Tethering IgG Surrogate Antigens on Lipid Bilayer Membranes to Facilitate the TIRFM Based Live Cell and Single Molecule Imaging Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xingwang; Chen, Xin; Fan, Yilin; Wan, Zhengpeng; Xu, Yinsheng; Liu, Wanli

    2013-01-01

    Our understanding of cell-cell interactions has been significantly improved in the past years with the help of Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope (TIRFM) in combination with an antigen presenting system supported by planar lipid bilayer (PLB) membranes, which are used to mimic the extensive receptor and ligand interactions within cell-cell contact interface. In TIRFM experiments, it is a challenge to uniformly present ligand molecules in monomeric format on the surface of PLB membranes. Here, we introduce a new and robust method of tethering IgG surrogate antigen ligands on the surface of Ni2+-containing PLB membranes. In this method, we use a modified D domain from staphylococcal protein A molecule that is fused with an N-terminus polyhistidine tag (H12-D-domain) to tether IgG surrogate antigens on Ni2+-containing PLB membranes. We systematically assessed the specificity and capability of H12-D-domain construct to capture IgG molecules from different species through live cell and single molecule TIRFM imaging. We find that these IgG surrogate antigens tethered by H12-D-domain show better lateral mobility and are more uniformly distributed on PLB membranes than the ones tethered by streptavidin. Neither IgM molecules, nor Fab or F(ab’)2 fragments of IgG molecules can be tethered on PLB membranes by H12-D-domain construct. These tethered IgG surrogate antigens strongly induce the formation and accumulation of signaling active antigen receptor microclusters within the immunological synapse in B or T lymphocyte cells. Thus our method provides a new and robust method to tether IgG surrogate antigens or other molecules fused with IgG Fc portion on PLB membranes for TIRFM based molecule imaging experiments. PMID:23717469

  6. A new and robust method of tethering IgG surrogate antigens on lipid bilayer membranes to facilitate the TIRFM based live cell and single molecule imaging experiments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaosen Zhang

    Full Text Available Our understanding of cell-cell interactions has been significantly improved in the past years with the help of Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence Microscope (TIRFM in combination with an antigen presenting system supported by planar lipid bilayer (PLB membranes, which are used to mimic the extensive receptor and ligand interactions within cell-cell contact interface. In TIRFM experiments, it is a challenge to uniformly present ligand molecules in monomeric format on the surface of PLB membranes. Here, we introduce a new and robust method of tethering IgG surrogate antigen ligands on the surface of Ni(2+-containing PLB membranes. In this method, we use a modified D domain from staphylococcal protein A molecule that is fused with an N-terminus polyhistidine tag (H12-D-domain to tether IgG surrogate antigens on Ni(2+-containing PLB membranes. We systematically assessed the specificity and capability of H12-D-domain construct to capture IgG molecules from different species through live cell and single molecule TIRFM imaging. We find that these IgG surrogate antigens tethered by H12-D-domain show better lateral mobility and are more uniformly distributed on PLB membranes than the ones tethered by streptavidin. Neither IgM molecules, nor Fab or F(ab'2 fragments of IgG molecules can be tethered on PLB membranes by H12-D-domain construct. These tethered IgG surrogate antigens strongly induce the formation and accumulation of signaling active antigen receptor microclusters within the immunological synapse in B or T lymphocyte cells. Thus our method provides a new and robust method to tether IgG surrogate antigens or other molecules fused with IgG Fc portion on PLB membranes for TIRFM based molecule imaging experiments.

  7. Lipid bilayers and interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kik, R.A.

    2007-01-01

    In biological systems lipid bilayers are subject to many different interactions with other entities. These can range from proteins that are attached to the hydrophilic region of the bilayer or transmembrane proteins that interact with the hydrophobic region of the lipid bilayer. Interaction between

  8. Reconstitution of Cholesterol-Dependent Vaginolysin into Tethered Phospholipid Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Budvytyte, Rima; Pleckaityte, M.; Zvirbliene, A.

    2013-01-01

    Functional reconstitution of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin vaginolysin (VLY) from Gardnerella vaginalis into artificial tethered bilayer membranes (tBLMs) has been accomplished. The reconstitution of VLY was followed in real-time by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Changes...

  9. Alcohol Interactions with Lipid Bilayers

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    Tomáš Kondela

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigate the structural changes to lipid membrane that ensue from the addition of aliphatic alcohols with various alkyl tail lengths. Small angle neutron diffraction from flat lipid bilayers that are hydrated through water vapor has been employed to eliminate possible artefacts of the membrane curvature and the alcohol’s membrane-water partitioning. We have observed clear changes to membrane structure in both transversal and lateral directions. Most importantly, our results suggest the alteration of the membrane-water interface. The water encroachment has shifted in the way that alcohol loaded bilayers absorbed more water molecules when compared to the neat lipid bilayers. The experimental results have been corroborated by molecular dynamics simulations to reveal further details. Namely, the order parameter profiles have been fruitful in correlating the mechanical model of structural changes to the effect of anesthesia.

  10. Tethered bimolecular lipid membranes - A novel model membrane platform

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoll, Wolfgang; Koeper, Ingo; Naumann, Renate; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin [Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Ackermannweg 10, 55128 Mainz (Germany)

    2008-10-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, synthesizing, assembling, and characterizing functional tethered bimolecular lipid membranes (tBLMs) as a novel platform for biophysical studies of and with artificial membranes or for sensor development employing, e.g., membrane integral receptor proteins. Chemical coupling schemes based on thiol groups for Au substrates or silanes used in the case of oxide surfaces allow for the covalent and, hence, chemically and mechanically robust attachment of anchor lipids to the solid support, stabilizing the proximal layer of a tethered membrane on the transducer surface. Surface plasmon optics, the quartz crystal microbalance, fluorescence- and IR spectroscopies, and electrochemical techniques are used to characterize the build-up of these complex supramolecular interfacial architectures. We demonstrate, in particular, that bilayers with a specific electrical resistance of better than 10 M{omega} cm{sup 2} can be achieved routinely with this approach. The functionalization of the lipid membranes by the incorporation of peptides is demonstrated for the carrier valinomycin which shows in our tBLMs the expected discrimination by four orders of magnitude between the translocation of K{sup +}- and Na{sup +}-ions across the hydrophobic barrier. For the synthetic channel-forming peptide M2 the high electrical resistance of the bilayer with the correspondingly low background current allows for the recording of even single channel current fluctuations. From the many membrane proteins that we reconstituted so far we describe results obtained with the redox-protein cytochrome c oxidase. Here, we also use a genetically modified mutant with a His-tag at either the C- or the N-terminus for the oriented attachment of the protein via the NTA/Ni{sup 2+} approach. With this strategy, we not only can control the density of the immobilized functional units, we introduce a completely new and alternative concept for the

  11. Polydopamine-Supported Lipid Bilayers

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    Souryvanh Nirasay

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available We report the formation of lipid membranes supported by a soft polymeric cushion of polydopamine. First, 20 nm thick polydopamine films were formed on mica substrates. Atomic force microscopy imaging indicated that these films were also soft with a surface roughness of 2 nm under hydrated conditions. A zwitterionic phospholipid bilayer was then deposited on the polydopamine cushion by fusion of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC vesicles. Polydopamine films preserved the lateral mobility of the phospholipids as shown by fluorescence microscopy recovery after photobleaching (FRAP experiments. Diffusion coefficients of ~5.9 and 7.2 µm2 s−1 were respectively determined for DMPC and DOPC at room temperature, values which are characteristic of lipids in a free standing bilayer system.

  12. Polydopamine-Supported Lipid Bilayers

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    Nirasay, Souryvanh; Badia, Antonella; Leclair, Grégoire; Claverie, Jerome P.; Marcotte, Isabelle

    2012-01-01

    We report the formation of lipid membranes supported by a soft polymeric cushion of polydopamine. First, 20 nm thick polydopamine films were formed on mica substrates. Atomic force microscopy imaging indicated that these films were also soft with a surface roughness of 2 nm under hydrated conditions. A zwitterionic phospholipid bilayer was then deposited on the polydopamine cushion by fusion of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) vesicles. Polydopamine films preserved the lateral mobility of the phospholipids as shown by fluorescence microscopy recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) experiments. Diffusion coefficients of ~5.9 and 7.2 µm2 s−1 were respectively determined for DMPC and DOPC at room temperature, values which are characteristic of lipids in a free standing bilayer system.

  13. Polydopamine-Supported Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Souryvanh Nirasay; Antonella Badia; Grégoire Leclair; Claverie, Jerome P.; Isabelle Marcotte

    2012-01-01

    We report the formation of lipid membranes supported by a soft polymeric cushion of polydopamine. First, 20 nm thick polydopamine films were formed on mica substrates. Atomic force microscopy imaging indicated that these films were also soft with a surface roughness of 2 nm under hydrated conditions. A zwitterionic phospholipid bilayer was then deposited on the polydopamine cushion by fusion of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) vesicles. Polydopamine...

  14. Texture of lipid bilayer domains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Uffe Bernchou; Brewer, Jonathan R.; Midtiby, Henrik Skov

    2009-01-01

    which correlates with the phase state of the membrane. This is quantified by the generalized polarization (GP) function, and we demonstrate that a GP analysis can be performed on supported membranes. The results show that although the gel domains have heterogeneous texture, the membrane phase state does......We investigate the texture of gel (g) domains in binary lipid membranes composed of the phospholipids DPPC and DOPC. Lateral organization of lipid bilayer membranes is a topic of fundamental and biological importance. Whereas questions related to size and composition of fluid membrane domain...... are well studied, the possibility of texture in gel domains has so far not been examined. When using polarized light for two-photon excitation of the fluorescent lipid probe Laurdan, the emission intensity is highly sensitive to the angle between the polarization and the tilt orientation of lipid acyl...

  15. DNA nanotechnology: Bringing lipid bilayers into shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howorka, Stefan

    2017-07-01

    Lipid bilayers form the thin and floppy membranes that define the boundary of compartments such as cells. Now, a method to control the shape and size of bilayers using DNA nanoscaffolds has been developed. Such designer materials advance synthetic biology and could find use in membrane research.

  16. Supramolecular protein immobilization on lipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bosmans, R.P.G.; Hendriksen, W.E.; Verheijden, Mark Lloyd; Eelkema, R.; Jonkheijm, Pascal; van Esch, J.H.; Brunsveld, Luc

    2015-01-01

    Protein immobilization on surfaces, and on lipid bilayers specifically, has great potential in biomolecular and biotechnological research. Of current special interest is the immobilization of proteins using supramolecular noncovalent interactions. This allows for a reversible immobilization and

  17. Lipid mobility in supported lipid bilayers by single molecule tracking

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    Kohram, Maryam; Shi, Xiaojun; Smith, Adam

    2015-03-01

    Phospholipid bilayers are the main component of cell membranes and their interaction with biomolecules in their immediate environment is critical for cellular functions. These interactions include the binding of polycationic polymers to lipid bilayers which affects many cell membrane events. As an alternative method of studying live cell membranes, we assemble a supported lipid bilayer and investigate its binding with polycationic polymers in vitro by fluorescently labeling the molecules of the supported lipid bilayer and tracking their mobility. In this work, we use single molecule tracking total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) to study phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids with and without an adsorbed polycationic polymer, quaternized polyvinylpyridine (QPVP). Individual molecular trajectories are obtained from the experiment, and a Brownian diffusion model is used to determine diffusion coefficients through mean square displacements. Our results indicate a smaller diffusion coefficient for the supported lipid bilayers in the presence of QPVP in comparison to its absence, revealing that their binding causes a decrease in lateral mobility.

  18. Droplet Microfluidics for Artificial Lipid Bilayers

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    Punnamaraju, Srikoundinya; Steckl, Andrew

    2012-02-01

    Droplet interface bilayer is a versatile approach that allows formation of artificial lipid bilayer membrane at the interface of two lipid monolayer coated aqueous droplets in a lipid filled oil medium. Versatility exists in the form of voltage control of DIB area, ability of forming networks of DIBs, volume control of droplets and lipid-oil, and ease of reformation. Significant effect of voltage on the area and capacitance of DIB as well as DIB networks are characterized using simultaneous optical and electrical recordings. Mechanisms behind voltage-induced effects on DIBs are investigated. Photo induced effect on the DIB membrane porosity is obtained by incorporating UVC-sensitive photo-polymerizable lipids in DIB. Photo-induced effects can be extended for in-vitro studies of triggered release of encapsulated contents across membranes. A droplet based low voltage digital microfluidic platform is developed to automate DIB formation, which could potentially be used for forming arrays of lipid bilayer membranes.

  19. Alcohol's Effects on Lipid Bilayer Properties

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    Ingólfsson, Helgi I.; Andersen, Olaf S.

    2011-01-01

    Alcohols are known modulators of lipid bilayer properties. Their biological effects have long been attributed to their bilayer-modifying effects, but alcohols can also alter protein function through direct protein interactions. This raises the question: Do alcohol's biological actions result predominantly from direct protein-alcohol interactions or from general changes in the membrane properties? The efficacy of alcohols of various chain lengths tends to exhibit a so-called cutoff effect (i.e., increasing potency with increased chain length, which that eventually levels off). The cutoff varies depending on the assay, and numerous mechanisms have been proposed such as: limited size of the alcohol-protein interaction site, limited alcohol solubility, and a chain-length-dependent lipid bilayer-alcohol interaction. To address these issues, we determined the bilayer-modifying potency of 27 aliphatic alcohols using a gramicidin-based fluorescence assay. All of the alcohols tested (with chain lengths of 1–16 carbons) alter the bilayer properties, as sensed by a bilayer-spanning channel. The bilayer-modifying potency of the short-chain alcohols scales linearly with their bilayer partitioning; the potency tapers off at higher chain lengths, and eventually changes sign for the longest-chain alcohols, demonstrating an alcohol cutoff effect in a system that has no alcohol-binding pocket. PMID:21843475

  20. Fragmented state of lipid bilayers in water

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helfrich, W.; Thimmel, J.; Klösgen, Beate Maria

    1999-01-01

    The bilayers of some typical biological membrane lipids such as PC and DGDG disintegrate in a large excess of water to form an optically invisible dispersive bilayer phase. `Dark bodies' can be reversibly precipitated from it by raising the temperature. The dispersive phase probably consists...... of `knotted sticks', i.e. very thin nodular tubes of bilayer. After reviewing pertinent experimental and theoretical work we report on the discovery of a lower consolute point near room temperature in DGDG/water systems. Its existence shows that the dispersive phase and the dark bodies belong to the same...

  1. Method of fabricating lipid bilayer membranes on solid supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Nam-Joon (Inventor); Frank, Curtis W. (Inventor); Glenn, Jeffrey S. (Inventor); Cheong, Kwang Ho (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of producing a planar lipid bilayer on a solid support. With this method, a solution of lipid vesicles is first deposited on the solid support. Next, the lipid vesicles are destabilized by adding an amphipathic peptide solution to the lipid vesicle solution. This destabilization leads to production of a planar lipid bilayer on the solid support. The present invention also provides a supported planar lipid bilayer, where the planar lipid bilayer is made of naturally occurring lipids and the solid support is made of unmodified gold or titanium oxide. Preferably, the supported planar lipid bilayer is continuous. The planar lipid bilayer may be made of any naturally occurring lipid or mixture of lipids, including, but not limited to phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinsitol, cardiolipin, cholesterol, and sphingomyelin.

  2. Lipid Bilayers: Clusters, Domains and Phases

    OpenAIRE

    Ackerman, David G.; Feigenson, Gerald W.

    2015-01-01

    In this chapter we discuss the complex mixing behavior of plasma membrane lipids. To do so, we first introduce the plasma membrane and membrane mixtures often used to model its complexity. We then discuss the nature of lipid phase behavior in bilayers and the distinction between these phases and other manifestations of nonrandom mixing found in one-phase mixtures, such as clusters, micelles, and microemulsions. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of Gibbs phase diagrams to the study of ...

  3. Novel biomedical applications of supported lipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Weerd, Jasper

    2015-01-01

    Studying and steering cell behaviour on artificial surfaces is challenged by the correct presentation of ligands and interaction with cells. Cell membrane mimics such as supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) offer unique possibilities in this field. For example, ligands that are displayed on SLBs can move

  4. Finite element modeling of lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Feng; Klug, William S.

    2006-12-01

    A numerical simulation framework is presented for the study of biological membranes composed of lipid bilayers based on the finite element method. The classic model for these membranes employs a two-dimensional-fluid-like elastic constitutive law which is sensitive to curvature, and subjects vesicles to physically imposed constraints on surface area and volume. This model is implemented numerically via the use of C1-conforming triangular Loop subdivision finite elements. The validity of the framework is tested by computing equilibrium shapes from previously-determined axisymmetric shape-phase diagram of lipid bilayer vesicles with homogeneous material properties. Some of the benefits and challenges of finite element modeling of lipid bilayer systems are discussed, and it is indicated how this framework is natural for future investigation of biologically realistic bilayer structures involving nonaxisymmetric geometries, binding and adhesive interactions, heterogeneous mechanical properties, cytoskeletal interactions, and complex loading arrangements. These biologically relevant features have important consequences for the shape mechanics of nonidealized vesicles and cells, and their study requires not simply advances in theory, but also advances in numerical simulation techniques, such as those presented here.

  5. The impact of resveratrol in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Chen; Ghellinck, Alexis de; Fragneto, Giovanna

    The natural antioxidant resveratrol, contained in the skin of red grape and accordingly in their wines, is hold liable for health impacts such as cardiovascular protection and anti-oxidative effect. Clinical trials of resveratrol as prophylactic or even therapeutic drug are ongoing. However, basic...... knowledge on its probable working mechanism is rare. In this biophysical study, neutron reflectometry was used to investigate the direct impact of resveratrol on lipid membranes with solid supported bilayers. When interacting with di- palmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) bilayers, resveratrol accumulates...

  6. DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langecker, Martin; Arnaut, Vera; List, Jonathan; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-06-17

    CONSPECTUS: DNA has been previously shown to be useful as a material for the fabrication of static nanoscale objects, and also for the realization of dynamic molecular devices and machines. In many cases, nucleic acid assemblies directly mimic biological structures, for example, cytoskeletal filaments, enzyme scaffolds, or molecular motors, and many of the applications envisioned for such structures involve the study or imitation of biological processes, and even the interaction with living cells and organisms. An essential feature of biological systems is their elaborate structural organization and compartmentalization, and this most often involves membranous structures that are formed by dynamic assemblies of lipid molecules. Imitation of or interaction with biological systems using the tools of DNA nanotechnology thus ultimately and necessarily also involves interactions with lipid membrane structures, and thus the creation of DNA-lipid hybrid assemblies. Due to their differing chemical nature, however, highly charged nucleic acids and amphiphilic lipids do not seem the best match for the construction of such systems, and in fact they are rarely found in nature. In recent years, however, a large variety of lipid-interacting DNA conjugates were developed, which are now increasingly being applied also for the realization of DNA nanostructures interacting with lipid bilayer membranes. In this Account, we will present the current state of this emerging class of nanosystems. After a brief overview of the basic biophysical and biochemical properties of lipids and lipid bilayer membranes, we will discuss how DNA molecules can interact with lipid membranes through electrostatic interactions or via covalent modification with hydrophobic moieties. We will then show how such DNA-lipid interactions have been utilized for the realization of DNA nanostructures attached to or embedded within lipid bilayer membranes. Under certain conditions, DNA nanostructures remain mobile on

  7. Lipid bilayers: clusters, domains and phases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David G; Feigenson, Gerald W

    2015-01-01

    In the present chapter we discuss the complex mixing behaviour of plasma membrane lipids. To do so, we first introduce the plasma membrane and membrane mixtures often used to model its complexity. We then discuss the nature of lipid phase behaviour in bilayers and the distinction between these phases and other manifestations of non-random mixing found in one-phase mixtures, such as clusters, micelles and microemulsions. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of Gibbs phase diagrams to the study of increasingly complex model membrane systems, with a focus on phase coexistence, morphology and their implications for the cell plasma membrane.

  8. Sorting of integral membrane proteins mediated by curvature-dependent protein-lipid bilayer interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Božič, Bojan; Das, Sovan L; Svetina, Saša

    2015-03-28

    Cell membrane proteins, both bound and integral, are known to preferentially accumulate at membrane locations with curvatures favorable to their shape. This is mainly due to the curvature dependent interaction between membrane proteins and their lipid environment. Here, we analyze the effects of the protein-lipid bilayer interaction energy due to mismatch between the protein shape and the principal curvatures of the surrounding bilayer. The role of different macroscopic parameters that define the interaction energy term is elucidated in relation to recent experiment in which the lateral distribution of a membrane embedded protein potassium channel KvAP is measured on a giant unilamellar lipid vesicle (reservoir) and a narrow tubular extension - a tether - kept at constant length. The dependence of the sorting ratio, defined as the ratio between the areal density of the protein on the tether and on the vesicle, on the inverse tether radius is influenced by the strength of the interaction, the intrinsic shape of the membrane embedded protein, and its abundance in the reservoir. It is described how the values of these constants can be extracted from experiments. The intrinsic principal curvatures of a protein are related to the tether radius at which the sorting ratio attains its maximum value. The estimate of the principal intrinsic curvature of the protein KvAP, obtained by comparing the experimental and theoretical sorting behavior, is consistent with the available information on its structure.

  9. Self-spreading method for forming lipid bilayer on a patterned agarose gel: Toward precise lipid bilayer patterning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimba, Kenta; Shoji, Kazuma; Miyamoto, Yoshitaka; Yagi, Tohru

    2017-07-01

    Forming artificial cell membranes is a suitable strategy for studying drug responses of membrane proteins. In order to form lipid bilayer with both mechanical stability and membrane protein functions, hydrogel supported bilayer has attracted attentions. Combinational use of self-extraction method for lipid bilayer formation and agarose gel patterning should realize hydrogel-supported bilayer with any shape and large area. In this study, we aimed to form a lipid bilayer on a patterned agarose gel and to characterize the membrane. First, lipid mixture was attached on an agarose gel, and lipid layers spread on the gel surface. With fluorescent observation, it is suggested that thin lipid layer was formed on the agarose gel, and their distance-dependent changes in spreading velocity was consistent with that in lipid bilayer. Next, the lipid layer was characterized with fluorescence recovery after photo breaching experiment. As a result, it is indicated that lipid molecules in the lipid layer on the agarose showed lateral diffusion, a typical characteristic of lipid bilayer. Taken together, we confirmed that lipid bilayer can be formed on the patterned agarose gel with self-spreading method. The hydrogel-supported bilayer will be a suitable tool for drug discovery.

  10. Engineering Lipid Bilayer Membranes for Protein Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Williams, John Dalton

    2013-01-01

    Lipid membranes regulate the flow of nutrients and communication signaling between cells and protect the sub-cellular structures. Recent attempts to fabricate artificial systems using nanostructures that mimic the physiological properties of natural lipid bilayer membranes (LBM) fused with transmembrane proteins have helped demonstrate the importance of temperature, pH, ionic strength, adsorption behavior, conformational reorientation and surface density in cellular membranes which all affect the incorporation of proteins on solid surfaces. Much of this work is performed on artificial templates made of polymer sponges or porous materials based on alumina, mica, and porous silicon (PSi) surfaces. For example, porous silicon materials have high biocompatibility, biodegradability, and photoluminescence, which allow them to be used both as a support structure for lipid bilayers or a template to measure the electrochemical functionality of living cells grown over the surface as in vivo. The variety of these media, coupled with the complex physiological conditions present in living systems, warrant a summary and prospectus detailing which artificial systems provide the most promise for different biological conditions. This study summarizes the use of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) data on artificial biological membranes that are closely matched with previously published biological systems using both black lipid membrane and patch clamp techniques. PMID:24185908

  11. Lipid peroxidation and water penetration in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Conte, Elena; Megli, Francesco Maria; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2012-01-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a key role in the alteration of cell membrane's properties. Here we used as model systems multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) made of the first two products in the oxidative cascade of linoleoyl lecithin, namely 1-palmitoyl-2-(13-hydroperoxy-9,11-octadecanedienoyl)-lecithin (Hp......(zz) parameters revealed that OHPLPC, but mostly HpPLPC, induced a measurable increase in polarity and H-bonding propensity in the central region of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics simulation performed on 16-DSA in the PLPC-HpPLPC bilayer revealed that water molecules are statistically favored with respect...... to the hydroperoxide groups to interact with the nitroxide at the methyl-terminal, confirming that the H-bonds experimentally observed are due to increased water penetration in the bilayer. The EPR and MD data on model membranes demonstrate that cell membrane damage by oxidative stress cause alteration of water...

  12. In situ atomic force microscope imaging of supported lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Leidy, Chad; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    2001-01-01

    In situ AFM images of phospholipase A/sub 2/ (PLA/sub 2/) hydrolysis of mica-supported one- and two-component lipid bilayers are presented. For one-component DPPC bilayers an enhanced enzymatic activity is observed towards preexisting defects in the bilayer. Phase separation is observed in two-co...

  13. Liquid immiscibility in model bilayer lipid membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Sarah L.

    There is growing evidence that cell plasma membranes are laterally organized into "raft" regions in which particular lipids and proteins are concentrated. These domains have sub-micron dimensions and have been implicated in vital cell functions. Similar liquid domains are observed in model bilayer membrane mixtures that mimick cellular lipid compositions. In model membranes, domains can be large (microns) and can readily form in the absence of proteins. This thesis presents studies of liquid immiscibility in model membrane systems using two experimental methods. By fluorescence microscopy, this thesis documents that miscibility transitions occur in a wide variety of ternary lipid mixtures containing high melting temperature (saturated) lipids, low melting temperature (usually unsaturated) lipids, and cholesterol. I have constructed detailed miscibility phase diagrams for three separate ternary lipid mixtures (DOPC/DPPC/Chol, DOPC/PSM/Chol, and POPC/PSM/Chol). Phase separation is also observed in membranes of lipids extracted from human erythrocytes. NMR experiments probe lipid order and verify the coexistence of a saturated lipid and cholesterol rich liquid ordered (Lo) phase with a more disordered, unsaturated lipid rich liquid crystalline (Lalpha) phase at low temperatures. These experiments also find multiple thermodynamic transitions and lipid organization on different length-scales. This complexity is revealed because fluorescence microscopy and NMR probe lipid order at different length-scales (>1mum vs. ˜100nm). NMR detects small domains (˜80nm) at temperatures just below the miscibility transition, even though micron-scale domains are observed by fluorescent microscopy. NMR does detect large-scale ("100nm) demixing, but at a lower temperature. In addition, it has long been known that >10nm length-scale structure is present in many lipid mixtures containing cholesterol and at least one additional lipid species, though it is shown here that only a subset of

  14. The impact of resveratrol in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Chen; Ghellinck, Alexis de; Fragneto, Giovanna

    The natural antioxidant resveratrol, contained in the skin of grape and accordingly in red wine, has significant health effects such as cardiovascular protection and anti-oxidation. Clinical trials of resveratrol as prophylactic or even therapeutic drug are ongoing. Most probably, the working...... mechanism is unspecific. However, there are only few biophysical studies regarding the impact of resveratrol on lipid membranes. Here, results from a neutron reflectometry investigation on solid supported di-palmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) bilayers with incorporated resveratrol are presented. The data...

  15. Supported lipid bilayers as templates to design manganese oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    This work reports on the preparation of nanoclusters of manganese oxide using biotemplating techniques. Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on quartz using cationic lipid [Dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DOMA)] and mixed systems with neutral phospholipids dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dioleoyl ...

  16. Characterization of the Transverse Relaxation Rates in Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watnick, Paula I.; Dea, Phoebe; Chan, Sunney I.

    1990-03-01

    The ^2H NMR transverse relaxation rates of a deuterated phospholipid bilayer reflect slow motions in the bilayer membrane. A study of dimyristoyl lecithin specifically deuterated at several positions of the hydrocarbon chains indicates that these motions are cooperative and are confined to the hydrocarbon chains of the lipid bilayer. However, lipid head group interactions do play an important role in modulating the properties of the cooperative fluctuations of the hydrocarbon chains (director fluctuations), as evidenced by the effects of various lipid additives on the ^2H NMR transverse relaxation rates of the dimyristoyl lecithin bilayer.

  17. Determination of lipid bilayer affinities and solvation characteristics by electrokinetic chromatography using polymer-bound lipid bilayer nanodiscs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penny, William M; Palmer, Christopher P

    2017-10-26

    Styrene-maleic acid polymer-bound lipid bilayer nanodiscs have been investigated and characterized by electrokinetic chromatography. Linear solvation energy relationship analysis was employed to characterize the changes in solvation environment of nanodiscs of varied belt to lipid ratio, belt polymer chemistry and molecular weight, and lipid composition. Increases in the lipid to belt polymer ratio resulted in smaller, more cohesive nanodiscs with greater electrophoretic mobility. Nanodisc structures with belt polymers of different chemistry and molecular weight were compared and showed only minor changes in solvent characteristics and selectivity consistent with changes in structure of the lipid bilayer. Seven phospholipid and sphingomyelin nanodiscs of different lipid composition were characterized. Changes in lipid head group structure had a significant effect on bilayer-solute interactions. In most cases, changes in alkyl tail structure had no discernible effect on solvation environment aside from those explained by changes in the gel-liquid transition temperature. Comparison to vesicles of similar lipid composition show only minor differences in solvation environment, likely due to differences in lipid composition and bilayer curvature. Together these results provide evidence that the dominant solute-nanodisc interactions are with the lipid bilayer and that head group chemistry has a greater impact on bilayer-solute interactions than alkyl tail or belt polymer structure. Nanodisc electrokinetic chromatography is demonstrated to allow characterization of solute interactions with lipid bilayers of varied composition. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Formation of supported lipid bilayers by vesicle fusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lind, Tania Kjellerup; Cardenas Gomez, Marite; Wacklin, Hanna

    2014-01-01

    phase-transition temperature of the lipid. We have carefully studied the formation mechanism of supported DPPC bilayers below and above the lipid melting temperature (Tm) by quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy under continuous flow conditions. We also measured the structure of lipid......We have investigated the effect of deposition temperature on supported lipid bilayer formation via vesicle fusion. By using several complementary surface-sensitive techniques, we demonstrate that despite contradicting literature on the subject, high-quality bilayers can be formed below the main...... bilayers formed below or above Tmby neutron reflection and investigated the effect of subsequent cooling to below the Tm. Our results clearly show that a continuous supported bilayer can be formed with high surface coverage below the lipid Tm. We also demonstrate that the high dissipation responses...

  19. Triglyceride Blisters in Lipid Bilayers: Implications for Lipid Droplet Biogenesis and the Mobile Lipid Signal in Cancer Cell Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Duelund, Lars; Pakkanen, Kirsi Inkeri

    2010-01-01

    Triglycerides have a limited solubility, around 3%, in phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Using millisecond-scale course grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the model lipid bilayer can accommodate a higher concentration of triolein (TO) than earlier anticipated, by sequestering ...

  20. Bilayer Deformation, Pores, and Micellation Induced by Oxidized Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonnoy, Phansiri; Jarerattanachat, Viwan; Karttunen, Mikko; Wong-Ekkabut, Jirasak

    2015-12-17

    The influence of different oxidized lipids on lipid bilayers was investigated with 16 individual 1 μs atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. Binary mixtures of lipid bilayers of 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PLPC) and its peroxide and aldehyde products were performed at different concentrations. In addition, an asymmetrical short chain lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-decanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (PDPC), was used to compare the effects of polar/apolar groups in the lipid tail on lipid bilayer. Although water defects occurred with both aldehyde and peroxide lipids, full pore formation was observed only for aldehyde lipids. At medium concentrations the pores were stable. At higher concentrations, however, the pores became unstable and micellation occurred. Data analysis shows that aldehyde lipids' propensity for pore formation is due to their shorter and highly mobile tail. The highly polar peroxide lipids are stabilized by strong hydrogen bonds with interfacial water.

  1. Hydrophobic silver nanoparticles trapped in lipid bilayers: Size distribution, bilayer phase behavior, and optical properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bothun Geoffrey D

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lipid-based dispersion of nanoparticles provides a biologically inspired route to designing therapeutic agents and a means of reducing nanoparticle toxicity. Little is currently known on how the presence of nanoparticles influences lipid vesicle stability and bilayer phase behavior. In this work, the formation of aqueous lipid/nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs consisting of hydrophobic silver-decanethiol particles (5.7 ± 1.8 nm embedded within 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC bilayers is demonstrated as a function of the DPPC/Ag nanoparticle (AgNP ratio. The effect of nanoparticle loading on the size distribution, bilayer phase behavior, and bilayer fluidity is determined. Concomitantly, the effect of bilayer incorporation on the optical properties of the AgNPs is also examined. Results The dispersions were stable at 50°C where the bilayers existed in a liquid crystalline state, but phase separated at 25°C where the bilayers were in a gel state, consistent with vesicle aggregation below the lipid melting temperature. Formation of bilayer-embedded nanoparticles was confirmed by differential scanning calorimetry and fluorescence anisotropy, where increasing nanoparticle concentration suppressed the lipid pretransition temperature, reduced the melting temperature, and disrupted gel phase bilayers. The characteristic surface plasmon resonance (SPR wavelength of the embedded nanoparticles was independent of the bilayer phase; however, the SPR absorbance was dependent on vesicle aggregation. Conclusion These results suggest that lipid bilayers can distort to accommodate large hydrophobic nanoparticles, relative to the thickness of the bilayer, and may provide insight into nanoparticle/biomembrane interactions and the design of multifunctional liposomal carriers.

  2. Investigating Sterol and Redox Regulation of the Ion Channel Activity of CLIC1 Using Tethered Bilayer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Khamici, Heba; Hossain, Khondker R.; Cornell, Bruce A.; Valenzuela, Stella M.

    2016-01-01

    The Chloride Intracellular Ion Channel (CLIC) family consists of six conserved proteins in humans. These are a group of enigmatic proteins, which adopt both a soluble and membrane bound form. CLIC1 was found to be a metamorphic protein, where under specific environmental triggers it adopts more than one stable reversible soluble structural conformation. CLIC1 was found to spontaneously insert into cell membranes and form chloride ion channels. However, factors that control the structural transition of CLIC1 from being an aqueous soluble protein into a membrane bound protein have yet to be adequately described. Using tethered bilayer lipid membranes and electrical impedance spectroscopy system, herein we demonstrate that CLIC1 ion channel activity is dependent on the type and concentration of sterols in bilayer membranes. These findings suggest that membrane sterols play an essential role in CLIC1’s acrobatic switching from a globular soluble form to an integral membrane form, promoting greater ion channel conductance in membranes. What remains unclear is the precise nature of this regulation involving membrane sterols and ultimately determining CLIC1’s membrane structure and function as an ion channel. Furthermore, our impedance spectroscopy results obtained using CLIC1 mutants, suggest that the residue Cys24 is not essential for CLIC1’s ion channel function. However Cys24 does appear important for optimal ion channel activity. We also observe differences in conductance between CLIC1 reduced and oxidized forms when added to our tethered membranes. Therefore, we conclude that both membrane sterols and redox play a role in the ion channel activity of CLIC1. PMID:27941637

  3. Lipid Bilayer-Integrated Optoelectronic Tweezers for Nanoparticle Manipulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    bilayer membrane with a ∼5 nm thickness supported by a photoconductive electrode to confine the diffusion of chemically tethered nanoparticles in a...membrane with a ∼5 nm thickness supported by a photoconductive electrode to confine the diffusion of chemically tethered nanoparticles in a two...operating the OET device at a lower a.c. frequency (᝺ kHz), where the light-induced a.c. electro- osmosis and/or electro-thermal flow19 was utilized to

  4. Pairing of cholesterol with oxidized phospholipid species in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Loubet, Bastien; Olzynska, Agnieszka

    2014-01-01

    We claim that (1) cholesterol protects bilayers from disruption caused by lipid oxidation by sequestering conical shaped oxidized lipid species such as 1-palmitoyl-2-azelaoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (PZPC) away from phospholipid, because cholesterol and the oxidized lipid have complementary...... shapes and (2) mixtures of cholesterol and oxidized lipids can self-assemble into bilayers much like lysolipid–cholesterol mixtures. The evidence for bilayer protection comes from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and dynamic light scattering (DLS) measurements. Unimodal size distributions of extruded...... vesicles (LUVETs) made up of a mixture of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) and PZPC containing high amounts of PZPC are only obtained when cholesterol is present in high concentrations. In simulations, bilayers containing high amounts of PZPC become porous, unless cholesterol is also present...

  5. Intercalation of small hydrophobic molecules in lipid bilayers containing cholesterol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worcester, D.L.; Hamacher, K.; Kaiser, H.; Kulasekere, R.; Torbet, J. [Univ. of Missouri, Columbia, MO (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Partitioning of small hydrophobic molecules into lipid bilayers containing cholesterol has been studied using the 2XC diffractometer at the University of Missouri Research Reactor. Locations of the compounds were determined by Fourier difference methods with data from both deuterated and undeuterated compounds introduced into the bilayers from the vapor phase. Data fitting procedures were developed for determining how well the compounds were localized. The compounds were found to be localized in a narrow region at the center of the hydrophobic layer, between the two halves of the bilayer. The structures are therefore intercalated structures with the long axis of the molecules in the plane of the bilayer.

  6. Supported lipid bilayers as templates to design manganese oxide ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) have been used as templates to synthesize these nanoparticles in a water- based medium at room ... Keywords. Manganese oxide; supported lipid bilayers; nanoparticles; organized assemblies. 1. Introduction .... before coating with two layers of the lipid DOMA,. DOMA+DPPC or ...

  7. Single lipid bilayer deposition on polymer surfaces using bicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleem, Qasim; Zhang, Zhenfu; Petretic, Amy; Gradinaru, Claudiu C; Macdonald, Peter M

    2015-03-09

    A lipid bilayer was deposited on a 3 μm diameter polystyrene (PS) bead via hydrophobic anchoring of bicelles containing oxyamine-bearing cholesteric moieties reacting with the aldehyde functionalized bead surface. Discoidal bicelles were formed by mixing dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dihexanoylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC), dimyristoyltrimethylammonium propane (DMTAP), and the oxyamine-terminated cholesterol derivative, cholest-5-en-3β-oxy-oct-3,6-oxa-an-8-oxyamine (CHOLOA), in the molar ratio DMPC/DHCP/DMTAP/CHOLOA (1/0.5/0.01/0.05) in water. Upon exposure to aldehyde-bearing PS beads, a stable single lipid bilayer coating rapidly formed at the bead surface. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching demonstrated that the deposited lipids fused into an encapsulating lipid bilayer. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry showed that the short chain lipid DHPC was entirely absent from the PS adherent lipid coating. Fluorescence quenching measurements proved that the coating was a single lipid bilayer. The bicelle coating method is thus simple and robust, can be modified to include membrane-associated species, and can be adapted to coat any number of different surfaces.

  8. Inducing morphological changes in lipid bilayer membranes with microfabricated substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fangjie; Collins, Liam F.; Ashkar, Rana; Heberle, Frederick A.; Srijanto, Bernadeta R.; Collier, C. Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Lateral organization of lipids and proteins into distinct domains and anchoring to a cytoskeleton are two important strategies employed by biological membranes to carry out many cellular functions. However, these interactions are difficult to emulate with model systems. Here we use the physical architecture of substrates consisting of arrays of micropillars to systematically control the behavior of supported lipid bilayers - an important step in engineering model lipid membrane systems with well-defined functionalities. Competition between attractive interactions of supported lipid bilayers with the underlying substrate versus the energy cost associated with membrane bending at pillar edges can be systematically investigated as functions of pillar height and pitch, chemical functionalization of the microstructured substrate, and the type of unilamellar vesicles used for assembling the supported bilayer. Confocal fluorescent imaging and AFM measurements highlight correlations that exist between topological and mechanical properties of lipid bilayers and lateral lipid mobility in these confined environments. This study provides a baseline for future investigations into lipid domain reorganization on structured solid surfaces and scaffolds for cell growth.

  9. Lipid Bilayer Composition Affects Transmembrane Protein Orientation and Function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie D. Hickey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Sperm membranes change in structure and composition upon ejaculation to undergo capacitation, a molecular transformation which enables spermatozoa to undergo the acrosome reaction and be capable of fertilization. Changes to the membrane environment including lipid composition, specifically lipid microdomains, may be responsible for enabling capacitation. To study the effect of lipid environment on proteins, liposomes were created using lipids extracted from bull sperm membranes, with or without a protein (Na+ K+-ATPase or -amylase. Protein incorporation, function, and orientation were determined. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET confirmed protein inclusion in the lipid bilayer, and protein function was confirmed using a colourometric assay of phosphate production from ATP cleavage. In the native lipid liposomes, ATPase was oriented with the subunit facing the outer leaflet, while changing the lipid composition to 50% native lipids and 50% exogenous lipids significantly altered this orientation of Na+ K+-ATPase within the membranes.

  10. Polyglutamine expansion in huntingtin increases its insertion into lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kegel, Kimberly B; Schewkunow, Vitali; Sapp, Ellen; Masso, Nicholas; Wanker, Erich E; DiFiglia, Marian; Goldmann, Wolfgang H

    2009-09-25

    An expanded polyglutamine (Q) tract (>37Q) in huntingtin (htt) causes Huntington disease. Htt associates with membranes and polyglutamine expansion in htt may alter membrane function in Huntington disease through a mechanism that is not known. Here we used differential scanning calorimetry to examine the effects of polyQ expansion in htt on its insertion into lipid bilayers. We prepared synthetic lipid vesicles composed of phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine and tested interactions of htt amino acids 1-89 with 20Q, 32Q or 53Q with the vesicles. GST-htt1-89 with 53Q inserted into synthetic lipid vesicles significantly more than GST-htt1-89 with 20Q or 32Q. We speculate that by inserting more into cell membranes, mutant huntingtin could increase disorder within the lipid bilayer and thereby disturb cellular membrane function.

  11. Cationic Dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine and Dioleoyloxytrimethylammonium Propane Lipid Bilayers: Atomistic Insight for Structure and Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhao, W.; Gurtovenko, A. A.; Vattulainen, I.

    2012-01-01

    of unsaturated lipid chains on structural and dynamic properties of mixed cationic bilayers. The bilayer area, as well as the ordering of lipid tails, shows a pronounced nonmonotonic behavior when TAP lipid fraction increases. The minimum in area (maximum in ordering) was observed for a bilayer with TAP fraction...... of 0.4, that is, at lower TAP fractions compared with saturated PC/TAP bilayers. Adding unsaturated DOTAP lipids into DMPC bilayers was found to promote lipid chain interdigitation and to fluidize lipid bilayers, as seen through enhanced lateral lipid diffusion. The speed-up in lateral diffusion...... at large DOTAP fractions results from increasing area per lipid, whereas at smaller DOTAP concentrations, the competing effect due to lipid-lipid complex formation results in a constant value for diffusion. We also characterize the lipid headgroup orientation and the interactions between DMPC and DOTAP...

  12. Photoinduced electron transfer of chlorophyll in lipid bilayer system

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Photoinduced electron transfer from chlorophyll- through the interface of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) headgroup of the lipid bilayers was studied with electron magnetic resonance (EMR). The photoproduced radicals were identified with electron spin resonance (ESR) and radical yields of chlorophyll- were ...

  13. Kinetics of domain registration in multicomponent lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sornbundit, K.; Modchang, C.; Triampo, W.

    2014-01-01

    The kinetics of registration of lipid domains in the apposing leaflets of symmetric bilayer membranes is investigated via systematic dissipative particle dynamics simulations. The decay of the distance between the centres of mass of the domains in the apposing leaflets is almost linear during ear...

  14. A Molecular Dynamics Study of the Structural and Dynamical Properties of Putative Arsenic Substituted Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ratna Juwita

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Cell membranes are composed mainly of phospholipids which are in turn, composed of five major chemical elements: carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, and phosphorus. Recent studies have suggested the possibility of sustaining life if the phosphorus is substituted by arsenic. Although this issue is still controversial, it is of interest to investigate the properties of arsenated-lipid bilayers to evaluate this possibility. In this study, we simulated arsenated-lipid, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-arsenocholine (POAC, lipid bilayers using all-atom molecular dynamics to understand basic structural and dynamical properties, in particular, the differences from analogous 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, (POPC lipid bilayers. Our simulations showed that POAC lipid bilayers have distinct structural and dynamical properties from those of native POPC lipid bilayers. Relative to POPC lipid bilayers, POAC lipid bilayers have a more compact structure with smaller lateral areas and greater order. The compact structure of POAC lipid bilayers is due to the fact that more inter-lipid salt bridges are formed with arsenate-choline compared to the phosphate-choline of POPC lipid bilayers. These inter-lipid salt bridges bind POAC lipids together and also slow down the head group rotation and lateral diffusion of POAC lipids. Thus, it would be anticipated that POAC and POPC lipid bilayers would have different biological implications.

  15. Activation of the Unfolded Protein Response by Lipid Bilayer Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halbleib, Kristina; Pesek, Kristina; Covino, Roberto; Hofbauer, Harald F; Wunnicke, Dorith; Hänelt, Inga; Hummer, Gerhard; Ernst, Robert

    2017-08-17

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved homeostatic program that is activated by misfolded proteins in the lumen of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). Recently, it became evident that aberrant lipid compositions of the ER membrane, referred to as lipid bilayer stress, are equally potent in activating the UPR. The underlying molecular mechanism, however, remained unclear. We show that the most conserved transducer of ER stress, Ire1, uses an amphipathic helix (AH) to sense membrane aberrancies and control UPR activity. In vivo and in vitro experiments, together with molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, identify the physicochemical properties of the membrane environment that control Ire1 oligomerization. This work establishes the molecular mechanism of UPR activation by lipid bilayer stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Fluid lipid bilayers: Intermonolayer coupling and its thermodynamic manifestations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Per Lyngs; Miao, Ling; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1998-01-01

    possesses "in-plane" degrees of freedom that characterize its physical or chemical state. Thermally excitable deformations of a Lipid bilayer in its geometrical conformation further impart to it ''out-of-plane'' degrees of freedom. In this paper we discuss the issue of intermonolayer coupling in terms...... of a phenomenological model that describes the necessary types of degrees of freedom and their interplay, which reflects different modes of intermonolayer coupling. Furthermore, we investigate! based on the phenomenological model, the manifestations of the intermonolayer coupling both in the lateral ordering processes...... of the "in-plane" degrees of freedom and in the conformational behavior of the bilayer membrane....

  17. Wound-Ribbon Helix Structure of Tilted Chiral Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yu-zhang; Yü-Chang, Hsieh

    1999-03-01

    With the equation of helicoid, it is found that for wound-ribbon helix of chiral lipid bilayers the edge line of the helix can only be parallel to the azimuthal direction of the director. This clears the dilemma of the existence of both the parallel and the perpendicular case under the treatment of a chiral bilayer around a circular cylinder by Ou-Yang and Liu [Phys. Rev. Lett. 65 (1990) 1679; Phys. Rev. A 43 (1991) 6826]. The present calculation also explains the self-transformation of the wound-ribbon helix into a prolate tube and the prolate tube into a multilayer soda straw structure.

  18. Methodological problems in pressure profile calculations for lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob; Hansen, Flemming Yssing; Peters, Günther H.J.

    2005-01-01

    From molecular dynamics simulations of a dipalmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) lipid bilayer in the liquid crystalline phase, pressure profiles through the bilayer are calculated by different methods. These profiles allow us to address two central and unresolved problems in pressure profile...... calculations: The first problem is that the pressure profile is not uniquely defined since the expression for the local pressure involves an arbitrary choice of an integration contour. We have investigated two different choices leading to the Irving-Kirkwood (IK) and Harasima (H) expressions for the local...... pressure tensor. For these choices we find that the pressure profile is almost independent of the contour used, which indicates that the local pressure is well defined for a DPPC bilayer in the liquid crystalline phase. This may not be the case for other systems and we therefore suggest that both the IK...

  19. Computer Simulations of Lipid Bilayers and Proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob

    2006-01-01

    profile. The pressure profile changes when small molecules partition into the bilayer and it has previously been suggested that such changes may be related to general anesthesia. MD simulations play an important role when studying the possible coupling between general anesthesia and changes...... in the pressure profile since the pressure profile cannot be measured in traditional experiments. Even so, pressure profile calculations from MD simulations are not trivial due to both fundamental and technical issues. We addressed two such issues namely the uniqueness of the pressure profile and the effect......CD belongs to the adonesine triphosphate (ATP) binding cassette (ABC) transporter family that use ATP to drive active transport of a wide variety of compounds across cell membranes. BtuCD accounts for vitamin B12 import into Escherichia coli and is one of the only ABC transporters for which a reliable...

  20. Membrane tethers formed from blood cells with available area and determination of their adhesion energy.

    OpenAIRE

    Hochmuth, Robert M; Marcus, Warren D.

    2002-01-01

    Fundamental to all mammalian cells is the adherence of the lipid bilayer membrane to the underlying membrane associated cytoskeleton. To investigate this adhesion, we physically detach the lipid membrane from the cell by mechanically forming membrane tethers. For the most part these have been tethers formed from either neutrophils or red cells. Here we do a simple thermodynamic analysis of the tether formation process using the entire cell, including tether, as the control volume. For a neutr...

  1. Penetration of Cell Membranes and Synthetic Lipid Bilayers by Nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angle, Matthew R.; Wang, Andrew; Thomas, Aman; Schaefer, Andreas T.; Melosh, Nicholas A.

    2014-01-01

    Nanoscale devices have been proposed as tools for measuring and controlling intracellular activity by providing electrical and/or chemical access to the cytosol. Unfortunately, nanostructures with diameters of 50–500 nm do not readily penetrate the cell membrane, and rationally optimizing nanoprobes for cell penetration requires real-time characterization methods that are capable of following the process of membrane penetration with nanometer resolution. Although extensive work has examined the rupture of supported synthetic lipid bilayers, little is known about the applicability of these model systems to living cell membranes with complex lipid compositions, cytoskeletal attachment, and membrane proteins. Here, we describe atomic force microscopy (AFM) membrane penetration experiments in two parallel systems: live HEK293 cells and stacks of synthetic lipid bilayers. By using the same probes in both systems, we were able to clearly identify membrane penetration in synthetic bilayers and compare these events with putative membrane penetration events in cells. We examined membrane penetration forces for three tip geometries and 18 chemical modifications of the probe surface, and in all cases the median forces required to penetrate cellular and synthetic lipid bilayers with nanoprobes were greater than 1 nN. The penetration force was sensitive to the probe's sharpness, but not its surface chemistry, and the force did not depend on cell surface or cytoskeletal properties, with cells and lipid stacks yielding similar forces. This systematic assessment of penetration under various mechanical and chemical conditions provides insights into nanoprobe-cell interactions and informs the design of future intracellular nanoprobes. PMID:25418094

  2. Partition, orientation and mobility of ubiquinones in a lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galassi, Vanesa Viviana; Arantes, Guilherme Menegon

    2015-12-01

    Ubiquinone is the universal mobile charge carrier involved in biological electron transfer processes. Its redox properties and biological function depend on the molecular partition and lateral diffusion over biological membranes. However, ubiquinone localization and dynamics within lipid bilayers are long debated and still uncertain. Here we present molecular dynamics simulations of several ubiquinone homologs with variable isoprenoid tail lengths complexed to phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Initially, a new force-field parametrization for ubiquinone is derived from and compared to high level quantum chemical data. Free energy profiles for ubiquinone insertion in the lipid bilayer are obtained with the new force-field. The profiles allow for the determination of the equilibrium location of ubiquinone in the membrane as well as for the validation of the simulation model by direct comparison with experimental partition coefficients. A detailed analysis of structural properties and interactions shows that the ubiquinone polar head group is localized at the water-bilayer interface at the same depth of the lipid glycerol groups and oriented normal to the membrane plane. Both the localization and orientation of ubiquinone head groups do not change significantly when increasing the number of isoprenoid units. The isoprenoid tail is extended and packed with the lipid acyl chains. For ubiquinones with long tails, the terminal isoprenoid units have high flexibility. Calculated ubiquinone diffusion coefficients are similar to that found for the phosphatidylcholine lipid. These results may have further implications for the mechanisms of ubiquinone transport and binding to respiratory and photosynthetic protein complexes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Protein-induced bilayer Perturbations: Lipid ordering and hydrophobic coupling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Frederic Nicolas Rønne; Laursen, Ib; Bohr, Henrik

    2009-01-01

    The host lipid bilayer is increasingly being recognized as an important non-specific regulator of membrane protein function. Despite considerable progress the interplay between hydrophobic coupling and lipid ordering is still elusive. We use electron spin resonance (ESR) to study the interaction...... and hydrophobic mismatch. Our findings also show that at high protein:lipid ratios the lipids are motionally restricted but not completely immobilized. Both exchange on and off rate values for the lipid ↔ gramicidin interaction are lowest at optimal hydrophobic matching. Hydrophobic mismatch of few Å results...... in up to 10-fold increased exchange rates as compared to the ‘optimal’ match situation pointing to the regulatory role of hydrophobic coupling in lipid–protein interactions....

  4. Reconstitution of cholesterol-dependent vaginolysin into tethered phospholipid bilayers: implications for bioanalysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rima Budvytyte

    Full Text Available Functional reconstitution of the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin vaginolysin (VLY from Gardnerella vaginalis into artificial tethered bilayer membranes (tBLMs has been accomplished. The reconstitution of VLY was followed in real-time by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS. Changes of the EIS parameters of the tBLMs upon exposure to VLY solutions were consistent with the formation of water-filled pores in the membranes. It was found that reconstitution of VLY is a strictly cholesterol-dependent, irreversible process. At a constant cholesterol concentration reconstitution of VLY occurred in a concentration-dependent manner, thus allowing the monitoring of VLY concentration and activity in vitro and opening possibilities for tBLM utilization in bioanalysis. EIS methodology allowed us to detect VLY down to 0.5 nM (28 ng/mL concentration. Inactivation of VLY by certain amino acid substitutions led to noticeably lesser tBLM damage. Pre-incubation of VLY with the neutralizing monoclonal antibody 9B4 inactivated the VLY membrane damage in a concentration-dependent manner, while the non-neutralizing antibody 21A5 exhibited no effect. These findings demonstrate the biological relevance of the interaction between VLY and the tBLM. The membrane-damaging interaction between VLY and tBLM was observed in the absence of the human CD59 receptor, known to strongly facilitate the hemolytic activity of VLY. Taken together, our study demonstrates the applicability of tBLMs as a bioanalytical platform for the detection of the activity of VLY and possibly other cholesterol-dependent cytolysins.

  5. Electrostatic forces on charged surfaces of bilayer lipid membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Mikucki, Michael; Zhou, Y. C.

    2013-01-01

    Simulating protein-membrane interactions is an important and dynamic area of research. A proper definition of electrostatic forces on membrane surfaces is necessary for developing electromechanical models of protein-membrane interactions. Here we modeled the bilayer membrane as a continuum with general continuous distributions of lipids charges on membrane surfaces. A new electrostatic potential energy functional was then defined for this solvated protein-membrane system. We investigated the ...

  6. Using bicellar mixtures to form supported and suspended lipid bilayers on silicon chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeineldin, Reema; Last, Julie A; Slade, Andrea L; Ista, Linnea K; Bisong, Paul; O'Brien, Michael J; Brueck, S R J; Sasaki, Darryl Y; Lopez, Gabriel P

    2006-09-12

    Bicellar mixtures, planar lipid bilayer assemblies comprising long- and short-chain phosphatidylcholine lipids in suspension, were used to form supported lipid bilayers on flat silicon substrate and on nanotextured silicon substrates containing arrays of parallel troughs (170 nm wide, 380 nm deep, and 300 nm apart). Confocal fluorescence and atomic force microscopies were used to characterize the resulting lipid bilayer. Formation of a continuous biphasic undulating lipid bilayer membrane, where the crests and troughs corresponded to supported and suspended lipid bilayer regions, is demonstrated. The use of interferometric lithography to fabricate nanotexured substrates provides an advantage over other nanotextured substrates such as nanoporous alumina by offering flexibility in designing different geometries for suspending lipid bilayers.

  7. Supported lipid bilayer nanosystems: stabilization by undulatory-protrusion forces and destabilization by lipid bridging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarala, Sushma; Monson, Frederick; Ilies, Marc A; Wunder, Stephanie L

    2011-05-17

    Control of the stabilization/destabilization of supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) on nanoparticles is important for promotion of their organized assembly and for their use as delivery vehicles. At the same time, understanding the mechanism of these processes can yield insight into nanoparticle-cell interactions and nanoparticle toxicity. In this study, the suspension/precipitation process of zwitterionic lipid/SiO(2) nanosystems was analyzed as a function of ionic strength and as a function of the ratio of lipid/SiO(2) surface areas, at pH = 7.6. Salt is necessary to induce supported lipid bilayer (SLB) formation for zwitterionic lipids on silica (SiO(2)) (Seantier, B.; Kasemo, B., Influence of Mono- and Divalent Ions on the Formation of Supported Phospholipid Bilayers via Vesicle Adsorption. Langmuir 2009, 25 (10), 5767-5772). However, for zwitterionic SLBs on SiO(2) nanoparticles, addition of salt can cause precipitation of the SLBs, due to electrostatic shielding by both the lipid and the salt and to the suppression of thermal undulation/protrusion repulsive forces for lipids on solid surfaces. At ionic strengths that cause precipitation of SLBs, it was found that addition of excess SUVs, at ratios where there were equal populations of SUVs and SLBs, restored the undulation/protrusion repulsive forces and restabilized the suspensions. We suggest that SUVs separate SLBs in the suspension, as observed by TEM, and that SLB-SLB interactions are replaced by SLB-SUV interactions. Decreasing the relative amount of lipid, to the extent that there was less lipid available than the amount required for complete bilayer coverage of the SiO(2), resulted in precipitation of the nanosystem by a process of nanoparticle lipid bridging. For this case, we postulate a process in which lipid bilayer patches on one nanoparticle collide with bare silica patches on another SiO(2) nanoparticle, forming a single bilayer bridge between them. TEM data confirmed these findings, thus

  8. Electrowetting on dielectric-based microfluidics for integrated lipid bilayer formation and measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, Jason L.; Nelson, Wyatt C.; Jeon, Tae-Joon; Kim, Chang-Jin ``Cj''; Schmidt, Jacob J.

    2009-07-01

    We present a microfluidic platform for the formation and electrical measurement of lipid bilayer membranes. Using electrowetting on dielectric (EWOD), two or more aqueous droplets surrounded by a lipid-containing organic phase were manipulated into contact to form a lipid bilayer at their interface. Thin-film Ag/AgCl electrodes integrated into the device enabled electrical measurement of membrane formation and the incorporation of gramicidin channels of two bilayers in parallel.

  9. Phase transition process in DDAB supported lipid bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isogai, Takumi; Nakada, Sakiko; Yoshida, Naoya; Sumi, Hayato; Tero, Ryugo; Harada, Shunta; Ujihara, Toru; Tagawa, Miho

    2017-06-01

    We report the results of microscope measurements examining the phase transition process of a cationic lipid, Dimethyldioctadecylammonium bromide (DDAB) supported lipid bilayer (SLB). Due to lateral fluidity and strong electrostatic interaction with DNA, SLB serves as a fluid substrate for assembling 2D lattices of DNA functionalized nanoparticles (DNA-NPs): lipid molecules work as carriers for transporting DNA-NPs. By fluorescence microscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM), two types of phase transitions, which correspond to liquid crystalline-gel and liquid crystalline-interdigitated gel (LβI) ones, were observed in DDAB SLB during cooling. In thermal equilibrium at room temperature both gel and LβI phases have enough adsorbed amounts of DNA-NPs which indicate that both domains have enough surface charge densities for adsorbing DNA-NPs, however, during phase transition DNA-NPs preferably distributed into LβI phase.

  10. Lipid peroxidation and water penetration in lipid bilayers: a W-band EPR study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Elena; Megli, Francesco Maria; Khandelia, Himanshu; Jeschke, Gunnar; Bordignon, Enrica

    2013-02-01

    Lipid peroxidation plays a key role in the alteration of cell membrane's properties. Here we used as model systems multilamellar vesicles (MLVs) made of the first two products in the oxidative cascade of linoleoyl lecithin, namely 1-palmitoyl-2-(13-hydroperoxy-9,11-octadecanedienoyl)-lecithin (HpPLPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-(13-hydroxy-9,11-octadecanedienoyl)-lecithin (OHPLPC), exhibiting a hydroperoxide or a hydroxy group at position 13, respectively. The two oxidized lipids were used either pure or in a 1:1 molar ratio mixture with untreated 1-palmitoyl-2-linoleoyl-lecithin (PLPC). The model membranes were doped with spin-labeled lipids to study bilayer alterations by electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy. Two different spin-labeled lipids were used, bearing the doxyl ring at position (n) 5 or 16: γ-palmitoyl-β-(n-doxylstearoyl)-lecithin (n-DSPPC) and n-doxylstearic acid (n-DSA). Small changes in the acyl chain order in the sub-polar region and at the methyl-terminal induced by lipid peroxidation were detected by X-band EPR. Concomitantly, the polarity and proticity of the membrane bilayer in those regions were investigated at W band in frozen samples. Analysis of the g(xx) and A(zz) parameters revealed that OHPLPC, but mostly HpPLPC, induced a measurable increase in polarity and H-bonding propensity in the central region of the bilayer. Molecular dynamics simulation performed on 16-DSA in the PLPC-HpPLPC bilayer revealed that water molecules are statistically favored with respect to the hydroperoxide groups to interact with the nitroxide at the methyl-terminal, confirming that the H-bonds experimentally observed are due to increased water penetration in the bilayer. The EPR and MD data on model membranes demonstrate that cell membrane damage by oxidative stress cause alteration of water penetration in the bilayer. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Substrate Effects on the Formation Process, Structure and Physicochemical Properties of Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryugo Tero

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Supported lipid bilayers are artificial lipid bilayer membranes existing at the interface between solid substrates and aqueous solution. Surface structures and properties of the solid substrates affect the formation process, fluidity, two-dimensional structure and chemical activity of supported lipid bilayers, through the 1–2 nm thick water layer between the substrate and bilayer membrane. Even on SiO2/Si and mica surfaces, which are flat and biologically inert, and most widely used as the substrates for the supported lipid bilayers, cause differences in the structure and properties of the supported membranes. In this review, I summarize several examples of the effects of substrate structures and properties on an atomic and nanometer scales on the solid-supported lipid bilayers, including our recent reports.

  12. Cholesterol Induces Uneven Curvature of Asymmetric Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. O. Yesylevskyy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A remarkable flexibility is observed in biological membranes, which allows them to form the structures of different curvatures. We addressed the question of intrinsic ability of phospholipid membranes to form highly curved structures and the role of cholesterol in this process. The distribution of cholesterol in the highly curved asymmetric DOPC/DOPS lipid bilayer was investigated by the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations in the membrane patches with large aspect ratio. It is shown that cholesterol induces uneven membrane curvature promoting the formation of extended flattened regions of the membrane interleaved by sharp bends. It is shown that the affinity of cholesterol to anionic DOPS or neutral DOPC lipids is curvature dependent. The cholesterol prefers DOPS to DOPC in either planar or highly curved parts of the membrane. In contrast, in the narrow interval of moderate membrane curvatures this preference is inverted. Our data suggest that there is a complex self-consistent interplay between the membrane curvature and cholesterol distribution in the asymmetric lipid bilayers. The suggested new function of cholesterol may have a biological relevance.

  13. Amphiphilic lipids in solution: a simulational study of lipid bilayer formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, Thomas; Landau, David P.; Gai, Lili; Maerzke, Katie A.; Iacovella, Christopher R.; McCabe, Clare M.; Cummings, Peter T.

    2013-03-01

    Amphiphilic molecules consisting of hydrophilic head and hydrophobic tail groups self-assemble into a wide variety of structures, such as bilayers (membranes), micelles, or vesicles (liposomes) when mixed with a suitable solvent. The understanding of this lipid self-assembly is essential for industrial, biological, or medical applications, but computer simulations are generally challenging due to the complex structure of the energy landscape. We show results for the lipid bilayer formation process obtained by newly developed parallel Wang-Landau Monte Carlo and statistical temperature molecular dynamics simulations. By applying those methods to a generic coarse-grained model for amphiphilic molecules in solution, we were able to obtain the thermodynamical data over the whole relevant temperature and energy range and to unravel the membrane formation process including all structural sub-transitions between different fluid and gel-phase bilayers. Research supported by NSF

  14. Effect of PEGylation on Drug Entry into Lipid Bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rissanen, S.; Kumorek, M.; Martinez-Seara, H.

    2014-01-01

    Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) is a polymer commonly used for functionalization of drug molecules to increase their bloodstream lifetime, hence efficacy. However, the interactions between the PEGylated drugs and biomembranes are not clearly understood. In this study, we employed atomic-scale molecular...... dynamics (MD) simulations to consider the behavior of two drug molecules functionalized with PEG (tetraphenylporphyrin used in cancer phototherapy and biochanin A belonging to the isoflavone family) in the presence of a lipid bilayer. The commonly held view is that functionalization of a drug molecule...

  15. Mixed lipid bilayers with locally varying spontaneous curvature and bending.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gueguen, Guillaume; Destainville, Nicolas; Manghi, Manoel

    2014-08-01

    A model of lipid bilayers made of a mixture of two lipids with different average compositions on both leaflets, is developed. A Landau Hamiltonian describing the lipid-lipid interactions on each leaflet, with two lipidic fields ψ 1 and ψ 2, is coupled to a Helfrich one, accounting for the membrane elasticity, via both a local spontaneous curvature, which varies as C 0 + C 1(ψ 1 - ψ 2/2), and a bending modulus equal to κ 0 + κ 1(ψ 1 + ψ 2)/2. This model allows us to define curved patches as membrane domains where the asymmetry in composition, ψ 1 - ψ 2, is large, and thick and stiff patches where ψ 1 + ψ 2 is large. These thick patches are good candidates for being lipidic rafts, as observed in cell membranes, which are composed primarily of saturated lipids forming a liquid-ordered domain and are known to be thick and flat nano-domains. The lipid-lipid structure factors and correlation functions are computed for globally spherical membranes and planar ones and for a whole set of parameters including the surface tension and the coupling in the two leaflet compositions. Phase diagrams are established, within a Gaussian approximation, showing the occurrence of two types of Structure Disordered phases, with correlations between either curved or thick patches, and an Ordered phase, corresponding to the divergence of the structure factor at a finite wave vector. The varying bending modulus plays a central role for curved membranes, where the driving force κ 1 C 0 (2) is balanced by the line tension, to form raft domains of size ranging from 10 to 100 nm. For planar membranes, raft domains emerge via the cross-correlation with curved domains. A global picture emerges from curvature-induced mechanisms, described in the literature for planar membranes, to coupled curvature- and bending-induced mechanisms in curved membranes forming a closed vesicle.

  16. Density imbalances and free energy of lipid transfer in supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Chenyue; Faller, Roland

    2009-11-01

    Supported lipid bilayers are an abundant research platform for understanding the behavior of real cell membranes as they allow for additional mechanical stability and at the same time have a fundamental structure approximating cell membranes. However, in computer simulations these systems have been studied only rarely up to now. An important property, which cannot be easily determined by molecular dynamics or experiments, is the unsymmetrical density profiles of bilayer leaflets (density imbalance) inflicted on the membrane by the support. This imbalance in the leaflets composition has consequences for membrane structure and phase behavior, and therefore we need to understand it in detail. The free energy can be used to determine the equilibrium structure of a given system. We employ an umbrella sampling approach to obtain the free energy of a lipid crossing the membrane (i.e., lipid flip-flop) as a function of bilayer composition and hence the equilibrium composition of the supported bilayers. In this paper, we use a variant of the coarse-grained Martini model. The results of the free energy calculation lead to a 5% higher density in the proximal leaflet. Recent data obtained by large scale modeling using a water free model suggested that the proximal leaflet had 3.2% more lipids than the distal leaflet [Hoopes et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 175102 (2008)]. Our findings are in line with these results. We compare results of the free energy of transport obtained by pulling the lipid across the membrane in different ways. There are small quantitative differences, but the overall picture is consistent. We additionally characterize the intermediate states, which determine the barrier height and therefore the rate of translocation. Calculations on unsupported bilayers are used to validate the approach and to determine the barrier to flip-flop in a free membrane.

  17. Vesicle fusion with bilayer lipid membrane controlled by electrostatic interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azusa Oshima

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The fusion of proteoliposomes is a promising approach for incorporating membrane proteins in artificial lipid membranes. In this study, we employed an electrostatic interaction between vesicles and supported bilayer lipid membranes (s-BLMs to control the fusion process. We combined large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs containing anionic lipids, which we used instead of proteoliposomes, and s-BLMs containing cationic lipids to control electrostatic interaction. Anionic LUVs were never adsorbed or ruptured on the SiO2 substrate with a slight negative charge, and selectively fused with cationic s-BLMs. The LUVs can be fused effectively to the target position. Furthermore, as the vesicle fusion proceeds and some of the positive charges are neutralized, the attractive interaction weakens and finally the vesicle fusion saturates. In other words, we can control the number of LUVs fused with s-BLMs by controlling the concentration of the cationic lipids in the s-BLMs. The fluidity of the s-BLMs after vesicle fusion was confirmed to be sufficiently high. This indicates that the LUVs attached to the s-BLMs were almost completely fused, and there were few intermediate state vesicles in the fusion process. We could control the position and amount of vesicle fusion with the s-BLMs by employing an electrostatic interaction.

  18. Interaction of hydrophobic polymers with model lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochicchio, D; Panizon, E; Monticelli, L; Rossi, G

    2017-07-25

    The interaction of nanoscale synthetic materials with cell membranes is one of the key steps determining nanomaterials' toxicity. Here we use molecular simulations, with atomistic and coarse-grained resolution, to investigate the interaction of three hydrophobic polymers with model lipid membranes. Polymer nanoparticles made of polyethylene (PE), polypropylene (PP) and polystyrene with size up to 7 nm enter easily POPC lipid membranes, localizing to the membrane hydrophobic core. For all three materials, solid polymeric nanoparticles become essentially liquid within the membrane at room temperature. Still, their behavior in the membrane core is not the same: PP and PS disperse in the core of the bilayer, while PE shows a tendency to aggregate. We also examined the interaction of the polymers with heterogeneous membranes, consisting of a ternary lipid mixture exhibiting liquid-ordered/liquid-disordered phase separation. The behavior of the three polymers is markedly different: PP disfavors lipid phase separation, PS stabilizes it, and PE modifies the topology of the phase boundaries and causes cholesterol depletion from the liquid ordered phase. Our results show that different hydrophobic polymers have major effects on the properties of lipid membranes, calling for further investigations on model systems and cell membranes.

  19. Quantifying the Electrostatics of Polycation-Lipid Bilayer Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troiano, Julianne M; McGeachy, Alicia C; Olenick, Laura L; Fang, Dong; Liang, Dongyue; Hong, Jiewei; Kuech, Thomas R; Caudill, Emily R; Pedersen, Joel A; Cui, Qiang; Geiger, Franz M

    2017-04-26

    Mechanistic insight into how polycations disrupt and cross cell membranes is needed for understanding and controlling polycation-membrane interactions, yet such information is surprisingly difficult to obtain at the molecular level. We use second harmonic and vibrational sum frequency generation spectroscopies along with quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring and computer simulations to quantify the interaction of poly(allylamine) hydrochloride (PAH) and its monomeric precursor allylamine hydrochloride (AH) with lipid bilayers. We find PAH adsorption to be reversible and nondisruptive to the bilayer under the conditions of our experiments. With an observed free adsorption energy of -52.7 ± 0.6 kJ/mol, PAH adsorption was found to be surprisingly less favorable relative to AH (-14.6 ± 0.4 kJ/mol) when considering a simple additive model. By experimentally quantifying the number of adsorbates and the average amount of charge carried by each adsorbate, we find that the PAH is associated with only 70% of the positive charges it could hold while the AH remains mostly charged while attached to the membrane. Simulations indicate that PAH pulls in condensed counterions from solution to avoid charge-repulsion along its backbone and with other PAH molecules to attach to, and completely cover, the bilayer surface. In addition, computations indicate that the amine groups shift their pKa values due to the confined environment upon adsorption to the surface. Our results provide experimental constraints for theoretical calculations, which yield atomistic views of the structures that are formed when polycations interact with lipid membranes that will be important for predicting polycation-membrane interactions.

  20. Statistical thermodynamics of association colloids. I. Lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leermakers, F. A. M.; Scheutjens, J. M. H. M.

    1988-09-01

    Step-weighted random walks (modified Markov chain statistics) combined with a self-consistent-field approximation form the basic concepts of a Flory-Huggins-type of theory to describe the lipid bilayer.1 The purpose of the present paper is to extend this model by incorporating the rotational isomeric state scheme, both for linear and branched chain molecules. Only three measurable interaction energy parameters of a Flory-Huggins-type are required, namely for the head group tail, the head group water, and the tail water contacts. In addition, the theory needs one energy parameter for the internal trans/gauche transition energy of the chain. Results of this self-consistent-field (SCF) theory are given for membranes formed by lecithin-like molecules. With respect to earlier work, more detailed insight is obtained in the behavior of the lipid bilayer above the gel to liquid phase transition temperature. Equilibrium conditions are formulated. Segment density profiles and solvent distributions are calculated. It is shown that the two apolar tails of the lecithin do not behave identically. The tail next to the head group is lifted slightly more out of the membrane than the other tail. The well-known balance of forces, responsible for membrane formation is analyzed. We found that the repulsive tail head interaction, often ignored in theories, is essential for the stability of association colloids.

  1. BILAYER LIPID MEMBRANE (BLM) BASED ION SELECTIVE ELECTRODES AT THE MESO, MICRO, AND NANO SCALES

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Bingwen; Rieck, Daniel; Van Wie, Bernard J.; Cheng, Gary J.; Moffett, David F.; Kidwell, David A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for making micron-sized apertures with tapered sidewalls and nano-sized apertures. Their use in bilayer lipid membrane-based ion selective electrode design is demonstrated and compared to mesoscale bilayers and traditional PVC ion selective electrodes. Micron-sized apertures are fabricated in SU-8 photoresist films and vary in diameter from 10 to 40 microns. The tapered edges in SU-8 films are desired to enhance bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) formation and are...

  2. Phase diagrams and lipid domains in multicomponent lipid bilayer mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feigenson, Gerald W

    2009-01-01

    Understanding the phase behavior of biological membranes is helped by the study of more simple systems. Model membranes that have as few as 3 components exhibit complex phase behavior that can be well described, providing insight for biological membranes. A number of different studies are in agreement on general findings for some compositional phase diagrams, in particular, those that model the outer leaflet of animal cell plasma membranes. These model mixtures include cholesterol, together with one high-melting lipid and one low-melting lipid. An interesting finding is of two categories of such 3-component mixtures, leading to what we term Type I and Type II compositional phase diagrams. The latter have phase regions of macroscopic coexisting domains of [Lalpha+Lbeta+Lo] and of [Lalpha+Lo], with domains resolved under the light microscope. Type I mixtures have the same phase coexistence regions, but the domains seem to be nanoscopic. Type I mixtures are likely to be better models for biological membranes.

  3. Assembly of RNA nanostructures on supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabkowska, Aleksandra P.; Michanek, Agnes; Jaeger, Luc; Rabe, Michael; Chworos, Arkadiusz; Höök, Fredrik; Nylander, Tommy; Sparr, Emma

    2014-12-01

    The assembly of nucleic acid nanostructures with controlled size and shape has large impact in the fields of nanotechnology, nanomedicine and synthetic biology. The directed arrangement of nano-structures at interfaces is important for many applications. In spite of this, the use of laterally mobile lipid bilayers to control RNA three-dimensional nanostructure formation on surfaces remains largely unexplored. Here, we direct the self-assembly of RNA building blocks into three-dimensional structures of RNA on fluid lipid bilayers composed of cationic 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP) or mixtures of zwitterionic 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) and cationic sphingosine. We demonstrate the stepwise supramolecular assembly of discrete building blocks through specific and selective RNA-RNA interactions, based on results from quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D), ellipsometry, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRF) experiments. The assembly can be controlled to give a densely packed single layer of RNA polyhedrons at the fluid lipid bilayer surface. We show that assembly of the 3D structure can be modulated by sequence specific interactions, surface charge and changes in the salt composition and concentration. In addition, the tertiary structure of the RNA polyhedron can be controllably switched from an extended structure to one that is dense and compact. The versatile approach to building up three-dimensional structures of RNA does not require modification of the surface or the RNA molecules, and can be used as a bottom-up means of nanofabrication of functionalized bio-mimicking surfaces.The assembly of nucleic acid nanostructures with controlled size and shape has large impact in the fields of nanotechnology, nanomedicine and synthetic biology. The directed arrangement of nano-structures at interfaces is important for many applications. In spite of

  4. A hybrid SAM phospholipid approach to fabricating a 'free' supported lipid bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hughes, A.V.; Goldar, A.; Gerstenberg, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    of phospholipid are separated from the silicon substrate and the lower layers by a hydration region approximately 30 A thick. This layer limits the tethering effect of the substrate such that the phospholipid molecules within the upper bilayer have significant freedom. This freedom is evidenced by the fact...

  5. Triglyceride blisters in lipid bilayers: implications for lipid droplet biogenesis and the mobile lipid signal in cancer cell membranes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Himanshu Khandelia

    Full Text Available Triglycerides have a limited solubility, around 3%, in phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. Using millisecond-scale course grained molecular dynamics simulations, we show that the model lipid bilayer can accommodate a higher concentration of triolein (TO than earlier anticipated, by sequestering triolein molecules to the bilayer center in the form of a disordered, isotropic, mobile neutral lipid aggregate, at least 17 nm in diameter, which forms spontaneously, and remains stable on at least the microsecond time scale. The results give credence to the hotly debated existence of mobile neutral lipid aggregates of unknown function present in malignant cells, and to the early biogenesis of lipid droplets accommodated between the two leaflets of the endoplasmic reticulum membrane. The TO aggregates give the bilayer a blister-like appearance, and will hinder the formation of multi-lamellar phases in model, and possibly living membranes. The blisters will result in anomalous membrane probe partitioning, which should be accounted for in the interpretation of probe-related measurements.

  6. Effect of support corrugation on silica xerogel--supported phase-separated lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goksu, Emel I; Nellis, Barbara A; Lin, Wan-Chen; Satcher, Joe H; Groves, Jay T; Risbud, Subhash H; Longo, Marjorie L

    2009-04-09

    Lipid bilayers supported by substrates with nanometer-scale surface corrugations hold interest in understanding both nanoparticle-membrane interactions and the challenges of constructing models of cell membranes on surfaces with desirable properties, e.g., porosity. Here, we successfully form a two-phase (gel-fluid) lipid bilayer supported by nanoporous silica xerogel. Surface topology, lateral diffusion coefficient, and lipid density in comparison to mica-supported lipid bilayers were characterized by atomic force microscopy, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. We found that the two-phase lipid bilayer follows the silica xerogel surface contours. The corrugation imparted on the lipid bilayer results in a lipid density that is twice that on a flat mica surface in the fluid regions. In direct agreement with the doubling of actual bilayer area in a projected area, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of fluid lipids on silica xerogel (approximately 1.7 microm2/s) is lower than on mica (approximately 3.9 microm2/s) by both FRAP and FCS techniques. Furthermore, the gel-phase domains on silica xerogel compared to mica were larger and less numerous. Overall, our results suggest the presence of a relatively defect-free continuous two-phase lipid bilayer that penetrates approximately midway into the first layer of approximately 50 nm silica xerogel beads.

  7. Regulation of membrane protein function by lipid bilayer elasticity—a single molecule technology to measure the bilayer properties experienced by an embedded protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August

    2008-01-01

    Membrane protein function is generally regulated by the molecular composition of the host lipid bilayer. The underlying mechanisms have long remained enigmatic. Some cases involve specific molecular interactions, but very often lipids and other amphiphiles, which are adsorbed to lipid bilayers, r...

  8. Corrugation of Phase-Separated Lipid Bilayers Supported by Nanoporous Silica Xerogel Surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goksu, E I; Nellis, B A; Lin, W; Satcher Jr., J H; Groves, J T; Risbud, S H; Longo, M L

    2008-10-30

    Lipid bilayers supported by substrates with nanometer-scale surface corrugations holds interest in understanding both nanoparticle-membrane interactions and the challenges of constructing models of cell membranes on surfaces with desirable properties, e.g. porosity. Here, we successfully form a two-phase (gel-fluid) lipid bilayer supported by nanoporous silica xerogel. Surface topology, diffusion, and lipid density in comparison to mica-supported lipid bilayers were characterized by AFM, FRAP, FCS, and quantitative fluorescence microscopy, respectively. We found that the two-phase lipid bilayer follows the xerogel surface contours. The corrugation imparted on the lipid bilayer results in a lipid density that is twice that on a flat mica surface. In direct agreement with the doubling of actual bilayer area in a projected area, we find that the lateral diffusion coefficient (D) of lipids on xerogel ({approx}1.7 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) is predictably lower than on mica ({approx}4.1 {micro}m{sup 2}/s) by both FRAP and FCS techniques. Furthermore, the gel-phase domains on xerogel compared to mica were larger and less numerous. Overall, our results suggest the presence of a relatively defect-free continuous two-phase bilayer that penetrates approximately midway into the first layer of {approx}50 nm xerogel beads.

  9. Morphogenesis of protrusions from confined lipid bilayers mediated by mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arroyo, Marino; Staykova, Margarita; Rahimi, Mohammad; Stone, Howard A.

    2012-02-01

    Biological membranes adopt a wide range of shapes that structure and give functionality to cells, compartmentalizing the cytosol, forming organelles, or regulating their area. The formation, stabilization, and remodeling of these structures is generally attributed to localized forces or to biochemical processes (insertion of proteins, active compositional regulation). Noting that in the crowded intra and extra-cellular environments membranes are highly constrained, we explore to what extent can mechanics explain the shape of protrusions out of confined membranes. For this purpose, we developed an in-vitro system coupling a lipid bilayer to the strain-controlled deformation of an elastic sheet (Staykova et al, PNAS 108, 2011). We show that upon contracting the elastic support, tubular or spherical protrusions grow out of the adhered membrane, which can be reversibly controlled with strain and osmolarity without resorting to localized forces or chemical alterations of the bilayer. The morphologies produced by our minimal system are ubiquitous in cells, suggesting mechanics may be a simple and generic organizing principle. We can understand most of our observations in terms of a phase diagram accounting for elasticity, adhesion, and the limited amount of area and volume available.

  10. Morphological and topological transformations of lipid bilayer vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Honda, Makoto; Takeda, Shuichi; Umeda, Tamiki; Takiguchi, Kingo; Hotani, Hirokazu

    2000-06-01

    Liposomes are the micro compartments made of lipid bilayer membrane of which characteristics are quite similar to those of biological membrane. To form artificial cell-like structure, we made liposomes that contained subunit of cytoskeletons: tubulin or actin. Spherical liposomes were transformed into bipolar or cell-like shape by mechanical force generated by the polymerization of encapsulated subunits of microtubules. Disk or dumbbell shape was generated by the polymerization of encapsulated action. Dynamic processes of morphological transformations of liposomes were visualized by the high intensity dark-field light microscopy. Topological changes such as fusion and division of membrane vesicles also play an essential role in cellular activities. We investigated the mechanism of these topological transformations by visualizing their real-time processes. A variety of novel topological transformations were found, including the opening-up of liposomes and the direct expulsion of inner vesicles. .

  11. New optical method for measuring the bending elasticity of lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minetti, C.; Vitkova, V.; Dubois, F.; Bivas, I.

    2016-02-01

    The knowledge of the elasticity of lipid bilayer structures is fundamental for new developments in biophysics, pharmacology and biomedical research. Lipid vesicles are readily prepared in laboratory conditions and employed for studying the physical properties of lipid membranes. The thermal fluctuation analysis of the shape of lipid vesicles (or flicker spectroscopy) is one of the experimental methods widely used for the measurement of the bending modulus of lipid bilayers. We present direct phase measurements performed on dilute vesicular suspensions by means of a new optical method exploiting holographic microscopy. For the bending constant of phosphatidylcholine bilayers we report the value of 23kBT in agreement with values previously measured by micropipette aspiration, electrodeformation and flicker spectroscopy of giant lipid vesicles. The application of this novel approach for the evaluation of the bending elasticity of lipid membranes opens the way to future developments in the phase measurements on lipid vesicles for the evaluation of their mechanical constants.

  12. Dark-field-based observation of single-nanoparticle dynamics on a supported lipid bilayer for in situ analysis of interacting molecules and nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Young Kwang; Kim, Sungi; Nam, Jwa-Min

    2015-01-12

    Observation of single plasmonic nanoparticles in reconstituted biological systems allows us to obtain snapshots of dynamic processes between molecules and nanoparticles with unprecedented spatiotemporal resolution and single-molecule/single-particle-level data acquisition. This Concept is intended to introduce nanoparticle-tethered supported lipid bilayer platforms that allow for the dynamic confinement of nanoparticles on a two-dimensional fluidic surface. The dark-field-based long-term, stable, real-time observation of freely diffusing plasmonic nanoparticles on a lipid bilayer enables one to extract a broad range of information about interparticle and molecular interactions throughout the entire reaction period. Herein, we highlight important developments in this context to provide ideas on how molecular interactions can be interpreted by monitoring dynamic behaviors and optical signals of laterally mobile nanoparticles. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Lipid bilayer regulation of membrane protein function: gramicidin channels as molecular force probes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August; Collingwood, S.A.; Ingolfsson, H.I.

    2010-01-01

    Membrane protein function is regulated by the host lipid bilayer composition. This regulation may depend on specific chemical interactions between proteins and individual molecules in the bilayer, as well as on non-specific interactions between proteins and the bilayer behaving as a physical entity...... with collective physical properties (e.g. thickness, intrinsic monolayer curvature or elastic moduli). Studies in physico-chemical model systems have demonstrated that changes in bilayer physical properties can regulate membrane protein function by altering the energetic cost of the bilayer deformation associated...... with a protein conformational change. This type of regulation is well characterized, and its mechanistic elucidation is an interdisciplinary field bordering on physics, chemistry and biology. Changes in lipid composition that alter bilayer physical properties (including cholesterol, polyunsaturated fatty acids...

  14. Phase behavior of supported lipid bilayers: A systematic study by coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poursoroush, Asma; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Laradji, Mohamed

    2017-01-01

    Solid-supported lipid bilayers are utilized by experimental scientists as models for biological membranes because of their stability. However, compared to free standing bilayers, their close proximity to the substrate may affect their phase behavior. As this is still poorly understood, and few...... computational studies have been performed on such systems thus far, here we present the results from a systematic study based on molecular dynamics simulations of an implicit-solvent model for solid-supported lipid bilayers with varying lipid-substrate interactions. The attractive interaction between...

  15. Dynamics, Surface Electrostatics and Phase Properties of Nanoscale Curved Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolivand, Amir

    Surface electrostatic potential of a lipid bilayer governs many vital functions of living cells. Several classes of proteins are known of exhibiting strong binding preferences to curved lipid bilayer surfaces. In this project we employed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) of a recently introduced phospholipid (IMTSL-PTE) bearing a pH-sensitive nitroxide covalently attached to the lipid head group to measure the surface electrostatics of the lipid membrane and nanopore-confined lipid bilayers as a function of the bilayer curvature. The pKa of the ionizable group of this lipid-based spin probe is reporting on the bilayer surface electrostatics potential by changes in the EPR spectra. Specifically, both rotational dynamics and magnetic parameters of the nitroxide are affected by the probe protonation. Effect of curvature on the surface electrostatic potential and dynamics of lipid bilayer was studied for POPG and DMPG unilamellar vesicles (ULVs). It was found that the magnitude of the negative surface electrostatic potential increased upon decrease in the vesicle diameter for the bilayers in the fluid phase; however, no significant changes were observed for DMPG ULVs in a gel phase. We speculate that biologically relevant fluid bilayer phase allows for a larger variability in the lipid packing density in the lipid polar head group region than a more ordered gel phase and it is likely that the lipid flip-flop is responsible for pH equilibration of IMTSL-PTE. The kinetic EPR study of nitroxide reduction showed that the rate of flip-flop is in the order of 10-5 s-1. The flip-flop rate constant increases when vesicle size deceases. Oxygen permeability measured by X-ban EPR decreases in higher curved vesicles---an observation that is consistent with a tighter packing in smaller vesicles. Partitioning of a small nitroxide molecule TEMPO into ULVs was measured by X-band (9 GHz) and W-band (95 GHz) EPR spectroscopy. The partitioning coefficient of this probe in the lipid

  16. Voltage control of droplet interface bilayer lipid membrane dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punnamaraju, Srikoundinya; Steckl, Andrew J

    2011-01-18

    A novel approach to control the area of anchor-free droplet interface bilayer (DIB) lipid membranes is presented. Unsupported DIB lipid membranes are formed at the interface of phospholipid-coated aqueous droplets dispensed in dodecane oil. Using electrodes inserted into the droplets, an external voltage is applied which modulates the effective DIB area. Electrical (capacitance or current) and optical (imaging of DIB lateral length) recordings were simultaneously performed. Alpha-hemolysin (αHL) single channel insertions into the DIB were recorded. Currents across the DIB were measured as a function of voltage and αHL concentration in the droplets. Nonlinear response is observed for current, DIB lateral length and area, and capacitance with respect to voltage. Voltage induced changes in interfacial tension modulated the DIB-oil contact angle and the membrane contact length, which provided control of membrane dimensions. Comparison of these results is made to the electrowetting effect, which is also governed by effect of voltage on the interfacial tension. This approach provides active control of the number of ion channels inserted into the DIB.

  17. Triggered release of molecules across droplet interface bilayer lipid membranes using photopolymerizable lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Punnamaraju, S; You, H; Steckl, A J

    2012-05-22

    A combination of nonpolymerizable phospholipids (DPPC or DPhPC) and a smaller amount of cross-linking photopolymerizable phospholipids (23:2 DiynePC) is incorporated in an unsupported artificial lipid bilayer formed using the droplet interface bilayer (DIB) approach. The DIB is formed by contacting lipid monolayer-coated aqueous droplets against each other in a dodecane-lipid medium. Cross-linking of the photopolymerizable lipids incorporated in the DIB was obtained by exposure to UV-C radiation (254 nm), resulting in pore formation. The effect of cross-linking on the DIB properties was characterized optically by measuring the diffusion of selectively encapsulated dye molecules (calcein) from one droplet of the DIB to the other droplet. Changes in DIB conductivity due to UV-C exposure were investigated using current-voltage (I-V) measurements. The leakage of dye molecules across the DIB and the increase in DIB conductivity after UV-C exposure indicates the formation of membrane pores. The results indicate that the DIB approach offers a simple and flexible platform for studying phototriggered drug delivery systems in vitro.

  18. Off-lattice model for the phase behavior of lipid-cholesterol bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Miao, Ling; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1999-01-01

    Lipid bilayers exhibit a phase behavior that involves two distinct, but coupled, order-disorder processes, one in terms of lipid-chain crystalline packing (translational degrees of freedom) and the other in terms of lipid-chain conformational ordering (internal degrees of freedom). Experiments an...

  19. Amyloids of Alpha-Synuclein Affect the Structure and Dynamics of Supported Lipid Bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iyer, A.S.; Petersen, N.O.; Claessens, Mireille Maria Anna Elisabeth; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of monomeric alpha-synuclein (αS) with lipid membranes have been suggested to play an important role in initiating aggregation of αS. We have systematically analyzed the distribution and self-assembly of monomeric αS on supported lipid bilayers. We observe that at protein/lipid ratios

  20. Amyloids of alpha-synuclein affect the structure and dynamics of supported lipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iyer, Aditya; Petersen, Nils O; Claessens, Mireille M A E; Subramaniam, Vinod

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of monomeric alpha-synuclein (αS) with lipid membranes have been suggested to play an important role in initiating aggregation of αS. We have systematically analyzed the distribution and self-assembly of monomeric αS on supported lipid bilayers. We observe that at protein/lipid ratios

  1. A criterion to identify the equilibration time in lipid bilayer simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo D. Porasso

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available With the aim of establishing a criterion for identifying when a lipid bilayer has reached steady state using the molecular dynamics simulation technique, lipid bilayers of different composition in their liquid crystalline phase were simulated in aqueous solution in presence of CaCl_2 as electrolyte, at different concentration levels. In this regard, we used two different lipid bilayer systems: one composed by 288 DPPC (DiPalmitoylPhosphatidylCholine and another constituted by 288 DPPS (DiPalmitoylPhosphatidylSerine. In this sense, for both type of lipid bilayers, we have studied the temporal evolution of some lipids properties, such as the surface area per lipid, the deuterium order parameter, the lipid hydration and the lipid-calcium coordination. From their analysis, it became evident how each property has a different time to achieve equilibrium. The following order was found, from faster property to slower property: coordination of ions $approx$ deuterium order parameter > area per lipid $approx$ hydration. Consequently, when the hydration of lipids or the mean area per lipid are stable, we can ensure that the lipid membrane has reached the steady state.

  2. Quantifying the Relationship Between Curvature and Electric Potential in Lipid Bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruhn, Dennis Skjøth; Lomholt, Michael Andersen; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2016-01-01

    Cellular membranes mediate vital cellular processes by being subject to curvature and transmembrane electrical potentials. Here we build upon the existing theory for flexoelectricity in liquid crystals to quantify the coupling between lipid bilayer curvature and membrane potentials. Using molecul...

  3. Dissimilar interaction of CB1/CB2 with lipid bilayers as revealed by molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Javier; Cruz, Víctor L; Martínez-Salazar, Javier; Campillo, Nuria E; Páez, Juan A

    2011-03-07

    Cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2 are a striking class of transmembrane proteins involved in a high number of important biological processes. In spite of the inherent similarity (40% in aminoacid sequence) these receptors are found in different cell environments. In addition to this, CB1 activity has been intimately associated with lipid rafts whereas CB2 has not. In this work we have performed a 50 nanosecond molecular dynamics simulation of the inactive conformations of both receptors inserted in a POPC lipid bilayer. Although in both cases the overall protein structure is maintained along the entire simulation we have found important differences in the protein-lipid interaction. While CB1 tends to distort the lipid bilayer regularity, especially in the extracellular moiety, CB2 has a minor influence on the lipid distribution along the plane of the bilayer. This observation is consistent with some experimental facts observed in these cannabinoid receptors with regard to lipid/protein interaction.

  4. Imaging and Analysis of OT1 T Cell Activation on Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2015-01-01

    Authors: Peter Beemiller, Jordan Jacobelli & Matthew Krummel ### Abstract Supported lipid bilayers are frequently used to study cell membrane protein dynamics during immune synapse formation by T cells. Here we describe methods for the imaging and analysis of OT1+ T cell activation and T-cell receptor (TCR) dynamics on lipid bilayers. ### Introduction T cells are activated at immune synapses when TCRs bind agonist ligands on antigen presenting cells (APCs). Glass coverslip...

  5. Hydrodynamic Forces on Macromolecules Protruding from Lipid Bilayers Due to External Liquid Flows.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönsson, Peter; Jönsson, Bengt

    2015-11-24

    It has previously been observed that an externally applied hydrodynamic shear flow above a fluid lipid bilayer can change the local concentration of macromolecules that are associated with the lipid bilayer. The external liquid flow results in a hydrodynamic force on molecules protruding from the lipid bilayer, causing them to move in the direction of the flow. However, there has been no quantitative study about the magnitude of these forces. We here use finite element simulations to investigate how the magnitude of the external hydrodynamic forces varies with the size and shape of the studied macromolecule. The simulations show that the hydrodynamic force is proportional to the effective hydrodynamic area of the studied molecule, Ahydro, multiplied by the mean hydrodynamic shear stress acting on the membrane surface, σhydro. The parameter Ahydro depends on the size and shape of the studied macromolecule above the lipid bilayer and scales with the cross-sectional area of the molecule. We also investigate how hydrodynamic shielding from other surrounding macromolecules decreases Ahydro when the surface coverage of the shielding macromolecules increases. Experiments where the protein streptavidin is anchored to a supported lipid bilayer on the floor of a microfluidic channel were finally performed at three different surface concentrations, Φ = 1%, 6%, and 10%, where the protein is being moved relative to the lipid bilayer by a liquid flow through the channel. From photobleaching measurements of fluorescently labeled streptavidin we found the experimental drift data to be within good accuracy of the simulated results, less than 12% difference, indicating the validity of the results obtained from the simulations. In addition to giving a deeper insight into how a liquid flow can affect membrane-associated molecules in a lipid bilayer, we also see an interesting potential of using hydrodynamic flow experiments together with the obtained results to study the size and

  6. Theory of helical structures of tilted chiral lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ou-Yang Zhong-Can; Liu Jixing

    1991-06-01

    Analogous to the theory of cholesteric liquid crystal, a theory for tilted chiral lipid bilayers (TCLB) [briefly reported in Phys. Rev. Lett. 65, 1679 (1990)] is developed. The tilt equation and the surface-shape-equilibrium equation have been derived. Application of the theory shows that on a cylindrical surface, the field of tilt directions of TCLB molecules forms a right-handed helix with a 45° gradient angle for k2>0 or a left-handed helix with -45° gradient angle for k2cholesteric liquid crystal. In addition, there exists another type of helical structure that looks like twisted strips or helicoids. It is also shown that on a spherical surface, the tilt field has at least two singular points. Based on these results, the succession of transitions from a vesicular dispersion to a phase involving helical structures and then to tubes observed in several laboratories can be reasonably explained. The general formula that explains the aggregation of narrow and prolate ribbon structures is derived. By including more terms of elasticity free energy into the theory, the size of the helical structure is obtained and is shown to agree with experimental observations.

  7. Undulation Contributions to the Area Compressibility in Lipid Bilayer Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waheed, Qaiser; Edholm, Olle

    2009-01-01

    Abstract It is here shown that there is a considerable system size-dependence in the area compressibility calculated from area fluctuations in lipid bilayers. This is caused by the contributions to the area fluctuations from undulations. This is also the case in experiments. At present, such a contribution, in most cases, is subtracted from the experimental values to obtain a true area compressibility. This should also be done with the simulation values. Here, this is done by extrapolating area compressibility versus system size, down to very small (zero) system size, where undulations no longer exist. The area compressibility moduli obtained from such simulations do not agree with experimental true area compressibility moduli as well as the uncorrected ones from contemporary or earlier simulations, but tend, instead, to be ∼50% too large. As a byproduct, the bending modulus can be calculated from the slope of the compressibility modulus versus system-size. The values obtained in this way for the bending modulus are then in good agreement with experiment. PMID:19917229

  8. Millimeter microwave effect on ion transport across lipid bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alekseev, S.I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Pushchino (Russian Federation). Inst. of Cell Biophysics; Ziskin, M.C. [Temple Univ. Medical School, Philadelphia, PA (United States). Center for Biomedical Physics

    1995-06-01

    The effects of millimeter microwaves in the frequency range of 54--76 GHz on capacitance and conductance of lipid bilayer membranes (BLM) were studied. Some of the membranes were modified by gramicidin A and amphotericin B or by tetraphenylboron anions (TPhB{sup {minus}}). The millimeter microwaves were pulse-modulated (PW) at repetition rates ranging from 1 to 100 pps, PW at 1,000 pps, or unmodulated continuous waves (CW). The maximum output power at the waveguide outlet was 20 mW. It was found that CW irradiation decreased the unmodified BLM capacitance by 1.2% {+-} 0.5%. At the same time, membrane current induced by TPhB{sup {minus}} transport increased by 5% {+-} 1%. The changes in conductance of ionic channels formed by gramicidin A and amphotericin B were small (0.6% {+-} 0.4%). No resonance-like effects of mm-wave irradiation on membrane capacitance, ionic channel currents, or TPhB{sup {minus}} transport were detected. All changes in membrane capacitance and currents were independent of the modulation employed and were equivalent to heating by approximately 1.1 C.

  9. A lipid E-MAP identifies Ubx2 as a critical regulator of lipid saturation and lipid bilayer stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Surma, Michal A; Klose, Christian; Peng, Debby

    2013-01-01

    Biological membranes are complex, and the mechanisms underlying their homeostasis are incompletely understood. Here, we present a quantitative genetic interaction map (E-MAP) focused on various aspects of lipid biology, including lipid metabolism, sorting, and trafficking. This E-MAP contains ∼250......,000 negative and positive genetic interaction scores and identifies a molecular crosstalk of protein quality control pathways with lipid bilayer homeostasis. Ubx2p, a component of the endoplasmic-reticulum-associated degradation pathway, surfaces as a key upstream regulator of the essential fatty acid (FA......) desaturase Ole1p. Loss of Ubx2p affects the transcriptional control of OLE1, resulting in impaired FA desaturation and a severe shift toward more saturated membrane lipids. Both the induction of the unfolded protein response and aberrant nuclear membrane morphologies observed in cells lacking UBX2...

  10. Revisiting the bilayer structures of fluid phase phosphatidylglycerol lipids: Accounting for exchangeable hydrogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Marquardt, Drew; Heberle, Frederick A; Kučerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John

    2014-11-01

    We recently published two papers detailing the structures of fluid phase phosphatidylglycerol (PG) lipid bilayers (Kučerka et al., 2012 J. Phys. Chem. B 116: 232-239; Pan et al., 2012 Biochim. Biophys. Acta Biomembr. 1818: 2135-2148), which were determined using the scattering density profile model. This hybrid experimental/computational technique utilizes molecular dynamics simulations to parse a lipid bilayer into components whose volume probabilities follow simple analytical functional forms. Given the appropriate scattering densities, these volume probabilities are then translated into neutron scattering length density (NSLD) and electron density (ED) profiles, which are used to jointly refine experimentally obtained small angle neutron and X-ray scattering data. However, accurate NSLD and ED profiles can only be obtained if the bilayer's chemical composition is known. Specifically, in the case of neutron scattering, the lipid's exchangeable hydrogens with aqueous D2O must be accounted for, as they can have a measureable effect on the resultant lipid bilayer structures. This was not done in our above-mentioned papers. Here we report on the molecular structures of PG lipid bilayers by appropriately taking into account the exchangeable hydrogens. Analysis indicates that the temperature-averaged PG lipid areas decrease by 1.5 to 3.8Å(2), depending on the lipid's acyl chain length and unsaturation, compared to PG areas when hydrogen exchange was not taken into account. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Lipid exchange and transfer on nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers: effect of defects, ionic strength, and size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drazenovic, Jelena; Ahmed, Selver; Tuzinkiewicz, Nicole-Marie; Wunder, Stephanie L

    2015-01-20

    Lipid exchange/transfer has been compared for zwitterionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-d54-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) and for the same lipids on silica (SiO2) nanoparticle supported lipid bilayers (NP-SLBs) as a function of ionic strength, temperature, temperature cycling, and NP size, above the main gel-to-liquid crystal phase transition temperature, Tm, using d- and h-DMPC and DPPC. Increasing ionic strength decreases the exchange kinetics for the SUVs, but more so for the NP-SLBs, due to better packing of the lipids and increased attraction between the lipid and support. When the NP-SLBs (or SUVs) are cycled above and below Tm, the exchange rate increases compared with exchange at the same temperature without cycling, for similar total times, suggesting that defects provide sites for more facile removal and thus exchange of lipids. Defects can occur: (i) at the phase boundaries between coexisting gel and fluid phases at Tm; (ii) in bare regions of exposed SiO2 that form during NP-SLB formation due to mismatched surface areas of lipid and NPs; and (iii) during cycling as the result of changes in area of the lipids at Tm and mismatched thermal expansion coefficient between the lipids and SiO2 support. Exchange rates are faster for NP-SLBs prepared with the nominal amount of lipid required to form a NP-SLB compared with NP-SLBs that have been prepared with excess lipids to minimize SiO2 patches. Nanosystems prepared with equimolar mixtures of NP-SLBs composed of d-DMPC (d(DMPC)-NP-SLB) and SUVs composed of h-DMPC (h(DMPC)-SUV) show that the calorimetric transition of the "donor" h(DMPC)-SUV decreases in intensity without an initial shift in Tm, indicating that the "acceptor" d(DMPC)-NP-SLB can accommodate more lipids, through either further fusion or insertion of lipids into the distal monolayer. Exchange for d/h(DMPC)-NP-SLB is in the order 100 nm SiO2 > 45 nm SiO2 > 5 nm SiO2.

  12. Properties of POPC/POPE supported lipid bilayers modified with hydrophobic quantum dots on polyelectrolyte cushions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolasinska-Sojka, Marta; Wlodek, Magdalena; Szuwarzynski, Michal; Kereiche, Sami; Kovacik, Lubomir; Warszynski, Piotr

    2017-10-01

    The formation and properties of supported lipid bilayers (SLB) containing hydrophobic nanoparticles (NP) was studied in relation to underlying cushion obtained from selected polyelectrolyte multilayers. Lipid vesicles were formed from zwitterionic 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and negatively charged 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE) in phosphate buffer (PBS). As hydrophobic nanoparticles - quantum dots (QD) with size of 3.8nm (emission wavelength of 420nm) were used. Polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEM) were constructed by the sequential, i.e., layer-by-layer (LbL) adsorption of alternately charged polyelectrolytes from their solutions. Liposomes and Liposome-QDs complexes were studied with Transmission Cryo-Electron Microscopy (Cryo-TEM) to verify the quality of vesicles and the position of QD within lipid bilayer. Deposition of liposomes and liposomes with quantum dots on polyelectrolyte films was studied in situ using quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) technique. The fluorescence emission spectra were analyzed for both: suspension of liposomes with nanoparticles and for supported lipid bilayers containing QD on PEM. It was demonstrated that quantum dots are located in the hydrophobic part of lipid bilayer. Moreover, we proved that such QD-modified liposomes formed supported lipid bilayers and their final structure depended on the type of underlying cushion. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Amyloids of alpha-synuclein affect the structure and dynamics of supported lipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Iyer, A.; Petersen, N.O.; Claessens, M.M.B.; Subramaniam, V.

    2014-01-01

    Interactions of monomeric alpha-synuclein (alphaS) with lipid membranes have been suggested to play an important role in initiating aggregation of alphaS. We have systematically analyzed the distribution and self-assembly of monomeric alphaS on supported lipid bilayers. We observe that at

  14. Reparameterization of all-atom dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine lipid parameters enables simulation of fluid bilayers at zero tension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Jacob; Jensen, M.Ø.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2007-01-01

    lipid of 60.4 ± 0.1 Å2. Compared to the 48 Å2, the new value of 60.4 Å2 is in fair agreement with the experimental value of 64 Å2. In addition, the simulated order parameter profile and electron density profile are in satisfactory agreement with experimental data. Thus, the biologically more interesting......Molecular dynamics simulations of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipid bilayers using the CHARMM27 force field in the tensionless isothermal-isobaric (NPT) ensemble give highly ordered, gel-like bilayers with an area per lipid of ∼48 Å2. To obtain fluid (Lα) phase properties of DPPC bilayers...... represented by the CHARMM energy function in this ensemble, we reparameterized the atomic partial charges in the lipid headgroup and upper parts of the acyl chains. The new charges were determined from the electron structure using both the Mulliken method and the restricted electrostatic potential fitting...

  15. Reduction in lateral lipid mobility of lipid bilayer membrane by atmospheric pressure plasma irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suda, Yoshiyuki; Tero, Ryugo; Yamashita, Ryuma; Yusa, Kota; Takikawa, Hirofumi

    2016-03-01

    Plasma medicine is an emerging research field in which various applications of electrical discharge, especially in the form of nonequilibrium plasma at atmospheric pressure, are examined, for example, the application of plasma to biological targets for various purposes such as selective killing of tumor cells and blood stanching. We have focused on the behavior of an artificial cell membrane system at the solid-liquid interface. To evaluate the lateral lipid mobility, we measured the diffusion coefficient of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB) composed of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine with fluorescence recovery after photobleaching by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It was found that the diffusion coefficient was decreased by plasma irradiation and that the diffusion coefficient decreasing rate proceeded with increasing plasma power. We investigated the effects of stimulation with an equilibrium chemical, H2O2, on the SLB and confirmed that the diffusion coefficient did not change at least up to a H2O2 concentration of 5 mM. These results indicate that transient active species generated by plasma play critical roles in the reduction in SLB fluidity. The effects of the two generated major oxidized lipid species, hydroxyl- or hydroperoxy-phosphatidylcholine (PC) and acyl-chain-truncated PCs terminated with aldehyde or carboxyl group, on lateral lipid mobility are discussed.

  16. Simultaneous probing of hydration and polarity of lipid bilayers with 3-hydroxyflavone fluorescent dyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klymchenko, Andrey S; Mély, Yves; Demchenko, Alexander P; Duportail, Guy

    2004-10-11

    The penetration of water into the hydrophobic interior leads to polarity and hydration profiles across lipid membranes which are fundamental in the maintenance of membrane architecture as well as in transport and insertion processes into the membrane. The present paper is an original attempt to evaluate simultaneously polarity and hydration properties of lipid bilayers by a fluorescence approach. We applied two 3-hydroxyflavone probes anchored in lipid bilayers at a relatively precise depth through their attached ammonium groups. They are present in two forms: either in H-bond-free form displaying a two-band emission due to an excited state intramolecular proton transfer reaction (ESIPT), or in H-bonded form displaying a single-band emission with no ESIPT. The individual emission profiles of these forms were obtained by deconvolution of the probes' fluorescence spectra. The polarity of the probe surrounding the bilayer was estimated from the two-band spectra of the H-bond-free form, while the local hydration was estimated from the relative contribution of the two forms. Our results confirm that by increasing the lipid order (phase transition from fluid to gel phase, addition of cholesterol or decrease in the lipid unsaturation), the polarity and to a lesser extent, the hydration of the bilayers decrease simultaneously. In contrast, when fluidity (i.e. lipid order) is kept invariant, increase of temperature and of bilayer curvature leads to a higher bilayer hydration with no effect on the polarity. Furthermore, no correlation was found between dipole potential and the hydration of the bilayers.

  17. Bilayer properties of hydroxytyrosol- and tyrosol-phosphatidylcholine lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol are the phytochemicals abundantly found in olive oil. Transphosphatidylation of tyrosol and hydroxytyrosol with dioleoylphosphocholine resulted in phospholipids with antioxidant properties. The ability of these phyto-phospholipids to form liposomes and supported bilayers w...

  18. Lipid asymmetry in DLPC/DSPC supported lipid bilayers, a combined AFM and fluorescence microscopy study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, W; Blanchette, C D; Ratto, T V; Longo, M L

    2005-06-20

    A fundamental attribute of cell membranes is transmembrane asymmetry, specifically the formation of ordered phase domains in one leaflet that are compositionally different from the opposing leaflet of the bilayer. Using model membrane systems, many previous studies have demonstrated the formation of ordered phase domains that display complete transmembrane symmetry but there have been few reports on the more biologically relevant asymmetric membrane structures. Here we report on a combined atomic force microscopy (AFM) and fluorescence microscopy study whereby we observe three different states of transmembrane symmetry in phase-separated supported bilayers formed by vesicle fusion. We find that if the leaflets differ in gel-phase area fraction, then the smaller domains in one leaflet are in registry with the larger domains in the other leaflet and the system is dynamic. In a presumed lipid flip-flop process similar to Ostwald Ripening, the smaller domains in one leaflet erode away while the large domains in the other leaflet grow until complete compositional asymmetry is reached and remains stable. We have quantified this evolution and determined that the lipid flip-flop event happens most frequently at the interface between symmetric and asymmetric DSPC domains. If both leaflets have nearly identical area fraction of gel-phase, gel-phase domains are in registry and are static in comparison to the first state. The stability of these three DSPC domain distributions, the degree of registry observed, and the domain immobility have direct biological significance with regards to maintenance of lipid asymmetry in living cell membranes, communication between inner leaflet and outer leaflet, membrane adhesion, and raft mobility.

  19. Electrochemically Triggered Release of Reagent to the Proximal Leaflet of a Microcavity Supported Lipid Bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basit, H; Maher, S; Forster, R J; Keyes, T E

    2017-07-11

    A novel and versatile approach to electrichemically triggering the release of a reagent, β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), selectively to the proximal leaflet of a supported lipid bilayer is described. Selective delivery is achieved by creating a spanning lipid bilayer across a microcavity array and exploiting the irreversible redox disassembly of the host-guest complex formed between thiolated ferrocene (Fc) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) in the presence of chloride. Self-assembled monolayers of the ferrocene-alkanethiols were formed regioselectively on the interior surface of highly ordered 2.8 μm cavities while the exterior top surface of the array was blocked with a monolayer of mercaptoethanol. The Fc monolayers were complexed with β-CD or β-CD-conjugated to streptavidin (β-CD-SA). Phospholipid bilayers were then assembled across the array via combined Langmuir-Blodgett/vesicle fusion leading to a spanning bilayer suspended across the aqueous filled microcavities. Upon application of a positive potential, ferrocene is oxidized to ferrocinium cation, disrupting the inclusion complex and leading to the release of the β-CD into the microcavity solution where it diffuses to the lower leaflet of the suspended bilayer. Disassembly of the supramolecular complex within the cavities and binding of the β-CD-SA to a biotinylated bilayer was followed by voltammetry and impedance spectroscopy where it caused a large increase in membrane resistance. For unmodified β-CD, the extraction of cholesterol from a cholesterol containing bilayer was evident in a decrease in the bilayer resistance. For the first time, this direct approach to targeted delivery of a reagent to the proximal layer of a lipid bilayer offers the potential to build models of bidirectional signaling (inside-out vs outside-in) in cell membrane model systems.

  20. Anomalous swelling of multilamellar lipid bilayers in the transition region by renormalization of curvature elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callisen, Thomas Hønger; Mortensen, Kell; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1994-01-01

    Small-angle neutron scattering is used to determine the temperature dependence of the lamellar repeat distance in an aqueous multilamellar solution of phospholipid bilayers. A thermal anomaly in the swelling behavior is observed at the bilayer phase transition. The anomalous behavior can be suppr...... be suppressed by varying the lipid acyl-chain length or by alloying with a molecular stiffening agent. The experimental results are explained in terms of renormalization of the bilayer curvature elasticity and by using a theory of repulsive interlamellar undulation forces....

  1. Structure and dynamics of water and lipid molecules in charged anionic DMPG lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rønnest, A. K.; Peters, Günther H.J.; Hansen, Flemming Yssing

    2016-01-01

    Molecular dynamics simulations have been used to investigate the influence of the valency of counter-ions on the structure of freestanding bilayer membranes of the anionic 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoglycerol (DMPG) lipid at 310 K and 1 atm. At this temperature, the membrane is in the fluid...... phase with a monovalent counter-ion and in the gel phase with a divalent counter-ion. The diffusion constant of water as a function of its depth in the membrane has been determined from mean-square-displacement calculations. Also, calculated incoherent quasielastic neutron scattering functions have been...... compared to experimental results and used to determine an average diffusion constant for all water molecules in the system. On extrapolating the diffusion constants inferred experimentally to a temperature of 310 K, reasonable agreement with the simulations is obtained. However, the experiments do not have...

  2. Temperature-controlled structure and kinetics of ripple phases in one- and two-component supported lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaasgaard, Thomas; Leidy, Chad; Crowe, J.H.

    2003-01-01

    ripples was seen. From height profiles of the AFM images, estimates of the amplitudes of the different ripple phases are reported. To elucidate the processes of ripple formation and disappearance, a ripple-phase DPPC lipid bilayer was taken through the pretransition in the cooling and the heating......Temperature-controlled atomic force microscopy (AFM) has been used to visualize and study the structure and kinetics of ripple phases in one-component dipalmitoylphosphaticlylcholine (DPPC) and two-component dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine-distearoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC-DSPC) lipid bilayers....... The lipid bilayers are mica-supported double bilayers in which ripple-phase formation occurs in the top bilayer. In one-component DPPC lipid bilayers, the stable and metastable ripple phases were observed. In addition, a third ripple structure with approximately twice the wavelength of the metastable...

  3. Recent progress in the application of atomic force microscopy for supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Jian; He, Dannong

    2012-04-02

    In the past two decades, atomic force microscopy has been widely used for studying supported lipid bilayer related research, including the structure and dynamics of membranes and membrane proteins, and the interaction of membranes with chemical and biological molecules. The focus of this minireview is on the recent progress in the application of atomic force microscopy for supported lipid bilayers. Such progress mainly includes the application in the following aspects: submolecular-resolution imaging, in situ observation, and nanomechanics measurement. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Molecular dynamics simulations of the interactions of medicinal plant extracts and drugs with lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kopec, Wojciech; Telenius, Jelena; Khandelia, Himanshu

    2013-01-01

    Several small drugs and medicinal plant extracts, such as the Indian spice extract curcumin, have a wide range of useful pharmacological properties that cannot be ascribed to binding to a single protein target alone. The lipid bilayer membrane is thought to mediate the effects of many such molecu......Several small drugs and medicinal plant extracts, such as the Indian spice extract curcumin, have a wide range of useful pharmacological properties that cannot be ascribed to binding to a single protein target alone. The lipid bilayer membrane is thought to mediate the effects of many...

  5. A portable lipid bilayer system for environmental sensing with a transmembrane protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryuji Kawano

    Full Text Available This paper describes a portable measurement system for current signals of an ion channel that is composed of a planar lipid bilayer. A stable and reproducible lipid bilayer is formed in outdoor environments by using a droplet contact method with a micropipette. Using this system, we demonstrated that the single-channel recording of a transmembrane protein (alpha-hemolysin was achieved in the field at a high-altitude (∼3623 m. This system would be broadly applicable for obtaining environmental measurements using membrane proteins as a highly sensitive sensor.

  6. Formation of supported lipid bilayers containing phase-segregated domains and their interaction with gold nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melby, Eric S.; Mensch, Arielle C.; Lohse, Samuel E.; Hu, Dehong; Orr, Galya; Murphy, Catherine J.; Hamers, Robert J.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2016-01-01

    The cell membrane represents an important biological interface that nanoparticles may encounter after being released into the environment. Interaction of nanoparticles with cellular membranes may alter membrane structure and function, lead to their uptake into cells, and elicit adverse biological responses. Supported lipid bilayers have proven to be valuable ex vivo models for biological membranes, allowing investigation of their mechanisms of interaction with nanoparticles with a degree of control impossible in living cells. To date, the majority of research on nanoparticle interaction with supported lipid bilayers has employed membranes composed of single or binary mixtures of phospholipids. Cellular membranes contain a wide variety of lipids and exhibit lateral organization. Ordered membrane domains enriched in specific membrane components are referred to as lipid rafts and have not been explored with respect to their interaction with nanoparticles. Here we develop model lipid raft-containing membranes amenable to investigation by a variety of surface-sensitive analytical techniques and demonstrate that lipid rafts influence the extent of nanoparticle attachment to model membranes. We determined conditions that allow reliable formation of bilayers containing rafts enriched in sphingomyelin and cholesterol and confirmed their morphology by structured illumination and atomic force microscopies. We demonstrate that lipid rafts increase attachment of cationic gold nanoparticles to model membranes under near physiological ionic strength conditions (0.1 M NaCl) at pH 7.4. We anticipate that these results will serve as the foundation for and motivate further study of nanoparticle interaction with compositionally varied lipid rafts.

  7. Atomic force microscope visualization of lipid bilayer degradation due to action of phospholipase A(2) and Humicola lanuginosa lipase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balashev, Konstantin; DiNardo, N. John; Callisen, Thomas H.

    2007-01-01

    at the surface of a supported lipid bilayer. In particular, the time course of the degradation of lipid bilayers by Phospholipase A(2) (PLA(2)) and Humicola Lanuginosa Lipase (HLL) has been investigated. Contact mode imaging allows visualization of enzyme activity on the substrate with high lateral resolution...

  8. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M.

    2014-02-01

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus kc and bar{k} and the preferred monolayer curvature J_0^m, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of kc and the area compression modulus kA are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for bar{k} and J_0^m can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both bar{k} and J_0^m change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically bar{k}PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J_0^m ≫ 0, especially at low ionic strengths. We anticipate that these changes lead to unstable membranes as these become vulnerable to pore formation or disintegration into lipid disks.

  9. Evidence for the Formation of Symmetric and Asymmetric DLPC-DAPC Lipid Bilayer Domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Ritter

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: We investigated if mixtures of the phosphatidylcholine (PC lipids 1,2-dilauroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C12:0 PC; DLPC and 1,2-diarachidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (C20:0 PC; DAPC, which differ by eight methylene groups in acyl chain length, lead to the spontaneous formation of distinct lipid rafts and asymmetric bilayers. Methods: The experiments were performed using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Results: We show that DLPC and DAPC mixed at a molar ratio of 1:1 lead to the formation of single, double and triple bilayers with peaks at 6.14 ± 0.11, 13.27 ± 0.17 and 20.54 ± 0.46 nm, respectively (n=750. Within these formations discrete height steps of 0.92 nm can be resolved (n=422. Conclusion: The most frequently observed height steps value of 0.92 nm matches best with the calculated mean lipid hydrophobic thickness difference for asymmetric C12:0 PC and C20:0 PC lipid bilayers of 0.88 nm. This indicates the ability of DLPC and DAPC to form asymmetric lipid bilayers.

  10. Amphiphilic polypeptoids connect lipid bilayers to rearrange unilamellar liposomes to closely spaced multilayered structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Vijay; Zhang, Yueheng; Xuan, Sunting; Zhang, Donghui; Omarova, Marzhana

    Hydrophobically modified polypeptoids (HMPs) are amphiphilic pseudo-peptidic macromolecules with hydrophobic groups attached randomly along the polypeptoid backbone. We show that these biocompatible polymers connect across lipid bilayers and thus form layered structures on liposomes. The transition from single bilayer to multiple bilayer structures is characterized by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and cryo-transmission electron microscopy (cryo-TEM). We propose a mechanism whereby the HMPs insert their hydrophobic tails into adjacent bilayers and thereby serve as the connective glue between bilayers. At higher HMP concentrations, the liposomes are entirely disrupted into much smaller micelle-like structures through extensive hydrophobe insertion. Interestingly, these small structures can reattach to fresh unilamellar liposomes and self-assemble to form new two-bilayered liposomes reminiscent of two-bilayered organelles such as the nucleus in eukaryotic cells. The observations have significance to designing new nanoscale drug delivery carriers. Replace this text with your abstract body. U.S. Department of Energy under EPSCoR Grant No. DE-SC0012432.

  11. Effect of neurosteroids on a model lipid bilayer including cholesterol: An Atomic Force Microscopy study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacchi, Mattia; Balleza, Daniel; Vena, Giulia; Puia, Giulia; Facci, Paolo; Alessandrini, Andrea

    2015-05-01

    Amphiphilic molecules which have a biological effect on specific membrane proteins, could also affect lipid bilayer properties possibly resulting in a modulation of the overall membrane behavior. In light of this consideration, it is important to study the possible effects of amphiphilic molecule of pharmacological interest on model systems which recapitulate some of the main properties of the biological plasma membranes. In this work we studied the effect of a neurosteroid, Allopregnanolone (3α,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or Allo), on a model bilayer composed by the ternary lipid mixture DOPC/bSM/chol. We chose ternary mixtures which present, at room temperature, a phase coexistence of liquid ordered (Lo) and liquid disordered (Ld) domains and which reside near to a critical point. We found that Allo, which is able to strongly partition in the lipid bilayer, induces a marked increase in the bilayer area and modifies the relative proportion of the two phases favoring the Ld phase. We also found that the neurosteroid shifts the miscibility temperature to higher values in a way similarly to what happens when the cholesterol concentration is decreased. Interestingly, an isoform of Allo, isoAllopregnanolone (3β,5α-tetrahydroprogesterone or isoAllo), known to inhibit the effects of Allo on GABAA receptors, has an opposite effect on the bilayer properties. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Stabilization of soft lipid colloids: competing effects of nanoparticle decoration and supported lipid bilayer formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savarala, Sushma; Ahmed, Selver; Ilies, Marc A; Wunder, Stephanie L

    2011-04-26

    Stabilization against fusion of zwitterionic lipid small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) by charged nanoparticles is essential to prevent premature inactivation and cargo unloading. In the present work, we examined the stabilization of DMPC and DPPC SUVs by monolithic silica (SiO(2)) nanoparticle envelopment, for SiO(2) with 4-6, 10-20, 20-30, and 40-50 nm nominal diameter. We found that for these soft colloids stabilization is critically dependent on whether fusion occurs between the charged nanoparticles and neutral SUVs to form supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), or whether the reverse occurs, namely, nanoparticle decoration of the SUVs. While SLB formation is accompanied by precipitation, nanoparticle decoration results in long-term stabilization of the SUVs. The fate of the nanosystem depends on the size of the nanoparticles and on the ionic strength of the medium. We found that, in the case of highly charged SiO(2) nanoparticles in water, there is no SUV fusion to SiO(2) for a specific range of nanoparticle sizes. Instead, the negatively charged SiO(2) nanoparticles surround the uncharged SUVs, resulting in electrostatic repulsion between the decorated SUVs, thus preventing their aggregation and precipitation. Addition of millimolar amounts of NaCl results in rapid SLB formation and precipitation. This study has great potential impact toward better understanding the interaction of nanoparticles with biological membranes and the factors affecting their use as drug carriers or sensors.

  13. Lipid Bilayer – mediated Regulation of Ion Channel Function by Amphiphilic Drugs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbæk, Jens August

    2008-01-01

    that are transforming it into a subject of quantitative science. It is described how the hydrophobic interactions between a membrane protein and the host lipid bilayer provide the basis for a mechanism, whereby protein function is regulated by the bilayer physical properties. The use of gramicidin channels as single-molecule......Drugs that at pico- to nanomolar concentration regulate ion channel function by high-affi nity binding to their cognate receptor often have a “ secondary pharmacology, ” in which the same molecule at low micromolar concentrations regulates a diversity of membrane proteins in an apparently...... nonspecifi c manner. It has long been suspected that this promiscuous regulation of membrane protein function could be due to changes in the physical properties of the host lipid bilayer, but the underlying mechanisms have been poorly understood. Given that pharmacological research often involves drug...

  14. Photoproduction of proton gradients with pi-stacked fluorophore scaffolds in lipid bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Bhosale, Sheshanath; Sisson, Adam L.; Talukdar, Pinaki; Fuerstenberg, Alexandre; Banerji, Natalie; Vauthey, Eric; Bollot, Guillaume; Mareda, Jiri; Roger, Cornelia; Wuerthner, Frank; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Rigid p-octiphenyl rods were used to create helical tetrameric {pi}-stacks of blue, red-fluorescent naphthalene diimides that can span lipid bilayer membranes. In lipid vesicles containing quinone as electron acceptors and surrounded by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as hole acceptors, transmembrane proton gradients arose through quinone reduction upon excitation with visible light. Quantitative ultrafast and relatively long-lived charge separation was confirmed as the origin of photosynthet...

  15. Tuning the mobility coupling of quaternized polyvinylpyridine and anionic phospholipids in supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Xiaojun; Li, Xiaosi; Kaliszewski, Megan J; Zhuang, Xiaodong; Smith, Adam W

    2015-02-10

    Binding of biomacromolecules to anionic lipids in the plasma membrane is a common motif in many cell signaling pathways. Previous work has shown that macromolecules with cationic sequences can form nanodomains with sequestered anionic lipids, which alters the lateral distribution and mobility of the membrane lipids. Such sequestration is believed to result from the formation of a lipid-macromolecule complex. To date, however, the molecular structure and dynamics of the lipid-polymer interface are poorly understood. We have investigated the behavior of polycationic quaternized polyvinylpyridine (QPVP) on supported lipid bilayers doped with phosphatidylserine (PS) or phosphatidylinositol phosphate (PIP) lipids using time-resolved fluorescence microscopy, including pulsed interleaved excitation fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (PIE-FCCS). PIE-FCCS is a dual-color fluorescence spectroscopy that translates fluctuations in fluorescence signal into a measurement of diffusion and colocalization. By labeling the polymer and lipids, we investigated the adsorption-induced translational mobility of lipids and systematically studied the influence of lipid charge density and solution ionic strength. Our results show that alteration of anionic lipid lateral mobility is dependent on the net charge of the lipid headgroup and is modulated by the ionic strength of the solution, indicating that electrostatic interactions drive the decrease in lateral mobility of anionic lipids by adsorbed QPVP. At physiological salt concentration we observe that the lipid lateral mobility is weakly influenced by QPVP and that there is no evidence of stable lipid-polymer complexes.

  16. Study of water diffusion on single-supported bilayer lipid membranes by quasielastic neutron scattering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bai, M.; Miskowiec, A.; Hansen, F. Y.

    2012-01-01

    High-energy-resolution quasielastic neutron scattering has been used to elucidate the diffusion of water molecules in proximity to single bilayer lipid membranes supported on a silicon substrate. By varying sample temperature, level of hydration, and deuteration, we identify three different types...

  17. Calculation of the electrostatic potential of lipid bilayers from molecular dynamics simulations: methodological issues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gurtovenko, Andrey A; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2009-01-01

    that it is employed in conjunction with tin-foil boundary conditions, which exactly balance a nonzero surface charge of a periodically replicated multibilayer system. Furthermore, we show that vacuum boundary conditions give qualitatively similar potential profiles for asymmetric lipid bilayers as compared...

  18. The influence of lipid composition on glycophorin-induced bilayer permeability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gier, J. de; Hoogevest, P. van; Kruijff, B. de; Du Maine, A.P.M.

    1984-01-01

    (1) Glycophorin was incorporated into large unilamellar vesicles and the bilayer permeability was measured as a function of the lipid composition. (2) In agreement with previous data (Van der Steen, A.T.M., De Kruijff, B. and De Gier, J. (1982) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 691, 13–23) it was found that

  19. Capturing suboptical dynamic structures in lipid bilayer patches formed from free-standing giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhatia, Tripta; Cornelius, Flemming; Ipsen, John H.

    2017-01-01

    treatment with magnesium chloride, they collapse to form planar lipid bilayer (PLB) patches. Rapid GUV collapse onto the mica preserves the lateral organization of freestanding membranes and thus makes it possible to image 'snapshots' of GUVs up to nanometer resolution by high-resolution microscopy...

  20. Lateral diffusion of peripheral membrane proteins on supported lipid bilayers is controlled by the additive frictional drags of (1) bound lipids and (2) protein domains penetrating into the bilayer hydrocarbon core.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemba, Brian P; Falke, Joseph J

    2013-01-01

    Peripheral membrane proteins bound to lipids on bilayer surfaces play central roles in a wide array of cellular processes, including many signaling pathways. These proteins diffuse in the plane of the bilayer and often undergo complex reactions involving the binding of regulatory and substrate lipids and proteins they encounter during their 2D diffusion. Some peripheral proteins, for example pleckstrin homology (PH) domains, dock to the bilayer in a relatively shallow position with little penetration into the bilayer. Other peripheral proteins exhibit more complex bilayer contacts, for example classical protein kinase C isoforms (PKCs) bind as many as six lipids in stepwise fashion, resulting in the penetration of three PKC domains (C1A, C1B, C2) into the bilayer headgroup and hydrocarbon regions. A molecular understanding of the molecular features that control the diffusion speeds of proteins bound to supported bilayers would enable key molecular information to be extracted from experimental diffusion constants, revealing protein-lipid and protein-bilayer interactions difficult to study by other methods. The present study investigates a range of 11 different peripheral protein constructs comprised by 1-3 distinct domains (PH, C1A, C1B, C2, anti-lipid antibody). By combining these constructs with various combinations of target lipids, the study measures 2D diffusion constants on supported bilayers for 17 different protein-lipid complexes. The resulting experimental diffusion constants, together with the known membrane interaction parameters of each complex, are used to analyze the molecular features correlated with diffusional slowing and bilayer friction. The findings show that both (1) individual bound lipids and (2) individual protein domains that penetrate into the hydrocarbon core make additive contributions to the friction against the bilayer, thereby defining the 2D diffusion constant. An empirical formula is developed that accurately estimates the diffusion

  1. Limited perturbation of a DPPC bilayer by fluorescent lipid probes: a molecular dynamics study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ackerman, David G; Heberle, Frederick A; Feigenson, Gerald W

    2013-05-02

    The properties of lipid bilayer nanometer-scale domains could be crucial for understanding cell membranes. Fluorescent probes are often used to study bilayers, yet their effects on host lipids are not well understood. We used molecular dynamics simulations to investigate perturbations in a fluid DPPC bilayer upon incorporation of three indocarbocyanine probes: DiI-C18:0, DiI-C18:2, or DiI-C12:0. We find a 10-12% decrease in chain order for DPPC in the solvation shell nearest the probe but smaller effects in subsequent shells, indicating that the probes significantly alter only their local environment. We also observe order perturbations of lipids directly across from the probe in the opposite leaflet. Additionally, the DPPC headgroup phosphorus-to-nitrogen vector of lipids nearest the probe exhibits preferential orientation pointing away from the DiI. We show that, while DiI probes perturb their local environment, they do not strongly influence the average properties of "nanoscopic" domains containing a few hundred lipids.

  2. Influence of natural organic matter (NOM) coatings on nanoparticle adsorption onto supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bo, Zhang; Avsar, Saziye Yorulmaz; Corliss, Michael K; Chung, Minsub; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2017-10-05

    As the worldwide usage of nanoparticles in commercial products continues to increase, there is growing concern about the environmental risks that nanoparticles pose to biological systems, including potential damage to cellular membranes. A detailed understanding of how different types of nanoparticles behave in environmentally relevant conditions is imperative for predicting and mitigating potential membrane-associated toxicities. Herein, we investigated the adsorption of two popular nanoparticles (silver and buckminsterfullerene) onto biomimetic supported lipid bilayers of varying membrane charge (positive and negative). The quartz crystal microbalance-dissipation (QCM-D) measurement technique was employed to track the adsorption kinetics. Particular attention was focused on understanding how natural organic matter (NOM) coatings affect nanoparticle-bilayer interactions. Both types of nanoparticles preferentially adsorbed onto the positively charged bilayers, although NOM coatings on the nanoparticle and lipid bilayer surfaces could either inhibit or promote adsorption in certain electrolyte conditions. While past findings showed that NOM coatings inhibit membrane adhesion, our findings demonstrate that the effects of NOM coatings are more nuanced depending on the type of nanoparticle and electrolyte condition. Taken together, the results demonstrate that NOM coatings can modulate the lipid membrane interactions of various nanoparticles, suggesting a possible way to improve the environmental safety of nanoparticles. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of the protein corona on the interaction between nanoparticles and lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Silvio, Desirè; Maccarini, Marco; Parker, Roger; Mackie, Alan; Fragneto, Giovanna; Baldelli Bombelli, Francesca

    2017-10-15

    It is known that nanoparticles (NPs) in a biological fluid are immediately coated by a protein corona (PC), composed of a hard (strongly bounded) and a soft (loosely associated) layers, which represents the real nano-interface interacting with the cellular membrane in vivo. In this regard, supported lipid bilayers (SLB) have extensively been used as relevant model systems for elucidating the interaction between biomembranes and NPs. Herein we show how the presence of a PC on the NP surface changes the interaction between NPs and lipid bilayers with particular care on the effects induced by the NPs on the bilayer structure. In the present work we combined Quartz Crystal Microbalance with Dissipation Monitoring (QCM-D) and Neutron Reflectometry (NR) experimental techniques to elucidate how the NP-membrane interaction is modulated by the presence of proteins in the environment and their effect on the lipid bilayer. Our study showed that the NP-membrane interaction is significantly affected by the presence of proteins and in particular we observed an important role of the soft corona in this phenomenon. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. The structure of polyunsaturated lipid bilayers important for rhodopsin function: a neutron diffraction study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihailescu, Mihaela; Gawrisch, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    The structure of oriented 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers with perdeuterated stearoyl- or docosahexaenoyl hydrocarbon chains was investigated by neutron diffraction. Experiments were conducted at two different relative humidities, 66 and 86%. At both humidities we observed that the polyunsaturated docosahexaenoyl chain has a preference to reside near the lipid water interface. That leaves voids in the bilayer center that are occupied by saturated stearoyl chain segments. This uneven distribution of saturated- and polyunsaturated chain densities is likely to result in membrane elastic stress that modulates function of integral receptor proteins like rhodopsin.

  5. Study of curcumin behavior in two different lipid bilayer models of liposomal curcumin using molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili, Seifollah; Saeedi, Marzieh

    2016-01-01

    Liposomal formulation of curcumin is an important therapeutic agent for the treatment of various cancers. Despite extensive studies on the biological effects of this formulation in cancer treatment, much remains unknown about curcumin-liposome interactions. Understanding how different lipid bilayers respond to curcumin molecule may help us to design more effective liposomal curcumin. Here, we used molecular dynamics simulation method to investigate the behavior of curcumin in two lipid bilayers commonly used in preparation of liposomal curcumin, namely dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dimyristoylphosphatidylglycerol (DMPG). First, the free energy barriers for translocation of one curcumin molecule from water to the lipid bilayer were determined by using the potential of mean force (PMF). The computed free energy profile exhibits a global minimum at the solvent-headgroup interface (LH region) for both lipid membranes. We also evaluated the free energy difference between the equilibrium position of curcumin in the lipid bilayer and bulk water as the excess chemical potential. Our results show that curcumin has the higher affinity in DMPG compared to DPPC lipid bilayer (-8.39 vs. -1.69 kBT) and this is related to more hydrogen bond possibility for curcumin in DMPG lipid membrane. Next, using an unconstrained molecular dynamic simulation with curcumin initially positioned at the center of lipid bilayer, we studied various properties of each lipid bilayer system in the presence of curcumin molecule that was in full agreement with PMF and experimental data. The results of these simulation studies suggest that membrane composition could have a large effect on interaction of curcumin-lipid bilayer.

  6. Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging and Force Spectroscopy of Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unsay, Joseph D.; Cosentino, Katia; García-Sáez, Ana J.

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is a versatile, high-resolution imaging technique that allows visualization of biological membranes. It has sufficient magnification to examine membrane substructures and even individual molecules. AFM can act as a force probe to measure interactions and mechanical properties of membranes. Supported lipid bilayers are conventionally used as membrane models in AFM studies. In this protocol, we demonstrate how to prepare supported bilayers and characterize their structure and mechanical properties using AFM. These include bilayer thickness and breakthrough force. The information provided by AFM imaging and force spectroscopy help define mechanical and chemical properties of membranes. These properties play an important role in cellular processes such as maintaining cell hemostasis from environmental stress, bringing membrane proteins together, and stabilizing protein complexes. PMID:26273958

  7. Probing the position of resveratrol in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Ghellinck, Alexis; Shen, Chen; Fragneto, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the natural antioxidant resveratrol on the structure of solid supported di-palmitoyl-phosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) bilayers in their fluid state was investigated by neutron reflectometry. Results reveal an accumulation of resveratrol (up to 25%, mol/mol) inside the headgroups...... and they exclude its presence in the hydrophobic core. The presence of resveratrol induces an increase of the average thickness and of the interfacial roughness of the headgroup layer. This may be due to a change of the tilt angle of the phosphocholine headgroups residing next to the resveratrol to a more upright...... orientation and leading to a reduction of the projected area per headgroup. This effect is propagated into the hydrophobic core, where the chain packing is modified despite the absence of resveratrol. When interacting with a DPPC/cholesterol membrane, resveratrol has a similar effect on the neighboring PC...

  8. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pera, H.; Kleijn, J. M.; Leermakers, F. A. M., E-mail: Frans.leermakers@wur.nl [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry and Colloid Science, Wageningen University, Dreijenplein 6, 6307 HB Wageningen (Netherlands)

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus k{sub c} and k{sup ¯} and the preferred monolayer curvature J{sub 0}{sup m}, and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of k{sub c} and the area compression modulus k{sub A} are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k{sup ¯} and J{sub 0}{sup m} change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k{sup ¯}<0, membranes can form stable cubic phases when the Gaussian bending modulus becomes positive, which occurs with membranes composed of PC lipids with long tails. Similarly, negative monolayer curvatures appear when a small head group such as PE is combined with long lipid tails, which hints towards the stability of inverse hexagonal phases at the cost of the bilayer topology. To prevent the destabilisation of bilayers, PG lipids can be mixed into these PC or PE lipid membranes. Progressive loading of bilayers with PG lipids lead to highly charged membranes, resulting in J{sub 0}{sup m}≫0, especially at low ionic

  9. Free Energy of Bare and Capped Gold Nanoparticles Permeating through a Lipid Bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhashal, Anil R; Roy, Sudip

    2016-11-04

    Herein, we study the permeation free energy of bare and octane-thiol-capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) translocating through a lipid membrane. To investigate this, we have pulled the bare and capped AuNPs from bulk water to the membrane interior and estimated the free energy cost. The adsorption of the bare AuNP on the bilayer surface is energetically favorable but further loading inside it requires energy. However, the estimated free-energy barrier for loading the capped AuNP into the lipid membrane is much higher compared to bare AuNP. We also demonstrate the details of the permeation process of bare and capped AuNPs. Bare AuNP induces the curvature in the lipid membrane whereas capped AuNP creates an opening in the interacting monolayer and get inserted into the membrane. The insertion of capped AuNP induces a partial unzipping of the lipid bilayer, which results in the ordering of the local lipids interacting with the nanoparticle. However, bare AuNP disrupts the lipid membrane by pushing the lipid molecules inside the membrane. We also analyze pore formation due to the insertion of capped AuNP into the membrane, which results in water molecules penetrating the hydrophobic region. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Discriminating binding and positioning of amphiphiles to lipid bilayers by {sup 1}H NMR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evanics, F. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, UTM, 3359 Mississauga Rd. North Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada); Prosser, R.S. [Department of Chemistry, University of Toronto, UTM, 3359 Mississauga Rd. North Mississauga, Ont., L5L 1C6 (Canada)]. E-mail: sprosser@utm.utoronto.ca

    2005-04-04

    The binding and positioning in lipid bilayers of three well-known drugs--imipramine, nicotine, and caffeine--have been studied using {sup 1}H NMR. The membrane model system consisted of 'fast-tumbling' lipid bicelles, in which a bilayered lipid domain, composed of the unsaturated lipid, 1,2-dimyristelaidoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMLPC) was surrounded by a rim of deuterated detergent-like lipids, consisting of 1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC-d22). Binding and immersion depth information was obtained by three experiments. (1) {sup 1}H chemical shift perturbations, upon transfer of the amphiphiles from water to a bicelle mixture, were used to estimate regions of the amphiphiles that interact with the membrane. (2) Water contact to resolvable protons was measured through a Nuclear Overhauser Effect (NOE) between water and resolvable drug and lipid resonances. In the case of both lipids and membrane bound drugs, positive NOEs with large cross-relaxation rates were measured for most resonances originating from the membrane hydrophilic region, while negative NOEs were observed predominantly to resonances in the hydrophobic region of the membrane. (3) {sup 1}H NMR measurements of oxygen-induced (paramagnetic) spin-lattice relaxation rates, which are known to increase with membrane immersion depth, were used to corroborate conclusions based on chemical shift perturbations and water-ligand NOEs.

  11. Directly mapping the surface charge density of lipid bilayers under physiological conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuhs, Thomas; Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Besenbacher, Flemming; Dong, Mingdong

    2015-03-01

    The surface charge density of lipid bilayers governs the cellular uptake of charged particles and guides cell-cell and cell-surface interactions. Direct probing of the potential requires sub nanometer distances as the electrostatic potential is screened by high physiological salt concentrations. This prevented direct measurement of the SCD under physiological conditions. In this study we investigate supported bilayers of lipid mixtures that form domains of distinct surface charges, submerged in 150mM NaCl. We use a scanning ion-conductance microscope (SICM) setup to measure the ionic current through a nanopipette as the pipette is scanned several nanometers above the sample. The charged headgroups of the lipids attract counter ions leading to a charge dependent enhancement of the ion concentration near the surface. This creates a measurable change of conductivity in the vicinity of the surface. As the dependency of the current on the SCD and pipette potential is non-trivial we characterized it using numerical solutions to Poisson and Nernst-Planck equations. Based on the simulation results we propose an imaging method. We confirm feasibility of the proposed method by experimentally mapping the local surface charge density of phase separated lipid bilayers.

  12. Application of Small-Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering in Determining Lipid Bilayer Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jianjun; Heberle, Frederick A.; Kucerka, Norbert; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie; Szymanski, Michelle; Koepfinger, Mary; Katsaras, John

    2012-02-01

    Accurately determining lipid structure in biologically relevant fluid bilayers is not straightforward. We have recently developed a hybrid experimental/computational technique (i.e., the scattering density profile, or SDP model), which exploits the fact that neutron and X-ray scattering are sensitive to different bilayer thicknesses - the large difference in neutron scattering length density (SLD) between proteated lipid and deuterated water defines the overall bilayer thickness, while X-ray scattering resolves the headgroup-headgroup distance due to the large scattering contrast between the electron-rich phosphate groups and the hydrocarbon/aqueous medium. A key step in the SDP analysis is the use of MD simulations to parse the lipid molecule into fragments whose volume probability distributions follow simple analytical functional forms. Given the appropriate atomic scattering lengths, these volume probabilities can simultaneously predict both the neutron and X-ray SLD profiles, and hence the scattering form factors. Structural results for commonly used phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylglycerol lipids will be given.

  13. BILAYER LIPID MEMBRANE (BLM) BASED ION SELECTIVE ELECTRODES AT THE MESO, MICRO, AND NANO SCALES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Bingwen; Rieck, Daniel; Van Wie, Bernard J.; Cheng, Gary J.; Moffett, David F.; Kidwell, David A.

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for making micron-sized apertures with tapered sidewalls and nano-sized apertures. Their use in bilayer lipid membrane-based ion selective electrode design is demonstrated and compared to mesoscale bilayers and traditional PVC ion selective electrodes. Micron-sized apertures are fabricated in SU-8 photoresist films and vary in diameter from 10 to 40 microns. The tapered edges in SU-8 films are desired to enhance bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) formation and are fabricated by UV-light overexposure. Nanoapertures are made in boron diffused silicon film. The membranes are used as septa to separate two potassium chloride solutions of different concentrations. Lecithin BLMs are assembled on the apertures by ejecting lipid solution. Potassium ionophore, dibenzo-18-crown-6, is incorporated into BLMs by dissolving it in the lipid solution before membrane assembly. Voltage changes with increasing potassium ion concentrations are recorded with an A/D converter. Various ionophore concentrations in BLMs are investigated. At least a 1% concentration is needed for consistent slopes. Electrode response curves are linear over the 10−6 to 0.1 M range with a sub-Nernstian slope of 20 mV per Log concentration change. This system shows high selectivity to potassium ions over potential interfering sodium ions. BLMs on the three different aperture sizes at the meso, micro, and nano-scales all show similar linear ranges and limits of detection (LODs) as PVC ion selective membranes. PMID:19008091

  14. Affinity of four polar neurotransmitters for lipid bilayer membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Chunhua; Ye, Fengbin; Valardez, Gustavo F.

    2011-01-01

    Weak interactions of neurotransmitters and the lipid matrix in the synaptic membrane have been hypothesized to play a role in synaptic transmission of nerve signals, particularly with respect to receptor desensitization (Cantor, R. S. Biochemistry 2003, 42, 11891). The strength of such interactions......, however, was not measured, and this is an obvious impediment for further evaluation and understanding of a possible role for desensitization. We have used dialysis equilibrium to directly measure the net affinity of selected neurotransmitters for lipid membranes and analyzed this affinity data...... with respect to calorimetric measurements and molecular dynamics simulations. We studied an anionic (glutamate), a cationic (acetylcholine), and two zwitterionic (-aminobutyric acid and glycine) neurotransmitters, and membranes of pure dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC), DMPC doped with 10% anionic lipid...

  15. Microfabricated Teflon Membranes for Low-Noise Recordings of Ion Channels in Planar Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Michael; Kriebel, Jennah K.; Tosteson, Magdalena T.; Whitesides, George M.

    2003-01-01

    We present a straightforward, accessible method for the fabrication of micropores with diameters from 2 to 800 μm in films of amorphous Teflon (Teflon AF). Pores with diameters ≤40 μm made it possible to record ion fluxes through ion channels in planar bilayers with excellent signal characteristics. These pores afforded: i), stable measurements at transmembrane voltages up to 460 mV; ii), recordings at low noise levels (0.4 pA rms at 4.3 kHz bandwidth); iii), recordings at high effective bandwidth (10.7 kHz); and iv), formation of multiple planar lipid bilayers in parallel. Microfabricated pores in films of Teflon AF made it possible to examine, experimentally and theoretically, the influence of the pore diameter on the current noise in planar bilayer recordings. Reducing the pore diameter below 40 μm mainly increased the stability of the planar bilayers, but had only a small effect on the level of the current noise. The low-noise properties of bilayer recordings on micropores in Teflon AF films were exploited to record the smallest conductance state of alamethicin (24 pS) at an unprecedentedly high bandwidth of 10.7 kHz. PMID:14507731

  16. Acceleration of Lateral Equilibration in Mixed Lipid Bilayers Using Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Kun; García, Angel E

    2014-10-14

    The lateral heterogeneity of cellular membranes plays an important role in many biological functions such as signaling and regulating membrane proteins. This heterogeneity can result from preferential interactions between membrane components or interactions with membrane proteins. One major difficulty in molecular dynamics simulations aimed at studying the membrane heterogeneity is that lipids diffuse slowly and collectively in bilayers, and therefore, it is difficult to reach equilibrium in lateral organization in bilayer mixtures. Here, we propose the use of the replica exchange with solute tempering (REST) approach to accelerate lateral relaxation in heterogeneous bilayers. REST is based on the replica exchange method but tempers only the solute, leaving the temperature of the solvent fixed. Since the number of replicas in REST scales approximately only with the degrees of freedom in the solute, REST enables us to enhance the configuration sampling of lipid bilayers with fewer replicas, in comparison with the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (T-REMD) where the number of replicas scales with the degrees of freedom of the entire system. We apply the REST method to a cholesterol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer mixture and find that the lateral distribution functions of all molecular pair types converge much faster than in the standard MD simulation. The relative diffusion rate between molecules in REST is, on average, an order of magnitude faster than in the standard MD simulation. Although REST was initially proposed to study protein folding and its efficiency in protein folding is still under debate, we find a unique application of REST to accelerate lateral equilibration in mixed lipid membranes and suggest a promising way to probe membrane lateral heterogeneity through molecular dynamics simulation.

  17. Acceleration of Lateral Equilibration in Mixed Lipid Bilayers Using Replica Exchange with Solute Tempering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    The lateral heterogeneity of cellular membranes plays an important role in many biological functions such as signaling and regulating membrane proteins. This heterogeneity can result from preferential interactions between membrane components or interactions with membrane proteins. One major difficulty in molecular dynamics simulations aimed at studying the membrane heterogeneity is that lipids diffuse slowly and collectively in bilayers, and therefore, it is difficult to reach equilibrium in lateral organization in bilayer mixtures. Here, we propose the use of the replica exchange with solute tempering (REST) approach to accelerate lateral relaxation in heterogeneous bilayers. REST is based on the replica exchange method but tempers only the solute, leaving the temperature of the solvent fixed. Since the number of replicas in REST scales approximately only with the degrees of freedom in the solute, REST enables us to enhance the configuration sampling of lipid bilayers with fewer replicas, in comparison with the temperature replica exchange molecular dynamics simulation (T-REMD) where the number of replicas scales with the degrees of freedom of the entire system. We apply the REST method to a cholesterol and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer mixture and find that the lateral distribution functions of all molecular pair types converge much faster than in the standard MD simulation. The relative diffusion rate between molecules in REST is, on average, an order of magnitude faster than in the standard MD simulation. Although REST was initially proposed to study protein folding and its efficiency in protein folding is still under debate, we find a unique application of REST to accelerate lateral equilibration in mixed lipid membranes and suggest a promising way to probe membrane lateral heterogeneity through molecular dynamics simulation. PMID:25328493

  18. Single-component supported lipid bilayers probed using broadband nonlinear optics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olenick, Laura L; Chase, Hilary M; Fu, Li; Zhang, Yun; McGeachy, Alicia C; Dogangun, Merve; Walter, Stephanie R; Wang, Hong-Fei; Geiger, Franz M

    2017-07-19

    Broadband SFG spectroscopy is shown to offer considerable advantages over scanning systems in terms of signal-to-noise ratios when probing well-formed single-component supported lipid bilayers formed from zwitterionic lipids with PC headgroups. The SFG spectra obtained from bilayers formed from DOPC, POPC, DLPC, DMPC, DPPC and DSPC show a common peak at ∼2980 cm(-1), which is subject to interference between the C-H and the O-H stretches from the aqueous phase, while membranes having transition temperatures above the laboratory temperature produce SFG spectra with at least two additional peaks, one at ∼2920 cm(-1) and another at ∼2880 cm(-1). The results validate spectroscopic and structural data from SFG experiments utilizing asymmetric bilayers in which one leaflet differs from the other in the extent of deuteration. Differences in H2O-D2O exchange experiments reveal that the lineshapes of the broadband SFG spectra are significantly influenced by interference from OH oscillators in the aqueous phase, even when those oscillators are not probed by the incident infrared light in our broadband setup. In the absence of spectral interference from the OH stretches of the solvent, the alkyl chain terminal methyl group of the bilayer is found to be tilted at an angle of 15° to 35° from the surface normal.

  19. Subdiffusion and lateral diffusion coefficient of lipid atoms and molecules in phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flenner, Elijah; Das, Jhuma; Rheinstädter, Maikel C; Kosztin, Ioan

    2009-01-01

    We use a long, all-atom molecular-dynamics (MD) simulation combined with theoretical modeling to investigate the dynamics of selected lipid atoms and lipid molecules in a hydrated diyristoyl-phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer. From the analysis of a 0.1 micros MD trajectory, we find that the time evolution of the mean-square displacement, , of lipid atoms and molecules exhibits three well-separated dynamical regions: (i) ballistic, with approximately t2 for t approximately tbeta with beta approximately t for t>or approximately 30 ns. We propose a memory-function approach for calculating over the entire time range extending from the ballistic to the Fickian diffusion regimes. The results are in very good agreement with the ones from the MD simulations. We also examine the implications of the presence of the subdiffusive dynamics of lipids on the self-intermediate scattering function and the incoherent dynamic structure factor measured in neutron-scattering experiments.

  20. Supported lipid bilayers with controlled curvature via colloidal lithography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sundh, Maria; Manandhar, Michal; Svedhem, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    , is presented, utilizing lipid vesicle rupture onto nanostructured sensor substrates. Heat treated colloidal particle masks were used as templates to produce silicon dioxide films with systematically varied radius of curvature (ROC, 70 to 170 nm are demonstrated) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation...

  1. Lipid Diffusion in Supported Lipid Bilayers: A Comparison between Line-Scanning Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy and Single-Particle Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Rose

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Diffusion in lipid membranes is an essential component of many cellular process and fluorescence a method of choice to study membrane dynamics. The goal of this work was to directly compare two common fluorescence methods, line-scanning fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and single-particle tracking, to observe the diffusion of a fluorescent lipophilic dye, DiD, in a complex five-component mitochondria-like solid-supported lipid bilayer. We measured diffusion coefficients of \\(D_{\\text{FCS}} \\sim\\ 3 \\(μ\\text{m}^2\\cdot\\text{s}^{-1}\\ and \\(D_{\\text{SPT}} \\sim\\ 2 \\( μ\\text{m}^2\\cdot\\text{s}^{-1}\\, respectively. These comparable, yet statistically different values are used to highlight the main message of the paper, namely that the two considered methods give access to distinctly different dynamic ranges: \\(D \\gtrsim\\ 1 \\(μ\\text{m}^2\\cdot\\text{s}^{-1}\\ for FCS and \\(D \\lesssim\\ 5 \\(μ\\text{m}^2\\cdot\\text{s}^{-1}\\ for SPT (with standard imaging conditions. In the context of membrane diffusion, this means that FCS allows studying lipid diffusion in fluid membranes, as well as the diffusion of loosely-bound proteins hovering above the membrane. SPT, on the other hand, is ideal to study the motions of membrane-inserted proteins, especially those presenting different conformations, but only allows studying lipid diffusion in relatively viscous membranes, such as supported lipid bilayers and cell membranes.

  2. Structure and function of membrane proteins encapsulated in a polymer-bound lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Naomi L; Lee, Sarah C; Patel, Jaimin H; Gulamhussein, Aiman A; Rothnie, Alice J

    2018-04-01

    New technologies for the purification of stable membrane proteins have emerged in recent years, in particular methods that allow the preparation of membrane proteins with their native lipid environment. Here, we look at the progress achieved with the use of styrene-maleic acid copolymers (SMA) which are able to insert into biological membranes forming nanoparticles containing membrane proteins and lipids. This technology can be applied to membrane proteins from any host source, and, uniquely, allows purification without the protein ever being removed from a lipid bilayer. Not only do these SMA lipid particles (SMALPs) stabilise membrane proteins, allowing structural and functional studies, but they also offer opportunities to understand the local lipid environment of the host membrane. With any new or different method, questions inevitably arise about the integrity of the protein purified: does it retain its activity; its native structure; and ability to perform its function? How do membrane proteins within SMALPS perform in existing assays and lend themselves to analysis by established methods? We outline here recent work on the structure and function of membrane proteins that have been encapsulated like this in a polymer-bound lipid bilayer, and the potential for the future with this approach. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Beyond the Structure-Function Horizon of Membrane Proteins edited by Ute Hellmich, Rupak Doshi and Benjamin McIlwain. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Study of procaine and tetracaine in the lipid bilayer using molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalili, Seifollah; Saeedi, Marzieh

    2017-04-01

    Despite available experimental results, the molecular mechanism of action of local anesthetics upon the nervous system and contribution of the cell membrane to the process are still controversial. In this work, molecular dynamics simulations were performed to investigate the effect of two clinically used local anesthetics, procaine and tetracaine, on the structure and dynamics of a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer. We focused on comparing the main effects of uncharged and charged drugs on various properties of the lipid membrane: mass density distribution, diffusion coefficient, order parameter, radial distribution function, hydrogen bonding, electrostatic potential, headgroup angle, and water dipole orientation. To compare the diffusive nature of anesthetic through the lipid membrane quantitatively, we investigated the hexadecane/water partition coefficient using expanded ensemble simulation. We predicted the permeability coefficient of anesthetics in the following order: uncharged tetracaine > uncharged procaine > charged tetracaine > charged procaine. We also shown that the charged forms of drugs are more potent in hydrogen bonding, disturbing the lipid headgroups, changing the orientation of water dipoles, and increasing the headgroup electrostatic potential more than uncharged drugs, while the uncharged drugs make the lipid diffusion faster and increase the tail order parameter. The results of these simulation studies suggest that the different forms of anesthetics induce different structural modifications in the lipid bilayer, which provides new insights into their molecular mechanism.

  4. Diffusion mediated coagulation and fragmentation based study of domain formation in lipid bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, Laxminarsimha V., E-mail: laxman@iitk.ac.in [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India); Roy, Subhradeep [Department of Biomedical Engineering and Mechanics (MC 0219), Virginia Tech, 495 Old Turner Street, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States); Das, Sovan Lal [Mechanics and Applied Mathematics Group, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Kanpur, Kanpur 208016 (India)

    2017-01-15

    We estimate the equilibrium size distribution of cholesterol rich micro-domains on a lipid bilayer by solving Smoluchowski equation for coagulation and fragmentation. Towards this aim, we first derive the coagulation kernels based on the diffusion behaviour of domains moving in a two dimensional membrane sheet, as this represents the reality better. We incorporate three different diffusion scenarios of domain diffusion into our coagulation kernel. Subsequently, we investigate the influence of the parameters in our model on the coagulation and fragmentation behaviour. The observed behaviours of the coagulation and fragmentation kernels are also manifested in the equilibrium domain size distribution and its first moment. Finally, considering the liquid domains diffusing in a supported lipid bilayer, we fit the equilibrium domain size distribution to a benchmark solution.

  5. Wafer-scale fabrication of glass-FEP-glass microfluidic devices for lipid bilayer experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bomer, Johan G; Prokofyev, Alexander V; van den Berg, Albert; Le Gac, Séverine

    2014-12-07

    We report a wafer-scale fabrication process for the production of glass-FEP-glass microdevices using UV-curable adhesive (NOA81) as gluing material, which is applied using a novel "spin & roll" approach. Devices are characterized for the uniformity of the gluing layer, presence of glue in the microchannels, and alignment precision. Experiments on lipid bilayers with electrophysiological recordings using a model pore-forming polypeptide are demonstrated.

  6. Single-nucleotide-resolution DNA differentiation by pattern generation in lipid bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priegue, Juan M; Montenegro, Javier; Granja, Juan R

    2014-09-24

    Pattern generation/recognition in lipid bilayers is introduced for the differentiation of anionic biological relevant polymers. The amplification of the polymer differences during transport events allows the straightforward identification of a wide range collection of anionic polymers. The introduced approach displays excellent resolution even for single mutations in short single-stranded oligonuclotides. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Automatable lipid bilayer formation and ion channel measurement using sessile droplets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulos, J. L.; Portonovo, S. A.; Bang, H.; Schmidt, J. J.

    2010-11-01

    Artificial lipid bilayer membranes have been used to reconstitute ion channels for scientific and technological applications. Membrane formation has traditionally involved slow, labor intensive processes best suited to small scale laboratory experimentation. We have recently demonstrated a high throughput method of membrane formation using automated liquid-handling robotics. We describe here the integration of membrane formation and measurement with two methods compatible with automation and high throughput liquid-handling robotics. Both of these methods create artificial lipid bilayers by joining lipid monolayers self-assembled at the interface of aqueous and organic phases using sessile aqueous droplets in contact with a measurement electrode; one using a pin tool, commonly employed in high throughput fluid handling assays, and the other using a positive displacement pipette. Membranes formed with both methods were high quality and supported measurement of ion channels at the single molecule level. Full automation of bilayer production and measurement with the positive displacement pipette was demonstrated by integrating it with a motion control platform.

  8. Effects of ether vs. ester linkage on lipid bilayer structure and water permeability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guler, S Deren; Ghosh, D Dipon; Pan, Jianjun; Mathai, John C; Zeidel, Mark L; Nagle, John F; Tristram-Nagle, Stephanie

    2009-07-01

    The structure and water permeability of bilayers composed of the ether-linked lipid, dihexadecylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC), were studied and compared with the ester-linked lipid, dipalmitoylphosphaditdylcholine (DPPC). Wide angle X-ray scattering on oriented bilayers in the fluid phase indicate that the area per lipid A is slightly larger for DHPC than for DPPC. Low angle X-ray scattering yields A=65.1A(2) for DHPC at 48 degrees C. LAXS data provide the bending modulus, K(C)=4.2x10(-13)erg, and the Hamaker parameter H=7.2x10(-14)erg for the van der Waals attractive interaction between neighboring bilayers. For the low temperature phases with ordered hydrocarbon chains, we confirm the transition from a tilted L(beta') gel phase to an untilted, interdigitated L(beta)I phase as the sample hydrates at 20 degrees C. Our measurement of water permeability, P(f)=0.022cm/s at 48 degrees C for fluid phase DHPC is slightly smaller than that of DPPC (P(f)=0.027cm/s) at 50 degrees C, consistent with our triple slab theory of permeability.

  9. Partitioning of lysolipids, fatty acids and their mixtures in aqueous lipid bilayers: solute concentration/composition effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Jasmeet; Lai, Amy Jo; Alaee, Yasmin; Ranganathan, Radha

    2014-01-01

    Distributions of lysopalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (LPPC), palmitic acid (PA) and their 1:1 mixtures between water and dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer were determined using a fluorescence probe that selectively detects only the solutes in water. Water solute concentrations were obtained at each of several lipid concentrations. Dynamic Light Scattering experiments confirmed that the lipid/solute aggregates were vesicles in the concentration range investigated. Lipid concentration dependence of the solute component in water was fit to a thermodynamic model of solute distribution between two coexisting solvents. Water/bilayer partition coefficient and the free energy of transfer, for each of these solutes were determined from the fit. Main findings are: (1) Water/bilayer partition coefficient of solute is greater for 2 to 10% solute mole fraction than for 0 to 2%, signaling solute induced bilayer perturbation that increases bilayer solubility, beginning at 2% solute mole fraction. (2) Partition coefficients are in the order LPPCsolute solubility in the bilayer-gel phase and lack of it in the bilayer-liquid phase when LPPC and PA are present together. Implications of the solute concentration/composition and bilayer phase dependences of the partition coefficients to the reported solute induced enhancements in transmembrane permeability are discussed. © 2013.

  10. Asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in a highly curved bilayer revealed by a small angle neutron scattering technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakuma, Y.; Urakami, N.; Taniguchi, T.; Imai, M.

    2011-07-01

    We have investigated the lipid sorting in a binary small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) composed of cone-shaped (1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DHPC) and cylinder-shaped (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DPPC) lipids. In order to reveal the lipid sorting we adopted a contrast matching technique of small angle neutron scattering (SANS), which extracts the distribution of deuterated lipids in the bilayer quantitatively without steric modification of lipids as in fluorescence probe techniques. First the SANS profile of protonated SUVs at a film contrast condition showed that SUVs have a spherical shape with an inner radius of 190 Å and a bilayer thickness of 40 Å. The SANS profile of deuterated SUVs at a contrast matching condition showed a characteristic scattering profile, indicating an asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer. The characteristic profile was described well by a spherical bilayer model. The fitting revealed that most DHPC molecules are localized in the outer leaflet. Thus the shape of the lipid is strongly coupled with the membrane curvature. We compared the obtained asymmetric distribution of the cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer with the theoretical prediction based on the curvature energy model.

  11. Asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in a highly curved bilayer revealed by a small angle neutron scattering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakuma, Y; Imai, M [Department of Physics, Ochanomizu University, Bunkyo, Tokyo 112-8610 (Japan); Urakami, N [Department of Physics and Information Sciences, Yamaguchi University, Yamaguchi 753-8512 (Japan); Taniguchi, T, E-mail: imai@phys.ocha.ac.jp [Department of Chemical Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8510 (Japan)

    2011-07-20

    We have investigated the lipid sorting in a binary small unilamellar vesicle (SUV) composed of cone-shaped (1,2-dihexanoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DHPC) and cylinder-shaped (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine: DPPC) lipids. In order to reveal the lipid sorting we adopted a contrast matching technique of small angle neutron scattering (SANS), which extracts the distribution of deuterated lipids in the bilayer quantitatively without steric modification of lipids as in fluorescence probe techniques. First the SANS profile of protonated SUVs at a film contrast condition showed that SUVs have a spherical shape with an inner radius of 190 A and a bilayer thickness of 40 A. The SANS profile of deuterated SUVs at a contrast matching condition showed a characteristic scattering profile, indicating an asymmetric distribution of cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer. The characteristic profile was described well by a spherical bilayer model. The fitting revealed that most DHPC molecules are localized in the outer leaflet. Thus the shape of the lipid is strongly coupled with the membrane curvature. We compared the obtained asymmetric distribution of the cone-shaped lipids in the bilayer with the theoretical prediction based on the curvature energy model.

  12. Structure and Dynamics of Glycosphingolipids in Lipid Bilayers: Insights from Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronak Y. Patel

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Glycolipids are important constituents of biological membranes, and understanding their structure and dynamics in lipid bilayers provides insights into their physiological and pathological roles. Experimental techniques have provided details into their behavior at model and biological membranes; however, computer simulations are needed to gain atomic level insights. This paper summarizes the insights obtained from MD simulations into the conformational and orientational dynamics of glycosphingolipids and their exposure, hydration, and hydrogen-bonding interactions in membrane environment. The organization of glycosphingolipids in raft-like membranes and their modulation of lipid membrane structure are also reviewed.

  13. Hydrogel Micro-/Nanosphere Coated by a Lipid Bilayer: Preparation and Microscopic Probing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Rahni

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The result of polymeric nanogels and lipid vesicles interaction—lipobeads—can be considered as multipurpose containers for future therapeutic applications, such as targeted anticancer chemotherapy with superior tumor response and minimum side effects. In this work, micrometer sized lipobeads were synthesized by two methods: (i mixing separately prepared microgels made of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide (PNIPA and phospholipid vesicles of micrometer or nanometer size and (ii polymerization within the lipid vesicles. For the first time, a high vacuum scanning electron microscopy was shown to be suitable for a quick validation of the structural organization of wet lipobeads and their constituents without special sample preparation. In particular, the structural difference of microgels prepared by thermal and UV-polymerization in different solvents was revealed and three types of giant liposomes were recognized under high vacuum in conjunction with their size, composition, and method of preparation. Importantly, the substructure of the hydrogel core and multi- and unilamellar constructions of the peripheral lipid part were explicitly distinguished on the SEM images of lipobeads, justifying the spontaneous formation of a lipid bilayer on the surface of microgels and evidencing an energetically favorable structural organization of the hydrogel/lipid bilayer assembly. This key property can facilitate lipobeads’ preparation and decrease technological expenses on their scaled production. The comparison of the SEM imaging with the scanning confocal and atomic force microscopies data are also presented in the discussion.

  14. Neutron reflectivity studies of single lipid bilayers supported on planar substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krueger, S.; Orts, W.J.; Berk, N.F.; Majkrzak, C.F. [National Inst. of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States); Koenig, B.W. [National Inst. of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Neutron reflectivity was used to probe the structure of single phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers adsorbed onto a planar silicon surface in an aqueous environment. Fluctuations in the neutron scattering length density profiles perpendicular to the silicon/water interface were determined for different lipids as a function of the hydrocarbon chain length. The lipids were studied in both the gel and liquid crystalline phases by monitoring changes in the specularly-reflected neutron intensity as a function of temperature. Contrast variation of the neutron scattering length density was applied to both the lipid and the solvent. Scattering length density profiles were determined using both model-independent and model-dependent fitting methods. During the reflectivity measurements, a novel experimental set-up was implemented to decrease the incoherent background scattering due to the solvent. Thus, the reflectivity was measured to Q {approx} 0.3{Angstrom}{sup -1}, covering up to seven orders of magnitude in reflected intensity, for PC bilayers in D{sub 2}O and silicon-matched (38% D{sub 2}O/62% H{sub 2}O) water. The kinetics of lipid adsorption at the silicon/water interface were also explored by observing changes in the reflectivity at low Q values under silicon-matched water conditions.

  15. Lipid Bilayers Are Long-Lived on Solvent Cleaned Plasma-Oxidized poly(dimethylsiloxane (ox-PDMS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K M Rifat Faysal

    Full Text Available Although it is well known that phospholipids self-assemble on hydrophilic plasma-oxidized PMDS surfaces (ox-PDMS to form cell membrane mimetic bilayers, the temporal stability of phospholipid membranes on these surfaces is unknown. Here we report that phospholipid bilayers remain stable on solvent-cleaned ox-PDMS for at least 132 hours after preparation. Absent solvent cleaning, the bilayers were stable for only 36 hours. We characterized the phospholipid bilayers, i through quantitative comparative analysis of the fluorescence intensity of phospholipid bilayers on ox-PDMS and phospholipid monolayers on native PDMS and, ii through measurements of the diffusive mobility of the lipids through fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP. The fluorescence intensity of the phospholipid layer remained consistent with that of a bilayer for 132 hours. The evolution of the diffusive mobility of the phospholipids in the bilayer on ox-PDMS over time was similar to lipids in control bilayers prepared on glass surfaces. Solvent cleaning was essential for the long-term stability of the bilayers on ox-PDMS. Without cleaning in acetone and isopropanol, phospholipid bilayers prepared on ox-PDMS surfaces peeled off in large patches within 36 hours. Importantly, we find that phospholipid bilayers supported on solvent-cleaned ox-PDMS were indistinguishable from phospholipid bilayers supported on glass for at least 36 hours after preparation. Our results provide a link between the two common surfaces used to prepare in vitro biomimetic phospholipid membranes-i glass surfaces used predominantly in fundamental biophysical experiments, for which there is abundant physicochemical information, with ii ox-PDMS, the dominant material used in practical, applications-oriented systems to build micro-devices, topographically-patterned surfaces, and biosensors where there is a dearth of information.

  16. Rab18 promotes lipid droplet (LD) growth by tethering the ER to LDs through SNARE and NRZ interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Dijin; Li, Yuqi; Wu, Lizhen; Li, Ying; Zhao, Dongyu; Yu, Jinhai; Huang, Tuozhi; Ferguson, Charles; Parton, Robert G; Yang, Hongyuan; Li, Peng

    2018-01-24

    Lipid incorporation from endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to lipid droplet (LD) is important in controlling LD growth and intracellular lipid homeostasis. However, the molecular link mediating ER and LD cross talk remains elusive. Here, we identified Rab18 as an important Rab guanosine triphosphatase in controlling LD growth and maturation. Rab18 deficiency resulted in a drastically reduced number of mature LDs and decreased lipid storage, and was accompanied by increased ER stress. Rab3GAP1/2, the GEF of Rab18, promoted LD growth by activating and targeting Rab18 to LDs. LD-associated Rab18 bound specifically to the ER-associated NAG-RINT1-ZW10 (NRZ) tethering complex and their associated SNAREs (Syntaxin18, Use1, BNIP1), resulting in the recruitment of ER to LD and the formation of direct ER-LD contact. Cells with defects in the NRZ/SNARE complex function showed reduced LD growth and lipid storage. Overall, our data reveal that the Rab18-NRZ-SNARE complex is critical protein machinery for tethering ER-LD and establishing ER-LD contact to promote LD growth. © 2018 Xu et al.

  17. Interaction of alpha-latroinsectotoxin from Latrodectus mactans venom with bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatursky OYa; Pashkov, V N; Bulgacov, O V; Grishin, E V

    1995-01-26

    alpha-Latroinsectotoxin (LIT) from Latrodectus mactans venom increased the conductance of bilayer lipid membranes (BLM) by inducing channel like activity. The channels formed had a maximal single channel conductance of 5 pS in 10 mM CaCl2 solution. This process occurred more rapidly in symmetrical 10 mM CaCl2 solution than in equimolar KCl or NaCl. The LIT induced conductance showed pronounced rectification, that was dependent upon the face of the BLM to which the LIT was applied. This suggests that the LIT molecules incorporate into the bilayer lipid membrane in an oriented manner. The ion channels formed in bilayer phospholipid membrane by LIT are cation selective. The permeability of divalent cations decreased in the order Ba2+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > Cd2+ > Zn2+ (Zn2+ and Cd2+ blocked effectively LIT channels with the ratio of Ca2+trans and Cd2+cis or Zn2+cis of 1:1). Selectivity of LIT to monovalent cations was not high and was Ca2+ sensitive. Our data suggest that LIT has at least two Ca(2+)-binding sites, a high affinity site and low one (pK of binding is 2.4). As a result, the binding kinetics of Ca2+ with the toxin shows a high positive cooperativity (Hill coefficient, (h) = 5.95) and that dimerization might be a prerequisite to channel formation. Temperature dependence of conductance of LIT treated lipid bilayers in 100 mM KCl and 10 mM CaCl2 solutions was also determined: 18.9 +/- 2.11 kJ/mol and 28.537 +/- 1.678 kJ/mol, respectively.

  18. SNARE-mediated Fusion of Single Proteoliposomes with Tethered Supported Bilayers in a Microfluidic Flow Cell Monitored by Polarized TIRF Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolaus, Joerg; Karatekin, Erdem

    2016-08-24

    In the ubiquitous process of membrane fusion the opening of a fusion pore establishes the first connection between two formerly separate compartments. During neurotransmitter or hormone release via exocytosis, the fusion pore can transiently open and close repeatedly, regulating cargo release kinetics. Pore dynamics also determine the mode of vesicle recycling; irreversible resealing results in transient, "kiss-and-run" fusion, whereas dilation leads to full fusion. To better understand what factors govern pore dynamics, we developed an assay to monitor membrane fusion using polarized total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy with single molecule sensitivity and ~15 msec time resolution in a biochemically well-defined in vitro system. Fusion of fluorescently labeled small unilamellar vesicles containing v-SNARE proteins (v-SUVs) with a planar bilayer bearing t-SNAREs, supported on a soft polymer cushion (t-SBL, t-supported bilayer), is monitored. The assay uses microfluidic flow channels that ensure minimal sample consumption while supplying a constant density of SUVs. Exploiting the rapid signal enhancement upon transfer of lipid labels from the SUV to the SBL during fusion, kinetics of lipid dye transfer is monitored. The sensitivity of TIRF microscopy allows tracking single fluorescent lipid labels, from which lipid diffusivity and SUV size can be deduced for every fusion event. Lipid dye release times can be much longer than expected for unimpeded passage through permanently open pores. Using a model that assumes retardation of lipid release is due to pore flickering, a pore "openness", the fraction of time the pore remains open during fusion, can be estimated. A soluble marker can be encapsulated in the SUVs for simultaneous monitoring of lipid and soluble cargo release. Such measurements indicate some pores may reseal after losing a fraction of the soluble cargo.

  19. Position and orientation of gallated proanthocyanidins in lipid bilayer membranes: influence of polymerization degree and linkage type.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Khalifa, Ibrahim; Peng, Jinming; Li, Chunmei

    2017-08-31

    It is well known that the biological activity of gallated proanthocyanidins (PAs) is highly structure-dependent. Polymerization degree (DP) and linkage types affect their biological activity greatly. Positions and orientations of gallated PAs in lipid bilayer reveal their structure-function activity at the molecular level. The present work aimed at determining the locations and orientations of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) and its derivatives: A-type and B-type EGCG dimers and trimers in 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine (POPC) and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE) lipid bilayer via molecular dynamic (MD) simulations. The results showed that EGCG and its derivatives localized in the lipid bilayer or on the bilayer/water interface. Their penetration depths and orientations depended on both DP and linkage types. The penetration depths decreased with the increase of DP, sequencing to be EGCG > EGCG dimers > EGCG trimers. Spatially stretched A-type PAs could form more hydrogen bonds (H-bonds) with deep oxygen atoms of lipid bilayer and have higher affinity to the lipid bilayer than B-type PAs. Our results will provide an explicit evidence for PAs' distinct biological activities.

  20. Structure and orientation of dynorphin bound to lipid bilayers by 13C solid-state NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uezono, Takiko; Toraya, Shuichi; Obata, Maki; Nishimura, Katsuyuki; Tuzi, Satoru; Saitô, Hazime; Naito, Akira

    2005-07-01

    Secondary structure and orientation of dynorphin bound to dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayer were investigated by solid-state 13C NMR spectroscopy. For this purpose, 13C NMR spectra of the site-specifically 13C-labeled dynorphin were measured in the membrane-bound state under static, magic angle spinning (MAS), and slow MAS conditions. In the static experiment, magnetically oriented vesicle system (MOVS) induced by dynorphin was successfully used to investigate the orientation of dynorphin bound to the lipid bilayers. It was found that dynorphin adopts an α-helical structure in the N-terminus from Gly 2 to Leu 5 by analyses of the isotropic chemical shifts obtained from the MAS experiments. In contrast, it adopts disordered conformations from the center to the C-terminus and is located on the membrane surface. The static 13C NMR spectra indicated that MOVS-bound dynorphin was oriented to the magnetic field and rotated rapidly about the bilayer normal. Subsequently, we analyzed the 13C chemical shift tensors of carbonyl carbons in the peptide backbone by considering the rotational motion of the N-terminal α-helix. It was revealed that the N-terminal α-helix is inserted into the membrane with the tilt angle of 21° to the bilayer normal. This structure suggests a possibility that dynorphin interacts with the extracellular loop II of the κ-receptor through a helix-helix interaction.

  1. 2D lattice model of a lipid bilayer: Microscopic derivation and thermodynamic exploration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakobyan, Davit; Heuer, Andreas

    2017-02-01

    Based on all-atom Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations of a lipid bilayer we present a systematic mapping on a 2D lattice model. Keeping the lipid type and the chain order parameter as key variables we derive a free energy functional, containing the enthalpic interaction of adjacent lipids as well as the tail entropy. The functional form of both functions is explicitly determined for saturated and polyunsaturated lipids. By studying the lattice model via Monte Carlo simulations it is possible to reproduce the temperature dependence of the distribution of order parameters of the pure lipids, including the prediction of the gel transition. Furthermore, application to a mixture of saturated and polyunsaturated lipids yields the correct phase separation behavior at lower temperatures with a simulation time reduced by approximately 7 orders of magnitude as compared to the corresponding MD simulations. Even the time-dependence of the de-mixing is reproduced on a semi-quantitative level. Due to the generality of the approach we envisage a large number of further applications, ranging from modeling larger sets of lipids, sterols, and solvent proteins to predicting nucleation barriers for the melting of lipids. Particularly, from the properties of the 2D lattice model one can directly read off the enthalpy and entropy change of the 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine gel-to-liquid transition in excellent agreement with experimental and MD results.

  2. Thin-film silica sol-gels doped with ion responsive fluorescent lipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sasaki, D.Y.; Shea, L.E.; Sinclair, M.B.

    1999-01-12

    A metal ion sensitive, fluorescent lipid-b i layer material (5oA PSIDA/DSPC) was successfully immobilized in a silica matrix using a tetramethoxysilane (TMOS) sol-gel procedure. The sol-gel immobilization method was quantitative in the entrapment of seif-assembled Iipid-bilayers and yielded thin films for facile configuration to optical fiber piatforms. The silica matrix was compatible with the solvent sensitive lipid bilayers and provided physical stabilization as well as biological protection. Immobilization in the silica sol-gel produced an added benefit of improving the bilayer's metal ion sensitivity by up to two orders of magnitude. This enhanced performance was attributed to a preconcentrator effect from the anionic surface of the silica matrix. Thin gels (193 micron thickness) were coupled to a bifurcated fiber optic bundle to produce a metal ion sensor probe. Response times of 10 - 15 minutes to 0.1 M CUCIZ were realized with complete regeneration of the sensor using an ethylenediarninetetraacetic acid (EDTA) solution.

  3. Molecular Dynamics Simulation Study of Permeation of Molecules through Skin Lipid Bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Rakesh; Sridhar, D B; Rai, Beena

    2016-09-01

    Stratum Corneum (SC), the outermost layer of skin, is mainly responsible for skin's barrier function. The complex lipid matrix of SC determines these barrier properties. In this study, the lipid matrix is modeled as an equimolar mixture of ceramide (CER), cholesterol (CHOL), and free fatty acid (FFA). The permeation of water, oxygen, ethanol, acetic acid, urea, butanol, benzene, dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO), toluene, phenol, styrene, and ethylbenzene across this layer is studied using a constrained MD simulations technique. Several long constrained simulations are performed at a skin temperature of 310 K under NPT conditions. The free energy profiles and diffusion coefficients along the bilayer normal have been calculated for each molecule. Permeability coefficients are also calculated and compared with experimental data. The main resistance for the permeation of hydrophilic and hydrophobic permeants has been found to be in the interior of the lipid bilayer and near the lipid-water interface, respectively. The obtained permeability is found to be a few orders of magnitude higher than experimental values for hydrophilic molecules while for hydrophobic molecules more discrepancy was observed. Overall, the qualitative ranking is consistent with the experiments.

  4. GABA_A receptor function is regulated by lipid bilayer elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard, Rikke; Werge, Thomas; Berthelsen, Camilla

    2006-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid ( DHA) and other polyunsaturated fatty acids ( PUFAs) promote GABA(A) receptor [ (3)H]-muscimol binding, and DHA increases the rate of GABAA receptor desensitization. Triton X-100, a structurally unrelated amphiphile, similarly promotes [ (3)H]-muscimol binding. The mechanism......( s) underlying these effects are poorly understood. DHA and Triton X-100, at concentrations that affect GABAA receptor function, increase the elasticity of lipid bilayers measured as decreased bilayer stiffness using gramicidin channels as molecular force transducers. We have previously shown......-beta-glucoside, capsaicin, and DHA) on GABAA receptor function in mammalian cells. All the compounds promoted GABAA receptor [ (3)H]-muscimol binding by increasing the binding capacity of high- affinity binding without affecting the associated equilibrium binding constant. A semiquantitative analysis found a similar...

  5. Squalane is in the midplane of the lipid bilayer: implications for its function as a proton permeability barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hauss, Thomas; Dante, Silvia; Dencher, Norbert A; Haines, Thomas H

    2002-12-02

    A recently proposed model for proton leakage across biological membranes [Prog. Lipid Res. 40 (2001) 299] suggested that hydrocarbons specifically in the center of the lipid bilayer inhibit proton leaks. Since cellular membranes maintain a proton electrochemical gradient as a principal energy transducer, proton leakage unproductively consumes cellular energy. Hydrocarbons in the bilayer are widespread in membranes that sustain such gradients. The alkaliphiles are unique in that they contain up to 40 mol% isoprenes in their membranes including 10-11 mol% squalene [J. Bacteriol. 168 (1986) 334]. Squalene is a polyisoprene hydrocarbon without polar groups. Localizing hydrocarbons in lipid bilayers has not been trivial. A myriad of physical methods including fluorescence spectroscopy, electron-spin resonance, nuclear magnetic resonance as well as X-ray and neutron diffraction have been used to explore this question with various degrees of success and often contradictory results. Seeking unambiguous evidence for the localization of squalene in membranes or lipid bilayers, we employed neutron diffraction. We incorporated 10 mol% perdeuterated or protonated squalane, an isosteric analogue of squalene, into stacked bilayers of dioleoyl phosphatidyl choline (DOPC) doped with dioleoyl phosphatidyl glycerol (DOPG) to simulate the negative charges found on natural membranes. The neutron diffraction data clearly show that the squalane lies predominantly in the bilayer center, parallel to the plane of the membrane.

  6. Real-time electrical detection of the formation and destruction of lipid bilayers on silicon nanowire devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elissa H. Williams

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Silicon nanowire (Si NW two-terminal devices were fabricated to electrically probe the real-time formation and destruction of lipid bilayers. A liposome solution, containing the same ratio of zwitterionic/anionic lipids that are present in an Escherichia coli cell membrane, was applied to the NW devices. Lipid bilayer formation on the Si NWs was detected in-situ by observing electrical resistance changes complemented by confocal fluorescence microscopy imaging. The formation of lipid bilayers resulted in a 1% to 2% decrease in device current, consistent with the negative gating effect of the lipids on the NW surface. The devices demonstrated a ≈ 1 min electrical response time to lipid encapsulation. Removal of the lipid layer was achieved by exposing the devices to a detergent, which resulted in NW conductance returning to its original value with a ≈ 2 min recovery time. The lipid bilayer coated Si NWs demonstrate a novel platform to enable in-situ electrical probing of bacterial cell membrane mechanisms, interactions, and reactions.

  7. Exploring the Effects on Lipid Bilayer Induced by Noble Gases via Molecular Dynamics Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Junlang; Chen, Liang; Wang, Yu; Wang, Xiaogang; Zeng, Songwei

    2015-11-25

    Noble gases seem to have no significant effect on the anesthetic targets due to their simple, spherical shape. However, xenon has strong narcotic efficacy and can be used clinically, while other noble gases cannot. The mechanism remains unclear. Here, we performed molecular dynamics simulations on phospholipid bilayers with four kinds of noble gases to elucidate the difference of their effects on the membrane. Our results showed that the sequence of effects on membrane exerted by noble gases from weak to strong was Ne, Ar, Kr and Xe, the same order as their relative narcotic potencies as well as their lipid/water partition percentages. Compared with the other three kinds of noble gases, more xenon molecules were distributed between the lipid tails and headgroups, resulting in membrane's lateral expansion and lipid tail disorder. It may contribute to xenon's strong anesthetic potency. The results are well consistent with the membrane mediated mechanism of general anesthesia.

  8. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-08-01

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far been capable of mapping surface charge densities under physiologically relevant conditions. Here, we use a scanning nanopipette setup (scanning ion-conductance microscope) combined with a novel algorithm to investigate the surface conductivity near supported lipid bilayers, and we present a new approach, quantitative surface conductivity microscopy (QSCM), capable of mapping surface charge density with high-quantitative precision and nanoscale resolution. The method is validated through an extensive theoretical analysis of the ionic current at the nanopipette tip, and we demonstrate the capacity of QSCM by mapping the surface charge density of model cationic, anionic and zwitterionic lipids with results accurately matching theoretical values.

  9. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-08-26

    Local surface charge density of lipid membranes influences membrane-protein interactions leading to distinct functions in all living cells, and it is a vital parameter in understanding membrane-binding mechanisms, liposome design and drug delivery. Despite the significance, no method has so far been capable of mapping surface charge densities under physiologically relevant conditions. Here, we use a scanning nanopipette setup (scanning ion-conductance microscope) combined with a novel algorithm to investigate the surface conductivity near supported lipid bilayers, and we present a new approach, quantitative surface conductivity microscopy (QSCM), capable of mapping surface charge density with high-quantitative precision and nanoscale resolution. The method is validated through an extensive theoretical analysis of the ionic current at the nanopipette tip, and we demonstrate the capacity of QSCM by mapping the surface charge density of model cationic, anionic and zwitterionic lipids with results accurately matching theoretical values.

  10. Coupling Optical and Electrical Measurements in Artificial Membranes: Lateral Diffusion of Lipids and Channel Forming Peptides in Planar Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duclohier H

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Planar lipid bilayers (PLB were prepared by the Montal-Mueller technique in a FRAP system designed to simultaneously measure conductivity across, and lateral diffusion of, the bilayer. In the first stage of the project the FRAP system was used to characterise the lateral dynamics of bilayer lipids with regards to phospholipid composition (headgroup, chain unsaturation etc., presence of cholesterol and the effect of divalent cations on negatively-charged bilayers. In the second stage of the project, lateral diffusion of two fluorescently-labelled voltage-dependent pore-forming peptides (alamethicin and S4s from Shaker K+ channel was determined at rest and in the conducting state. This study demonstrates the feasibility of such experiments with PLBs, amenable to physical constraints, and thus offers new opportunities for systematic studies of structure-function relationships in membrane-associating molecules.

  11. Specific DNA duplex formation at an artificial lipid bilayer: towards a new DNA biosensor technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werz, Emma; Korneev, Sergei; Montilla-Martinez, Malayko; Wagner, Richard; Hemmler, Roland; Walter, Claudius; Eisfeld, Jörg; Gall, Karsten; Rosemeyer, Helmut

    2012-02-01

    A novel technique is described which comprises a base-specific DNA duplex formation at a lipid bilayer-H(2) O-phase boundary layer. Two different probes of oligonucleotides both carrying a double-tailed lipid at the 5'-terminus were incorporated into stable artificial lipid bilayers separating two compartments (cis/trans-channel) of an optically transparent microfluidic sample carrier with perfusion capabilities. Both the cis- and trans-channels are filled with saline buffer. Injection of a cyanine-5-labeled target DNA sequence, which is complementary to only one of the oligonucleotide probes, into the cis-channel, followed by a thorough perfusion, leads to an immobilization of the labeled complementary oligonucleotide on the membrane as detected by single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy. In the case of fluorescent but non-complementary DNA sequences, no immobilized fluorescent oligonucleotide duplex could be detected on the membrane. This clearly verifies a specific duplex formation at the membrane interface. Copyright © 2012 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  12. Micrometer-Scale Membrane Transition of Supported Lipid Bilayer Membrane Reconstituted with Cytosol of Dictyostelium discoideum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Takahashi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: The transformation of the supported lipid bilayer (SLB membrane by extracted cytosol from living resources, has recently drawn much attention. It enables us to address the question of whether the purified phospholipid SLB membrane, including lipids related to amoeba locomotion, which was discussed in many previous studies, exhibits membrane deformation in the presence of cytosol extracted from amoeba; Methods: In this report, a method for reconstituting a supported lipid bilayer (SLB membrane, composed of purified phospholipids and cytosol extracted from Dictyostelium discoideum, is described. This technique is a new reconstitution method combining the artificial constitution of membranes with the reconstitution using animate cytosol (without precise purification at a molecular level, contributing to membrane deformation analysis; Results: The morphology transition of a SLB membrane composed of phosphatidylcholines, after the addition of cytosolic extract, was traced using a confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope. As a result, pore formation in the SLB membrane was observed and phosphatidylinositides incorporated into the SLB membrane tended to suppress pore formation and expansion; Conclusions: The current findings imply that phosphatidylinositides have the potential to control cytoplasm activity and bind to a phosphoinositide-containing SLB membrane.

  13. Stochastic transport through carbon nanotubes in lipid bilayers and live cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Jia; Kim, Kyunghoon; Zhang, Jianfei; Escalada, Artur; Tunuguntla, Ramya; Comolli, Luis R; Allen, Frances I; Shnyrova, Anna V; Cho, Kang Rae; Munoz, Dayannara; Wang, Y Morris; Grigoropoulos, Costas P; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M; Frolov, Vadim A; Noy, Aleksandr

    2014-10-30

    There is much interest in developing synthetic analogues of biological membrane channels with high efficiency and exquisite selectivity for transporting ions and molecules. Bottom-up and top-down methods can produce nanopores of a size comparable to that of endogenous protein channels, but replicating their affinity and transport properties remains challenging. In principle, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) should be an ideal membrane channel platform: they exhibit excellent transport properties and their narrow hydrophobic inner pores mimic structural motifs typical of biological channels. Moreover, simulations predict that CNTs with a length comparable to the thickness of a lipid bilayer membrane can self-insert into the membrane. Functionalized CNTs have indeed been found to penetrate lipid membranes and cell walls, and short tubes have been forced into membranes to create sensors, yet membrane transport applications of short CNTs remain underexplored. Here we show that short CNTs spontaneously insert into lipid bilayers and live cell membranes to form channels that exhibit a unitary conductance of 70-100 picosiemens under physiological conditions. Despite their structural simplicity, these 'CNT porins' transport water, protons, small ions and DNA, stochastically switch between metastable conductance substates, and display characteristic macromolecule-induced ionic current blockades. We also show that local channel and membrane charges can control the conductance and ion selectivity of the CNT porins, thereby establishing these nanopores as a promising biomimetic platform for developing cell interfaces, studying transport in biological channels, and creating stochastic sensors.

  14. Engineered-membranes: a novel concept for clustering of native lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patchornik, Guy; Namboothiri, Irishi N N; Nair, Divya K; Wachtel, Ellen; Cohen, Sidney R; Friedman, Noga; Sheves, Mordechai

    2012-12-15

    A strategy for clustering of native lipid membranes is presented. It relies on the formation of complexes between hydrophobic chelators embedded within the lipid bilayer and metal cations in the aqueous phase, capable of binding two (or more) chelators simultaneously Fig. 1. We used this approach with purple membranes containing the light driven proton pump protein bacteriorhodopsin (bR) and showed that patches of purple membranes cluster into mm sized aggregates and that these are stable for months when incubated at 19°C in the dark. The strategy may be general since four different hydrophobic chelators (1,10-phenanthroline, bathophenanthroline, Phen-C10, and 8-hydroxyquinoline) and various divalent cations (Ni(2+), Zn(2+), Cd(2+), Mn(2+), and Cu(2+)) induced formation of membrane clusters. Moreover, the absolute requirement for a hydrophobic chelator and the appropriate metal cations was demonstrated with light and atomic force microscopy (AFM); the presence of the metal does not appear to affect the functional state of the protein. The potential utility of the approach as an alternative to assembled lipid bilayers is suggested. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Under the influence of alcohol: the effect of ethanol and methanol on lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patra, Michael; Salonen, Emppu; Terama, Emma; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Faller, Roland; Lee, Bryan W; Holopainen, Juha; Karttunen, Mikko

    2006-02-15

    Extensive microscopic molecular dynamics simulations have been performed to study the effects of short-chain alcohols, methanol and ethanol, on two different fully hydrated lipid bilayer systems (POPC and DPPC) in the fluid phase at 323 K. It is found that ethanol has a stronger effect on the structural properties of the membranes. In particular, the bilayers become more fluid and permeable: ethanol molecules are able to penetrate through the membrane in typical timescales of approximately 200 ns, whereas for methanol that timescale is considerably longer, at least of the order of microseconds. A closer examination exposes a number of effects due to ethanol. Hydrogen-bonding analysis reveals that a large fraction of ethanols is involved in hydrogen bonds with lipids. This in turn is intimately coupled to the ordering of hydrocarbon chains: we find that binding to an ethanol decreases the order of the chains. We have also determined the dependence of lipid-chain ordering on ethanol concentration and found that to be nonmonotonous. Overall, we find good agreement with NMR and micropipette studies.

  16. Permeation of the three aromatic dipeptides through lipid bilayers: Experimental and computational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Brent L.; Kuczera, Krzysztof; Middaugh, C. Russell; Jas, Gouri S.

    2016-06-01

    The time-resolved parallel artificial membrane permeability assay with fluorescence detection and comprehensive computer simulations are used to study the passive permeation of three aromatic dipeptides - N-acetyl-phenylalanineamide (NAFA), N-acetyltyrosineamide (NAYA), and N-acetyl-tryptophanamide (NATA) through a 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer. Measured permeation times and permeability coefficients show fastest translocation for NAFA, slowest for NAYA, and intermediate for NATA under physiological temperature and pH. Computationally, we perform umbrella sampling simulations to model the structure, dynamics, and interactions of the peptides as a function of z, the distance from lipid bilayer. The calculated profiles of the potential of mean force show two strong effects - preferential binding of each of the three peptides to the lipid interface and large free energy barriers in the membrane center. We use several approaches to calculate the position-dependent translational diffusion coefficients D(z), including one based on numerical solution the Smoluchowski equation. Surprisingly, computed D(z) values change very little with reaction coordinate and are also quite similar for the three peptides studied. In contrast, calculated values of sidechain rotational correlation times τrot(z) show extremely large changes with peptide membrane insertion - values become 100 times larger in the headgroup region and 10 times larger at interface and in membrane center, relative to solution. The peptides' conformational freedom becomes systematically more restricted as they enter the membrane, sampling α and β and C7eq basins in solution, α and C7eq at the interface, and C7eq only in the center. Residual waters of solvation remain around the peptides even in the membrane center. Overall, our study provides an improved microscopic understanding of passive peptide permeation through membranes, especially on the sensitivity of rotational diffusion

  17. Linking lipid architecture to bilayer structure and mechanics using self-consistent field modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pera, H; Kleijn, J M; Leermakers, F A M

    2014-02-14

    To understand how lipid architecture determines the lipid bilayer structure and its mechanics, we implement a molecularly detailed model that uses the self-consistent field theory. This numerical model accurately predicts parameters such as Helfrichs mean and Gaussian bending modulus kc and k̄ and the preferred monolayer curvature J(0)(m), and also delivers structural membrane properties like the core thickness, and head group position and orientation. We studied how these mechanical parameters vary with system variations, such as lipid tail length, membrane composition, and those parameters that control the lipid tail and head group solvent quality. For the membrane composition, negatively charged phosphatidylglycerol (PG) or zwitterionic, phosphatidylcholine (PC), and -ethanolamine (PE) lipids were used. In line with experimental findings, we find that the values of kc and the area compression modulus kA are always positive. They respond similarly to parameters that affect the core thickness, but differently to parameters that affect the head group properties. We found that the trends for k̄ and J(0)(m) can be rationalised by the concept of Israelachivili's surfactant packing parameter, and that both k̄ and J(0)(m) change sign with relevant parameter changes. Although typically k̄ 0, especially at low ionic strengths. We anticipate that these changes lead to unstable membranes as these become vulnerable to pore formation or disintegration into lipid disks.

  18. Kinetic Control of Histidine-Tagged Protein Surface Density on Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nye, Jeffrey A. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Groves, Jay T. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2008-02-28

    Nickel-chelating lipids are general tools for anchoring polyhistidine-tagged proteins to supported lipid bilayers (SLBs), but controversy exists over the stability of the protein-lipid attachment. In this study, we show that chelator lipids are suitable anchors for building stable, biologically active surfaces but that a simple Langmuirian model is insufficient to describe their behavior. Desorption kinetics from chelator lipids are governed by the valency of surface binding: monovalently bound proteins desorb within minutes (t1/2 ≈ 6 min), whereas polyvalently bound species remain bound for hours (t1/2 ≈ 12 h). Evolution between surface states is slow, so equilibrium is unlikely to be reached on experimental timescales. However, by tuning incubation conditions, the populations of each species can be kinetically controlled, providing a wide range of protein densities on SLBs with a single concentration of chelator lipid. In conclusion, we propose guidelines for the assembly of SLB surfaces functionalized with specific protein densities and demonstrate their utility in the formation of hybrid immunological synapses.

  19. α-Synuclein can inhibit SNARE-mediated vesicle fusion through direct interactions with lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeWitt, David C; Rhoades, Elizabeth

    2013-04-09

    The native function of α-synuclein is thought to involve regulation of synaptic vesicle trafficking. Recent work has also implicated a role in neurotransmission, possibly through interactions with the proteins involved in synaptic vesicle fusion. Here, we demonstrate that α-synuclein inhibits SNARE-mediated vesicle fusion through binding the membrane, without a direct interaction between α-synuclein and any of the SNARE proteins. This work supports a model in which α-synuclein plays a role in the regulation of vesicle fusion by modulating properties of the lipid bilayer.

  20. A Microscopic Interaction Model of Maximum Solubility of Cholesterol in Lipid Bilayers

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Juyang; Feigenson, Gerald.W.

    1999-01-01

    We recently reported the equilibrium maximum solubility of cholesterol in a lipid bilayer, chi*chol, to be 0.66 in four different phosphatidylcholines, and 0.51 in a phosphatidylethanolamine (Huang, J.,J.T. Buboltz, and G. W. Feigenson. 1999. Biochim. Biophys. Acta. in press). Here we present a model of cholesterol-phospholipid mixing that explains these observed values of chi*chol. Monte Carlo simulations show that pairwise-additivity of nearest-neighbor interactions is inadequate to describ...

  1. Mapping surface charge density of lipid bilayers by quantitative surface conductivity microscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Lasse Hyldgaard; Fuhs, Thomas; Dong, Mingdong

    2016-01-01

    been capable of mapping surface charge densities under physiologically relevant conditions. Here, we use a scanning nanopipette setup (scanning ion-conductance microscope) combined with a novel algorithm to investigate the surface conductivity near supported lipid bilayers, and we present a new...... approach, quantitative surface conductivity microscopy (QSCM), capable of mapping surface charge density with high-quantitative precision and nanoscale resolution. The method is validated through an extensive theoretical analysis of the ionic current at the nanopipette tip, and we demonstrate the capacity...

  2. Polarity-sensitive fluorescent probes in lipid bilayers: bridging spectroscopic behavior and microenvironment properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parisio, Giulia; Marini, Alberto; Biancardi, Alessandro; Ferrarini, Alberta; Mennucci, Benedetta

    2011-08-25

    We have studied the emission features of the fluorescent polarity-sensitive probes known as Prodan and Laurdan in a liquid-crystalline DPPC bilayer. To this purpose, we have combined high-level quantum mechanical electronic structure calculations with a molecular field theory for the positional-orientational-conformational distribution of the probes, in their ground and excited states, inside of the lipid bilayer, taking into account at both levels the nonuniformity and anisotropy of the environment. Thus, we can interpret the features of the fluorescence spectra of Prodan and Laurdan in relation to the position and orientation of their chromophore in the bilayer. We have found that the environment polarity is not sufficient to explain the large red shifts experimentally observed and that specific effects due to hydrogen bonding must be considered. We show that the orientation of the probe is important in determining the accessibility to water of the H-bond-acceptor group; in the case of Laurdan interesting conformational effects are highlighted. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  3. The Effect of Tethers on Artificial Cell Membranes: A Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Hoiles

    Full Text Available Tethered bilayer lipid membranes (tBLMs provide a stable platform for modeling the dynamics and order of biological membranes where the tethers mimic the cytoskeletal supports present in biological cell membranes. In this paper coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD is applied to study the effects of tethers on lipid membrane properties. Using results from the CGMD model and the overdamped Fokker-Planck equation, we show that the diffusion tensor and particle density of water in the tBLM is spatially dependent. Further, it is shown that the membrane thickness, lipid diffusion, defect density, free energy of lipid flip-flop, and membrane dielectric permittivity are all dependent on the tether density. The numerically computed results from the CGMD model are in agreement with the experimentally measured results from tBLMs containing different tether densities and lipids derived from Archaebacteria. Additionally, using experimental measurements from Escherichia coli bacteria and Saccharomyces Cerevisiae yeast tethered membranes, we illustrate how previous molecular dynamics results can be combined with the proposed model to estimate the dielectric permittivity and defect density of these membranes as a function of tether density.

  4. Direct observation of lipid domains in free standing bilayers: from simple to complex lipid mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis A

    2003-01-01

    reported from our laboratory, regarding the direct observation of lipid domain coexistence at the level of single vesicles in artificial and natural lipid mixtures. In addition, key points concerning our experimental approach will be discussed. The unique advantages of the fluorescent probe 6-dodecanoyl-2......The direct observation of temperature-dependent lipid phase equilibria, using two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy on giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) composed of different lipid mixtures, provides novel information about the physical characteristics of lipid domain coexistence. Physical......-dimethylamino-naphthalene (LAURDAN) under the two-photon excitation fluorescence microscopy will be particularly addressed, especially, the possibility to obtain information about the phase-state of different lipid domains directly from the fluorescent images. Udgivelsesdato: 2003-Jan...

  5. Supercritical angle fluorescence as a tool to study the interaction between lipid bilayer and peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubois, Valentin; Serrano, Diana; Seeger, Stefan

    2017-06-01

    The understanding of processes occurring at the interface between two media are of prior importance in various fields of research, from material sciences to biology. A custom-made microscope objective based on the supercritical angle technique was developed in our group, allowing to probe these interfacial events by carrying out surface-sensitive and low invasive spectroscopy of aqueous samples. A biological example of particular interest is the comprehension of neurodegenerative diseases which seem caused by the interaction of specific peptides with the membrane of the neurons. Taking advantage of our optical setup, we used supercritical angle fluorescence spectroscopy to specifically monitor the interaction between a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) and the Amyloid β peptide, notably responsible of the Alzheimer disease. Different forms of the peptide (40 and 42 amino acids composition) were tested and the interfacial fluorescence measured to get information about the lipid integrity and mobility. The adsorption of the peptide was also characterized in terms of kinetic and affinity.

  6. Photoproduction of proton gradients with pi-stacked fluorophore scaffolds in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhosale, Sheshanath; Sisson, Adam L; Talukdar, Pinaki; Fürstenberg, Alexandre; Banerji, Natalie; Vauthey, Eric; Bollot, Guillaume; Mareda, Jiri; Röger, Cornelia; Würthner, Frank; Sakai, Naomi; Matile, Stefan

    2006-07-07

    Rigid p-octiphenyl rods were used to create helical tetrameric pi-stacks of blue, red-fluorescent naphthalene diimides that can span lipid bilayer membranes. In lipid vesicles containing quinone as electron acceptors and surrounded by ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid as hole acceptors, transmembrane proton gradients arose through quinone reduction upon excitation with visible light. Quantitative ultrafast and relatively long-lived charge separation was confirmed as the origin of photosynthetic activity by femtosecond fluorescence and transient absorption spectroscopy. Supramolecular self-organization was essential in that photoactivity was lost upon rod shortening (from p-octiphenyl to biphenyl) and chromophore expansion (from naphthalene diimide to perylene diimide). Ligand intercalation transformed the photoactive scaffolds into ion channels.

  7. Voltage-sensitive styryl dyes as singlet oxygen targets on the surface of bilayer lipid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokolov, V S; Gavrilchik, A N; Kulagina, A O; Meshkov, I N; Pohl, P; Gorbunova, Yu G

    2016-08-01

    Photosensitizers are widely used as photodynamic therapeutic agents killing cancer cells by photooxidation of their components. Development of new effective photosensitive molecules requires profound knowledge of possible targets for reactive oxygen species, especially for its singlet form. Here we studied photooxidation of voltage-sensitive styryl dyes (di-4-ANEPPS, di-8-ANEPPS, RH-421 and RH-237) by singlet oxygen on the surface of bilayer lipid membranes commonly used as cell membrane models. Oxidation was induced by irradiation of a photosensitizer (aluminum phthalocyanine tetrasulfonate) and monitored by the change of dipole potential on the surface of the membrane. We studied the drop of the dipole potential both in the case when the dye molecules were adsorbed on the same side of the lipid bilayer as the photosensitizer (cis-configuration) and in the case when they were adsorbed on the opposite side (trans-configuration). Based on a simple model, we determined the rate of oxidation of the dyes from the kinetics of change of the potential during and after irradiation. This rate is proportional to steady-state concentration of singlet oxygen in the membrane under irradiation. Comparison of the oxidation rates of various dyes reveals that compounds of ANEPPS series are more sensitive to singlet oxygen than RH type dyes, indicating that naphthalene group is primarily responsible for their oxidation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Formation and fluidity measurement of supported lipid bilayer on polyvinyl chloride membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kobayashi, Takuji, E-mail: kobayashi-t@int.ee.tut.ac.jp; Kono, Akiteru, E-mail: kobayashi-t@int.ee.tut.ac.jp; Sawada, Kazuaki [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, 441-8580 (Japan); Futagawa, Masato [Department of Electrical and Electronic Information Engineering and Head Office for the Tailor-Made and Baton-Zone Graduate Course, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, 441-8580 (Japan); Tero, Ryugo, E-mail: tero@tut.jp [Electronics-Inspired Interdisciplinary Research Institute and Department of Environmental and Life Sciences, Toyohashi University of Technology, 1-1 Hibarigaoka Tempaku-cho, Toyohashi, 441-8580 (Japan)

    2014-02-20

    We prepared an artificial lipid bilayer on a plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) membrane on a Si3N4 layer deposited on a Si wafer. We optimized the experimental condition for the fabrication of the PVC membrane, and obtained a PVC membrane with a flat and uniform surface on the scale of several hundreds of micrometer suitable for a substrate for supported lipid bilayers (SLBs). The SLB of 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) was formed on the PVC membrane by the vesicle fusion method. The observation with a conventional epi-fluorescence microscope and a confocal laser scanning microscope gave geometrically uniform images of the SLB on the PVC membrane. The fluidity and the mobile fraction of the SLB was evaluated by the fluorescence recovery after photobleaching method, and compared with that on a thermally oxidized SiO{sub 2}/Si substrate. The SLB on the PVC membrane contained immobile fraction ∼30%, but the diffusion in the mobile fraction was two times faster than that in the SLB on SiO{sub 2}/Si, which had little immobile fraction.

  9. Nanomechanical properties of lipid bilayer: asymmetric modulation of lateral pressure and surface tension due to protein insertion in one leaflet of a bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maftouni, Negin; Amininasab, Mehriar; Ejtehadi, Mohammad Reza; Kowsari, Farshad; Dastvan, Reza

    2013-02-14

    The lipid membranes of living cells form an integral part of biological systems, and the mechanical properties of these membranes play an important role in biophysical investigations. One interesting problem to be evaluated is the effect of protein insertion in one leaflet of a bilayer on the physical properties of lipid membrane. In the present study, an all atom (fine-grained) molecular dynamics simulation is used to investigate the binding of cytotoxin A3 (CTX A3), a cytotoxin from snake venom, to a phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayer. Then, a 5-microsecond [corrected] coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation is carried out to compute the pressure tensor, lateral pressure, surface tension, and first moment of lateral pressure in each monolayer. Our simulations reveal that the insertion of CTX A3 into one monolayer results in an asymmetrical change in the lateral pressure and corresponding spatial distribution of surface tension of the individual bilayer leaflets. The relative variation in the surface tension of the two monolayers as a result of a change in the contribution of the various intermolecular forces may potentially be expressed morphologically.

  10. Diffusion and spectroscopy of water and lipids in fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine bilayer membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, J.; Martí, J., E-mail: jordi.marti@upc.edu [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia-Barcelona Tech, B4-B5 Northern Campus, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Calero, C. [Department of Physics and Nuclear Engineering, Technical University of Catalonia-Barcelona Tech, B4-B5 Northern Campus, Jordi Girona 1-3, 08034 Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Center for Polymer Studies, Department of Physics, Boston University, 590 Commonwealth Avenue, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States)

    2014-03-14

    Microscopic structure and dynamics of water and lipids in a fully hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine phospholipid lipid bilayer membrane in the liquid-crystalline phase have been analyzed with all-atom molecular dynamics simulations based on the recently parameterized CHARMM36 force field. The diffusive dynamics of the membrane lipids and of its hydration water, their reorientational motions as well as their corresponding spectral densities, related to the absorption of radiation, have been considered for the first time using the present force field. In addition, structural properties such as density and pressure profiles, a deuterium-order parameter, surface tension, and the extent of water penetration in the membrane have been analyzed. Molecular self-diffusion, reorientational motions, and spectral densities of atomic species reveal a variety of time scales playing a role in membrane dynamics. The mechanisms of lipid motion strongly depend on the time scale considered, from fast ballistic translation at the scale of picoseconds (effective diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −5} cm{sup 2}/s) to diffusive flow of a few lipids forming nanodomains at the scale of hundreds of nanoseconds (diffusion coefficients of the order of 10{sup −8} cm{sup 2}/s). In the intermediate regime of sub-diffusion, collisions with nearest neighbors prevent the lipids to achieve full diffusion. Lipid reorientations along selected directions agree well with reported nuclear magnetic resonance data and indicate two different time scales, one about 1 ns and a second one in the range of 2–8 ns. We associated the two time scales of reorientational motions with angular distributions of selected vectors. Calculated spectral densities corresponding to lipid and water reveal an overall good qualitative agreement with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy experiments. Our simulations indicate a blue-shift of the low frequency spectral bands of hydration water as a result of

  11. Advanced environmental monitoring system using ecosensor based on bilayer lipid membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimori, Yoshio; Kawano, Koichiro; Tamura, Hiroshi; Aoyama, Nobuhiro; Mouri, Mitsuo; Kase, Takao; Tamiya, Eiichi; Ishizuka, Masaru

    2002-01-01

    In recent years, we have developed an advanced environmental monitoring system (AEMS) containing the eco-sensor, which means a sensor for the measurement of environmental pollutants, based on lipid membranes for continuous monitoring of underground water in industry areas such as semiconductor factories. The AEMS project is composed of three work packages followed by 1) Eco-sensor, 2) Prediction of plume propagation using a computer simulation technique, and 3) Environmental protection method. In this presentation, we would like to focus on the study of the eco-sensor. The reason why lipid membranes were selected as a sensing element for environmental pollutants is that the pollutants should be interacted with cell membranes because cells are surrounded by cell membranes containing lipid components. Improving the applicability and the responsibility of bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) in the eco-sensor, we have investigated the automatic BLMs preparation device. An automatic BLMs preparation device was made by use of an inkjet mechanism. The reproducibility of the BLMs preparation was remarkably improved. The sensitivity to volatile organic chloride compounds such as cis-1,2-dichloroethylene was in the order of 10 ppb using the monoolein BLMs even in real underground water. We also have been developing a smaller sized eco-sensor for the practical use.

  12. Interactions of the baicalin and baicalein with bilayer lipid membranes investigated by cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Xuejing; Wang, Lei; Yu, Miao; Han, Xiaojun

    2014-02-01

    The baicalin and baicalein are the major flavonoids found in Radix Scutellariae, an essential herb in traditional Chinese medicine for thousands of years. The interactions of the baicalin and baicalein with lipid bilayer membranes were studied using cyclic voltammetry and UV-Vis spectroscopy. The thickness d of supported bilayer lipid membranes was calculated as d=4.59(±0.36) nm using AC impedance spectroscopy. The baicalein interacted with egg PC bilayer membranes in a dose-dependent manner. The responses of K3Fe(CN)6 on lipid bilayer membrane modified Pt electrode linearly increased in a concentration range of baicalein from 6.25μM to 25μM with a detection limit of 0.1μM and current-concentration sensitivity of 0.11(±0.01) μA/μM, and then reached a plateau from 25μM to 50μM. However the baicalin showed much weaker interactions with egg PC bilayer membranes. UV-Vis spectroscopy also confirmed that the baicalein could interact with egg PC membranes noticeably, but the interaction of baicalin with membranes was hard to be detected. The results provide useful information on understanding the mechanism of action of Radix Scutellariae in vivo. © 2013.

  13. Bilayer lipid membranes supported on Teflon filters: a functional environment for ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phung, Thai; Zhang, Yanli; Dunlop, James; Dalziel, Julie

    2011-03-15

    Many ion channel proteins have binding sites for toxins and pharmaceutical drugs and therefore have much promise as the sensing entity in high throughput technologies and biosensor devices. Measurement of ionic conductance changes through ion channels requires a robust biological membrane with sufficient longevity for practical applications. The conventional planar BLM is 100-300 μm in diameter and typically contains fewer than a dozen channels whereas pharmaceutical screening methods in cells use current recordings for many ion channels. We present a new, simple method for the fabrication of a disposable porous-supported bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) ion channel biosensor using hydrated Teflon (polytetrafluoroethylene, PTFE) filter material (pore size 5 μm, filter diameter=1 mm). The lipid layer was monitored for its thickness and mechanical stability by electrical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed membrane capacitances of 1.8±0.2 nF and membrane resistances of 25.9±4.1 GΩ, indicating the formation of lipid bilayers. The current level increased upon addition of the pore-forming peptide gramicidin. Following addition of liposomes containing voltage-gated sodium channels, small macroscopic sodium currents (1-80 pA) could be recorded. By preloading the porous Teflon with sodium channel proteoliposomes, prior to BLM formation, currents of 1-10 nA could be recorded in the presence of the activator veratridine that increased with time, and were inhibited by tetrodotoxin. A lack of rectification suggests that the channels incorporated in both orientations. This work demonstrates that PTFE filters can support BLMs that provide an environment in which ion channels can maintain their functional activity relevant for applications in drug discovery, toxin detection, and odour sensing. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Retinoschisin (RS1) Interacts with Negatively Charged Lipid Bilayers in the presence of Ca2+: An Atomic Force Microscopy Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotova, Svetlana; Vijayasarathy, Camasamudram; Dimitriadis, Emilios K.; Ikonomou, Laertis; Jaffe, Howard; Sieving, Paul A.

    2010-01-01

    Retinoschisin (RS1) is a retina-specific secreted protein encoding a conserved discoidin domain sequence. As an adhesion molecule, RS1 preserves the retinal cell architecture and promotes visual signal transduction. In young males, loss-of-function mutations in the X- linked retinoschisis gene (RS1) cause X-linked retinoschisis, a form of progressive blindness. Neither the structure of RS1 nor the nature of its anchoring and organization on the plasma membranes is fully understood. The discoidin C2 domains of coagulation factors V and VIII are known to interact with extracellular phosphatidylserine (PS). In this study we have used atomic force microscopy (AFM) to study the interactions of murine retinoschisin (Rs1) with supported anionic lipid bilayers in the presence of Ca2+. The bilayers consisting of a single lipid, PS, and mixtures of lipids with or without PS were used. Consistent with previous X-ray diffraction studies, AFM imaging showed two distinct domains in pure PS bilayers when Ca2+ was present. Upon Rs1 adsorption, these PS and PS-containing mixed bilayers underwent fast and extensive reorganization. Protein localization was ascertained by immunolabeling. AFM imaging showed the Rs1 antibody bound exclusively to the calcium-rich ordered phase of the bilayers pointing to the sequestration of Rs1 within those domains. This was further supported by the increased mechanical strength of these domains after Rs1 binding. Besides, changes in bilayer thickness suggested that Rs1 was partially embedded into the bilayer. These findings support a model whereby the Rs1 protein binds to PS in the retinal cell plasma membranes in a calcium-dependent manner. PMID:20677810

  15. Absorption and folding of melittin onto lipid bilayer membranes via unbiased atomic detail microsecond molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Charles H; Wiedman, Gregory; Khan, Ayesha; Ulmschneider, Martin B

    2014-09-01

    Unbiased molecular simulation is a powerful tool to study the atomic details driving functional structural changes or folding pathways of highly fluid systems, which present great challenges experimentally. Here we apply unbiased long-timescale molecular dynamics simulation to study the ab initio folding and partitioning of melittin, a template amphiphilic membrane active peptide. The simulations reveal that the peptide binds strongly to the lipid bilayer in an unstructured configuration. Interfacial folding results in a localized bilayer deformation. Akin to purely hydrophobic transmembrane segments the surface bound native helical conformer is highly resistant against thermal denaturation. Circular dichroism spectroscopy experiments confirm the strong binding and thermostability of the peptide. The study highlights the utility of molecular dynamics simulations for studying transient mechanisms in fluid lipid bilayer systems. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Interfacially Active Peptides and Proteins. Guest Editors: William C. Wimley and Kalina Hristova. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  16. The effects of ethylene oxide containing lipopolymers and tri-block copolymers on lipid bilayers of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baekmark, T. R.; Pedersen, S.; Jorgensen, K.

    1997-01-01

    oxide moity, anchored to the bilayer by a 1,2-dioctadecanoyl-s,n-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DC18PE) lipid. The second type, which is a novel type of membrane-spanning object, is an amphiphilic tri-block copolymer composed of two hydrophilic stretches of polyethylene oxide separated by a hydrophobic...... stretch of polystyrene. Hence the tri-block copolymer may act as a membrane-spanning macromolecule mimicking an amphiphilic protein or polypeptide. Differential scanning calorimetry is used to determine a partial phase diagram for the lipopolymer systems and to assess the amount of lipopolymer that can...... be loaded into DC16PC lipid bilayers before micellization takes place. Unilamellar and micellar phase structures are investigated by fluorescence quenching using bilayer permeating dithionite. The chain length-dependent critical lipopolymer concentration, denoting the lamellar-to-micellar phase transition...

  17. Modelling of noble anaesthetic gases and high hydrostatic pressure effects in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskovitz, Yevgeny; Yang, Hui

    2015-03-21

    Our objective was to study molecular processes that might be responsible for inert gas narcosis and high-pressure nervous syndrome. The classical molecular dynamics trajectories (200 ns) of dioleoylphosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers simulated by the Berger force field were evaluated for water and the atomic distribution of noble gases around DOPC molecules in the pressure range of 1-1000 bar and at a temperature of 310 K. Xenon and argon have been tested as model gases for general anaesthetics, and neon has been investigated for distortions that are potentially responsible for neurological tremors in hyperbaric conditions. The analysis of stacked radial pair distribution functions of DOPC headgroup atoms revealed the explicit solvation potential of the gas molecules, which correlates with their dimensions. The orientational dynamics of water molecules at the biomolecular interface should be considered as an influential factor, while excessive solvation effects appearing in the lumen of membrane-embedded ion channels could be a possible cause of inert gas narcosis. All the noble gases tested exhibit similar order parameter patterns for both DOPC acyl chains, which are opposite of the patterns found for the order parameter curve at high hydrostatic pressures in intact bilayers. This finding supports the 'critical volume' hypothesis of anaesthesia pressure reversal. The irregular lipid headgroup-water boundary observed in DOPC bilayers saturated with neon in the pressure range of 1-100 bar could be associated with the possible manifestation of neurological tremors at the atomic scale. The non-immobiliser neon also demonstrated the highest momentum impact on the normal component of the DOPC diffusion coefficient representing the monolayer undulation rate, which indicates that enhanced diffusivity rather than atomic size is the key factor.

  18. Volumetric characterization of ester- and ether-linked lipid bilayers by pressure perturbation calorimetry and densitometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamai, Nobutake; Nambu, Yuko; Tanaka, Saeko; Goto, Masaki; Matsuki, Hitoshi; Kaneshina, Shoji

    2012-04-01

    We investigated the thermotropic volume behavior of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC), dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) and dihexadecylphosphatidylcholine (DHPC) membranes using pressure perturbation calorimetry (PPC) and densitometry. The ln φ(2) vs temperature curves (φ(2): apparent molar volume of phospholipid) obtained from the PPC data using an analysis method that we developed agreed with the results from the density measurements for these lipids within the relative difference of about 0.62%. From those curves, the volume changes with the main transition were estimated at 18.0±0.49, 23.5±2.33 and 23.0±0.33 cm(3) mol(-1) for DMPC, DPPC and DHPC, respectively. For DPPC and DMPC, the average volume per methylene group of the hydrocarbon chains v(CH2) calculated by referring to the procedure by Nagle and Wilkinson was consistent with the previous result, which indicates that the DPPC bilayer in the gel state has denser hydrophobic bilayer core than the DMPC bilayer. For DHPC, the volume of the headgroup region v(H) was calculated to be 244 Å(3) by assuming that v(CH2) of DHPC equals that of DPPC above 45°C. This value was comparable to that of DPPC when the volume of the carbonyl groups was considered, which may signify that there is no significant conformational difference in the polar headgroups of both phospholipids. However, it was suggested from the consideration on v(H) of DHPC at 20°C that expansion of the headgroup region should occur as the interdigitated structure is formed, which means some conformational change of the headgroup region is induced by the interdigitation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Protein/lipid coaggregates are formed during α-synuclein-induced disruption of lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Maarschalkerweerd, Andreas; Vetri, Valeria; Langkilde, Annette Eva

    2014-01-01

    the molecular mechanisms behind potential amyloid-mediated toxic effects, is still missing. Interaction between amyloid aggregates and the lipid cell membrane is expected to play a key role in the disease progress. Here, we present experimental data based on hybrid analysis of two-photon-microscopy, solution......Amyloid formation is associated with neurodegenerative diseases such as Parkinson's disease (PD). Significant α-synuclein (αSN) deposition in lipid-rich Lewy bodies is a hallmark of PD. Nonetheless, an unraveling of the connection between neurodegeneration and amyloid fibrils, including...... small-angle X-ray scattering and circular dichroism data. Data show in real time changes in liposome morphology and stability upon protein addition and reveal that membrane disruption mediated by amyloidogenic αSN is associated with dehydration of anionic lipid membranes and stimulation of protein...

  20. Arrangement of Annexin A2 tetramer and its impact on the structure and diffusivity of supported lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fritz, K.; Fritz, G.; Windschiegl, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    +-dependent exocytosis and cell-cell adhesion of metastatic cells. Here, we employ X-ray reflectivity measurements to resolve the conformation of Anx A2t upon Ca2+-dependent binding to single supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) composed of different mixtures of anionic (POPS) and neutral (POPC) phospholipids...... implications for the biochemical mechanism of Anx A2t-induced endo- and exocytosis....

  1. Structure of the antimicrobial beta-hairpin peptide protegrin-1 in a DLPC lipid bilayer investigated by molecular dynamics simulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Khandelia, Himanshu; Kaznessis, Yiannis N

    2007-01-01

    All atom molecular dynamics simulations of the 18-residue beta-hairpin antimicrobial peptide protegrin-1 (PG-1, RGGRLCYCRRRFCVCVGR-NH(2)) in a fully hydrated dilauroylphosphatidylcholine (DLPC) lipid bilayer have been implemented. The goal of the reported work is to investigate the structure of t...

  2. Smart polymer brush nanostructures guide the self-assembly of pore-spanning lipid bilayers with integrated membrane proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Groot, G.W.; Demarche, S.; Santonicola, M.G.; Tiefenauer, L.; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2014-01-01

    Nanopores in arrays on silicon chips are functionalized with pH-responsive poly(methacrylic acid) (PMAA) brushes and used as supports for pore-spanning lipid bilayers with integrated membrane proteins. Robust platforms are created by the covalent grafting of polymer brushes using surface-initiated

  3. Formation Mechanism and Properties of Polyelectrolyte Multilayer-Supported Lipid Bilayers: A Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caixia Wen

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyelectrolyte multilayer (PEM-supported lipid bilayers (SLBs that connect with functional proteins are popular models for cell membranes and are usually obtained via vesicle adsorption and spreading. However, the exact mechanism by which SLBs are formed is not fully understood. In this study, we employ coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the pathways by which vesicles undergo spreading upon the deposition on PEM-cushioned substrates. The substrates consist of positive chitosan (CHI/negative alginate (ALG multilayers. We find that an isolated vesicle tends to completely disintegrate upon deposition, forming a well-ordered lipid bilayer at appropriate polymer ionic strengths by a mechanism described as “parachute” model. Lipids from the vesicle’s outer leaflet are predominantly oriented toward the bulk after the formation of the SLB. The PEM cushion provides adsorption energy of 26.9 kJ mol–1 per lipid for the SLBs. The process by which SLBs are formed is almost independent of the number of layers of CHI/ALG in the PEM cushion. Additional simulations on vesicle clusters also demonstrate that the formation of SLBs can be catalyzed by either neighboring vesicles or preexisting bilayer edges on the support. Moreover, our simulations show that SLBs created on PEM supports preserve the lateral mobility and the symmetric density profile of the phospholipids, as in a freestanding bilayer.

  4. Polyelectrolyte-Mediated Transport of Doxorubicin Through the Bilayer Lipid Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaroslavov, Alexander A.; Kitaeva, Marina V.; Melik-Nubarov, Nikolay S.; Menger, Frederic M.

    A model is developed for the effect of ionic polymers on the transport of doxorubicin, an antitumor drug, through a bilayer membrane. Accordingly, a protonated (cationic) form of doxorubicin binds to an anionic polymer, poly(acrylic acid), the resulting complex being several hundred nanometers in size. Nevertheless, large complex species associate with neutral egg lecithin liposomes by means of hydrophobic attraction between the doxorubicin and the liposome bilayer. Then, the doxorubicin enters the liposome interior which has been imparted with an acidic buffer to protonate the doxorubicin. The rate of transmembrane Dox permeation decreases when elevating the polyacid-to-doxorubicin ratio. A cationic polymer, polylysine, being coupled with liposomes containing the negative lipid cardiolipin, accelerates membrane transport of doxorubicin with the maximum rate at a complete neutralization of the membrane charge by an interacting polycation. The effect of a polycation on doxorubicin transport becomes more pronounced as small negative liposomes (60-80 nm in diameter) are changed to larger ones (approx. 600 nm in diameter). An opportunity thus opens up for the manipulation of the kinetics of drug uptake by cells and, ultimately, the control of the pharmaceutical action of drugs.

  5. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Aoki, Noriyuki; Okazaki, Susumu

    2016-02-28

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal mouse hepatocytes and hepatomas in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15 K and 1 atm). The changes in the membrane properties induced by hepatic canceration were investigated and were compared with previous MD calculations included in our previous study of the changes in membrane properties induced by murine thymic canceration. The calculated model membranes for normal hepatocytes and hepatomas comprised 23 and 24 kinds of lipids, respectively. These included phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. We referred to previously published experimental values for the mole fraction of the lipids adopted in the present calculations. The calculated structural and dynamic properties of the membranes such as lateral structure, order parameters, lateral self-diffusion constants, and rotational correlation times all showed that hepatic canceration causes plasma membranes to become more ordered laterally and less fluid. Interestingly, this finding contrasts with the less ordered structure and increased fluidity of plasma membranes induced by thymic canceration observed in our previous MD study.

  6. Flexoelectricity and thermal fluctuations of lipid bilayer membranes: Renormalization of flexoelectric, dielectric, and elastic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L. P.; Sharma, P.

    2013-03-01

    Thermal fluctuations renormalize the bending elasticity of lipid bilayers. This well-studied effect is a cornerstone in the study of several membrane biophysical phenomena. Analogously, nearly all membranes are endowed with an electromechanical coupling called flexoelectricity that admits membrane polarization due to curvature changes. Flexoelectricity is found to be important in a number of biological functions, including hearing, ion transport, and in some situations where mechanotransduction is necessary. Very little is known about the interplay between thermal fluctuations and flexoelectricity. In this work, we explore how the apparent flexoelectricity is altered due to thermal fluctuations and, further, how the elastic and dielectric properties are renormalized due to flexoelectricity. We find that the apparent bending rigidity is softened by flexoelectricity and discuss the ramifications for interpreting existing experimental work.

  7. Hydrodynamic collective effects of active protein machines in solution and lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailov, Alexander S.; Kapral, Raymond

    2015-01-01

    The cytoplasm and biomembranes in biological cells contain large numbers of proteins that cyclically change their shapes. They are molecular machines that can function as molecular motors or carry out various other tasks in the cell. Many enzymes also undergo conformational changes within their turnover cycles. We analyze the advection effects that nonthermal fluctuating hydrodynamic flows induced by active proteins have on other passive molecules in solution or membranes. We show that the diffusion constants of passive particles are enhanced substantially. Furthermore, when gradients of active proteins are present, a chemotaxis-like drift of passive particles takes place. In lipid bilayers, the effects are strongly nonlocal, so that active inclusions in the entire membrane contribute to local diffusion enhancement and the drift. All active proteins in a biological cell or in a membrane contribute to such effects and all passive particles, and the proteins themselves, will be subject to them. PMID:26124140

  8. Supported Lipid Bilayers for the Generation of Dynamic Cell-Material Interfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Weerd, Jasper; Karperien, Marcel; Jonkheijm, Pascal

    2015-12-30

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLB) offer unique possibilities for studying cellular membranes and have been used as a synthetic architecture to interact with cells. Here, the state-of-the-art in SLB-based technology is presented. The fabrication, analysis, characteristics and modification of SLBs are described in great detail. Numerous strategies to form SLBs on different substrates, and the means to patteren them, are described. The use of SLBs as model membranes for the study of membrane organization and membrane processes in vitro is highlighted. In addition, the use of SLBs as a substratum for cell analysis is presented, with discrimination between cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) mimicry. The study is concluded with a discussion of the potential for in vivo applications of SLBs. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Poisson-Boltzmann versus Size-Modified Poisson-Boltzmann Electrostatics Applied to Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nuo; Zhou, Shenggao; Kekenes-Huskey, Peter M; Li, Bo; McCammon, J Andrew

    2014-12-26

    Mean-field methods, such as the Poisson-Boltzmann equation (PBE), are often used to calculate the electrostatic properties of molecular systems. In the past two decades, an enhancement of the PBE, the size-modified Poisson-Boltzmann equation (SMPBE), has been reported. Here, the PBE and the SMPBE are reevaluated for realistic molecular systems, namely, lipid bilayers, under eight different sets of input parameters. The SMPBE appears to reproduce the molecular dynamics simulation results better than the PBE only under specific parameter sets, but in general, it performs no better than the Stern layer correction of the PBE. These results emphasize the need for careful discussions of the accuracy of mean-field calculations on realistic systems with respect to the choice of parameters and call for reconsideration of the cost-efficiency and the significance of the current SMPBE formulation.

  10. Helical structures of tilted chiral lipid bilayers viewed as cholesteric liquid crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong-Can, Ou-Yang; Ji-Xing, Liu

    1990-09-01

    We have derived the tilt and surface shape-equilibrium equations for tilted chiral lipid bilayers (TCLB's) in analogy with cholesteric liquid crystals. On a cylindrical surface the field of tilt directions of TCLB molecules forms a right-handed helix with 45° gradient angle for k2>0 or a left-handed helix with -45° angle for k2cholesteric chiral curvature modulus. In addition, there exists another type of helical structure that looks like twisted strips or helicoids. We also show that on a spherical surface the tilt field has at least two singular points. These results explain the observed succession of transitions from a vesicular dispersion to a phase involving helical structures and then to tubes.

  11. On the equivalence of local and global area-constraint formulations for lipid bilayer vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dharmavaram, Sanjay; Healey, Timothy J.

    2015-10-01

    Lipid bilayer membranes are commonly modeled as area-preserving fluid surfaces that resist bending. There appear to be two schools of thought in the literature concerning the actual area constraint. In some works the total or global area of the vesicle is a prescribed constant, while in others the local area ratio is assigned to unity. In this work we demonstrate the equivalence of these ostensibly distinct approaches in the specific case when the equilibrium configuration is a smooth, closed surface of genus zero. We accomplish this in the context of the Euler-Lagrange equilibrium equations, constraint equations and the second variation with admissibility conditions, for a broad class of models—including the phase-field type. In particular, the two formulations have equivalent equilibria characterized by the same local-energy properties.

  12. Interaction with prefibrillar species and amyloid-like fibrils changes the stiffness of lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borro, Bruno C; Parolini, Lucia; Cicuta, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    interaction with different protein states. Using a combination of spectroscopic techniques, morphological observations, and spectral analysis of membrane fluctuations, we identify different destabilisation routes for giant unilamellar vesicles interacting with native-like states, prefibrillar species...... and amyloid-like fibrils of α-lactalbumin. These effects range from substantially lowering the bending rigidity of the membranes to irreversible structural changes and complete disruption of the lipid bilayers. Our findings clearly indicate how the wide heterogeneity in structures occurring during protein......Evaluating the toxicity of self-assembled protein states is a key step towards developing effective strategies against amyloidogenic pathologies such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Such analysis is directly connected to quantitatively probing the stability of the cellular membrane upon...

  13. Physical understanding of pore formation on supported lipid bilayer by bacterial toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, R.; Agrawal, A.; Ayappa, K. G.; Visweswariah, S. S.; Basu, J. K.

    2013-02-01

    Pore forming toxins are being classified in the protein community based on their ability of forming pores in living cell membranes. Some initial study has apparently pointed out the crystallographic pathway rather can be viewed as a structural as well as morphological changes of proteins in terms of self assembly before and during the pore formation process in surfactant medium. Being a water soluble compound, it changes its conformation and originates some pre-pore complex, which later partially goes inside the cell membrane causing a pore. The physical mechanism for this whole process is still unknown. In this study we have tried to understand these types of biological processes from physical point of view by using supported lipid bilayer as a model system.

  14. Serogroup-specific interactions of lipopolysaccharides with supported lipid bilayer assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendez, Heather M.; Stromberg, Loreen R.; Swingle, Kirstie; Graves, Steven W.; Montano, Gabriel; Mukundan, Harshini

    2017-02-01

    Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is an amphiphilic lipoglycan that is the primary component of the outer membrane of Gramnegative bacteria. Classified as a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMPs), LPS is an essential biomarker for identifying pathogen serogroups. Structurally, LPS is comprised of a hydrophobic lipophilic domain that partitions into the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria. Previous work by our team explored biophysical interactions of LPS in supported lipid bilayer assemblies (sLBAs), and demonstrated LPS-induced hole formation in DOPC lipid bilayers. Here, we have incorporated cholesterol and sphingomyelin into sLBAs to evaluate the interaction of LPS in a more physiologically relevant system. The goal of this work was to determine whether increasing membrane complexity of sLBAs, and changing physiological parameters such as temperature, affects LPS-induced hole formation. Integrating cholesterol and sphingomyelin into sLBAs decreased LPS-induced hole formation at lower concentrations of LPS, and bacterial serotype contributed to differences in hole formation as a response to changes in temperature. We also investigated the possibility of LPS-induced hole formation in cellular systems using the cytokine response in both TLR4 (+)/(-) murine macrophages. LPS was presented to each cell line in murine serum, delipidated serum, and buffer (i.e. no serum), and the resulting cytokine levels were measured. Results indicate that the method of LPS presentation directly affects cellular cytokine expression. The two model systems presented in this study provide preliminary insight into the interactions of LPS in the host, and suggest the significance of amphiphile-carrier interactions in regulating host-pathogen biology during infection.

  15. Terminal lipophilization of a unique DNA dodecamer by various nucleolipid headgroups: Their incorporation into artificial lipid bilayers and hydrodynamic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emma Werz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A series of six cyanine-5-labeled oligonucleotides (LONs 10–15, each terminally lipophilized with different nucleolipid head groups, were synthesized using the recently prepared phosphoramidites 4b–9b. The insertion of the LONs within an artificial lipid bilayer, composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC and 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (POPE, was studied by single molecule fluorescence spectroscopy and microscopy with the help of an optically transparent microfluidic sample carrier with perfusion capabilities. The incorporation of the lipo-oligonucleotides into the bilayer was studied with respect to efficiency (maximal bilayer brightness as well as stability against perfusion (final stable bilayer brightness. Attempts to correlate these parameters with the log P values of the corresponding nucleolipid head groups failed, a result which clearly demonstrates that not only the lipophilicity but mainly the chemical structure and topology of the head group is of decisive importance for the optimal interaction of a lipo-oligonucleotide with an artificial lipid bilayer. Moreover, fluorescence half-live and diffusion time values were measured to determine the diffusion coefficients of the lipo-oligonucleotides.

  16. Investigation into viscoelastic properties of free-standing DPPC lipid bilayer via molecular dynamics and inverse finite element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni Bashusqeh, Saeed; Rastgoo, Abbas

    2017-10-01

    In the current study, the viscoelastic properties of the free-standing DPPC lipid bilayer are investigated using coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CG-MD) and inverse finite element (FE) methods. As the first step, the CG-MD method is employed to simulate the loading/relaxation of a free-standing DPPC lipid bilayer in an indentation experiment. Then the experiment is simulated using the FE method, in which viscoelastic properties of the bilayer are chosen by a genetic algorithm. At each optimization step, the force-time curve is extracted and evaluated with respect to the curve obtained from the CG-MD simulation. The optimization process is continued until a sufficiently good accordance is acquired between the force-time curves obtained from the FE and CG-MD simulations. The material’s behavior in the FE simulation is represented by a two-term Prony model which comprises three unknown constants; the instantaneous Young’s modulus, the steady-state Young’s modulus and the relaxation time constant, which are obtained through optimization. The effects of various simulation parameters, such as indentation speed, the shape of the indenter, the size of the bilayer and temperature, on the viscoelastic properties of the bilayer are also studied and discussed.

  17. Oxygen permeability of the lipid bilayer membrane made of calf lens lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widomska, Justyna; Raguz, Marija; Subczynski, Witold K

    2007-10-01

    The oxygen permeability coefficient across the membrane made of the total lipid extract from the plasma membrane of calf lens was estimated from the profile of the oxygen transport parameter (local oxygen diffusion-concentration product) and compared with those estimated for membranes made of an equimolar 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoylphosphatidylcholine/cholesterol (POPC/Chol) mixture and of pure POPC. Profiles of the oxygen transport parameter were obtained by observing the collision of molecular oxygen with nitroxide radical spin labels placed at different depths in the membrane using the saturation-recovery EPR technique and were published by us earlier (J. Widomska, M. Raguz, J. Dillon, E. R. Gaillard, W. K. Subczynski, Biochim. Biophys. Acta. 1768 (2007) 1454-1465). At 35 degrees C, the estimated oxygen permeability coefficients were 51.3, 49.7, and 157.4 cm/s for lens lipid, POPC/Chol, and POPC membranes, respectively (compared with 53.3 cm/s for a water layer with the same thickness as a membrane). Membrane permeability significantly decreases at lower temperatures. In the lens lipid membrane, resistance to the oxygen transport is located in and near the polar headgroup region of the membrane to the depth of the ninth carbon, which is approximately where the steroid-ring structure of cholesterol reaches into the membrane. In the central region of the membrane, oxygen transport is enhanced, significantly exceeding that in bulk water. It is concluded that the high level of cholesterol in lens lipids is responsible for these unique membrane properties.

  18. Interaction of menthol with mixed-lipid bilayer of stratum corneum: A coarse-grained simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Guang; Dai, Xingxing; Yin, Qianqian; Shi, Xinyuan; Qiao, Yanjiang

    2015-07-01

    Menthol is a widely used penetration enhancer in clinical medicine due to its high efficiency and relative safety. Although there are many studies focused on the penetration-enhancing activity of menthol, the details of molecular mechanism are rarely involved in the discussion. In this study, we present a series of coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to investigate the interaction of menthol with a mixed-lipid bilayer model consisting of ceramides, cholesterol and free fatty acids in a 2:2:1 molar ratio. Taking both the concentration of menthol and temperature into consideration, it was found that a rise in temperature and concentration within a specific range (1-20%) could improve the penetration-enhancing property of menthol and the floppiness of the bilayer. However, at high concentrations (30% and more), menthol completely mixed with the lipids and the membrane can no longer maintain a bilayer structure. Our results elucidates some of the molecular basis for menthol's penetration enhancing effects and may provide some assistance for the development and applications of menthol as a penetration enhancer. Furthermore, we establish a method to investigate the penetration enhancement mechanism of traditional Chinese medicine using the mixed-lipid bilayer model of stratum corneum by molecular dynamics simulations. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probes through bilayer lipid membranes: A low frequency ESR study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meenakumari, V.; Benial, A. Milton Franklin, E-mail: miltonfranklin@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India); Utsumi, Hideo; Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi [Department of Bio-functional Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hyodo, Fuminori [Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Jawahar, A. [Department of Chemistry, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019, Tamilnadu (India)

    2015-06-24

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for permeable 2mM {sup 14}N-labeled deutrated 3 Methoxy carbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water and 1mM, 2mM, 3mM, 4mM concentration of 14N-labeled deutrated MC-PROXYL in 400mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a 300 MHz ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported for these samples. The line broadening was observed for the nitroxyl spin probe in the liposomal solution. The line broadening indicates that the high viscous nature of the liposomal solution. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum diffusion of nitroxyl spin probes in the bilayer lipid membranes at 2 mM concentration of nitroxyl radical. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra- membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the spin probe concentration was optimized as 2mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies/imaging, invivo and invitro experiments.

  20. Nanobioarchitectures based on chlorophyll photopigment, artificial lipid bilayers and carbon nanotubes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Elisabeta Barbinta-Patrascu

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last decade, building biohybrid materials has gained considerable interest in the field of nanotechnology. This paper describes an original design for bionanoarchitectures with interesting properties and potential bioapplications. Multilamellar lipid vesicles (obtained by hydration of a dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine thin film with and without cholesterol were labelled with a natural photopigment (chlorophyll a, which functioned as a sensor to detect modifications in the artificial lipid bilayers. These biomimetic membranes were used to build non-covalent structures with single-walled carbon nanotubes. Different biophysical methods were employed to characterize these biohybrids such as: UV–vis absorption and emission spectroscopy, zeta potential measurements, AFM and chemiluminescence techniques. The designed, carbon-based biohybrids exhibited good physical stability, good antioxidant and antimicrobial properties, and could be used as biocoating materials. As compared to the cholesterol-free samples, the cholesterol-containing hybrid structures demonstrated better stability (i.e., their zeta potential reached the value of −36.4 mV, more pronounced oxygen radical scavenging ability (affording an antioxidant activity of 73.25% and enhanced biocidal ability, offering inhibition zones of 12.4, 11.3 and 10.2 mm in diameter, against Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus and Enterococcus faecalis, respectively.

  1. α-Synuclein insertion into supported lipid bilayers as seen by in situ X-ray reflectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hähl, Hendrik; Möller, Isabelle; Kiesel, Irena; Campioni, Silvia; Riek, Roland; Verdes, Dorinel; Seeger, Stefan

    2015-03-18

    Large aggregates of misfolded α-synuclein inside neuronal cells are the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease. The protein's natural function and its supposed toxicity, however, are believed to be closely related to its interaction with cell and vesicle membranes. Upon this interaction, the protein folds into an α-helical structure and intercalates into the membrane. In this study, we focus on the changes in the lipid bilayer caused by this intrusion. In situ X-ray reflectivity was applied to determine the vertical density structure of the bilayer before and after exposure to α-synuclein. It was found that the α-synuclein insertion, wild type and E57K variant, caused a reduction in bilayer thickness. This effect may be one factor in the membrane pore formation ability of α-synuclein.

  2. Mycobacterial outer membrane is a lipid bilayer and the inner membrane is unusually rich in diacyl phosphatidylinositol dimannosides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal-Mutalik, Ritu; Nikaido, Hiroshi

    2014-04-01

    Mycobacterium species, including the human pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are unique among Gram-positive bacteria in producing a complex cell wall that contains unusual lipids and functions as a permeability barrier. Lipids in the cell wall were hypothesized to form a bilayer or outer membrane that would prevent the entry of chemotherapeutic agents, but this could not be tested because of the difficulty in extracting only the cell-wall lipids. We used reverse micellar extraction to achieve this goal and carried out a quantitative analysis of both the cell wall and the inner membrane lipids of Mycobacterium smegmatis. We found that the outer leaflet of the outer membrane contains a similar number of hydrocarbon chains as the inner leaflet composed of mycolic acids covalently linked to cell-wall arabinogalactan, thus validating the outer membrane model. Furthermore, we found that preliminary extraction with reverse micelles permitted the subsequent complete extraction of inner membrane lipids with chloroform-methanol-water, revealing that one-half of hydrocarbon chains in this membrane are contributed by an unusual lipid, diacyl phosphatidylinositol dimannoside. The inner leaflet of this membrane likely is composed nearly entirely of this lipid. Because it contains four fatty acyl chains within a single molecule, it may produce a bilayer environment of unusually low fluidity and may slow the influx of drugs, contributing to the general drug resistance phenotype of mycobacteria.

  3. Lytic and non-lytic permeabilization of cardiolipin-containing lipid bilayers induced by cytochrome C.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xu

    Full Text Available The release of cytochrome c (cyt c from mitochondria is an important early step during cellular apoptosis, however the precise mechanism by which the outer mitochondrial membrane becomes permeable to these proteins is as yet unclear. Inspired by our previous observation of cyt c crossing the membrane barrier of giant unilamellar vesicle model systems, we investigate the interaction of cyt c with cardiolipin (CL-containing membranes using the innovative droplet bilayer system that permits electrochemical measurements with simultaneous microscopy observation. We find that cyt c can permeabilize CL-containing membranes by induction of lipid pores in a dose-dependent manner, with membrane lysis eventually observed at relatively high (µM cyt c concentrations due to widespread pore formation in the membrane destabilizing its bilayer structure. Surprisingly, as cyt c concentration is further increased, we find a regime with exceptionally high permeability where a stable membrane barrier is still maintained between droplet compartments. This unusual non-lytic state has a long lifetime (>20 h and can be reversibly formed by mechanically separating the droplets before reforming the contact area between them. The transitions between behavioural regimes are electrostatically driven, demonstrated by their suppression with increasing ionic concentrations and their dependence on CL composition. While membrane permeability could also be induced by cationic PAMAM dendrimers, the non-lytic, highly permeable membrane state could not be reproduced using these synthetic polymers, indicating that details in the structure of cyt c beyond simply possessing a cationic net charge are important for the emergence of this unconventional membrane state. These unexpected findings may hold significance for the mechanism by which cyt c escapes into the cytosol of cells during apoptosis.

  4. Asymmetric Structural Features in Single Supported Lipid Bilayers Containing Cholesterol and GM1 Resolved with Synchrotron X-Ray Reflectivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Christian; Horton, Margaret R.; Krause, Bärbel; Gast, Alice P.; Rädler, Joachim O.; Nickel, Bert

    2008-01-01

    The cell membrane comprises numerous protein and lipid molecules capable of asymmetric organization between leaflets and liquid-liquid phase separation. We use single supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) to model cell membranes, and study how cholesterol and asymmetrically oriented ganglioside receptor GM1 affect membrane structure using synchrotron x-ray reflectivity. Using mixtures of cholesterol, sphingomyelin, and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, we characterize the structure of liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered SLBs in terms of acyl-chain density, headgroup size, and leaflet thickness. SLBs modeling the liquid-ordered phase are 10 Å thicker and have a higher acyl-chain electron density (〈ρchain〉 = 0.33 e−/Å3) compared to SLBs modeling the liquid-disordered phase, or pure phosphatidylcholine SLBs (〈ρchain〉 = 0.28 e−/Å3). Incorporating GM1 into the distal bilayer leaflet results in membrane asymmetry and thickening of the leaflet of 4–9 Å. The structural effect of GM1 is more complex in SLBs of cholesterol/sphingomyelin/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, where the distal chains show a high electron density (〈ρchain〉 = 0.33 e−/Å3) and the lipid diffusion constant is reduced by ∼50%, as measured by fluorescence microscopy. These results give quantitative information about the leaflet asymmetry and electron density changes induced by receptor molecules that penetrate a single lipid bilayer. PMID:18375517

  5. Stabilization of functional recombinant cannabinoid receptor CB(2 in detergent micelles and lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishna Vukoti

    Full Text Available Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms of activation of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs is among the most challenging tasks for modern membrane biology. For studies by high resolution analytical methods, these integral membrane receptors have to be expressed in large quantities, solubilized from cell membranes and purified in detergent micelles, which may result in a severe destabilization and a loss of function. Here, we report insights into differential effects of detergents, lipids and cannabinoid ligands on stability of the recombinant cannabinoid receptor CB(2, and provide guidelines for preparation and handling of the fully functional receptor suitable for a wide array of downstream applications. While we previously described the expression in Escherichia coli, purification and liposome-reconstitution of multi-milligram quantities of CB(2, here we report an efficient stabilization of the recombinant receptor in micelles - crucial for functional and structural characterization. The effects of detergents, lipids and specific ligands on structural stability of CB(2 were assessed by studying activation of G proteins by the purified receptor reconstituted into liposomes. Functional structure of the ligand binding pocket of the receptor was confirmed by binding of (2H-labeled ligand measured by solid-state NMR. We demonstrate that a concerted action of an anionic cholesterol derivative, cholesteryl hemisuccinate (CHS and high affinity cannabinoid ligands CP-55,940 or SR-144,528 are required for efficient stabilization of the functional fold of CB(2 in dodecyl maltoside (DDM/CHAPS detergent solutions. Similar to CHS, the negatively charged phospholipids with the serine headgroup (PS exerted significant stabilizing effects in micelles while uncharged phospholipids were not effective. The purified CB(2 reconstituted into lipid bilayers retained functionality for up to several weeks enabling high resolution structural studies of this GPCR at

  6. Insertion and self-diffusion of a monotopic protein, the Aquifex aeolicus sulfide quinone reductase, in supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harb, Frédéric; Prunetti, Laurence; Giudici-Orticoni, Marie-Thérèse; Guiral, Marianne; Tinland, Bernard

    2015-10-01

    Monotopic proteins constitute a class of membrane proteins that bind tightly to cell membranes, but do not span them. We present a FRAPP (Fluorescence Recovery After Patterned Photobleaching) study of the dynamics of a bacterial monotopic protein, SQR (sulfide quinone oxidoreductase) from the thermophilic bacteria Aquifex aeolicus, inserted into two different types of lipid bilayers (EggPC: L-α-phosphatidylcholine (Egg, Chicken) and DMPC: 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) supported on two different types of support (mica or glass). It sheds light on the behavior of a monotopic protein inside the bilayer. The insertion of SQR is more efficient when the bilayer is in the fluid phase than in the gel phase. We observed diffusion of the protein, with no immobile fraction, and deduced from the diffusion coefficient measurements that the resulting inserted object is the same whatever the incubation conditions, i.e. homogeneous in terms of oligomerization state. As expected, the diffusion coefficient of the SQR is smaller in the gel phase than in the fluid phase. In the supported lipid bilayer, the diffusion coefficient of the SQR is smaller than the diffusion coefficient of phospholipids in both gel and fluid phase. SQR shows a diffusion behavior different from the transmembrane protein α-hemolysin, and consistent with its monotopic character. Preliminary experiments in the presence of the substrate of SQR, DecylUbiquinone, an analogue of quinone, component of transmembrane electrons transport systems of eukaryotic and prokaryotic organisms, have been carried out. Finally, we studied the behavior of SQR, in terms of insertion and diffusion, in bilayers formed with lipids from Aquifex aeolicus. All the conclusions that we have found in the biomimetic systems applied to the biological system.

  7. Heating and temperature gradients of lipid bilayer samples induced by RF irradiation in MAS solid-state NMR experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Zhang, Zhengfeng; Zhao, Weijing; Wang, Liying; Yang, Jun

    2016-05-09

    The MAS solid-state NMR has been a powerful technique for studying membrane proteins within the native-like lipid bilayer environment. In general, RF irradiation in MAS NMR experiments can heat and potentially destroy expensive membrane protein samples. However, under practical MAS NMR experimental conditions, detailed characterization of RF heating effect of lipid bilayer samples is still lacking. Herein, using (1) H chemical shift of water for temperature calibration, we systematically study the dependence of RF heating on hydration levels and salt concentrations of three lipids in MAS NMR experiments. Under practical (1) H decoupling conditions used in biological MAS NMR experiments, three lipids show different dependence of RF heating on hydration levels as well as salt concentrations, which are closely associated with the properties of lipids. The maximum temperature elevation of about 10 °C is similar for the three lipids containing 200% hydration, which is much lower than that in static solid-state NMR experiments. The RF heating due to salt is observed to be less than that due to hydration, with a maximum temperature elevation of less than 4 °C in the hydrated samples containing 120 mmol l(-1) of salt. Upon RF irradiation, the temperature gradient across the sample is observed to be greatly increased up to 20 °C, as demonstrated by the remarkable broadening of (1) H signal of water. Based on detailed characterization of RF heating effect, we demonstrate that RF heating and temperature gradient can be significantly reduced by decreasing the hydration levels of lipid bilayer samples from 200% to 30%. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Mechanisms of peptide-induced pore formation in lipid bilayers investigated by oriented 31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kresten Bertelsen

    Full Text Available There is a considerable interest in understanding the function of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs, but the details of their mode of action is not fully understood. This motivates extensive efforts in determining structural and mechanistic parameters for AMP's interaction with lipid membranes. In this study we show that oriented-sample (31P solid-state NMR spectroscopy can be used to probe the membrane perturbations and disruption by AMPs. For two AMPs, alamethicin and novicidin, we observe that the majority of the lipids remain in a planar bilayer conformation but that a number of lipids are involved in the peptide anchoring. These lipids display reduced dynamics. Our study supports previous studies showing that alamethicin adopts a transmembrane arrangement without significant disturbance of the surrounding lipids, while novicidin forms toroidal pores at high concentrations leading to more extensive membrane disturbance.

  9. Effect of intra-membrane C60 fullerenes on the modulus of elasticity and the mechanical resistance of gel and fluid lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jihan; Liang, Dehai; Contera, Sonia

    2015-10-28

    Penetration and partition of C60 to the lipid bilayer core are both relevant to C60 toxicity, and useful to realise C60 biomedical potential. A key aspect is the effect of C60 on bilayer mechanical properties. Here, we present an experimental study on the mechanical effect of the incorporation of C60 into the hydrophobic core of fluid and gel phase zwitterionic phosphatidylcholine (PC) lipid bilayers. We demonstrate its incorporation inside the hydrophobic lipid core and the effect on the packing of the lipids and the vesicle size using a combination of infrared (IR) spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy (AFM) and laser light scattering. Using AFM we measured the Young's modulus of elasticity (E) of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC), 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) and 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC) in the absence (presence) of intra-membranous C60 at 24.5 °C. E of fluid phase supported bilayers is not altered by C60, but E increases with incorporation of C60 in gel phase bilayers. The increase is higher for longer hydrocarbon chains: 1.6 times for DPPC and 2 times for DSPC. However the mechanical resistance of gel phase bilayers of curved bilayered structures decreases with the incorporation of C60. Our combined results indicate that C60 causes a decrease in gel phase lipid mobility, i.e. an increase in membrane viscosity.

  10. The OpenPicoAmp: An Open-Source Planar Lipid Bilayer Amplifier for Hands-On Learning of Neuroscience

    OpenAIRE

    Vadim Shlyonsky; Freddy Dupuis; David Gall

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the electrical biophysical properties of the cell membrane can be difficult for neuroscience students as it relies solely on lectures of theoretical models without practical hands on experiments. To address this issue, we developed an open-source lipid bilayer amplifier, the OpenPicoAmp, which is appropriate for use in introductory courses in biophysics or neurosciences at the undergraduate level, dealing with the electrical properties of the cell membrane. The amplifier is desi...

  11. Antimicrobial Peptide Simulations and the Influence of Force Field on the Free Energy for Pore Formation in Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, W F Drew; Hong, Chun Kit; Wang, Yi; Tieleman, D Peter

    2016-09-13

    Due to antimicrobial resistance, the development of new drugs to combat bacterial and fungal infections is an important area of research. Nature uses short, charged, and amphipathic peptides for antimicrobial defense, many of which disrupt the lipid membrane in addition to other possible targets inside the cell. Computer simulations have revealed atomistic details for the interactions of antimicrobial peptides and cell-penetrating peptides with lipid bilayers. Strong interactions between the polar interface and the charged peptides can induce bilayer deformations - including membrane rupture and peptide stabilization of a hydrophilic pore. Here, we performed microsecond-long simulations of the antimicrobial peptide CM15 in a POPC bilayer expecting to observe pore formation (based on previous molecular dynamics simulations). We show that caution is needed when interpreting results of equilibrium peptide-membrane simulations, given the length of time single trajectories can dwell in local energy minima for 100's of ns to microseconds. While we did record significant membrane perturbations from the CM15 peptide, pores were not observed. We explain this discrepancy by computing the free energy for pore formation with different force fields. Our results show a large difference in the free energy barrier (ca. 40 kJ/mol) against pore formation predicted by the different force fields that would result in orders of magnitude differences in the simulation time required to observe spontaneous pore formation. This explains why previous simulations using the Berger lipid parameters reported pores induced by charged peptides, while with CHARMM based models pores were not observed in our long time-scale simulations. We reconcile some of the differences in the distance dependent free energies by shifting the free energy profiles to account for thickness differences between force fields. The shifted curves show that all the models describe small defects in lipid bilayers in a

  12. Fabrication and characterization of an integrated ionic device from suspended polypyrrole and alamethicin-reconstituted lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Northcutt, Robert; Sundaresan, Vishnu-Baba

    2012-09-01

    Conducting polymers are electroactive materials that undergo conformal relaxation of the polymer backbone in the presence of an electrical field through ion exchange with solid or aqueous electrolytes. This conformal relaxation and the associated morphological changes make conducting polymers highly suitable for actuation and sensing applications. Among smart materials, bioderived active materials also use ion transport for sensing and actuation functions via selective ion transport. The transporter proteins extracted from biological cell membranes and reconstituted into a bilayer lipid membrane in bioderived active materials regulate ion transport for engineering functions. The protein transporter reconstituted in the bilayer lipid membrane is referred to as the bioderived membrane and serves as the active component in bioderived active materials. Inspired by the similarities in the physics of transduction in conducting polymers and bioderived active materials, an integrated ionic device is formed from the bioderived membrane and the conducting polymer membrane. This ionic device is fabricated into a laminated thin-film membrane and a common ion that can be processed by the bioderived and the conducting polymer membranes couple the ionic function of these two membranes. An integrated ionic device, fabricated from polypyrrole (PPy) doped with sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDBS) and an alamethicin-reconstituted DPhPC bilayer lipid membrane, is presented in this paper. A voltage-gated sodium current regulates the electrochemical response in the PPy(DBS) layer. The integrated device is fabricated on silicon-based substrates through microfabrication, electropolymerization, and vesicle fusion, and ionic activity is characterized through electrochemical measurements.

  13. Spontaneous adsorption of coiled-coil model peptides K and E to a mixed lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pluhackova, Kristyna; Wassenaar, Tsjerk A; Kirsch, Sonja; Böckmann, Rainer A

    2015-03-26

    A molecular description of the lipid-protein interactions underlying the adsorption of proteins to membranes is crucial for understanding, for example, the specificity of adsorption or the binding strength of a protein to a bilayer, or for characterizing protein-induced changes of membrane properties. In this paper, we extend an automated in silico assay (DAFT) for binding studies and apply it to characterize the adsorption of the model fusion peptides E and K to a mixed phospholipid/cholesterol membrane using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. In addition, we couple the coarse-grained protocol to reverse transformation to atomistic resolution, thereby allowing to study molecular interactions with high detail. The experimentally observed differential binding of the peptides E and K to membranes, as well as the increased binding affinity of helical over unstructered peptides, could be well reproduced using the polarizable Martini coarse-grained (CG) force field. Binding to neutral membranes is shown to be dominated by initial binding of the positively charged N-terminus to the phospholipid headgroup region, followed by membrane surface-aligned insertion of the peptide at the interface between the hydrophobic core of the membrane and its polar headgroup region. Both coarse-grained and atomistic simulations confirm a before hypothesized snorkeling of lysine side chains for the membrane-bound state of the peptide K. Cholesterol was found to be enriched in peptide vicinity, which is probably of importance for the mechanism of membrane fusion. The applied sequential multiscale method, using coarse-grained simulations for the slow adsorption process of peptides to membranes followed by backward transformation to atomistic detail and subsequent atomistic simulations of the preformed peptide-lipid complexes, is shown to be a versatile approach to study the interactions of peptides or proteins with biomembranes.

  14. Permeation of ammonia across bilayer lipid membranes studied by ammonium ion selective microelectrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonenko, Y N; Pohl, P; Denisov, G A

    1997-01-01

    Ammonium ion and proton concentration profiles near the surface of a planar bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) generated by an ammonium ion gradient across the BLM are studied by means of microelectrodes. If the concentration of the weak base is small compared with the buffer capacity of the medium, the experimental results are well described by the standard physiological model in which the transmembrane transport is assumed to be limited by diffusion across unstirred layers (USLs) adjacent to the membrane at basic pH values (pH > pKa) and by the permeation across the membrane itself at acidic pH values. In a poorly buffered medium, however, these predictions are not fulfilled. A pH gradient that develops within the USL must be taken into account under these conditions. From the concentration distribution of ammonium ions recorded at both sides of the BLM, the membrane permeability for ammonia is determined for BLMs of different lipid composition (48 x 10(-3) cm/s in the case of diphytanoyl phosphatidylcholine). A theoretical model of weak electrolyte transport that is based on the knowledge of reaction and diffusion rates is found to describe well the experimental profiles under any conditions. The microelectrode technique can be applied for the study of the membrane permeability of other weak acids or bases, even if no microsensor for the substance under study is available, because with the help of the theoretical model the membrane permeability values can be estimated from pH profiles alone. The accuracy of such measurements is limited, however, because small changes in the equilibrium constants, diffusion coefficients, or concentrations used for computations create a systematic error. PMID:9129821

  15. Design and characterization of a membrane protein unfolding platform in lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincent G Nadeau

    Full Text Available Accurate measurement of membrane protein stability--and particularly how it may vary as a result of disease-phenotypic mutations--ideally requires a denaturant that can unfold a membrane-embedded structure while leaving the solubilizing environment unaffected. The steric trap method fulfills this requirement by using monovalent streptavidin (mSA molecules to unfold membrane proteins engineered with two spatially close biotin tags. Here we adapted this method to an 87-residue helix-loop-helix (hairpin construct derived from helices 3 and 4 in the transmembrane domain of the human cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR, wherein helix-helix tertiary interactions are anticipated to confer a portion of construct stability. The wild type CFTR TM3/4 hairpin construct was modified with two accessible biotin tags for mSA-induced unfolding, along with two helix-terminal pyrene labels to monitor loss of inter-helical contacts by pyrene excimer fluorescence. A series of eight constructs with biotin tags at varying distances from the helix-terminal pyrene labels were expressed, purified and labeled appropriately; all constructs exhibited largely helical circular dichroism spectra. We found that addition of mSA to an optimized construct in lipid vesicles led to a complete and reversible loss in pyrene excimer fluorescence and mSA binding, and hence hairpin unfolding--results further supported by SDS-PAGE visualization of mSA bound and unbound species. While some dimeric/oligomeric populations persist that may affect quantitation of the unfolding step, our characterization of the design yields a promising prototype of a future platform for the systematic study of membrane protein folding in a lipid bilayer environment.

  16. Model lipid bilayers mimic non-specific interactions of gold nanoparticles with macrophage plasma membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montis, Costanza; Generini, Viola; Boccalini, Giulia; Bergese, Paolo; Bani, Daniele; Berti, Debora

    2018-04-15

    Understanding the interaction between nanomaterials and biological interfaces is a key unmet goal that still hampers clinical translation of nanomedicine. Here we investigate and compare non-specific interaction of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) with synthetic lipid and wild type macrophage membranes. A comprehensive data set was generated by systematically varying the structural and physicochemical properties of the AuNPs (size, shape, charge, surface functionalization) and of the synthetic membranes (composition, fluidity, bending properties and surface charge), which allowed to unveil the matching conditions for the interaction of the AuNPs with macrophage plasma membranes in vitro. This effort directly proved for the first time that synthetic bilayers can be set to mimic and predict with high fidelity key aspects of nanoparticle interaction with macrophage eukaryotic plasma membranes. It then allowed to model the experimental observations according to classical interface thermodynamics and in turn determine the paramount role played by non-specific contributions, primarily electrostatic, Van der Waals and bending energy, in driving nanoparticle-plasma membrane interactions. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Determining the Gaussian Modulus and Edge Properties of 2D Materials: From Graphene to Lipid Bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelisko, Matthew; Ahmadpoor, Fatemeh; Gao, Huajian; Sharma, Pradeep

    2017-08-01

    The dominant deformation behavior of two-dimensional materials (bending) is primarily governed by just two parameters: bending rigidity and the Gaussian modulus. These properties also set the energy scale for various important physical and biological processes such as pore formation, cell fission and generally, any event accompanied by a topological change. Unlike the bending rigidity, the Gaussian modulus is, however, notoriously difficult to evaluate via either experiments or atomistic simulations. In this Letter, recognizing that the Gaussian modulus and edge tension play a nontrivial role in the fluctuations of a 2D material edge, we derive closed-form expressions for edge fluctuations. Combined with atomistic simulations, we use the developed approach to extract the Gaussian modulus and edge tension at finite temperatures for both graphene and various types of lipid bilayers. Our results possibly provide the first reliable estimate of this elusive property at finite temperatures and appear to suggest that earlier estimates must be revised. In particular, we show that, if previously estimated properties are employed, the graphene-free edge will exhibit unstable behavior at room temperature. Remarkably, in the case of graphene, we show that the Gaussian modulus and edge tension even change sign at finite temperatures.

  18. Stochastic adhesion of hydroxylated atomic force microscopy tips to supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apetrei, Aurelia; Sirghi, Lucel

    2013-12-31

    This work reports results of an atomic force microscopy (AFM) study of adhesion force between hydroxylated AFM tips and supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) of phosphatidylcholine in phosphate buffer saline solution at neutral pH. Silicon nitride AFM probes were hydroxylated by treatment in water vapor plasma and used in force spectroscopy measurements of adhesion force on SLBs with control of contact loading force and residence time. The measurements showed a stochastic behavior of adhesion force that was attributed to stochastic formation of hydrogen bonds between the hydroxyl groups on the AFM tip and oxygen atoms from the phosphate groups of the phosphatidylcholine molecules. Analysis of a large number of force curves revealed a very low probability of hydrogen bond formation, a probability that increased with the increase of contact loading force and residence time. The variance and mean values of adhesion force showed a linear dependence on each other, which indicated that hydrogen bond formation obeyed the Poisson distribution of probability. This allowed for the quantitative determination of the rupture force per hydrogen bond of about 40 pN and showed the absence of other nonspecific interaction forces.

  19. Large-conductance cholesterol-amphotericin B channels in reconstituted lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilma, Solomon; Cannon-Sykora, Jennifer; Samoylov, Alexandre; Lo, Ting; Liu, Nangou; Brinker, C Jeffrey; Neely, William C; Vodyanoy, Vitaly

    2007-02-15

    The antimycotic activity of amphotericin B (AmB) depends on its ability to make complexes sterols to form ion channels that cause membrane leakage. To study this phenomenon, surface pressure (pi) as a function of surface area (A) and pi-A hysteresis were measured in monolayers of AmB-cholesterol mixtures on the water-air interface. The most stable monolayers were produced from molecules of AmB and cholesterol with 2:1 stoichiometry. At this ratio, AmB and cholesterol interact to form ion channels in lipid bilayers with millisecond dwell times and conductances of 4-400 pS. The AmB-cholesterol complexes assemble in three, four, etc., subunit aggregates to form ion channels of diverse and large-conductances. Their I-V characteristics were linear over a range of +/-200 mV. The channel currents were inhibited by the addition of tetraethylammonium (TEA), potassium channel blocker, to the cis-side of the membrane. Likewise, AmB-cholesterol complexes reconstituted in membrane-coated nanoporous silicon dioxide surfaces showed single channel behavior with large amplitudes at various voltages. Large-conductance ion channels show great promise for use in biosensors on solid supports.

  20. Porous nanoparticle-supported lipid bilayers (protocells) for targeted delivery and methods of using same

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brinker, C. Jeffrey; Carnes, Eric C.; Ashley, Carlee Erin; Willman, Cheryl L.

    2017-02-28

    The present invention is directed to protocells for specific targeting of hepatocellular and other cancer cells which comprise a nanoporous silica core with a supported lipid bilayer; at least one agent which facilitates cancer cell death (such as a traditional small molecule, a macromolecular cargo (e.g. siRNA or a protein toxin such as ricin toxin A-chain or diphtheria toxin A-chain) and/or a histone-packaged plasmid DNA disposed within the nanoporous silica core (preferably supercoiled in order to more efficiently package the DNA into protocells) which is optionally modified with a nuclear localization sequence to assist in localizing protocells within the nucleus of the cancer cell and the ability to express peptides involved in therapy (apoptosis/cell death) of the cancer cell or as a reporter, a targeting peptide which targets cancer cells in tissue to be treated such that binding of the protocell to the targeted cells is specific and enhanced and a fusogenic peptide that promotes endosomal escape of protocells and encapsulated DNA. Protocells according to the present invention may be used to treat cancer, especially including hepatocellular (liver) cancer using novel binding peptides (c-MET peptides) which selectively bind to hepatocellular tissue or to function in diagnosis of cancer, including cancer treatment and drug discovery.

  1. Reconstitution of highly purified saxitoxin-sensitive Na+-channels into planar lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanke, W; Boheim, G; Barhanin, J; Pauron, D; Lazdunski, M

    1984-01-01

    Highly purified Na+-channels isolated from rat brain have been reconstituted into virtually solvent-free planar lipid bilayer membranes. Two different types of electrically excitable channels were detected in the absence of any neurotoxins. The activity of both channels was blocked by saxitoxin. The first channel type is highly selective for Na+ over K+ (approximately 10:1), it shows a bursting behavior, a conductance of 25 pS in Na+-Ringer and undergoes continuous opening and closing events for periods of minutes within a defined range of negative membranes voltages. The second channel type has a conductance of 150 pS and a lower selectivity for Na+ and K+ (2.2:1); only a few opening and closing events are observed with this channel after one voltage jump. The latter type of channel is also found with highly purified Na+-channel from Electrophorus electricus electroplax. A qualitative analysis of the physicochemical and pharmacological properties of the high conductance channel has been carried out. Channel properties are affected not only by saxitoxin but also by a scorpion (Centruroides suffusus suffusus) toxin and a sea anemone (Anemonia sulcata) toxin both known to be selective for the Na+-channel. The spontaneous transformation of the large conductance channel type into the small one has been considered; the two channel types may represent the expression of activity of different conformational states of the same protein. Images Fig. 1. PMID:6325173

  2. Computer simulations of the diffusion of Na(+) and Cl(-) ions across POPC lipid bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Rangeen; Matthai, C C

    2017-03-14

    We have carried out molecular dynamics simulations using NAMD to study the diffusivity of Na and Cl ions across a POPC lipid bilayer membrane. We show that an imbalance of positively and negatively charged ions on either side of the membrane leads to the diffusion of ions and water molecules. We considered the cases of both weak and very strong charge imbalance across the membrane. The diffusion coefficients of the ions have been determined from the mean square displacements of the particles as a function of time. We find that for strong electrochemical gradients, both the Na and Cl ions diffuse rapidly through pores in the membrane with diffusion coefficients up to ten times larger than in water. Rather surprisingly, we found that although the Na ions are the first to begin the permeation process due to the lower potential barrier that they experience compared to the Cl ions, the latter complete the permeation across the barrier more quickly due to their faster diffusion rates.

  3. Computer simulations of the diffusion of Na+ and Cl- ions across POPC lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salih, Rangeen; Matthai, C. C.

    2017-03-01

    We have carried out molecular dynamics simulations using NAMD to study the diffusivity of Na and Cl ions across a POPC lipid bilayer membrane. We show that an imbalance of positively and negatively charged ions on either side of the membrane leads to the diffusion of ions and water molecules. We considered the cases of both weak and very strong charge imbalance across the membrane. The diffusion coefficients of the ions have been determined from the mean square displacements of the particles as a function of time. We find that for strong electrochemical gradients, both the Na and Cl ions diffuse rapidly through pores in the membrane with diffusion coefficients up to ten times larger than in water. Rather surprisingly, we found that although the Na ions are the first to begin the permeation process due to the lower potential barrier that they experience compared to the Cl ions, the latter complete the permeation across the barrier more quickly due to their faster diffusion rates.

  4. New insight into probe-location dependent polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces: comparison between gel- and fluid-phases of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Moirangthem Kiran; Shweta, Him; Khan, Mohammad Firoz; Sen, Sobhan

    2016-09-21

    Environment polarity and hydration at lipid/water interfaces play important roles in membrane biology, which are investigated here using a new homologous series of 4-aminophthalimide-based fluorescent molecules (4AP-Cn; n = 2-10, 12) having different lipophilicities (octanol/water partition coefficient - log P). We show that 4AP-Cn molecules probe a peculiar stepwise polarity (E) profile at the lipid/water interface of the gel-phase (Lβ') DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature, which was not anticipated in earlier studies. However, the same molecules probe only a subtle but continuous polarity change at the interface of water and the fluid-phase (Lα) DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayer at room temperature. Fluorescence quenching experiments indicate that solutes with different log P values adsorb at different depths across DPPC/water and DOPC/water interfaces, which correlate with the polarity profiles observed at the interfaces. Molecular dynamics simulations performed on eight probe-lipid systems (four in each of the DPPC and DOPC bilayers - a total run of 2.6 μs) support experimental results, providing further information on the relative position and angle distributions as well as hydration of probes at the interfaces. Simulation results indicate that besides positions, probe orientations also play an important role in defining the local dielectric environment by controlling the probes' exposure to water at the interfaces especially of the gel-phase DPPC bilayer. The results suggest that 4AP-Cn probes are well suited for studying solvation properties at lipid/water interfaces of gel- and fluid-phases simultaneously.

  5. Ion transport through lipid bilayers by synthetic ionophores: modulation of activity and selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Riccardis, Francesco; Izzo, Irene; Montesarchio, Daniela; Tecilla, Paolo

    2013-12-17

    The ion-coupled processes that occur in the plasma membrane regulate the cell machineries in all the living organisms. The details of the chemical events that allow ion transport in biological systems remain elusive. However, investigations of the structure and function of natural and artificial transporters has led to increasing insights about the conductance mechanisms. Since the publication of the first successful artificial system by Tabushi and co-workers in 1982, synthetic chemists have designed and constructed a variety of chemically diverse and effective low molecular weight ionophores. Despite their relative structural simplicity, ionophores must satisfy several requirements. They must partition in the membrane, interact specifically with ions, shield them from the hydrocarbon core of the phospholipid bilayer, and transport ions from one side of the membrane to the other. All these attributes require amphipathic molecules in which the polar donor set used for ion recognition (usually oxygens for cations and hydrogen bond donors for anions) is arranged on a lipophilic organic scaffold. Playing with these two structural motifs, donor atoms and scaffolds, researchers have constructed a variety of different ionophores, and we describe a subset of interesting examples in this Account. Despite the ample structural diversity, structure/activity relationships studies reveal common features. Even when they include different hydrophilic moieties (oxyethylene chains, free hydroxyl, etc.) and scaffolds (steroid derivatives, neutral or polar macrocycles, etc.), amphipathic molecules, that cannot span the entire phospholipid bilayer, generate defects in the contact zone between the ionophore and the lipids and increase the permeability in the bulk membrane. Therefore, topologically complex structures that span the entire membrane are needed to elicit channel-like and ion selective behaviors. In particular the alternate-calix[4]arene macrocycle proved to be a versatile

  6. Lindane Suppresses the Lipid-bilayer Permeability in Main Transition Region

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sabra, Mads Christian; Jørgensen, Kent; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1996-01-01

    the transition and lower the transition temperature, without changing the transition enthalpy significantly. Lindane therefore enhances the thermal fluctuations of the bilayer. The calorimetric data furthermore suggest that the bilayer structure is intact and not disrupted by even high concentrations (32 mol...

  7. Does fluoride disrupt hydrogen bond network in cationic lipid bilayer? Time-dependent fluorescence shift of Laurdan and molecular dynamics simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pokorna, Sarka; Jurkiewicz, Piotr; Hof, Martin, E-mail: martin.hof@jh-inst.cas.cz [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Dolejskova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Vazdar, Mario [Division of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Rudjer Bošković Institute, P.O.B. 180, HR-10002 Zagreb (Croatia); Cwiklik, Lukasz [J. Heyrovský Institute of Physical Chemistry of the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic v.v.i., Dolejskova 3, 18223 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Jungwirth, Pavel [Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Flemingovo nám. 2, 16610 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Department of Physics, Tampere University of Technology, P.O. Box 692, FI-33101 Tampere (Finland)

    2014-12-14

    Time-dependent fluorescence shift (TDFS) of Laurdan embedded in phospholipid bilayers reports on hydration and mobility of the phospholipid acylgroups. Exchange of H{sub 2}O with D{sub 2}O prolongs the lifetime of lipid-water and lipid-water-lipid interactions, which is reflected in a significantly slower TDFS kinetics. Combining TDFS measurements in H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers with atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations provides a unique tool for characterization of the hydrogen bonding at the acylgroup level of lipid bilayers. In this work, we use this approach to study the influence of fluoride anions on the properties of cationic bilayers composed of trimethylammonium-propane (DOTAP). The results obtained for DOTAP are confronted with those for neutral phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) bilayers. Both in DOTAP and DOPC H{sub 2}O/D{sub 2}O exchange prolongs hydrogen-bonding lifetime and does not disturb bilayer structure. These results are confirmed by MD simulations. TDFS experiments show, however, that for DOTAP this effect is cancelled in the presence of fluoride ions. We interpret these results as evidence that strongly hydrated fluoride is able to steal water molecules that bridge lipid carbonyls. Consequently, when attracted to DOTAP bilayer, fluoride disrupts the local hydrogen-bonding network, and the differences in TDFS kinetics between H{sub 2}O and D{sub 2}O hydrated bilayers are no longer observed. A distinct behavior of fluoride is also evidenced by MD simulations, which show different lipid-ion binding for Cl{sup −} and F{sup −}.

  8. Lipid Bilayer Membrane in a Silicon Based Micron Sized Cavity Accessed by Atomic Force Microscopy and Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Muhammad Shuja; Dosoky, Noura Sayed; Patel, Darayas; Weimer, Jeffrey; Williams, John Dalton

    2017-07-05

    Supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) are widely used in biophysical research to probe the functionality of biological membranes and to provide diagnoses in high throughput drug screening. Formation of SLBs at below phase transition temperature (Tm) has applications in nano-medicine research where low temperature profiles are required. Herein, we report the successful production of SLBs at above-as well as below-the Tm of the lipids in an anisotropically etched, silicon-based micro-cavity. The Si-based cavity walls exhibit controlled temperature which assist in the quick and stable formation of lipid bilayer membranes. Fusion of large unilamellar vesicles was monitored in real time in an aqueous environment inside the Si cavity using atomic force microscopy (AFM), and the lateral organization of the lipid molecules was characterized until the formation of the SLBs. The stability of SLBs produced was also characterized by recording the electrical resistance and the capacitance using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Analysis was done in the frequency regime of 10(-2)-10⁵ Hz at a signal voltage of 100 mV and giga-ohm sealed impedance was obtained continuously over four days. Finally, the cantilever tip in AFM was utilized to estimate the bilayer thickness and to calculate the rupture force at the interface of the tip and the SLB. We anticipate that a silicon-based, micron-sized cavity has the potential to produce highly-stable SLBs below their Tm. The membranes inside the Si cavity could last for several days and allow robust characterization using AFM or EIS. This could be an excellent platform for nanomedicine experiments that require low operating temperatures.

  9. Structure and dynamics of Penetratin's association and translocation to a lipid bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ignacio J., General; Asciutto, Eliana K.

    2017-03-01

    Penetratin belongs to the important class of small and positively charged peptides, capable of entering cells. The determination of the optimal peptidic structure for translocation is challenging; results obtained so far are varied and dependent on several factors. In this work, we review the dynamics of association of Penetratin with a modeled dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC) lipid membrane using molecular dynamics simulations with last generation force fields. Penetratin's structural preferences are determined using a Markov state model. It is observed that the peptide retains a helical form in the membrane associated state, just as in water, with the exception of both termini which lose helicity, facilitating the interaction of terminal residues with the phosphate groups on the membrane's outer layer. The optimal orientation for insertion is found to be with the peptide's axis forming a small angle with the interface, and with R1 stretching toward the bilayer. The interaction between arginine side-chains and phosphate groups is found to be greater than the corresponding to lysine, mainly due to a higher number of hydrogen bonds between them. The free energy profile of translocation is qualitatively studied using Umbrella Sampling. It is found that there are different paths of penetration, that greatly differ in size of free energy barrier. The lowest path is compatible with residues R10 to K13 leading the way through the membrane and pulling the rest of the peptide. When the other side is reached, the C-terminus overtakes those residues, and finally breaks out of the membrane. The peptide's secondary structure during this traversal suffers some changes with respect to the association structure but, overall, conserves its helicity, with both termini in a more disordered state.

  10. Shape Effect on Particle-Lipid Bilayer Membrane Association, Cellular Uptake, and Cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tree-Udom, Thapakorn; Seemork, Jiraporn; Shigyou, Kazuki; Hamada, Tsutomu; Sangphech, Naunpun; Palaga, Tanapat; Insin, Numpon; Pan-In, Porntip; Wanichwecharungruang, Supason

    2015-11-04

    Although computer simulation and cell culture experiments have shown that elongated spherical particles can be taken up into cells more efficiently than spherical particles, experimental investigation on effects of these different shapes over the particle-membrane association has never been reported. Therefore, whether the higher cellular uptake of an elongated spherical particles is a result of a better particle-membrane association as suggested by some calculation works or a consequence of its influence on other cellular trans-membrane components involved in particle translocation process, cannot be concluded. Here, we study the effect of particle shape on the particle-membrane interaction by monitoring the association between particles of various shapes and lipid bilayer membrane of artificial cell-sized liposomes. Among the three shaped lanthanide-doped NaYF4 particles, all with high shape purity and uniformity, similar crystal phase, and surface chemistry, the elongated spherical particle shows the highest level of membrane association, followed by the spherical particle with a similar radius, and the hexagonal prism-shaped particle, respectively. The free energy of membrane curvature calculated based on a membrane indentation induced by a particle association indicates that among the three particle shapes, the elongated spherical particle give the most stable membrane curvature. The elongated spherical particles show the highest cellular uptake into cytosol of human melanoma (A-375) and human liver carcinoma (HepG2) cells when observed through a confocal laser scanning fluorescence microscope. Quantitative study using flow cytometry also gives the same result. The elongated spherical particles also possess the highest cytotoxicity in A-375 and normal skin (WI-38) cell lines, comparing to the other two shaped particles.

  11. Structure and dynamics of Penetratin’s association and translocation to a lipid bilayer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignacio J. General

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Penetratin belongs to the important class of small and positively charged peptides, capable of entering cells. The determination of the optimal peptidic structure for translocation is challenging; results obtained so far are varied and dependent on several factors. In this work, we review the dynamics of association of Penetratin with a modeled dioleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DOPC lipid membrane using molecular dynamics simulations with last generation force fields. Penetratin’s structural preferences are determined using a Markov state model. It is observed that the peptide retains a helical form in the membrane associated state, just as in water, with the exception of both termini which lose helicity, facilitating the interaction of terminal residues with the phosphate groups on the membrane’s outer layer. The optimal orientation for insertion is found to be with the peptide’s axis forming a small angle with the interface, and with R1 stretching toward the bilayer. The interaction between arginine side-chains and phosphate groups is found to be greater than the corresponding to lysine, mainly due to a higher number of hydrogen bonds between them. The free energy profile of translocation is qualitatively studied using Umbrella Sampling. It is found that there are different paths of penetration, that greatly differ in size of free energy barrier. The lowest path is compatible with residues R10 to K13 leading the way through the membrane and pulling the rest of the peptide. When the other side is reached, the C-terminus overtakes those residues, and finally breaks out of the membrane. The peptide’s secondary structure during this traversal suffers some changes with respect to the association structure but, overall, conserves its helicity, with both termini in a more disordered state.

  12. Membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to a target lipid bilayer: an EPR site-directed spin-labeling and relaxation study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Chun Chen

    Full Text Available The second messenger lipid PIP(3 (phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-trisphosphate is generated by the lipid kinase PI3K (phosphoinositide-3-kinase in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, where it regulates a broad array of cell processes by recruiting multiple signaling proteins containing PIP(3-specific pleckstrin homology (PH domains to the membrane surface. Despite the broad importance of PIP(3-specific PH domains, the membrane docking geometry of a PH domain bound to its target PIP(3 lipid on a bilayer surface has not yet been experimentally determined. The present study employs EPR site-directed spin labeling and relaxation methods to elucidate the membrane docking geometry of GRP1 PH domain bound to bilayer-embedded PIP(3. The model target bilayer contains the neutral background lipid PC and both essential targeting lipids: (i PIP(3 target lipid that provides specificity and affinity, and (ii PS facilitator lipid that enhances the PIP(3 on-rate via an electrostatic search mechanism. The EPR approach measures membrane depth parameters for 18 function-retaining spin labels coupled to the PH domain, and for calibration spin labels coupled to phospholipids. The resulting depth parameters, together with the known high resolution structure of the co-complex between GRP1 PH domain and the PIP(3 headgroup, provide sufficient constraints to define an optimized, self-consistent membrane docking geometry. In this optimized geometry the PH domain engulfs the PIP(3 headgroup with minimal bilayer penetration, yielding the shallowest membrane position yet described for a lipid binding domain. This binding interaction displaces the PIP(3 headgroup from its lowest energy position and orientation in the bilayer, but the headgroup remains within its energetically accessible depth and angular ranges. Finally, the optimized docking geometry explains previous biophysical findings including mutations observed to disrupt membrane binding, and the rapid lateral

  13. The OpenPicoAmp : an open-source planar lipid bilayer amplifier for hands-on learning of neuroscience

    CERN Document Server

    Shlyonsky, Vadim; Gall, David

    2014-01-01

    Neuroscience education can be promoted by the availability of low cost and engaging teaching materials. To address this, we developed an open-source lipid bilayer amplifier, the OpenPicoAmp, which is appropriate for use in introductory courses in biophysics or neurosciences concerning the electrical properties of the cell membrane. The amplifier is designed using the common lithographic printed circuit board fabrication process and off-the-shelf electronic components. In addition, we propose a specific design for experimental chambers allowing the insertion of a commercially available polytetrafluoroethylene film. This experimental setup can be used in simple experiments in which students monitor the bilayer formation by capacitance measurement and record unitary currents produced by ionophores like gramicidin A. Used in combination with a low-cost data acquisition board this system provides a complete solution for hands-on lessons, therefore improving the effectiveness in teaching basic neurosciences or biop...

  14. Interbilayer repulsion forces between tension-free lipid bilayers from simulation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smirnova, Y. G.; Aeffner, S.; Risselada, H. J.; Salditt, T.; Marrink, S. J.; Mueller, M.; Knecht, V.

    2013-01-01

    Here we report studies on biologically important intermembrane repulsion forces using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations and experimental (osmotic stress) investigations of repulsion forces between 1-palmitoyl-2-oleyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers. We show that the repulsion between

  15. Lipid bilayers in the gel phase become saturated by triton X-100 at lower surfactant concentrations than those in the fluid phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahyayauch, Hasna; Collado, M Isabel; Alonso, Alicia; Goñi, Felix M

    2012-06-06

    It has been repeatedly observed that lipid bilayers in the gel phase are solubilized by lower concentrations of Triton X-100, at least within certain temperature ranges, or other nonionic detergents than bilayers in the fluid phase. In a previous study, we showed that detergent partition coefficients into the lipid bilayer were the same for the gel and the fluid phases. In this contribution, turbidity, calorimetry, and 31P-NMR concur in showing that bilayers in the gel state (at least down to 13-20°C below the gel-fluid transition temperature) become saturated with detergent at lower detergent concentrations than those in the fluid state, irrespective of temperature. The different saturation may explain the observed differences in solubilization. Copyright © 2012 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Cell adhesion on supported lipid bilayers functionalized with RGD peptides monitored by using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaohua; Wang, Zhao; Zhao, Ansha; Huang, Nan; Chen, Huadong; Zhou, Shuo; Xie, Xiao

    2014-04-01

    Supported lipid bilayer (SLB) is one of the most widely used structures to mimic cell membranes. To study the cell-cell, cell-matrix and cell-material interactions, supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) functionalized with RGD peptides (SLBs-RGD) were prepared by vesicle fusion on a SiO2 quartz crystal, and subsequently bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) adhesion was analyzed. A quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) was utilized to detect the dynamic adsorption behavior of lipid vesicles and BMSCs in real time. Observations obtained by QCM-D signals are confirmed by conducting fluorescence microscopy. QCM-D measurements showed the SLB formation starts at the critical concentration of the vesicles. More BMSCs adhered on SLBs-RGD than on SLBs. With the presence of SLBs, the adhesion cells on SLBs surfaces had a rounded morphology, and cells on SLBs-RGD will take long time to rearrange their cytoskeleton, which led to incomplete spreading compared with SiO2. Differences in adhesion density and adhesion properties of the cells on the different substrates could be traced at the dissipation versus frequency (ΔD/Δf) plots. These results indicate that RGD in/on SLBs could provide anchorage sites for more cells adhesion. QCM-D is demonstrated to be a useful tool for evaluating the interactions between various biological and non-biological systems in situ and in real-time. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Human Rab small GTPase- and class V myosin-mediated membrane tethering in a chemically defined reconstitution system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoshita, Motoki; Mima, Joji

    2017-11-10

    Membrane tethering is a fundamental process essential for the compartmental specificity of intracellular membrane trafficking in eukaryotic cells. Rab-family small GTPases and specific sets of Rab-interacting effector proteins, including coiled-coil tethering proteins and multisubunit tethering complexes, are reported to be responsible for membrane tethering. However, whether and how these key components directly and specifically tether subcellular membranes remains enigmatic. Using chemically defined proteoliposomal systems reconstituted with purified human Rab proteins and synthetic liposomal membranes to study the molecular basis of membrane tethering, we established here that Rab-family GTPases have a highly conserved function to directly mediate membrane tethering, even in the absence of any types of Rab effectors such as the so-called tethering proteins. Moreover, we demonstrate that membrane tethering mediated by endosomal Rab11a is drastically and selectively stimulated by its cognate Rab effectors, class V myosins (Myo5A and Myo5B), in a GTP-dependent manner. Of note, Myo5A and Myo5B exclusively recognized and cooperated with the membrane-anchored form of their cognate Rab11a to support membrane tethering mediated by trans-Rab assemblies on opposing membranes. Our findings support the novel concept that Rab-family proteins provide a bona fide membrane tether to physically and specifically link two distinct lipid bilayers of subcellular membranes. They further indicate that Rab-interacting effector proteins, including class V myosins, can regulate these Rab-mediated membrane-tethering reactions. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Using crosslinkable diacetylene phospholipids to construct two-dimensional packed beds in supported lipid bilayer separation platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Kai Hu, Sheng-Wen Hsiao, Hsun-Yen Mao, Ya-Ming Chen, Yung Chang and Ling Chao

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Separating and purifying cell membrane-associated biomolecules has been a challenge owing to their amphiphilic property. Taking these species out of their native lipid membrane environment usually results in biomolecule degradation. One of the new directions is to use supported lipid bilayer (SLB platforms to separate the membrane species while they are protected in their native environment. Here we used a type of crosslinkable diacetylene phospholipids, diynePC (1,2-bis(10,12-tricosadiynoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, as a packed material to create a 'two-dimensional (2D packed bed' in a SLB platform. After the diynePC SLB is exposed to UV light, some of the diynePC lipids in the SLB can crosslink and the non-crosslinked monomer lipids can be washed away, leaving a 2D porous solid matrix. We incorporated the lipid vesicle deposition method with a microfluidic device to pattern the location of the packed-bed region and the feed region with species to be separated in a SLB platform. Our atomic force microscopy result shows that the nano-scaled structure density of the '2D packed bed' can be tuned by the UV dose applied to the diynePC membrane. When the model membrane biomolecules were forced to transport through the packed-bed region, their concentration front velocities were found to decrease linearly with the UV dose, indicating the successful creation of packed obstacles in these 2D lipid membrane separation platforms.

  19. Attenuation of proton currents by methanol in a dioxolane-linked gramicidin A channel in different lipid bilayers.

    OpenAIRE

    Quigley, Edward P.; Emerick, April J.; Crumrine, David S.; Cukierman, Samuel

    1998-01-01

    The mobility of protons in a dioxolane-linked gramicidin A channel (D1) is comparable to the mobility of protons in aqueous solutions (Cukierman, S., E. P. Quigley, and D. S. Crumrine. 1997. Biophys. J. 73:2489-2502). Aliphatic alcohols decrease the mobility of H+ in aqueous solutions. In this study, the effects of methanol on proton conduction through D1 channels were investigated in different lipid bilayers and at different HCl concentrations. Methanol attenuated H+ currents in a voltage-in...

  20. Comparative computational study of interaction of C60-fullerene and tris-malonyl-C60-fullerene isomers with lipid bilayer: relation to their antioxidant effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdaganyan, Marine E; Orekhov, Philipp S; Shaytan, Alexey K; Shaitan, Konstantin V

    2014-01-01

    Oxidative stress induced by excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has been implicated in the etiology of many human diseases. It has been reported that fullerenes and some of their derivatives-carboxyfullerenes-exhibits a strong free radical scavenging capacity. The permeation of C60-fullerene and its amphiphilic derivatives-C3-tris-malonic-C60-fullerene (C3) and D3-tris-malonyl-C60-fullerene (D3)-through a lipid bilayer mimicking the eukaryotic cell membrane was studied using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The free energy profiles along the normal to the bilayer composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) for C60, C3 and D3 were calculated. We found that C60 molecules alone or in clusters spontaneously translocate to the hydrophobic core of the membrane and stay inside the bilayer during the whole period of simulation time. The incorporation of cluster of fullerenes inside the bilayer changes properties of the bilayer and leads to its deformation. In simulations of the tris-malonic fullerenes we discovered that both isomers, C3 and D3, adsorb at the surface of the bilayer but only C3 tends to be buried in the area of the lipid headgroups forming hydrophobic contacts with the lipid tails. We hypothesize that such position has implications for ROS scavenging mechanism in the specific cell compartments.

  1. Comparative computational study of interaction of C60-fullerene and tris-malonyl-C60-fullerene isomers with lipid bilayer: relation to their antioxidant effect.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine E Bozdaganyan

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress induced by excessive production of reactive oxygen species (ROS has been implicated in the etiology of many human diseases. It has been reported that fullerenes and some of their derivatives-carboxyfullerenes-exhibits a strong free radical scavenging capacity. The permeation of C60-fullerene and its amphiphilic derivatives-C3-tris-malonic-C60-fullerene (C3 and D3-tris-malonyl-C60-fullerene (D3-through a lipid bilayer mimicking the eukaryotic cell membrane was studied using molecular dynamics (MD simulations. The free energy profiles along the normal to the bilayer composed of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC for C60, C3 and D3 were calculated. We found that C60 molecules alone or in clusters spontaneously translocate to the hydrophobic core of the membrane and stay inside the bilayer during the whole period of simulation time. The incorporation of cluster of fullerenes inside the bilayer changes properties of the bilayer and leads to its deformation. In simulations of the tris-malonic fullerenes we discovered that both isomers, C3 and D3, adsorb at the surface of the bilayer but only C3 tends to be buried in the area of the lipid headgroups forming hydrophobic contacts with the lipid tails. We hypothesize that such position has implications for ROS scavenging mechanism in the specific cell compartments.

  2. Effects of Oriented Surface Dipole on Photoconversion Efficiency in an Alkane/Lipid-Hybrid-Bilayer-Based Photovoltaic Model System

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Lixia

    2013-06-21

    When a phospholipid monolayer containing a zinc-coordinated porphyrin species formed atop a self-assembled monolayer of heptadecafluoro-1-decanethiol (CF3(CF2)7(CH2)2SH) is subjected to photoelectrochemical current generation, a significant modulation effect is observed. Compared with devices that contain similar photoactive lipid monolayers but formed on 1-dodecanethiol SAMs, these fluorinated hybrid bilayers produce a >60 % increase in cathodic currents and a similar decrease in anodic currents. Photovoltages recorded from these hybrid bilayers are found to vary in the same fashion. The modulation of photovoltaic responses in these hybrid-bilayer-based devices is explained by the opposite surface dipoles associated with the thiols employed in this study, which in one case (fluorothiol) increase and in another (alkanethiol) decrease the work function of the underlying gold substrates. A similar trend of photovoltage/photocurrent modulation is also observed if fullerene is used as the photoagent in these devices. Our results reveal the intricacy of orientated surface dipole in influencing the photovoltaic processes, and its subtle interplay with other factors related to the photoagents, such as their location and orientation within the organic matrix. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Experimental Investigations of Direct and Converse Flexoelectric Effect in Bilayer Lipid Membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todorov, Angelio Todorov

    Flexoelectric coefficients (direct and converse), electric properties (capacitance and resistivity) and mechanical properties (thickness and elastic coefficients) have been determined for bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) prepared from egg yolk lecithin (EYL), glycerol monoleate (GMO), phosphatidyl choline (PC) and phosphatidyl serine (PS) as a function of frequency, pH and surface charge modifiers. Direct flexoelectric effect manifested itself in the development of microvolt range a.c. potential (U_{f}) upon subjecting one side of a BLM to an oscillating hydrostatic pressure, in the 100-1000 Hz range. Operationally, the flexoelectric coefficient (f) is expressed by the ratio between U_{f} and the change of curvature (c) which accompanied the flexing of the membrane. Membrane curvature was determined by means of either the electric method (capacitance microphone effect) or by the newly developed method of stroboscopic interferometry. Real-time stroboscopic interferometry coupled with simultaneous electric measurements, provided a direct method for the determination of f. Two different frequency regimes of f were recognized. At low frequencies (300 Hz), associated with blocked mobility of the surfactant, f-values of 16.5 times 10^ {-19} and 0.30 times 10^{-19} Coulombs were obtained for PC and GMO BLMs. The theoretically calculated value for the GMO BLM oscillating at high frequency (0.12 times 10^{-19 } Coulombs) agreed well with that determined experimentally (0.3 times 10 ^{-19} Coulombs). For charged bovine brain PS BLM the observed flexocoefficient was f = 4.0 times 10^{ -18} Coulombs. Converse flexoelectric effect manifested itself in voltage-induced BLM curvature. Observations were carried out on uranyl acetate (UA) stabilized PS BLM under a.c. excitation. Frequency dependence of f was revealed by means of real-time stroboscopic interferometry. Satisfactory agreement was observed between the direct and converse f-values, measured. Thus, both manifestations of

  4. Sensitivity and directionality of lipid bilayer mechanotransduction studied using a revised, highly durable membrane-based hair cell sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamaddoni, Nima; Freeman, Eric C.; Sarles, Stephen A.

    2015-06-01

    A bioinspired, membrane-based hair cell sensor consists of a planar lipid bilayer formed between two lipid-coated water droplets that connect to an artificial hair. This assembly enables motion of the hair caused by mechanical stimuli to vibrate the bilayer and produce a capacitive current. In this work, the mechanoelectrical transduction mechanism and sensing performance is experimentally characterized for a more-durable, revised hair cell embodiment that includes a cantilevered hair rooted firmly in the surrounding solid substrate. Specifically, this study demonstrates that the revised membrane-based hair cell sensor produces higher time rates of change in capacitance (0.8-6.0 nF s-1) in response to airflow across the hair compared to the original sensor (45-60 pF s-1) that did not feature a cantilevered hair. The 10-fold to 100-fold increase in the time rate change of capacitance corresponds to greater membrane bending and, thus, higher sensing currents. Membranes in the revised sensor exhibit changes in area due to bending on the order of 0.2-2.0%, versus 0.02% for the original sensor. Experiments also reveal that the bilayer displays highest sensitivity to mechanical perturbations normal to the plane of the bilayer, a membrane can transduce hair motion at frequencies below the hair’s characteristic frequency, and bilayers formed between polymerized hydrogel volumes exhibit a higher sensing currents than those formed between liquid aqueous volumes. Finally, measurements of sensitivity (5-35 pA m-1 s-1) and minimum (4.0-0.6 m s-1) and maximum (28-13 m s-1) sensing thresholds to airflow are performed for the first time, and we observe maximum electrical power (˜65 pW) in the membrane occurs for combinations of slower airflow and higher voltage. These results highlight that along with the dimensions of the hair and the compositions of the aqueous volumes, sensing performance can be tuned with applied voltage.

  5. Loading characteristics and chemical stability of headgroup-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-lipid ligand tethers on polypropylene capillary-channeled polymer fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schadock-Hewitt, Abby J; Marcus, R Kenneth

    2014-12-01

    Polypropylene capillary-channeled polymer fibers have been modified by adsorption of headgroup-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol)-lipids to generate a species-specific stationary phase. In order to study ligand binding characteristics, a fluorescein-labeled poly(ethylene glycol)-lipid was used as a model system. Breakthrough curves and frontal analysis were employed to characterize the surface loading characteristics across a range of lipid concentrations and mobile phase flow rates. Efficient mass transfer and fluid transport yield a linear adsorption isotherm up to the maximum loading concentration of 3 mg/mL, at a linear velocity of 57.1 mm/s. Under these conditions, the dynamic binding capacity was found to be 1.52 mg/g of fiber support. Variation of the linear velocity from 8.6 to 57.1 mm/s showed only small changes in breakthrough volume. The maximum capacity of 1.8 mg/g is found under conditions of a load velocity of 34.2 mm/s and a concentration of 3 mg/mL lipid. Exposure of the lipid modified fibers to several challenge solvents reveals a chemically robust system, with only 50% acetonitrile and hexanes able to disrupt the lipid adsorption. The straightforward capillary-channeled polymer fiber surface modification with headgroup-functionalized lipids provides both a diverse yet practically robust ligand tethering system. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Protein Crowding in Lipid Bilayers Gives Rise to Non-Gaussian Anomalous Lateral Diffusion of Phospholipids and Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Hyung Jeon

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Biomembranes are exceptionally crowded with proteins with typical protein-to-lipid ratios being around 1∶50−1∶100. Protein crowding has a decisive role in lateral membrane dynamics as shown by recent experimental and computational studies that have reported anomalous lateral diffusion of phospholipids and membrane proteins in crowded lipid membranes. Based on extensive simulations and stochastic modeling of the simulated trajectories, we here investigate in detail how increasing crowding by membrane proteins reshapes the stochastic characteristics of the anomalous lateral diffusion in lipid membranes. We observe that correlated Gaussian processes of the fractional Langevin equation type, identified as the stochastic mechanism behind lipid motion in noncrowded bilayer, no longer adequately describe the lipid and protein motion in crowded but otherwise identical membranes. It turns out that protein crowding gives rise to a multifractal, non-Gaussian, and spatiotemporally heterogeneous anomalous lateral diffusion on time scales from nanoseconds to, at least, tens of microseconds. Our investigation strongly suggests that the macromolecular complexity and spatiotemporal membrane heterogeneity in cellular membranes play critical roles in determining the stochastic nature of the lateral diffusion and, consequently, the associated dynamic phenomena within membranes. Clarifying the exact stochastic mechanism for various kinds of biological membranes is an important step towards a quantitative understanding of numerous intramembrane dynamic phenomena.

  7. Electron density analysis of the effects of sugars on the structure of lipid bilayers at low hydration - a preliminary study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenné, T.; Kent, B.; Koster, K.L.; Garvey, C.J.; Bryant, G. (ANSTO); (USD); (ANU); (RMIT)

    2012-02-06

    Small angle X-ray scattering is used to study the effects of sugars on membranes during dehydration. Previous work has shown that the bilayer and chain-chain repeat spacings of DPPC bilayers are relatively unaffected by the presence of sugars. In this work we present a preliminary analysis of the electron density profiles of DPPC in the presence of sugars at low hydration. The difficulties of determining the correct phasing are discussed. Sugars and other small solutes have been shown to have an important role in improving the tolerance of a range of species to desiccation and freezing. In particular it has been shown that sugars can stabilize membranes in the fluid membrane phase during dehydration, and in the fully dehydrated state. Equivalently, at a particular hydration, the presence of sugars lowers the transition temperature between the fluid and gel phases. There are two competing models for explaining the effects of sugars on membrane phase transition temperatures. One, designated the water replacement hypothesis (WRH) states that sugars hydrogen bond to phospholipid headgroups, thus hindering the fluid-gel phase transition. One version of this model suggests that certain sugars (such as trehalose) achieve the measured effects by inserting between the phospholipid head groups. An alternative model explains the observed effects of sugars in terms of the sugars effect on the hydration repulsion that develops between opposing membranes during dehydration. The hydration repulsion leads to a lateral compressive stress in the bilayer which squeezes adjacent lipids more closely together, resulting in a transition to the gel phase. When sugars are present, their osmotic and volumetric effects reduce the hydration repulsion, reduce the compressive stress in the membranes, and therefore tend to maintain the average lateral separation between lipids. This model is called the hydration forces explanation (HFE). We recently showed that neither mono- nor di

  8. Evaluation of physical integrity of lipid bilayer under oxidative stress: application of fluorescence microscopy and digital image processing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Ran; Zhang, Jian-Ping; Skibsted, Leif H

    2015-01-01

    Membrane damage as a result of oxidative stress is quantified using digital image heterogeneity analysis of single giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs) composed of soy phosphatidylcholine (PC), which were found to undergo budding when containing chlorophyll a (Chla) as photosensitizer in the lipid bilayer. Based on digital image heterogeneity analysis, a dimensionless scalar parameter "entropy" for the budding process was found to change linearly during an initial budding stage. Photo-induced peroxidation of PC to form linoleoyl hydroperoxides, further leading to domains of higher polarities in GUVs, was suggested to initiate the budding process. The effect on budding process of GUVs was suggested for use in assays for evaluation of potential protectors of lipid bilayer integrity under oxidative stress, and "entropy" seemed to be a valid descriptor of such membranal integrity. The one-step procedure for quantification of prooxidative effects and antioxidative protection provided by drug candidates and potential food ingredients in membranes could be easily automated for direct measurement of oxidative and antioxidative effects on cellular integrity.

  9. Particle/fluid interface replication as a means of producing topographically patterned surfaces: Substrates for supported lipid bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramaniam, Anand; Lecuyer, Sigolene; Ramamurthi, Kumaran; Losick, Richard; Stone, Howard

    2010-03-01

    There is intense interest in the role of geometry in the thermodynamics and dynamics of such systems as lipid bilayers, membrane proteins and block copolymers. Topographically patterned surfaces that impose well-defined gradients of curvature on surface adsorbed layers are a potential model to study these geometrical effects. Here we report a method for producing topographically patterned surfaces by replicating a fluid-fluid interface studded with colloidal particles. With this method we have fabricated geometrically simple surfaces, such as arrays of spherical features on planar surfaces and also surfaces with complex geometries such as replicas of whole bacterial cells, tubular nanoclays, and even multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Furthermore, chemically heterogeneous surfaces composed of silica, polystyrene, epoxy or poly(dimethyl)siloxane (PDMS), and chemically homogeneous surfaces composed of PDMS or epoxy can be made. As an example of the potential applications of these surfaces, we show that lipid bilayers that are supported on all-PDMS topographically patterned substrates undergo curvature-modulated phase separation.

  10. The defense substance allicin from garlic permeabilizes membranes of Beta vulgaris, Rhoeo discolor, Chara corallina and artificial lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruhlke, Martin C H; Hemmis, Birgit; Noll, Ulrike; Wagner, Richard; Lühring, Hinrich; Slusarenko, Alan J

    2015-04-01

    Allicin (diallylthiosulfinate) is the major volatile- and antimicrobial substance produced by garlic cells upon wounding. We tested the hypothesis that allicin affects membrane function and investigated 1) betanine pigment leakage from beetroot (Beta vulgaris) tissue, 2) the semipermeability of the vacuolar membrane of Rhoeo discolor cells, 3) the electrophysiology of plasmalemma and tonoplast of Chara corallina and 4) electrical conductivity of artificial lipid bilayers. Garlic juice and chemically synthesized allicin were used and betanine loss into the medium was monitored spectrophotometrically. Rhoeo cells were studied microscopically and Chara- and artificial membranes were patch clamped. Beet cell membranes were approximately 200-fold more sensitive to allicin on a mol-for-mol basis than to dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and approximately 400-fold more sensitive to allicin than to ethanol. Allicin-treated Rhoeo discolor cells lost the ability to plasmolyse in an osmoticum, confirming that their membranes had lost semipermeability after allicin treatment. Furthermore, allicin and garlic juice diluted in artificial pond water caused an immediate strong depolarization, and a decrease in membrane resistance at the plasmalemma of Chara, and caused pore formation in the tonoplast and artificial lipid bilayers. Allicin increases the permeability of membranes. Since garlic is a common foodstuff the physiological effects of its constituents are important. Allicin's ability to permeabilize cell membranes may contribute to its antimicrobial activity independently of its activity as a thiol reagent. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Time-of-Flight Bragg Scattering from Aligned Stacks of Lipid Bilayers using the Liquids Reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Carmichael, Justin R [ORNL; Ankner, John Francis [ORNL; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Time-of-flight (TOF) neutron diffraction experiments on aligned stacks of lipid bilayers using the horizontal Liquids Reflectometer at the Spallation Neutron Source are reported. Specific details are given regarding the instrumental setup, data collection and reduction, phase determination of the structure factors, and reconstruction of the one-dimensional neutron scattering length density (NSLD) profile. The validity of using TOF measurements to determine the one-dimensional NSLD profile is demonstrated by reproducing the results of two well known lipid bilayer structures. The method is then applied to show how an antimicrobial peptide affects membranes with and without cholesterol.

  12. Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa2 binding on lipid/cholesterol bilayer depends on protein concentration and time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharad, Sudarat; Moreno-Cencerrado, Alberto; Üzülmez, Öykü; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Toca-Herrera, Jose L

    2017-10-14

    Bacillus thuringiensis produces cytolytic proteins (Cyt) that show toxicity against dipteran insect larvae acting directly on the cell membrane. Up to now, two different models have been proposed to explain the interaction mechanism of the cytolytic protein Cyt2Aa2 on lipid membranes: pore-forming and detergent-like action. Here we report on the interaction of Cyt2Aa2 with lipid/cholesterol bilayers at early stage (far from equilibrium) as a function of protein concentration. Quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D) measurements showed that the rate of protein adsorption increased with concentration, although the mass of the final protein-lipid was similar after two hours. In addition, the dissipation (compliance of the hybrid lipid/protein layer) increased with decreasing protein concentration. Furthermore, atomic force microscopy (AFM) revealed that the structure of the protein-lipid layer was concentration and time dependent. A rigid hybrid homogeneous layer was observed at protein concentrations of 50 μg/ml and 100 μg/ml after 30 min. At lower concentrations, 10 μg/ml and 17.5 μg/ml, protein adsorption on the lipid layer led to the formation of small aggregates. Interestingly, at 25 μg/ml a transition of a hole-like structure into a homogeneous layer was observed. This suggests that 25 μg/ml is a threshold concentration for the binding mechanism of Cyt2Aa2 on to lipid membranes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Theory of phase equilibria and critical mixing points in binary lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Risbo, Jens; Sperotto, Maria Maddalena; Mouritsen, Ole G.

    1995-01-01

    The fundamental problem of determining the phase equilibria of binary mixtures is discussed in the context of two-component phospholipid bilayer membranes of saturated phospholipids with different acyl-chain lengths. Results are presented from mean-field calculations and Monte Carlo simulations o...

  14. Small-angle neutron scattering from multilamellar lipid bilayers: Theory, model, and experiment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lemmich, Jesper; Mortensen, Kell; Ipsen, John Hjorth

    1996-01-01

    of temperature for the lamellar repeat distance, the hydrophobic bilayer thickness, as well as the thickness of the aqueous and polar head group region. In addition to these geometric parameters the analysis permits determination of molecular cross-sectional area, number of interlamellar water molecules, as well...

  15. Peroxide decoloration of CI Acid Orange 7 catalyzed by manganese chlorophyll derivatives at the surfaces of micelles and lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishigure, Shuichi; Mitsui, Tatsuro; Ito, Shingo; Kondo, Yuji; Kawabe, Shigeki; Kondo, Masaharu; Dewa, Takehisa; Mino, Hiroyuki; Itoh, Shigeru; Nango, Mamoru

    2010-06-01

    Manganese-substituted chlorophyll a derivatives (MnChls) were synthesized. We first report peroxidative oxidation of an azo dye, CI Acid Orange 7, catalyzed by MnChls at the surfaces of micelles and lipid bilayers with hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) under mild conditions (pH 8.0, 25 degrees C). Peroxide decoloration depended upon the structures of MnChls, surfactants, lipids, and the presence of imidazole. Surprisingly, a largest decoloration rate was observed for MnChls dimer, MnPChlide a-K(MnPChlide a)-His 5 in cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) micellar solution, especially when imidazole was present: this observation is analogous to the decoloration using horseradish peroxidase (HRP). Interestingly, the dimer complexes showed enhanced decoloration in comparison to the corresponding MnChls monomer in the micellar solution. In contrast, the MnChls monomer showed enhanced decoloration in comparison with the MnChls dimer in liposomal suspensions. Further, the imidazole residue covalently linked to the MnChls plays an important role in increasing the decoloration in both micellar and liposomal suspensions as well as in addition of imidazole into the solutions. It is interesting that the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra of MnPChlide a ME 2, MnPChlide a-His 3, and MnMPMME-His 7 have 16 peaks around g = 2 in Egg PC or DMPC liposomal suspension with H(2)O(2), which is typical of a mixed-valence Mn(III)-Mn(IV) complex with coupling between two ions. The higher decoloration performance obtained by the monomer porphyrin compounds at the surface of the lipid bilayers appears to be related to the stability of this mixed-valence Mn(III)-Mn(IV) species formed in the lipid bilayers. This finding should provide useful information to note that MnChls, which are easily found in a number of biological systems, are involved in functions such as hydrogen peroxide decomposition in bacteria and the oxidation of water during photosynthesis as well as the peroxidases

  16. Study of pH (low) insertion peptides (pHLIPs) interaction with lipid bilayer of membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerakkody, Dhammika

    The pH-dependent interactions of pHLIPsRTM (pH (Low) Insertion Peptides) with lipid bilayer of membrane provides an opportunity to study and address fundamental questions of protein folding/insertion into membrane and unfolding/exit, as well as develop novel approach to target acidic diseased tissue such as cancer, ischemic myocardium, infection and others. The main goal of the work presented here is to answer the following questions: - What is the molecular mechanism of spontaneous insertion and folding of a peptide in a lipid bilayer of membrane; - What is the molecular mechanism of unfolding and exit of a peptide from a lipid bilayer of membrane; - How polar cargo attached to a peptide's inserting end might affect the process of insertion into a lipid bilayer of membrane; How sequence variation will affect a peptide's interactions with a lipid bilayer of membrane (partitioning into bilayer at neutral and low pH; apparent pK of insertion) with the main goal to identify the best pHLIP variants for imaging and therapy of pathological states such as cancer and others. It has been demonstrated that pHLIP insertion into a membrane is associated with the protonation of Asp/Glu residues, which leads to an increase of hydrophobicity that triggers the folding and insertion of the peptide across a lipid bilayer. The insertion of the pHLIP is unidirectional and it is accompanied by the release of energy. Therefore, the energy of membrane associated-folding can be used to favor the movement of cell-impermeable polar cargo molecules across the hydrophobic membrane bilayer when they are attached to the inserting end of pHLIP. Both pH-targeting behavior and molecular translocation have been demonstrated in cultured cells and in vivo. Thus, there is an opportunity to develop a novel concept in drug delivery, which is based on the use of a monomeric, pH-sensitive peptide molecular transporter, to deliver agents that are significantly more polar than conventional drugs

  17. Development of an eco-sensor based on bilayer lipid membrane for the continuous monitoring of environmental pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimori, Yoshio; Kawano, Koichiro; Ishizuka, Masaru; Murahashi, Mizuho; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-03-01

    In recent years, we have developed an advanced environmental monitoring system (AEMS) containing the eco-sensor, which means a sensor for the measurement of environmental pollutants, based on lipid membranes for continuous monitoring of ground water in industry areas such as semiconductor factories. The AEMS project is composed of three work packages as follows, 1) Eco -sensor, 2) Prediction of plume propagation using a computer simulation technique, and 3) Environmental protection method. In this paper, we would like to focus on the study of the eco-sensor. We considered that modified lipid membranes serve as good models for cell membranes because they would be ideal hosts for receptor molecules of biological origin or disruptive environmental pollutants. Thus, we selected lipid membrane as a sensing element for environmental pollutants. We have already confirmed that the eco-sensor could detect a 10 ppb level of volatile organic chlorinated compounds (VOCs) such as trichloroethylene in ground water. Here, we tried to apply the eco-sensor to measure other environmental pollutants containing pesticides and endocrine disrupting chemicals. We made a novel automatic bilayer lipid membrane preparation device and a new system for the continuous measurement of environmental pollutants in ground water.

  18. Attenuation of proton currents by methanol in a dioxolane-linked gramicidin A channel in different lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, E P; Emerick, A J; Crumrine, D S; Cukierman, S

    1998-12-01

    The mobility of protons in a dioxolane-linked gramicidin A channel (D1) is comparable to the mobility of protons in aqueous solutions (Cukierman, S., E. P. Quigley, and D. S. Crumrine. 1997. Biophys. J. 73:2489-2502). Aliphatic alcohols decrease the mobility of H+ in aqueous solutions. In this study, the effects of methanol on proton conduction through D1 channels were investigated in different lipid bilayers and at different HCl concentrations. Methanol attenuated H+ currents in a voltage-independent manner. Attenuation of proton currents was also independent of H+ concentrations in solution. In phospholipid bilayers, methanol decreased the single channel conductance to protons without affecting the binding affinity of protons to bilayers. In glycerylmonooleate membranes, the attenuation of single channel proton conductances qualitatively resembled the decrease of conductivities of HCl solutions by methanol. However, in both types of lipid bilayers, single channel proton conductances through D1 channels were considerably more attenuated than the conductivities of different HCl solutions. This suggests that methanol modulates single proton currents through D1 channels. It is proposed that, on average, one methanol molecule binds to a D1 channel, and attenuates H+ conductance. The Gibbs free energy of this process (DeltaG0) is approximately 1.2 kcal/mol, which is comparable to the free energy of decrease of HCl conductivity in methanol solutions (1.6 kcal/mol). Apolar substances like urea and glucose that do not transport protons in HCl solutions and do not permeate D1 channels decreased solution conductivity and single channel conductance by a considerably larger proportion than methanol. Cs+ currents through D1 channels were considerably less (fivefold) attenuated by methanol than proton currents. It is proposed that methanol partitions inside the pore of gramicidin channels and delays the transfer of protons between water and methanol molecules, causing a

  19. Coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of cobra cytotoxin A3 interactions with a lipid bilayer: penetration of loops into membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Zhi-Yuan; Wang, Yeng-Tseng

    2011-02-10

    Cobra cytotoxins, which are small three-looped proteins composed of approximately 60 amino acid residues, primarily act by destroying the bilayer membranes of cells and artificial vesicles. However, the molecular mechanism governing this process is not yet completely understood. We used coarse-grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) simulations to study the mechanism underlying the penetration of cardiotoxin A3 (CTX A3), the major toxic component of Naja atra (Chinese cobra) venom, into a hydrated 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-1-sn-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) lipid bilayer. We performed CGMD simulations for three different conformations of the cobra cytotoxin-the tail, lying, and harrow conformations. The results of our simulations indicate that two of these, the tail and lying conformations, did not penetrate the bilayer system. Further, for the harrow conformation, loops 2 and 3 played important roles in penetration of CTX A3 into the bilayer system.

  20. Exploring the interactions between peptides and lipid bilayers using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and two-photon fluorescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mari, M.; Mouras, R.; Downes, A.; Elfick, A.

    2011-06-01

    We have used a versatile and powerful microscope[1] for multi-modal biomedical imaging on which we combine Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Scattering (CARS) with Two Photon Excitation Fluorescence (TPEF) using a Nd: YVO4 pump laser. We acquired 2PEF, CARS, and phase contrast images of Multilamellar Vesicles (MLVs) and Giant Unilamellar Vesicles (GUVs), as well as Raman spectra of the constituent lipids. A wide range of peptides are harmful to cells by altering the structure of the biological membranes. This effect depends on the composition of the membrane and the chemical structure of the peptide. The peptide we studied is the beta amyloid Aβ which is a major component of the amyloid plaques deposited on neuronal membranes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients. AD is neurodegenerative disorder in which the hallmark symptoms include cognitive decline and dementia[2] and is characterized by the formation of extracellular amyloid fibrils on the neuronal membranes of the brain. Many questions still remain unanswered concerning the destabilization of cellular ionic homeostasis due to pores formed during the interactions of lipid membranes with peptides. In this project, biomimics of cell membranes are used. The structures that best mimic the plasma membranes are MLVs or GUVs. These vesicles are formed using the gentle hydration technique[3] or the electroformation technique[4] respectively and are composed of phospholipids such as DOPC, DPPC, D62PPC and their binary mixtures. The MLVs and GUVs imaging by CARS and TPEF microscopy not only permits the direct imaging of the leakage phenomenon caused by the toxic peptide (Aβ) on the lipid bilayer, but also records simultaneously the lateral structure of the bilayer and peptide distribution in the plane across the membrane.

  1. Disturb or Stabilize? A Molecular Dynamics Study of the Effects of Resorcinolic Lipids on Phospholipid Bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Siwko, Magdalena E.; de Vries, Alex H.; Mark, Alan E.; Kozubek, Arkadiusz; Marrink, Siewert J.

    2009-01-01

    Resorcinolic lipids, or resorcinols, are commonly found in plant membranes. They consist of a substituted benzene ring forming the hydrophilic lipid head, attached to an alkyl chain forming the hydrophobic tail. Experimental results show alternative effects of resorcinols on lipid membranes.

  2. Model-based approaches for the determination of lipid bilayer structure from small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A; Pan, Jianjun; Standaert, Robert F; Drazba, Paul; Kučerka, Norbert; Katsaras, John

    2012-10-01

    Some of our recent work has resulted in the detailed structures of fully hydrated, fluid phase phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) bilayers. These structures were obtained from the joint refinement of small-angle neutron and X-ray data using the scattering density profile (SDP) models developed by Kučerka et al. (Biophys J 95:2356-2367, 2008; J Phys Chem B 116:232-239, 2012). In this review, we first discuss models for the standalone analysis of neutron or X-ray scattering data from bilayers, and assess the strengths and weaknesses inherent to these models. In particular, it is recognized that standalone data do not contain enough information to fully resolve the structure of naturally disordered fluid bilayers, and therefore may not provide a robust determination of bilayer structure parameters, including the much-sought-after area per lipid. We then discuss the development of matter density-based models (including the SDP model) that allow for the joint refinement of different contrast neutron and X-ray data, as well as the implementation of local volume conservation within the unit cell (i.e., ideal packing). Such models provide natural definitions of bilayer thicknesses (most importantly the hydrophobic and Luzzati thicknesses) in terms of Gibbs dividing surfaces, and thus allow for the robust determination of lipid areas through equivalent slab relationships between bilayer thickness and lipid volume. In the final section of this review, we discuss some of the significant findings/features pertaining to structures of PC and PG bilayers as determined from SDP model analyses.

  3. Model-based Approaches for the Determination of Lipid Bilayer Structure from Small-Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Standaert, Robert F [ORNL; Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2012-01-01

    Some of our recent work has resulted in the detailed structures of fully hydrated, fluid phase phosphatidylcholine (PC) and phosphatidylglycerol (PG) bilayers. These structures were obtained from the joint refinement of small-angle neutron and X-ray data using the scattering density profile (SDP) models developed by Ku erka et al. (Ku erka et al. 2012; Ku erka et al. 2008). In this review, we first discuss models for the standalone analysis of neutron or X-ray scattering data from bilayers, and assess the strengths and weaknesses inherent in these models. In particular, it is recognized that standalone data do not contain enough information to fully resolve the structure of inherently disordered fluid bilayers, and therefore may not provide a robust determination of bilayer structural parameters, including the much sought after area per lipid. We then discuss the development of matter density-based models (including the SDP model) that allow for the joint refinement of different contrast neutron and X-ray data sets, as well as the implementation of local volume conservation in the unit cell (i.e., ideal packing). Such models provide natural definitions of bilayer thicknesses (most importantly the hydrophobic and Luzzati thicknesses) in terms of Gibbs dividing surfaces, and thus allow for the robust determination of lipid areas through equivalent slab relationships between bilayer thickness and lipid volume. In the final section of this review, we discuss some of the significant findings/features pertaining to structures of PC and PG bilayers as determined from SDP model analyses.

  4. Self-consistent field modeling of hydrated unsaturated lipid bilayers in the liquid-crystal phase and comparison to molecular dynamics simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leermakers, F.A.M.; Rabinovich, A.L.; Balabaev, N.K.

    2003-01-01

    A molecular-level self-consistent-field (SCF) theory is applied to model the lipid bilayer structures composed of 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (18:0/18:1omega9cis PC) and 1-stearoyl-2-docosahexaenoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (18:0/22:6omega3cis PC). As compared to

  5. Impaired biosynthesis of the non-bilayer lipids phosphatidylethanolamine or cardiolipin does not affect peroxisome biogenesis and proliferation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kawalek, Adam; Jagadeesan, Chandhuru; van der Klei, Ida J.

    2016-01-01

    The non-bilayer forming lipids cardiolipin (CL) and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) modulate membrane curvature, facilitate membrane fusion and affect the stability and function of membrane proteins. Yeast peroxisomal membranes contain significant amounts of CL and PE. We analysed the effect of CL

  6. The OpenPicoAmp: an open-source planar lipid bilayer amplifier for hands-on learning of neuroscience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vadim Shlyonsky

    Full Text Available Understanding the electrical biophysical properties of the cell membrane can be difficult for neuroscience students as it relies solely on lectures of theoretical models without practical hands on experiments. To address this issue, we developed an open-source lipid bilayer amplifier, the OpenPicoAmp, which is appropriate for use in introductory courses in biophysics or neurosciences at the undergraduate level, dealing with the electrical properties of the cell membrane. The amplifier is designed using the common lithographic printed circuit board fabrication process and off-the-shelf electronic components. In addition, we propose a specific design for experimental chambers allowing the insertion of a commercially available polytetrafluoroethylene film. We provide a complete documentation allowing to build the amplifier and the experimental chamber. The students hand-out giving step-by step instructions to perform a recording is also included. Our experimental setup can be used in basic experiments in which students monitor the bilayer formation by capacitance measurement and record unitary currents produced by ionic channels like gramicidin A dimers. Used in combination with a low-cost data acquisition board this system provides a complete solution for hands-on lessons, therefore improving the effectiveness in teaching basic neurosciences or biophysics.

  7. The OpenPicoAmp: an open-source planar lipid bilayer amplifier for hands-on learning of neuroscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shlyonsky, Vadim; Dupuis, Freddy; Gall, David

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the electrical biophysical properties of the cell membrane can be difficult for neuroscience students as it relies solely on lectures of theoretical models without practical hands on experiments. To address this issue, we developed an open-source lipid bilayer amplifier, the OpenPicoAmp, which is appropriate for use in introductory courses in biophysics or neurosciences at the undergraduate level, dealing with the electrical properties of the cell membrane. The amplifier is designed using the common lithographic printed circuit board fabrication process and off-the-shelf electronic components. In addition, we propose a specific design for experimental chambers allowing the insertion of a commercially available polytetrafluoroethylene film. We provide a complete documentation allowing to build the amplifier and the experimental chamber. The students hand-out giving step-by step instructions to perform a recording is also included. Our experimental setup can be used in basic experiments in which students monitor the bilayer formation by capacitance measurement and record unitary currents produced by ionic channels like gramicidin A dimers. Used in combination with a low-cost data acquisition board this system provides a complete solution for hands-on lessons, therefore improving the effectiveness in teaching basic neurosciences or biophysics.

  8. Interaction of PEGylated anti-hypertensive drugs, amlodipine, atenolol and lisinopril with lipid bilayer membrane: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefpour, Abbas; Modarress, Hamid; Goharpey, Fatemeh; Amjad-Iranagh, Sepideh

    2015-08-01

    The interaction of PEGylated anti-hypertensive drugs, amlodipine, atenolol and lisinopril with lipid bilayer membrane dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) has been studied in nine different simulation systems consisting of 128 lipid molecules and appropriate number of water molecules by molecular dynamics method and by utilizing GROMACS software. The influences of PEGylation on the mentioned drugs and the differences in application of two types of spacer molecules on the performance of drugs and DMPC membrane have been evaluated and mass density of the components in the simulation box, mean square displacement (MSD), electrostatic potential, hydrogen bonding, radial distribution function (RDF), area per lipid, order parameter, and angle distribution of the component molecules including drug, DMPC and PEG has been investigated. Furthermore, umbrella sampling analysis indicated that, PEGylation of the drugs made amlodipine to behave more hydrophilic, whereas in case of lisinopril and atenolol, PEGylation made these drugs to behave more hydrophobic. In almost all of the simulated systems, PEGylation increased the diffusion coefficient of the drugs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Solid-state NMR of the Yersinia pestis outer membrane protein Ail in lipid bilayer nanodiscs sedimented by ultracentrifugation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, Yi; Fujimoto, L. Miya; Yao, Yong; Marassi, Francesca M., E-mail: fmarassi@sbmri.org [Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (United States)

    2015-04-15

    Solid-state NMR studies of sedimented soluble proteins has been developed recently as an attractive approach for overcoming the size limitations of solution NMR spectroscopy while bypassing the need for sample crystallization or precipitation (Bertini et al. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 108(26):10396–10399, 2011). Inspired by the potential benefits of this method, we have investigated the ability to sediment lipid bilayer nanodiscs reconstituted with a membrane protein. In this study, we show that nanodiscs containing the outer membrane protein Ail from Yersinia pestis can be sedimented for solid-state NMR structural studies, without the need for precipitation or lyophilization. Optimized preparations of Ail in phospholipid nanodiscs support both the structure and the fibronectin binding activity of the protein. The same sample can be used for solution NMR, solid-state NMR and activity assays, facilitating structure–activity correlation experiments across a wide range of timescales.

  10. Multiscale modelling to understand the self-assembly mechanism of human β2-adrenergic receptor in lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Anirban; Sonavane, Uddhavesh; Joshi, Rajendra

    2014-02-01

    The long perceived notion that G-Protein Coupled Receptors (GPCRs) function in monomeric form has recently been changed by the description of a number of GPCRs that are found in oligomeric states. The mechanism of GPCR oligomerization, and its effect on receptor function, is not well understood. In the present study, coarse grained molecular dynamics (CGMD) approach was adopted for studying the self-assembly process of the human GPCR, β2-adrenergic receptor (β2-AR), for which several experimental evidences of the dimerization process and its effect on cellular functions are available. Since the crystal structure of β2-AR lacks the third intracellular loop, initially it was modelled and simulated using restrained MD in order to get a stable starting conformation. This structure was then converted to CG representation and 16 copies of it, inserted into a hydrated lipid bilayer, were simulated for 10 μs using the MARTINI force field. At the end of 10μs, oligomers of β2-AR were found to be formed through the self-assembly mechanism which were further validated through various analyses of the receptors. The lipid bilayer analysis also helped to quantify this assembly mechanism. In order to identify the domains which are responsible for this oligomerization, a reverse transformation of the CG system back to all-atom structure and simulated annealing run were carried out at the end of 10 μs CGMD run. Analysis of the all-atom dimers thus obtained, revealed that TM1/TM1, H8/H8, TM1/TM5 and TM6/TM6 regions formed most of the dimerization surfaces, which is in accordance with some of the experimental observations and recent simulation results. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Small molecule interactions with lipid bilayers: a molecular dynamics study of chlorhexidine

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Oosten, Brad; Marquardt, Drew; Sternin, Edward; Harroun, Thad

    2013-03-01

    Chlorhexidine presents an interesting modelling challenge with a hydrophobic hexane connecting two biguanides (arginine analogues) and two aromatic rings. We conducted molecular dynamic simulations using the GROMACS simulation software to reproduce the experimental environment of chlorhexidine in a 1,2-Dimyristoyl-sn-Glycero-3-Phosphocholine (DMPC) bilayer to produce atomic-level information. We constructed an all-atom force field of chlorhexidine from the CHARMM36 force field using well established parameters of certain amino acids. Partial charges were treated differently, which were calculated using GAUSSIAN software. We will compare and contrast the results of our model to that of our neutron scattering experiments previously done in our lab.

  12. Effect of hydrophobic mismatch on domain formation and peptide sorting in the multicomponent lipid bilayers in the presence of immobilized peptides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qing; Wu, Qing-Yan; Wang, Zhi-Yong

    2014-08-01

    In the plasma membranes, many transmembrane (TM) proteins/peptides are anchored to the underlying cytoskeleton and/or the extracellular matrix. The lateral diffusion and the tilt of these proteins/peptides may be greatly restricted by the anchoring. Here, using the coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation, we investigated the domain formation and peptide sorting in the ternary lipid bilayers in the presence of the immobilized peptide-grid and peptide-cluster. We mainly focused on examining the combining effect of the peptide immobilization and hydrophobic mismatch on the domain formation and peptide sorting in the lipid bilayers. Compared to the lipid bilayers inserted with free TM peptides, our results showed that, because of the tilt restriction imposed on the peptides, the hydrophobic mismatch effect more significantly influences the domain size, the dynamics of domain formation, and the peptide sorting in our systems. Our results provide some theoretical insights into understanding the formation of nanosized lipid rafts, the protein sorting in the lipid rafts and the interaction between the cytoskeleton, the extracellular matrix, and the plasma membranes.

  13. Cholesterol-induced variations in the volume and enthalpy fluctuations of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halstenberg, S; Heimburg, T; Hianik, T; Kaatze, U; Krivanek, R

    1998-07-01

    The sound velocity and density of suspensions of large unilamellar liposomes from dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine with admixed cholesterol have been measured as a function of temperature around the chain melting temperature of the phospholipid. The cholesterol-to-phospholipid molar ratio xc has been varied over a wide range (0 bilayer system has been derived. Comparison of the compressibilities (and sound velocity numbers) with heat capacity traces display the close correlation between these quantities for bilayer systems. This correlation appears to be very useful as it allows some of the mechanical properties of membrane systems to be calculated from the specific heat capacity data and vice versa.

  14. ITO/Poly(Aniline/Sol-Gel Glass: An Optically Transparent, pH-Responsive Substrate for Supported Lipid Bilayers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Al-Obeidi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Described here is fabrication of a pH-sensitive, optically transparent transducer composed of a planar indium-tin oxide (ITO electrode overcoated with a poly(aniline (PANI thin film and a porous sol-gel layer. Adsorption of the PANI film renders the ITO electrode sensitive to pH, whereas the sol-gel spin-coated layer makes the upper surface compatible with fusion of phospholipid vesicles to form a planar supported lipid bilayer (PSLB. The response to changes in the pH of the buffer contacting the sol-gel/PANI/ITO electrode is pseudo-Nernstian with a slope of 52 mV/pH over a pH range of 4–9. Vesicle fusion forms a laterally continuous PSLB on the upper sol-gel surface that is fluid with a lateral lipid diffusion coefficient of 2.2 μm2/s measured by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Due to its lateral continuity and lack of defects, the PSLB blocks the pH response of the underlying electrode to changes in the pH of the overlying buffer. This architecture is simpler to fabricate than previously reported ITO electrodes derivatized for PSLB formation and should be useful for optical monitoring of proton transport across supported membranes derivatized with ionophores and ion channels.

  15. Reconstitution of SNARE proteins into solid-supported lipid bilayer stacks and X-ray structure analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yihui; Kuhlmann, Jan; Brennich, Martha; Komorowski, Karlo; Jahn, Reinhard; Steinem, Claudia; Salditt, Tim

    2018-02-01

    SNAREs are known as an important family of proteins mediating vesicle fusion. For various biophysical studies, they have been reconstituted into supported single bilayers via proteoliposome adsorption and rupture. In this study we extended this method to the reconstitution of SNAREs into supported multilamellar lipid membranes, i.e. oriented multibilayer stacks, as an ideal model system for X-ray structure analysis (X-ray reflectivity and diffraction). The reconstitution was implemented through a pathway of proteomicelle, proteoliposome and multibilayer. To monitor the structural evolution in each step, we used small-angle X-ray scattering for the proteomicelles and proteoliposomes, followed by X-ray reflectivity and grazing-incidence small-angle scattering for the multibilayers. Results show that SNAREs can be successfully reconstituted into supported multibilayers, with high enough orientational alignment for the application of surface sensitive X-ray characterizations. Based on this protocol, we then investigated the effect of SNAREs on the structure and phase diagram of the lipid membranes. Beyond this application, this reconstitution protocol could also be useful for X-ray analysis of many further membrane proteins. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Calcein release behavior from liposomal bilayer; influence of physicochemical/mechanical/structural properties of lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maherani, Behnoush; Arab-Tehrany, Elmira; Kheirolomoom, Azadeh; Geny, David; Linder, Michel

    2013-11-01

    The design of the drug delivery depends upon different parameters. One of the most noticeable factors in design of the drug delivery is drug-release profile which determines the site of action, the concentration of the drug at the time of administration, the period of time that the drug must remain at a therapeutic concentration. To get a better understanding of drug release, large unilamellar liposomes containing calcein were prepared using 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-palmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and a mixture of them; calcein was chosen as a model of hydrophilic drug. The calcein permeability across liposomal membrane (with different compositions) was evaluated on the basis of the first-order kinetic by spectrofluorometer. Also, the effects of liposome composition/fluidity as well as the incubation temperature/pH were investigated. Furthermore, we simulated the digestion condition in the gastrointestinal tract in humans, to mimic human gastro-duodenal digestion to monitor calcein release during the course of the digestion process. In vitro digestion model ''pH stat'' was used to systematically examine the influence of pH/enzyme on phospholipid liposomes digestion under simulated gastro-duodenal digestion. The results revealed that calcein permeates across liposomal membrane without membrane disruption. The release rate of calcein from the liposomes depends on the number and fluidity of bilayers and its mechanical/physical properties such as permeability, bending elasticity. Chemo-structural properties of drugs like as partition coefficient (Log P), H-bonding, polar surface area (PSA) are also determinative parameter in release behavior. Finally, stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy was used to study calcein translocation through liposomal bilayers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular simulations of lipid systems: Edge stability and structure in pure and mixed bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong

    2007-12-01

    Understanding the structural, mechanical and dynamical properties of lipid self-assembled systems is fundamental to understand the behavior of the cell membrane. This thesis has investigated the equilibrium properties of lipid systems with edge defects through various molecular simulation techniques. The overall goal of this study is to understand the free energy terms of the edges and to develop efficient methods to sample equilibrium distributions of mixed-lipid systems. In the first main part of my thesis, an atomistic molecular model is used to study lipid ribbon which has two edges on both sides. Details of the edge structures, such as area per lipid and tail torsional statistics are presented. Line tension, calculated from pressure tensor in MD simulation has good agreement with result from other sources. To further investigate edge properties on a longer timescale and larger length scale, we have applied a coarse-grained forcefield on mixed lipid systems and try to interpret the edge fluctuations in terms of free energy parameters such as line tension and bending modulus. We have identified two regimes with quite different edge behavior: a high line tension regime and a low line tension regime. The last part of this thesis focuses on a hybrid Molecular dynamics and Configurational-bias Monte Carlo (MCMD) simulation method in which molecules can change their type by growing and shrinking the terminal acyl united carbon atoms. A two-step extension of the MCMD method has been developed to allow for a larger difference in the components' tail lengths. Results agreed well with previous one-step mutation results for a mixture with a length difference of four carbons. The current method can efficiently sample mixtures with a length difference of eight carbons, with a small portion of lipids of intermediate tail length. Preliminary results are obtained for "bicelle"-type (DMPC/DHPC) ribbons.

  18. Development of an Automation Technique for the Establishment of Functional Lipid Bilayer Arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jesper Søndergaard; Perry, Mark; Vogel, Jörg

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, a technique for establishing multiple black lipid membranes (BLMs) in arrays of micro structured ethylene tetrafluoroethylene (ETFE) films, and supported by a micro porous material was developed. Rectangular 8 x 8 arrays with apertures having diameters of 301 +/- 5 mu m were...... fabricated in ETFE Teflon film by laser ablation using a carbon dioxide laser. Multiple lipid membranes could be formed across the micro structured 8 x 8 array ETFE partitions. Success rates for the establishment of cellulose-supported BLMs across the multiple aperture arrays were above 95%. However...

  19. Probing topology and dynamics of the second transmembrane domain (M2δ) of the acetyl choline receptor using magnetically aligned lipid bilayers (bicelles) and EPR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahu, Indra D; Mayo, Daniel J; Subbaraman, Nidhi; Inbaraj, Johnson J; McCarrick, Robert M; Lorigan, Gary A

    2017-08-01

    Characterizing membrane protein structure and dynamics in the lipid bilayer membrane is very important but experimentally challenging. EPR spectroscopy offers a unique set of techniques to investigate a membrane protein structure, dynamics, topology, and distance constraints in lipid bilayers. Previously our lab demonstrated the use of magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers (bicelles) for probing topology and dynamics of the membrane peptide M2δ of the acetyl choline receptor (AchR) as a proof of concept. In this study, magnetically aligned phospholipid bilayers and rigid spin labels were further utilized to provide improved dynamic information and topology of M2δ peptide. Seven TOAC-labeled AchR M2δ peptides were synthesized to demonstrate the utility of a multi-labeling amino acid substitution alignment strategy. Our data revealed the helical tilts to be 11°, 17°, 9°, 17°, 16°, 11°, 9°±4° for residues I7TOAC, Q13TOAC, A14TOAC, V15TOAC, C16TOAC, L17TOAC, and L18TOAC, respectively. The average helical tilt of the M2δ peptide was determined to be ∼13°. This study also revealed that the TOAC labels were attached to the M2δ peptide with different dynamics suggesting that the sites towards the C-terminal end are more rigid when compared to the sites towards the N-terminus. The dynamics of the TOAC labeled sites were more resolved in the aligned samples when compared to the randomly disordered samples. This study highlights the use of magnetically aligned lipid bilayer EPR technique to determine a more accurate helical tilt and more resolved local dynamics of AchR M2δ peptide. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The temperature-dependent physical state of polar lipids and their miscibility impact the topography and mechanical properties of bilayer models of the milk fat globule membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murthy, Appala Venkata Ramana; Guyomarc'h, Fanny; Lopez, Christelle

    2016-09-01

    The polar lipid assembly and biophysical properties of the biological membrane enveloping the milk fat globules (the MFGM) are yet poorly known, especially in connection with the temperature history that milk can experience after its secretion. However, bioactive mechanisms depend on biological structure, which itself highly depend on temperature. The objectives of this study were to investigate polar lipid packing in hydrated bilayers, models of the MFGM, and to follow at intermolecular level temperature-induced changes in the range 60-6°C, using the combination of differential scanning calorimetry, X-ray diffraction, atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and force spectroscopy. MFGM polar lipids, especially sphingomyelin, contain long chain saturated fatty acids with high phase transition temperatures. On cooling, the liquid disordered ld to solid ordered so (gel) phase transition of MFGM polar lipids started at about 40°C, leading to phase separation and formation of so phase domains protruding by about 1nm from the ld phase. Indentation measurements using AFM revealed that the resistance of the so phase domains to rupture was significantly higher than that of the ld phase and that it increased for both the domain and fluid phases with decreasing temperature. However, packing and stability of the bilayers were adversely affected by fast cooling to 6°C or by cooling-rewarming cycle. This study showed that MFGM polar lipid bilayers are dynamic systems. Heterogeneity in the structure and mechanical properties of the membrane was induced by temperature-dependent so/ld phase immiscibility of the lipid components. This could have consequences on the MFGM technological and biological functions (e.g. immunity and milk lipid digestion). Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Synthetic S6 Segment Derived from KvAP Channel Self-assembles, Permeabilizes Lipid Vesicles, and Exhibits Ion Channel Activity in Bilayer Lipid Membrane*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Richa; Malik, Chetan; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Srivastava, Saurabh; Ghosh, Subhendu; Ghosh, Jimut Kanti

    2011-01-01

    KvAP is a voltage-gated tetrameric K+ channel with six transmembrane (S1–S6) segments in each monomer from the archaeon Aeropyrum pernix. The objective of the present investigation was to understand the plausible role of the S6 segment, which has been proposed to form the inner lining of the pore, in the membrane assembly and functional properties of KvAP channel. For this purpose, a 22-residue peptide, corresponding to the S6 transmembrane segment of KvAP (amino acids 218–239), and a scrambled peptide (S6-SCR) with rearrangement of only hydrophobic amino acids but without changing its composition were synthesized and characterized structurally and functionally. Although both peptides bound to the negatively charged phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol model membrane with comparable affinity, significant differences were observed between these peptides in their localization, self-assembly, and aggregation properties onto this membrane. S6-SCR also exhibited reduced helical structures in SDS micelles and phosphatidylcholine/phosphatidylglycerol lipid vesicles as compared with the S6 peptide. Furthermore, the S6 peptide showed significant membrane-permeabilizing capability as evidenced by the release of calcein from the calcein-entrapped lipid vesicles, whereas S6-SCR showed much weaker efficacy. Interestingly, although the S6 peptide showed ion channel activity in the bilayer lipid membrane, despite having the same amino acid composition, S6-SCR was significantly inactive. The results demonstrated sequence-specific structural and functional properties of the S6 wild type peptide. The selected S6 segment is probably an important structural element that could play an important role in the membrane interaction, membrane assembly, and functional property of the KvAP channel. PMID:21592970

  2. On the one-sided action of amphotericin B on lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The one-sided action of the polyene antibiotic, amphotericin B, on phospholipid bilayer membranes formed from synthetic phosphatidylcholines (DOPC and DPhPC) and sterols (ergosterol and cholesterol), has been investigated. We found formation of well-defined ionic channels for both sterols and not only for ergosterol-containing membranes (Bolard, J., P. Legrand, F. Heitz, and B. Cybulska. 1991. Biochemistry. 30:5707-5715). Characteristics of these channels were studied in the presence of different salts. It was found that the channels have comparable conductances but different lifetimes that are approximately 100-fold less in cholesterol-containing membranes than in ergosterol-containing ones. Channel blocking by tetraethylammonium (TEA) ions shows that TEA blockage of channels in the presence of cholesterol increases their lifetimes in analogy to the lengthening of lifetimes of protein channels blocked by local anesthetics (Neher, E., and J. H. Steinbach. 1978. J. Physiol. 277: 153-176). However, the effect of the blocker on single-channel conductance is very close for both sterols. The data support the classical model of amphotericin B pore formation from complexes initially lying on the membrane surface as nonconducting prepores. We explain the antibiotic's cytotoxic selectivity by differences in the lifetimes of the channels formed with different sterols and suggest that phosphatidylcholine-sterol membranes can be used as a tool for rapid estimation of polyene antibiotic cytotoxicity. PMID:8741731

  3. Organized Aggregation of Porphyrins in Lipid Bilayers for Third Harmonic Generation Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Liyang; Tokarz, Danielle; Cisek, Richard; Ng, Kenneth K; Wang, Fan; Chen, Juan; Barzda, Virginijus; Zheng, Gang

    2015-11-16

    Nonlinear optical microscopy has become a powerful tool for high-resolution imaging of cellular and subcellular composition, morphology, and interactions because of its high spatial resolution, deep penetration, and low photo-damage to tissue. Developing specific harmonic probes is essential for exploiting nonlinear microscopic imaging for biomedical applications. We report an organized aggregate of porphyrins (OAP) that formed within lipidic nanoparticles showing fingerprint spectroscopic properties, structure-associated second harmonic generation, and superradiant third harmonic generation. The OAP facilitated harmonic microscopic imaging of living cells with significantly enhanced contrast. The structure-dependent switch between harmonic (OAP-intact) and fluorescence (OAP-disrupted) generation enabled real-time multi-modality imaging of the cellular fate of nanoparticles. Robustly produced under various conditions and easily incorporated into pre-formed lipid nanovesicles, OAP provides a biocompatible nanoplatform for harmonic imaging. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Quantitative optical microscopy and micromanipulation studies on the lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagatolli, Luis; Needham, David

    2014-01-01

    experimentation. For instance, using different fluorescent reporters, fluorescence microscopy allows strategies to study membrane lateral structure/dynamics at the level of single vesicles of diverse compositions. The micropipette manipulation technique on the other hand, uses Hoffman modulation contrast...... of well-defined stresses to a single membrane or observe the effects of adhesive spreading. Knowledge gained by these studies has informed several applications of lipid membranes including their use as lung surfactants and drug delivery systems for cancer....

  5. A novel fluorescent probe that senses the physical state of lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Hirotaka; White, Stephen H

    2009-06-03

    Cell membrane lipids and proteins are heterogeneously distributed in the membrane plane. In recent years, much attention has been paid to the heterogeneous distribution of the lipid components, particularly the formation of cholesterol-rich domains that are thought to be important in signaling processes. This has led to renewed interest in the phase diagrams of complex lipid mixtures, such as three-component mixtures containing phospholipids and cholesterol. We report here a novel fluorescent probe (NBD-R595) that is useful for exploring the phase behaviors of one-, two-, and three-component large unilamellar vesicles. In one-component fluid-phase membranes, the probe has the expected spectral characteristic of monomeric 7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazol, with a fluorescence maximum of 540 nm when excited at 470 nm. But below the gel-to-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature, an additional emission peak appears at approximately 610 nm, because of Förster resonance energy transfer from NBD-R595 monomers to NBD-R595 Jelley aggregates of limited size formed by the association of 7-nitrobenzo-2-oxa-1,3-diazol moieties. This may be the first report of Förster resonance energy transfer from a single fluorophore in two different physical states. In a test of the probe, we found NBD-R595 to be remarkably sensitive to the molar composition of large unilamellar vesicles formed from cholesterol, distearoylphosphatidylcholine, and dioleoylphosphatidylcholine.

  6. Conformation of the acylation site of palmitoylgramicidin in lipid bilayers of dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeppe, R E; Vogt, T C; Greathouse, D V; Killian, J A; de Kruijff, B

    1996-03-19

    Gramicidin A(gA) can be palmitoylated by means of an ester linkage to the OH group of the terminal ethanolamine that sits at the membrane-water interface in the functional gA channel. We have investigated palmitoyl-gA as a model transmembrane acylprotein. Ethanolamine-d(4) (NH(2)CD(2)CD(2)OH) was incorporated into gA by total synthesis, and a portion of the labeled gA was palmitoylated. Solid-state (2)H-NMR spectra of acyl- and nonacyl-gA in hydrated dimyristoylphosphatidylcholine (DMPC) bilayers were compared. The spectra for both oriented and nonoriented samples at 4 and at 40 degrees C indicate that the ethanolamine of gA is highly mobile prior to acylation, but essentially immobile after palmitoylation. The (2)H quadrupolar splittings allow the conformation of the ethanolamine group in acyl-gA to be determined. By combining our data with the previously determined quadrupolar splittings for deuterium labels on the palmitoyl chain [Vogt, T.C.B., Killian, J.A., & de Kruijff, B. (1994) Biochemistry 33, 2063-2070], we also propose a model for the acyl chain. The ethanolamine group rotates over Leu(10) and toward the outside of the gA channel's cylinder upon acylation, so that the attached acyl chain passes between the side chains of Trp(9) and Leu(10). To accommodate the acyl chain, the six-membered portion of the indole ring of Trp(9) is displaced by about 0.9 angstroms, by means of 1-2 degree rotations in chi(1) and chi(2).

  7. Heterogeneous MAC Initiator and Pore Structures in a Lipid Bilayer by Phase-Plate Cryo-electron Tomography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas H. Sharp

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pore formation in membranes is important for mammalian immune defense against invading bacteria. Induced by complement activation, the membrane attack complex (MAC forms through sequential binding and membrane insertion of C5b6, C7, C8, and C9. Using cryo-electron tomography with a Volta phase plate and subtomogram averaging, we imaged C5b-7, C5b-8, and C5b-9 complexes and determined the C5b-9 pore structure in lipid bilayers. The in situ C5b-9 pore structure at 2.3-nm resolution reveals a 10- to 11.5-nm cone-shaped pore starting with C5b678 and multiple copies of C9 that is poorly closed, yielding a seam between C9 and C6 substituting for the shorter β strands in C6 and C7. However, large variations of composite pore complexes are apparent in subtomograms. Oligomerized initiator complexes C5b-7 and C5b-8 show stages of membrane binding, deformation, and perforation that yield ∼3.5-nm-wide pores. These data indicate a dynamic process of pore formation that likely adapts to biological membranes under attack.

  8. Influence of H2TOEtPyP4 porphyrin on the stability and conductivity of bilayer lipid membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torosyan, Anahit; Arakelyan, Valeri

    2015-12-01

    Many water-soluble cationic porphyrins are known to be prospective chemotherapeutics and photosensitizers for cancer treatment and diagnosis. The physicochemical properties of porphyrins, in particular their interactions with membranes, are important determining factors of their biological activity. The influence of cationic meso-tetra-[4-N-(2'-hydroxyethyl) pyridyl] porphyrin (H2TOEtPyP) on the stability and conductivity of bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs) was studied. H2TOEtPyP4 porphyrin was shown to decrease the stability of BLMs made of a mixture of DOPS and DPPE (1:1) in an electric field because of a reduction of line tension of spontaneously formed pore edges in the BLM. The presence of cationic porphyrin was found to reduce BLM surface tension. This effect was enhanced with increasing porphyrin concentration. H2TOEtPyP4 increased the probability of spontaneous pore formation. Further investigating the cyclic current-voltage characteristics of BLMs allowed determining the electrical capacity and conductivity of BLMs in the presence of H2TOEtPyP4 porphyrin. It was shown that in the presence of cationic porphyrin the electrical capacity as well as conductivity of the BLM increases.

  9. Predicting solute partitioning in lipid bilayers: Free energies and partition coefficients from molecular dynamics simulations and COSMOmic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jakobtorweihen, S.; Zuniga, A. Chaides; Ingram, T.; Gerlach, T.; Keil, F. J.; Smirnova, I.

    2014-07-01

    Quantitative predictions of biomembrane/water partition coefficients are important, as they are a key property in pharmaceutical applications and toxicological studies. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to calculate free energy profiles for different solutes in lipid bilayers. How to calculate partition coefficients from these profiles is discussed in detail and different definitions of partition coefficients are compared. Importantly, it is shown that the calculated coefficients are in quantitative agreement with experimental results. Furthermore, we compare free energy profiles from MD simulations to profiles obtained by the recent method COSMOmic, which is an extension of the conductor-like screening model for realistic solvation to micelles and biomembranes. The free energy profiles from these molecular methods are in good agreement. Additionally, solute orientations calculated with MD and COSMOmic are compared and again a good agreement is found. Four different solutes are investigated in detail: 4-ethylphenol, propanol, 5-phenylvaleric acid, and dibenz[a,h]anthracene, whereby the latter belongs to the class of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The convergence of the free energy profiles from biased MD simulations is discussed and the results are shown to be comparable to equilibrium MD simulations. For 5-phenylvaleric acid the influence of the carboxyl group dihedral angle on free energy profiles is analyzed with MD simulations.

  10. Solid-Supported Lipid Membranes: Formation, Stability and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Haw Zan

    This thesis presents a comprehensive investigation of the formation of supported lipid membranes with vesicle hemifusion, their stability under detergents and organic solvents and their applications in molecular biology. In Chapter 3, we describe how isolated patches of DOPC bilayers supported on glass surfaces are dissolved by various detergents (decyl maltoside, dodecyl maltoside, CHAPS, CTAB, SDS, TritonX-100 and Tween20) at their CMC, as investigated by fluorescence video microscopy. In general, detergents partition into distal leaflets of bilayers and lead to the expansion of the bilayers through a rolling motion of the distal over the proximal leaflets, in agreement with the first stage of the established 3-stage model of lipid vesicle solubilization by detergents. Subsequently, we study the partitioning of organic solvents (methanol, ethanol, isopropanol, propanol, acetone and chloroform) into isolated bilayer patches on glass in Chapter 4 with fluorescence microscopy. The area expansion of bilayers due to the partitioning of organic solvents is measured. From the titration of organic solvents, we measured the rate of area expansion as a function of the volume fraction of organic solvents, which is proposed to be a measure of strength of interactions between solvents and membranes. From the same experiments, we also measure the maximum expansion of bilayers (or the maximum binding stoichiometry between organic solvents and lipids) before structural breakdown, which depends on the depth of penetration of solvents to the membranes. In Chapter 5, we investigate the formation of sparsely-tethered bilayer lipid membranes (stBLMs) with vesicle hemifusion. In vesicle hemifusion, lipid vesicles in contact with a hydrophobic alkyl-terminated self-assembled monolayer (SAM) deposit a lipid monolayer to the SAM surface, thus completing the bilayer. Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy and Neutron Reflectivity are used to probe the integrity of stBLMs in terms of their

  11. Comparison of three ternary lipid bilayer mixtures: FRET and ESR reveal nanodomains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A; Wu, Jing; Goh, Shih Lin; Petruzielo, Robin S; Feigenson, Gerald W

    2010-11-17

    Phase diagrams of ternary lipid mixtures containing cholesterol have provided valuable insight into cell membrane behaviors, especially by describing regions of coexisting liquid-disordered (Ld) and liquid-ordered (Lo) phases. Fluorescence microscopy imaging of giant unilamellar vesicles has greatly assisted the determination of phase behavior in these systems. However, the requirement for optically resolved Ld + Lo domains can lead to the incorrect inference that in lipid-only mixtures, Ld + Lo domain coexistence generally shows macroscopic domains. Here we show this inference is incorrect for the low melting temperature phosphatidylcholines abundant in mammalian plasma membranes. By use of high compositional resolution Förster resonance energy transfer measurements, together with electron spin resonance data and spectral simulation, we find that ternary mixtures of DSPC and cholesterol together with either POPC or SOPC, do indeed have regions of Ld + Lo coexistence. However, phase domains are much smaller than the optical resolution limit, likely on the order of the Förster distance for energy transfer (R(0), ∼2-8 nm). Copyright © 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Diffusion studies on permeable nitroxyl spin probe through lipid bilayer membrane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benial, A. Milton Franklin; Meenakumari, V. [Department of Physics, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625019 (India); Ichikawa, Kazuhiro; Yamada, Ken-ichi; Utsumi, Hideo, E-mail: hideo.utsumi.278@m.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Bio-functional Science, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Hyodo, Fuminori [Innovation Center for Medical Redox Navigation, Kyushu University, Fukuoka (Japan); Jawahar, A. [Department of Chemistry, NMSSVN College, Nagamalai, Madurai-625 019 (India)

    2014-04-24

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies were carried out for 2mM {sup 14}N labeled deutrated permeable 3- methoxycarbonyl-2,2,5,5-tetramethyl-pyrrolidine-1-oxyl (MC-PROXYL) in pure water, 1 mM, 2 mM, 3 mM and 4 mM concentration of MC-PROXYL in 300 mM concentration of liposomal solution by using a L-band ESR spectrometer. The ESR parameters such as linewidth, hyperfine coupling constant, g-factor, partition parameter and permeability were reported. The partition parameter and permeability values indicate the maximum spin distribution in the lipid phase at 2 mM concentration. This study illustrates that ESR can be used to differentiate between the intra and extra-membrane water by loading the liposome vesicles with a lipid-permeable nitroxyl spin probe. From the ESR results, the radical concentration was optimized as 2 mM in liposomal solution for ESR phantom studies and experiments.

  13. Fundamental Studies of Assembly and Mechanical Properties of Lipid Bilayer Membranes and Unilamellar Vesicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xi

    This dissertation work focuses on: (i) obtaining a phospholipid bilayer membrane (LBM)/conducting electrode system with low defect density and optimized rigidity; (ii) investigating vesicle stability and mechanical properties. LBM is a simplified yet representative cell membrane model. LBMs assembled on conductive surfaces can probe protein-LBM interactions activities electrochemically. Sterically stabilized vesicles could be used as cell models or for drug delivery. The main challenges for LBM assembly on gold are vesicles do not spontaneously rupture to form LBMs on gold and the roughness of the gold substrate has considerable influence on molecular film defect density. In this study, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) vesicles were functionalized with 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine- N-poly(ethylene glycol)-2000-N-[3-(2-pyridyldithio)propionate] (DSPE-PEG-PDP) to yield stable LBMs on gold without surface modification. A template-stripping method was used to obtain atomically flat and pristine gold surfaces. The critical force to initiate vesicle rupture decreases with increasing DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration, indicating that gold-thiolate bonding between DSPE-PEG-PDP and gold substrates promotes LBM formation. Mechanical properties of LBMs and vesicles were investigated as a function of DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration via Atomic Force Microscopy. The elastic moduli of LBMs were determined with DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration ranging from 0mol% to 24mol% and were found to depend on PEG chain conformation. Incorporating DSPE-PEG-PDP molecules with PEG in mushroom conformation results in a decrease of LBM rigidity, while incorporating PEG in brush conformation leads to LBM stiffening. Contrarily, mechanical properties of functionalized vesicles did not vary significantly by varying DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration. LBM with tunable rigidity by adjusting DSPE-PEG-PDP concentration provides a versatile cell membrane model for studying protein or

  14. Effect of the cosolutes trehalose and methanol on the equilibrium and phase-transition properties of glycerol-monopalmitate lipid bilayers investigated using molecular dynamics simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laner, Monika; Horta, Bruno A C; Hünenberger, Philippe H

    2014-11-01

    The influence of the cosolutes trehalose and methanol on the structural, dynamic and thermodynamic properties of a glycerol-1-monopalmitate (GMP) bilayer and on its main transition temperature [Formula: see text] is investigated using atomistic molecular dynamics simulations (600 ns) of a GMP bilayer patch (2 × 8 × 8 lipids) at different temperatures in the range of 302 to 338 K and considering three different cosolute concentrations. Depending on the environment and temperature, these simulations present no or a single GL[Formula: see text]LC, LC[Formula: see text]GL or LC[Formula: see text]ID transition, where LC, GL and ID are the liquid crystal, gel and interdigitated phases, respectively. The trehalose molecules form a coating layer at the bilayer surface, promote the hydrogen-bonded bridging of the lipid headgroups, preserve the interaction of the headgroups with trapped water and induce a slight lateral expansion of the bilayer in the LC phase, observations that may have implications for the phenomenon of anhydrobiosis. However, this cosolute does not affect [Formula: see text] and its dependence on hydration in the concentration range considered. On the other hand, methanol molecules intercalate between the lipid headgroups, promote a lateral expansion of the bilayer in the LC phase and induce a concentration dependent decrease of [Formula: see text], observations that may have implications for the phenomenon of anesthesia. The occurrence of an ID phase in the presence of this cosolute may be viewed as an extreme consequence of lateral expansion. The analysis of the simulations also suggests the existence of two basic conservation principles: (1) the hydrogen-bond saturation principle rests on the observation that for all species present in the different systems, the total numbers of hydrogen-bonds per molecule is essentially constant, the only factor of variability being their distribution among different partners; (2) the densest packing principle

  15. Antimicrobial peptides at work: interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR with lipid bilayers mimicking the P. aeruginosa and E. coli membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Lucia; Stellato, Marco Ignazio; Oliva, Rosario; Falanga, Annarita; Galdiero, Massimiliano; Petraccone, Luigi; D'Errico, Geradino; de Santis, Augusta; Galdiero, Stefania; Del Vecchio, Pompea

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial peptides are promising candidates as future therapeutics in order to face the problem of antibiotic resistance caused by pathogenic bacteria. Myxinidin is a peptide derived from the hagfish mucus displaying activity against a broad range of bacteria. We have focused our studies on the physico-chemical characterization of the interaction of myxinidin and its mutant WMR, which contains a tryptophan residue at the N-terminus and four additional positive charges, with two model biological membranes (DOPE/DOPG 80/20 and DOPE/DOPG/CL 65/23/12), mimicking respectively Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa membrane bilayers. All our results have coherently shown that, although both myxinidin and WMR interact with the two membranes, their effect on membrane microstructure and stability are different. We further have shown that the presence of cardiolipin plays a key role in the WMR-membrane interaction. Particularly, WMR drastically perturbs the DOPE/DOPG/CL membrane stability inducing a segregation of anionic lipids. On the contrary, myxinidin is not able to significantly perturb the DOPE/DOPG/CL bilayer whereas interacts better with the DOPE/DOPG bilayer causing a significant perturbing effect of the lipid acyl chains. These findings are fully consistent with the reported greater antimicrobial activity of WMR against P. aeruginosa compared with myxinidin.

  16. AFM observation of single, functioning ionotropic glutamate receptors reconstituted in lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasai, Nahoko; Ramanujan, Chandra S; Fujimoto, Ichiro; Shimada, Akiyoshi; Ryan, John F; Torimitsu, Keiichi

    2010-07-01

    Ionotropic glutamate receptors (iGluRs) are responsible for extracellular signaling in the central nervous system. However, the relationship between the overall structure of the protein and its function has yet to be resolved. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) is an important technique that allows nano-scale imaging in liquid. In the present work we have succeeded in imaging by AFM of the external features of the most common iGluR, AMPA-R (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole propionic acid receptor), in a physiological environment. Homomeric GluR3 receptors were over-expressed in insect cells, purified and reconstituted into lipid membranes. AFM images were obtained in a buffer from membranes immobilized on a mica substrate. Using Au nanoparticle-conjugated antibodies, we show that proteins reconstitute predominantly with the N-terminal domain uppermost on the membrane. A tetrameric receptor structure is clearly observed, but it displays considerable heterogeneity, and the dimensions differ considerably from cryo-electron microscopy measurements. Our results indicate that the extracellular domains of AMPA-R are highly flexible in a physiological environment. AFM allows us to observe the protein surface structure, suggesting the possibility of visualizing real time conformational changes of a functioning protein. This knowledge may be useful for neuroscience as well as in pharmaceutical applications. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Interaction of antimicrobial peptide Plantaricin149a and four analogs with lipid bilayers and bacterial membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Luiz de Souza Lopes

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The amidated analog of Plantaricin149, an antimicrobial peptide from Lactobacillus plantarum NRIC 149, directly interacts with negatively charged liposomes and bacterial membranes, leading to their lysis. In this study, four Pln149-analogs were synthesized with different hydrophobic groups at their N-terminus with the goal of evaluating the effect of the modifications at this region in the peptide's antimicrobial properties. The interaction of these peptides with membrane models, surface activity, their hemolytic effect on red blood cells, and antibacterial activity against microorganisms were evaluated. The analogs presented similar action of Plantaricin149a; three of them with no hemolytic effect (< 5% until 0.5 mM, in addition to the induction of a helical element when binding to negative liposomes. The N-terminus difference between the analogs and Plantaricin149a retained the antibacterial effect on S. aureus and P. aeruginosa for all peptides (MIC50 of 19 µM and 155 µM to Plantaricin149a, respectively but resulted in a different mechanism of action against the microorganisms, that was bactericidal for Plantaricin149a and bacteriostatic for the analogs. This difference was confirmed by a reduction in leakage action for the analogs. The lytic activity of Plantaricin149a is suggested to be a result of the peptide-lipid interactions from the amphipathic helix and the hydrophobic residues at the N-terminus of the antimicrobial peptide.

  18. Statistical thermodynamics of association colloids. III. The gel to liquid phase transition of lipid bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leermakers, F. A. M.; Scheutjens, J. M. H. M.

    1988-12-01

    A new theory is introduced to model the lipid membrane structure and stability both above and below the gel to liquid phase transition temperature. Recently, we elaborated a self-consistent-field (SCF) theory, in which the full set of conformations was generated in a rotational isomeric state scheme and Boltzmann statistics was used to determine the statistical weight per conformation. In the present paper we also take into account that the anisotropic distribution of the molecules on the lattice induce a self-consistent anisotropic molecular field. This field, which is a function of the bond orientations, leads to an extra factor in the statistical weight of each conformation and is based on a generalization of Flory's and Di Marzio's analysis of systems with rigid rods. This elegant refinement follows from elementary statistics, is free of new adjustable parameters, and significantly improves details of the structure of the model membranes. To examine the properties of the SCAF (self-consistent anisotropic field) theory we use a model membrane built up by lecithin-like molecules composed of apolar and polar segments. The model has three nearest-neighbor interaction parameters of the Flory-Huggins type, namely for the interaction between apolar segments and water, that between polar segments and water, and that between polar and apolar segments. A fourth parameter is the dihedral trans/gauche energy difference. The theory predicts a first order gel to liquid phase transition for the model membranes. Depending on the membrane concentration, both an intercalated (in the dilute regime) and a nonintercalated (in the concentrated regime) gel phase are observed. Detailed information on the various membrane phases is obtained. Order parameter and segment density profiles are given.

  19. Ligand partitioning into lipid bilayer membranes under high pressure: Implication of variation in phase-transition temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuki, Hitoshi; Kato, Kentaro; Okamoto, Hirotsugu; Yoshida, Shuntaro; Goto, Masaki; Tamai, Nobutake; Kaneshina, Shoji

    2017-12-01

    The variation in phase-transition temperatures of dipalmitoylphosphatidylcholine (DPPC) bilayer membrane by adding two membrane-active ligands, a long-chain fatty acid (palmitic acid (PA)) and an inhalation anesthetic (halothane (HAL)), was investigated by light-transmittance measurements and fluorometry. By assuming the thermodynamic colligative property for the bilayer membrane at low ligand concentrations, the partitioning behavior of these ligands into the DPPC bilayer membrane was considered. It was proved from the differential partition coefficients between two phases that PA has strong affinity with the gel (lamellar gel) phase in a micro-molal concentration range and makes the bilayer membrane more ordered, while HAL has strong affinity with the liquid crystalline phase in a milli-molal concentration range and does the bilayer membrane more disordered. The transfer volumes of both ligands from the aqueous solution to each phase of the DPPC bilayer membrane showed that the preferential partitioning of the PA molecule into the gel (lamellar gel) produces about 20% decrease in transfer volume as compared with the liquid crystalline phase, whereas that of the HAL molecule into the liquid crystalline phase does about twice increase in transfer volume as compared with the gel (ripple gel) phase. Furthermore, changes in thermotropic and barotropic phase behavior of the DPPC bilayer membrane by adding the ligand was discussed from the viewpoint of the ligand partitioning. Reflecting the contrastive partitioning of PA and HAL into the pressure-induced interdigitated gel phase among the gel phases, it was revealed that PA suppresses the formation of the interdigitated gel phase under high pressure while HAL promotes it. These results clearly indicate that each phase of the DPPC bilayer membrane has a potential to recognize various ligand molecules. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Adhesion between cerebroside bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, K; Snyder, D S; McIntosh, T J

    1999-11-16

    The structure, hydration properties, and adhesion energy of the membrane glycolipid galactosylceramide (GalCer) were studied by osmotic stress/X-ray diffraction analysis.(1) Fully hydrated GalCer gave a repeat period of 67 A, which decreased less than 2 A with application of applied osmotic pressures as large as 1.6 x 10(9) dyn/cm(2). These results, along with the invariance of GalCer structure obtained by a Fourier analysis of the X-ray data, indicated that there was an extremely narrow fluid space (less than the diameter of a single water molecule) between fully hydrated cerebroside bilayers. Electron density profiles showed that the hydrocarbon chains from apposing GalCer monolayers partially interdigitated in the center of the bilayer. To obtain information on the adhesive properties of GalCer bilayers, we incorporated into the bilayer various mole ratios of the negatively charged lipid dipalmitoylphosphatidylglycerol (DPPG) to provide known electrostatic repulsion between the bilayers. Although 17 and 20 mol % DPPG swelled (disjoined) the GalCer bilayers by an amount predictable from electrostatic double-layer theory, 5, 10, 13, and 15 mol % DPPG did not disjoin the bilayers. By calculating the magnitude of the electrostatic pressure necessary to disjoin the bilayers, we estimated the adhesion energy for GalCer bilayers to be about -1.5 erg/cm(2), a much larger value than that previously measured for phosphatidylcholine bilayers. The observed discontinuous disjoining with increased electrostatic pressure and this relatively large value for adhesion energy indicated the presence of an attractive interaction, in addition to van der Waals attraction, between cerebroside bilayers. Possible attractive interactions are hydrogen bond formation and hydrophobic interactions between the galactose headgroups of apposing GalCer bilayers.

  1. Influence of the long-chain/short-chain amphiphile ratio on lateral diffusion of PEG-lipid in magnetically aligned lipid bilayers as measured via pulsed-field-gradient NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soong, Ronald; Macdonald, Peter M

    2005-09-01

    Lateral diffusion measurements of polyethylene glycol(PEG)-lipid incorporated into magnetically aligned lipid bilayers, composed of dimyristoyl phosphatidylcholine (DMPC) plus dihexanoyl phosphatidylcholine (DHPC) plus 1 mol % (relative to DMPC) dimyristoyl phosphatidylethanolamine-n-[methoxy(polyethylene glycol)-2000] (DMPE-PEG 2000), were performed using stimulated-echo pulsed-field-gradient proton ((1)H) nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The DMPE-PEG 2000 (1 mol %, 35 degrees C) lateral diffusion coefficient D varied directly with the mole fraction of DMPC, X(DMPC) = q/(1+q) where q = DMPC/DHPC molar ratio, decreasing progressively from D = 1.65 x 10(-11) m(2) s(-1) at q approximately 4.7 to D = 0.65 x 10(-11) m(2) s(-1) at q approximately 2.5. Possible sources of this dependence, including orientational disorder, obstruction, and PEG-lipid sequestration, were simulated using, respectively, a diffusion-in-a-cone model, percolation theory, and a two-phase PEG distribution model. Orientational disorder alone was not capable of reproducing the observations, but in combination with either obstruction or PEG-lipid two-phase distribution models did so satisfactorily. A combination of all three models yielded the most reasonable fit to the observed dependence of lateral diffusion on q. These same effects would be expected to influence lateral diffusion of any bilayer-associating species in such systems.

  2. Highly efficient integration of the viral portal proteins from different types of phages into planar bilayers for the black lipid membrane analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jing, Peng; Paraiso, Hallel; Burris, Benjamin

    2016-02-01

    The planar lipid bilayer technology is a technique that yields incredibly useful structural function information about a single channel protein. It is also currently actively utilized as a powerful platform using biological protein nanopores for the development of single-molecule nanopore sensing technology, as well as ultrafast DNA sequencing technology. The portal protein, GP10, from the bacteriophage Φ29 was the first phage portal protein shown to be successfully inserted into planar bilayer membranes, thereby it may inspire more researchers to apply the techniques to portal proteins from the other bacteriophages. However, the technology is far from perfect since the insertion of the channel proteins into planar bilayer membranes is not only technically difficult but also time-consuming. For the fusion of phage portal proteins, vesicles are typically needed to be reconstituted with the portal proteins to form proteoliposomes. However, most of the phage portal proteins have low solubility, and may self-aggregate during the preparation of the proteoliposomes. Furthermore, the fusion of the formed proteoliposomes is sporadic, unpredictable and varied from person to person. Due to the lack of experimental consistency between labs, the results from different methodologies reported for generating fusible proteoliposomes are highly variable. In this research, we propose a new method for the preparation of the fusible proteoliposomes containing portal proteins from bacteriophages, to circumvent the problems aforementioned. Compared to the conventional methods, this method was able to avoid the protein aggregation issues during the vesicle preparation by eliminating the need for detergents and the subsequent time-consuming step for detergent removal. The proteoliposomes prepared by the method were shown to be more efficiently and rapidly inserted into planar bilayer membranes bathed in different conducting buffer solutions including those with nonelectrolytes such as

  3. Bilayer-thickness-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins

    CERN Document Server

    Kahraman, Osman; Klug, William S; Haselwandter, Christoph A

    2016-01-01

    Hydrophobic thickness mismatch between integral membrane proteins and the surrounding lipid bilayer can produce lipid bilayer thickness deformations. Experiment and theory have shown that protein-induced lipid bilayer thickness deformations can yield energetically favorable bilayer-mediated interactions between integral membrane proteins, and large-scale organization of integral membrane proteins into protein clusters in cell membranes. Within the continuum elasticity theory of membranes, the energy cost of protein-induced bilayer thickness deformations can be captured by considering compression and expansion of the bilayer hydrophobic core, membrane tension, and bilayer bending, resulting in biharmonic equilibrium equations describing the shape of lipid bilayers for a given set of bilayer-protein boundary conditions. Here we develop a combined analytic and numerical methodology for the solution of the equilibrium elastic equations associated with protein-induced lipid bilayer deformations. Our methodology al...

  4. Generalization of the swelling method to measure the intrinsic curvature of lipids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragán Vidal, I. A.; Müller, M.

    2017-12-01

    Via computer simulation of a coarse-grained model of two-component lipid bilayers, we compare two methods of measuring the intrinsic curvatures of the constituting monolayers. The first one is a generalization of the swelling method that, in addition to the assumption that the spontaneous curvature linearly depends on the composition of the lipid mixture, incorporates contributions from its elastic energy. The second method measures the effective curvature-composition coupling between the apposing leaflets of bilayer structures (planar bilayers or cylindrical tethers) to extract the spontaneous curvature. Our findings demonstrate that both methods yield consistent results. However, we highlight that the two-leaflet structure inherent to the latter method has the advantage of allowing measurements for mixed lipid systems up to their critical point of demixing as well as in the regime of high concentration (of either species).

  5. Surface coating of siRNA-peptidomimetic nano-self-assemblies with anionic lipid bilayers: Enhanced gene silencing and reduced adversed effects in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Xianghui; de Groot, A. M.; Sijts, Alice

    2015-01-01

    Cationic vectors have demonstrated the potential to facilitate intracellular delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. However, enhanced transfection efficiency is usually associated with adverse effects, which also proves to be a challenge for vectors based on cationic peptides. In this study...... a series of proteolytically stable palmitoylated α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics with a systematically varied number of repeating lysine and homoarginine residues was shown to self-assemble with small interfering RNA (siRNA). The resulting well-defined nanocomplexes were coated with anionic lipids...... not display any noticeable cytotoxicity and immunogenicity in vitro. In contrast, the corresponding nanocomplexes mediated a reduced silencing effect with a more narrow safety window. The surface coating with anionic lipid bilayers led to partial decomplexation of the siRNA–peptidomimetic nanocomplex core...

  6. Time-resolved FTIR spectroscopy for monitoring protein dynamics exemplified by functional studies of Ras protein bound to a lipid bilayer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koetting, Carsten, E-mail: carsten.koetting@rub.de [Lehrstuhl fuer Biophysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Gueldenhaupt, Joern [Lehrstuhl fuer Biophysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Gerwert, Klaus, E-mail: gerwert@bph.rub.de [Lehrstuhl fuer Biophysik, Ruhr-Universitaet Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2012-03-02

    Graphical abstract: The first time resolved FTIR investigation of a GTPase reaction of a protein anchored at a single lipid bilayer. Display Omitted Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer FTIR difference spectroscopy monitors protein dynamics with atomic detail. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ATR-FTIR allows the measurement of a monolayer sample. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Membrane proteins can be investigated near physiological conditions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The hydrolysis reaction of Ras was investigated in this condition for the first time. - Abstract: Time-resolved Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) difference spectroscopy is a valuable tool for monitoring the dynamics of protein reactions and interactions. Absorbance changes can be monitored with time resolutions down to nanoseconds and followed for time periods that range over nine orders of magnitude. Membrane proteins bound to solid supported lipid bilayers can be investigated in near physiological conditions with the attenuated total reflection (ATR) technique. Here, we review the basics of time-resolved FTIR with a focus on Ras, a GTPase that is mutated in 25% of human tumors. We show the first time-resolved measurements of membrane anchored Ras and observed the switching between its activated and its inactivated state. We compared those measurements with measurements of the truncated Ras in solution. We found that both the kinetics and the functional groups involved were very similar. This suggested that the membrane did not have a major influence on the hydrolysis reaction.

  7. Free-standing lipid bilayers in silicon chips-membrane stabilization based on microfabricated apertures with a nanometer-scale smoothness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi; Aoto, Kouji; Oshima, Azusa; Taira, Tasuku; Yamaguchi, Ryo-taro; Kimura, Yasuo; Niwano, Michio

    2010-02-02

    In the present study, we propose a method for preparing stable free-standing bilayer lipid membranes (BLMs). The BLMs were prepared in a microfabricated aperture with a smoothly tapered edge, which was prepared in a nanometer-thick Si(3)N(4) septum by the wet etching method. Owing to this structure, the stress on lipid bilayers at the contact with the septum was minimized, leading to remarkable membrane stability. The BLMs were not broken by applying a constant voltage of +/-1 V. The membrane lifetime was 15-45 h with and without an incorporated gramicidin channel. Gramicidin single-channel currents were recorded from the same BLM preparation when the aqueous solutions surrounding the BLM were repeatedly exchanged, demonstrating the tolerance of the present BLM to repetitive solution exchanges. Such stable membranes enable analysis of channel functions under various solution conditions from the same BLM, which will open up a variety of applications including a high throughput drug screening for ion channels.

  8. Tethered Lubricants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Archer, Lynden

    2010-09-15

    We have performed extensive experimental and theoretical studies of interfacial friction, relaxation dynamics, and thermodynamics of polymer chains tethered to points, planes, and particles. A key result from our tribology studies using lateral force microscopy (LFM) measurements of polydisperse brushes of linear and branched chains densely grafted to planar substrates is that there are exceedingly low friction coefficients for these systems. Specific project achievements include: (1) Synthesis of three-tiered lubricant films containing controlled amounts of free and pendent PDMS chains, and investigated the effect of their molecular weight and volume fraction on interfacial friction. (2.) Detailed studies of a family of hairy particles termed nanoscale organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) and demonstration of their use as lubricants.

  9. Interaction of cholesterol-like molecules in polyunsaturated phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers as revealed by a self-consistent field theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leermakers, F.A.M.; Rabinovich, A.L.

    2007-01-01

    Cholesterol is one of the most abundant components in biological membranes. In this paper we apply a detailed state-of-the-art self-consistent field (SCF) theory to predict the influence of cholesterol-look-alikes in the bilayer composed of

  10. Surface coating of siRNA-peptidomimetic nano-self-assemblies with anionic lipid bilayers: enhanced gene silencing and reduced adverse effects in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xianghui; de Groot, Anne Marit; Sijts, Alice J. A. M.; Broere, Femke; Oude Blenke, Erik; Colombo, Stefano; van Eden, Willem; Franzyk, Henrik; Nielsen, Hanne Mørck; Foged, Camilla

    2015-11-01

    Cationic vectors have demonstrated the potential to facilitate intracellular delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. However, enhanced transfection efficiency is usually associated with adverse effects, which also proves to be a challenge for vectors based on cationic peptides. In this study a series of proteolytically stable palmitoylated α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics with a systematically varied number of repeating lysine and homoarginine residues was shown to self-assemble with small interfering RNA (siRNA). The resulting well-defined nanocomplexes were coated with anionic lipids giving rise to net anionic liposomes. These complexes and the corresponding liposomes were optimized towards efficient gene silencing and low adverse effects. The optimal anionic liposomes mediated a high silencing effect, which was comparable to that of the control (cationic Lipofectamine 2000), and did not display any noticeable cytotoxicity and immunogenicity in vitro. In contrast, the corresponding nanocomplexes mediated a reduced silencing effect with a more narrow safety window. The surface coating with anionic lipid bilayers led to partial decomplexation of the siRNA-peptidomimetic nanocomplex core of the liposomes, which facilitated siRNA release. Additionally, the optimal anionic liposomes showed efficient intracellular uptake and endosomal escape. Therefore, these findings suggest that a more efficacious and safe formulation can be achieved by surface coating of the siRNA-peptidomimetic nano-self-assemblies with anionic lipid bilayers.Cationic vectors have demonstrated the potential to facilitate intracellular delivery of therapeutic oligonucleotides. However, enhanced transfection efficiency is usually associated with adverse effects, which also proves to be a challenge for vectors based on cationic peptides. In this study a series of proteolytically stable palmitoylated α-peptide/β-peptoid peptidomimetics with a systematically varied number of repeating lysine

  11. Perillyl alcohol: Dynamic interactions with the lipid bilayer and implications for long‐term inhalational chemotherapy for gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orlando da Fonseca, Clovis; Khandelia, Himanshu; D’Alincourt Salazar, Marcela

    2016-01-01

    Background: Gliomas display a high degree of intratumor heterogeneity, including changes in physiological parameters and lipid composition of the plasma membrane, which may contribute to the development of drug resistance. Biophysical interactions between therapeutic agents and the lipid componen...

  12. Exploring the dynamics and interaction of a full ErbB2 receptor and Trastuzumab-Fab antibody in a lipid bilayer model using Martini coarse-grained force field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Gonzalez, Juan Felipe; Ramos, Javier; Cruz, Victor L.; Martinez-Salazar, Javier

    2014-11-01

    Coarse grained (CG) modeling has been applied to study the influence of the Trastuzumab monoclonal antibody on the structure and dynamics of the full ErbB2 receptor dimer, including the lipid bilayer. The usage of CG models to study such complexes is almost mandatory, at present, due to the large size of the whole system. We will show that the Martini model performs satisfactorily well, giving results well-matched with those obtained by atomistic models as well as with the experimental information existing on homolog receptors. For example, the extra and intracellular domains approach the bilayer surface in both the monomer and dimer cases. The Trastuzumab-Fab hinders the interaction of the receptors with the lipid bilayer. Another interesting effect of the antibody is the disruption of the antiparallel arrangement of the juxtamembrane segments in the dimer case. These findings might help to understand the effect of the antibody on the receptor bioactivity.

  13. Contrasting Effects of a Rigid Core and an Alkyl Chain in nCB on the Phase Behavior of Lipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usuda, Hatsuho; Hishida, Mafumi; Yamamura, Yasuhisa; Saito, Kazuya

    2016-06-14

    Molecules incorporated into biomembranes often bear both a core and an alkyl chain in a single molecule (e.g., sterols). To clarify the effects of these two parts of a molecule, the phase behavior of a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer containing 4-n-alkyl-4'-cyanobiphenyl (nCB) (n = 0-8) was investigated. The trends of the main transition temperature (Tm) with respect to n and of the pretransition temperature (Tp) with respect to nCB content changed at n = 3. It was therefore suggested that the two parts of the molecule had opposing effects on the phase behavior of DPPC bilayers. The core appears to perturb molecular ordering in the gel phase and lowers Tm (like cholesterol), while alkyl chains appear to order the lipids in the gel phase and raise Tm (like n-alkanes). In addition, Tm exhibits the so-called odd-even effect based on the alkyl chain length of the minor component, nCB. Depending on the value of n, the variation in Tp was dependent on the additive content, although the pretransition was rarely observed at high contents.

  14. Oxygen as a paramagnetic probe for nuclear magnetic resonance: structure and paramagnetic profile of a lipid bilayer/membrane model system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-Abdul Wahid, M.S

    2005-07-01

    Paramagnetic contact shifts and relaxation rate enhancements from molecular oxygen dissolved in a model membrane, were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The model membrane system was an isotropic bicelle formed using 1-myristelaidoyl-2-myristoyl-d27-sn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (MLMPC), a custom phospholipid, and 1-2-dihexanoyl-d22-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DHPC). The {sup 13}C and {sup 1}H spectra of MLMPC were assigned. Molecular oxygen was delivered at external pressures of 20 and 50 atm. Paramagnetic contact shifts were found to scale with the oxygen solubility gradient in the lipid bilayer, were found to be invariant to temperature changes in the region studied (288K to 331K), and scaled linearly with changes in oxygen pressure. Relaxation rate enhancements from oxygen were low in the headgroup region and increased to a roughly constant rate in the acyl chain region. Rates were comparable to values predicted by simple thermodynamic theories which take into account the observed gradients in diffusion rates and solubility of oxygen in bilayers. (author)

  15. Critical size dependence of domain formation observed in coarse-grained simulations of bilayers composed of ternary lipid mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantelopulos, George A.; Nagai, Tetsuro; Bandara, Asanga; Panahi, Afra; Straub, John E.

    2017-09-01

    Model cellular membranes are known to form micro- and macroscale lipid domains dependent on molecular composition. The formation of macroscopic lipid domains by lipid mixtures has been the subject of many simulation investigations. We present a critical study of system size impact on lipid domain phase separation into liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered macroscale domains in ternary lipid mixtures. In the popular di-C16:0 PC:di-C18:2 PC:cholesterol at 35:35:30 ratio mixture, we find systems with a minimum of 1480 lipids to be necessary for the formation of macroscopic phase separated domains and systems of 10 000 lipids to achieve structurally converged conformations similar to the thermodynamic limit. To understand these results and predict the behavior of any mixture forming two phases, we develop and investigate an analytical Flory-Huggins model which is recursively validated using simulation and experimental data. We find that micro- and macroscale domains can coexist in ternary mixtures. Additionally, we analyze the distributions of specific lipid-lipid interactions in each phase, characterizing domain structures proposed based on past experimental studies. These findings offer guidance in selecting appropriate system sizes for the study of phase separations and provide new insights into the nature of domain structure for a popular ternary lipid mixture.

  16. Ultrafast molecular dynamics of biofuel extraction for microalgae and bacteria milking: blocking membrane folding pathways to damaged lipid-bilayer conformations with nanomicelles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillet, Jean-Numa

    2015-01-01

    Cell milking is a 100% renewable green energy for CO2 by extraction of biofuels inside the cytosol of photosynthetic micro-organisms as microalgae and bacteria. The cells are exposed to a hydrophobic solvent forming holes and cracks through their membranes from which the biofuels can leak out. In protein folding, the goal would be to find pathways to the unique functional protein conformer. However, in the lipid-bilayer interaction with the solvent for milking, the objective is to block the pathways for damaged membrane conformations of low free energy with undesired nanostructures, using the solvent properties, as shown with an ab initio structural bioinformatic model. Statistical thermodynamics is used to compute the free energy (including entropy) from the molecular dynamics trajectory of the biomolecular system with many conformational changes. This model can be extended to the general problem of biomolecules folding as for proteins and nucleic acids. Using an adaptation of the Einstein diffusion law, the conformational change dynamics of the lipid bilayer depends on the two diffusion coefficients of the solvent: D1 before the irreversible folding transition time and the much smaller D2 thereafter. In contrast to the n-hexane and n-heptane hydrocarbons of smaller size, the residual D2=4.7 × 10(-7)cm(2)/s of the n-decane solvent, with the highest partition coefficient among the three extractors, is the only to present a D2 value that is significantly below the critical threshold of 10(-6)cm(2)/s. Therefore, the membrane would resist to long hydrocarbons and the exposed cells would remain viable for milking.

  17. Efficient molecular mechanics simulations of the folding, orientation, and assembly of peptides in lipid bilayers using an implicit atomic solvation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordner, Andrew J.; Zorman, Barry; Abagyan, Ruben

    2011-10-01

    Membrane proteins comprise a significant fraction of the proteomes of sequenced organisms and are the targets of approximately half of marketed drugs. However, in spite of their prevalence and biomedical importance, relatively few experimental structures are available due to technical challenges. Computational simulations can potentially address this deficit by providing structural models of membrane proteins. Solvation within the spatially heterogeneous membrane/solvent environment provides a major component of the energetics driving protein folding and association within the membrane. We have developed an implicit solvation model for membranes that is both computationally efficient and accurate enough to enable molecular mechanics predictions for the folding and association of peptides within the membrane. We derived the new atomic solvation model parameters using an unbiased fitting procedure to experimental data and have applied it to diverse problems in order to test its accuracy and to gain insight into membrane protein folding. First, we predicted the positions and orientations of peptides and complexes within the lipid bilayer and compared the simulation results with solid-state NMR structures. Additionally, we performed folding simulations for a series of host-guest peptides with varying propensities to form alpha helices in a hydrophobic environment and compared the structures with experimental measurements. We were also able to successfully predict the structures of amphipathic peptides as well as the structures for dimeric complexes of short hexapeptides that have experimentally characterized propensities to form beta sheets within the membrane. Finally, we compared calculated relative transfer energies with data from experiments measuring the effects of mutations on the free energies of translocon-mediated insertion of proteins into lipid bilayers and of combined folding and membrane insertion of a beta barrel protein.

  18. TrackArt: the user friendly interface for single molecule tracking data analysis and simulation applied to complex diffusion in mica supported lipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matysik, Artur; Kraut, Rachel S

    2014-05-01

    Single molecule tracking (SMT) analysis of fluorescently tagged lipid and protein probes is an attractive alternative to ensemble averaged methods such as fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) or fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) for measuring diffusion in artificial and plasma membranes. The meaningful estimation of diffusion coefficients and their errors is however not straightforward, and is heavily dependent on sample type, acquisition method, and equipment used. Many approaches require advanced computing and programming skills for their implementation. Here we present TrackArt software, an accessible graphic interface for simulation and complex analysis of multiple particle paths. Imported trajectories can be filtered to eliminate spurious or corrupted tracks, and are then analyzed using several previously described methodologies, to yield single or multiple diffusion coefficients, their population fractions, and estimated errors. We use TrackArt to analyze the single-molecule diffusion behavior of a sphingolipid analog SM-Atto647N, in mica supported DOPC (1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine) bilayers. Fitting with a two-component diffusion model confirms the existence of two separate populations of diffusing particles in these bilayers on mica. As a demonstration of the TrackArt workflow, we characterize and discuss the effective activation energies required to increase the diffusion rates of these populations, obtained from Arrhenius plots of temperature-dependent diffusion. Finally, TrackArt provides a simulation module, allowing the user to generate models with multiple particle trajectories, diffusing with different characteristics. Maps of domains, acting as impermeable or permeable obstacles for particles diffusing with given rate constants and diffusion coefficients, can be simulated or imported from an image. Importantly, this allows one to use simulated data with a known diffusion behavior as a comparison for results

  19. Nanodiscs for immobilization of lipid bilayers and membrane receptors: kinetic analysis of cholera toxin binding to a glycolipid receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Jonas; Torta, Federico; Sligar, Stephen G

    2008-01-01

    nanodiscs and their incorporated membrane receptors can be attached to surface plasmon resonance sensorchips and used to measure the kinetics of the interaction between soluble molecules and membrane receptors inserted in the bilayer of nanodiscs. Cholera toxin and its glycolipid receptor G(M1) constitute...... partner cholera toxin B subunit to the receptor with the sensorchip-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technology. The measured stoichiometric and kinetic values of the interaction are in agreement with those reported by previous studies, thus providing proof-of-principle that nanodiscs can be employed...

  20. How proteins move lipids and lipids move proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong, H.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/222364815; van der Sluijs, P.; van Meer, G.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/068570368

    2001-01-01

    Cells determine the bilayer characteristics of different membranes by tightly controlling their lipid composition. Local changes in the physical properties of bilayers, in turn, allow membrane deformation, and facilitate vesicle budding and fusion. Moreover, specific lipids at specific locations

  1. Data including GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of mixed, asymmetric bilayers including molecular topologies, equilibrated structures, and force field for lipids compatible with OPLS-AA parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Róg, Tomasz; Orłowski, Adam; Llorente, Alicia; Skotland, Tore; Sylvänne, Tuulia; Kauhanen, Dimple; Ekroos, Kim; Sandvig, Kirsten; Vattulainen, Ilpo

    2016-06-01

    In this Data in Brief article we provide a data package of GROMACS input files for atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of multicomponent, asymmetric lipid bilayers using the OPLS-AA force field. These data include 14 model bilayers composed of 8 different lipid molecules. The lipids present in these models are: cholesterol (CHOL), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylcholine (POPC), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylethanolamine (POPE), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidyl-ethanolamine (SOPE), 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS), 1-stearoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (SOPS), N-palmitoyl-D-erythro-sphingosyl-phosphatidylcholine (SM16), and N-lignoceroyl-D-erythro-sphingosyl-phosphatidylcholine (SM24). The bilayers׳ compositions are based on lipidomic studies of PC-3 prostate cancer cells and exosomes discussed in Llorente et al. (2013) [1], showing an increase in the section of long-tail lipid species (SOPS, SOPE, and SM24) in the exosomes. Former knowledge about lipid asymmetry in cell membranes was accounted for in the models, meaning that the model of the inner leaflet is composed of a mixture of PC, PS, PE, and cholesterol, while the extracellular leaflet is composed of SM, PC and cholesterol discussed in Van Meer et al. (2008) [2]. The provided data include lipids׳ topologies, equilibrated structures of asymmetric bilayers, all force field parameters, and input files with parameters describing simulation conditions (md.mdp). The data is associated with the research article "Interdigitation of Long-Chain Sphingomyelin Induces Coupling of Membrane Leaflets in a Cholesterol Dependent Manner" (Róg et al., 2016) [3].

  2. Tethering a new technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stone, Nobie H.; Candidi, Maurizio

    1993-01-01

    In a tethered-satellite system, two satellites travelling in different orbits are forced to circle the earth in the same time period. The lower satellite is dragged by the tether to a higher orbital speed, while the upper one tends to move higher. This generates a tension which maintains the system in a stable configuration; the tether is aligned with a radius projecting outward from the earth's center. Such a system has been demonstrated by the TSS-1 tethered satellite carried by the Space Shuttle's STS-46 mission. The dynamic and the electrodynamic behavior of the system at long tether lengths were not, however, evaluated due to system malfunctions.

  3. Label-free detection and identification of protein ligands captured by receptors in a polymerized planar lipid bilayer using MALDI-TOF MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Boying; Ju, Yue; Joubert, James R; Kaleta, Erin J; Lopez, Rodrigo; Jones, Ian W; Hall, Henry K; Ratnayaka, Saliya N; Wysocki, Vicki H; Saavedra, S Scott

    2015-04-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry (MS) coupled with affinity capture is a well-established method to extract biological analytes from complex samples followed by label-free detection and identification. Many bioanalytes of interest bind to membrane-associated receptors; however, the matrices and high-vacuum conditions inherent to MALDI-TOF MS make it largely incompatible with the use of artificial lipid membranes with incorporated receptors as platforms for detection of captured proteins and peptides. Here we show that cross-linking polymerization of a planar supported lipid bilayer (PSLB) provides the stability needed for MALDI-TOF MS analysis of proteins captured by receptors embedded in the membrane. PSLBs composed of poly(bis-sorbylphosphatidylcholine) (poly(bis-SorbPC)) and doped with the ganglioside receptors GM1 and GD1a were used for affinity capture of the B subunits of cholera toxin, heat-labile enterotoxin, and pertussis toxin. The three toxins were captured simultaneously, then detected and identified by MS on the basis of differences in their molecular weights. Poly(bis-SorbPC) PSLBs are inherently resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption, which allowed selective toxin detection to be achieved in complex matrices (bovine serum and shrimp extract). Using GM1-cholera toxin subunit B as a model receptor-ligand pair, we estimated the minimal detectable concentration of toxin to be 4 nM. On-plate tryptic digestion of bound cholera toxin subunit B followed by MS/MS analysis of digested peptides was performed successfully, demonstrating the feasibility of using the PSLB-based affinity capture platform for identification of unknown, membrane-associated proteins. Overall, this work demonstrates that combining a poly(lipid) affinity capture platform with MALDI-TOF MS detection is a viable approach for capture and proteomic characterization of membrane-associated proteins in a label-free manner.

  4. Cyclohexane Rings Reduce Membrane Permeability to Small Ions in Archaea-Inspired Tetraether Lipids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyanagi, Takaoki; Leriche, Geoffray; Onofrei, David; Holland, Gregory P; Mayer, Michael; Yang, Jerry

    2016-01-26

    Extremophile archaeal organisms overcome problems of membrane permeability by producing lipids with structural elements that putatively improve membrane integrity compared to lipids from other life forms. Herein, we describe a series of lipids that mimic some key structural features of archaeal lipids, such as: 1) single tethering of lipid tails to create fully transmembrane tetraether lipids and 2) the incorporation of small rings into these tethered segments. We found that membranes formed from pure tetraether lipids leaked small ions at a rate that was about two orders of magnitude slower than common bilayer-forming lipids. Incorporation of cyclopentane rings into the tetraether lipids did not affect membrane leakage, whereas a cyclohexane ring reduced leakage by an additional 40 %. These results show that mimicking certain structural features of natural archaeal lipids results in improved membrane integrity, which may help overcome limitations of many current lipid-based technologies. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Conserved molecular superlattices in a series of homologous synthetic mycobacterial cell-wall lipids forming interdigitated bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin-Bertelsen, Birte; Yaghmur, Anan; Franzyk, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Synthetic analogues of the cell-wall lipid monomycoloyl glycerol (MMG) are promising as next-generation vaccine adjuvants. In the present study, the thermotropic phase behaviour of an array of synthetic MMG analogues was examined using simultaneous small- and wide-angle X-ray scattering under exc...... for the rational design of nanoparticulate adjuvants with specific and tailored structural features....

  6. Protein crowding in lipid bilayers gives rise to non-Gaussian anomalous lateral diffusion of phospholipids and proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeon, Jae Hyung; Javanainen, Matti; Martinez-Seara, Hector

    2016-01-01

    Biomembranes are exceptionally crowded with proteins with typical protein-to-lipid ratios being around 1:50-1:100. Protein crowding has a decisive role in lateral membrane dynamics as shown by recent experimental and computational studies that have reported anomalous lateral diffusion of phosphol...

  7. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes. Copyright © 2013

  8. Computer simulation of ion channel gating: the M(2) channel of influenza A virus in a lipid bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweighofer, K. J.; Pohorille, A.

    2000-01-01

    The transmembrane fragment of the influenza virus M(2) protein forms a homotetrameric channel that transports protons. In this paper, we use molecular dynamics simulations to help elucidate the mechanism of channel gating by four histidines that occlude the channel lumen in the closed state. We test two competing hypotheses. In the "shuttle" mechanism, the delta nitrogen atom on the extracellular side of one histidine is protonated by the incoming proton, and, subsequently, the proton on the epsilon nitrogen atom is released on the opposite side. In the "water-wire" mechanism, the gate opens because of electrostatic repulsion between four simultaneously biprotonated histidines. This allows for proton transport along the water wire that penetrates the gate. For each system, composed of the channel embedded in a hydrated phospholipid bilayer, a 1.3-ns trajectory was obtained. It is found that the states involved in the shuttle mechanism, which contain either single-protonated histidines or a mixture of single-protonated histidines plus one biprotonated residue, are stable during the simulations. Furthermore, the orientations and dynamics of water molecules near the gate are conducive to proton transfer. In contrast, the fully biprotonated state is not stable. Additional simulations show that if only two histidines are biprotonated, the channel deforms but the gate remains closed. These results support the shuttle mechanism but not the gate-opening mechanism of proton gating in M(2).

  9. Choosing the right fluorophore for single-molecule fluorescence studies in a lipid environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhenfu; Yomo, Dan; Gradinaru, Claudiu

    2017-07-01

    Nonspecific interactions between lipids and fluorophores can alter the outcomes of single-molecule spectroscopy of membrane proteins in live cells, liposomes or lipid nanodiscs and of cytosolic proteins encapsulated in liposomes or tethered to supported lipid bilayers. To gain insight into these effects, we examined interactions between 9 dyes that are commonly used as labels for single-molecule fluorescence (SMF) and 6 standard lipids including cationic, zwitterionic and anionic types. The diffusion coefficients of dyes in the absence and presence of set amounts of lipid vesicles were measured by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). The partition coefficients and the free energies of partitioning for different fluorophore-lipid pairs were obtained by global fitting of the titration FCS curves. Lipids with different charges, head groups and degrees of chain saturation were investigated, and interactions with dyes are discussed in terms of hydrophobic, electrostatic and steric contributions. Fluorescence imaging of individual fluorophores adsorbed on supported lipid bilayers provides visualization and additional quantification of the strength of dye-lipid interaction in the context of single-molecule measurements. By dissecting fluorophore-lipid interactions, our study provides new insights into setting up single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy experiments with minimal interference from interactions between fluorescent labels and lipids in the environment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Adaptation Independent Modulation of Auditory Hair Cell Mechanotransduction Channel Open Probability Implicates a Role for the Lipid Bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Anthony W; Gnanasambandam, Radhakrishnan; Sachs, Frederick; Ricci, Anthony J

    2016-03-09

    The auditory system is able to detect movement down to atomic dimensions. This sensitivity comes in part from mechanisms associated with gating of hair cell mechanoelectric transduction (MET) channels. MET channels, located at the tops of stereocilia, are poised to detect tension induced by hair bundle deflection. Hair bundle deflection generates a force by pulling on tip-link proteins connecting adjacent stereocilia. The resting open probability (P(open)) of MET channels determines the linearity and sensitivity to mechanical stimulation. Classically, P(open) is regulated by a calcium-sensitive adaptation mechanism in which lowering extracellular calcium or depolarization increases P(open). Recent data demonstrated that the fast component of adaptation is independent of both calcium and voltage, thus requiring an alternative explanation for the sensitivity of P(open) to calcium and voltage. Using rat auditory hair cells, we characterize a mechanism, separate from fast adaptation, whereby divalent ions interacting with the local lipid environment modulate resting P(open). The specificity of this effect for different divalent ions suggests binding sites that are not an EF-hand or calmodulin model. GsMTx4, a lipid-mediated modifier of cationic stretch-activated channels, eliminated the voltage and divalent sensitivity with minimal effects on adaptation. We hypothesize that the dual mechanisms (lipid modulation and adaptation) extend the dynamic range of the system while maintaining adaptation kinetics at their maximal rates. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/362945-12$15.00/0.

  11. Mechanically stable solvent-free lipid bilayers in nano- and micro-tapered apertures for reconstitution of cell-free synthesized hERG channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tadaki, Daisuke; Yamaura, Daichi; Araki, Shun; Yoshida, Miyu; Arata, Kohei; Ohori, Takeshi; Ishibashi, Ken-Ichi; Kato, Miki; Ma, Teng; Miyata, Ryusuke; Tozawa, Yuzuru; Yamamoto, Hideaki; Niwano, Michio; Hirano-Iwata, Ayumi

    2017-12-18

    The self-assembled bilayer lipid membrane (BLM) is the basic component of the cell membrane. The reconstitution of ion channel proteins in artificially formed BLMs represents a well-defined system for the functional analysis of ion channels and screening the effects of drugs that act on them. However, because BLMs are unstable, this limits the experimental throughput of BLM reconstitution systems. Here we report on the formation of mechanically stable solvent-free BLMs in microfabricated apertures with defined nano- and micro-tapered edge structures. The role of such nano- and micro-tapered structures on the stability of the BLMs was also investigated. Finally, this BLM system was combined with a cell-free synthesized human ether-a-go-go-related gene channel, a cardiac potassium channel whose relation to arrhythmic side effects following drug treatment is well recognized. Such stable BLMs as these, when combined with a cell-free system, represent a potential platform for screening the effects of drugs that act on various ion-channel genotypes.

  12. Synthesis and evaluation of mesoporous carbon/lipid bilayer nanocomposites for improved oral delivery of the poorly water-soluble drug, nimodipine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanzhuo; Zhao, Qinfu; Zhu, Wufu; Zhang, Lihua; Han, Jin; Lin, Qisi; Ai, Fengwei

    2015-07-01

    A novel mesoporous carbon/lipid bilayer nanocomposite (MCLN) with a core-shell structure was synthesized and characterized as an oral drug delivery system for poorly water-soluble drugs. The objective of this study was to investigate the potential of MCLN-based formulation to modulate the in vitro release and in vivo absorption of a model drug, nimodipine (NIM). NIM-loaded MCLN was prepared by a procedure involving a combination of thin-film hydration and lyophilization. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), specific surface area analysis, differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were employed to characterize the NIM-loaded MCLN formulation. The effect of MCLN on cell viability was assessed using the MTT assay. In addition, the oral bioavailability of NIM-loaded MCLN in beagle dogs was compared with that of the immediate-release formulation, Nimotop®. Our results demonstrate that the NIM-loaded MCLN formulation exhibited a typical sustained release pattern. The NIM-loaded MCLN formulation achieved a greater degree of absorption and longer lasting plasma drug levels compared with the commercial formulation. The relative bioavailability of NIM for NIM-loaded MCLN was 214%. MCLN exhibited negligible toxicity. The data reported herein suggest that the MCLN matrix is a promising carrier for controlling the drug release rate and improving the oral absorption of poorly water-soluble drugs.

  13. PEGylated lipid bilayer-wrapped nano-graphene oxides for synergistic co-delivery of doxorubicin and rapamycin to prevent drug resistance in cancers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Raj Kumar; Byeon, Jeong Hoon; Choi, Han-Gon; Yong, Chul Soon; Kim, Jong Oh

    2017-07-01

    Nano-graphene oxide (nGO) is a carbon allotrope studied for its potential as carrier for chemotherapeutic delivery and its photoablation effects. However, interaction of nGO with blood components and the subsequent toxicities warrant a hybrid system for effective cancer drug delivery. Combination chemotherapy aids in effective cancer treatment and prevention of drug resistance. Therefore, in this study, we attempted to prepare polyethylene glycosylated (PEGylated) lipid bilayer-wrapped nGO co-loaded with doxorubicin (DOX) and rapamycin (RAPA), GOLDR, for the prevention and treatment of resistant cancers. Our results revealed a stable GOLDR formulation with appropriate particle size (∼170 nm), polydispersity (∼0.19) and drug loading. Free drug combination (DOX and RAPA) presented synergistic anticancer effects in MDA-MB-231, MCF-7, and BT474 cells. Treatment with GOLDR formulation maintained this synergism in treated cancer cells, which was further enhanced by the near infrared (NIR) laser irradiation-induced photothermal effects of nGO. Higher chromatin condensation and apoptotic body formation, and enhanced protein expression of apoptosis-related markers (Bax, p53, p21, and c-caspase 3) following GOLDR treatment in the presence of NIR laser treatment clearly suggests its superiority in effective chemo-photothermal therapy of resistant cancers. The hybrid nanosystem that we developed provides a basis for the effective use of GOLDR treatment in the prevention and treatment of resistant cancer types.

  14. Elasticities and stabilities: lipid membranes vs cell membranes

    OpenAIRE

    Tu, Z. C.; An, R.; Ou-Yang, Z. C.

    2005-01-01

    A cell membrane can be simply regarded as composite material consisting of lipid bilayer, membrane cytoskeleton beneath lipid bilayer, and proteins embedded in lipid bilayer and linked with membrane cytoskeleton if one only concerns its mechanical properties. In this Chapter, above all, the authors give a brief introduction to some important work on mechanical properties of lipid bilayers following Helfrich's seminal work on spontaneous curvature energy of lipid bilayers. Next, the entropy of...

  15. The influence of non polar and polar molecules in mouse motile cells membranes and pure lipid bilayers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco J Sierra-Valdez

    Full Text Available We report an experimental study of mouse sperm motility that shows chief aspects characteristic of neurons: the anesthetic (produced by tetracaine and excitatory (produced by either caffeine or calcium effects and their antagonic action. While tetracaine inhibits sperm motility and caffeine has an excitatory action, the combination of these two substances balance the effects, producing a motility quite similar to that of control cells. We also study the effects of these agents (anesthetic and excitatory on the melting points of pure lipid liposomes constituted by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC and dipalmitoyl phosphatidic acid (DPPA. Tetracaine induces a large fluidization of the membrane, shifting the liposomes melting transition temperature to much lower values. The effect of caffeine is null, but its addition to tetracaine-doped liposomes greatly screen the fluidization effect. A high calcium concentration stiffens pure lipid membranes and strongly reduces the effect of tetracaine. Molecular Dynamics Simulations are performed to further understand our experimental findings at the molecular level. We find a strong correlation between the effect of antagonic molecules that could explain how the mechanical properties suitable for normal cell functioning are affected and recovered.

  16. Ripples and the formation of anisotropic lipid domains: Imaging two-component double bilayers by atomic force microscopy_copy_03

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leidy, C.; Kaasgaard, Thomas; Crowe, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Direct visualization of the fluid-phase/ordered-phase domain structure in mica-supported bilayers composed of 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine/1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine mixtures is performed with atomic force microscopy. The system studied is a double bilayer supported...

  17. Mode of action of cationic antimicrobial peptides defines the tethering position and the efficacy of biocidal surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagheri, Mojtaba; Beyermann, Michael; Dathe, Margitta

    2012-01-18

    Covalent immobilization of cationic antimicrobial peptides (CAPs) at sufficient density and distance from the solid matrix has been suggested as a successful strategy for the generation of biocidal surfaces. To test the hypothesis that the mode of peptide action is decisive for the selection of an appropriate tethering position on solid surfaces, melittin (MEL), a channel-forming peptide, buforin 2 (BUF2), a peptide able to translocate bacterial membranes without permeabilization and targeting nucleic acids, and tritrpticin (TP), described to be membrane-lytic and to have intracellular targets, were C- and N-terminally immobilized on TentaGel S NH(2) resin beads as model surface. The peptide termini were modified with aminooxyacetic acid (AOA) and coupled via oxime-forming ligation. The comparison of the activities of the three peptides and their AOA-modified analogues with a KLAL model peptide which permeabilizes membranes by a so-called "carpet-like" mode provided the following results: The peptides in solution state were active against Bacillus subtilis and Escherichia coli at micromolar concentrations. MEL and TP but not BUF2-derived peptides permeabilized the inner and outer membrane of E. coli and enhanced the permeability of lipid bilayers at concentrations around their antimicrobial values (MICs). Immobilization reduced peptide activity to millimolar MICs. The activity reduction for KLAL was independent of the tethering position and comparably low, as reflected by a low ratio of MIC(tethered)/MIC(free). In contrary, the pore-forming MEL was much less active when immobilized at the N-terminus compared with the C-terminally tethered peptide. C- and N-terminal TP tethering caused an identical but much pronounced activity decrease. The tethered BUF2 peptides were inactive at the tested concentrations suggesting that the peptides could not reach the intracellular targets. In conclusion, membrane active peptides seem to be most suitable for the generation of

  18. Molecular dynamics modelling of EGCG clusters on ceramide bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Jingjie; Cheng, Yuan; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Yong-Wei

    2015-12-01

    A novel method of atomistic modelling and characterization of both pure ceramide and mixed lipid bilayers is being developed, using only the General Amber ForceField. Lipid bilayers modelled as pure ceramides adopt hexagonal packing after equilibration, and the area per lipid and bilayer thickness are consistent with previously reported theoretical results. Mixed lipid bilayers are modelled as a combination of ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. This model is shown to be stable after equilibration. Green tea extract, also known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate, is introduced as a spherical cluster on the surface of the mixed lipid bilayer. It is demonstrated that the cluster is able to bind to the bilayers as a cluster without diffusing into the surrounding water.

  19. Molecular dynamics modelling of EGCG clusters on ceramide bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yeo, Jingjie; Cheng, Yuan; Li, Weifeng; Zhang, Yong-Wei [Institute of High Performance Computing, A*STAR, 138632 (Singapore)

    2015-12-31

    A novel method of atomistic modelling and characterization of both pure ceramide and mixed lipid bilayers is being developed, using only the General Amber ForceField. Lipid bilayers modelled as pure ceramides adopt hexagonal packing after equilibration, and the area per lipid and bilayer thickness are consistent with previously reported theoretical results. Mixed lipid bilayers are modelled as a combination of ceramides, cholesterol, and free fatty acids. This model is shown to be stable after equilibration. Green tea extract, also known as epigallocatechin-3-gallate, is introduced as a spherical cluster on the surface of the mixed lipid bilayer. It is demonstrated that the cluster is able to bind to the bilayers as a cluster without diffusing into the surrounding water.

  20. In Vivo Biomolecule Corona around Blood-Circulating, Clinically Used and Antibody-Targeted Lipid Bilayer Nanoscale Vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadjidemetriou, Marilena; Al-Ahmady, Zahraa; Mazza, Mariarosa; Collins, Richard F; Dawson, Kenneth; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2015-08-25

    The adsorption of proteins and their layering onto nanoparticle surfaces has been called the "protein corona". This dynamic process of protein adsorption has been extensively studied following in vitro incubation of many different nanoparticles with plasma proteins. However, the formation of protein corona under dynamic, in vivo conditions remains largely unexplored. Extrapolation of in vitro formed protein coronas to predict the fate and possible toxicological burden from nanoparticles in vivo is of great interest. However, complete lack of such direct comparisons for clinically used nanoparticles makes the study of in vitro and in vivo formed protein coronas of great importance. Our aim was to study the in vivo protein corona formed onto intravenously injected, clinically used liposomes, based on the composition of the PEGylated liposomal formulation that constitutes the anticancer agent Doxil. The formation of in vivo protein corona was determined after the recovery of the liposomes from the blood circulation of CD-1 mice 10 min postinjection. In comparison, in vitro protein corona was formed by the incubation of liposomes in CD-1 mouse plasma. In vivo and in vitro formed protein coronas were compared in terms of morphology, composition and cellular internalization. The protein coronas on bare (non-PEGylated) and monoclonal antibody (IgG) targeted liposomes of the same lipid composition were also comparatively investigated. A network of linear fibrillary structures constituted the in vitro formed protein corona, whereas the in vivo corona had a different morphology but did not appear to coat the liposome surface entirely. Even though the total amount of protein attached on circulating liposomes correlated with that observed from in vitro incubations, the variety of molecular species in the in vivo corona were considerably wider. Both in vitro and in vivo formed protein coronas were found to significantly reduce receptor binding and cellular internalization of

  1. Interaction of n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside with giant magnetic-fluid-loaded phosphatidylcholine vesicles: direct visualization of membrane curvature fluctuations as a function of surfactant partitioning between water and lipid bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ménager, Christine; Guemghar, Dihya; Cabuil, Valérie; Lesieur, Sylviane

    2010-10-05

    The present study deals with the morphological modifications of giant dioleoyl phosphatidylcholine vesicles (DOPC GUVs) induced by the nonionic surfactant n-octyl β,D-glucopyranoside at sublytic levels, i.e., in the first steps of the vesicle-to-micelle transition process, when surfactant inserts into the vesicle bilayer without disruption. Experimental conditions were perfected to exactly control the surfactant bilayer composition of the vesicles, in line with former work focused on the mechanical properties of the membrane of magnetic-fluid-loaded DOPC GUVs submitted to a magnetic field. The purpose here was to systematically examine, in the absence of any external mechanical constraint, the dynamics of giant vesicle shape and membrane deformations as a function of surfactant partitioning between the aqueous phase and the lipid membrane, beforehand established by turbidity measurements from small unilamellar vesicles.

  2. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SEARCH Definition Treatment Prognosis Clinical Trials Organizations Publications Definition Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological disorder caused by tissue attachments that limit the movement of the spinal cord within the ...

  3. GRASP : A Multitasking Tether

    OpenAIRE

    Catherine eRabouille; Adam eLinstedt

    2016-01-01

    Originally identified as Golgi stacking factors in vitro, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein (GRASP) family has been shown to act as membrane tethers with multiple cellular roles. As an update to previous comprehensive reviews of the GRASP family (Giuliani et al., 2011; Vinke et al., 2011; Jarvela and Linstedt, 2012), we outline here the latest findings concerning their diverse roles. New insights into the mechanics of GRASP-mediated tethering come from recent crystal structures. The model...

  4. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of a Palmitoyl-Oleoyl Phosphatidylserine Bilayer with Na + Counterions and NaCl

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mukhopadhyay, Parag; Monticelli, Luca; Tieleman, D. Peter

    2004-01-01

    ...) lipid bilayer in the liquid crystalline phase with Na(+) counterions and NaCl were carried out to investigate the structure of the negatively charged lipid bilayer and the effect of salt (NaCl...

  5. GRASP: A multitasking tether

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eRabouille

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Originally identified as Golgi stacking factors in vitro, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein (GRASP family has been shown to act as membrane tethers with multiple cellular roles. As an update to previous comprehensive reviews of the GRASP family (Vinke et al., 2011 (Giuliani et al., 2011;Jarvela and Linstedt, 2012, we outline here the latest findings concerning their diverse roles. New insights into the mechanics of GRASP-mediated tethering come from recent crystal structures. The models of how GRASP65 and GRASP55 tether membranes relate directly to their role in Golgi ribbon formation in mammalian cells and the unlinking of the ribbon at the onset of mitosis. However, it is also clear that GRASPs act outside the Golgi with roles at the ER and ER exit sites (ERES. Furthermore, the proteins of this family display other roles upon cellular stress, especially in mediating unconventional secretion of both transmembrane proteins (Golgi bypass and cytoplasmic proteins (through secretory autophagosomes.

  6. GRASP: A Multitasking Tether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabouille, Catherine; Linstedt, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Originally identified as Golgi stacking factors in vitro, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein (GRASP) family has been shown to act as membrane tethers with multiple cellular roles. As an update to previous comprehensive reviews of the GRASP family (Giuliani et al., 2011; Vinke et al., 2011; Jarvela and Linstedt, 2012), we outline here the latest findings concerning their diverse roles. New insights into the mechanics of GRASP-mediated tethering come from recent crystal structures. The models of how GRASP65 and GRASP55 tether membranes relate directly to their role in Golgi ribbon formation in mammalian cells and the unlinking of the ribbon at the onset of mitosis. However, it is also clear that GRASPs act outside the Golgi with roles at the ER and ER exit sites (ERES). Furthermore, the proteins of this family display other roles upon cellular stress, especially in mediating unconventional secretion of both transmembrane proteins (Golgi bypass) and cytoplasmic proteins (through secretory autophagosomes).

  7. Modelling Tethered Enzymatic Reactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solis Salas, Citlali; Goyette, Jesse; Coker-Gordon, Nicola; Bridge, Marcus; Isaacson, Samuel; Allard, Jun; Maini, Philip; Dushek, Omer

    Enzymatic reactions are key to cell functioning, and whilst much work has been done in protein interaction in cases where diffusion is possible, interactions of tethered proteins are poorly understood. Yet, because of the large role cell membranes play in enzymatic reactions, several reactions may take place where one of the proteins is bound to a fixed point in space. We develop a model to characterize tethered signalling between the phosphatase SHP-1 interacting with a tethered, phosphorylated protein. We compare our model to experimental data obtained using surface plasmon resonance (SPR). We show that a single SPR experiment recovers 5 independent biophysical/biochemical constants. We also compare the results between a three dimensional model and a two dimensional model. The work gives the opportunity to use known techniques to learn more about signalling processes, and new insights into how enzyme tethering alters cellular signalling. With support from the Mexican Council for Science and Technology (CONACyT), the Public Education Secretariat (SEP), and the Mexican National Autonomous University's Foundation (Fundacion UNAM).

  8. GRASP : A Multitasking Tether

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rabouille, Catherine; Linstedt, Adam D

    2016-01-01

    Originally identified as Golgi stacking factors in vitro, the Golgi reassembly stacking protein (GRASP) family has been shown to act as membrane tethers with multiple cellular roles. As an update to previous comprehensive reviews of the GRASP family (Giuliani et al., 2011; Vinke et al., 2011;

  9. Electrodynamic Tethers for Spacecraft Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les

    2009-01-01

    Electrodynamic (Drag) Tether Thrust Principles: a) Uses both solar energy and consumes no propellant. b) Tether's orbital velocity v (approx. 7500 m/s) through North-pointing geomagnetic field B(sub north) (0.18 - 0.32 Gauss) induces voltage (35 - 160 V/km) in tether. c) Return current is through surrounding plasma. d) Current I produces a drag thrust force F on the tether. e) Magnetic force F from current I through insulated tether of length l: F = lI x B(sub north).

  10. Biophysical changes induced by xenon on phospholipid bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Ryan D; Sum, Amadeu K

    2013-05-01

    Structural and dynamic changes in cell membrane properties induced by xenon, a volatile anesthetic molecule, may affect the function of membrane-mediated proteins, providing a hypothesis for the mechanism of general anesthetic action. Here, we use molecular dynamics simulation and differential scanning calorimetry to examine the biophysical and thermodynamic effects of xenon on model lipid membranes. Our results indicate that xenon atoms preferentially localize in the hydrophobic core of the lipid bilayer, inducing substantial increases in the area per lipid and bilayer thickness. Xenon depresses the membrane gel-liquid crystalline phase transition temperature, increasing membrane fluidity and lipid head group spacing, while inducing net local ordering effects in a small region of the lipid carbon tails and modulating the bilayer lateral pressure profile. Our results are consistent with a role for nonspecific, lipid bilayer-mediated mechanisms in producing xenon's general anesthetic action. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Potential of mean force for insertion of antimicrobial peptide melittin into a pore in mixed DOPC/DOPG lipid bilayer by molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyu, Yuan; Xiang, Ning; Zhu, Xiao; Narsimhan, Ganesan

    2017-04-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) inactivate microorganisms by forming transmembrane pores in a cell membrane through adsorption and aggregation. Energetics of addition of an AMP to a transmembrane pore is important for evaluation of its formation and growth. Such information is essential for the characterization of pore forming ability of peptides in cell membranes. This study quantifies the potential of mean force through molecular dynamics (MD) simulation for the addition of melittin, a naturally occurring AMP, into a DOPC/DOPG mixed bilayer, a mimic of bacterial membrane, for different extents of insertion into either a bilayer or a pore consisting of three to six transmembrane peptides. The energy barrier for insertion of a melittin molecule into the bilayer was highest in the absence of transmembrane peptides and decreased for the number of transmembrane peptides from three to six, eventually approaching zero. The decrease in free energy for complete insertion of peptide was found to be higher for larger pore size. Water channel formation occurred only for insertion into pores consisting of three or more transmembrane peptides with the radius of water channel being larger for a larger number of transmembrane peptides. The structure of the pore was found to be paraboloid. The estimated free energy barrier for insertion of melittin into an ideal paraboloid pore accounting for different intermolecular interactions was consistent with MD simulation results. The results reported in this manuscript will be useful for the development of a model for nucleation of pores and a rational methodology for selection of synthetic antimicrobial peptides.

  12. Structure of Amantadine-Bound M2 Transmembrane Peptide of Influenza A in Lipid Bilayers from Magic-Angle-Spinning Solid-State NMR: the Role of Ser31 in Amantadine Binding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cady, Sarah D.; Mishanina, Tatiana V.; Hong, Mei

    2014-01-01

    The M2 proton channel of influenza A is the target of the antiviral drugs amantadine and rimantadine, whose effectiveness has been abolished by a single-site mutation of Ser31 to Asn in the transmembrane domain of the protein. Recent high-resolution structures of the M2 transmembrane domain obtained from detergent-solubilized protein in solution and crystal environments gave conflicting drug binding sites. We present magic-angle-spinning solid-state NMR results of Ser31 and a number of other residues in the M2 transmembrane peptide (M2TMP) bound to lipid bilayers. Comparison of the spectra of the membrane-bound apo and complexed M2TMP indicates that Ser31 is the site of the largest chemical shift perturbation by amantadine. The chemical shift constraints lead to a monomer structure with a small kink of the helical axis at Gly34. A tetramer model is then constructed using the helix tilt angle and several interhelical distances previously measured on unoriented bilayer samples. This tetramer model differs from the solution and crystal structures in terms of the openness of the N-terminus of the channel, the constriction at Ser31, and the sidechain conformations of Trp41, a residue important for channel gating. Moreover, the tetramer model suggests that Ser31 may interact with amantadine amine via hydrogen bonding. While the apo and drug-bound M2TMP have similar average structures, the complexed peptide has much narrower linewidths at physiological temperature, indicating drug-induced changes of the protein dynamics in the membrane. Further, at low temperature, several residues show narrower lines in the complexed peptide than the apo peptide, indicating that amantadine binding reduces the conformational heterogeneity of specific residues. The differences of the current solid-state NMR structure of the bilayer-bound M2TMP from the detergent-based M2 structures suggest that the M2 conformation is sensitive to the environment, and care must be taken when interpreting

  13. Electrodynamic Tethers for Spacecraft Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Les; Estes, Robert D.; Lorenzini, Enrico; Martinez-Sanchez, Manuel; Sanmartin, Juan; Vas, Irwin

    1998-01-01

    Relatively short electrodynamic tethers can use solar power to 'push' against a planetary magnetic field to achieve propulsion without the expenditure of propellant. The groundwork has been laid for this type of propulsion. NASA began developing tether technology for space applications in the 1960's. Important recent milestones include retrieval of a tether in space (TSS-1, 1992), successful deployment of a 20-km-long tether in space (SEDS-1, 1993), and operation of an electrodynamic tether with tether current driven in both directions-power and thrust modes (PMG, 1993). The planned Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) experiment will demonstrate electrodynamic tether thrust during its flight in early 2000. ProSEDS will use the flight-proven Small Expendable Deployer System (SEDS) to deploy a 5 km bare copper tether from a Delta II upper stage to achieve approximately 0.4 N drag thrust, thus deorbiting the stage. The experiment will use a predominantly 'bare' tether for current collection in lieu of the endmass collector and insulated tether approach used on previous missions. Theory and ground-based plasma chamber testing indicate that the bare tether is a highly-efficient current collector. The flight experiment is a precursor to utilization of the technology on the International Space Station for reboost application and the more ambitious electrodynamic tether upper stage demonstration mission which will be capable of orbit raising, lowering and inclination changes - all using electrodynamic thrust. In addition, the use of this type of propulsion may be attractive for future missions at Jupiter and any other planetary body with a magnetosphere.

  14. Surface tension effects on the phase transition of a DPPC bilayer with and without protein: a molecular dynamics simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Xian; Qin, Shanshan; Lu, Diannan; Liu, Zheng

    2014-05-14

    While the surface tension of a cell membrane, or a plasma membrane, regulates cell functions, little is known about its effect on the conformational changes of the lipid bilayer and hence the resulting changes in the cell membrane. To obtain some insights into the phase transition of the lipid bilayer as a function of surface tension, we used a 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer as a model lipid bilayer and aquaporin (AqpZ), a transmembrane channel protein for water, as a model embedded protein. A coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation was applied to illustrate the phase transition behavior of the pure DPPC bilayer and aquaporin-embedded DPPC bilayer under different surface tensions. It was shown that an increased surface tension reduced the phase transition temperature of the DPPC bilayer. As for the DPPC bilayer in gel form, no significant changes occurred in the structure of the bilayer in response to the surface tension. Once in a liquid crystal state, both the structure and properties of the DPPC bilayer, such as area per lipid, lipid order parameters, bilayer thickness and lateral diffusion coefficients, were responsive to the magnitude of surface tension in a linear way. The presence of aquaporin attenuated the compact alignment of the lipid bilayer, hindered the parallel movement, and thus made the DPPC bilayer less sensitive to the surface tension.

  15. Space Station tethered elevator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddock, Michael H.; Anderson, Loren A.; Hosterman, K.; Decresie, E.; Miranda, P.; Hamilton, R.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The tethered elevator is an unmanned, mobile structure which operates on a ten-kilometer tether spanning the distance between Space Station Freedom and a platform. Its capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The report discusses the potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design. Emphasis is placed on the elevator's structural configuration and three major subsystem designs. First, the design of elevator robotics used to aid in elevator operations and tethered experimentation is presented. Second, the design of drive mechanisms used to propel the vehicle is discussed. Third, the design of an onboard self-sufficient power generation and transmission system is addressed.

  16. Bioavailability of Fullerene under Environmentally Relevant Conditions: Effects of Humic Acid and Fetal Bovine Serum on Accumulation in Lipid Bilayers and Cellular Uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Yeonjeong; Wang, Xianzhe; Liljestrand, Howard M; Maynard, Jennifer A; Katz, Lynn E

    2016-07-05

    Carbon fullerene (C60) has emerged at the forefront of nanoscale research and application due to its unique properties. As the production of this nanoparticle rapidly increases, it can be released into natural aquatic environments and can accumulate in biological systems. This research examined the effects of humic acid and fetal bovine serum (FBS), which are ubiquitous in aquatic environments and representative of blood plasma in living organisms, respectively, on bioavailability of fullerene. Bioavailability was investigated using in vitro methods for lipid membrane accumulation and cellular uptake studies. Humic acid and FBS significantly changed the characteristics of fullerene including its particle size and surface charge. The effects of humic acid on lipid accumulation of fullerene depended on the lipid head charge. FBS also significantly decreased the lipid accumulation when positively charged and zwitterionic head groups were present on the lipids, possibly due to the higher steric repulsion of the protein coated nanoparticles. In addition, both humic acid and FBS protein effectively lowered the amounts of fullerene taken up by Caco-2 cells, which are derived from a human colorectal adenocarcinoma and have similar functions to the small intestinal epithelium. Results of this study suggest that surface modification of fullerene by environmentally relevant matrices can significantly affect the biological transport, as well as the possible toxicity of this nanomaterial.

  17. Lipids, lipid droplets and lipoproteins in their cellular context; an ultrastructural approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mesman, R.J.

    2013-01-01

    Lipids are essential for cellular life, functioning either organized as bilayer membranes to compartmentalize cellular processes, as signaling molecules or as metabolic energy storage. Our current knowledge on lipid organization and cellular lipid homeostasis is mainly based on biochemical data.

  18. Determination of the electroporation onset of bilayer lipid membranes as a novel approach to establish ternary phase diagrams: example of the L-α-PC/SM/cholesterol system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uitert, I.; le Gac, Severine; van den Berg, Albert

    2010-01-01

    The lipid matrix of cell membranes contains phospholipids belonging to two main classes, glycero- and sphingolipids, as well as cholesterol. This matrix can exist in different phases, liquid disordered (l(d)), liquid ordered (l(o)) and possibly solid (s(o)), or even a combination of these. The

  19. Regulation of sodium channel function by bilayer elasticity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundbaek, Jens A; Birn, Pia; Hansen, Anker J

    2004-01-01

    and kinetics of the protein conformational changes therefore will be regulated by the bilayer elasticity, which is determined by the lipid composition. This hydrophobic coupling mechanism has been studied extensively in gramicidin channels, where the channel-bilayer hydrophobic interactions link...... a "conformational" change (the monomerdimer transition) to an elastic bilayer deformation. Gramicidin channels thus are regulated by the lipid bilayer elastic properties (thickness, monolayer equilibrium curvature, and compression and bending moduli). To investigate whether this hydrophobic coupling mechanism could...... be a general mechanism regulating membrane protein function, we examined whether voltage-dependent skeletal-muscle sodium channels, expressed in HEK293 cells, are regulated by bilayer elasticity, as monitored using gramicidin A (gA) channels. Nonphysiological amphiphiles (beta-octyl-glucoside, Genapol X-100...

  20. Lipid somersaults

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Günther-Pomorski, Thomas; Menon, Anant K.

    2016-01-01

    Membrane lipids diffuse rapidly in the plane of the membrane but their ability to flip spontaneously across a membrane bilayer is hampered by a significant energy barrier. Thus spontaneous flip-flop of polar lipids across membranes is very slow, even though it must occur rapidly to support diverse...... aspects of cellular life. Here we discuss the mechanisms by which rapid flip-flop occurs, and what role lipid flipping plays in membrane homeostasis and cell growth. We focus on conceptual aspects, highlighting mechanistic insights from biochemical and in silico experiments, and the recent, ground...

  1. Label-free detection and identification of protein ligands captured by receptors in a polymerized planar lipid bilayer using MALDI-TOF MS

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Boying; Ju, Yue; Joubert, James R.; Kaleta, Erin J.; Lopez, Rodrigo; Jones, Ian W.; Hall, Henry K.; Ratnayaka, Saliya N.; Wysocki, Vicki H.; Saavedra, S. Scott

    2015-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) coupled with affinity capture is a well-established method to extract biological analytes from complex samples followed by label-free detection and identification. Many bioanalytes of interest bind to membrane-associated receptors, however, the matrices and high vacuum conditions inherent to MALDI-TOF MS make it largely incompatible with the use of artificial lipid membranes with incorporated receptors...

  2. Protein-lipid interactions: from membrane domains to cellular networks

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tamm, Lukas K

    2005-01-01

    ... membranes is the lipid bilayer. Embedded in the fluid lipid bilayer are proteins of various shapes and traits. This volume illuminates from physical, chemical and biological angles the numerous - mostly quite weak - interactions between lipids, proteins, and proteins and lipids that define the delicate, highly dynamic and yet so stable fabri...

  3. Modeling and Control of a Tethered Rotorcraft

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-30

    compared to the tether sway and surge . This report models the tether using a chain of N bodies connected by spherical joints rather than using stiff...tether drag coefficient CS = tether damping coefficient Cv = viscous damping coefficient d = diameter of the tether En = n x n identity matrix FA...viscous damper with damping coefficient Cv. Visco-elastic line force is written in terms of components Δx, Δy, and Δz, of the difference vector formed

  4. IgG from Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis Patients Increases Current Through P-Type Calcium Channels in Mammalian Cerebellar Purkinje Cells and in Isolated Channel Protein in Lipid Bilayer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llinas, R.; Sugimori, M.; Cherksey, B. D.; Smith, R. Glenn; Delbono, O.; Stefani, E.; Appel, S.

    1993-12-01

    The effect of the IgG from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) patients was tested on the voltage-dependent barium currents (IBa) in mammalian dissociated Purkinje cells and in isolated P-type calcium channels in lipid bilayers. Whole cell clamp of Purkinje cells demonstrates that ALS IgG increases the amplitude of IBa without modifying their voltage kinetics. This increased IBa could be blocked by a purified nonpeptide toxin from Agelenopsis aperta venom (purified funnel-web spider toxin) or by a synthetic polyamine analog (synthetic funnel-web spider toxin) and by a peptide toxin from the same spider venom, ω-Aga-IVA. Similar results were obtained on single-channel recordings from purified P channel protein. The addition of ALS IgG increased single-channel IBa open time without affecting slope conductance. The results described above were not seen with normal human IgG nor with boiled ALS IgG. It is concluded that ALS IgG enhances inward current through P-type calcium channels. Since P-type Ca2+ channels are present in motoneuron axon terminals, we propose that the enhanced calcium current triggered by ALS IgG may contribute to neuronal damage in ALS.

  5. Cholesterol interactions with fluid-phase phospholipids: effect on the lateral organization of the bilayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halling, Katrin K; Ramstedt, Bodil; Nyström, Joel H; Slotte, J Peter; Nyholm, Thomas K M

    2008-10-01

    The lateral organization of lipids and proteins in cell membranes is recognized as an important factor in several cellular processes. Cholesterol is thought to function as a modulator of the lateral segregation of lipids into cholesterol-poor and cholesterol-rich domains. We investigated how the affinity of cholesterol for different phospholipids, as seen in cholesterol partitioning between methyl-beta-cyclodextrin and large unilamellar vesicles, was reflected in the lateral organization of lipids in complex bilayers. We especially wanted to determine how the low-T(m) lipid affected the lateral structure. Partition experiments showed that cholesterol had a higher affinity for N-oleoyl-sphingomyelin (OSM) than for palmitoyl-oleoyl-phosphatidylcholine (POPC) bilayers, but the highest preference was for N-palmitoyl-sphingomyelin (PSM)-containing bilayers. Partial phase diagrams of POPC/PSM/cholesterol and OSM/PSM/cholesterol bilayers at 23 degrees C and 37 degrees C were used to gain insight into the lateral organization of lipids in bilayers. Analysis of phase diagrams revealed that the phospholipid composition of cholesterol-poor and cholesterol-rich domains reflected the affinity that cholesterol exhibited toward bilayers composed of different lipids. Therefore, the determined affinity of cholesterol for different phospholipid bilayers was useful in predicting the cholesterol-induced lateral segregation of lipids in complex bilayers.

  6. Streptavidin 2D crystals on supported phospholipid bilayers : Toward constructing anchored phospholipid bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reviakine, [No Value; Brisson, A

    2001-01-01

    Streptavidin two-dimensional (2D) crystals were grown on mica-supported phospholipid bilayers containing a biotinylated phospholipid. Their topography structure obtained by atomic force microscopy compares favorably with the electron microscopy analysis of streptavidin 2D crystals grown on lipid

  7. Enabling Tethered Exploration on Mars Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Strong science motivations exist for exploring hard to reach terrain on Mars and the leading systems proposed to do so require tethers. While tethers are used...

  8. Cholesterol enhances surface water diffusion of phospholipid bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kausik, Ravinath; Han, Songi, E-mail: songi@chem.ucsb.edu [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Materials Research Laboratory, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States); Olijve, Luuk L. C. [Laboratory of Macromolecular and Organic Chemistry and Institute for Complex Molecular Systems, Eindhoven University of Technology, P.O. Box 513, 5600 MB, Eindhoven (Netherlands)

    2014-12-14

    Elucidating the physical effect of cholesterol (Chol) on biological membranes is necessary towards rationalizing their structural and functional role in cell membranes. One of the debated questions is the role of hydration water in Chol-embedding lipid membranes, for which only little direct experimental data are available. Here, we study the hydration dynamics in a series of Chol-rich and depleted bilayer systems using an approach termed {sup 1}H Overhauser dynamic nuclear polarization (ODNP) NMR relaxometry that enables the sensitive and selective determination of water diffusion within 5–10 Å of a nitroxide-based spin label, positioned off the surface of the polar headgroups or within the nonpolar core of lipid membranes. The Chol-rich membrane systems were prepared from mixtures of Chol, dipalmitoyl phosphatidylcholine and/or dioctadecyl phosphatidylcholine lipid that are known to form liquid-ordered, raft-like, domains. Our data reveal that the translational diffusion of local water on the surface and within the hydrocarbon volume of the bilayer is significantly altered, but in opposite directions: accelerated on the membrane surface and dramatically slowed in the bilayer interior with increasing Chol content. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) lineshape analysis shows looser packing of lipid headgroups and concurrently tighter packing in the bilayer core with increasing Chol content, with the effects peaking at lipid compositions reported to form lipid rafts. The complementary capability of ODNP and EPR to site-specifically probe the hydration dynamics and lipid ordering in lipid membrane systems extends the current understanding of how Chol may regulate biological processes. One possible role of Chol is the facilitation of interactions between biological constituents and the lipid membrane through the weakening or disruption of strong hydrogen-bond networks of the surface hydration layers that otherwise exert stronger repulsive forces, as reflected in

  9. Self-assembled core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell nanoparticles demonstrate high stability in shear flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Ye, Huilin; Kröger, Martin; Li, Ying

    2017-05-24

    A core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticle consists of an inorganic core coated with polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers, surrounded by a lipid bilayer shell. It can be self-assembled from a PEGylated core with surface-tethered PEG chains, where all the distal ends are covalently bonded to lipid molecules. Upon adding free lipids, a complete lipid bilayer shell can be formed on the surface driven by the hydrophobic nature of lipid tails, leading to the formation of a CPLS nanoparticle. The stability of CPLS nanoparticles in shear flow has been systematically studied through large scale dissipative particle dynamics simulations. CPLS nanoparticles demonstrate higher stability and less deformation in shear flow, compared with lipid vesicles. Burst leakage of drug molecules inside lipid vesicles and CPLS NPs can be induced by the large pores at their tips. These pores are initiated by the maximum stress in the waist region. It further grows along with the tank-treading motion of vesicles or CPLS NPs in shear flow. However, due to the constraints applied by PEG polymers, CPLS NPs are less deformed than vesicles with comparable size under the same flow conditions. Thus, the less deformed CPLS NPs express a smaller maximum stress at waists, demonstrating higher stability. Pore formation at waists, evolving into large pores on vesicles, leads to the burst leakage of drug molecules and complete rupture of vesicles. In contrast, although similar drug leakage in CPLS nanoparticles can occur at high shear rates, pores initiated at moderate shear rates tend to be short-lived and close due to the constraints mediated by PEG polymers. This kind of 'self-healing' capability can be observed over a wide range of shear rates for CPLS nanoparticles. Our results suggest self-assembled CPLS nanoparticles to exhibit high stability during blood circulation without rapid drug leakage. These features make CPLS nanoparticles candidates for a promising drug delivery platform.

  10. Evaporation-Induced Buckling and Fission of Microscale Droplet Interface Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boreyko, Jonathan B [ORNL; Mruetusatorn, Prachya [ORNL; Sarles, Stephen A [ORNL; Retterer, Scott T [ORNL; Collier, Pat [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    Droplet interface bilayers (DIBs) are a robust platform for studying synthetic cellular membranes; however, to date no DIBs have been produced at cellular length scales. Here, we create microscale droplet interface bilayers ( DIBs) at the interface between aqueous femtoliter-volume droplets within an oil-filled microfluidic channel. The uniquely large area-to-volume ratio of the droplets results in strong evaporation effects, causing the system to transition through three distinct regimes. First, the two adjacent droplets shrink into the shape of a single spherical droplet, where an augmented lipid bilayer partitions two hemi-spherical volumes. In the second regime, the combined effects of the shrinking monolayers and growing bilayer force the confined bilayer to buckle to conserve its mass. Finally, at a bending moment corresponding to a critical shear stress, the buckling bilayer fissions a vesicle to regulate its shape and stress. The DIBs produced here enable evaporation-induced bilayer dynamics reminiscent of endo- and exocytosis in cells.

  11. The Molecular Structure of a Phosphatidylserine Bilayer Determined by Scattering and Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jianjun [University of South Florida, Tampa (USF); Cheng, Xiaolin [ORNL; Monticelli, Luca [Institut National de la Santé et de la Recherche Médicale (INSERM) and INTS, France; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Tieleman, D. Peter [University of Calgary, ALberta, Canada; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    Phosphatidylserine (PS) lipids play essential roles in biological processes, including enzyme activation and apoptosis. We report on the molecular structure and atomic scale interactions of a fluid bilayer composed of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphatidylserine (POPS). A scattering density profile model, aided by molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, was developed to jointly refine different contrast small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, which yielded a lipid area of 62.7 A2 at 25 C. MD simulations with POPS lipid area constrained at different values were also performed using all-atom and aliphatic united-atom models. The optimal simulated bilayer was obtained using a model-free comparison approach. Examination of the simulated bilayer, which agrees best with the experimental scattering data, reveals a preferential interaction between Na+ ions and the terminal serine and phosphate moieties. Long-range inter-lipid interactions were identified, primarily between the positively charged ammonium, and the negatively charged carboxylic and phosphate oxygens. The area compressibility modulus KA of the POPS bilayer was derived by quantifying lipid area as a function of surface tension from area-constrained MD simulations. It was found that POPS bilayers possess a much larger KA than that of neutral phosphatidylcholine lipid bilayers. We propose that the unique molecular features of POPS bilayers may play an important role in certain physiological functions.

  12. A new look at lipid-membrane structure in relation to drug research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, Ole G.; Jørgensen, Kent

    1998-01-01

    and theoretical studies. Special attention is paid to trans-bilayer structure, lateral molecular organization of the lipid bilayer, lipid-mediated protein assembly, and lipid-bilayer permeability. It is argued that lipids play a major role in lipid membrane-organization and functionality.......Lipid-bilayer membranes are key objects in drug research in relation to (i) interaction of drugs with membrane-bound receptors, (ii) drug targeting, penetration, and permeation of cell membranes, and (iii) use of liposomes in micro-encapsulation technologies for drug delivery. Rational design...... of new drugs and drug-delivery systems therefore requries insight into the physical properties of lipid-bilayer membranes. This mini-review provides a perspective on the current view of lipid-bilayer structure and dynamics based on information obtained from a variety of recent experimental...

  13. The impact of resveratrol in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Chen; Ghellinck, Alexis de; Fragneto, Giovanna

    The natural antioxidant resveratrol, contained in the skin of red grape and accordingly in their wines, is hold liable for health impacts such as cardiovascular protection and anti-oxidative effect. Clinical trials of resveratrol as prophylactic or even therapeutic drug are ongoing. However, basic...

  14. The impact of resveratrol in lipid bilayers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shen, Chen; Ghellinck, Alexis de; Fragneto, Giovanna

    The natural antioxidant resveratrol, contained in the skin of grape and accordingly in red wine, has significant health effects such as cardiovascular protection and anti-oxidation. Clinical trials of resveratrol as prophylactic or even therapeutic drug are ongoing. Most probably, the working...

  15. Methodological issues in lipid bilayer simulations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anezo, C; de Vries, AH; Holtje, HD; Tieleman, DP; Marrink, SJ

    2003-01-01

    Methodological issues in molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, such as the treatment of long-range electrostatic interactions or the type of pressure coupling, have important consequences for the equilibrium properties observed. We report a series of long (up to 150 ns) MD simulations of

  16. Ca2+-induced isotropic motion and phosphatidylcholine flip-flop in phosphatidylcholine-cardiolipin bilayers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gerritsen, W.J.; Kruijff, B. de; Verkleij, A.J.; Gier, J. de; Deenen, L.L.M. van

    1980-01-01

    Ca2+ induces a structural change in phosphatidylcholine-cardiolipin bilayers, which is visualised by freeze-fracturing as lipidic particles associated with the bilayer and is detected by 31P-NMR as isotropic motion of the phospholipids. In this structure a rapid transbilayer movement of

  17. Interaction of neurotransmitters with a phospholipid bilayer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peters, Günther H.J.; Werge, Mikkel; Elf-Lind, Maria Northved

    2014-01-01

    We have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations to study the interactions between the neurotransmitters (NTs) γ-aminobutyrate (GABA), glycine (GLY), acetylcholine (ACH) and glutamate (GLU) as well as the amidated/acetylated γ-aminobutyrate (GABAneu) and the osmolyte molecule glycerol...... that there is no intermediate exchange of slow moving water molecules from the solutes to the lipid atoms and vice versa. Instead, the exchange relies on the reservoir of unbounded (“free”) water molecules in the interfacial bilayer region. Results from the equilibrium simulations are in good agreement with the results from...... umbrella sampling simulations, which were conducted for the four naturally occurring NTs. Free energy profiles for ACH and GLU show a minimum of ∼2–3 kJ/mol close to the bilayer interface, while for GABA and GLY, a minimum of respectively ∼2 kJ/mol and ∼5 kJ/mol is observed when these NTs are located...

  18. Light-Patterned Current Generation in a Droplet Bilayer Array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Restrepo Schild, Vanessa; Booth, Michael J.; Box, Stuart J.; Olof, Sam N.; Mahendran, Kozhinjampara R.; Bayley, Hagan

    2017-04-01

    We have created a 4 × 4 droplet bilayer array comprising light-activatable aqueous droplet bio-pixels. Aqueous droplets containing bacteriorhodopsin (bR), a light-driven proton pump, were arranged on a common hydrogel surface in lipid-containing oil. A separate lipid bilayer formed at the interface between each droplet and the hydrogel; each bilayer then incorporated bR. Electrodes in each droplet simultaneously measured the light-driven proton-pumping activities of each bio-pixel. The 4 × 4 array derived by this bottom-up synthetic biology approach can detect grey-scale images and patterns of light moving across the device, which are transduced as electrical current generated in each bio-pixel. We propose that synthetic biological light-activatable arrays, produced with soft materials, might be interfaced with living tissues to stimulate neuronal pathways.

  19. The effects of globotriaosylceramide tail saturation level on bilayer phases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pezeshkian, Weria; Chaban, Vitaly V; Johannes, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Globotriaosylceramide (Gb3) is a glycosphingolipid present in the plasma membrane that is the natural receptor of the bacterial Shiga toxin. The unsaturation level of Gb3 acyl chains has a drastic impact on lipid bilayer properties and phase behaviour, and on many Gb3-related cellular processes. ...

  20. Molecular structures of fluid phosphatidylethanolamine bilayers obtained from simulation-to-experiment comparisons and experimental scattering density profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kučerka, Norbert; van Oosten, Brad; Pan, Jianjun; Heberle, Frederick A; Harroun, Thad A; Katsaras, John

    2015-02-05

    Following our previous efforts in determining the structures of commonly used PC, PG, and PS bilayers, we continue our studies of fully hydrated, fluid phase PE bilayers. The newly designed parsing scheme for PE bilayers was based on extensive MD simulations, and is utilized in the SDP analysis of both X-ray and neutron (contrast varied) scattering measurements. Obtained experimental scattering form factors are directly compared to our simulation results, and can serve as a benchmark for future developed force fields. Among the evaluated structural parameters, namely, area per lipid A, overall bilayer thickness DB, and hydrocarbon region thickness 2DC, the PE bilayer response to changing temperature is similar to previously studied bilayers with different headgroups. On the other hand, the reduced hydration of PE headgroups, as well as the strong hydrogen bonding between PE headgroups, dramatically affects lateral packing within the bilayer. Despite sharing the same glycerol backbone, a markedly smaller area per lipid distinguishes PE from other bilayers (i.e., PC, PG, and PS) studied to date. Overall, our data are consistent with the notion that lipid headgroups govern bilayer packing, while hydrocarbon chains dominate the bilayer's response to temperature changes.

  1. Tether dynamics and control results for tethered satellite system's initial flight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapel, Jim D.; Flanders, Howard

    The recent Tethered Satellite System-1 (TSS-1) mission has provided a wealth of data concerning the dynamics of tethered systems in space and has demonstrated the effectiveness of operational techniques designed to control these dynamics. In this paper, we review control techniques developed for managing tether dynamics, and discuss the results of using these techniques for the Tethered Satellite System's maiden flight on STS-46. In particular, the flight results of controlling libration dynamics, string dynamics, and slack tether are presented. These results show that tether dynamics can be safely managed. The overall stability of the system was found to be surprisingly good even at relatively short tether lengths. In fact, the system operated in passive mode at a tether length of 256 meters for over 9 hours. Only monitoring of the system was required during this time. Although flight anomalies prevented the planned deployment to 20 km, the extended operations at shorter tether lengths have proven the viability of using tethers in space. These results should prove invaluable in preparing for future missions with tethered objects in space.

  2. Hypervelocity impact experiments on tether materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabath, D.; Paul, K. G.

    Tethered systems are new and exciting means for various applications, such as the re-entry of small payloads from the space station. Due to payload mass constraints of the launch vehicle, the mass of the tethered system should be minimised. Therefore, fibres are the choice for tether materials. The probability of a severe impact into the tether is very high due its large surface area despite its small diameter. Hence, the risk of an impact of a micrometeoroid or a space debris particle cutting the tether should be investigated prior to flight. This work reports first observations of hypervelocity impact experiments on three different braided materials used for tether applications. The tether samples -- Dyneema, Kevlar and Spectra -- were tested using the plasma drag accelerator (PDA) facility of the Fachgebiet Raumfahrttechnik (LRT), Technische Universität München (TUM). An overview of the morphology of such impacts is presented. The extent of damage is compared to other materials commonly found on spacecraft. A risk assessment of an impact cutting the tether with current meteoroid and debris models and data from LDEF, Eureca and HST solar arrays, is also given.

  3. Modeling and position control of tethered octocopters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Castro Davi Ferreira

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents the modeling and control of a multirotor aerial vehicle with tethered configuration. It is considered an octocopter with a saturated proportional-plus-derivative position control. A viscoelastic model is considered for the tether, which has a tension control. Numerical simulations are carried out to compare the performance of the tethred configuration with the vehicle in free flight.

  4. Mobile tethering: Overview, perspectives and challengess

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Constantinescu, M.; Onur, E.; Durmus, Y.; Nikou, S.; Reuver, M. de; Bouwman, H.; Djurica, M.; Glatz, P.M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze mobile tethering from technological and social perspectives. Mobile tethering allows us to share cellular data connection with others over WiFi, Bluetooth or USB. Although the technology is ready and has promising outcomes, service providers and the

  5. Structure and organization of nanosized-inclusion-containing bilayer membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Chun-lai; Ma, Yu-qiang

    2009-07-01

    Based on a considerable amount of experimental evidence for lateral organization of lipid membranes which share astonishingly similar features in the presence of different inclusions, we use a hybrid self-consistent field theory (SCFT)/density-functional theory (DFT) approach to deal with bilayer membranes embedded by nanosized inclusions and explain experimental findings. Here, the hydrophobic inclusions are simple models of hydrophobic drugs or other nanoparticles for biomedical applications. It is found that lipid/inclusion-rich domains are formed at moderate inclusion concentrations and disappear with the increase in the concentration of inclusions. At high inclusion content, chaining of inclusions occurs due to the effective depletion attraction between inclusions mediated by lipids. Meanwhile, the increase in the concentration of inclusions can also cause thickening of the membrane and the distribution of inclusions undergoes a layering transition from one-layer structure located in the bilayer midplane to two-layer structure arranged into the two leaflets of a bilayer. Our theoretical predictions address the complex interactions between membranes and inclusions suggesting a unifying mechanism which reflects the competition between the conformational entropy of lipids favoring the formation of lipid- and inclusion-rich domains in lipids and the steric repulsion of inclusions leading to the uniform dispersion.

  6. Phenobarbital selectively modulates the glucagon-stimulated activity of adenylate cyclase by depressing the lipid phase separation occurring in the outer half of the bilayer of liver plasma membranes.

    OpenAIRE

    Houslay, M D; Dipple, I; Gordon, L M

    1981-01-01

    The glucagon-stimulated (coupled) activity of rat liver plasma-membrane adenylate cyclase could be selectively modulated by the anionic drug phenobarbital, whereas the fluoride-stimulated (uncoupled) activity remained unaffected. It is suggested that the cationic drug phenobarbital preferentially interacts with the external half of the bilayer, as the negatively charged phospholipids are found at the cytosol-facing side. This results in a selective fluidization of the external half of the bil...

  7. Effects of Lateral and Terminal Chains of X-Shaped Bolapolyphiles with Oligo(phenylene ethynylene Cores on Self-Assembly Behavior. Part 2: Domain Formation by Self-Assembly in Lipid Bilayer Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Werner

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Supramolecular self-assembly of membrane constituents within a phospholipid bilayer creates complex functional platforms in biological cells that operate in intracellular signaling, trafficking and membrane remodeling. Synthetic polyphilic compounds of macromolecular or small size can be incorporated into artificial phospholipid bilayers. Featuring three or four moieties of different philicities, they reach beyond ordinary amphiphilicity and open up avenues to new functions and interaction concepts. Here, we have incorporated a series of X-shaped bolapolyphiles into DPPC (1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayers of giant unilamellar vesicles. The bolapolyphiles consist of a rod-like oligo(phenylene ethynylene (OPE core, hydrophilic glycerol-based headgroups with or without oligo(ethylene oxide expansions at both ends and two lateral alkyl chains attached near the center of the OPE core. In the absence of DPPC and water, the compounds showed thermotropic liquid-crystalline behavior with a transition between polyphilic and amphiphilic assembly (see part 1 in this issue. In DPPC membranes, various trends in the domain morphologies were observed upon structure variations, which entailed branched alkyl chains of various sizes, alkyl chain semiperfluorination and size expansion of the headgroups. Observed effects on domain morphology are interpreted in the context of the bulk behavior (part 1 and of a model that was previously developed based on spectroscopic and physicochemical data.

  8. Profile structures of the voltage-sensor domain and the voltage-gated K+-channel vectorially oriented in a single phospholipid bilayer membrane at the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces determined by x-ray interferometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Liu, J.; Strzalka, J.; Blasie, J. K.

    2011-09-01

    One subunit of the prokaryotic voltage-gated potassium ion channel from Aeropyrum pernix (KvAP) is comprised of six transmembrane α helices, of which S1-S4 form the voltage-sensor domain (VSD) and S5 and S6 contribute to the pore domain (PD) of the functional homotetramer. However, the mechanism of electromechanical coupling interconverting the closed-to-open (i.e., nonconducting-to-K+-conducting) states remains undetermined. Here, we have vectorially oriented the detergent (OG)-solubilized VSD in single monolayers by two independent approaches, namely “directed-assembly” and “self-assembly,” to achieve a high in-plane density. Both utilize Ni coordination chemistry to tether the protein to an alkylated inorganic surface via its C-terminal His6 tag. Subsequently, the detergent is replaced by phospholipid (POPC) via exchange, intended to reconstitute a phospholipid bilayer environment for the protein. X-ray interferometry, in which interference with a multilayer reference structure is used to both enhance and phase the specular x-ray reflectivity from the tethered single membrane, was used to determine directly the electron density profile structures of the VSD protein solvated by detergent versus phospholipid, and with either a moist He (moderate hydration) or bulk aqueous buffer (high hydration) environment to preserve a native structure conformation. Difference electron density profiles, with respect to the multilayer substrate itself, for the VSD-OG monolayer and VSD-POPC membranes at both the solid-vapor and solid-liquid interfaces, reveal the profile structures of the VSD protein dominating these profiles and further indicate a successful reconstitution of a lipid bilayer environment. The self-assembly approach was similarly extended to the intact full-length KvAP channel for comparison. The spatial extent and asymmetry in the profile structures of both proteins confirm their unidirectional vectorial orientation within the reconstituted membrane and

  9. Photoinitiated ion movements in bilayer membranes containing magnesium octaethylporphyrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodle, M C; Mauzerall, D

    1986-09-01

    A photocurrent produced by planar lipid bilayers containing Mg-octaethylporphyrin in the presence of oxygen has been investigated to determine if the current is due to movement of the MgOEP+ ion in the bilayer. Photoexcitation of the MgOEP is known to produce MgOEP+ in the bilayer when an electron acceptor is present. However, the aqueous electron acceptors ferricyanide and methyl viologen (MV+2) have opposite effects on the photocurrent. Ferricyanide decreases the photo current, even in the presence of oxygen, whereas methyl viologen increases the photocurrent, but only when oxygen is present. We attribute most of the photocurrent to the movement of superoxide anion. The difference in effect between ferricyanide and methyl viologen is attributed to the different rates of reduction of O2 by reduced MV+ (fast) vs. ferrocyanide (slow) and the known competition between ferricyanide and oxygen as the acceptor for the photoexcited porphyrin. It is inferred that most of the MgOEP is localized in the polar region of the lipid bilayer. Addition of ferrocyanide to the aqueous phase on one side of the bilayer, to trap MgOEP+ produced on the other side by MV+2, fails to increase the lifetime of the photovoltage. With a pH gradient across the bilayer, we observed only 5% of the photovoltage expected for the selective transport of H+ or OH- by MgOEP+. Thus, these measurements set the lower limit for the cross bilayer transit time of MgOEP+ or its charge in the range of 0.1-0.5 s.

  10. Electrodynamic tethers for energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobles, W.

    1986-01-01

    Conductive tethers have been proposed as a new method for converting orbital mechanical energy into electrical power for use on-board a satellite (generator mode) or conversely (motor mode) as a method of providing electric propulsion using electrical energy from the satellite. The operating characteristics of such systems are functionally dependent on orbit altitude and inclination. Effects of these relationships are examined to determine acceptable regions of application. To identify system design considerations, a specific set of system performance goals and requirements are selected. The case selected is for a 25 kW auxiliary power system for use on Space Station. Appropriate system design considerations are developed, and the resulting system is described.

  11. Golgi GRASPs: moonlighting membrane tethers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jarvela T

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Timothy Jarvela, Adam D LinstedtDepartment of Biological Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA, USAAbstract: The identification of mammalian Golgi reassembly stacking proteins (GRASPs 15 years ago was followed by experiments implicating them in diverse functions, including two differing structural roles in Golgi biogenesis and at least two distinct roles in the secretion of proteins. GRASP55 and GRASP65 are localized to cis and medial/trans Golgi cisternae, respectively. They are both required for stacking of Golgi membranes in a Golgi reassembly assay. Depletion of either GRASP from cultured cells prevents the linking of Golgi membranes into their normal ribbon-like network. While GRASPs are not required for transport of secretory cargo per se, they are required for ER-to-Golgi transport of certain specific cargo, such as those containing a C-terminal valine motif. Surprisingly, GRASPs also promote secretion of cargo by the so-called unconventional secretory pathway, which bypasses the Golgi apparatus where the GRASPs reside. Furthermore, regulation of GRASP activity is now recognized for its connections to cell cycle control, development, and disease. Underlying these diverse activities is the structurally conserved N-terminal GRASP domain whose crystal structure was recently determined. It consists of a tandem array of atypical PSD95–DlgA–Zo–1 (PDZ domains, which are well-known protein–protein interaction motifs. The GRASP PDZ domains are used to localize the proteins to the Golgi as well as GRASP-mediated membrane tethering and cargo interactions. These activities are regulated, in part, by phosphorylation of the large unstructured C-terminal domain.Keywords: GRASP, review, membrane, tether, PDZ domain, secretory chaperone, unconventional secretion

  12. The space station tethered elevator system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Loren A.

    1989-01-01

    The optimized conceptual engineering design of a space station tethered elevator is presented. The elevator is an unmanned mobile structure which operates on a ten kilometer tether spanning the distance between the Space Station and a tethered platform. Elevator capabilities include providing access to residual gravity levels, remote servicing, and transportation to any point along a tether. The potential uses, parameters, and evolution of the spacecraft design are discussed. Engineering development of the tethered elevator is the result of work conducted in the following areas: structural configurations; robotics, drive mechanisms; and power generation and transmission systems. The structural configuration of the elevator is presented. The structure supports, houses, and protects all systems on board the elevator. The implementation of robotics on board the elevator is discussed. Elevator robotics allow for the deployment, retrieval, and manipulation of tethered objects. Robotic manipulators also aid in hooking the elevator on a tether. Critical to the operation of the tethered elevator is the design of its drive mechanisms, which are discussed. Two drivers, located internal to the elevator, propel the vehicle along a tether. These modular components consist of endless toothed belts, shunt-wound motors, regenerative power braking, and computer controlled linear actuators. The designs of self-sufficient power generation and transmission systems are reviewed. Thorough research indicates all components of the elevator will operate under power provided by fuel cells. The fuel cell systems will power the vehicle at seven kilowatts continuously and twelve kilowatts maximally. A set of secondary fuel cells provides redundancy in the unlikely event of a primary system failure. Power storage exists in the form of Nickel-Hydrogen batteries capable of powering the elevator under maximum loads.

  13. Effect of tension and curvature on the chemical potential of lipids in lipid aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grafmüller, Andrea; Lipowsky, Reinhard; Knecht, Volker

    2013-01-21

    Understanding the factors that influence the free energy of lipids in bilayer membranes is an essential step toward understanding exchange processes of lipids between membranes. In general, both lipid composition and membrane geometry can affect lipid exchange rates between bilayer membranes. Here, the free energy change ΔG(des) for the desorption of dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine (DPPC) lipids from different lipid aggregates has been computed using molecular dynamics simulations and umbrella sampling. The value of ΔG(des) is found to depend strongly on the local properties of the aggregate, in that both tension and curvature lead to an increase in ΔG(des). A detailed analysis shows that the increased desorption free energy for tense bilayers arises from the increased conformational entropy of the lipid tails, which reduces the favorable component -TΔS(L) of the desorption free energy.

  14. Bilayer thickness mismatch controls domain size in biomimetic membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A.; Petruzielo, Robin S.; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kučerka, Norbert; Standaert, Robert F.; Feigenson, Gerald W.; Katsara, John

    2013-03-01

    In order to promote functionality, cells may alter the spatial organization of membrane lipids and proteins, including separation of liquid phases into distinct domains. In model membranes, domain size and morphology depend strongly on composition and temperature, but the physicochemical mechanisms controlling them are poorly understood. Theoretical work suggests a role for interfacial energy at domain boundaries, which may be driven in part by thickness mismatch between a domain and its surrounding bilayer. However, no direct evidence linking thickness mismatch to domain size in free-standing bilayers has been reported. We describe the use of Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) to detect domains in simplified lipid-only models that mimic the composition of plasma membrane. We find that domain size is controlled by the degree of acyl chain unsaturation of low-melting temperature lipids, and that this size transition is correlated to changes in the thickness mismatch between coexisting liquid phases.

  15. Tethered satellite thermal design and test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapter, John J.

    1991-01-01

    The Tethered Satellite System (TSS) is the first Shuttle Orbiter mission that investigates electrodynamic phenomenon of a 20 km conductive tether, in space. The TSS Mission is planned for January 1992. The 'Deployer' that provides the mechanisms that control a tethered satellite is mounted on a Spacelab Pallet. The Deployer thermal design uses Multilayer Insulation (MLI), heaters, and the Spacelab payload freon loop. The pallet and Deployer are isolated from the space thermal environment with MLI that forms an enclosure that is a unique part of the thermal design. This paper describes the TSS thermal design, presents the analysis approach, and details the Deployer thermal balance test.

  16. Micrometre and nanometre scale patterning of binary polymer brushes, supported lipid bilayers and proteins† †Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: A detailed discussion of the optimisation of NPPOC-APTES patterning and functionalization chemistry, and full experimental details. See DOI: 10.1039/c7sc00289k Click here for additional data file.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Alexander; Madsen, Jeppe; Chapman, Paul; Alswieleh, Abdullah; Al-Jaf, Omed; Bao, Peng; Hurley, Claire R.; Cartron, Michaël L.; Evans, Stephen D.; Hobbs, Jamie K.; Hunter, C. Neil; Armes, Steven P.

    2017-01-01

    Binary polymer brush patterns were fabricated via photodeprotection of an aminosilane with a photo-cleavable nitrophenyl protecting group. UV exposure of the silane film through a mask yields micrometre-scale amine-terminated regions that can be derivatised to incorporate a bromine initiator to facilitate polymer brush growth via atom transfer radical polymerisation (ATRP). Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and imaging secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) confirm that relatively thick brushes can be grown with high spatial confinement. Nanometre-scale patterns were formed by using a Lloyd's mirror interferometer to expose the nitrophenyl-protected aminosilane film. In exposed regions, protein-resistant poly(oligo(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate) (POEGMEMA) brushes were grown by ATRP and used to define channels as narrow as 141 nm into which proteins could be adsorbed. The contrast in the pattern can be inverted by (i) a simple blocking reaction after UV exposure, (ii) a second deprotection step to expose previously intact protecting groups, and (iii) subsequent brush growth via surface ATRP. Alternatively, two-component brush patterns can be formed. Exposure of a nitrophenyl-protected aminosilane layer either through a mask or to an interferogram, enables growth of an initial POEGMEMA brush. Subsequent UV exposure of the previously intact regions allows attachment of ATRP initiator sites and growth of a second poly(cysteine methacrylate) (PCysMA) brush within photolithographically-defined micrometre or nanometre scale regions. POEGMEMA brushes resist deposition of liposomes, but fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) studies confirm that liposomes readily rupture on PCysMA “corrals” defined within POEGMEMA “walls”. This leads to the formation of highly mobile supported lipid bilayers that exhibit similar diffusion coefficients to lipid bilayers formed on surfaces such as glass. PMID:28660065

  17. Dynamics analysis of electrodynamic satellite tethers. Equations of motion and numerical solution algorithms for the tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nacozy, P. E.

    1984-01-01

    The equations of motion are developed for a perfectly flexible, inelastic tether with a satellite at its extremity. The tether is attached to a space vehicle in orbit. The tether is allowed to possess electrical conductivity. A numerical solution algorithm to provide the motion of the tether and satellite system is presented. The resulting differential equations can be solved by various existing standard numerical integration computer programs. The resulting differential equations allow the introduction of approximations that can lead to analytical, approximate general solutions. The differential equations allow more dynamical insight of the motion.

  18. Comparative atomic-scale hydration of the ceramide and phosphocholine headgroup in solution and bilayer environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillams, Richard J.; Lorenz, Christian D.; McLain, Sylvia E.

    2016-06-01

    Previous studies have used neutron diffraction to elucidate the hydration of the ceramide and the phosphatidylcholine headgroup in solution. These solution studies provide bond-length resolution information on the system, but are limited to liquid samples. The work presented here investigates how the hydration of ceramide and phosphatidylcholine headgroups in a solution compares with that found in a lipid bilayer. This work shows that the hydration patterns seen in the solution samples provide valuable insight into the preferential location of hydrating water molecules in the bilayer. There are certain subtle differences in the distribution, which result from a combination of the lipid conformation and the lipid-lipid interactions within the bilayer environment. The lipid-lipid interactions in the bilayer will be dependent on the composition of the bilayer, whereas the restricted exploration of conformational space is likely to be applicable in all membrane environments. The generalized description of hydration gathered from the neutron diffraction studies thus provides good initial estimation for the hydration pattern, but this can be further refined for specific systems.

  19. Numerical modelling of elastic space tethers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Kristian Uldall; Palmer, P. L.; Roberts, R. M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper the importance of the ill-posedness of the classical, non-dissipative massive tether model on an orbiting tether system is studied numerically. The computations document that via the regularisation of bending resistance a more reliable numerical integrator can be produced. Furthermore......, the numerical experiments of an orbiting tether system show that bending may introduce significant forces in some regions of phase space. Finally, numerical evidence for the existence of an almost invariant slow manifold of the singularly perturbed, regularised, non-dissipative massive tether model is provided....... It is also shown that on the slow manifold the dynamics of the satellites are well-approximated by the finite dimensional slack-spring model....

  20. Tether as a dynamic transmission line

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullahorn, Gordon E.; Hohlfeld, Robert G.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of longitudinal impulses on a satellite when a continuum tether from the Shuttle or Space Station is included is investigated. It is demonstrated that, taking the continuum nature of the tether into account, the sharp onset of a forcing impulse at the Shuttle end is perceived on board the satellite. The magnitude of the satellite response is diminished from that of the forcing impulse, and the response exhibits a broadened exponential tailoff. These are due primarily to the coupling between the tether and the satellite and its influence on an impinging impulsive wave, and not on the whole system as in the spring-mass model. The full impulse response function can be quite complex, showing repeated impulses as the tether wave bounces back and forth between the satellite and Shuttle, and having a different shape at each impingement on the satellite.

  1. FCAPD Protective Coating for Space Tethers Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Alameda Applied Sciences Corporation (AASC) proposes to demonstrate extended service lifetime of space tethers in the Low Earth Orbit (LEO) environment by using...

  2. Hydrophobic actuation of a DNA origami bilayer structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    List, Jonathan; Weber, Michael; Simmel, Friedrich C

    2014-04-14

    Amphiphilic compounds have a strong tendency to form aggregates in aqueous solutions. It is shown that such aggregation can be utilized to fold cholesterol-modified, single-layered DNA origami structures into sandwich-like bilayer structures, which hide the cholesterol modifications in their interior. The DNA bilayer structures unfold after addition of the surfactant Tween 80, and also in the presence of lipid bilayer membranes, with opening kinetics well described by stretched exponentials. It is also demonstrated that by combination with an appropriate lock and key mechanism, hydrophobic actuation of DNA sandwiches can be made conditional on the presence of an additional molecular input such as a specific DNA sequence. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Compositional and structural characterization of monolayers and bilayers composed of native pulmonary surfactant from wild type mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernardino de la Serna, Jorge; Hansen, Soren; Berzina, Zane

    2013-01-01

    This work comprises a structural and dynamical study of monolayers and bilayers composed of native pulmonary surfactant from mice. Spatially resolved information was obtained using fluorescence (confocal, wide field and two photon excitation) and atomic force microscopy methods. Lipid mass...

  4. Lipid domains in bicelles containing unsaturated lipids and cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Hyo Soon; Dominick, Johnna L; Spence, Megan M

    2010-07-22

    We have created a stable bicelle system capable of forming micrometer-scale lipid domains that orient in a magnetic field, suitable for structural biology determination in solid-state NMR. The bicelles consisted of a mixture of cholesterol, saturated lipid (DMPC), and unsaturated lipid (POPC), a mixture commonly used to create domains in model membranes, along with a short chain lipid (DHPC) that allows formation of the bicelle phase. While maintaining a constant molar ratio of long to short chain lipids, q = ([POPC]+[DMPC])/[DHPC] = 3, we varied the concentrations of the unsaturated lipid, POPC, and cholesterol to observe the effects of the components on bicelle stability. Using (31)P solid-state NMR, we observed that unsaturated lipids (POPC) greatly destabilized the alignment of the membranes in the magnetic field, while cholesterol stabilized their alignment. By combining cholesterol and unsaturated lipids in the bicelles, we created membranes aligning uniformly in the magnetic field, despite very high concentrations of unsaturated lipids. These bicelles, with high concentrations of both cholesterol and unsaturated lipid, showed similar phase behavior to bicelles commonly used in structural biology, but aligned over a wider temperature range (291-314 K). Domains were observed by measuring time-dependent diffusion constants reflecting restricted diffusion of the lipids within micrometer-scale regions of the bicelles. Micron-scale domains have never been observed in POPC/DMPC/cholesterol vesicles, implying that bilayers in bicelles show different phase behavior than their counterparts in vesicles, and that bilayers in bicelles favor domain formation.

  5. Development of the flight tether for ProSEDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Leslie; Vaughn, Jason; Welzyn, Ken; Carroll, Joe

    2002-01-01

    The Propulsive Small Expendable Deployer System (ProSEDS) space experiment will demonstrate the use of an electrodynamic tether propulsion system to generate thrust in space by decreasing the orbital altitude of a Delta II Expendable Launch Vehicle second stage. ProSEDS will use the flight-proven Small Expendable Deployer System to deploy a newly designed and developed tether which will provide tether generated drag thrust of ~0.4 N. The development and production of very long tethers with specific properties for performance and survivability will be required to enable future tether missions. The ProSEDS tether design and the development process may provide some lessons learned for these future missions. The ProSEDS system requirements drove the design of the tether to have three different sections of tether each serving a specialized purpose. The tether is a total of 15 kilometers long: 10 kilometers of a non-conductive Dyneema lead tether; 5 km of CCOR conductive coated wire; and 220 meters of insulated wire with a protective Kevlar overbraid. Production and joining of long tether lengths involved many development efforts. Extensive testing of tether materials including ground deployment of the full-length ProSEDS tether was conducted to validate the tether design and performance before flight. .

  6. Modeling nanoparticle wrapping or translocation in bilayer membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Emily M.; Bahrami, Amir H.; Weikl, Thomas R.; Hall, Carol K.

    2015-08-01

    The spontaneous wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes is of increasing interest as nanoparticles become more prevalent in consumer products and hence more likely to enter the human body. We introduce a simulations-based tool that can be used to visualize the molecular level interaction between nanoparticles and bilayer membranes. By combining LIME, an intermediate resolution, implicit solvent model for phospholipids, with discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD), we are able to simulate the wrapping or embedding of nanoparticles by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Simulations of hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters from 10 Å to 250 Å show that hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20 Å become wrapped while the nanoparticle with a diameter of 10 Å does not. Instead this smaller particle became embedded in the bilayer surface where it can interact with the hydrophilic head groups of the lipid molecules. We also investigate the interaction between a DPPC bilayer and hydrophobic nanoparticles with diameters 10 Å to 40 Å. These nanoparticles do not undergo the wrapping process; instead they directly penetrate the membrane and embed themselves within the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayers.

  7. Modeling Nanoparticle Wrapping or Translocation in Bilayer Membranes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curtis, Emily M.; Bahrami, Amir H.; Weikl, Thomas R.; Hall, Carol K.

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes is of increasing interest as nanoparticles become more prevalent in consumer products and hence more likely to enter the human body. We introduce a simulations-based tool that can be used to visualize the molecular level interaction between nanoparticles and bilayer membranes. By combining LIME, an intermediate resolution, implicit solvent model for phospholipids, with discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD), we are able to simulate the wrapping or embedding of nanoparticles by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Simulations of hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters from 10Å to 250Å show that hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20Å become wrapped while the nanoparticle with a diameter of 10Å does not . Instead this smaller particle became embedded in the bilayer surface where it could interact with the hydrophilic head groups of the lipid molecules. We also investigate the interaction between a DPPC bilayer and hydrophobic nanoparticles with diameters 10Å to 40Å. These nanoparticles do not undergo the wrapping process; instead they directly penetrate the membrane and embed themselves within the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayers. PMID:26260123

  8. Thermal Response Analysis of Phospholipid Bilayers Using Ellipsometric Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Henríquez, Carmen M.; Villegas-Opazo, Vanessa A.; Sagredo-Oyarce, Dallits H.; Sarabia-Vallejos, Mauricio A.; Terraza, Claudio A.

    2017-01-01

    Biomimetic planar artificial membranes have been widely studied due to their multiple applications in several research fields. Their humectation and thermal response are crucial for reaching stability; these characteristics are related to the molecular organization inside the bilayer, which is affected by the aliphatic chain length, saturations, and molecule polarity, among others. Bilayer stability becomes a fundamental factor when technological devices are developed—like biosensors—based on those systems. Thermal studies were performed for different types of phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecules: two pure PC bilayers and four binary PC mixtures. These analyses were carried out through the detection of slight changes in their optical and structural parameters via Ellipsometry and Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR) techniques. Phospholipid bilayers were prepared by Langmuir-Blodgett technique and deposited over a hydrophilic silicon wafer. Their molecular inclination degree, mobility, and stability of the different phases were detected and analyzed through bilayer thickness changes and their optical phase-amplitude response. Results show that certain binary lipid mixtures—with differences in its aliphatic chain length—present a co-existence of two thermal responses due to non-ideal mixing. PMID:28820461

  9. Phospholipid bilayer formation on a variety of nanoporous oxide and organic xerogel films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nellis, Barbara A; Satcher, Joe H; Risbud, Subhash H

    2011-01-01

    Lipid bilayers supported by nanoporous xerogel materials are being explored as models for cell membranes. In order to better understand and characterize the nature of the surface-bilayer interactions, several oxide and organic nanoporous xerogel films (alumina, titania, iron oxide, phloroglucinol-formaldehyde, resorcinol-formaldehyde and cellulose acetate) have been investigated as a scaffold for vesicle-fused 1,2-dioleoyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) lipid bilayer formation and mobility. The surface topography of the different substrates was analyzed using contact and tapping-mode atomic force microscopy and the surface energy of the substrates was determined using contact angle goniometry. Lipid bilayer formation has been observed with fluorescence microscopy and lateral lipid diffusion coefficients have been determined using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching. Titania xerogel films were found to be a robust and convenient support for formation of a two-phase DOPC/1,2-distearoyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine bilayer and domains were observed with this system. It was found that the cellulose acetate xerogel film support produced the slowest lipid lateral diffusion. Copyright © 2010 Acta Materialia Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Self-assembly of core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticles and their potential as drug delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Zhiqiang; Loe, David T.; Awino, Joseph K.; Kröger, Martin; Rouge, Jessica L.; Li, Ying

    2016-08-01

    Herein a new multifunctional formulation, referred to as a core-polyethylene glycol-lipid shell (CPLS) nanoparticle, has been proposed and studied in silico via large scale coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations. A PEGylated core with surface tethered polyethylene glycol (PEG) chains is used as the starting configuration, where the free ends of the PEG chains are covalently bonded with lipid molecules (lipid heads). A complete lipid bilayer is formed at the surface of the PEGylated particle core upon addition of free lipids, driven by the hydrophobic properties of the lipid tails, leading to the formation of a CPLS nanoparticle. The self-assembly process is found to be sensitive to the grafting density and molecular weight of the tethered PEG chains, as well as the amount of free lipids added. At low grafting densities the assembly of CPLS nanoparticles cannot be accomplished. As demonstrated by simulations, a lipid bud/vesicle can be formed on the surface when an excess amount of free lipids is added at high grafting density. Therefore, the CPLS nanoparticles can only be formed under appropriate conditions of both PEG and free lipids. The CPLS nanoparticle has been recognized to be able to store a large quantity of water molecules, particularly with high molecular weight of PEG chains, indicating its capacity for carrying hydrophilic molecules such as therapeutic biomolecules or imaging agents. Under identical size and surface chemistry conditions of a liposome, it has been observed that the CPLS particle can be more efficiently wrapped by the lipid membrane, indicating its potential for a greater efficiency in delivering its hydrophilic cargo. As a proof-of-concept, the experimental realization of CPLS nanoparticles is explicitly demonstrated in this study. To test the capacity of the CPLS to store small molecule cargo a hydrophilic dye was successfully encapsulated in the particles' water soluble layer. The results of this study show the power and

  11. Laser-induced tether & spouts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delville, Jean-Pierre

    2004-03-01

    Since the seminal work of Ashkin and Dziedzic on the deformation of transparent free-surfaces induced by laser waves, the optical radiation pressure has been recognized as very appealing to locally manipulate liquid interfaces. While the first developments essentially exploited the interface bending for optical applications in adaptive lensing, radiation pressure effects have recently received renewed interest in connection with nano/bio-technologies, as a non-intrusive tool to probe microscopic surface properties of soft materials including cell stretching, or membrane and interface visco-elasticity. However, as the optical bending of a fluid interface is generally weak, these experiments were essentially limited to the linear regime in deformation. Non-linear behaviors can nevertheless be investigated using very soft transparent liquid interfaces to enhance light effects. At large optical excitation, either a large stable tether is formed, or else a break-up of the interface occurs, depending on the direction of the beam propagation. Physically, the reason for this asymmetry can be traced to whether total reflection of light at deformed interface occurs or not. Laser-induced interface instability leads to the formation of a stationary beam-centered liquid micro-jet emitting droplets, which anticipates the bases for new applications in micro-fluidics and liquid micro-spraying. On the other hand, the method can be extended to form microscopic liquid bridges of very large aspect ratio, because optical forces are able to overcome the fundamental Rayleigh-Plateau limitation. As laser-induced micro-jets, laser-sustained liquid columns are tunable in aspect ratio and adjustable in direction. Consequently, the applications range of "opto-hydrodynamic" interface instability is wide, going from micro-optics (i.e. liquid columns also behave as soft optical fibers) to micro-fluidics, as fluid transfer can be optically monitored and directed in three dimensions.

  12. SP-B and SP-C Alter Diffusion in Bilayers of Pulmonary Surfactant

    OpenAIRE

    Schram, Vincent; Hall, Stephen B.

    2004-01-01

    The hydrophobic proteins SP-B and SP-C promote rapid adsorption of pulmonary surfactant to an air/water interface by an unknown mechanism. We tested the hypothesis that these proteins accelerate adsorption by disrupting the structure of the lipid bilayer, either by a generalized increase in fluidity or by a focal induction of interfacial boundaries within the bilayer. We used fluorescence recovery after photobleaching to measure diffusion of nitrobenzoxadiazolyl-dimyristoyl-phosphatidylethano...

  13. The HOPS/Class C Vps Complex Tethers High-Curvature Membranes via a Direct Protein-Membrane Interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ruoya; Stroupe, Christopher

    2016-10-01

    Membrane tethering is a physical association of two membranes before their fusion. Many membrane tethering factors have been identified, but the interactions that mediate inter-membrane associations remain largely a matter of conjecture. Previously, we reported that the homotypic fusion and protein sorting/Class C vacuolar protein sorting (HOPS/Class C Vps) complex, which has two binding sites for the yeast vacuolar Rab GTPase Ypt7p, can tether two low-curvature liposomes when both membranes bear Ypt7p. Here, we show that HOPS tethers highly curved liposomes to Ypt7p-bearing low-curvature liposomes even when the high-curvature liposomes are protein-free. Phosphorylation of the curvature-sensing amphipathic lipid-packing sensor (ALPS) motif from the Vps41p HOPS subunit abrogates tethering of high-curvature liposomes. A HOPS complex without its Vps39p subunit, which contains one of the Ypt7p binding sites in HOPS, lacks tethering activity, though it binds high-curvature liposomes and Ypt7p-bearing low-curvature liposomes. Thus, HOPS tethers highly curved membranes via a direct protein-membrane interaction. Such high-curvature membranes are found at the sites of vacuole tethering and fusion. There, vacuole membranes bend sharply, generating large areas of vacuole-vacuole contact. We propose that HOPS localizes via the Vps41p ALPS motif to these high-curvature regions. There, HOPS binds via Vps39p to Ypt7p in an apposed vacuole membrane. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Neural stem cell adhesion and proliferation on phospholipid bilayers functionalized with RGD peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ananthanarayanan, Badriprasad; Little, Lauren; Schaffer, David V; Healy, Kevin E; Tirrell, Matthew

    2010-11-01

    Peptide-functionalized materials show promise in controlling stem cell behavior by mimicking cell-matrix interactions. Supported lipid bilayers are an excellent platform for displaying peptides due to their ease of fabrication and low non-specific interactions with cells. In this paper, we report on the behavior of adult hippocampal neural stem cells (NSCs) on phospholipid bilayers functionalized with different RGD-containing peptides: either GGGNGEPRGDTYRAY ('bsp-RGD(15)') or GRGDSP. Fluid supported bilayers were prepared on glass surfaces by adsorption and fusion of small lipid vesicles incorporating synthetic peptide amphiphiles. NSCs adhered to bilayers with either GRGDSP or bsp-RGD(15) peptide. After 5 days in culture, NSCs formed neurosphere-like aggregates on GRGDSP bilayers, whereas on bsp-RGD(15) bilayers a large fraction of single adhered cells were observed, comparable to monolayer growth seen on laminin controls. NSCs retained their ability to differentiate into neurons and astrocytes on both peptide surfaces. This work illustrates the utility of supported bilayers in displaying peptide ligands and demonstrates that RGD peptides may be useful in synthetic culture systems for stem cells. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Membrane Protein Mobility and Orientation Preserved in Supported Bilayers Created Directly from Cell Plasma Membrane Blebs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Mark J; Hsia, Chih-Yun; Singh, Rohit R; Haider, Huma; Kumpf, Julia; Kawate, Toshimitsu; Daniel, Susan

    2016-03-29

    Membrane protein interactions with lipids are crucial for their native biological behavior, yet traditional characterization methods are often carried out on purified protein in the absence of lipids. We present a simple method to transfer membrane proteins expressed in mammalian cells to an assay-friendly, cushioned, supported lipid bilayer platform using cell blebs as an intermediate. Cell blebs, expressing either GPI-linked yellow fluorescent proteins or neon-green fused transmembrane P2X2 receptors, were induced to rupture on glass surfaces using PEGylated lipid vesicles, which resulted in planar supported membranes with over 50% mobility for multipass transmembrane proteins and over 90% for GPI-linked proteins. Fluorescent proteins were tracked, and their diffusion in supported bilayers characterized, using single molecule tracking and moment scaling spectrum (MSS) analysis. Diffusion was characterized for individual proteins as either free or confined, revealing details of the local lipid membrane heterogeneity surrounding the protein. A particularly useful result of our bilayer formation process is the protein orientation in the supported planar bilayer. For both the GPI-linked and transmembrane proteins used here, an enzymatic assay revealed that protein orientation in the planar bilayer results in the extracellular domains facing toward the bulk, and that the dominant mode of bleb rupture is via the "parachute" mechanism. Mobility, orientation, and preservation of the native lipid environment of the proteins using cell blebs offers advantages over proteoliposome reconstitution or disrupted cell membrane preparations, which necessarily result in significant scrambling of protein orientation and typically immobilized membrane proteins in SLBs. The bleb-based bilayer platform presented here is an important step toward integrating membrane proteomic studies on chip, especially for future studies aimed at understanding fundamental effects of lipid interactions

  16. Lipid nanoparticle interactions and assemblies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preiss, Matthew Ryan

    Novel liposome-nanoparticle assemblies (LNAs) provide a biologically inspired route for designing multifunctional bionanotheranostics. LNAs combine the benefits of lipids and liposomes to encapsulate, transport, and protect hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutics with functional nanoparticles. Functional nanoparticles endow LNAs with additional capabilities, including the ability to target diseases, triggered drug release, controlled therapeutic output, and diagnostic capabilities to produce a drug delivery system that can effectively and efficiently deliver therapeutics while reducing side effects. Not only could LNAs make existing drugs better, they could also provide an avenue to allow once promising non-approved drugs (rejected due to harmful side effects, inadequate pharmacokinetics, and poor efficacy) to be safely used through targeted and controlled delivery directly to the diseased site. LNAs have the potential to be stimuli responsive, delivering drugs on command by external (ultrasound, RF heating, etc.) or internal (pH, blood sugar, heart rate, etc.) stimuli. Individually, lipids and nanoparticles have been clinically approved for therapy, such as Doxil (a liposomal doxorubicin for cancer treatment), and diagnosis, such as Feridex (an iron oxide nanoparticle an MRI contrast enhancement agent for liver tumors). In order to engineer these multifunctional LNAs for theranostic applications, the interactions between nanoparticles and lipids must be better understood. This research sought to explore the formation, design, structures, characteristics, and functions of LNAs. To achieve this goal, different types of LNAs were formed, specifically magnetoliposomes, bilayer decorated LNAs (DLNAs), and lipid-coated magnetic nanoparticles (LMNPs). A fluorescent probe was embedded in the lipid bilayer of magnetoliposomes allowing the local temperature and membrane fluidity to be observed. When subjected to an electromagnetic field that heated the encapsulated iron

  17. Bilayer thickness mismatch controls domain size in model membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberle, Frederick A; Petruzielo, Robin S; Pan, Jianjun; Drazba, Paul; Kučerka, Norbert; Standaert, Robert F; Feigenson, Gerald W; Katsaras, John

    2013-05-08

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm-beyond the reach of optical microscopy-are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  18. Bilayer Thickness Mismatch Controls Domain Size in Model Membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Petruzielo, Robin S [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Drazba, Paul [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia); Feigenson, Gerald [Cornell University; Katsaras, John [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The observation of lateral phase separation in lipid bilayers has received considerable attention, especially in connection to lipid raft phenomena in cells. It is widely accepted that rafts play a central role in cellular processes, notably signal transduction. While micrometer-sized domains are observed with some model membrane mixtures, rafts much smaller than 100 nm beyond the reach of optical microscopy are now thought to exist, both in vitro and in vivo. We have used small-angle neutron scattering, a probe free technique, to measure the size of nanoscopic membrane domains in unilamellar vesicles with unprecedented accuracy. These experiments were performed using a four-component model system containing fixed proportions of cholesterol and the saturated phospholipid 1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DSPC), mixed with varying amounts of the unsaturated phospholipids 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) and 1,2-dioleoylsn- glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC). We find that liquid domain size increases with the extent of acyl chain unsaturation (DOPC:POPC ratio). Furthermore, we find a direct correlation between domain size and the mismatch in bilayer thickness of the coexisting liquid-ordered and liquid-disordered phases, suggesting a dominant role for line tension in controlling domain size. While this result is expected from line tension theories, we provide the first experimental verification in free-floating bilayers. Importantly, we also find that changes in bilayer thickness, which accompany changes in the degree of lipid chain unsaturation, are entirely confined to the disordered phase. Together, these results suggest how the size of functional domains in homeothermic cells may be regulated through changes in lipid composition.

  19. Use of isothermal titration calorimetry to study the interaction of short-chain alcohols with lipid membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trandum, Christa; Westh-Andersen, Peter; Jørgensen, Kent

    1999-01-01

    of short-chain alcohols on Lipid bilayers. isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) has been used to determine the energy involved in the association of the alcohols with lipid bilayers. Pure unilamellar DMPC liposomes and DMPC liposomes incorporated with different amounts of cholesterol, sphingomyelin...... dependent on the lipid bilayer composition. In the presence of high concentrations of cholesterol, the binding enthalpy of ethanol is decreased, whereas the presence of ceramides enhances the enthalpic response of the lipid bilayer to ethanol. Isothermal titration calorimetry offers a new methodology...

  20. Review of bilayer tablet technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abebe, Admassu; Akseli, Ilgaz; Sprockel, Omar; Kottala, Niranjan; Cuitiño, Alberto M

    2014-01-30

    Therapeutic strategies based on oral delivery of bilayer (and multilayer) tablets are gaining more acceptance among brand and generic products due to a confluence of factors including advanced delivery strategies, patient compliance and combination therapy. Successful manufacturing of these ever more complex systems needs to overcome a series of challenges from formulation design to tablet press monitoring and control. This article provides an overview of the state-of-the-art of bilayer tablet technology, highlighting the main benefits of this type of oral dosage forms while providing a description of current challenges and advances toward improving manufacturing practices and product quality. Several aspects relevant to bilayer tablet manufacturing are addressed including material properties, lubrication, layer ordering, layer thickness, layer weight control, as well as first and final compression forces. A section is also devoted to bilayer tablet characterization that present additional complexities associated with interfaces between layers. The available features of the manufacturing equipment for bilayer tablet production are also described indicating the different strategies for sensing and controls offered by bilayer tablet press manufacturers. Finally, a roadmap for bilayer tablet manufacturing is advanced as a guideline to formulation design and selection of process parameters and equipment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A Child with Tethered Cord Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekti Safarini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Tethered Cord Syndome (TCS refers to a group of neurological disorders related to malformations of the spinal cord, pulling of the spinal cord at the base of spinal canal. Tethered cord syndrome can be seen at any age but most often during childhood. A few children complain of diffuse pain in lower extremitiesor urological symptoms, 20% - 30 % of the patients will have a neurogenic bladder. A 9 years old girl, complained to have a flank pain and eneuresis. A mass is palpable at right flank. Ultrasound revealed duplex hydronephrosis and hydroureter with trabeculated bladder. Voiding Cystouretrography showed grade V vesicoureteral reflux (VUR and neurogenic bladder appearance. Lumbosacral MRI demonstrated tethered cord with adjacent lipoma and spina bifida (Sains Medika, 4(1:89-96.

  2. Silica-based cationic bilayers as immunoadjuvants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmona-Ribeiro Ana M

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Silica particles cationized by dioctadecyldimethylammonium bromide (DODAB bilayer were previously described. This work shows the efficiency of these particulates for antigen adsorption and presentation to the immune system and proves the concept that silica-based cationic bilayers exhibit better performance than alum regarding colloid stability and cellular immune responses for vaccine design. Results Firstly, the silica/DODAB assembly was characterized at 1 mM NaCl, pH 6.3 or 5 mM Tris.HCl, pH 7.4 and 0.1 mg/ml silica over a range of DODAB concentrations (0.001–1 mM by means of dynamic light scattering for particle sizing and zeta-potential analysis. 0.05 mM DODAB is enough to produce cationic bilayer-covered particles with good colloid stability. Secondly, conditions for maximal adsorption of bovine serum albumin (BSA or a recombinant, heat-shock protein from Mycobacterium leprae (18 kDa-hsp onto DODAB-covered or onto bare silica were determined. At maximal antigen adsorption, cellular immune responses in vivo from delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions determined by foot-pad swelling tests (DTH and cytokines analysis evidenced the superior performance of the silica/DODAB adjuvant as compared to alum or antigens alone whereas humoral response from IgG in serum was equal to the one elicited by alum as adjuvant. Conclusion Cationized silica is a biocompatible, inexpensive, easily prepared and possibly general immunoadjuvant for antigen presentation which displays higher colloid stability than alum, better performance regarding cellular immune responses and employs very low, micromolar doses of cationic and toxic synthetic lipid.

  3. Cholesterol Bilayer Domains in the Eye Lens Health: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widomska, Justyna; Subczynski, Witold K; Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija

    2017-12-01

    The most unique biochemical characteristic of the eye lens fiber cell plasma membrane is its extremely high cholesterol content, the need for which is still unclear. It is evident, however, that the disturbance of Chol homeostasis may result in damages associated with cataracts. Electron paramagnetic resonance methods allow discrimination of two types of lipid domains in model membranes overloaded with Chol, namely, phospholipid-cholesterol domains and pure Chol bilayer domains. These domains are also detected in human lens lipid membranes prepared from the total lipids extracted from lens cortices and nuclei of donors from different age groups. Independent of the age-related changes in phospholipid composition, the physical properties of phospholipid-Chol domains remain the same for all age groups and are practically identical for cortical and nuclear membranes. The presence of Chol bilayer domains in these membranes provides a buffering capacity for cholesterol concentration in the surrounding phospholipid-Chol domains, keeping it at a constant saturating level and thus keeping the physical properties of the membrane consistent with and independent of changes in phospholipid composition. It seems that the presence of Chol bilayer domains plays an integral role in the regulation of cholesterol-dependent processes in fiber cell plasm membranes and in the maintenance of fiber cell membrane homeostasis.

  4. Lipid protrusions membrane softness, and enzymatic activity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Morten Østergaard; Høyrup, P.; Callisen, T.H.

    2004-01-01

    The activity of phospholipase A(2) on lipid bilayers displays a characteristic lag burst behavior that has previously been shown to reflect the physical properties of the substrate. It has remained unclear which underlying molecular mechanism is responsible for this phenomenon. We propose here...... that protrusions of single lipid molecules out of the bilayer plane could provide such a mechanism. The proposal is supported by a combination of atomic-scale molecular dynamics simulations, theory, and experiments that have been performed in order to investigate the relationship between on the one side lipid...

  5. Mixtures of Supported and Hybrid Lipid Membranes on Heterogeneously Modified Silica Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Piper-Feldkamp, Aundrea R.; Wegner, Maria; Brzezinski, Peter; Reed, Scott M.

    2013-01-01

    Simple supported lipid bilayers do not accurately reflect the complex heterogeneity of cellular membranes; however, surface modification makes it possible to tune membrane properties to better mimic biological systems. Here, 3-[2-(2-aminoethylamino)ethylamino]propyl-trimethoxysilane (DETAS), a silica modifier, facilitated formation of supported lipid bilayers on silica nanoparticles. Evidence for a stable supported bilayer came from the successful entrapment of a soluble fluorophore within an...

  6. An overview of molecular dynamics simulations of oxidized lipid systems, with a comparison of ELBA and MARTINI force fields for coarse grained lipid simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siani, Pablo; de Souza, R M; Dias, L G

    2016-01-01

    Biological membranes and model lipid systems containing high amounts of unsaturated lipids and sterols are subject to chemical and/or photo-induced lipid oxidation, which leads to the creation of exotic oxidized lipid products (OxPLs). OxPLs are known to have significant physiological impact...... in cellular systems and also affect physical properties of both biological and model lipid bilayers. In this paper we (i) provide a perspective on the existing literature on simulations of lipid bilayer systems containing oxidized lipid species as well as the main related experimental results, (ii) describe...

  7. Tethers in Space : A propellantless propulsion in-orbit demonstration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kruijff, M.

    2011-01-01

    Space tethers are cables that connect satellites or other endmasses in orbit. The emptiness of space and the near-weightlessness there make it possible to deploy very long and thin tethers. By exploiting basic principles of physics, tethers can provide propellantless propulsion and enable unique

  8. Dynamics and offset control of tethered space-tug system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jingrui; Yang, Keying; Qi, Rui

    2018-01-01

    Tethered space-tug system is regarded as one of the most promising active debris removal technologies to effectively decrease the steep increasing population of space debris. In order to suppress the spin of space debris, single-tethered space-tug system is employed by regulating the tether. Unfortunately, this system is underactuated as tether length is the only input, and there are two control objectives: the spinning debris and the vibration of tether. Thus, it may suffer great oscillations and result in failure in space debris removal. This paper presents the study of attitude stabilization of the single-tethered space-tug system using not only tether length but also the offset of tether attachment point to suppress the spin of debris, so as to accomplish the space debris removal mission. Firstly, a precise 3D mathematical model in which the debris and tug are both treated as rigid bodies is developed to study the dynamical evolution of the tethered space-tug system. The relative motion equation of the system is described using Lagrange method. Secondly, the dynamic characteristic of the system is analyzed and an offset control law is designed to stabilize the spin of debris by exploiting the variation of tether offset and the regulation of tether length. Besides, an estimation formula is proposed to evaluate the capability of tether for suppressing spinning debris. Finally, the effectiveness of attitude stabilization by the utilization of the proposed scheme is demonstrated via numerical case studies.

  9. Electropore Formation in Mechanically Constrained Phospholipid Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández, M Laura; Risk, Marcelo Raúl; Vernier, P Thomas

    2017-11-23

    Molecular dynamics simulations of lipid bilayers in aqueous systems reveal how an applied electric field stabilizes the reorganization of the water-membrane interface into water-filled, membrane-spanning, conductive pores with a symmetric, toroidal geometry. The pore formation process and the resulting symmetric structures are consistent with other mathematical approaches such as continuum models formulated to describe the electroporation process. Some experimental data suggest, however, that the shape of lipid electropores in living cell membranes may be asymmetric. We describe here the axially asymmetric pores that form when mechanical constraints are applied to selected phospholipid atoms. Electropore formation proceeds even with severe constraints in place, but pore shape and pore formation time are affected. Since lateral and transverse movement of phospholipids may be restricted in cell membranes by covalent attachments to or non-covalent associations with other components of the membrane or to membrane-proximate intracellular or extracellular biomolecular assemblies, these lipid-constrained molecular models point the way to more realistic representations of cell membranes in electric fields.

  10. Tethered spacecraft in asteroid gravitational environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burov, Alexander A.; Guerman, Anna D.; Kosenko, Ivan I.; Nikonov, Vasily I.

    2018-02-01

    Relative equilibria of a pendulum attached to the surface of a uniformly rotating celestial body are considered. The locations of the tether anchor that correspond to a given spacecraft position are defined. The domains, where the spacecraft can be held with the help of such a pendulum, are also described. Stability of the found relative equilibria is studied.

  11. Ionic-Liquid-Tethered Nanoparticles: Hybrid Electrolytes

    KAUST Repository

    Moganty, Surya S.

    2010-10-22

    A new class of solventless electrolytes was created by tethering ionic liquids to hard inorganic ZrO2 nanostructures (see picture; NIM=nanoscale ionic material). These hybrid fluids exhibit exceptional redox stability windows, excellent thermal stability, good lithium transference numbers, long-term interfacial stability in the presence of a lithium anode and, when doped with lithium salt, reasonable ionic conductivities.

  12. Tethered "kiteplane" design for the Laddermill project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Breukels, J.; Ockels, W.

    2005-01-01

    The Laddermill is an innovative concept for generating energy from wind using large kite-like wings on a tether. The wings are able to fly in both the regime of airplanes and kites. We therefore call these structures "kiteplanes". By providing a recurring motion with a large lift during ascending

  13. Nanomechanics of HaloTag tethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Ionel; Berkovich, Ronen; Alegre-Cebollada, Jorge; Badilla, Carmen L; Rivas-Pardo, Jaime Andrés; Taniguchi, Yukinori; Kawakami, Masaru; Fernandez, Julio M

    2013-08-28

    The active site of the Haloalkane Dehydrogenase (HaloTag) enzyme can be covalently attached to a chloroalkane ligand providing a mechanically strong tether, resistant to large pulling forces. Here we demonstrate the covalent tethering of protein L and I27 polyproteins between an atomic force microscopy (AFM) cantilever and a glass surface using HaloTag anchoring at one end and thiol chemistry at the other end. Covalent tethering is unambiguously confirmed by the observation of full length polyprotein unfolding, combined with high detachment forces that range up to ∼2000 pN. We use these covalently anchored polyproteins to study the remarkable mechanical properties of HaloTag proteins. We show that the force that triggers unfolding of the HaloTag protein exhibits a 4-fold increase, from 131 to 491 pN, when the direction of the applied force is changed from the C-terminus to the N-terminus. Force-clamp experiments reveal that unfolding of the HaloTag protein is twice as sensitive to pulling force compared to protein L and refolds at a slower rate. We show how these properties allow for the long-term observation of protein folding-unfolding cycles at high forces, without interference from the HaloTag tether.

  14. Yielding elastic tethers stabilize robust cell adhesion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt J Whitfield

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds.

  15. Yielding Elastic Tethers Stabilize Robust Cell Adhesion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitfield, Matt J.; Luo, Jonathon P.; Thomas, Wendy E.

    2014-01-01

    Many bacteria and eukaryotic cells express adhesive proteins at the end of tethers that elongate reversibly at constant or near constant force, which we refer to as yielding elasticity. Here we address the function of yielding elastic adhesive tethers with Escherichia coli bacteria as a model for cell adhesion, using a combination of experiments and simulations. The adhesive bond kinetics and tether elasticity was modeled in the simulations with realistic biophysical models that were fit to new and previously published single molecule force spectroscopy data. The simulations were validated by comparison to experiments measuring the adhesive behavior of E. coli in flowing fluid. Analysis of the simulations demonstrated that yielding elasticity is required for the bacteria to remain bound in high and variable flow conditions, because it allows the force to be distributed evenly between multiple bonds. In contrast, strain-hardening and linear elastic tethers concentrate force on the most vulnerable bonds, which leads to failure of the entire adhesive contact. Load distribution is especially important to noncovalent receptor-ligand bonds, because they become exponentially shorter lived at higher force above a critical force, even if they form catch bonds. The advantage of yielding is likely to extend to any blood cells or pathogens adhering in flow, or to any situation where bonds are stretched unequally due to surface roughness, unequal native bond lengths, or conditions that act to unzip the bonds. PMID:25473833

  16. Tethered Aerostat Effects on Nearby Seismometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, Daniel [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-12-01

    This report assesses seismic interference generated by a tethered aerostat. The study was motivated by a planned aerostat deployment within the footprint of the Dry Alluvium Geology seismic network. No evidence was found for seismic interference generated by the aerostat, and thus the e ects on the Dry Alluvium Geology sensors will be negligible.

  17. Heroin-HIV-1 (H2) vaccine: induction of dual immunologic effects with a heroin hapten-conjugate and an HIV-1 envelope V2 peptide with liposomal lipid A as an adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Oscar B; Matyas, Gary R; Rao, Mangala; Peachman, Kristina K; Jalah, Rashmi; Beck, Zoltan; Michael, Nelson L; Rice, Kenner C; Jacobson, Arthur E; Alving, Carl R

    2017-01-01

    A synthetic heroin analog (MorHap) and a synthetic 42 amino acid V2 loop peptide from A/E strain of HIV-1 gp120 envelope protein that was previously used in a successful phase III vaccine trial were constructed as antigens together with liposomes containing monophosphoryl lipid A as an adjuvant, to explore the feasibility of producing a dual use vaccine both for treatment of heroin addiction and prevention of HIV-1 infection among injection drug users. The V2 peptide was tethered by a palmitoyl fatty acyl tail embedded in the liposomal lipid bilayer, and the heroin analog was conjugated to tetanus toxoid as a carrier protein that was mixed with the adjuvant. Upon comparison of a linear V2 peptide with a cyclic peptide, differences were found in the secondary configurations by circular dichroism, with the tethered cyclic peptide (palm-cyclic peptide) entirely in a random coil, and the tethered linear V2 peptide (palm-linear V2 peptide) entirely in a beta-sheet. Upon immunization of mice, palm-cyclic peptide induced anti-cyclic peptide endpoint titers >10 6 and was considered to be a better immunogen overall than palm-linear V2 peptide for inducing antibodies to gp120 and gp70-V1V2. The antibodies also inhibited the binding of V2 peptide to the HIV-1 α 4 β 7 integrin receptor. Antibody titers to MorHap, even with the presence of injected cyclic peptide, were very high, and resulted in inhibition of the hyper-locomotion and antinociception effects of injected heroin. From these initial experiments, we conclude that with a potent adjuvant and mostly synthetic constituents, a vaccine directed to heroin and HIV-1 (H2 vaccine) could be a feasible objective.

  18. Structure and dynamics of POPC bilayers in water solutions of room temperature ionic liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benedetto, Antonio [School of Physics, University College Dublin, Dublin 4 (Ireland); Laboratory for Neutron Scattering and Imaging, Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen (Switzerland); Bingham, Richard J. [York Centre for Complex Systems Analysis, University of York, York YO10 5GE (United Kingdom); Ballone, Pietro [Center for Life Nano Science @Sapienza, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia (IIT), 00185 Roma (Italy); Department of Physics, Università di Roma “La Sapienza,” 00185 Roma (Italy)

    2015-03-28

    Molecular dynamics simulations in the NPT ensemble have been carried out to investigate the effect of two room temperature ionic liquids (RTILs), on stacks of phospholipid bilayers in water. We consider RTIL compounds consisting of chloride ([bmim][Cl]) and hexafluorophosphate ([bmim][PF{sub 6}]) salts of the 1-buthyl-3-methylimidazolium ([bmim]{sup +}) cation, while the phospholipid bilayer is made of 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC). Our investigations focus on structural and dynamical properties of phospholipid and water molecules that could be probed by inelastic and quasi-elastic neutron scattering measurements. The results confirm the fast incorporation of [bmim]{sup +} into the lipid phase already observed in previous simulations, driven by the Coulomb attraction of the cation for the most electronegative oxygens in the POPC head group and by sizeable dispersion forces binding the neutral hydrocarbon tails of [bmim]{sup +} and of POPC. The [bmim]{sup +} absorption into the bilayer favours the penetration of water into POPC, causes a slight but systematic thinning of the bilayer, and further stabilises hydrogen bonds at the lipid/water interface that already in pure samples (no RTIL) display a lifetime much longer than in bulk water. On the other hand, the effect of RTILs on the diffusion constant of POPC (D{sub POPC}) does not reveal a clearly identifiable trend, since D{sub POPC} increases upon addition of [bmim][Cl] and decreases in the [bmim][PF{sub 6}] case. Moreover, because of screening, the electrostatic signature of each bilayer is only moderately affected by the addition of RTIL ions in solution. The analysis of long wavelength fluctuations of the bilayers shows that RTIL sorption causes a general decrease of the lipid/water interfacial tension and bending rigidity, pointing to the destabilizing effect of RTILs on lipid bilayers.

  19. Coordinated coupling control of tethered space robot using releasing characteristics of space tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Panfeng; Zhang, Fan; Xu, Xiudong; Meng, Zhongjie; Liu, Zhengxiong; Hu, Yongxin

    2016-04-01

    Tethered space robot (TSR) is a new concept of space robot, which is released from the platform satellite, and retrieved via connected tether after space debris capture. In this paper, we propose a new coordinate control scheme for optimal trajectory and attitude tracking, and use releasing motor torque to instead the tension force, since it is difficult to track in practical. Firstly, the 6-DOF dynamics model of TSR is derived, in which the dynamics of tether releasing system is taken into account. Then, we propose and design the coordinated coupled controller, which is composed of a 6-DOF sliding mode controller and a PD controller tether's releasing. Thrust is treated as control input of the 6-DOF sliding mode controller to control the in-plane and out-of-plane angle of the tether and attitude angles of the TSR. The torque of releasing motor is used as input of PD controller, which controls the length rate of space tether. After the verification of the control scheme, finally, the simulation experiment is presented in order to validate the effectiveness of this control method. The results show that TSR can track the optimal approaching trajectory accurately. Simultaneously, the attitude angles can be changed to the desired attitude angles in control period, and the terminal accuracy is ±0.3°.

  20. Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C. L.; Bergeron, G.; Drobot, A. D.; Papadopoulos, K.; Riyopoulos, S.; Szuszczewicz, E.

    1999-01-01

    This final report summarizes the work performed by SAIC's Applied Physics Operation on the modeling and support of Tethered Satellite System missions (TSS-1 and TSS-1R). The SAIC team, known to be Theory and Modeling in Support of Tether (TMST) investigation, was one of the original twelve teams selected in July, 1985 for the first TSS mission. The accomplishments described in this report cover the period December 19, 1985 to September 31, 1999 and are the result of a continuous effort aimed at supporting the TSS missions in the following major areas. During the contract period, the SAIC's TMST investigation acted to: Participate in the planning and the execution on both of the TSS missions; Provide scientific understanding on the issues involved in the electrodynamic tether system operation prior to the TSS missions; Predict ionospheric conditions encountered during the re-flight mission (TSS-lR) based on realtime global ionosounde data; Perform post mission analyses to enhance our understanding on the TSS results. Specifically, we have 1) constructed and improved current collection models and enhanced our understanding on the current-voltage data; 2) investigated the effects of neutral gas in the current collection processes; 3) conducted laboratory experiments to study the discharge phenomena during and after tether-break; and 4) perform numerical simulations to understand data collected by plasma instruments SPES onboard the TSS satellite; Design and produce multi-media CD that highlights TSS mission achievements and convey the knowledge of the tether technology to the general public. Along with discussions of this work, a list of publications and presentations derived from the TMST investigation spanning the reporting period is compiled.

  1. Optimal control of electrodynamic tether satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Robert E.

    Low thrust propulsion systems offer a fuel-efficient means to maneuver satellites to new orbits, however they can only perform such maneuvers when they are continuously operated for a long time. Such long-term maneuvers occur over many orbital revolutions often rendering short time scale trajectory optimization methods ineffective. An approach to multirevolution, long time scale optimal control of an electrodynamic tether is investigated for a tethered satellite system in Low Earth Orbit with atmospheric drag. Control is assumed to be periodic over several orbits since under the assumptions of a nearly circular orbit, periodic control yields the only solution that significantly contributes to secular changes in the orbital parameters. The optimal control problem is constructed in such a way as to maneuver the satellite to a new orbit while minimizing a cost function subject to the constraints of the time-averaged equations of motion by controlling current in the tether. To accurately capture the tether orbital dynamics, libration is modeled and controlled over long time scales in a similar manner to the orbital states. Libration is addressed in two parts; equilibrium and stability analysis, and control. Libration equations of motion are derived and analyzed to provide equilibrium and stability criteria that define the constraints of the design. A new libration mean square state is introduced and constrained to maintain libration within an acceptable envelope throughout a given maneuver. Optimal control solutions are achieved using a pseudospectral method that maneuver an electrodynamic tether to new orbits over long time scales while managing librational motion using only current in a wire.

  2. Super-Sensitive and Robust Biosensors from Supported Polymer Bilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paxton, Walter F. [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Biological organisms are potentially the most sensitive and selective biological detection systems known, yet we are currently severely limited in our ability to exploit biological interactions in sensory devices, due in part to the limited stability of biological systems and derived materials. This proposal addresses an important aspect of integrating biological sensory materials in a solid state device. If successful, such technology could enable entirely new classes of robust biosensors that could be miniaturized and deployed in the field. The critical aims of the proposed work were 1) the calibration of a more versatile approach to measuring pH, 2) the use of this method to monitor pH changes caused by the light-induced pumping of protons across vesicles with bacteriorhodopsin integrated into the membranes (either polymer or lipid); 3) the preparation of bilayer assemblies on platinum surfaces; 4) the enhanced detection of lightinduced pH changes driven by bR-loaded supported bilayers. I have developed a methodology that may enable that at interfaces and developed a methodology to characterize the functionality of bilayer membranes with reconstituted membrane proteins. The integrity of the supported bilayer films however must be optimized prior to the full realization of the work originally envisioned in the original proposal. Nevertheless, the work performed on this project and the encouraging results it has produced has demonstrated that these goals are challenging yet within reach.

  3. Molecular Structures of Fluid Phase Phosphatidylglycerol Bilayers as Determined by Small Angle Neutron and X-ray Scattering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Tristram-Nagle, Dr. Stephanie [Carnegie Mellon University; Michelle, Szymanski [Rutgers University; Mary, Koepfinger [Rutgers University; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Kucerka, Norbert [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre and Comelius University (Slovakia)

    2012-01-01

    We have determined the molecular structures of commonly used phosphatidylglycerols (PGs) in the commonly accepted biologically relevant fluid phase. This was done by simultaneously analyzing small-angle neutron and X-ray scattering data, with the constraint of a measured volume per lipid. We report the temperature dependence of bilayer parameters obtained using the one dimensional scattering density profile model derived from molecular dynamics simulations, including the area per lipid, the overall bilayer thickness, as well as other intrabilayer parameters (e.g., hydrocarbon thickness). Lipid areas are found to be larger than their phosphatidylcholine (PC) counterparts, a result likely due to repulsive electrostatic interactions taking place between the charged PG headgroups even in the presence of Na+ counterions. In general, PG and PC bilayers show a similar response to changes in temperature and chain length, but differ in their response to chain unsaturation. For example, compared to their PC counterparts, the inclusion of a double bond in PG lipids results in a smaller incremental change in lipid area and bilayer thickness. However, the extrapolated lipid area of saturated PG lipids at infinite chain length is found to be similar to that of PCs, an indication of the glycerol-carbonyl backbone's pivotal role in influencing the lipid-water interface.

  4. Effect of Sodium and Chloride Binding on a Lecithin Bilayer. A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reif, Maria M; Kallies, Christopher; Knecht, Volker

    2017-01-25

    The effect of ion binding on the structural, mechanical, dynamic and electrostatic properties of a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC) bilayer in a 0.5 M aqueous NaCl solution is investigated using classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation with different force-field descriptions for ion-ion and ion-lipid interactions. Most importantly, the repulsive Lennard-Jones parameters for the latter were modified, such that approximately similar binding of cations and anions to the lipid membrane is achieved. This was done to qualitatively improve the apparent ion-lipid binding constants obtained from simulations with the original force field (Berger lipids and GROMOS87 ions in combination with the SPC water model) in comparison to experimental data. Furthermore, various parameters characterizing membrane structure, elasticity, order and dynamics are analyzed. It is found that ion binding as observed in simulations involving the modified in comparison to the original force-field description leads to: (i) a smaller salt-induced change in the area per lipid, which is in closer agreement with the experiment; (ii) a decrease in the area compressibility and bilayer thickness to values comparable to a bilayer in pure water; (iii) lipid deuterium order parameters and lipid diffusion coefficients on nanosecond timescales that are very similar to the values for a membrane in pure water. In general, salt effects on the structural properties of a POPC bilayer in an aqueous sodium-chloride solution appear to be reproduced reasonably well by the new force-field description. An analysis of membrane-membrane disjoining pressure suggests that the smaller salt-induced change in area per lipid induced by the new force-field description is not due to the alteration of membrane-associated net charge, but must rather be understood as a consequence of ion-specific effects on the arrangement of lipid molecules.

  5. Effect of Sodium and Chloride Binding on a Lecithin Bilayer. A Molecular Dynamics Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria M. Reif

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of ion binding on the structural, mechanical, dynamic and electrostatic properties of a 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POPC bilayer in a 0.5 M aqueous NaCl solution is investigated using classical atomistic molecular dynamics simulation with different force-field descriptions for ion-ion and ion-lipid interactions. Most importantly, the repulsive Lennard–Jones parameters for the latter were modified, such that approximately similar binding of cations and anions to the lipid membrane is achieved. This was done to qualitatively improve the apparent ion-lipid binding constants obtained from simulations with the original force field (Berger lipids and GROMOS87 ions in combination with the SPC water model in comparison to experimental data. Furthermore, various parameters characterizing membrane structure, elasticity, order and dynamics are analyzed. It is found that ion binding as observed in simulations involving the modified in comparison to the original force-field description leads to: (i a smaller salt-induced change in the area per lipid, which is in closer agreement with the experiment; (ii a decrease in the area compressibility and bilayer thickness to values comparable to a bilayer in pure water; (iii lipid deuterium order parameters and lipid diffusion coefficients on nanosecond timescales that are very similar to the values for a membrane in pure water. In general, salt effects on the structural properties of a POPC bilayer in an aqueous sodium-chloride solution appear to be reproduced reasonably well by the new force-field description. An analysis of membrane-membrane disjoining pressure suggests that the smaller salt-induced change in area per lipid induced by the new force-field description is not due to the alteration of membrane-associated net charge, but must rather be understood as a consequence of ion-specific effects on the arrangement of lipid molecules.

  6. Precision tethered satellite attitude control. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kline-Schoder, Robert J.

    1990-01-01

    Tethered spacecraft possess unique dynamic characteristics which make them advantageous for certain classes of experiments. One use for which tethers are particularly well suited is to provide an isolated platform for spaceborne observatories. The advantages of tethering a pointing platform 1 or 2 km from a space shuttle or space station are that, compared to placing the observatory on the parent spacecraft, vibrational disturbances are attenuated and contamination is eliminated. In practice, all satellites have some requirement on the attitude control of the spacecraft, and tethered satellites are no exception. It has previously been shown that conventional means of performing attitude control for tethered satellites are insufficient for any mission with pointing requirements more stringent than about 1 deg. This is due mainly to the relatively large force applied by the tether to the spacecraft. A particularly effective method of implementing attitude control for tethered satellites is to use this tether tension force to generate control torques by moving the tether attach point relative to the subsatellite center of mass. A demonstration of this attitude control technique on an astrophysical pointing platform has been proposed for a space shuttle flight test project and is referred to as the Kinetic Isolation Tether Experiment (KITE).

  7. Model Answers to Lipid Membrane Questions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mouritsen, O. G.

    2011-01-01

    Ever since it was discovered that biological membranes have a core of a bimolecular sheet of lipid molecules, lipid bilayers have been a model laboratory for investigating physicochemical and functional properties of biological membranes. Experimental and theoretical models help the experimental ...... to pursue. Here we review some membrane models for lipid self-assembly, monolayers, bilayers, liposomes, and lipid-protein interactions and illustrate how such models can help answering questions in modern lipid cell biology....... scientist to plan experiments and interpret data. Theoretical models are the theoretical scientist's preferred toys to make contact between membrane theory and experiments. Most importantly, models serve to shape our intuition about which membrane questions are the more fundamental and relevant ones...

  8. Phase transition behaviors of the supported DPPC bilayer investigated by sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Heng-Liang; Tong, Yujin; Peng, Qiling; Li, Na; Ye, Shen

    2016-01-21

    The phase transition behaviors of a supported bilayer of dipalmitoylphosphatidyl-choline (DPPC) have been systematically evaluated by in situ sum frequency generation (SFG) vibrational spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy (AFM). By using an asymmetric bilayer composed of per-deuterated and per-protonated monolayers, i.e., DPPC-d75/DPPC and a symmetric bilayer of DPPC/DPPC, we were able to probe the molecular structural changes during the phase transition process of the lipid bilayer by SFG spectroscopy. It was found that the DPPC bilayer is sequentially melted from the top (adjacent to the solution) to bottom leaflet (adjacent to the substrate) over a wide temperature range. The conformational ordering of the supported bilayer does not decrease (even slightly increases) during the phase transition process. The conformational defects in the bilayer can be removed after the complete melting process. The phase transition enthalpy for the bottom leaflet was found to be approximately three times greater than that for the top leaflet, indicating a strong interaction of the lipids with the substrate. The present SFG and AFM observations revealed similar temperature dependent profiles. Based on these results, the temperature-induced structural changes in the supported lipid bilayer during its phase transition process are discussed in comparison with previous studies.

  9. Organization in lipid membranes containing cholesterol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veatch, Sarah L; Keller, Sarah L

    2002-12-23

    A fundamental attribute of raft formation in cell membranes is lateral separation of lipids into coexisting liquid phases. Using fluorescence microscopy, we observe spontaneous lateral separation in free-floating giant unilamellar vesicles. We record coexisting liquid domains over a range of composition and temperature significantly wider than previously reported. Furthermore, we establish correlations between miscibility in bilayers and in monolayers. For example, the same lipid mixtures that produce liquid domains in bilayer membranes produce two upper miscibility critical points in the phase diagrams of monolayers.

  10. Bending rigidities of surfactant bilayers using self-consistent field theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leermakers, F.A.M.

    2013-01-01

    Self-consistent field (SCF) theory is used to find bending moduli of surfactant and lipid bilayers. Recently, we successfully applied low-memory search methods to solve the SCF equations. Using these we are now able to directly evaluate the Gaussian bending modulus for molecularly detailed models of

  11. Statistical thermodynamics of association colloids : the equilibrium structure of micelles, vesicles, and bilayer membranes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leermakers, F.A.M.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to unravel the general equilibrium physical properties of lipid bilayer membranes. We consider four major questions:
    1. What determines the morphology of the association colloids (micelles, membranes, vesicles) in general?
    2. Do the

  12. Tethered constellation, their utilization as microgravity platforms and relevant features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napolitano, L. G.; Bevilacqua, F.

    1984-10-01

    The gravitational, thermal, and dynamic docking effects on tethered platforms were studied. The near-earth environment has gravitational effects such as g-jitters and intermittencies, g-noise, and frequency and amplitude features which may influence life science, materials processing, and fluid processes research and commercial activities. Artificial gravity is produced by minute accelerations imparted by tethers. The magnitudes of gravitational forces produced by tethers 100 and 100,000 m long at various altitudes from 463-35,786 km are calculated. Thermal analyses were performed for stainless steel and Kevlar tethers, showing the steel tether could vary 300 m in length and the polyamide 25 m during one orbit. Finally, consideration given to docking with a tethered platform revealed that the center of mass could change, which would produce, however, negligible changes in orbit and therefore gravity.

  13. Orbital oscillations of an elastic vertically-tethered satellite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanov, V. S.

    2011-10-01

    The motion of a satellite in a circular orbit with respect to its center of mass is considered. The satellite bears an elastic tether system unrolled along the local vertical. The load at the end of the tether oscillates harmonically. The satellite motion under the action of the gravitational moment and the moment due to the tether tension force is studied. The bifurcation diagram is constructed and the hetero- and homoclinic separatrix trajectories are determined. Mel'nikov's method is used to study the satellite chaotic behavior near separatrices under the action of the periodic tether tension force. The results of the present paper can be used to analyze tether systems of gravitational stabilization and to study the orbital behavior of a satellite with an unrolled tether system with respect to the satellite center of mass.

  14. Surface modification using peptide functionalized bilayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stroumpoulis, Dimitrios

    Engineering materials that are capable of supporting cell and tissue growth is a challenging task that involves identifying and incorporating biological signals into the material surfaces or scaffolds. One approach towards bioactivity in materials is to mimic the function of the extracellular matrix (ECM) by displaying adhesion promoting oligopeptides. Supported planar bilayers (SPB) are a good platform to study molecular interactions at interfaces, since transmembrane proteins and peptides can be incorporated in a biologically relevant environment with precise control over their concentration and presentation. SPBs can be formed on flat surfaces using the Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) technique or alternatively from vesicle solutions. The fusion of vesicles with solid substrates offers simplicity and enhanced bilayer deposition rates over the LB method, whereas it can also be used with convex and enclosed surfaces. Ellipsometry and a mass transport model were used to investigate the kinetics of SPB formation on silicon dioxide surfaces from 100 nm diameter 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glyce