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Sample records for testing general relativity

  1. Cosmological tests of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hut, P.

    1977-01-01

    It is stated that the general relativity theory could be tested on a cosmological scale by measuring the Hubble constant and the deceleration parameter, if, in addition, everything could be known about the matter filling the universe. If, on the other hand, nothing could be presupposed about the matter content of the universe general relativity could not be tested by measuring any number of time derivatives of the scale factor. But upon making the assumption of a universe filled with non-interacting mixture of non-relativistic matter and radiation general relativity can in principle be tested by measuring the first five derivatives of the scale factor. Some general relations are here presented using this assumption. (author)

  2. General Relativity: horizons for tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yatskiv, Ya. S.; Alexandrov, A. N.; Vavilova, I. B.; Zhdanov, V. I.; Zhuk, A. I.; Kudrya, Yu. N.; Parnovsky, S. L.; Fedorova, E. V.; Khmil, S. V.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical basis of the General Relativity Theory (GRT), its experimental tests as well as GRT applications are briefly summarized taking into account the results of the last decade. The monograph addresses scientists, post-graduated students, and students specialized in the natural sciences as well as everyone who takes an interest in GRT.

  3. Spacecraft Tests of General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, John D.

    1997-01-01

    Current spacecraft tests of general relativity depend on coherent radio tracking referred to atomic frequency standards at the ground stations. This paper addresses the possibility of improved tests using essentially the current system, but with the added possibility of a space-borne atomic clock. Outside of the obvious measurement of the gravitational frequency shift of the spacecraft clock, a successor to the suborbital flight of a Scout D rocket in 1976 (GP-A Project), other metric tests would benefit most directly by a possible improved sensitivity for the reduced coherent data. For purposes of illustration, two possible missions are discussed. The first is a highly eccentric Earth orbiter, and the second a solar-conjunction experiment to measure the Shapiro time delay using coherent Doppler data instead of the conventional ranging modulation.

  4. Testing general relativity on accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tigran Kalaydzhyan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Within the general theory of relativity, the curvature of spacetime is related to the energy and momentum of the present matter and radiation. One of the more specific predictions of general relativity is the deflection of light and particle trajectories in the gravitational field of massive objects. Bending angles for electromagnetic waves and light in particular were measured with a high precision. However, the effect of gravity on relativistic massive particles was never studied experimentally. Here we propose and analyze experiments devoted to that purpose. We demonstrate a high sensitivity of the laser Compton scattering at high energy accelerators to the effects of gravity. The main observable – maximal energy of the scattered photons – would experience a significant shift in the ambient gravitational field even for otherwise negligible violation of the equivalence principle. We confirm predictions of general relativity for ultrarelativistic electrons of energy of tens of GeV at a current level of resolution and expect our work to be a starting point of further high-precision studies on current and future accelerators, such as PETRA, European XFEL and ILC.

  5. Black hole based tests of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yagi, Kent; Stein, Leo C

    2016-01-01

    General relativity has passed all solar system experiments and neutron star based tests, such as binary pulsar observations, with flying colors. A more exotic arena for testing general relativity is in systems that contain one or more black holes. Black holes are the most compact objects in the Universe, providing probes of the strongest-possible gravitational fields. We are motivated to study strong-field gravity since many theories give large deviations from general relativity only at large field strengths, while recovering the weak-field behavior. In this article, we review how one can probe general relativity and various alternative theories of gravity by using electromagnetic waves from a black hole with an accretion disk, and gravitational waves from black hole binaries. We first review model-independent ways of testing gravity with electromagnetic/gravitational waves from a black hole system. We then focus on selected examples of theories that extend general relativity in rather simple ways. Some important characteristics of general relativity include (but are not limited to) (i) only tensor gravitational degrees of freedom, (ii) the graviton is massless, (iii) no quadratic or higher curvatures in the action, and (iv) the theory is four-dimensional. Altering a characteristic leads to a different extension of general relativity: (i) scalar–tensor theories, (ii) massive gravity theories, (iii) quadratic gravity, and (iv) theories with large extra dimensions. Within each theory, we describe black hole solutions, their properties, and current and projected constraints on each theory using black hole based tests of gravity. We close this review by listing some of the open problems in model-independent tests and within each specific theory. (paper)

  6. Testing General Relativity with Pulsar Timing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stairs Ingrid H.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulsars of very different types, including isolated objects and binaries (with short- and long-period orbits, and white-dwarf and neutron-star companions provide the means to test both the predictions of general relativity and the viability of alternate theories of gravity. This article presents an overview of pulsars, then discusses the current status of and future prospects for tests of equivalence-principle violations and strong-field gravitational experiments.

  7. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Adams, T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, C.; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, D. A.; Brown, D. D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Calderón Bustillo, J.; Callister, T.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Casanueva Diaz, J.; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglià, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Cerboni Baiardi, L.; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Q.; Chua, S.; Chung, S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P.-F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, C. A.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J.-P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; DeBra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De Laurentis, M.; Deléglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.; De Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Díaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Di Giovanni, M.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H.-B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M.; Fournier, J.-D.; Franco, S.; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; González, G.; Gonzalez Castro, J. M.; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Hall, B. R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C.-J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J.-M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jiménez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W. W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, D. I.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, M. K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kéfélian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan, S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, K.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.-M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Królak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C. H.; Lee, H. K.; Lee, H. M.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lück, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magaña-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Márka, S.; Márka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R. M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B. C.; Moore, C. J.; Moraru, D.; Moreno, G.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P. G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J. J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Pürrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosińska, D.; Rowan, S.; Rüdiger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.; Sachdev, S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J.; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schönbeck, A.; Schreiber, E.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, S. M.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, A. D.; Simakov, D.; Singer, A.; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, J. R.; Smith, N. D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepańczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Tápai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Töyrä, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifirò, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; van Bakel, N.; van Beuzekom, M.; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasúth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P. J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J.-Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, M.; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L.-W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.; Weßels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.; Williams, R. D.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J. L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; ZadroŻny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J.-P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Campanelli, M.; Hemberger, D. A.; Kidder, L. E.; Ossokine, S.; Scheel, M. A.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.; LIGO Scientific; Virgo Collaborations

    2016-06-01

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large-velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We carry out several investigations to determine whether GW150914 is consistent with a binary black-hole merger in general relativity. We find that the final remnant's mass and spin, as determined from the low-frequency (inspiral) and high-frequency (postinspiral) phases of the signal, are mutually consistent with the binary black-hole solution in general relativity. Furthermore, the data following the peak of GW150914 are consistent with the least-damped quasinormal mode inferred from the mass and spin of the remnant black hole. By using waveform models that allow for parametrized general-relativity violations during the inspiral and merger phases, we perform quantitative tests on the gravitational-wave phase in the dynamical regime and we determine the first empirical bounds on several high-order post-Newtonian coefficients. We constrain the graviton Compton wavelength, assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum in the same way as particles with mass, obtaining a 90%-confidence lower bound of 1013 km . In conclusion, within our statistical uncertainties, we find no evidence for violations of general relativity in the genuinely strong-field regime of gravity.

  8. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, B P; Abbott, R; Abbott, T D; Abernathy, M R; Acernese, F; Ackley, K; Adams, C; Adams, T; Addesso, P; Adhikari, R X; Adya, V B; Affeldt, C; Agathos, M; Agatsuma, K; Aggarwal, N; Aguiar, O D; Aiello, L; Ain, A; Ajith, P; Allen, B; Allocca, A; Altin, P A; Anderson, S B; Anderson, W G; Arai, K; Araya, M C; Arceneaux, C C; Areeda, J S; Arnaud, N; Arun, K G; Ascenzi, S; Ashton, G; Ast, M; Aston, S M; Astone, P; Aufmuth, P; Aulbert, C; Babak, S; Bacon, P; Bader, M K M; Baker, P T; Baldaccini, F; Ballardin, G; Ballmer, S W; Barayoga, J C; Barclay, S E; Barish, B C; Barker, D; Barone, F; Barr, B; Barsotti, L; Barsuglia, M; Barta, D; Bartlett, J; Bartos, I; Bassiri, R; Basti, A; Batch, J C; Baune, C; Bavigadda, V; Bazzan, M; Behnke, B; Bejger, M; Bell, A S; Bell, C J; Berger, B K; Bergman, J; Bergmann, G; Berry, C P L; Bersanetti, D; Bertolini, A; Betzwieser, J; Bhagwat, S; Bhandare, R; Bilenko, I A; Billingsley, G; Birch, J; Birney, R; Birnholtz, O; Biscans, S; Bisht, A; Bitossi, M; Biwer, C; Bizouard, M A; Blackburn, J K; Blair, C D; Blair, D G; Blair, R M; Bloemen, S; Bock, O; Bodiya, T P; Boer, M; Bogaert, G; Bogan, C; Bohe, A; Bojtos, P; Bond, C; Bondu, F; Bonnand, R; Boom, B A; Bork, R; Boschi, V; Bose, S; Bouffanais, Y; Bozzi, A; Bradaschia, C; Brady, P R; Braginsky, V B; Branchesi, M; Brau, J E; Briant, T; Brillet, A; Brinkmann, M; Brisson, V; Brockill, P; Brooks, A F; Brown, D A; Brown, D D; Brown, N M; Buchanan, C C; Buikema, A; Bulik, T; Bulten, H J; Buonanno, A; Buskulic, D; Buy, C; Byer, R L; Cadonati, L; Cagnoli, G; Cahillane, C; Calderón Bustillo, J; Callister, T; Calloni, E; Camp, J B; Cannon, K C; Cao, J; Capano, C D; Capocasa, E; Carbognani, F; Caride, S; Casanueva Diaz, J; Casentini, C; Caudill, S; Cavaglià, M; Cavalier, F; Cavalieri, R; Cella, G; Cepeda, C B; Cerboni Baiardi, L; Cerretani, G; Cesarini, E; Chakraborty, R; Chalermsongsak, T; Chamberlin, S J; Chan, M; Chao, S; Charlton, P; Chassande-Mottin, E; Chen, H Y; Chen, Y; Cheng, C; Chincarini, A; Chiummo, A; Cho, H S; Cho, M; Chow, J H; Christensen, N; Chu, Q; Chua, S; Chung, S; Ciani, G; Clara, F; Clark, J A; Cleva, F; Coccia, E; Cohadon, P-F; Colla, A; Collette, C G; Cominsky, L; Constancio, M; Conte, A; Conti, L; Cook, D; Corbitt, T R; Cornish, N; Corsi, A; Cortese, S; Costa, C A; Coughlin, M W; Coughlin, S B; Coulon, J-P; Countryman, S T; Couvares, P; Cowan, E E; Coward, D M; Cowart, M J; Coyne, D C; Coyne, R; Craig, K; Creighton, J D E; Cripe, J; Crowder, S G; Cumming, A; Cunningham, L; Cuoco, E; Dal Canton, T; Danilishin, S L; D'Antonio, S; Danzmann, K; Darman, N S; Dattilo, V; Dave, I; Daveloza, H P; Davier, M; Davies, G S; Daw, E J; Day, R; DeBra, D; Debreczeni, G; Degallaix, J; De Laurentis, M; Deléglise, S; Del Pozzo, W; Denker, T; Dent, T; Dereli, H; Dergachev, V; De Rosa, R; DeRosa, R T; DeSalvo, R; Dhurandhar, S; Díaz, M C; Di Fiore, L; Di Giovanni, M; Di Lieto, A; Di Pace, S; Di Palma, I; Di Virgilio, A; Dojcinoski, G; Dolique, V; Donovan, F; Dooley, K L; Doravari, S; Douglas, R; Downes, T P; Drago, M; Drever, R W P; Driggers, J C; Du, Z; Ducrot, M; Dwyer, S E; Edo, T B; Edwards, M C; Effler, A; Eggenstein, H-B; Ehrens, P; Eichholz, J; Eikenberry, S S; Engels, W; Essick, R C; Etzel, T; Evans, M; Evans, T M; Everett, R; Factourovich, M; Fafone, V; Fair, H; Fairhurst, S; Fan, X; Fang, Q; Farinon, S; Farr, B; Farr, W M; Favata, M; Fays, M; Fehrmann, H; Fejer, M M; Ferrante, I; Ferreira, E C; Ferrini, F; Fidecaro, F; Fiori, I; Fiorucci, D; Fisher, R P; Flaminio, R; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J-D; Franco, S; Frasca, S; Frasconi, F; Frei, Z; Freise, A; Frey, R; Frey, V; Fricke, T T; Fritschel, P; Frolov, V V; Fulda, P; Fyffe, M; Gabbard, H A G; Gair, J R; Gammaitoni, L; Gaonkar, S G; Garufi, F; Gatto, A; Gaur, G; Gehrels, N; Gemme, G; Gendre, B; Genin, E; Gennai, A; George, J; Gergely, L; Germain, V; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S; Giaime, J A; Giardina, K D; Giazotto, A; Gill, K; Glaefke, A; Goetz, E; Goetz, R; Gondan, L; González, G; Gonzalez Castro, J M; Gopakumar, A; Gordon, N A; Gorodetsky, M L; Gossan, S E; Gosselin, M; Gouaty, R; Graef, C; Graff, P B; Granata, M; Grant, A; Gras, S; Gray, C; Greco, G; Green, A C; Groot, P; Grote, H; Grunewald, S; Guidi, G M; Guo, X; Gupta, A; Gupta, M K; Gushwa, K E; Gustafson, E K; Gustafson, R; Hacker, J J; Hall, B R; Hall, E D; Hammond, G; Haney, M; Hanke, M M; Hanks, J; Hanna, C; Hannam, M D; Hanson, J; Hardwick, T; Harms, J; Harry, G M; Harry, I W; Hart, M J; Hartman, M T; Haster, C-J; Haughian, K; Healy, J; Heidmann, A; Heintze, M C; Heitmann, H; Hello, P; Hemming, G; Hendry, M; Heng, I S; Hennig, J; Heptonstall, A W; Heurs, M; Hild, S; Hoak, D; Hodge, K A; Hofman, D; Hollitt, S E; Holt, K; Holz, D E; Hopkins, P; Hosken, D J; Hough, J; Houston, E A; Howell, E J; Hu, Y M; Huang, S; Huerta, E A; Huet, D; Hughey, B; Husa, S; Huttner, S H; Huynh-Dinh, T; Idrisy, A; Indik, N; Ingram, D R; Inta, R; Isa, H N; Isac, J-M; Isi, M; Islas, G; Isogai, T; Iyer, B R; Izumi, K; Jacqmin, T; Jang, H; Jani, K; Jaranowski, P; Jawahar, S; Jiménez-Forteza, F; Johnson, W W; Johnson-McDaniel, N K; Jones, D I; Jones, R; Jonker, R J G; Ju, L; Haris, M K; Kalaghatgi, C V; Kalogera, V; Kandhasamy, S; Kang, G; Kanner, J B; Karki, S; Kasprzack, M; Katsavounidis, E; Katzman, W; Kaufer, S; Kaur, T; Kawabe, K; Kawazoe, F; Kéfélian, F; Kehl, M S; Keitel, D; Kelley, D B; Kells, W; Kennedy, R; Key, J S; Khalaidovski, A; Khalili, F Y; Khan, I; Khan, S; Khan, Z; Khazanov, E A; Kijbunchoo, N; Kim, C; Kim, J; Kim, K; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y-M; King, E J; King, P J; Kinzel, D L; Kissel, J S; Kleybolte, L; Klimenko, S; Koehlenbeck, S M; Kokeyama, K; Koley, S; Kondrashov, V; Kontos, A; Korobko, M; Korth, W Z; Kowalska, I; Kozak, D B; Kringel, V; Krishnan, B; Królak, A; Krueger, C; Kuehn, G; Kumar, P; Kuo, L; Kutynia, A; Lackey, B D; Landry, M; Lange, J; Lantz, B; Lasky, P D; Lazzarini, A; Lazzaro, C; Leaci, P; Leavey, S; Lebigot, E O; Lee, C H; Lee, H K; Lee, H M; Lee, K; Lenon, A; Leonardi, M; Leong, J R; Leroy, N; Letendre, N; Levin, Y; Levine, B M; Li, T G F; Libson, A; Littenberg, T B; Lockerbie, N A; Logue, J; Lombardi, A L; London, L T; Lord, J E; Lorenzini, M; Loriette, V; Lormand, M; Losurdo, G; Lough, J D; Lousto, C O; Lovelace, G; Lück, H; Lundgren, A P; Luo, J; Lynch, R; Ma, Y; MacDonald, T; Machenschalk, B; MacInnis, M; Macleod, D M; Magaña-Sandoval, F; Magee, R M; Mageswaran, M; Majorana, E; Maksimovic, I; Malvezzi, V; Man, N; Mandel, I; Mandic, V; Mangano, V; Mansell, G L; Manske, M; Mantovani, M; Marchesoni, F; Marion, F; Márka, S; Márka, Z; Markosyan, A S; Maros, E; Martelli, F; Martellini, L; Martin, I W; Martin, R M; Martynov, D V; Marx, J N; Mason, K; Masserot, A; Massinger, T J; Masso-Reid, M; Matichard, F; Matone, L; Mavalvala, N; Mazumder, N; Mazzolo, G; McCarthy, R; McClelland, D E; McCormick, S; McGuire, S C; McIntyre, G; McIver, J; McManus, D J; McWilliams, S T; Meacher, D; Meadors, G D; Meidam, J; Melatos, A; Mendell, G; Mendoza-Gandara, D; Mercer, R A; Merilh, E; Merzougui, M; Meshkov, S; Messenger, C; Messick, C; Meyers, P M; Mezzani, F; Miao, H; Michel, C; Middleton, H; Mikhailov, E E; Milano, L; Miller, J; Millhouse, M; Minenkov, Y; Ming, J; Mirshekari, S; Mishra, C; Mitra, S; Mitrofanov, V P; Mitselmakher, G; Mittleman, R; Moggi, A; Mohan, M; Mohapatra, S R P; Montani, M; Moore, B C; Moore, C J; Moraru, D; Moreno, G; Morriss, S R; Mossavi, K; Mours, B; Mow-Lowry, C M; Mueller, C L; Mueller, G; Muir, A W; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, D; Mukherjee, S; Mukund, N; Mullavey, A; Munch, J; Murphy, D J; Murray, P G; Mytidis, A; Nardecchia, I; Naticchioni, L; Nayak, R K; Necula, V; Nedkova, K; Nelemans, G; Neri, M; Neunzert, A; Newton, G; Nguyen, T T; Nielsen, A B; Nissanke, S; Nitz, A; Nocera, F; Nolting, D; Normandin, M E; Nuttall, L K; Oberling, J; Ochsner, E; O'Dell, J; Oelker, E; Ogin, G H; Oh, J J; Oh, S H; Ohme, F; Oliver, M; Oppermann, P; Oram, Richard J; O'Reilly, B; O'Shaughnessy, R; Ottaway, D J; Ottens, R S; Overmier, H; Owen, B J; Pai, A; Pai, S A; Palamos, J R; Palashov, O; Palomba, C; Pal-Singh, A; Pan, H; Pan, Y; Pankow, C; Pannarale, F; Pant, B C; Paoletti, F; Paoli, A; Papa, M A; Paris, H R; Parker, W; Pascucci, D; Pasqualetti, A; Passaquieti, R; Passuello, D; Patricelli, B; Patrick, Z; Pearlstone, B L; Pedraza, M; Pedurand, R; Pekowsky, L; Pele, A; Penn, S; Perreca, A; Pfeiffer, H P; Phelps, M; Piccinni, O; Pichot, M; Piergiovanni, F; Pierro, V; Pillant, G; Pinard, L; Pinto, I M; Pitkin, M; Poggiani, R; Popolizio, P; Post, A; Powell, J; Prasad, J; Predoi, V; Premachandra, S S; Prestegard, T; Price, L R; Prijatelj, M; Principe, M; Privitera, S; Prix, R; Prodi, G A; Prokhorov, L; Puncken, O; Punturo, M; Puppo, P; Pürrer, M; Qi, H; Qin, J; Quetschke, V; Quintero, E A; Quitzow-James, R; Raab, F J; Rabeling, D S; Radkins, H; Raffai, P; Raja, S; Rakhmanov, M; Rapagnani, P; Raymond, V; Razzano, M; Re, V; Read, J; Reed, C M; Regimbau, T; Rei, L; Reid, S; Reitze, D H; Rew, H; Reyes, S D; Ricci, F; Riles, K; Robertson, N A; Robie, R; Robinet, F; Rocchi, A; Rolland, L; Rollins, J G; Roma, V J; Romano, R; Romanov, G; Romie, J H; Rosińska, D; Rowan, S; Rüdiger, A; Ruggi, P; Ryan, K; Sachdev, S; Sadecki, T; Sadeghian, L; Salconi, L; Saleem, M; Salemi, F; Samajdar, A; Sammut, L; Sanchez, E J; Sandberg, V; Sandeen, B; Sanders, J R; Sassolas, B; Sathyaprakash, B S; Saulson, P R; Sauter, O; Savage, R L; Sawadsky, A; Schale, P; Schilling, R; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P; Schnabel, R; Schofield, R M S; Schönbeck, A; Schreiber, E; Schuette, D; Schutz, B F; Scott, J; Scott, S M; Sellers, D; Sengupta, A S; Sentenac, D; Sequino, V; Sergeev, A; Serna, G; Setyawati, Y; Sevigny, A; Shaddock, D A; Shah, S; Shahriar, M S; Shaltev, M; Shao, Z; Shapiro, B; Shawhan, P; Sheperd, A; Shoemaker, D H; Shoemaker, D M; Siellez, K; Siemens, X; Sigg, D; Silva, A D; Simakov, D; Singer, A; Singer, L P; Singh, A; Singh, R; Singhal, A; Sintes, A M; Slagmolen, B J J; Smith, J R; Smith, N D; Smith, R J E; Son, E J; Sorazu, B; Sorrentino, F; Souradeep, T; Srivastava, A K; Staley, A; Steinke, M; Steinlechner, J; Steinlechner, S; Steinmeyer, D; Stephens, B C; Stone, R; Strain, K A; Straniero, N; Stratta, G; Strauss, N A; Strigin, S; Sturani, R; Stuver, A L; Summerscales, T Z; Sun, L; Sutton, P J; Swinkels, B L; Szczepańczyk, M J; Tacca, M; Talukder, D; Tanner, D B; Tápai, M; Tarabrin, S P; Taracchini, A; Taylor, R; Theeg, T; Thirugnanasambandam, M P; Thomas, E G; Thomas, M; Thomas, P; Thorne, K A; Thorne, K S; Thrane, E; Tiwari, S; Tiwari, V; Tokmakov, K V; Tomlinson, C; Tonelli, M; Torres, C V; Torrie, C I; Töyrä, D; Travasso, F; Traylor, G; Trifirò, D; Tringali, M C; Trozzo, L; Tse, M; Turconi, M; Tuyenbayev, D; Ugolini, D; Unnikrishnan, C S; Urban, A L; Usman, S A; Vahlbruch, H; Vajente, G; Valdes, G; Vallisneri, M; van Bakel, N; van Beuzekom, M; van den Brand, J F J; Van Den Broeck, C; Vander-Hyde, D C; van der Schaaf, L; van Heijningen, J V; van Veggel, A A; Vardaro, M; Vass, S; Vasúth, M; Vaulin, R; Vecchio, A; Vedovato, G; Veitch, J; Veitch, P J; Venkateswara, K; Verkindt, D; Vetrano, F; Viceré, A; Vinciguerra, S; Vine, D J; Vinet, J-Y; Vitale, S; Vo, T; Vocca, H; Vorvick, C; Voss, D; Vousden, W D; Vyatchanin, S P; Wade, A R; Wade, L E; Wade, M; Walker, M; Wallace, L; Walsh, S; Wang, G; Wang, H; Wang, M; Wang, X; Wang, Y; Ward, R L; Warner, J; Was, M; Weaver, B; Wei, L-W; Weinert, M; Weinstein, A J; Weiss, R; Welborn, T; Wen, L; Weßels, P; Westphal, T; Wette, K; Whelan, J T; White, D J; Whiting, B F; Williams, D; Williams, R D; Williamson, A R; Willis, J L; Willke, B; Wimmer, M H; Winkler, W; Wipf, C C; Wittel, H; Woan, G; Worden, J; Wright, J L; Wu, G; Yablon, J; Yam, W; Yamamoto, H; Yancey, C C; Yap, M J; Yu, H; Yvert, M; Zadrożny, A; Zangrando, L; Zanolin, M; Zendri, J-P; Zevin, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, M; Zhang, Y; Zhao, C; Zhou, M; Zhou, Z; Zhu, X J; Zucker, M E; Zuraw, S E; Zweizig, J; Boyle, M; Campanelli, M; Hemberger, D A; Kidder, L E; Ossokine, S; Scheel, M A; Szilagyi, B; Teukolsky, S; Zlochower, Y

    2016-06-03

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large-velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We carry out several investigations to determine whether GW150914 is consistent with a binary black-hole merger in general relativity. We find that the final remnant's mass and spin, as determined from the low-frequency (inspiral) and high-frequency (postinspiral) phases of the signal, are mutually consistent with the binary black-hole solution in general relativity. Furthermore, the data following the peak of GW150914 are consistent with the least-damped quasinormal mode inferred from the mass and spin of the remnant black hole. By using waveform models that allow for parametrized general-relativity violations during the inspiral and merger phases, we perform quantitative tests on the gravitational-wave phase in the dynamical regime and we determine the first empirical bounds on several high-order post-Newtonian coefficients. We constrain the graviton Compton wavelength, assuming that gravitons are dispersed in vacuum in the same way as particles with mass, obtaining a 90%-confidence lower bound of 10^{13}  km. In conclusion, within our statistical uncertainties, we find no evidence for violations of general relativity in the genuinely strong-field regime of gravity.

  9. A precise extragalactic test of General Relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collett, Thomas E; Oldham, Lindsay J; Smith, Russell J; Auger, Matthew W; Westfall, Kyle B; Bacon, David; Nichol, Robert C; Masters, Karen L; Koyama, Kazuya; van den Bosch, Remco

    2018-06-22

    Einstein's theory of gravity, General Relativity, has been precisely tested on Solar System scales, but the long-range nature of gravity is still poorly constrained. The nearby strong gravitational lens ESO 325-G004 provides a laboratory to probe the weak-field regime of gravity and measure the spatial curvature generated per unit mass, γ. By reconstructing the observed light profile of the lensed arcs and the observed spatially resolved stellar kinematics with a single self-consistent model, we conclude that γ = 0.97 ± 0.09 at 68% confidence. Our result is consistent with the prediction of 1 from General Relativity and provides a strong extragalactic constraint on the weak-field metric of gravity. Copyright © 2018 The Authors, some rights reserved; exclusive licensee American Association for the Advancement of Science. No claim to original U.S. Government Works.

  10. Dynamics of relative motion of test particles in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazanski, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    Several variational principles which lead to the first and the second geodesic deviation equations, recently formulated by the author and used for the description of the relative motion of test particles in general relativity are presented. Relations between these principles are investigated and exhibited. The Hamilton-Jacobi equation is also studied for these generalized deviations and the conservation laws appearing here are discussed

  11. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abernathy, M. R.; Adhikari, R. X.; Anderson, S. B.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barish, B. C.; Berger, B. K.; Billingsley, G.; Blackburn, J. K.; Bork, R.; Brooks, A. F.; Cahillane, C.

    2016-01-01

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large-velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We carry out several investigations to determine whether GW150914 is consistent with a binary black-hole merger in general relativity. We find that the final remnant’s mass and spin, as determined fro...

  12. Kinematics of relative motion of test particles in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bazanski, S.L.

    1977-01-01

    A detailed mathematical study of the concept of geodesic deviation in pseudo-riemannian geometry is presented. A generalization of this concept to geodesic deviations of a higher order is then introduced and the second geodesic deviation is investigated in some detail. A geometric interpretation of the set of generalized geodesic deviations is given and applied in general relativity to determine a covariant and local description (with a desired order of accuracy) of test motions which take place in a certain finite neighbourhood of a given world line of an observer. The proper time evolution of two other objects related to geodesic deviation is also discussed: the space separation vector and the telescopic vector. This last name is given here to a field of null vectors along observer's world line which always point towards the same adjacent world line. The telescopic equations allow to determine the evolution of the frequency shift of electromagnetic radiation sent from and received on neighbouring world lines. On the basis of these equations also certain relations have been derived which connect the frequencies or frequency shifts with the curvature of space-time

  13. Experimental tests of general relativity: recent progress and future directions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turyshev, S G

    2009-01-01

    Einstein's general theory of relativity is the standard theory of gravity, especially where the needs of astronomy, astrophysics, cosmology, and fundamental physics are concerned. As such, this theory is used for many practical purposes involving spacecraft navigation, geodesy, and time transfer. We review the foundations of general relativity, discuss recent progress in tests of relativistic gravity, and present motivations for the new generation of high-accuracy tests of new physics beyond general relativity. Space-based experiments in fundamental physics are presently capable of uniquely addressing important questions related to the fundamental laws of nature. We discuss the advances in our understanding of fundamental physics that are anticipated in the near future and evaluate the discovery potential of a number of recently proposed space-based gravitational experiments. (reviews of topical problems)

  14. Test theories of special relativity: a general critique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maciel, A.K.A.; Tiomno, J.

    1988-01-01

    Absolute Spacetime Theories conceived for the purpose of testing Special Relativity (SR) are reviewed. It is found that most theories proposed were in fact SR in different coordinate systems, since in general no specific SR violations were introduced. Models based on possible SR violating mechanisms are considered. Misconceptions in recently published papers are examined. (author) [pt

  15. Generalization of the test theory of relativity to noninertial frames

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abolghasem, G.H.; Khajehpour, M.R.H.; Mansouri, R.

    1988-08-01

    We present a generalized test theory of special relativity, using a noninertial frame. Within the framework of the special theory of relativity the transport- and Einstein-synchronizations are equivalent on a rigidly rotating disk. But in any theory with a preferred frame such an equivalence does not hold. The time difference resulting from the two synchronization procedures is a measurable quantity within the reach of existing clock systems on the earth. The final result contains a term which depends on the angular velocity of the rotating system, and hence measures an absolute effect. This term is of crucial importance in our test theory of the special relativity. (author). 13 refs

  16. Tests of general relativity from timing the double pulsar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, M; Stairs, I H; Manchester, R N; McLaughlin, M A; Lyne, A G; Ferdman, R D; Burgay, M; Lorimer, D R; Possenti, A; D'Amico, N; Sarkissian, J M; Hobbs, G B; Reynolds, J E; Freire, P C C; Camilo, F

    2006-10-06

    The double pulsar system PSR J0737-3039A/B is unique in that both neutron stars are detectable as radio pulsars. They are also known to have much higher mean orbital velocities and accelerations than those of other binary pulsars. The system is therefore a good candidate for testing Einstein's theory of general relativity and alternative theories of gravity in the strong-field regime. We report on precision timing observations taken over the 2.5 years since its discovery and present four independent strong-field tests of general relativity. These tests use the theory-independent mass ratio of the two stars. By measuring relativistic corrections to the Keplerian description of the orbital motion, we find that the "post-Keplerian" parameter s agrees with the value predicted by general relativity within an uncertainty of 0.05%, the most precise test yet obtained. We also show that the transverse velocity of the system's center of mass is extremely small. Combined with the system's location near the Sun, this result suggests that future tests of gravitational theories with the double pulsar will supersede the best current solar system tests. It also implies that the second-born pulsar may not have formed through the core collapse of a helium star, as is usually assumed.

  17. Testing general relativity at cosmological scales: Implementation and parameter correlations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dossett, Jason N.; Ishak, Mustapha; Moldenhauer, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    The testing of general relativity at cosmological scales has become a possible and timely endeavor that is not only motivated by the pressing question of cosmic acceleration but also by the proposals of some extensions to general relativity that would manifest themselves at large scales of distance. We analyze here correlations between modified gravity growth parameters and some core cosmological parameters using the latest cosmological data sets including the refined Cosmic Evolution Survey 3D weak lensing. We provide the parametrized modified growth equations and their evolution. We implement known functional and binning approaches, and propose a new hybrid approach to evolve the modified gravity parameters in redshift (time) and scale. The hybrid parametrization combines a binned redshift dependence and a smooth evolution in scale avoiding a jump in the matter power spectrum. The formalism developed to test the consistency of current and future data with general relativity is implemented in a package that we make publicly available and call ISiTGR (Integrated Software in Testing General Relativity), an integrated set of modified modules for the publicly available packages CosmoMC and CAMB, including a modified version of the integrated Sachs-Wolfe-galaxy cross correlation module of Ho et al. and a new weak-lensing likelihood module for the refined Hubble Space Telescope Cosmic Evolution Survey weak gravitational lensing tomography data. We obtain parameter constraints and correlation coefficients finding that modified gravity parameters are significantly correlated with σ 8 and mildly correlated with Ω m , for all evolution methods. The degeneracies between σ 8 and modified gravity parameters are found to be substantial for the functional form and also for some specific bins in the hybrid and binned methods indicating that these degeneracies will need to be taken into consideration when using future high precision data.

  18. A superconducting gyroscope to test Einstein's general theory of relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C. W. F.

    1978-01-01

    Schiff (1960) proposed a new test of general relativity based on measuring the precessions of the spin axes of gyroscopes in earth orbit. Since 1963 a Stanford research team has been developing an experiment to measure the two effects calculated by Schiff. The gyroscope consists of a uniform sphere of fused quartz 38 mm in diameter, coated with superconductor, electrically suspended and spinning at about 170 Hz in vacuum. The paper describes the proposed flight apparatus and the current state of development of the gyroscope, including techniques for manufacturing and measuring the gyro rotor and housing, generating ultralow magnetic fields, and mechanizing the readout.

  19. Ambiguous tests of general relativity on cosmological scales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zuntz, Joe; Baker, Tessa; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Skordis, Constantinos

    2012-01-01

    There are a number of approaches to testing General Relativity (GR) on linear scales using parameterized frameworks for modifying cosmological perturbation theory. It is sometimes assumed that the details of any given parameterization are unimportant if one uses it as a diagnostic for deviations from GR. In this brief report we argue that this is not necessarily so. First we show that adopting alternative combinations of modifications to the field equations significantly changes the constraints that one obtains. In addition, we show that using a parameterization with insufficient freedom significantly tightens the apparent theoretical constraints. Fundamentally we argue that it is almost never appropriate to consider modifications to the perturbed Einstein equations as being constraints on the effective gravitational constant, for example, in the same sense that solar system constraints are. The only consistent modifications are either those that grant near-total freedom, as in decomposition methods, or ones which map directly to a particular part of theory space

  20. Astrometric tests of General Relativity in the Solar system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gai, M; Vecchiato, A; Riva, A; Lattanzi, M G; Sozzetti, A; Crosta, M T; Busonero, D

    2014-01-01

    Micro-arcsec astronomy is able to verify the predictions of theoretical models of gravitation at a level adequate to constraint relevant parameters and select among different formulations. In particular, this concerns the weak field limit applicable to the Sun neighborhood, where competing models can be expressed in a common framework as the Parametrised Post-Newtonian and Parametrised Post-Post-Newtonian formulations. The mission Gaia is going to provide an unprecedented determination of the γ PPN parameter at the 10 −6 level. Other recently proposed concepts, as GAME, may improve the precision on γ by one or two orders of magnitude and provide constraints on other crucial phenomenological aspects. We review the key concepts of astrometric tests of General Relativity and discuss a possible development scenario

  1. OPTIS - A satellite test of Special and General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dittus, H.; Lämmerzahl, C.; Peters, A.; Schiller, S.

    OPTIS has been proposed as a small satellite platform in a high elliptical orbit (apogee 40,000 km, perigee 10,000 km) and is designed for high precision tests of foundations of Special and General Relativity. The experimental set-up consists of two ultrastable Nd:YAG lasers, two crossed optical resonators (monolithic cavities), an atomic clock, and an optical comb generator. OPTIS enables (1) a Michelson- Morley experiment to test the isotropy of light propagation (constancy of light speed, dc/c) with an accuracy of 1 part in 101 8 , (2) a Kennedey-Thorndike experiment to measure the independence of the light speed from the velocity of the laboratory in the order of 1 part in 101 6 , and (3) a test of the gravitational red shift by comparing the atomic clock and an optical clock on a precision level of 1 part in 104 . To avoid any influence from atmospheric drag, solar radiation, or earth albedo, the satellite needs drag free control, to depress the residual acceleration down to 10-14 m/s 2 in the frequency range between 100 to 1,000 Hz, and thermal control to stabilize the cavity temperature variation, dT/T, to 1 part in 107 during 100 s and to 1 part in 105 during 1 orbit.

  2. General relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kenyon, I.R.

    1990-01-01

    General relativity is discussed in this book at a level appropriate to undergraduate students of physics and astronomy. It describes concepts and experimental results, and provides a succinct account of the formalism. A brief review of special relativity is followed by a discussion of the equivalence principle and its implications. Other topics covered include the concepts of curvature and the Schwarzschild metric, test of the general theory, black holes and their properties, gravitational radiation and methods for its detection, the impact of general relativity on cosmology, and the continuing search for a quantum theory of gravity. (author)

  3. A Time Domain Waveform for Testing General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huwyler, Cédric; Jetzer, Philippe; Porter, Edward K

    2015-01-01

    Gravitational-wave parameter estimation is only as good as the theory the waveform generation models are based upon. It is therefore crucial to test General Relativity (GR) once data becomes available. Many previous works, such as studies connected with the ppE framework by Yunes and Pretorius, rely on the stationary phase approximation (SPA) to model deviations from GR in the frequency domain. As Fast Fourier Transform algorithms have become considerably faster and in order to circumvent possible problems with the SPA, we test GR with corrected time domain waveforms instead of SPA waveforms. Since a considerable amount of work has been done already in the field using SPA waveforms, we establish a connection between leading-order-corrected waveforms in time and frequency domain, concentrating on phase-only corrected terms. In a Markov Chain Monte Carlo study, whose results are preliminary and will only be available later, we will assess the ability of the eLISA detector to measure deviations from GR for signals coming from supermassive black hole inspirals using these corrected waveforms. (paper)

  4. Testing General Relativity Using Gravitational-Wave Observations

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Coalescence of binary black holes. 4. Post-Newtonian theory. BH perturbation theory. Numerical. Relativity. Inspiral. Merger Ring down. (Pic. K. Thorne). First opportunity to test Einstein's theory in the highly relativistic regime.

  5. Comparison of Einstein-Boltzmann solvers for testing general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellini, E.; Barreira, A.; Frusciante, N.; Hu, B.; Peirone, S.; Raveri, M.; Zumalacárregui, M.; Avilez-Lopez, A.; Ballardini, M.; Battye, R. A.; Bolliet, B.; Calabrese, E.; Dirian, Y.; Ferreira, P. G.; Finelli, F.; Huang, Z.; Ivanov, M. M.; Lesgourgues, J.; Li, B.; Lima, N. A.; Pace, F.; Paoletti, D.; Sawicki, I.; Silvestri, A.; Skordis, C.; Umiltà, C.; Vernizzi, F.

    2018-01-01

    We compare Einstein-Boltzmann solvers that include modifications to general relativity and find that, for a wide range of models and parameters, they agree to a high level of precision. We look at three general purpose codes that primarily model general scalar-tensor theories, three codes that model Jordan-Brans-Dicke (JBD) gravity, a code that models f (R ) gravity, a code that models covariant Galileons, a code that models Hořava-Lifschitz gravity, and two codes that model nonlocal models of gravity. Comparing predictions of the angular power spectrum of the cosmic microwave background and the power spectrum of dark matter for a suite of different models, we find agreement at the subpercent level. This means that this suite of Einstein-Boltzmann solvers is now sufficiently accurate for precision constraints on cosmological and gravitational parameters.

  6. Testing General Relativity with the Shadow Size of Sgr A(*).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Tim; Broderick, Avery E; Plewa, Philipp M; Chatzopoulos, Sotiris; Doeleman, Sheperd S; Eisenhauer, Frank; Fish, Vincent L; Genzel, Reinhard; Gerhard, Ortwin; Johnson, Michael D

    2016-01-22

    In general relativity, the angular radius of the shadow of a black hole is primarily determined by its mass-to-distance ratio and depends only weakly on its spin and inclination. If general relativity is violated, however, the shadow size may also depend strongly on parametric deviations from the Kerr metric. Based on a reconstructed image of Sagittarius A^{*} (Sgr A^{*}) from a simulated one-day observing run of a seven-station Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) array, we employ a Markov chain Monte Carlo algorithm to demonstrate that such an observation can measure the angular radius of the shadow of Sgr A^{*} with an uncertainty of ∼1.5  μas (6%). We show that existing mass and distance measurements can be improved significantly when combined with upcoming EHT measurements of the shadow size and that tight constraints on potential deviations from the Kerr metric can be obtained.

  7. Proposed new test of spin effects in general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, R F

    2004-08-20

    The recent discovery of a double-pulsar PSR J0737-3039A/B provides an opportunity of unequivocally observing, for the first time, spin effects in general relativity. Existing efforts involve detection of the precession of the spinning body itself. However, for a close binary system, spin effects on the orbit may also be discernible. Not only do they add to the advance of the periastron (by an amount which is small compared to the conventional contribution) but they also give rise to a precession of the orbit about the spin direction. The measurement of such an effect would also give information on the moment of inertia of pulsars.

  8. General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Straumann, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    This book provides a completely revised and expanded version of the previous classic edition ‘General Relativity and Relativistic Astrophysics’. In Part I the foundations of general relativity are thoroughly developed, while Part II is devoted to tests of general relativity and many of its applications. Binary pulsars – our best laboratories for general relativity – are studied in considerable detail. An introduction to gravitational lensing theory is included as well, so as to make the current literature on the subject accessible to readers. Considerable attention is devoted to the study of compact objects, especially to black holes. This includes a detailed derivation of the Kerr solution, Israel’s proof of his uniqueness theorem, and a derivation of the basic laws of black hole physics. Part II ends with Witten’s proof of the positive energy theorem, which is presented in detail, together with the required tools on spin structures and spinor analysis. In Part III, all of the differential geomet...

  9. Bulk optic Sagnac interferometer for tests of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ranganathan, D.; Mehta, C.L.

    1986-01-01

    Ring laser and Sagnac interferometer gyroscopes have been suggested for a possible experiment to test metric theories of gravity. As emphasized in recent reviews, neither ring lasers nor fiber gyroscopes seem to provide the required accuracy. The same appears to be true of passive cavity resonators or nonlinear variants. The primary problem with fiber Sagnac interferometers is that the permissible power before onset or nonlinearities is quite limited (10-100 mW). Thus the SNR possible is also limited. To overcome this limitation, the authors suggest use of a bulk optic device. Specifically, the author' suggest the use of a silica block with a square cross section. Each of its faces is polished to form a segment of a sphere whose center is at the center of the opposite face. Rays originating at the center of a face and incident on the next adjacent face near its center are totally internally reflected and focused on the center of the third face in sequence. Thus the light rotates about the cavity before coming back to the point of incidence. If a light beam is introduced slightly off-axis in such an arrangement, it must complete many rotations before coming back to its starting point. Such off-axis delay lines have been used in laser gravitational wave detectors. A similar resonator has been used by another group. In the authors' configuration, the internal reflections minimize reflection and scattering losses. The spherical surfaces can be figured extremely accurately. The system is achromatic, and thus multifrequency operation to eliminate cavity drifts is possible. A model analysis for this cavity is presented including estimates of the error due to Rayleigh scattering. Generalization of this configuration to include cavities with a greater number of faces and their advantages are discussed

  10. PLANCK, the Satellite: a New Experimental Test of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If the origin of a microwave background (EMB is the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole anisotropy measured at different altitudes from the surface of the Earth? The mathematical methods of the General Theory of Relativity are applied herein to answer these questions. The density of the EMB is answered by means of Einstein's equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The dipole anisotropy, which is due to the rapid motion of the source (the Earth in the weak intergalactic field, is analysed by using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons, which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the EMB decreases with altitude so that the density of its energy at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25km. Furthermore, the density at the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites should be only 10$^{-7}$ of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the EMB doesn't depend on altitude from the surface of the Earth, it should be the same irrespective of the altitude at which measurements are taken. This result is in support to the experimental and observational analysis conducted by P.-M.Robitaille, according to which the 2.7K microwave background, first observed by Penzias and Wilson, is not of cosmic origin, but of the Earth, and is generated by the oceans. WMAP indicated the same anisotropy of the microwave background at the 2nd Lagrange point that near the Earth. Therefore when PLANCK, which is planned on July, 2008, will manifest the 2.7K monopole microwave signal deceased at the 2nd Langrange point, it will be a new experimental verification of Einstein's theory.

  11. PLANCK, the Satellite: a New Experimental Test of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If the origin of a microwave background (EMB is the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole anisotropy measured at different altitudes from the surface of the Earth? The mathematical methods of the General Theory of Relativity are applied herein to answer these questions. The density of the EMB is answered by means of Einstein’s equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The dipole anisotropy, which is due to the rapid motion of the source (the Earth in the weak intergalactic field, is analysed by using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons, which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the EMB decreases with altitude so that the density of its energy at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25 km. Furthermore, the density at the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites should be only 1E-7 of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the EMB doesn’t depend on altitude from the surface of the Earth, it should be the same irrespective of the altitude at which measurements are taken. This result is in support to the experimental and observational analysis conducted by P.-M. Robitaille, according to which the 2.7 K microwave background, first observed by Penzias and Wilson, is not of cosmic origin, but of the Earth, and is generated by the oceans. WMAP indicated the same anisotropy of the microwave background at the 2nd Lagrange point that near the Earth. Therefore when PLANCK, which is planned on July, 2008, will manifest the 2.7 K monopole microwave signal deceased at the 2nd Langrange point, it will be a new experimental verification of Einstein’s theory.

  12. Testing general relativity with the neutral kaon system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chardin, G.

    1992-01-01

    The arguments favouring gravitation as the 'Master Arrow of Time' are briefly reviewed and the possibility that CP violation observed in the neutral kaon system may be explained by a violation of the Equivalence Principle is discussed. It was attempted to demonstrate that the arguments against antigravity should be reconsidered and that the neutral kaon system, the most sensitive interferometric system at the disposal, is ideal to test the existence of antigravity. (R.P.) 33 refs

  13. A new golden age: testing general relativity with cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean, Rachel; Ferreira, Pedro G; Taylor, Andy

    2011-12-28

    Gravity drives the evolution of the Universe and is at the heart of its complexity. Einstein's field equations can be used to work out the detailed dynamics of space and time and to calculate the emergence of large-scale structure in the distribution of galaxies and radiation. Over the past few years, it has become clear that cosmological observations can be used not only to constrain different world models within the context of Einstein gravity but also to constrain the theory of gravity itself. In this article, we look at different aspects of this new field in which cosmology is used to test theories of gravity with a wide range of observations.

  14. A possible new test of general relativity with Juno

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iorio, L

    2013-01-01

    The expansion in multipoles J ℓ , ℓ = 2, … of the gravitational potential of a rotating body affects the orbital motion of a test particle orbiting it with long-term perturbations both at a classical and at a relativistic level. In this preliminary sensitivity analysis, we show that, for the first time, the J 2 c −2 effects could be measured by the ongoing Juno mission in the gravitational field of Jupiter during its nearly yearlong science phase (10 November 2016–5 October 2017), thanks to its high eccentricity (e = 0.947) and to the huge oblateness of Jupiter (J 2 = 1.47 × 10 −2 ). The semimajor axis a and the perijove ω of Juno are expected to be shifted by Δa ≲ 700–900 m and Δω ≲ 50–60 milliarcseconds (mas), respectively, over 1–2 yr. A numerical analysis shows also that the expected J 2 c −2 range-rate signal for Juno should be as large as ≈280 microns per second (μm s −1 ) during a typical 6 h pass at its closest approach. Independent analyses previously performed by other researchers about the measurability of the Lense–Thirring effect showed that the radio science apparatus of Juno should reach an accuracy in Doppler range-rate measurements of ≈1–5 μm s −1 over such passes. The range-rate signature of the classical even zonal perturbations is different from the first post-Newtonian (1PN) one. Thus, further investigations, based on covariance analyses of simulated Doppler data and dedicated parameters estimation, are worth of further consideration. It turns out that the J 2 c −2 effects cannot be responsible of the flyby anomaly in the gravitational field of the Earth. A dedicated spacecraft in a 6678 km × 57103 km polar orbit would experience a geocentric J 2 c −2 range-rate shift of ≈0.4 mm s −1 . (paper)

  15. General relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gourgoulhon, Eric

    2013-01-01

    The author proposes a course on general relativity. He first presents a geometrical framework by addressing, presenting and discussion the following notions: the relativistic space-time, the metric tensor, Universe lines, observers, principle of equivalence and geodesics. In the next part, he addresses gravitational fields with spherical symmetry: presentation of the Schwarzschild metrics, radial light geodesics, gravitational spectral shift (Einstein effect), orbitals of material objects, photon trajectories. The next parts address the Einstein equation, black holes, gravitational waves, and cosmological solutions. Appendices propose a discussion of the relationship between relativity and GPS, some problems and their solutions, and Sage codes

  16. Structure of the generalized momentum of a test charged particle and the inverse problem in general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zakharov, A.V.; Singatullin, R.S.

    1981-01-01

    The inverse problem is solved in general relativity theory (GRT) consisting in determining the metric and potentials of an electromagnetic field by their values in the nonsingular point of the V 4 space and present functions, being the generalized momenta of a test charged particle. The Hamilton-Jacobi equation for a test charged particle in GRT is used. The general form of the generalized momentum dependence on the initial values is determined. It is noted that the inverse problem solution of dynamics in GRT contains arbitrariness which depends on the choice of the metric and potential values of the electromagnetic field in the nonsingular point [ru

  17. On the possibility of a fourth test of general relativity in earth's gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Yuan-zhong.

    1981-03-01

    In the paper the possibility for a fourth test of general relativity (i.e. relativistic time delay) in Earth's gravitational field is discussed. The effects of Earth's gravitational field on an interferometer and a resonant cavity are calculated by means of both two definitions of physical length. (author)

  18. Black-hole spectroscopy: testing general relativity through gravitational-wave observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dreyer, Olaf [Perimeter Institute of Theoretical Physics, 35 King Street North, Waterloo, Ontario, N2J 2G9 (Canada); Kelly, Bernard [Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, Center for Gravitational Physics and Geometry and Department of Physics, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Krishnan, Badri [Max Planck Institut fuer Gravitationsphysik, Am Muehlenberg 1, D-14476 Golm (Germany); Finn, Lee Samuel [Center for Gravitational Wave Physics, Center for Gravitational Physics and Geometry, Department of Physics and Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 104 Davey Laboratory, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Garrison, David [University of Houston, Clear Lake, 2700 Bay Area Bvd, Room 3531-2, Houston, TX 77058 (United States); Lopez-Aleman, Ramon [Physical Sciences Department, University of Puerto Rico, Rio Piedras Campus, Rio Piedras, Puerto Rico 00931 (Puerto Rico)

    2004-02-21

    Assuming that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity in the strong-field limit, can gravitational-wave observations distinguish between black holes and other compact object sources? Alternatively, can gravitational-wave observations provide a test of one of the fundamental predictions of general relativity: the no-hair theorem? Here we describe a definitive test of the hypothesis that observations of damped, sinusoidal gravitational waves originate from a black hole or, alternatively, that nature respects the general relativistic no-hair theorem. For astrophysical black holes, which have a negligible charge-to-mass ratio, the black-hole quasi-normal mode spectrum is characterized entirely by the black-hole mass and angular momentum and is unique to black holes. In a different theory of gravity, or if the observed radiation arises from a different source (e.g., a neutron star, strange matter or boson star), the spectrum will be inconsistent with that predicted for general relativistic black holes. We give a statistical characterization of the consistency between the noisy observation and the theoretical predictions of general relativity and a demonstration, through simulation, of the effectiveness of the test for strong sources.

  19. Black-hole spectroscopy: testing general relativity through gravitational-wave observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dreyer, Olaf; Kelly, Bernard; Krishnan, Badri; Finn, Lee Samuel; Garrison, David; Lopez-Aleman, Ramon

    2004-01-01

    Assuming that general relativity is the correct theory of gravity in the strong-field limit, can gravitational-wave observations distinguish between black holes and other compact object sources? Alternatively, can gravitational-wave observations provide a test of one of the fundamental predictions of general relativity: the no-hair theorem? Here we describe a definitive test of the hypothesis that observations of damped, sinusoidal gravitational waves originate from a black hole or, alternatively, that nature respects the general relativistic no-hair theorem. For astrophysical black holes, which have a negligible charge-to-mass ratio, the black-hole quasi-normal mode spectrum is characterized entirely by the black-hole mass and angular momentum and is unique to black holes. In a different theory of gravity, or if the observed radiation arises from a different source (e.g., a neutron star, strange matter or boson star), the spectrum will be inconsistent with that predicted for general relativistic black holes. We give a statistical characterization of the consistency between the noisy observation and the theoretical predictions of general relativity and a demonstration, through simulation, of the effectiveness of the test for strong sources

  20. A validity generalization procedure to test relations between intrinsic and extrinsic motivation and influence tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbuto, John E; Moss, Jennifer A

    2006-08-01

    The relations of intrinsic and extrinsic motivation with use of consultative, legitimating, and pressure influence tactics were examined using validity generalization procedures. 5 to 7 field studies with cumulative samples exceeding 800 were used to test each relationship. Significance was found for relation between agents' intrinsic motivation and their use of consultative influence tactics and agents' extrinsic motivation and their use of legitimating influence tactics.

  1. Classic tests of General Relativity described by brane-based spherically symmetric solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuzinatto, R.R. [Universidade Federal de Alfenas, Instituto de Ciencia e Tecnologia, Pocos de Caldas, MG (Brazil); Pompeia, P.J. [Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Instituto de Fomento e Coordenacao Industrial, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Ciencia e Tecnologia Aeroespacial, Instituto Tecnologico de Aeronautica, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); De Montigny, M. [University of Alberta, Theoretical Physics Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); University of Alberta, Campus Saint-Jean, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Khanna, F.C. [University of Alberta, Theoretical Physics Institute, Edmonton, AB (Canada); TRIUMF, Vancouver, BC (Canada); University of Victoria, Department of Physics and Astronomy, PO box 1700, Victoria, BC (Canada); Silva, J.M.H. da [Universidade Estadual Paulista, Departamento de Fisica e Quimica, Guaratingueta, SP (Brazil)

    2014-08-15

    We discuss a way to obtain information about higher dimensions from observations by studying a brane-based spherically symmetric solution. The three classic tests of General Relativity are analyzed in detail: the perihelion shift of the planet Mercury, the deflection of light by the Sun, and the gravitational redshift of atomic spectral lines. The braneworld version of these tests exhibits an additional parameter b related to the fifth-coordinate. This constant b can be constrained by comparison with observational data for massive and massless particles. (orig.)

  2. Experimental test of General Relativity theory by radar observations of planets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afanas'eva, T.I.; Kislik, M.D.; Kolyuka, Yu.F.; Tikhonov, V.F.

    1991-01-01

    Basing on the radar observations of planets, carried out in the USSR and USA in 1964-1986, a particular relativistic effect has been tested, namely the (O-C) discrepancies in radar distances, arising in the construction of a unified theory of motion on interior planets in the Newtonian approximation. The results obtained confirm the validity of General Relativity to an accuracy of about 10 -2

  3. Minimally modified theories of gravity: a playground for testing the uniqueness of general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carballo-Rubio, Ra{úl; Di Filippo, Francesco; Liberati, Stefano

    2018-06-01

    In a recent paper [1], it was introduced a new class of gravitational theories with two local degrees of freedom. The existence of these theories apparently challenges the distinctive role of general relativity as the unique non-linear theory of massless spin-2 particles. Here we perform a comprehensive analysis of these theories with the aim of (i) understanding whether or not these are actually equivalent to general relativity, and (ii) finding the root of the variance in case these are not. We have found that a broad set of seemingly different theories actually pass all the possible tests of equivalence to general relativity (in vacuum) that we were able to devise, including the analysis of scattering amplitudes using on-shell techniques. These results are complemented with the observation that the only examples which are manifestly not equivalent to general relativity either do not contain gravitons in their spectrum, or are not guaranteed to include only two local degrees of freedom once radiative corrections are taken into account. Coupling to matter is also considered: we show that coupling these theories to matter in a consistent way is not as straightforward as one could expect. Minimal coupling, as well as the most straightforward non-minimal couplings, cannot be used. Therefore, before being able to address any issues in the presence of matter, it would be necessary to find a consistent (and in any case rather peculiar) coupling scheme.

  4. A massive binary black-hole system in OJ 287 and a test of general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valtonen, M J; Lehto, H J; Nilsson, K; Heidt, J; Takalo, L O; Sillanpää, A; Villforth, C; Kidger, M; Poyner, G; Pursimo, T; Zola, S; Wu, J-H; Zhou, X; Sadakane, K; Drozdz, M; Koziel, D; Marchev, D; Ogloza, W; Porowski, C; Siwak, M; Stachowski, G; Winiarski, M; Hentunen, V-P; Nissinen, M; Liakos, A; Dogru, S

    2008-04-17

    Tests of Einstein's general theory of relativity have mostly been carried out in weak gravitational fields where the space-time curvature effects are first-order deviations from Newton's theory. Binary pulsars provide a means of probing the strong gravitational field around a neutron star, but strong-field effects may be best tested in systems containing black holes. Here we report such a test in a close binary system of two candidate black holes in the quasar OJ 287. This quasar shows quasi-periodic optical outbursts at 12-year intervals, with two outburst peaks per interval. The latest outburst occurred in September 2007, within a day of the time predicted by the binary black-hole model and general relativity. The observations confirm the binary nature of the system and also provide evidence for the loss of orbital energy in agreement (within 10 per cent) with the emission of gravitational waves from the system. In the absence of gravitational wave emission the outburst would have happened 20 days later.

  5. Testing General Relativity with High-Resolution Imaging of Sgr A*

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Broderick, Avery E; Loeb, Abraham

    2006-01-01

    Submilliarcsecond astrometry and imaging of the black hole Sgr A* at the Galactic Center may become possible in the near future at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. This resolution is sufficient to observe the silhouette the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center casts upon background emission. However, more exciting is the prospect of observing 'hot spots' in the accretion fbw. Here we discuss how such measurements may be used to test not only the consistency of General Relativity, but also the validity of the Kerr metric in particular

  6. Testing General Relativity with High-Resolution Imaging of Sgr A*

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broderick, Avery E; Loeb, Abraham [Institute for Theory and Computation, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA, 02145 (United States)

    2006-12-15

    Submilliarcsecond astrometry and imaging of the black hole Sgr A* at the Galactic Center may become possible in the near future at infrared and submillimetre wavelengths. This resolution is sufficient to observe the silhouette the supermassive black hole in the Galactic center casts upon background emission. However, more exciting is the prospect of observing 'hot spots' in the accretion fbw. Here we discuss how such measurements may be used to test not only the consistency of General Relativity, but also the validity of the Kerr metric in particular.

  7. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Baker

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10^{-5} – 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  8. Testing General Relativity with Low-Frequency, Space-Based Gravitational-Wave Detectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gair, Jonathan R; Vallisneri, Michele; Larson, Shane L; Baker, John G

    2013-01-01

    We review the tests of general relativity that will become possible with space-based gravitational-wave detectors operating in the ∼ 10 -5 - 1 Hz low-frequency band. The fundamental aspects of gravitation that can be tested include the presence of additional gravitational fields other than the metric; the number and tensorial nature of gravitational-wave polarization states; the velocity of propagation of gravitational waves; the binding energy and gravitational-wave radiation of binaries, and therefore the time evolution of binary inspirals; the strength and shape of the waves emitted from binary mergers and ringdowns; the true nature of astrophysical black holes; and much more. The strength of this science alone calls for the swift implementation of a space-based detector; the remarkable richness of astrophysics, astronomy, and cosmology in the low-frequency gravitational-wave band make the case even stronger.

  9. Gravity Probe B: final results of a space experiment to test general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everitt, C W F; DeBra, D B; Parkinson, B W; Turneaure, J P; Conklin, J W; Heifetz, M I; Keiser, G M; Silbergleit, A S; Holmes, T; Kolodziejczak, J; Al-Meshari, M; Mester, J C; Muhlfelder, B; Solomonik, V G; Stahl, K; Worden, P W; Bencze, W; Buchman, S; Clarke, B; Al-Jadaan, A; Al-Jibreen, H; Li, J; Lipa, J A; Lockhart, J M; Al-Suwaidan, B; Taber, M; Wang, S

    2011-06-03

    Gravity Probe B, launched 20 April 2004, is a space experiment testing two fundamental predictions of Einstein's theory of general relativity (GR), the geodetic and frame-dragging effects, by means of cryogenic gyroscopes in Earth orbit. Data collection started 28 August 2004 and ended 14 August 2005. Analysis of the data from all four gyroscopes results in a geodetic drift rate of -6601.8±18.3  mas/yr and a frame-dragging drift rate of -37.2±7.2  mas/yr, to be compared with the GR predictions of -6606.1  mas/yr and -39.2  mas/yr, respectively ("mas" is milliarcsecond; 1  mas=4.848×10(-9)  rad).

  10. The Sun-Earth saddle point: characterization and opportunities to test general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topputo, Francesco; Dei Tos, Diogene A.; Rasotto, Mirco; Nakamiya, Masaki

    2018-04-01

    The saddle points are locations where the net gravitational accelerations balance. These regions are gathering more attention within the astrophysics community. Regions about the saddle points present clean, close-to-zero background acceleration environments where possible deviations from General Relativity can be tested and quantified. Their location suggests that flying through a saddle point can be accomplished by leveraging highly nonlinear orbits. In this paper, the geometrical and dynamical properties of the Sun-Earth saddle point are characterized. A systematic approach is devised to find ballistic orbits that experience one or multiple passages through this point. A parametric analysis is performed to consider spacecraft initially on L_{1,2} Lagrange point orbits. Sun-Earth saddle point ballistic fly-through trajectories are evaluated and classified for potential use. Results indicate an abundance of short-duration, regular solutions with a variety of characteristics.

  11. Testing General Relativity with Stellar Orbits around the Supermassive Black Hole in Our Galactic Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hees, A; Do, T; Ghez, A M; Martinez, G D; Naoz, S; Becklin, E E; Boehle, A; Chappell, S; Chu, D; Dehghanfar, A; Kosmo, K; Lu, J R; Matthews, K; Morris, M R; Sakai, S; Schödel, R; Witzel, G

    2017-05-26

    We demonstrate that short-period stars orbiting around the supermassive black hole in our Galactic center can successfully be used to probe the gravitational theory in a strong regime. We use 19 years of observations of the two best measured short-period stars orbiting our Galactic center to constrain a hypothetical fifth force that arises in various scenarios motivated by the development of a unification theory or in some models of dark matter and dark energy. No deviation from general relativity is reported and the fifth force strength is restricted to an upper 95% confidence limit of |α|<0.016 at a length scale of λ=150 astronomical units. We also derive a 95% confidence upper limit on a linear drift of the argument of periastron of the short-period star S0-2 of |ω[over ˙]_{S0-2}|<1.6×10^{-3}  rad/yr, which can be used to constrain various gravitational and astrophysical theories. This analysis provides the first fully self-consistent test of the gravitational theory using orbital dynamic in a strong gravitational regime, that of a supermassive black hole. A sensitivity analysis for future measurements is also presented.

  12. Strains in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bini, Donato; Felice, Fernando de; Geralico, Andrea

    2006-01-01

    The definition of relative accelerations and strains among a set of comoving particles is studied in connection with the geometric properties of the frame adapted to a 'fiducial observer'. We find that a relativistically complete and correct definition of strains must take into account the transport law of the chosen spatial triad along the observer's congruence. We use special congruences of (accelerated) test particles in some familiar spacetimes to elucidate such a point. The celebrated idea of Szekeres' compass of inertia, arising when studying geodesic deviation among a set of free-falling particles, is here generalized to the case of accelerated particles. In doing so we have naturally contributed to the theory of relativistic gravity gradiometer. Moreover, our analysis was made in an observer-dependent form, a fact that would be very useful when thinking about general relativistic tests on space stations orbiting compact objects like black holes and also in other interesting gravitational situations

  13. Gravitational wave tests of general relativity with the parameterized post-Einsteinian framework

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cornish, Neil; Sampson, Laura; Yunes, Nicolas; Pretorius, Frans

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy has tremendous potential for studying extreme astrophysical phenomena and exploring fundamental physics. The waves produced by binary black hole mergers will provide a pristine environment in which to study strong-field dynamical gravity. Extracting detailed information about these systems requires accurate theoretical models of the gravitational wave signals. If gravity is not described by general relativity, analyses that are based on waveforms derived from Einstein's field equations could result in parameter biases and a loss of detection efficiency. A new class of ''parameterized post-Einsteinian'' waveforms has been proposed to cover this eventuality. Here, we apply the parameterized post-Einsteinian approach to simulated data from a network of advanced ground-based interferometers and from a future space-based interferometer. Bayesian inference and model selection are used to investigate parameter biases, and to determine the level at which departures from general relativity can be detected. We find that in some cases the parameter biases from assuming the wrong theory can be severe. We also find that gravitational wave observations will beat the existing bounds on deviations from general relativity derived from the orbital decay of binary pulsars by a large margin across a wide swath of parameter space.

  14. TEPE/GReAT (General Relativity Accuracy Test in an Einstein Elevator): ready to start

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iafolla, V.; Fiorenza, E.; Lefevre, C.

    2008-01-01

    TEPEE/GReAT is an experiment aimed at testing the principle of equivalence at a level of accuracy equal to 5 parts in 10 15 by means of a differential acceleration detector free falling inside a co-moving, endogenic, evacuated capsule, released from a stratospheric balloon. The detector is spun about a horizontal axis during the fall in order to modulate the equivalence principle violation signal at the spin frequency. Thanks to the recent funding of the Italian side, the project is ready- to enter its second phase. The main activities related to detector prototype (both non-cryogenic and cryogenic versions) development and testing, free-fall tests, signal extraction from noise (in particular related to the common-mode rejection factor) and flight model requirements are discussed.

  15. Tidal fields in general relativity: D'Alembert's principle and the test rigid rod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faulkner, J.; Flannery, B.P.

    1978-01-01

    To the general relativist, tidal forces are a manifestation of the Riemann tensor; the relativist therefore uses the Riemann tensor to calculate the effects of such forces. In contrast, we show that the intorduction of gravitational ''probes'' (or ''test rigid rods'') and the adoption of a view-point closely allied to d'Alembert's principle, give an enormous simplification in cases of interest. No component of the Riemann tensor need to be calculated as such. In the corotating orbital case (or Roche problem) the calculation of the relevant distortional field becomes trivial. As a by-product of this investigation, there emerges an illuminating strong field generalization of de Sitter's weak field precession for slowly spinning gyroscopes

  16. Testing general relativity with compact-body orbits: a modified Einstein–Infeld–Hoffmann framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Clifford M.

    2018-04-01

    We describe a general framework for analyzing orbits of systems containing compact objects (neutron stars or black holes) in a class of Lagrangian-based alternative theories of gravity that also admit a global preferred reference frame. The framework is based on a modified Einstein–Infeld–Hoffmann (EIH) formalism developed by Eardley and by Will, generalized to include the possibility of Lorentz-violating, preferred-frame effects. It uses a post-Newtonian N-body Lagrangian with arbitrary parameters that depend on the theory of gravity and on ‘sensitivities’ that encode the effects of the bodies’ internal structure on their motion. We determine the modified EIH parameters for the Einstein-Æther and Khronometric vector-tensor theories of gravity. We find the effects of motion relative to a preferred universal frame on the orbital parameters of binary systems containing neutron stars, such as a class of ultra-circular pulsar-white dwarf binaries; the amplitudes of the effects depend upon ‘strong-field’ preferred-frame parameters \\hatα1 and \\hatα2 , which we relate to the fundamental modified EIH parameters. We also determine the amplitude of the ‘Nordtvedt effect’ in a triple system containing the pulsar J0337+1715 in terms of the modified EIH parameters.

  17. Forces in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridgely, Charles T.

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced…

  18. On possible a-priori "imprinting" of General Relativity itself on the performed Lense-Thirring tests with LAGEOS satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iorio, Lorenzo

    2010-02-01

    The impact of possible a-priori "imprinting" effects of general relativity itself on recent attempts to measure the general relativistic Lense-Thirring effect with the LAGEOS satellites orbiting the Earth and the terrestrial geopotential models from the dedicated mission GRACE is investigated. It is analytically shown that general relativity, not explicitly solved for in the GRACE-based models, may "imprint" their even zonal harmonic coefficients of low degrees J_l at a non-negligible level, given the present-day accuracy in recovering them. This translates into a bias of the LAGEOS-based relativistic tests as large as the Lense-Thirring effect itself. Further analyses should include general relativity itself in the GRACE data processing by explicitly solving for it.

  19. Theoretical general relativity: 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergmann, O.

    1979-01-01

    The metric and field equations of Einstein's general relativity theory are written down. Solutions to the equations are discussed. Connection is made between relativity theory and elementary particle theory. Possibilities for a unified field theory are considered

  20. Introduction to general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Parthasarthy, R

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION TO GENERAL RELATIVITY begins with a description of the geometry of curved space, explaining geodesics, parallel transport, covariant differentiation, geodesic deviation and spacetime symmetry by killing vectors. It then introduces Einstein's theory of gravitation followed by Schwarzschild solution with its relevance to Positive Mass theorem. The three tests for Einstein's gravity are explained. Other exact solutions such as Vaidya, Kerr and Reisner - Nordstrom metric are included. In the Chapter on cosmological solutions, a detailed description of Godel metric is provided. It then introduces five dimensional spacetime of Kaluza showing the unification of gravity with electromagnetism. This is extended to include non-Abelian gauge theory by invoking compact extra dimensions. Explicit expressions in this case for Christoffel connections and ricci tensor are derived and the higher dimensional gravity action is shown to compactification are given.

  1. Bimetric general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, N.

    1979-01-01

    A modification of general relativity is proposed involving a second metric tensor describing a space-time of constant curvature and associated with the fundamental rest-frame of the universe. The theory generally agrees with the Einstein theory, but gives cosmological models without singularities which can account for present observation, including helium abundance

  2. General Relativity and Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, A. T.

    1973-01-01

    Reviews theoretical and experimental fundamentals of Einstein's theory of general relativity. Indicates that recent development of the theory of the continually expanding universe may lead to revision of the space-time continuum of the finite and unbounded universe. (CC)

  3. General relativity and experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Damour, T.

    1994-01-01

    The confrontation between Einstein's theory of gravitation and experiment is summarized. Although all current experimental data are compatible with general relativity, the importance of pursuing the quest for possible deviations from Einstein's theory is emphasized.

  4. Introducing Distance and Measurement in General Relativity: Changes for the Standard Tests and the Cosmological Large-Scale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crothers S. J.

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Relativistic motion in the gravitational field of a massive body is governed by the external metric of a spherically symmetric extended object. Consequently, any solution for the point-mass is inadequate for the treatment of such motions since it pertains to a fictitious object. I therefore develop herein the physics of the standard tests of General Relativity by means of the generalised solution for the field external to a sphere of incompressible homogeneous fluid.

  5. Forces in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ridgely, Charles T

    2010-01-01

    Many textbooks dealing with general relativity do not demonstrate the derivation of forces in enough detail. The analyses presented herein demonstrate straightforward methods for computing forces by way of general relativity. Covariant divergence of the stress-energy-momentum tensor is used to derive a general expression of the force experienced by an observer in general coordinates. The general force is then applied to the local co-moving coordinate system of a uniformly accelerating observer, leading to an expression of the inertial force experienced by the observer. Next, applying the general force in Schwarzschild coordinates is shown to lead to familiar expressions of the gravitational force. As a more complex demonstration, the general force is applied to an observer in Boyer-Lindquist coordinates near a rotating, Kerr black hole. It is then shown that when the angular momentum of the black hole goes to zero, the force on the observer reduces to the force on an observer held stationary in Schwarzschild coordinates. As a final consideration, the force on an observer moving in rotating coordinates is derived. Expressing the force in terms of Christoffel symbols in rotating coordinates leads to familiar expressions of the centrifugal and Coriolis forces on the observer. It is envisioned that the techniques presented herein will be most useful to graduate level students, as well as those undergraduate students having experience with general relativity and tensor analysis.

  6. Improved servo-controlled inertial clock for laboratory tests of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leyh, C.H.

    1984-01-01

    An inertial clock, consisting of a protected macroscopic rotor as the time base, was developed and tested preliminarily and partially by Cheung. This research offers considerable refinement of the equipment and the operating software, and includes serious testing of the experimental behavior. The inertial clock uses magnetic suspension to levitate a capped hollow cylindrical rotor (called the shroud rotor) within a vacuum chamber. A second rotor (called the proof rotor) is magnetically suspended within the shroud rotor. The shroud rotor is caused to corotate precisely with the rotating proof rotor by a microcomputer-controlled eddy current drive feedback servo loop. This produces a drag-free environment for the proof rotor which becomes the inertial timekeeper. In this way corotation effectively eliminates the residual gas drag on the proof rotor and the magnetic suspension bearing reduces bearing drag

  7. Matter in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Two theories of matter in general relativity, the fluid theory and the kinetic theory, were studied. Results include: (1) a discussion of various methods of completing the fluid equations; (2) a method of constructing charged general relativistic solutions in kinetic theory; and (3) a proof and discussion of the incompatibility of perfect fluid solutions in anisotropic cosmologies. Interpretations of NASA gravitational experiments using the above mentioned results were started. Two papers were prepared for publications based on this work.

  8. New general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayashi, K.; Shirafuji, T.

    1979-01-01

    A gravitational theory is formulated on the Weitzenboeck space-time, characterized by the vanishing curvature tensor (absolute parallelism) and by the torsion tensor formed of four parallel vector fields. This theory is called new general relativity, since Einstein in 1928 first gave its original form. New general relativity has three parameters c 1 , c 2 , and lambda, besides the Einstein constant kappa. In this paper we choose c 1 = 0 = c 2 , leaving open lambda. We prove, among other things, that (i) a static, spherically symmetric gravitational field is given by the Schwarzschild metric, that (ii) in the weak-field approximation an antisymmetric field of zero mass and zero spin exists, besides gravitons, and that (iii) new general relativity agrees with all the experiments so far carried out

  9. Lectures on general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Papapetrou, Achille

    1974-01-01

    This book is an elaboration of lecture notes for the graduate course on General Rela­ tivity given by the author at Boston University in the spring semester of 1972. It is an introduction to the subject only, as the time available for the course was limited. The author of an introduction to General Relativity is faced from the beginning with the difficult task of choosing which material to include. A general criterion as­ sisting in this choice is provided by the didactic character of the book: Those chapters have to be included in priority, which will be most useful to the reader in enabling him to understand the methods used in General Relativity, the results obtained so far and possibly the problems still to be solved. This criterion is not sufficient to ensure a unique choice. General Relativity has developed to such a degree, that it is impossible to include in an introductory textbook of a reasonable length even a very condensed treatment of all important problems which have been discussed unt...

  10. General Relativity and Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ehlers, J.; Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    The General Theory of Relativity (GR), created by Albert Einstein between 1907 and 1915, is a theory both of gravitation and of spacetime structure. It is based on the assumption that matter, via its energy-momentum, interacts with the metric of spacetime, which is considered (in contrast to Newtonian physics and SPECIAL RELATIVITY) as a dynamical field having degrees of freedom of its own (GRAVI...

  11. Global general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrose, R.

    1979-01-01

    Much theoretical work in General Relativity has been concerned with finding explicit solutions of Einstein field equations. Exact solutions must involve simplifying procedures which in the case of strong gravitational fields may not be valid. Computers can help but complementary to these are the global qualitative mathematics that have been introduced into relativity over the past years. These have shown that Einstein's equations together with suitable inequalities on the energy-momentum tensor can lead inevitably to space-time singularities arising, provided that some qualitative geometric criterion is satisfied. It seems that in suitable situations of gravitational collapse this criterion will be satisfied. Similarly in a cosmological setting the criterion can be applied in the reverse direction in time. There is, however, the unsolved problem in general relativity of cosmic censorship and this is discussed as a consequence of Einstein's equations. (UK)

  12. Elementary general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clarke, C.

    1979-01-01

    The plan of the book is as follows: Chapter 1 develops special relativity in a setting and notation that can immediately be transferred to general relativity. Most of the fundamental geometrical ideas are established here. Chapter 2 gives a more conventional account of some selected applications of special relativity. Chapter 3 is the heart of the book. A geometrical model of space-time is progressively built up, motivated by physical arguments stemming from the equivalence principle, leading to Einstein's field equations. Chapter 4 deals very quickly with the simplest form of weak-field theory with application to gravitational radiation. Chapter 5 concludes the book with a fairly detailed analysis of the Schwarzschild solution, plane fronted gravitational waves, and the Robertson-Walker cosmological solutions. Exercises at the end of each chapter extend the general theory into particular applications, giving a broader picture of the scope of the subject. (author)

  13. Attitudes toward genetic testing among the general population and relatives of patients with a severe genetic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hietala, M; Hakonen, A; Aro, A R

    1995-01-01

    evaluated attitudes toward gene tests in general and also respondents' preparedness to undergo gene tests for predictive testing, carrier detection, prenatal diagnosis, and selective abortion, in theoretical situations. The results of the study indicate that both the Finnish population in general and family...... members of AGU patients have a favorable attitude toward genetic testing. However, a commonly expressed reason against testing was that test results might lead to discrimination in employment or insurance policies. Based on the responses, we predict that future genetic testing programs will most probably...

  14. General Relativity and Gravitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay; Berger, Beverly; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-07-01

    Part I. Einstein's Triumph: 1. 100 years of general relativity George F. R. Ellis; 2. Was Einstein right? Clifford M. Will; 3. Cosmology David Wands, Misao Sasaki, Eiichiro Komatsu, Roy Maartens and Malcolm A. H. MacCallum; 4. Relativistic astrophysics Peter Schneider, Ramesh Narayan, Jeffrey E. McClintock, Peter Mészáros and Martin J. Rees; Part II. New Window on the Universe: 5. Receiving gravitational waves Beverly K. Berger, Karsten Danzmann, Gabriela Gonzalez, Andrea Lommen, Guido Mueller, Albrecht Rüdiger and William Joseph Weber; 6. Sources of gravitational waves. Theory and observations Alessandra Buonanno and B. S. Sathyaprakash; Part III. Gravity is Geometry, After All: 7. Probing strong field gravity through numerical simulations Frans Pretorius, Matthew W. Choptuik and Luis Lehner; 8. The initial value problem of general relativity and its implications Gregory J. Galloway, Pengzi Miao and Richard Schoen; 9. Global behavior of solutions to Einstein's equations Stefanos Aretakis, James Isenberg, Vincent Moncrief and Igor Rodnianski; Part IV. Beyond Einstein: 10. Quantum fields in curved space-times Stefan Hollands and Robert M. Wald; 11. From general relativity to quantum gravity Abhay Ashtekar, Martin Reuter and Carlo Rovelli; 12. Quantum gravity via unification Henriette Elvang and Gary T. Horowitz.

  15. Results on the gravity of quantum Fermi pressure of localized matter: A new test of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unnikrishnan, C.S.; Gillies, G.T.

    2006-01-01

    Recently Ehlers, Ozsvath, and Schucking discussed whether pressure contributes to active gravitational mass as required by general relativity. They pointed out that there is no experimental information on this available, though precision measurement of the gravitational constant should provide a test of this foundational aspect of gravity. We had used a similar argument earlier to test the contribution of leptons to the active gravitational mass. In this paper we use the result from the Zuerich gravitational constant experiment to provide the first adequate experimental input regarding the active gravitational mass of Fermi pressure. Apart from confirming the equality of the passive and active gravitational roles of the pressure term in general relativity within an accuracy of 5%, our results are consistent with the theoretical expectation of the cancellation of the gravity of pressure by the gravity of the surface tension of confined matter. This result on the active gravitational mass of the quantum zero-point Fermi pressure in the atomic nucleus is also interesting from the point of view of studying the interplay between quantum physics and classical gravity

  16. RELATIONS BETWEEN GENERAL MOTOR SKILLS AND HANDBALL SPECIFIC TEST "BALL SLALOM" IN STUDENTS OF THE IV GRADE OF PRIMARY SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Branković

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Teaching physical education and physical training of children, should be appropriate to their age abilities and needs. Acquire the diversified movement experience is a priority of physical education in junior school age. Students fourth grade of primary school - age 10-11 years, in the sensitive period for developing coordination and speed capabilities. Sports game handball and mode of the game "mini-handball", which is adapted to students age abilities and spatial characteristics of the majority of primary schools, abundant with various tasks, specifically dominated by natural forms of movement - running, jumping, throwing. Therefore, handball has a significant role in solving the tasks of physical education. The specific motor tests and relations with the general motor skills are particularly important for continuous monitoring of motor development of children. The survey was conducted on 79 boys fourth grade of primary school who participated in the electoral sport of handball in the regular physical education classes. The results of the handball test "ball slalom" and its relation with general motor skills of students fourth grade of primary school, should contribute to the perception of the value of handball as the content of physical education, but also to contribute to the selection and forecast performance of children in handball.

  17. Testing general relativity using Bayesian model selection: Applications to observations of gravitational waves from compact binary systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Del Pozzo, Walter; Veitch, John; Vecchio, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Second-generation interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, such as Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo, are expected to begin operation by 2015. Such instruments plan to reach sensitivities that will offer the unique possibility to test general relativity in the dynamical, strong-field regime and investigate departures from its predictions, in particular, using the signal from coalescing binary systems. We introduce a statistical framework based on Bayesian model selection in which the Bayes factor between two competing hypotheses measures which theory is favored by the data. Probability density functions of the model parameters are then used to quantify the inference on individual parameters. We also develop a method to combine the information coming from multiple independent observations of gravitational waves, and show how much stronger inference could be. As an introduction and illustration of this framework-and a practical numerical implementation through the Monte Carlo integration technique of nested sampling-we apply it to gravitational waves from the inspiral phase of coalescing binary systems as predicted by general relativity and a very simple alternative theory in which the graviton has a nonzero mass. This method can (and should) be extended to more realistic and physically motivated theories.

  18. Advanced mechanics and general relativity an introduction to general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Franklin, Joel

    2010-01-01

    Aimed at advanced undergraduates with background knowledge of classical mechanics and electricity and magnetism, this textbook presents both the particle dynamics relevant to general relativity, and the field dynamics necessary to understand the theory. Focusing on action extremization, the book develops the structure and predictions of general relativity by analogy with familiar physical systems. Topics ranging from classical field theory to minimal surfaces and relativistic strings are covered in a homogeneous manner. Nearly 150 exercises and numerous examples throughout the textbook enable students to test their understanding of the material covered.

  19. Modified General Relativity and Cosmology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, A.-M. M.

    1997-10-01

    Aspects of the modified general relativity theory of Rastall, Al-Rawaf and Taha are discussed in both the radiation- and matter-dominated flat cosmological models. A nucleosynthesis constraint on the theory's free parameter is obtained and the implication for the age of the Universe is discussed. The consistency of the modified matter- dominated model with the neoclassical cosmological tests is demonstrated.

  20. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolás Yunes

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein’s theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  1. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunes, Nicolás; Siemens, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein's theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime . Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  2. Conformal covariance of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionescu-Pallas, N.; Gottlieb, I.

    1980-01-01

    The Einstein's equations of General Relativity are written in a conformal metric, resulting as a consequence of geometrizing the pressure forces. Accordingly, the trajectory of a test body pursues a geodetic line even inside the source of gravitational field. Moreover, the pressure, entering the perfect fluid scheme, may be replaced by a certain scalar interaction. This new manner of interpreting General Relativity is then applied to Cosmology, in order to build up a model of Universe whose static limit should coincide with that of Einstein. At the same time, the cosmological constant is connected to the scalar interaction acquiring a plausible explanation. (author)

  3. Pseudo-complex general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Hess, Peter O; Greiner, Walter

    2016-01-01

    This volume presents an pseudo-complex extension of General Relativity which addresses these issues and presents proposals for experimental examinations in strong fields near a large mass. General Relativity is a beautiful and well tested theory of gravitation. Nevertheless, it implies conceptual problems like the creation of singularities (Black Holes) as a result of the collapse of large masses, or the appearance of event horizons which exclude parts of the space-time from the observation of external observers. The mathematical and geometrical foundations of this extension are displayed in detail, and applications including orbits and accretion disks around large central masses, neutron stars or cosmological models are introduced. Calculations both for classical and extended applications are often executed in the form of problems with extensive solutions, which makes this volume also a valuable resource for any student of General Relativity.

  4. Measuring growth index in a universe with massive neutrinos: A revisit of the general relativity test with the latest observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ming-Ming; Zhang, Jing-Fei; Zhang, Xin

    2018-04-01

    We make a consistency test for the general relativity (GR) through measuring the growth index γ in a universe with massive (sterile/active) neutrinos. We employ the redshift space distortion measurements to do the analysis. To constrain other cosmological parameters, we also use other cosmological measurements, including the Planck 2015 cosmic microwave background temperature and polarization data, the baryon acoustic oscillation data, the type Ia supernova JLA data, the weak lensing galaxy shear data, and the Planck 2015 lensing data. In a universe with massive sterile neutrinos, we obtain γ =0.624-0.050+0.055, with the tension with the GR prediction γ = 0.55 at the 1.48σ level, showing that the consideration of sterile neutrinos still cannot make the true measurement of γ be well consistent with the GR prediction. In a universe with massive active neutrinos, we obtain γ = 0.663 ± 0.045 for the normal hierarchy case, γ =0.661-0.050+0.044 for the degenerate hierarchy case, and γ =0.668-0.051+0.045 for the inverted hierarchy case, with the tensions with GR all at beyond the 2σ level. We find that the consideration of massive active neutrinos (no matter what mass hierarchy is considered) almost does not influence the measurement of the growth index γ.

  5. Tests Related to Pregnancy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to learn. Search form Search Tests related to pregnancy You are here Home Testing & Services Testing for ... to Genetic Counseling . What Are Tests Related to Pregnancy? Pregnancy related testing is done before or during ...

  6. Gravitation. [Book on general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misner, C. W.; Thorne, K. S.; Wheeler, J. A.

    1973-01-01

    This textbook on gravitation physics (Einstein's general relativity or geometrodynamics) is designed for a rigorous full-year course at the graduate level. The material is presented in two parallel tracks in an attempt to divide key physical ideas from more complex enrichment material to be selected at the discretion of the reader or teacher. The full book is intended to provide competence relative to the laws of physics in flat space-time, Einstein's geometric framework for physics, applications with pulsars and neutron stars, cosmology, the Schwarzschild geometry and gravitational collapse, gravitational waves, experimental tests of Einstein's theory, and mathematical concepts of differential geometry.

  7. Patch Test Negative Generalized Dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiker, Alison; Mowad, Christen

    2016-01-01

    Allergic contact dermatitis is a common condition in dermatology. Patch testing is the criterion standard for diagnosis. However, dermatitis is not always caused by an allergen, and patch testing does not identify a culprit in every patient. Generalized dermatitis, defined as eczematous dermatitis affecting greater than 3 body sites, is often encountered in dermatology practice, especially patch test referral centers. Management for patients with generalized dermatitis who are patch test negative is challenging. The purpose of this article is to outline an approach to this challenging scenario and summarize the paucity of existing literature on patch test negative generalized dermatitis.

  8. Conformally Coupled General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrej Arbuzov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available The gravity model developed in the series of papers (Arbuzov et al. 2009; 2010, (Pervushin et al. 2012 is revisited. The model is based on the Ogievetsky theorem, which specifies the structure of the general coordinate transformation group. The theorem is implemented in the context of the Noether theorem with the use of the nonlinear representation technique. The canonical quantization is performed with the use of reparametrization-invariant time and Arnowitt– Deser–Misner foliation techniques. Basic quantum features of the models are discussed. Mistakes appearing in the previous papers are corrected.

  9. Twistors in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Penrose, R.

    1987-01-01

    The two most significant definitions of a twistor in (conformally) flat space-time are that given by solutions of the twistor equation and that given by α-planes in the complexification of the space-time. It is shown that these concepts are naturally dual to one another, and that they give rise to various different twistor concepts in curved space-time when referred to submanifolds of differing dimension. One of these concepts, that of 2-surface twistors, gives rise to a quasi-local definition of mass (and angular momentum). The status of this definition is explored in relation to various examples. (author)

  10. General relativity and gravitation, 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ashby, N.; Bartlett, D.F.; Wyss, W.

    1990-01-01

    This volume records the lectures and symposia of the 12th International Conference on General Relativity and Gravitation. Plenary lecturers reviewed the major advances since the previous conference in 1986. The reviews cover classical and quantum theory of gravity, colliding gravitational waves, gravitational lensing, relativistic effects on pulsars, tests of the inverse square law, numerical relativity, cosmic microwave background radiation, experimental tests of gravity theory, gravitational wave detectors, and cosmology. The plenary lectures are complemented by summaries of symposia, provided by the chairmen. Almost 700 contributed papers were presented at these and they cover an even wider range of topics than the plenary talks. The book provides a comprehensive guide to research activity in both experimental and theoretical gravitation and its applications in astrophysics and cosmology. It will be essential reading for research workers in these fields, as well as theoretical and experimental physicists, astronomers, and mathematicians who wish to be acquainted with modern developments in gravitational theory and general relativity. All the papers and summaries of the workshop sessions are indexed separately. (16 united talks, 20 workshop sessions). (author)

  11. Einstein algebras and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, M.

    1992-01-01

    A purely algebraic structure called an Einstein algebra is defined in such a way that every spacetime satisfying Einstein's equations is an Einstein algebra but not vice versa. The Gelfand representation of Einstein algebras is defined, and two of its subrepresentations are discussed. One of them is equivalent to the global formulation of the standard theory of general relativity; the other one leads to a more general theory of gravitation which, in particular, includes so-called regular singularities. In order to include other types of singularities one must change to sheaves of Einstein algebras. They are defined and briefly discussed. As a test of the proposed method, the sheaf of Einstein algebras corresponding to the space-time of a straight cosmic string with quasiregular singularity is constructed. 22 refs

  12. A generalization of Bertrand's test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amirali Tabatabai Adnani

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available One of the most practical routine tests for convergence of a positive series makes use of the ratio test. If this test fails, we can use Rabbe's test. When Rabbe's test fails the next sharper criteria which may sometimes be used is the Bertrand's test. If this test fails,we can use a generalization of Bertrand's test and such tests can be continued in nitely. For simplicity, we call ratio test, Rabbe's test, Bertrand's test as the Bertrand's test of order 0, 1 and 2, respectively. In this paper, we generalize Bertrand's test in order k for natural k > 2. It is also shown that for any k, there exists a series such that the Bertrand's test of order fails, but such test of order k + 1 is useful, furthermore we show that there exists a series such that for any k, Bertrand's test of order k fails. The only prerequisite for reading this article is a standard knowledge of advanced calculus.

  13. General relativity basics and beyond

    CERN Document Server

    Date, Ghanashyam

    2015-01-01

    A Broad Perspective on the Theory of General Relativity and Its Observable Implications General Relativity: Basics and Beyond familiarizes students and beginning researchers with the basic features of the theory of general relativity as well as some of its more advanced aspects. Employing the pedagogical style of a textbook, it includes essential ideas and just enough background material needed for readers to appreciate the issues and current research. Basics The first five chapters form the core of an introductory course on general relativity. The author traces Einstein’s arguments and presents examples of space-times corresponding to different types of gravitational fields. He discusses the adaptation of dynamics in a Riemannian geometry framework, the Einstein equation and its elementary properties, and different phenomena predicted or influenced by general relativity. Beyond Moving on to more sophisticated features of general relativity, the book presents the physical requirements of a well-defined de...

  14. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Clifford

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analysing them are reviewed. Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of special relativity, and the gravitational redshift experiment. Future tests of EEP and of the inverse square law will search for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, and the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and new binary pulsar systems may yield further improvements.When direct observation of gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources begins, new tests of general relativity will be possible.

  15. The renaissance of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Will, C.

    1989-01-01

    A historical evaluation of Einstein's theory of general relativity is presented, including the three classical tests of the theory. Gravitation is shown to be a ''curved spacetime'' phenomenon, particularly if the Einstein equivalence principle (EEP) is true. The article traces the success and failures of the theory over the years and up to the present. The concept of gravitation waves was, for example, strengthened by the discovery of a binary pulsar in 1974. The author describes the theory's relevance to neutron stars and black holes and its role in establishing the hot big bang model of cosmological evolution. The article concludes by considering the possibility of antigravity and how gravitational calculations can be done by computer because of the large number of variables in the calculations. (U.K.)

  16. General relativity: An erfc metric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plamondon, Réjean

    2018-06-01

    This paper proposes an erfc potential to incorporate in a symmetric metric. One key feature of this model is that it relies on the existence of an intrinsic physical constant σ, a star-specific proper length that scales all its surroundings. Based thereon, the new metric is used to study the space-time geometry of a static symmetric massive object, as seen from its interior. The analytical solutions to the Einstein equation are presented, highlighting the absence of singularities and discontinuities in such a model. The geodesics are derived in their second- and first-order differential formats. Recalling the slight impact of the new model on the classical general relativity tests in the solar system, a number of facts and open problems are briefly revisited on the basis of a heuristic definition of σ. A special attention is given to gravitational collapses and non-singular black holes.

  17. Nuclear multifragmentation, its relation to general physics. A rich test ground of the fundamentals of statistical mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, D.H.E.

    2006-01-01

    Heat can flow from cold to hot at any phase separation even in macroscopic systems. Therefore also Lynden-Bell's famous gravo-thermal catastrophe must be reconsidered. In contrast to traditional canonical Boltzmann-Gibbs statistics this is correctly described only by microcanonical statistics. Systems studied in chemical thermodynamics (ChTh) by using canonical statistics consist of several homogeneous macroscopic phases. Evidently, macroscopic statistics as in chemistry cannot and should not be applied to non-extensive or inhomogeneous systems like nuclei or galaxies. Nuclei are small and inhomogeneous. Multifragmented nuclei are even more inhomogeneous and the fragments even smaller. Phase transitions of first order and especially phase separations therefore cannot be described by a (homogeneous) canonical ensemble. Taking this serious, fascinating perspectives open for statistical nuclear fragmentation as test ground for the basic principles of statistical mechanics, especially of phase transitions, without the use of the thermodynamic limit. Moreover, there is also a lot of similarity between the accessible phase space of fragmenting nuclei and inhomogeneous multistellar systems. This underlines the fundamental significance for statistical physics in general. (orig.)

  18. Testing general relativity and alternative theories of gravity with space-based atomic clocks and atom interferometers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bondarescu Ruxandra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The successful miniaturisation of extremely accurate atomic clocks and atom interferometers invites prospects for satellite missions to perform precision experiments. We discuss the effects predicted by general relativity and alternative theories of gravity that can be detected by a clock, which orbits the Earth. Our experiment relies on the precise tracking of the spacecraft using its observed tick-rate. The spacecraft’s reconstructed four-dimensional trajectory will reveal the nature of gravitational perturbations in Earth’s gravitational field, potentially differentiating between different theories of gravity. This mission can measure multiple relativistic effects all during the course of a single experiment, and constrain the Parametrized Post-Newtonian Parameters around the Earth. A satellite carrying a clock of fractional timing inaccuracy of Δ f / f ∼ 10−16 in an elliptic orbit around the Earth would constrain the PPN parameters |β − 1|, |γ − 1| ≲ 10−6. We also briefly review potential constraints by atom interferometers on scalar tensor theories and in particular on Chameleon and dilaton models.

  19. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Will, Clifford M

    2014-01-01

    The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them is reviewed and updated. Einstein's equivalence principle (EEP) is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of local Lorentz invariance and clock experiments. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion, and frame-dragging. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and a growing family of other binary pulsar systems is yielding new tests, especially of strong-field effects. Current and future tests of relativity will center on strong gravity and gravitational waves.

  20. Modern canonical quantum general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Thiemann, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    This is an introduction to the by now fifteen years old research field of canonical quantum general relativity, sometimes called "loop quantum gravity". The term "modern" in the title refers to the fact that the quantum theory is based on formulating classical general relativity as a theory of connections rather than metrics as compared to in original version due to Arnowitt, Deser and Misner. Canonical quantum general relativity is an attempt to define a mathematically rigorous, non-perturbative, background independent theory of Lorentzian quantum gravity in four spacetime dimensions in the continuum. The approach is minimal in that one simply analyzes the logical consequences of combining the principles of general relativity with the principles of quantum mechanics. The requirement to preserve background independence has lead to new, fascinating mathematical structures which one does not see in perturbative approaches, e.g. a fundamental discreteness of spacetime seems to be a prediction of the theory provi...

  1. Geometrical optics in general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Loinger, A.

    2006-01-01

    General relativity includes geometrical optics. This basic fact has relevant consequences that concern the physical meaning of the discontinuity surfaces propagated in the gravitational field - as it was first emphasized by Levi-Civita.

  2. Cosmic frontiers of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaufmann, W.J. III.

    1977-01-01

    All relevant topics in general astronomy are covered including orientation in space--time, special relativity, gravitation and general relativity, stars and stellar evolution, white dwarfs, pulsars, neutron stars, the black hole, the geometry of the Schwarzschild solution, and electrically charged and rotating black holes. Also the geometry of the Kerr solution, observations of black holes, white holes and particle creation, gravitational waves and lenses, exploding galaxies and massive and primordial black holes are discussed

  3. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model. Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio [Universita del Salento, Dipartimento Ingegneria dell' Innovazione, Lecce (Italy); Sapienza Universita di Roma, Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Rome (Italy); Paolozzi, Antonio; Paris, Claudio [Sapienza Universita di Roma, Scuola di Ingegneria Aerospaziale, Rome (Italy); Museo della Fisica e Centro Studi e Ricerche Enrico Fermi, Rome (Italy); Pavlis, Erricos C. [University of Maryland, Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET), Baltimore County (United States); Koenig, Rolf [GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences, Helmholtz Centre Potsdam, Potsdam (Germany); Ries, John [University of Texas at Austin, Center for Space Research, Austin (United States); Gurzadyan, Vahe; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey [Alikhanian National Laboratory and Yerevan State University, Center for Cosmology and Astrophysics, Yerevan (Armenia); Matzner, Richard [University of Texas at Austin, Theory Center, Austin (United States); Penrose, Roger [University of Oxford, Mathematical Institute, Oxford (United Kingdom); Sindoni, Giampiero [Sapienza Universita di Roma, DIAEE, Rome (Italy)

    2016-03-15

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure μ = (0.994 ± 0.002) ± 0.05, where μ is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity. (orig.)

  4. A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model: Measurement of Earth's dragging of inertial frames.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciufolini, Ignazio; Paolozzi, Antonio; Pavlis, Erricos C; Koenig, Rolf; Ries, John; Gurzadyan, Vahe; Matzner, Richard; Penrose, Roger; Sindoni, Giampiero; Paris, Claudio; Khachatryan, Harutyun; Mirzoyan, Sergey

    2016-01-01

    We present a test of general relativity, the measurement of the Earth's dragging of inertial frames. Our result is obtained using about 3.5 years of laser-ranged observations of the LARES, LAGEOS, and LAGEOS 2 laser-ranged satellites together with the Earth gravity field model GGM05S produced by the space geodesy mission GRACE. We measure [Formula: see text], where [Formula: see text] is the Earth's dragging of inertial frames normalized to its general relativity value, 0.002 is the 1-sigma formal error and 0.05 is our preliminary estimate of systematic error mainly due to the uncertainties in the Earth gravity model GGM05S. Our result is in agreement with the prediction of general relativity.

  5. Relativity: Special, General, and Cosmological

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ellis, G F R

    2005-01-01

    considered study of the properties of horizons. Linearized relativity is dealt with in depth leading to the standard weak field gravitational wave formulae and a study of their effects on test particles, together with a very useful discussion of the analogy between weak gravity and the electromagnetic field. Thus this is a straightforward detailed presentation of both special and general relativity theory and their applications. It has many examples and is well suited as a text on these topics, giving a clear relativists' view all the way through. It does not go into astrophysical or particle physics aspects, which is fine given its focus. Personally I would have liked a bit more emphasis on the geodesic deviation equation on the one hand, and on holonomy (which provides a link into particle gauge theories) on the other. But that is a matter of taste. This is an excellent book, which can be highly recommended. Just one quibble: what is the reason for the blurred picture of Einstein on the cover? The whole point of the book is its clarity: why the implication of this picture that it presents a blurred vision? (book review)

  6. The power of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Clifton, Timothy; Barrow, John D.

    2005-01-01

    We study the cosmological and weak-field properties of theories of gravity derived by extending general relativity by means of a Lagrangian proportional to R 1+δ . This scale-free extension reduces to general relativity when δ→0. In order to constrain generalizations of general relativity of this power class, we analyze the behavior of the perfect-fluid Friedmann universes and isolate the physically relevant models of zero curvature. A stable matter-dominated period of evolution requires δ>0 or δ -19 assuming that Mercury follows a timelike geodesic. The combination of these observational constraints leads to the overall bound 0≤δ -19 on theories of this type

  7. Generalized Moshinsky bracket recurrence relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bevelacqua, J.J.

    1979-01-01

    Recurrence relations for generalized Talmi-Moshinsky brackets are derived. These relations permit the generation of transformation brackets once appropriate starting brackets are determined. The savings in computer time, when compared with generating brackets individually, is at least a factor of 10 for brackets with radial quantum numbers as large as 9 and angular quantum numbers as large as 2. (author)

  8. Spinning fluids in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, J. R.; Smalley, L. L.

    1982-01-01

    General relativity field equations are employed to examine a continuous medium with internal spin. A variational principle formerly applied in the special relativity case is extended to the general relativity case, using a tetrad to express the spin density and the four-velocity of the fluid. An energy-momentum tensor is subsequently defined for a spinning fluid. The equations of motion of the fluid are suggested to be useful in analytical studies of galaxies, for anisotropic Bianchi universes, and for turbulent eddies.

  9. A blueprint for a simultaneous test of quantum mechanics and general relativity in a space-based quantum optics experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pallister, Sam [University of Bristol, School of Mathematics, Bristol (United Kingdom); Coop, Simon [The Barcelona Institute of Science and Technology, ICFO-Institut de Ciencies Fotoniques, Barcelona (Spain); Formichella, Valerio [Politecnico di Torino, Torino (Italy); Istituto Nazionale di Ricerca Metrologica (INRiM), Torino (Italy); Gampierakis, Nicolas [University of East Anglia, School of Natural Sciences, Norwich (United Kingdom); Notaro, Virginia [Sapienza University of Rome, Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Rome (Italy); Knott, Paul [University of Sussex, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Brighton (United Kingdom); Azevedo, Rui [Faculdade de Ciencias da Universidade do Porto, Porto (Portugal); Buchheim, Nikolaus [Max Planck Institute of Quantum Optics, Garching (Germany); De Carvalho, Silvio [University of Applied Sciences Wiener Neustadt, Aerospace Engineering Department, Wiener Neustadt (Austria); Jaervelae, Emilia [Aalto University Metsaehovi Radio Observatory, Kylmaelae (Finland); Aalto University Department of Radio Science and Engineering, Aalto (Finland); Laporte, Matthieu [Universite Paris Diderot, APC (AstroParticule et Cosmologie), Paris (France); Kaikkonen, Jukka-Pekka [Aalto University, Low Temperature Laboratory, Department of Applied Physics, Aalto (Finland); Meshksar, Neda [Leibniz University Hanover, Albert Einstein Institute, Hanover (Germany); Nikkanen, Timo [Aalto University Department of Radio Science and Engineering, Aalto (Finland); Finnish Meteorological Institute, Radar and Space Technology Research Group, Helsinki (Finland); Yttergren, Madeleine [Chalmers University of Technology, Physics and Astronomy, Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2017-12-15

    In this paper we propose an experiment designed to observe a general-relativistic effect on single photon interference. The experiment consists of a folded Mach-Zehnder interferometer, with the arms distributed between a single Earth orbiter and a ground station. By compensating for other degrees of freedom and the motion of the orbiter, this setup aims to detect the influence of general relativistic time dilation on a spatially superposed single photon. The proposal details a payload to measure the required effect, along with an extensive feasibility analysis given current technological capabilities. (orig.)

  10. Bimetric general relativity and cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, N.

    1980-01-01

    A modification of the general relativity theory is proposed (bimetric general relativity) in which, in addition to the usual metric tensor gsub(μupsilon) describing the space-time geometry and gravitation, there exists also a background metric tensor γsub(μupsilon). The latter describes the space-time of the universe if no matter were present and is taken to correspond to a space-time of constant curvature with positive spatial curvature (k = 1). Field equations are obtained, and these agree with the Einstein equations for systems that are small compared to the size of the universe, such as the solar system. Energy considerations lead to a generalized form of the De Donder condition. Simple isotropic closed models of the universe can be set up which first contract and then expand without going through a singular state. It is suggested that the maximum density of the universe was of the order of c 5 -h -1 G -2 approximately 10 93 g/cm 3 . The expansion from such a high-density state is similar to that from the singular state ('big bang') of the general relativity models. In the case of the dust-filled model the parameters can be fitted to present cosmological data. Using the radiation-filled model to describe the early history of the universe, the cosmic abundance of helium and other light elements can be accounted for in the same way as in ordinary general relativity. (author)

  11. Testing General Relativity with the Reflection Spectrum of the Supermassive Black Hole in 1H0707-495.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Zheng; Nampalliwar, Sourabh; Bambi, Cosimo; Dauser, Thomas; García, Javier A

    2018-02-02

    Recently, we have extended the x-ray reflection model relxill to test the spacetime metric in the strong gravitational field of astrophysical black holes. In the present Letter, we employ this extended model to analyze XMM-Newton, NuSTAR, and Swift data of the supermassive black hole in 1H0707-495 and test deviations from a Kerr metric parametrized by the Johannsen deformation parameter α_{13}. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that the spacetime metric around the black hole in 1H0707-495 is described by the Kerr solution.

  12. The gauge in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohn, J.

    1975-01-01

    The view is taken that the field equations of General Relativity, without a definition of congruence of length and time intervals at different events, are without physical content. The possibility is explored that the customary Einstein field equations are to be used but with a different congruence definition than is customary. When these resulting equations are, in turn, expressed with the customary congruence, they comprise a new set of field equations physically not equivalent to either Einstein's or Brans-Dicke's formulations of general relativity. Similarities with Einstein's and Brans-Dicke's formulations are discussed, and the possibility of experimental confirmation of these new equations is also briefly considered. (author)

  13. General relativity and gravitational waves

    CERN Document Server

    Weber, Johanna

    1961-01-01

    An internationally famous physicist and electrical engineer, the author of this text was a pioneer in the investigation of gravitational waves. Joseph Weber's General Relativity and Gravitational Waves offers a classic treatment of the subject. Appropriate for upper-level undergraduates and graduate students, this text remains ever relevant. Brief but thorough in its introduction to the foundations of general relativity, it also examines the elements of Riemannian geometry and tensor calculus applicable to this field.Approximately a quarter of the contents explores theoretical and experimenta

  14. General relativity 50 years old

    CERN Multimedia

    1966-01-01

    In May 1916, 'The Foundations of General Relativity Theory' by Albert Einstein was published in 'Annalen der Physik'. Fifty years later, this major contribution to scientific thought still has a rather isolated position with respect to the main-stream of scientific theory. (In contrast, the Special Theory of Relativity is one of the cornerstones of sub-nuclear physics.) To mark the anniversary of the publication of Einstein's paper a theoretician from CERN discusses the theory and its present status.

  15. Quantum mechanics from general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, M.

    1986-01-01

    A generalization of quantum mechanics is demonstrated in the context of general relativity, following from a generally covariant field theory of inertia. Nonrelativistically, the formalism corresponds with linear quantum mechanics. In the limit of special relativity, nonlinearity remains and several new features are derived: (1) Particle-antiparticle pairs do not annihilate; an exact bound state solution is derived corresponding with all experimental facts about annihilation/creation - which, in approximation, gives the blackbody radiation spectrum for a sea of such pairs. (2) A result is proven, without approximation, that is physically equivalent to the Pauli exclusion principle - which, in linear approximation, gives the totally antisymmetrised many-body wave function and Fermi-Dirac statistics. (3) The hydrogen spectrum is derived, including the Lamb shifts, in agreement with experiment; new results are found for high energy electron-proton scattering. (4) Finally, several applications to the elementary particle domain are demonstrated, in agreement with results from experimental high energy physics. (Auth.)

  16. General relativity and dark matter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pestov, A.B.

    1993-01-01

    It is shown that from the first principles of General Relativity it follows that there exists a new type of interactions which are tightly connected with the gravitational interactions. New particles representing a new form of interactions do not interact electromagnetically, strongly and weakly with the known elementary particles. Physics of the new particles is defined by the Planck scales. (author.). 9 refs

  17. General Relativity: Geometry Meets Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomsen, Dietrick E.

    1975-01-01

    Observing the relationship of general relativity and the geometry of space-time, the author questions whether the rest of physics has geometrical explanations. As a partial answer he discusses current research on subatomic particles employing geometric transformations, and cites the existence of geometrical definitions of physical quantities such…

  18. Algebraic computing in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D'Inverno, R.A.

    1975-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to bring to the attention of potential users the existence of algebraic computing systems, and to illustrate their use by reviewing a number of problems for which such a system has been successfully used in General Relativity. In addition, some remarks are included which may be of help in the future design of these systems. (author)

  19. Cosmological models in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cosmological models in general relativity. B B PAUL. Department of Physics, Nowgong College, Nagaon, Assam, India. MS received 4 October 2002; revised 6 March 2003; accepted 21 May 2003. Abstract. LRS Bianchi type-I space-time filled with perfect fluid is considered here with deceler- ation parameter as variable.

  20. Dimensional Analysis and General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovatt, Ian

    2009-01-01

    Newton's law of gravitation is a central topic in the first-year physics curriculum. A lecturer can go beyond the physical details and use the history of gravitation to discuss the development of scientific ideas; unfortunately, the most recent chapter in this history, general relativity, is not covered in first-year courses. This paper discusses…

  1. The confrontation between general relativity and experiment

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... and tests of gravity at short distance to look for extra spatial dimensions could further constrain alternatives to general relativity. Laser Interferometric Gravitational Wave Observatories on Earth and in space may provide new tests of scalar–tensor gravity and graviton-mass theories via the properties of gravitational waves.

  2. The genesis of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Norton, John; Renn, Jürgen; Sauer, Tilman; Stachel, John

    2007-01-01

    This four-volume work represents the most comprehensive documentation and study of the creation of general relativity; one of the fundamental physical theories of the 20th century. It comprises key sources from Einstein and others who from the late 19th to the early 20th century contributed to this monumental development. Some of these sources are presented here in translation for the first time. Einstein’s famous Zurich notebook, which documents the pivotal steps toward general relativity, is reproduced here for the first time and transcribed in its entirety. The volumes offer detailed commentaries and analyses of these sources that are based on a close reading of these documents supplemented by interpretations by the leading historians of relativity. All in all, the facets of this work, based on more than a decade of research, combine to constitute one of the most in-depth studies of a scientific revolution ever written.

  3. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Will Clifford M.

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them is reviewed. Einstein’s equivalence principle (EEP is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of special relativity, and the gravitational redshift experiment. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, and the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse-Taylor binary pulsar, and other binary pulsar systems have yielded other tests, especially of strong-field effects. When direct observation of gravitational radiation from astrophysical sources begins, new tests of general relativity will be possible.

  4. Quantum information and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peres, A.

    2004-01-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as on-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  5. Quantum information and general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peres, A. [Technion, Israel Institute of Technology, Haifa (Israel)

    2004-12-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as on-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks. (Abstract Copyright [2004], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Quantum information and general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Peres, Asher

    2004-01-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as one-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks.

  7. Quantum information and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, A.

    2004-11-01

    The Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen paradox (1935) is reexamined in the light of Shannon's information theory (1948). The EPR argument did not take into account that the observers' information was localized, like any other physical object. General relativity introduces new problems: there are horizons which act as on-way membranes for the propagation of quantum information, in particular black holes which act like sinks.

  8. Bubble collisions in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siklos, S.T.C.; Wu, Z.C.; University of Science and Technology of China, Hofei, Anhwei)

    1983-01-01

    The collision of two bubbles of true vacuum in a background of false vacuum is considered in the context of General Relativity. It is found that in the thin wall approximation, the problem, can be solved exactly. The region to the future of the collision is described by the pseudo-Schwarzschild de Sitter metric. The parameters in this metric are found by solving the junction conditions at each collision. (author)

  9. Results from Numerical General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John G.

    2011-01-01

    For several years numerical simulations have been revealing the details of general relativity's predictions for the dynamical interactions of merging black holes. I will review what has been learned of the rich phenomenology of these mergers and the resulting gravitational wave signatures. These wave forms provide a potentially observable record of the powerful astronomical events, a central target of gravitational wave astronomy. Asymmetric radiation can produce a thrust on the system which may accelerate the single black hole resulting from the merger to high relative velocity.

  10. A generalized Principle of Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Felice, Fernando de; Preti, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    The Theory of Relativity stands as a firm groundstone on which modern physics is founded. In this paper we bring to light an hitherto undisclosed richness of this theory, namely its admitting a consistent reformulation which is able to provide a unified scenario for all kinds of particles, be they lightlike or not. This result hinges on a generalized Principle of Relativity which is intrinsic to Einstein's theory - a fact which went completely unnoticed before. The road leading to this generalization starts, in the very spirit of Relativity, from enhancing full equivalence between the four spacetime directions by requiring full equivalence between the motions along these four spacetime directions as well. So far, no measurable spatial velocity in the direction of the time axis has ever been defined, on the same footing of the usual velocities - the 'space-velocities' - in the local three-space of a given observer. In this paper, we show how Relativity allows such a 'time-velocity' to be defined in a very natural way, for any particle and in any reference frame. As a consequence of this natural definition, it also follows that the time- and space-velocity vectors sum up to define a spacelike 'world-velocity' vector, the modulus of which - the world-velocity - turns out to be equal to the Maxwell's constant c, irrespective of the observer who measures it. This measurable world-velocity (not to be confused with the space-velocities we are used to deal with) therefore represents the speed at which all kinds of particles move in spacetime, according to any observer. As remarked above, the unifying scenario thus emerging is intrinsic to Einstein's Theory; it extends the role traditionally assigned to Maxwell's constant c, and can therefore justly be referred to as 'a generalized Principle of Relativity'.

  11. Zorn algebra in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, C.G.; Maia, M.D.

    The covariant differential properties of the split Cayley subalgebra of local real quaternion tetrads is considered. Referred to this local quaternion tetrad several geometrical objects are given in terms of Zorn-Weyl matrices. Associated to a pair of real null vectors we define two-component spinor fields over the curved space and the associated Zorn-Weyl matrices which satisfy the Dirac equation written in terms of the Zorn algebra. The formalism is generalized by considering a field of complex tetrads defining a Hermitian second rank tensor. The real part of this tensor describes the gravitational potentials and the imaginary part the electromagnetic potentials in the Lorentz gauge. The motion of a charged spin zero test body is considered. The Zorn-Weyl algebra associated to this generalized formalism has elements belonging to the full octonion algebra [pt

  12. Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Thomas

    2008-11-01

    Preface; Notation and conventions; Introduction; Part I. Classical Foundations, Interpretation and the Canonical Quantisation Programme: 1. Classical Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity; 2. The problem of time, locality and the interpretation of quantum mechanics; 3. The programme of canonical quantisation; 4. The new canonical variables of Ashtekar for general relativity; Part II. Foundations of Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity: 5. Introduction; 6. Step I: the holonomy-flux algebra [P]; 7. Step II: quantum-algebra; 8. Step III: representation theory of [A]; 9. Step IV: 1. Implementation and solution of the kinematical constraints; 10. Step V: 2. Implementation and solution of the Hamiltonian constraint; 11. Step VI: semiclassical analysis; Part III. Physical Applications: 12. Extension to standard matter; 13. Kinematical geometrical operators; 14. Spin foam models; 15. Quantum black hole physics; 16. Applications to particle physics and quantum cosmology; 17. Loop quantum gravity phenomenology; Part IV. Mathematical Tools and their Connection to Physics: 18. Tools from general topology; 19. Differential, Riemannian, symplectic and complex geometry; 20. Semianalytical category; 21. Elements of fibre bundle theory; 22. Holonomies on non-trivial fibre bundles; 23. Geometric quantisation; 24. The Dirac algorithm for field theories with constraints; 25. Tools from measure theory; 26. Elementary introduction to Gel'fand theory for Abelean C* algebras; 27. Bohr compactification of the real line; 28. Operatir -algebras and spectral theorem; 29. Refined algebraic quantisation (RAQ) and direct integral decomposition (DID); 30. Basics of harmonic analysis on compact Lie groups; 31. Spin network functions for SU(2); 32. + Functional analytical description of classical connection dynamics; Bibliography; Index.

  13. Homothetic motions in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McIntosh, C.B.G.

    1976-01-01

    Properties of homothetic or self-similar motions in general relativity are examined with particular reference to vacuum and perfect-fluid space-times. The role of the homothetic bivector with components Hsub((a;b)) formed from the homothetic vector H is discussed in some detail. It is proved that a vacuum space-time only admits a nontrivial homothetic motion if the homothetic vector field is non-null and is not hypersurface orthogonal. As a subcase of a more general result it is shown that a perfect-fluid space-time cannot admit a non-trivial homothetic vector which is orthogonal to the fluid velocity 4-vector. (author)

  14. Modern Canonical Quantum General Relativity;

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiefer, Claus

    2008-01-01

    The open problem of constructing a consistent and experimentally tested quantum theory of the gravitational field has its place at the heart of fundamental physics. The main approaches can be roughly divided into two classes: either one seeks a unified quantum framework of all interactions or one starts with a direct quantization of general relativity. In the first class, string theory (M-theory) is the only known example. In the second class, one can make an additional methodological distinction: while covariant approaches such as path-integral quantization use the four-dimensional metric as an essential ingredient of their formalism, canonical approaches start with a foliation of spacetime into spacelike hypersurfaces in order to arrive at a Hamiltonian formulation. The present book is devoted to one of the canonical approaches-loop quantum gravity. It is named modern canonical quantum general relativity by the author because it uses connections and holonomies as central variables, which are analogous to the variables used in Yang-Mills theories. In fact, the canonically conjugate variables are a holonomy of a connection and the flux of a non-Abelian electric field. This has to be contrasted with the older geometrodynamical approach in which the metric of three-dimensional space and the second fundamental form are the fundamental entities, an approach which is still actively being pursued. It is the author's ambition to present loop quantum gravity in a way in which every step is formulated in a mathematically rigorous form. The formal Leitmotiv of loop quantum gravity is background independence. Non-gravitational theories are usually quantized on a given non-dynamical background. In contrast, due to the geometrical nature of gravity, no such background exists in quantum gravity. Instead, the notion of a background is supposed to emerge a posteriori as an approximate notion from quantum states of geometry. As a consequence, the standard ultraviolet divergences of

  15. Nonlinear generalization of special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1985-01-01

    In Poincares axiomatic formulation special relativity is a derived consequence of a true Lorentz contraction, for a rod in absolute motion through a substratum. Furthermore, Lorentz had shown that the rod contraction can be understood by an inverse square law interaction and therefore special relativity derived from more fundamental principles. The derivation by Lorentz shows that the root of the divergence problems is the singular inverse square law. By replacing the inverse square law with a regular one through the introduction of a finite length, the author has succeeded in deriving a nonlinear generalization of special relativity which eliminates all infinities. Besides the relative velocities, these nonlinear transformation equations also contain absolute velocities against a substratum, but in the limit of small energies they go over into the linear Lorentz transformations. Depending on the smallness of the fundamental length, departures from special relativity can be observed only at very high energies. The theorem that the velocity of light is the same in all reference systems still holds and likewise the conservation laws for energy and momentum

  16. The Confrontation between General Relativity and Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clifford M. Will

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The status of experimental tests of general relativity and of theoretical frameworks for analyzing them is reviewed and updated. Einstein’s equivalence principle (EEP is well supported by experiments such as the Eötvös experiment, tests of local Lorentz invariance and clock experiments. Ongoing tests of EEP and of the inverse square law are searching for new interactions arising from unification or quantum gravity. Tests of general relativity at the post-Newtonian level have reached high precision, including the light deflection, the Shapiro time delay, the perihelion advance of Mercury, the Nordtvedt effect in lunar motion, and frame-dragging. Gravitational wave damping has been detected in an amount that agrees with general relativity to better than half a percent using the Hulse–Taylor binary pulsar, and a growing family of other binary pulsar systems is yielding new tests, especially of strong-field effects. Current and future tests of relativity will center on strong gravity and gravitational waves.

  17. Probing the Higgs vacuum with general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannheim, Philip D.; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that the structure of the Higgs vacuum can be revealed in gravitational experiments which probe the Schwarzschild geometry to only one order in MG/r beyond that needed for the classical tests of general relativity. The possibility that deviations from the conventional geometry are at least theoretically conceivable is explored. The deviations obtained provide a diagnostic test for searching for the existence of macroscopic scalar fields and open up the possiblity for further exploring the Higgs mechanism.

  18. Machian effects in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embacher, F.

    1988-01-01

    As a consequence of Mach's principle, rotating matter should cause local inertial frames or gyroscopes in its vicinity to undergo a small rotation which is not present in the Newtonian picture. H. Thirring and J. Lense were the first to derive similar predictions from the field equations of general relativity. Since these early days of relativity, a lot of exact and approximate solutions to Einstein's equations have been examined under this point of view. The qualitative features of Machian effects are most easily demonstrated in the cylinder symmetric case, where some exact results are available. For example, space-time is flat inside a uniformly rotating matter shell, and the rotation of this interior with respect to 'infinity' (the distant stars) has a clear meaning. In the more realistic case of what happens near a massive rotating star, one is forced to perform certain approximations. In modern language, Machian effects are described in terms of the twist of timelike killing vector fields. In the linearized theory, the equations that determine the Machian structure generated by a given matter distribution, resemble to some extent those of classical electrodynamics. This correspondence provides a pedagogical approach how to compute the quantitative extent of inertial frame 'dragging'. 6 refs., 5 figs. (Author)

  19. Angular momentum in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prior, C.R.

    1977-01-01

    The definition of angular momentum proposed in part I of this series (Prior. Proc. R. Soc. Lond.; A354:379 (1977)) is investigated when applied to rotating black holes. It is shown how to use the formula to evaluate the angular momentum of a stationary black hole. This acts as a description of a background space on which the effect of first matter and then gravitational perturbations is considered. The latter are of most interest and the rate of change of angular momentum, dJ/dt, is found as an expression in the shear induced in the event horizon by the perturbation and in its time integral. Teukolsky's solutions (Astrophys. J.; 185:635 (1973)) for the perturbed component of the Weyl tensor are then used to find this shear and hence to give an exact answer for dJ/dt. One of the implications of the result is a direct verification of Bekenstein's formula (Phys. Rev.; 7D:949 (1973)) relating in a simple way the rate of change of angular momentum to the rate of change of mass caused by a plane wave. A more general expression is also given for dM/dt. Considering only stationary perturbations, it is shown how to generalize the definition of angular momentum so as to include information about its direction as well. Three problems are particularly discussed - a single moon, two or more moons and a ring of matter causing the perturbation - since they provide illustrations of all the main features of the black hole's behaviour. In every case it is found that the black hole realigns its axis of rotation so that the final configuration is axisymmetric if possible; otherwise is slows down completely to reach a static state. (author)

  20. Geometric quantization and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Souriau, J.-M.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of geometric quantization is to give a rigorous mathematical content to the 'correspondence principle' between classical and quantum mechanics. The main tools are borrowed on one hand from differential geometry and topology (differential manifolds, differential forms, fiber bundles, homology and cohomology, homotopy), on the other hand from analysis (functions of positive type, infinite dimensional group representations, pseudo-differential operators). Some satisfactory results have been obtained in the study of dynamical systems, but some fundamental questions are still waiting for an answer. The 'geometric quantization of fields', where some further well known difficulties arise, is still in a preliminary stage. In particular, the geometric quantization on the gravitational field is still a mere project. The situation is even more uncertain due to the fact that there is no experimental evidence of any quantum gravitational effect which could give us a hint towards what we are supposed to look for. The first level of both Quantum Theory, and General Relativity describes passive matter: influence by the field without being a source of it (first quantization and equivalence principle respectively). In both cases this is only an approximation (matter is always a source). But this approximation turns out to be the least uncertain part of the description, because on one hand the first quantization avoids the problems of renormalization and on the other hand the equivalence principle does not imply any choice of field equations (it is known that one can modify Einstein equations at short distances without changing their geometrical properties). (Auth.)

  1. Missed opportunities to offer HIV tests to high-risk groups during general practitioners’ STI-related consultations: an observational study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joore, I.K.; Reukers, D.F.M.; Donker, G.A.; Sighem, A.I. van; Coul, E.L.M. Op de; Prins, J.M.; Geerlings, S.E.; Barth, S.R.E.; Bergen, J.E.A.M. van; Broek, I.V.F. van den

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Prior research has shown that Dutch general practitioners (GPs) do not always offer HIV testing and the number of undiagnosed HIV patients remains high. We aimed to further investigate the frequency and reasons for (not) testing for HIV and the contribution of GPs to the diagnosis of HIV

  2. Managing work-related psychological complaints by general practitioners, in coordination with occupational physicians: A pilot Study - Developing and testing a guideline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijs, P.C.; Dijk, F.J.H. van; Evers, M.; Klink, J.J.L. van de; Anema, H.

    2007-01-01

    Increasingly, workers have psychological work-related complaints, endangering their work ability and causing considerable economic losses. Many employees consult their general practitioner (GP). He, however, often pays insufficient attention to work-relatedness or to coordination with occupational

  3. General Relativity and John Archibald Wheeler

    CERN Document Server

    Ciufolini, Ignazio

    2010-01-01

    Observational and experimental data pertaining to gravity and cosmology are changing our view of the Universe. General relativity is a fundamental key for the understanding of these observations and its theory is undergoing a continuing enhancement of its intersection with observational and experimental data. These data include direct observations and experiments carried out in our solar system, among which there are direct gravitational wave astronomy, frame dragging and tests of gravitational theories from solar system and spacecraft observations. This book explores John Archibald Wheeler's seminal and enduring contributions in relativistic astrophysics and includes: the General Theory of Relativity and Wheeler's influence; recent developments in the confrontation of relativity with experiments; the theory describing gravitational radiation, and its detection in Earth-based and space-based interferometer detectors as well as in Earth-based bar detectors; the mathematical description of the initial value pro...

  4. Action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brown, J. David

    2011-01-01

    An action principle for the generalized harmonic formulation of general relativity is presented. The action is a functional of the spacetime metric and the gauge source vector. An action principle for the Z4 formulation of general relativity has been proposed recently by Bona, Bona-Casas, and Palenzuela. The relationship between the generalized harmonic action and the Bona, Bona-Casas, and Palenzuela action is discussed in detail.

  5. Quantum theory and Einstein's general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzeszkowski, H. von; Treder, H.

    1982-01-01

    We dicusss the meaning and prove the accordance of general relativity, wave mechanics, and the quantization of Einstein's gravitation equations themselves. Firstly, we have the problem of the influence of gravitational fields on the de Broglie waves, which influence is in accordance with Einstein's weak principle of equivalence and the limitation of measurements given by Heisenberg's uncertainty relations. Secondly, the quantization of the gravitational fields is a ''quantization of geometry.'' However, classical and quantum gravitation have the same physical meaning according to limitations of measurements given by Einstein's strong principle of equivalence and the Heisenberg uncertainties for the mechanics of test bodies

  6. Isotropic stars in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mak, M.K.; Harko, T.

    2013-01-01

    We present a general solution of the Einstein gravitational field equations for the static spherically symmetric gravitational interior space-time of an isotropic fluid sphere. The solution is obtained by transforming the pressure isotropy condition, a second order ordinary differential equation, into a Riccati type first order differential equation, and using a general integrability condition for the Riccati equation. This allows us to obtain an exact non-singular solution of the interior field equations for a fluid sphere, expressed in the form of infinite power series. The physical features of the solution are studied in detail numerically by cutting the infinite series expansions, and restricting our numerical analysis by taking into account only n=21 terms in the power series representations of the relevant astrophysical parameters. In the present model all physical quantities (density, pressure, speed of sound etc.) are finite at the center of the sphere. The physical behavior of the solution essentially depends on the equation of state of the dense matter at the center of the star. The stability properties of the model are also analyzed in detail for a number of central equations of state, and it is shown that it is stable with respect to the radial adiabatic perturbations. The astrophysical analysis indicates that this solution can be used as a realistic model for static general relativistic high density objects, like neutron stars. (orig.)

  7. General relativity with applications to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Straumann, Norbert

    2004-01-01

    This text provides a comprehensive and timely introduction to general relativity The foundations of the theory in Part I are thoroughly developed together with the required mathematical background from differential geometry in Part III The six chapters in Part II are devoted to tests of general relativity and to many of its applications Binary pulsars are studied in considerable detail Much space is devoted to the study of compact objects, especially to black holes This includes a detailed derivation of the Kerr solution, Israel's proof of his uniqueness theorem, and derivations of the basic laws of black hole physics The final chapter of this part contains Witten's proof of the positive energy theorem The book addresses undergraduate and graduate students in physics, astrophysics and mathematics It is very well structured and should become a standard text for a modern treatment of gravitational physics The clear presentation of differential geometry makes it also useful for string theory and other fields of ...

  8. Numerical Hydrodynamics in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Font José A.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The current status of numerical solutions for the equations of ideal general relativistic hydrodynamics is reviewed. With respect to an earlier version of the article, the present update provides additional information on numerical schemes, and extends the discussion of astrophysical simulations in general relativistic hydrodynamics. Different formulations of the equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well-adapted to advanced numerical methods. A large sample of available numerical schemes is discussed, paying particular attention to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. A comprehensive summary of astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields is presented. These include gravitational collapse, accretion onto black holes, and hydrodynamical evolutions of neutron stars. The material contained in these sections highlights the numerical challenges of various representative simulations. It also follows, to some extent, the chronological development of the field, concerning advances on the formulation of the gravitational field and hydrodynamic equations and the numerical methodology designed to solve them.

  9. Stochastic quantization of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rumpf, H.

    1986-01-01

    Following an elementary exposition of the basic mathematical concepts used in the theory of stochastic relaxation processes the stochastic quantization method of Parisi and Wu is briefly reviewed. The method is applied to Einstein's theory of gravitation using a formalism that is manifestly covariant with respect to field redefinitions. This requires the adoption of Ito's calculus and the introduction of a metric in field configuration space, for which there is a unique candidate. Due to the indefiniteness of the Euclidean Einstein-Hilbert action stochastic quantization is generalized to the pseudo-Riemannian case. It is formally shown to imply the DeWitt path integral measure. Finally a new type of perturbation theory is developed. (Author)

  10. A logic road from special relativity to general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Andréka, Hajnal; Madarász, Judit X.; Németi, István; Székely, Gergely

    2010-01-01

    We present a streamlined axiom system of special relativity in first-order logic. From this axiom system we "derive" an axiom system of general relativity in two natural steps. We will also see how the axioms of special relativity transform into those of general relativity. This way we hope to make general relativity more accessible for the non-specialist.

  11. Longitudinal relation between general well-being and self-esteem : Testing differences for adolescents admitted to secure residential care and after discharge

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barendregt, C.S.; Laan, A.J.; Bongers, I.L.; van Nieuwenhuizen, Ch.

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the longitudinal relation between general well-being and self-esteem of male adolescents with severe psychiatric disorders. Moreover, the transition out of secure residential care was studied. Adolescents (N = 172) were assessed three times with 6 months between each

  12. Gravity: An Introduction to Einstein's General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabris, Julio C

    2004-01-01

    some sense, in the second part, containing 14 chapters and covering almost two thirds of the book. Here, the principle of equivalence is fully discussed as well as the idea that gravity can be represented by the geometry of spacetime. Gravity is no longer conceived as a force but instead as the curvature of spacetime. First, the author shows how Newtonian gravity can be obtained as the limit of a specific spacetime geometry, which is after all the weak field limit of a general pseudo-Riemannian spacetime. From this, he is able to introduce geometries that represent gravity outside this weak field limit. The general approach followed by the author could be summarized as follows. The equivalence principle is encoded in curved spacetime. When gravitation effects are weak and the velocity small compared with the velocity of light, we can recover Newtonian theory from this spacetime structure. Now, let us assume a specific curved spacetime representing a physical situation, for example, the gravitational field created by a spherical mass distribution. This leads to the Schwarzschild spacetime. Hence, possible kinds of orbits can be studied through the geodesic equation, observational results (light deflection, perihelion precession of closed orbits, etc) can be discussed, the notion of 'coordinate singularity' can be presented, and so on. What is really effective in this approach is that essentially all the content of specific physical situations, such as the static, spherically symmetric problem, can be extracted. For the Schwarzschild spacetime, the employment of different coordinates is discussed (Eddington-Finkelstein, Kruskal, etc), the Kruskal extension and Penrose diagram are studied in detail and tests of general relativity are analysed. The Kerr metric is also presented and discussed, with emphasis on the new features that it brings (energy extraction, for example). The same is done for cosmology (restricted, for obvious reasons, to the isotropic and homogenous

  13. Conformal methods in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Valiente Kroon, Juan A

    2016-01-01

    This book offers a systematic exposition of conformal methods and how they can be used to study the global properties of solutions to the equations of Einstein's theory of gravity. It shows that combining these ideas with differential geometry can elucidate the existence and stability of the basic solutions of the theory. Introducing the differential geometric, spinorial and PDE background required to gain a deep understanding of conformal methods, this text provides an accessible account of key results in mathematical relativity over the last thirty years, including the stability of de Sitter and Minkowski spacetimes. For graduate students and researchers, this self-contained account includes useful visual models to help the reader grasp abstract concepts and a list of further reading, making this the perfect reference companion on the topic.

  14. Pulsar timing and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backer, D. C.; Hellings, R. W.

    1986-01-01

    Techniques are described for accounting for relativistic effects in the analysis of pulsar signals. Design features of instrumentation used to achieve millisecond accuracy in the signal measurements are discussed. The accuracy of the data permits modeling the pulsar physical characteristics from the natural glitches in the emissions. Relativistic corrections are defined for adjusting for differences between the pulsar motion in its spacetime coordinate system relative to the terrestrial coordinate system, the earth's motion, and the gravitational potentials of solar system bodies. Modifications of the model to allow for a binary pulsar system are outlined, including treatment of the system as a point mass. Finally, a quadrupole model is presented for gravitational radiation and techniques are defined for using pulsars in the search for gravitational waves.

  15. The use of generalized functions and distributions in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steinbauer, R; Vickers, J A

    2006-01-01

    We review the extent to which one can use classical distribution theory in describing solutions of Einstein's equations. We show that there are a number of physically interesting cases which cannot be treated using distribution theory but require a more general concept. We describe a mathematical theory of nonlinear generalized functions based on Colombeau algebras and show how this may be applied in general relativity. We end by discussing the concept of singularity in general relativity and show that certain solutions with weak singularities may be regarded as distributional solutions of Einstein's equations. (topical review)

  16. Possible experiment with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites to obtain a new test of Einstein's general theory of relativity and improved measurements in geodesy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van Patten, R.A.; Everitt, C.W.F.

    1976-01-01

    In 1918, Lense and Thirring calculated that a moon orbiting a rotating planet would experience a nodal dragging effect due to general relativity. We describe an experiment to measure this effect to 1% with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites in polar earth orbit. In addition to tracking data from existing ground stations, satellite-to-satellite Doppler ranging data are taken near the poles. New geophysical information is inherent in the polar data

  17. General relativity and mathematics; Relatividad General y Matematicas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mars, M.

    2015-07-01

    General relativity is more than a theory of gravity, since any physical process occupies space and lasts for a time, forcing to reconcile that physical theory that describes what the dynamic nature of space-time itself. (Author)

  18. Introduction to general relativity and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Mitchell A

    2018-01-01

    The textbook aims to present general relativity and modern cosmology in a friendly form suitable for advanced undergraduates. The text begins with a self-contained introduction to the theory of manifolds and then develops the tools needed to understand curved spaces and curved spacetimes. Special relativity can then be understood in a geometrical context, bypassing some of the difficulties students have when encountering relativistic effects (e.g. time dilation and length contraction) for the first time. The theory of curvature and its effects leads to the Einstein field equations and its classic tests in the precession of Mercury and the deflection of starlight. The second part of the book covers modern cosmology, starting with the evolution equations for the expansion of the universe. The microwave background, evidence for dark matter, and the clustering of galaxies are examined in detail.

  19. Centennial of general relativity a celebration

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    It has been over 100 years since the presentation of the Theory of General Relativity by Albert Einstein, in its final formulation, to the Royal Prussian Academy of Sciences. To celebrate 100 years of general relativity, World Scientific publishes this volume with a dual goal: to assess the current status of the field of general relativity in broad terms, and discuss future directions. The volume thus consists of broad overviews summarizing major developments over the past decades and their perspective contributions.

  20. Student-led Re-enactment of Eddington’s 1919 Light Deflection Test of General Relativity during the Great American Eclipse of 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Keri; Glazer, Kelsey Samantha; Overduin, James; Miskiewicz, Chris; Eney, Brian; Mouette, Jean

    2018-01-01

    We describe a student-led project to image two seventh-magnitude stars on either side of the Sun during the solar eclipse of August 21, 2017. Both stars were within one solar radius of the Sun, and according to Einstein’s theory of General Relativity, their positions would have been shifted away from the Sun by 1 arcsec. We observed the eclipse from three different sites along the path of totality (Lexington, South Carolina; Indian Valley, Idaho; Madras, Oregon). All three sites were clear, but the brightness of the solar corona has complicated the analysis. We present preliminary results using our best images from the site in Idaho.

  1. General Relativity in (1 + 1) Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boozer, A. D.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a theory of gravity in (1 + 1) dimensions that can be thought of as a toy model of general relativity. The theory should be a useful pedagogical tool, because it is mathematically much simpler than general relativity but shares much of the same conceptual structure; in particular, it gives a simple illustration of how gravity arises…

  2. Mechanics of extended masses in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harte, Abraham I

    2012-01-01

    The 'external' or 'Right' motion of extended bodies is studied in general relativity. Compact material objects of essentially arbitrary shape, spin, internal composition and velocity are allowed as long as there is no direct (non-gravitational) contact with other sources of stress-energy. Physically reasonable linear and angular momenta are proposed for such bodies and exact equations describing their evolution are derived. Changes in the momenta depend on a certain 'effective metric' that is closely related to a non-perturbative generalization of the Detweiler-Whiting R-field originally introduced in the self-force literature. If the effective metric inside a self-gravitating body can be adequately approximated by an appropriate power series, the instantaneous gravitational force and torque exerted on it is shown to be identical to the force and torque exerted on an appropriate test body moving in the effective metric. This result holds to all multipole orders. The only instantaneous effect of a body's self-field is to finitely renormalize the 'bare' multipole moments of its stress-energy tensor. The MiSaTaQuWa expression for the gravitational self-force is recovered as a simple application. A gravitational self-torque is obtained as well. Lastly, it is shown that the effective metric in which objects appear to move is approximately a solution to the vacuum Einstein equation if the physical metric is an approximate solution to Einstein's equation linearized about a vacuum background. (paper)

  3. Motivations for antigravity in General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chardin, G. [DSM/DAPNIA/SPP, CEN-Saclay (France)

    1997-08-15

    We present arguments showing that it is natural to interpret the negative mass part of the Kerr solution as representing the geometry experienced by antimatter. The C, P and T discrete transformations are considered for this geometry. The C and T properties of the proposed identification are found to be in agreement with the usual representation of antimatter. In addition, we conjecture a property of perfect stigmatism through Kerr wormholes which allows General Relativity to mimic antigravity. Kerr wormholes would then act as 'supermirrors' reversing the C, P and T images of an object seen through it. This interpretation is subject to several experimental tests and able to provide an explanation, without any free parameter, of the 'CP' violation observed in the neutral kaon system.

  4. Motivations for antigravity in General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chardin, G.

    1997-01-01

    We present arguments showing that it is natural to interpret the negative mass part of the Kerr solution as representing the geometry experienced by antimatter. The C, P and T discrete transformations are considered for this geometry. The C and T properties of the proposed identification are found to be in agreement with the usual representation of antimatter. In addition, we conjecture a property of perfect stigmatism through Kerr wormholes which allows General Relativity to mimic antigravity. Kerr wormholes would then act as 'supermirrors' reversing the C, P and T images of an object seen through it. This interpretation is subject to several experimental tests and able to provide an explanation, without any free parameter, of the 'CP' violation observed in the neutral kaon system

  5. On thick domain walls in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Guenter; Noetzold, Dirk

    1989-01-01

    Planar scalar field configurations in general relativity differ considerably from those in flat space. It is shown that static domain walls of finite thickness in curved space-time do not possess a reflection symmetry. At infinity, the space-time tends to the Taub vacuum on one side of the wall and to the Minkowski vacuum (Rindler space-time) on the other. Massive test particles are always accelerated towards the Minkowski side, i.e., domain walls are attractive on the Taub side, but repulsive on the Minkowski side (Taub-vacuum cleaner). It is also proved that the pressure in all directions is always negative. Finally, a brief comment is made concerning the possibility of infinite, i.e., bigger than horizon size, domain walls in our universe. All of the results are independent of the form of the potential V(phi) greater than or equal to 0 of the scalar field phi.

  6. Figures of merit and constraints from testing general relativity using the latest cosmological data sets including refined COSMOS 3D weak lensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dossett, Jason N.; Moldenhauer, Jacob; Ishak, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    We use cosmological constraints from current data sets and a figure of merit approach in order to probe any deviations from general relativity at cosmological scales. The figure of merit approach is used to study and compare the constraining power of various combinations of data sets on the modified gravity (MG) parameters. We use the recently refined HST-COSMOS weak-lensing tomography data, the ISW-galaxy cross correlations from 2MASS and SDSS luminous red galaxy surveys, the matter power spectrum from SDSS-DR7 (MPK), the WMAP7 temperature and polarization spectra, the baryon acoustic oscillations from Two-Degree Field and SDSS-DR7, and the Union2 compilation of type Ia supernovae, in addition to other bounds from Hubble parameter measurements and big bang nucleosynthesis. We use three parametrizations of MG parameters that enter the perturbed field equations. In order to allow for variations of the parameters with the redshift and scale, the first two parametrizations use recently suggested functional forms while the third is based on binning methods. Using the first parametrization, we find that the CMB+ISW+WL combination provides the strongest constraints on the MG parameters followed by CMB+WL or CMB+MPK+ISW. Using the second parametrization or the binning methods, we find that the combination CMB+MPK+ISW consistently provides some of the strongest constraints. This shows that the constraints are parametrization dependent. We find that adding up current data sets does not improve consistently the uncertainties on MG parameters due to tensions between the best-fit MG parameters preferred by different data sets. Furthermore, some functional forms imposed by the parametrizations can lead to an exacerbation of these tensions. Next, unlike some studies that used the CFHTLS lensing data, we do not find any deviation from general relativity using the refined HST-COSMOS data, confirming previous claims in those studies that their result may have been due to some

  7. An Introduction to General Relativity and Cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wainwright, John

    2007-01-01

    -Walker geometry and the FL models. The rest of part II, two lengthy chapters, deals with two classes of solutions of Einstein's field equations that represent spatially inhomogeneous cosmological models, and that contain the FL models as a special case. Parts of these two chapters are based on Krasinski's book on inhomogeneous cosmologies, with the difference that the present work does not attempt to be comprehensive, but instead provides clear derivations of the most important results. A potential reader may ask how this book differs from other texts on general relativity. It is unique in a number of respects. First is the authors' emphasis on spatially inhomogeneous cosmological models, i.e. models that do not satisfy the cosmological principle. The authors appear to have reservations about the almost universal preference in the cosmological community for working within the framework of the FL models, combined with the inflationary scenario in the very early universe, and these reservations motivate the above emphasis. They remind the reader that the FL models are based on the cosmological principle, which has a philosophical rather than a physical status, since it cannot be directly tested by observation. In other words, observations alone do not uniquely select the FL models. Moreover the interpretation of cosmological observations depends on the choice of the underlying spacetime geometry. For example, there is ambiguity in inferring the spatial distribution of matter from redshift measurements. The authors discuss in some detail the work of Kurki-Suonio and Liang to illustrate this point. They also refer to Celerier who shows that the high redshift type Ia supernovae observations are compatible with a Lemaitre-Tolman model with zero cosmological constant, i.e. these observations do not imply that the universe is accelerating if one considers models more general than the FL models, in contrast to the usual interpretation. The authors also give a critique of the cosmological

  8. A possible experiment with two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites to obtain a new test of Einstein's general theory of relativity and improved measurements in geodesy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Patten, R. A.; Everitt, C. W. F.

    1976-01-01

    In 1918, Lense and Thirring calculated that a moon in orbit around a massive rotating planet would experience a nodal dragging effect due to general relativity. We describe an experiment to measure this effect by means of two counter-orbiting drag-free satellites in polar orbit about the earth. For a 2-1/2 year experiment, the measurement should approach an accuracy of 1%. An independent measurement of the geodetic precession of the orbit plane due to the motion about the sun may also be possible to about 10% accuracy. In addition to precision tracking data from existing ground stations, satellite-to-satellite Doppler data are taken at points of passing near the poles to yield an accurate measurement of the separation distance between the two satellites. New geophysical information on both earth harmonics and tidal effects is inherent in this polar ranging data.

  9. An elementary course on general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regge, T.

    1983-01-01

    This report gives an informal account of the theory of general relativity, for non-specialists. It does not contain any detailed technical expose of tensor calculus but relies instead on a number of intuitive arguments. After a brief historical introduction the notion of curvature is developed, first in two dimensions (as done originally by Gauss) and then in higher dimensions, following the ideas of Riemann. This curvature is then related to quantities of physical interest through the following steps: i) The equality of gravitational and inertial masses is discussed and presented as the ''weak equivalence principle''. ii) This is then extended to the ''strong equivalence principle'' according to the original programme of Einstein. iii) The ''strong equivalence principle'' implies the existence of a local inertial observer in any point of space-time. In a sufficiently small region of space-time this observer will not sense any gravitational field. iv) In a larger region the observer will, however, sense residual tidal forces. These forces are identified with the curvature of spacetime, to achieve a direct geometrical interpretation of gravity. v) Finally certain curvature components are related to the distribution of matter through Einstein's field equations. Section 4 contains a discussion of the classical tests of the theory and of the possibility of detecting gravitational waves. Sections 5 and 6 deal with cosmology and with the possible extension of the theory along the lines of the original ideas of Einstein, with emphasis on the dimensional reduction techniques of current interest. (orig.)

  10. Particle field in bimetric general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falik, D.; Rosen, N.

    1980-01-01

    The field equations of the bimetric general relativity theory proposed recently by one of the authors (N. Rosen) are put into a static form. The equations are solved near the Schwarzschild sphere, and it is found that the field differs from that of the Einstein general relativity theory: instead of a black hole, one has an impenetrable sphere. For larger distances the field is found to agree with that of ordinary general relativity, so that solar system observations cannot distinguish between the two theories. For very large distances one gets a cosmic contribution to the field which may affect the dynamics of clusters of galaxies

  11. Compact objects in bimetric general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harpaz, A.; Rosen, N.

    1985-01-01

    The field equations of the bimetric general relativity theory proposed by one of the authors (N. Rosen), in the static form, are solved in order to investigate the structure of a star. It is found that for an ordinary star the bimetric theory gives the same results as the Einstein general relativity theory. However, for a collapsed star the two theories give different results. In the bimetric theory a configuration in hydrostatic equilibrium exists for a collapsed star filling its Schwarzschild sphere. In general relativity no equilibrium configuration exists in this region, and the star shrinks to a point singularity to form a black hole

  12. Victories and defeats in general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moeller, C.

    1977-01-01

    Only within the last 20 years has it been possible to conduct far-reaching experimental tests of the validity of Einstein's General Relativity Theory. Experimental confirmation in some fields is embarrassed by considerable difficulties in applying the theory to cosmic systems, which indicate that such major systems lie at the limit of the theory's applicability. The lecture here reproduced discusses both the successes and the limitations of the theory, starting with its replacement of the absolute space-time theory of Newton and its historical replacement by the relativistic gravitational postulates of Einstein which, in spite of its more complicated postulates, nevertheless introduced a great simplicity and comprehensiveness into the overall conception of nature. This theoretical 'beauty', however, can only be trusted if vindicated experimentally, which has to a considerable extent proved to be the case. For weak fields Newtonian and Einsteinian concepts coincide, while for stronger fields, and velocities not far from that of light, Einstein's theory is superior, giving,for example, an excellent correspondence with the precession of the perehelion of Mercury. On a larger scale, however, the theory appears to lead to conclusions which would invalidate the very concepts of space and time, even within a finite time-interval. A more generalized theory seems to be required. (A.D.N.)

  13. O(3)-invariant tunneling in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berezin, V.A.; Tkachev, I.I.; Kuzmin, V.A.; AN SSSR, Moscow. Inst. Yadernykh Issledovanij)

    1987-12-01

    We derived a general formula for the action for any O(3)-invariant tunneling processes in false vacuum decay in general relativity. The general classification of the bubble Euclidean trajectories is elaborated and explicit expressions for bounces for some processes like the vacuum creation of a double bubble, in particular in the vicinity of a black hole; the subbarrier creation of the Einstein-Rosen bridge, creation from nothing of two Minkowski worlds connected by a shell etc., are given. (orig.)

  14. Axisymmetric solution with charge in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arutyunyan, G.G.; Papoyan, V.V.

    1989-01-01

    The possibility of generating solutions to the equations of general relativity from known solutions of the generalized theory of gravitation and vice versa is proved. An electrovac solution to Einstein's equations that describes a static axisymmetric gravitational field is found. 14 refs

  15. Einstein and General Relativity: Historical Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presented in the 1978 Oppenheimer Memorial Lecture at Los Alamos Scientific Laboratories on August 17, 1978, discusses Einstein's contributions to physics, in particular, his discovery of the general theory of relativity. (HM)

  16. Quantum theory and Einstein's general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borzeszkowski, H.H.v.; Treder, H.J.

    1984-01-01

    The paper concerns Einstein's general relativity, wave mechanics and the quantization of Einstein's gravitation equations. The principle of equivalence and its association with both wave mechanics and quantum gravity, is discussed. (U.K.)

  17. Black hole dynamics in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Basic features of dynamical black holes in full, non-linear general relativity are summarized in a pedagogical fashion. Qualitative properties of the evolution of various horizons follow directly from the celebrated Raychaudhuri equation.

  18. Differential Prediction Generalization in College Admissions Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguinis, Herman; Culpepper, Steven A.; Pierce, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the concept of "differential prediction generalization" in the context of college admissions testing. Specifically, we assess the extent to which predicted first-year college grade point average (GPA) based on high-school grade point average (HSGPA) and SAT scores depends on a student's ethnicity and gender and whether this…

  19. Einstein and general relativity: historical perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1978-01-01

    The place of Einstein in 20th-century physics is discussed. The basic ideas that led Einstein to his theory of gravitation by the sheer power of speculative thought are described in the most general terms. The prediction of the bending of starlight by the Sun and the eclipse expedition of 1919 are recounted. The author feels that ''the general theory of relativity is incredibly rich in its content;...one finds a glittering face at almost every turn.'' The prediction of black holes by general relativity is noted

  20. Energy and Uncertainty in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooperstock, F. I.; Dupre, M. J.

    2018-03-01

    The issue of energy and its potential localizability in general relativity has challenged physicists for more than a century. Many non-invariant measures were proposed over the years but an invariant measure was never found. We discovered the invariant localized energy measure by expanding the domain of investigation from space to spacetime. We note from relativity that the finiteness of the velocity of propagation of interactions necessarily induces indefiniteness in measurements. This is because the elements of actual physical systems being measured as well as their detectors are characterized by entire four-velocity fields, which necessarily leads to information from a measured system being processed by the detector in a spread of time. General relativity adds additional indefiniteness because of the variation in proper time between elements. The uncertainty is encapsulated in a generalized uncertainty principle, in parallel with that of Heisenberg, which incorporates the localized contribution of gravity to energy. This naturally leads to a generalized uncertainty principle for momentum as well. These generalized forms and the gravitational contribution to localized energy would be expected to be of particular importance in the regimes of ultra-strong gravitational fields. We contrast our invariant spacetime energy measure with the standard 3-space energy measure which is familiar from special relativity, appreciating why general relativity demands a measure in spacetime as opposed to 3-space. We illustrate the misconceptions by certain authors of our approach.

  1. Supersymmetry, General Relativity and Unity of Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Shima, Kazunari; Tsuda, Motomu

    2008-01-01

    The basic idea and some physical implications of nonlinear supersymmetric general relativity (NLSUSY GR) are presented. NLSUSY GR may give new insights into the origin of mass and the mysterious relations between the cosmology and the low energy particle physics, e.g. the spontaneous SUSY breaking scale, the cosmological constant, the (dark) energy density of the universe and the neutrino mass.

  2. Teaching General Relativity to the Layperson

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egdall, Mark

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a lay course on general relativity (GR) given at the Osher Lifelong Learning Institute at Florida International University. It is presented in six hour-and-a-half weekly sessions. Other courses offered by the author include special relativity (which precedes the course described here), quantum theory, and cosmology. Students…

  3. General very special relativity in Finsler cosmology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kouretsis, A. P.; Stathakopoulos, M.; Stavrinos, P. C.

    2009-01-01

    General very special relativity (GVSR) is the curved space-time of very special relativity (VSR) proposed by Cohen and Glashow. The geometry of general very special relativity possesses a line element of Finsler geometry introduced by Bogoslovsky. We calculate the Einstein field equations and derive a modified Friedmann-Robertson-Walker cosmology for an osculating Riemannian space. The Friedmann equation of motion leads to an explanation of the cosmological acceleration in terms of an alternative non-Lorentz invariant theory. A first order approach for a primordial-spurionic vector field introduced into the metric gives back an estimation of the energy evolution and inflation.

  4. On generalization uniaxial stress-strain relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sahay, C.; Dubey, R.N.

    1980-01-01

    Different forms of constitutive relations have been advanced for elastic, plastic and elastic-plastic behaviour of materials. It is shown that the various forms of the stress-strain relationship are specialized forms of generalization of a single stress-strain relation. For example, it is shown how the laws of elastic deformation, and the incremental and total deformation relationship for plastic behaviour are derivable from the Ramberg-Osgood relation. (orig.)

  5. Generalized transformations and coordinates for static spherically symmetric general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, James M.; O'Leary, Joseph

    2018-04-01

    We examine a static, spherically symmetric solution of the empty space field equations of general relativity with a non-orthogonal line element which gives rise to an opportunity that does not occur in the standard derivations of the Schwarzschild solution. In these derivations, convenient coordinate transformations and dynamical assumptions inevitably lead to the Schwarzschild solution. By relaxing these conditions, a new solution possibility arises and the resulting formalism embraces the Schwarzschild solution as a special case. The new solution avoids the coordinate singularity associated with the Schwarzschild solution and is achieved by obtaining a more suitable coordinate chart. The solution embodies two arbitrary constants, one of which can be identified as the Newtonian gravitational potential using the weak field limit. The additional arbitrary constant gives rise to a situation that allows for generalizations of the Eddington-Finkelstein transformation and the Kruskal-Szekeres coordinates.

  6. Generalized transformations and coordinates for static spherically symmetric general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, James M; O'Leary, Joseph

    2018-04-01

    We examine a static, spherically symmetric solution of the empty space field equations of general relativity with a non-orthogonal line element which gives rise to an opportunity that does not occur in the standard derivations of the Schwarzschild solution. In these derivations, convenient coordinate transformations and dynamical assumptions inevitably lead to the Schwarzschild solution. By relaxing these conditions, a new solution possibility arises and the resulting formalism embraces the Schwarzschild solution as a special case. The new solution avoids the coordinate singularity associated with the Schwarzschild solution and is achieved by obtaining a more suitable coordinate chart. The solution embodies two arbitrary constants, one of which can be identified as the Newtonian gravitational potential using the weak field limit. The additional arbitrary constant gives rise to a situation that allows for generalizations of the Eddington-Finkelstein transformation and the Kruskal-Szekeres coordinates.

  7. Generalized Disjunctions in (Infinitary) Structural Consequence Relations

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Cintula, Petr; Noguera, C.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 18, č. 3 (2012), s. 442-443 ISSN 1079-8986. [Logic Colloquium 2011. 11.07.2011-16.07.2011, Barcelona] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0545 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10300504 Keywords : Abstract Algebraic Logic * Generalized disjunction * Proof by cases properties * Consequence relations Subject RIV: BA - General Mathematics http://www.math.ucla.edu/~asl/bsl/1803- toc .htm

  8. 26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    26th August 2010 - World Meteorological Organization Secretary-General M. Jarraud signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with Technology Department Head F. Bordry; throughout accompanied by M. Bona, CERN Relations with International Organisations

  9. Einstein and the history of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, D.; Stachel, J.

    1989-01-01

    This book is a collection of essays by the authors and other people that deal with scientific opinions that led Einstein and his contemporaries to their views of general relativity. Some of the essays explore Einstein's passage from the special theory through a sequence of gravitational theories to the discovery of the field equations of the grand theory in November 1915. Two other essays discuss Einstein's public and private exchanges with Max Abraham and Tullio Levi-Civita in 1913 and 1914. A sympathetic picture of H.A. Lorentz's reaction to the general theory of relativity is included, and a careful and insightful essay on the early understanding of the Schwarzschild-Droste solution to the field equations of general relativity is presented. One paper presents a discussion on the state of the enterprise of general relativity between 1925 and 1928, and a short essay details the history of steps toward quantum gravitational through canonical quantization. A discussion of the history of derivations of the geodesic equation of motion from the field equation and conservation laws of the general theory is presented. The early history of geometrical unified field theories is included

  10. Generalized Landau-Pollak uncertainty relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Miyadera, Takayuki; Imai, Hideki

    2007-01-01

    The Landau-Pollak uncertainty relation treats a pair of rank one projection valued measures and imposes a restriction on their probability distributions. It gives a nontrivial bound for summation of their maximum values. We give a generalization of this bound (weak version of the Landau-Pollak uncertainty relation). Our generalization covers a pair of positive operator valued measures. A nontrivial but slightly weak inequality that can treat an arbitrary number of positive operator valued measures is also presented. A possible application to the problem of separability criterion is also suggested

  11. Relational Coordination in Danish General Practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundstrøm, Sanne Lykke

    . The dissertation present the research study and a collection of three research papers prepared during the period from May 2010 to June 2014. Relational coordination and organisational social capital are measures of novel aspects of an organisation's performance. Relational coordination analyse the communication...... and relationship networks through which work is coordinated across functional and organisational boundaries. Previous studies have shown that relational coordination is positively associated with delivery of care for patients with chronic illness. Organisational social capital is used when analysing...... the psychosocial work environment in organisations, and is seen as a powerful resources for improving organisational performance. Relational coordination and organisational social capital may oer new insight and opportunities for general practice to learn. General practice provides cost-efficient, first...

  12. Singular Null Hypersurfaces in General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dray, T

    2006-01-01

    test particles in such a spacetime, in an initial attempt to outline a framework for the detection of impulsive gravitational waves. Subsequent chapters describe the singular null hypersurfaces obtained by boosting isolated gravitational sources, building on the work of Aichelburg and Sexl, and by colliding impulsive waves, building on the work of Khan and Penrose. In between, the special case of spherical symmetry is considered, both with and without collisions. There is also a short chapter discussing the effect of replacing GR by alternative theories of gravity, and an appendix which briefly summarizes the non-null case. The references are reasonably complete, from Synge and Penrose to the recent work of the authors. However, there are a few relatively minor errors and omissions. For instance, the results in chapter 3 about shells of matter in both Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordstroem geometries are presented without reference or derivation. And I was disappointed to see that my own work with 't Hooft on the horizon shift due to the impulsive wave of a massless particle at the horizon of a Schwarzschild black hole-a direct generalization of the work by Aichelburg and Sexl-is not mentioned. But none of these minor complaints detracts from my appreciation of having a complete discussion of singular null hypersurfaces all in one place. The three fundamental papers which started this area of research all appeared at essentially the same time, 35 years ago; it is high time there was a unified presentation of the entire field. This book fills that need admirably, and could serve as the core of a graduate seminar for students having already taken a course in general relativity, or as a reference. My copy will have a treasured place in my library. References Penrose R 1972 The geometry of impulsive gravitational waves General Relativity: Papers in Honour of J L Synge ed L O Raifeartaigh (Oxford: Clarendon) pp 101-30 Aichelburg P C and Sexl R U 1971 On the gravitational

  13. Generating perfect fluid spheres in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2005-06-01

    Ever since Karl Schwarzschild’s 1916 discovery of the spacetime geometry describing the interior of a particular idealized general relativistic star—a static spherically symmetric blob of fluid with position-independent density—the general relativity community has continued to devote considerable time and energy to understanding the general-relativistic static perfect fluid sphere. Over the last 90 years a tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these specific examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, in this article we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres.

  14. Generating perfect fluid spheres in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boonserm, Petarpa; Visser, Matt; Weinfurtner, Silke

    2005-01-01

    Ever since Karl Schwarzschild's 1916 discovery of the spacetime geometry describing the interior of a particular idealized general relativistic star--a static spherically symmetric blob of fluid with position-independent density--the general relativity community has continued to devote considerable time and energy to understanding the general-relativistic static perfect fluid sphere. Over the last 90 years a tangle of specific perfect fluid spheres has been discovered, with most of these specific examples seemingly independent from each other. To bring some order to this collection, in this article we develop several new transformation theorems that map perfect fluid spheres into perfect fluid spheres. These transformation theorems sometimes lead to unexpected connections between previously known perfect fluid spheres, sometimes lead to new previously unknown perfect fluid spheres, and in general can be used to develop a systematic way of classifying the set of all perfect fluid spheres

  15. Generalization of Gibbs Entropy and Thermodynamic Relation

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Jun Chul

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we extend Gibbs's approach of quasi-equilibrium thermodynamic processes, and calculate the microscopic expression of entropy for general non-equilibrium thermodynamic processes. Also, we analyze the formal structure of thermodynamic relation in non-equilibrium thermodynamic processes.

  16. Summary of classical general relativity workshop

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the classical general relativity workshop, ten lectures were presented on various topics. The topics included aspects of black-hole physics, gravitational collapse and the formation of black holes, specific stellar models like a superdense star, method of extracting solutions by exploiting Noether symmetry, brane world and.

  17. Safety Evaluation Report related to the renewal of the operating license for the General Electric-Nuclear Test Reactor (GE-NTR) (Docket No. 50-73)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1984-09-01

    This Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the General Electric Company (GE) for a renewal license number R-33 to continue to operate its research reactor has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is owned and operated by GE and is located in Pleasanton, California. The staff concludes that the reactor can continue to be operated by GE without endangering the health and safety of the public

  18. General relativity and gravitation a centennial perspective

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Beverly K; Isenberg, James; MacCallum, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    Explore spectacular advances in cosmology, relativistic astrophysics, gravitational wave science, mathematics, computational science, and the interface of gravitation and quantum physics with this unique celebration of the centennial of Einstein's discovery of general relativity. Twelve comprehensive and in-depth reviews, written by a team of world-leading international experts, together present an up-to-date overview of key topics at the frontiers of these areas, with particular emphasis on the significant developments of the last three decades. Interconnections with other fields of research are also highlighted, making this an invaluable resource for both new and experienced researchers. Commissioned by the International Society on General Relativity and Gravitation, and including accessible introductions to cutting-edge topics, ample references to original research papers, and informative colour figures, this is a definitive reference for researchers and graduate students in cosmology, relativity, and grav...

  19. Development of Einstein's general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Datta, B.K.

    1980-01-01

    Starting from Poincare's Lorentz-invariant theory of gravity formulated in 1906, development of Einstein's general theory of relativity during 1906-1916 is discussed. Three stages in this development are recognised. In the first stage during 1907-1914, Einstein tried to extend the relativity principle of uniform motion to the frames in non-uniform motion. For this purpose, he introduced the principle of equivalence which made it possible to calculate the effect of homogeneous gravitational field on arbitrary physical processes. During the second stage comprising years 1912-1914 overlapping the first stage, Einstein and Grossmann were struggling to translate physical postulates into the language of the absolute differential calculus. In the period 1915-1916, Einstein formulated the field equations of general relativity. While discussing these developmental stages, theories of gravitation formulated by Abraham, Nordstroem and Mie are also discussed. (M.G.B.)

  20. Partial Differential Equations in General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne

    2008-01-01

    General relativity is a physical theory basic in the modeling of the universe at the large and small scales. Its mathematical formulation, the Einstein partial differential equations, are geometrically simple, but intricate for the analyst, involving both hyperbolic and elliptic PDE, with local and global problems. Many problems remain open though remarkable progress has been made recently towards their solutions. Alan Rendall's book states, in a down-to-earth form, fundamental results used to solve different types of equations. In each case he gives applications to special models as well as to general properties of Einsteinian spacetimes. A chapter on ODE contains, in particular, a detailed discussion of Bianchi spacetimes. A chapter entitled 'Elliptic systems' treats the Einstein constraints. A chapter entitled 'Hyperbolic systems' is followed by a chapter on the Cauchy problem and a chapter 'Global results' which contains recently proved theorems. A chapter is dedicated to the Einstein-Vlasov system, of which the author is a specialist. On the whole, the book surveys, in a concise though precise way, many essential results of recent interest in mathematical general relativity, and it is very clearly written. Each chapter is followed by an up to date bibliography. In conclusion, this book will be a valuable asset to relativists who wish to learn clearly-stated mathematical results and to mathematicians who want to penetrate into the subtleties of general relativity, as a mathematical and physical theory. (book review)

  1. Partial Differential Equations in General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne

    2008-09-07

    General relativity is a physical theory basic in the modeling of the universe at the large and small scales. Its mathematical formulation, the Einstein partial differential equations, are geometrically simple, but intricate for the analyst, involving both hyperbolic and elliptic PDE, with local and global problems. Many problems remain open though remarkable progress has been made recently towards their solutions. Alan Rendall's book states, in a down-to-earth form, fundamental results used to solve different types of equations. In each case he gives applications to special models as well as to general properties of Einsteinian spacetimes. A chapter on ODE contains, in particular, a detailed discussion of Bianchi spacetimes. A chapter entitled 'Elliptic systems' treats the Einstein constraints. A chapter entitled 'Hyperbolic systems' is followed by a chapter on the Cauchy problem and a chapter 'Global results' which contains recently proved theorems. A chapter is dedicated to the Einstein-Vlasov system, of which the author is a specialist. On the whole, the book surveys, in a concise though precise way, many essential results of recent interest in mathematical general relativity, and it is very clearly written. Each chapter is followed by an up to date bibliography. In conclusion, this book will be a valuable asset to relativists who wish to learn clearly-stated mathematical results and to mathematicians who want to penetrate into the subtleties of general relativity, as a mathematical and physical theory. (book review)

  2. Using CAMAL for algebraic computations in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fitch, J.P.

    1979-01-01

    CAMAL is a collection of computer algebra systems developed in Cambridge, England for use mainly in theoretical physics. One of these was designed originally for general relativity calculations, although it is often used in other fields. In a recent paper Cohen, Leringe, and Sundblad compared six systems for algebraic computations applied to general relativity available in Stockholm. Here similar information for CAMAL is given and by using the same tests CAMAL is added to the comparison. (author)

  3. Generalized Weierstrass Relations and Frobenius Reciprocity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsutani, Shigeki

    2006-01-01

    This article investigates local properties of the further generalized Weierstrass relations for a spin manifold S immersed in a higher dimensional spin manifold M from the viewpoint of the study of submanifold quantum mechanics. We show that the kernel of a certain Dirac operator defined over S, which we call a submanifold Dirac operator, gives the data of the immersion. In the derivation, the simple Frobenius reciprocity of Clifford algebras S and M plays an important role

  4. Screening vector field modifications of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beltrán Jiménez, Jose; Delvas Fróes, André Luís; Mota, David F.

    2013-01-01

    A screening mechanism for conformal vector–tensor modifications of general relativity is proposed. The conformal factor depends on the norm of the vector field and makes the field to vanish in high dense regions, whereas drives it to a non-null value in low density environments. Such process occurs due to a spontaneous symmetry breaking mechanism and gives rise to both the screening of fifth forces as well as Lorentz violations. The cosmology and local constraints are also computed

  5. Interacting electromagnetic waves in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffiths, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    The problem is considered of finding exact solutions of the Einstein-Maxwell equations which describe the physical situation of two colliding and subsequently interacting electromagnetic waves. The general theory of relativity predicts a nonlinear interaction between electromagnetic waves. The situation is described using an approximate geometrical method, and a new exact solution describing two interacting electromagnetic waves is given. This describes waves emitted from two sources mutually focusing each other on the opposite source. (author)

  6. Gravity, general relativity theory and alternative theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zel'dovich, Ya.B.; Grishchuk, L.P.; Moskovskij Gosudarstvennyj Univ.

    1986-01-01

    The main steps in plotting the current gravitation theory and some prospects of its subsequent development are reviewed. The attention is concentrated on a comparison of the relativistic gravitational field with other physical fields. Two equivalent formulations of the general relativity (GR) - geometrical and field-theoretical - are considered in detail. It is shown that some theories of gravity constructed as the field theories at a flat background space-time are in fact just different formulations of GR and not alternative theories

  7. Between general relativity and quantum theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rayski, J.

    1982-01-01

    Some possibilities of reconciling general relativity with quantum theory are discussed. The procedure of quantization is certainly not unique, but depends upon the choice of the coordinate conditions. Most versions of quantization predict the existence of gravitons, but it is also possible to formulate a quantum theory with a classical gravity whereby the expectation values of Tsub(μν) constitute the sources of the classical metric field. (author)

  8. Special relativity, electrodynamics, and general relativity from Newton to Einstein

    CERN Document Server

    Kogut, John B

    2018-01-01

    Special Relativity, Electrodynamics and General Relativity: From Newton to Einstein, Second Edition, is intended to teach (astro)physics, astronomy, and cosmology students how to think about special and general relativity in a fundamental, but accessible, way. Designed to render any reader a "master of relativity," everything on the subject is comprehensible and derivable from first principles. The book emphasizes problem solving, contains abundant problem sets, and is conveniently organized to meet the needs of both student and instructor. Fully revised, updated and expanded second edition Includes new chapters on magnetism as a consequence of relativity and electromagnetism Contains many improved and more engaging figures Uses less algebra resulting in more efficient derivations Enlarged discussion of dynamics and the relativistic version of Newton's second law

  9. Relativity the special and the general theory

    CERN Document Server

    Einstein, Albert

    2015-01-01

    After completing the final version of his general theory of relativity in November 1915, Albert Einstein wrote a book about relativity for a popular audience. His intention was "to give an exact insight into the theory of relativity to those readers who, from a general scientific and philosophical point of view, are interested in the theory, but who are not conversant with the mathematical apparatus of theoretical physics." The book remains one of the most lucid explanations of the special and general theories ever written. In the early 1920s alone, it was translated into ten languages, and fifteen editions in the original German appeared over the course of Einstein's lifetime. This new edition of Einstein's celebrated book features an authoritative English translation of the text along with an introduction and a reading companion by Hanoch Gutfreund and Jürgen Renn that examines the evolution of Einstein's thinking and casts his ideas in a broader present-day context. A special chapter explores the history...

  10. Simple recursion relations for general field theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cheung, Clifford; Shen, Chia-Hsien; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2015-01-01

    On-shell methods offer an alternative definition of quantum field theory at tree-level, replacing Feynman diagrams with recursion relations and interaction vertices with a handful of seed scattering amplitudes. In this paper we determine the simplest recursion relations needed to construct a general four-dimensional quantum field theory of massless particles. For this purpose we define a covering space of recursion relations which naturally generalizes all existing constructions, including those of BCFW and Risager. The validity of each recursion relation hinges on the large momentum behavior of an n-point scattering amplitude under an m-line momentum shift, which we determine solely from dimensional analysis, Lorentz invariance, and locality. We show that all amplitudes in a renormalizable theory are 5-line constructible. Amplitudes are 3-line constructible if an external particle carries spin or if the scalars in the theory carry equal charge under a global or gauge symmetry. Remarkably, this implies the 3-line constructibility of all gauge theories with fermions and complex scalars in arbitrary representations, all supersymmetric theories, and the standard model. Moreover, all amplitudes in non-renormalizable theories without derivative interactions are constructible; with derivative interactions, a subset of amplitudes is constructible. We illustrate our results with examples from both renormalizable and non-renormalizable theories. Our study demonstrates both the power and limitations of recursion relations as a self-contained formulation of quantum field theory.

  11. General Vehicle Test Plan (GVTP) for Urban Rail Transit Cars

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-09-01

    The General Vehicle Test Plan provides a system for general vehicle testing and for documenting and utilizing data and information in the testing of urban rail transit cars. Test procedures are defined for nine categories: (1) Performance; (2) Power ...

  12. Gravitational radiation and the validity of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Will, C.M.

    2001-01-01

    The regular observation of gravitational radiation by a world-wide network of resonant and laser-interferometric detectors will usher in a new form of astronomy. At the same time, it will provide new and interesting tests of general relativity. We review the current empirical status of general relativity, and discuss three areas in which direct observation of gravitational radiation could test the theory further: polarization of the waves, speed of the waves, and back-reaction of the waves on the evolution of the source. (author)

  13. Relativity tests and their motivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lehnert, Ralf

    2011-01-01

    Some motivations for Lorentz-symmetry tests in the context of quantum-gravity phenomenology are reiterated. The description of the emergent low-energy effects with the Standard-Model Extension (SME) is reviewed. The possibility of constraining such effects with dispersion-relation analyses of collider data is established.

  14. Numerical Hydrodynamics and Magnetohydrodynamics in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Font José A.

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents a comprehensive overview of numerical hydrodynamics and magnetohydrodynamics (MHD in general relativity. Some significant additions have been incorporated with respect to the previous two versions of this review (2000, 2003, most notably the coverage of general-relativistic MHD, a field in which remarkable activity and progress has occurred in the last few years. Correspondingly, the discussion of astrophysical simulations in general-relativistic hydrodynamics is enlarged to account for recent relevant advances, while those dealing with general-relativistic MHD are amply covered in this review for the first time. The basic outline of this article is nevertheless similar to its earlier versions, save for the addition of MHD-related issues throughout. Hence, different formulations of both the hydrodynamics and MHD equations are presented, with special mention of conservative and hyperbolic formulations well adapted to advanced numerical methods. A large sample of numerical approaches for solving such hyperbolic systems of equations is discussed, paying particular attention to solution procedures based on schemes exploiting the characteristic structure of the equations through linearized Riemann solvers. As previously stated, a comprehensive summary of astrophysical simulations in strong gravitational fields is also presented. These are detailed in three basic sections, namely gravitational collapse, black-hole accretion, and neutron-star evolutions; despite the boundaries, these sections may (and in fact do overlap throughout the discussion. The material contained in these sections highlights the numerical challenges of various representative simulations. It also follows, to some extent, the chronological development of the field, concerning advances in the formulation of the gravitational field, hydrodynamics and MHD equations and the numerical methodology designed to solve them. To keep the length of this article reasonable

  15. Energy conditions and stability in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hall, G.S.

    1982-01-01

    The dominant energy condition in general relativity theory, which says that every observer measures a nonnegative local energy density and a nonspacelike local energy flow, is examined in connection with the types of energy-momentum tensor it permits. The condition that the energy-momentum tensor be ''stable'' in obeying the dominant energy conditions is then defined in terms of a suitable topology on the set of energy-momentum tensors on space-time and the consequences are evaluated and discussed. (author)

  16. Weak field approximation of new general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fukui, Masayasu; Masukawa, Junnichi

    1985-01-01

    In the weak field approximation, gravitational field equations of new general relativity with arbitrary parameters are examined. Assuming a conservation law delta sup(μ)T sub(μν) = 0 of the energy-momentum tensor T sub(μν) for matter fields in addition to the usual one delta sup(ν)T sub(μν) = 0, we show that the linearized gravitational field equations are decomposed into equations for a Lorentz scalar field and symmetric and antisymmetric Lorentz tensor fields. (author)

  17. The mathematical theory of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Katkar, L N

    2014-01-01

    This book is prepared for M. Sc. Students of Mathematics and Physics. The aim of writing this book is to give the reader a feeling for the necessity and beauty of the laws of general relativity. The contents of the book will attract both mathematicians and physicists which provides motivation and applications of many ideas and powerful mathematical methods of modern analysis and differential geometry. An attempt has been made to make the presentation comprehensive, rigorous and yet simple. Most calculations and transformations have been carried out in great detail. KEY FEATURE: Numerous solved examples using the well known mathematical techniques viz., the tensors and the differential forms in each chapter.

  18. New Area Law in General Relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousso, Raphael; Engelhardt, Netta

    2015-08-21

    We report a new area law in general relativity. A future holographic screen is a hypersurface foliated by marginally trapped surfaces. We show that their area increases monotonically along the foliation. Future holographic screens can easily be found in collapsing stars and near a big crunch. Past holographic screens exist in any expanding universe and obey a similar theorem, yielding the first rigorous area law in big bang cosmology. Unlike event horizons, these objects can be identified at finite time and without reference to an asymptotic boundary. The Bousso bound is not used, but it naturally suggests a thermodynamic interpretation of our result.

  19. Anholonomic Cauchy problem in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stachel, J.

    1980-01-01

    The Lie derivative approach to the Cauchy problem in general relativity is applied to the evolution along an arbitrary timelike vector field for the case where the dynamical degrees of freedom are chosen as the (generally anholonomic) metric of the hypersurface elements orthogonal to the vector field. Generalizations of the shear, rotation, and acceleration are given for a nonunit timelike vector field, and applied to the three-plus-one breakup of the Riemann tensor into components parallel and orthogonal to the vector field, resulting in the anholonomic Gauss--Codazzi equations. A similar breakup of the Einstein field equations results in the form of the constraint and evolution equations for the anholonomic case. The results are applied to the case of a space--time with a timelike Killing vector field (stationary field) to demonstrate their utility. Other possible applications, such as in the numerical integration of the field equations, are mentioned. Definitions are given of three-index shear, rotation, and acceleration tensors, and their use in a two-plus-two decomposition of the Riemann tensor and field equations is indicated

  20. Optical drift effects in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korzyński, Mikołaj; Kopiński, Jarosław

    2018-03-01

    We consider the question of determining the optical drift effects in general relativity, i.e. the rate of change of the apparent position, redshift, Jacobi matrix, angular distance and luminosity distance of a distant object as registered by an observer in an arbitrary spacetime. We present a fully relativistic and covariant approach, in which the problem is reduced to a hierarchy of ODE's solved along the line of sight. The 4-velocities and 4-accelerations of the observer and the emitter and the geometry of the spacetime along the line of sight constitute the input data. We build on the standard relativistic geometric optics formalism and extend it to include the time derivatives of the observables. In the process we obtain two general, non-perturbative relations: the first one between the gravitational lensing, represented by the Jacobi matrix, and the apparent position drift, also called the cosmic parallax, and the second one between the apparent position drift and the redshift drift. The applications of the results include the theoretical study of the drift effects of cosmological origin (so-called real-time cosmology) in numerical or exact Universe models.

  1. Kinematics in special and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woodside, R.W.M.

    1979-05-01

    This thesis investigates the problem of motion for extended bodies from the viewpoint of classical field theory, where the classical field is the body's energy-momentum or matter tensor. In special relativity a symmetric and divergence-free matter tensor combined with inertial frames is used to generate a kinematics for extended bodies. In general relativity the author suggests an analogous kinematics and applies it to the simplest non-trivial example of static, spherical stars, looking for special sets of vector fields whose matter currents are conserved. Such a set of ten vector fields defines a special frame, and integrals of the conserved matter currents define ten momenta whcih give the kinematics. Application of de Rham cohomology theory shows that the conserved matter currents for isolated bodies will have mechanical potentials which enable the momenta to be found from flux integrals evaluated in the vacuum region surrounding the body. These potentials contain the full Riemann curvature, allowing a body's general relativistic momenta to be determined by its vacuum graviational field

  2. Tests of General Relativity with GW150914

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Abbott, B. P.; Abbott, R.; Abbott, T. D.; Abernathy, M. R.; Acernese, F.; Ackley, K.; Adams, C.; Phythian-Adams, A.T.; Addesso, P.; Adhikari, R. X.; Adya, V. B.; Affeldt, C.; Agathos, M.; Agatsuma, K.; Aggarwal, N.T.; Aguiar, O. D.; Aiello, L.; Ain, A.; Ajith, P.; Allen, B.; Allocca, A.; Altin, P. A.; Anderson, S. B.; Anderson, W. G.; Arai, K.; Araya, M. C.; Arceneaux, C. C.; Areeda, J. S.; Arnaud, N.; Arun, K. G.; Ascenzi, S.; Ashton, G.; Ast, M.; Aston, S. M.; Astone, P.; Aufmuth, P.; Aulbert, C.; Babak, S.; Bacon, P.; Bader, M. K. M.; Baker, P. T.; Baldaccini, F.; Ballardin, G.; Ballmer, S. W.; Barayoga, J. C.; Barclay, S. E.; Barish, B. C.; Barker, R.D.; Barone, F.; Barr, B.; Barsotti, L.; Barsuglia, M.; Barta, D.; Bartlett, J.; Bartos, I.; Bassiri, R.; Basti, A.; Batch, J. C.; Baune, C.; Bavigadda, V.; Bazzan, M.; Behnke, B.; Bejger, M.; Bell, A. S.; Bell, C. J.; Berger, B. K.; Bergman, J.; Bergmann, G.; Berry, C. P. L.; Bersanetti, D.; Bertolini, A.; Betzwieser, J.; Bhagwat, S.; Bhandare, R.; Bilenko, I. A.; Billingsley, G.; Birch, M.J.; Birney, R.; Birnholtz, O.; Biscans, S.; Bisht, A.; Bitossi, M.; Biwer, C.; Bizouard, M. A.; Blackburn, J. K.; Blair, C. D.; Blair, D. G.; Blair, R. M.; Bloemen, A.L.S.; Bock, O.; Bodiya, T. P.; Boer, M.; Bogaert, J.G.; Bogan, C.; Bohe, A.; Bojtos, P.; Bond, T.C; Bondu, F.; Bonnand, R.; Boom, B. A.; Bork, R.; Boschi, V.; Bose, S.; Bouffanais, Y.; Bozzi, A.; Bradaschia, C.; Brady, P. R.; Braginsky, V. B.; Branchesi, M.; Brau, J. E.; Briant, T.; Brillet, A.; Brinkmann, M.; Brisson, V.; Brockill, P.; Brooks, A. F.; Brown, A.D.; Brown, D.; Brown, N. M.; Buchanan, C. C.; Buikema, A.; Bulik, T.; Bulten, H. J.; Buonanno, A.; Buskulic, D.; Buy, C.; Byer, R. L.; Cadonati, L.; Cagnoli, G.; Cahillane, C.; Bustillo, J. Calderon; Callister, T. A.; Calloni, E.; Camp, J. B.; Cannon, K. C.; Cao, J.; Capano, C. D.; Capocasa, E.; Carbognani, F.; Caride, S.; Diaz, J. Casanueva; Casentini, C.; Caudill, S.; Cavaglia, M.; Cavalier, F.; Cavalieri, R.; Cella, G.; Cepeda, C. B.; Baiardi, L. Cerboni; Cerretani, G.; Cesarini, E.; Chakraborty, R.; Chalermsongsak, T.; Chamberlin, S. J.; Chan, M.; Chao, D. S.; Charlton, P.; Chassande-Mottin, E.; Chen, H. Y.; Chen, Y; Cheng, C.; Chincarini, A.; Chiummo, A.; Cho, H. S.; Cho, M.; Chow, J. H.; Christensen, N.; Chu, Qian; Chua, S. E.; Chung, E.S.; Ciani, G.; Clara, F.; Clark, J. A.; Cleva, F.; Coccia, E.; Cohadon, P. -F.; Colla, A.; Collette, C. G.; Cominsky, L.; Constancio, M., Jr.; Conte, A.; Conti, L.; Cook, D.; Corbitt, T. R.; Cornish, N.; Corsi, A.; Cortese, S.; Costa, A.C.; Coughlin, M. W.; Coughlin, S. B.; Coulon, J. -P.; Countryman, S. T.; Couvares, P.; Cowan, E. E.; Coward, D. M.; Cowart, M. J.; Coyne, D. C.; Coyne, R.; Craig, K.; Creighton, J. D. E.; Cripe, J.; Crowder, S. G.; Cumming, A.; Cunningham, A.L.; Cuoco, E.; Dal Canton, T.; Danilishin, S. L.; D'Antonio, S.; Danzmann, K.; Darman, N. S.; Dattilo, V.; Dave, I.; Daveloza, H. P.; Davier, M.; Davies, G. S.; Daw, E. J.; Day, R.; Debra, D.; Debreczeni, G.; Degallaix, J.; De laurentis, M.; Deleglise, S.; Del Pozzo, W.; Denker, T.; Dent, T.; Dereli, H.; Dergachev, V.A.; Rosa, R.; DeRosa, R. T.; DeSalvo, R.; Dhurandhar, S.; Diaz, M. C.; Di Fiore, L.; Giovanni, M.G.; Di Lieto, A.; Di Pace, S.; Di Palma, I.; Di Virgilio, A.; Dojcinoski, G.; Dolique, V.; Donovan, F.; Dooley, K. L.; Doravari, S.; Douglas, R.; Downes, T. P.; Drago, M.; Drever, R. W. P.; Driggers, J. C.; Du, Z.; Ducrot, M.; Dwyer, S. E.; Edo, T. B.; Edwards, M. C.; Effler, A.; Eggenstein, H. -B.; Ehrens, P.; Eichholz, J.; Eikenberry, S. S.; Engels, W.; Essick, R. C.; Etzel, T.; Evans, T. M.; Evans, T. M.; Everett, R.; Factourovich, M.; Fafone, V.; Fair, H.; Fairhurst, S.; Fan, X.M.; Fang, Q.; Farinon, S.; Farr, B.; Farr, W. M.; Favata, M.; Fays, M.; Fehrmann, H.; Fejer, M. M.; Ferrante, I.; Ferreira, E. C.; Ferrini, F.; Fidecaro, F.; Fiori, I.; Fiorucci, D.; Fisher, R. P.; Flaminio, R.; Fletcher, M; Fournier, J. -D.; Franco, S; Frasca, S.; Frasconi, F.; Frei, Z.; Freise, A.; Frey, R.; Frey, V.; Fricke, T. T.; Fritschel, P.; Frolov, V. V.; Fulda, P.; Fyffe, M.; Gabbard, H. A. G.; Gair, J. R.; Gammaitoni, L.; Gaonkar, S. G.; Garufi, F.; Gatto, A.; Gaur, G.; Gehrels, N.; Gemme, G.; Gendre, B.; Genin, E.; Gennai, A.; George, J.; Gergely, L.; Germain, V.; Ghosh, Abhirup; Ghosh, Archisman; Ghosh, S.; Giaime, J. A.; Giardina, K. D.; Giazotto, A.; Gill, K.P.; Glaefke, A.; Goetz, E.; Goetz, R.; Gondan, L.; Gonzalez, Idelmis G.; Castro, J. M. Gonzalez; Gopakumar, A.; Gordon, N. A.; Gorodetsky, M. L.; Gossan, S. E.; Lee-Gosselin, M.; Gouaty, R.; Graef, C.; Graff, P. B.; Granata, M.; Grant, A.; Gras, S.; Gray, C.M.; Greco, G.; Green, A. C.; Groot, P.; Grote, H.; Grunewald, S.; Guidi, G. M.; Guo, X.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, M. K.; Gushwa, K. E.; Gustafson, E. K.; Gustafson, R.; Hacker, J. J.; Buffoni-Hall, R.; Hall, E. D.; Hammond, G.L.; Haney, M.; Hanke, M. M.; Hanks, J.; Hanna, C.; Hannam, M. D.; Hanson, P.J.; Hardwick, T.; Harms, J.; Harry, G. M.; Harry, I. W.; Hart, M. J.; Hartman, M. T.; Haster, C. -J.; Haughian, K.; Healy, J.; Heidmann, A.; Heintze, M. C.; Heitmann, H.; Hello, P.; Hemming, G.; Hendry, M.; Heng, I. S.; Hennig, J.; Heptonstall, A. W.; Heurs, M.; Hild, S.; Hoak, D.; Hodge, K. A.; Hofman, D.; Hollitt, S. E.; Holt, K.; Holz, D. E.; Hopkins, P.; Hosken, D. J.; Hough, J.; Houston, E. A.; Howell, E. J.; Hu, Y. M.; Huang, S.; Huerta, E. A.; Huet, D.; Hughey, B.; Husa, S.; Huttner, S. H.; Huynh-Dinh, T.; Idrisy, A.; Indik, N.; Ingram, D. R.; Inta, R.; Isa, H. N.; Isac, J. -M.; Isi, M.; Islas, G.; Isogai, T.; Iyer, B. R.; Izumi, K.; Jacqmin, T.; Jang, D.H.; Jani, K.; Jaranowski, P.; Jawahar, S.; Jimenez-Forteza, F.; Johnson, W.; Johnson-McDaniel, N. K.; Jones, I.D.; Jones, R.; Jonker, R. J. G.; Ju, L.; Haris, M. K.; Kalaghatgi, C. V.; Kalogera, V.; Kandhasamy, S.; Kang, G.H.; Kanner, J. B.; Karki, S.; Kasprzack, M.; Katsavounidis, E.; Katzman, W.; Kaufer, S.; Kaur, T.; Kawabe, K.; Kawazoe, F.; Kefelian, F.; Kehl, M. S.; Keitel, D.; Kelley, D. B.; Kells, W.; Kennedy, R.E.; Key, J. S.; Khalaidovski, A.; Khalili, F. Y.; Khan, I.; Khan., S.; Khan, Z.; Khazanov, E. A.; Kijbunchoo, N.; Kim, C.; Kim, J.; Kim, Nam-Gyu; Kim, K.; Kim, Namjun; Kim, Y.M.; King, E. J.; King, P. J.; Kinzel, D. L.; Kissel, J. S.; Kleybolte, L.; Klimenko, S.; Koehlenbeck, S. M.; Kokeyama, K.; Koley, S.; Kondrashov, V.; Kontos, A.; Korobko, M.; Korth, W. Z.; Kowalska, I.; Kozak, D. B.; Kringel, V.; Krishnan, B.; Krolak, A.; Krueger, C.; Kuehn, G.; Kumar, P.; Kuo, L.; Kutynia, A.; Lackey, B. D.; Landry, M.; Lange, J.; Lantz, B.; Lasky, P. D.; Lazzarini, A.; Lazzaro, C.; Leaci, P.; Leavey, S.; Lebigot, E. O.; Lee, C.H.; Lee, K.H.; Lee, M.H.; Lee, K.; Lenon, A.; Leonardi, M.; Leong, J. R.; Leroy, N.; Letendre, N.; Levin, Y.; Levine, B. M.; Li, T. G. F.; Libson, A.; Littenberg, T. B.; Lockerbie, N. A.; Logue, J.; Lombardi, A. L.; London, L. T.; Lord, J. E.; Lorenzini, M.; Loriette, V.; Lormand, M.; Losurdo, G.; Lough, J. D.; Lousto, C. O.; Lovelace, G.; Lueck, H.; Lundgren, A. P.; Luo, J.; Lynch, R.; Ma, Y.; MacDonald, T.T.; Machenschalk, B.; MacInnis, M.; Macleod, D. M.; Magana-Sandoval, F.; Magee, R. M.; Mageswaran, M.; Majorana, E.; Maksimovic, I.; Malvezzi, V.; Man, N.; Mandel, I.; Mandic, V.; Mangano, V.; Mansell, G. L.; Manske, M.; Mantovani, M.; Marchesoni, F.; Marion, F.; Marka, S.; Marka, Z.; Markosyan, A. S.; Maros, E.; Martelli, F.; Martellini, L.; Martin, I. W.; Martin, R.M.; Martynov, D. V.; Marx, J. N.; Mason, K.; Masserot, A.; Massinger, T. J.; Masso-Reid, M.; Matichard, F.; Matone, L.; Mavalvala, N.; Mazumder, N.; Mazzolo, G.; McCarthy, R.; McClelland, D. E.; McCormick, S.; McGuire, S. C.; McIntyre, G.; McIver, J.; McManus, D. J.; McWilliams, S. T.; Meacher, D.; Meadors, G. D.; Meidam, J.; Melatos, A.; Mendell, G.; Mendoza-Gandara, D.; Mercer, R. A.; Merilh, E. L.; Merzougui, M.; Meshkov, S.; Messenger, C.; Messick, C.; Meyers, P. M.; Mezzani, F.; Miao, H.; Michel, C.; Middleton, H.; Mikhailov, E. E.; Milano, L.; Miller, J.; Millhouse, M.; Minenkov, Y.; Ming, J.; Mirshekari, S.; Mishra, C.; Mitra, S.; Mitrofanov, V. P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mittleman, R.; Moggi, A.; Mohan, M.; Mohapatra, S. R. P.; Montani, M.; Moore, B.C.; Moore, J.C.; Moraru, D.; Gutierrez Moreno, M.; Morriss, S. R.; Mossavi, K.; Mours, B.; Mow-Lowry, C. M.; Mueller, C. L.; Mueller, G.; Muir, A. W.; Mukherjee, Arunava; Mukherjee, S.D.; Mukherjee, S.; Mukund, N.; Mullavey, A.; Munch, J.; Murphy, D. J.; Murray, P.G.; Mytidis, A.; Nardecchia, I.; Naticchioni, L.; Nayak, R. K.; Necula, V.; Nedkova, K.; Nelemans, G.; Gutierrez-Neri, M.; Neunzert, A.; Newton-Howes, G.; Nguyen, T. T.; Nielsen, A. B.; Nissanke, S.; Nitz, A.; Nocera, F.; Nolting, D.; Normandin, M. E. N.; Nuttall, L. K.; Oberling, J.; Ochsner, E.; O'Dell, J.; Oelker, E.; Ogin, G. H.; Oh, J.; Oh, S. H.; Ohme, F.; Oliver, M. B.; Oppermann, P.; Oram, Richard J.; O'Reilly, B.; O'Shaughnessy, R.; Ottaway, D. J.; Ottens, R. S.; Overmier, H.; Owen, B. J.; Pai, A.; Pai, S. A.; Palamos, J. R.; Palashov, O.; Palomba, C.; Pal-Singh, A.; Pan, H.; Pan, Y.; Pankow, C.; Pannarale, F.; Pant, B. C.; Paoletti, F.; Paoli, A.; Papa, M. A.; Paris, H. R.; Parker, W.S; Pascucci, D.; Pasqualetti, A.; Passaquieti, R.; Passuello, D.; Patricelli, B.; Patrick, Z.; Pearlstone, B. L.; Pedraza, M.; Pedurand, R.; Pekowsky, L.; Pele, A.; Penn, S.; Perreca, A.; Pfeiffer, H. P.; Phelps, M.; Piccinni, O. J.; Pichot, M.; Piergiovanni, F.; Pierro, V.; Pillant, G.; Pinard, L.; Pinto, I. M.; Pitkin, M.; Poggiani, R.; Popolizio, P.; Post, A.; Powell, J.; Prasad, J.; Predoi, V.; Premachandra, S. S.; Prestegard, T.; Price, L. R.; Prijatelj, M.; Principe, M.; Privitera, S.; Prix, R.; Prodi, G. A.; Prokhorov, L. G.; Puncken, O.; Punturo, M.; Puppo, P.; Puerrer, M.; Qi, H.; Qin, J.; Quetschke, V.; Quintero, E. A.; Quitzow-James, R.; Raab, F. J.; Rabeling, D. S.; Radkins, H.; Raffai, P.; Raja, S.; Rakhmanov, M.; Rapagnani, P.; Raymond, V.; Razzano, M.; Re, V.; Read, J.; Reed, C. M.; Regimbau, T.; Rei, L.; Reid, S.; Reitze, D. H.; Rew, H.; Reyes, S. D.; Ricci, F.; Riles, K.; Robertson, N. A.; Robie, R.; Robinet, F.; Rocchi, A.; Rolland, L.; Rollins, J. G.; Roma, V. J.; Romano, R.; Romanov, G.; Romie, J. H.; Rosinska, D.; Rowan, S.; Ruediger, A.; Ruggi, P.; Ryan, K.A.; Sachdev, P.S.; Sadecki, T.; Sadeghian, L.; Salconi, L.; Saleem, M.; Salemi, F.; Samajdar, A.; Sammut, L.; Sanchez, E. J.; Sandberg, V.; Sandeen, B.; Sanders, J. R.; Sassolas, B.; Sathyaprakash, B. S.; Saulson, P. R.; Sauter, O.; Savage, R. L.; Sawadsky, A.; Schale, P.; Schilling, R.; Schmidt, J; Schmidt, P.; Schnabel, R.B.; Schofield, R. M. S.; Schoenbeck, A.; Schreiber, K.E.C.; Schuette, D.; Schutz, B. F.; Scott, J.; Scott, M.S.; Sellers, D.; Sengupta, A. S.; Sentenac, D.; Sequino, V.; Sergeev, A.; Serna, G.; Setyawati, Y.; Sevigny, A.; Shaddock, D. A.; Shah, S.; Shahriar, M. S.; Shaltev, M.; Shao, Z.M.; Shapiro, B.; Shawhan, P.; Sheperd, A.; Shoemaker, D. H.; Shoemaker, D. M.; Siellez, K.; Siemens, X.; Sigg, D.; Silva, António Dias da; Simakov, D.; Singer, A; Singer, L. P.; Singh, A.; Singh, R.; Singhal, A.; Sintes, A. M.; Slagmolen, B. J. J.; Smith, R. J. E.; Smith, N.D.; Smith, R. J. E.; Son, E. J.; Sorazu, B.; Sorrentino, F.; Souradeep, T.; Srivastava, A. K.; Staley, A.; Steinke, M.; Steinlechner, J.; Steinlechner, S.; Steinmeyer, D.; Stephens, B. C.; Stone, J.R.; Strain, K. A.; Straniero, N.; Stratta, G.; Strauss, N. A.; Strigin, S. E.; Sturani, R.; Stuver, A. L.; Summerscales, T. Z.; Sun, L.; Sutton, P. J.; Swinkels, B. L.; Szczepanczyk, M. J.; Tacca, M.D.; Talukder, D.; Tanner, D. B.; Typai, M.; Tarabrin, S. P.; Taracchini, A.; Taylor, W.R.; Theeg, T.; Thirugnanasambandam, M. P.; Thomas, E. G.; Thomas, M.; Thomas, P.; Thorne, K. A.; Thorne, K. S.; Thrane, E.; Tiwari, S.; Tiwari, V.; Tokmakov, K. V.; Tomlinson, C.; Tonelli, M.; Torres, C. V.; Torrie, C. I.; Toeyrae, D.; Travasso, F.; Traylor, G.; Trifiro, D.; Tringali, M. C.; Trozzo, L.; Tse, M.; Turconi, M.; Tuyenbayev, D.; Ugolini, D.; Unnikrishnan, C. S.; Urban, A. L.; Usman, S. A.; Vahlbruch, H.; Vajente, G.; Valdes, G.; Vallisneri, M.; Van Bakel, N.; Van Beuzekom, Martin; van den Brand, J. F. J.; Van Den Broeck, C.F.F.; Vander-Hyde, D. C.; van der Schaaf, L.; van Heijningen, J. V.; van Veggel, A. A.; Vardaro, M.; Vass, S.; Vasuth, M.; Vaulin, R.; Vecchio, A.; Vedovato, G.; Veitch, J.; Veitch, P.J.; Venkateswara, K.; Verkindt, D.; Vetrano, F.; Vicere, A.; Vinciguerra, S.; Vine, D. J.; Vinet, J. -Y.; Vitale, S.; Vo, T.; Vocca, H.; Vorvick, C.; Voss, D. V.; Vousden, W. D.; Vyatchanin, S. P.; Wade, A. R.; Wade, L. E.; Wade, MT; Walker, M.; Wallace, L.; Walsh, S.; Wang, G.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Wang, X.; Wang, Y.; Ward, R. L.; Warner, J.; Was, M.; Weaver, B.; Wei, L. -W.; Weinert, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Weiss, R.; Welborn, T.; Wen, L.M.; Wessels, P.; Westphal, T.; Wette, K.; Whelan, J. T.; White, D. J.; Whiting, B. F.; Williams, D.; Williams, D.R.; Williamson, A. R.; Willis, J. L.; Willke, B.; Wimmer, M. H.; Winkler, W.; Wipf, C. C.; Wittel, H.; Woan, G.; Worden, J.; Wright, J.L.; Wu, G.; Yablon, J.; Yam, W.; Yamamoto, H.; Yancey, C. C.; Yap, M. J.; Yu, H.; Yvert, M.; Zadrozny, A.; Zangrando, L.; Zanolin, M.; Zendri, J. -P.; Zevin, M.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, M.; Zhang, Y.; Zhao, C.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, X. J.; Zucker, M. E.; Zuraw, S. E.; Zweizig, J.; Boyle, M.; Campanelli, M.; Hemberger, D. A.; Kidder, L. E.; Ossokine, S.; Scheel, M. A.; Szilagyi, B.; Teukolsky, S.; Zlochower, Y.

    2016-01-01

    The LIGO detection of GW150914 provides an unprecedented opportunity to study the two-body motion of a compact-object binary in the large velocity, highly nonlinear regime, and to witness the final merger of the binary and the excitation of uniquely relativistic modes of the gravitational field. We

  3. [Generalized neonatal screening based on laboratory tests].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardaillou, Raymond; Le Gall, Jean-Yves

    2006-11-01

    Implementation of a generalized screening program for neonatal diseases must obey precise rules. The disease must be severe, recognizable at an early stage, amenable to an effective treatment, detectable with a non expensive and widely applicable test; it must also be a significant public health problem. Subjects with positive results must be offered immediate treatment or prevention. All screening programs must be regularly evaluated. In France, since 1978, a national screening program has been organized by a private association ("Association française pour le dépistage et la prévention des handicaps de l'enfant") and supervised by the "Caisse nationale d'assurance maladie" and "Direction Générale de la Sante". Five diseases are now included in the screening program: phenylketonuria, hypothyroidism, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, cystic fibrosis and sickle cell disease (the latter only in at-risk newborns). Toxoplasmosis is a particular problem because only the children of mothers who were not tested during the pregnancy or who seroconverted are screened. Neonatal screening for phenylketonuria and hypothyrodism is unanimously recommended. Screening for congenital adrenal hyperplasia is approved in most countries. Cases of sickle cell disease and cystic fibrosis are more complex because--not all children who carry the mutations develop severe forms;--there is no curative treatment;--parents may become anxious, even though the phenotype is sometimes mild or even asymptomatic. Supporters of screening stress the benefits of early diagnosis (which extends the life expectancy of these children, particularly in the case of sickle cell disease), the fact that it opens up the possibility of prenatal screening of future pregnancies, and the utility of informing heterozygous carriers identified by familial screening. Neonatal screening for other diseases is under discussion. Indeed, technical advances such as tandem mass spectrometry make it possible to detect about 50

  4. General Relativity solutions in modified gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motohashi, Hayato; Minamitsuji, Masato

    2018-06-01

    Recent gravitational wave observations of binary black hole mergers and a binary neutron star merger by LIGO and Virgo Collaborations associated with its optical counterpart constrain deviation from General Relativity (GR) both on strong-field regime and cosmological scales with high accuracy, and further strong constraints are expected by near-future observations. Thus, it is important to identify theories of modified gravity that intrinsically possess the same solutions as in GR among a huge number of theories. We clarify the three conditions for theories of modified gravity to allow GR solutions, i.e., solutions with the metric satisfying the Einstein equations in GR and the constant profile of the scalar fields. Our analysis is quite general, as it applies a wide class of single-/multi-field scalar-tensor theories of modified gravity in the presence of matter component, and any spacetime geometry including cosmological background as well as spacetime around black hole and neutron star, for the latter of which these conditions provide a necessary condition for no-hair theorem. The three conditions will be useful for further constraints on modified gravity theories as they classify general theories of modified gravity into three classes, each of which possesses i) unique GR solutions (i.e., no-hair cases), ii) only hairy solutions (except the cases that GR solutions are realized by cancellation between singular coupling functions in the Euler-Lagrange equations), and iii) both GR and hairy solutions, for the last of which one of the two solutions may be selected dynamically.

  5. Dynamical laws of superenergy in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Lobo, Alfonso GarcIa-Parrado

    2008-01-01

    The Bel and Bel-Robinson tensors were introduced nearly 50 years ago in an attempt to generalize to gravitation the energy-momentum tensor of electromagnetism. This generalization was successful from the mathematical point of view because these tensors share mathematical properties which are remarkably similar to those of the energy-momentum tensor of electromagnetism. However, the physical role of these tensors in general relativity has remained obscure and no interpretation has achieved wide acceptance. In principle, they cannot represent energy and the term superenergy has been coined for the hypothetical physical magnitude lying behind them. In this work, we try to shed light on the true physical meaning of superenergy by following the same procedure which enables us to give an interpretation of the electromagnetic energy. This procedure consists in performing an orthogonal splitting of the Bel and Bel-Robinson tensors and analyzing the different parts resulting from the splitting. In the electromagnetic case such splitting gives rise to the electromagnetic energy density, the Poynting vector and the electromagnetic stress tensor, each of them having a precise physical interpretation which is deduced from the dynamical laws of electromagnetism (Poynting theorem). The full orthogonal splitting of the Bel and Bel-Robinson tensors is more complex but, as expected, similarities with electromagnetism are present. Also the covariant divergence of the Bel tensor is analogous to the covariant divergence of the electromagnetic energy-momentum tensor and the orthogonal splitting of the former is found. The ensuing equations are to the superenergy what the Poynting theorem is to electromagnetism. Some consequences of these dynamical laws of superenergy are explored, among them the possibility of defining superenergy radiative states for the gravitational field

  6. 42 CFR 84.99 - Man tests; testing conditions; general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Man tests; testing conditions; general requirements. 84.99 Section 84.99 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH RESEARCH AND RELATED ACTIVITIES APPROVAL OF RESPIRATORY PROTECTIVE DEVICES Self-Contained Breathing Apparatus § 84.99...

  7. Moisture related test protocols for HVS testing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Denneman, E

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available outcomes of HVS tests where the moisture condition of the pavement or specific layers in the pavement is under investigation for a specific test. Practical guidance is then provided on the potential systems (how to manage the moisture – hardware) as well...

  8. TEPSS related PANDA tests (ESBWR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggenberger, M.; Aubert, C.; Bandurski, T.; Dreier, J.; Fischer, O.; Strassberger, H.J.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    2000-01-01

    A number of test series to investigate passive safety systems for the next generation of Light Water Reactors have been performed in the PANDA facility at the Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI). The large scale thermalhydraulic test facility allows to investigate Passive Containment Cooling Systems (PCCS) and the long-term containment behaviour after a Loss of Coolant Accident (LOCA). After successful completion of the ALPHA phase-I test series, where the PCCS performance of the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR) was examined, phase-II was initiated in 1996 with new projects, all with international participation (EC Fourth Framework Programme on Nuclear Fission Safety). One of these projects is entitled 'Technology Enhancement for Passive Safety Systems' (TEPSS). TEPSS is focused on the European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). Several new containment features and PCCS long-term response under different LOCA scenarios were investigated in PANDA. The PCCS start-up was demonstrated under challenging conditions. The effect of nitrogen hidden somewhere in the drywell and released later in the transient was simulated by injecting air for a certain period into the drywell. The effect of light gases on the PCCS performance was investigated by helium injection to the drywell. Finally, the influence of low PCC pool levels on PCCS and containment performance was examined. The main findings were that the PCCS works as intended and shows generally a favourable and robust long-term post LOCA behaviour. The system starts working even under extreme conditions and trapped air released from the drywell later in the transient does only temporarily reduce the PCCS performance. The new PANDA test series provided an extensive data base which will contribute to further improve containment design of passive plants and allow for system code assessment in a wide parameter range. (author)

  9. On multipole moments in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoenselaers, C.

    1986-01-01

    In general situations, involving gravitational waves the question of multiple moments in general relativity restricts the author to stationary axisymmetric situations. Here it has been shown that multipole moments, a set of numbers defined at spatial infinity as far away from the source as possible, determine a solution of Einstein's equations uniquely. With the rather powerful methods for generating solutions one might hope to get solutions with predefined multipole moments. Before doing so, however, one needs an efficient algorithm for calculating the moments of a given solution. Chapter 2 deals with a conjecture pertaining to such a calculational procedure and shows it to be not true. There is another context in which multipole moments are important. Consider a system composed of several objects. To separate, if possible, the various parts of their interaction, one needs a definition for multipole moments of individual members of a many body system. In spite of the fact that there is no definition for individual moments, with the exception of mass and angular momentum, Chapter 3 shows what can be done for the double Kerr solution. The authors can identify various terms in he interaction of two aligned Kerr objects and show that gravitational spin-spin interaction is indeed proportional to the product of the angular momenta

  10. Rotating Quark Stars in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enping Zhou

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available We have built quasi-equilibrium models for uniformly rotating quark stars in general relativity. The conformal flatness approximation is employed and the Compact Object CALculator (cocal code is extended to treat rotating stars with surface density discontinuity. In addition to the widely used MIT bag model, we have considered a strangeon star equation of state (EoS, suggested by Lai and Xu, that is based on quark clustering and results in a stiff EoS. We have investigated the maximum mass of uniformly rotating axisymmetric quark stars. We have also built triaxially deformed solutions for extremely fast rotating quark stars and studied the possible gravitational wave emission from such configurations.

  11. Testing the generalized partial credit model

    OpenAIRE

    Glas, Cornelis A.W.

    1996-01-01

    The partial credit model (PCM) (G.N. Masters, 1982) can be viewed as a generalization of the Rasch model for dichotomous items to the case of polytomous items. In many cases, the PCM is too restrictive to fit the data. Several generalizations of the PCM have been proposed. In this paper, a generalization of the PCM (GPCM), a further generalization of the one-parameter logistic model, is discussed. The model is defined and the conditional maximum likelihood procedure for the method is describe...

  12. The generalized Crewther relation in QCD and its experimental consequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brodsky, S.J.; Gabadadze, G.T.; Kataev, A.L.; Lu, H.J.

    1995-12-01

    We use the BLM scale-fixing prescription to derive a renormalization-scheme invariant relation between the coefficient function for the Bjorken sum rule for polarized deep inelastic scattering and the R-ratio for the e + e - annihilation cross section. This relation provides a generalization of the Crewther relation to non-conformally invariant gauge theories. The derived relations allow one to calculate unambiguously without renormalization scale or scheme ambiguity the effective charges of the polarized Bjorken and the Gross-Llewellen Smith sum rules from the experimental value for the effective charge associated with R-ratio. Present data are consistent with the generalized Crewther relations, but measurements at higher precision and energies will be needed to decisively test these fundamental relations in QCD. (orig.)

  13. Testing the generalized partial credit model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, Cornelis A.W.

    1996-01-01

    The partial credit model (PCM) (G.N. Masters, 1982) can be viewed as a generalization of the Rasch model for dichotomous items to the case of polytomous items. In many cases, the PCM is too restrictive to fit the data. Several generalizations of the PCM have been proposed. In this paper, a

  14. A general theory of quantum relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minic, Djordje; Tze, C.-H.

    2004-01-01

    The geometric form of standard quantum mechanics is compatible with the two postulates: (1) the laws of physics are invariant under the choice of experimental setup and (2) every quantum observation or event is intrinsically statistical. These postulates remain compatible within a background independent extension of quantum theory with a local intrinsic time implying the relativity of the concept of a quantum event. In this extension the space of quantum events becomes dynamical and only individual quantum events make sense observationally. At the core of such a general theory of quantum relativity is the three-way interplay between the symplectic form, the dynamical metric and non-integrable almost complex structure of the space of quantum events. Such a formulation provides a missing conceptual ingredient in the search for a background independent quantum theory of gravity and matter. The crucial new technical element in our scheme derives from a set of recent mathematical results on certain infinite-dimensional almost Kahler manifolds which replace the complex projective spaces of standard quantum mechanics

  15. Axially symmetric Lorentzian wormholes in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schein, F.

    1997-11-01

    The field equations of Einstein's theory of general relativity, being local, do not fix the global structure of space-time. They admit topologically non-trivial solutions, including spatially closed universes and the amazing possibility of shortcuts for travel between distant regions in space and time - so-called Lorentzian wormholes. The aim of this thesis is to (mathematically) construct space-times which contain traversal wormholes connecting arbitrary distant regions of an asymptotically flat or asymptotically de Sitter universe. Since the wormhole mouths appear as two separate masses in the exterior space, space-time can at best be axially symmetric. We eliminate the non-staticity caused by the gravitational attraction of the mouths by anchoring them by strings held at infinity or, alternatively, by electric repulsion. The space-times are obtained by surgically grafting together well-known solutions of Einstein's equations along timelike hypersurfaces. This surgery naturally concentrates a non-zero stress-energy tensor on the boundary between the two space-times which can be investigated by using the standard thin shell formalism. It turns out that, when using charged black holes, the provided constructions are possible without violation of any of the energy conditions. In general, observers living in the axially symmetric, asymptotically flat (respectively asymptotically de Sitter) region axe able to send causal signals through the topologically non-trivial region. However, the wormhole space-times contain closed timelike curves. Because of this explicit violation of global hyperbolicity these models do not serve as counterexamples to known topological censorship theorems. (author)

  16. On the ultrarelativistic limit of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dautcourt, G.

    1998-01-01

    As is well-known, Newton's gravitational theory can be formulated as a four-dimensional space-time theory and follows as singular limit from Einstein's theory, if the velocity of light tends to the infinity. Here 'singular' stands for the fact, that the limiting geometrical structure differs from a regular Riemannian space-time. Geometrically, the transition Einstein → Newton can be viewed as an 'opening' of the light cones. This picture suggests that there might be other singular limits of Einstein's theory: Let all light cones shrink and ultimately become part of a congruence of singular world lines. The limiting structure may be considered as a null hypersurface embedded in a five-dimensional spacetime. While the velocity of light tends to zero here, all other velocities tend to the velocity of light. Thus one may speak of an ultrarelativistic limit of General Relativity. The resulting theory is as simple as Newton's gravitational theory, with the basic difference, that Newton's elliptic differential equation is replaced by essentially ordinary differential equations, with derivatives tangent to the generators of the singular congruence. The Galilei group is replaced by the Carroll group introduced by Levy-Leblond. We suggest to study near ultrarelativistic situations with a perturbational approach starting from the singular structure, similar to post-Newtonian expansions in the c → ∞ case. (author)

  17. Direction dependent structures in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herberthson, M.

    1993-01-01

    This thesis deals with, within the theory of general relativity, asymptotic properties of certain types of space-times. Using conformal transformations, it is possible to describe asymptotic properties of a physical space-time in terms of the local behaviour of the new, rescaled space-time. One then uses so called direction dependent structures. We present two such structures and applications to them. One structure is used in the study of spacelike (or spatial) infinity. We discuss the asymptotic conditions on the gravitational and the electromagnetic field, especially the conditions put on directions corresponding to future and past null infinity. It is shown that these fields have desired physical properties. The other structure is used in connection with timelike infinity. Using this structure, we suggest a new definition of timelike infinity. This definition differs significantly from earlier definitions, and leads to the concept of asymptotically stationary space-times. We also suggest a definition of asymptotic flatness at future null infinity, and a definition of a black hole which is, in a sense, local. Both of these definitions fit nicely into the structure. (24 refs.)

  18. Einstein's Jury The Race to Test Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Crelinsten, Jeffrey

    2006-01-01

    Einstein's Jury is the dramatic story of how astronomers in Germany, England, and America competed to test Einstein's developing theory of relativity. Weaving a rich narrative based on extensive archival research, Jeffrey Crelinsten shows how these early scientific debates shaped cultural attitudes we hold today. The book examines Einstein's theory of general relativity through the eyes of astronomers, many of whom were not convinced of the legitimacy of Einstein's startling breakthrough. These were individuals with international reputations to uphold and benefactors and shareholders to p

  19. General relativity invariance and string field theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aref'eva, I.Ya.; Volovich, I.V.

    1987-04-01

    The general covariance principle in the string field theory is considered. The algebraic properties of the string Lie derivative are discussed. The string vielbein and spin connection are introduced and an action invariant under general co-ordinate transformation is proposed. (author). 18 refs

  20. Gravitational Wave in Linear General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubillos, D. J.

    2017-07-01

    General relativity is the best theory currently available to describe the interaction due to gravity. Within Albert Einstein's field equations this interaction is described by means of the spatiotemporal curvature generated by the matter-energy content in the universe. Weyl worked on the existence of perturbations of the curvature of space-time that propagate at the speed of light, which are known as Gravitational Waves, obtained to a first approximation through the linearization of the field equations of Einstein. Weyl's solution consists of taking the field equations in a vacuum and disturbing the metric, using the Minkowski metric slightly perturbed by a factor ɛ greater than zero but much smaller than one. If the feedback effect of the field is neglected, it can be considered as a weak field solution. After introducing the disturbed metric and ignoring ɛ terms of order greater than one, we can find the linearized field equations in terms of the perturbation, which can then be expressed in terms of the Dalambertian operator of the perturbation equalized to zero. This is analogous to the linear wave equation in classical mechanics, which can be interpreted by saying that gravitational effects propagate as waves at the speed of light. In addition to this, by studying the motion of a particle affected by this perturbation through the geodesic equation can show the transversal character of the gravitational wave and its two possible states of polarization. It can be shown that the energy carried by the wave is of the order of 1/c5 where c is the speed of light, which explains that its effects on matter are very small and very difficult to detect.

  1. The Concept of General Relativity is not Related to Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotas, Ronald

    2015-04-01

    The concept of general relativity is not related to reality. It is not real or factual Science. GR cannot account for objects falling to earth or for the weight of objects sitting on the earth. The Cavendish demonstration showing the attraction between two masses at right angles to earth's gravity, is not explained by GR. No one can prove the existence of ``space fabric.'' The concept of ``space time'' effects causing gravitational attraction between masses is wrong. Conservation law of energy - momentum does not exist in GR. LIGO fails in detecting ``gravity waves'' because there is no ``space fabric'' to transmit them. The Gravity B Probe data manipulated to show some effects, is not proof of ``space fabric.'' It is Nuclear Quantum Gravitation that provides clear definitive explanation of Gravity and Gravitation. It is harmonious with Newtonian and Quantum Mechanics, and Scientific Logic. Nuclear Quantum Gravitation has 10 clear, Scientific proofs and 21 more good indications. With this theory the Physical Forces are Unified. See: OBSCURANTISM ON EINSTEIN GRAVITATION? http://www.santilli-foundation.org/inconsistencies-gravitation.php and Einstein's Theory of Relativity versus Classical Mechanics, by Paul Marmet http://www.newtonphysics.on.ca/einstein/

  2. A century of general relativity: astrophysics and cosmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blandford, R D

    2015-03-06

    One hundred years after its birth, general relativity has become a highly successful physical theory in the sense that it has passed a large number of experimental and observational tests and finds extensive application to a wide variety of cosmic phenomena. It remains an active area of research as new tests are on the way, epitomized by the exciting prospect of detecting gravitational waves from merging black holes. General relativity is the essential foundation of the standard model of cosmology and underlies our description of the black holes and neutron stars that are ultimately responsible for the most powerful and dramatic cosmic sources. Its interface with physics on the smallest and largest scales will continue to provide fertile areas of investigation in its next century. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  3. Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes (5/5)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  4. Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes (3/5)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  5. Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes (1/5)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  6. Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes (2/5)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  7. Introduction to General Relativity and Black Holes (4/5)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2001-01-01

    Conceptual foundations of General Relativity (GR). Uniqueness of GR. Mathematical framework: tensor calculus, Riemannian geometry, connection, 'spin' connection, curvature, Cartan's form calculus. Hilbert-Einstein action, Einstein equations. Weak gravitational fields. Post Newtonian Approximation. Gravitanional Waves. Exact solutions. Killing vectors. Experimental tests. Black Holes: extensions of the Schwarzschild solution; Kerr-Newman holes; no-hair theorems; energtics of black holes; the membrane approach; quantum mechanics of black holes; Bekenstein entropy; Hawking temperature; black holes and string theory.

  8. The tensorial conservation law in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, M.G.

    1984-01-01

    A general tensorial conservation law is formulated by starting from the invariance of the gravitational Lagrangian density. Utilising this new formula, the author derives some reasonable results for the mass-energy distribution which are in accordance with the Newtonian formulae. (author)

  9. Point-of-Care Testing: General Aspects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Carlos E S; Guerra, Joao C C; Slhessarenko, Natasha; Scartezini, Marileia; Franca, Carolina N; Colombini, Marjorie P; Berlitz, Fernando; Machado, Antonia M O; Campana, Gustavo A; Faulhaber, Adriana C L; Galoro, Cesar A; Dias, Claudia M; Shcolnik, Wilson; Martino, Marines D V; Cesar, Katia R; Sumita, Nairo M; Mendes, Maria E; Faulhaber, Marcelo H W; Pinho, Joao R R; Barbosa, Ismar V; Batista, Marcelo C; Khawali, Cristina; Pariz, Vitor M; Andriolo, Adagmar

    2018-01-01

    Point-of-Care Testing (POCT) has been highlighted in the health care sector in recent decades. On the other hand, due to its low demand, POCT is at a disadvantage compared to conventional equipment, since its cost is inversely proportional to the volume of use. In addition, for the implementation of POCT to succeed, it is essential to rely on the work of a multidisciplinary team. The awareness of health professionals of the importance of each step is perhaps the critical success factor. The trend towards the continuous advancement of the use of POCT and the great potential of its contributions reinforce the need to implement quality management tools, including performance indicators, to ensure their results. This review presents some advantages and disadvantages concerning POCT and the real need to use it. A worldwide call for the availability of easy-to-use health technologies that are increasingly closer to the final user is one of the main reasons for this focus.

  10. Testing General Relativistic Predictions with the LAGEOS Satellites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peron, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    The spacetime around Earth is a good environment in order to perform tests of gravitational theories. According to Einstein’s view of gravitational phenomena, the Earth mass-energy content curves the surrounding spacetime in a peculiar way. This (relatively) quiet dynamical environment enables a good reconstruction of geodetic satellites (test masses) orbit, provided that high-quality tracking data are available. This is the case of the LAGEOS satellites, built and launched mainly for geodetic and geodynamical purposes, but equally good for fundamental physics studies. A review of these studies is presented, focusing on data, models, and analysis strategies. Some recent and less recent results are presented. All of them indicate general relativity theory as a very good description of gravitational phenomena, at least in the studied environment.

  11. Testing relativity with solar system dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellings, R. W.

    1984-01-01

    A major breakthrough is described in the accuracy of Solar System dynamical tests of relativistic gravity. The breakthrough was achieved by factoring in ranging data from Viking Landers 1 and 2 from the surface of Mars. Other key data sources included optical transit circle observations, lunar laser ranging, planetary radar, and spacecraft (Mariner 9 to Mars and Mariner 10 to Mercury). The Solar System model which is used to fit the data and the process by which such fits are performed are explained and results are discussed. The results are fully consistent with the predictions of General Relativity.

  12. Optical design for the Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Shao, Michael; Nordtvedt, Kenneth L., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses the Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity (LATOR) mission. LATOR is a Michelson-Morley-type experiment designed to test the pure tensor metric nature of gravitation the fundamental postulate of Einstein's theory of general relativity. With its focus on gravity's action on light propagation it complements other tests which rely on the gravitational dynamics of bodies.

  13. A controllability test for general first-order representations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    U. Helmke; J. Rosenthal; J.M. Schumacher (Hans)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractIn this paper we derive a new controllability rank test for general first-order representations. The criterion generalizes the well-known controllability rank test for linear input-state systems as well as a controllability rank test by Mertzios et al. for descriptor systems.

  14. The 'Falling Box' method in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gladush, V.D.

    1998-01-01

    The problems of justification, generalization, and applicability of the 'falling box' method to obtained some exact solutions of the vacuum Einstein equations are investigated. The 'physical' inference of the Reissner-Nordstrom-de Sitter and Kerr metrics is shown. Explanation is given for the well-known relativistic phenomenon which consists in that gravity is created by the double density of the electrical field energy

  15. General Information about AIDS-Related Lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and treatment options. AIDS-related lymphoma is a disease in which malignant (cancer) cells form in the ... cord. The sample may also be checked for Epstein-Barr virus . This procedure is also called an LP ...

  16. On ``minimally curved spacetimes'' in general relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Dadhich, Naresh

    1997-01-01

    We consider a spacetime corresponding to uniform relativistic potential analogus to Newtonian potential as an example of ``minimally curved spacetime''. We also consider a radially symmetric analogue of the Rindler spacetime of uniform proper acceleration relative to infinity.

  17. Grand Canonical Ensembles in General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klein, David; Yang, Wei-Shih

    2012-01-01

    We develop a formalism for general relativistic, grand canonical ensembles in space-times with timelike Killing fields. Using that, we derive ideal gas laws, and show how they depend on the geometry of the particular space-times. A systematic method for calculating Newtonian limits is given for a class of these space-times, which is illustrated for Kerr space-time. In addition, we prove uniqueness of the infinite volume Gibbs measure, and absence of phase transitions for a class of interaction potentials in anti-de Sitter space.

  18. On hypermomentum in general relativity. Pt.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehl, F.W.; Kerlick, G.D.; Heyde, P. von der

    1976-01-01

    In this series of notes, we introduce a new quantity into the theory of classical matter fields. Besides the usual energy-momentum tensor, we postulate the existence of a further dynamical attribute of matter, the 3rd rank tensor Δsup(ijk) of hypermomentum. Subsequently, a general relativistic field theory of energy-momentum and hypermomentum is outlined. In Part I we motivate the need for hypermomentum. We split it into spin angular momentum, the dilatation hypermomentum, and traceless proper hypermomentum and discuss their physical meanings and conservation laws. (orig.) [de

  19. General Theory of Relativity: Will It Survive the Next Decade?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolami, Orfeu; Paramos, Jorge; Turyshev, Slava G.

    2006-01-01

    The nature of gravity is fundamental to our understanding of our own solar system, the galaxy and the structure and evolution of the Universe. Einstein's general theory of relativity is the standard model that is used for almost ninety years to describe gravitational phenomena on these various scales. We review the foundations of general relativity, discuss the recent progress in the tests of relativistic gravity, and present motivations for high-accuracy gravitational experiments in space. We also summarize the science objectives and technology needs for the laboratory experiments in space with laboratory being the entire solar system. We discuss the advances in our understanding of fundamental physics anticipated in the near future and evaluate discovery potential for the recently proposed gravitational experiments.

  20. Singularities in the general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Treder, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    'Regular solutions of Einstein's equations' mean very different things. In the case of the empty-space equations, Rsub(ik) = o, such solutions must be metrics gsub(ik)(xsup(l)) without additionaly singular 'field sources' (Einstein's 'Particle problem'). However the 'phenomenological matter' is defined by the Einstein equations Rsub(ik) - 1/2gsub(ik)R = -kappaTsub(ik) itselves. Therefore if 10 regular functions gsub(ik)(xsup(l)) are given (which the inequalities of Lorentz-signature fulfil) then these gsub(ik) define 10 functions Tsub(ik)(xsup(l)) without singularities. But, the matter-tensor Tsub(ik) must fulfil the two inequalities T >= o, T 0 0 >= 1/2 T only and therefore the Einstein-equations with 'phenomenological matter' mean the two inequalities R >= o, R 0 0 <= o which are incompatible with a permanently regular metric with Lorentz-signature, generally. (author)

  1. Matroidal Structure of Generalized Rough Sets Based on Tolerance Relations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    2014-01-01

    of the generalized rough set based on the tolerance relation. The matroid can also induce a new relation. We investigate the connection between the original tolerance relation and the induced relation.

  2. Test Performance Related Dysfunctional Beliefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Recep TÜTÜNCÜ

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Examinations by using tests are very frequently used in educational settings and successful studying before the examinations is a complex matter to deal with. In order to understand the determinants of success in exams better, we need to take into account not only emotional and motivational, but also cognitive aspects of the participants such as dysfunctional beliefs. Our aim is to present the relationship between candidates’ characteristics and distorted beliefs/schemata just before an examination. Method: The subjects of the study were 30 female and 30 male physicians who were about to take the medical specialization exam (MSE in Turkey. Dysfunctional Attitude Scale (DAS and Young Schema Questionnaire Short Form (YSQ-SF were applied to the subjects. The statistical analysis was done using the F test, Mann-Whitney, Kruskal-Wallis, chi-square test and spearman’s correlation test. Results: It was shown that some of the DAS and YSQ-SF scores were significantly higher in female gender, in the group who could not pass the exam, who had repetitive examinations, who had their first try taking an examination and who were unemployed at the time of the examination. Conclusion: Our findings indicate that candidates seeking help before MSE examination could be referred for cognitive therapy or counseling even they do not have any psychiatric diagnosis due to clinically significant cognitive distortion. Measurement and treatment of cognitive distortions that have negative impact on MSE performance may improve the cost-effectiveness and mental well being of the young doctors.

  3. Large-scale tides in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ip, Hiu Yan; Schmidt, Fabian, E-mail: iphys@mpa-garching.mpg.de, E-mail: fabians@mpa-garching.mpg.de [Max-Planck-Institut für Astrophysik, Karl-Schwarzschild-Str. 1, 85741 Garching (Germany)

    2017-02-01

    Density perturbations in cosmology, i.e. spherically symmetric adiabatic perturbations of a Friedmann-Lemaȋtre-Robertson-Walker (FLRW) spacetime, are locally exactly equivalent to a different FLRW solution, as long as their wavelength is much larger than the sound horizon of all fluid components. This fact is known as the 'separate universe' paradigm. However, no such relation is known for anisotropic adiabatic perturbations, which correspond to an FLRW spacetime with large-scale tidal fields. Here, we provide a closed, fully relativistic set of evolutionary equations for the nonlinear evolution of such modes, based on the conformal Fermi (CFC) frame. We show explicitly that the tidal effects are encoded by the Weyl tensor, and are hence entirely different from an anisotropic Bianchi I spacetime, where the anisotropy is sourced by the Ricci tensor. In order to close the system, certain higher derivative terms have to be dropped. We show that this approximation is equivalent to the local tidal approximation of Hui and Bertschinger [1]. We also show that this very simple set of equations matches the exact evolution of the density field at second order, but fails at third and higher order. This provides a useful, easy-to-use framework for computing the fully relativistic growth of structure at second order.

  4. BOOK REVIEW: Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louko, Jorma

    2011-04-01

    Joel Franklin's textbook `Advanced Mechanics and General Relativity' comprises two partially overlapping, partially complementary introductory paths into general relativity at advanced undergraduate level. Path I starts with the Lagrangian and Hamiltonian formulations of Newtonian point particle motion, emphasising the action principle and the connection between symmetries and conservation laws. The concepts are then adapted to point particle motion in Minkowski space, introducing Lorentz transformations as symmetries of the action. There follows a focused development of tensor calculus, parallel transport and curvature, using examples from Newtonian mechanics and special relativity, culminating in the field equations of general relativity. The Schwarzschild solution is analysed, including a detailed discussion of the tidal forces on a radially infalling observer. Basics of gravitational radiation are examined, highlighting the similarities to and differences from electromagnetic radiation. The final topics in Path I are equatorial geodesics in Kerr and the motion of a relativistic string in Minkowski space. Path II starts by introducing scalar field theory on Minkowski space as a limit of point masses connected by springs, emphasising the action principle, conservation laws and the energy-momentum tensor. The action principle for electromagnetism is introduced, and the coupling of electromagnetism to a complex scalar field is developed in a detailed and pedagogical fashion. A free symmetric second-rank tensor field on Minkowski space is introduced, and the action principle of general relativity is recovered from coupling the second-rank tensor to its own energy-momentum tensor. Path II then merges with Path I and, supplanted with judicious early selections from Path I, can proceed to the Schwarzschild solution. The choice of material in each path is logical and focused. A notable example in Path I is that Lorentz transformations in Minkowki space are introduced

  5. General and special education teachers' relations within teamwork ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    and instruction, assessment and evaluation, and classroom management and behavior. Typically, the ... teaching techniques and learning processes. ... general objective of this research is to establish the relations of general and special.

  6. Geometrical determination of the constant of motion in General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Catoni, F.; Cannata, R.; Zampetti, P.

    2009-01-01

    In recent time a theorem, due to E. Beltrami, through which the integration of the geodesic equations of a curved manifold is obtained by means of a merely geometric method, has been revisited. This way of dealing with the problem is well in accordance with the geometric spirit of the Theory of General Relativity. In this paper we show another relevant consequence of this method. Actually, the constants of the motion, introduced in this geometrical way that is completely independent of Newton theory, are related to the conservation laws for test particles in the Einstein theory. These conservation laws may be compared with the conservation laws of Newton. In particular, by the conservation of energy (E) and the L z component of angular momentum, the equivalence of the conservation laws for the Schwarzschild field is verified and the difference between Newton and Einstein theories for the rotating bodies (Kerr metric) is obtained in a straightforward way.

  7. Reliability Generalization of the Alcohol Use Disorder Identification Test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shields, Alan L.; Caruso, John C.

    2002-01-01

    Evaluated the reliability of scores from the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT; J. Sounders and others, 1993) in a reliability generalization study based on 17 empirical journal articles. Results show AUDIT scores to be generally reliable for basic assessment. (SLD)

  8. The laser astrometric test of relativity mission

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Turyshev, Slava G.; Shao, Michael; Nordtvedt, Kenneth L.

    2004-01-01

    This paper discusses new fundamental physics experiment to test relativistic gravity at the accuracy better than the effects of the 2nd order in the gravitational field strength, ∝ G 2 . The Laser Astrometric Test Of Relativity (LATOR) mission uses laser interferometry between two micro-spacecraft whose lines of sight pass close by the Sun to accurately measure deflection of light in the solar gravity. The key element of the experimental design is a redundant geometry optical truss provided by a long-baseline (100 m) multi-channel stellar optical interferometer placed on the International Space Station (ISS). The interferometer is used for measuring the angles between the two spacecraft. In Euclidean geometry, determination of a triangle's three sides determines any angle therein; with gravity changing the optical lengths of sides passing close by the Sun and deflecting the light, the Euclidean relationships are overthrown. The geometric redundancy enables LATOR to measure the departure from Euclidean geometry caused by the solar gravity field to a very high accuracy. LATOR will not only improve the value of the parameterized post-Newtonian (PPN) parameter γ to unprecedented levels of accuracy of 10 -8 , it will also reach ability to measure effects of the next post-Newtonian order (c -4 ) of light deflection resulting from gravity's intrinsic non-linearity. The solar quadrupole moment parameter, J2, will be measured with high precision, as well as a variety of other relativistic effects including Lense-Thirring precession. LATOR will lead to very robust advances in the tests of fundamental physics: this mission could discover a violation or extension of general relativity, or reveal the presence of an additional long range interaction in the physical law. There are no analogs to the LATOR experiment; it is unique and is a natural culmination of solar system gravity experiments

  9. Kinematical Test Theories for Special Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lämmerzahl, Claus; Braxmaier, Claus; Dittus, Hansjörg; Müller, Holger; Peters, Achim; Schiller, Stephan

    A comparison of certain kinematical test theories for Special Relativity including the Robertson and Mansouri-Sext test theories is presented and the accuracy of the experimental results testing Special Relativity are expressed in terms of the parameters appearing in these test theories. The theoretical results are applied to the most precise experimental results obtained recently for the isotropy of light propagation and the constancy of the speed of light.

  10. DSR Theories, Conformal Group and Generalized Commutation Relation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leiva, Carlos

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the relationship of DSR theories and Conformal Group is reviewed. On the other hand, the relation between DSR Magueijo Smolin generators and generalized commutation relations is also shown

  11. Generalized uncertainty relations and characteristic invariants for the multimode states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sudarshan, E.C.G.; Chiu, C.B.; Bhamathi, G.

    1995-01-01

    The close relationship between the zero-point energy, the uncertainty relation, coherent states, squeezed states, and correlated states for one mode is investigated. This group theoretic perspective of the problem enables the parametrization and identification of their multimode generalization. A simple and efficient method of determining the canonical structure of the generalized correlated states is presented. Implication of canonical commutation relations for correlations are not exhausted by the Heisenberg uncertainty relation, not even by the Schroedinger-Robertson uncertainty inequality, but there are relations in the multimode case that are the generalization of the Schroedinger-Robertson relation

  12. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schermer, Tjard RJ; Crockett, Alan J; Poels, Patrick JP; van Dijke, Jacob J; Akkermans, Reinier P; Vlek, Hans F; Pieters, Willem R

    2009-01-01

    Background Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. Aim To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. Design of study Analysis of routine spirometry test records. Setting Fifteen general practices which had a working agreement with a local hospital pulmonary function laboratory for spirometry assessment regarding test quality and interpretation. Method Spirometry tests were judged by a pulmonary function technician and a chest physician. Proportions of test adequacy were analysed using markers for manoeuvre acceptability and test reproducibility derived from the 1994 American Thoracic Society spirometry guideline. Associations between quality markers and age, sex, and severity of obstruction were examined using logistic regression. Results Practices performed a mean of four (standard deviation = 2) spirometry tests per week; 1271 tests from 1091 adult patients were analysed; 96.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 95.6 to 97.2) of all tests consisted of ≥3 blows. With 60.6% of tests, forced expiratory time was the marker with the lowest acceptability rate. An overall 38.8% (95% CI = 36.0 to 41.6) of the tests met the acceptability as well as reproducibility criteria. Age, sex, and severity of obstruction were associated with test quality markers. Conclusion The quality of routine spirometry tests was better than in previous reports from primary care research settings, but there is still substantial room for improvement. Sufficient duration of forced expiratory time is the quality marker with the highest rate of inadequacy. Primary care professionals should be aware of patient characteristics that may diminish the quality of their spirometry tests. Further research is needed to establish to what extent spirometry tests that are inadequate, according to stringent international expert criteria

  13. Quality of routine spirometry tests in Dutch general practices.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schermer, T.R.J.; Crockett, A.J.; Poels, P.J.P.; Dijke, J.J. van; Akkermans, R.P.; Vlek, H.F.; Pieters, W.R.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Spirometry is an indispensable tool for diagnosis and monitoring of chronic airways disease in primary care. AIM: To establish the quality of routine spirometry tests in general practice, and explore associations between test quality and patient characteristics. DESIGN OF STUDY: Analysis

  14. Fixing extensions to general relativity in the nonlinear regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cayuso, Juan; Ortiz, Néstor; Lehner, Luis

    2017-10-01

    The question of what gravitational theory could supersede General Relativity has been central in theoretical physics for decades. Many disparate alternatives have been proposed motivated by cosmology, quantum gravity and phenomenological angles, and have been subjected to tests derived from cosmological, solar system and pulsar observations typically restricted to linearized regimes. Gravitational waves from compact binaries provide new opportunities to probe these theories in the strongly gravitating/highly dynamical regimes. To this end however, a reliable understanding of the dynamics in such a regime is required. Unfortunately, most of these theories fail to define well posed initial value problems, which prevents at face value from meeting such challenge. In this work, we introduce a consistent program able to remedy this situation. This program is inspired in the approach to "fixing" viscous relativistic hydrodynamics introduced by Israel and Stewart in the late 70's. We illustrate how to implement this approach to control undesirable effects of higher order derivatives in gravity theories and argue how the modified system still captures the true dynamics of the putative underlying theories in 3 +1 dimensions. We sketch the implementation of this idea in a couple of effective theories of gravity, one in the context of Noncommutative Geometry, and one in the context of Chern-Simons modified General Relativity.

  15. Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ency/article/003691.htm Parathyroid hormone-related protein blood test To use the sharing features on this page, ... measures the level of a hormone in the blood, called parathyroid hormone-related protein. How the Test is Performed A blood sample is needed . How ...

  16. Numerical performance of the parabolized ADM formulation of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios; Hansen, Jakob; Khokhlov, Alexei

    2008-01-01

    In a recent paper [Vasileios Paschalidis, Phys. Rev. D 78, 024002 (2008).], the first coauthor presented a new parabolic extension (PADM) of the standard 3+1 Arnowitt, Deser, Misner (ADM) formulation of the equations of general relativity. By parabolizing first-order ADM in a certain way, the PADM formulation turns it into a well-posed system which resembles the structure of mixed hyperbolic-second-order parabolic partial differential equations. The surface of constraints of PADM becomes a local attractor for all solutions and all possible well-posed gauge conditions. This paper describes a numerical implementation of PADM and studies its accuracy and stability in a series of standard numerical tests. Numerical properties of PADM are compared with those of standard ADM and its hyperbolic Kidder, Scheel, Teukolsky (KST) extension. The PADM scheme is numerically stable, convergent, and second-order accurate. The new formulation has better control of the constraint-violating modes than ADM and KST.

  17. Motivations for anti-gravity in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chardin, G.

    1996-05-01

    Arguments are presented showing that it is natural to interpret the negative mass part of the Kerr solution as representing the geometry experienced by antimatter. The C, P and T discrete transformations are considered for this geometry. The C and T properties of the proposed identification are found to be in agreement with the usual representation of antimatter. In addition, a property of perfect stigmatism through Kerr wormholes which allows general relativity to mimic anti-gravity is conjectured. Kerr wormholes would then act as 'super-mirrors' reversing the C, P and T images of an object seen through it. This interpretation is subjected to several experimental tests and able to provide an explanation, without any free parameter, of the 'CP'-violation observed in the neutral kaon system. (K.A.)

  18. Bell's inequalities from the field concept in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sachs, M.

    1980-01-01

    A nonlinear field theory of matter, based axiomatically on general relativity, has an asymptotic, low-energy limit that predicts the outcome of experimental tests of Bell's inequalities. The inequalities should follow if spin-correlated, spin-1/2 particles, observed in coincidence, were a spacelike distance apart; they should be violated if they were separated by timelike distances. The experiment at timelike separations, for scattered protons observed in coincidence, was carried out by Lahemi-Rachti and Mittig and, thus far, agrees with this theory. Extension of the low-energy pp scattering experiment to observations at spacelike distances is suggested, with the prediction that agreement should be obtained with Bell's inequalities there. (author)

  19. Motivations for anti-gravity in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chardin, G. [CEA Centre d`Etudes de Saclay, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France). Dept. d`Astrophysique, de la Physique des Particules, de la Physique Nucleaire et de l`Instrumentation Associee

    1996-05-01

    Arguments are presented showing that it is natural to interpret the negative mass part of the Kerr solution as representing the geometry experienced by antimatter. The C, P and T discrete transformations are considered for this geometry. The C and T properties of the proposed identification are found to be in agreement with the usual representation of antimatter. In addition, a property of perfect stigmatism through Kerr wormholes which allows general relativity to mimic anti-gravity is conjectured. Kerr wormholes would then act as `super-mirrors` reversing the C, P and T images of an object seen through it. This interpretation is subjected to several experimental tests and able to provide an explanation, without any free parameter, of the `CP`-violation observed in the neutral kaon system. (K.A.). 37 refs.

  20. Probing strong-field general relativity near black holes

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Alvarez-Gaumé, Luís

    2005-01-01

    Nature has sprinkled black holes of various sizes throughout the universe, from stellar mass black holes in X-ray sources to supermassive black holes of billions of solar masses in quasars. Astronomers today are probing the spacetime near black holes using X-rays, and gravitational waves will open a different view in the near future. These tools give us an unprecedented opportunity to test ultra-strong-field general relativity, including the fundamental theorem of the uniqueness of the Kerr metric and Roger Penrose's cosmic censorship conjecture. Already, fascinating studies of spectral lines are showing the extreme gravitational lensing effects near black holes and allowing crude measurements of black hole spin. When the ESA-NASA gravitational wave detector LISA begins its observations in about 10 years, it will make measurements of dynamical spacetimes near black holes with an accuracy greater even than that which theoreticians can reach with their computations today. Most importantly, when gravitational wa...

  1. Differential forms and the geometry of general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Dray, Tevian

    2015-01-01

    Differential Forms and the Geometry of General Relativity provides readers with a coherent path to understanding relativity. Requiring little more than calculus and some linear algebra, it helps readers learn just enough differential geometry to grasp the basics of general relativity.The book contains two intertwined but distinct halves. Designed for advanced undergraduate or beginning graduate students in mathematics or physics, most of the text requires little more than familiarity with calculus and linear algebra. The first half presents an introduction to general relativity that describes

  2. Constraints on stress-energy perturbations in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Traschen, J.

    1985-01-01

    Conditions are found for the existence of integral constraints on stress-energy perturbations in general relativity. The integral constraints can be thought of as a general-relativistic generalization of the conservation of energy and momentum of matter perturbations in special relativity. The constraints are stated in terms of a vector field V, and the Robertson-Walker spacetimes are shown to have such constraint vectors. Although in general V is not a Killing vector, in a vacuum spacetime the constraint vectors are precisely the Killing vectors

  3. 6th International Conference on the History of General Relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Eisenstaedt, Jean; The Universe of General Relativity; GR 6

    2005-01-01

    This volume from the Einstein Studies Series is based largely on papers presented at the Sixth International Conference on the History of General Relativity, held in Amsterdam on June 26-29, 2002. These contributions from notable experts offer both new and historical insights on gravitation, general relativity, cosmology, unified field theory, and the history of science. Topics discussed include the prehistory of special relativity, early attempts at a relativistic theory of gravitation, the beginnings of general relativity, the problem of motion in the context of relativity, conservation laws, the axiomatization of relativity, classical and contemporary cosmology, gravitation and electromagnetism, quantum gravity, and relativity as seen through the eyes of the public and renowned relativists. Contributors: K. Brading; G. Gale; H.F.M. Goenner; J. Goldberg; S. Katzir; D. Kennefick; H. Kragh; C. Lehner; U. Majer; J. Mattingly; E.T. Newman; J.D. Norton; J. Renn; R. Rynasiewicz; J.M. Sánchez-Ron; T. Sauer; C. Sm...

  4. BOOK REVIEW: A First Course in General Relativity (Second Edition) A First Course in General Relativity (Second Edition)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poisson, Eric

    2010-05-01

    chapter 11 the student is introduced to black holes. A large part of the chapter is devoted to the study of geodesic motion in Schwarzschild spacetime, and this allows Schutz to make contact with the classical tests of general relativity: perihelion advance and light deflection. The singular behaviour of the Schwarzschild coordinates at the event horizon is described in detail. This reveals another weakness of the book: the Kruskal coordinates are simply written down, with no derivation and little motivation; it is a pity that Schutz did not choose to introduce the Eddington--Finkelstein coordinates, or the Painlevé-Gullstand coordinates, as easier alternatives. The chapter ends with a general discussion of black holes (including their place in astrophysics and a description of the Hawking effect) and a detailed presentation of the Kerr solution. The last chapter (chapter 12) is devoted to cosmology, and this is the part of the book that was the most thoroughly revised. The presentation begins with the enunciation of the cosmological principle and a derivation of the Friedmann-Lemaitre models. It continues with a discussion of cosmological dynamics in the presence of pressureless matter, radiation, and a cosmological constant (of which nobody wanted to be reminded at the time of the first edition). It concludes with an up-to-date review of cosmological measurements and a (very) brief history of the Universe, from the big bang to inflation, to recombination, to structure formation. The presentation of general relativity and its applications contained in this book is suitable for undergraduate students who would prefer the standard `math-first approach' to Hartle's `physics-first approach'. The student will learn the essentials of differential geometry in a gentle way, and will then apply these tools to physics in curved spacetime; all of this can be accomplished in a brisk one-semester course. The book leaves out many topics than can be found in more advanced texts, such

  5. The consistency assessment of topological relations in cartographic generalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunyan; Guo, Qingsheng; Du, Xiaochu

    2006-10-01

    The field of research in the generalization assessment has been less studied than the generalization process itself, and it is very important to keep topological relation consistency for meeting generalization quality. This paper proposes a methodology to assess the quality of generalized map from topological relations consistency. Taking roads (including railway) and residential areas for examples, from the viewpoint of the spatial cognition, some issues about topological consistency in different map scales are analyzed. The statistic information about the inconsistent topological relations can be obtained by comparing the two matrices: one is the matrix for the topological relations in the generalized map; the other is the theoretical matrix for the topological relations that should be maintained after generalization. Based on the fuzzy set theory and the classification of map object types, the consistency evaluation model of topological relations is established. The paper proves the feasibility of the method through the example about how to evaluate the local topological relations between simple roads and residential area finally.

  6. Homogeneity and scale testing of generalized gamma distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stehlik, Milan

    2008-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to derive the exact distributions of the likelihood ratio tests of homogeneity and scale hypothesis when the observations are generalized gamma distributed. The special cases of exponential, Rayleigh, Weibull or gamma distributed observations are discussed exclusively. The photoemulsion experiment analysis and scale test with missing time-to-failure observations are present to illustrate the applications of methods discussed

  7. Generalized string theory mapping relations between gravity and gauge theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N.E.J.

    2003-01-01

    A previous study of the Kawai, Lewellen and Tye (KLT) relations between gravity and gauge theories, imposed by the relationship of closed and open strings, are here extended in the light of general relativity and Yang-Mills theory as effective field theories. We discuss the possibility of generalizing the traditional KLT mapping in this effective setting. A generalized mapping between the effective Lagrangians of gravity and Yang-Mills theory is presented, and the corresponding operator relations between gauge and gravity theories at the tree level are further explored. From this generalized mapping remarkable diagrammatic relations are found, linking diagrams in gravity and Yang-Mills theory, as well as diagrams in pure effective Yang-Mills theory. Also the possibility of a gravitational coupling to an antisymmetric field in the gravity scattering amplitude is considered, and shown to allow for mixed open-closed string solutions, i.e., closed heterotic strings

  8. Can one tell Einstein's unimodular theory from Einstein's general relativity?

    OpenAIRE

    Alvarez, Enrique

    2005-01-01

    The so called unimodular theory of gravitation is compared with general relativity in the quadratic (Fierz-Pauli) regime, using a quite broad framework, and it is argued that quantum effects allow in principle to discriminate between both theories.

  9. The role of Einstein's general relativity theory in today's physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bicak, J.

    The relationships are discussed of the general relativity theory to other fields of today's physics. Recent results are reported of studies into gravitational radiation, relativistic astrophysics, cosmology and the quantum theory. (Z.M.)

  10. Generalized hypervirial and Blanchard's recurrence relations for radial matrix elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dong Shihai; Chen Changyuan; Lozada-Cassou, M

    2005-01-01

    Based on the Hamiltonian identity, we propose a generalized expression of the second hypervirial for an arbitrary central potential wavefunction in arbitrary dimensions D. We demonstrate that the new proposed second hypervirial formula is very powerful in deriving the general Blanchard's and Kramers' recurrence relations among the radial matrix elements. As their useful and important applications, we derive all general Blanchard's and Kramers' recurrence relations and some identities for the Coulomb-like potential, harmonic oscillator and Kratzer oscillator. The recurrence relation and identity between the exponential functions and the powers of the radial function are established for the Morse potential. The corresponding general Blanchard's and Kramers' recurrence relations in 2D are also briefly studied

  11. 70 years of the general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro Diaz-Balart, F.; Cabezas Solorzano, R.

    1986-06-01

    In view of the 70th anniversary of the discovery of the General Theory of Relativity, an analysis was made of the special and general theories. The basic postulates, their consequences in the formulation of the theories, the main results, some aspects related to the experimental verification and its applications are presented, as are some elements of the mathematical formalism of the theories, to facilitate the logical interrelationships between its results and consequences. (author)

  12. Liouville's equation and radiative acceleration in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keane, A.J.

    1999-01-01

    This thesis examines thoroughly the general motion of a material charged particle in the intense radiation field of a static spherically symmetric compact object with spherical emitting surface outside the Schwarzschild radius. Such a test particle will be pulled in by the gravitational attraction of the compact object and pushed out by the radiation pressure force, therefore the types of trajectory admitted will depend the gravitational field, the radiation field and the particle cross-section. The presence of a strong gravitational field demands a fully general relativistic treatment of the problem. This type of calculation is interesting not only as a formal problem in general relativity but also since it has important astrophysical implications, for example, application to astrophysical discs and jets. In chapter 1 we review the classical radiation force problem and outline the transition to a fully general relativistic scenario. We discuss the method for obtaining the radiation pressure force and calculating the particle trajectories. We review previous work in this area and outline the aims of the thesis. Then we consider some astrophysical applications and discuss how realistic our calculations are. In chapter 2 we give an introduction and overview of differential geometry as this is necessary for an accurate description of tensors on a curved manifold. Then we review the general theory of relativity and in particular obtain the Schwarzschild metric describing a static spherically symmetric vacuum spacetime. Chapter 3 deals with test particle motion through a curved spacetime. Liouville's equation describes the statistical distribution in phase space of a collection of test particles and is based upon a Hamiltonian formulation of the dynamical system - this material also relies heavily upon the concepts of differential geometry introduced in chapter 2. In particular we are interested in photon transport and find the general solutions for some symmetric

  13. The generalized scheme-independent Crewther relation in QCD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian-Ming; Wu, Xing-Gang; Ma, Yang; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2017-07-01

    The Principle of Maximal Conformality (PMC) provides a systematic way to set the renormalization scales order-by-order for any perturbative QCD calculable processes. The resulting predictions are independent of the choice of renormalization scheme, a requirement of renormalization group invariance. The Crewther relation, which was originally derived as a consequence of conformally invariant field theory, provides a remarkable connection between two observables when the β function vanishes: one can show that the product of the Bjorken sum rule for spin-dependent deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering times the Adler function, defined from the cross section for electron-positron annihilation into hadrons, has no pQCD radiative corrections. The ;Generalized Crewther Relation; relates these two observables for physical QCD with nonzero β function; specifically, it connects the non-singlet Adler function (Dns) to the Bjorken sum rule coefficient for polarized deep-inelastic electron scattering (CBjp) at leading twist. A scheme-dependent ΔCSB-term appears in the analysis in order to compensate for the conformal symmetry breaking (CSB) terms from perturbative QCD. In conventional analyses, this normally leads to unphysical dependence in both the choice of the renormalization scheme and the choice of the initial scale at any finite order. However, by applying PMC scale-setting, we can fix the scales of the QCD coupling unambiguously at every order of pQCD. The result is that both Dns and the inverse coefficient CBjp-1 have identical pQCD coefficients, which also exactly match the coefficients of the corresponding conformal theory. Thus one obtains a new generalized Crewther relation for QCD which connects two effective charges, αˆd (Q) =∑i≥1 αˆg1 i (Qi), at their respective physical scales. This identity is independent of the choice of the renormalization scheme at any finite order, and the dependence on the choice of the initial scale is negligible. Similar

  14. A test theory of special relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mansouri, R.; Sexl, R.U.

    1977-01-01

    Various second-order optical tests of special relativity are discussed within the framework of a test theory developed previously. Owing to the low accuracy of the Kennedy-Thorndike experiment, the Lorentz contraction is known by direct experiments only to an accuracy of a few percent. To improve this accuracy several experiments are suggested. (author)

  15. Testing Parametric versus Semiparametric Modelling in Generalized Linear Models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Härdle, W.K.; Mammen, E.; Müller, M.D.

    1996-01-01

    We consider a generalized partially linear model E(Y|X,T) = G{X'b + m(T)} where G is a known function, b is an unknown parameter vector, and m is an unknown function.The paper introduces a test statistic which allows to decide between a parametric and a semiparametric model: (i) m is linear, i.e.

  16. Integrated radiobioecological monitoring of Semipalatinsk test site: general approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sejsebaev, A.T.; Shenal', K.; Bakhtin, M.M.; Kadyrova, N.Zh.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents major research directions and general methodology for establishment of an integrated radio-bio-ecological monitoring system at the territory of the former Semipalatinsk nuclear test site. Also, it briefly provides the first results of monitoring the natural plant and animal populations at STS. (author)

  17. Diffeomorphism invariance in the Hamiltonian formulation of General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiriushcheva, N.; Kuzmin, S.V.; Racknor, C.; Valluri, S.R.

    2008-01-01

    It is shown that when the Einstein-Hilbert Lagrangian is considered without any non-covariant modifications or change of variables, its Hamiltonian formulation leads to results consistent with principles of General Relativity. The first-class constraints of such a Hamiltonian formulation, with the metric tensor taken as a canonical variable, allow one to derive the generator of gauge transformations, which directly leads to diffeomorphism invariance. The given Hamiltonian formulation preserves general covariance of the transformations derivable from it. This characteristic should be used as the crucial consistency requirement that must be met by any Hamiltonian formulation of General Relativity

  18. Spinor formalism and complex-vector formalism of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han-ying, G.; Yong-shi, W.; Gendao, L.

    1974-01-01

    In this paper, using E. Cartan's exterior calculus, we give the spinor form of the structure equations, which leads naturally to the Newman--Penrose equations. Furthermore, starting from the spinor spaces and the el (2C) algebra, we construct the general complex-vector formalism of general relativity. We find that both the Cahen--Debever--Defrise complex-vector formalism and that of Brans are its special cases. Thus, the spinor formalism and the complex-vector formalism of general relativity are unified on the basis of the uni-modular group SL(2C) and its Lie algebra

  19. Implications of a positive cosmological constant for general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtekar, Abhay

    2017-10-01

    Most of the literature on general relativity over the last century assumes that the cosmological constant [Formula: see text] is zero. However, by now independent observations have led to a consensus that the dynamics of the universe is best described by Einstein's equations with a small but positive [Formula: see text]. Interestingly, this requires a drastic revision of conceptual frameworks commonly used in general relativity, no matter how small [Formula: see text] is. We first explain why, and then summarize the current status of generalizations of these frameworks to include a positive [Formula: see text], focusing on gravitational waves.

  20. The general class of the vacuum spherically symmetric equations of the general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karbanovski, V. V.; Sorokin, O. M.; Nesterova, M. I.; Bolotnyaya, V. A.; Markov, V. N.; Kairov, T. V.; Lyash, A. A.; Tarasyuk, O. R.

    2012-01-01

    The system of the spherical-symmetric vacuum equations of the General Relativity Theory is considered. The general solution to a problem representing two classes of line elements with arbitrary functions g 00 and g 22 is obtained. The properties of the found solutions are analyzed.

  1. Probing modifications of general relativity using current cosmological observations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao Gongbo; Bacon, David J.; Koyama, Kazuya; Nichol, Robert C.; Song, Yong-Seon; Giannantonio, Tommaso; Pogosian, Levon; Silvestri, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    We test general relativity (GR) using current cosmological data: the CMB from WMAP5 [E. Komatsu et al. (WMAP Collaboration), Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 180, 330 (2009)], the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect from the cross correlation of the CMB with six galaxy catalogs [T. Giannantonio et al., Phys. Rev. D 77, 123520 (2008)], a compilation of supernovae (SNe) type Ia including the latest Sloan Digital Sky Survey SNe [R. Kessler et al., Astrophys. J. Suppl. Ser. 185, 32 (2009).], and part of the weak lensing (WL) data from the Canada-Franco-Hawaii Telescope Legacy Survey [L. Fu et al., Astron. Astrophys. 479, 9 (2008); M. Kilbinger et al., Astron. Astrophys. 497, 677 (2009).] that probe linear and mildly nonlinear scales. We first test a model in which the effective Newtonian constant μ and the ratio of the two gravitational potentials, η, transit from the GR value to another constant at late times; in this case, we find that GR is fully consistent with the combined data. The strongest constraint comes from the ISW effect which would arise from this gravitational transition; the observed ISW signal imposes a tight constraint on a combination of μ and η that characterizes the lensing potential. Next, we consider four pixels in time and space for each function μ and η, and perform a principal component analysis, finding that seven of the resulting eight eigenmodes are consistent with GR within the errors. Only one eigenmode shows a 2σ deviation from the GR prediction, which is likely to be due to a systematic effect. However, the detection of such a deviation demonstrates the power of our time- and scale-dependent principal component analysis methodology when combining observations of structure formation and expansion history to test GR.

  2. Acceptance of genetic testing in a general population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aro, A R; Hakonen, A; Hietala, M

    1997-01-01

    in favour of mandatory genetic testing than other respondents. Respondents with university education were more critical towards genetic testing and expressed their worry about eugenics more often than other education groups. In conclusion, there are age, education and gender related differences...

  3. Nonlinear Supersymmetric General Relativity and Unity of Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Shima, Kazunari; Tsuda, Motomu

    2008-01-01

    The basic idea and some physical implications of nonlinear supersymmetric general relativity (NLSUSY GR) are discussed, which give new insights into the origin of mass and the mysterious relations between the cosmology and the low energy particle physics, e.g. the spontaneous SUSY breaking scale, the cosmological constant, the (dark) energy density of the universe and the neutrino mass.

  4. Indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity, 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Noboru

    1978-01-01

    The canonical commutation relations are analyzed in detail in the manifestly covariant quantum field theory of general relativity proposed previously. It is explicitly proved that the BRS charge is indeed the generator of the BRS transformation both in the Landau gauge and in the non-Landau one. The equivalence between the field equations and the Heisenberg equations is confirmed. (author)

  5. Probing General Relativity and New Physics with Lunar Laser Ranging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Agnello, S. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) dell' INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Maiello, M., E-mail: mauro.maiello@lnf.infn.it [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) dell' INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Currie, D.G. [University of Maryland (UMD), College Park, MD (United States); Boni, A.; Berardi, S.; Cantone, C.; Delle Monache, G.O.; Intaglietta, N.; Lops, C.; Garattini, M.; Martini, M.; Patrizi, G.; Porcelli, L.; Tibuzzi, M. [Laboratori Nazionali di Frascati (LNF) dell' INFN, Frascati, Rome (Italy); Vittori, R. [Aeronautica Militare Italiana (AMI), Rome (Italy); Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI), Rome (Italy); Bianco, G. [ASI-Centro di Geodesia Spaziale, Matera (Italy); Coradini, A. [INAF-Istituto di Fisica dello Spazio Interplanetario (IFSI), Via Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Dionisio, C. [Rheinmetall Italia S.p.A., Via Affile 102, 00131 Rome (Italy); March, R. [INFN-LNF and CNR-Istituto per le Applicazioni del Calcolo (IAC), Viale del Policlinico 137, 00161 Rome (Italy); Bellettini, G. [INFN-LNF and Department of Mathematics, University of Rome ' Tor Vergata' , Via della Ricerca Scientifica, 00133 Rome (Italy); and others

    2012-11-11

    Over the past 40 years, Lunar Laser Ranging (LLR, developed by the Univ. of Maryland (PI) and INFN-LNF (Co-PI)) to the Apollo Cube Corner Retroreflector (CCR) arrays have supplied almost all the significant tests of General Relativity (Currie et al., 2009 [12]). LLR can evaluate the PPN (Post Newtonian Parameters), addressing this way both the possible changes in the gravitational constant and the self-energy properties of the gravitational field. In addition, the LLR has provided significant information on the composition and origin of the Moon. This is the only Apollo experiment that is still in operation. Initially the Apollo LLR arrays contributed a negligible fraction of the ranging error budget. Over the decades, the ranging capabilities of the ground stations have improved by more than two orders of magnitude. Now, because of the lunar librations, the existing Apollo retroreflector arrays contribute a significant fraction of the limiting errors in the range measurements. We built a new experimental apparatus (the 'Satellite/Lunar Laser Ranging Characterization Facility', SCF) and created a new test procedure (the SCF-Test) to characterize and model the detailed thermal behavior and the optical performance of cube corner laser retroreflectors in space for industrial and scientific applications (Dell'Agnello et al., 2011 [13]). Our key experimental innovation is the concurrent measurement and modeling of the optical Far Field Diffraction Pattern (FFDP) and the temperature distribution of the SLR retroreflector payload under thermal conditions produced with a close-match solar simulator. The apparatus includes infrared cameras for non-invasive thermometry, thermal control and real-time movement of the payload to experimentally simulate satellite orientation on orbit with respect to both solar illumination and laser interrogation beams. These unique capabilities provide experimental validation of the space segment for SLR and Lunar Laser Ranging

  6. 1 April 2011 - Croatian Rudjer Boskovic Institute (RBI)Director-General D. Ramljak visiting CMS Control Centre in Meyrin with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli; signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Walckiers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien brice

    2011-01-01

    1 April 2011 - Croatian Rudjer Boskovic Institute (RBI)Director-General D. Ramljak visiting CMS Control Centre in Meyrin with Collaboration Spokesperson G. Tonelli; signing the guest book with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Walckiers.

  7. 23rd June 2010 - IATA Director-General and CEO G. Bisignani signing the guest book with Research and Computing Director S. Bertolucci; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura; throughout accompanied by Adviser for International relations M. Bona.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2010-01-01

    23rd June 2010 - IATA Director-General and CEO G. Bisignani signing the guest book with Research and Computing Director S. Bertolucci; visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura; throughout accompanied by Adviser for International relations M. Bona.

  8. 8 April 2011 - Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology A. Mercadante Oliva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with J.M. Jimenez.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    8 April 2011 - Brazilian Minister of State for Science and Technology A. Mercadante Oliva signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer and Head of International Relations F. Pauss; in the ATLAS visitor centre with Collaboration Former Spokesperson P. Jenni; visiting LHC superconducting magnet test hall with J.M. Jimenez.

  9. Proceedings of the fourth Marcel Grossmann meeting on general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruffini, R.

    1986-01-01

    The Marcel Grossmann meetings were conceived with the aim of reviewing recent advances in gravitation and general relativity with the major emphasis on their mathematical foundations and physical predictions. Their main objective is to elicit contributions which deepen our understanding of space-time structures as well as to review the status of experiments verifying Einstein's Theory of Gravitation. It has been demonstrated by the previous meetings that these sessions provide physicists from various countries who are involved in research on general relativity with a unique opportunity to exchange experiences and enhance co-operation in fields of common interest. The meeting was essentially divided into 3 sub-areas; interplay between elementary particle physics and cosmology and relativistic astrophysics, classical relativity, and experimental relativity. Among the topics covered were supergravity and superstrings, bar gravitational wave detectors, black holes, classical relativity, computer relativity, cosmology and inos, early cosmology, exact solutions, Kaluza Klein theories, relativistic self-gravitating systems and quantum gravity. (Auth.)

  10. A comment on ''A test of general relativity using the LARES and LAGEOS satellites and a GRACE Earth gravity model'', by I. Ciufolini et al

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iorio, Lorenzo [Ministero dell' Istruzione Univ. della Ricerca (M.I.U.R.), Bari (Italy)

    2017-02-15

    Recently, Ciufolini et al. reported on a test of the general relativistic gravitomagnetic Lense-Thirring effect by analyzing about 3.5 years of laser ranging data to the LAGEOS, LAGEOS II, LARES geodetic satellites orbiting the Earth. By using the GRACE-based GGM05S Earth's global gravity model and a linear combination of the nodes Ω of the three satellites designed to remove the impact of errors in the first two even zonal harmonic coefficients J{sub 2}, J{sub 4} of the multipolar expansion of the Newtonian part of the Earth's gravitational potential, they claimed an overall accuracy of 5% for the Lense-Thirring caused node motion. We show that the scatter in the nominal values of the uncancelled even zonals of degree l = 6, 8, 10 from some of the most recent global gravity models does not yet allow to reach unambiguously and univocally the expected ∼1% level, being large up to

  11. Multigroup Moderation Test in Generalized Structured Component Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Dwi Mulyanto

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Generalized Structured Component Analysis (GSCA is an alternative method in structural modeling using alternating least squares. GSCA can be used for the complex analysis including multigroup. GSCA can be run with a free software called GeSCA, but in GeSCA there is no multigroup moderation test to compare the effect between groups. In this research we propose to use the T test in PLS for testing moderation Multigroup on GSCA. T test only requires sample size, estimate path coefficient, and standard error of each group that are already available on the output of GeSCA and the formula is simple so the user does not need a long time for analysis.

  12. Mixed hyperbolic-second-order-parabolic formulations of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paschalidis, Vasileios

    2008-01-01

    Two new formulations of general relativity are introduced. The first one is a parabolization of the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner formulation and is derived by the addition of combinations of the constraints and their derivatives to the right-hand side of the Arnowitt-Deser-Misner evolution equations. The desirable property of this modification is that it turns the surface of constraints into a local attractor because the constraint propagation equations become second-order parabolic independently of the gauge conditions employed. This system may be classified as mixed hyperbolic--second-order parabolic. The second formulation is a parabolization of the Kidder-Scheel-Teukolsky formulation and is a manifestly mixed strongly hyperbolic--second-order-parabolic set of equations, bearing thus resemblance to the compressible Navier-Stokes equations. As a first test, a stability analysis of flat space is carried out and it is shown that the first modification exponentially damps and smoothes all constraint-violating modes. These systems provide a new basis for constructing schemes for long-term and stable numerical integration of the Einstein field equations.

  13. Hydrodynamics in full general relativity with conservative adaptive mesh refinement

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, William E.; Pretorius, Frans; Stephens, Branson C.

    2012-06-01

    There is great interest in numerical relativity simulations involving matter due to the likelihood that binary compact objects involving neutron stars will be detected by gravitational wave observatories in the coming years, as well as to the possibility that binary compact object mergers could explain short-duration gamma-ray bursts. We present a code designed for simulations of hydrodynamics coupled to the Einstein field equations targeted toward such applications. This code has recently been used to study eccentric mergers of black hole-neutron star binaries. We evolve the fluid conservatively using high-resolution shock-capturing methods, while the field equations are solved in the generalized-harmonic formulation with finite differences. In order to resolve the various scales that may arise, we use adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) with grid hierarchies based on truncation error estimates. A noteworthy feature of this code is the implementation of the flux correction algorithm of Berger and Colella to ensure that the conservative nature of fluid advection is respected across AMR boundaries. We present various tests to compare the performance of different limiters and flux calculation methods, as well as to demonstrate the utility of AMR flux corrections.

  14. Thurstonian models for sensory discrimination tests as generalized linear models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockhoff, Per B.; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen

    2010-01-01

    as a so-called generalized linear model. The underlying sensory difference 6 becomes directly a parameter of the statistical model and the estimate d' and it's standard error becomes the "usual" output of the statistical analysis. The d' for the monadic A-NOT A method is shown to appear as a standard......Sensory discrimination tests such as the triangle, duo-trio, 2-AFC and 3-AFC tests produce binary data and the Thurstonian decision rule links the underlying sensory difference 6 to the observed number of correct responses. In this paper it is shown how each of these four situations can be viewed...

  15. Introduction to general relativity, black holes and cosmology

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet-Bruhat, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    General Relativity is a beautiful geometric theory, simple in its mathematical formulation but leading to numerous consequences with striking physical interpretations: gravitational waves, black holes, cosmological models, and so on. This introductory textbook is written for mathematics students interested in physics and physics students interested in exact mathematical formulations (or for anyone with a scientific mind who is curious to know more of the world we live in), recent remarkable experimental and observational results which confirm the theory are clearly described and no specialised physics knowledge is required. The mathematical level of Part A is aimed at undergraduate students and could be the basis for a course on General Relativity. Part B is more advanced, but still does not require sophisticated mathematics. Based on Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat's more advanced text, General Relativity and the Einstein Equations, the aim of this book is to give with precision, but as simply as possible, the found...

  16. Episodic, generalized, and semantic memory tests: switching and strength effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Michael S; Murray, Krista L

    2011-09-01

    We continue the process of investigating the probabilistic paired associate paradigm in an effort to understand the memory access control processes involved and to determine whether the memory structure produced is in transition between episodic and semantic memory. In this paradigm two targets are probabilistically paired with a cue across a large number of short lists. Participants can recall the target paired with the cue in the most recent list (list specific test), produce the first of the two targets that have been paired with that cue to come to mind (generalised test), and produce a free association response (semantic test). Switching between a generalised test and a list specific test did not produce a switching cost indicating a general similarity in the control processes involved. In addition, there was evidence for a dissociation between two different strength manipulations (amount of study time and number of cue-target pairings) such that number of pairings influenced the list specific, generalised and the semantic test but amount of study time only influenced the list specific and generalised test. © 2011 Canadian Psychological Association

  17. The motion of a charged particle in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ludvigsen, M.

    1979-01-01

    A new approach to the problem of the motion of a self-interacting massive charged particle in general relativity is presented. A charged Robinson-Trautman solution is used as a general relativistic model of such a particle. Such a solution is shown to generate a unique world line in its own H space, which is interpreted as the world line of the particle. Using the R-T dynamical relations, the equation of motion of the particle is derived, which, in the limiting case of zero curvature, is shown to be the same as the classical Lorentz-Dirac equation of motion. (author)

  18. On the mathematical theory of classical fields and general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Klainerman, S

    1993-01-01

    From the perspective of an analyst, like myself, the General Theory of Relativity provides an extrordinary rich and vastly virgin territory. It is the aim of my lecture to provide, first, an account of those aspects of the theory which attract me most and second a perspective of what has been accomplished so far in that respect. In trying to state our main objectives it helps to view General Relativity in the broader context of Classical Field Theory. EinsteiniVacuum equations, or shortly E—V, is already sufficiently complicated. I will thus restrict my attention to them.

  19. Canonical quantization of general relativity in discrete space-times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gambini, Rodolfo; Pullin, Jorge

    2003-01-17

    It has long been recognized that lattice gauge theory formulations, when applied to general relativity, conflict with the invariance of the theory under diffeomorphisms. We analyze discrete lattice general relativity and develop a canonical formalism that allows one to treat constrained theories in Lorentzian signature space-times. The presence of the lattice introduces a "dynamical gauge" fixing that makes the quantization of the theories conceptually clear, albeit computationally involved. The problem of a consistent algebra of constraints is automatically solved in our approach. The approach works successfully in other field theories as well, including topological theories. A simple cosmological application exhibits quantum elimination of the singularity at the big bang.

  20. Essays in general relativity a Festschrift for Abraham Taub

    CERN Document Server

    Tipler, Frank J

    1981-01-01

    Essays in General Relativity: A Festschrift for Abraham Taub is collection of essays to honor Professor Abraham H. Taub on the occasion of his retirement from the mathematics faculty of the University of California at Berkeley. Relativistic hydrodynamics has always been a subject dear to Taub's heart. In fact, many basic results on special relativistic fluid flows are due to him, and he has been a major contributor to the study of fluid flows near shocks. The book contains 16 chapters and begins with a discussion of a geometrical approach to general relativity. This is followed by separate cha

  1. Are Autistic Traits in the General Population Related to Global and Regional Brain Differences?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koolschijn, P. Cédric M. P.; Geurts, Hilde M.; van der Leij, Andries R.; Scholte, H. Steven

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that autistic-related traits in the general population lie on a continuum, with autism spectrum disorders representing the extreme end of this distribution. Here, we tested the hypothesis of a possible relationship between autistic traits and brain morphometry in the general population. Participants completed the…

  2. A general Bayes weibull inference model for accelerated life testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorp, J. Rene van; Mazzuchi, Thomas A.

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the development of a general Bayes inference model for accelerated life testing. The failure times at a constant stress level are assumed to belong to a Weibull distribution, but the specification of strict adherence to a parametric time-transformation function is not required. Rather, prior information is used to indirectly define a multivariate prior distribution for the scale parameters at the various stress levels and the common shape parameter. Using the approach, Bayes point estimates as well as probability statements for use-stress (and accelerated) life parameters may be inferred from a host of testing scenarios. The inference procedure accommodates both the interval data sampling strategy and type I censored sampling strategy for the collection of ALT test data. The inference procedure uses the well-known MCMC (Markov Chain Monte Carlo) methods to derive posterior approximations. The approach is illustrated with an example

  3. Doppler frequency in interplanetary radar and general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcvittie, G. C.

    1972-01-01

    The change of frequency of an interplanetary radar signal sent from the earth to another planet or to a space probe is worked out according to general relativity. The Schwarzschild spacetime is employed and its null geodesics control the motion of the signals. Exact Doppler frequency formulas are derived for one-way and two-way radar in terms of an arbitrary Schwarzschild radial coordinate. A reduction to the special relativity case is used to interpret the formulas in terms of the relative radial velocity of emitter and target. The general relativity corrections are worked out approximately for each of three possible Schwarzschild radial coordinates, and a numerical example is given. The amount of the correction is different according as one or the other of the Schwarzschild coordinates is identified with the radius vector deduced from classical celestial mechanics. The identification problem is discussed.

  4. Cosmological perturbations in a family of deformations of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnov, Kirill; Shtanov, Yuri

    2010-01-01

    We study linear cosmological perturbations in a previously introduced family of deformations of general relativity characterized by the absence of new degrees of freedom. The homogeneous and isotropic background in this class of theories is unmodified and is described by the usual Friedmann equations. The theory of cosmological perturbations is modified and the relevant deformation parameter has the dimension of length. Gravitational perturbations of the scalar type can be described by a certain relativistic potential related to the matter perturbations just as in general relativity. A system of differential equations describing the evolution of this potential and of the stress-energy density perturbations is obtained. We find that the evolution of scalar perturbations proceeds with a modified effective time-dependent speed of sound, which, contrary to the case of general relativity, does not vanish even at the matter-dominated stage. In a broad range of values of the length parameter controlling the deformation, a specific transition from the regime of modified gravity to the regime of general relativity in the evolution of scalar perturbations takes place during the radiation domination. In this case, the resulting power spectrum of perturbations in radiation and dark matter is suppressed on the comoving spatial scales that enter the Hubble radius before this transition. We estimate the bounds on the deformation parameter for which this suppression does not lead to observable consequences. Evolution of scalar perturbations at the inflationary stage is modified but very slightly and the primordial spectrum generated during inflation is not noticeably different from the one obtained in general relativity

  5. BOOK REVIEW: Partial Differential Equations in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halburd, Rodney G.

    2008-11-01

    Although many books on general relativity contain an overview of the relevant background material from differential geometry, very little attention is usually paid to background material from the theory of differential equations. This is understandable in a first course on relativity but it often limits the kinds of problems that can be studied rigorously. Einstein's field equations lie at the heart of general relativity. They are a system of partial differential equations (PDEs) relating the curvature of spacetime to properties of matter. A central part of most problems in general relativity is to extract information about solutions of these equations. Most standard texts achieve this by studying exact solutions or numerical and analytical approximations. In the book under review, Alan Rendall emphasises the role of rigorous qualitative methods in general relativity. There has long been a need for such a book, giving a broad overview of the relevant background from the theory of partial differential equations, and not just from differential geometry. It should be noted that the book also covers the basic theory of ordinary differential equations. Although there are many good books on the rigorous theory of PDEs, methods related to the Einstein equations deserve special attention, not only because of the complexity and importance of these equations, but because these equations do not fit into any of the standard classes of equations (elliptic, parabolic, hyperbolic) that one typically encounters in a course on PDEs. Even specifying exactly what ones means by a Cauchy problem in general relativity requires considerable care. The main problem here is that the manifold on which the solution is defined is determined by the solution itself. This means that one does not simply define data on a submanifold. Rendall's book gives a good overview of applications and results from the qualitative theory of PDEs to general relativity. It would be impossible to give detailed

  6. General circular velocity relation of a test particle in a 3D gravitational potential: application to the rotation curves analysis and total mass determination of UGC 8490 and UGC 9753

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repetto, P.; Martínez-García, E. E.; Rosado, M.; Gabbasov, R.

    2018-06-01

    In this paper, we derive a novel circular velocity relation for a test particle in a 3D gravitational potential applicable to every system of curvilinear coordinates, suitable to be reduced to orthogonal form. As an illustration of the potentiality of the determined circular velocity expression, we perform the rotation curves analysis of UGC 8490 and UGC 9753 and we estimate the total and dark matter mass of these two galaxies under the assumption that their respective dark matter haloes have spherical, prolate, and oblate spheroidal mass distributions. We employ stellar population synthesis models and the total H I density map to obtain the stellar and H I+He+metals rotation curves of both galaxies. The subtraction of the stellar plus gas rotation curves from the observed rotation curves of UGC 8490 and UGC 9753 generates the dark matter circular velocity curves of both galaxies. We fit the dark matter rotation curves of UGC 8490 and UGC 9753 through the newly established circular velocity formula specialized to the spherical, prolate, and oblate spheroidal mass distributions, considering the Navarro, Frenk, and White, Burkert, Di Cintio, Einasto, and Stadel dark matter haloes. Our principal findings are the following: globally, cored dark matter profiles Burkert and Einasto prevail over cuspy Navarro, Frenk, and White, and Di Cintio. Also, spherical/oblate dark matter models fit better the dark matter rotation curves of both galaxies than prolate dark matter haloes.

  7. Indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Noboru

    1978-01-01

    Quantum field theory of Einstein's general relativity is formulated in the indefinitemetric Hilbert space in such a way that asymptotic fields are manifestly Lorentz covariant and the physical S-matrix is unitary. The general coordinate transformation is transcribed into a q-number transformation, called the BRS transformation. Its abstract definition is presented on the basis of the BRS transformation for the Yang-Mills theory. The BRS transformation for general relativity is then explicitly constructed. The gauge-fixing Lagrangian density and the Faddeev-Popov one are introduced in such a way that their sum behaves like a scalar density under the BRS transformation. One can then proceed in the same way as in the Kugo-Ojima formalism of the Yang-Mills theory to establish the unitarity of the physical S-matrix. (author)

  8. General projective relativity and the vector-tensor gravitational field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arcidiacono, G.

    1986-01-01

    In the general projective relativity, the induced 4-dimensional metric is symmetric in three cases, and we obtain the vector-tensor, the scalar-tensor, and the scalar-vector-tensor theories of gravitation. In this work we examine the vector-tensor theory, similar to the Veblen's theory, but with a different physical interpretation

  9. Survey on Dirac equation in general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paillere, P.

    1984-10-01

    Starting from an infinitesimal transformation expressed with a Killing vector and using systematically the formalism of the local tetrades, we show that, in the area of the general relativity, the Dirac equation may be formulated only versus the four local vectors which determine the gravitational potentials, their gradients and the 4-vector potential of the electromagnetic field [fr

  10. An experiment designed to verify the general theory of relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surdin, Maurice

    1960-01-01

    The project for an experiment which uses the effect of gravitation on Maser-type clocks placed on the ground at two different heights and which is designed to verify the general theory of relativity. Reprint of a paper published in Comptes rendus des seances de l'Academie des Sciences, t. 250, p. 299-301, sitting of 11 January 1960 [fr

  11. Spinning fluids in general relativity: a variational formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, H.P. de; Salim, J.M.

    1990-01-01

    In this paper we present a variational formulation for spinning fluids in General Relativity. In our model each volume element of the fluid has rigid microstructure. We deduce a symmetrical energy-moment tensor where there is an explicit contribution of kinetic spin energy to the total energy. (author)

  12. Albert Einstein's 1916 Review Article on General Relativity

    OpenAIRE

    Sauer, Tilman

    2004-01-01

    The first comprehensive overview of the final version of the general theory of relativity was published by Einstein in 1916 after several expositions of preliminary versions and latest revisions of the theory in November 1915. A historical account of this review paper is given, of its prehistory, including a discussion of Einstein's collaboration with Marcel Grossmann, and of its immediate reception.

  13. Derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petti, Richard

    2015-04-01

    General relativity cannot describe exchange of classical intrinsic angular momentum and orbital angular momentum. Einstein-Cartan theory fixes this problem in the least invasive way. In the late 20th century, the consensus view was that Einstein-Cartan theory requires inclusion of torsion without adequate justification, it has no empirical support (though it doesn't conflict with any known evidence), it solves no important problem, and it complicates gravitational theory with no compensating benefit. In 1986 the author published a derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity, with no additional assumptions or parameters. Starting without torsion, Poincaré symmetry, classical or quantum spin, or spinors, it derives torsion and its relation to spin from a continuum limit of general relativistic solutions. The present work makes the case that this computation, combined with supporting arguments, constitutes a derivation of Einstein-Cartan theory from general relativity, not just a plausibility argument. This paper adds more and simpler explanations, more computational details, correction of a factor of 2, discussion of limitations of the derivation, and discussion of some areas of gravitational research where Einstein-Cartan theory is relevant.

  14. General relativity from a gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anabalon, Andres; Willison, Steven; Zanelli, Jorge

    2007-01-01

    In this paper two things are done. First it is shown how a four-dimensional gauged Wess-Zumino-Witten term arises from the five-dimensional Einstein-Hilbert plus Gauss-Bonnet Lagrangian with a special choice of the coefficients. Second, the way in which the equations of motion of four-dimensional General Relativity arise is exhibited

  15. Einstein and Hilbert: The creation of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Todorov, I.T.

    1992-12-01

    It took eight years after Einstein announced the basic physical ideas behind the relativistic gravity theory before the proper mathematical formulation of general-relativity was mastered. The efforts of the greatest physicist and of the greatest mathematician of the time was involved and reached a breathtaking concentration during the last month of the work. (author)

  16. Proceedings of the third Marcel Grossmann meeting on general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Ning

    1983-01-01

    This book contains 64 session papers presented at the 3rd Marcel Grossmann Meeting on General Relativity. The papers are divided into 10 sections including: classical problem in gravitation; alternative approaches to gravitational theory; supergravity; quantum gravity and quantum field theory in curved space; cosmology; early universe; physics of compact bodies; gravitational wave experiments; gravitational experiments; miscellaneous. (Auth.)

  17. Generalized virial relations and the theory of subdynamics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Obcemea, Ch.; Froelich, P.; Braandas, E.J.

    1981-05-01

    In this paper, we discuss the implication of the generalized virial relations in the spectral analysis of Liouville operators. In particular, we refer to the existence problem of the analytic continuation of these super-operators and their resolvents occurring in the reduced dynamics description of open systems. For completeness, we outline the main ideas of the subdynamics approach. (author)

  18. Energy-momentum distribution: A crucial problem in general relativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharif, M.; Fatima, T.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is aimed to elaborate the problem of energy–momentum in general relativity. In this connection, we use the prescriptions of Einstein, Landau–Lifshitz, Papapetrou and Möller to compute the energy–momentum densities for two exact solutions of Einstein field equations. The space–times under

  19. Statistical equilibrium and symplectic geometry in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iglesias, P.

    1981-09-01

    A geometrical construction is given of the statistical equilibrium states of a system of particles in the gravitational field in general relativity. By a method of localization variables, the expression of thermodynamic values is given and the compatibility of this description is shown with a macroscopic model of a relativistic continuous medium for a given value of the free-energy function [fr

  20. Collineations of the curvature tensor in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The general theory of relativity, which is a field theory of gravitation, is described by the Einstein field equations. These equations whose fundamental constituent is the space-time metric gij, are highly non-linear partial differential equations and, therefore it is very difficult to obtain exact solutions. They become still more diffi-.

  1. The general theory of relativity: the first thirty years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandrasekhar, S.

    1980-01-01

    The principal landmarks in the development of general relativity (exclusive of cosmology) during the first 30 years after its founding are presented. The emergence of the new gravitational laws, their experimental consequences and the consequent growth of the present concern with gravitational collapse and black holes are traced. (U.K.)

  2. Scalar fields and cosmic censorship hypothesis in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parnovs'kij, S.L.; Gajdamaka, O.Z.

    2004-01-01

    We discuss an influence of the presence of some nonstandard scalar fields in the vicinity of naked time-like singularity on the type and properties of this singularity. The main goal is to study the validity of the Penrose's Cosmic Censorship hypothesis in the General Relativity

  3. Probing Students' Understanding of Some Conceptual Themes in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandyopadhyay, Atanu; Kumar, Arvind

    2010-01-01

    This work is an attempt to see how physics undergraduates view the basic ideas of general relativity when they are exposed to the topic in a standard introductory course. Since the subject is conceptually and technically difficult, we adopted a "case studies" approach, focusing in depth on about six students who had just finished a one semester…

  4. Galileons as the Scalar Analogue of General Relativity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klein, Remko; Ozkan, Mehmet; Roest, Diederik

    2016-01-01

    We establish a correspondence between general relativity with diffeomorphism invariance and scalar field theories with Galilean invariance: notions such as the Levi-Civita connection and the Riemann tensor have a Galilean counterpart. This suggests Galilean theories as the unique nontrivial

  5. A general diagnostic model applied to language testing data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Davier, Matthias

    2008-11-01

    Probabilistic models with one or more latent variables are designed to report on a corresponding number of skills or cognitive attributes. Multidimensional skill profiles offer additional information beyond what a single test score can provide, if the reported skills can be identified and distinguished reliably. Many recent approaches to skill profile models are limited to dichotomous data and have made use of computationally intensive estimation methods such as Markov chain Monte Carlo, since standard maximum likelihood (ML) estimation techniques were deemed infeasible. This paper presents a general diagnostic model (GDM) that can be estimated with standard ML techniques and applies to polytomous response variables as well as to skills with two or more proficiency levels. The paper uses one member of a larger class of diagnostic models, a compensatory diagnostic model for dichotomous and partial credit data. Many well-known models, such as univariate and multivariate versions of the Rasch model and the two-parameter logistic item response theory model, the generalized partial credit model, as well as a variety of skill profile models, are special cases of this GDM. In addition to an introduction to this model, the paper presents a parameter recovery study using simulated data and an application to real data from the field test for TOEFL Internet-based testing.

  6. On stability relative to vector elements of the orbit in general relativity motion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdil'din, M.M.; Bejsenova, N.A.

    2002-01-01

    In this work a question of a new type of stability - stability relative to vector elements of the orbit is considered in general relativity mechanics in case of the Lenze-Thirring and two body rotation. (author)

  7. The science, technology and mission design for the Laser Astrometric test of relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turyshev, Slava G.

    2006-01-01

    The Laser Astrometric Test of Relativity (LATOR) is a Michelson-Morley-type experiment designed to test the Einstein's general theory of relativity in the most intense gravitational environment available in the solar system - the close proximity to the Sun.

  8. Testing for one Generalized Linear Single Order Parameter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Niels Langager; Christensen, Tage Emil; Dyre, Jeppe

    We examine a linear single order parameter model for thermoviscoelastic relaxation in viscous liquids, allowing for a distribution of relaxation times. In this model the relaxation of volume and entalpy is completely described by the relaxation of one internal order parameter. In contrast to prior...... work the order parameter may be chosen to have a non-exponential relaxation. The model predictions contradict the general consensus of the properties of viscous liquids in two ways: (i) The model predicts that following a linear isobaric temperature step, the normalized volume and entalpy relaxation...... responses or extrapolate from measurements of a glassy state away from equilibrium. Starting from a master equation description of inherent dynamics, we calculate the complex thermodynamic response functions. We device a way of testing for the generalized single order parameter model by measuring 3 complex...

  9. Gravitational redshift of galaxies in clusters as predicted by general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtak, Radosław; Hansen, Steen H; Hjorth, Jens

    2011-09-28

    The theoretical framework of cosmology is mainly defined by gravity, of which general relativity is the current model. Recent tests of general relativity within the Lambda Cold Dark Matter (ΛCDM) model have found a concordance between predictions and the observations of the growth rate and clustering of the cosmic web. General relativity has not hitherto been tested on cosmological scales independently of the assumptions of the ΛCDM model. Here we report an observation of the gravitational redshift of light coming from galaxies in clusters at the 99 per cent confidence level, based on archival data. Our measurement agrees with the predictions of general relativity and its modification created to explain cosmic acceleration without the need for dark energy (the f(R) theory), but is inconsistent with alternative models designed to avoid the presence of dark matter. © 2011 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved

  10. Reformulation of the symmetries of first-order general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montesinos, Merced; González, Diego; Celada, Mariano; Díaz, Bogar

    2017-10-01

    We report a new internal gauge symmetry of the n-dimensional Palatini action with cosmological term (n>3 ) that is the generalization of three-dimensional local translations. This symmetry is obtained through the direct application of the converse of Noether’s second theorem on the theory under consideration. We show that diffeomorphisms can be expressed as linear combinations of it and local Lorentz transformations with field-dependent parameters up to terms involving the variational derivatives of the action. As a result, the new internal symmetry together with local Lorentz transformations can be adopted as the fundamental gauge symmetries of general relativity. Although their gauge algebra is open in general, it allows us to recover, without resorting to the equations of motion, the very well-known Lie algebra satisfied by translations and Lorentz transformations in three dimensions. We also report the analog of the new gauge symmetry for the Holst action with cosmological term, finding that it explicitly depends on the Immirzi parameter. The same result concerning its relation to diffeomorphisms and the open character of the gauge algebra also hold in this case. Finally, we consider the non-minimal coupling of a scalar field to gravity in n dimensions and establish that the new gauge symmetry is affected by this matter field. Our results indicate that general relativity in dimension greater than three can be thought of as a gauge theory.

  11. A General Model for Testing Mediation and Moderation Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKinnon, David P.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes methods for testing mediation and moderation effects in a dataset, both together and separately. Investigations of this kind are especially valuable in prevention research to obtain information on the process by which a program achieves its effects and whether the program is effective for subgroups of individuals. A general model that simultaneously estimates mediation and moderation effects is presented, and the utility of combining the effects into a single model is described. Possible effects of interest in the model are explained, as are statistical methods to assess these effects. The methods are further illustrated in a hypothetical prevention program example. PMID:19003535

  12. Testing special relativity theory using Compton scattering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contreras S, H.; Hernandez A, L.; Baltazar R, A.; Escareno J, E.; Mares E, C. A.; Hernandez V, C.; Vega C, H. R.

    2010-10-01

    The validity of the special relativity theory has been tested using the Compton scattering. Since 1905 several experiments has been carried out to show that time, mass, and length change with the velocity, in this work the Compton scattering has been utilized as a simple way to show the validity to relativity. The work was carried out through Monte Carlo calculations and experiments with different gamma-ray sources and a gamma-ray spectrometer with a 3 x 3 NaI (Tl) detector. The pulse-height spectra were collected and the Compton edge was observed. This information was utilized to determine the relationship between the electron's mass and energy using the Compton -knee- position, the obtained results were contrasted with two collision models between photon and electron, one model was built using the classical physics and another using the special relativity theory. It was found that calculations and experiments results fit to collision model made using the special relativity. (Author)

  13. Extent of the Immirzi ambiguity in quantum general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marugan, Guillermo A Mena

    2002-01-01

    The Ashtekar-Barbero formulation of general relativity admits a one-parameter family of canonical transformations that preserves the expressions of the Gauss and diffeomorphism constraints. The loop quantization of the connection formalism based on each of these canonical sets leads to different predictions. This phenomenon is called the Immirzi ambiguity. It has been recently argued that this ambiguity could be generalized to the extent of a spatially dependent function instead of a parameter. This would ruin the predictability of loop quantum gravity. We prove that such expectations are not realized, so that the Immirzi ambiguity introduces exclusively a freedom in the choice of a real number. (letter to the editor)

  14. Escape trajectories of solar sails and general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya. [Physics Department, New York City College of Technology, City University of New York, 300 Jay Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States); Vazquez-Poritz, Justin F., E-mail: jvazquez-poritz@citytech.cuny.ed [Physics Department, New York City College of Technology, City University of New York, 300 Jay Street, Brooklyn, NY 11201 (United States); Graduate School and University Center, City University of New York, 365 Fifth Avenue, New York, NY 10016 (United States)

    2009-11-16

    General relativity can have a significant impact on the long-range escape trajectories of solar sails deployed near the sun. For example, spacetime curvature in the vicinity of the sun can cause a solar sail traveling from about 4 solar radii to 2550 AU to be deflected by on the order of a million kilometers, and should therefore be taken into account at the beginning of the mission. There are a number of smaller general relativistic effects, such as frame dragging due to the slow rotation of the sun which can cause a deflection of more than one thousand kilometers.

  15. Escape trajectories of solar sails and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kezerashvili, Roman Ya.; Vazquez-Poritz, Justin F.

    2009-01-01

    General relativity can have a significant impact on the long-range escape trajectories of solar sails deployed near the sun. For example, spacetime curvature in the vicinity of the sun can cause a solar sail traveling from about 4 solar radii to 2550 AU to be deflected by on the order of a million kilometers, and should therefore be taken into account at the beginning of the mission. There are a number of smaller general relativistic effects, such as frame dragging due to the slow rotation of the sun which can cause a deflection of more than one thousand kilometers.

  16. Experimental testing of constructivism and related theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidelman, U

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to show that experimental scientific methods can be applied to explain how the analytic mechanism of the left cerebral hemisphere and the synthetic mechanism of the right one create complex cognitive constructions like ontology and mathematics. Nominalism and ordinal mathematical concepts are related to the analytic left hemisphere while Platonism and cardinal mathematical concepts are related to the synthetic right one. Thus persons with a dominant left hemisphere tend to prefer nominalist ontology and have more aptitude for ordinal mathematics than for cardinal mathematics, while persons with a dominant right hemisphere tend to prefer platonist ontology and have more aptitude for cardinal mathematics than for ordinal mathematics. It is further explained how the Kantism temporal mode of perceiving experience can be related to the left hemisphere while the Kantian spatial mode of perceiving experience can be related to the right hemisphere. This relation can be tested experimentally, thus the Kantian source of constructivism, and through it constructivism itself, can be tested experimentally.

  17. Issues related to field testing in tuff

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zimmerman, R.M.

    1982-01-01

    This paper has brought out the unique properties of tuffs and related them to needs associated with their use as a host rock for a high level nuclear waste repository. Major issues of temperature, pore water, joints, and depositional patterns have been identified and related responses and impacts outlined in Table 1. Planned experiments have been outlined and their relationships to the rock mechanics issues summarized in Table 2. The conclusions from this paper are: (1) tuff is a complex rock and basic phenomenological understanding is incomplete; and (2) available field test facilities will be used for a series of experiments designed to improve phenomenological understanding and support repository design efforts

  18. New ghost-free extensions of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mann, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    The method of algebraic extension is shown to yield a large class of gravitational theories which are extensions of general relativity. Requiring positivity of energy in the flat-space limit of such theories provides some constraints, but a large set of theories of potential phenomenological interest survives this condition. Explicit examples of such theories include the non-symmetric gravitational theory, algebraically extended Hilbert gravity and a one-parameter family of theories with dynamical torsion. In general such theories do not alter general relativistic post-Newtonian predictions for time delay experiments; rather they alter the non-linearities of the post-Newtonian gravitational potential. Such effects may be probed by measuring periastron shifts, as in the eclipsing binary systems Di Her and As Cam, as well as in the binary pulsar PSR 1913 + 16 (author)

  19. Testing for changes in spatial relative risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazelton, Martin L

    2017-07-30

    The spatial relative risk function is a useful tool for describing geographical variation in disease incidence. We consider the problem of comparing relative risk functions between two time periods, with the idea of detecting alterations in the spatial pattern of disease risk irrespective of whether there has been a change in the overall incidence rate. Using case-control datasets for each period, we use kernel smoothing methods to derive a test statistic based on the difference between the log-relative risk functions, which we term the log-relative risk ratio. For testing a null hypothesis of an unchanging spatial pattern of risk, we show how p-values can be computed using both randomization methods and an asymptotic normal approximation. The methodology is applied to data on campylobacteriosis from 2006 to 2013 in a region of New Zealand. We find clear evidence of a change in the spatial pattern of risk between those years, which can be explained in differences by response to a public health initiative between urban and rural communities. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Isotropic extensions of the vacuum solutions in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molina, C. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil); Martin-Moruno, Prado [Victoria University of Wellington (New Zealand); Gonzalez-Diaz, Pedro F. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Madrid (Spain)

    2012-07-01

    Full text: Spacetimes described by spherically symmetric solutions of Einstein's equations are of paramount importance both in astrophysical applications and theoretical considerations. And among those, black holes are highlighted. In vacuum, Birkhoff's theorem and its generalizations to non-asymptotically flat cases uniquely fix the metric as the Schwarzschild, Schwarzschild-de Sitter or Schwarzschild-anti-de Sitter geometries, the vacuum solutions of the usual general relativity with zero, positive or negative values for the cosmological constant, respectively. In this work we are mainly interested in black holes in a cosmological environment. Of the two main assumptions of the cosmological principle, homogeneity is lost when compact objects are considered. Nevertheless isotropy is still possible, and we enforce this condition. Within this context, we investigate spatially isotropic solutions close - continuously deformable - to the usual vacuum solutions. We obtain isotropic extensions of the usual spherically symmetric vacuum geometries in general relativity. Exact and perturbative solutions are derived. Maximal extensions are constructed and their causal structures are discussed. The classes of geometries obtained include black holes in compact and non-compact universes, wormholes in the interior region of cosmological horizons, and anti-de Sitter geometries with excess/deficit solid angle. The tools developed here are applicable in more general contexts, with extensions subjected to other constraints. (author)

  1. Noncommutative unification of general relativity and quantum mechanics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heller, Michael; Pysiak, Leszek; Sasin, Wieslaw

    2005-01-01

    We present a model unifying general relativity and quantum mechanics based on a noncommutative geometry. This geometry is developed in terms of a noncommutative algebra A which is defined on a transformation groupoid Γ given by the action of a noncompact group G on the total space E of a principal fiber bundle over space-time M. The case is important since to obtain physical effects predicted by the model we should assume that G is a Lorentz group or some of its representations. We show that the generalized Einstein equation of the model has the form of the eigenvalue equation for the generalized Ricci operator, and all relevant operators in the quantum sector of the model are random operators; we study their dynamics. We also show that the model correctly reproduces general relativity and the usual quantum mechanics. It is interesting that the latter is recovered by performing the measurement of any observable. In the act of such a measurement the model 'collapses' to the usual quantum mechanics

  2. Academic Training: Einstein and beyond: Introduction to General relativity

    CERN Multimedia

    Françoise Benz

    2005-01-01

    2005-2006 ACADEMIC TRAINING PROGRAMME LECTURE SERIES 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 October from 11:00 to 12:00 - Main Auditorium, bldg. 500 Einstein and beyond: Introduction to General relativity by N. Straumann / Institut fur theoretische physics, Univ. Zürich We review the enduring achievements of Einstein's papers of 1905 and their impact on the further developments in physics. Program : Lectures I and II:Einstein's Contributions to Statistical Mechanics and Quantum Theory Lecture III:Einstein's Thesis at the University of Zürich Lecture IV: From Special to General Relativity Lecture V: The History and the Mystery of the Cosmological Constant ENSEIGNEMENT ACADEMIQUE ACADEMIC TRAINING Françoise Benz 73127 academic.training@cern.ch

  3. Relations between task delegation and job satisfaction in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard, Helle; Nexøe, Jørgen; Videbæk Le, Jette

    2016-01-01

    practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction appears to be sparse even though job satisfaction is acknowledged as an important factor associated with both patient satisfaction and medical quality of care. Therefore, the overall aim of this study was 1) to review the current research on the relation between...... task delegation and general practitioners' and their staff's job satisfaction and, additionally, 2) to review the evidence of possible explanations for this relation. METHODS: A systematic literature review. We searched the four databases PubMed, Cinahl, Embase, and Scopus systematically. The immediate...... attitude towards task delegation was positive and led to increased job satisfaction, probably because task delegation comprised a high degree of work autonomy. CONCLUSIONS: The few studies included in our review suggest that task delegation within general practice may be seen by the staff as an overall...

  4. A student's manual for A first course in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Scott, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    This comprehensive student manual has been designed to accompany the leading textbook by Bernard Schutz, A First Course in General Relativity, and uses detailed solutions, cross-referenced to several introductory and more advanced textbooks, to enable self-learners, undergraduates and postgraduates to master general relativity through problem solving. The perfect accompaniment to Schutz's textbook, this manual guides the reader step-by-step through over 200 exercises, with clear easy-to-follow derivations. It provides detailed solutions to almost half of Schutz's exercises, and includes 125 brand new supplementary problems that address the subtle points of each chapter. It includes a comprehensive index and collects useful mathematical results, such as transformation matrices and Christoffel symbols for commonly studied spacetimes, in an appendix. Supported by an online table categorising exercises, a Maple worksheet and an instructors' manual, this text provides an invaluable resource for all students and in...

  5. A theory of strong interactions ''from'' general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caldirola, P.; Recami, E.

    1979-01-01

    In this paper a previous letter (where, among other things, a classical ''quark confinement'' was derived from general relativity plus dilatation-covariance), is completed by showing that the theory is compatible also with quarks ''asymptotic freedom''. Then -within a bi-scale theory of gravitational and strong interactions- a classical field theory is proposed for the (strong) interactions between hadrons. Various consequences are briefly analysed

  6. On the geometry of null congruences in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahsan, Zafar; Malik, N.P.

    1977-01-01

    Some theorems for the null congruences within the framework of general theory of relativity are given. These theorems are important in themselves as they illustrate the geometric meaning of the spin coefficients. The newly developed Geroch-Held-Penrose (GHP) formalism has been used throughout the investigations. The salient features of GHP formalism that are necessary for the present work are given and these techniques are applied to a pair of null congruences C(l) and C(n). (author)

  7. Canonical perturbation theory in linearized general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gonzales, R.; Pavlenko, Yu.G.

    1986-01-01

    Canonical perturbation theory in linearized general relativity theory is developed. It is shown that the evolution of arbitrary dynamic value, conditioned by the interaction of particles, gravitation and electromagnetic fields, can be presented in the form of a series, each member of it corresponding to the contribution of certain spontaneous or induced process. The main concepts of the approach are presented in the approximation of a weak gravitational field

  8. The role of general relativity in the uncertainty principle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Padmanabhan, T.

    1986-01-01

    The role played by general relativity in quantum mechanics (especially as regards the uncertainty principle) is investigated. It is confirmed that the validity of time-energy uncertainty does depend on gravitational time dilation. It is also shown that there exists an intrinsic lower bound to the accuracy with which acceleration due to gravity can be measured. The motion of equivalence principle in quantum mechanics is clarified. (author)

  9. New relativistic generalization of the Heisenberg commutation relations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bohm, A.; Loewe, M.; Magnollay, P.; Tarlini, M.; Aldinger, R.R.; Kielanowski, P.

    1984-01-01

    A relativistic generalization of the Heisenberg commutation relations is suggested which is different from the conventional ones used for the intrinsic coordinates and momenta in the relativistic oscillator model and the relativistic string. This new quantum relativistic oscillator model is determined by the requirement that it gives a unified description of relativistic vibrations and rotations and contracts in the nonrelativistic limit c -1 →0 into the usual nonrelativistic harmonic oscillator

  10. Generalization of uncertainty relation for quantum and stochastic systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, T.; Kodama, T.

    2018-06-01

    The generalized uncertainty relation applicable to quantum and stochastic systems is derived within the stochastic variational method. This relation not only reproduces the well-known inequality in quantum mechanics but also is applicable to the Gross-Pitaevskii equation and the Navier-Stokes-Fourier equation, showing that the finite minimum uncertainty between the position and the momentum is not an inherent property of quantum mechanics but a common feature of stochastic systems. We further discuss the possible implication of the present study in discussing the application of the hydrodynamic picture to microscopic systems, like relativistic heavy-ion collisions.

  11. Explanatory and illustrative visualization of special and general relativity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiskopf, Daniel; Borchers, Marc; Ertl, Thomas; Falk, Martin; Fechtig, Oliver; Frank, Regine; Grave, Frank; King, Andreas; Kraus, Ute; Müller, Thomas; Nollert, Hans-Peter; Rica Mendez, Isabel; Ruder, Hanns; Schafhitzel, Tobias; Schär, Sonja; Zahn, Corvin; Zatloukal, Michael

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes methods for explanatory and illustrative visualizations used to communicate aspects of Einstein's theories of special and general relativity, their geometric structure, and of the related fields of cosmology and astrophysics. Our illustrations target a general audience of laypersons interested in relativity. We discuss visualization strategies, motivated by physics education and the didactics of mathematics, and describe what kind of visualization methods have proven to be useful for different types of media, such as still images in popular science magazines, film contributions to TV shows, oral presentations, or interactive museum installations. Our primary approach is to adopt an egocentric point of view: The recipients of a visualization participate in a visually enriched thought experiment that allows them to experience or explore a relativistic scenario. In addition, we often combine egocentric visualizations with more abstract illustrations based on an outside view in order to provide several presentations of the same phenomenon. Although our visualization tools often build upon existing methods and implementations, the underlying techniques have been improved by several novel technical contributions like image-based special relativistic rendering on GPUs, special relativistic 4D ray tracing for accelerating scene objects, an extension of general relativistic ray tracing to manifolds described by multiple charts, GPU-based interactive visualization of gravitational light deflection, as well as planetary terrain rendering. The usefulness and effectiveness of our visualizations are demonstrated by reporting on experiences with, and feedback from, recipients of visualizations and collaborators.

  12. [Tests and scales: restrains to use them by general practitioners. Descriptive transversal study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cario, Camille; Levesque, Jean-Louis; Bouche, Gauthier

    2010-12-20

    Tests, even though recommended, are only few used by general practitioners (GP's). The aim of this study was to understand the reasons of this underuse. Descriptive transversal study, to explore knowledge, use and restrains to using ten tests related in the first 50 results of consultation in general practice. We questioned 121 GP's from Charente, selected ad random. The oldest tests (MMS, MNA, Fagerström, mini-GDS, IPSS, depression) are known by more than half of the GP's. Only one third is familiar with more recent tests devoted to ambulatory care (TSTS, FACE, venous thromboembolic risk), which are also used less (20% at most). Systematic use of all tests mixed up, never exceeds 30% of all GP's. The principal restrain to use these tests is lack of training (53%), which seems indeed to be inefficient in this domain; 20 to 60% of GP's who know the tests, do not use them, mainly because of doubts regarding their usefulness (38%). What really is the utility of these tests in ambulatory care? Their validity in general practice shows some gaps: their validation results seldom on studies conducted in primary care, impact studies to evaluate the benefits for patients are lacking, and tests designed for specific use by GP's are rare and lacking in validity. Development of research in primary care in this field would be desirable in order to develop relevant, feasible and acceptable tools to help decision making in general practice.

  13. Gauge stability of 3+1 formulations of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khokhlov, A M; Novikov, I D

    2002-01-01

    We present a general approach to the analysis of gauge stability of 3+1 formulations of general relativity (GR). Evolution of coordinate perturbations and the corresponding perturbations of lapse and shift can be described by a system of eight quasi-linear partial differential equations. Stability with respect to gauge perturbations depends on the choice of gauge and a background metric, but it does not depend on a particular form of a 3+1 system if its constrained solutions are equivalent to those of the Einstein equations. Stability of a number of known gauges is investigated in the limit of short-wavelength perturbations. All fixed gauges except a synchronous gauge are found to be ill posed. A maximal slicing gauge and its parabolic extension are shown to be ill posed as well. A necessary condition is derived for well-posedness of metric-dependent algebraic gauges. Well-posed metric-dependent gauges are found, however, to be generally unstable. Both instability and ill-posedness are associated with the existence of growing modes of coordinate perturbations related to perturbations of physical accelerations of reference frames

  14. A database for extract solutions in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, I.; Horvath, Zs.; Lukacs, B.

    1993-07-01

    The field of equations of General Relativity are coupled second order partial differential equations. Therefore no general method is known to generate solutions for prescribed initial and boundary conditions. In addition, the meaning of the particular coordinates cannot be known until the metric is not found. Therefore the result must permit arbitrary coordinate transformations, i.e. most kinds of approximating methods are improper. So exact solutions are necessary and each one is an individual product. For storage, retrieval and comparison database handling techniques are needed. A database of 1359 articles is shown (cross-referred at least once) published in 156 more important journals. It can be handled by dBase III plus on IBM PC's. (author) 5 refs.; 5 tabs

  15. Solitons and action propagation according to general relativity (Part one)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stavroulakis, N.

    1987-01-01

    The current exposition of General Relativity involves two contradictory statements: at first it is asserted that every change in the distribution of matter brings about gravitational waves. Then it is asserted that, specifically, no gravitational effect is produced by the pulsations of a spherical source. By analysing the second statement, we conclude that it arises from a vicious circle tied up with mathematical errors which led to the Schwarzschild solution and the theory of black holes. In order to obtain the correct formulation of the problem, we establish rigorously the general form of the θ(4)-invariant space-time metrics on R x R 3 and bring out the principles allowing to associate gravitational effects with oscillating masses [fr

  16. Charged point particles with magnetic moment in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorim, R.; Tiomno, J.

    1977-01-01

    Halbwachs Lagrangean formalism for the theory of charged point particles with spin (g = 2) is generalized and formulated in General Relativity for particles of arbitrary charge and magnetic moment. Equations are obtained, both corresponding to Frenkel's condition Ssub(μν)Xsup(ν) = 0 and to Nakano's condition Ssub(μν)Psup(ν) = 0. With the later condition the exact equations are highly coupled and non linear. When linearized in the electromagnetic and gravitational fields they coincide with de Groot-Suttorp equations for vanishing gravitational fields and with Dixon-Wald equations in the absence of electromagnetic field. The equations corresponding to Frenkel's condition, when linearized in Ssub(μν), coincide with Papapetrou's and Frenkel's equations in the corresponding limits [pt

  17. General relativity with spin and torsion: Foundations and prospects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hehl, F.W.; von der Heyde, P.; Kerlick, G.D.; Nester, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    A generalization of Einstein's gravitational theory is discussed in which the spin of matter as well as its mass plays a dynamical role. The spin of matter couples to a non-Riemannian structure in space-time, Cartan's torsion tensor. The theory which emerges from taking this coupling into account, the U 4 theory of gravitation, predicts, in addition to the usual infinite-range gravitational interaction mediated by the metric field, a new, very weak, spin contact interaction of gravitational origin. We summarize here all the available theoretical evidence that argues for admitting spin and torsion into a relativistic gravitational theory. Not least among this evidence is the demonstration that the U 4 theory arises as a local gauge theory for the Poincare group in space-time. The deviations of the U 4 theory from standard general relativity are estimated, and the prospects for further theoretical development are assessed

  18. 24 CFR 598.110 - Tests of pervasive poverty, unemployment and general distress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ..., unemployment and general distress. 598.110 Section 598.110 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating... TWO AND THREE DESIGNATIONS Eligibility Requirements § 598.110 Tests of pervasive poverty, unemployment...) Unemployment. Unemployment is demonstrated by: (1) The most recent data available indicating that the annual...

  19. The revival of General Relativity at Princeton: Daring Conservatism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brill, Dieter; Blum, Alexander

    2018-01-01

    After General Relativity was established in essentially its present form in 1915 it was celebrated as a great success of mathematical physics. But the initial hopes for this theory as a basis for all of physics began to fade in the next several decades, as General Relativity was relegated to the margins of theoretical physics. Its fate began to rise in the 1950's in a revival of interest and research that over time made gravitational physics one of the hottest research topics it is today. One center of this renaissance was Princeton, where two relative newcomers explored new and different approaches to gravitational physics. Robert Dicke showed that gravity is not as inaccessible to experiment as was thought, and John Wheeler propelled it into the mainstream by proposing highly original and imaginative consequences of Einstein's theory. We will concentrate on these ideas that, in his characteristically intriguing style, Wheeler called "Daring Conservatism" - a term well known to his associates, but one he never mentioned in print. With the aid of unpublished manuscripts and notes we will explore Daring Conservatism's origin and motivation, its successes and failures, and the legacy it left behind.

  20. The revival of General Relativity at Princeton: Daring Conservatism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brill Dieter

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available After General Relativity was established in essentially its present form in 1915 it was celebrated as a great success of mathematical physics. But the initial hopes for this theory as a basis for all of physics began to fade in the next several decades, as General Relativity was relegated to the margins of theoretical physics. Its fate began to rise in the 1950's in a revival of interest and research that over time made gravitational physics one of the hottest research topics it is today. One center of this renaissance was Princeton, where two relative newcomers explored new and different approaches to gravitational physics. Robert Dicke showed that gravity is not as inaccessible to experiment as was thought, and John Wheeler propelled it into the mainstream by proposing highly original and imaginative consequences of Einstein's theory. We will concentrate on these ideas that, in his characteristically intriguing style, Wheeler called "Daring Conservatism" -- a term well known to his associates, but one he never mentioned in print. With the aid of unpublished manuscripts and notes we will explore Daring Conservatism's origin and motivation, its successes and failures, and the legacy it left behind.

  1. On complicated continuum models in general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsypkin, A.G.

    1987-01-01

    A set of Euler's equations is obtained in the framework of the general relativity theory from the variational equation in the supposition that lagrangian of the material depends on additional (in comparison with classical theories) thermodynamic parameters and taking into account possible irreversible processes. Momentum equations for continuous medium of a thermodynamic closed set are shown to be the consequence of field equations. The problem about the type of energy-momentum material tensor in the presence of derivatives from additional thermodynamic parameters in the number of lagrangian arguments is considered

  2. Lectures on General Relativity, Cosmology and Quantum Black Holes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ydri, Badis

    2017-07-01

    This book is a rigorous text for students in physics and mathematics requiring an introduction to the implications and interpretation of general relativity in areas of cosmology. Readers of this text will be well prepared to follow the theoretical developments in the field and undertake research projects as part of an MSc or PhD programme. This ebook contains interactive Q&A technology, allowing the reader to interact with the text and reveal answers to selected exercises posed by the author within the book. This feature may not function in all formats and on reading devices.

  3. Hamiltonian Dynamics and Positive Energy in General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deser, S. [Physics Department, Brandeis University, Waltham, MA (United States)

    1969-07-15

    A review is first given of the Hamiltonian formulation of general relativity; the gravitational field is a self-interacting massless spin-two system within the framework of ordinary Lorentz covariant field theory. The recently solved problem of positive-definiteness of the field energy is then discussed. The latter, a conserved functional of the dynamical variables, is shown to have only one extremum, a local minimum, which is the vacuum state (flat space). This implies positive energy for the field, with the vacuum as ground-state. Similar results hold when minimally coupled matter is present. (author)

  4. Indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity, 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Noboru

    1979-01-01

    The indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity is extended to the coupled system of the gravitational field and a Dirac field on the basis of the vierbein formalism. The six extra degrees of freedom involved in vierbein are made unobservable by introducing an extra subsidiary condition Q sub(s) + phys> = 0, where Q sub(s) denotes a new BRS charge corresponding to the local Lorentz invariance. It is shown that a manifestly covariant, unitary, canonical theory can be constructed consistently on the basis of the vierbein formalism. (author)

  5. Conservation and non-conservation in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, H.

    1990-01-01

    The difficulties of conservation laws in general relativity are discussed, with special reference to the non-tangible nature of gravitational energy and its transformation into tangible forms of energy. Inductive transfer of energy is marked out as wholly distinct from wave transfer. Slow (adiabatic) changes are utilized to make clear, in the axi-symmetric case, that the mass of an isolated body is conserved irrespective of any local changes (e.g. of shape) and that in inductive transfer the movement of energy between two bodies can readily be traced by the changes in their masses. (author)

  6. Equivalence of the theories of reciprocity and general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Qadir, A.

    1976-01-01

    Khan's theory (Nuovo Cimento; 57B:321 (1968) and Int. J. Theor. Phys.; 6:383 (1972)) of reciprocity has been shown to be equivalent to the theory of general relativity (in a conformally flat space-time) in that the same predictions are made physically. It is is proved that, since 'centrifugal forces' are used by Khan, gravitational phenomena are being considered equal in status to electromagnetic phenomena, and hence the difference claimed to exist between Milne's theory and Khan's theory disappears. (author)

  7. Testing the Larson relations in massive clumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traficante, A.; Duarte-Cabral, A.; Elia, D.; Fuller, G. A.; Merello, M.; Molinari, S.; Peretto, N.; Schisano, E.; Di Giorgio, A.

    2018-06-01

    We tested the validity of the three Larson relations in a sample of 213 massive clumps selected from the Herschel infrared Galactic Plane (Hi-GAL) survey, also using data from the Millimetre Astronomy Legacy Team 90 GHz (MALT90) survey of 3-mm emission lines. The clumps are divided into five evolutionary stages so that we can also discuss the Larson relations as a function of evolution. We show that this ensemble does not follow the three Larson relations, regardless of the clump's evolutionary phase. A consequence of this breakdown is that the dependence of the virial parameter αvir on mass (and radius) is only a function of the gravitational energy, independent of the kinetic energy of the system; thus, αvir is not a good descriptor of clump dynamics. Our results suggest that clumps with clear signatures of infall motions are statistically indistinguishable from clumps with no such signatures. The observed non-thermal motions are not necessarily ascribed to turbulence acting to sustain the gravity, but they might be a result of the gravitational collapse at the clump scales. This seems to be particularly true for the most massive (M ≥ 1000 M⊙) clumps in the sample, where exceptionally high magnetic fields might not be enough to stabilize the collapse.

  8. Gyroscope precession in special and general relativity from basic principles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Rickard M.

    2007-05-01

    In special relativity a gyroscope that is suspended in a torque-free manner will precess as it is moved along a curved path relative to an inertial frame S. We explain this effect, which is known as Thomas precession, by considering a real grid that moves along with the gyroscope, and that by definition is not rotating as observed from its own momentary inertial rest frame. From the basic properties of the Lorentz transformation we deduce how the form and rotation of the grid (and hence the gyroscope) will evolve relative to S. As an intermediate step we consider how the grid would appear if it were not length contracted along the direction of motion. We show that the uncontracted grid obeys a simple law of rotation. This law simplifies the analysis of spin precession compared to more traditional approaches based on Fermi transport. We also consider gyroscope precession relative to an accelerated reference frame and show that there are extra precession effects that can be explained in a way analogous to the Thomas precession. Although fully relativistically correct, the entire analysis is carried out using three-vectors. By using the equivalence principle the formalism can also be applied to static spacetimes in general relativity. As an example, we calculate the precession of a gyroscope orbiting a static black hole.

  9. Kerr-Taub-NUT General Frame, Energy, and Momentum in Teleparallel Equivalent of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamal G. L. Nashed

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A new exact solution describing a general stationary and axisymmetric object of the gravitational field in the framework of teleparallel equivalent of general relativity (TEGR is derived. The solution is characterized by three parameters “the gravitational mass M, the rotation a, and the NUT L.” The vierbein field is axially symmetric, and the associated metric gives the Kerr-Taub-NUT spacetime. Calculation of the total energy using two different methods, the gravitational energy momentum and the Riemannian connection 1-form Γα̃β, is carried out. It is shown that the two methods give the same results of energy and momentum. The value of energy is shown to depend on the mass M and the NUT parameter L. If L is vanishing, then the total energy reduced to the energy of Kerr black hole.

  10. Theory of Nonlocal Point Transformations in General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Tessarotto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discussion of the functional setting customarily adopted in General Relativity (GR is proposed. This is based on the introduction of the notion of nonlocal point transformations (NLPTs. While allowing the extension of the traditional concept of GR-reference frame, NLPTs are important because they permit the explicit determination of the map between intrinsically different and generally curved space-times expressed in arbitrary coordinate systems. For this purpose in the paper the mathematical foundations of NLPT-theory are laid down and basic physical implications are considered. In particular, explicit applications of the theory are proposed, which concern (1 a solution to the so-called Einstein teleparallel problem in the framework of NLPT-theory; (2 the determination of the tensor transformation laws holding for the acceleration 4-tensor with respect to the group of NLPTs and the identification of NLPT-acceleration effects, namely, the relationship established via general NLPT between particle 4-acceleration tensors existing in different curved space-times; (3 the construction of the nonlocal transformation law connecting different diagonal metric tensors solution to the Einstein field equations; and (4 the diagonalization of nondiagonal metric tensors.

  11. The problem of time quantum mechanics versus general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Anderson, Edward

    2017-01-01

    This book is a treatise on time and on background independence in physics. It first considers how time is conceived of in each accepted paradigm of physics: Newtonian, special relativity, quantum mechanics (QM) and general relativity (GR). Substantial differences are moreover uncovered between what is meant by time in QM and in GR. These differences jointly source the Problem of Time: Nine interlinked facets which arise upon attempting concurrent treatment of the QM and GR paradigms, as is required in particular for a background independent theory of quantum gravity. A sizeable proportion of current quantum gravity programs - e.g. geometrodynamical and loop quantum gravity approaches to quantum GR, quantum cosmology, supergravity and M-theory - are background independent in this sense. This book's foundational topic is thus furthermore of practical relevance in the ongoing development of quantum gravity programs. This book shows moreover that eight of the nine facets of the Problem of Time already occur upon ...

  12. Nonlinear generalization of special relativity at very high energies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winterberg, F.

    1984-01-01

    It is shown, that the introduction of a fundamental length constant into the operator representation of the quantum mechanical commutation relations, as suggested by Bagge, leads to a nonlinear generalization of the Lorentz transformations. The theory requires the introduction of a substratum (ether) and which can be identified as the zero point vacuum energy. At very high energies a non-Lorentz invariant behaviour for the cross sections between elementary particles is predicted. Using the Einstein clock synchronisation definition, the velocity of light is also constant and equal to c in the new theory, but the zero point vacuum energy becomes finite, as are all other quantities which are divergent in Lorentz invariant quantum field theories. In the limiting case where the length constant is set equal to zero, the zero point vacuum energy diverges and special relativity is recovered. (orig.) [de

  13. Correlated quadratures of resonance fluorescence and the generalized uncertainty relation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnoldus, Henk F.; George, Thomas F.; Gross, Rolf W. F.

    1994-01-01

    Resonance fluorescence from a two-state atom has been predicted to exhibit quadrature squeezing below the Heisenberg uncertainty limit, provided that the optical parameters (Rabi frequency, detuning, laser linewidth, etc.) are chosen carefully. When the correlation between two quadratures of the radiation field does not vanish, however, the Heisenberg limit for quantum fluctuations might be an unrealistic lower bound. A generalized uncertainty relation, due to Schroedinger, takes into account the possible correlation between the quadrature components of the radiation, and it suggests a modified definition of squeezing. We show that the coherence between the two levels of a laser-driven atom is responsible for the correlation between the quadrature components of the emitted fluorescence, and that the Schrodinger uncertainty limit increases monotonically with the coherence. On the other hand, the fluctuations in the quadrature field diminish with an increasing coherence, and can disappear completely when the coherence reaches 1/2, provided that certain phase relations hold.

  14. Einstein and Beyond: A Critical Perspective on General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Gopal Vishwakarma

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available An alternative approach to Einstein’s theory of General Relativity (GR is reviewed, which is motivated by a range of serious theoretical issues inflicting the theory, such as the cosmological constant problem, presence of non-Machian solutions, problems related with the energy-stress tensor T i k and unphysical solutions. The new approach emanates from a critical analysis of these problems, providing a novel insight that the matter fields, together with the ensuing gravitational field, are already present inherently in the spacetime without taking recourse to T i k . Supported by lots of evidence, the new insight revolutionizes our views on the representation of the source of gravitation and establishes the spacetime itself as the source, which becomes crucial for understanding the unresolved issues in a unified manner. This leads to a new paradigm in GR by establishing equation R i k = 0 as the field equation of gravitation plus inertia in the very presence of matter.

  15. Vocabulary test format and differential relations to age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Ryan P; Salthouse, Timothy A

    2008-06-01

    Although vocabulary tests are generally considered interchangeable, regardless of format, different tests can have different relations to age and to other cognitive abilities. In this study, 4 vocabulary test formats were examined: multiple-choice synonyms, multiple-choice antonyms, produce the definition, and picture identification. Results indicated that, although they form a single coherent vocabulary knowledge factor, the formats have different relations to age. In earlier adulthood, picture identification had the strongest growth, and produce the definition had the weakest. In later adulthood, picture identification had the strongest decline, and multiple-choice synonyms had the least. The formats differed in their relation to other cognitive variables, including reasoning, spatial visualization, memory, and speed. After accounting for the differential relations to other cognitive variables, differences in relation to age were eliminated with the exception of differences for the picture identification test. No theory of the aging of vocabulary knowledge fully explains these findings. These results suggest that using a single indicator of vocabulary may yield incomplete and somewhat misleading results about the aging of vocabulary knowledge.

  16. Geometrical optics in general relativity: A study of the higher order corrections

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anile, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    The higher order corrections to geometrical optics are studied in general relativity for an electromagnetic test wave. An explicit expression is found for the average energy--momentum tensor which takes into account the first-order corrections. Finally the first-order corrections to the well-known area-intensity law of geometrical optics are derived

  17. Blood test ordering for unexplained complaints in general practice: the VAMPIRE randomised clinical trial protocol. [ISRCTN55755886

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bokhoven, Marloes A.; Koch, Hèlen; van der Weijden, Trudy; Grol, Richard P. T. M.; Bindels, Patrick J. E.; Dinant, Geert-Jan

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: General practitioners (GPs) frequently order blood tests when they see patients presenting with unexplained complaints. Due to the low prevalence of serious pathology in general practice, the risk of false-positive test results is relatively high. This may result in unnecessary further

  18. Outer boundary as arrested history in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lau, Stephen R

    2002-01-01

    We present explicit outer boundary conditions for the canonical variables of general relativity. The conditions are associated with the causal evolution of a finite Cauchy domain, a so-called quasilocal boost, and they suggest a consistent scheme for modelling such an evolution numerically. The scheme involves a continuous boost in the spacetime orthogonal complement 'orthogonal' T p (B) of the tangent space T p (B) belonging to each point p on the system boundary B. We show how the boost rate may be computed numerically via equations similar to those appearing in canonical investigations of black-hole thermodynamics (although here holding at an outer two-surface rather than the bifurcate two-surface of a Killing horizon). We demonstrate the numerical scheme on a model example, the quasilocal boost of a spherical three-ball in Minkowski spacetime. Developing our general formalism with recent hyperbolic formulations of the Einstein equations in mind, we use Anderson and York's 'Einstein-Christoffel' hyperbolic system as the evolution equations for our numerical simulation of the model

  19. Outer boundary as arrested history in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Stephen R.

    2002-06-01

    We present explicit outer boundary conditions for the canonical variables of general relativity. The conditions are associated with the causal evolution of a finite Cauchy domain, a so-called quasilocal boost, and they suggest a consistent scheme for modelling such an evolution numerically. The scheme involves a continuous boost in the spacetime orthogonal complement ⊥Tp(B) of the tangent space Tp(B) belonging to each point p on the system boundary B. We show how the boost rate may be computed numerically via equations similar to those appearing in canonical investigations of black-hole thermodynamics (although here holding at an outer two-surface rather than the bifurcate two-surface of a Killing horizon). We demonstrate the numerical scheme on a model example, the quasilocal boost of a spherical three-ball in Minkowski spacetime. Developing our general formalism with recent hyperbolic formulations of the Einstein equations in mind, we use Anderson and York's 'Einstein-Christoffel' hyperbolic system as the evolution equations for our numerical simulation of the model.

  20. Outer boundary as arrested history in general relativity

    CERN Document Server

    Lau, S

    2002-01-01

    We present explicit outer boundary conditions for the canonical variables of general relativity. The conditions are associated with the causal evolution of a finite Cauchy domain, a so-called quasilocal boost, and they suggest a consistent scheme for modelling such an evolution numerically. The scheme involves a continuous boost in the spacetime orthogonal complement 'orthogonal' T sub p (B) of the tangent space T sub p (B) belonging to each point p on the system boundary B. We show how the boost rate may be computed numerically via equations similar to those appearing in canonical investigations of black-hole thermodynamics (although here holding at an outer two-surface rather than the bifurcate two-surface of a Killing horizon). We demonstrate the numerical scheme on a model example, the quasilocal boost of a spherical three-ball in Minkowski spacetime. Developing our general formalism with recent hyperbolic formulations of the Einstein equations in mind, we use Anderson and York's 'Einstein-Christoffel' hy...

  1. Accelerating particles in general relativity (stationary C-metric)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farhoosh, H.

    1979-01-01

    The purpose of this thesis is to study the physical and geometrical properties of uniformly accelerating particles in the general theory of relativity and it consists of four main parts. In the first part the structure of the Killing horizons in the static vacuum C-metric which represents the gravitational field of a uniformly accelerating Schwarzschild like particle (non-rotating and spherically symmetric) is studied. In the second part these results are generalized to include the effects of the rotation of the source. For small acceleration and small rotation this solution reveals the existance of three Killing horizons. Two the these horizons are the Schwarzschild and the Rindler surfaces which are mainly due to the mass and the acceleration of the particle, respectively. In part three the radial geodesic and non-geodesic motions in the static vacuum C-metric (non-rotating case) are investigated. The effect of the dragging of the inertial frame is also shown in this part. In part four the radiative behavior of the stationary charged C-metric representing the electro-gravitational field of a uniformly accelerating and rotating charged particle with magnetic monopole and the NUT-parameter are investigated. The physical quantities - the news function, mass loss, mass, charge and the multipole moments - are calculated. It is also shown in this part that the magnetic monopole in the presence of rotation and acceleration affects the electric charge

  2. Determinants related to gender differences in general practice utilization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeanette Therming; Andersen, John Sahl; Tjønneland, Anne

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study aims to describe the determinants related to gender differences in the GP utilization in Danish population aged 50-65 years. DESIGN: Cohort-based cross-sectional study. SETTING: Danish general practice. SUBJECTS: Totally, 54,849 participants of the Danish Diet, Cancer...... information on lifestyle (smoking, body mass index (BMI), alcohol use, physical activity), medical conditions (somatic and mental), employment, education, gravidity, and hormone therapy (HT) use was collected by questionnaire. RESULTS: Women had on average 4.1 and men 2.8 consultations per year. In a crude....... Strongest determinants for GP use among Danish adults aged 50-65 years were the presence of medical conditions (somatic and mental) and unemployment, while lifestyle factors (e.g., body mass index, alcohol consumption and smoking) had minor effect....

  3. Rotating collapse of stellar iron cores in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ott, C D; Dimmelmeier, H; Marek, A; Janka, H-T; Zink, B; Hawke, I; Schnetter, E

    2007-01-01

    We present results from the first 2 + 1 and 3 + 1 simulations of the collapse of rotating stellar iron cores in general relativity employing a finite-temperature equation of state and an approximate treatment of deleptonization during collapse. We compare full 3 + 1 and conformally-flat spacetime evolution methods and find that the conformally-flat treatment is sufficiently accurate for the core-collapse supernova problem. We focus on the gravitational wave (GW) emission from rotating collapse, core bounce and early postbounce phases. Our results indicate that the GW signature of these phases is much more generic than previously estimated. In addition, we track the growth of a nonaxisymmetric instability of dominant m = 1 character in two of our models that leads to prolonged narrow-band GW emission at ∼920-930 Hz over several tens of milliseconds

  4. Commutative deformations of general relativity: nonlocality, causality, and dark matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Vegvar, P.G.N. [SWK Research, Bellingham, WA (United States)

    2017-01-15

    Hopf algebra methods are applied to study Drinfeld twists of (3+1)-diffeomorphisms and deformed general relativity on commutative manifolds. A classical nonlocality length scale is produced above which microcausality emerges. Matter fields are utilized to generate self-consistent Abelian Drinfeld twists in a background independent manner and their continuous and discrete symmetries are examined. There is negligible experimental effect on the standard model of particles. While baryonic twist producing matter would begin to behave acausally for rest masses above ∝1-10 TeV, other possibilities are viable dark matter candidates or a right-handed neutrino. First order deformed Maxwell equations are derived and yield immeasurably small cosmological dispersion and produce a propagation horizon only for photons at or above Planck energies. This model incorporates dark matter without any appeal to extra dimensions, supersymmetry, strings, grand unified theories, mirror worlds, or modifications of Newtonian dynamics. (orig.)

  5. A non-local variable for general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozameh, C.N.; Newman, E.T.

    1983-01-01

    The usual description of differential geometry and general relativity is in terms of local fields, e.g. the metric, the curvature tensor, etc, which satisfy local differential equations. The authors introduce a new non-local field (Z) from which the local fields can be derived. Basically Z, though it is non-local, should be thought of as a function on the bundle of null directions on a space-time. The program can be divided into two parts; first the authors want to show the geometric meaning of and the relationship between Z and the local field. Then they want to provide field equations (non-local) for Z which will be equivalent to the vacuum Einstein equations for the local field. (Auth.)

  6. CPT symmetry and antimatter gravity in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villata, M.

    2011-04-01

    The gravitational behavior of antimatter is still unknown. While we may be confident that antimatter is self-attractive, the interaction between matter and antimatter might be either attractive or repulsive. We investigate this issue on theoretical grounds. Starting from the CPT invariance of physical laws, we transform matter into antimatter in the equations of both electrodynamics and gravitation. In the former case, the result is the well-known change of sign of the electric charge. In the latter, we find that the gravitational interaction between matter and antimatter is a mutual repulsion, i.e. antigravity appears as a prediction of general relativity when CPT is applied. This result supports cosmological models attempting to explain the Universe accelerated expansion in terms of a matter-antimatter repulsive interaction.

  7. On special and general relativity theory. 24. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Einstein, Albert

    2009-01-01

    The present booklet shall mediate to such an as possible exact view in relativity theory, who are especially interested for the theory from a generally scientific, philosophical, point of view, without mastering the mathematical apparatus. The lecture presupposes some maturity knowledge and - in spite of the shortness of the booklet - quite much perseverance and strength of mind. The author has token very much efforts in order to present the main thoughts as distinctly and simply as possible, in the whole in such a sequence and in such connection, as it has really been arose. With the aim of distinctiveness it seemed to me unavoidable to repeat myself frequently without paying the smallest regard to the elegance of the presentation; I maintained conscientiously the prescription of the ingenious theoretician L. Boltzmann, elegance should by the object of the taylors ans shoemakers [de

  8. General Relativity and Cosmology: Unsolved Questions and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Debono

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available For the last 100 years, General Relativity (GR has taken over the gravitational theory mantle held by Newtonian Gravity for the previous 200 years. This article reviews the status of GR in terms of its self-consistency, completeness, and the evidence provided by observations, which have allowed GR to remain the champion of gravitational theories against several other classes of competing theories. We pay particular attention to the role of GR and gravity in cosmology, one of the areas in which one gravity dominates and new phenomena and effects challenge the orthodoxy. We also review other areas where there are likely conflicts pointing to the need to replace or revise GR to represent correctly observations and consistent theoretical framework. Observations have long been key both to the theoretical liveliness and viability of GR. We conclude with a discussion of the likely developments over the next 100 years.

  9. The canonical Lagrangian approach to three-space general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shyam, Vasudev; Venkatesh, Madhavan

    2013-07-01

    We study the action for the three-space formalism of general relativity, better known as the Barbour-Foster-Ó Murchadha action, which is a square-root Baierlein-Sharp-Wheeler action. In particular, we explore the (pre)symplectic structure by pulling it back via a Legendre map to the tangent bundle of the configuration space of this action. With it we attain the canonical Lagrangian vector field which generates the gauge transformations (3-diffeomorphisms) and the true physical evolution of the system. This vector field encapsulates all the dynamics of the system. We also discuss briefly the observables and perennials for this theory. We then present a symplectic reduction of the constrained phase space.

  10. Dynamics of plane-symmetric thin walls in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, A.

    1992-01-01

    Plane walls (including plane domain walls) without reflection symmetry are studied in the framework of Einstein's general relativity. Using the distribution theory, all the Einstein field equations and Bianchi identities are split into two groups: one holding in the regions outside of the wall and the other holding at the wall. The Einstein field equations at the wall are found to take a very simple form, and given explicitly in terms of the discontinuities of the metric coefficients and their derivatives. The Bianchi identities at the wall are also given explicitly. Using the latter, the interaction of a plane wall with gravitational waves and some specific matter fields is studied. In particular, it is found that, when a gravitational plane wave passes through a wall, if the wall has no reflection symmetry, the phenomena, such as reflection, stimulation, or absorption, in general, occur. It is also found that, unlike for gravitational waves, a massless scalar wave or an electromagnetic wave continuously passes through a wall without any reflection. The repulsion and attraction of a plane wall are also studied. It is found that the acceleration of an observer who is at rest relative to the wall usually consists of three parts: one is due to the force produced by the wall, the second is due to the force produced by the space-time curvature, which is zero if the wall has reflection symmetry, and the last is due to the accelerated motion of the wall. As a result, a repulsive (attractive) plane wall may not be repulsive (attractive) at all. Finally, the collision and interaction among the walls are studied

  11. Generalized requirements and decompositions for the design of test parts for micro additive manufacturing research

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thompson, Mary Kathryn; Clemmensen, Line Katrine Harder

    2015-01-01

    The design of experimental test parts to characterize micro additive manufacturing (AM) processes is challenging due to the influence of the manufacturing and metrology processes. This work builds on the lessons learned from a case study in the literature to derive generalized requirements and high...... level decompositions for the design of test parts and the design of experiments to characterize micro additive manufacturing processes. While the test parts and the experiments described are still work in progress, the generic requirements derived from them can serve as a starting point for the design...... of other micro additive manufacturing related studies and their decompositions can help structure future work....

  12. Einstein's Jury: The Race to Test Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ehlers, Juergen

    2007-01-01

    'I know very well that my theory rests on a shaky foundation. What attracts me to it is that it leads to consequences that seem to be accessible to experiment, and it provides a starting point for the theoretical understanding of gravitation', wrote Einstein in 1911. Einstein's Jury by Jeffrey Crelinsten-well documented, well written, and fascinating to read-describes how, from 1909 on, Einstein's two theories of relativity became known to astronomers, and how the predictions made between 1907 and 1915 were received as challenges to observers. The author gives a non-technical account of the efforts made until 1930 to test these predictions; he focuses on two of the three classical tests, namely gravitational redshift and bending of light; the 'jury' consists mainly of American observers-Adams, Campbell, Curtis, Hale, Perrin, St John, Trumpler and others-working with newly built large telescopes, and the Britons Eddington and Evershed. The major steps which, after a long struggle, convinced the majority of astronomers that Einstein was right, are narrated chronologically in rather great detail, especially the work at Lick Observatory, before and after the famous British observation of 1919, on solar eclipses, and the work at Mount Wilson and the Indian Kodaikanal Observatories to extract the gravitational redshift from the complicated spectrum of the sun. The account of the eclipse work which was carried out between 1918 and 1923 by Lick astronomers corrects the impression suggested by many historical accounts that the British expedition alone settled the light-bending question. Apart from these main topics, the anomalous perihelion advance of Mercury and the ether problem are covered. By concentrating on astronomy rather than on physics this book complements the rich but repetitive literature on Einstein and relativity which appeared in connection with the commemoration of Einstein's annus mirabilis, 2005. The well told stories include curiosities such as the

  13. General relativity and gauge gravity theories of higher order

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Konopleva, N.P.

    1998-01-01

    It is a short review of today's gauge gravity theories and their relations with Einstein General Relativity. The conceptions of construction of the gauge gravity theories with higher derivatives are analyzed. GR is regarded as the gauge gravity theory corresponding to the choice of G ∞4 as the local gauge symmetry group and the symmetrical tensor of rank two g μν as the field variable. Using the mathematical technique, single for all fundamental interactions (namely variational formalism for infinite Lie groups), we can obtain Einstein's theory as the gauge theory without any changes. All other gauge approaches lead to non-Einstein theories of gravity. But above-mentioned mathematical technique permits us to construct the gauge gravity theory of higher order (for instance SO (3,1)-gravity) so that all vacuum solutions of Einstein equations are the solutions of the SO (3,1)-gravity theory. The structure of equations of SO(3,1)-gravity becomes analogous to Weeler-Misner geometrodynamics one

  14. Origins and development of the Cauchy problem in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ringström, Hans

    2015-01-01

    The seminal work of Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat published in 1952 demonstrates that it is possible to formulate Einstein's equations as an initial value problem. The purpose of this article is to describe the background to and impact of this achievement, as well as the result itself. In some respects, the idea of viewing the field equations of general relativity as a system of evolution equations goes back to Einstein himself; in an argument justifying that gravitational waves propagate at the speed of light, Einstein used a special choice of coordinates to derive a system of wave equations for the linear perturbations on a Minkowski background. Over the following decades, Hilbert, de Donder, Lanczos, Darmois and many others worked to put Einstein's ideas on a more solid footing. In fact, the issue of local uniqueness (giving a rigorous justification for the statement that the speed of propagation of the gravitational field is bounded by that of light) was already settled in the 1930s by the work of Stellmacher. However, the first person to demonstrate both local existence and uniqueness in a setting in which the notion of finite speed of propagation makes sense was Yvonne Choquet-Bruhat. In this sense, her work lays the foundation for the formulation of Einstein's equations as an initial value problem. Following a description of the results of Choquet-Bruhat, we discuss the development of three research topics that have their origin in her work. The first one is local existence. One reason for addressing it is that it is at the heart of the original paper. Moreover, it is still an active and important research field, connected to the problem of characterizing the asymptotic behaviour of solutions that blow up in finite time. As a second topic, we turn to the questions of global uniqueness and strong cosmic censorship. These questions are of fundamental importance to anyone interested in justifying that the Cauchy problem makes sense globally. They are

  15. On the relation of the theoretical foundations of quantum theory and general relativity theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kober, Martin

    2010-01-01

    The specific content of the present thesis is presented in the following way. First the most important contents of quantum theory and general relativity theory are presented. In connection with the general relativity theory the mathematical property of the diffeomorphism invariance plays the deciding role, while concerning the quantum theory starting from the Copenhagen interpretation first the measurement problem is treated, before basing on the analysis of concrete phenomena and the mathematical apparatus of quantum theory the nonlocality is brought into focus as an important property. This means that both theories suggest a relationalistic view of the nature of the space. This analysis of the theoretical foundations of quantum theory and general relativity theory in relation to the nature of the space obtains only under inclusion of Kant's philosophy and his analysis of the terms space and time as fundamental forms of perception its full persuasive power. Then von Weizsaeckers quantum theory of the ur-alternatives is presented. Finally attempts are made to apply the obtained knowledge to the question of the quantum-theoretical formulation of general relativity theory.

  16. Generality of leaf trait relationships: A test across six biomes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reich, P.B. [Univ. of Minnesota, Saint Paul, MN (United States). Dept. of Forest Resources; Ellsworth, D.S. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Dept. of Applied Science; Walters, M.B. [Michigan State Univ., East Lansing, MI (United States). Dept. of Forestry; Vose, J.M. [Forest Service, Otto, NC (United States). Coweeta Hydrological Lab.; Gresham, C. [Clemson Univ., Georgetown, SC (United States). Baruch Forest Inst.; Volin, J.C. [Florida Atlantic Univ., Davie, FL (United States). Div. of Science; Bowman, W.D. [Inst. of Arctic and Alpine Research, Boulder, CO (United States). Mountain Research Station]|[Univ. of Colorado, Boulder, CO (United States). Dept. of Evolutionary, Population, and Organismic Biology

    1999-09-01

    Convergence in interspecific leaf trait relationships across diverse taxonomic groups and biomes would have important evolutionary and ecological implications. Such convergence has been hypothesized to result from trade-offs that limit the combination of plant traits for any species. Here the authors address this issue by testing for biome differences in the slope and intercept of interspecific relationships among leaf traits: longevity, net photosynthetic capacity (A{sub max}), leaf diffusive conductance (G{sub S}), specific leaf area (SLA), and nitrogen (N) status, for more than 100 species in six distinct biomes of the Americas. The six biomes were: alpine tundra-subalpine forest ecotone, cold temperate forest-prairie ecotone, montane cool temperate forest, desert shrubland, subtropical forest, and tropical rain forest. Despite large differences in climate and evolutionary history, in all biomes mass-based leaf N (N{sub mass}), SLA, G{sub S}, and A{sub max} were positively related to one another and decreased with increasing leaf life span. The relationships between pairs of leaf traits exhibited similar slopes among biomes, suggesting a predictable set of scaling relationships among key leaf morphological, chemical, and metabolic traits that are replicated globally among terrestrial ecosystems regardless of biome or vegetation type. However, the intercept (i.e., the overall elevation of regression lines) of relationships between pairs of leaf traits usually differed among biomes. With increasing aridity across sites, species had greater A{sub max} for a given level of G{sub S} and lower SLA for any given leaf life span. Using principal components analysis, most variation among species was explained by an axis related to mass-based leaf traits (A{sub max}, N, and SLA) while a second axis reflected climate, G{sub S}, and other area-based leaf traits.

  17. General-Purpose Heat Source Development: Safety Test Program. Postimpact evaluation, Design Iteration Test 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schonfeld, F.W.; George, T.G.

    1984-07-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source(GPHS) provides power for space missions by transmitting the heat of 238 PuO 2 decay to thermoelectric elements. Because of the inevitable return of certain aborted missions, the heat source must be designed and constructed to survive both re-entry and Earth impact. The Design Iteration Test (DIT) series is part of an ongoing test program. In the third test (DIT-3), a full GPHS module was impacted at 58 m/s and 930 0 C. The module impacted the target at an angle of 30 0 to the pole of the large faces. The four capsules used in DIT-3 survived impact with minimal deformation; no internal cracks other than in the regions indicated by Savannah River Plant (SRP) preimpact nondestructive testing were observed in any of the capsules. The 30 0 impact orientation used in DIT-3 was considerably less severe than the flat-on impact utilized in DIT-1 and DIT-2. The four capsules used in DIT-1 survived, while two of the capsules used in DIT-2 breached; a small quantity (approx. = 50 μg) of 238 PuO 2 was released from the capsules breached in the DIT-2 impact. All of the capsules used in DIT-1 and DIT-2 were severely deformed and contained large internal cracks. Postimpact analyses of the DIT-3 test components are described, with emphasis on weld structure and the behavior of defects identified by SRP nondestructive testing

  18. Spacetime and Geometry: An Introduction to General Relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poisson, E

    2005-01-01

    The ever growing relevance of general relativity to astrophysics and cosmology continues to motivate the publication of new textbooks which put the theory in a fresh perspective informed by recent developments. While the 1970s were the decade of Weinberg and Misner et al and the 80s the decade of Schutz and Wald, this is clearly the decade of Hartle and Carroll. Hartle has introduced a novel pedagogical approach to teaching general relativity, which he convincingly argues should be done in the standard undergraduate physics curriculum. His 'physics-first approach' emphasizes physical phenomena and minimizes mathematical formalism. Hartle achieves a lot by introducing only the spacetime metric and the geodesic equation, which are the main tools needed to explore curved spacetime and extract physical consequences. To be sure, to explain how the metric is obtained in the first place does require a background of differential geometry and the formulation of the Einstein field equations. But in Hartle's book this material is wisely presented at a later stage, after an ample sampling of the physics of curved spacetime has motivated the need for the advanced mathematics. Carroll follows instead the traditional route, what Hartle calls the 'math-first approach', in which one introduces first the required mathematical formalism and only then derives the physical consequences. He is, of course, in good company, as this is the method followed in all existing textbooks (with Hartle's being the sole exception). Carroll's approach may not be original, but it is tried and true, and the result of Carroll's efforts is an excellent introduction to general relativity. The book covers the standard topics that would be found in virtually all textbooks (differential geometry, the field equations, linearized theory, black holes, and cosmology), but in addition it contains topics (such as quantum field theory in curved spacetime) which can rarely be found in introductory texts. All these

  19. Reading Test-taking Strategies in General Training IELTS

    OpenAIRE

    Vahede Nosrati

    2015-01-01

    The significance of gaining a better understanding of how test-taking strategies are used has been recognized by researchers. Considering this fact, this study aimed at investigating the test-taking strategies which were employed by IELTS candidates in reading comprehension test. Besides, it tried to take into account the differences among strategies used for different tasks. In order to gather data, two instruments were employed: the think-aloud protocol, and an IELTS reading test. The obtai...

  20. 40 CFR 86.230-11 - Test sequence: general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compartment cooling. (1) Fixed speed air cooling of the engine compartment with the compartment cover open... fuel economy testing, alternative engine compartment cooling fans or systems, including those which... test. Additionally, the Administrator may conduct certification, fuel economy and in-use testing using...

  1. 40 CFR 92.124 - Test sequence; general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF AIR POLLUTION FROM LOCOMOTIVES AND LOCOMOTIVE ENGINES Test Procedures § 92...) For the testing of locomotives and engines, the atmospheric pressure shall be between 31.0 inches Hg... test conditions. (c) No control of humidity is required for ambient air, engine intake air or dilution...

  2. Reading Test-Taking Strategies in General Training IELTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosrati, Vahede

    2015-01-01

    The significance of gaining a better understanding of how test-taking strategies are used has been recognized by researchers. Considering this fact, this study aimed at investigating the test-taking strategies which were employed by IELTS candidates in reading comprehension test. Besides, it tried to take into account the differences among…

  3. Semiquantitative analysis of interictal glucose metabolism between generalized epilepsy and localization related epilepsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hikima, Akio; Mochizuki, Hiroyuki; Oriuchi, Noboru; Endo, Keigo; Morikawa, Akihiro

    2004-01-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) with [ 18 F]fluoro-D-deoxyglucose (FDG) has been used to detect seizure foci and evaluate surgical resection with localization related epilepsies. However, few investigations have focused on generalized epilepsy in children. To reveal the pathophysiology of generalized epilepsy, we studied 11 patients with generalized epilepsy except West syndrome, and 11 patients with localization related epilepsy without organic disease. The FDG PET was performed by simultaneous emission and transmission scanning. We placed regions of interest (ROI) on bilateral frontal lobe, parietal lobe, occipital lobe, temporal lobe, basal ganglia, thalamus and cerebellum. Standardized uptake value (SUV) was measured and normalized to SUV of ipsilateral cerebellum. Then, we compared the data of generalized epilepsy to those of localization related epilepsy. FDG PET revealed significant interictal glucose hypometabolism in bilateral basal ganglia in generalized epilepsy compared to that in localization related epilepsy (right side: p=0.0095, left side: p=0.0256, Mann-Whitney test). No other region showed any significant difference (p>0.05) between the two groups. These findings indicate that the basal ganglia is involved in the outbreak of generalized seizures or is affected secondarily by the epileptogenicity itself. (author)

  4. Inferring general relations between network characteristics from specific network ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardanobile, Stefano; Pernice, Volker; Deger, Moritz; Rotter, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Different network models have been suggested for the topology underlying complex interactions in natural systems. These models are aimed at replicating specific statistical features encountered in real-world networks. However, it is rarely considered to which degree the results obtained for one particular network class can be extrapolated to real-world networks. We address this issue by comparing different classical and more recently developed network models with respect to their ability to generate networks with large structural variability. In particular, we consider the statistical constraints which the respective construction scheme imposes on the generated networks. After having identified the most variable networks, we address the issue of which constraints are common to all network classes and are thus suitable candidates for being generic statistical laws of complex networks. In fact, we find that generic, not model-related dependencies between different network characteristics do exist. This makes it possible to infer global features from local ones using regression models trained on networks with high generalization power. Our results confirm and extend previous findings regarding the synchronization properties of neural networks. Our method seems especially relevant for large networks, which are difficult to map completely, like the neural networks in the brain. The structure of such large networks cannot be fully sampled with the present technology. Our approach provides a method to estimate global properties of under-sampled networks in good approximation. Finally, we demonstrate on three different data sets (C. elegans neuronal network, R. prowazekii metabolic network, and a network of synonyms extracted from Roget's Thesaurus) that real-world networks have statistical relations compatible with those obtained using regression models.

  5. Free and constrained symplectic integrators for numerical general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richter, Ronny; Lubich, Christian

    2008-01-01

    We consider symplectic time integrators in numerical general relativity and discuss both free and constrained evolution schemes. For free evolution of ADM-like equations we propose the use of the Stoermer-Verlet method, a standard symplectic integrator which here is explicit in the computationally expensive curvature terms. For the constrained evolution we give a formulation of the evolution equations that enforces the momentum constraints in a holonomically constrained Hamiltonian system and turns the Hamilton constraint function from a weak to a strong invariant of the system. This formulation permits the use of the constraint-preserving symplectic RATTLE integrator, a constrained version of the Stoermer-Verlet method. The behavior of the methods is illustrated on two effectively (1+1)-dimensional versions of Einstein's equations, which allow us to investigate a perturbed Minkowski problem and the Schwarzschild spacetime. We compare symplectic and non-symplectic integrators for free evolution, showing very different numerical behavior for nearly-conserved quantities in the perturbed Minkowski problem. Further we compare free and constrained evolution, demonstrating in our examples that enforcing the momentum constraints can turn an unstable free evolution into a stable constrained evolution. This is demonstrated in the stabilization of a perturbed Minkowski problem with Dirac gauge, and in the suppression of the propagation of boundary instabilities into the interior of the domain in Schwarzschild spacetime

  6. Spinning solutions in general relativity with infinite central density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flammer, P. D.

    2018-05-01

    This paper presents general relativistic numerical simulations of uniformly rotating polytropes. Equations are developed using MSQI coordinates, but taking a logarithm of the radial coordinate. The result is relatively simple elliptical differential equations. Due to the logarithmic scale, we can resolve solutions with near-singular mass distributions near their center, while the solution domain extends many orders of magnitude larger than the radius of the distribution (to connect with flat space-time). Rotating solutions are found with very high central energy densities for a range of adiabatic exponents. Analytically, assuming the pressure is proportional to the energy density (which is true for polytropes in the limit of large energy density), we determine the small radius behavior of the metric potentials and energy density. This small radius behavior agrees well with the small radius behavior of large central density numerical results, lending confidence to our numerical approach. We compare results with rotating solutions available in the literature, which show good agreement. We study the stability of spherical solutions: instability sets in at the first maximum in mass versus central energy density; this is also consistent with results in the literature, and further lends confidence to the numerical approach.

  7. Simulation of merging neutron stars in full general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shibata, M.

    2001-01-01

    We have performed 3D numerical simulations for merger of equal mass binary neutron stars in full general relativity. We adopt a Γ-law equation of state in the form P = (Γ - 1)ρε where P, ρ, ε and Γ are the pressure, rest mass density, specific internal energy, and the adiabatic constant. As initial conditions, we adopt models of irrotational binary neutron stars in a quasiequilibrium state. Simulations have been carried out for a wide range of Γ and compactness of neutron stars, paying particular attention to the final product and gravitational waves. We find that the final product depends sensitively on the initial compactness of the neutron stars: In a merger between sufficiently compact neutron stars, a black hole is formed in a dynamical timescale. As the compactness is decreased, the formation timescale becomes longer and longer. It is also found that a differentially rotating massive neutron star is formed instead of a black hole for less compact binary cases. In the case of black hole formation, the disk mass around the black hole appears to be very small; less than 1% of the total rest mass. It is indicated that waveforms of high-frequency gravitational waves after merger depend strongly on the compactness of neutron stars before the merger. We point out importance of detecting such gravitational waves of high frequency to constrain the maximum allowed mass of neutron stars. (author)

  8. Gravitational field of massive point particle in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fiziev, P.P.

    2003-10-01

    Using various gauges of the radial coordinate we give a description of the static spherically symmetric space-times with point singularity at the center and vacuum outside the singularity. We show that in general relativity (GR) there exist infinitely many such solutions to the Einstein equations which are physically different and only some of them describe the gravitational field of a single massive point particle. In particular, we show that the widespread Hilbert's form of Schwarzschild solution does not solve the Einstein equations with a massive point particle's stress-energy tensor. Novel normal coordinates for the field and a new physical class of gauges are proposed, in this way achieving a correct description of a point mass source in GR. We also introduce a gravitational mass defect of a point particle and determine the dependence of the solutions on this mass defect. In addition we give invariant characteristics of the physically and geometrically different classes of spherically symmetric static space-times created by one point mass. (author)

  9. A New Solution for Einstein Field Equation in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousavi, Sadegh

    2006-05-01

    There are different solutions for Einstein field equation in general relativity that they have been proposed by different people the most important solutions are Schwarzchild, Reissner Nordstrom, Kerr and Kerr Newmam. However, each one of these solutions limited to special case. I've found a new solution for Einstein field equation which is more complete than all previous ones and this solution contains the previous solutions as its special forms. In this talk I will present my new metric for Einstein field equation and the Christofel symbols and Richi and Rieman tensor components for the new metric that I have calculated them by GR TENSOR software. As a result I will determine the actual movement of black holes which is different From Kerr black hole's movement. Finally this new solution predicts, existence of a new and constant field in the nature (that nobody can found it up to now), so in this talk I will introduce this new field and even I will calculate the amount of this field. SADEGH MOUSAVI, Amirkabir University of Technology.

  10. General relativity cosmological models without the big bang

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosen, N.

    1985-01-01

    Attention is given to the so-called standard model of the universe in the framework of the general theory of relativity. This model is taken to be homogeneous and isotropic and filled with an ideal fluid characterized by a density and a pressure. Taking into consideration, however, the assumption that the universe began in a singular state, it is found hard to understand why the universe is so nearly homogeneous and isotropic at present for a singularity represents a breakdown of physical laws, and the initial singularity cannot, therefore, predetermine the subsequent symmetries of the universe. The present investigation has the objective to find a way of avoiding this initial singularity, i.e., to look for a cosmological model without the big bang. The idea is proposed that there exists a limiting density of matter of the order of magnitude of the Planck density, and that this was the density of matter at the moment at which the universe began to expand

  11. One interpretation for both Quantum Mechanics and General Relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Halewijn, Ewoud

    2014-07-01

    In reconciling General Relativity with Quantum Mechanics, it is challenging to resolve the combined mathematical equations and to find an interpretation that makes sense ontologically. Such an interpretation has been developed by quantizing descriptive components in both the theories and other views. The resulting micro-components have been re-integrated within the scope of known gaps between science and 'the real world'. The odd peculiarities in these theories have been made look 'normal' by fully untraditionally answering fundamental questions. The interpretation is suggesting that we define time as a discrete operator and its eigenvalues as constraints on space-time manifolds, in order to reconcile the mathematical equations. Outside the mathematical arena we suggest reconsidering the concepts of Black Holes, the Big Bang, the epistemological problem of perception in philosophy and the supposed clash between scientific and the spiritual worldviews. It is concluded that developing one consistent ontological interpretation for both theorie is possible. It is a weird story, but it is making powerful suggestions for reviewing some of our fundamental convictions.

  12. Cosmology in time asymmetric extensions of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, Genly; Saridakis, Emmanuel N.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the cosmological behavior in a universe governed by time asymmetric extensions of general relativity, which is a novel modified gravity based on the addition of new, time-asymmetric, terms on the Hamiltonian framework, in a way that the algebra of constraints and local physics remain unchanged. Nevertheless, at cosmological scales these new terms can have significant effects that can alter the universe evolution, both at early and late times, and the freedom in the choice of the involved modification function makes the scenario able to produce a huge class of cosmological behaviors. For basic ansatzes of modification, we perform a detailed dynamical analysis, extracting the stable late-time solutions. Amongst others, we find that the universe can result in dark-energy dominated, accelerating solutions, even in the absence of an explicit cosmological constant, in which the dark energy can be quintessence-like, phantom-like, or behave as an effective cosmological constant. Moreover, it can result to matter-domination, or to a Big Rip, or experience the sequence from matter to dark energy domination. Additionally, in the case of closed curvature, the universe may experience a cosmological bounce or turnaround, or even cyclic behavior. Finally, these scenarios can easily satisfy the observational and phenomenological requirements. Hence, time asymmetric cosmology can be a good candidate for the description of the universe

  13. Confirmation of general relativity on large scales from weak lensing and galaxy velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Reinabelle; Mandelbaum, Rachel; Seljak, Uros; Baldauf, Tobias; Gunn, James E.; Lombriser, Lucas; Smith, Robert E.

    2010-03-01

    Although general relativity underlies modern cosmology, its applicability on cosmological length scales has yet to be stringently tested. Such a test has recently been proposed, using a quantity, EG, that combines measures of large-scale gravitational lensing, galaxy clustering and structure growth rate. The combination is insensitive to `galaxy bias' (the difference between the clustering of visible galaxies and invisible dark matter) and is thus robust to the uncertainty in this parameter. Modified theories of gravity generally predict values of EG different from the general relativistic prediction because, in these theories, the `gravitational slip' (the difference between the two potentials that describe perturbations in the gravitational metric) is non-zero, which leads to changes in the growth of structure and the strength of the gravitational lensing effect. Here we report that EG = 0.39+/-0.06 on length scales of tens of megaparsecs, in agreement with the general relativistic prediction of EG~0.4. The measured value excludes a model within the tensor-vector-scalar gravity theory, which modifies both Newtonian and Einstein gravity. However, the relatively large uncertainty still permits models within f() theory, which is an extension of general relativity. A fivefold decrease in uncertainty is needed to rule out these models.

  14. Coupling of linearized gravity to nonrelativistic test particles: Dynamics in the general laboratory frame

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speliotopoulos, A.D.; Chiao, Raymond Y.

    2004-01-01

    The coupling of gravity to matter is explored in the linearized gravity limit. The usual derivation of gravity-matter couplings within the quantum-field-theoretic framework is reviewed. A number of inconsistencies between this derivation of the couplings and the known results of tidal effects on test particles according to classical general relativity are pointed out. As a step towards resolving these inconsistencies, a general laboratory frame fixed on the worldline of an observer is constructed. In this frame, the dynamics of nonrelativistic test particles in the linearized gravity limit is studied, and their Hamiltonian dynamics is derived. It is shown that for stationary metrics this Hamiltonian reduces to the usual Hamiltonian for nonrelativistic particles undergoing geodesic motion. For nonstationary metrics with long-wavelength gravitational waves present (GWs), it reduces to the Hamiltonian for a nonrelativistic particle undergoing geodesic deviation motion. Arbitrary-wavelength GWs couple to the test particle through a vector-potential-like field N a , the net result of the tidal forces that the GW induces in the system, namely, a local velocity field on the system induced by tidal effects, as seen by an observer in the general laboratory frame. Effective electric and magnetic fields, which are related to the electric and magnetic parts of the Weyl tensor, are constructed from N a that obey equations of the same form as Maxwell's equations. A gedankin gravitational Aharonov-Bohm-type experiment using N a to measure the interference of quantum test particles is presented

  15. Rastall's and related theories are conservative gravitational theories although physically inequivalent to general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smalley, L. L.

    1983-01-01

    The proper framework for testing Rastall's theory and its generalizations is in the case of non-negligible (i.e. discernible) gravitational effects such as gravity gradients. These theories have conserved integral four-momentum and angular momentum. The Nordtvedt effect then provides limits on the parameters which arise as the result of the non-zero divergence of the energy-momentum tensor.

  16. 40 CFR 86.230-94 - Test sequence: general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... compartment cooling. (1) Fixed speed air cooling of the engine compartment with the compartment cover open... fuel economy testing, alternative engine compartment cooling fans or systems, including those which... Administrator may conduct certification, fuel economy and in-use testing using the additional cooling set-up...

  17. Nonequilibrium statistical mechanics in the general theory of relativity. I. A general formalism

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Israel, W.; Kandrup, H.E.

    1984-01-01

    This is the first in a series of papers, the overall objective of which is the formulation of a new covariant approach to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics in classical general relativity. The objecct here is the development of a tractable theory for self-gravitating systems. It is argued that the ''state'' of an N-particle system may be characterized by an N-particle distribution function, defined in an 8N-dimensional phase space, which satisfies a collection of N conservation equations. By mapping the true physics onto a fictitious ''background'' spacetime, which may be chosen to satisfy some ''average'' field equations, one then obtains a useful covariant notion of ''evolution'' in response to a fluctuating ''gravitational force.'' For many cases of practical interest, one may suppose (i) that these fluctuating forces satisfy linear field equations and (ii) that they may be modeled by a direct interaction. In this case, one can use a relativistic projection operator formalism to derive exact closed equations for the evolution of such objects as an appropriately defined reduced one-particle distribution function. By capturing, in a natural way, the notion of a dilute gas, or impulse, approximation, one is then led to a comparatively simple equation for the one-particle distribution. If, furthermore, one treats the effects of the fluctuating forces as ''localized'' in space and time, one obtains a tractable kinetic equation which reduces, in the Newtonian limit, to the stardard Landau equation

  18. Reading Test-taking Strategies in General Training IELTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vahede Nosrati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The significance of gaining a better understanding of how test-taking strategies are used has been recognized by researchers. Considering this fact, this study aimed at investigating the test-taking strategies which were employed by IELTS candidates in reading comprehension test. Besides, it tried to take into account the differences among strategies used for different tasks. In order to gather data, two instruments were employed: the think-aloud protocol, and an IELTS reading test. The obtained data were analyzed and interpreted qualitatively by the researcher. The findings indicated that candidates employed 15 different strategies which were categorized in 3 stages, pre-reading, reading, and post-reading stages. Furthermore, it was revealed that test-takers used certain strategies differently, depending on the type of the task. The findings provide a better understanding of strategy use among IELTS candidates and help teachers to improve their approaches toward teaching and learning goals. Keywords: Test-taking Strategy, Test-taker, Reading Comprehension, Language Learning Strategy, IELTS

  19. A generalized development model for testing GPS user equipment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemesath, N.

    1978-01-01

    The generalized development model (GDM) program, which was intended to establish how well GPS user equipment can perform under a combination of jamming and dynamics, is described. The systems design and the characteristics of the GDM are discussed. The performance aspects of the GDM are listed and the application of the GDM to civil aviation is examined.

  20. Disseminating General Relativity for 21st century astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crosta, Mariateresa

    2015-08-01

    The talk aims to present two outreach projects - initially developed for the ESA Gaia satellite, a multidisciplinary mission launched on December 19, 2013 - available to the OAD community: NeST and "The Meaning of Light".NeST is an interactive educational tool, that displays how the theory of GR rules the Universe, it creates a performance physically "belonging" to the exhibition space and moving through it, materializing what J.A. Wheeler said "mass tells space-time how to curve, and space-time tells mass how to move"."The Meaning of Light" is a short motion comics, part of an extensive outreach program called "The History of Photons" whose main theme is the story of a beam of stellar photons that, after leaving the progenitor star, propagates through the Universe and, once intercepted come into contact with a team of scientists: here begins their adventure to be taken "back" home and in doing so the scientists, and the spectators, are driven to discover the wonders of which the light are the bearers.The description of the journey of the photons becomes, therefore, an opportunity to easily tell the fascinating topics of Astrophysics and General Relativity, i.e. the complexity and the infinite beauty of the Universe in which we live.For this movie a new theme song was produced, "Singing the Stars", whose refrain (Oh Be A Fine Girl / Guy Kiss Me Little Thing, Yeah) adds to the famous mnemonic for stellar classification (OBAFGKM) the new stellar types LTY discovered in recent years.

  1. Some General Principles in Cryogenic Design, Implementation, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipirro, Michael James

    2015-01-01

    Brief Course Description: In 2 hours only the most basic principles of cryogenics can be presented. I will concentrate on the differences between a room temperature thermal analysis and cryogenic thermal analysis, namely temperature dependent properties. I will talk about practical materials for thermal contact and isolation. I will finish by describing the verification process and instrumentation used that is unique to cryogenic (in general less than 100K) systems.

  2. Relation of a unified quantum field theory of spinors to the structure of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kober, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Based on a unified quantum field theory of spinors assumed to describe all matter fields and their interactions we construct the space-time structure of general relativity according to a general connection within the corresponding spinor space. The tetrad field and the corresponding metric field are composed from a space-time dependent basis of spinors within the internal space of the fundamental matter field. Similar to twistor theory the Minkowski signature of the space-time metric is related to this spinor nature of elementary matter, if we assume the spinor space to be endowed with a symplectic structure. The equivalence principle and the property of background independence arise from the fact that all elementary fields are composed from the fundamental spinor field. This means that the structure of space-time according to general relativity seems to be a consequence of a fundamental theory of matter fields and not a presupposition as in the usual setting of relativistic quantum field theories.

  3. General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test Program. Bullet/fragment test series

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    George, T.G.; Tate, R.E.; Axler, K.M.

    1985-05-01

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will provide power for space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. Each module contains four /sup 238/PuO/sub 2/-fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. Because a launch-pad or post-launch explosion is always possible, we need to determine the ability of GPHS fueled clads within a module to survive fragment impact. The bullet/fragment test series, part of the Safety Verification Test Plan, was designed to provide information on clad response to impact by a compact, high-energy, aluminum-alloy fragment and to establish a threshold value of fragment energy required to breach the iridium cladding. Test results show that a velocity of 555 m/s (1820 ft/s) with an 18-g bullet is at or near the threshold value of fragment velocity that will cause a clad breach. Results also show that an exothermic Ir/Al reaction occurs if aluminum and hot iridium are in contact, a contact that is possible and most damaging to the clad within a narrow velocity range. The observed reactions between the iridium and the aluminum were studied in the laboratory and are reported in the Appendix.

  4. General-Purpose Heat Source Safety Verification Test program: Edge-on flyer plate tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    George, T.G.

    1987-03-01

    The radioisotope thermoelectric generator (RTG) that will supply power for the Galileo and Ulysses space missions contains 18 General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) modules. The GPHS modules provide power by transmitting the heat of 238 Pu α-decay to an array of thermoelectric elements. Each module contains four 238 PuO 2 -fueled clads and generates 250 W(t). Because the possibility of a launch vehicle explosion always exists, and because such an explosion could generate a field of high-energy fragments, the fueled clads within each GPHS module must survive fragment impact. The edge-on flyer plate tests were included in the Safety Verification Test series to provide information on the module/clad response to the impact of high-energy plate fragments. The test results indicate that the edge-on impact of a 3.2-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (2219-T87) plate traveling at 915 m/s causes the complete release of fuel from capsules contained within a bare GPHS module, and that the threshold velocity sufficient to cause the breach of a bare, simulant-fueled clad impacted by a 3.5-mm-thick, aluminum-alloy (5052-T0) plate is approximately 140 m/s

  5. Explosion overpressure test series: General-Purpose Heat Source development: Safety Verification Test program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cull, T.A.; George, T.G.; Pavone, D.

    1986-09-01

    The General-Purpose Heat Source (GPHS) is a modular, radioisotope heat source that will be used in radioisotope thermoelectric generators (RTGs) to supply electric power for space missions. The first two uses will be the NASA Galileo and the ESA Ulysses missions. The RTG for these missions will contain 18 GPHS modules, each of which contains four 238 PuO 2 -fueled clads and generates 250 W/sub (t)/. A series of Safety Verification Tests (SVTs) was conducted to assess the ability of the GPHS modules to contain the plutonia in accident environments. Because a launch pad or postlaunch explosion of the Space Transportation System vehicle (space shuttle) is a conceivable accident, the SVT plan included a series of tests that simulated the overpressure exposure the RTG and GPHS modules could experience in such an event. Results of these tests, in which we used depleted UO 2 as a fuel simulant, suggest that exposure to overpressures as high as 15.2 MPa (2200 psi), without subsequent impact, does not result in a release of fuel

  6. Univalence Conditions Related to a General Integral Operator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoleta Breaz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We consider a general integral operator based on two types of analytic functions, namely, regular functions and, respectively, functions having a positive real part. Some univalence conditions for this integral operator are obtained.

  7. Application of the dynamical interpretation of general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deumens, E.

    1981-01-01

    The paper argues that the gravitational field seen in the fully dynamical way, described here, is a useful tool for understanding some fundamental results in a coherent general relativistic way. (author)

  8. General gamma-radiation test of TGC detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Smakhtin, V P

    2004-01-01

    The TGC detectors are expected to provide the Muon trigger for the ATLAS detector in the forward region of the ATLAS Muon Spectrometer. The TGC detectors have to provide a trigger signal within 25 ns of the LHC accelerator bunch spacing, with an efficiency exceeding 95%, while exposed to an effective)photon and neutron background ranging from 30 to 150 Hz/cm/sup 2/. In order to test TGC detectors in high rate environment every detector was irradiated at 2500 Cu Co-60 source in Radiation Facility of Weizmann Institute of Science at nominal operating voltage and at photon rate several times above the expected background. This radiation test was succeeded in diagnostics of the hot spots inside detectors. The present publication refers to the test results of 800 TGC detectors produced in the Weizmann Institute of Science. (1 refs).

  9. A sequential hypothesis test based on a generalized Azuma inequality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Reijsbergen, D.P.; Scheinhardt, Willem R.W.; de Boer, Pieter-Tjerk

    We present a new power-one sequential hypothesis test based on a bound for the probability that a bounded zero-mean martingale ever crosses a curve of the form $a(n+k)^b$. The proof of the bound is of independent interest.

  10. Generalized reduced rank tests using the singular value decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleibergen, F.R.; Paap, R.

    2002-01-01

    We propose a novel statistic to test the rank of a matrix. The rank statistic overcomes deficiencies of existing rank statistics, like: necessity of a Kronecker covariance matrix for the canonical correlation rank statistic of Anderson (1951), sensitivity to the ordering of the variables for the LDU

  11. 21 CFR 352.72 - General testing procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... required. (g) Number of subjects. A test panel shall consist of not more than 25 subjects with the number fixed in advance by the investigator. From this panel, at least 20 subjects must produce valid data for... administered the doses of UV radiation. After UV radiation exposure from the solar simulator is completed, all...

  12. 40 CFR 92.123 - Test procedure; general requirements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... the test. Auxiliary fan(s) may be used to maintain engine cooling during operation on the dynamometer... smoke. (1) In the raw exhaust sampling procedure, sample is collected directly from the exhaust stream... of another raw exhaust sample. The fuel flow rate for each throttle setting is measured. (2) For...

  13. Generalized Reduced Rank Tests using the Singular Value Decomposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.R. Kleibergen (Frank); R. Paap (Richard)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractWe propose a novel statistic to test the rank of a matrix. The rank statistic overcomes deficiencies of existing rank statistics, like: necessity of a Kronecker covariance matrix for the canonical correlation rank statistic of Anderson (1951), sensitivity to the ordering of the variables

  14. 16 CFR 1211.5 - General testing parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... § 1211.15(i) and (k). (7) When the Demonstrated Method Test is conducted, the multiplier is to be based... condition flow chart shown in figure 1 shall be used: (1) To conduct a failure-mode and effect analysis...

  15. Emotion perception and empathy: An individual differences test of relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olderbak, Sally; Wilhelm, Oliver

    2017-10-01

    Numerous theories posit a positive relation between perceiving emotion expressed in the face of a stranger (emotion perception) and feeling or cognitively understanding the emotion of that person (affective and cognitive empathy, respectively). However, when relating individual differences in emotion perception with individual differences in affective or cognitive empathy, effect sizes are contradictory, but often not significantly different from zero. Based on 4 studies (study ns range from 97 to 486 persons; n total = 958) that differ from one another on many design and sample characteristics, applying advanced modeling techniques to control for measurement error, we estimate relations between affective empathy, cognitive empathy, and emotion perception. Relations are tested separately for each of the 6 basic emotions (an emotion-specific model) as well as across all emotions (an emotion-general model). Reflecting the literature, effect sizes and statistical significance with an emotion-general model vary across the individual studies (rs range from -.001 to .24 for emotion perception with affective empathy and -.01 to .39 for emotion perception with cognitive empathy), with a meta-analysis of these results indicating emotion perception is weakly related with affective (r = .13, p = .003) and cognitive empathy (r = .13, p = .05). Relations are not strengthened in an emotion-specific model. We argue that the weak effect sizes and inconsistency across studies reflects a neglected distinction of measurement approach-specifically, empathy is assessed as typical behavior and emotion perception is assessed as maximal effort-and conclude with considerations regarding the measurement of each construct. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  16. Implementation of immunochemical faecal occult blood test in general practice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jakob Søgaard; Bro, Flemming; Hornung, Nete

    2016-01-01

    anvendelsen af immunochemical faecal occult blood test (iFOBT) i almen praksis. iFOBT detekterer humant globin i fæces og indikerer gastrointestinal blødning. Studiet udgør en del af et ph.d.-studie, der bidrager med ny viden til at optimere udredningen af patienter med tarmkræft. Der er et stort behov...

  17. Quantum mechanics in general relativity and its special - relativistic limit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagirov, Eh.A.

    1998-01-01

    Quantum mechanics of a neutral point-like particle in the general Riemannian space-time is constructed starting with the general Fock representation of the quantum scalar field. The known ambiguity of the representation is removed by the requirement that the quasi-one-particle wave functions in configurational space should admit the Born probabilistic interpretation after a transformation, generally nonlocal, and therefore may be considered as the one-particle wave functions. Operators of momentum and spatial position of a particle acting in the space of these transformed wave functions are deduced consecutively from basic naturally defined operators of the observables in the Fock space. They coincide with the canonical ones only in the case of the infinite velocity of light. In particular, even in the Minkowski space-time and inertial frames of reference , the operators of curvilinear coordinates do not commute

  18. Large-scale structure observables in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jeong, Donghui; Schmidt, Fabian

    2015-01-01

    We review recent studies that rigorously define several key observables of the large-scale structure of the Universe in a general relativistic context. Specifically, we consider (i) redshift perturbation of cosmic clock events; (ii) distortion of cosmic rulers, including weak lensing shear and magnification; and (iii) observed number density of tracers of the large-scale structure. We provide covariant and gauge-invariant expressions of these observables. Our expressions are given for a linearly perturbed flat Friedmann–Robertson–Walker metric including scalar, vector, and tensor metric perturbations. While we restrict ourselves to linear order in perturbation theory, the approach can be straightforwardly generalized to higher order. (paper)

  19. Unification of General Relativity with Quantum Field Theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ni Jun

    2011-01-01

    In the frame of quantum field theory, instead of using the action principle, we deduce the Einstein equation from purely the general covariant principle and the homogeneity of spacetime. The Einstein equation is shown to be the gauge equation to guarantee the local symmetry of spacetime translation. Gravity is an apparent force due to the curvature of spacetime resulted from the conservation of energy-momentum. In the action of quantum field theory, only electroweak-strong interactions should be considered with the curved spacetime metric determined by the Einstein equation. (general)

  20. Explicit Relations of Physical Potentials Through Generalized Hypervirial and Kramers' Recurrence Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Hua; Dong, Shi-Hai

    2015-06-01

    Based on a Hamiltonian identity, we study one-dimensional generalized hypervirial theorem, Blanchard-like (non-diagonal case) and Kramers' (diagonal case) recurrence relations for arbitrary xκ which is independent of the central potential V(x). Some significant results in diagonal case are obtained for special κ in xκ (κ ≥ 2). In particular, we find the orthogonal relation = δn1n2 (κ = 0), = (En1 - En2)2 (κ = 1), En = + (κ = 2) and -4En + + 4 = 0 (κ = 3). The latter two formulas can be used directly to calculate the energy levels. We present useful explicit relations for some well known physical potentials without requiring the energy spectra of quantum system. Supported in part by Project 20150964-SIP-IPN, COFAA-IPN, Mexico

  1. ESBWR related passive decay heat removal tests in PANDA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huggenberger, M.; Aubert, C.; Bandurski, T.; Dreier, J.; Fischer, O.; Strassberger, H.J.; Yadigaroglu, G.

    1999-01-01

    A number of test series to investigate passive safety systems for the next generation of Light Water Reactors have been performed in the PANDA multi-purpose facility at the Paul Scherrer Institut (PSI). The large scale thermal-hydraulic test facility allows to investigate LWR containment phenomena and system behaviour. PANDA was first used to examine the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCCS) for the Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (SBWR). In 1996 new test series were initiated; all related to projects of the EC Fourth Framework Programme on Nuclear Fission Safety. One of these projects (TEPSS) is focused on the European Simplified Boiling Water Reactor (ESBWR). The ESBWR containment features and PCCS long-term post LOCA response were investigated in PANDA. The PCCS start-up was demonstrated, the effect of nitrogen hidden somewhere in the drywell and released later in the transient was simulated and the effect of light gases (helium) on the PCCS performance was investigated. Finally, the influence of low PCC pool levels on PCCS and containment performance was examined. The main findings were that the PCCS works as intended and shows generally a favorable and robust long-term post LOCA behaviour. The system starts working even under extreme conditions and trapped air released from the drywell later in the transient does only temporarily reduce the PCCS performance. The new PANDA test series provided an extensive data base which will contribute to further improve containment design of passive plants and allow for system code assessment in a wide parameter range. (author)

  2. Relativity: An Introduction to Special and General Relativity, 3rd edn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rendall, Alan

    2004-01-01

    This book is concerned with mathematical topics related to general relativity. Chapters 1-6 are expositions of a number of parts of mathematics which are important for relativists. The main subjects covered are linear algebra, general topology, manifolds, Lie groups and, in particular detail, the Lorentz group. Chapters 7-13 analyse aspects of the geometrical structure of spacetimes. They focus on symmetries of various types and on properties of curvature. Subjects covered include the Petrov classification, holonomy groups, the relation between metric and curvature, affine vector fields, conformal symmetries, projective symmetries and curvature collineations. This part of the book is a treatise on the (mainly local) geometry of four-dimensional Lorentz manifolds, with attention to energy-momentum tensors of interest in general relativity. In the first six chapters the author has concentrated on giving definitions and statements of theorems, the proofs being left to the references that are quoted. He has clearly put much effort into producing a very smooth exposition which is easy to follow and has succeeded in giving us a readable and informative account of the mathematics covered. At the same time mathematical rigour is strictly observed. He also takes the time to carefully discuss many of the subtleties which arise. This part of the book has the character of a textbook suitable for students of general relativity but experienced researchers will also find it a useful reference and are likely to come across interesting facts they have not met elsewhere. The remaining chapters are more like a research monograph and are influenced by the author's own research interests. More proofs are included. Much of the material in this part will be of interest to a narrower audience of relativists than that of the first part. It should, however, be of interest to those working on exact solutions of the Einstein equations and related topics. It is also the case that most

  3. The subliminal mere exposure effect does not generalize to structurally related stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newell, Ben R; Bright, James E H

    2003-03-01

    R.F. Bornstein (1994) questioned whether subliminal mere exposure effects might generalize to structurally related stimuli, thereby providing evidence for the existence of implicit learning. Two experiments examined this claim using letter string stimuli constructed according to the rules of an artificial grammar. Experiment 1 demonstrated that brief, masked exposure to grammatical strings impaired recognition but failed to produce a mere exposure effect on novel structurally related strings seen at test. Experiment 2 replicated this result but also demonstrated that a reliable mere exposure effect could be obtained, provided the same grammatical strings were presented at test. The results suggest that the structural relationship between training and test items prevents the mere exposure effect when participants are unaware of the exposure status of stimuli, and therefore provide no evidence for the existence of implicit learning.

  4. Einstein's Unification: General Relativity and the Quest for Mathematical Naturalness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, J.A.E.F.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the thesis has been to understand Einstein's development and see the historical coherence in his later attitude in physics. The lesson we learned has been straightforward: the key that unlocks the later Einstein lies in the road by which he arrived at the field equations of general

  5. Bianchi type IX string cosmological model in general relativity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cosmic strings arise during phase transitions after the big-bang explosion as the temperature goes down below some critical temperature [1–3]. These strings have stress energy and couple in a simple way to the gravitational field. The general relativistic formalism of cosmic strings is due to Letelier [4,5]. Stachel [6] has ...

  6. An introduction to the geometry of singularities on general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canarutto, D.

    1988-01-01

    The aim of this paper is the introduction of many ideas in differential geometry by adopting an abstract and general framework. Such a clearness permits to obtain a powerful and simple theory of connection on fibred manifolds allowing a clearer understanding and easier handling (C.P.)

  7. Charged Analogues of Henning Knutsen Type Solutions in General Relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Y. K.; Kumar, Sachin; Pratibha

    2011-11-01

    In the present article, we have found charged analogues of Henning Knutsen's interior solutions which join smoothly to the Reissner-Nordstrom metric at the pressure free interface. The solutions are singularity free and analyzed numerically with respect to pressure, energy-density and charge-density in details. The solutions so obtained also present the generalization of A.L. Mehra's solutions.

  8. 42 CFR 493.1467 - Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... testing; cytology general supervisor. 493.1467 Section 493.1467 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE....1467 Condition: Laboratories performing high complexity testing; cytology general supervisor. For the subspecialty of cytology, the laboratory must have a general supervisor who meets the qualification...

  9. The relative performance of bivariate causality tests in small samples

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bult, J..R.; Leeflang, P.S.H.; Wittink, D.R.

    1997-01-01

    Causality tests have been applied to establish directional effects and to reduce the set of potential predictors, For the latter type of application only bivariate tests can be used, In this study we compare bivariate causality tests. Although the problem addressed is general and could benefit

  10. The Generals’ Revolt and Civil-Military Relations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-11

    freedom of speech .1 In America, where freedom of speech is an inalienable right and civilian control of the military is a...military. 2 This paper will examine the Generals’ Revolt as well as review legal restrictions on the freedom of speech of retired officers. It will also...Spring of 2006 does not correct the problem, nor does it bring comfort to the families who lost servicemembers in Iraq. 8 Freedom of Speech

  11. Indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity, 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Noboru

    1979-01-01

    The canonical commutation relations are analyzed in detail in the indefinite-metric quantum field theory of gravity based on the vierbein formalism. It is explicitly verified that the BRS charge, the local-Lorentz-BRS charge and the Poincare generators satisfy the expected commutation relations. (author)

  12. Fireworks Assembler (Fireworks) 737.887 -- Technical Report on Standardization of the General Aptitude Test Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manpower Administration (DOL), Washington, DC. U.S. Training and Employment Service.

    The United States Training and Employment Service General Aptitude Test Battery (GATB), first published in 1947, has been included in a continuing program of research to validate the tests against success in many different occupations. The GATB consists of 12 tests which measure nine aptitudes: General Learning Ability; Verbal Aptitude; Numerical…

  13. Urinary tract infections in general practice patients: diagnostic tests versus bacteriological culture.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nys, S.; Merode, T. van; Bartelds, A.I.M.; Stobberingh, E.E.

    2006-01-01

    Objectives: Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are common bacterial infections encountered in general practice. For the optimal treatment the general practitioner (GP) should rely on the results of diagnostic tests and recent antimicrobial susceptibility of uropathogens. Patients and methods: In total

  14. Testing concordance of instrumental variable effects in generalized linear models with application to Mendelian randomization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, James Y.; Chan, Kwun Chuen Gary; Hsu, Li

    2014-01-01

    Instrumental variable regression is one way to overcome unmeasured confounding and estimate causal effect in observational studies. Built on structural mean models, there has been considerale work recently developed for consistent estimation of causal relative risk and causal odds ratio. Such models can sometimes suffer from identification issues for weak instruments. This hampered the applicability of Mendelian randomization analysis in genetic epidemiology. When there are multiple genetic variants available as instrumental variables, and causal effect is defined in a generalized linear model in the presence of unmeasured confounders, we propose to test concordance between instrumental variable effects on the intermediate exposure and instrumental variable effects on the disease outcome, as a means to test the causal effect. We show that a class of generalized least squares estimators provide valid and consistent tests of causality. For causal effect of a continuous exposure on a dichotomous outcome in logistic models, the proposed estimators are shown to be asymptotically conservative. When the disease outcome is rare, such estimators are consistent due to the log-linear approximation of the logistic function. Optimality of such estimators relative to the well-known two-stage least squares estimator and the double-logistic structural mean model is further discussed. PMID:24863158

  15. Orbits in general relativity: the Jacobian elliptic function

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miro Rodriguez, C

    1987-03-11

    The Jacobian elliptic functions are applied to the motion of nonzero-rest-mass particles in the Schwarzschild geometry. The bound and unbound trajectories are analysed together with their classical and special-relativity limits.

  16. Linear relations in microbial reaction systems: a general overview of their origin, form, and use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noorman, H J; Heijnen, J J; Ch A M Luyben, K

    1991-09-01

    In microbial reaction systems, there are a number of linear relations among net conversion rates. These can be very useful in the analysis of experimental data. This article provides a general approach for the formation and application of the linear relations. Two type of system descriptions, one considering the biomass as a black box and the other based on metabolic pathways, are encountered. These are defined in a linear vector and matrix algebra framework. A correct a priori description can be obtained by three useful tests: the independency, consistency, and observability tests. The independency are different. The black box approach provides only conservations relations. They are derived from element, electrical charge, energy, and Gibbs energy balances. The metabolic approach provides, in addition to the conservation relations, metabolic and reaction relations. These result from component, energy, and Gibbs energy balances. Thus it is more attractive to use the metabolic description than the black box approach. A number of different types of linear relations given in the literature are reviewed. They are classified according to the different categories that result from the black box or the metabolic system description. Validation of hypotheses related to metabolic pathways can be supported by experimental validation of the linear metabolic relations. However, definite proof from biochemical evidence remains indispensable.

  17. Preservation of FFTF Data Related to Passive Safety Testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wootan, David W.; Butner, R. Scott; Omberg, Ronald P.; Makenas, Bruce J.; Nielsen, Deborah L.

    2010-01-01

    experience to a large-size LMR and obtain data for validating design analysis computer codes, and (3) to develop and test passive safety enhancements that might be used for future LMRs. These tests were designed to provide data sufficient to allow separation of fuel temperature effects from structural temperature effects. The data developed through this testing program were used to verify the predictive capability of passive safety analysis methods as well as provide a data base for calibrating design tools such as the SASSYS/SAS4A codes. These tests were instrumental in improving understanding of reactivity feedback mechanisms in LMRs and demonstrating passive safety margins available in an LMR. Knowledge preservation at the FFTF is focused on the areas of design, construction, startup, and operation of the reactor. This information may be of potential use for international exchanges with other LMR programs around the world. This information provides the basis for creating benchmarks for validating and testing large scale computer programs. All information preserved to date is now being stored and categorized consistent with the IAEA international standardized taxonomy. The test results information exists in several different formats depending upon the final stage of the test evaluation. Over 100 documents relevant to passive safety testing have been identified and are being recovered, scanned, and catalogued. Attempts to recover plant data tapes are also in progress. Documents related to passive safety testing are now being categorized consistent with internationally agreed upon IAEA standards. Documents are being converted to electronic format compatible with a general search engine being developed by INL. The data from the FFTF passive safety tests provides experimental verification of structural reactivity effects that should be very useful to innovative designers seeking to optimize passive safety in the design of new LMRs.

  18. Nonextensive kinetic theory and H-theorem in general relativity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos, A. P.; Silva, R.; Alcaniz, J. S.; Lima, J. A. S.

    2017-11-01

    The nonextensive kinetic theory for degenerate quantum gases is discussed in the general relativistic framework. By incorporating nonadditive modifications in the collisional term of the relativistic Boltzmann equation and entropy current, it is shown that Tsallis entropic framework satisfies a H-theorem in the presence of gravitational fields. Consistency with the 2nd law of thermodynamics is obtained only whether the entropic q-parameter lies in the interval q ∈ [ 0 , 2 ] . As occurs in the absence of gravitational fields, it is also proved that the local collisional equilibrium is described by the extended Bose-Einstein (Fermi-Dirac) q-distributions.

  19. Generalized classification of welds according to defect type based on raidation testing results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adamenko, A.A.; Demidko, V.G.

    1980-01-01

    Constructed is a generalized classification of welds according to defect type, with respect to real danger of defect, which in the first approximation is proportional to relatively decrease of the thickness, and with respect to defect potential danger which can be determined by its pointing. According to this classification the welded joints are divided into five classes according to COMECON guides. The division into classes is carried out according to two-fold numerical criterium which is applicable in case of the presence of experimental data on three defect linear sizes. The above classification is of main importance while automatic data processing of the radiation testing

  20. Electromagnetic perturbations of black holes in general relativity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toshmatov, Bobir; Stuchlík, Zdeněk; Schee, Jan; Ahmedov, Bobomurat

    2018-04-01

    The electromagnetic (EM) perturbations of the black hole solutions in general relativity coupled to nonlinear electrodynamics (NED) are studied for both electrically and magnetically charged black holes, assuming that the EM perturbations do not alter the spacetime geometry. It is shown that the effective potentials of the electrically and magnetically charged black holes related to test perturbative NED EM fields are related to the effective metric governing the photon motion, contrary to the effective potential of the linear electrodynamic (Maxwell) field that is related to the spacetime metric. Consequently, corresponding quasinormal (QN) frequencies differ as well. As a special case, we study new family of the NED black hole solutions which tend in the weak field limit to the Maxwell field, giving the Reissner-Nordström (RN) black hole solution. We compare the NED Maxwellian black hole QN spectra with the RN black hole QN spectra.

  1. Hamiltonian formalism for perfect fluids in general relativity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demaret, J.; Moncrief, V.

    1980-01-01

    Schutz's Hamiltonian theory of a relativistic perfect fluid, based on the velocity-potential version of classical perfect fluid hydrodynamics as formulated by Seliger and Whitham, is used to derive, in the framework of the Arnowitt, Deser, and Misner (ADM) method, a general partially reduced Hamiltonian for relativistic systems filled with a perfect fluid. The time coordinate is chosen, as in Lund's treatment of collapsing balls of dust, as minus the only velocity potential different from zero in the case of an irrotational and isentropic fluid. A ''semi-Dirac'' method can be applied to quantize astrophysical and cosmological models in the framework of this partially reduced formalism. If one chooses Taub's adapted comoving coordinate system, it is possible to derive a fully reduced ADM Hamiltonian, which is equal to minus the total baryon number of the fluid, generalizing a result previously obtained by Moncrief in the more particular framework of Taub's variational principle, valid for self-gravitating barotropic relativistic perfect fluids. An unconstrained Hamiltonian density is then explicitly derived for a fluid obeying the equation of state p=(gamma-1)rho (1 < or = γ < or = 2), which can adequately describe the phases of very high density attained in a catastrophic collapse or during the early stages of the Universe. This Hamiltonian density, shown to be equivalent to Moncrief's in the particular case of an isentropic fluid, can be simplified for fluid-filled class-A diagonal Bianchi-type cosmological models and appears as a suitable starting point for the study of the canonical quantization of these models

  2. 9th International Conference on General Relativity and Gravitation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmutzer, E.

    1980-01-01

    Volume 3 presents the abstracts of the following discussion groups: Quantization about classical background metrics (36 abstracts); Supergravity, renormalization program (8 abstracts); Classical gauge type theories of gravity (23 abstracts). 14 abstracts not related to any discussion group and 5 later submitted abstracts are also included. An alphabetic author index is given

  3. Special relativity in general frames from particles to astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Gourgoulhon, Éric

    2013-01-01

    Special relativity is the basis of many fields in modern physics: particle physics, quantum field theory, high-energy astrophysics, etc. This theory is presented here by adopting a four-dimensional point of view from the start. An outstanding feature of the book is that it doesn’t restrict itself to inertial frames but considers accelerated and rotating observers. It is thus possible to treat physical effects such as the Thomas precession or the Sagnac effect in a simple yet precise manner. In the final chapters, more advanced topics like tensorial fields in spacetime, exterior calculus and relativistic hydrodynamics are addressed. In the last, brief chapter the author gives a preview of gravity and shows where it becomes incompatible with Minkowsky spacetime. Well illustrated and enriched by many historical notes, this book also presents many applications of special relativity, ranging from particle physics (accelerators, particle collisions, quark-gluon plasma) to astrophysics (relativistic jets, active g...

  4. Indefinite-metric quantum field theory of general relativity, 15

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakanishi, Noboru

    1982-01-01

    In the manifestly covariant canonical formalism of quantum gravity, it is known that the equal-time commutator between a tensor field and the B field b sub(rho) is consistent with the rules of tensor analysis. Another tensorlike commutation relation is shown to exist for the equal-time commutator between a tensor and b sub(rho), but at the same time its limitation is clarified. The quantum-gravity extension of the invariant D function is defined and provied to be affine-invariant. The four-dimensional commutation relation between a tensor and b sub(rho) is investigated, and it is shown that the commutator consists of a completely tensorlike, manifestly affine-covariant part and a remainder, which is clearly distinguishable from the former. (author)

  5. Hydrodynamics in full general relativity with conservative AMR

    OpenAIRE

    East, William E.; Pretorius, Frans; Stephens, Branson C.

    2011-01-01

    There is great interest in numerical relativity simulations involving matter due to the likelihood that binary compact objects involving neutron stars will be detected by gravitational wave observatories in the coming years, as well as to the possibility that binary compact object mergers could explain short-duration gamma-ray bursts. We present a code designed for simulations of hydrodynamics coupled to the Einstein field equations targeted toward such applications. This code has recently be...

  6. General characteristics of relative dispersion in the ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corrado, Raffaele; Lacorata, Guglielmo; Palatella, Luigi; Santoleri, Rosalia; Zambianchi, Enrico

    2017-04-01

    The multi-scale and nonlinear nature of the ocean dynamics dramatically affects the spreading of matter, like pollutants, marine litter, etc., of physical and chemical seawater properties, and the biological connectivity inside and among different basins. Based on the Finite-Scale Lyapunov Exponent analysis of the largest available near-surface Lagrangian data set from the Global Drifter Program, our results show that, despite the large variety of flow features, relative dispersion can ultimately be described by a few parameters common to all ocean sub-basins, at least in terms of order of magnitude. This provides valuable information to undertake Lagrangian dispersion studies by means of models and/or of observational data. Moreover, our results show that the relative dispersion rates measured at submesoscale are significantly higher than for large-scale dynamics. Auxiliary analysis of high resolution GPS-tracked drifter hourly data as well as of the drogued/undrogued status of the buoys is provided in support of our conclusions. A possible application of our study, concerning reverse drifter motion and error growth analysis, is proposed relatively to the case of the missing Malaysia Airlines MH370 aircraft.

  7. Anaphylactic bronchospasm during general anesthesia is not related to asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouel-Chéron, A; Neukirch, C; Aubier, B; Montravers, P; Nicaise, P; Chollet-Martin, S; Mertes, P-M; Aubier, M; Longrois, D

    2015-04-01

    In the general population, a history of asthma (HA) is associated with a higher risk of mortality of anaphylactic shock (AS), but it is unknown whether this association remains valid for intra-operative AS. The goal of this retrospective study was to investigate whether a HA was associated with a higher risk of bronchospasm during intra-operative AS. We analyzed 106 patients (January 2009-December 2012) with intra-operative AS: 57% of them had a confirmed IgE-mediated reaction and 27% had a HA. On logistic regression, the only factor statistically associated with bronchospasm was a neuromuscular blocking drug, with both IgE- or non-IgE-mediated reactions. These results suggest that the mechanisms of bronchospasm in AS may be different from those of asthma and that, in the presence of bronchospasm during anesthesia, AS should be considered to be the most likely cause. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Thermodynamic Product Relations for Generalized Regular Black Hole

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, Parthapratim

    2016-01-01

    We derive thermodynamic product relations for four-parametric regular black hole (BH) solutions of the Einstein equations coupled with a nonlinear electrodynamics source. The four parameters can be described by the mass (m), charge (q), dipole moment (α), and quadrupole moment (β), respectively. We study its complete thermodynamics. We compute different thermodynamic products, that is, area product, BH temperature product, specific heat product, and Komar energy product, respectively. Furthermore, we show some complicated function of horizon areas that is indeed mass-independent and could turn out to be universal.

  9. Loop space representation of quantum general relativity and the group of loops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gambini, R.

    1991-01-01

    The action of the constraints of quantum general relativity on a general state in the loop representation is coded in terms of loop derivatives. These differential operators are related to the infinitesimal generators of the group of loops and generalize the area derivative first considered by Mandelstam. A new sector of solutions of the physical states space of nonperturbative quantum general relativity is found. (orig.)

  10. The Predominance Of Integrative Tests Over Discrete Point Tests In Evaluating The Medical Students' General English Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    maryam Heydarpour Meymeh

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and purpose: Multiple choice tests are the most common type of tests used in evaluating the general English knowledge of the students in most medical universities, however the efficacy of these tests are not examined precisely. Wecompare and examine the integrative tests and discrete point tests as measures of the English language knowledge of medical students.Methods: Three tests were given to 60 undergraduate physiotherapy and Audiology students in their second year of study (after passing their general English course. They were divided into 2 groups.The first test for both groups was an integrative test, writing. The second test was a multiple - choice test 0.(prepositions for group one and a multiple - choice test of tensesfor group two. The same items which were mostfi-equently used wrongly in thefirst test were used in the items of the second test. A third test, a TOEFL, was given to the subjects in order to estimate the correlation between this test and tests one and two.Results: The students performed better in the second test, discrete point test rather than the first which was an integrative test. The same grammatical mistakes in the composition were used correctly in the multiple choice tests by the students.Conclusion:Our findings show that student perform better in non-productive rather than productive test. Since being competent English language user is an expected outcome of university language courses it seems warranted to switch to integrative tests as a measure of English language competency.Keywords: INTEGRATIVE TESTS, ENGLISH LANGUAGE FOR MEDICINE, ACADEMIC ENGLISH

  11. Design and implementation of a general and automatic test platform base on NI PXI system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Long

    2018-05-01

    Aiming at some difficulties of test equipment such as the short product life, poor generality and high development cost, a general and automatic test platform base on NI PXI system is designed in this paper, which is able to meet most test requirements of circuit boards. The test platform is devided into 5 layers, every layer is introduced in detail except for the "Equipment Under Test" layer. An output board of a track-side equipment, which is an important part of high speed train control system, is taken as an example to make the functional circuit test by the test platform. The results show that the test platform is easy to realize add-on functions development, automatic test, wide compatibility and strong generality.

  12. Modeling of charged anisotropic compact stars in general relativity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dayanandan, Baiju; Maurya, S.K.; T, Smitha T. [University of Nizwa, Department of Mathematical and Physical Sciences, College of Arts and Science, Nizwa (Oman)

    2017-06-15

    A charged compact star model has been determined for anisotropic fluid distribution. We have solved the Einstein-Maxwell field equations to construct the charged compact star model by using the radial pressure, the metric function e{sup λ} and the electric charge function. The generic charged anisotropic solution is verified by exploring different physical conditions like causality condition, mass-radius relation and stability of the solution (via the adiabatic index, TOV equations and the Herrera cracking concept). It is observed that the present charged anisotropic compact star model is compatible with the star PSR 1937+21. Moreover, we also presented the EOS ρ = f(p) for the present charged compact star model. (orig.)

  13. Extension of relational event algebra to a general decision making setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, I.R.; Kramer, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    Relational Event Algebra (REA) is a new mathematical tool which provides an explicit algebraic reconstruction of events (appropriately designated as relational events) when initially only the formal probability values of such events are given as functions of known contributing event probabilities. In turn, once such relational events are obtained, one can then determine the probability of any finite logical combination, and in particular, various probabilistic distance measures among the events. A basic application of REA is to test hypotheses for the similarity of distinct models attempting to describe the same events such as in data fusion and combination of evidence. This paper considers new motivation for the use of REA, as well as a more general decision-making framework where system performance and redundancy / consistency tradeoffs are considered.

  14. Generality of a congruity effect in judgements of relative order.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yang S; Chan, Michelle; Caplan, Jeremy B

    2014-10-01

    The judgement of relative order (JOR) procedure is used to investigate serial-order memory. Measuring response times, the wording of the instructions (whether the earlier or the later item was designated as the target) reversed the direction of search in subspan lists (Chan, Ross, Earle, & Caplan Psychonomic Bulletin & Review, 16(5), 945-951, 2009). If a similar congruity effect applied to above-span lists and, furthermore, with error rate as the measure, this could suggest how to model order memory across scales. Participants performed JORs on lists of nouns (Experiment 1: list lengths = 4, 6, 8, 10) or consonants (Experiment 2: list lengths = 4, 8). In addition to the usual distance, primacy, and recency effects, instructions interacted with serial position of the later probe in both experiments, not only in response time, but also in error rate, suggesting that availability, not just accessibility, is affected by instructions. The congruity effect challenges current memory models. We fitted Hacker's (Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Learning and Memory, 6(6), 651-675, 1980) self-terminating search model to our data and found that a switch in search direction could explain the congruity effect for short lists, but not longer lists. This suggests that JORs may need to be understood via direct-access models, adapted to produce a congruity effect, or a mix of mechanisms.

  15. A Bayesian goodness of fit test and semiparametric generalization of logistic regression with measurement data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schörgendorfer, Angela; Branscum, Adam J; Hanson, Timothy E

    2013-06-01

    Logistic regression is a popular tool for risk analysis in medical and population health science. With continuous response data, it is common to create a dichotomous outcome for logistic regression analysis by specifying a threshold for positivity. Fitting a linear regression to the nondichotomized response variable assuming a logistic sampling model for the data has been empirically shown to yield more efficient estimates of odds ratios than ordinary logistic regression of the dichotomized endpoint. We illustrate that risk inference is not robust to departures from the parametric logistic distribution. Moreover, the model assumption of proportional odds is generally not satisfied when the condition of a logistic distribution for the data is violated, leading to biased inference from a parametric logistic analysis. We develop novel Bayesian semiparametric methodology for testing goodness of fit of parametric logistic regression with continuous measurement data. The testing procedures hold for any cutoff threshold and our approach simultaneously provides the ability to perform semiparametric risk estimation. Bayes factors are calculated using the Savage-Dickey ratio for testing the null hypothesis of logistic regression versus a semiparametric generalization. We propose a fully Bayesian and a computationally efficient empirical Bayesian approach to testing, and we present methods for semiparametric estimation of risks, relative risks, and odds ratios when parametric logistic regression fails. Theoretical results establish the consistency of the empirical Bayes test. Results from simulated data show that the proposed approach provides accurate inference irrespective of whether parametric assumptions hold or not. Evaluation of risk factors for obesity shows that different inferences are derived from an analysis of a real data set when deviations from a logistic distribution are permissible in a flexible semiparametric framework. © 2013, The International Biometric

  16. The speed of gravity in general relativity and theoretical interpretation of the Jovian deflection experiment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kopeikin, Sergei M

    2004-01-01

    According to Einstein, the notions of geodesic, parallel transport (affine connection) and curvature of the spacetime manifold have a pure geometric origin and do not correlate with any electromagnetic concepts. At the same time, curvature is generated by matter which is not affiliated with the spacetime geometric concepts. For this reason, the fundamental constant c entering the geometric and matter sectors of the general theory of relativity has different conceptual meanings. Specifically, the letter c on the left-hand side of the Einstein equations (geometric sector) entering the Christoffel symbols and its time derivatives is the ultimate speed of gravity characterizing the upper limit on the speed of its propagation as well as the maximal rate of change of time derivatives of the metric tensor, that is gravitational field. The letter c on the right-hand side of the Einstein equations (matter sector) is the maximal speed of propagation of any other field rather than gravity. Einstein's general principle of relativity extends his principle of special relativity and equates the numerical value of the ultimate speed of gravity to that of the speed of light in the special theory of relativity but this general principle must be tested experimentally. To this end, we work out the speed of gravity parametrization of the Einstein equations (c g -parametrization) to keep track of the time-dependent effects associated with the geometric sector of general relativity and to separate them from the time-dependent effects of the matter sector. Parametrized post-Newtonian (PPN) approximation of the Einstein equations is derived in order to explain the gravitational physics of the Jovian deflection VLBI experiment conducted on 8 September 2002. The post-Newtonian series expansion in the c g -parametrized general relativity is with respect to a small parameter that is proportional to the ratio of the characteristic velocity of the bodies to the speed of propagation of the

  17. 77 FR 47922 - Publication of General Licenses Related to the Burma Sanctions Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-10

    ... DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Foreign Assets Control Publication of General Licenses Related to the Burma Sanctions Program AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION: Notice, publication of general licenses. [[Page 47923

  18. 21 March 2011 - South African Ministry of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Director General P. Mjwara signing the guest with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser J. Ellis and ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and J. Cleymans; in the CERN control centre with R. Steerenberg; visiting ALICE surface exhibition with P. Giubellino and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2011-01-01

    21 March 2011 - South African Ministry of Science and Technology, Department of Science and Technology (DST) Director General P. Mjwara signing the guest with Head of International Relations F. Pauss and Adviser J. Ellis and ALICE Collaboration Spokesperson P. Giubellino and J. Cleymans; in the CERN control centre with R. Steerenberg; visiting ALICE surface exhibition with P. Giubellino and LHC superconducting magnet test hall with L. Bottura.

  19. Iz ''general relativity'' necessary for the Einstein gravitation theory gravitation theory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bondi, G.

    1982-01-01

    Main principles of relativity and gravitation theories are deeply analyzed. Problems of boundaries of applicability for these theories and possible ways of their change and generalization are discussed. It is shown that the notion of general relativity does not introduce any post-newton physics - it only deals with coordinate transformations. It is supposed that ''general relativity'' is a physically senseless phrase which can be considered only as a historical remainder of an interesting philosophic discourse. The paper reveals that there exists appropriate physical substantiation of the Einstein gravitation theory not including a physically senseless concept of general relativity and promoting its fundamental relations with the experiment

  20. Topics in the Foundations of General Relativity and Newtonian Gravitation Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Malament, David B

    2012-01-01

    In Topics in the Foundations of General Relativity and Newtonian Gravitation Theory, David B. Malament presents the basic logical-mathematical structure of general relativity and considers a number of special topics concerning the foundations of general relativity and its relation to Newtonian gravitation theory. These special topics include the geometrized formulation of Newtonian theory (also known as Newton-Cartan theory), the concept of rotation in general relativity, and Gödel spacetime. One of the highlights of the book is a no-go theorem that can be understood to show that there is