WorldWideScience

Sample records for testing effective yukawa

  1. Flavour Geometry and Effective Yukawa Couplings in the MSSM

    CERN Document Server

    Ellis, John; Lee, Jae Sik; Pilaftsis, Apostolos

    2010-01-01

    We present a new geometric approach to the flavour decomposition of an arbitrary soft supersymmetry-breaking sector in the MSSM. Our approach is based on the geometry that results from the quark and lepton Yukawa couplings, and enables us to derive the necessary and sufficient conditions for a linearly-independent basis of matrices related to the completeness of the internal [SU(3) x U(1)]^5 flavour space. In a second step, we calculate the effective Yukawa couplings that are enhanced at large values of tan(beta) for general soft supersymmetry-breaking mass parameters. We highlight the contributions due to non-universal terms in the flavour decompositions of the sfermion mass matrices. We present numerical examples illustrating how such terms are induced by renormalization-group evolution starting from universal input boundary conditions, and demonstrate their importance for the flavour-violating effective Yukawa couplings of quarks.

  2. Effective Natural Supersymmetry from the Yukawa Deflected Mediations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-ran Liang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The natural supersymmetry (SUSY requires light (≤1 TeV stop quarks, light sbottom quark, and gluinos. The first generation of squarks can be effectively larger than several TeV which does not introduce any hierarchy problem in order to escape the constraints from LHC. In this paper we consider a Yukawa deflected mediation to realize the effective natural supersymmetry where the interactions between squarks and messengers are made natural under certain Froggatt-Nielsen U(1X charges. The first generation squarks obtain large and positive contribution from the Yukawa deflected mediation. The corresponding phenomenology and sparticle spectra are discussed in detail.

  3. Testing the supersymmetric QCD Yukawa coupling in a combined ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. In order to establish supersymmetry (SUSY) at future colliders, the identity of gauge couplings and the corresponding Yukawa couplings between gauginos, sfermi- ons and fermions needs to be verified. A first phenomenological study for determining the Yukawa coupling of the SUSY-QCD sector is presented here ...

  4. Testing the supersymmetric QCD Yukawa coupling in a combined ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The production of same-sign squarks (˜uL ˜uL, ...) is especially interesting, since it only proceeds through the diagram in the lower left of figure 1, and thus depends solely on the SUSY Yukawa coupling ˆgs. In pp collisions this process dominantly produces ˜u and ˜d squarks, in direct proportion to the quark content of.

  5. The Poynting-Robertson effect in the Newtonian potential with a Yukawa correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haranas, Ioannis; Ragos, Omiros; Gkigkitzis, Ioannis; Kotsireas, Ilias; Martz, Connor; Van Middekoop, Sheldon

    2018-01-01

    We consider a Yukawa-type gravitational potential combined with the Poynting-Robertson effect. Dust particles originating within the asteroid belt and moving on circular and elliptic trajectories are studied and expressions for the time rate of change of their orbital radii and semimajor axes, respectively, are obtained. These expressions are written in terms of basic particle parameters, namely their density and diameter. Then, they are applied to produce expressions for the time required by the dust particles to reach the orbit of Earth. For the Yukawa gravitational potential, dust particles of diameter 10^{ - 3} m in circular orbits require times of the order of 8.557 × 106 yr and for elliptic orbits of eccentricities e =0.1, 0.5 require times of 9.396 × 106 and 2.129 × 106 yr respectively to reach Earth's orbit. Finally, various cases of the Yukawa potential are studied and the corresponding particle times to reach Earth's are derived per case along with numerical results for circular and various elliptical orbits.

  6. Effective Yukawa couplings and flavor-changing Higgs boson decays at linear colliders

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielli, Emidio

    2011-01-01

    We analyze the advantages of a linear-collider program for testing a recent theoretical proposal where the Higgs-boson Yukawa couplings are radiatively generated, keeping unchanged the standard-model mechanism for electroweak-gauge-symmetry breaking. Fermion masses arise at a large energy scale through an unknown mechanism, and the standard model at the electroweak scale is regarded as an effective field theory. In this scenario, Higgs boson decays into photons and electroweak gauge-boson pairs are considerably enhanced for a light Higgs boson, which makes a signal observation at the LHC straightforward. On the other hand, the clean environment of a linear collider is required to directly probe the radiative fermionic sector of the Higgs boson couplings. Also, we show that the flavor-changing Higgs-boson decays are dramatically enhanced with respect to the standard model. In particular, we find a measurable branching ratio in the range (10^{-4}-10^{-3}) for the decay H\\to bs for a Higgs boson lighter than 140...

  7. Three-loop Standard Model effective potential at leading order in strong and top Yukawa couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, Stephen P. [Santa Barbara, KITP

    2014-01-08

    I find the three-loop contribution to the effective potential for the Standard Model Higgs field, in the approximation that the strong and top Yukawa couplings are large compared to all other couplings, using dimensional regularization with modified minimal subtraction. Checks follow from gauge invariance and renormalization group invariance. I also briefly comment on the special problems posed by Goldstone boson contributions to the effective potential, and on the numerical impact of the result on the relations between the Higgs vacuum expectation value, mass, and self-interaction coupling.

  8. Three-dimensional noncommutative Yukawa theory: Induced effective action and propagating modes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bufalo, R.; Ghasemkhani, M.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we establish the analysis of noncommutative Yukawa theory, encompassing neutral and charged scalar fields. We approach the analysis by considering carefully the derivation of the respective effective actions. Hence, based on the obtained results, we compute the one-loop contributions to the neutral and charged scalar field self-energy, as well as to the Chern-Simons polarization tensor. In order to properly define the behavior of the quantum fields, the known UV/IR mixing due to radiative corrections is analyzed in the one-loop physical dispersion relation of the scalar and gauge fields.

  9. TESTING YUKAWA-LIKE POTENTIALS FROM f(R)-GRAVITY IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Napolitano, N. R. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomico di Capodimonte, Salita Moiariello, 16, 80131-Napoli (Italy); Capozziello, S.; Capaccioli, M. [Dipartimento di Scienze Fisiche, Universita di Napoli ' Federico II' , Napoli (Italy); Romanowsky, A. J. [UCO/Lick Observatory, University of California, Santa Cruz, CA 95064 (United States); Tortora, C., E-mail: napolita@na.astro.it [Institut fuer Theoretische Physik, Universitaet Zuerich, Winterthurerstrasse 190, CH-8057, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2012-04-01

    We present the first analysis of extended stellar kinematics of elliptical galaxies where a Yukawa-like correction to the Newtonian gravitational potential derived from f(R)-gravity is considered as an alternative to dark matter. In this framework, we model long-slit data and planetary nebula data out to 7 R{sub eff} of three galaxies with either decreasing or flat dispersion profiles. We use the corrected Newtonian potential in a dispersion-kurtosis Jeans analysis to account for the mass-anisotropy degeneracy. We find that these modified potentials are able to fit nicely all three elliptical galaxies and the anisotropy distribution is consistent with that estimated if a dark halo is considered. The parameter which measures the 'strength' of the Yukawa-like correction is, on average, smaller than the one found previously in spiral galaxies and correlates both with the scale length of the Yukawa-like term and the orbital anisotropy.

  10. TESTING YUKAWA-LIKE POTENTIALS FROM f(R)-GRAVITY IN ELLIPTICAL GALAXIES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napolitano, N. R.; Capozziello, S.; Capaccioli, M.; Romanowsky, A. J.; Tortora, C.

    2012-01-01

    We present the first analysis of extended stellar kinematics of elliptical galaxies where a Yukawa-like correction to the Newtonian gravitational potential derived from f(R)-gravity is considered as an alternative to dark matter. In this framework, we model long-slit data and planetary nebula data out to 7 R eff of three galaxies with either decreasing or flat dispersion profiles. We use the corrected Newtonian potential in a dispersion-kurtosis Jeans analysis to account for the mass-anisotropy degeneracy. We find that these modified potentials are able to fit nicely all three elliptical galaxies and the anisotropy distribution is consistent with that estimated if a dark halo is considered. The parameter which measures the 'strength' of the Yukawa-like correction is, on average, smaller than the one found previously in spiral galaxies and correlates both with the scale length of the Yukawa-like term and the orbital anisotropy.

  11. Yukawa Tomonaga and nuclear physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Udagawa, Takeshi

    2006-01-01

    Yukawa and Tomonaga made epoch-making contributions to the development of elementary particle physics; Yukawa proposed the meson theory of the nuclear force and Tomonaga developed renormalization theory in QED. The nuclear force is, of course, the basis of all nuclear physics. In this sense, Yukawa's work set the foundations for nuclear physics. Tomonaga worked in his late years on problems of collective motion appearing in many many-particle-systems, nuclear systems being one of the examples. Yukawa and Tomonaga were also deeply involved in founding the Institute of Fundamental Physics and Institute for Nuclear Study, through which they made invaluable contributions to the development of the field of nuclear physics. It is almost impossible to report in this short article on all of what they have achieved and thus I would like to discuss here their contributions to nuclear physics only in a limited scope, based on my personal reminiscence of them. (author)

  12. The phase structure of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model for small and for large values of the Yukawa coupling constant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhold, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    We consider a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model based on the Neuberger overlap operator D{sup (ov)}. As a first step towards the eventual determination of Higgs mass bounds we study the phase diagram of the model analytically in the large N{sub f}-limit. We present an expression for the effective potential at tree-level in the regime of small Yukawa and quartic coupling constants and determine the order of the phase transitions. In the case of strong Yukawa couplings the model effectively becomes an O(4)-symmetric non-linear {sigma}-model for all values of the quartic coupling constant. This leads to the existence of a symmetric phase also in the regime of large values of the Yukawa coupling constant. On finite and small lattices, however, strong finite volume effects prevent the expectation value of the Higgs field from vanishing thus obscuring the existence of the symmetric phase at strong Yukawa couplings. (orig.)

  13. Probing light-quark Yukawa couplings via hadronic event shapes at lepton colliders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jun

    2018-01-01

    We propose a novel idea for probing the Higgs boson couplings through the measurement of hadronic event shape distributions in the decay of the Higgs boson at lepton colliders. The method provides a unique test of the Higgs boson couplings and of QCD effects in the decay of the Higgs boson. It can be used to probe the Yukawa couplings of the light quarks and to further test the mechanism of electroweak symmetry breaking. From a case study for the proposed Circular Electron-Positron Collider, assuming a hypothesis of SM-like theory, light-quark couplings with a strength greater than 9% of the bottom-quark Yukawa coupling in the standard model can be excluded.

  14. SU(5) orientifolds, Yukawa couplings, Stringy Instantons and Proton Decay

    CERN Document Server

    Kiritsis, Elias; Schellekens, Bert; 10.1016

    2009-01-01

    We construct a large class of SU(5) orientifold vacua with tadpole cancellation both for the standard and the flipped case. We give a general analysis of superpotential couplings up to quartic order in orientifold vacua and identify the properties of needed Yukawa couplings as well as the baryon number violating couplings. We point out that successful generation of the perturbatively forbidden Yukawa couplings entails a generically disastrous rate for proton decay from an associated quartic term in the superpotential, generated from the same instanton effects. This problem seems generic and may appear in F-theory vacua as well. We search for the appropriate instanton effects that generate the missing Yukawa couplings in the SU(5) vacua we constructed and find them in a small subset of them.

  15. Nuclear interaction potential in a folded-Yukawa model with diffuse densities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Randrup, J.

    1975-09-01

    The folded-Yukawa model for the nuclear interaction potential is generalized to diffuse density distributions which are generated by folding a Yukawa function into sharp generating distributions. The effect of a finite density diffuseness or of a finite interaction range is studied. The Proximity Formula corresponding to the generalized model is derived and numerical comparison is made with the exact results. (8 figures)

  16. Isothermal equation of state of three dimensional Yukawa gas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Manish K.; Avinash, K.; Mukherjee, Rupak; Ganesh, R.

    2017-11-01

    Molecular Dynamics (MD) simulations are carried out to examine the effect of particle confinement on the pressure of 3D Yukawa gas. Confinement effects are taken into account by using perfectly reflecting boundary conditions in MD simulations. An equation of state relating pressure to number density is obtained. The results of the MD simulations show that in the weak coupling regime, pressure of confined Yukawa gas is much larger than the kinetic pressure and scales quadratically with number density. The results are compared with earlier theories and experiments which show quadratic scaling of dust pressure with density.

  17. Flavor cosmology: dynamical yukawas in the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldes, Iason; Konstandin, Thomas [DESY,Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, D-22607 (Germany); Servant, Géraldine [DESY,Notkestraße 85, Hamburg, D-22607 (Germany); II. Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Hamburg,Luruper Chaussee 149, Hamburg, D-22761 (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    Can the cosmological dynamics responsible for settling down the present values of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix be related to electroweak symmetry breaking? If the Standard Model Yukawa couplings varied in the early universe and started with order one values before electroweak symmetry breaking, the CP violation associated with the CKM matrix could be the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry. The large effective Yukawa couplings which lead to the enhanced CP violation can also help in achieving a strong first-order electroweak phase transition. We study in detail the feasibility of this idea by implementing dynamical Yukawa couplings in the context of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss two main realizations of such a mechanism, related phenomenology, cosmological and collider bounds, and provide an estimate of the baryonic yield. A generic prediction is that this scenario always features a new scalar field below the electroweak scale. We point out ways to get around this conclusion.

  18. Flavor cosmology. Dynamical Yukawas in the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldes, Iason; Konstandin, Thomas [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Servant, Geraldine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2016-12-02

    Can the cosmological dynamics responsible for settling down the present values of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix be related to electroweak symmetry breaking? If the Standard Model Yukawa couplings varied in the early universe and started with order one values before electroweak symmetry breaking, the CP violation associated with the CKM matrix could be the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry. The large effective Yukawa couplings which lead to the enhanced CP violation can also help in achieving a strong first-order electroweak phase transition. We study in detail the feasibility of this idea by implementing dynamical Yukawa couplings in the context of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss two main realizations of such a mechanism, related phenomenology, cosmological and collider bounds, and provide an estimate of the baryonic yield. A generic prediction is that this scenario always features a new scalar field below the electroweak scale. We point out ways to get around this conclusion.

  19. Flavor cosmology: dynamical yukawas in the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldes, Iason; Konstandin, Thomas; Servant, Géraldine

    2016-12-01

    Can the cosmological dynamics responsible for settling down the present values of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix be related to electroweak symmetry breaking? If the Standard Model Yukawa couplings varied in the early universe and started with order one values before electroweak symmetry breaking, the CP violation associated with the CKM matrix could be the origin of the matter-antimatter asymmetry. The large effective Yukawa couplings which lead to the enhanced CP violation can also help in achieving a strong first-order electroweak phase transition. We study in detail the feasibility of this idea by implementing dynamical Yukawa couplings in the context of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism. We discuss two main realizations of such a mechanism, related phenomenology, cosmological and collider bounds, and provide an estimate of the baryonic yield. A generic prediction is that this scenario always features a new scalar field below the electroweak scale. We point out ways to get around this conclusion.

  20. Radiative Yukawa couplings in the simplest left-right symmetric model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielli, Emidio; Marzola, Luca; Raidal, Martti

    2017-02-01

    We revisit a recent solution to the flavor hierarchy problem based on the paradigm that Yukawa couplings are, rather than fundamental constants, effective low energy couplings radiatively generated by interactions in a hidden sector of the theory. In the present paper we show that the setup required by this scenario can be set by gauge invariance alone, provided that the standard model gauge group be extended to the left-right symmetric group of S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )Y. The simplest scheme in which Yukawa couplings are forbidden at the tree-level organises the right-handed fermions into doublets and presents an additional Higgs S U (2 )R doublet, responsible for the spontaneous breaking of the S U (2 )R gauge sector. The flavor and chiral symmetry breaking induced by the S U (2 )R breaking is transferred at the one-loop level to the standard model via the dynamics of the hidden sector, which effectively regulates the spread of the effective Yukawa couplings. The emerging left-right symmetric framework recovers additional appealing features typical of these models, allowing for instance to identify the hypercharges of the involved fermions with their B -L charges and offering a straightforward solution to the strong C P problem. The scheme gives rise to a distinguishing phenomenology that potentially can be tested at the LHC and future colliders through the same interactions that result in the radiative generation of Yukawa couplings, as well as by exploiting the properties of the additional S U (2 )R Higgs doublet.

  1. From the Yukawa Particle to the QGCW

    CERN Document Server

    Zichichi, A

    2008-01-01

    The remarkable consequences of the Yukawa particle, theoretically proposed in 1935, are reviewed. The production, the decay and the intrinsic structure of the Yukawa particle opened new frontiers with laws and regularities which brought us to the discovery of subnuclear physics and now to the Quark-Gluon-Coloured-World (QGCW).

  2. Structural and dynamical properties of Yukawa balls

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Block, D; Kroll, M; Arp, O; Piel, A; Kaeding, S; Ivanov, Y; Melzer, A; Henning, C; Baumgartner, H; Ludwig, P; Bonitz, M

    2007-01-01

    To study the structural and dynamical properties of finite 3D dust clouds (Yukawa balls) new diagnostic tools have been developed. This contribution describes the progress towards 3D diagnostics for measuring the particle positions. It is shown that these diagnostics are capable of investigating the structural and dynamical properties of Yukawa balls and gaining insight into their basic construction principles

  3. Yukawa Bound States and Their LHC Phenomenology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enkhbat Tsedenbaljir

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We present the current status on the possible bound states of extra generation quarks. These include phenomenology and search strategy at the LHC. If chiral fourth-generation quarks do exist their strong Yukawa couplings, implied by current experimental lower bound on their masses, may lead to formation of bound states. Due to nearly degenerate 4G masses suggested by Precision Electroweak Test one can employ “heavy isospin” symmetry to classify possible spectrum. Among these states, the color-octet isosinglet vector ω 8 is the easiest to be produced at the LHC. The discovery potential and corresponding decay channels are covered in this paper. With possible light Higgs at ~125 GeV two-Higgs doublet version is briefly discussed.

  4. Higgs Pair Production as a Signal of Enhanced Yukawa Couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bauer, Martin [Heidelberg U.; Carena, Marcela [Chicago U., KICP; Carmona, Adrián [U. Mainz, PRISMA

    2017-12-31

    We present a non-trivial correlation between the enhancement of the Higgs-fermion couplings and the Higgs pair production cross section in two Higgs doublet models with a flavour symmetry. This symmetry suppresses flavour-changing neutral couplings of the Higgs boson and allows for a partial explanation of the hierarchy in the Yukawa sector. After taking into account the constraints from electroweak precision measurements, Higgs coupling strength measurements, and unitarity and perturbativity bounds, we identify an interesting region of parameter space leading to enhanced Yukawa couplings as well as enhanced di-Higgs gluon fusion production at the LHC reach. This effect is visible in both the resonant and non-resonant contributions to the Higgs pair production cross section. We encourage dedicated searches based on differential distributions as a novel way to indirectly probe enhanced Higgs couplings to light fermions.

  5. Universal Seesaw Mechanism with Universal Strength for Yukawa Couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Shinohara, T; Sogami, I S

    1998-01-01

    Hypotheses of universal seesaw mechanism and universal strength for Yukawa couplings are applied to explain one possible origin of quasi-democratic mass matrices of special type in a left-right symmetric model with the gauge group $SU(3)_c\\times SU(2)_L\\times SU(2)_R\\times U(1)$. Two kinds of Higgs doublets are postulated to mediate scalar interactions between $i$-th generation of light fermion doublets and $j$-th generation of heavy fermion singlets with relative Yukawa coupling constants of exponential form $e^{i\\phi_{ij}}$, where $\\phi_{ij}$ are real phase constants. The lowest seesaw approximation results effectively in self-adjoint mass matrices which are quasi-democratic and have same diagonal elements. A set of values for parameters $\\phi_{ij}$ is found which reproduces well the present experimental data for the absolute values of the CKM matrix elements, the Jarlskog parameter and the Wolfenstein parameters.

  6. Probes of Yukawa unification in supersymmetric SO(10) models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westhoff, Susanne

    2009-10-23

    This work is composed as follows: In Chapter 1, the disposed reader is made familiar with the foundations of flavourphysics and Grand Unification, including group-theoretical aspects of SO(10). In Chapter 2, we introduce a specific supersymmetric GUT model based on SO(10) and designed to probe down-quark-lepton Yukawa unification. Within this framework we explore the effects of large atmospheric neutrino mixing in bottom-strange transitions on the mass difference and CP phase in B{sub s}- anti B{sub s} meson mixing. Chapter 3 is devoted to corrections to Yukawa unification. We derive constraints on Yukawa corrections for light fermions from K- anti K and B{sub d}- anti B {sub d} mixing. As an application we study implications of neutrino mixing effects in CP-violating K and B{sub d} observables on the unitrity triangle. Finally, in Chapter 4, we discuss effects of large tan {beta} in B{yields}(D){tau}{nu} decays with respect to their potential to discover charged Higgs bosons and to discriminate between different GUT models of flavour.

  7. Indirect handle on the down-quark Yukawa coupling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goertz, Florian

    2014-12-31

    To measure the Yukawa couplings of the up and down quarks, Yu,d, seems to be far beyond the capabilities of current and (near) future experiments in particle physics. By performing a general analysis of the potential misalignment between quark masses and Yukawa couplings, we derive predictions for the magnitude of induced flavor-changing neutral currents (FCNCs), depending on the shift in the physical Yukawa coupling of first-generation quarks. We find that a change of more than 50% in Yd would generically result in ds transitions in conflict with kaon physics. This could already be seen as evidence for a nonvanishing direct coupling of the down quark to the newly discovered Higgs boson. The nonobservation of certain--already well-constrained--processes is thus turned into a powerful indirect measure of otherwise basically unaccessible physical parameters of the effective standard model. Similarly, improvements in limits on FCNCs in the up-type quark sector can lead to valuable information on Yu.

  8. Study of the Higgs-Yukawa theory in the strong-Yukawa coupling regime

    CERN Document Server

    Bulava, John; Hou, George W.S.; Jansen, Karl; Knippschild, Bastian; Lin, C.J.David; Nagai, Kei-Ichi; Nagy, Attila; Ogawa, Kenji; Smigielski, Brian

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we present an ongoing lattice study of the Higgs-Yukawa model, in the regime of strong-Yukawa coupling, using overlap fermions. We investigated the phase structure in this regime by computing the Higgs vacuum expectation value, and by exploring the finite-size scaling behaviour of the susceptibility corresponding to the magnetisation. Our preliminary results indicate the existence of a second-order phase transition when the Yukawa coupling becomes large enough, at which the Higgs vacuum expectation value vanishes and the susceptibility diverges.

  9. Superstring threshold corrections to Yukawa couplings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Antoniadis, I.; Taylor, T.R.

    1992-12-01

    A general method of computing string corrections to the Kaehler metric and Yukawa couplings is developed at the one-loop level for a general compactification of the heterotic superstring theory. It also provides a direct determination of the so-called Green-Schwarz term. The matter metric has an infrared divergent part which reproduces the field-theoretical anomalous dimensions, and a moduli-dependent part which gives rise to threshold corrections in the physical Yukawa couplings. Explicit expressions are derived for symmetric orbifold compactifications. (author). 20 refs

  10. Renormalization Group Evolution of the Standard Model Dimension Six Operators II: Yukawa Dependence

    CERN Document Server

    Jenkins, Elizabeth E; Trott, Michael

    2014-01-01

    We calculate the complete order y^2 and y^4 terms of the 59 x 59 one-loop anomalous dimension matrix for the dimension-six operators of the Standard Model effective field theory, where y is a generic Yukawa coupling. These terms, together with the terms of order lambda, lambda^2 and lambda y^2 depending on the Standard Model Higgs self-coupling lambda which were calculated in a previous work, yield the complete one-loop anomalous dimension matrix in the limit of vanishing gauge couplings. The Yukawa contributions result in non-trivial flavor mixing in the various operator sectors of the Standard Model effective theory.

  11. The phase structure of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model. Numerical simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhold, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2007-07-15

    The phase diagram of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model is explored by means of numerical simulations. The results revealing a rich phase structure are compared to analytical large N{sub f} calculations which we performed earlier. The analytical and numerical results are in excellent agreement at large values of N{sub f}. In the opposite case the large N{sub f} computation still gives a good qualitative description of the phase diagram. In particular we find numerical evidence for the predicted ferrimagnetic phase at intermediate values of the Yukawa coupling constant and for the symmetric phase at strong Yukawa couplings. Emphasis is put on the finite size effects which can hide the existence of the latter symmetric phase. (orig.)

  12. Single particle closed orbits in Yukawa potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, R.; Sounda, S.

    2018-02-01

    Orbit of a single particle moving under the Yukawa potential is studied and there exists precessing ellipse type orbits. The amount of precession can be tuned through the coupling parameter α. With a suitable choice of the coupling parameter; we get a closed bound orbit. In some cases few petals are observed which is possessed of a closed bound nature for suitably chosen coupling parameter. Threshold energy has also been calculated for bound orbits.

  13. Yukawa particles in a confining potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Girotto, Matheus, E-mail: matheus.girotto@ufrgs.br; Levin, Yan, E-mail: levin@if.ufrgs.br [Instituto de Física, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Caixa Postal 15051, CEP 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Santos, Alexandre P. dos, E-mail: alexandreps@ufcspa.edu.br [Departamento de Educação e Informação em Saúde, Universidade Federal de Ciências da Saúde de Porto Alegre, 90050-170, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina, 88040-900, Florianópolis, Santa Catarina (Brazil); Colla, Thiago, E-mail: thiago.colla@ufrgs.br [Faculty of Physics, University of Vienna, Boltzmanngasse 5, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2014-07-07

    We study the density distribution of repulsive Yukawa particles confined by an external potential. In the weak coupling limit, we show that the mean-field theory is able to accurately account for the particle distribution. In the strong coupling limit, the correlations between the particles become important and the mean-field theory fails. For strongly correlated systems, we construct a density functional theory which provides an excellent description of the particle distribution, without any adjustable parameters.

  14. Application of the Optimized Baxter Model to the hard-core attractive Yukawa system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, P.; Pamies, J.C.; Odijk, Th.; Frenkel, D.

    2006-01-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations on the hard-core attractive Yukawa system to test the Optimized Baxter Model that was introduced in [P.Prinsen and T. Odijk, J. Chem. Phys. 121, p.6525 (2004)] to study a fluid phase of spherical particles interacting through a short-range pair potential. We

  15. Application of the optimized Baxter model to the hard-core attractive Yukawa system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prinsen, P.; Pàmies, J.C.; Odijk, T.; Frenkel, D.

    2006-01-01

    We perform Monte Carlo simulations on the hard-core attractive Yukawa system to test the optimized Baxter model that was introduced by Prinsen and Odijk [J. Chem. Phys. 121, 6525 (2004) ] to study a fluid phase of spherical particles interacting through a short-range pair potential. We compare the

  16. Impact of generalized Yukawa interactions on the lower Higgs-mass bound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gies, Holger [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Jena (Germany); Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Abbe Center of Photonics, Jena (Germany); Helmholtz-Institut Jena, Jena (Germany); Sondenheimer, Rene [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Jena (Germany); Warschinke, Matthias [Friedrich-Schiller-Universitaet Jena, Theoretisch-Physikalisches Institut, Jena (Germany); Chiba University, Department of Physics, Graduate School of Science, Chiba (Japan)

    2017-11-15

    We investigate the impact of operators of higher canonical dimension on the lower Higgs-mass consistency bound by means of generalized Higgs-Yukawa interactions. Analogously to higher-order operators in the bare Higgs potential in an effective field theory approach, the inclusion of higher-order Yukawa interactions, e.g., φ{sup 3} anti ψψ, leads to a diminishing of the lower Higgs-mass bound and thus to a shift of the scale of new physics towards larger scales by a few orders of magnitude without introducing a metastability in the effective Higgs potential. We observe that similar renormalization group mechanisms near the weak-coupling fixed point are at work in both generalizations of the microscopic action. Thus, a combination of higher-dimensional operators with generalized Higgs as well as Yukawa interactions does not lead to an additive shift of the lower mass bound, but it relaxes the consistency bounds found recently only slightly. On the method side, we clarify the convergence properties of different projection and expansion schemes for the Yukawa potential used in the functional renormalization group literature so far. (orig.)

  17. Yukawa sector of minimal SO(10) unification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Babu, K.S. [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University,Stillwater, OK, 74078 (United States); Bajc, Borut [Jožef Stefan Institute,Ljubljana, 1000 (Slovenia); Saad, Shaikh [Department of Physics, Oklahoma State University,Stillwater, OK, 74078 (United States)

    2017-02-28

    We show that in SO(10) models, a Yukawa sector consisting of a real 10{sub H}, a real 120{sub H} and a complex 126{sub H} of Higgs fields can provide a realistic fit to all fermion masses and mixings, including the neutrino sector. Although the group theory of SO(10) demands that the 10{sub H} and 120{sub H} be real, most constructions complexify these fields and impose symmetries exterior to SO(10) to achieve predictivity. The proposed new framework with real10{sub H} and real120{sub H} relies only on SO(10) gauge symmetry, and yet has a limited number of Yukawa parameters. Our analysis shows that while there are restrictions on the observables, a good fit to the entire fermion spectrum can be realized. Unification of gauge couplings is achieved with an intermediate scale Pati-Salam gauge symmetry. Proton decay branching ratios are calculable, with the leading decay modes being p→ν̄π{sup +} and p→e{sup +}π{sup 0}.

  18. Electric dipole moments from Yukawa phases in supersymmetric theories

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Romanino, A.; Strumia, A.

    1997-01-01

    We study quark and electron EDMs generated by Yukawa couplings in supersymmetric models with different gauge groups, using the EDM properties under flavour transformations. In the MSSM (or if soft terms are mediated below the unification scale) the one-loop contributions to the neutron EDM are smaller than in previous computations based on numerical methods, although increasing as tan 3 β. A neutron EDM close to the experimental limits can be generated in SU(5), if tan β is large, through the u-quark EDM d u , proportional to tan 4 β. This effect has to be taken into account also in SO(10) with large tan β, where d u is comparable to the d quark EDM, proportional to tan β. (orig.)

  19. Calogero model with Yukawa-like interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kessabi, Mohammed; Saidi, El Hassan; Sebbata, Hanane

    2006-01-01

    We study an extension of one-dimensional Calogero model involving strongly coupled and electrically charged particles. Besides Calogero term g2x 2 , there is an extra factor described by a Yukawa-like coupling modeling short distance interactions. Mimicking Calogero analysis and using developments in formal series of the wave function Ψ(x) factorized as x - bar Φ(x) with -bar (-bar -1)=g, we develop a technique to approach the spectrum of the generalized system and show that information on full spectrum is captured by Φ(x) and Φ ' '(x) at the singular point x=0 of the potential. Convergence of ∫dx|Ψ(x)| 2 requires -bar >-12 and is shown to be sensitive to the zero mode of Φ(x) at x=0

  20. Constraining Light-Quark Yukawa Couplings from Higgs Distributions

    CERN Document Server

    Bishara, Fady

    2017-03-20

    We propose a novel strategy to constrain the bottom and charm Yukawa couplings by exploiting LHC measurements of transverse momentum distributions in Higgs production. Our method does not rely on the reconstruction of exclusive final states or heavy-flavour tagging. Compared to other proposals it leads to an enhanced sensitivity to the Yukawa couplings due to distortions of the differential Higgs spectra from emissions which either probe quark loops or are associated to quark-initiated production. We derive constraints using data from LHC Run I, and we explore the prospects of our method at future LHC runs. Finally, we comment on the possibility of bounding the strange Yukawa coupling.

  1. Indeterminacy points for superposed Yukawa and Gauss potentials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choubey, Jyoti; Sharma, L.K.

    1981-01-01

    Eigenenergy expansion for the superposition of Yukawa and Gauss potentials for calculating the first indeterminacy points is derived. Behaviour of Regge trajectories for the superposed potential is also studied. (author)

  2. Holomorphic Yukawa couplings for complete intersection Calabi-Yau manifolds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blesneag, Stefan [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford University,1 Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom); Buchbinder, Evgeny I. [The University of Western Australia,35 Stirling Highway, Crawley WA 6009 (Australia); Lukas, Andre [Rudolf Peierls Centre for Theoretical Physics, Oxford University,1 Keble Road, Oxford, OX1 3NP (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-27

    We develop methods to compute holomorphic Yukawa couplings for heterotic compactifications on complete intersection Calabi-Yau manifolds, generalising results of an earlier paper for Calabi-Yau hypersurfaces. Our methods are based on constructing the required bundle-valued forms explicitly and evaluating the relevant integrals over the projective ambient space. We also show how our approach relates to an earlier, algebraic one to calculate the holomorphic Yukawa couplings. A vanishing theorem, which we prove, implies that certain Yukawa couplings allowed by low-energy symmetries are zero due to topological reasons. To illustrate our methods, we calculate Yukawa couplings for SU(5)-based standard models on a co-dimension two complete intersection manifold.

  3. Renormalization-group flows and fixed points in Yukawa theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Esben; Shrock, R.

    2014-01-01

    We study renormalization-group flows in Yukawa theories with massless fermions, including determination of fixed points and curves that separate regions of different flow behavior. We assess the reliability of perturbative calculations for various values of Yukawa coupling y and quartic scalar....... In the regime of weak couplings where the perturbative calculations are most reliable, we find that the theories have no nontrivial fixed points, and the flow is toward a free theory in the infrared....

  4. Discriminating leptonic Yukawa interactions with doubly charged scalar at the ILC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi; Yokoya, Hiroshi

    2018-04-01

    We explore discrimination of two types of leptonic Yukawa interactions associated with Higgs triplet, LbarLc ΔLL, and with SU (2) singlet doubly charged scalar, ebarRc k++eR. These interactions can be distinguished by measuring the effects of doubly charged scalar boson exchange in the e+e- →ℓ+ℓ- processes at polarized electron-positron colliders. We study a forward-backward asymmetry of scattering angular distribution to estimate the sensitivity for these effects at the ILC. In addition, we investigate prospects of upper bounds on the Yukawa couplings by combining the constraints of lepton flavor violation processes and the e+e- →ℓ+ℓ- processes at the LEP and the ILC.

  5. Numerical experiment of thermal conductivity in two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shahzad, Aamir, E-mail: aamirshahzad-8@hotmail.com [Key Laboratory of Thermo-Fluid Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China); Department of Physics, Government College University Faisalabad (GCUF), Allama Iqbal Road, Faisalabad 38000 (Pakistan); He, Mao-Gang, E-mail: mghe@mail.xjtu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Thermo-Fluid Science and Engineering, Ministry of Education (MOE), Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an 710049 (China)

    2015-12-15

    A newly improved homogenous nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (HNEMDS) method, proposed by the Evans, has been used to compute the thermal conductivity of two-dimensional (2D) strongly coupled complex (dusty) plasma liquids (SCCDPLs), for the first time. The effects of equilibrium external field strength along with different system sizes and plasma states (Γ, κ) on the thermal conductivity of SCCDPLs have been calculated using an enhanced HNEMDS method. A simple analytical temperature representation of Yukawa 2D thermal conductivity with appropriate normalized frequencies (plasma and Einstein) has also been calculated. The new HNEMDS algorithm shows that the present method provides more accurate results with fast convergence and small size effects over a wide range of plasma states. The presented thermal conductivity obtained from HNEMDS method is found to be in very good agreement with that obtained through the previously known numerical simulations and experimental results for 2D Yukawa liquids (SCCDPLs) and with the three-dimensional nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulation (MDS) and equilibrium MDS calculations. It is shown that the HNEMDS algorithm is a powerful tool, making the calculations very efficient and can be used to predict the thermal conductivity in 2D Yukawa liquid systems.

  6. Vectorlike particles, Z‧ and Yukawa unification in F-theory inspired E6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karozas, Athanasios; Leontaris, George K.; Shafi, Qaisar

    2018-03-01

    We explore the low energy implications of an F-theory inspired E6 model whose breaking yields, in addition to the MSSM gauge symmetry, a Z‧ gauge boson associated with a U (1) symmetry broken at the TeV scale. The zero mode spectrum of the effective low energy theory is derived from the decomposition of the 27 and 27 ‾ representations of E6 and we parametrise their multiplicities in terms of a minimum number of flux parameters. We perform a two-loop renormalisation group analysis of the gauge and Yukawa couplings of the effective theory model and estimate lower bounds on the new vectorlike particles predicted in the model. We compute the third generation Yukawa couplings in an F-theory context assuming an E8 point of enhancement and express our results in terms of the local flux densities associated with the gauge symmetry breaking. We find that their values are compatible with the ones computed by the renormalisation group equations, and we identify points in the parameter space of the flux densities where the t - b - τ Yukawa couplings unify.

  7. Constraining Light-Quark Yukawa Couplings from Higgs Distributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishara, Fady; Haisch, Ulrich; Monni, Pier Francesco; Re, Emanuele

    2017-03-24

    We propose a novel strategy to constrain the bottom and charm Yukawa couplings by exploiting Large Hadron Collider (LHC) measurements of transverse momentum distributions in Higgs production. Our method does not rely on the reconstruction of exclusive final states or heavy-flavor tagging. Compared to other proposals, it leads to an enhanced sensitivity to the Yukawa couplings due to distortions of the differential Higgs spectra from emissions which either probe quark loops or are associated with quark-initiated production. We derive constraints using data from LHC run I, and we explore the prospects of our method at future LHC runs. Finally, we comment on the possibility of bounding the strange Yukawa coupling.

  8. Four-Fermion Limit of Gauge-Yukawa Theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krog, Jens; Mojaza, Matin; Sannino, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    We elucidate and extend the conditions that map gauge-Yukawa theories at low energies into time-honoured gauged four-fermion interactions at high energies. These compositeness conditions permit to investigate theories of composite dynamics through gauge-Yukawa theories. Here we investigate whether...... perturbative gauge-Yukawa theories can have a strongly coupled limit at high-energy, that can be mapped into a four-fermion theory. Interestingly, we are able to precisely carve out a region of the perturbative parameter space supporting such a composite limit. This has interesting implications on our current...... view on models of particle physics. As a template model we use an $SU(N_C)$ gauge theory with $N_F$ Dirac fermions transforming according to the fundamental representation of the gauge group. The fermions further interact with a gauge singlet complex $N_F\\times N_F$ Higgs that ceases to be a physical...

  9. Measurement of the top-Yukawa coupling and the search for ttH production

    CERN Document Server

    Vasquez, Jared; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    To test whether the observed Higgs boson follows the predictions of the SM, careful study and measurement of its properties are necessary. Due to the top quark's large mass, a measurement of the top-Yukawa coupling (Y_t) is paramount to an understanding of EWSB and could provide a viable probe for new physics. While most production processes provide only an indirect measurement of Y_t via loop effects, the ttH and tH production allow for a direct tree-level measurement of the coupling strength (which could differ due to new physics contamination). The ttH process is probed through various Higgs decay channels with several advantages. The H->bb channel allows for a coupling measurement of both 3rd generation quarks while profiting from the largest Higgs branching ratio. The h->γγ channel has a much smaller branching ratio but benefits from a fine diphoton mass resolution. The process is also probed in the multilepton channel, which is targeted at the off-shell Higgs coupling of H->WW* and H->ZZ* as well as t...

  10. Baryon asymmetry from leptogenesis with four zero neutrino Yukawa textures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikary, Biswajit; Ghosal, Ambar; Roy, Probir, E-mail: biswajit.adhikary@saha.ac.in, E-mail: ambar.ghosal@saha.ac.in, E-mail: probir.roy@saha.ac.in [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2011-01-01

    The generation of the right amount of baryon asymmetry η of the Universe from supersymmetric leptogenesis is studied within the type-I seesaw framework with three heavy singlet Majorana neutrinos N{sub i} (i = 1,2,3) and their superpartners. We assume the occurrence of four zeroes in the neutrino Yukawa coupling matrix Y{sub ν}, taken to be μτ symmetric, in the weak basis where N{sub i} (with real masses M{sub i} > 0) and the charged leptons l{sub α} (α = e,μ,τ) are mass diagonal. The quadrant of the single nontrivial phase, allowed in the corresponding light neutrino mass matrix m{sub ν}, gets fixed and additional constraints ensue from the requirement of matching η with its observed value. Special attention is paid to flavor effects in the washout of the lepton asymmetry. We also comment on the role of small departures from high scale μτ symmetry due to RG evolution.

  11. Electroweak baryogenesis driven by extra top Yukawa couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuyuto, Kaori; Hou, Wei-Shu; Senaha, Eibun

    2018-01-01

    We study electroweak baryogenesis driven by the top quark in a general two Higgs doublet model with flavor-changing Yukawa couplings, keeping the Higgs potential CP invariant. With Higgs sector couplings and the additional top Yukawa coupling ρtt all of O(1), one naturally has sizable CP violation that fuels the cosmic baryon asymmetry. Even if ρtt vanishes, the favor-changing coupling ρtc can still lead to successful baryogenesis. Phenomenological consequences such as t → ch, τ → μγ electron electric dipole moment, h → γγ, and hhh coupling are discussed.

  12. Conformal Gauge-Yukawa Theories away From Four Dimensions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Codello, Alessandro; Langaeble, Kasper; Litim, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    We present the phase diagram and associated fixed points for a wide class of Gauge-Yukawa theories in $d=4+\\epsilon$ dimensions. The theories we investigate involve non-abelian gauge fields, fermions and scalars in the Veneziano-Witten limit. The analysis is performed in steps, we start with QCD...

  13. Dynamical fermion mass generation by a strong Yukawa interaction

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Brauner, Tomáš; Hošek, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 72, č. 4 (2005), 045007 ISSN 0556-2821 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LA 080; GA ČR(CZ) GD202/05/H003 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : dynamical mass generation * Yukawa interaction Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.852, year: 2005

  14. Vapour-liquid equilibria of the hard core Yukawa fluid

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit, B.; Frenkel, D.

    1991-01-01

    Techniques which extend the range of applicability of the Gibbs ensemble technique for particles which interact with a hard core potential are described. The power of the new technique is demonstrated in a numerical study of the vapour-liquid coexistence curve of the hard core Yukawa fluid.

  15. Calculation of energy spectrum of C isotope with modified Yukawa ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-12

    Sep 12, 2016 ... Abstract. In this paper, we have calculated the energy spectrum of 12C isotope in two-cluster models, 3α cluster model and 8Be + α cluster model. We use the modified Yukawa potential for interaction between the clusters and solve the Schrödinger equation using Nikiforov–Uvarov method to calculate the ...

  16. Vacuum stability of asymptotically safe gauge-Yukawa theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Litim, Daniel F.; Mojaza, Matin; Sannino, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    We study the phase diagram and the stability of the ground state for certain four-dimensional gauge-Yukawa theories whose high-energy behaviour is controlled by an interacting fixed point. We also provide analytical and numerical results for running couplings, their crossover scales, the separatrix...

  17. Electronic transport properties of 4f shell elements of liquid metal using hard sphere Yukawa system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, H. P.; Sonvane, Y. A.; Thakor, P. B.

    2018-04-01

    The electronic transport properties are analyzed for 4f shell elements of liquid metals. To examine the electronic transport properties like electrical resistivity (ρ), thermal conductivity (σ) and thermo electrical power (Q), we used our own parameter free model potential with the Hard Sphere Yukawa (HSY) reference system. The screening effect on aforesaid properties has been examined by using different screening functions like Hartree (H), Taylor (T) and Sarkar (S). The correlations of our resultsand other data with available experimental values are intensely promising. Also, we conclude that our newly constructed parameter free model potential is capable of explaining the above mentioned electronic transport properties.

  18. Fermion Wavefunctions in Magnetized branes Theta identities and Yukawa couplings

    CERN Document Server

    Antoniadis, Ignatios; Panda, Binata

    2009-01-01

    Computation of Yukawa couplings, determining superpotentials as well as the Kähler metric, with oblique (non-commuting) fluxes in magnetized brane constructions is an interesting unresolved issue, in view of the importance of such fluxes for obtaining phenomenologically viable models. In order to perform this task, fermion (scalar) wavefunctions on toroidally compactified spaces are presented for general fluxes, parameterized by Hermitian matrices with eigenvalues of arbitrary signatures. We also give explicit mappings among fermion wavefunctions, of different internal chiralities on the tori, which interchange the role of the flux components with the complex structure of the torus. By evaluating the overlap integral of the wavefunctions, we give the expressions for Yukawa couplings among chiral multiplets arising from an arbitrary set of branes (or their orientifold images). The method is based on constructing certain mathematical identities for general Riemann theta functions with matrix valued modular par...

  19. Yukawa unification in moduli-dominant SUSY breaking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khalil, S.; Tatsuo Kobayashi

    1997-07-01

    We study Yukawa in string models with moduli-dominant SUSY breaking. This type of SUSY breaking in general leads to non-universal soft masses, i.e. soft scalar masses and gaugino masses. Such non-universality is important for phenomenological aspects of Yukawa unification, i.e., successful electroweak breaking, SUSY corrections to the bottom mass and the branching ratio of b → sγ. We show three regions in the whole parameter space which lead to successful electroweak breaking and allow small SUSY corrections to the bottom mass. For these three regions we investigated the b → sγ decay and mass spectra. (author). 26 refs, 6 figs

  20. Is scale-invariance in gauge-Yukawa systems compatible with the graviton?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Nicolai; Eichhorn, Astrid; Held, Aaron

    2017-10-01

    We explore whether perturbative interacting fixed points in matter systems can persist under the impact of quantum gravity. We first focus on semisimple gauge theories and show that the leading order gravity contribution evaluated within the functional Renormalization Group framework preserves the perturbative fixed-point structure in these models discovered in [J. K. Esbensen, T. A. Ryttov, and F. Sannino, Phys. Rev. D 93, 045009 (2016)., 10.1103/PhysRevD.93.045009]. We highlight that the quantum-gravity contribution alters the scaling dimension of the gauge coupling, such that the system exhibits an effective dimensional reduction. We secondly explore the effect of metric fluctuations on asymptotically safe gauge-Yukawa systems which feature an asymptotically safe fixed point [D. F. Litim and F. Sannino, J. High Energy Phys. 12 (2014) 178., 10.1007/JHEP12(2014)178]. The same effective dimensional reduction that takes effect in pure gauge theories also impacts gauge-Yukawa systems. There, it appears to lead to a split of the degenerate free fixed point into an interacting infrared attractive fixed point and a partially ultraviolet attractive free fixed point. The quantum-gravity induced infrared fixed point moves towards the asymptotically safe fixed point of the matter system, and annihilates it at a critical value of the gravity coupling. Even after that fixed-point annihilation, graviton effects leave behind new partially interacting fixed points for the matter sector.

  1. Cosmological evolution of Yukawa couplings. The 5D perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harling, Benedict von [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Servant, Geraldine [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Hamburg Univ. (Germany). 2. Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik

    2017-02-15

    The cosmological evolution of standard model Yukawa couplings may have major implications for baryogenesis. In particular, as highlighted recently, the CKM matrix alone could be the source of CP-violation during electroweak baryogenesis provided that the Yukawa couplings were large and varied during the electroweak phase transition. We provide a natural realisation of this idea in the context of Randall-Sundrum models and show that the geometrical warped approach to the fermion mass hierarchy may naturally display the desired cosmological dynamics. The key ingredient is the coupling of the Goldberger-Wise scalar, responsible for the IR brane stabilisation, to the bulk fermions, which modifies the fermionic profiles. This also helps alleviating the usually tight constraints from CP-violation in Randall-Sundrum scenarios. We study how the Yukawa couplings vary during the stabilisation of the Randall-Sundrum geometry and can thus induce large CP-violation during the electroweak phase transition. Using holography, we discuss the 4D interpretation of this dynamical interplay between flavour and electroweak symmetry breaking.

  2. Lower Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model with overlap fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhold, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany); Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    We study the coupling parameter dependence of the Higgs boson mass in a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same Yukawa coupling structure as in the Higgs-fermion sector of the Standard Model. Eventually, the aim is to establish non-perturbative upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds derived from first principles, in particular not relying on vacuum stability considerations for the latter case. Here, we present our lattice results for the lower Higgs boson mass bound at several values of the cutoff {lambda} and compare them to corresponding analytical calculations based on the effective potential as obtained from lattice perturbation theory. Furthermore, we give a brief outlook towards the calculation of the upper Higgs boson mass bound. (orig.)

  3. Symmetries for Light-Front Quantization of Yukawa Model with Renormalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żochowski, Jan; Przeszowski, Jerzy A.

    2017-12-01

    In this work we discuss the Yukawa model with the extra term of self-interacting scalar field in D=1+3 dimensions. We present the method of derivation the light-front commutators and anti-commutators from the Heisenberg equations induced by the kinematical generating operator of the translation P+. Mentioned Heisenberg equations are the starting point for obtaining this algebra of the (anti-) commutators. Some discrepancies between existing and proposed method of quantization are revealed. The Lorentz and the CPT symmetry, together with some features of the quantum theory were applied to obtain the two-point Wightman function for the free fermions. Moreover, these Wightman functions were computed especially without referring to the Fock expansion. The Gaussian effective potential for the Yukawa model was found in the terms of the Wightman functions. It was regularized by the space-like point-splitting method. The coupling constants within the model were redefined. The optimum mass parameters remained regularization independent. Finally, the Gaussian effective potential was renormalized.

  4. Study of shear viscosity for dense plasmas by equilibrium molecular dynamics in asymmetric Yukawa ionic mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haxhimali, Tomorr; Rudd, Robert; Cabot, William; Graziani, Frank

    2015-11-01

    We present molecular dynamics (MD) calculations of shear viscosity for asymmetric mixed plasma for thermodynamic conditions relevant to astrophysical and Inertial Confinement Fusion plasmas. Specifically, we consider mixtures of deuterium and argon at temperatures of 100-500 eV and a number density of 1025 ions/cc. The motion of 30000-120000 ions is simulated in which the ions interact via the Yukawa (screened Coulomb) potential. The electric field of the electrons is included in this effective interaction. Shear viscosity is calculated using the Green-Kubo approach with an integral of the shear stress autocorrelation function, a quantity calculated in the equilibrium MD simulations. We study different mixtures with increasing fraction of the minority high-Z element (Ar) in the D-Ar plasma mixture. In the more weakly coupled plasmas, at 500 eV and low Ar fractions, results from MD compare very well with Chapman-Enskog kinetic results. We introduce a model that interpolates between a screened-plasma kinetic theory at weak coupling and the Murillo Yukawa viscosity model at higher coupling. This hybrid kinetics-MD viscosity model agrees well with the MD results over the conditions simulated. This work was performed under the auspices of the US Dept. of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  5. Perturbed Yukawa textures in the minimal seesaw model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rink, Thomas; Schmitz, Kai [Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics (MPIK),69117 Heidelberg (Germany)

    2017-03-29

    We revisit the minimal seesaw model, i.e., the type-I seesaw mechanism involving only two right-handed neutrinos. This model represents an important minimal benchmark scenario for future experimental updates on neutrino oscillations. It features four real parameters that cannot be fixed by the current data: two CP-violating phases, δ and σ, as well as one complex parameter, z, that is experimentally inaccessible at low energies. The parameter z controls the structure of the neutrino Yukawa matrix at high energies, which is why it may be regarded as a label or index for all UV completions of the minimal seesaw model. The fact that z encompasses only two real degrees of freedom allows us to systematically scan the minimal seesaw model over all of its possible UV completions. In doing so, we address the following question: suppose δ and σ should be measured at particular values in the future — to what extent is one then still able to realize approximate textures in the neutrino Yukawa matrix? Our analysis, thus, generalizes previous studies of the minimal seesaw model based on the assumption of exact texture zeros. In particular, our study allows us to assess the theoretical uncertainty inherent to the common texture ansatz. One of our main results is that a normal light-neutrino mass hierarchy is, in fact, still consistent with a two-zero Yukawa texture, provided that the two texture zeros receive corrections at the level of O(10 %). While our numerical results pertain to the minimal seesaw model only, our general procedure appears to be applicable to other neutrino mass models as well.

  6. Lepton electric dipole moments from heavy states Yukawa couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masina, Isabella E-mail: masina@roma1.infn.it

    2003-11-03

    In supersymmetric theories the radiative corrections due to heavy states could leave their footprints in the flavour structure of the supersymmetry breaking masses. We investigate whether present and future searches for the muon and electron EDMs could be sensitive to the CP violation and flavour misalignment induced on slepton masses by the radiative corrections due to the right-handed neutrinos of the seesaw model and to the heavy Higgs triplets of SU(5) GUT. When this is the case, limits on the relevant combination of neutrino Yukawa couplings are obtained. Explicit analytical expressions are provided which accounts for the dependencies on the supersymmetric mass parameters.

  7. Yukawa's of light stringy states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anastasopoulos, Pascal [Technische Univ. Wien (Austria). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Bianchi, Massimo; Consoli, Dario [Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' Univ. (Italy). Dipt. di Fisica; I.N.F.N., Sezione di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' (Italy)

    2017-01-15

    Light massive string states can appear at D-brane intersections with small angles. We compute tri-linear Yukawa couplings of such open-string states to massless ones and to one another. Due to ambiguities in the normalisation of the vertex operators, that involve twist fields, we proceed via factorization of appropriate scattering amplitudes. Some peculiar features are observed that may lead to interesting signatures at colliders in the future. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. One-loop Yukawa couplings in local models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conlon, Joseph P. [Rudolf Peierls Center for Theoretical Physics, Oxford (United Kingdom); Balliol College, Oxford (United Kingdom); Goodsell, Mark [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); Palti, Eran [Centre de Physique Theorique, Ecole Polytechnique, CNRS, Palaiseau (France)

    2010-07-15

    We calculate the one-loop Yukawa couplings and threshold corrections for supersymmetric local models of branes at singularities in type IIB string theory. We compute the corrections coming both from wavefunction and vertex renormalisation. The former comes in the IR from conventional field theory running and in the UV from threshold corrections that cause it to run from the winding scale associated to the full Calabi-Yau volume. The vertex correction is naively absent as it appears to correspond to superpotential renormalisation. However, we find that while the Wilsonian superpotential is not renormalised there is a physical vertex correction in the 1PI action associated to light particle loops. (orig.)

  9. One-loop Yukawa Couplings in Local Models

    CERN Document Server

    Conlon, Joseph P; Palti, Eran; 10.1007

    2010-01-01

    We calculate the one-loop Yukawa couplings and threshold corrections for supersymmetric local models of branes at singularities in type IIB string theory. We compute the corrections coming both from wavefunction and vertex renormalisation. The former comes in the IR from conventional field theory running and in the UV from threshold corrections that cause it to run from the winding scale associated to the full Calabi-Yau volume. The vertex correction is naively absent as it appears to correspond to superpotential renormalisation. However, we find that while the Wilsonian superpotential is not renormalised there is a physical vertex correction in the 1PI action associated to light particle loops.

  10. Diffusion coefficient of three-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzhumagulova, K. N.; Ramazanov, T. S.; Masheeva, R. U. [IETP, Al Farabi Kazakh National University, 71, al Farabi ave., Almaty 050040 (Kazakhstan)

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this work is an investigation of the diffusion coefficient of the dust component in complex plasma. The computer simulation of the Yukawa liquids was made on the basis of the Langevin equation, which takes into account the influence of buffer plasma on the dust particles dynamics. The Green–Kubo relation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficient. Calculations of the diffusion coefficient for a wide range of the system parameters were performed. Using obtained numerical data, we constructed the interpolation formula for the diffusion coefficient. We also show that the interpolation formula correctly describes experimental data obtained under microgravity conditions.

  11. New LEP constraints on some supersymmetric Yukawa interactions that violate R-parity

    CERN Document Server

    Bhattacharya, G; Sridhar, K; Bhattacharyya, Gautam; Ellis, John; Sridhar, K

    1995-01-01

    We consider one-loop corrections to partial widths of the Z induced by supersymmetric Yukawa interactions that violate R-parity. The precise experimental values of the leptonic Z partial widths bound these Yukawa couplings, with the most interesting constraints being those on couplings involving the \\tau, since previous constraints on them were very mild.

  12. Signatures of baryon-nonconserving Yukawa couplings in a supersymmetric theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bastero-Gil, Mar; Brahmachari, Biswajoy

    1997-12-01

    Renormalization effects of large baryon-nonconserving Yukawa couplings λ''ijkDiDjUk¯ lower the right-handed squark masses keeping the left-handed squark masses virtually untouched at the lowest order. At low energy they enhance the mass splitting between left- and right-handed squarks of the same generation as well as intergenerational mass splitting among squarks, potentially detectable in future colliders or in rare decays. The predicted mass of the lightest top squark becomes lower than the experimental bound for larger ranges of parameter space than that of the baryon-conserving case, hence, further constraining the parameter space of a supersymmetric theory when baryon violation is included.

  13. Absence of Rapid Proton Decay and Origin of Low-Energy Particlesand Yukawa Couplings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tatar, Radu; Watari, Taizan

    2006-01-01

    In string theory, massless particles often originate from a symmetry breaking of a large gauge symmetry G to its subgroup H. The absence of dimension-4 proton decay in supersymmetric theories suggests that ({bar D},L) are different from {bar H}({bar 5}) in their origins. In this article, we consider a possibility that they come from different irreducible components in g/h. Requiring that all the Yukawa coupling constants of quarks and leptons be generated from the super Yang-Mills interactions of G, we found in the context of Georgi-Glashow H = SU(5) unification that the minimal choice of G is E{sub 7} and E{sub 8} is the only alternative. This idea is systematically implemented in Heterotic String, M theory and F theory, confirming the absence of dimension 4 proton decay operators. Not only H = SU(5) but also G constrain operators of effective field theories, providing non-trivial information.

  14. Probing the top-Yukawa coupling in associated Higgs production with a single top quark

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Jung [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University,Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Cheung, Kingman [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University,Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China); Division of Quantum Phases and Devices, School of Physics, Konkuk University,Seoul 143-701 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Sik [Department of Physics, Chonnam National University, 300 Yongbong-dong, Buk-gu, Gwangju, 500-757 (Korea, Republic of); Lu, Chih-Ting [Department of Physics, National Tsing Hua University,Hsinchu 300, Taiwan (China)

    2014-05-15

    Associated production of the Higgs boson with a single top quark proceeds through Feynman diagrams, which are either proportional to the hWW, top-Yukawa, or the bottom-Yukawa couplings. It was shown in literature that the interference between the top-Yukawa and the gauge-Higgs diagrams can be significant, and thus the measurement of the cross sections can help pin down the sign and the size of the top-Yukawa coupling. Here we perform a detailed study with full detector simulations of such a possibility at the LHC-14 within the current allowed range of hWW and top-Yukawa couplings, using h→bb-macron, γγ, τ{sup +}τ{sup −}, ZZ{sup ∗}→4ℓ modes. We found that the LHC-14 has the potential to distinguish the size and the sign of the top-Yukawa coupling. Among the channels the h→bb-macron mode provides the best chance to probe the signal, followed by the h→γγ mode, which has the advantage of a narrow reconstructed mass peak. We also pointed out that the spatial separation among the final-state particles has the potential in differentiating among various values of the top-Yukawa coupling.

  15. Contribution from neutrino Yukawa couplings to lepton electric dipole moments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzan, Yasaman; Peskin, Michael E.

    2004-11-01

    To explain the observed neutrino masses through the seesaw mechanism, a supersymmetric generalization of the standard model should include heavy right-handed neutrino supermultiplets. Then the neutrino Yukawa couplings can induce CP violation in the lepton sector. In this paper, we compute the contribution of these CP violating terms to lepton electric dipole moments. We introduce a new formalism that makes use of supersymmetry to expose the Glashow-Iliopoulos-Maiani cancellations. In the region of small tan(β, we find a different result from that given previously by Ellis, Hisano, Raidal, and Shimizu. We confirm the structure found by this group, but with a much smaller overall coefficient. In the region of large tan(β, we recompute the leading term that has been identified by Masina and confirm her result up to minor factors. We discuss the implications of these results for constraints on the Yν.

  16. Investigation of the phase structure of a chirally-invariant Higgs-Yukawa model

    CERN Document Server

    Bulava, John; Hou, George W.-S.; Jansen, Karl; Knippschild, Bastian; Lin, C.-J.David; Nagai, Kei-Ichi; Nagy, Attila; Ogawa, Kenji

    2012-01-01

    We present new data on our ongoing project on the investigation of the phase structure of the Higgs-Yukawa model at large bare Yukawa couplings. The data presented last year are extended in terms of statistics, the number of bare Yukawa couplings at existing, and new larger volumes. In addition, this study is extended by a finite temperature project at the physical top quark mass m_t =175 GeV and a hypothetical fourth generation top quark with a mass of m_t' =700 GeV .

  17. Aspect of Fermion Mass Hierarchy within Flavor Democracy for Yukawa Couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higuchi, Katsuichi; Yamamoto, Katsuji

    We discuss the fermion mass hierarchy by including vector-like fermions which are accommodated in E6 GUTs within flavor democracy for Yukawa couplings. In this framework, all Yukawa couplings for the standard Higgs doublet have the same strength, and all Yukawa couplings for the singlet Higgs have the same strength (New ansatz). In addition, singlet Higgs and right-handed neutrinos exist. Under this condition, the mass hierarchy mt ≫ mb ˜ mτ as well as mt ≫ mc, mu can be naturally explained.

  18. EXP6 fluids at extreme conditions modeled by two-Yukawa potentials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejcí, Jan; Nezbeda, Ivo; Melnyk, Roman; Trokhymchuk, Andrij

    2010-09-07

    A two-Yukawa representation of the EXP6 fluids at supercritical temperatures and high pressures has been developed and examined using molecular simulations. A uniquely defined mapping of the repulsive part of the EXP6 potential curve onto the two-Yukawa potential is used. Two ranges of temperatures, one encountered in geochemical applications (T(geo) range) and the other at conditions of detonations (T(det) range), are considered and it is shown that the local structures of both fluids are practically identical. Deviations between the EXP6 and two-Yukawa potential functions at intermediate separations lead to differences in the thermodynamic properties of the two fluids at lower temperatures of the T(geo) range; at higher temperatures and in the high T(det) temperature range both the structural and thermodynamic properties of the EXP6 and two-Yukawa fluids are practically identical.

  19. Higgs-Yukawa model in chirally-invariant lattice field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Bulava, John; Jansen, Karl; Kallarackal, Jim; Knippschild, Bastian; Lin, C.-J.David; Nagai, Kei-Ichi; Nagy, Attila; Ogawa, Kenji

    2013-01-01

    Non-perturbative numerical lattice studies of the Higgs-Yukawa sector of the standard model with exact chiral symmetry are reviewed. In particular, we discuss bounds on the Higgs boson mass at the standard model top quark mass, and in the presence of heavy fermions. We present a comprehensive study of the phase structure of the theory at weak and very strong values of the Yukawa coupling as well as at non-zero temperature.

  20. Global well posedness of the relativistic Vlasov-Yukawa system with small data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ha, Seung-Yeal; Lee, Ho

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present an existence theory and uniform L 1 -stability estimate for classical solutions with small data to the Vlasov-Yukawa system. The Vlasov-Yukawa system corresponds to a short-range correction of the Vlasov-Poisson system appearing in plasma physics and astrophysics. For the existence and stability of classical solutions, we crucially use dispersion estimates due to the smallness of data

  1. Higgs-Yukawa model in chirally-invariant lattice field theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulava, John [CERN, Geneva (Switzerland). Physics Department; Gerhold, Philipp; Kallarackal, Jim; Nagy, Attila [Humboldt Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Knippschild, Bastian [National Taiwan Univ., Taipei (China). Dept. of Physics; Lin, C.J. David [National Chiao-Tung Univ., Hsinchu (China). Inst. of Physics; National Centre for Theoretical Sciences, Hsinchu (China). Div. of Physics; Nagai, Kei-Ichi [Nagoya Univ., Nagoya, Aichi (Japan). Kobayashi-Maskawa Institute; Ogawa, Kenji [Chung-Yuan Christian Univ., Chung-Li (China). Dept. of Physics

    2012-10-15

    Non-perturbative numerical lattice studies of the Higgs-Yukawa sector of the standard model with exact chiral symmetry are reviewed. In particular, we discuss bounds on the Higgs boson mass at the standard model top quark mass, and in the presence of heavy fermions. We present a comprehensive study of the phase structure of the theory at weak and very strong values of the Yukawa coupling as well as at non-zero temperature.

  2. Color Superconductivity and Charge Neutrality in Yukawa Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Mark G.; Pangeni, Kamal; Windisch, Andreas

    2018-02-01

    It is generally believed that when Cooper pairing occurs between two different species of fermions, their Fermi surfaces become locked together so that the resultant state remains "neutral," with equal number densities of the two species, even when subjected to a chemical potential that couples to the difference in number densities. This belief is based on mean-field calculations in models with a zero-range interaction, where the anomalous self-energy is independent of energy and momentum. Following up on an early report of a deviation from neutrality in a Dyson-Schwinger calculation of color-flavor-locked quark matter, we investigate the neutrality of a two-species condensate using a Yukawa model which has a finite-range interaction. In a mean field calculation we obtain the full energy-momentum dependence of the self-energy and find that the energy dependence leads to a population imbalance in the Cooper-paired phase when it is stressed by a species-dependent chemical potential. This gives some support to the suggestion that the color-flavor-locked phase of quark matter might not be an insulator.

  3. The Higgs boson resonance from a chiral Higgs-Yukawa model on the lattice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kallarackal, Jim

    2011-04-28

    Despite the fact that the standard model of particle physics has been confirmed in many high energy experiments, the existence of the Higgs boson is not assured. The Higgs boson is a central part of the electroweak theory and is crucial to generate masses for fermions and the weak gauge bosons. The goal of this work is to set limits on the mass and the decay width of the Higgs boson. The basis to compute the physical quantities is the path integral which is here evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations thus allowing for fully non perturbative calculations. A polynomial hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm is used to incorporate dynamical fermions. The chiral symmetry of the electroweak model is incorporated by using the Neuberger overlap operator. Here, the standard model is considered in the limit of a Higgs-Yukawa sector which does not contain the weak gauge bosons and only a degenerate doublet of top- and bottom quarks are incorporated. Results from lattice perturbation theory up to one loop of the Higgs boson propagator are compared with those obtained from Monte Carlo simulations at three different values of the Yukawa coupling. At all values of the investigated couplings, the perturbative results agree very well with the Monte Carlo data. A main focus of this work is the investigation of the resonance parameters of the Higgs boson. The resonance width and the resonance mass are investigated at weak and at large quartic couplings. The parameters of the model are chosen such that the Higgs boson can decay into any even number of Goldstone bosons. Thus, the Higgs boson does not appear as an asymptotic stable state but as a resonance. In all considered cases the Higgs boson resonance width lies below 10% of the resonance mass. The obtained resonance mass is compared with the mass obtained from the Higgs boson propagator. The results agree perfectly at all values of the quartic coupling considered. Finally, the effect of a heavy fourth generation of fermions on the

  4. Surface tension of a Yukawa fluid according to mean-field theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossa, Guilherme Volpe; Norris, Joseph; May, Sylvio

    2017-04-07

    Yukawa fluids consist of particles that interact through a repulsive or attractive Yukawa potential. A surface tension arises at the walls of the container that encloses the fluid or at the interface between two coexisting phases. We calculate that surface tension on the level of mean-field theory, thereby either ignoring the particle size (ideal Yukawa fluid) or accounting for a non-vanishing particle size through a nonideal contribution to the free energy, exemplified either on the level of a lattice gas (lattice Yukawa fluid) or based on the Carnahan-Starling equation of state (Carnahan-Starling Yukawa fluid). Our mean-field results, which do not rely on assuming small gradients of the particle concentrations, become exact in the limit of large temperature and large screening length. They are calculated numerically in the general case and analytically in the two limits of small particle concentration and close to the critical point for a phase-separating system. For a sufficiently small particle concentration, our predicted surface tension is accurate whereas for a phase boundary, we expect good agreement with exact calculations in the limit of a large screening length and if the mean-field model employs the Carnahan-Starling equation of state.

  5. Finite size scaling of the Higgs-Yukawa model near the Gaussian fixed point

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, David Y.J.; Lin, C.J. David [National Chiao-Tung Univ., Hsinchu, Taiwan (China); Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Knippschild, Bastian [HISKP, Bonn (Germany); Nagy, Attila [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC; Humboldt-Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2016-12-15

    We study the scaling properties of Higgs-Yukawa models. Using the technique of Finite-Size Scaling, we are able to derive scaling functions that describe the observables of the model in the vicinity of a Gaussian fixed point. A feasibility study of our strategy is performed for the pure scalar theory in the weak-coupling regime. Choosing the on-shell renormalisation scheme gives us an advantage to fit the scaling functions against lattice data with only a small number of fit parameters. These formulae can be used to determine the universality of the observed phase transitions, and thus play an essential role in future investigations of Higgs-Yukawa models, in particular in the strong Yukawa coupling region.

  6. Renormalization-group constraints on Yukawa alignment in multi-Higgs-doublet models

    CERN Document Server

    Ferreira, P M; Silva, Joao P

    2010-01-01

    We write down the renormalization-group equations for the Yukawa-coupling matrices in a general multi-Higgs-doublet model. We then assume that the matrices of the Yukawa couplings of the various Higgs doublets to right-handed fermions of fixed quantum numbers are all proportional to each other. We demonstrate that, in the case of the two-Higgs-doublet model, this proportionality is preserved by the renormalization-group running only in the cases of the standard type-I, II, X, and Y models. We furthermore show that a similar result holds even when there are more than two Higgs doublets: the Yukawa-coupling matrices to fermions of a given electric charge remain proportional under the renormalization-group running if and only if there is a basis for the Higgs doublets in which all the fermions of a given electric charge couple to only one Higgs doublet.

  7. Auxeticity of Yukawa Systems with Nanolayers in the (111 Crystallographic Plane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł M. Pigłowski

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Elastic properties of model crystalline systems, in which the particles interact via the hard potential (infinite when any particles overlap and zero otherwise and the hard-core repulsive Yukawa interaction, were determined by Monte Carlo simulations. The influence of structural modifications, in the form of periodic nanolayers being perpendicular to the crystallographic axis [111], on auxetic properties of the crystal was investigated. It has been shown that the hard sphere nanolayers introduced into Yukawa crystals allow one to control the elastic properties of the system. It has been also found that the introduction of the Yukawa monolayers to the hard sphere crystal induces auxeticity in the [ 11 1 ¯ ] [ 112 ] -direction, while maintaining the negative Poisson’s ratio in the [ 110 ] [ 1 1 ¯ 0 ] -direction, thus expanding the partial auxeticity of the system to an additional important crystallographic direction.

  8. A gateway to new physics: direct measurement of the top Yukawa coupling to the Higgs boson

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(INSPIRE)INSPIRE-00405244; Wermes, Norbert

    The top quark has the largest Yukawa coupling in the Standard Model, is the main contribution to the Higgs mass $m_H$ corrections and defines the evolution of the Higgs effective potential with the energy, together with $m_H$. It can be directly measured through the associated production process $pp \\to t\\bar{t}H$. Two searches for this process are described in this thesis, using data collected with the ATLAS detector at the Large Hadron Collider. The fully hadronic analysis is performed with data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of $20.3\\,\\text{fb}^{-1}$ at a centre-of-mass energy of $\\sqrt{s}=8\\,\\text{TeV}$ and uses a boosted decision tree algorithm to discriminate between signal and background: the dominant multijet background is estimated using a data-driven method. An upper limit of $6.4$ ($5.4$) times the Standard Model cross section is observed (expected) at 95% confidence level and a best-fit value of $1.6 \\pm 2.6$ for the signal strength $\\mu_{t\\bar{t}H}=\\sigma_{t\\bar{t}H}^\\text{obs}/\\sigma...

  9. Higgs-Yukawa model with higher dimension operators via extended mean field theory

    CERN Document Server

    Akerlund, Oscar

    2016-01-01

    Using Extended Mean Field Theory (EMFT) on the lattice, we study properties of the Higgs-Yukawa model as an approximation of the Standard Model Higgs sector, and the effect of higher dimension operators. We note that the discussion of vacuum stability is completely modified in the presence of a $\\phi^6$ term, and that the Higgs mass no longer appears fine tuned. We also study the finite temperature transition. Without higher dimension operators the transition is found to be second order (crossover with gauge fields) for the experimental value of the Higgs mass $M_h=125$ GeV. By taking a $\\phi^6$ interaction in the Higgs potential as a proxy for a UV completion of the Standard Model, the transition becomes stronger and turns first order if the scale of new physics, i.e. the mass of the lightest mediator particle, is around $1.5$ TeV. This implies that electroweak baryogenesis may be viable in models which introduce new particles around that scale.

  10. A new method for measuring the bottom quark Yukawa coupling at the CERN Large Hadron Collider

    CERN Document Server

    Rainwater, D L

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new method for measuring the bottom quark Yukawa coupling at the LHC. Higgs boson production in purely electroweak WHjj events is calculated. The Standard Model signal rate including decays W -> l nu and H -> bb is 11 fb for M_H = 120 GeV. It is possible to suppress the principal background, tt + jets, to below the level of the signal. As the top quark Yukawa coupling does not appear in this process, it promises a reliable extraction of g_Hbb in the context of extensions to the Standard Model, especially the MSSM.

  11. Upper Higgs boson mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhold, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC/DESY, Zeuthen (Germany); Jansen, K. [John von Neumann-Institut fuer Computing NIC/DESY, Zeuthen (Germany)

    2010-02-15

    We establish the cutoff-dependent upper Higgs boson mass bound by means of direct lattice computations in the framework of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same chiral Yukawa coupling structure as in the Higgs-fermion sector of the Standard Model. As expected from the triviality picture of the Higgs sector, we observe the upper mass bound to decrease with rising cutoff parameter {lambda}. Moreover, the strength of the fermionic contribution to the upper mass bound is explored by comparing to the corresponding analysis in the pure {phi}{sup 4}-theory. (orig.)

  12. Muon g -2 in an alternative quasi-Yukawa unification with a less fine-tuned seesaw mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altın, Zafer; Ã-zdal, Ã.-zer; Ün, Cem Salih

    2018-03-01

    We explore the low-scale implications of the Pati-Salam Model including the TeV scale right-handed neutrinos interacting and mixing with the MSSM fields through the inverse seesaw (IS) mechanism in light of the muon anomalous magnetic moment (muon g -2 ) resolution and highlight the solutions which are compatible with the quasi-Yukawa unification condition (QYU). We find that the presence of the right-handed neutrinos causes heavy smuons as mμ ˜≳800 GeV in order to avoid tachyonic staus at the low scale. On the other hand, the sneutrinos can be as light as about 100 GeV, and along with the light charginos of mass ≲400 GeV , they can yield such large contributions to muon g -2 that the discrepancy between the experiment and the theory can be resolved. These solutions also require mχ˜1 ±≲400 GeV and mχ˜10≲200 . We also discuss such light chargino and neutralino along with the light stau (mτ ˜≳200 GeV ) in the light of current LHC results. Besides, the gluino mass lies in a range ˜[2.5 - 3.5 ] TeV , which is tested in near future experiments. In addition, the model predicts relatively light Higgsinos (μ ≲700 GeV ); hence, the second chargino mass is also light enough (≲700 GeV ) to contribute to muon g -2 . Light Higgsinos also yield less fine-tuning at the electroweak scale, and the regions compatible with muon g -2 restrict ΔEW≲100 strictly, and this region also satisfies the QYU condition. In addition, the ratios among the Yukawa couplings should be 1.8 ≲yt/yb≲2.6 , yτ/yb˜1.3 to yield correct fermion masses. Even though the right-handed neutrino Yukawa coupling can be varied freely, the solutions bound its range to 0.8 ≲yν/yb≲1.7 .

  13. Ultraheavy Yukawa-bound states of fourth-generation at Large ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A study of bound states of the fourth-generation quarks in the range of 500–700 GeV is presented, where the binding energies are expected to be mainly of Yukawa origin, with QCD subdominant. Near degeneracy of their masses exhibits a new `isospin'. The production of a colour- octet, isosinglet vector meson via q q ...

  14. Molecular dynamics studies of crystalline nucleation in one-component Yukawa plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ravelo, R.; Hammerberg, J.E.; Holian, B.L.

    1992-01-01

    We report on molecular dynamics studies of one-component Yukawa plasmas undergoing rapid quenches from a fluid state with a Coulomb parameter Γ = 40 to solid states in the range 350 < Γ < 800. The detailed dynamical structure of ordering appears more complicated than results from classical theories of nucleation, with planar formation being observed before fully 3-dimensional ordering appears

  15. Construction of wave operator for two-dimensional Klein-Gordon-Schrodinger systems with Yukawa coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Tsuruta

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available We prove the existence of the wave operator for the Klein-Gordon-Schrodinger system with Yukawa coupling. This non-linearity type is below Strichartz scaling, and therefore classic perturbation methods will fail in any Strichartz space. Instead, we follow the "first iteration method" to handle these critical non-linearities.

  16. Ultraheavy Yukawa-bound states of fourth-generation at Large ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-05

    Oct 5, 2012 ... Abstract. A study of bound states of the fourth-generation quarks in the range of 500–700 GeV is presented, where the binding energies are expected to be mainly of Yukawa origin, with QCD subdominant. Near degeneracy of their masses exhibits a new 'isospin'. The production of a colour- octet, isosinglet ...

  17. On the impossibility of defining adhesive hard spheres as sticky limit of a hard-sphere-Yukawa potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzillo, Domenico

    2011-03-28

    For fluids of molecules with short-ranged hard-sphere-Yukawa (HSY) interactions, it is proven that the Noro-Frenkel "extended law of corresponding states" cannot be applied down to the vanishing attraction range, since the exact HSY second virial coefficient diverges in such a limit. It is also shown that, besides Baxter's original approach, a fully correct alternative definition of "adhesive hard spheres" can be obtained by taking the vanishing-range-limit (sticky limit) not of a Yukawa tail, as is commonly done, but of a slightly different potential with a logarithmic-Yukawa attraction.

  18. Revision of FMM-Yukawa: An adaptive fast multipole method for screened Coulomb interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bo; Huang, Jingfang; Pitsianis, Nikos P.; Sun, Xiaobai

    2010-12-01

    FMM-YUKAWA is a mathematical software package primarily for rapid evaluation of the screened Coulomb interactions of N particles in three dimensional space. Since its release, we have revised and re-organized the data structure, software architecture, and user interface, for the purpose of enabling more flexible, broader and easier use of the package. The package and its documentation are available at http://www.fastmultipole.org/, along with a few other closely related mathematical software packages. New version program summaryProgram title: FMM-Yukawa Catalogue identifier: AEEQ_v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEEQ_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU GPL 2.0 No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 78 704 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 854 265 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: FORTRAN 77, FORTRAN 90, and C. Requires gcc and gfortran version 4.4.3 or later Computer: All Operating system: Any Classification: 4.8, 4.12 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEEQ_v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 180 (2009) 2331 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: To evaluate the screened Coulomb potential and force field of N charged particles, and to evaluate a convolution type integral where the Green's function is the fundamental solution of the modified Helmholtz equation. Solution method: The new version of fast multipole method (FMM) that diagonalizes the multipole-to-local translation operator is applied with the tree structure adaptive to sample particle locations. Reasons for new version: To handle much larger particle ensembles, to enable the iterative use of the subroutines in a solver, and to remove potential contention in assignments for parallelization. Summary of revisions: The software package FMM-Yukawa has been

  19. Estudo de sistemas atômicos confinados usando o potencial de Yukawa

    OpenAIRE

    Santos, Leandro Cerqueira

    2009-01-01

    94f. Neste trabalho apresentamos um método analítico para estudar o átomo de Hélio e íons de dois elétrons confinados. O potencial de Yukawa é utilizado como um potencial confinante. Usamos pela primeira vez, como função base, um produto de soluções analíticas aproximadas do estado fundamental e do estado excitado do Hidrogênio de Yukawa. O princípio variacional é usado e a energia do estado fundamental de sistemas confinados de dois elétrons, com Z variando de 2 a 18, é determinada. Este ...

  20. The Higgs boson resonance width from a chiral Higgs-Yukawa model on the lattice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gerhold, Philipp; Kallarackal, Jim; Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin; Jansen, Karl

    2011-11-01

    The Higgs boson is a central part of the electroweak theory and is crucial to generate masses for quarks, leptons and the weak gauge bosons. We use a 4-dimensional Euclidean lattice formulation of the Higgs-Yukawa sector of the electroweak model to compute physical quantities in the path integral approach which is evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations thus allowing for fully non perturbative calculations. The chiral symmetry of the model is incorporated by using the Neuberger overlap Dirac operator. The here considered Higgs-Yukawa model does not involve the weak gauge bosons and furthermore, only a degenerate doublet of top- and bottom quarks are incorporated. The goal of this work is to study the resonance properties of the Higgs boson and its sensitivity to the strength of the quartic self coupling. (orig.)

  1. New method for extracting the bottom quark Yukawa coupling at the CERN LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Rainwater, D L

    2001-01-01

    We propose a new method for measuring the H to bb rate at the CERN Large Hadron Collider in a manner which would allow extraction of the b quark Yukawa coupling. Higgs boson production in purely electroweak WHjj events is calculated. The Standard Model signal rate including decays W to lv and H to bb is 11 fb for M/sub H/=120 GeV. It is possible to suppress the principal backgrounds, Wbbjj and ttjj, to approximately the level of the signal. As the top quark Yukawa coupling does not appear in this process, it promises a reliable extraction of g/sub Hbb/ in the context of the Standard Model or some extensions, such as the MSSM. (16 refs).

  2. The phase structure of a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhold, P. [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany); Jansen, K. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2007-12-15

    We consider a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model based on the Neuberger overlap operator D{sup (ov)}. As a first step towards the eventual determination of Higgs mass bounds we present the phase structure of the model analytically in the large N{sub f}-limit in the physically interesting region of the Yukawa coupling constant. We confront the analytically obtained phase diagram with corresponding HMC-simulations and find an excellent agreement at large values of N{sub f}. In the opposite case the large N{sub f} computation still gives a good qualitative description of the phase diagram. We also present first and very preliminary results on the Higgs upper bound at one selected cut-off {lambda}. (orig.)

  3. Ultraheavy Yukawa-bound states of fourth-generation at Large ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-10-05

    Oct 5, 2012 ... A study of bound states of the fourth-generation quarks in the range of 500–700 GeV is presented ... Fourth-generation; Yukawa-bound states; Large Hadron Collider phenomenology. PACS Nos 14.65. ... our numerical study: the decay constant ξ = fω8 /mω8 of ω8, ω8 and π8 mass difference m which ...

  4. Higgs mass bounds from a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model with overlap fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhold, Philipp; Kallarackal, Jim [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany)

    2008-10-15

    We study the parameter dependence of the Higgs mass in a chirally invariant lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same Higgs-fermion coupling structure as in the Higgs sector of the electroweak Standard Model. Eventually, the aim is to establish upper and lower Higgs mass bounds. Here we present our preliminary results on the lower Higgs mass bound at several selected values for the cutoff and give a brief outlook towards the upper Higgs mass bound. (orig.)

  5. Testing of Binders Toxicological Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strokova, V.; Nelyubova, V.; Rykunova, M.

    2017-11-01

    The article presents the results of a study of the toxicological effect of binders with different compositions on the vital activity of plant and animal test-objects. The analysis of the effect on plant cultures was made on the basis of the phytotesting data. The study of the effect of binders on objects of animal origin was carried out using the method of short-term testing. Based on the data obtained, binders are ranked according to the degree of increase in the toxic effect: Gypsum → Portland cement → Slag Portland cement. Regardless of the test-object type, the influence of binders is due to the release of various elements (calcium ions or heavy metals) into the solution. In case of plant cultures, the saturation of the solution with elements has a positive effect (there is no inhibitory effect), and in case of animal specimens - an increase in the toxic effect.

  6. Critical screening in the one- and two-electron Yukawa atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montgomery, H. E.; Sen, K. D.; Katriel, Jacob

    2018-02-01

    The one- and two-electron Yukawa atoms, also referred to as the Debye-Hückel or screened Coulomb atoms, have been topics of considerable interest both for intrinsic reasons and because of their relevance to terrestrial and astrophysical plasmas. At sufficiently high screening the one-electron Yukawa atom ceases to be bound. Some calculations appeared to suggest that as the screening increases in the ground state of the two-electron Yukawa atom (in which both the one-particle attraction and the interparticle repulsion are screened) the two electrons are detached simultaneously, at the same screening constant at which the one-electron atom becomes unbound. Our results rule this scenario out, offering an alternative that is not less interesting. In particular, it is found that for Z charge Zc≈0.911028 ... , at which the bare Coulomb two-electron atom becomes unbound, and even over a range of lower nuclear charges, an appropriate amount of screening gives rise to a bound two-electron system.

  7. Attention and the Testing Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Neil W.; Picklesimer, Milton

    2016-01-01

    Memory retrieval often enhances still later memory as evidenced by the testing effect. Divided attention (DA) is known to produce different effects on encoding and retrieval, substantially disrupting the former and often producing little effect on the latter. The present experiments examine whether the mnemonic consequences of retrieval are…

  8. Irradiation Effects Test Series: Test IE-2. Test results report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Allison, C.M.; Croucher, D.W.; Ploger, S.A.; Mehner, A.S.

    1977-08-01

    The report describes the results of a test using four 0.97-m long PWR-type fuel rods with differences in diametral gap and cladding irradiation. The objective of this test was to provide information about the effects of these differences on fuel rod behavior during quasi-equilibrium and film boiling operation. The fuel rods were subjected to a series of preconditioning power cycles of less than 30 kW/m. Rod powers were then increased to 68 kW/m at a coolant mass flux of 4900 kg/s-m 2 . After one hour at 68 kW/m, a power-cooling-mismatch sequence was initiated by a flow reduction at constant power. At a flow of 2550 kg/s-m 2 , the onset of film boiling occurred on one rod, Rod IE-011. An additional flow reduction to 2245 kg/s-m 2 caused the onset of film boiling on the remaining three rods. Data are presented on the behavior of fuel rods during quasiequilibrium and during film boiling operation. The effects of initial gap size, cladding irradiation, rod power cycling, a rapid power increase, and sustained film boiling are discussed. These discussions are based on measured test data, preliminary postirradiation examination results, and comparisons of results with FRAP-T3 computer model calculations

  9. Transport properties of warm and hot dense iron from orbital free and corrected Yukawa potential molecular dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.Y. Sun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The equation of states, diffusions, and viscosities of strongly coupled Fe at 80 and 240 eV with densities from 1.6 to 40 g/cm3 are studied by orbital-free molecular dynamics, classical molecular dynamics with a corrected Yukawa potential and compared with the results from average atom model. A new local pseudopotential is generated for orbital free calculations. For low densities, the Yukawa model captures the correct ionic interaction behavior around the first peak of the radial distribution function (RDF, thus it gives correct RDFs and transport coefficients. For higher densities, the scaled transformation of the Yukawa potential or adding a short range repulsion part to the Yukawa potential can give correct RDFs and transport coefficients. The corrected potentials are further validated by the force matching method. Keywords: Transport properties, Orbital-free molecular dynamics, Yukawa model, Force matching, PACS codes: 34.20.Cf, 52.25.Fi, 52.27.Gr, 52.65.Yy

  10. Charge and color breaking constraints in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model associated with the bottom Yukawa coupling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolfgang Gregor Hollik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Testing the stability of the electroweak vacuum in any extension of the Standard Model Higgs sector is of great importance to verify the consistency of the theory. Multi-scalar extensions as the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model generically lead to unstable configurations in certain regions of parameter space. An exact minimization of the scalar potential is rather an impossible analytic task. To give handy analytic constraints, a specific direction in field space has to be considered which is a simplification that tends to miss excluded regions, however good to quickly check parameter points. We describe a yet undescribed class of charge and color breaking minima as they appear in the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model, exemplarily for the case of non-vanishing bottom squark vacuum expectation values constraining the combination μYb in a non-trivial way. Contrary to famous A-parameter bounds, we relate the bottom Yukawa coupling with the supersymmetry breaking masses. Another bound can be found relating soft breaking masses and μ only. The exclusions follow from the tree-level minimization and can change dramatically using the one-loop potential. Estimates of the lifetime of unstable configurations show that they are either extremely short- or long-lived.

  11. Causality in 1+1-dimensional Yukawa model-II

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-10-01

    Oct 1, 2013 ... shown that the effective model can be interpreted as a field theory of a bound state. We study causality in such a ... the motivation pertaining to causality violation in the bound states. In §3 condition of .... Consider a diagram with n external scalars, L fermion loops, V vertices, IF internal fermion lines and IB ...

  12. Examining the identity of Yukawa with gauge couplings in supersymmetric QCD at LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Freitas, A.; Spira, M.; Zerwas, P.M.

    2007-03-01

    The identity of the quark-squark-gluino Yukawa coupling with the corresponding quark-quark-gluon QCD coupling in supersymmetric theories can be examined experimentally at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Extending earlier investigations of like-sign di-lepton final states, we include jets in the analysis of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, adding squark-gluino and gluino-pair production to squark-pair production. Moreover we expand the method towards model-independent analyses which cover more general scenarios. In all cases, squark decays to light charginos and neutralinos persist to play a dominant role. (orig.)

  13. Examining the identity of Yukawa with gauge couplings in supersymmetric QCD at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, A. [Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. fuer Theoretische Physik; Skands, P. [Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (United States); Spira, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland); Zerwas, P.M. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2007-03-15

    The identity of the quark-squark-gluino Yukawa coupling with the corresponding quark-quark-gluon QCD coupling in supersymmetric theories can be examined experimentally at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Extending earlier investigations of like-sign di-lepton final states, we include jets in the analysis of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, adding squark-gluino and gluino-pair production to squark-pair production. Moreover we expand the method towards model-independent analyses which cover more general scenarios. In all cases, squark decays to light charginos and neutralinos persist to play a dominant role. (orig.)

  14. Examining the identity of Yukawa with gauge couplings in supersymmetric QCD at LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freitas, Ayres; /Zurich U.; Skands, Peter Z.; /Fermilab; Spira, M.; /PSI, Villigen; Zerwas, P.M.; /DESY

    2007-03-01

    The identity of the quark-squark-gluino Yukawa coupling with the corresponding quark-quark-gluon QCD coupling in supersymmetric theories can be examined experimentally at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Extending earlier investigations of like-sign di-lepton final states, we include jets in the analysis of the minimal supersymmetric standard model, adding squark-gluino and gluino-pair production to squark-pair production. Moreover we expand the method towards model-independent analyses which cover more general scenarios. In all cases, squark decays to light charginos and neutralinos persist to play a dominant role.

  15. Cores in dwarf galaxies from dark matter with a Yukawa potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loeb, Abraham; Weiner, Neal

    2011-04-29

    We show that cold dark matter particles interacting through a Yukawa potential could naturally explain the recently observed cores in dwarf galaxies without affecting the dynamics of objects with a much larger velocity dispersion, such as clusters of galaxies. The velocity dependence of the associated cross section as well as the possible exothermic nature of the interaction alleviates earlier concerns about strongly interacting dark matter. Dark matter evaporation in low-mass objects might explain the observed deficit of satellite galaxies in the Milky Way halo and have important implications for the first galaxies and reionization.

  16. Short-time behavior of a spherically trapped Yukawa plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaehlert, Hanno; Bonitz, Michael

    2009-11-01

    The formation of correlations in non-ideal plasmas and the associated heating or cooling effects have attracted considerable attention in recent years [1-4]. These results were obtained for macroscopic plasmas. Here, this question is reconsidered for charged particles confined by a spherical trap. Langevin dynamics simulations are used to study the correlation buildup and the formation of a strongly correlated Coulomb liquid when starting from a completely uncorrelated state. We observe an oscillatory behavior of the potential energy with the signature of a breathing oscillation of the whole cluster and a strong dependence of the maximal heating effect on the initial density profile. Results are also presented for the temperature relaxation to equilibrium.[4pt] [1] M. Bonitz, D. Semkat and D. Kremp, Phys. Rev. E 56, 1246 (1997)[2] D. Semkat, D. Kremp, and M. Bonitz, Phys. Rev. E 59, 1557 (1999) [3] D.O. Gericke, M.S. Murillo, D. Semkat, M. Bonitz, and D. Kremp, J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 36, 6087-6093 (2003)[4] D. Semkat et al., Progress in Nonequilibrium Green's functions II, p. 83, M. Bonitz and D. Semkat (Eds.), World Scientific Publ. (2003)

  17. Electromagnetic Environmental Effects System Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-20

    includes such items as machine tools, micromanipulators, sheet metal fabricating tools, TOP 01-2-511A 20 November 2013 4 microscopes, Hazards of...Electromagnetic Radiation to Ordnance (HERO) sensors, pneumatic switching, and those equipments associated with fiber optic technology. c. Test...and current flow. These effects include puncture, tearing, bending , burning, vaporization, or blasting of hardware. TOP 01-2-511A 20

  18. Effective sextic superpotential and violation in NMSGUT

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    C S Aulakh

    2017-10-05

    Oct 5, 2017 ... If the neutrino Yukawa couplings. Y ν. AB are similar in size to the Yukawa couplings for charged fermions of their generation, as expected from. GUTs, specially SO(10) ..... the sextic effective potential, and the relevant operators would be even more hopelessly suppressed. Mass terms of heavy fields are ...

  19. Viable and testable SUSY GUTs with Yukawa unification the case of split trilinears

    CERN Document Server

    Guadagnoli, Diego; Straub, David M

    2009-01-01

    We explore general SUSY GUT models with exact third-generation Yukawa unification, but where the requirement of universal soft terms at the GUT scale is relaxed. We consider the scenario in which the breaking of universality inherits from the Yukawa couplings, i.e. is of minimal flavor violating (MFV) type. In particular, the MFV principle allows for a splitting between the up-type and the down-type soft trilinear couplings. We explore the viability of this trilinear splitting scenario by means of a fitting procedure to electroweak observables, quark masses as well as flavor-changing neutral current processes. Phenomenological viability singles out one main scenario. This scenario is characterized by a sizable splitting between the trilinear soft terms and a large mu term. Remarkably, this scenario does not invoke a partial decoupling of the sparticle spectrum, as in the case of universal soft terms, but instead it requires part of the spectrum, notably the lightest stop, the gluino and the lightest charginos...

  20. Prospects for the measurement of the Higgs Yukawa couplings to b and c quarks, and muons at CLIC

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grefe, C.; Laštovička, Tomáš; Strube, J.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 73, č. 2 (2013), s. 1-7 ISSN 1434-6044 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Higgs * branching * ratio * Yukawa * couplings * quarks * muons * CLIC * inear collider Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 5.436, year: 2013

  1. Yukawa multipole electrostatics and nontrivial coupling between electrostatic and dispersion interactions in electrolytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kjellander, Roland; Ramirez, Rosa

    2008-01-01

    An exact treatment of screened electrostatics in electrolyte solutions is presented. In electrolytes the anisotropy of the exponentially decaying electrostatic potential from a molecule extends to the far field region. The full directional dependence of the electrostatic potential from a charged or uncharged molecule remains in the longest range tail (i.e. from all multipole moments). In particular, the range of the potential from an ion and that from an electroneutral polar particle is generally exactly the same. This is in contrast to the case in vacuum or pure polar liquids, where the potential from a single charge is longer ranged than that from a dipole, which is, itself, longer ranged than the one from a quadrupole etc. The orientational dependence of the exponentially screened electrostatic interaction between two molecules in electrolytes is therefore rather complex even at long distances. These facts are formalized in Yukawa multipole expansions of the electrostatic potential and the pair interaction free energy based on the Yukawa function family exp(-κr)/r m , where r is the distance, κ is a decay parameter and m is a positive integer. The expansion is formally exact for electrolytes with molecular solvent and in the primitive model, provided the non-Coulombic interactions between the particles are sufficiently short ranged. The results can also be applied in the Poisson-Boltzmann approximation. Differences and similarities to the ordinary multipole expansion of electrostatics are pointed out. On the other hand, when the non-Coulombic interactions between the constituent particles of the electrolyte solution contain a dispersion 1/r 6 potential, the electrostatic potential from a molecule decays like a power law for long distances rather than as a Yukawa function. This is due to nontrivial coupling between the electrostatic and dispersion interactions. There remains an exponentially decaying component in the electrostatic potential, but it becomes

  2. Pechukas-Yukawa approach to the evolution of the quantum state of a parametrically perturbed system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Mumnuna A.; Zhong, Johnny; Qureshi, Zihad; Mason, Peter; Betouras, Joseph J.; Zagoskin, Alexandre M.

    2018-03-01

    We consider the evolution of the quantum states of a Hamiltonian that is parametrically perturbed via a term proportional to the adiabatic parameter λ (t ) . Starting with the Pechukas-Yukawa mapping of the energy eigenvalue evolution in a generalized Calogero-Sutherland model of a one-dimensional classical gas, we consider the adiabatic approximation with two different expansions of the quantum state in powers of d λ /d t and compare them with a direct numerical simulation. We show that one of these expansions (Magnus series) is especially convenient for the description of nonadiabatic evolution of the system. Applying the expansion to the exact cover 3-satisfiability problem, we obtain the occupation dynamics, which provides insight into the population of states and sources of decoherence in a quantum system.

  3. The Contribution from Neutrino Yukawa Couplings to Lepton Electric Dipole Moments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzan, Y

    2004-05-24

    To explain the observed neutrino masses through the seesaw mechanism, a supersymmetric generalization of the Standard Model should include heavy right-handed neutrino supermultiplets. Then the neutrino Yukawa couplings can induce CP violation in the lepton sector. In this paper, we compute the contribution of these CP violating terms to lepton electric dipole moments. We introduce a new formalism that makes use of supersymmetry to expose the GIM cancellations. In the region of small tan {beta}, we find a different result from that given previously by Ellis, Hisano, Raidal, and Shimizu. We confirm the structure found by this group, but with a much smaller overall coefficient. In the region of large tan {beta}, we recompute the leading term that has been identified by Masina and confirm her result up to minor factors. We discuss the implications of these results for constraints on the Y{sub v}.

  4. Yukawa corrections from PGBs in OGTC model to the process γγ→bb-bar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jinshu; Song Taiping; Song Haizhen; Lu gongru

    2000-01-01

    The Yukawa corrections from the pseudo-Goldstone bosons (PGBs) in the one generation technicolor (OGTC) model to the process γγ→bb-bar are calculated. The authors find the corrections from the PGBs to the cross section γγ→bb-bar are more than 10% in the certain parameter values region. The maximum of the relative corrections to the process e + e - →γγ→bb-bar may reach -51% in laser back-scattering photos mode, and is only -17.9% in Beamstrahlung photons mode. The corrections are greatly larger the contributions from the relevant particles in the standard model and the supersymmetric model. It can be considered as a signatures of finding the technicolor at the next-generation high energy photons collision

  5. Soft photon theorem for high energy amplitudes in Yukawa and scalar theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gervais, Hualong

    2017-06-01

    We study the emission of soft photons coupling to high energy fixed angle scattering processes at first order in the electromagnetic coupling but to all loop orders in a class of theories without soft divergences, including massive and massless Yukawa and scalar theories. We adapt a method introduced by del Duca for quantum electrodynamics to show that subleading corrections to the soft photon theorem are sensitive to the structure of nonleading external jets of collinear lines. Our techniques are based on a power counting analysis of loop integrals and an application of jet Ward identities. We also apply Grammer and Yennie's decomposition to isolate separately gauge invariant contributions to the soft photon expansion. These are interpreted as infrared sensitive matrix elements coupling to a field strength tensor.

  6. Analytical Solution of Relativistic Few-Body Bound Systems with a Generalized Yukawa Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslanzadeh, M.; Rajabi, A. A.

    2016-03-01

    We have investigated in this paper the few-body bound systems in a simple semi-relativistic scheme. For this aim, we introduced a spin independent relativistic description for a few-identical body system by presenting the analytical solution of few-particle Klein-Gordon equation. Performing calculations in D-dimensional configuration on the basis of the hypercentral approach, we reduced the few-body Klein-Gordon equation to a Schrödinger-like form. This equation is solved by using the Nikiforov-Uvarov method, through which the energy equations and eigenfunctions for a few-body bound system are obtained. We used the spin- and isospin-independent generalized Yukawa potential in our calculations, and the dependence of the few-body binding energies on the potential parameters has been investigated.

  7. Viscosity of confined two-dimensional Yukawa liquids: A nonequilibrium method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Landmann, S. [Universität Leipzig, Institut für Theoretische Physik, Brüderstr. 16, 04103 Leipzig (Germany); Kählert, H.; Thomsen, H.; Bonitz, M. [Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel, Institut für Theoretische Physik und Astrophysik, Leibnizstr. 15, 24098 Kiel (Germany)

    2015-09-15

    We present a nonequilibrium method that allows one to determine the viscosity of two-dimensional dust clusters in an isotropic confinement. By applying a tangential external force to the outer parts of the cluster (e.g., with lasers), a sheared velocity profile is created. The decay of the angular velocity towards the center of the confinement potential is determined by a balance between internal (viscosity) and external friction (neutral gas damping). The viscosity can then be calculated from a fit of the measured velocity profile to a solution of the Navier-Stokes equation. Langevin dynamics simulations are used to demonstrate the feasibility of the method. We find good agreement of the measured viscosity with previous results for macroscopic Yukawa plasmas.

  8. Explaining DAMPE results by dark matter with hierarchical lepton-specific Yukawa interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guoli; Wang, Fei; Wang, Wenyu; Yang, Jin-Min

    2018-02-01

    We propose to interpret the DAMPE electron excess at 1.5 TeV through scalar or Dirac fermion dark matter (DM) annihilation with doubly charged scalar mediators that have lepton-specific Yukawa couplings. The hierarchy of such lepton-specific Yukawa couplings is generated through the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism, so that the dark matter annihilation products can be dominantly electrons. Stringent constraints from LEP2 on intermediate vector boson production can be evaded in our scenarios. In the case of scalar DM, we discuss one scenario with DM annihilating directly to leptons and another scenario with DM annihilating to scalar mediators followed by their decays. We also discuss the Breit-Wigner resonant enhancement and the Sommerfeld enhancement in the case where the s-wave annihilation process is small or helicity-suppressed. With both types of enhancement, constraints on the parameters can be relaxed and new ways for model building can be opened in explaining the DAMPE results. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11105124, 11105125, 11375001, 11675147, 11675242), the Open Project Program of State Key Laboratory of Theoretical Physics, Institute of Theoretical Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences (Y5KF121CJ1), the Innovation Talent project of Henan Province (15HASTIT017), the Young-Talent Foundation of Zhengzhou University, the CAS Center for Excellence in Particle Physics (CCEPP), the CAS Key Research Program of Frontier Sciences and a Key R&D Program of Ministry of Science and Technology of China (2017YFA0402200-04)

  9. lmerTest Package: Tests in Linear Mixed Effects Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuznetsova, Alexandra; Brockhoff, Per B.; Christensen, Rune Haubo Bojesen

    2017-01-01

    by providing p values for tests for fixed effects. We have implemented the Satterthwaite's method for approximating degrees of freedom for the t and F tests. We have also implemented the construction of Type I - III ANOVA tables. Furthermore, one may also obtain the summary as well as the anova table using...

  10. Solitonic lattice and Yukawa forces in the rare-earth orthoferrite TbFeO3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Artyukhin, Sergey; Mostovoy, Maxim; Jensen, Niels Paduraru

    2012-01-01

    , such as domain walls, can result in novel magnetic states. We report the discovery of an unusual incommensurate phase in the orthoferrite TbFeO 3 using neutron diffraction under an applied magnetic field. The magnetic modulation has a very long period of 340 Å at 3 K and exhibits an anomalously large number...... to the pion-mediated Yukawa interaction between protons and neutrons in nuclei. © 2012 Macmillan Publishers Limited. All rights reserved....

  11. Mass scale of vectorlike matter and superpartners from IR fixed point predictions of gauge and top Yukawa couplings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dermíšek, Radovan; McGinnis, Navin

    2018-03-01

    We use the IR fixed point predictions for gauge couplings and the top Yukawa coupling in the minimal supersymmetric model (MSSM) extended with vectorlike families to infer the scale of vectorlike matter and superpartners. We quote results for several extensions of the MSSM and present results in detail for the MSSM extended with one complete vectorlike family. We find that for a unified gauge coupling αG>0.3 vectorlike matter or superpartners are expected within 1.7 TeV (2.5 TeV) based on all three gauge couplings being simultaneously within 1.5% (5%) from observed values. This range extends to about 4 TeV for αG>0.2 . We also find that in the scenario with two additional large Yukawa couplings of vectorlike quarks the IR fixed point value of the top Yukawa coupling independently points to a multi-TeV range for vectorlike matter and superpartners. Assuming a universal value for all large Yukawa couplings at the grand unified theory scale, the measured top quark mass can be obtained from the IR fixed point for tan β ≃4 . The range expands to any tan β >3 for significant departures from the universality assumption. Considering that the Higgs boson mass also points to a multi-TeV range for superpartners in the MSSM, adding a complete vectorlike family at the same scale provides a compelling scenario where the values of gauge couplings and the top quark mass are understood as a consequence of the particle content of the model.

  12. Risk effectiveness evaluation of surveillance testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, I.S.; Samanta, P.K.; Martorell, S.; Vesely, W.E.

    1991-01-01

    To address the concerns about nuclear power plant surveillance tests, i.e., their adverse safety impact due to negative effects and too burdensome requirements, it is necessary to evaluate the safety significance or risk effectiveness of such tests explicitly considering both negative and positive effects. This paper defines the negative effects of surveillance testing from a risk perspective, and then presents a methodology to quantify the negative risk impact, i.e., the risk penalty or risk increase caused by the test. The method focuses on two important kinds of negative effects, namely, test-caused transients and test-caused equipment degradations. The concepts and quantitative methods for the risk evaluation can be used in the decision-making process to establish the safety significance of the tests and to screen the plant-specific surveillance test requirements. 6 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Toetsen als Leerinterventie. Samenvatten in het Testing Effect Paradigma [Tests as learning interventions. Summarization in the testing effect paradigma investigated

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkx, Kim; Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Dirkx, K. J. H., Kester, L., & Kirschner, P. A. (2011, July). Toetsen als leerinterventie. Samenvatten in het testing effect paradigma onderzocht [Tests as learning interventions. Summarization in the testing effect paradigma investigated]. Presentation for Erasmus University Rotterdam, Rotterdam.

  14. Putting the Testing Effect to the Test. Why and When is Testing effective for Learning in Secondary School

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkx, Kim

    2014-01-01

    Dirkx, K. J. H. (2014, 11 April). Putting the testing effect to the test. Why and when is testing effective for learning in secondary school. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. Heerlen: Open University of the Netherlands

  15. Bridge density functional approximation for non-uniform hard core repulsive Yukawa fluid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou Shiqi

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a bridge density functional approximation (BDFA) (J. Chem. Phys. 112, 8079 (2000)) for a non-uniform hard-sphere fluid is extended to a non-uniform hard-core repulsive Yukawa (HCRY) fluid. It is found that the choice of a bulk bridge functional approximation is crucial for both a uniform HCRY fluid and a non-uniform HCRY fluid. A new bridge functional approximation is proposed, which can accurately predict the radial distribution function of the bulk HCRY fluid. With the new bridge functional approximation and its associated bulk second order direct correlation function as input, the BDFA can be used to well calculate the density profile of the HCRY fluid subjected to the influence of varying external fields, and the theoretical predictions are in good agreement with the corresponding simulation data. The calculated results indicate that the present BDFA captures quantitatively the phenomena such as the coexistence of solid-like high density phase and low density gas phase, and the adsorption properties of the HCRY fluid, which qualitatively differ from those of the fluids combining both hard-core repulsion and an attractive tail. (condensed matter: structure, thermal and mechanical properties)

  16. Freezing lines of colloidal Yukawa spheres. II. Local structure and characteristic lengths

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gapinski, Jacek, E-mail: gapinski@amu.edu.pl; Patkowski, Adam [Molecular Biophysics Division, Faculty of Physics, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); NanoBioMedical Center, A. Mickiewicz University, Umultowska 85, 61-614 Poznań (Poland); Nägele, Gerhard [Institute of Complex Systems (ICS-3), Forschungszentrum Jülich, D-52425 Jülich (Germany)

    2014-09-28

    Using the Rogers-Young (RY) integral equation scheme for the static pair correlation functions combined with the liquid-phase Hansen-Verlet freezing rule, we study the generic behavior of the radial distribution function and static structure factor of monodisperse charge-stabilized suspensions with Yukawa-type repulsive particle interactions at freezing. In a related article, labeled Paper I [J. Gapinski, G. Nägele, and A. Patkowski, J. Chem. Phys. 136, 024507 (2012)], this hybrid method was used to determine two-parameter freezing lines for experimentally controllable parameters, characteristic of suspensions of charged silica spheres in dimethylformamide. A universal scaling of the RY radial distribution function maximum is shown to apply to the liquid-bcc and liquid-fcc segments of the universal freezing line. A thorough analysis is made of the behavior of characteristic distances and wavenumbers, next-neighbor particle coordination numbers, osmotic compressibility factor, and the Ravaché-Mountain-Streett minimum-maximum radial distribution function ratio.

  17. Space-time properties of a boson-dressed fermion for the Yukawa model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wagner, R. E.; Ware, M. R.; Su, Q.; Grobe, R.

    2010-01-01

    We analyze the interaction of fermions and bosons through a one-dimensional Yukawa model. We numerically compute the energy eigenstates that represent a physical fermion, which is a superposition of bare fermionic and bosonic eigenstates of the uncoupled Hamiltonian. It turns out that even fast bare fermions require only low-momentum dressing bosons, which attach themselves to the fast fermion through quantum correlations. We compare the space-time evolution of a physical fermion with that of its bare counterpart and show the importance of using dressed observables. The time evolution of the center of mass as well as the wave packet's spatial width suggests that the physical particle has a lower mass than the sum of the masses of its bare constituents. The numerically predicted dressed mass agrees with that from lowest-order perturbation theory as well as with the renormalized mass obtained from the corresponding Feynman graphs. For a given momentum, this lower mass leads to a faster physical particle and a different relativistic spreading behavior of the wave packet.

  18. Lepton flavour violation, Yukawa unification and neutrino masses in supersymmetric unified models

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, J.M.D.S.B.

    2000-12-01

    We explore some phenomenological consequences of models based on supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model. In particular, we focus on the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model supplemented by right-handed neutrinos in the context of the Pati-Salam SU(4) x SU(2) L x SU(2) R Grand Unified Theory. We start by analysing the possibility of using Lepton Flavour Violation as a probe of physics beyond the Standard Model. We show that the μ → eγ and τ → μγ decays impose important constraints to the soft supersymmetry breaking parameters of the Pati-Salam model that already allow the formulation of lower bounds for the masses of the lighter supersymmetric particles. Secondly, we investigate how third family Yukawa unification can be used to provide a window into the soft supersymmetry breaking Lagrangian. We show that, a successful top quark mass prediction requires that the supersymmetric corrections to the bottom quark mass are small which, in turn, imposes a distinct hierarchy between the soft breaking parameters. Finally, we explicitly construct a realistic model of quark, charged lepton and neutrino masses and mixing angles, based on the Pati-Salam. gauge group supplemented by an abelian flavour symmetry, that can explain the large atmospheric neutrino mixing angle, suggested by the Super-Kamiokande data, and account for the large mixing angle Mikheyev-Smirnov-Wolfenstein solution to the solar neutrino problem. (author)

  19. Measuring the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 500 GeV

    CERN Document Server

    Yonamine, Ryo; Tanabe, Tomohiko; Fujii, Keisuke; Kiyo, Yuichiro; Sumino, Yukinari; Yokoya, Hiroshi

    2011-01-01

    We report on the feasibility of the direct measurement of the top Yukawa coupling g_t at the International Linear Collider (ILC) during its first phase of operation with a center-of-mass energy of 500 GeV. The signal and background models incorporate the non-relativistic QCD corrections which enhance the production cross section near the t-tbar threshold. The e+e- -> t tbar H signal is reconstructed in the 6-jet + lepton and the 8-jet modes. The results from the two channels are combined. The background processes considered are e+e- -> t bbar W- / tbar b W+ (which includes e+e- -> t tbar), e+e- -> t tbar Z, and e+e- -> t tbar g* -> t tbar b bar. We use a realistic fast Monte-Carlo detector simulation. Signal events are selected using event shape variables, through jet clustering, and by identifying heavy flavor jets. Assuming a Higgs mass of 120 GeV, polarized electron and positron beams with (Pe-,Pe+) = (-0.8,+0.3), and an integrated luminosity of 1 ab-1, we estimate that the e+e- -> t tbar H events can be s...

  20. Solitonic lattice and Yukawa forces in the rare-earth orthoferrite TbFeO3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artyukhin, Sergey; Mostovoy, Maxim; Jensen, Niels Paduraru; Le, Duc; Prokes, Karel; de Paula, Vinícius G; Bordallo, Heloisa N; Maljuk, Andrey; Landsgesell, Sven; Ryll, Hanjo; Klemke, Bastian; Paeckel, Sebastian; Kiefer, Klaus; Lefmann, Kim; Kuhn, Luise Theil; Argyriou, Dimitri N

    2012-06-24

    The random fluctuations of spins give rise to many interesting physical phenomena, such as the 'order-from-disorder' arising in frustrated magnets and unconventional Cooper pairing in magnetic superconductors. Here we show that the exchange of spin waves between extended topological defects, such as domain walls, can result in novel magnetic states. We report the discovery of an unusual incommensurate phase in the orthoferrite TbFeO(3) using neutron diffraction under an applied magnetic field. The magnetic modulation has a very long period of 340 Å at 3 K and exhibits an anomalously large number of higher-order harmonics. These domain walls are formed by Ising-like Tb spins. They interact by exchanging magnons propagating through the Fe magnetic sublattice. The resulting force between the domain walls has a rather long range that determines the period of the incommensurate state and is analogous to the pion-mediated Yukawa interaction between protons and neutrons in nuclei.

  1. Probing the CP properties of top Yukawa coupling at an e + e - collider

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagiwara, Kaoru; Yokoya, Hiroshi; Zheng, Ya-Juan

    2018-02-01

    We study consequences of CP violation in the ht\\overline{t} Yukawa coupling through the process {e}+{e}-\\to h(125)t\\overline{t} . The helicity amplitudes are calculated in the t\\overline{t} rest frame, where the initial e + e - current and the final Higgs boson have the same three-momentum. CP-violating asymmetries appear not only in the azimuthal angle between the e + e - plane and the t\\overline{t} plane about the Higgs momentum direction, but also in the correlated decay angular distributions of t and \\overline{t} . Complete description of the production and decay angular distributions are obtained analytically, including both leptonic and hadronic decays of t and \\overline{t} . We study the ultimate sensitivity to the CP-violating ht\\overline{t} coupling at a few center-of-mass energies. Our analysis shows that the possibility of discovering CP-violating ht\\overline{t} coupling improves significantly by studying t\\overline{t} decay angular correlations, and more importantly, by increasing its energy upgrade target from √{s}=500 GeV to 550 GeV.

  2. Thermodynamic equivalence between the Lennard-Jones and hard-core attractive Yukawa systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kadiri, Y.; Albaki, R.; Bretonnet, J.L.

    2008-01-01

    The investigation of the thermodynamic properties of the Lennard-Jones (LJ) fluid is made by means of a system of particles interacting with a potential of hard-core plus attractive Yukawa tail (HCY). Due to the similarity between the LJ potential and the HCY potential in its overall form, it is worthwhile seeking to approximate the LJ potential in much the same way that the hard-sphere reference potential has been so used. The study consists in describing the thermodynamics of the LJ fluid in terms of the equivalent HCY system, whose the properties are known accurately, by means of mapping the thermodynamic quantities for the HCY potential parameters. The method is feasible owing to a convenient analytical expression of the Helmholtz free energy from the mean-spherical approximation expanded in power of the inverse temperature. Two different procedures are used to determine the parameters of the HCY potential as a function of the thermodynamic states: one is based on the simultaneous fits of pressure and internal energy of the LJ system and the other uses the concept of collision frequency. The reasonable homogeneity of the results in both procedures of mapping makes that the HCY potential is a very good reference system, whose the proposed theoretical expressions can be used confidently to predict the thermodynamic properties of more realistic potentials

  3. The renormalized gauge coupling and non-perturbative tests of dimensional reduction

    CERN Document Server

    Laine, Mikko

    1999-01-01

    In 4d lattice simulations of Standard Model like theories, the renormalized gauge coupling in the broken phase can be determined from the prefactor of the Yukawa term in the static potential. We compute the same quantity in terms of the conventional MSbar scheme gauge coupling. The result allows for a further non-perturbative test of finite temperature dimensional reduction, by a comparison of the critical temperatures for the electroweak phase transition as obtained with 4d lattice simulations and with 3d effective theory simulations.

  4. Single Event Effect (SEE) Test Planning 101

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.; Pellish, Jonathan; Berg, Melanie D.

    2011-01-01

    This is a course on SEE Test Plan development. It is an introductory discussion of the items that go into planning an SEE test that should complement the SEE test methodology used. Material will only cover heavy ion SEE testing and not proton, LASER, or other though many of the discussed items may be applicable. While standards and guidelines for how-to perform single event effects (SEE) testing have existed almost since the first cyclotron testing, guidance on the development of SEE test plans has not been as easy to find. In this section of the short course, we attempt to rectify this lack. We consider the approach outlined here as a "living" document: mission specific constraints and new technology related issues always need to be taken into account. We note that we will use the term "test planning" in the context of those items being included in a test plan.

  5. Effectiveness testing of spill-treating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.; Stoodley, R.; Laroche, N.

    1990-01-01

    Laboratory effectiveness tests are described for four classes of spill-treating agents: solidifiers, demulsifying agents, surface-washing agents and dispersants. Many treating agents in these four categories have been tested for effectiveness and the results are presented. Solidifiers or gelling agents solidify oil, requiring a large amount of agent to solidify oil-ranging between 16% by weight, to over 200%. Emulsion breakers prevent or reverse the formation of water-in-oil emulsions. A newly-developed effectiveness test shows that only one product is highly effective; however, many products will work, but require large amounts of spill-treating agent. Surfactant--containing materials are of two types, surface-washing agents and dispersants. Testing has shown that an agent that is a good dispersant is conversely a poor surface-washing agent, and vice versa. Tests of surface-washing agents show that only a few agents have effectiveness of 25-40%, where this effectiveness is the percentage of heavy oil removed from a test surface. Results using the 'swirling flask' test for dispersant effectiveness are reported. Heavy oils show effectiveness values of about 1%, medium crudes of about 10%, light crude oils of about 30% and very light oils of about 90%. (author)

  6. Effective squark/chargino/neutralino couplings: MadGraph implementation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abrahantes, Arian [Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Facultad de Ciencias, Zaragoza (Spain); Guasch, Jaume [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Penaranda, Siannah [Universidad de Zaragoza, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Facultad de Ciencias, Zaragoza (Spain); Universitat de Barcelona, Departament de Fisica Fonamental, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain); Sanchez-Florit, Rauel [Universitat de Barcelona, Departament d' Estructura i Constituents de la Materia, Institut de Ciencies del Cosmos, Barcelona, Catalonia (Spain)

    2013-04-15

    We have included the effective description of squark interactions with charginos/neutralinos in the MadGraph MSSM model. This effective description includes the effective Yukawa couplings, and another logarithmic term which encodes the supersymmetry-breaking. We have performed an extensive test of our implementation analyzing the results of the partial decay widths of squarks into charginos and neutralinos obtained by using FeynArts/FormCalc programs and the new model file in MadGraph. We present results for the cross-section of top-squark production decaying into charginos and neutralinos. (orig.)

  7. Full simulation study of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC at $\\sqrt{s}$ = 1 TeV

    CERN Document Server

    Price, Tony; Strube, Jan; Tanabe, Tomohiko

    2015-01-01

    We present a study of the expected precision for measurement of the top Yukawa coupling, yt, in e+e- collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1 TeV and assuming a beam polarization of P (e-, e+) = (-0.8,+0.2). Independent analyses of ttH final states containing at least six hadronic jets are performed, based on detailed simulations of SiD and ILD, the two candidate detector concepts for the ILC. We estimate that a statistical precision of yt of 4% can be obtained with an integrated luminosity of 1 $\\mathrm{ab}^{-1}$.

  8. Two-loop top and bottom Yukawa corrections to the Higgs-boson masses in the complex MSSM

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paßehr, Sebastian; Weiglein, Georg

    2018-03-01

    Results for the two-loop corrections to the Higgs-boson masses of the MSSM with complex parameters of O{( α _t^2+α _tα _b+α _b^2) } from the Yukawa sector in the gauge-less limit are presented. The corresponding self-energies and their renormalization have been obtained in the Feynman-diagrammatic approach. The impact of the new contributions on the Higgs spectrum is investigated. Furthermore, a comparison with an existing result in the limit of the MSSM with real parameters is carried out. The new results will be included in the public code FeynHiggs.

  9. Upper and lower Higgs boson mass bounds from a lattice Higgs-Yukawa model with dynamical overlap fermions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerhold, Philipp [Humboldt-Universitaet, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Physik; Jansen, Karl [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Zeuthen (Germany). John von Neumann-Inst. fuer Computing NIC

    2009-12-15

    We study a lattice Higgs-Yukawa model emulating the same Higgs-fermion coupling structure as in the Higgs sector of the electroweak Standard Model, in particular, obeying a Ginsparg- Wilson version of the underlying SU(2){sub L} x U(1){sub Y} symmetry, being a global symmetry here due to the neglection of gauge fields in this model. In this paper we present our results on the cutoffdependent upper Higgs boson mass bound at several selected values of the cutoff parameter {lambda}. (orig.)

  10. Light-quarks Yukawa couplings and new physics in exclusive high-pT Higgs boson +jet and Higgs boson + b -jet events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Jonathan; Bar-Shalom, Shaouly; Eilam, Gad; Soni, Amarjit

    2018-03-01

    We suggest that the exclusive Higgs +light (or b)-jet production at the LHC, p p →h +j (jb), is a rather sensitive probe of the light-quarks Yukawa couplings and of other forms of new physics (NP) in the Higgs-gluon h g g and quark-gluon q q g interactions. We study the Higgs pT-distribution in p p →h +j (jb)→γ γ +j (jb), i.e., in h +j (jb) production followed by the Higgs decay h →γ γ , employing the (pT-dependent) signal strength formalism to probe various types of NP which are relevant to these processes and which we parametrize either as scaled Standard Model (SM) couplings (the kappa-framework) and/or through new higher dimensional effective operators (the SMEFT framework). We find that the exclusive h +j (jb) production at the 13 TeV LHC is sensitive to various NP scenarios, with typical scales ranging from a few TeV to O (10 ) TeV , depending on the flavor, chirality and Lorentz structure of the underlying physics.

  11. The Evaluator Effect in Usability Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Niels Ebbe; Hertzum, Morten; John, Bonnie E.

    1998-01-01

    Usability tests are applied in industry to evaluate systems and in research as a yardstick for other usability evaluation methods. However, one potential threat to the reliability of usability tests has been left unaddressed: the evaluator effect. In this study, four evaluators analyzed four...... videotaped usability test sessions. Only 20% of the 93 unique problems were detected by all four evaluators and 46% were detected by only a single evaluator. Severe problems were detected more often by all four evaluators (41%) and less often by only one evaluator (22%) but a substantial evaluator effect...

  12. Comparing the effectiveness of software testing strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basili, Victor R.; Selby, Richard W.

    1987-01-01

    This study compares the results of code reading, functional testing, and structural testing in three aspects of software testing: fault detection effectiveness, fault detection cost, and classes of faults detected. Thirty two professional programmers and 42 advanced students applied the three techniques to four unit-sized programs in a fractional experimental design. The major results of this study are the following: (1) With the professional programmers, code reading detected more software faults and had a higher detection rate than did functional or structural testing, while functional testing detected more faults than did structural testing, but functional and structural testing were not different in fault detection rate. (2) In one advanced student subject group, code reading and functional testing were not different in faults found, but were superior to structural testing, while in the other advanced student subject group there was no difference among the techniques. (3) With the advanced student subjects, the three techniques were not different in fault deteciton rate. (4) Number of faults observed, fault detection rate, and total effort in detection depended on the type of software tested. (5) Code reading detected more interface faults than did the other methods. (6) Functional testing detected more control faults than did the other methods. (7) When asked to estimate the percentage of faults detected, code readers gave the most accurate estimates while functional testers gave the least accurate estimates. Appendix B includes the source code for the word.

  13. The effect of testing on skills learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, Charles B; Jensen, Morten L; Ringsted, Charlotte

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: In addition to the extrinsic effects of assessment and examinations on students' study habits, testing can have an intrinsic effect on the memory of studied material. Whether this testing effect also applies to skills learning is not known. However, this is especially interesting...... in view of the need to maximise learning outcomes from costly simulation-based courses. This study was conducted to determine whether testing as the final activity in a skills course increases learning outcome compared with an equal amount of time spent practising the skill. METHODS: We carried out...... randomised to either the intervention or control group and were invited to participate in an assessment of learning outcome. The intervention course included 3.5 hours of instruction and training followed by 30 minutes of testing. The control course included 4 hours of instruction and training. Participant...

  14. Presentation Order Effects in Product Taste Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Michael L.

    1980-01-01

    Presentation order in paired-comparison testing was varied to measure the impact of primacy v recency effects on consumer product evaluation. First position preference bias characterized the findings, lending support to the attention decrement hypothesis or a suggested palate desensitization effect on subsequent taste trial behavior. (Author)

  15. Toetsen als Leerinterventie. Samenvatten in het Testing Effect Paradigma [Tests as learning interventions. Summarization investigated in the Testing Effect Paradigm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkx, Kim; Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2011-01-01

    Dirkx, K. J. H., Kester, L., & Kirschner, P. A. (2011, 8 Juni). Toetsen als Leerinterventie. Samenvatten in het Testing Effect Paradigma Onderzocht [Tests as learning interventions. Summarization investigated in the Testing Effect Paradigm]. Paper presented during a symposium at the Educational

  16. Constraining the range of Yukawa gravity interaction from S2 star orbits III: improvement expectations for graviton mass bounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakharov, A. F.; Jovanović, P.; Borka, D.; Borka Jovanović, V.

    2018-04-01

    Recently, the LIGO-Virgo collaboration discovered gravitational waves and in their first publication on the subject the authors also presented a graviton mass constraint as mg advance for general relativity and Yukawa potential are different functions on eccentricity and semimajor axis, it gives an opportunity to improve current estimates of graviton mass with future observational facilities. In our considerations of an improvement potential for a graviton mass estimate we adopt a conservative strategy and assume that trajectories of bright stars and their apocenter advance will be described with general relativity expressions and it gives opportunities to improve graviton mass constraints. In contrast with our previous studies, where we present current constraints on parameters of Yukawa gravity [5] and graviton mass [6] from observations of S2 star, in the paper we express expectations to improve current constraints for graviton mass, assuming the GR predictions about apocenter shifts will be confirmed with future observations. We concluded that if future observations of bright star orbits during around fifty years will confirm GR predictions about apocenter shifts of bright star orbits it give an opportunity to constrain a graviton mass at a level around 5 × 10‑23 eV or slightly better than current estimates obtained with LIGO observations.

  17. Structure Factor of a Hard-core Fluid with Short-range Yukawa Attraction: Analytical FMSA Theory against Monte Carlo Simulations.

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Melnyk, R.; Nezbeda, Ivo; Trokhymchuk, A.

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 114, 16-17 (2016), s. 2523-2529 ISSN 0026-8976 Institutional support: RVO:67985858 Keywords : hard-core fluid * reference system * short-range Yukawa attraction Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 1.870, year: 2016

  18. Pragmatic Software Testing Becoming an Effective and Efficient Test Professional

    CERN Document Server

    Black, Rex

    2011-01-01

    A hands-on guide to testing techniques that deliver reliable software and systemsTesting even a simple system can quickly turn into a potentially infinite task. Faced with tight costs and schedules, testers need to have a toolkit of practical techniques combined with hands-on experience and the right strategies in order to complete a successful project. World-renowned testing expert Rex Black provides you with the proven methods and concepts that test professionals must know. He presents you with the fundamental techniques for testing and clearly shows you how to select and apply successful st

  19. Laboratory tests for single-event effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buchner, S.; McMorrow, D.; Melinger, J.; Campbell, A.B.

    1996-01-01

    Integrated circuits are currently tested at accelerators for their susceptibility to single-event effects (SEE's). However, because of the cost and limited accessibility associated with accelerator testing, there is considerable interest in developing alternate testing methods. Two laboratory techniques for measuring SEE, one involving a pulsed laser and the other 252 Cf, are described in detail in this paper. The pulsed laser provides information on the spatial and temporal dependence of SEE, information that has proven invaluable in understanding and mitigating SEE in spite of the differences in the physical mechanisms responsible for SEE induced by light and by ions. Considerable effort has been expended on developing 252 Cf as a laboratory test for SEE, but the technique has not found wide use because it is severely limited by the low energy and short range of the emitted ions that are unable to reach junctions either covered with dielectric layers or deep below the surface. In fact, there are documented cases where single-event latchup (SEL) testing with 252 Cf gave significantly different results from accelerator testing. A detailed comparison of laboratory and accelerator SEE data is presented in this review in order to establish the limits of each technique

  20. The Effects of Test Format and Locus of Control on Test Anxiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Namok

    1998-01-01

    Investigates the joint effects of locus of control and test format on test anxiety with college students (N=86). Examines the relationship between students' attitudes toward test format and test anxiety. Results show no differential effect of locus of control on test anxiety across test format; students were more anxious about essay tests than…

  1. The Effects of Humor on Test Anxiety and Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tali, Glenda

    2017-01-01

    Testing in an academic setting provokes anxiety in all students in higher education, particularly nursing students. When students experience high levels of anxiety, the resulting decline in test performance often does not represent an accurate assessment of students' academic achievement. This quantitative, experimental study examined the effects…

  2. Virucidal Effectiveness Testing Using Feline Calicivirus as Surrogate for Norovirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    These documents describe the effectiveness test using Feline Calicivirus as Surrogate for Norovirus, including initial and confirmatory testing and testing with pre-saturated or impregnated towelettes.

  3. Field tests on partial embedment effects (embedment effect tests on soil-structure interaction)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurimoto, O.; Tsunoda, T.; Inoue, T.; Izumi, M.; Kusakabe, K.; Akino, K.

    1993-01-01

    A series of Model Tests of Embedment Effect on Reactor Buildings has been carried out by the Nuclear Power Engineering Corporation (NUPEC), under the sponsorship of the Ministry of International Trade and lndustry (MITI) of Japan. The nuclear reactor buildings are partially embedded due to conditions for the construction or building arrangement in Japan. It is necessary to verify the partial embedment effects by experiments and analytical studies in order to incorporate the effects in the seismic design. Forced vibration tests, therefore, were performed using a model with several types of embedment. Correlated simulation analyses were also performed and the characteristics of partial embedment effects on soil-structure interaction were evaluated. (author)

  4. The Forward Testing Effect: Interim Testing Enhances Inductive Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunliang; Shanks, David R.

    2018-01-01

    "Induction" refers to the process in which people generalize their previous experience when making uncertain inferences about the environment that go beyond direct experience. Here we show that interim tests strongly enhance inductive learning. Participants studied the painting styles of eight famous artists across four lists, each…

  5. The "Volvo Effect"--Questioning Standardized Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesson, Kenneth A.

    2001-01-01

    Questions current emphasis on standardized tests and discusses several factors about the tests that should prompt reevaluation of their usefulness. Issues discussed include: development and design of standardized tests; the correlation between test scores and socioeconomic position; the discrepancy between test designs and accurate reflection of…

  6. Irradiation Effects Test Series: Test IE-2. Test results report. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allison, C. M.; Croucher, D. W.; Ploger, S. A.; Mehner, A. S.

    1977-08-01

    The report describes the results of a test using four 0.97-m long PWR-type fuel rods with differences in diametral gap and cladding irradiation. The objective of this test was to provide information about the effects of these differences on fuel rod behavior during quasi-equilibrium and film boiling operation. The fuel rods were subjected to a series of preconditioning power cycles of less than 30 kW/m. Rod powers were then increased to 68 kW/m at a coolant mass flux of 4900 kg/s-m/sup 2/. After one hour at 68 kW/m, a power-cooling-mismatch sequence was initiated by a flow reduction at constant power. At a flow of 2550 kg/s-m/sup 2/, the onset of film boiling occurred on one rod, Rod IE-011. An additional flow reduction to 2245 kg/s-m/sup 2/ caused the onset of film boiling on the remaining three rods. Data are presented on the behavior of fuel rods during quasiequilibrium and during film boiling operation. The effects of initial gap size, cladding irradiation, rod power cycling, a rapid power increase, and sustained film boiling are discussed. These discussions are based on measured test data, preliminary postirradiation examination results, and comparisons of results with FRAP-T3 computer model calculations.

  7. A theoretical Deduction from the Hubble law based on a Modified Newtonian Dynamics with field of Yukawa inverse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falcon, N.

    2017-07-01

    At cosmic scales the dynamics of the Universe are almost exclusively prescribed by the force of gravity; however the assumption of the law of gravitation, depending on the inverse of the distance, leads to the known problems of the rotation curves of galaxies and missing mass (dark matter). The problem of the coupling of gravity to changes in scale and deviations from the law of the inverse square is an old problem (Laplace, 1805; Seeliger 1898), which has motivated alternatives to Newtonian dynamics compatible with observations. The present paper postulates a modified Newtonian dynamics by adding an inverse Yukawa potential: U(r)≡U0(M)(r-r0)e-α/r is the the potential per unit mass (in N/kg) as a function of the barionic mass that causes the field, r0 is of the order of 50h-1 Mpc and alpha is a coupling constant of the order of 2.5 h-1 Mpc. This potential is zero within the solar system, slightly attractive at interstellar distances, very attractive in galactic range and repulsive at cosmic scales. Its origin is the barionic matter, it allows to include the Milgrow MoND theory to explain the rotation curves, it is compatible with the experiments Eovos type, and allows to deduce the law of Hubble to cosmic scales, in the form H0=100h km/s Mpc≍U0(M)/c, where U0(M)≍ 4pi×6.67 10-11m/s2, is obtained from the Laplace's equation, assuming that the gravitational force is the law of the inverse of the square plus a non-linear term type Yukawa inverse. It is concluded that the modification of the law of gravity with nonlinear terms, allows to model the dynamics of the Universe on a large scale and include non-locality without dark matter. (See Falcon et al. 2014, International Journal of Astronomy and Astrophysics, 4, 551-559).

  8. Testing overall and moderator effects meta-regression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, H.M.; Visser, I.; Dolan, C.V.

    2011-01-01

    Random effects meta-regression is a technique to synthesize results of multiple studies. It allows for a test of an overall effect, as well as for tests of effects of study characteristics, that is, (discrete or continuous) moderator effects. We describe various procedures to test moderator effects:

  9. Improving Single Event Effects Testing Through Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, M. W.

    2011-01-01

    Radiation encountered in space environments can be damaging to microelectronics and potentially cause spacecraft failure. Single event effects (SEE) are a type of radiation effect that occur when an ion strikes a device. Single event gate rupture (SEGR) is a type of SEE that can cause failure in power transistors. Unlike other SEE rates in which a constant linear energy transfer (LET) can be used, SEGR rates sometimes require a non-uniform LET to be used to be accurate. A recent analysis shows that SEGR rates are most easily calculated when the environment is described as a stopping rate per unit volume for each ion species. Stopping rates in silicon for pertinent ions were calculated using the Stopping and Range of Ions in Matter (SRIM) software and CREME-MC software. A reference table was generated and can be used by others to calculate SEGR rates for a candidate device. Additionally, lasers can be used to simulate SEEs, providing more control and information at lower cost than heavy ion testing. The electron/hole pair generation rate from a laser pulse in a semiconductor can be related to the LET of an ion. MATLAB was used to generate a plot to easily make this comparison.

  10. Effects of Variables in Charpy Impact Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Test equipment, * Charpy impact tests, *Steel, Machine shop practice, Cooling, Polishing, Surface properties, Mechanical properties, Release...mechanisms, Jamming, Pendulums , Sizes(Dimensions), Analysis of variance, Tensile properties, Gun barrels, Gun muzzles, Heat treatment, Hardness

  11. Effect of demographic data on neuropsychological tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmet Evlice

    2016-09-01

    Material and Methods: Between 2014-2016 years; mini mental state examination, forward and backward digit span, verbal fluency (semantic and lexical, clock drawing, verbal and visual memory tests were performed to healthy people. The presence of correlation between neuropsychological tests and gender, age and education were researched in healthy people. Results: Hundred subjects (60 female, 40 male were included to study. No difference was observed between male and female subjects on neuropsychological tests. There was negative correlation between age and mini mental state examination, digit span and semantic fluency tests. And also there was positive correlation between education and all neuropsychological tests (except verbal memory test. Conclusion: The mean neuropsychological test scores in healthy people were not shown differences by gender, but they were affected by age and education. [Cukurova Med J 2016; 41(3.000: 528-532

  12. Effective Teaching Practices during Physical Fitness Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Amanda; Elliot, Steven; Boyce, B. Ann; Block, Martin E.

    2005-01-01

    Participation in fitness tests is among the most common memories many adults hold of physical education class. If students have a negative attitude towards fitness testing, they may be less likely to assess their own progress once they graduate. These negative attitudes often promote lifestyle choices that support participation in at-risk…

  13. The Operational Testing Effectiveness Evaluation Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-04-01

    objective evaluation method. 3 CHAPTER TWO HISTORICAL OT&E: A RESTLESS SEARCH We regard the creation of the testing and eva ]uation group as of the utmost...supervise it? Tracing the organiza- tional development of operational testing leads through a bewildering maze of command and staff structures. This chapter

  14. Test Methods for Effects on Organisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    NORD-UTTE er Nordisk koordineringsgrupp för utvekling av testmetoder inom toxicologi och ekotoxicology. The Nordic Co-ordination Group for the Development of Test Methods for Toxicology and Ecotoxicology...

  15. Political aspects of nuclear test effects at Semipalatinsk nuclear test site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sydykov, E.B.; Panin, M.S.

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes tense struggle of Kazakhstan people for closure of the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site. It reveals major foreign policy aspects and nuclear test effects for both Kazakhstan and the world community. (author)

  16. The effects of free recall testing on subsequent source memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, Gene A; Marsh, Richard L; Meeks, Joseph T; Clark-Foos, Arlo; Hicks, Jason L

    2010-05-01

    The testing effect is the finding that prior retrieval of information from memory will result in better subsequent memory for that material. One explanation for these effects is that initial free recall testing increases the recollective details for tested information, which then becomes more available during a subsequent test phase. In three experiments we explored this hypothesis using a source-monitoring test phase after the initial free recall tests. We discovered that memory is differentially enhanced for certain recollective details depending on the nature of the free recall task. Thus further research needs to be conducted to specify how different kinds of memorial details are enhanced by free recall testing.

  17. A dual memory theory of the testing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Timothy C; Pan, Steven C

    2017-06-05

    A new theoretical framework for the testing effect-the finding that retrieval practice is usually more effective for learning than are other strategies-is proposed, the empirically supported tenet of which is that separate memories form as a consequence of study and test events. A simplest case quantitative model is derived from that framework for the case of cued recall. With no free parameters, that model predicts both proportion correct in the test condition and the magnitude of the testing effect across 10 experiments conducted in our laboratory, experiments that varied with respect to material type, retention interval, and performance in the restudy condition. The model also provides the first quantitative accounts of (a) the testing effect as a function of performance in the restudy condition, (b) the upper bound magnitude of the testing effect, (c) the effect of correct answer feedback, (d) the testing effect as a function of retention interval for the cases of feedback and no feedback, and (e) the effect of prior learning method on subsequent learning through testing. Candidate accounts of several other core phenomena in the literature, including test-potentiated learning, recognition versus cued recall training effects, cued versus free recall final test effects, and other select transfer effects, are also proposed. Future prospects and relations to other theories are discussed.

  18. Effectiveness of dialectical behaviour therapy in reduction of test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Participants exposed to DBT (X=25.725) exhibited lesser degree of test anxiety compared with control group (X=36.392) There was, however, no main effect of types of learning disabilities (dyslexia, dyscalculia and dysgraphia) on the test anxiety of the participants. No main effect of gender on test anxiety of the participants ...

  19. Probing the Top-Yukawa Coupling by Searching for Associated Higgs Boson Production with a Single Top Quark at the CMS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Fink, Simon; Quast, Günter

    In this thesis the associated production of a single top quark with a Higgs boson is studied. This process is especially well suited for probing of the Top-Yukawa coupling, as the cross section of the tH process increases for couplings deviating from the Standard Model prediction. Upper exclusion limits are set on the tH production by analyzing the data recorded during Run-I and recorded in 2015 during Run-II of the LHC with the CMS detector.

  20. The interim test effect: testing prior material can facilitate the learning of new material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissman, Kathryn T; Rawson, Katherine A; Pyc, Mary A

    2011-12-01

    A wealth of prior research has shown that testing can improve subsequent learning of the initially tested material. In contrast, only one recent study has shown that an interim test over prior material can improve learning of subsequent new material (i.e., an interim-test effect). Five experiments replicated and extended this initial work by exploring the extent to which interim test effects generalize to complex text material. Participants were prompted to recall each section of an expository text before moving on to study the next section, or were only prompted to recall after the final section. In all experiments, recall of the final, target section was greater when prior sections had received interim tests versus no interim tests. Experiment 3 established that the effect was due to interim testing in particular rather than to intervening activity in general. Experiment 4 established that the effect was not due to test expectancy differences. In contrast to prior research, Experiment 4 also provided evidence that the effect is not due to release from proactive interference. We discuss other possible mechanisms underlying interim-test effects with text, including shifting to more effective encoding strategies.

  1. Comparing Cost-Effectiveness of HIV Testing Strategies: Targeted and Routine Testing in Washington, DC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda D Castel

    Full Text Available Routine HIV testing is an essential approach to identifying undiagnosed infections, linking people to care and treatment, and preventing new infections. In Washington, DC, where HIV prevalence is 2.4%, a combination of routine and targeted testing approaches has been implemented since 2006.We sought to evaluate the cost effectiveness of the District of Columbia (DC Department of Health's routine and targeted HIV testing implementation strategies. We collected HIV testing data from 3 types of DC Department of Health-funded testing sites (clinics, hospitals, and community-based organizations; collected testing and labor costs; and calculated effectiveness measures including cost per new diagnosis and cost per averted transmission.Compared to routine testing, targeted testing resulted in higher positivity rates (1.33% vs. 0.44%. Routine testing averted 34.30 transmissions per year compared to targeted testing at 17.78. The cost per new diagnosis was lower for targeted testing ($2,467 vs. $7,753 per new diagnosis as was the cost per transmission averted ($33,160 vs. $104,205. When stratified by testing site, both testing approaches were most cost effective in averting new transmissions when conducted by community based organizations ($25,037 routine; $33,123 targeted compared to hospitals or clinics.While routine testing identified more newly diagnosed infections and averted more infections than targeted testing, targeted testing is more cost effective per diagnosis and per transmission averted overall. Given the high HIV prevalence in DC, the DC Department of Health's implementation strategy should continue to encourage routine testing implementation with emphasis on a combined testing strategy among community-based organizations.

  2. Major Achievements and Prospect of the ATLAS Integral Effect Tests

    OpenAIRE

    Ki-Yong Choi; Yeon-Sik Kim; Chul-Hwa Song; Won-Pil Baek

    2012-01-01

    A large-scale thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation), has been operated by KAERI. The reference plant of ATLAS is the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor, 1400 MWe). Since 2007, an extensive series of experimental works were successfully carried out, including large break loss of coolant accident tests, small break loss of coolant accident tests at various break locations, steam generator tube rupture tests, feed line ...

  3. Testing Prepares Students to Learn Better: The Forward Effect of Testing in Category Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Seung; Ahn, Dahwi

    2018-01-01

    The forward effect of testing occurs when testing on previously studied information facilitates subsequent learning. The present research investigated whether interim testing on initially studied materials enhances the learning of new materials in category learning and examined the metacognitive judgments of such learning. Across the 4…

  4. Ionizing radiation effects on silicon test structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraner, H.W.; Beuttenmuller, R.; Chen, W.; Kierstead, J.A.; Li, Z.; Zhang, Y.; Dou, L.; Fretwurst, E.; Lindstroem, G.

    1993-12-01

    The effects of 60 Co gamma irradiation on MOSCAPS and special junction diode detectors have been studied. The capacitors were used to ellicit the charge accumulation and anneal in two types of thermally grown oxides representative of those used in routine detector processing. Ion implanted, oxide passivated junction detectors having 0.25 and 1 cm 2 areas and perimeter to area ratios of 1 (a square), 2 and 5 were designed and constructed to amplify the ionizing effects expected to largely affect junction edges through changes in fixed oxide charges. Detectors were exposed to over 4 Mrad and showed clear increases in leakage current in proportion to the junction edge length. Annealing schedules were determined to provide a continuous response to incremental irradiations and subsequent room temperature anneals of leakage current. Besides an increase in gate threshold, little effect on the C(V) response was found. PISCES simulation of the edge fields using different fixed oxide charge revealed regions of very high lateral fields near the junction edges for fixed charges in the 2 x 10 12 /cm 2 range expected from the capacitor studies which could be responsible for the observed leakage currents

  5. Irradiation effects test series, test IE-5. Test results report. [PWR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Croucher, D. W.; Yackle, T. R.; Allison, C. M.; Ploger, S. A.

    1978-01-01

    Test IE-5, conducted in the Power Burst Facility at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory, employed three 0.97-m long pressurized water reactor type fuel rods, fabricated from previously irradiated zircaloy-4 cladding and one similar rod fabricated from unirradiated cladding. The objectives of the test were to evaluate the influence of simulated fission products, cladding irradiation damage, and fuel rod internal pressure on pellet-cladding interaction during a power ramp and on fuel rod behavior during film boiling operation. The four rods were subjected to a preconditioning period, a power ramp to an average fuel rod peak power of 65 kW/m, and steady state operation for one hour at a coolant mass flux of 4880 kg/s-m/sup 2/ for each rod. After a flow reduction to 1800 kg/s-m/sup 2/, film boiling occurred on one rod. Additional flow reductions to 970 kg/s-m/sup 2/ produced film boiling on the three remaining fuel rods. Maximum time in film boiling was 80s. The rod having the highest initial internal pressure (8.3 MPa) failed 10s after the onset of film boiling. A second rod failed about 90s after reactor shutdown. The report contains a description of the experiment, the test conduct, test results, and results from the preliminary postirradiation examination. Calculations using a transient fuel rod behavior code are compared with the test results.

  6. Test requirements for the integral effect test to simulate Korean PWR plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Park, C. K.; Lee, S. J.; Kwon, T. S.; Yun, B. J.; Chung, M. K.

    2001-02-01

    In this report, the test requirements are described for the design of the integral effect test facility to simulate Korean PWR plants. Since the integral effect test facility should be designed so as to simulate various thermal hydraulic phenomena, as closely as possible, to be occurred in real plants during operation or anticipated transients, the design and operational characteristics of the reference plants (Korean Standard Nuclear Plant and Korean Next Generation Reactor)were analyzed in order to draw major components, systems, and functions to be satisfied or simulated in the test facility. The test matrix is set up by considering major safety concerns of interest and the test objectives to confirm and enhance the safety of the plants. And the analysis and prioritization of the test matrix leads to the general design requirements of the test facility. Based on the general design requirements, the design criteria is set up for the basic and detailed design of the test facility. And finally it is drawn the design requirements specific to the fluid system and measurement system of the test facility. The test requirements in this report will be used as a guideline to the scaling analysis and basic design of the test facility. The test matrix specified in this report can be modified in the stage of main testing by considering the needs of experiments and circumstances at that time

  7. Test requirements for the integral effect test to simulate Korean PWR plants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chul Hwa; Park, C. K.; Lee, S. J.; Kwon, T. S.; Yun, B. J.; Chung, M. K

    2001-02-01

    In this report, the test requirements are described for the design of the integral effect test facility to simulate Korean PWR plants. Since the integral effect test facility should be designed so as to simulate various thermal hydraulic phenomena, as closely as possible, to be occurred in real plants during operation or anticipated transients, the design and operational characteristics of the reference plants (Korean Standard Nuclear Plant and Korean Next Generation Reactor)were analyzed in order to draw major components, systems, and functions to be satisfied or simulated in the test facility. The test matrix is set up by considering major safety concerns of interest and the test objectives to confirm and enhance the safety of the plants. And the analysis and prioritization of the test matrix leads to the general design requirements of the test facility. Based on the general design requirements, the design criteria is set up for the basic and detailed design of the test facility. And finally it is drawn the design requirements specific to the fluid system and measurement system of the test facility. The test requirements in this report will be used as a guideline to the scaling analysis and basic design of the test facility. The test matrix specified in this report can be modified in the stage of main testing by considering the needs of experiments and circumstances at that time.

  8. Effects of Test Item Disclosure on Medical Licensing Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eunbae B.; Lee, Myung Ae; Park, Yoon Soo

    2018-01-01

    In 2012, the National Health Personnel Licensing Examination Board of Korea decided to publicly disclose all test items and answers to satisfy the test takers' right to know and enhance the transparency of tests administered by the government. This study investigated the effects of item disclosure on the medical licensing examination (MLE),…

  9. Testing the exclusivity effect in location memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Daniel P A; Dunn, Andrew K; Baguley, Thom

    2013-01-01

    There is growing literature exploring the possibility of parallel retrieval of location memories, although this literature focuses primarily on the speed of retrieval with little attention to the accuracy of location memory recall. Baguley, Lansdale, Lines, and Parkin (2006) found that when a person has two or more memories for an object's location, their recall accuracy suggests that only one representation can be retrieved at a time (exclusivity). This finding is counterintuitive given evidence of non-exclusive recall in the wider memory literature. The current experiment explored the exclusivity effect further and aimed to promote an alternative outcome (i.e., independence or superadditivity) by encouraging the participants to combine multiple representations of space at encoding or retrieval. This was encouraged by using anchor (points of reference) labels that could be combined to form a single strongly associated combination. It was hypothesised that the ability to combine the anchor labels would allow the two representations to be retrieved concurrently, generating higher levels of recall accuracy. The results demonstrate further support for the exclusivity hypothesis, showing no significant improvement in recall accuracy when there are multiple representations of a target object's location as compared to a single representation.

  10. Attributes of system testing which promote cost-effectiveness

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, L.C.

    1975-01-01

    A brief overview of conventional EMP testing activity examines attributes of overall systems tests which promote cost-effectiveness. The general framework represents an EMP-oriented systems test as a portion of a planned program to design, produce, and field system elements. As such, all so-called system tests should play appropriate cost-effective roles in this program, and the objective here is to disclose such roles. The intrinsic worth of such tests depends not only upon placing proper values on the outcomes, but also upon the possible eventual consequences of not doing tests. A relative worth measure is required. Attributes of EMP system testing over the range of potential activity which encompasses research and development, production, field handling, verification, evaluation, and others are reviewed and examined. Thus, the relative worth, in a cost-effective sense, is provided by relating such attributes to the overall program objectives so that values can be placed on the outcomes for tradeoff purposes

  11. RCT Testing Bystander Effectiveness to Reduce Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coker, Ann L; Bush, Heather M; Cook-Craig, Patricia G; DeGue, Sarah A; Clear, Emily R; Brancato, Candace J; Fisher, Bonnie S; Recktenwald, Eileen A

    2017-05-01

    Bystander-based programs have shown promise to reduce interpersonal violence at colleges, yet limited rigorous evaluations have addressed bystander intervention effectiveness in high schools. This study evaluated the Green Dot bystander intervention to reduce sexual violence and related forms of interpersonal violence in 26 high schools over 5 years. A cluster RCT was conducted. Kentucky high schools were randomized to intervention or control (wait list) conditions. Green Dot-trained educators conducted schoolwide presentations and recruited student popular opinion leaders to receive bystander training in intervention schools beginning in Year 1. The primary outcome was sexual violence perpetration, and related forms of interpersonal violence victimization and perpetration were also measured using anonymous student surveys collected at baseline and annually from 2010 to 2014. Because the school was the unit of analysis, violence measures were aggregated by school and year and school-level counts were provided. A total of 89,707 students completed surveys. The primary, as randomized, analyses conducted in 2014-2016 included linear mixed models and generalized estimating equations to examine the condition-time interaction on violence outcomes. Slopes of school-level totals of sexual violence perpetration (condition-time, pviolence perpetration in the intervention relative to control schools were 0.83 (95% CI=0.70, 0.99) in Year 3 and 0.79 (95% CI=0.67, 0.94) in Year 4. Similar patterns were observed for sexual violence victimization, sexual harassment, stalking, and dating violence perpetration and victimization. Implementation of Green Dot in Kentucky high schools significantly decreased not only sexual violence perpetration but also other forms of interpersonal violence perpetration and victimization. Copyright © 2017 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Test Report: Cost Effective Foundation Insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeffrey M. Lacy; T. E. Rahl; G. A. Twitchell; R. G. Kobbe

    2003-06-01

    A field experiment was conducted to demonstrate and quantify the thermal effectiveness of rigid insulation board when installed on the exterior of a buried concrete foundation wall. A heated, insulated box was constructed along one wall of an existing, unheated building to simulate the living space of a home. The crawl space beneath the living space was divided into two sections. One featured external foundation insulation, while the other side had none. 36 temperature and heat flux sensors were installed at predetermined locations to measure the temperature profile and heat flow out of the living space. The temperature profile through the foundation was then used to calculate the total heat flow out of the foundation for both cases. This experiment showed that a significant energy savings is available with exterior foundation insulation. Over the course of 3 months, the heat-loss differential between the insulated and non-insulated foundations was 4.95 kilowatt-hours per lineal foot of foundation wall, for a ratio of 3:1. For a 2200 sq. ft home with a foundation perimeter 200 ft. long, this would amount to a savings of 990 kW-hrs in just 3 months, or 330 kW-hrs per month. Extrapolating to an 8-month heating year, we would expect to save over 2640 kW-hrs per year for such a home. The savings for a basement foundation, rather than a crawlspace, would be approach twice that amount, nearing 5280 kW-hr per year. Because these data were not collected during the coldest months of the year, they are conservative, and greater savings may be expected during colder periods.

  13. On the Directionality Test of Peer Effects in Social Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Weihua

    2016-01-01

    One interesting idea in social network analysis is the directionality test that utilizes the directions of social ties to help identify peer effects. The null hypothesis of the test is that if contextual factors are the only force that affects peer outcomes, the estimated peer effects should not differ, if the directions of social ties are…

  14. Effect of obestatin on morphometry of testes and testosterone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effect of obestatin on morphometry of testes and testosterone secretion in male rats. S Jahan, T Sidrat, S Ahmed, H Wazir, K Ullah. Abstract. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of chronic intra peritoneal administration of obestatin on plasma testosterone concentrations and cellular morphometry of the testes in ...

  15. Cosmic-ray test and temperature effects of MRPC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yue Qian; Li Yuanjing; Cheng Jianping; Wang Yi; Li Jin; Lai Yongfang; Li Qinghua; Tang Le

    2004-01-01

    A comic-ray test system has been built for testing the performance of MRPC modules. Some methods have been studied to improve the time resolution of the cosmic-ray test based on this testing system. The time resolutions of about 84 ps and 75 ps can be achieved for MRPC and its reference time, respectively. The temperature effects of MRPC have also been researched and some useful results are obtained. (author)

  16. A test of the testing effect: acquiring problem-solving skills from worked examples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gog, Tamara; Kester, Liesbeth

    2012-01-01

    The "testing effect" refers to the finding that after an initial study opportunity, testing is more effective for long-term retention than restudying. The testing effect seems robust and is a finding from the field of cognitive science that has important implications for education. However, it is unclear whether this effect also applies to the acquisition of problem-solving skills, which is important to establish given the key role problem solving plays in, for instance, math and science education. Worked examples are an effective and efficient way of acquiring problem-solving skills. Forty students either only studied worked examples (SSSS) or engaged in testing after studying an example by solving an isomorphic problem (STST). Surprisingly, results showed equal performance in both conditions on an immediate retention test after 5 min, but the SSSS condition outperformed the STST condition on a delayed retention test after 1 week. These findings suggest the testing effect might not apply to acquiring problem-solving skills from worked examples. Copyright © 2012 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  17. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4∼2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure

  18. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baek, W. P.; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S. and others

    2005-02-15

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform various integral effect tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. During the first phase of this project (1997.8{approx}2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished: a full-height, 1/300-volume-scaled full pressure facility for APR1400, an evolutionary pressurized water reactor that was developed by Korean industry. Main objectives of the present phase (2002.4{approx}2005.2), was to optimize the facility design and to construct the experimental facility. We have performed following researches: 1) Optimization of the basic design of the thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility for PWRs - ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) - Reduced height design for APR1400 (+ specific design features of KSNP safety injection systems) - Thermal-hydraulic scaling based on three-level scaling methodology by Ishii et al. 2) Construction of the ATLAS facility - Detailed design of the test facility - Manufacturing and procurement of components - Installation of the facility 3) Development of supporting technology for integral effect tests - Development and application of advanced instrumentation technology - Preliminary analysis of test scenarios - Development of experimental procedures - Establishment and implementation of QA system/procedure.

  19. Thermal Hydraulic Integral Effect Tests for Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Won Pil; Song, C. H.; Kim, Y. S.

    2007-02-01

    The objectives of the project are to construct a thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility and to perform the tests for design, operation, and safety regulation of pressurized water reactors. In the first phase of this project (1997.8∼2002.3), the basic technology for thermal-hydraulic integral effect tests was established and the basic design of the test facility was accomplished. In the second phase (2002.4∼2005.2), an optimized design of the ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation) was established and the construction of the facility was almost completed. In the third phase (2005.3∼2007.2), the construction and commission tests of the ATLAS are to be completed and some first-phase tests are to be conducted

  20. Cost Effectiveness of Gene Expression Profile Testing in Community Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Young; Schechter, Clyde B; Jayasekera, Jinani; Near, Aimee; O'Neill, Suzanne C; Isaacs, Claudine; Phelps, Charles E; Ray, G Thomas; Lieu, Tracy A; Ramsey, Scott; Mandelblatt, Jeanne S

    2018-02-20

    Purpose Gene expression profile (GEP) testing can support chemotherapy decision making for patients with early-stage, estrogen receptor-positive, human epidermal growth factor 2-negative breast cancers. This study evaluated the cost effectiveness of one GEP test, Onco type DX (Genomic Health, Redwood City, CA), in community practice with test-eligible patients age 40 to 79 years. Methods A simulation model compared 25-year societal incremental costs and quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) of community Onco type DX use from 2005 to 2012 versus usual care in the pretesting era (2000 to 2004). Inputs included Onco type DX and chemotherapy data from an integrated health care system and national and published data on Onco type DX accuracy, chemotherapy effectiveness, utilities, survival and recurrence, and Medicare and patient costs. Sensitivity analyses varied individual parameters; results were also estimated for ideal conditions (ie, 100% testing and adherence to test-suggested treatment, perfect test accuracy, considering test effects on reassurance or worry, and lowest costs). Results Twenty-four percent of test-eligible patients had Onco type DX testing. Testing was higher in younger patients and patients with stage I disease ( v stage IIA), and 75.3% and 10.2% of patients with high and low recurrence risk scores received chemotherapy, respectively. The cost-effectiveness ratio for testing ( v usual care) was $188,125 per QALY. Considering test effects on worry versus reassurance decreased the cost-effectiveness ratio to $58,431 per QALY. With perfect test accuracy, the cost-effectiveness ratio was $28,947 per QALY, and under ideal conditions, it was $39,496 per QALY. Conclusion GEP testing is likely to have a high cost-effectiveness ratio on the basis of community practice patterns. However, realistic variations in assumptions about key variables could result in GEP testing having cost-effectiveness ratios in the range of other accepted interventions. The

  1. The effect of test specifications review on improving the quality of a test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamed Zandi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Reviewing the test specifications to improve the quality of language tests may be a routine process in professional testing systems. However, there is a paucity of research about the effect of specifications review on improving the quality of small-scale tests. The purpose of the present study was twofold: how specifications review could help improve the validity of a test in the context of assessment for learning (AFL and to what extent qualitative review of items can identify poor ones. To this end, a group of trained test specifications reviewers (No = 7 provided feedback on the specifications of a test and the quality of the items. Analysis of feedback showed that pedagogical concerns naturally emerged during the specifications review and led to concrete suggestions on how the specifications could be revised so that the resulting test could become more useful in a classroom context. Moreover, the test items were administered to a group of (No = 40 test-takers and a set of quantitative item analyses was carried out. Comparison of the results of qualitative judgment of reviewers with the quantitative analyses showed about 38 % of the items suggested for revision by the reviewers were also identified as poor by the classical test theory (CTT analysis. The findings highlight the potential of specifications review as part of the a priori validation of tests in small-scale assessments where conducting statistical analysis is not usually feasible.

  2. Validating safeguards effectiveness given inherently limited test data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sicherman, A.

    1987-01-01

    A key issue in designing and evaluating nuclear safeguards systems is how to validate safeguards effectiveness against a spectrum of potential threats. Safeguards effectiveness is measured by a performance indicator such as the probability of defeating an adversary attempting a malevolent act. Effectiveness validation means a testing program that provides sufficient evidence that the performance indicator is at an acceptable level. Traditional statistical program when numerous independent system trials are possible. However, within the safeguards environment, many situations arise for which traditional statistical approaches may be neither feasible nor appropriate. Such situations can occur, for example, when there are obvious constraints on the number of possible tests due to operational impacts and testing costs. Furthermore, these tests are usually simulations (e.g., staged force-on-force exercises) rather than actual tests, and the system is often modified after each test. Under such circumstances, it is difficult to make and justify inferences about system performance by using traditional statistical techniques. In this paper, the authors discuss several alternative quantitative techniques for validating system effectiveness. The techniques include: (1) minimizing the number of required tests using sequential testing; (2) combining data from models inspections and exercises using Bayesian statistics to improve inferences about system performance; and (3) using reliability growth and scenario modeling to help specify which safeguards elements and scenarios to test

  3. Major Achievements and Prospect of the ATLAS Integral Effect Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ki-Yong Choi

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A large-scale thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation, has been operated by KAERI. The reference plant of ATLAS is the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor, 1400 MWe. Since 2007, an extensive series of experimental works were successfully carried out, including large break loss of coolant accident tests, small break loss of coolant accident tests at various break locations, steam generator tube rupture tests, feed line break tests, and steam line break tests. These tests contributed toward an understanding of the unique thermal-hydraulic behavior, resolving the safety-related concerns and providing validation data for evaluation of the safety analysis codes and methodology for the advanced pressurized water reactor, APR1400. Major discoveries and lessons found in the past integral effect tests are summarized in this paper. As the demand for integral effect tests is on the rise due to the active national nuclear R&D program in Korea, the future prospects of the application of the ATLAS facility are also discussed.

  4. Major Achievements and Prospect of the ATLAS Integral Effect Tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, K.; Kim, Y.; Song, C.; Baek, W.

    2012-01-01

    A large-scale thermal-hydraulic integral effect test facility, ATLAS (Advanced Thermal-hydraulic Test Loop for Accident Simulation), has been operated by KAERI. The reference plant of ATLAS is the APR1400 (Advanced Power Reactor, 1400 MWe). Since 2007, an extensive series of experimental works were successfully carried out, including large break loss of coolant accident tests, small break loss of coolant accident tests at various break locations, steam generator tube rupture tests, feed line break tests, and steam line break tests. These tests contributed toward an understanding of the unique thermal-hydraulic behavior, resolving the safety-related concerns and providing validation data for evaluation of the safety analysis codes and methodology for the advanced pressurized water reactor, APR1400. Major discoveries and lessons found in the past integral effect tests are summarized in this paper. As the demand for integral effect tests is on the rise due to the active national nuclear R and D program in Korea, the future prospects of the application of the ATLAS facility are also discussed.

  5. The effectiveness testing of oil spill-treating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.; Kyle, D.A.; Laroche, N.; Fieldhouse, B.; Sergy, G.; Stoodley, G.

    1995-01-01

    Laboratory effectiveness tests have been developed for four classes of oil spill treating agents: solidifiers, demulsifying agents, surface-washing agents and dispersants. Several treating agent products in these four categories have been tested for effectiveness. The aquatic toxicity of these agents is an important factor and has been measured for many products. These results are presented. Solidifiers or gelling agents solidify oil. Test results show that solidifiers require between 16% and 200% of agent by weight compared to the oil. De-emulsifying agents or emulsion breakers prevent the formation of or break water-in-oil emulsions. Surfactant-containing materials are of two types, surface-washing agents and dispersants. Testing has shown that effectiveness is orthogonal for these two types of treating agents. Tests of surface washing agents show that only a few agents have effectiveness of 25 to 55%, where this is defined as the percentage of oil removed from a test surface. Dispersant effectiveness results using the swirling flask test are reported. Heavy oils show effectiveness values of about 1%, medium crudes of about 10%, light crude oils of about 30% and very light oils of about 90%

  6. Stereotype threat? Effects of inquiring about test takers' gender on conceptual test performance in physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maries, Alexandru; Singh, Chandralekha

    2015-12-01

    It has been found that activation of a stereotype, for example by indicating one's gender before a test, typically alters performance in a way consistent with the stereotype, an effect called "stereotype threat." On a standardized conceptual physics assessment, we found that asking test takers to indicate their gender right before taking the test did not deteriorate performance compared to an equivalent group who did not provide gender information. Although a statistically significant gender gap was present on the standardized test whether or not students indicated their gender, no gender gap was observed on the multiple-choice final exam students took, which included both quantitative and conceptual questions on similar topics.

  7. Contamination effects of nuclear weapon tests in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hertelendi, Ede; Csongor, Eva

    1984-01-01

    The atmospheric explosions for weapon testing are listed from 1945 to 1962: to the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty. The atmospheric contamination and fallout effects of these tests are discussed, including local, tropospheric and stratospheric components. The conclusions from the activity of precipitation and the radioisotopes resulting from neutron activation processes are described. Finally, the contamination resulting from a hypothetical nuclear war is estimated. (R.P.)

  8. The testing-effect under investigation. Experiences in Kiel

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkx, Kim; Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Dirkx, K. J. H., Kester, L., & Kirschner, P. A. (2013, 22 January). The testing-effect under investigation. Experiences in Kiel. Presentation held at the Learning & Cognition meeting, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  9. The endowment effect and WTA: a quasi-experimental test

    Science.gov (United States)

    H.F. MacDonald; J. Michael Bowker

    1993-01-01

    This paper reports a test of the endowment effect in an economic analysis of localized air pollution. Regression techniques are used to test the significance of perceived property rights on household WTP for improved air quality versus WTA compensation to forgo an improvement in air quality. Our experimental contributes to the research into WTP/WTA divergence by...

  10. When the test of mediation is more powerful than the test of the total effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Holly P; MacKinnon, David P

    2015-06-01

    Although previous research has studied power in mediation models, the extent to which the inclusion of a mediator will increase power has not been investigated. To address this deficit, in a first study we compared the analytical power values of the mediated effect and the total effect in a single-mediator model, to identify the situations in which the inclusion of one mediator increased statistical power. The results from this first study indicated that including a mediator increased statistical power in small samples with large coefficients and in large samples with small coefficients, and when coefficients were nonzero and equal across models. Next, we identified conditions under which power was greater for the test of the total mediated effect than for the test of the total effect in the parallel two-mediator model. These results indicated that including two mediators increased power in small samples with large coefficients and in large samples with small coefficients, the same pattern of results that had been found in the first study. Finally, we assessed the analytical power for a sequential (three-path) two-mediator model and compared the power to detect the three-path mediated effect to the power to detect both the test of the total effect and the test of the mediated effect for the single-mediator model. The results indicated that the three-path mediated effect had more power than the mediated effect from the single-mediator model and the test of the total effect. Practical implications of these results for researchers are then discussed.

  11. The effect of success probability on test economy and self-confidence in computerized adaptive tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JOACHIM HÄUSLER

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent research on the psychological effects of different design decisions in computerized adaptive tests indicates that the maximum-information item selection rule fails to optimize respondents’ test-taking motivation. While several recent studies have investigated psychological reactions to computerized adaptive tests using a consistently higher base success rate, little research has so far been conducted on the psychometric (primarily test reliability and bias and psychological effects (e.g. test-taking motivation, self-confidence of using mixtures of highly informative (p = .50 and easier items (p = .80 in the item selection process. The present paper thus compares these modifications to item selection with a classical maximum-information algorithm. In a simulation study the effect of the different item selection algorithms on measurement precision and bias in the person parameter estimates is evaluated. To do so, the item pool of the Lexical Knowledge Test, measuring crystallized intelligence and self-confidence, is used. The study indicated that modifications using base success probabilities over p = .70 lead to reduced measurement accuracy and - more seriously - a bias in the person parameter estimates for higher ability respondents. However, this was not the case for the motivator item algorithm, occasionally administering easier items as well. The second study (n = 191 thus compared the unmodified maximum-information algorithm with two motivator item algorithms, which differed with regard to the percentage of motivator items presented. The results indicate that respondents yield higher self-confidence estimates under the motivator item conditions. Furthermore, the three conditions did not differ from each other with regard to the total test duration. It can be concluded that a small number of easier motivator items is sufficient to preserve test-taking motivation throughout the test without a loss of test economy.

  12. Test of "Light" cigarette counter-advertising using a standard test of advertising effectiveness

    OpenAIRE

    Shiffman, S.; Burton, S.; Pillitteri, J.; Gitchell, J.; Di, M; Sweeney, C.; Wardle, P.; Koehler, G.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To evaluate systematically the effectiveness of six advertising strategies (two message strategies presented in three different contexts) designed to promote smoking cessation by addressing smokers' misperceptions about Light cigarettes.
DESIGN—Smokers viewed one of six, 30 second test television concept advertisements, which varied by message (one emphasising how the sensory effects of Lights can be deceptive, the other describing the effects of vent blocking) and by ad context (no...

  13. The effects of protoype medium on usability testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boothe, Chase; Strawderman, Lesley; Hosea, Ethan

    2013-11-01

    Inconsistencies among testing methods and results in previous research prompted this study that builds upon a systematic usability testing research framework to better understand how interface medium influences users' abilities to detect usability flaws in applications. Interface medium was tested to identify its effects on users' perceptions of usability and abilities to detect usability problems and severe usability problems. Results indicated that medium has no effect on users' abilities to detect usability problems or perceptions of usability. However, results did indicate an interaction between the medium and the tested application in which users were able to identify significantly more usability problems on a higher fidelity medium using a particular application. Results also indicated that as users' perceptions of an application's usability increases, the users are less able to detect usability problems in that application. Usability testing should begin early in the design process, even if low fidelity mediums will be used. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  14. Embedment Effect test on soil-structure interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nasuda, Toshiaki; Akino, Kinji; Izumi, Masanori.

    1991-01-01

    A project consisting of laboratory test and field test has been conducted to clarify the embedment effect on soil-structure interaction. The objective of this project is to obtain the data for improving and preparing seismic analysis codes regarding the behavior of embedded reactor buildings during earthquakes. This project was planned to study the effect of soil-structure interaction using small size soil-structure models as well as the large scale models. The project was started in April, 1986, and is scheduled to end in March, 1994. The laboratory test models and field test models, and the measurement with accelerometers and others are described. As the interim results, the natural frequency and damping factor increased, and the amplitude decreased by the embedment of the test models. Some earthquakes were recorded in a soft rock site. The epicenters of the earthquakes occurred in 1989 are shown. The field tests were carried out in three sites. Two sites were used for the dynamic test with four test models having 8 m x 8 m plane size and 10 m height. One site was used for the static test with one concrete block as a specimen. Two models represent BWR type reactor buildings, and two models represent PWR type buildings. (K.I.)

  15. Evaluation of three oil spill laboratory dispersant effectiveness tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sullivan, D.; Farlow, J.; Sahatjian, K.A.

    1993-01-01

    Chemical dispersants can be used to reduce the interfacial tension of floating oil slicks so that the oils disperse more rapidly into the water column and thus pose less of a threat to shorelines, birds, and marine mammals. The laboratory test currently specified in federal regulations to measure dispersant effectiveness is not especially easy or inexpensive, and generates a rather large quantity of oily waste water. This paper describes the results of an effort by the EPA to identify a more suitable laboratory dispersant effectiveness test. EPA evaluated three laboratory methods: the Revised Standard Dispersant Effectiveness Test currently used (and required by regulation) in the United States, the swirling flask test (developed by Environment Canada), and the IFP-dilution test (used in france and other European countries). Six test oils and three dispersants were evaluated; dispersants were applied to the oil at an average 1:10 ratio (dispersant to oil) for each of the three laboratory methods. Screening efforts were used to focus on the most appropriate oil/dispersant combination for detailed study. A screening criterion was established that required a combination that gave at least 20% effectiveness results. The selected combination turned out to be Prudhoe Bay crude oil and the dispersant Corexit 9527. This combination was also most likely to be encountered in US coastal waters. The EPA evaluation concluded that the three tests gave similar precision results, but that the swirling flask test was fastest, cheapest, simplest, and required least operator skill. Further, EPA is considering conducting the dispersant effectiveness test itself, rather than having data submitted by a dispersant manufacturer, and establishing an acceptability criterion (45% efficiency) which would have to be met before a dispersant could be placed on the Product Schedule of the National Contingency Plan (NCP)

  16. Comparative effectiveness of 50g glucose challenge test and risk ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Context: Gestational diabeles mellitus (GDM) complicates 3- 5% of pregnancies. Prompt diagnosis helps to prevent its subsequent complications and one-step effective screening method is desirable for our environment. Objective: To compare the effectiveness of 50g glucose challenge test (GCT) with risk factors alone in ...

  17. The Effects of Testing on Meta-Cognitive Awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkx, Kim; Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Dirkx, K. J. H., Kester, L., & Kirschner, P. A. (2013, 27 August). The Effects of Testing on Meta-Cognitive Awareness. In B. Klein (Chair), Effective Learning Strategies and their Usage in Self-Regulated Training Programs and Computer-Based Learning Environments. Symposium conducted at the meeting

  18. Effect of Differential Item Functioning on Test Equating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabasakal, Kübra Atalay; Kelecioglu, Hülya

    2015-01-01

    This study examines the effect of differential item functioning (DIF) items on test equating through multilevel item response models (MIRMs) and traditional IRMs. The performances of three different equating models were investigated under 24 different simulation conditions, and the variables whose effects were examined included sample size, test…

  19. Estimating and Testing Mediation Effects with Censored Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lijuan; Zhang, Zhiyong

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated influences of censored data on mediation analysis. Mediation effect estimates can be biased and inefficient with censoring on any one of the input, mediation, and output variables. A Bayesian Tobit approach was introduced to estimate and test mediation effects with censored data. Simulation results showed that the Bayesian…

  20. Random Effects Structure for Confirmatory Hypothesis Testing: Keep It Maximal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Dale J.; Levy, Roger; Scheepers, Christoph; Tily, Harry J.

    2013-01-01

    Linear mixed-effects models (LMEMs) have become increasingly prominent in psycholinguistics and related areas. However, many researchers do not seem to appreciate how random effects structures affect the generalizability of an analysis. Here, we argue that researchers using LMEMs for confirmatory hypothesis testing should minimally adhere to the…

  1. Studies of Health Effects from Nuclear Testing near the Semipalatinsk Nuclear Test Site, Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Grosche

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The nuclear bomb testing conducted at the Semipalatinsk nuclear test site in Kazakhstan is of great importance for today’s radiation protection research, particularly in the area of low dose exposures. This type of radiation is of particular interest due to the lack of research in this field and how it impacts population health. In order to understand the possible health effects of nuclear bomb testing, it is important to determine what studies have been conducted on the effects of low dose exposure and dosimetry, and evaluate new epidemiologic data and biological material collected from populations living in proximity to the test site. With time, new epidemiological data has been made available, and it is possible that these data may be linked to biological samples. Next to linking existing and newly available data to examine health effects, the existing dosimetry system needs to be expanded and further developed to include residential areas, which have not yet been taken into account. The aim of this paper is to provide an overview of previous studies evaluating the health effects of nuclear testing, including some information on dosimetry efforts, and pointing out directions for future epidemiologic studies.

  2. The revelation effect: A meta-analytic test of hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aßfalg, André; Bernstein, Daniel M; Hockley, William

    2017-12-01

    Judgments can depend on the activity directly preceding them. An example is the revelation effect whereby participants are more likely to claim that a stimulus is familiar after a preceding task, such as solving an anagram, than without a preceding task. We test conflicting predictions of four revelation-effect hypotheses in a meta-analysis of 26 years of revelation-effect research. The hypotheses' predictions refer to three subject areas: (1) the basis of judgments that are subject to the revelation effect (recollection vs. familiarity vs. fluency), (2) the degree of similarity between the task and test item, and (3) the difficulty of the preceding task. We use a hierarchical multivariate meta-analysis to account for dependent effect sizes and variance in experimental procedures. We test the revelation-effect hypotheses with a model selection procedure, where each model corresponds to a prediction of a revelation-effect hypothesis. We further quantify the amount of evidence for one model compared to another with Bayes factors. The results of this analysis suggest that none of the extant revelation-effect hypotheses can fully account for the data. The general vagueness of revelation-effect hypotheses and the scarcity of data were the major limiting factors in our analyses, emphasizing the need for formalized theories and further research into the puzzling revelation effect.

  3. Effects of health information exchange adoption on ambulatory testing rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Stephen E; Radcliff, Tiffany A; Leblanc, William G; Dickinson, L Miriam; Libby, Anne M; Nease, Donald E

    2013-01-01

    To determine the effects of the adoption of ambulatory electronic health information exchange (HIE) on rates of laboratory and radiology testing and allowable charges. Claims data from the dominant health plan in Mesa County, Colorado, from 1 April 2005 to 31 December 2010 were matched to HIE adoption data on the provider level. Using mixed effects regression models with the quarter as the unit of analysis, the effect of HIE adoption on testing rates and associated charges was assessed. Claims submitted by 306 providers in 69 practices for 34 818 patients were analyzed. The rate of testing per provider was expressed as tests per 1000 patients per quarter. For primary care providers, the rate of laboratory testing increased over the time span (baseline 1041 tests/1000 patients/quarter, increasing by 13.9 each quarter) and shifted downward with HIE adoption (downward shift of 83, prates or imputed charges in either provider group. Ambulatory HIE adoption is unlikely to produce significant direct savings through reductions in rates of testing. The economic benefits of HIE may reside instead in other downstream outcomes of better informed, higher quality care.

  4. Het effect van herhaalde versus nieuwe vragen in het testing-effect

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkx, Kim; Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Dirkx, K. J. H., Kester, L., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, 22 June). Het effect van herhaalde versus nieuwe vragen in het testing-effect. [The effects of repeated versus new questions in the testing-effect]. Poster session presented at the meeting of the Onderwijs Research Dagen [Educational Research

  5. A study on the couplant effects in contact ultrasonic testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, J. K.; Kim, H. C.; Lee, S. S.; Kim, Young H.

    1997-01-01

    The amplitude of the back-wall echoes depend on the reflection coefficient on the interface between transducer and test material in the contact pulse-echo ultrasonic testing. The couplant is used to transmit the ultrasonic energy through the interface, and has an influence on the amplitude of the pulse-echo signal. To investigate the couplant effect on the pulse-echo ultrasonic testing, the back-wall echoes are measured by using various couplants made of water and glycerine in a carbon and an austenitic stainless steel specimens. The amplitude of the first back-wall echo and the apparent attenuation coefficient increase with the acoustic impedance of couplant. The couplant having higher value of transmission coefficient is more effective for flaws detection, and the reflection coefficient should be known to measure the attenuation coefficient of test material.

  6. Reflections on the Resurgence of Interest in the Testing Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roediger, Henry L; Karpicke, Jeffrey D

    2018-03-01

    We discuss the findings from our 2006 article in Psychological Science on the testing effect and describe how the project arose. The testing effect (or retrieval-practice effect) was first reported in the experimental literature about a century before our article was published, and the effect had been replicated (and sometimes discovered anew) many times over the years. Our experiments used prose materials (unlike most prior research) and produced a more powerful effect than prior research even though we used a conservative control condition for comparison. In our discussion, we drew out possible implications for educational practice. We also reported that students in the experiment could not predict the effect; this lack of metacognitive awareness represented a new finding in this context. In a companion article the same year, we provided an historical review of the testing effect. We believe the synergistic effect of the two articles accounts in part for the resurgence in interest in this phenomenon and its application in educational settings.

  7. Effects of strain rate, test temperature and test environment on tensile properties of vandium alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gubbi, A.N.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Eatherly, W.S.; Gibson, L.T. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Tensile testing was carried out on SS-3 tensile specimens punched from 0.762-mm-thick sheets of the large heat of V-4Cr-4Ti and small heats of V-3Cr-3Ti and V-6Cr-6Ti. The tensile specimens were annealed at 1000{degrees} for 2 h to obtain a fully recrystallized, fine grain microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10-19 {mu}m. Room temperature tests at strain rates ranging from 10{sup {minus}3} to 5 x 10{sup {minus}1}/s were carried out in air; elevated temperature testing up to 700{degrees}C was conducted in a vacuum better than 1 x 10{sup {minus}5} torr (<10{sup {minus}3} Pa). To study the effect of atomic hydrogen on ductility, tensile tests were conducted at room temperature in an ultra high vacuum chamber (UHV) with a hydrogen leak system.

  8. Instrumented impact testing machine with reduced specimen oscillation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rintamaa, R.; Rahka, K.; Wallin, K.

    1984-07-01

    Owing to small and inexpensive specimens the Charpy impact test is widely used in quality control and alloy development. Limitations in power reactor survellance capsules it is also widely used for safety analysis purposes. Instrumenting the tup and computerizing data acquisition, makes dynamic fracture mechanics data measurement possible and convenient. However, the dynamic effects (inertia forces, specimen oscillations) in the impact test cause inaccuracies in the recorded load-time diagram and hence diminish the reliability of the calculated dynamic fracture mechanics parameters. To decrease inaccuracies a new pendulum type of instrumented impact test apparatus has been developed and constructed in the Metals Laboratory of the Technical Research Centre of Finland. This tester is based on a new principle involving inverted test geometry. The purpose of the geometry inversion is to reduce inertia load and specimen oscillation effects. Further, the new impact tester has some other novel features: e.g. the available initia impact energy is about double compared to the conventional standard (300 J) impact tester allowing the use of larger (10 x 20 x 110 mm) bend specimens than normal Charpy specimens. Also, the rotation asix in the three point bending is nearly stationary making COD-measurements possible. An experimental test series is described in which the inertia effects and specimen oscillations are compared in the conventional and new impact tester utilizing Charpy V-notch specimens. Comparison of the two test geometries is also made with the aid of an analytical model using finite element method (FEM) analysis. (author)

  9. Learning effect of computerized cognitive tests in older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira,Rafaela Sanches de; Trezza,Beatriz Maria; Busse,Alexandre Leopold; Jacob Filho,Wilson

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the learning effect of computerized cognitive testing in the elderly. Methods: Cross-sectional study with 20 elderly, 10 women and 10 men, with average age of 77.5 (?4.28) years. The volunteers performed two series of computerized cognitive tests in sequence and their results were compared. The applied tests were: Trail Making A and B, Spatial Recognition, Go/No Go, Memory Span, Pattern Recognition Memory and Reverse Span. Results: Based on the comparison of th...

  10. Instrumented impact testing machine with reduced specimen oscillation effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintamaa, R.; Ranka, K.; Wallin, K.; Ikonen, K.; Talja, H.; Kotilainen, H.; Sirkkola, E.

    1984-07-01

    A pendulum-type instrumented Charpy test apparatus based on inverted test geometry was developed. Geometry inversion reduces inertia load and specimen oscillation effects. Initial impact energy is double that of standard (300 J) impact testers, allowing the use of larger (10 x 20 x 110 mm) bend specimens than normal Charpy specimens. The rotation axis in the three point bending is nearly stationary, making COD-measurements possible. Inertia effects and specimen oscillations are compared with the conventional tester, and using an analytical finite element model for Charpy V-notch specimens. Better performance for the inverted geometry is reported.

  11. 50 Grams Oral Glucose Challenge Test: Is It an Effective Screening Test for Gestational Diabetes Mellitus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Heija, Adel; Al-Bash, Majeda; Ishrat, Noreen; Al-Kharausi, Lamya

    2016-10-01

    To find out whether 50 g oral glucose challenge test (OGCT) is an effective screening test for all pregnant women between 24 and 28 weeks gestation. A 50 g OGCT test was administered to 307 unselected women at 24-28 weeks of gestation. When venous plasma glucose (VPG) concentration after 1 h was >7.8 mmol/l, OGCT was positive. Women with a positive OGCT underwent 2 h 75 grams oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) as a confirmatory diagnosis of GDM. When fasting and 2 h post 75 g OGTT values were >5.5 mmol/I and >8 mmol/l, respectively, women were considered diabetic. We screened 307 women for GDM by OGCT. Total number of women with positive OGCT was 83 (27.03 %). In the low-risk group, total number of women with GDM was 9/168 (5.35 %) while the total number of women with GDM in the high-risk group was 14/139 (10.07 %). There was no significant difference with respect to the total number of women with GDM in the groups. A 50 g OGCT seems to be an effective screening test for both groups. More cases of GDM can be discovered when universal rather than risk-related screening is applied.

  12. Laboratory effectiveness testing of water-in-oil emulsion breakers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fingas, M.F.; Fieldhouse, B.; Bier, I.; Conrod, D.; Tennyson, E.

    1995-01-01

    The physics and chemistry of water-in-oil emulsions dominate the development of effectiveness tests. Emulsions are variable in stability--this variability is largely dependent on oil type and degree of weathering. These factors complicate the development of a test. Emulsions which have low stability will apparently break easily with chemical emulsion breakers. Broken emulsions will form a foam-like material, called rag, which retains water which is not part of the stable emulsions. Analytical methods used to determine the final stability of the broken or unbroken emulsion were evaluated. Measurements of water content and viscosity measurements show correlation to emulsion stability. Viscosity provides a more reliable measure of emulsion stability but water content measurements are more convenient and are largely used in this study. Twelve tests were developed in the past. Two testing methods have been developed to a usable stage. These tests are described and data using them provided. The effects of mixing time, agent amount, settling time and mixing energy on effectiveness results are presented

  13. The test-negative design for estimating influenza vaccine effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Michael L; Nelson, Jennifer C

    2013-04-19

    The test-negative design has emerged in recent years as the preferred method for estimating influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) in observational studies. However, the methodologic basis of this design has not been formally developed. In this paper we develop the rationale and underlying assumptions of the test-negative study. Under the test-negative design for influenza VE, study subjects are all persons who seek care for an acute respiratory illness (ARI). All subjects are tested for influenza infection. Influenza VE is estimated from the ratio of the odds of vaccination among subjects testing positive for influenza to the odds of vaccination among subjects testing negative. With the assumptions that (a) the distribution of non-influenza causes of ARI does not vary by influenza vaccination status, and (b) VE does not vary by health care-seeking behavior, the VE estimate from the sample can generalized to the full source population that gave rise to the study sample. Based on our derivation of this design, we show that test-negative studies of influenza VE can produce biased VE estimates if they include persons seeking care for ARI when influenza is not circulating or do not adjust for calendar time. The test-negative design is less susceptible to bias due to misclassification of infection and to confounding by health care-seeking behavior, relative to traditional case-control or cohort studies. The cost of the test-negative design is the additional, difficult-to-test assumptions that incidence of non-influenza respiratory infections is similar between vaccinated and unvaccinated groups within any stratum of care-seeking behavior, and that influenza VE does not vary across care-seeking strata. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Falsification Testing of Instrumental Variables Methods for Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizer, Steven D

    2016-04-01

    To demonstrate how falsification tests can be used to evaluate instrumental variables methods applicable to a wide variety of comparative effectiveness research questions. Brief conceptual review of instrumental variables and falsification testing principles and techniques accompanied by an empirical application. Sample STATA code related to the empirical application is provided in the Appendix. Comparative long-term risks of sulfonylureas and thiazolidinediones for management of type 2 diabetes. Outcomes include mortality and hospitalization for an ambulatory care-sensitive condition. Prescribing pattern variations are used as instrumental variables. Falsification testing is an easily computed and powerful way to evaluate the validity of the key assumption underlying instrumental variables analysis. If falsification tests are used, instrumental variables techniques can help answer a multitude of important clinical questions. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  15. Neurocognitive mechanisms of the "testing effect" : A review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Broek, Gesa; Takashima, Atsuko; Wiklund-Hörnqvist, Carola; Karlsson Wirebring, Linnea; Segers, Eliane; Verhoeven, Ludo; Nyberg, Lars

    2016-01-01

    Memory retrieval is an active process that can alter the content and accessibility of stored memories. Of potential relevance for educational practice are findings that memory retrieval fosters better retention than mere studying. This so-called testing effect has been demonstrated for different

  16. The Testing Effect Is Alive and Well with Complex Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpicke, Jeffrey D.; Aue, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Van Gog and Sweller (2015) claim that there is no testing effect--no benefit of practicing retrieval--for complex materials. We show that this claim is incorrect on several grounds. First, Van Gog and Sweller's idea of "element interactivity" is not defined in a quantitative, measurable way. As a consequence, the idea is applied…

  17. Effects of Vigorous Intensity Physical Activity on Mathematics Test Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, David S.; Hannon, James C.; Castelli, Darla M.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of an acute bout of physical activity on academic performance in school-based settings is under researched. The purpose of this study was to examine associations between a single, vigorous (70-85%) bout of physical activity completed during physical education on standardized mathematics test performance among 72, eighth grade students…

  18. Effect of obestatin on morphometry of testes and testosterone ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-27

    Jul 27, 2011 ... Full Length Research Paper. Effect of obestatin on morphometry of testes and testosterone secretion in male rats. Sarwat Jahan*, Tabinda Sidrat, Shakeel Ahmed, Hizbullah Wazir and Kamran Ullah. Reproductive physiology Laboratory, Department of Animal sciences Quaid-i-Azam University, Islamabad, ...

  19. The effect of sample preparation and testing procedure on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of sample preparation and testing procedure on the geotechnical properties of tropically weathered residual laterite soils of Ethiopia. ... A combination of classification based on structure, mineralogical composition, and geo-morphological impact on soil formation together with conventional classification systems is ...

  20. Recruiting Source Effects: A Test of Two Alternative Explanations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breaugh, James A.; Mann, Rebecca B.

    The source of employee recruitment has been related to numerous important work outcomes (e.g., turnover, performance), but reasons for this relationship are not known. To test the viability of two possible explanations for recruiting source effects, i.e., employee level of realistic expectation, or individual differences, information was gathered…

  1. HYBRID DATA APPROACH FOR SELECTING EFFECTIVE TEST CASES DURING THE REGRESSION TESTING

    OpenAIRE

    Mohan, M.; Shrimali, Tarun

    2017-01-01

    In the software industry, software testing becomes more important in the entire software development life cycle. Software testing is one of the fundamental components of software quality assurances. Software Testing Life Cycle (STLC)is a process involved in testing the complete software, which includes Regression Testing, Unit Testing, Smoke Testing, Integration Testing, Interface Testing, System Testing & etc. In the STLC of Regression testing, test case selection is one of the most importan...

  2. The moderator effect of test anxiety in the relationship between test expectancy and the retention of prose

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Minnaert, Alexander E

    2003-01-01

    The effect of test expectancy and test anxiety on the retention of prose is not yet profoundly examined in an ecologically valid learning context. The influence of test expectancy, test anxiety, and differences in intelligence on the retention of prose was addressed in the hypothesis that test

  3. Effects of Targeted Test Preparation on Scores of Two Tests of Oral English as a Second Language

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnsworth, Tim

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of targeted test preparation, or coaching, on oral English as a second language test scores. The tests in question were the Basic English Skills Test Plus (BEST Plus), a scripted oral interview published by the Center for Applied Linguistics, and the Versant English Test (VET), a computer-administered and…

  4. Ground motion effects of underground nuclear testing on perennial vegetation at Nevada Test Site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhoads, W.A.

    1976-07-01

    In this study to estimate the potential injury to vegetation from earth movement caused by underground nuclear detonations and to estimate the extent to which this may have occurred at NTS, two explosions in the megaton range on Pahute Mesa were studied in some detail: Boxcar, which caused a surface subsidence, and Benham, which did not. Because of the subsidence phenomenology, shock propagation through the earth and along the surface, and the resulting fractures, shrubs were killed at Boxcar around the perimeter of the subsidence crater. Both trees and shrubs were killed along tectonic faults, which became the path for earth fractures, and along fractures and rock falls elsewhere. There was also evidence at Boxcar of tree damage which antedated the nuclear testing program, presumably from natural earthquakes. With the possible exception of damage to aged junipers this investigation did not reveal any good evidence of immediate effects from underground testing on vegetation beyond that recognized earlier as the edge effect

  5. Celebrity Influence and Identification: A Test of the Angelina Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosenko, Kami A; Binder, Andrew R; Hurley, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    Angelina Jolie's announcement that she is a BRCA1 carrier and has had a prophylactic bilateral mastectomy was met with widespread support as well as speculation about its possible impact on the public. These speculations were the subject of a Time magazine cover story titled "The Angelina Effect" (Kluger et al., 2013 ). Although there is anecdotal evidence to support this hypothesized Angelina effect, empirical tests are lacking. To explore possible links between Angelina's announcement and public health, we surveyed 356 adults immediately after the announcement. Guided by a model of celebrity influence, the survey assessed participants' demographics and health history, identification and parasocial interaction with Jolie, and genetic testing intentions. Results supported the model's predictions and provided preliminary evidence of an Angelina effect.

  6. European accelerator facilities for single event effects testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, L.; Nickson, R.; Harboe-Sorensen, R. [ESA-ESTEC, Noordwijk (Netherlands); Hajdas, W.; Berger, G.

    1997-03-01

    Single event effects are an important hazard to spacecraft and payloads. The advances in component technology, with shrinking dimensions and increasing complexity will give even more importance to single event effects in the future. The ground test facilities are complex and expensive and the complexities of installing a facility are compounded by the requirement that maximum control is to be exercised by users largely unfamiliar with accelerator technology. The PIF and the HIF are the result of experience gained in the field of single event effects testing and represent a unique collaboration between space technology and accelerator experts. Both facilities form an essential part of the European infrastructure supporting space projects. (J.P.N.)

  7. Effect of testing position on dynamic visual acuity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danenbaum, Elizabeth; Chilingaryan, Gevorg; Fung, Joyce

    2008-12-01

    To investigate the effect of altering testing position on dynamic visual acuity (DVA) in vestibulopathic adults. Quasiexperimental research. Outpatient vestibular program. Twelve vestibulopathic adults with impaired DVA in the sitting position. DVA scores were collected during (1) sitting, (2) standing comfortably, and (3) semitandem standing as subjects viewed a vision (E) chart 3.48 m in front of them. DVA was obtained as the head was passively moved by the evaluator at a frequency of 1.5 Hz in both horizontal and vertical directions. A further subgroup of subjects (n=5) was retested after performing the "viewing x1" gaze stability home exercise four times daily (1 minute duration in the horizontal direction while sitting) for 2 months. Noncomputerized DVA score. The DVA score remained constant independent of testing position as the Friedman test did not reveal any significant differences in the DVA scores in the horizontal or vertical direction. Subjects who improved after performing the viewing x1 exercise in the horizontal direction in the sitting position tended to have the same improvement in DVA in all three positions. The results of this study show that DVA score is independent of testing position. This is clinically important since it shows that the results of DVA testing in one position are valid for other positions and that subjects can be trained to improve their DVA in a sitting posture while having carry-over effects to other, more challenging postures.

  8. The effect of repeated testing on judgement biases in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Rebecca E; Vidal, Stephanie; Hinch, Geoff N; Fisher, Andrew D; Boissy, Alain; Lee, Caroline

    2010-03-01

    Testing judgement biases of animals may provide insight into their affective states; however important questions about methodologies need to be answered. This experiment investigated the effect of repeated testing using unreinforced, ambiguous cues on the response of sheep to a go/no-go judgement bias test. Fifteen sheep were trained to differentiate between two locations, reinforced respectively with feed (positive) or with the presentation of a dog (negative). The responses to nine ambiguous locations, positioned between the positively and negatively reinforced locations, were tested repeatedly over 3 weeks. Sheep exhibited a symmetrical gradation in response to ambiguous locations between the positive and negative reinforcers. There was a significant decline (P=0.001) in the total number of approaches to the ambiguous positions over time (weeks). This effect of time suggests that sheep learnt that the ambiguous locations were unrewarded. This result supplies evidence of a limitation identified in current judgement bias methodology, due to repeated testing, which has the potential to provide misleading results. Crown Copyright (c) 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Tracer Interaction Effects During Partitioning Tracer Tests for NAPL Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imhoff, P. T.; Pirestani, K.; Jafarpour, Y.; Spivey, K. M.

    2002-05-01

    Partitioning tracer tests have been used in laboratory and field investigations to quantify the amount of nonaqueous phase liquid (NAPL) within porous media. In these tests multiple chemical tracers are typically injected into flowing groundwater: conservative tracers react minimally with the NAPL, while non-conservative tracers partition into the NAPL and exhibit retarded transport. The mean travel times of the conservative and partitioning tracers can be used to estimate the NAPL saturation in the swept zone. When multiple tracers are injected in the system, the tracers themselves change the chemical composition of the NAPL, which may affect partitioning behavior. Although co-tracer interactions have been considered by others, there are no reports of such effects during actual partitioning tracer tests. In this study tracer partitioning was examined in static batch systems and dynamic column experiments using 2,3-dimethyl-2-butanol and 1-hexanol as partitioning tracers and trichloroethylene as the NAPL. Co-tracer effects resulted in nonlinear partitioning of 2,3-dimethyl-2-butanol in batch tests, which increased with increasing tracer concentrations. The UNIFAC model was used to predict tracer activities in the NAPL, and the resulting predictions of tracer partitioning matched the data trends. Column experiments were conducted with these same tracers, and nonlinear tracer partitioning associated with co-tracer effects resulted in underestimation of NAPL mass in some systems. If linear partitioning were assumed, a priori analysis suggested that nonlinear partitioning would result in an overestimation of NAPL saturation. We discuss these observations and suggest guidelines for avoiding co-tracer effects during partitioning tracer tests.

  10. Test of "Light" cigarette counter-advertising using a standard test of advertising effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiffman, S; Burton, S L; Pillitteri, J L; Gitchell, J G; Di Marino, M E; Sweeney, C T; Wardle, P A; Koehler, G L

    2001-01-01

    To evaluate systematically the effectiveness of six advertising strategies (two message strategies presented in three different contexts) designed to promote smoking cessation by addressing smokers' misperceptions about Light cigarettes. Smokers viewed one of six, 30 second test television concept advertisements, which varied by message (one emphasising how the sensory effects of Lights can be deceptive, the other describing the effects of vent blocking) and by ad context (non-commercial public service announcement (PSA), promotion of unbranded nicotine replacement therapy (NRT), or promotion of branded NRT). The effectiveness of each advertisement was determined using a validated advertising testing system in which ads were viewed in the context of reviewing a pilot television programme. Response to ads is assessed through shifts in subject choices of products offered as prizes before and after viewing the test advertisements. Included among the possible prizes were cigarettes and various pharmacotherapies for smoking cessation. Daily smokers (n = 1890) of Regular (34%), Light (47%), and Ultra Light (19%) cigarettes recruited from eight US cities. The primary outcome of interest was the shift away from cigarettes as the selected prize following exposure to the test advertisements. Secondary outcomes of interest included movement away from Light cigarettes and movement towards assisted quitting products. Smokers who saw the advertisement emphasising the sensory characteristics of Light cigarettes were more likely than subjects who saw the advertisement emphasising the effect of vent blocking to move away from cigarettes (OR = 1.97, 95% confidence interval CI 1.25 to 3.09; chi(2)(1) = 8.69, p = 0.003). Similarly, subjects who saw the advertisement framed as a PSA, rather than as a promotion for either a branded or unbranded NRT product, were also somewhat more likely to move away from cigarettes (OR = 1.51, 95% CI 0.94 to 2.40; chi(2)(1) = 2.97, p = 0.085). The

  11. Nondestructive testing and assessment of consolidation effects of earthen sites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Wang

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Earthen sites are widely distributed throughout China, and most of them belong to archaeological sites with significant values, which not only directly witness the origin, formation and development of Chinese civilization, but also possess important values for conservation and exhibition. Many researches and practices on their conservation and consolidation have been carried out; however, the consolidation effect is mainly judged by visual observation and expert evaluation. Scientific assessment of conservation and consolidation effects is a challenging issue. Many instruments in other fields cannot be directly applied to the conservation of cultural relics due to their peculiarity. In order to assess the effects of field conservation experiments, this paper tries to understand the consolidation effects at Liangzhu site using nondestructive or micro-damage methods, including thermo-physical parameters testing, infrared thermal imaging, high-density microelectrode resistivity testing, portable microscope observation, and hydrophilic and hydrophobic testing, and thereby explores the practicable methods for evaluating the properties of consolidation materials for earthen sites treatment.

  12. Modelling climate change effects with provenance test data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matyas, C. (Sopron Univ., Sopron (Hungary))

    1994-01-01

    Provenance tests of forest trees, which were originally intended to identify suitable seed sources for planting at different locations, provide valuable data for assessing the response of populations to environmental change. Environmental differences between the location of origin and the planting (test) site have been calculated by principal component analysis and termed ecological distance. Based on ecological distance values, the growth response of tree populations can be modeled as a function of the test site macroclimate. These models can then be used to predict the effects of climatic change on growth and survival. The growth response model predicts that increasing annual mean temperatures will result in accelerated growth if precipitation is sufficient, but only within the limits characteristic of the species. At the southern limits of distribution, growth and competitive ability of the species will decline, leading to successional changes. 20 refs., 4 figs., 3 tabs.

  13. Oral fluid drug tests: effects of adulterants and foodstuffs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Raphael C; Tran, Minhchau; Tung, James K

    2005-06-10

    An on-site oral fluid drug screen, Oratect, was used to investigate the effects of adulterants and foodstuffs on oral fluid test results. Common foods, beverages, food ingredients, cosmetics and hygienic products were demonstrated not to cause false positive results when tested 30 min after their consumption. Evaluations of two commercial oral fluid adulterants, "Clear Choice Fizzy Flush" and "Test'in Spit n Kleen Mouthwash" suggest their mechanism of action is the clearing of residual drugs of abuse compounds through rinsing of the oral cavity. They do not directly destroy the drug compounds or change the pH of the oral fluid. It is also suggested that a common mouthwash would perform similar action.

  14. Testing Overall and Subpopulation Treatment Effects with Measurement Errors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yanyuan; Yin, Guosheng

    2013-07-01

    There is a growing interest in the discovery of important predictors from many potential biomarkers for therapeutic use. In particular, a biomarker has predictive value for treatment if the treatment is only effective for patients whose biomarker values exceed a certain threshold. However, biomarker expressions are often subject to measurement errors, which may blur the biomarker's predictive capability in patient classification and, as a consequence, may lead to inappropriate treatment decisions. By taking into account the measurement errors, we propose a new testing procedure for the overall and subpopulation treatment effects in the multiple testing framework. The proposed method bypasses the permutation or other resampling procedures that become computationally infeasible in the presence of measurement errors. We conduct simulation studies to examine the performance of the proposed method, and illustrate it with a data example.

  15. Your move: The effect of chess on mathematics test scores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosholm, Michael; Mikkelsen, Mai Bjørnskov; Gumede, Kamilla Trille

    2017-01-01

    We analyse the effect of substituting a weekly mathematics lesson in primary school grades 1–3 with a lesson in mathematics based on chess instruction. We use data from the City of Aarhus in Denmark, combining test score data with a comprehensive data set obtained from administrative registers. We...... are bored in school, perhaps because chess instruction facilitates learning by providing an alternative approach to mathematics for these children. The results are encouraging and suggest that chess may be an important and effective tool for improving mathematical capacity in young students....... use two different methodological approaches to identify and estimate treatment effects and we tend to find positive effects, indicating that knowledge acquired through chess play can be transferred to the domain of mathematics. We also find larger impacts for unhappy children and children who...

  16. Your move: The effect of chess on mathematics test scores.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rosholm

    Full Text Available We analyse the effect of substituting a weekly mathematics lesson in primary school grades 1-3 with a lesson in mathematics based on chess instruction. We use data from the City of Aarhus in Denmark, combining test score data with a comprehensive data set obtained from administrative registers. We use two different methodological approaches to identify and estimate treatment effects and we tend to find positive effects, indicating that knowledge acquired through chess play can be transferred to the domain of mathematics. We also find larger impacts for unhappy children and children who are bored in school, perhaps because chess instruction facilitates learning by providing an alternative approach to mathematics for these children. The results are encouraging and suggest that chess may be an important and effective tool for improving mathematical capacity in young students.

  17. Testing hypotheses on frequency effects in first language acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbæk, Laila; Basbøll, Hans

    On the basis of extensive literature studies Ambridge, Kidd, Rowland & Theakston (JCL, 2015) present five theses on frequency effects on language acquisition: 1) Levels and Kinds Thesis. Frequency effects exist at all levels and are of many different kinds (e.g. type and token frequency effects...... with other effects. The acquisition of the Danish noun plural system is particularly interesting in this regard. The reason is, that where English is characterized by having one default inflectional marker for a grammatical category (e.g. the plural suffix -s) and a minor number of exceptions to this default...... rule, Danish has several competing inflectional markers. Furthermore, there are important interactions between phonetics/phonology and morphology in the Danish system (Kjærbæk, dePont Christensen & Basbøll, NJL, 2014).In this study we will test the theses in a phonetic/phonological perspective...

  18. Temperature effect compensation for fast differential pressure decay testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shi, Yan; Tong, Xiaomeng; Cai, Maolin

    2014-01-01

    To avoid the long temperature recovery period with differential pressure decay for leak detection, a novel method with temperature effect compensation is proposed to improve the testing efficiency without full stabilization of temperature. The mathematical model of conventional differential pressure decay testing is established to analyze the changes of temperature and pressure during the measuring period. Then the differential pressure is divided into two parts: the exponential part caused by temperature recovery and the linear part caused by leak. With prior information obtained from samples, parameters of the exponential part can be identified precisely, and the temperature effect will be compensated before it fully recovers. To verify the effect of the temperature compensated method, chambers with different volumes are tested under various pressures and the experiments show that the improved method is faster with satisfactory precision, and an accuracy less than 0.25 cc min −1  can be achieved when the compensation time is proportional to four times the theoretical thermal-time constant. (paper)

  19. The effects of surface treatments on rapid chloride permeability tests

    KAUST Repository

    Yoon, Seyoon

    2012-08-01

    Surface treatments are commonly applied to improve the chloride resistance of concrete structures exposed to saline environments. Information on chloride ingress to surface-treated concrete is mostly provided by application of the rapid chloride permeability test (RCPT); this test is short in duration and provides rapid results. This study presents a numerical formulation, based on the extended Nernst-Plank/Poisson (NPP) equation, to model the effect of the surface treatment on a sample tested by RCPT. Predictions of the model are compared to experimental measurements. The simulations show that the results from RCPT, in terms of ionic profiles and measurement of the electric field, are dependent on the effectiveness of surface treatments. During RCPT, highly effective surface treatments cause both cations and anions to flocculate at the interface between the surface treatment and the concrete, creating a local electric field. Our numerical model includes these phenomena and presents a methodology to obtain more accurate diffusivities of the surface-treated- concrete from RCPT. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Measurement of the top Yukawa Coupling at a 1 TeV International Linear Collider using the SiD detector

    CERN Document Server

    Roloff, Philipp

    2013-01-01

    One of the detector benchmark processes investigated for the SiD Detailed Baseline Design (DBD) is given by: $e^+ e^- \\to t\\bar{t}H$, where H is the Standard Model Higgs boson of mass 125 GeV. The study is carried out at a centre-of-mass energy of 1 TeV and assuming an integrated luminosity of 1 ab$^{-1}$. The physics aim is a direct measurement of the top Yukawa coupling at the ILC. Higgs boson decays to beauty quark-antiquark pairs are reconstructed. The investigated final states contain eight jets or six jets, one charged lepton and missing energy. Additionally, four of the jets in signal events are caused by beauty quark decays. The analysis is based on a full simulation of the SiD detector using GEANT4. Beam-related backgrounds from $\\gamma\\gamma \\to$ hadrons interactions and incoherent $e^+ e^-$ pairs are considered. This study addresses various aspects of the detector performance: jet clustering in complex hadronic final states, flavour-tagging and the identification of high energy leptons.

  1. Kinetic origin of grain boundary migration, grain coalescence, and defect reduction in the crystallization of quenched two-dimensional Yukawa liquids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Chun; Yang, Chi; I, Lin

    2014-11-01

    The kinetic origin of grain boundary migration, grain coalescence, and defect reduction in the crystallization of quenched two-dimensional Yukawa liquids are numerically investigated. It is found that, in grain coalescence, stick-slip cracking the region in front of the grain boundary into smaller subgrains corotating with small angle, followed by healing, is the key for aligning lattice misorientation and inducing grain boundary stick-slip advance. Cracking is initiated from the weakly interlocked dislocation along its Burgers vector, which in turn causes dislocation motion along the crack. The cascaded scattering and recombination of two dislocations with 60∘ and 120∘ Burgers vector angle difference into two and one dislocations are the major processes for dislocation motion and reduction, respectively, in grain boundary migration. A rough grain boundary with large curvature easily supports the above process and induces high grain boundary mobility. Along a straight smooth grain boundary, the parallel Burgers vectors of the string of dislocations hinder defect reduction and induce coalescence stagnation.

  2. Path-integral Monte Carlo simulation of time-reversal noninvariant bulk systems with a case study of rotating Yukawa gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haidekker Galambos, Tamás; Tőke, Csaba

    2018-02-01

    We elaborate on the methodology to simulate bulk systems in the absence of time-reversal symmetry by the phase-fixed path-integral Monte Carlo method under (possibly twisted) periodic boundary conditions. Such systems include two-dimensional electrons in the quantum Hall regime and rotating ultracold Bose and Fermi gases; time-reversal symmetry is broken by an external magnetic field and the Coriolis force, respectively. We provide closed-form expressions in terms of Jacobi elliptic functions for the thermal density matrix (or the Euclidean propagator) of a single particle on a flat torus under very general conditions. We then modify the multislice sampling method in order to sample paths by the magnitude of the complex-valued thermal density matrix. Finally, we demonstrate that these inventions let us study the vortex melting process of a two-dimensional Yukawa gas in terms of the de Boer interaction strength parameter, temperature, and rotation (Coriolis force). The bosonic case is relevant to ultracold Fermi-Fermi mixtures of widely different masses under rotation.

  3. Physiological and perceptual responses to incremental exercise testing in healthy men: effect of exercise test modality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscat, Kristina M; Kotrach, Houssam G; Wilkinson-Maitland, Courtney A; Schaeffer, Michele R; Mendonca, Cassandra T; Jensen, Dennis

    2015-11-01

    In a randomized cross-over study of 15 healthy men aged 20-30 years, we compared physiological and perceptual responses during treadmill and cycle exercise test protocols matched for increments in work rate - the source of increased locomotor muscle metabolic and contractile demands. The rates of O2 consumption and CO2 production were higher at the peak of treadmill versus cycle testing (p ≤ 0.05). Nevertheless, work rate, minute ventilation, tidal volume (VT), breathing frequency (fR), inspiratory capacity (IC), inspiratory reserve volume (IRV), tidal esophageal (Pes,tidal) and transdiaphragmatic pressure swings (Pdi,tidal), peak expiratory gastric pressures (Pga,peak), the root mean square of the diaphragm electromyogram (EMGdi,rms) expressed as a percentage of maximum EMGdi,rms (EMGdi,rms%max), and dyspnea ratings were similar at the peak of treadmill versus cycle testing (p > 0.05). Ratings of leg discomfort were higher at the peak of cycle versus treadmill exercise (p ≤ 0.05), even though peak O2 consumption was lower during cycling. Oxygen consumption, CO2 production, minute ventilation, fR, Pes,tidal, Pdi,tidal and Pga,peak were higher (p ≤ 0.05), while VT, IC, IRV, EMGdi,rms%max, and ratings of dyspnea and leg discomfort were similar (p > 0.05) at all or most submaximal work rates during treadmill versus cycle exercise. Our findings highlight important differences (and similarities) in physiological and perceptual responses at maximal and submaximal work rates during incremental treadmill and cycle exercise testing protocols. The lack of effect of exercise test modality on peak work rate advocates for the use of this readily available parameter to optimize training intensity determination, regardless of exercise training mode.

  4. The Effects of Listening to Music Just Before Reading Test on Students’ Test Score

    OpenAIRE

    MAHDAVI, Mojtaba

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. In this study the researcher  examined  the  effect  of  music  on  reading  comprehension played just before the test .  Because the emotional consequences of music listening are evident in stress and anxiety removal, it was used as a tool to pacify the mind of the tastes and boost their memory and the related cognitive processes. Experimental group did well with the mean score of) and control group (). This study confirmed that using multimedia devices such as music can not only i...

  5. Parametric effects on glass reaction in the unsaturated test method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Woodland, A.B.; Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.

    1991-12-01

    The Unsaturated Test Method has been applied to study glass reaction under conditions that may be present at the potential Yucca Mountain site, currently under evaluation for storage of reprocessed high-level nuclear waste. The results from five separate sets of parametric experiments are presented wherein test parameters ranging from water contact volume to sensitization of metal in contact with the glass were examined. The most significant effect was observed when the volume of water, as controlled by the water inject volume and interval period, was such to allow exfoliation of reacted glass to occur. The extent of reaction was also influenced to a lesser extent by the degree of sensitization of the 304L stainless steel. For each experiment, the release of cations from the glass and alteration of the glass were examined. The major alteration product is a smectite clay that forms both from precipitation from solution and from in-situ alteration of the glass itself. It is this clay that undergoes exfoliation as water drips from the glass. A comparison is made between the results of the parametric experiments with those of static leach tests. In the static tests the rates of release become progressively reduced through 39 weeks while, in contrast, they remain relatively constant in the parametric experiments for at least 300 weeks. This differing behavior may be attributable to the dripping water environment where fresh water is periodically added and where evaporation can occur.

  6. The effects of transport by car on coagulation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ergin, Merve; Erdogan, Serpil; Akturk, Onur; Erel, Ozcan

    2017-10-26

    This research investigated the effects of the transport of blood samples between centers/laboratories by car on coagulation tests. Five tubes of blood samples were taken from 20 healthy volunteers. The samples consisted of a baseline (control) group, centrifuged and noncentrifuged transported samples; centrifuged and noncentrifuged untransported samples. The groups of centrifuged and noncentrifuged samples were transported by car for 2 h. The centrifuged and noncentrifuged untransported samples were incubated in the laboratory until the transported samples arrived. Prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) tests were conducted for all samples. Significant differences between the baseline group and the centrifuged and noncentrifuged transported samples and the noncentrifuged untransported samples were found for APTT levels (pcar.

  7. Overview of CSNI separate effects tests validation matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aksan, N. [Paul Scherrer Institute, Villigen (Switzerland); Auria, F.D. [Univ. of Pisa (Italy); Glaeser, H. [Gesellschaft fuer anlagen und Reaktorsicherheit, (GRS), Garching (Germany)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    An internationally agreed separate effects test (SET) Validation Matrix for thermal-hydraulic system codes has been established by a sub-group of the Task Group on Thermal Hydraulic System Behaviour as requested by the OECD/NEA Committee on Safety of Nuclear Installations (SCNI) Principal Working Group No. 2 on Coolant System Behaviour. The construction of such a Matrix is an attempt to collect together in a systematic way the best sets of openly available test data for code validation, assessment and improvement and also for quantitative code assessment with respect to quantification of uncertainties to the modeling of individual phenomena by the codes. The methodology, that has been developed during the process of establishing CSNI-SET validation matrix, was an important outcome of the work on SET matrix. In addition, all the choices which have been made from the 187 identified facilities covering the 67 phenomena will be investigated together with some discussions on the data base.

  8. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States); Bergey, Daniel [Building Science Corporation, Somerville, MA (United States)

    2014-02-01

    In this project, Building America research team Building Science Corporation tested the effectiveness of ventilation systems at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. This was because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four system factor categories: balance, distribution, outside air source, and recirculation filtration. Recommended system factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  9. Ventilation System Effectiveness and Tested Indoor Air Quality Impacts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rudd, Armin [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Bergey, Daniel [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2014-02-01

    Ventilation system effectiveness testing was conducted at two unoccupied, single-family, detached lab homes at the University of Texas - Tyler. Five ventilation system tests were conducted with various whole-building ventilation systems. Multizone fan pressurization testing characterized building and zone enclosure leakage. PFT testing showed multizone air change rates and interzonal airflow. Cumulative particle counts for six particle sizes, and formaldehyde and other Top 20 VOC concentrations were measured in multiple zones. The testing showed that single-point exhaust ventilation was inferior as a whole-house ventilation strategy. It was inferior because the source of outside air was not direct from outside, the ventilation air was not distributed, and no provision existed for air filtration. Indoor air recirculation by a central air distribution system can help improve the exhaust ventilation system by way of air mixing and filtration. In contrast, the supply and balanced ventilation systems showed that there is a significant benefit to drawing outside air from a known outside location, and filtering and distributing that air. Compared to the Exhaust systems, the CFIS and ERV systems showed better ventilation air distribution and lower concentrations of particulates, formaldehyde and other VOCs. System improvement percentages were estimated based on four System Factor Categories: Balance, Distribution, Outside Air Source, and Recirculation Filtration. Recommended System Factors could be applied to reduce ventilation fan airflow rates relative to ASHRAE Standard 62.2 to save energy and reduce moisture control risk in humid climates. HVAC energy savings were predicted to be 8-10%, or $50-$75/year.

  10. Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Nuclear Test Effects and Geologic Data Bank

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, N.W.

    1976-01-01

    Data on the geology of the USERDA Nevada Test Site have been collected for the purpose of evaluating the possibility of release of radioactivity at proposed underground nuclear test sites. These data, including both the rock physical properties and the geologic structure and stratigraphy of a large number of drill-hole sites, are stored in the Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Earth Sciences Division Nuclear Test Effects and Geologic Data Bank. Retrieval programs can quickly provide a geological and geophysical comparison of a particular site with other sites where radioactivity was successfully contained. The data can be automatically sorted, compared, and averaged, and information listed according to site location, drill-hole construction, rock units, depth to key horizons and to the water table, and distance to faults. These programs also make possible ordered listings of geophysical properties (interval bulk density, overburden density, interval velocity, velocity to the surface, grain density, water content, carbonate content, porosity, and saturation of the rocks). The characteristics and capabilities of the data bank are discussed

  11. Effectiveness of nursing interventions to increase pap smear test screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guvenc, Gulten; Akyuz, Aygul; Yenen, Mufit Cemal

    2013-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of a three-stage nursing intervention to increase Turkish women's participation in Pap smear testing. Knowledge and beliefs about cervical cancer screening and barriers to Pap smears also were explored. In a quasi-experimental study in a target population of 2,500 women, 237 completed pre-test measures to inform the intervention, and an educational brochure was distributed to all 2,500. As a result, 510 women (20.4%) accepted free Pap smears. Of the remaining 1,990 women, 417 were randomly selected for telephone interviews, 302 participated, and 158 of these (52.3%) participated in free Pap smear testing. Of the 144 who did not have Pap smears after participating in telephone interviews, 54 were then interviewed face-to-face, and 20 (37.0%) decided to accept free Pap smears. A total of 668 women had accepted free Pap smears by the end of the intervention period. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Size Effect Studies on Tensile Tests for Hot Stamping Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaodu; Li, Yuanyuan; Han, Xianhong; Zhang, Junbo

    2018-02-01

    Tensile tests have been widely used to determine basic mechanical properties of materials. However, the properties measured may be related to geometrical factors of the tested samples especially for high-strength steels; this makes the properties' definitions and comparisons difficult. In this study, a series of tensile tests of ultra-high-strength hot-stamped steel were performed; the geometric shapes and sizes as well as the cutting direction were modified. The results demonstrate that the hot-stamped parts were isotropic and the cutting direction had no effect; the measured strengths were practically unrelated to the specimen geometries, including both size and shape. The elongations were slightly related to sample sizes within the studied range but highly depended on the sample shape, represented by the coefficient K. Such phenomena were analyzed and discussed based on microstructural observations and fracture morphologies. Moreover, two widely used elongation conversion equations, the Oliver formula and Barba's law, were introduced to verify their applicability, and a new interpolating function was developed and compared.

  13. A Quick-Test for Biochar Effects on Seed Germination ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar is being globally evaluated as a soil amendment to improve soil characteristics (e.g. soil water holding, nutrient exchange, microbiology, pesticides and chemical availability) to increase crop yields. Unfortunately, there are no quick tests to determine what biochar types are most effective at improving soil characteristics amenable for higher crop yields. Seed germination is a critical parameter for plant establishment and may be a quick indicator of biochar quality. We adapted Oregon State University Seed Laboratory procedures to develop a “quick-test” for screening the effects of biochar on seed germination. We used 11.0 cm rectangular x 3.5 cm deep containers fitted with blotter paper. The paper was premoistened with reverse-osmosis water, followed by placement of seeds (25 in a uniform 5 x 5 vacuum-assisted pattern, and biochar mixtures). A Norfolk and Coxville soil series from South Carolina were used. A total of 18 biochars were evaluated that were produced from 6 feedstocks (pine chips, poultry litter, swine solids, switchgrass, and two blends of pine chips and poultry litter); with biochar from each feedstock made by pyrolysis at 350, 500 and 700 ̊ C. Crops were cabbage, cucumber, onion, ryegrass and tomato. Preliminary results from the test indicated differences in seed germination due to soil type and possibly soil x biochar feedstock interactions. Other measurements including shoot dry weight per plate and pH of the soil+ biochar mixtur

  14. Test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendixen, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers.......Bidrag med en kortfattet, introducerende, perspektiverende og begrebsafklarende fremstilling af begrebet test i det pædagogiske univers....

  15. Effects of Test Media on Different EFL Test-Takers in Writing Scores and in the Cognitive Writing Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Yan-Min

    2016-01-01

    The effects of computer and paper test media on EFL test-takers with different computer familiarity in writing scores and in the cognitive writing process have been comprehensively explored from the learners' aspect as well as on the basis of related theories and practice. The results indicate significant differences in test scores among the…

  16. Neurobehavioral Effects of Space Radiation on Psychomotor Vigilance Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hienz, Robert; Davis, Catherine; Weed, Michael; Guida, Peter; Gooden, Virginia; Brady, Joseph; Roma, Peter

    Neurobehavioral Effects of Space Radiation on Psychomotor Vigilance Tests INTRODUCTION Risk assessment of the biological consequences of living in the space radiation environment represents one of the highest priority areas of NASA radiation research. Of critical importance is the need for a risk assessment of damage to the central nervous system (CNS) leading to functional cognitive/behavioral changes during long-term space missions, and the development of effective shielding or biological countermeasures to such risks. The present research focuses on the use of an animal model that employs neurobehavioral tests identical or homologous to those currently in use in human models of risk assessment by U.S. agencies such as the Depart-ment of Defense and Federal Aviation and Federal Railroad Administrations for monitoring performance and estimating accident risks associated with such variables as fatigue and/or alcohol or drug abuse. As a first approximation for establishing human risk assessments due to exposure to space radiation, the present work provides animal performance data obtained with the rPVT (rat Psychomotor Vigilance Test), an animal analog of the human PVT that is currently employed for human risk assessments via quantification of sustained attention (e.g., 'vigilance' or 'readiness to perform' tasks). Ground-based studies indicate that radiation can induce neurobehavioral changes in rodents, including impaired performance on motor tasks and deficits in spatial learning and memory. The present study is testing the hypothesis that radiation exposure impairs motor function, performance accuracy, vigilance, motivation, and memory in adult male rats. METHODS The psychomotor vigilance test (PVT) was originally developed as a human cognitive neurobe-havioral assay for tracking the temporally dynamic changes in sustained attention, and has also been used to track changes in circadian rhythm. In humans the test requires responding to a small, bright

  17. Algal testing of titanium dioxide nanoparticles-Testing considerations, inhibitory effects and modification of cadmium bioavailability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hartmann, N.B.; Von der Kammer, F.; Hofmann, T.; Baalousha, M.; Ottofuelling, S.; Baun, A.

    2010-01-01

    The ecotoxicity of three different sizes of titanium dioxide (TiO 2 ) particles (primary particles sizes: 10, 30, and 300 nm) to the freshwater green alga Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata was investigated in this study. Algal growth inhibition was found for all three particle types, but the physiological mode of action is not yet clear. It was possible to establish a concentration/dose-response relationship for the three particle sizes. Reproducibility, however, was affected by concentration-dependent aggregation of the nanoparticles, subsequent sedimentation, and possible attachment to vessel surfaces. It is also believed that heteroaggregation, driven by algal exopolymeric exudates, is occurring and could influence the concentration-response relationship. The ecotoxicity of cadmium to algae was investigated both in the presence and absence of 2 mg/L TiO 2 . The presence of TiO 2 in algal tests reduced the observed toxicity due to decreased bioavailability of cadmium resulting from sorption/complexation of Cd 2+ ions to the TiO 2 surface. However, for the 30 nm TiO 2 nanoparticles, the observed growth inhibition was greater than what could be explained by the concentration of dissolved Cd(II) species, indicating a possible carrier effect, or combined toxic effect of TiO 2 nanoparticles and cadmium. These results emphasize the importance of systematic studies of nanoecotoxicological effects of different sizes of nanoparticles and underline the fact that, in addition to particle toxicity, potential interactions with existing environmental contaminants are also of crucial importance in assessing the potential environmental risks of nanoparticles.

  18. TESTING THE EFFECTS OF EXPANSION ON SOLAR WIND TURBULENCE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vech, Daniel; Chen, Christopher H K

    2016-01-01

    We present a multi-spacecraft approach to test the predictions of recent studies on the effect of solar wind expansion on the radial spectral, variance, and local 3D anisotropies of the turbulence. We found that on small scales (5000–10,000 km) the power levels of the B-trace structure functions do not depend on the sampling direction with respect to the radial suggesting that on this scale the effect of expansion is small possibly due to fast turbulent timescales. On larger scales (110–135 R E ), the fluctuations of the radial magnetic field component are reduced by ∼20% compared to the transverse (perpendicular to radial) ones, which could be due to expansion confining the fluctuations into the plane perpendicular to radial. For the local 3D spectral anisotropy, the B-trace structure functions showed dependence on the sampling direction with respect to radial. The anisotropy in the perpendicular plane is reduced when the increments are taken perpendicular with respect to radial, which could be an effect of expansion.

  19. Experimental Plan to Verify the YPCP Model: "Yukawa Pico Chemistry and Physics" Implications in the CF-Lenr Field

    OpenAIRE

    Dufour, Jacques; Dufour, Xavier; Murat, Denis; Foos, Jacques

    2008-01-01

    In the CF-LERN field (Cold Fusion and Low Energy Nuclear reactions) many experimental results are available: unexplained energy production, presence of unusual patterns of classical fusion reaction products, isotopic composition variations, sporadic emission of nuclear radiations. These effects are not always observed, for similar experimental conditions. Should a fundamental reason exist for these effects to occur, funding would be justified, to make them repeatable and more intense (this st...

  20. Effect of an Emergency Department HIV Testing Program on the Proportion of Emergency Department Patients Who Have Been Tested

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudepohl, Nathan J.; Lindsell, Christopher J.; Hart, Kimberly W.; Ruffner, Andrew H.; Trott, Alexander T.; Fichtenbaum, Carl J.; Lyons, Michael S.

    2013-01-01

    Objective The lack of well-described population-level outcome measures for emergency department (ED) HIV testing is one barrier to translation of screening into practice. We demonstrate the impact of an ED diagnostic testing and targeted screening program on the proportion of ED patients ever tested for HIV and explore cumulative effects on testing rates over time. Methods Data were extracted from electronic HIV testing program records and administrative hospital databases for January 2003 to December 2008 to obtain the monthly number of ED visits and HIV tests. We calculated the proportions of (1) patients tested in the program who reported a previous HIV test or had been previously tested in the program, and (2) the cumulative number of unique ED patients who were tested in our program. Results During the study period, 165,665 unique patients made 491,552 ED visits and the program provided 13,509 tests to 11,503 unique patients. From 2003 to 2008, tested patients who reported a history of an HIV test increased by 0.085% per month (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.037% to 0.133%), from 67.7% to 74.4%; the percentage of tested patients who had previous testing in the program increased by 0.277% per month (95% CI 0.245% to 0.308%), from 3.2% to 21.2%; and the percentage of unique ED patients previously tested in the program increased by 0.100% per month (95% CI 0.096% to 0.105%), reaching a cumulative proportion of 6.9%. Conclusion Our HIV testing program increased the proportion of ED patients who have been tested for HIV at least once and repeatedly tested a subset of individuals. HIV screening, even during a minority of ED visits, can have important cumulative effects over time. PMID:21684393

  1. Effect of normalization on significance testing for oligonucleotide microarrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Rudolph S; Spencer, Horace J

    2004-08-01

    Normalization techniques are used to reduce variation among gene expression measurements in oligonucleotide microarrays in an effort to improve the quality of the data and the power of significance tests for detecting differential expression. Of several such proposed methods, two that have commonly been employed include median-interquartile range normalization and quantile normalization. The median-IQR method applied directly to fold-changes for paired data also was considered. Two methods for calculating gene expression values include the MAS 5.0 algorithm [Affymetrix. (2002). Statistical Algorithms Description Document. Santa Clara, CA: Affymetrix, Inc. http://www.affymetrix.com/support/technical/whitepapers/sadd-whitepaper.pdf] and the RMA method [Irizarry, R. A., Bolstad, B. M., Collin, F., Cope, L. M., Hobbs, B., Speed, T. P. (2003a). Summaries of Affymetrix GeneChip probe level data. Nucleic Acids Res. 31(4,e15); Irizarry, R. A., Hobbs, B., Collin, F., Beazer-Barclay, Y. D., Antonellis, K. J., Scherf, U., Speed, T. P. (2003b). Exploration, normalization, and summaries of high density oligonucleotide array probe-level data. Biostatistics 4(2):249-264; Irizarry, R. A., Gautier, L., Cope, L. (2003c). An R package for analysis of Affymetrix oligonucleotide arrays. In: Parmigiani, R. I. G., Garrett, E. S., Ziegler, S., eds. The Analysis of Gene Expression Data: Methods and Software. Berlin: Springer, pp. 102-119]. In considering these methods applied to a prostate cancer data set derived from paired samples on normal and tumor tissue, it is shown that normalization methods may lead to substantial inflation of the number of genes identified by paired-t significance tests even after adjustment for multiple testing. This is shown to be due primarily to an unintended effect that normalization has on the experimental error variance. The impact appears to be greater in the RMA method compared to the MAS 5.0 algorithm and for quantile normalization compared to median

  2. Test of fundamental symmetries via the Primakoff effect

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gan Liping

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The three neutral pseudoscalar mesons, π0, η and η′, represent one of the most interesting systems in strong interaction physics. A study of the electromagnetic properties of these mesons provides a sensitive probe of the symmetry structure of QCD at low energy. A comprehensive experimental program at Jefferson Laboratory (Jlab is aimed at gathering high precision measurements on the two-photon decay widths and transition form factors at low Q2 of π0, η and η′ via the Primakoff effect. The completed experiments on the π0 radiative decay width at Jlab 6 GeV, and other planned measurements at Jlab 12 GeV will provide a rich laboratory to test the chiral anomaly and to study the origin and dynamics of chiral symmetry breaking at the confinement scale of QCD.

  3. Further evaluation of the CSNI separate effect test activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D`Auria, F.; Aksan, S.N.; Glaeser, H. [and others

    1995-09-01

    An internationally agreed Separate Effect Test (SET) Validation Matrix for the thermalhydraulic system codes has been established by a subgroup of the Task Group on Thermalhydraulic System Behaviour as requested by OECD/NEA Committee on the Safety of Nuclear Installations (CSNI) Principal Working Group No. 2 on Coolant System Behavior. The construction of such matrix constituted an attempt to collect together in a systematic way the best sets of openly available test data to select for code validation. As a final result, 67 phenomena have been identified and characterized, roughly 200 facilities have been considered and more than 1000 experiments have been selected as useful for the validation of the codes. The objective of the present paper is to provide additional evaluation of the obtained data base and to supply an a-posteriori judgement in relation to (a) the data base adequacy, (b) the phenomenon, and (c) the need for additional experiments. This has been provided independently by each of the authors. The main conclusions are that large amount of data are available for certain popular phenomena e.g. heat transfer, but data are severely lacking in more esoteric areas e.g. for characterizing phenomena such as parallel channel instability and boron mixing and transport.

  4. Effects of Repeated Testing on Short- and Long-Term Memory Performance across Different Test Formats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenlund, Tova; Sundström, Anna; Jonsson, Bert

    2016-01-01

    This study examined whether practice testing with short-answer (SA) items benefits learning over time compared to practice testing with multiple-choice (MC) items, and rereading the material. More specifically, the aim was to test the hypotheses of "retrieval effort" and "transfer appropriate processing" by comparing retention…

  5. Flood field uniformity testing - effects of crystal hydration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimcheva, M.; Sergieva, S.; Doldurova, M.; Jovanovska, A.

    2012-01-01

    The most basic and sensitive routine quality control (QC) of gamma camera is that of intrinsic flood-field uniformity. The routine QC test must be assessed daily and any nonuniformity must be eliminated before patient testing to eliminate artifacts and false positive or false-negative patient results. The purpose of this study was to compare uniformity analysis results for scintillation crystal hydration with symmetric and asymmetric energy window on the Siemens Symbia T2 SPECTCT camera. Integral and differential uniformity analysis was performed by placing a point source 99m Tc in front of the detector with removed collimator to measure the effect of correction matrix, a count rate and activity volume on intrinsic uniformity. A 15% energy window set symmetrically over the 99m Tc photo peak is equivalent to 140±10% keV or a window spanning 126-154 keV. The results, received from Detector 2 gave the following uniformity parameter values: Both asymmetric energy window images show clearly multiple focal spots due to crystal hydration: discrete hot spots in the asymmetric low window image and discrete cold spots in the asymmetric high window image. The above results are not seen yet on the symmetric window image. We had replaced Detector 2 in order to avoid spots become visible in flood images obtained with the clinical energy window. The uniformity of a gamma camera is maybe the most important parameter that expresses the quality of the camera's performance. Non uniform areas in the field of view can result in misdiagnosed patients and low quality of clinical services. (authors)

  6. On quantum effects in the dynamics of macroscopic test masses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller-Ebhardt, Helge

    2009-01-01

    This thesis provides theoretically a link between the increase of the sensitivity of gravitational-wave detectors and the possibility of preparing macroscopic quantum states in such detectors. In the first part of this thesis, we theoretically explore the quantum measurement noise of an optical speed meter topology, the Sagnac interferometer, equipped with an additional detuned cavity at the output port. This detuned signal-recycling technique was already investigated when applying it to a Michelson interferometer and is used in the gravitational-wave detector GEO600. Together with the quantum noise analysis of the simple Sagnac interferometer, it is the basis of our study: we optimize the Sagnac interferometer's sensitivity towards the detection of a certain gravitational-wave source in the vicinity of a realistic classical noise environment. Motivated by the fact that the Michelson interferometer, as a position meter, with detuned signal-recycling can transduce the gravitational-wave strain into real mirror motion, we compare the transducer effect in a speed and in a position meter. Furthermore, we theoretically investigate the conditional output squeezing of a cavity which is detuned with respect to its carrier and its subcarrier. Therewith we pursue the theoretical analysis of the ponderomotive squeezer. With the knowledge gained in the first part about the quantum measurement process in laser interferometers, the second part of this thesis comprises a theoretical analysis of the conditonal state in positon and momentum of the interferometer's test masses. We motivate not to obtain the conditional states from a stochastic master equation but with the help of the so-called Wiener filtering method. Using this method, we calculate the most general expression for the conditional covariance matrix of the Gaussian state of a test mass under any linear Markovian measurement process. Then we specify to the interferometry and theoretically show under which circumstances

  7. A study on test variables effected on grain boundary etching test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baek, Seung Se; Na, Sung Hoon; Yu, Hyo Sun; Lee, Hae Moo

    2001-01-01

    Recently the non-destructive test technique which uses the grain boundary etching characteristics owing to the variation of material structures has been proposed. However, during in-serviced GEM test there are a lot of variables such as the changes of temperature and concentration of etching solution, the roughness condition of surface polished etc.. The purpose of this paper is to investigate the influences of these test variables on GEM test results in order to establish a reliable and sensitive of GEM evaluation technique. The experiments are conducted in various solution temperatures, 10 deg. C, 15 .deg. C, 20 .deg. C, and 25 .deg. C and in 70% and 100% concentrations of that, and in various surface roughnesses polished by no.800, no.2000, and 0.3μm alumina powder. Through the test with variables, it is verified that the decrease of temperature and concentration of etching solution and the coarsened surface roughness by not using polishing cloth and powder induce some badly and/or greatly influences on GEM test results like grain boundary etching width(W GB ) and intersecting point ratio(N i /N o ). Therefore, to get reliable and good GEM test results, it must be prepared the surface of specimen polished by polishing cloth and 0.3μm alumina powder and the saturated picric acid solution having 25 .deg. C and be maintained the constant temperature(25 .deg. C) during GEM test

  8. Effects of white noise on Callsign Acquisition Test and Modified Rhyme Test scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blue-Terry, Misty; Letowski, Tomasz

    2011-02-01

    The Callsign Acquisition Test (CAT) is a speech intelligibility test developed by the US Army Research Laboratory. The test has been used to evaluate speech transmission through various communication systems but has not been yet sufficiently standardised and validated. The aim of this study was to compare CAT and Modified Rhyme Test (MRT) performance in the presence of white noise across a range of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs). A group of 16 normal-hearing listeners participated in the study. The speech items were presented at 65 dB(A) in the background of white noise at SNRs of -18, -15, -12, -9 and -6 dB. The results showed a strong positive association (75.14%) between the two tests, but significant differences between the CAT and MRT absolute scores in the range of investigated SNRs. Based on the data, a function to predict CAT scores based on existing MRT scores and vice versa was formulated. STATEMENT OF RELEVANCE: This work compares performance data of a common speech intelligibility test (MRT) with a new test (CAT) in the presence of white noise. The results here can be used as a part of the standardisation procedures and provide insights to the predictive capabilities of the CAT to quantify speech intelligibility communication in high-noise military environments.

  9. Performance-intensity functions of Mandarin word recognition tests in noise: test dialect and listener language effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Danzheng; Shi, Lu-Feng

    2013-06-01

    This study established the performance-intensity function for Beijing and Taiwan Mandarin bisyllabic word recognition tests in noise in native speakers of Wu Chinese. Effects of the test dialect and listeners' first language on psychometric variables (i.e., slope and 50%-correct threshold) were analyzed. Thirty-two normal-hearing Wu-speaking adults who used Mandarin since early childhood were compared to 16 native Mandarin-speaking adults. Both Beijing and Taiwan bisyllabic word recognition tests were presented at 8 signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) in 4-dB steps (-12 dB to +16 dB). At each SNR, a half list (25 words) was presented in speech-spectrum noise to listeners' right ear. The order of the test, SNR, and half list was randomized across listeners. Listeners responded orally and in writing. Overall, the Wu-speaking listeners performed comparably to the Mandarin-speaking listeners on both tests. Compared to the Taiwan test, the Beijing test yielded a significantly lower threshold for both the Mandarin- and Wu-speaking listeners, as well as a significantly steeper slope for the Wu-speaking listeners. Both Mandarin tests can be used to evaluate Wu-speaking listeners. Of the 2, the Taiwan Mandarin test results in more comparable functions across listener groups. Differences in the performance-intensity function between listener groups and between tests indicate a first language and dialectal effect, respectively.

  10. Effective test of lacquer in marine diesel engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung-Ho Hong

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available We perform an experiment on lacquer formation with simple test device. The anti-lacquer is one of important issues to increase durability, and to improve performance in the engines because the lacquer formation cause sticking of fuel injection pump, scuffing of cylinder liners, and increase of lubricant oil consumption in the marine diesel engines. We suggest this simple test in order to save enormous experimental cost in marine diesel engines, and in order to have ease in performing the various tests. The influences of the Base Number (BN of lubricant oils and the sulfur content of fuel oils in the formation of lacquer are investigated. In order to investigate physical and chemical properties of lacquer, we perform a variety of tests such as, visual inspection, EDS. In addition, we investigate adhesion of lacquer by pull-off test quantitatively, and perform dissolution test with dilute sulfuric acid.

  11. Subjective Well-Being, Test Anxiety, Academic Achievement: Testing for Reciprocal Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Steinmayr, Ricarda; Crede, Julia; McElvany, Nele; Wirthwein, Linda

    2016-01-01

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety is, however, still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female...

  12. Observing the Testing Effect using Coursera Video-Recorded Lectures: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yong, Paul Zhihao; Lim, Stephen Wee Hun

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the testing effect in Coursera video-based learning. One hundred and twenty-three participants either (a) studied an instructional video-recorded lecture four times, (b) studied the lecture three times and took one recall test, or (c) studied the lecture once and took three tests. They then took a final recall test, either immediately or a week later, through which their learning was assessed. Whereas repeated studying produced better recall performance than did repeated testing when the final test was administered immediately, testing produced better performance when the final test was delayed until a week after. The testing effect was observed using Coursera lectures. Future directions are documented.

  13. PWR blowdown heat transfer separate-effects program: thermal-hydraulic test facility experimental data report for test 104

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leon, D.M.; White, M.D.; Moore, P.A.; Hedrick, R.A.

    1978-01-01

    Reduced instrument responses are presented for Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test 104, which is part of the ORNL Pressurized-Water Reactor (PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program. The objective of the program is to investigate the thermal-hydraulic phenomenon governing the energy transfer and transport processes that occur during a loss-of-coolant accident in the PWR system. Test 104 was conducted to obtain CHF in bundle 1 under blowdown conditions. The primary purpose of this report is to make the reduced instrument responses during test 104 available

  14. Persistence Heterogeneity Testing in Panels with Interactive Fixed Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ergemen, Yunus Emre; Velasco, Carlos

    for correction. We develop tests of homogeneity of dynamics, including the degree of integration, that have no trivial power under local departures from the null hypothesis of a non-negligible fraction of cross-section units. A simulation study shows that our estimates and test have good performance even...

  15. The Effectiveness of Mandatory-Random Student Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    James-Burdumy, Susanne; Goesling, Brian; Deke, John; Einspruch, Eric

    2011-01-01

    One approach some U.S. schools now use to combat high rates of adolescent substance use is school-based mandatory-random student drug testing (MRSDT). Under MRSDT, students and their parents sign consent forms agreeing to the students' participation in random drug testing as a condition of participating in athletics and other school-sponsored…

  16. Possible recombinogenic effect of caprolactam in the mammalian spot test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrig, R

    1989-11-01

    Tests of caprolactam in the mouse spot test showed that treatment with this compound increased the frequency of color spots among animals treated in utero. The nature of these spots suggests that caprolactam may induce spots through the induction of mitotic recombination.

  17. Educational credentials and external effects : A test for the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Meer, P.H.

    This paper proposes and uses a new test to discriminate between on the one hand the human capital model and on the other hand the credentialists and signalling models. Previous tests used only one source of variation between years spend in education and obtained degrees. Most use the variation among

  18. Computerized Testing in a Hospital Setting: Psychometric and Psychological Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Leif; And Others

    1996-01-01

    This Swedish study sought to evaluate a touch-screen computer-based (CB) test administration system in a hospital setting in comparison with paper-and-pencil administrative routine. Patients were given psychometric tests (involving depression, mood, and intelligence measurement) in both formats. Patient pleasantness, activation, and calmness were…

  19. The effect of temperature in high temperature SHPB test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Kyoung Joon; Yang, Hyun Mo; Min, Oak Key

    2001-01-01

    The split Hopkinson pressure bar has used for a high strain rate impact test. Also, it has been developed and modified for compression, shear, tension, elevated temperature and subzero tests. In this paper, SHPB compression tests have been performed with pure titanium at elevated temperatures. The range of temperature is from room temperature to 1000 deg. C with interval of 200 .deg. C. To raise temperature of the specimen, a radiant heater which is composed of a pair of ellipsoidal cavities and halogen lamps is developed at high temperature SHPB test. There are some difficulties in a high temperature test such as temperature gradient, lubrication and prevention of oxidation of specimen. The temperature gradient of specimen is affected by the variation of temperature. Barreling occurred at not properly lubricated specimen. Stress-strain relations of pure titanium have been obtained in the range of strain rate at 1900/sec∼2000/sec and temperature at 25 .deg. C∼1000 .deg. C

  20. Subjective Well-Being, Test Anxiety, Academic Achievement: Testing for Reciprocal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmayr, Ricarda; Crede, Julia; McElvany, Nele; Wirthwein, Linda

    2016-01-01

    In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety is, however, still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of 1 year. Grade point average (GPA) indicated students’ academic achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes. PMID:26779096

  1. Subjective Well-Being, Test Anxiety, Academic Achievement: Testing for Reciprocal Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinmayr, Ricarda; Crede, Julia; McElvany, Nele; Wirthwein, Linda

    2015-01-01

    In the context of adolescents' subjective well-being (SWB), research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents' SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety is, however, still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57) completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of 1 year. Grade point average (GPA) indicated students' academic achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction). Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students' GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic achievement and test anxiety on adolescents' SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

  2. Subjective Well-Being, Test Anxiety, Academic Achievement: Testing for Reciprocal Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricarda eSteinmayr

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In the context of adolescents’ subjective well-being (SWB, research has recently focused on a number of different school variables. The direction of the relationships between adolescents’ SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety is however still open although reciprocal causation has been hypothesized. The present study set out to investigate to what extent SWB, academic achievement, and test anxiety influence each other over time. A sample of N = 290 11th grade students (n = 138 female; age: M = 16.54 years, SD = 0.57 completed measures of SWB and test anxiety in the time span of one year. Grade Point Average (GPA indicated students’ academic achievement. We analyzed the reciprocal relations using cross-lagged structural equation modeling. The model fit was satisfactory for all computed models. Results indicated that the worry component of test anxiety negatively and GPA positively predicted changes in the cognitive component of SWB (life satisfaction. Worry also negatively predicted changes in the affective component of SWB. Moreover, worry negatively predicted changes in students’ GPA. Directions for future research and the differential predictive influences of academic achievement and test anxiety on adolescents’ SWB are discussed with regard to potential underlying processes.

  3. Genotoxic, Cytotoxic, Antigenotoxic, and Anticytotoxic Effects of Sulfonamide Chalcone Using the Ames Test and the Mouse Bone Marrow Micronucleus Test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Ribeiro E Silva

    Full Text Available Chalcones present several biological activities and sulfonamide chalcone derivatives have shown important biological applications, including antitumor activity. In this study, genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic activities of the sulfonamide chalcone N-{4-[3-(4-nitrophenylprop-2-enoyl]phenyl} benzenesulfonamide (CPN were assessed using the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation test (Ames test and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. The results showed that CPN caused a small increase in the number of histidine revertant colonies in S. typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100, but not statistically significant (p > 0.05. The antimutagenicity test showed that CPN significantly decreased the number of His+ revertants in strain TA98 at all doses tested (p 0.05. Additionally, CPN co-administered with MMC significantly increased PCE/NCE ratio at all doses tested, demonstrating its anticytotoxic effect. In summary, CPN presented genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic properties.

  4. Genotoxic, Cytotoxic, Antigenotoxic, and Anticytotoxic Effects of Sulfonamide Chalcone Using the Ames Test and the Mouse Bone Marrow Micronucleus Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, Flávio Fernandes Veloso; Bernardes, Aline; Perez, Caridad Noda; Silva, Daniela de Melo e

    2015-01-01

    Chalcones present several biological activities and sulfonamide chalcone derivatives have shown important biological applications, including antitumor activity. In this study, genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic activities of the sulfonamide chalcone N-{4-[3-(4-nitrophenyl)prop-2-enoyl]phenyl} benzenesulfonamide (CPN) were assessed using the Salmonella typhimurium reverse mutation test (Ames test) and the mouse bone marrow micronucleus test. The results showed that CPN caused a small increase in the number of histidine revertant colonies in S. typhimurium strains TA98 and TA100, but not statistically significant (p > 0.05). The antimutagenicity test showed that CPN significantly decreased the number of His+ revertants in strain TA98 at all doses tested (p 0.05). Additionally, CPN co-administered with MMC significantly increased PCE/NCE ratio at all doses tested, demonstrating its anticytotoxic effect. In summary, CPN presented genotoxic, cytotoxic, antigenotoxic, and anticytotoxic properties. PMID:26335560

  5. 30 CFR 35.22 - Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test to determine effect of evaporation on... § 35.22 Test to determine effect of evaporation on flammability. (a) Purpose. The purpose of this test shall be to determine the effect of evaporation on the reduction of fire resistance of a hydraulic fluid...

  6. Neutrino properties from Yukawa structure

    CERN Document Server

    Ibarra, A

    2003-01-01

    We discuss the implications for lepton mixing and CP violation of structure in the lepton mass matrices, for the case that neutrino masses are generated by the see-saw mechanism with an hierarchical structure for the Majorana masses. For a particularly interesting case with enhanced symmetry in which the lepton Dirac mass matrices are related to those in the quark sector, the CHOOZ angle is near the present limit and the CP violating phase relevant to thermal leptogenesis and to $nu 0 beta beta $ decay is near maximal.

  7. Spillover effects of HIV testing policies: changes in HIV testing guidelines and HCV testing practices in drug treatment programs in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jemima A. Frimpong

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To examine the extent to which state adoption of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC 2006 revisions to adult and adolescent HIV testing guidelines is associated with availability of other important prevention and medical services. We hypothesized that in states where the pretest counseling requirement for HIV testing was dropped from state legislation, substance use disorder treatment programs would have higher availability of HCV testing services than in states that had maintained this requirement. Methods We analyzed a nationally representative sample of 383 opioid treatment programs from the 2005 and 2011 National Drug Abuse Treatment System Survey (NDATSS. Data were collected from program directors and clinical supervisors through telephone surveys. Multivariate logistic regression models were used to measure associations between state adoption of CDC recommended guidelines for HIV pretest counseling and availability of HCV testing services. Results The effects of HIV testing legislative changes on HCV testing practices varied by type of opioid treatment program. In states that had removed the requirement for HIV pretest counseling, buprenorphine-only programs were more likely to offer HCV testing to their patients. The positive spillover effect of HIV pretest counseling policies, however, did not extend to methadone programs and did not translate into increased availability of on-site HCV testing in either program type. Conclusions Our findings highlight potential positive spillover effects of HIV testing policies on HCV testing practices. They also suggest that maximizing the benefits of HIV policies may require other initiatives, including resources and programmatic efforts that support systematic integration with other services and effective implementation.

  8. Effects of Comparison Question Type and Between Test Stimulation on the Validity of Comparison Question Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-09-08

    C. J., & Iacono, W. G. (1989). Psychopathy , threat, and polygraph test accuracy. Journal of Applied Psychology, 74, 347-355. Patrick, C. J... Psychopathy and detection of deception in a prison population. Psychophysiology, 15,121-136. Raskin, D. C, & Honts, C. R. (2002). The comparison question

  9. The Effect of Test Expectations on Study Strategies and Test Performance: A Metacognitive Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abd-El-Fattah, Sabry M.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate whether university students can adjust their study strategies to meet the cognitive demands of testing; a metacognitive self-regulatory skill. One hundred and fifty undergraduates attended three lectures as part of a course on the psychology of individual differences. These participants were then…

  10. Behavioral testing and litter effects in the rabbit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gümüş, H G; Agyemang, A A; Romantsik, O; Sandgren, R; Karlsson, H; Gram, M; Vallius, S; Ley, D; van den Hove, D L A; Bruschettini, M

    2018-02-23

    Behavioral testing provides an essential approach in further developing our understanding of brain structure and function. The aim of our study was to outline a more expanded approach to cognition- and anxiety-related behavior in the rabbit. Twenty-one 70-day old rabbits (13 female, 8 male) were exposed to open field test, dark-light box test and object recognition testing with variations in inter-trial-interval, olfactory recognition and object location testing. Independent T-tests were used to compare data by individual baseline characteristics, i.e. birth weight, weight at testing, sex, litter #, litter size. In the open field test, median time spent in the center was 3.64 s (0.84-41.36) for the 9 rabbits who entered the center; median distance moved in the arena was 874.42 cm (54.20-3444.83). In the dark light box test, 12 rabbits entered the light compartment. In the object recognition task, rabbits spent significantly less time exploring the familiar object compared to the novel (0.40 s [0-2.8] vs. 3.17 s [1.30-32.69]; P = 0.003) when using a 30-min inter-trial interval, as well with a 90-min inter-trial interval: 0.87 s [0-7.8] vs. 7.65 s [0-37.6] (P = 0.008). However, recognition was lost when using a 24-h inter-trial interval (time spent exploring the familiar object: 3.33 [0-10.90]; novel object:3.87 [1.15-48.53]; n.s). In the object location task and in olfactory object recognition task, median discrimination indexes were 0.69 (-1 to 1) and 0.37 (-0.38 to 0.78) respectively, higher than level expected by chance (P Litter size >3 during the neonatal period was associated with increased explorative behavior in the dark light box test (P = 0.046) and in the visual object recognition task (P = 0.005), whereas body weight and sex were not. Settings and outcome measures for multiple behavioral tests, providing reference values and considerations for future developmental studies are reported. Discrimination and memory in the rabbit

  11. A Test for Lateralization of the Mozart Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bates, Angela; Cagle, Stacy; Rideout, Bruce

    The Mozart effect involves the enhancement of spatial processing after listening to a Mozart piano sonata (Rauscher, Dhaw, and Ky, 1993). Efforts to replicate the Mozart effect have been mixed, possibly due to differences in dependent variable operationalization across studies or large individual differences in magnitude of effect. Chabria and…

  12. Effects of earthquake induced rock shear on containment system integrity. Laboratory testing plan development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Read, Rodney S. (RSRead Consulting Inc. (Canada))

    2011-07-15

    This report describes a laboratory-scale testing program plan to address the issue of earthquake induced rock shear effects on containment system integrity. The document contains a review of relevant literature from SKB covering laboratory testing of bentonite clay buffer material, scaled analogue tests, and the development of related material models to simulate rock shear effects. The proposed testing program includes standard single component tests, new two-component constant volume tests, and new scaled analogue tests. Conceptual drawings of equipment required to undertake these tests are presented along with a schedule of tests. The information in this document is considered sufficient to engage qualified testing facilities, and to guide implementation of laboratory testing of rock shear effects. This document was completed as part of a collaborative agreement between SKB and Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in Canada

  13. Effects of earthquake induced rock shear on containment system integrity. Laboratory testing plan development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Read, Rodney S.

    2011-07-01

    This report describes a laboratory-scale testing program plan to address the issue of earthquake induced rock shear effects on containment system integrity. The document contains a review of relevant literature from SKB covering laboratory testing of bentonite clay buffer material, scaled analogue tests, and the development of related material models to simulate rock shear effects. The proposed testing program includes standard single component tests, new two-component constant volume tests, and new scaled analogue tests. Conceptual drawings of equipment required to undertake these tests are presented along with a schedule of tests. The information in this document is considered sufficient to engage qualified testing facilities, and to guide implementation of laboratory testing of rock shear effects. This document was completed as part of a collaborative agreement between SKB and Nuclear Waste Management Organization (NWMO) in Canada

  14. Testing for marginal linear effects in quantile regression

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Huixia Judy

    2017-10-23

    The paper develops a new marginal testing procedure to detect significant predictors that are associated with the conditional quantiles of a scalar response. The idea is to fit the marginal quantile regression on each predictor one at a time, and then to base the test on the t-statistics that are associated with the most predictive predictors. A resampling method is devised to calibrate this test statistic, which has non-regular limiting behaviour due to the selection of the most predictive variables. Asymptotic validity of the procedure is established in a general quantile regression setting in which the marginal quantile regression models can be misspecified. Even though a fixed dimension is assumed to derive the asymptotic results, the test proposed is applicable and computationally feasible for large dimensional predictors. The method is more flexible than existing marginal screening test methods based on mean regression and has the added advantage of being robust against outliers in the response. The approach is illustrated by using an application to a human immunodeficiency virus drug resistance data set.

  15. GMOtrack: generator of cost-effective GMO testing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Petra Krau; Gruden, Kristina; Morisset, Dany; Lavrac, Nada; Stebih, Dejan; Rotter, Ana; Zel, Jana

    2009-01-01

    Commercialization of numerous genetically modified organisms (GMOs) has already been approved worldwide, and several additional GMOs are in the approval process. Many countries have adopted legislation to deal with GMO-related issues such as food safety, environmental concerns, and consumers' right of choice, making GMO traceability a necessity. The growing extent of GMO testing makes it important to study optimal GMO detection and identification strategies. This paper formally defines the problem of routine laboratory-level GMO tracking as a cost optimization problem, thus proposing a shift from "the same strategy for all samples" to "sample-centered GMO testing strategies." An algorithm (GMOtrack) for finding optimal two-phase (screening-identification) testing strategies is proposed. The advantages of cost optimization with increasing GMO presence on the market are demonstrated, showing that optimization approaches to analytic GMO traceability can result in major cost reductions. The optimal testing strategies are laboratory-dependent, as the costs depend on prior probabilities of local GMO presence, which are exemplified on food and feed samples. The proposed GMOtrack approach, publicly available under the terms of the General Public License, can be extended to other domains where complex testing is involved, such as safety and quality assurance in the food supply chain.

  16. PWR Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program. Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility experimental data report for test 103

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemons, V.D.; White, M.D.; Moore, P.A.; Hedrick, R.A.

    1978-03-07

    Reduced instrument responses are presented for Thermal-Hydraulic Test Facility (THTF) test 103, which is part of the ORNL Pressurized-Water Reactor (PWR) Blowdown Heat Transfer Separate-Effects Program. The objective of the program is to investigate the thermal-hydraulic phenomenon governing the energy transfer and transport processes that occur during a loss-of-coolant accident in a PWR system.

  17. Effects of phytosterols on zebrafish reproduction in multigeneration test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakari, Tarja; Erkomaa, Kirsti

    2003-05-01

    A multigeneration test is used to show disruption of the reproductive system by phytosterols. - Zebrafish from mixed sex populations were exposed continuously across three generations to two phytosterol preparations both containing {beta}-sitosterol. The phytosterols were isolated from wood and soy beans. Blood vitellogenin levels and sex ratio changes were used as intermediate indicators of the reproduction failures. Both sterol preparations caused vitellogenin induction in the exposed fish. The wood sterol changed the sex ratio of the exposed fish. In generation F1, the predominant sex was male, and in generation F2 it was female. The soy sterol in the used test concentration was lethal to the exposed fish in generation F1. This multigeneration test evidenced that phytosterols containing {beta}-sitosterol disrupt the reproduction system of zebrafish by changing the sex ratios and by inducing the vitellogenin production in the exposed fish.

  18. Effects of phytosterols on zebrafish reproduction in multigeneration test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakari, Tarja; Erkomaa, Kirsti

    2003-01-01

    A multigeneration test is used to show disruption of the reproductive system by phytosterols. - Zebrafish from mixed sex populations were exposed continuously across three generations to two phytosterol preparations both containing β-sitosterol. The phytosterols were isolated from wood and soy beans. Blood vitellogenin levels and sex ratio changes were used as intermediate indicators of the reproduction failures. Both sterol preparations caused vitellogenin induction in the exposed fish. The wood sterol changed the sex ratio of the exposed fish. In generation F1, the predominant sex was male, and in generation F2 it was female. The soy sterol in the used test concentration was lethal to the exposed fish in generation F1. This multigeneration test evidenced that phytosterols containing β-sitosterol disrupt the reproduction system of zebrafish by changing the sex ratios and by inducing the vitellogenin production in the exposed fish

  19. Express Testing Makes for More Effective Vet Visit

    Science.gov (United States)

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a discussion on Vetscan, a system designed to provide veterinarians with instant diagnostic information needed for rapid treatment decisions. VetScan is designed for point-of-care testing in any treatment setting, including mobile environments, where veterinarians can operate the analyzer from a car-lighter adapter. A full range of tests is available for almost every species normally treated by veterinarians, including cats, dogs, birds, reptiles, and large animals, such as those in the equine and bovine families.

  20. Pulsed laser simulation of VLSI single-event effect testing study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xue Yuxiong; Cao Zhou Yang Shiyu; Tian Kai; Liu Shufen; Chu Nan; Cao Haining; Shang Zhi

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes a study aimed at investigating the pulsed laser simulation of Single-Event Effect (SEE) testing for VLSI Intel386EX CPU, using our laboratory LSS (laser simulation system). We have detailed SEE testing principle, testing method, testing system constituting, testing result. It validates that our laser pulses simulate may use SEE testing in VLSI, and Intel 386Ex have a large locking resistance to single event. (authors)

  1. Preliminary test for the aging effects of drift chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    MA Ji-Mao; WANG Yun-Yong; MAO Ze-Fe; LU Xin-Hua; XIE Pei-Pei; YAN Jie

    1985-01-01

    The degradation of some performance characteristics of drift chambers irradiated with a 5 MeV electron beam was tested. The gas mixtures Ar/CO 2 , Ar/CH 4 , and Ar/ iC 4 H 10 were used. The dark current, the pulse height, the energy resolution and the counting rate plateau were measured during the irradiation

  2. Histomorphological Effect of Zidovudine on the Testes of Adult Male ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The rats were fed with growers mash and given water liberally. The rats were euthanized under chloroform vapor on the 31st day of the experiment, and the testes were carefully harvested and fi xed in 10% formol saline for histological studies. Results: Histological results of treated group revealed signifi cant changes in ...

  3. Effective Rating Scale Development for Speaking Tests: Performance Decision Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulcher, Glenn; Davidson, Fred; Kemp, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Rating scale design and development for testing speaking is generally conducted using one of two approaches: the measurement-driven approach or the performance data-driven approach. The measurement-driven approach prioritizes the ordering of descriptors onto a single scale. Meaning is derived from the scaling methodology and the agreement of…

  4. Attributes Effecting Software Testing Estimation; Is Organizational Trust an Issue?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammoud, Wissam

    2013-01-01

    This quantitative correlational research explored the potential association between the levels of organizational trust and the software testing estimation. This was conducted by exploring the relationships between organizational trust, tester's expertise, organizational technology used, and the number of hours, number of testers, and time-coding…

  5. The Effects of High Stakes Testing on Teachers in NJ

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulgar, Sylvia

    2012-01-01

    A great number of teachers in the United States have found themselves wrestling with an internal conflict between their teaching beliefs and a need to revert back to traditional modes of teaching in order to have their students demonstrate proficiency on high-stakes tests. While they want to include more non-traditional methods in their repertoire…

  6. The Effect of Sample Preparation and Testing Procedure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    handling and disturbance. Revisions to sample preparation and testing procedures are considered necessary and are proposed in utilizing these soils for civil engineering purposes. It is concluded that the plasticity chart should be regarded as a guidance tool only for evaluating the likely properties of laterite soils. It should.

  7. Glucose tolerance test and some biochemical effect of Phyllanthus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The concentration of total cholesterol was significantly (p < 0.05) reduced for all the concentrations; the reduction was found to be dose dependant. The atherogenic index Log (TG/HDL-CH) of the animals showed no significant differences between tests and control. These findings may be of clinical importance to individuals ...

  8. A Quick-Test for Biochar Effects on Seed Germination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biochar is being globally evaluated as a soil amendment to improve soil characteristics (e.g. soil water holding, nutrient exchange, microbiology, pesticides and chemical availability) to increase crop yields. Unfortunately, there are no quick tests to determine what biochar type...

  9. Effects of Introduced Materials in the Drift Scale Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DeLoach, L; Jones, RL

    2002-01-01

    Water samples previously acquired from superheated (>140 C) zones within hydrological test boreholes of the Drift Scale Test (DST) show relatively high fluoride concentrations (5-66 ppm) and low pH (3.1-3.5) values. In these high temperature regions of the rock, water is present superheated vapor only--liquid water for sampling purposes is obtained during the sampling process by cooling. Based on data collected to date, it is evident that the source of the fluoride and low pH is from introduced man-made materials (Teflon(trademark) and/or Viton(trademark) fluoroelastomer) used in the test. The test materials may contribute fluoride either by degassing hydrogen fluoride (HF) directly to produce trace concentrations of HF gas (∼0.1 ppm) in the high temperature steam, or by leaching fluoride in the sampling tubes after condensation of the superheated steam. HF gas is known to be released from Viton(trademark) at high temperatures (Dupont Dow Elastomers L.L.C., Elkton, MD, personal communication) and the sample water compositions indicate near stoichiometric balance of hydrogen ion and fluoride ion, indicating dissolution of HF gas into the aqueous phase. These conclusions are based on a series of water samples collected to determine if the source of the fluoride is from the degradation of materials originally installed to facilitate measurements. Analyses of these water samples show that the source of the fluoride is the introduced materials, that is the Viton(trademark) packers used to isolate test zones and/or Teflon(trademark) tubing used to draw water and steam from the test zones. In particular, water samples collected from borehole (BH) 72 high temperatures (∼ 170 C) prior to introduction of any Viton(trademark) or Teflon(trademark) show pH Values (4.8 to 5.5) and fluoride concentrations well below 1 ppm over a period of six months. These characteristics are typical of condensing DST steam that contains only some dissolved carbon dioxide generated by water

  10. Does rheumatoid arthritis have an effect on audiovestibular tests?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özkırış, Mahmut; Kapusuz, Zeliha; Günaydın, İlhan; Kubilay, Utku; Pırtı, İlyas; Saydam, Levent

    2014-06-01

    The study aimed to determine the characteristics of hearing loss, vestibular responses and the incidence of vestibular disturbances in RA patients. This prospective study was performed at the Otolaryngology Department of Bozok University School of Medicine between May and November 2012. Eighty-one RA patients (69 women and 12 men) with a mean age of 40.8 ± 13.4 years (23-67 years) and 81 healthy controls (67 women and 14 men) with a mean age of 41.3 ± 13.8 years (24-66 years). Each subject was tested with low and high-frequency audiometry by a single experienced investigator under standard audiometric testing conditions. For each set of tests, mean values of air and bone conduction at each frequency and tympanometric values were calculated for the study groups. Videonystagmography (VNG) including smooth pursuit, saccade, positional, and caloric tests were also performed. The mean air conduction threshold values at high frequencies (4,000, 6,000, and 8,000 Hz) in RA group were lower than control groups. The difference between mean air conduction threshold values of the control groups against RA group at high frequencies were statistically significant (p VNG testing revealed central abnormalities in twenty patients (24.69%), peripheral abnormalities in five patients (6.17%), and mixed abnormalities in six patients (7.4%). There was no association between VNG abnormalities in patients with RA and age, sex, duration of disease, accompanying vertigo complaint, the laboratory findings and hearing levels (p < 0.05). Our findings suggest an association of RA and audiovestibular system dysfunction regardless clinical and demographic situation of patients. We assume the hearing and vestibular disturbances in RA are more prevalent than previously recognized. Also hearing losses in high frequencies in RA patients may be considered as an indicator of cochlear involvement in this disease.

  11. Practice effects and test-re-test reliability of the Five Digit Test in patients with stroke over four serial assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, En-Chi; Koh, Chia-Lin; Tsai, Chia-Yin; Lu, Wen-Shian; Sheu, Ching-Fan; Hsueh, I-Ping; Hsieh, Ching-Lin

    2014-01-01

    To investigate practice effect and test-re-test reliability of the Five Digit Test (FDT) over four serial assessments in patients with stroke. Single-group repeated measures design. Twenty-five patients with stroke were administered the FDT in four consecutive assessments every 2 weeks. The FDT contains four parts with five indices: 'basic measures of attention and processing speed', 'selective attention', 'alternating attention', 'ability of inhibition' and 'ability of switching'. The five indices of the FDT showed trivial-to-small practice effects (Cohen's d = 0.03-0.47) and moderate-to-excellent test-re-test reliability (intra-class correlation coefficient = 0.59-0.97). Practice effects of the five indices all appeared cumulative, but one index, 'basic measures of attention and processing speed', reached a plateau after the second assessment. The minimum and maximum values of the 90% confidence interval (CI) of reliable change index modified for practice (RCIp) for this index were [-17.6, 11.2]. One of five indices of the FDT reached a plateau, whose minimum and maximum values of the 90% CI RCIp are useful to determine whether the change in an individual's score is real. However, clinicians and researchers should be cautious when interpreting the test results of these four indices over repeated assessments.

  12. Effect of industrial dust on some test organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schuck, H.J.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of industrial dust on the growth of Lepidium sativum Cress and on spore germination and germ-tube development of Botrytis cinerea and Fusarium oxysporum was studied. Lepidium sativum was strongly inhibited and in most cases the fungi were stimulated. The effect was related to the species of trees and the district, where the dust-samples were collected.

  13. Four Semesters Investigating Frequency of Testing, the Testing Effect, and Transfer of Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foss, Donald J.; Pirozzolo, Joseph W.

    2017-01-01

    We carried out 4 semester-long studies of student performance in a college research methods course (total N = 588). Two sections of it were taught each semester with systematic and controlled differences between them. Key manipulations were repeated (with some variation) across the 4 terms, allowing assessment of replicability of effects.…

  14. A Microcomputer Test Battery for Evaluating the Effects of Neuropsychiatric Treatment Interventions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krynicki, Victor E.; MacKenty, Edmund; Itil, Turan M.

    1979-01-01

    A microcomputer based battery of neuropsychiatric tests is described. This battery is capable of gathering a large amount of information in a cost-effective way. The tests included are: a Learning Paradigm, a Memory Scanning Test, a Rapid Automatized Naming Test, the Continuous Performance Test, and a Selective Attention Test. The background of each test is described. Results of the administration of this battery are written out by means of a password-controlled Output program. A case example is presented, in which the battery was used to establish the effect of a very low dosage of medication on memory functions in a learning disabled/MBD child.

  15. Why wait if you can switch? A short term testing effect in cross-language recognition.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkoeijen, Peter; Bouwmeester, Samantha; Camp, Gino

    2018-01-01

    Taking a memory test after an initial study phase produces better long-term retention than restudying the items, a phenomenon known as the testing effect. We propose that this effect emerges because testing strengthens semantic features of items’ memory traces, whereas restudying strengthens surface

  16. Test-Enhanced Learning of Natural Concepts: Effects on Recognition Memory, Classification, and Metacognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Larry L.; Wahlheim, Christopher N.; Coane, Jennifer H.

    2010-01-01

    Three experiments examined testing effects on learning of natural concepts and metacognitive assessments of such learning. Results revealed that testing enhanced recognition memory and classification accuracy for studied and novel exemplars of bird families on immediate and delayed tests. These effects depended on the balance of study and test…

  17. 49 CFR 40.207 - What is the effect of a cancelled drug test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the effect of a cancelled drug test? 40.207 Section 40.207 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Drug Tests § 40.207 What is the effect of...

  18. Ecological Validity of the Testing Effect: The Use of Daily Quizzes in Introductory Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batsell, W. Robert, Jr.; Perry, Jennifer L.; Hanley, Elizabeth; Hostetter, Autumn B.

    2017-01-01

    The testing effect is the enhanced retention of learned information by individuals who have studied and completed a test over the material relative to individuals who have only studied the material. Although numerous laboratory studies and simulated classroom studies have provided evidence of the testing effect, data from a natural class setting…

  19. Debris filtering effectiveness and pressure drop tests of debris resistance-bottom end piece

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Moon Ki; Song, Chul Hwa; Chung, Heung June; Won, Soon Yeun; Cho, Young Ro; Kim, Bok Deuk

    1992-03-01

    In this final report, described are the test conditions and test procedures for the debris filtering effectiveness and pressure drop tests for developing the Debris Resistance-Bottom End Piece (DR-BEP). And the test results are tabulated for later evaluation. (Author)

  20. Quantitative Differences in Retest Effects across Different Methods Used to Construct Alternate Test Forms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arendasy, Martin E.; Sommer, Markus

    2013-01-01

    Allowing respondents to retake a cognitive ability test has shown to increase their test scores. Several theoretical models have been proposed to explain this effect, which make distinct assumptions regarding the measurement invariance of psychometric tests across test administration sessions with regard to narrower cognitive abilities and general…

  1. The Effect of Testing on the Retention of Coherent and Incoherent Text Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Jonge, Mario; Tabbers, Huib K.; Rikers, Remy M. J. P.

    2015-01-01

    Research has shown that testing during learning can enhance the long-term retention of text material. In two experiments, we investigated the testing effect with a fill-in-the-blank test on the retention of text material. In Experiment 1, using a coherent text, we found no retention benefit of testing compared to a restudy (control) condition. In…

  2. Source effects on surface waves from Nevada Test Site explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patton, H.J.; Vergino, E.S.

    1981-11-01

    Surface waves recorded on the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) digital network have been used to study five underground nuclear explosions detonated in Yucca Valley at the Nevada Test Site. The purpose of this study is to characterize the reduced displacement potential (RDP) at low frequencies and to test secondary source models of underground explosions. The observations consist of Rayleigh- and Love-wave amplitude and phase spectra in the frequency range 0.03 to 0.16 Hz. We have found that Rayleigh-wave spectral amplitudes are modeled well by a RDP with little or no overshoot for explosions detonated in alluvium and tuff. On the basis of comparisons between observed and predicted source phase, the spall closure source proposed by Viecelli does not appear to be a significant source of Rayleigh waves that reach the far field. We tested two other secondary source models, the strike-slip, tectonic strain release model proposed by Toksoez and Kehrer and the dip-slip thrust model of Masse. The surface-wave observations do not provide sufficient information to discriminate between these models at the low F-values (0.2 to 0.8) obtained for these explosions. In the case of the strike-slip model, the principal stress axes inferred from the fault slip angle and strike angle are in good agreement with the regional tectonic stress field for all but one explosion, Nessel. The results of the Nessel explosion suggest a mechanism other than tectonic strain release

  3. Integral Effect Tests in the PKL Facility with International Participation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umminger, Klaus; Mull, Thomas; Brand, Bernhard [AREVA NP, Erlangen (Georgia)

    2009-08-15

    For over 30 years, investigations of the thermohydraulic behavior of pressurized-water reactors under accident conditions have been carried out in the PKL test facility at AREVA NP in Erlangen, Germany. The PKL facility models the entire primary side and significant parts of the secondary side of a of pressurized water reactor at a height scale of 1:1. Volumes, power ratings and mass flows are scaled with a ratio of 1:145. The experimental facility consists of four primary loops with circulation pumps and steam generators (SGs) arranged symmetrically around the reactor pressure vessel (RPV). The investigations carried out encompass a very broad spectrum from accident scenario simulations with large, medium, and small breaks, over the investigation of shutdown procedures after a wide variety of accidents, to the systematic investigation of complex thermohydraulic phenomena. The PKL tests began in the mid 1970s with the support of the German Research Ministry. Since the mid 1980s, the project has also been significantly supported by the German PWR operators. Since 2001, 25 partner organizations from 15 countries have taken part in the PKL investigations with the support and mediation of the OECD/NEA (Nuclear Energy Agency). After an overview of PKL history and a short description of the facility, this paper focuses on the investigations carried out since the beginning of the international cooperation, and shows, by means of some examples, what insights can be derived from the tests

  4. Testing hypotheses on frequency effects in first language acquisition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærbæk, Laila; Basbøll, Hans

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of extensive literature studies, Ambridge, Kidd, Rowland and Theakston (2015) present five theses on frequency effects on language acquisition: i) the Levels and Kinds Thesis argues that frequency effects exist at all levels and are of many different kinds (e.g., type and token...... frequency effects as well as absolute and relative frequency effects); ii) the Age of Acquisition Thesis argues that all other things being equal, frequent forms will be acquired before less frequent forms. Since all other things are not equal, this claim does not entail a one-to-one relationship between...... frequency and age of acquisition; iii) the Prevent Error Thesis argues that high-frequency forms prevent (or reduce) errors in contexts in which they are the target; iv) the Cause Error Thesis argues that high-frequency forms also cause errors in contexts in which a competing, related lower-frequency form...

  5. Der Einfluss von Tests auf Studienleistung und Leistung [The Effects of Tests on Study Behavior and Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dirkx, Kim; Kester, Liesbeth; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Dirkx, K. J. H., Kester, L., & Kirschner, P. A. (2012, 24 September). Der Einfluss von Tests auf Studienverhalten und Leistung [The Effects of Study Behavior and Performance]. Presentation at the Leibniz Institute for Pedagogies in Sciences and Mathematics (IPN), Kiel, Germany.

  6. Effects of structured testing versus routine testing of blood glucose in diabetes self-management: A randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishimura, Akiko; Harashima, Shin-Ichi; Fujita, Yoshihito; Tanaka, Daisuke; Wang, Yu; Liu, Yanyan; Inagaki, Nobuya

    2017-01-01

    To compare the effects of structured and routine testing regimens used in self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) on glycemic control and diabetes self-management in insulin-naïve type 2 diabetes patients. Sixty-two outpatients with insulin-naïve type 2 diabetes were randomly allocated into two less-frequent SMBG usage groups: a structured testing group (STG) and a routine testing group (RTG). Subjects in STG measured 7-points on SMBG for 3 consecutive days once every two months without daily testing; subjects in RTG measured SMBG 3 times each week before breakfast on Monday and Friday and before dinner on Wednesday. The primary endpoint was HbA1c reduction. The secondary endpoints were change in body weight, blood pressure, treatment change, and self-management performance change. HbA1c levels were significantly decreased by 0.32% (3.50mmol/mol) in STG, partly because physicians changed medications more actively. In contrast, body weight and systolic/diastolic blood pressure were significantly reduced by 0.94kg and 6.8/4.7mmHg, respectively, in RTG, possibly related to the increased diet and exercise score in RTG. Structured testing without daily testing is beneficial for glycemic control; routine testing 3 times a week is more helpful for daily self-management. In low SMBG frequency usage, these two regimens can be utilized according to individual diabetic conditions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Brazilian preliminary norms and investigation of age and education effects on the Modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test, Stroop Color and Word test and Digit Span test in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, Nicolle; Cardoso, Caroline de Oliveira; Trentini, Clarissa Marceli; Grassi-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Fonseca, Rochele Paz

    2015-01-01

    Executive functions are involved in a series of human neurological and psychiatric disorders. For this reason, appropriate assessment tools with age and education adjusted norms for symptom diagnosis are necessary. To present normative data for adults (19-75 year-olds; with five years of education or more) on the Modified Wisconsin Card Sorting Test (MWCST), Stroop color and word test and Digit Span test. Age and education effects were investigated. Three samples were formed after inclusion criteria and data analysis: MWCST (n=124); Digit Span (n=123), and Stroop test (n=158). Groups were divided into young (19-39), middle-aged (40-59) and older (60-75) participants with five to eight years of education and nine years of education or more. Two-way ANOVA and ANCOVA analyses were used. Education effects were found in most variables of the three tasks. An age effect was only found on color naming and color-word naming speed from the Stroop test. No interactions were detected. In countries with heterogeneous educational backgrounds, the use of stratified norms by education to assess at least some components of executive functions is essential for an ethical and accurate cognitive diagnosis.

  8. USING PEA AND SOYBEAN IN DEVELOPMENTAL TESTS FOR NON-TARGET PLANT EFFECTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Current tests required for pesticide registration do not investigate the potential effects of chemical exposure on plant development. The tests investigate only seedling emergence and early growth. Previous research has shown that significant impacts can occur to plant developm...

  9. Voltage stress effects on microcircuit accelerated life test failure rates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G. M.

    1976-01-01

    The applicability of Arrhenius and Eyring reaction rate models for describing microcircuit aging characteristics as a function of junction temperature and applied voltage was evaluated. The results of a matrix of accelerated life tests with a single metal oxide semiconductor microcircuit operated at six different combinations of temperature and voltage were used to evaluate the models. A total of 450 devices from two different lots were tested at ambient temperatures between 200 C and 250 C and applied voltages between 5 Vdc and 15 Vdc. A statistical analysis of the surface related failure data resulted in bimodal failure distributions comprising two lognormal distributions; a 'freak' distribution observed early in time, and a 'main' distribution observed later in time. The Arrhenius model was shown to provide a good description of device aging as a function of temperature at a fixed voltage. The Eyring model also appeared to provide a reasonable description of main distribution device aging as a function of temperature and voltage. Circuit diagrams are shown.

  10. Effects of oral contraceptives on thyroid tests using 131I

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carvalho, N.; Silva, W.N. da; Papaleo Netto, M.

    1973-01-01

    The effect of oral contraceptives on 131 I uptake, the depuration rate of this isotope and the PBI was studied in 24 euthyroid female patients. The dose administered was of 2.5 mg of norestinodrel and 0.05 mg of ethynil estradiol. The data were submitted to a statistical study applying analysis of variance, comparison of the means, determination of the standard deviations and the confidence interval. It is concluded that drug does affect thyroid function and that these effects may cause certain disturbances, as arterial hypertension, thrombosis, etc., in patients under prolonged contraceptive treatment [pt

  11. Experimental investigations on dynamic effects in impact notch bending tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehme, W.

    1985-06-01

    The dynamic behaviour of three point bending samples under impact stresses is examined experimentally. Various measuring processes, above all the shadow optics etching process are used. A quasi-static analysis is made by a simple spring/mass model to describe the stress behaviour quantitatively. Based on this, the dynamic effects in model experiments are measured quantitatively with dynamic correction functions and are discussed with reference to the wave processes in the sample. A systematic view of the effect of the many system parameters on the dynamic stress behaviour is obtained. Finally, examples show that the results of this model investigation can be transferred to other experimental conditions. (orig./HP) [de

  12. An Effect Size Measure for Raju's Differential Functioning for Items and Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Keith D.; Oshima, T. C.

    2015-01-01

    This study established an effect size measure for differential functioning for items and tests' noncompensatory differential item functioning (NCDIF). The Mantel-Haenszel parameter served as the benchmark for developing NCDIF's effect size measure for reporting moderate and large differential item functioning in test items. The effect size of…

  13. Estimating and testing the effect of allelic recombination on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-01-21

    Jan 21, 2011 ... The significance of the correlation coefficient as well as the fitted regression model was obtained using. Analysis of Variance method. Key words: Allele, genotype, regression, correlation, F-ratio, analysis of variance. INTRODUCTION. Genetic recombination is an effective means of combining one individual ...

  14. Aging, Neighborhood Attachment, and Fear of Crime: Testing Reciprocal Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Joong-Hwan; Kim, Sangmoon

    2009-01-01

    This study attempts to examine the reciprocal effects between fear of crime and neighborhood attachment because aging is a critical factor in both discussions of fear of crime and neighborhood attachment (friendship, neighboring, social cohesion and trust, informal social control, and participation in neighborhood watch program). Using data from…

  15. Testing the Effectiveness of Online Assignments in Theory of Finance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batu, Michael; Bower, Nancy; Lun, Esmond; Sadanand, Asha

    2018-01-01

    The authors investigated the effectiveness of online versus paper assignments using final examination scores in three cohorts of theory of finance. In particular, two cohorts were exposed to online assignments while another cohort was exposed to traditional assignments. The central result is that exposure to online assignments robustly leads to…

  16. Effectiveness comparison of partially executed t-way test suite based generated by existing strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Othman, Rozmie R.; Ahmad, Mohd Zamri Zahir; Ali, Mohd Shaiful Aziz Rashid; Zakaria, Hasneeza Liza; Rahman, Md. Mostafijur

    2015-05-01

    Consuming 40 to 50 percent of software development cost, software testing is one of the most resource consuming activities in software development lifecycle. To ensure an acceptable level of quality and reliability of a typical software product, it is desirable to test every possible combination of input data under various configurations. Due to combinatorial explosion problem, considering all exhaustive testing is practically impossible. Resource constraints, costing factors as well as strict time-to-market deadlines are amongst the main factors that inhibit such consideration. Earlier work suggests that sampling strategy (i.e. based on t-way parameter interaction or called as t-way testing) can be effective to reduce number of test cases without effecting the fault detection capability. However, for a very large system, even t-way strategy will produce a large test suite that need to be executed. In the end, only part of the planned test suite can be executed in order to meet the aforementioned constraints. Here, there is a need for test engineers to measure the effectiveness of partially executed test suite in order for them to assess the risk they have to take. Motivated by the abovementioned problem, this paper presents the effectiveness comparison of partially executed t-way test suite generated by existing strategies using tuples coverage method. Here, test engineers can predict the effectiveness of the testing process if only part of the original test cases is executed.

  17. Mechanisms behind the testing effect: an empirical investigation of retrieval practice in meaningful learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Endres, Tino; Renkl, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The testing effect-more learning by testing as compared to restudying-is a well-established finding. A typical testing procedure in the context of meaningful learning comprises a recall task after an initial study phase. Different theories refer to different mechanisms when explaining the positive effects of such recall tasks. In the context of learning from expository texts, we tested three mechanisms as suggested by a variety of prominent approaches: the elaborative-retrieval theory, the theory of transfer-appropriate processing, and the unspecific-goal perspective. We experimentally varied the type of testing task (short-answer task vs. free-recall task, both compared to a restudy task) in a within-subject design (N = 47 university students). We replicated the testing effect. We found no evidence for a transfer-appropriate processing effect or an unspecific-goal effect. The testing effect disappeared when statistically controlling for mental effort. Initially non-tested material was also fostered by testing (spreading activation effect). These findings indicate that testing helps learning when learners must invest substantial mental effort, as suggested by the elaborative retrieval theory. For educational purposes, testing tasks should be assigned that require the learners to invest substantial mental effort.

  18. Postirradiation examination results for the irradiation effects scoping test 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehner, A.S.; Quapp, W.J.; Goetzmann, O.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1976-09-01

    A zircaloy-clad UO 2 fuel rod was operated above its critical heat flux within the in-pile test loop of the Power Burst Facility and later examined in the hot cells. The results of the postirradiation examinations are presented in this report. A Zr-UO 2 reaction at the fuel-cladding interface embrittled nearly as much of the cladding wall thickness as the Zr-water reaction on the exterior. Data on both the internal and external reactions, and cladding and fuel microstructures, are presented. Cladding embrittlement and rod failure are compared with several rod fragmentation criteria, and conclusions concerning fuel rod failure propagation in a power reactor system are made

  19. Postirradiation examination results for the irradiation effects scoping test 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mehner, A.S.; Quapp, W.J.; Goetzmann, O.; Hobbins, R.R.

    1976-09-01

    A zircaloy-clad UO/sub 2/ fuel rod was operated above its critical heat flux within the in-pile test loop of the Power Burst Facility and later examined in the hot cells. The results of the postirradiation examinations are presented in this report. A Zr-UO/sub 2/ reaction at the fuel-cladding interface embrittled nearly as much of the cladding wall thickness as the Zr-water reaction on the exterior. Data on both the internal and external reactions, and cladding and fuel microstructures, are presented. Cladding embrittlement and rod failure are compared with several rod fragmentation criteria, and conclusions concerning fuel rod failure propagation in a power reactor system are made.

  20. Separate Effects Tests to Determine the Pressure Drop over Packed Beds in the PBMR HPTU Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Toit, C.G. du; Rousseau, P.G.

    2014-01-01

    In this study experiments were conducted in the PBMR HPTU test facility on a small scale randomly packed cylindrical bed and a specific annular pebble bed in an effort to determine the impact of the wall effects. Tests were also conducted on test sections with structured BCC packings in an attempt to isolate the effect of porosity. The pebbles were mounted on cables and the required porosities were obtained by varying the distance between the pebbles. The required Reynolds numbers ranging between 1000 and 50000 were obtained by varying the system pressure. In the execution of the tests and the data reduction considerable care was taken to obtain good repeatability and to account for the uncertainties due to statistical variance, instrument accuracy and drift. Evaluation of the results has shown that the wall effect is negligible and that the well-known KTA correlation derived for cylindrical beds may thus be used to determine the pressure drop over the annular packed bed. The results have also shown that porosity is not the only characteristic of the packing structure that influences the pressure drop, but that amongst others the type of packing also plays an important role. (author)

  1. The late negative episodic memory effect: the effect of recapitulating study details at test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, David; Cycowicz, Yael M; Bersick, Michael

    2005-05-01

    An hypothesis concerning mnemonic function suggests that perceptual details of previously experienced episodes are retrieved from the cortices that initially processed that information during the encoding phase. Cycowicz et al. [Cycowicz, Y.M., Friedman, D. and Snodgrass, J.G., Remembering the color of objects: an ERP investigation of source memory, Cereb Cortex, 11 (2001) 322-334.] have interpreted the presence of a late negative episodic memory (EM) effect, maximal over parieto-occipital scalp, as a brain signature of the search for and/or retrieval/evaluation of the specific perceptual source-specifying attributes (i.e., color) of pictures in the visual cortical regions that were recruited during the encoding of that information. The present study assessed the validity of this hypothesis. Twelve participants studied pictures outlined in red or green and were subsequently tested with inclusion (i.e., item; old or new regardless of color) and exclusion (i.e., source; same color, different color/new judgments) tasks. In both, old pictures were presented either in the same color as at study or in the alternate color. A late negative, parieto-occipital EM effect was of much larger amplitude in the source compared to the item task. It was of similar magnitude to correctly recognized pictures whose colors were identical at study and test relative to those whose colors changed, and was not modulated by the success or failure of the source retrieval. These data run counter to the initial hypothesis that the late negative EM effect reflects the search for and/or retrieval of specific perceptual attributes such as color. Rather, the late negative EM effect may reflect the search for and/or retrieval/evaluation of more general source-specifying information in the cortical regions that initially processed the stimuli.

  2. Testing effective string models of black holes with fixed scalars

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Krasnitz, M.; Klebanov, I.R.

    1997-01-01

    We solve the problem of mixing between the fixed scalar and metric fluctuations. First, we derive the decoupled fixed scalar equation for the four-dimensional black hole with two different charges. We proceed to the five-dimensional black hole with different electric (one-brane) and magnetic (five-brane) charges, and derive two decoupled equations satisfied by appropriate mixtures of the original fixed scalar fields. The resulting greybody factors are proportional to those that follow from coupling to dimension (2,2) operators on the effective string. In general, however, the string action also contains couplings to chiral operators of dimension (1,3) and (3,1), which cause disagreements with the semiclassical absorption cross sections. Implications of this for the effective string models are discussed. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Testing indirect effect of consumer attitudes toward a product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hrubá, Renata; Sudzina, Frantisek

    2016-01-01

    and on the indirect and direct effects of the perception of information through information behavior and the use of the model ordered. It is proposed that consumer levels of product familiarity of attributes affects behavior. Consumer attitudes towards agri-food products and behaviour were analyzed through......The number of farmers´ markets has been increasing all around the world. This growth in the popularity of farmers´ markets has been attributed to factors of changing consumer interest in local traditional or innovative food products. This paper focuses on familiarity bias in the Czech dairy market...... a questionnaire in 2010-2011. The model is estimated using probit analysis to predict relationship between producer and consumer in decision-making when buying a new type of cheese and to examine consumer attitudes toward food origins and nutrient food security. It can be concluded that the indirect effect (e...

  4. Battery powered cost effective TDS logger intended for water testing.

    OpenAIRE

    Alexandru Ivan, Ioan; Stihi, Valentin; Ivan, Michaela; Stihi, C.; Rakotondrabe, Micky; Jelea, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    International audience; The paper presents a cost-effective device designed for measuring and monitoring the TDS (total dissolved solids) level of drinkable, surface (lakes, rivers) and/or industrial waters. Providing a first reading of potential water pollutions, the device is dedicated to the sectors of environment and consumer protection. The device was implemented and a series of continuous measurements is depicted, discovering some abnormalities in the quality of Targoviste city water ut...

  5. Tests of equal effect per fraction in microcolony assays of survival after fractionated irradiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taylor, J.M.G.

    1985-01-01

    H.D Thames, Jr. and H.R. Withers propose a test of an equal effect per fraction in microcolony assays after fractionated radiation, in which the total effect is measured by counting microcolonies derived from surviving cells in a tissue. The factors considered to influence the cytocidal effect per fraction are incomplete repair, repopulation, and synchrony. The statistics used in the method are criticized and conditions are given under which the test should not be used. An alternative method of testing for an equal effect per fraction is proposed. The pros and cons of each test are discussed and compared using some mouse jejunal crypt cell survival data

  6. Short-term practice effects and variability in cognitive testing in a healthy elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krenk, L.; Rasmussen, L.S.; Siersma, V.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cognitive decline in the elderly is a subject of intense focus. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding definition of significant decline in connection with repeated testing and the interpretation of cognitive tests results must take into account the practice effect and variab......BACKGROUND: Cognitive decline in the elderly is a subject of intense focus. However, there is a lack of consensus regarding definition of significant decline in connection with repeated testing and the interpretation of cognitive tests results must take into account the practice effect...... and variability in test performance. The aim of this study was to collect cognitive test results with repeated testing in an elderly healthy population. METHODS: 161 healthy controls =60years were included. Cognitive testing was performed upon entry into the study, at 1week and 3months. Practice effect...

  7. Observing the Testing Effect using Coursera Video-recorded Lectures: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Zhihao eYONG

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the testing effect in Coursera video-based learning. One hundred and twenty-three participants either (a studied an instructional video-recorded lecture four times, (b studied the lecture three times and took one recall test, or (c studied the lecture once and took three tests. They then took a final recall test, either immediately or a week later, through which their learning was assessed. Whereas repeated studying produced better recall performance than did repeated testing when the final test was administered immediately, testing produced better performance when the final test was delayed until a week after. The testing effect was observed using Coursera lectures. Future directions are documented.

  8. Testing the Effectiveness of Therapeutic Showering in Labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Mary Ann

    : Therapeutic showering is a holistic nursing intervention that is often available and supports physiologic labor. The purpose of this study was to compare the effectiveness of therapeutic showering with usual care during active labor. Research questions were as follows: Are there significant differences between women who showered 30 minutes during active labor and those who received usual labor care in anxiety, tension, relaxation, pain, discomfort, and coping? Is there a difference in use of obstetric interventions between groups? A convenience sample of healthy low-risk women in active labor was recruited (N = 32). A pretest posttest control group repeated-measures design was used. Participants were randomized to treatment group (n = 17), who showered for 30 minutes, or to control group (n = 14) who received usual labor care. Women evaluated pain, discomfort, anxiety, tension, coping, and relaxation at enrollment, again 15 minutes after entering the shower or receiving usual care, then again 30 minutes after entering the shower or receiving usual care. Chart reviews after delivery recorded obstetric interventions. The showering group had statistically significant decreases in pain, discomfort, anxiety and tension, and significant increase in relaxation. There were no differences in use of obstetric interventions. Therapeutic showering was effective in reducing pain, discomfort, anxiety, and tension while improving relaxation and supporting labor in this sample.

  9. The mere exposure effect is sensitive to color information: evidence for color effects in a perceptual implicit memory test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hupbach, Almut; Melzer, André; Hardt, Oliver

    2006-01-01

    Priming effects in perceptual tests of implicit memory are assumed to be perceptually specific. Surprisingly, changing object colors from study to test did not diminish priming in most previous studies. However, these studies used implicit tests that are based on object identification, which mainly depends on the analysis of the object shape and therefore operates color-independently. The present study shows that color effects can be found in perceptual implicit tests when the test task requires the processing of color information. In Experiment 1, reliable color priming was found in a mere exposure design (preference test). In Experiment 2, the preference test was contrasted with a conceptually driven color-choice test. Altering the shape of object from study to test resulted in significant priming in the color-choice test but eliminated priming in the preference test. Preference judgments thus largely depend on perceptual processes. In Experiment 3, the preference and the color-choice test were studied under explicit test instructions. Differences in reaction times between the implicit and the explicit test suggest that the implicit test results were not an artifact of explicit retrieval attempts. In contrast with previous assumptions, it is therefore concluded that color is part of the representation that mediates perceptual priming.

  10. Test implementation of a school-oriented drug prevention program "Study without Drugs": pre- and post-testing for effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishaak, Fariel; de Vries, Nanne Karel; van der Wolf, Kees

    2014-06-11

    In this article, the test implementation of a school-oriented drug prevention program "Study without Drugs" is discussed. The aims of this study were to determine the results of the process evaluation and to determine whether the proposed school-oriented drug prevention program during a pilot project was effective for the participating pupils. Sixty second-grade pupils at a junior high school in Paramaribo, Suriname participated in the test implementation. They were divided into two classes. For the process evaluation the students completed a structured questionnaire focusing on content and teaching method after every lesson. Lessons were qualified with a score from 0-10. The process was also evaluated by the teachers through structured interviews. Attention was paid to reach, dose delivered, dose received, fidelity, connection, achieved effects/observed behaviors, areas for improvement, and lesson strengths. The effect evaluation was conducted by using the General Liniair Model (repeated measure). The research (-design) was a pre-experimental design with pre-and post-test. No class or sex differences were detected among the pupils with regard to the assessment of content, methodology, and qualification of the lessons. Post-testing showed that participating pupils obtained an increased knowledge of drugs, their drug-resisting skills were enhanced, and behavior determinants (attitude, subjective norm, self-efficacy, and intention) became more negative towards drugs. From the results of the test implementation can be cautiously concluded that the program "Study without Drugs" may yield positive results when applied in schools). Thus, this pilot program can be considered a step towards the development and implementation of an evidence-based school-oriented program for pupils in Suriname.

  11. Cost-effectiveness of presentation versus delayed troponin testing for acute myocardial infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve W; Collinson, Paul O; Stevens, John W; Mills, Nicholas L; Newby, David E; Morris, Francis; Kendall, Jason; Stevenson, Matt D

    2012-10-01

    To estimate the cost-effectiveness of delayed troponin testing for myocardial infarction compared with troponin testing at presentation. Decision analysis modelling of cost-effectiveness using secondary data sources. Acute hospitals in the UK. Patients attending hospital with suspected myocardial infarction but a normal or non-diagnostic ECG and no major comorbidities requiring admission. Delayed troponin testing (10 h after symptom onset) compared with standard and high-sensitivity troponin testing at presentation and no testing. Sensitivity analysis evaluated high-sensitivity troponin testing 3 h after initial assessment. The incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained by each strategy, compared with the next most effective alternative, and the probability of each strategy being cost-effective at varying willingness-to-pay per QALY gained. In all scenarios tested, presentation high-sensitivity troponin testing was the most effective strategy with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio below the £20 000/QALY threshold. 10 h troponin testing was only likely to be cost-effective if a discharge decision could be made as soon as a negative result was available and the £30 000/QALY threshold was used, or if a lower sensitivity estimate for presentation high-sensitivity troponin was assumed. Sensitivity analysis showed that including high-sensitivity troponin testing at presentation and 3 h in the analysis makes this the most cost-effective strategy. Delayed troponin testing is unlikely to be cost-effective compared with high-sensitivity troponin testing at presentation in most scenarios. Current NICE chest pain guidelines do not promote cost-effective care.

  12. Effects of the neutronic irradiation on the impact tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lapena, J.; Perosanz, F.J.; Hernandez, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    The changes that the Charpy curves suffer when steel is exposed to neutronic fluence are studied. Three steels with different chemical composition were chosen, two of them (JPF and JPJ) being treated at only one neutronic fluence, while the last one (JRQ) was irradiated at three fluences. In this way, it was possible to compare the effect of increasing the neutronic dose, and to study the experimental results as a function of the steel chemical composition. Two characteristic facts have been observed: the displacement of the curve at higher temperatures, and decrease of the upper shelf energy (USE). The mechanical recovery of the materials after two different thermal treatments is also described, and a comparation between the experimental results obtained and the damage prediction formulas given by different regulatory international organisms in the nuclear field is established. Author. 11 refs

  13. Evaluation of innovative state and community alcohol projects : breath alcohol testing program effectiveness, impact and transferability

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-03-01

    Breath Alcohol Testing (BAT) programs in Albuquerque and Santa Fe, New Mexico are evaluated in regard to effectiveness, impact, and transferability of the special DWI enforcement squads and their use of BAT Mobiles. Squad activity effectiveness is me...

  14. The Effect of Testing on the Retention of Coherent and Incoherent Text Material

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. de Jonge (Mario); H.K. Tabbers (Huib); R.M.J.P. Rikers (Remy)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractResearch has shown that testing during learning can enhance the long-term retention of text material. In two experiments, we investigated the testing effect with a fill-in-the-blank test on the retention of text material. In Experiment 1, using a coherent text, we found no retention

  15. 49 CFR 40.273 - What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What is the effect of a cancelled alcohol test? 40.273 Section 40.273 Transportation Office of the Secretary of Transportation PROCEDURES FOR TRANSPORTATION WORKPLACE DRUG AND ALCOHOL TESTING PROGRAMS Problems in Alcohol Testing § 40.273 What is the...

  16. Modeling Student Software Testing Processes: Attitudes, Behaviors, Interventions, and Their Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffardi, Kevin John

    2014-01-01

    Effective software testing identifies potential bugs and helps correct them, producing more reliable and maintainable software. As software development processes have evolved, incremental testing techniques have grown in popularity, particularly with introduction of test-driven development (TDD). However, many programmers struggle to adopt TDD's…

  17. Effects of different simplified milk recording methods on genetic evaluation with test-day animal model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Portolano, B.; Maizon, D.O.; Riggio, V.; Tolone, M.; Cacioppo, D.

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare estimated breeding values (EBV) for milk yield using different testing schemes with a test-day animal model and to evaluate the effect of different testing schemes on the ranking of top sheep. Alternative recording schemes that use less information than

  18. Marshes on the Move: Testing effects of seawater intrusion on ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Northeastern United States is a hotspot for sea level rise (SLR), subjecting coastal salt marshes to erosive loss, shifts in vegetation communities, and altered biogeochemistry due to seawater intrusion. Salt marsh plant community zonation is driven by tradeoffs in stress tolerance and interspecific interactions. As seawater inundates progressively higher marsh elevations, shifts in marsh vegetation communities landward may herald salt marsh “migration”, which could allow continuity of marsh function and ecosystem service provision. To elucidate possible effects of seawater intrusion on marsh-upland edge plant communities, a space-for-time approach was replicated at two Rhode Island salt marshes. At each site, peat blocks (0.5 m x 0.5 m x 0.5 m, n=6) with intact upland-marsh edge vegetation were transplanted downslope into the regularly-inundated mid-marsh. Procedural controls (n=3) were established at each elevation by removing and replacing peat blocks, and natural controls (n=3) consisted of undisturbed plots. During peak productivity, each plot was assessed for species composition, percent cover and average height. Results demonstrate stunting of marsh-upland edge vegetation in response to increased inundation, and the beginnings of colonization of the transplanted plots by salt marsh species. The extent of colonization differed between the two sites, suggesting that site-specific factors govern vegetation responses to increased inundation.

  19. FCNC Effects in a Minimal Theory of Fermion Masses

    CERN Document Server

    Buras, Andrzej J; Pokorski, Stefan; Ziegler, Robert

    2011-01-01

    As a minimal theory of fermion masses we extend the SM by heavy vectorlike fermions, with flavor-anarchical Yukawa couplings, that mix with chiral fermions such that small SM Yukawa couplings arise from small mixing angles. This model can be regarded as an effective description of the fermionic sector of a large class of existing flavor models and thus might serve as a useful reference frame for a further understanding of flavor hierarchies in the SM. Already such a minimal framework gives rise to FCNC effects through exchange of massive SM bosons whose couplings to the light fermions get modified by the mixing. We derive general formulae for these corrections and discuss the bounds on the heavy fermion masses. Particularly stringent bounds, in a few TeV range, come from the corrections to the Z couplings.

  20. Effects of seasonal and well construction variables on soil vapor extraction pilot tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, R.; Hudon, N.; Bass, D.

    1995-01-01

    The selection and design of an effective soil vapor extraction system is dependent upon data generated from pilot testing. Therefore, it is critical to understand factors that may affect the testing prior to selecting or designing a system. In Sebago Lake Village, Maine, two adjacent gasoline stations experienced a release. Gasoline migrated through fine sand into the groundwater and discharged to a small stream. Soil vapor extraction was investigated as a remedial alternative to reduce volatile organic compounds in the unsaturated soil. Three soil vapor extraction pilot tests were performed at one of the sites and one test at the other site. The results of the testing varied. Data collected during a summer test indicated soil vapor extraction was less likely to work. The wells tested were installed using an excavator. An adequate surface seal was not present in any of the tested wells. An additional test was performed in the winter using wells installed by a drill rig. Winter test results indicated that soil vapor extraction could be effective. Another test was performed after a horizontal soil vapor extraction system with a surface seal was installed. The results of this testing indicated that soil vapor extraction was more effective than predicted by the earlier tests. Tests performed on the other property indicated that the horizontal wells were more effective than the vertical wells. Testing results were affected by the well installation method, well construction, proximity to manmade structures, and the season in which testing was performed. Understanding factors that affect the testing is critical in selecting and designing the system

  1. Effects of Unilateral and Bilateral Epididymectomy on Testes of Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayfer Aktaş

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available It is generally agreed that the testis is under endocrine control from the pituitary, and is influenced by physiological and paracrine factors within the organ.The aim of this study is to analyze the effect of unilateral and bilateral epididectomy on the testicular tissue growth of rats.Twenty- one male old Sprague-Dawley rats (28 days old were used in the study. Rats were assigned into 3 equal groups. The first group was the control group, while unilateral and bilateral epididectomy was performed on the second and third groups, respectively. Twenty-one days after the epididectomy, testicular tissues from each group were taken and fixed in Bouin solution. Paraffin sections were stained with Haematoxylin and Eosin, Vangiesson, PAS-Hemalun and examined by light microscopy.Disorganization of the germinal epithelium, desquamation, degeneration and edema in interstitial tissue was seen in the testicular cross sections of the unilateral group. Arrest in spermatozoon stage in some tubules and presence of eosinophylic stained multinucler bodies were recognizable. In the bilateral group, degeneration and atrophic status in the seminiferous tubules of the bilateral group was observed preciesly, and occasional interstitial edema and perforations in the basal lamina were recognizable. In addition, vasodilatation, arrest in spermatozoa stage and multinucleated bodies in some of the seminiferous tubules lumen were observed in some testicular cross sections of this group.As a result, epididectomy causes degeneration in the germinal epithelium and hypoplasia in Leydig cells.It is concluded that epididectomy causes degeneration in the germinal epithelium, interruption of spermatogenesis, and a notable decrease in the number of Leydig cells.

  2. Practice effect in Symbol Digit Modalities Test in multiple sclerosis patients treated with natalizumab

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roar Eriksen, Malte; Illes, Zsolt; Sejbaek, Tobias

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: How practice effect influences cognitive testing measured by monthly Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) during natalizumab treatment, and what factors confound such effect. METHODS: Eighty patients were examined monthly with SDMT for 26.2±8.4 months. After 26.0±8.1 months, SDMT...... and the rearranged key, respectively. We also explored if natalizumab applied before regular monthly SDMT may influence practice effect and cognition. RESULTS: SDMT performance improved by 1.2 points/test during the first six months and by 0.4 points/test thereafter. Rearranging the symbols of the key after 26...

  3. Do testing effects change over time? Insights from immediate and delayed retrieval speed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, G.S.E. van den; Segers, P.C.J.; Takashima, A.; Verhoeven, L.T.W.

    2014-01-01

    Retrieving information from memory improves recall accuracy more than continued studying, but this testing effect often only becomes visible over time. In contrast, the present study documents testing effects on recall speed both immediately after practice and after a delay. A total of 40

  4. Stereotype Threat Effects on African American and Latina/o Elementary Students Tested Together

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserberg, Martin James

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to investigate whether a diagnostic testing condition leads to stereotype threat effects for African American and Latina/o children (N = 81) when tested together at an urban elementary school in Miami, Florida. Design/methodology/approach: To analyze the effect of stereotype threat on participants' reading test…

  5. Effects of Lumbar Spine Assemblies and Body-Borne Equipment Mass on Anthropomorphic Test Device Responses During Drop Tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggromito, Daniel; Jaffrey, Mark; Chhor, Allen; Chen, Bernard; Yan, Wenyi

    2017-10-01

    When simulating or conducting land mine blast tests on armored vehicles to assess potential occupant injury, the preference is to use the Hybrid III anthropomorphic test device (ATD). In land blast events, neither the effect of body-borne equipment (BBE) on the ATD response nor the dynamic response index (DRI) is well understood. An experimental study was carried out using a drop tower test rig, with a rigid seat mounted on a carriage table undergoing average accelerations of 161 g and 232 g over 3 ms. A key aspect of the work looked at the various lumbar spine assemblies available for a Hybrid III ATD. These can result in different load cell orientations for the ATD which in turn can affect the load measurement in the vertical and horizontal planes. Thirty-two tests were carried out using two BBE mass conditions and three variations of ATDs. The latter were the Hybrid III with the curved (conventional) spine, the Hybrid III with the pedestrian (straight) spine, and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) Hybrid III which also has a straight spine. The results showed that the straight lumbar spine assemblies produced similar ATD responses in drop tower tests using a rigid seat. In contrast, the curved lumbar spine assembly generated a lower pelvis acceleration and a higher lumbar load than the straight lumbar spine assemblies. The maximum relative displacement of the lumbar spine occurred after the peak loading event, suggesting that the DRI is not suitable for assessing injury when the impact duration is short and an ATD is seated on a rigid seat on a drop tower. The peak vertical lumbar loads did not change with increasing BBE mass because the equipment mass effects did not become a factor during the peak loading event.

  6. Is testing a more effective learning strategy than note-taking?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rummer, Ralf; Schweppe, Judith; Gerst, Kathleen; Wagner, Simon

    2017-09-01

    The testing effect is both robust and generalizable. However, most of the underlying studies compare testing to a rather ineffective control condition: massed repeated reading. This article therefore compares testing with note-taking, which has been shown to be more effective than repeated reading. Experiment 1 is based on a 3 × 3 between-participants design with the factors learning condition (repeated reading vs. repeated testing vs. repeated note-taking) and final test delay (5 min vs. 1 week vs. 2 weeks). It shows that in the immediate condition, learning performance is best after note-taking. After 1 week, both the note-taking and the testing groups outperform the rereading group, and after 2 weeks, testing is superior to both note-taking and rereading. Since repeated notetaking may not be the most effective (and common) operationalization of note-taking, Experiment 2 contrasts repeated testing with 2 other note-taking conditions: note-taking plus note-reading and note-taking plus testing (with only a 2-week final test delay). Both conditions that include a testing phase result in better long-term learning than note-taking plus note-reading. In summary, our findings indicate that-in the long run-testing is a powerful learning tool both in isolation and in combination with note-taking. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Effects of a test taking strategy on postsecondary computer assisted chemistry assessments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manco, Sharon Ann

    Metacognitive test taking strategies have proven advantageous in improving content-based test scores in a wide variety of disciplines and age/grade levels using traditional paper-and-pencil tests. However, despite the increase in computer assisted assessment (CAA), little research has examined whether these test taking strategies are effective for computer assisted tests. Research was conducted to determine if learning a proven test taking strategy would improve the online quiz scores of six university students in an introductory chemistry course intended for science, technology, engineering and math majors. Participants completed six to ten chemistry quizzes prior to intervention---learning the test taking strategy---and four to eight chemistry quizzes after intervention. Results indicated that, while students learned the strategy, it had little effect on their online chemistry quiz scores. Additionally, at the end of the semester, participants completed a satisfaction survey indicating general satisfaction with having learned the test taking strategy and generalization to other courses and types of tests. Furthermore, results suggest that adaptations to the on-line delivery method of the quizzes and to the test taking strategies may improve the robustness of the effect. Due to the increased use of computer assisted assessment, additional research is warranted to determine appropriate test taking strategies for online tests.

  8. Independent assessment of TRAC and RELAP5 codes through separate effects tests

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saha, P.; Rohatgi, U.S.; Jo, J.H.; Neymotin, L.; Slovik, G.; Yuelys-Miksis, C.; Pu, J.

    1983-01-01

    Independent assessment of TRAC-PF1 (Version 7.0), TRAC-BD1 (Version 12.0) and RELAP5/MOD1 (Cycle 14) that was initiated at BNL in FY 1982, has been completed in FY 1983. As in the previous years, emphasis at Brookhaven has been in simulating various separate-effects tests with these advanced codes and identifying the areas where further thermal-hydraulic modeling improvements are needed. The following six catetories of tests were simulated with the above codes: (1) critical flow tests (Moby-Dick nitrogen-water, BNL flashing flow, Marviken Test 24); (2) Counter-Current Flow Limiting (CCFL) tests (University of Houston, Dartmouth College single and parallel tube test); (3) level swell tests (G.E. large vessel test); (4) steam generator tests (B and W 19-tube model S.G. tests, FLECHT-SEASET U-tube S.G. tests); (5) natural circulation tests (FRIGG loop tests); and (6) post-CHF tests (Oak Ridge steady-state test)

  9. Preference option randomized design (PORD) for comparative effectiveness research: Statistical power for testing comparative effect, preference effect, selection effect, intent-to-treat effect, and overall effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, Moonseong; Meissner, Paul; Litwin, Alain H; Arnsten, Julia H; McKee, M Diane; Karasz, Alison; McKinley, Paula; Rehm, Colin D; Chambers, Earle C; Yeh, Ming-Chin; Wylie-Rosett, Judith

    2017-01-01

    Comparative effectiveness research trials in real-world settings may require participants to choose between preferred intervention options. A randomized clinical trial with parallel experimental and control arms is straightforward and regarded as a gold standard design, but by design it forces and anticipates the participants to comply with a randomly assigned intervention regardless of their preference. Therefore, the randomized clinical trial may impose impractical limitations when planning comparative effectiveness research trials. To accommodate participants' preference if they are expressed, and to maintain randomization, we propose an alternative design that allows participants' preference after randomization, which we call a "preference option randomized design (PORD)". In contrast to other preference designs, which ask whether or not participants consent to the assigned intervention after randomization, the crucial feature of preference option randomized design is its unique informed consent process before randomization. Specifically, the preference option randomized design consent process informs participants that they can opt out and switch to the other intervention only if after randomization they actively express the desire to do so. Participants who do not independently express explicit alternate preference or assent to the randomly assigned intervention are considered to not have an alternate preference. In sum, preference option randomized design intends to maximize retention, minimize possibility of forced assignment for any participants, and to maintain randomization by allowing participants with no or equal preference to represent random assignments. This design scheme enables to define five effects that are interconnected with each other through common design parameters-comparative, preference, selection, intent-to-treat, and overall/as-treated-to collectively guide decision making between interventions. Statistical power functions for testing

  10. Teaching through Entry Test & Summarization - An Effective Classroom Teaching Model in Higher Education Training

    OpenAIRE

    Aithal P. S.

    2015-01-01

    Systematic teaching through long-time tested model will certainly improve the effectiveness of teaching-learning process in higher education. Teaching through Entry Test & Summarization is an effective model named 'Aithal model of effective classroom teaching' in Higher Education Training developed by Prof. Aithal combines both positive and negative motivation and integrated into a best practice. According to this model each class of one hour duration starts with silent prayer for one minute ...

  11. The roles of encoding strategies and retrieval practice in test-expectancy effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kit W; Neely, James H

    2017-05-01

    We investigated whether expectations for different kinds of memory tests induce qualitatively different encoding strategies. In Experiment 1, participants studied four lists of words and after each list completed a cued-recall test that contained either all semantic or all orthographic cues so as to build up an expectancy for receiving the same type of test for the fifth critical study list. To rule out that the test-expectancy effects in Experiment 1 were due to differences in retrieval practice, in Experiment 2, participants received three practice tests each for both cue-types. Participants' test expectancy for all lists was induced by telling them before each list the type of cue they would receive for the upcoming study list. In both experiments, the critical test contained both expected and unexpected cues. In Experiment 1, participants who expected semantic cues had better recall to the semantic cues than to the orthographic cues and vice versa for those who expected orthographic cues. However, in Experiment 2, there was no effect of test expectancy. These findings suggest that the test-expectancy effects in Experiment 1 were due to more retrieval practice on the expected than unexpected tests rather than to qualitatively different test-expectancy-induced encoding strategies.

  12. Aquatic Ecotoxicity Testing of Nanoparticles—The Quest To Disclose Nanoparticle Effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjolding, Lars Michael; Sørensen, Sara Nørgaard; Hartmann, Nanna B.

    2016-01-01

    The number of products on the market containing engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) has increased significantly, and concerns have been raised regarding their ecotoxicological effects. Environmental safety assessments as well as relevant and reliable ecotoxicological data are required for the safe...... and sustainable use of ENPs. Although the number of publications on the ecotoxicological effects and uptake of ENPs is rapidly expanding, the applicability of the reported data for hazard assessment is questionable. A major knowledge gap is whether nanoparticle effects occur when test organisms are exposed...... tests is high, and in most cases difficult to assess. This Review outlines some of the pitfalls in the aquatic toxicity testing of ENPs which may lead to misinterpretation of test results. Response types are also proposed to reveal potential nanoparticle effects in the aquatic test organisms....

  13. Heavy neutrino threshold effects in low energy phenomenology

    CERN Document Server

    Leontaris, George K; Ross, Graham G

    1995-01-01

    Right handed neutrinos with mass of {\\cal O} \\; (10^{12}-10^{13}) GeV are required to implement the see-saw mechanism and generate neutrino masses capable of playing a role in structure formation. Moreover models of fermion masses often relate the Yukawa couplings involving these neutrinos to the up-quark Yukawa couplings. Here we study the effects of such couplings on the radiative corrections to quark masses. We find that b-\\tau equality at M_{GUT} may still give the correct m_b/m_{\\tau}-- ratio at low energies, but only if there is large \\mu-\\tau mixing in the charged leptonic sector. We propose specific mass matrix ``textures'' dictated by a U(1) family symmetry whose structure preserves m_b=m_{\\tau} at M_{GUT}. In these schemes, due to the large \

  14. Practice Effects on Story Memory and List Learning Tests in the Neuropsychological Assessment of Older Adults.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brandon E Gavett

    Full Text Available Two of the most commonly used methods to assess memory functioning in studies of cognitive aging and dementia are story memory and list learning tests. We hypothesized that the most commonly used story memory test, Wechsler's Logical Memory, would generate more pronounced practice effects than a well validated but less common list learning test, the Neuropsychological Assessment Battery (NAB List Learning test. Two hundred eighty-seven older adults, ages 51 to 100 at baseline, completed both tests as part of a larger neuropsychological test battery on an annual basis. Up to five years of recall scores from participants who were diagnosed as cognitively normal (n = 96 or with mild cognitive impairment (MCI; n = 72 or Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 121 at their most recent visit were analyzed with linear mixed effects regression to examine the interaction between the type of test and the number of times exposed to the test. Other variables, including age at baseline, sex, education, race, time (years since baseline, and clinical diagnosis were also entered as fixed effects predictor variables. The results indicated that both tests produced significant practice effects in controls and MCI participants; in contrast, participants with AD declined or remained stable. However, for the delayed-but not the immediate-recall condition, Logical Memory generated more pronounced practice effects than NAB List Learning (b = 0.16, p < .01 for controls. These differential practice effects were moderated by clinical diagnosis, such that controls and MCI participants-but not participants with AD-improved more on Logical Memory delayed recall than on delayed NAB List Learning delayed recall over five annual assessments. Because the Logical Memory test is ubiquitous in cognitive aging and neurodegenerative disease research, its tendency to produce marked practice effects-especially on the delayed recall condition-suggests a threat to its validity as a measure of new

  15. Estimating, Testing, and Comparing Specific Effects in Structural Equation Models: The Phantom Model Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macho, Siegfried; Ledermann, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    The phantom model approach for estimating, testing, and comparing specific effects within structural equation models (SEMs) is presented. The rationale underlying this novel method consists in representing the specific effect to be assessed as a total effect within a separate latent variable model, the phantom model that is added to the main…

  16. Analysis and elimination method of the effects of cables on LVRT testing for offshore wind turbines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zimin; Liu, Xiaohao; Li, Changgang; Liu, Yutian

    2018-02-01

    The current state, characteristics and necessity of the low voltage ride through (LVRT) on-site testing for grid-connected offshore wind turbines are introduced firstly. Then the effects of submarine cables on the LVRT testing are analysed based on the equivalent circuit of the testing system. A scheme for eliminating the effects of cables on the proposed LVRT testing method is presented. The specified voltage dips are guaranteed to be in compliance with the testing standards by adjusting the ratio between the current limiting impedance and short circuit impedance according to the steady voltage relationship derived from the equivalent circuit. Finally, simulation results demonstrate that the voltage dips at the high voltage side of wind turbine transformer satisfy the requirements of testing standards.

  17. Cost-effective degradation test plan for a nonlinear random-coefficients model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Seong-Joon; Bae, Suk Joo

    2013-01-01

    The determination of requisite sample size and the inspection schedule considering both testing cost and accuracy has been an important issue in the degradation test. This paper proposes a cost-effective degradation test plan in the context of a nonlinear random-coefficients model, while meeting some precision constraints for failure-time distribution. We introduce a precision measure to quantify the information losses incurred by reducing testing resources. The precision measure is incorporated into time-varying cost functions to reflect real circumstances. We apply a hybrid genetic algorithm to general cost optimization problem with reasonable constraints on the level of testing precision in order to determine a cost-effective inspection scheme. The proposed method is applied to the degradation data of plasma display panels (PDPs) following a bi-exponential degradation model. Finally, sensitivity analysis via simulation is provided to evaluate the robustness of the proposed degradation test plan.

  18. ttH, H {yields} WW{sup (*)} analysis at Atlas, LHC and Very Low Energy electron studies of 2004 combined test beam; Analyse ttH,H {yields} WW{sup (*)} avec ATLAS au LHC et etude des electron a tres basses energie dans le test faisceau combine 2004

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, H

    2008-06-15

    The Large Hadron Collider(LHC) at CERN is a proton-proton collider with a designed center of mass energy of 14 TeV. ATLAS is a general purpose particle detector located at one of the colliding point of the LHC. Using ATLAS Computing System Commissioning (CSC) Monte Carlo full simulation data of the tt-bar H, H {yields} WW{sup *} channel, this thesis studies the feasibility of measuring top-quark Yukawa Coupling up to 30 fb{sup -1} integrated luminosity, within the intermediate Higgs mass range from 120 to 200 GeV. For the first time, trigger, pileup effects as well as all possible systematic uncertainties are extensively studied. For a Higgs mass of 160 GeV, with the detailed systematics uncertainties studied, the signal significance is shown to exceed 2{sigma} by combining 2 leptons and 3 leptons final states together. The combined branching ratio of {sigma}{sub tt}-bar{sub H}*BR{sub H{yields}WW{sup (*)}} can reach an accuracy of 47%, and gives important information on the top quark Yukawa Coupling. This is the first study of the tt-bar H, H {yields} WW{sup *} channel based on full simulation data, including a complete and detailed study of the systematic uncertainties. The most difficult part of the tt-bar H, H {yields} WW{sup *} analysis is to extract signal from an abundant background since the total cross section of signal is only 0.1% of the main background. Moreover, signals have a complex final state of at least 4 jets, 2 leptons, 2 neutrinos, making the Higgs mass reconstruction very difficult. Lepton isolation is one of the most powerful method to suppress reducible backgrounds. This thesis develops a special Cone Isolation procedure, which suppress by a factor 5 the main tt-bar background. Lepton energy scale uncertainty is one of the important systematics for the tt-bar H, H {yields} WW{sup *} analysis. A good linearity of Very Low Energy (VLE) electrons can improve the performance of estimating electron energy scale. The second part of this thesis

  19. Test-enhanced learning of natural concepts: effects on recognition memory, classification, and metacognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacoby, Larry L; Wahlheim, Christopher N; Coane, Jennifer H

    2010-11-01

    Three experiments examined testing effects on learning of natural concepts and metacognitive assessments of such learning. Results revealed that testing enhanced recognition memory and classification accuracy for studied and novel exemplars of bird families on immediate and delayed tests. These effects depended on the balance of study and test trials during training. Metacognitive measures provided results suggesting that participants were aware of the beneficial effects of testing. A new measure of metacognition at the level of categories is introduced and shown to be potentially useful for theory and applied purposes. It is argued that focusing on optimizing the learning of natural concepts encourages the convergence of theorizing about memory, concept learning, and metacognition and holds promise for the development of applications to education. (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved

  20. A bootstrap test for instrument validity in heterogeneous treatment effect models

    OpenAIRE

    Kitagawa, Toru

    2013-01-01

    This paper develops a specification test for the instrument validity conditions in the heterogeneous treatment effect model with a binary treatment and a discrete instrument. A necessary testable implication for the joint restriction of instrument exogeneity and instrument monotonicity is given by nonnegativity of point-identifiable complier's outcome densities. Our specification test infers this testable implication using a Kolmogorov-Smirnov type test statistic. We provide a bootstrap algor...

  1. Application of complex programmable logic devices in memory radiation effects test system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Yonghong; He Chaohui; Yang Hailiang; He Baoping

    2005-01-01

    The application of the complex programmable logic device (CPLD) in electronics is emphatically discussed. The method of using software MAX + plus II and CPLD are introduced. A new test system for memory radiation effects is established by using CPLD devices-EPM7128C84-15. The old test system's function are realized and, moreover, a number of small scale integrated circuits are reduced and the test system's reliability is improved. (authors)

  2. A comprehensive review of regulatory test methods for endocrine adverse health effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manibusan, M K; Touart, L W

    2017-07-01

    Development of new endocrine disruption-relevant test methods has been the subject of intensive research efforts for the past several decades, prompted in part by mandates in the 1996 Food Quality Protection Act (FQPA). While scientific understanding and test methods have advanced, questions remain on whether current scientific methods are capable of adequately addressing the complexities of the endocrine system for regulatory health and ecological risk assessments. The specific objective of this article is to perform a comprehensive, detailed evaluation of the adequacy of current test methods to inform regulatory risk assessments of whether a substance has the potential to perturb endocrine-related pathways resulting in human adverse effects. To that end,  approximately 42 existing test guidelines (TGs) were considered in the evaluation of coverage for endocrine-related adverse effects. In addition to evaluations of whether test methods are adequate to capture endocrine-related effects, considerations of further enhancements to current test methods, along with the need to develop novel test methods to address existing test method gaps are described. From this specific evaluation, up to 35 test methods are capable of informing whether a chemical substance perturbs known endocrine related biological pathways. Based on these findings, it can be concluded that current validated test methods are adequate to discern substances that may perturb the endocrine system, resulting in an adverse health effect. Together, these test methods predominantly form the core data requirements of a typical food-use pesticide registration submission. It is recognized, however, that the current state of science is rapidly advancing and there is a need to update current test methods to include added enhancements to ensure continued coverage and public health and environmental protection.

  3. Analysis of experiment testing technology for single event effects in China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Chaohui

    2001-01-01

    The merit and demerit of simulation source were analyzed for Single Event Effects (SEE) experiment testing in China. Laboratory experiment systems for SEE were brief introduced and requests for SEE test system were emphasize analyzed. Test systems were presented for Single Event Upset, Single Event Latch-up, Single Event Burnout and Single Event Gate-Rupture. The attention should be in mind in SEE experiments were discussed

  4. Search for H→γγ produced in association with top quarks and constraints on the Yukawa coupling between the top quark and the Higgs boson using data taken at 7 TeV and 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Aad

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A search is performed for Higgs bosons produced in association with top quarks using the diphoton decay mode of the Higgs boson. Selection requirements are optimized separately for leptonic and fully hadronic final states from the top quark decays. The dataset used corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 4.5 fb−1 of proton–proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 7 TeV and 20.3 fb−1 at 8 TeV recorded by the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. No significant excess over the background prediction is observed and upper limits are set on the tt¯H production cross section. The observed exclusion upper limit at 95% confidence level is 6.7 times the predicted Standard Model cross section value. In addition, limits are set on the strength of the Yukawa coupling between the top quark and the Higgs boson, taking into account the dependence of the tt¯H and tH cross sections as well as the H→γγ branching fraction on the Yukawa coupling. Lower and upper limits at 95% confidence level are set at −1.3 and +8.0 times the Yukawa coupling strength in the Standard Model.

  5. Single event effect testing of the Intel 80386 family and the 80486 microprocessor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moran, A.; LaBel, K.; Gates, M.; Seidleck, C.; McGraw, R.; Broida, M.; Firer, J.; Sprehn, S.

    1996-01-01

    The authors present single event effect test results for the Intel 80386 microprocessor, the 80387 coprocessor, the 82380 peripheral device, and on the 80486 microprocessor. Both single event upset and latchup conditions were monitored

  6. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-01-01

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption

  7. Standard Practice for Dosimetry of Proton Beams for use in Radiation Effects Testing of Electronics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, Margaret A.; Blackmore, Ewart; Cascio, Ethan W.; Castaneda, Carlos; von Przewoski, Barbara; Eisen, Harvey

    2008-07-25

    Representatives of facilities that routinely deliver protons for radiation effect testing are collaborating to establish a set of standard best practices for proton dosimetry. These best practices will be submitted to the ASTM International for adoption.

  8. The influence of text length and prior knowledge on the testing effect in meaningful learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wetzels, Sandra; Kester, Liesbeth

    2012-01-01

    Wetzels, S. A. J., & Kester, L. (2012, 14 June). The influence of text length and prior knowledge on the testing effect in meaningful learning. Presentation at plenary meeting Learning and Cognition, Heerlen, The Netherlands.

  9. Instrumented impact testing of kenaf fiber reinforced polypropylene composites: effects of temperature and composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig Merrill Clemons; Anand R. Sanadi

    2007-01-01

    An instrumented Izod test was used to investigate the effects of fiber content, coupling agent, and temperature on the impact performance of kenaf fiber reinforced polypropylene (PP). Composites containing 0-60% (by weight) kenaf fiber and 0 or 2% maleated polypropylene (MAPP) and PP/wood flour composites were tested at room temperature and between -50 °C and +...

  10. Verbal memory improved by D-amphetamine: influence of the testing effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeeuws, Inge; Deroost, Natacha; Soetens, Eric

    2010-07-01

    The improvement of long-term retention of verbal memory after an acute administration of D-amphetamine in recall and recognition tasks has been ascribed to an influence of the drug on memory consolidation. Because recent research has demonstrated that intermediate testing is of overriding importance for retention, we investigated whether D-amphetamine modulates the repeated testing effect in verbal long-term recognition. Forty men participated in two double blind placebo controlled studies. In Experiment 1, we manipulated the number of recognition tests and in Experiment 2, we compared repeated with nonrepeated testing of the same items. Drug effects were observed on delayed tests only, leaving immediate recognition unaffected. Number of intermediate recognition tests and repeated testing of the same items were not affected by D-amphetamine. We conclude that the D-amphetamine memory enhancement is not related to the testing effect. This result supports that D-amphetamine modulates other aspects of the consolidation process, probably related to context effects. (c) 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Effects of human errors on the determination of surveillance test interval

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Dae Wook; Koo, Bon Hyun

    1990-01-01

    This paper incorporates the effects of human error relevant to the periodic test on the unavailability of the safety system as well as the component unavailability. Two types of possible human error during the test are considered. One is the possibility that a good safety system is inadvertently left in a bad state after the test (Type A human error) and the other is the possibility that bad safety system is undetected upon the test (Type B human error). An event tree model is developed for the steady-state unavailability of safety system to determine the effects of human errors on the component unavailability and the test interval. We perform the reliability analysis of safety injection system (SIS) by applying aforementioned two types of human error to safety injection pumps. Results of various sensitivity analyses show that; 1) the appropriate test interval decreases and steady-state unavailability increases as the probabilities of both types of human errors increase, and they are far more sensitive to Type A human error than Type B and 2) the SIS unavailability increases slightly as the probability of Type B human error increases, and significantly as the probability of Type A human error increases. Therefore, to avoid underestimation, the effects of human error should be incorporated in the system reliability analysis which aims at the relaxations of the surveillance test intervals, and Type A human error has more important effect on the unavailability and surveillance test interval

  12. The Risk of Adverse Impact in Selections Based on a Test with Known Effect Size

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Corte, Wilfried; Lievens, Filip

    2005-01-01

    The authors derive the exact sampling distribution function of the adverse impact (AI) ratio for single-stage, top-down selections using tests with known effect sizes. Subsequently, it is shown how this distribution function can be used to determine the risk that a future selection decision on the basis of such tests will result in an outcome that…

  13. The Status of the Testing Effect for Complex Materials: Still a Winner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawson, Katherine A.

    2015-01-01

    The target articles in the special issue address a timely and important question concerning whether practice tests enhance learning of complex materials. The consensus conclusion from these articles is that the testing effect does not obtain for complex materials. In this commentary, I discuss why this conclusion is not warranted either by the…

  14. The Effectiveness of Mandatory-Random Student Drug Testing. NCEE 2010-4025

    Science.gov (United States)

    James-Burdumy, Susanne; Goesling, Brian; Deke, John; Einspruch, Eric

    2010-01-01

    To help assess the effects of school-based random drug testing programs, the U.S. Department of Education's Institute of Education Sciences (IES) contracted with RMC Research Corporation and Mathematica Policy Research to conduct an experimental evaluation of the Mandatory-Random Student Drug Testing (MRSDT) programs in 36 high schools within…

  15. Dose-Time Effect of Crude Oil and Hydro-test Effluent on Freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This work was undertaken to investigate the dose-time effect of crude oil and hydro-test effluent on freshwater and brackish water habitats. The species used for the acute toxicity were freshwater fish, Tilapia guineenis (fry) and a brackish water shrimp, Palaemonetes africanus. Test results indicated that the brackish water ...

  16. Effects of Strength of Accent on an L2 Interactive Lecture Listening Comprehension Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ockey, Gary J.; Papageorgiou, Spiros; French, Robert

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study which aimed to determine the effect of strength of accent on listening comprehension of interactive lectures. Test takers (N = 21,726) listened to an interactive lecture given by one of nine speakers and responded to six comprehension items. The test taker responses were analyzed with the Rasch computer program…

  17. Comparing the Effects of Elementary Music and Visual Arts Lessons on Standardized Mathematics Test Scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Molly Elizabeth

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this quantitative, causal-comparative study was to compare the effect elementary music and visual arts lessons had on third through sixth grade standardized mathematics test scores. Inferential statistics were used to compare the differences between test scores of students who took in-school, elementary, music instruction during the…

  18. LLL K Division nuclear test effects and geologic data base: glossary and parameter definitions (U)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, N.W.

    1979-01-01

    The report lists, defines, and updates Parameters in DBASE, an LLL test effects data bank in which data is stored from experiments performed at NTS and other test sites. Parameters are listed by subject and by number. Part 2 of this report presents the same information for parameters for which some of the data may be classified

  19. Testing the External Effect of Household Behavior: The Case of the Demand for Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongbin; Zhang, Junsen

    2009-01-01

    This paper tests the external effect of household childbearing behavior by drawing on microfertility data from China. The test is executed by regressing one woman's fertility on the average fertility of neighboring women. China's unique affirmative birth control policy provides us with quasi-experimental fertility variation that facilities…

  20. Correcting for Test Score Measurement Error in ANCOVA Models for Estimating Treatment Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, J. R.; McCaffrey, Daniel F.

    2014-01-01

    A common strategy for estimating treatment effects in observational studies using individual student-level data is analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) or hierarchical variants of it, in which outcomes (often standardized test scores) are regressed on pretreatment test scores, other student characteristics, and treatment group indicators. Measurement…

  1. Academic Performance in Predominantly Black Nursing Classes: Effects Associated with Intervention Designed for Standardized Test Preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frierson, Henry T., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    One hundred fifty-two senior nursing students at a traditionally Black college participated in a study to determine the effect on academic performance of: (1) test-taking instruction; (2) a combination of test-taking instruction with cooperative learning procedures; or (3) no intervention. Spring semester grades were used to represent academic…

  2. Usability Testing for Developing Effective Interactive Multimedia Software: Concepts, Dimensions, and Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Heum Lee

    1999-04-01

    Full Text Available Usability testing is a dynamic process that can be used throughout the process of developing interactive multimedia software. The purpose of usability testing is to find problems and make recommendations to improve the utility of a product during its design and development. For developing effective interactive multimedia software, dimensions of usability testing were classified into the general categories of: learnability; performance effectiveness; flexibility; error tolerance and system integrity; and user satisfaction. In the process of usability testing, evaluation experts consider the nature of users and tasks, tradeoffs supported by the iterative design paradigm, and real world constraints to effectively evaluate and improve interactive multimedia software. Different methods address different purposes and involve a combination of user and usability testing, however, usability practitioners follow the seven general procedures of usability testing for effective multimedia development. As the knowledge about usability testing grows, evaluation experts will be able to choose more effective and efficient methods and techniques that are appropriate to their goals.

  3. An Effective Strategy to Build Up a Balanced Test Suite for Spectrum-Based Fault Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available During past decades, many automated software faults diagnosis techniques including Spectrum-Based Fault Localization (SBFL have been proposed to improve the efficiency of software debugging activity. In the field of SBFL, suspiciousness calculation is closely related to the number of failed and passed test cases. Studies have shown that the ratio of the number of failed and passed test case has more significant impact on the accuracy of SBFL than the total number of test cases, and a balanced test suite is more beneficial to improving the accuracy of SBFL. Based on theoretical analysis, we proposed an PNF (Passed test cases, Not execute Faulty statement strategy to reduce test suite and build up a more balanced one for SBFL, which can be used in regression testing. We evaluated the strategy making experiments using the Siemens program and Space program. Experiments indicated that our PNF strategy can be used to construct a new test suite effectively. Compared with the original test suite, the new one has smaller size (average 90% test case was reduced in experiments and more balanced ratio of failed test cases to passed test cases, while it has the same statement coverage and fault localization accuracy.

  4. A statistical analysis of the deterrence effects of the Military Services' Drug testing policies

    OpenAIRE

    Martinez, Antonio.

    1998-01-01

    This thesis examines themagnitude of the deterrence effect associated with the militaryservices' drug testing policies. Using data from the 1995Department of Defense Survey of Health Related Behaviors Among Military Personnel and the 1995 National Household Survey on Drug Abuse, illicit drug use rates are modeled as a function of pertinent demographic characteristics. The naturalvariation in drug testing policies is exploited to estimate the deterrence effects of suchprograms. The first analy...

  5. Development of a standardized battery of performance tests for the assessment of noise stress effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theologus, G. C.; Wheaton, G. R.; Mirabella, A.; Brahlek, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    A set of 36 relatively independent categories of human performance were identified. These categories encompass human performance in the cognitive, perceptual, and psychomotor areas, and include diagnostic measures and sensitive performance metrics. Then a prototype standardized test battery was constructed, and research was conducted to obtain information on the sensitivity of the tests to stress, the sensitivity of selected categories of performance degradation, the time course of stress effects on each of the selected tests, and the learning curves associated with each test. A research project utilizing a three factor partially repeated analysis of covariance design was conducted in which 60 male subjects were exposed to variations in noise level and quality during performance testing. Effects of randomly intermittent noise on performance of the reaction time tests were observed, but most of the other performance tests showed consistent stability. The results of 14 analyses of covariance of the data taken from the performance of the 60 subjects on the prototype standardized test battery provided information which will enable the final development and test of a standardized test battery and the associated development of differential sensitivity metrics and diagnostic classificatory system.

  6. Push-pull tests for estimating effective porosity: expanded analytical solution and in situ application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Charles J.; McKay, Larry D.; Perfect, Edmund; Istok, Jonathan D.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2018-03-01

    The analytical solution describing the one-dimensional displacement of the center of mass of a tracer during an injection, drift, and extraction test (push-pull test) was expanded to account for displacement during the injection phase. The solution was expanded to improve the in situ estimation of effective porosity. The truncated equation assumed displacement during the injection phase was negligible, which may theoretically lead to an underestimation of the true value of effective porosity. To experimentally compare the expanded and truncated equations, single-well push-pull tests were conducted across six test wells located in a shallow, unconfined aquifer comprised of unconsolidated and heterogeneous silty and clayey fill materials. The push-pull tests were conducted by injection of bromide tracer, followed by a non-pumping period, and subsequent extraction of groundwater. The values of effective porosity from the expanded equation (0.6-5.0%) were substantially greater than from the truncated equation (0.1-1.3%). The expanded and truncated equations were compared to data from previous push-pull studies in the literature and demonstrated that displacement during the injection phase may or may not be negligible, depending on the aquifer properties and the push-pull test parameters. The results presented here also demonstrated the spatial variability of effective porosity within a relatively small study site can be substantial, and the error-propagated uncertainty of effective porosity can be mitigated to a reasonable level (effective porosity of fine-grained fill material.

  7. Anxiolytic-like effect of cannabidiol in the rat Vogel conflict test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Fabrício A; Aguiar, Daniele C; Guimarães, Francisco S

    2006-12-30

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major constituent of the Cannabis sativa plant. It inhibits the anxiogenic activity of high doses of Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol and induces anxiolytic-like effects. However, the mechanisms underlying the actions of CBD are unknown. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to test the effects of CBD in the Vogel test, a widely used animal model of anxiety. In addition, it was verified if these effects would depend on benzodiazepine-receptor activation. After 24 h of water deprivation, male Wistar rats were subjected to an initial 3-min non-punished (pre-test) drinking session. This was followed by an additional 24-h period of water deprivation followed by a 3-min punished-licking session (test). Diazepam (3 mg/kg) or CBD (2.5, 5 or 10 mg/kg) were intraperitoneally injected 30 min before the test session. CBD (10 mg/kg) and diazepam had similar anticonflict effects, increasing the number of punished licks. The effect of diazepam, but not of CBD, was prevented by the benzodiazepine-receptor antagonist flumazenil (10 mg/kg). To exclude that the anticonflict effects were reflecting non-specific drug effects, we checked the effects of CBD on water consumption and nociceptive response. The drug did not interfere on the former variable in a non-punished test session. Moreover, contrary to morphine (5 mg/kg), CBD was ineffective in the tail-flick test. In conclusion, CBD induced an anticonflict effect not mediated by benzodiazepine receptors or by non-specific drug interference on nociceptive threshold or water consumption. These results reinforce the hypothesis that this cannabinoid has anxiolytic properties.

  8. Pulse testing in the presence of wellbore storage and skin effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogbe, D.O.; Brigham, W.E.

    1984-08-01

    A pulse test is conducted by creating a series of short-time pressure transients in an active (pulsing) well and recording the observed pressure response at an observation (responding) well. Using the pressure response and flow rate data, the transmissivity and storativity of the tested formation can be determined. Like any other pressure transient data, the pulse-test response is significantly influenced by wellbore storage and skin effects. The purpose of this research is to examine the influence of wellbore storage and skin effects on interference testing in general and on pulse-testing in particular, and to present the type curves and procedures for designing and analyzing pulse-test data when wellbore storage and skin effects are active at either the responding well or the pulsing well. A mathematical model for interference testing was developed by solving the diffusivity equation for radial flow of a single-phase, slightly compressible fluid in an infinitely large, homogeneous reservoir. When wellbore storage and skin effects are present in a pulse test, the observed response amplitude is attenuated and the time lag is inflated. Consequently, neglecting wellbore storage and skin effects in a pulse test causes the calculated storativity to be over-estimated and the transmissivity to be under-estimated. The error can be as high as 30%. New correlations and procedures are developed for correcting the pulse response amplitude and time lag for wellbore storage effects. Using these correlations, it is possible to correct the wellbore storage-dominated response amplitude and time lag to within 3% of their expected values without wellbore storage, and in turn to calculate the corresponding transmissivity and storativity. Worked examples are presented to illustrate how to use the new correction techniques. 45 references.

  9. TESTING CASC SCALE FOR MEASURING EMOTIONAL AND RATIONAL ADVERTISING AND MEDIA EFFECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nevenka Podgornik

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Researching effects of media and advertising demands a search for a cost efficient, quick and verified method of testing the its emotional as well as rational effects on consumers. Thus a CASC (Communication Analytic and Syncretic Cognitions scale was developed to meassure advertising effects and was selected for testing. In an extended research presented in this paper and based on 988 respondents evaluating 15 different ads we provided evidence that verify this scale on four different groups of ad motives. In addition we have tested individual ads and their complience with the suggested motives based on the theory and the four separate components (rational component, primary emotions, pro-social emotions and individualistic emotions. The findings confirm that CASC scale is able to detect differences between different motives and is thus an effective tool for measuring advertising effects.

  10. Testing for a Level Effect in Short-Term Interest Rates

    OpenAIRE

    Olan T. Henry; Sandy Suardi

    2004-01-01

    There is an extensive theoretical and empirical literature discussing the link between short-term interest rate volatility and interest rate levels. We present an LM based test for the presence of a level effect which is robust to the presence of unidentified nuisance parameter under the null of no level effect. We provide extensive Monte-Carlo evidence on the performance of this test under various DGPs. When applied to data on the 3-month US Treasury Bills rate, the test reports significant ...

  11. A cost-effective smartphone-based antimicrobial susceptibility test reader for drug resistance testing (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Steve W.; Tseng, Derek; Di Carlo, Dino; Garner, Omai B.; Ozcan, Aydogan

    2017-03-01

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) is commonly used for determining microbial drug resistance, but routine testing, which can significantly reduce the spread of multi-drug resistant organisms, is not regularly performed in resource-limited and field-settings due to technological challenges and lack of trained diagnosticians. We developed a portable cost-effective smartphone-based colorimetric 96-well microtiter plate (MTP) reader capable of automated AST without the need for a trained diagnostician. This system is composed of a smartphone used in conjunction with a 3D-printed opto-mechanical attachment, which holds a set of inexpensive light-emitting-diodes and fiber-optic cables coupled to the 96-well MTP for enabling the capture of the transmitted light through each well by the smartphone camera. Images of the MTP plate are captured at multiple exposures and uploaded to a local or remote server (e.g., a laptop) for automated processing/analysis of the results using a custom-designed smartphone application. Each set of images are combined to generate a high dynamic-range image and analyzed for well turbidity (indicative of bacterial growth), followed by interpretative analysis per plate to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and drug susceptibility for the specific bacterium. Results are returned to the originating device within 1 minute and shown to the user in tabular form. We demonstrated the capability of this platform using MTPs prepared with 17 antibiotic drugs targeting Gram-negative bacteria and tested 82 patient isolate MTPs of Klebsiella pneumoniae, achieving well turbidity accuracy of 98.19%, MIC accuracy of 95.15%, and drug susceptibility interpretation accuracy of 99.06%, meeting the FDA defined criteria for AST.

  12. Direct testing of scale effects in metal forming friction and lubrication

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter Søe; Calaon, Matteo; Paldan, Nikolas Aulin

    2010-01-01

    Downscaling of metal forming operations from macro to micro scale implies significant changes caused by size effects, among these the friction increase, which has been reported by researchers using indirect test methods such as ring-compression test and double-cup-extrusion test. In the present...... work a new test equipment is developed for direct friction measurements in the range from macro to micro scale. Investigations confirm a significant friction increase when downscaling. Visual inspection of the work pieces show this to be explained by the amount of open and closed lubricant pockets....

  13. Deployment Efficiency and Barrier Effectiveness Testing of a Temporary Anti-Personnel (TAP) Barrier System.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, David James [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Hedrick, Charles D. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Martinez, Ruben [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2017-02-01

    This report documents tests conducted by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) on behalf of the U.S. Department of State to evaluate a temporary anti-personnel (TAP) barrier system developed by Mitigation Technologies. For this, the SNL Denial and Structural Assessment department developed a test protocol for the evaluation of the TAP barrier system on the basis of deployment efficiency and barrier effectiveness against a riotous/mob attack threat. The test protocol was then executed by SNL personnel and the results of the testing are documented.

  14. Effects of different simplified milk recording methods on genetic evaluation with test-day animal model

    OpenAIRE

    Portolano, B.; Maizon, D. O.; Riggio, V.; Tolone, M.; Cacioppo, D.

    2007-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to compare estimated breeding values (EBV) for milk yield using different testing schemes with a test-day animal model and to evaluate the effect of different testing schemes on the ranking of top sheep. Alternative recording schemes that use less information than that currently obtained with a monthly test-day schedule were employed to estimate breeding values. A random regression animal mixed model that used a spline function of days in milk was fitted. EB...

  15. Impact and cost-effectiveness of chlamydia testing in Scotland: a mathematical modelling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Looker, Katharine J; Wallace, Lesley A; Turner, Katherine M E

    2015-01-15

    Chlamydia is the most common sexually transmitted bacterial infection in Scotland, and is associated with potentially serious reproductive outcomes, including pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) and tubal factor infertility (TFI) in women. Chlamydia testing in Scotland is currently targeted towards symptomatic individuals, individuals at high risk of existing undetected infection, and young people. The cost-effectiveness of testing and treatment to prevent PID and TFI in Scotland is uncertain. A compartmental deterministic dynamic model of chlamydia infection in 15-24 year olds in Scotland was developed. The model was used to estimate the impact of a change in testing strategy from baseline (16.8% overall testing coverage; 0.4 partners notified and tested/treated per treated positive index) on PID and TFI cases. Cost-effectiveness calculations informed by best-available estimates of the quality-adjusted life years (QALYs) lost due to PID and TFI were also performed. Increasing overall testing coverage by 50% from baseline to 25.2% is estimated to result in 21% fewer cases in young women each year (PID: 703 fewer; TFI: 88 fewer). A 50% decrease to 8.4% would result in 20% more PID (669 additional) and TFI (84 additional) cases occurring annually. The cost per QALY gained of current testing activities compared to no testing is £40,034, which is above the £20,000-£30,000 cost-effectiveness threshold. However, calculations are hampered by lack of reliable data. Any increase in partner notification from baseline would be cost-effective (incremental cost per QALY gained for a partner notification efficacy of 1 compared to baseline: £5,119), and would increase the cost-effectiveness of current testing strategy compared to no testing, with threshold cost-effectiveness reached at a partner notification efficacy of 1.5. However, there is uncertainty in the extent to which partner notification is currently done, and hence the amount by which it could potentially be

  16. Cost-effectiveness of exercise stress testing performed as part of executive health examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, S J; Rehman, A; Shaukat, M H S; Awais, M

    2017-05-01

    An executive health examination is offered at many hospitals for "busy executives" that comprises of a typical history and examination along with screening tests for major cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses. Exercise stress tests are also frequently included in such packages, though the appropriateness of such stress testing remains uncertain. To assess the appropriateness and cost-effectiveness of exercise stress tests performed as part of executive health examinations. Records of all individuals who underwent an executive health examination at our institution between January, 2007 and December, 2012 were retrospectively reviewed. Data were collected pertaining to demographics, cardiovascular risk factors, indication of stress testing and results of exercise stress tests. Of a total of 1650 subjects who underwent exercise stress tests as part of executive health examinations, indication for exercise stress testing was class IIb or III (as per American College of Cardiology's appropriateness criteria) in 96.1 % of subjects. The cumulative cost and time burden of testing for these subjects were Rs. 11,419,200/- PKR (≈$114,192 USD) and 2 weeks and 4 days, respectively. Exercise stress tests were not positive for ischemia in any such cases. Based on the results of this study, exercise stress tests should not be routinely offered as part of executive health examinations.

  17. [Effect of different doses of Plantago psyllium mucilage on the glucose tolerance test].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frati-Munari, A C; Flores-Garduño, M A; Ariza-Andraca, R; Islas-Andrade, S; Chávez Negrete, A

    1989-01-01

    To assess the effect of different doses of Plantago psyllium mucilage on glucose tolerance test, four oral glucose tolerance tests were performed to eight healthy volunteers. Glucose load (75 g) was mixed with 0 (control test), 10.20 and 30 g of mucilage. Serum glucose levels were measured at 0, 30, 60, 120 and 180 minutes. Maximum peak of glucose at 30 minutes, and the area under the curve of glucose were significantly lower in the test with 20 and 30 g of mucilage than the tests with 0 and 10g. There was a significant relationship (r = 0.44 p less than 0.025) between the dose of P. psyllium mucilage and its attenuating effect of hyperglycemia.

  18. Effects of glyphosate and 2,4-D on earthworms (Eisenia foetida) in laboratory tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Correia, F V; Moreira, J C

    2010-09-01

    Laboratory tests were conducted to compare the effects of various concentrations of glyphosate and 2,4-D on earthworms (Eisenia foetida) cultured in Argissol during 56 days of incubation. The effects on earthworm growth, survival, and reproduction rates were verified for different exposure times. Earthworms kept in glyphosate-treated soil were classified as alive in all evaluations, but showed gradual and significant reduction in mean weight (50%) at all test concentrations. For 2,4-D, 100% mortality was observed in soil treated with 500 and 1,000 mg/kg. At 14 days, 30%-40% mortality levels were observed in all other concentrations. No cocoons or juveniles were found in soil treated with either herbicide. Glyphosate and 2,4-D demonstrated severe effects on the development and reproduction of Eisenia foetida in laboratory tests in the range of test concentrations.

  19. Sensitivity and validity of psychometric tests for assessing driving impairment: effects of sleep deprivation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Jongen

    Full Text Available To assess drug induced driving impairment, initial screening is needed. However, no consensus has been reached about which initial screening tools have to be used. The present study aims to determine the ability of a battery of psychometric tests to detect performance impairing effects of clinically relevant levels of drowsiness as induced by one night of sleep deprivation.Twenty four healthy volunteers participated in a 2-period crossover study in which the highway driving test was conducted twice: once after normal sleep and once after one night of sleep deprivation. The psychometric tests were conducted on 4 occasions: once after normal sleep (at 11 am and three times during a single night of sleep deprivation (at 1 am, 5 am, and 11 am.On-the-road driving performance was significantly impaired after sleep deprivation, as measured by an increase in Standard Deviation of Lateral Position (SDLP of 3.1 cm compared to performance after a normal night of sleep. At 5 am, performance in most psychometric tests showed significant impairment. As expected, largest effect sizes were found on performance in the Psychomotor Vigilance Test (PVT. Large effects sizes were also found in the Divided Attention Test (DAT, the Attention Network Test (ANT, and the test for Useful Field of View (UFOV at 5 and 11 am during sleep deprivation. Effects of sleep deprivation on SDLP correlated significantly with performance changes in the PVT and the DAT, but not with performance changes in the UFOV.From the psychometric tests used in this study, the PVT and DAT seem most promising for initial evaluation of drug impairment based on sensitivity and correlations with driving impairment. Further studies are needed to assess the sensitivity and validity of these psychometric tests after benchmark sedative drug use.

  20. Cost-effectiveness of point-of-care testing for dehydration in the pediatric ED.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Rachel E; Santucci, Karen; Hsiao, Allen; Chen, Lei

    2016-08-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) and subsequent dehydration account for a large proportion of pediatric emergency department (PED) visits. Point-of-care (POC) testing has been used in conjunction with clinical assessment to determine the degree of dehydration. Despite the wide acceptance of POC testing, little formal cost-effective analysis of POC testing in the PED exists. We aim to examine the cost-effectiveness of using POC electrolyte testing vs traditional serum chemistry testing in the PED for children with AGE. This was a cost-effective analysis using data from a randomized control trial of children with AGE. A decision analysis model was constructed to calculate cost-savings from the point of view of the payer and the provider. We used parameters obtained from the trial, including cost of testing, admission rates, cost of admission, and length of stay. Sensitivity analyses were performed to evaluate the stability of our model. Using the data set of 225 subjects, POC testing results in a cost savings of $303.30 per patient compared with traditional serum testing from the point of the view of the payer. From the point-of-view of the provider, POC testing results in consistent mean savings of $36.32 ($8.29-$64.35) per patient. Sensitivity analyses demonstrated the stability of the model and consistent savings. This decision analysis provides evidence that POC testing in children with gastroenteritis-related moderate dehydration results in significant cost savings from the points of view of payers and providers compared to traditional serum chemistry testing. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effect of test temperature on the fatigue strength of the 12GN2MFAYu tempered steel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goritskij, V.M.; Terent'ev, V.F.; Bobyleva, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    The cyclic strength, variation of dislocation structure and fractography of specimen fractures were investigated depending on testing temperature. The specimens were tested at temperatures of 20, 350, 450, 550 deg C. The increase of testing temperature, according to the experimental data obtained, is accompanied by an insignificant reduction of fatigue strength. The testing temperature in the range from 350 to 550 deg C has a weak effect on the fatigue strength of the quenched and tempered steel. A change in the dislocation structure occurs under all tested temperatures in the 12 GN2MFAYu steel during fatigue. The intensity of the rearrangement of dislocation structure increases as the testing temperature increases to 550 deg C causing a decrease of the limited life-time at increased stress amplitudes

  2. Effect of education and language on baseline concussion screening tests in professional baseball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nathaniel S; Walter, Kevin D; Caplinger, Roger; Wright, Daniel; Raasch, William G; Young, Craig

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the possible effects of sociocultural influences, specifically pertaining to language and education, on baseline neuropsychological concussion testing as obtained via immediate postconcussion assessment and cognitive testing (ImPACT) of players from a professional baseball team. A retrospective chart review. Baseline testing of a professional baseball organization. Four hundred five professional baseball players. Age, languages spoken, hometown country location (United States/Canada vs overseas), and years of education. The 5 ImPACT composite scores (verbal memory, visual memory, visual motor speed, reaction time, impulse control) and ImPACT total symptom score from the initial baseline testing. The result of t tests revealed significant differences (P education, the significant differences (P < 0.05) remained in some scores. Sociocultural differences may result in differences in computer-based neuropsychological testing scores.

  3. Testing to evaluate synergistic effects from LOCA environments. Test IX. Simultaneous mode; cables, splice assemblies, and electrical insulation samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thome, F.V.

    1978-04-01

    This test was conducted to complement Test VIII which was a sequential test of cables, cable splices, and insulation samples. In this test, the generic LOCA environments (radiation, temperature, pressure, chemical spray) were simulated and simultaneously applied to the test items. There were no failures of any assemblies and all were able to function at rated current and voltage throughout the entire test. An additional parameter, dissipation factor, was monitored in this test and when used in conjunction with capacitance, provided a better indication of insulation degradation.

  4. Test-retest reliability and practice effects of the computerized neuropsychological test battery CNS Vital Signs : Evaluation in a Dutch healthy sample

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Linden, S.D.; Rijnen, S.J.M.; Emons, W.H.M.; Sitskoorn, M.M.; Gehring, K.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: CNS Vital Signs (CNS VS) is a computerized neuropsychological test battery that is translated into many languages. Test-retest reliability and potential practice effects of CNS VS were evaluated. Method: Dutch healthy participants were tested with CNS VS (T0), and retested after 3 (T1)

  5. Retrieval Practice Makes Procedure from Remembering: An Automatization Account of the Testing Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racsmány, Mihály; Szollosi, Ágnes; Bencze, Dorottya

    2018-01-01

    The "testing effect" refers to the striking phenomenon that repeated retrieval practice is one of the most effective learning strategies, and certainly more advantageous for long-term learning, than additional restudying of the same information. How retrieval can boost the retention of memories is still without unanimous explanation. In…

  6. Testing the effects of a message framing intervention on intentions towards hearing loss prevention in adolescents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruijn, G.J. de; Spaans, P.; Jansen, B.; Riet, J.P. van 't

    2016-01-01

    Adolescent hearing loss is a public health problem that has eluded effective intervention. A persuasive message strategy was tested for its effectiveness on adolescents’ intention to listen to music at a reduced volume. The messages manipulated both type of message frame [positive consequences of

  7. The effect of storage temperature on the accuracy of a cow-side test for ketosis

    OpenAIRE

    Hubbard, Jennifer; LeBlanc, Stephen; Duffield, Todd; Bagg, Randal; Dubuc, Jocelyn

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of storage conditions on the accuracy of a milk test strip for ketosis. Storage at 21°C for up to 18 wk had little effect on accuracy for diagnosis and classification of subclinical ketosis.

  8. The effect of storage temperature on the accuracy of a cow-side test for ketosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubbard, Jennifer; LeBlanc, Stephen; Duffield, Todd; Bagg, Randal; Dubuc, Jocelyn

    2010-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the effect of storage conditions on the accuracy of a milk test strip for ketosis. Storage at 21°C for up to 18 wk had little effect on accuracy for diagnosis and classification of subclinical ketosis. PMID:20676298

  9. How To Test Nontarget Effects of Veterinary Pharmaceutical Residues in Livestock Dung in the Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jochmann, R.; Blanckenhorn, W.U.; Bussière, L.; Eirkson, C.E.; Jensen, J.; Kryger, U.; Lahr, J.; Lumaret, J.P.; Römbke, J.; Wardhaugh, K.G.; Floate, K.D.

    2010-01-01

    To register veterinary medicinal products (VMPs) as parasiticides on pastured animals, legislation in the European Union requires an environmental risk assessment to test the potential nontarget effects of fecal residues on dung-dwelling organisms. Products with adverse effects in single-species

  10. Assessing the Treatment Effects in Apraxia of Speech: Introduction and Evaluation of the Modified Diadochokinesis Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of reliable and valid instruments to measure the effects of therapy in apraxia of speech (AoS) is limited. Aims: To evaluate the newly developed Modified Diadochokinesis Test (MDT), which is a task to assess the effects of rate and rhythm therapies for AoS in a multiple baseline across behaviours design. Methods: The…

  11. Assessing the treatment effects in apraxia of speech : introduction and evaluation of the Modified Diadochokinesis Test

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hurkmans, Joost; Jonkers, Roel; Boonstra, Anne M.; Stewart, Roy E.; Reinders-Messelink, Heleen A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: The number of reliable and valid instruments to measure the effects of therapy in apraxia of speech (AoS) is limited. Aims: To evaluate the newly developed Modified Diadochokinesis Test (MDT), which is a task to assess the effects of rate and rhythm therapies for AoS in a multiple

  12. 33. Effects of HIV status and Linguistic Medium on the Test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Esem

    three learning trials. Delayed Recall is assessed 20 to 25 minutes after completion of the Immediate Recall test. Immediately after administration of the Delayed .... with HIV positive group performing poorer. Interaction effects between HIV status and linguistic medium. In order to determine the interaction effects, a 2x2x2.

  13. Dose-Time Effect of Crude Oil and Hydro-test Effluent on Freshwater ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The project therefore has provided a learning tool and a platform in evaluating the concentrations of the chemical and the duration of exposure required to produce the criterion effect. Moreover, test results validated the age long theory that 'the most important factor that determines the effect of any substance is the dose-time ...

  14. Using a Comprehensive Model to Test and Predict the Factors of Online Learning Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Minyan

    2013-01-01

    As online learning is an important part of higher education, the effectiveness of online learning has been tested with different methods. Although the literature regarding online learning effectiveness has been related to various factors, a more comprehensive review of the factors may result in broader understanding of online learning…

  15. The manufacture of system for testing static random access memory radiation effect

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Rui; Yang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Space radiation effects will lead to single event upset, event latch up and other phenomena in SRAM devices. This paper introduces the hardware, software composition and related testing technology of SRAM radiation effect testing device. Through to the SRAM chip current detection and power protection, it has solved the SRAM chip damage question in the SRAM experiment. It has accessed to the expected experimental data by using the device in different source of radiation conducted on SRAM Experimental study of radiation effects. It provides important references in the assessment of operational life and reinforcement of the memory carried in the satellites. (authors)

  16. Toxicity tests with crustaceans for detecting sublethal effects of potential endocrine disrupting chemicals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wollenberger, Leah

    on effects of potential endocrine disrupters on crustacean development and reproduction have been published since the beginning of the nineties. However, most crustacean toxicity test protocols routinely used so far have not been designed with endocrine-specific endpoints in mind. The main objectives...... of effective concentrations (ECx). After having demonstrated that larval development of A. tonsa was a very sensitive endpoint for evaluating effects of chemicals that might interfere with the endocrine system of crustaceans, the larval development test has been applied to two groups of emerging environmental...

  17. The effect of patch testing on surgical practices and outcomes in orthopedic patients with metal implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanaskova Mesinkovska, Natasha; Tellez, Alejandra; Molina, Luciana; Honari, Golara; Sood, Apra; Barsoum, Wael; Taylor, James S

    2012-06-01

    To determine the effect of patch testing on surgical decision making and outcomes in patients evaluated for suspected metal hypersensitivity related to implants in bones or joints. Medical chart review. Tertiary care academic medical center. All patients who had patch testing for allergic contact dermatitis related to orthopedic implants. Patch testing. The surgeon's preoperative choice of metal implant alloy compared with patch testing results and the presence of hypersensitivity complications related to the metal implant on postsurgical follow-up. Patients with potential metal hypersensitivity from implanted devices (N = 72) were divided into 2 groups depending on timing of their patch testing: preimplantation (n = 31) and postimplantation (n = 41). History of hypersensitivity to metals was a predictor of positive patch test results to metals in both groups. Positive patch test results indicating metal hypersensitivity influenced the decision-making process of the referring surgeon in all preimplantation cases (n = 21). Patients with metal hypersensitivity who received an allergen-free implant had surgical outcomes free of hypersensitivity complications (n = 21). In patients who had positive patch test results to a metal in their implant after implantation, removal of the device led to resolution of associated symptoms (6 of 10 patients). The findings of this study support a role for patch testing in patients with a clinical history of metal hypersensitivity before prosthetic device implantation. The decision on whether to remove an implanted device after positive patch test results should be made on a case-by-case basis, as decided by the surgeon and patient.

  18. The Glare Effect Test and the Impact of Age on Luminosity Thresholds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Facchin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The glare effect (GE is an illusion in which a white region appears self-luminous when surrounded by linearly decreasing luminance ramps. It has been shown that the magnitude of the luminosity effect can be modulated by manipulating the luminance range of the gradients. In the present study we tested the thresholds for the GE on two groups of adults: young (20–30 years old and elderly (60–75 years old. Purpose of our perspective study was to test the possibility of transforming the GE into a test that could easily measure thresholds for luminosity and discomfort glare. The Glare Effect Test (GET consisted in 101 printed cards that differed from each other for the range of luminance ramps. Participants were assessed with GET and a battery of visual tests: visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, illusion of length perception, and Ishihara test. Specifically in the GET, participants were required to classify cards on the basis of two reference cards (solid black-no gradient; full range black to white gradient. PSEs of the GE show no correlation with the other visual tests, revealing a divergent validity. A significant difference between young and elderly was found: contrary to our original expectations, luminosity thresholds of GE for elderly were higher than those for young, suggesting a non-direct relationship between luminosity perception and discomfort glare.

  19. Immediate detailed feedback to test-enhanced learning: an effective online educational tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojcikowski, Ken; Kirk, Leslie

    2013-11-01

    Test-enhanced learning has gained popularity because it is an effective way to increase retention of knowledge; provided the student receives the correct answer soon after the test is taken. To determine whether detailed feedback provided to test-enhanced learning questions is an effective online educational tool for improving performance on complex biomedical information exams. A series of online multiple choice tests were developed to test knowledge of biomedical information that students were expected to know after each patient-case. Following submission of the student answers, one cohort (n = 52) received answers only while the following year, a second cohort (n = 51) received the answers with detailed feedback explaining why each answer was correct or incorrect. Students in both groups progressed through the series of online tests with little assessor intervention. Students receiving the answers along with the explanations within their feedback performed significantly better in the final biomedical information exam than those students receiving correct answers only. This pilot study found that the detailed feedback to test-enhanced learning questions is an important online learning tool. The increase in student performance in the complex biomedical information exam in this study suggests that detailed feedback should be investigated not only for increasing knowledge, but also be investigated for its effect on retention and application of knowledge.

  20. Evaluation of the effects of the radial constant-head boundary in slug tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yunfeng; Zhou, Zhifang; Zhao, Yanrong; Cui, Ziteng

    2015-03-01

    A semianalytical model of slug tests, conducted in a completely penetrating well within a radial constant-head boundary, was derived. The model, based on the Cooper et al. (1967) model, estimates the hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficient through the matching of type curves. Type curves of the semianalytical solution were plotted, and the effect of the distance of the radial constant-head boundary is discussed. For different storage coefficients, the critical distances of the effect of the constant-head boundary were determined. The effect of the storage coefficient on the response of the water head in slug tests with a radial constant-head boundary of a certain distance is also shown. To verify the model, laboratory slug-test experiments were carried out using a cylindrical test platform, in which an artificial confined coarse-sand aquifer was built. Pumping tests were also executed using the test platform. The Cooper et al. (1967) model and new semianalytical model were used to analyze measurements; the hydraulic conductivity and storage coefficient determined using the two methods were compared to demonstrate the importance of the radial constant-head boundary. A model considering the inertial effect was also used to analyze the slug-test measurements, and although the water head response did not oscillate greatly, the inertial effect affected the slug-test calculation result. The laboratory experiments indicate that the proposed semianalytical model is reasonable and reliable. Cooper HH, Bredehoeft JD, Papadopulos IS (1967) Response of a finite-diameter well to an instantaneous charge of water, Water Resour Res 3(1):263-269.

  1. Single Event Effects Test Facility Options at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riemer, Bernie [ORNL; Gallmeier, Franz X [ORNL; Dominik, Laura J [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Increasing use of microelectronics of ever diminishing feature size in avionics systems has led to a growing Single Event Effects (SEE) susceptibility arising from the highly ionizing interactions of cosmic rays and solar particles. Single event effects caused by atmospheric radiation have been recognized in recent years as a design issue for avionics equipment and systems. To ensure a system meets all its safety and reliability requirements, SEE induced upsets and potential system failures need to be considered, including testing of the components and systems in a neutron beam. Testing of integrated circuits (ICs) and systems for use in radiation environments requires the utilization of highly advanced laboratory facilities that can run evaluations on microcircuits for the effects of radiation. This paper provides a background of the atmospheric radiation phenomenon and the resulting single event effects, including single event upset (SEU) and latch up conditions. A study investigating requirements for future single event effect irradiation test facilities and developing options at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is summarized. The relatively new SNS with its 1.0 GeV proton beam, typical operation of 5000 h per year, expertise in spallation neutron sources, user program infrastructure, and decades of useful life ahead is well suited for hosting a world-class SEE test facility in North America. Emphasis was put on testing of large avionics systems while still providing tunable high flux irradiation conditions for component tests. Makers of ground-based systems would also be served well by these facilities. Three options are described; the most capable, flexible, and highest-test-capacity option is a new stand-alone target station using about one kW of proton beam power on a gas-cooled tungsten target, with dual test enclosures. Less expensive options are also described.

  2. Socioeconomic influences on the effects of a genetic testing direct-to-consumer marketing campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowen, D J; Harris, J; Jorgensen, C M; Myers, M F; Kuniyuki, A

    2010-01-01

    Direct-to-consumer marketing of genetic tests is beginning to appear in select markets, and little independent evaluation has been conducted on the effects of this marketing on consumer attitudes or behavior. The purpose of this paper is to identify the effects of socioeconomic status on women's reactions to such a campaign, including knowledge of the test, perceptions of personal risk, communications with others about the test, and interest in pursuing the test. The only United States provider of genetic testing for breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility (BRCA1/2 testing) conducted a pilot marketing campaign that targeted women aged 25-54 and their health care providers in 2 cities, Atlanta, Ga., and Denver, Colo. The design for the evaluation was a post campaign consumer survey, based on a cross-sectional stratified random sample of women in the 2 intervention sites and 2 comparison sites. The campaign had no differential impact by socioeconomic status. However, there was a consistent relationship between socioeconomic status and several outcome variables, including knowledge of the test, beliefs about the test, and desire to know about genetic risk. These data indicate that socioeconomic status may play a role in uptake of genetic services, regardless of response to a media campaign. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Push-pull tests for estimating effective porosity: expanded analytical solution and in situ application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Charles J.; McKay, Larry D.; Perfect, Edmund; Istok, Jonathan D.; Hazen, Terry C.

    2017-10-01

    The analytical solution describing the one-dimensional displacement of the center of mass of a tracer during an injection, drift, and extraction test (push-pull test) was expanded to account for displacement during the injection phase. The solution was expanded to improve the in situ estimation of effective porosity. The truncated equation assumed displacement during the injection phase was negligible, which may theoretically lead to an underestimation of the true value of effective porosity. To experimentally compare the expanded and truncated equations, single-well push-pull tests were conducted across six test wells located in a shallow, unconfined aquifer comprised of unconsolidated and heterogeneous silty and clayey fill materials. The push-pull tests were conducted by injection of bromide tracer, followed by a non-pumping period, and subsequent extraction of groundwater. The values of effective porosity from the expanded equation (0.6-5.0%) were substantially greater than from the truncated equation (0.1-1.3%). The expanded and truncated equations were compared to data from previous push-pull studies in the literature and demonstrated that displacement during the injection phase may or may not be negligible, depending on the aquifer properties and the push-pull test parameters. The results presented here also demonstrated the spatial variability of effective porosity within a relatively small study site can be substantial, and the error-propagated uncertainty of effective porosity can be mitigated to a reasonable level (< ± 0.5%). The tests presented here are also the first that the authors are aware of that estimate, in situ, the effective porosity of fine-grained fill material.

  4. How effective is preening against mobile ectoparasites? An experimental test with pigeons and hippoboscid flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jessica L, Waite; Henry, Autumn R; Clayton, Dale H

    2012-05-01

    Birds combat ectoparasites with many defences but the first line of defence is grooming behaviour, which includes preening with the bill and scratching with the feet. Preening has been shown to be very effective against ectoparasites. However, most tests have been with feather lice, which are relatively slow moving. Less is known about the effectiveness of preening as a defence against more mobile and evasive ectoparasites such as hippoboscid flies. Hippoboscids, which feed on blood, have direct effects on the host such asanaemia, as well as indirect effects as vectors of pathogens. Hence, effective defence against hippoboscid flies is important. We used captive Rock Pigeons (Columba livia) to test whether preening behaviour helps to control pigeon flies (Pseudolynchia canariensis). We found that pigeons responded to fly infestation by preening twice as much as pigeons without flies. Preening birds killed twice as many flies over the course of our week-long experiment as birds with impaired preening; however, preening did not kill all of the flies. We also tested the role of the bill overhang, which is critical for effective preening against feather lice, by experimentally removing the overhang and re-measuring the effectiveness of preening against flies. Birds without overhangs were as effective at controlling flies as were birds with overhangs. Overall, we found that preening is effective against mobile hippoboscid flies, yet it does not eliminate them. We discuss the potential impact of preening on the transmission dynamics of blood parasites vectored by hippoboscid flies.

  5. Feasibility and effectiveness of two community-based HIV testing models in rural Swaziland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Lucy Anne; Jobanputra, Kiran; Rusike, Lorraine; Mazibuko, Sikhathele; Okello, Velephi; Kerschberger, Bernhard; Jouquet, Guillaume; Cyr, Joanne; Teck, Roger

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the feasibility (population reached, costs) and effectiveness (positivity rates, linkage to care) of two strategies of community-based HIV testing and counselling (HTC) in rural Swaziland. Strategies used were mobile HTC (MHTC) and home-based HTC (HBHTC). Information on age, sex, previous testing and HIV results was obtained from routine HTC records. A consecutive series of individuals testing HIV-positive were followed up for 6 months from the test date to assess linkage to care. A total of 9 060 people were tested: 2 034 through MHTC and 7 026 through HBHTC. A higher proportion of children and adolescents (<20 years) were tested through HBHTC than MHTC (57% vs. 17%; P < 0.001). MHTC reached a higher proportion of adult men than HBHTC (42% vs. 39%; P = 0.015). Of 398 HIV-positive individuals, only 135 (34%) were enrolled in HIV care within 6 months. Of 42 individuals eligible for antiretroviral therapy, 22 (52%) started treatment within 6 months. Linkage to care was lowest among people who had tested previously and those aged 20-40 years. HBHTC was 50% cheaper (US$11 per person tested; $797 per individual enrolled in HIV care) than MHTC ($24 and $1698, respectively). In this high HIV prevalence setting, a community-based testing programme achieved high uptake of testing and appears to be an effective and affordable way to encourage large numbers of people to learn their HIV status (particularly underserved populations such as men and young people). However, for community HTC to impact mortality and incidence, strategies need to be implemented to ensure people testing HIV-positive in the community are linked to HIV care. © 2015 The Authors. Tropical Medicine & International Health Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. The effect of an oral contraceptive on tests of thyroid function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishell, D R; Colodny, S Z; Swanson, L A

    1969-01-01

    To determine the effect of a combined oral progestin on 5 tests of thyroid function, 21 parous women at least 8 weeks postpartum and with histories of regular menses were studied. A complete physical examination showed all to be normal. The 5 tests performed were radioactive iodine uptake (RAI) at 2 and 24 hours, serum protein-bound iodine (PBI), thyroxine iodine by column, triiodothyronine absorption test, and serum cholesterol. 2 baseline determinations of each test except the RAI were performed on each subject on separate days. Only euthyroid subjects were further tested. Of these 16 were given 10 mg of medroxyprogesterone acetate in combination with .05 mg of ethinyl estradiol cyclically for 20 days. Thyroid function tests were repeated at various intervals from the end of the first week of therapy to over 4 months after starting therapy. Cholesterol and RAI determinations were extremely variable precluding any evidence of drug effect. The other 3 tests showed consistent changes in all patients studied. The serum PBI and thyrozine-iodine by column tests both showed slight elevation within the first week of therapy and further elevation 1 months thereafter. These changes approached hyperthyroidism levels. The triiodothyronine absorption test showed little change in the first week but a definite downward shift thereafter with a maximum depression at 3 months of therapy. This change reached hypothyroidism level. If test were done during the 1 week each month patients were not taking the drug, results were the same. These changes are thought to be due to the estrogen component of the contraceptive drugs. Those physicians depending on these thyroid tests for diagnosis should be aware of these changes in patients taking these drugs.

  7. Testing for constant nonparametric effects in general semiparametric regression models with interactions

    KAUST Repository

    Wei, Jiawei

    2011-07-01

    We consider the problem of testing for a constant nonparametric effect in a general semi-parametric regression model when there is the potential for interaction between the parametrically and nonparametrically modeled variables. The work was originally motivated by a unique testing problem in genetic epidemiology (Chatterjee, et al., 2006) that involved a typical generalized linear model but with an additional term reminiscent of the Tukey one-degree-of-freedom formulation, and their interest was in testing for main effects of the genetic variables, while gaining statistical power by allowing for a possible interaction between genes and the environment. Later work (Maity, et al., 2009) involved the possibility of modeling the environmental variable nonparametrically, but they focused on whether there was a parametric main effect for the genetic variables. In this paper, we consider the complementary problem, where the interest is in testing for the main effect of the nonparametrically modeled environmental variable. We derive a generalized likelihood ratio test for this hypothesis, show how to implement it, and provide evidence that our method can improve statistical power when compared to standard partially linear models with main effects only. We use the method for the primary purpose of analyzing data from a case-control study of colorectal adenoma.

  8. Evaluation of near-critical overdamping effects in slug-test response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weeks, Edwin P.; Clark, Arthur C.

    2013-01-01

    A slug test behaves as a harmonic oscillator, subject to both inertial effects and viscous damping. When viscous and inertial forces are closely balanced, the system is nearly critically damped, and water-level recovery is affected by inertial effects, but does not exhibit oscillation. These effects were investigated by use of type curves, generated both by modification of Kipp's (1985) computer program and by use of the Butler-Zhan (2004) model. Utility of the type curves was verified by re-analysis of the Regina slug test previously analyzed by Kipp. These type curves indicate that near-critical inertial effects result in early-time delayed water-level response followed by merger with, or more rapid recovery than, response for the fully damped case. Because of this early time response, slug tests in the moderately over-damped range are best analyzed using log-log type curves of (1 − H/H0) vs. Tt/. Failure to recognize inertial effects in slug test data could result in an over-estimate of transmissivity, and a too-small estimate of storage coefficient or too-large estimate of well skin. However, application of the widely used but highly empirical Hvorslev (1951) method to analyze both the Regina slug test and type-curve generated data indicate that such analyses provide T values within a factor of 2 of the true value.

  9. Final Test Report: Hexavalent Chrome Free Coatings for Electronics Electromagnetic Interference (EMI) Shielding Effectiveness (SE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessel, Kurt R.

    2016-01-01

    The test results for Salt Spray Resistance, Static Heat and Humidity and Marine Environment can be found in Sections 3.1.3.3, 3.1.4.3 and 3.1.5.3 respectively. In summary, both the Metalast TCP and SurTec 650 Type 2 conversion coatings perform very similar to the incumbent Type 1 conversion coating against both 6061 and 5052 aluminum under all three test conditions. Significant prior work was performed to select the aluminum and conversion coating included within this test cycle; Reference - NASA GSDO Program Hexavalent Chrome Alternatives Final Pretreatments Test Report Task Order: NNH12AA45D September 01, 2013. As illustrated in the data, the 6061 aluminum panels SLIGHTLY out-performed the 5052 aluminum panels. Individual shielding effectiveness graphs for each panel are included within Appendix C and D. One other notable effect found during review of the data is that the Test Panels exposed to B117 Salt Fog reduced in shielding effectiveness significantly more than the Marine Environment Test Panels. The shielding effectiveness of the Marine Test Panels was approximately 20dB higher than the Test Panels that underwent B117 Salt Fog Exposure. The intent of this evaluation was not to maximize shielding effectiveness values. The same Parker Chomerics Cho-Seal 6503 gasket material was used for all panels with aluminum and conversion coating variants. A typical EMI gasket design for corrosive environments would be done quite differently. The intent was to execute a test that would provide the best possible evaluation of different aluminum materials and conversion coatings in corrosive environments. The test program achieved this intent. The fact that the two aluminums and two Type II conversion coatings performed similar to the incumbent Type 1 conversion coating is a positive outcome. It was desired to have an outcome that further differentiation the performance of two aluminum types and two conversion coating types but this could not be extracted by the test

  10. Practice effect in Symbol Digit Modalities Test in multiple sclerosis patients treated with natalizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roar, Malte; Illes, Zsolt; Sejbaek, Tobias

    2016-11-01

    How practice effect influences cognitive testing measured by monthly Symbol Digit Modalities Test (SDMT) during natalizumab treatment, and what factors confound such effect. Eighty patients were examined monthly with SDMT for 26.2±8.4 months. After 26.0±8.1 months, SDMT was also performed with a rearranged key in 59 cases. Results of SDMTs with the rearranged and previous regular key were compared. We examined if gender, age, Extended Disability Status Scale (EDSS), relapses, and disability progression/improvement influence SDMT performed with the regular and the rearranged key, respectively. We also explored if natalizumab applied before regular monthly SDMT may influence practice effect and cognition. SDMT performance improved by 1.2 points/test during the first six months and by 0.4 points/test thereafter. Rearranging the symbols of the key after 26.0±8.1 months returned SDMT scores to baseline indicating a practice effect. Such practice effect was more significant after longer testing period, but was not influenced by gender, age, relapses, disability progression and prior natalizumab treatment. Although the change from baseline to 2.5 years was significant in subgroups with EDSS 0-3, 3.5-5.5 and 6-7.5, this was higher in patients with EDSS 0-3 compared to 6-7.5. Practice effect significantly contributes to continuous improvement in SDMT performance during natalizumab treatment: to test cognition, a change in key is required. Practice effect is less pronounced in patients with advanced disease. Cognition remains stable even in patients with progressive disease during more than 2 years of natalizumab treatment indicated by scores corresponding to baseline after changing the key. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. The Mediating Effect of Listening Metacognitive Awareness between Test-Taking Motivation and Listening Test Score: An Expectancy-Value Theory Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xu

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study investigated test-taking motivation in L2 listening testing context by applying Expectancy-Value Theory as the framework. Specifically, this study was intended to examine the complex relationships among expectancy, importance, interest, listening anxiety, listening metacognitive awareness, and listening test score using data from a large-scale and high-stakes language test among Chinese first-year undergraduates. Structural equation modeling was used to examine the mediating effect of listening metacognitive awareness on the relationship between expectancy, importance, interest, listening anxiety, and listening test score. According to the results, test takers’ listening scores can be predicted by expectancy, interest, and listening anxiety significantly. The relationship between expectancy, interest, listening anxiety, and listening test score was mediated by listening metacognitive awareness. The findings have implications for test takers to improve their test taking motivation and listening metacognitive awareness, as well as for L2 teachers to intervene in L2 listening classrooms.

  12. The testing effect on skills learning might last 6 months

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kromann, C B; Bohnstedt, C; Jensen, M L

    2009-01-01

    In a recent study we found that testing as a final activity in a skills course increases the learning outcome compared to spending an equal amount of time practicing. Whether this testing effect measured as skills performance can be demonstrated on long-term basis is not known. The research...... question was: does testing as a final activity in a cardio-pulmonary resuscitation (CPR) skills course increase learning outcome when assessed after half a year, compared to spending an equal amount of time practicing? The study was an assessor-blinded randomised controlled trial. A convenient sample of 7.......4. The difference between groups was not statistically significant, P = 0.06. This study suggests that testing as a final activity in a CPR skills course might have an effect on long-term learning outcome compared to spending an equal amount of time practicing the skills. Although this difference...

  13. Testing for direct genetic effects using a screening step in family-based association studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon M Lutz

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available In genome wide association studies (GWAS, families based studies tend to have less power to detect genetic associations than population based studies, such as case-control studies. This can be an issue when testing if genes in a family based GWAS have a direct effect on the phenotype of interest or if the genes act indirectly through a secondary phenotype. When multiple SNPs are tested for a direct effect in the family based study, a screening step can be used to minimize the burden of multiple comparisons in the causal analysis. We propose a 2-stage screening step that can be incorporated into the family based association test (FBAT approach similar to the conditional mean model approach in the VanSteen-algorithm [1]. Simulations demonstrate that the type 1 error is preserved and this method is advantageous when multiple markers are tested. This method is illustrated by an application to the Framingham Heart Study.

  14. Confirmatory Testing Prior to Initiating Onychomycosis Therapy Is Cost-Effective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Aditya K; Versteeg, Sarah G; Shear, Neil H

    2017-09-01

    Onychomycosis can be investigated by sampling. Information gleaned includes nail bed involvement, nail plate penetration, fungal viability, and species identification. Testing samples can confirm a diagnosis. While diagnostic testing is considered useful in directing therapy, a substantial number of clinicians do not confirm diagnosis prior to treatment. The aim of this study is to quantify the benefit of confirmatory testing prior to treating toenail onychomycosis. The cost of mycological cure (negative potassium hydroxide and negative culture) and the cost-effectiveness of confirmatory testing were determined using the average cost of potassium hydroxide (KOH), culture, periodic acid-Schiff (PAS), efinaconazole, ciclopirox, terbinafine, and itraconazole. Costs were obtained through literature searches, public domain websites, and telephone surveys to local pharmacies and laboratories. To represent the potential risks of prescribing onychomycosis treatment, the costs associated with liver monitoring, potential life-threatening adverse events, and drug-drug interactions were obtained through public domain websites, published studies, and product inserts. PAS was determined to be the most sensitive confirmatory test and KOH the least expensive. The overall cost of an incorrect diagnosis (no confirmatory test used) ranged between $350 and $1175 CAD per patient for treatment of 3 infected toenails. Comparatively, performing confirmatory testing prior to treatment decreases the overall cost to $320 to $930, depending on the therapy, physician, and test. It is preferred to diagnose onychomycosis prior to treatment. Furthermore, there are cost savings when confirmatory testing is performed before initiating treatment with both topical and oral antifungals in Canada.

  15. Anxiolytic-like effect of oxytocin in the simulated public speaking test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Danielle C G; Zuardi, Antonio W; Graeff, Frederico G; Queiroz, Regina H C; Crippa, José A S

    2012-04-01

    Oxytocin (OT) is known to be involved in anxiety, as well as cardiovascular and hormonal regulation. The objective of this study was to assess the acute effect of intranasally administered OT on subjective states, as well as cardiovascular and endocrine parameters, in healthy volunteers (n = 14) performing a simulated public speaking test. OT or placebo was administered intranasally 50 min before the test. Assessments were made across time during the experimental session: (1) baseline (-30 min); (2) pre-test (-15 min); (3) anticipation of the speech (50 min); (4) during the speech (1:03 h), post-test time 1 (1:26 h), and post-test time 2 (1:46 h). Subjective states were evaluated by self-assessment scales. Cortisol serum and plasma adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were measured. Additionally, heart rate, blood pressure, skin conductance, and the number of spontaneous fluctuations in skin conductance were measured. Compared with placebo, OT reduced the Visual Analogue Mood Scale (VAMS) anxiety index during the pre-test phase only, while increasing sedation at the pre-test, anticipation, and speech phases. OT also lowered the skin conductance level at the pre-test, anticipation, speech, and post-test 2 phases. Other parameters evaluated were not significantly affected by OT. The present results show that OT reduces anticipatory anxiety, but does not affect public speaking fear, suggesting that this hormone has anxiolytic properties.

  16. Investigating the Mutagenic Effects of Three Commonly Used Pulpotomy Agents Using the Ames Test

    OpenAIRE

    Samiei, Mohammad; Asgary, Saeed; Farajzadeh, Malak; Bargahi, Nasrin; Abdolrahimi, Majid; Kananizadeh, Usef; Dastmalchi, Siavoush

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The mutagenic potency of materials used in dentistry is of great concern. The Ames test is a bacterial reverse mutation assay, which is used to determine the mutagenicity potential of chemicals. In this study, the Ames test was used to compare mutagenic effects of three pulpotomy agents, namely, CEM cement, formocresol and ferric sulfate. Methods: TA100 strain of Salmonella typhimurium was used to evaluate mutagenicity of different concentrations of pulpotomy materials in the pres...

  17. Identification of Radiation Effects on Carcinogenic Food Estimated by Ames Test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Afifi, M.; Eid, I.; El - Nagdy, M.; Zaher, R.; Abd El-Karem, H.; Abd EL Karim, A.

    2016-01-01

    A major concern in studies related to carcinogenesis is the exposure to the exogenous carcinogens that may occur in food in both natural and polluted human environments. The purpose of the present study is to examine some of food products by Ames test to find out if food products carcinogenic then expose food to gamma radiation to find out the effect of radiation on it as a treatment. In this study, the food samples were examined by Ames test (Salmonella typhimurium mutagenicity test) to find out that a food product could be carcinogenic or highly mutated. Testing of chemicals for mutagenicity is based on the knowledge that a substance which is mutagenic in the bacterium is more likely than not to be a carcinogen in laboratory animals, and thus , by extension, present a risk of cancer to humans. After that food products that showed mutagenicity exposed to gamma radiation at different doses to examine the effect of gamma radiation on food products. This study represent γ radiation effect on carcinogenic food by using Ames test in the following steps: Detect food by Ames test using Salmonella typhimurium strains in which the colony count /plate for each food sample will show if food is slightly mutated or highly mutated or carcinogenic. If food is highly mutated or carcinogenic with high number of colonies /plate, then the carcinogenic food or highly mutated food exposed to different doses of radiation The applied doses in this study were 0, 2.5, 5, and 10 (KGy). Detect the radiation effect on food samples by Ames test after irradiation. The study shows that mutated and carcinogenic food products estimated by Ames test could be treated by irradiation

  18. LLNL Containment Program nuclear test effects and geologic data base: glossary and parameter definitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Howard, N.W.

    1983-01-01

    This report lists, defines, and updates Parameters in DBASE, an LLNL test effects data bank in which data are stored from experiments performed at NTS and other test sites. Parameters are listed by subject and by number. Part 2 of this report presents the same information for parameters for which some of the data may be classified; it was issued in 1979 and is not being reissued at this time as it is essentially unchanged

  19. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2010-06-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  20. Preliminary Failure Modes and Effects Analysis of the US DCLL Test Blanket Module

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee C. Cadwallader

    2007-08-01

    This report presents the results of a preliminary failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) of a small tritium-breeding test blanket module design for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor. The FMEA was quantified with “generic” component failure rate data, and the failure events are binned into postulated initiating event families and frequency categories for safety assessment. An appendix to this report contains repair time data to support an occupational radiation exposure assessment for test blanket module maintenance.

  1. Bancroftian filariasis: long-term effect of the DEC provocative day test on microfilaraemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Poul Erik; Meyrowitsch, Dan Wolf; Makunde, W.H.

    1997-01-01

    The diethylcarbamazine (DEC) provocative day test has been widely used for daytime diagnosis of Wuchereria bancrofti infections in areas where microfilariae exhibit nocturnal periodicity. Since DEC is also the primary drug for treatment of bancroftian filariasis, we examined the long term effect...... amicrofilaraemic. No significant reduction of microfilaraemia was observed in the placebo group. The results imply that the DEC provocative day test should not be used as a diagnostic tool in follow-up studies on microfilaraemias....

  2. Solar cooker effect test and temperature field simulation of radio telescope subreflector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Deshen; Wang, Huajie; Qian, Hongliang; Zhang, Gang; Shen, Shizhao

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Solar cooker effect test of a telescope subreflector is conducted for the first time. • The cause and temperature distribution regularities are analyzed contrastively. • Simulation methods are proposed using light beam segmentation and tracking methods. • The validity of simulation methods is evaluated using the test results. - Abstract: The solar cooker effect can cause a local high temperature of the subreflector and can directly affect the working performance of the radio telescope. To study the daily temperature field and solar cooker effect of a subreflector, experimental studies are carried out with a 3-m-diameter radio telescope model for the first time. Initially, the solar temperature distribution rules, especially the solar cooker effect, are summarized according to the field test results under the most unfavorable conditions. Then, a numerical simulation for the solar temperature field of the subreflector is studied by light beam segmentation and tracking methods. Finally, the validity of the simulation methods is evaluated using the test results. The experimental studies prove that the solar cooker effect really exists and should not be overlooked. In addition, simulation methods for the subreflector temperature field proposed in this paper are effective. The research methods and conclusions can provide valuable references for thermal design, monitoring and control of similar high-precision radio telescopes.

  3. Modified whole effluent toxicity test to assess and decouple wastewater effects from environmental gradients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastián Sauco

    Full Text Available Environmental gradients and wastewater discharges produce aggregated effects on marine populations, obscuring the detection of human impact. Classical assessment methods do not include environmental effects in toxicity tests designs, which could lead to incorrect conclusions. We proposed a modified Whole Effluent Toxicity test (mWET that includes environmental gradients in addition to effluent dilutions, together with the application of Generalized Linear Mixed Models (GLMM to assess and decouple those effects. We tested this approach, analyzing the lethal effects of wastewater on a marine sandy beach bivalve affected by an artificial canal freshwater discharge used for rice crops irrigation. To this end, we compared bivalve mortality between canal water dilutions (CWd and salinity controls (SC: without canal water. CWd were prepared by diluting the water effluent (sampled during the pesticide application period with artificial marine water. The salinity gradient was included in the design by achieving the same final salinities in both CWd and SC, allowing us to account for the effects of salinity by including this variable as a random factor in the GLMM. Our approach detected significantly higher mortalities in CWd, indicating potential toxic effects of the effluent discharge. mWET represents an improvement over the internationally standardized WET tests, since it considers environmental variability and uses appropriate statistical analyses.

  4. Basic principles of test-negative design in evaluating influenza vaccine effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Wakaba; Hirota, Yoshio

    2017-08-24

    Based on the unique characteristics of influenza, the concept of "monitoring" influenza vaccine effectiveness (VE) across the seasons using the same observational study design has been developed. In recent years, there has been a growing number of influenza VE reports using the test-negative design, which can minimize both misclassification of diseases and confounding by health care-seeking behavior. Although the test-negative designs offer considerable advantages, there are some concerns that widespread use of the test-negative design without knowledge of the basic principles of epidemiology could produce invalid findings. In this article, we briefly review the basic concepts of the test-negative design with respect to classic study design such as cohort studies or case-control studies. We also mention selection bias, which may be of concern in some countries where rapid diagnostic testing is frequently used in routine clinical practices, as in Japan. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  5. The effect of breath freshener strips on two types of breath alcohol testing instruments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Ronald L; Guillen, Jennifer

    2004-07-01

    The potential for breath freshener strips to interfere with the accuracy of a breath alcohol test was studied. Twelve varieties of breath freshener strips from five manufacturers were examined. Breath tests were conducted using the infrared based BAC DataMaster or the fuel cell based Alco-Sensor IV-XL, 30 and 150 seconds after placing a breath strip on the tongue. No effect was observed using the Alco-Sensor system. Some of the strips gave a small reading at 30 seconds (less than or equal to 0.010 g/210 L apparent alcohol) using the DataMaster. Readings on the DataMaster returned to zero by the 150 second test. A proper pre-test observation and deprivation period should prevent any interference from breath freshener strips on breath alcohol testing.

  6. Effects of different simplified milk recording methods on genetic evaluation with Test-Day animal model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Cacioppo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The aims of the present study were to compare estimated breeding values (EBV for milk yield using different testing schemes with a test-day animal model and to evaluate the effect of different testing schemes on the ranking of top sheep. Alternative recording schemes that use less information than that currently obtained with a monthly test-day schedule were employed to estimate breeding values. A random regression animal mixed model that used a spline function of days in milk was fitted. EBVs obtained with alternative recording schemes showed different degrees of Spearman correlation with EBVs obtained using the monthly recording scheme. These correlations ranged from 0.77 to 0.92. A reduction in accuracy and intensity of selection could be anticipated if these alternative schemes are used; more research in this area is needed to reduce the costs of test-day recording.

  7. Radiation testing of composite materials, in situ versus ex situ effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurland, R. M.; Thomasson, J. F.; Beggs, W. C.

    1981-01-01

    The effect of post irradiation test environments on tensile properties of representative advanced composite materials (T300/5208, T300/934, C6000/P1700) was investigated. Four ply (+ or - 45 deg/+ or - 45 deg) laminate tensile specimens were exposed in vacuum up to a bulk dose of 1 x 10 to the 10th power rads using a mono-energetic fluence of 700 keV electrons from a Van de Graaff accelerator. Post irradiation testing was performed while specimens were being irradiated (in situ data), in vacuum after cessation of irradiation (in vacuo data), and after exposure to air (ex situ data). Room temperature and elevated temperature effects were evaluated. The radiation induced changes to the tensile properties were small. Since the absolute changes in tensile properties were small, the existance of a post irradiation test environment effect was indeterminate.

  8. A Spline-Based Lack-Of-Fit Test for Independent Variable Effect in Poisson Regression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chin-Shang; Tu, Wanzhu

    2007-05-01

    In regression analysis of count data, independent variables are often modeled by their linear effects under the assumption of log-linearity. In reality, the validity of such an assumption is rarely tested, and its use is at times unjustifiable. A lack-of-fit test is proposed for the adequacy of a postulated functional form of an independent variable within the framework of semiparametric Poisson regression models based on penalized splines. It offers added flexibility in accommodating the potentially non-loglinear effect of the independent variable. A likelihood ratio test is constructed for the adequacy of the postulated parametric form, for example log-linearity, of the independent variable effect. Simulations indicate that the proposed model performs well, and misspecified parametric model has much reduced power. An example is given.

  9. Electrostatic Screening and Charge Correlation Effects in Micellization of Ionic Surfactants

    KAUST Repository

    Jusufi, Arben

    2009-05-07

    We have used atomistic simulations to study the role of electrostatic screening and charge correlation effects in self-assembly processes of ionic surfactants into micelles. Specifically, we employed grand canonical Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the critical micelle concentration (cmc), aggregation number, and micellar shape in the presence of explicit sodium chloride (NaCl). The two systems investigated are cationic dodecyltrimethylammonium chloride (DTAC) and anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) surfactants. Our explicit-salt results, obtained from a previously developed potential model with no further adjustment of its parameters, are in good agreement with experimental data for structural and thermodynamic micellar properties. We illustrate the importance of ion correlation effects by comparing these results with a Yukawa-type surfactant model that incorporates electrostatic screening implicitly. While the effect of salt on the cmc is well-reproduced even with the implicit Yukawa model, the aggregate size predictions deviate significantly from experimental observations at low salt concentrations. We attribute this discrepancy to the neglect of ion correlations in the implicit-salt model. At higher salt concentrations, we find reasonable agreement of the Yukawa model with experimental data. The crossover from low to high salt concentrations is reached when the electrostatic screening length becomes comparable to the headgroup size. © 2009 American Chemical Society.

  10. Perceived effectiveness of HPV test as a primary screening modality among US providers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Crystale Purvis; Saraiya, Mona

    2015-09-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) test, administered alone without the Papanicolaou (Pap) test, was recently recognized as a cervical cancer screening option in the United States by the Society of Gynecologic Oncology and the American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology, and the Food and Drug Administration has approved an HPV test for primary screening. Surveys of US internists, family practitioners, nurse practitioners, and obstetrician-gynecologists were conducted in 2009 and 2012 to investigate providers' perceptions of the effectiveness of the HPV test administered alone as a population-based screening modality (2009: N=1040, 141-494 per provider group; 2012: N=1039, 155-435 per provider group). The majority in each provider group agreed that the HPV test administered alone is an effective screening modality in 2009 (75.3%-86.1%) and 2012 (79.5%-91.8%), and agreement rose significantly during this time period among family practitioners (χ(2)=15.26, df=1, ptest administered alone is an effective cervical cancer screening modality was widespread among providers in both 2009 and 2012, however implementation of guidelines for screening with the HPV test may be influenced by many other factors including reimbursement and patient preferences. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Primacy effects induced by temporal or physical context shifts are attenuated by a preshift test trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Daniel S.; Miller, Ralph R.

    2007-01-01

    When subjects are sequentially trained with a cue (A) paired separately with two outcomes (B and C) in different phases (i.e., A–B pairings followed by A–C pairings) testing in the training context after short retention intervals often reveals recency effects (i.e., stronger influence by A–C). In contrast, testing after long retention intervals or testing in a context different from that of training sometimes reveals primacy effects (A–B). Three experiments were conducted using rats in a Pavlovian conditioned bar-press suppression preparation to ascertain whether a nonreinforced test trial in the training context soon after training can attenuate this shift to primacy. Experiment 1 demonstrated that exposure to A shortly after both phases of training, but prior to a long retention interval, can attenuate shifts from recency to primacy otherwise observed with a long retention interval. Experiment 2 showed that exposure to A in the training context can also eliminate the shift from recency to primacy otherwise produced by shifting the physical context between training and test. Experiment 3 discredited a potential account of the results of Experiments 1 and 2. The effects observed in Experiment 1 and 2 are interpreted as early testing in the training context serving to initiate rehearsal of the A–C association due to the temporal proximity of A–C training. PMID:17389907

  12. A cost-effectiveness analysis of coagulation testing prior to tonsillectomy and adenoidectomy in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, James D; Smith, Kenneth J; Ritchey, A Kim

    2010-12-01

    The American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology recommends pre-operative coagulation testing only when indicated by history or physical exam. Nevertheless, many surgeons test all children scheduled for tonsillectomy and/or adenoidectomy (T&A). Studies of pre-operative screening have had conflicting results. A decision analysis model was constructed to address the costs and health outcome states of pre-operative screening strategies in children. A 14-day Markov model evaluated three strategies: (1) test all children for coagulation disorders; (2) test only those children with a pertinent history; and (3) perform no pre-operative testing. A literature search and a review of national databases estimated probabilities, costs, and utility data. Parameters then were varied widely in sensitivity analyses. Using a societal perspective and a cycle length of 1 day, we compared the strategies based on total costs and quality-adjusted life years (QALYs). Total costs for the strategies were $3,200 for testing all children, $3,083 for testing only those with a history finding, and $3,077 for not testing. Total utilities were 0.02579, 0.02654, and 0.02659 QALYs, respectively. Cost-effectiveness ratios were most sensitive to variation in the cost of post-operative care and the probability of post-operative bleeding. The strategy of not testing was dominant in all sensitivity analyses. Our results demonstrate that not performing preoperative testing is the most cost-effective strategy. This was persistent in sensitivity analyses, indicating that the model was robust. These data may be helpful to institutions and organizations to formulate policies regarding pre-operative coagulation for children without previous diagnoses of bleeding disorders.

  13. Effectiveness of test-enhanced learning in continuing health sciences education: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Meghan M; Azzam, Khalid; Xenodemetropoulos, Ted; Panju, Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Increasing concerns over the effectiveness and quality of continuing medical education (CME) programs has encouraged educators to use theoretically driven empirical research to improve the educational value of these activities. Within cognitive psychology, theories of learning and knowledge acquisition, such as test-enhanced learning (TEL), may be used to enhance the effectiveness of CME protocols and delivery. The present study examined whether the pedagogical benefits of testing can be observed in practicing physicians. A total of 83 physicians were recruited following an education session on constipation management and were randomized to either (a) the test condition (n = 43), where learners wrote a short test consisting of 10 short-answer questions (SAQs), or (b) the study condition (n = 40), where learners studied the same information. Four weeks later, 56 (68%) physicians completed a final test with 10 new SAQs, with 27 being from the initial test condition and 29 belonging to the initial study condition. Performance on the final SAQ test was equivalent for both test (42.5%) and study-only (41.2%) conditions (p = .71). The null findings in the present study are inconsistent with previous research showing the pedagogical benefits of testing relative to studying. Given that most TEL research focuses on novice learners, who lack strong associative memory networks, it is possible that TEL is specific to novices and not generalizable to experts. Alternative explanations focus on the importance of repeated, distributed testing with feedback. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  14. Cost-Effectiveness of HIV Testing Referral Strategies among Tuberculosis Patients in India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uhler, Lauren M.; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Mayer, Kenneth H.; Saxena, Anjali; Losina, Elena; Muniyandi, Malaisamy; Stoler, Adam W.; Lu, Zhigang; Walensky, Rochelle P.; Flanigan, Timothy P.; Bender, Melissa A.; Freedberg, Kenneth A.; Swaminathan, Soumya

    2010-01-01

    Background Indian guidelines recommend routine referral for HIV testing of all tuberculosis (TB) patients in the nine states with the highest HIV prevalence, and selective referral for testing elsewhere. We assessed the clinical impact and cost-effectiveness of alternative HIV testing referral strategies among TB patients in India. Methods and Findings We utilized a computer model of HIV and TB disease to project outcomes for patients with active TB in India. We compared life expectancy, cost, and cost-effectiveness for three HIV testing referral strategies: 1) selective referral for HIV testing of those with increased HIV risk, 2) routine referral of patients in the nine highest HIV prevalence states with selective referral elsewhere (current standard), and 3) routine referral of all patients for HIV testing. TB-related data were from the World Health Organization. HIV prevalence among TB patients was 9.0% in the highest prevalence states, 2.9% in the other states, and 4.9% overall. The selective referral strategy, beginning from age 33.50 years, had a projected discounted life expectancy of 16.88 years and a mean lifetime HIV/TB treatment cost of US$100. The current standard increased mean life expectancy to 16.90 years with additional per-person cost of US$10; the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio was US$650/year of life saved (YLS) compared to selective referral. Routine referral of all patients for HIV testing increased life expectancy to 16.91 years, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of US$730/YLS compared to the current standard. For HIV-infected patients cured of TB, receiving antiretroviral therapy increased survival from 4.71 to 13.87 years. Results were most sensitive to the HIV prevalence and the cost of second-line antiretroviral therapy. Conclusions Referral of all patients with active TB in India for HIV testing will be both effective and cost-effective. While effective implementation of this strategy would require investment, routine

  15. Individual and combined effects of enactment and testing on memory for action phrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubik, Veit; Söderlund, Hedvig; Nilsson, Lars-Göran; Jönsson, Fredrik U

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the individual and combined effects of enactment and testing on memory for action phrases to address whether both study techniques commonly promote item-specific processing. Participants (N = 112) were divided into four groups (n = 28). They either exclusively studied 36 action phrases (e.g., "lift the glass") or both studied and cued-recalled them in four trials. During study trials participants encoded the action phrases either by motorically performing them, or by reading them aloud, and they took final verb-cued recall tests over 18-min and 1-week retention intervals. A testing effect was demonstrated for action phrases, however, only when they were verbally encoded, and not when they were enacted. Similarly, enactive (relative to verbal) encoding reduced the rate of forgetting, but only when the action phrases were exclusively studied, and not when they were also tested. These less-than-additive effects of enactment and testing on the rate of forgetting, as well as on long-term retention, support the notion that both study techniques effectively promote item-specific processing that can only be marginally increased further by combining them.

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis for Pap smear screening and human papillomavirus DNA testing and vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Meng-Kan; Hung, Hui-Fang; Duffy, Stephen; Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2011-12-01

    As the effectiveness of cytology-based screening programme for cervical cancer in mortality reduction has reached a plateau, various preventive strategies have been considered, including intensive Pap smear screening and the supplemental use of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA test or HPV vaccination. Cost and effectiveness of these various preventive strategies are therefore of great concern for health policy makers. We intended to assess whether the combination of HPV DNA testing or HPV vaccination with Pap smear screening programme or the sole annual Pap smear screening is more effective and cost-effective in prevention of cervical cancer than the existing triennial Pap smear screening programme. A Markov decision model was constructed to compare total costs and effectiveness between different preventive strategies (including annual Pap smear, HPV DNA testing or HPV vaccination together with Pap smear screening programme) as opposed to the triennial Pap smear screening alone (the comparator). Probabilistic cost-effectiveness (C-E) analysis was adopted to plot a series of simulated incremental C-E ratios scattered over C-E plane and also to yield the acceptability curve for different comparisons of strategies. The threshold of vaccine cost and the influence of attendance rate were also investigated. Compared with triennial Pap smear screening programme, most of preventive strategies cost more but gain additional life years (quadrant I of C-E plane) except HPV DNA testing with Pap smear every 5 years dominated by triennial Pap smear screening programme. The most cost-effective strategy was annual Pap smear (incremental C-E ratio = $31 698), followed by HPV DNA testing with Pap smear every 3 years ($36 627), and vaccination programme with triennial Pap smear screening ($44 688) with the corresponding cost-effective probabilities by the acceptability curve being 65.52%, 52.08% and 35.84% given the threshold of $40 000 of willingness to pay. Vaccination combined with

  17. Critical evaluation of the pulsed laser method for single event effects testing and fundamental studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Melinger, J.S.; Buchner, S.; McMorrow, D.; Stapor, W.J.; Weatherford, T.R.; Campbell, A.B.; Eisen, H.

    1994-01-01

    In this paper the authors present an evaluation of the pulsed laser as a technique for single events effects (SEE) testing. They explore in detail the important optical effects, such as laser beam propagation, surface reflection, and linear and nonlinear absorption, which determine the nature of laser-generated charge tracks in semiconductor materials. While there are differences in the structure of laser- and ion-generated charge tracks, they show that in many cases the pulsed laser remains an invaluable tool for SEE testing. Indeed, for several SEE applications, they show that the pulsed laser method represents a more practical approach than conventional accelerator-based methods

  18. Weibull statistics effective area and volume in the ball-on-ring testing method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Henrik Lund

    2014-01-01

    to geometries relevant for the application of the material, the effective area or volume for the test specimen must be evaluated. In this work analytical expressions for the effective area and volume of the ball-on-ring test specimen is derived. In the derivation the multiaxial stress field has been accounted...... for by use of the Weibull theory, and the multinomial theorem has been used to handle the integration of multiple terms raised to the power of the Weibull modulus. The analytical solution is verified with a high number of finite element models for various geometric parameters. The finite element model...

  19. Improving Decision Making about Genetic Testing in the Clinic: An Overview of Effective Knowledge Translation Interventions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    France Légaré

    Full Text Available Knowledge translation (KT interventions are attempts to change behavior in keeping with scientific evidence. While genetic tests are increasingly available to healthcare consumers in the clinic, evidence about their benefits is unclear and decisions about genetic testing are thus difficult for all parties.We sought to identify KT interventions that involved decisions about genetic testing in the clinical context and to assess their effectiveness for improving decision making in terms of behavior change, increased knowledge and wellbeing.We searched for trials assessing KT interventions in the context of genetic testing up to March 2014 in all systematic reviews (n = 153 published by two Cochrane review groups: Effective Practice and Organisation of Care (EPOC and Consumers and Communication.We retrieved 2473 unique trials of which we retained only 28 (1%. Two EPOC reviews yielded two trials of KT interventions: audit and feedback (n = 1 and educational outreach (n = 1. Both targeted health professionals and the KT intervention they assessed was found to be effective. Four Consumers and Communication reviews yielded 26 trials: decision aids (n = 15, communication of DNA-based disease risk estimates (n = 7, personalized risk communication (n = 3 and mobile phone messaging (n = 1. Among these, 25 trials targeted only health consumers or patients and the KT interventions were found to be effective in four trials, partly effective in seven, and ineffective in four. Lastly, only one trial targeted both physicians and patients and was found to be effective.More research on the effectiveness of KT interventions regarding genetic testing in the clinical context may contribute to patients making informed value-based decisions and drawing the maximum benefit from clinical applications of genetic and genomic innovations.

  20. Finite Element Simulations for Investigating the Effects of Specimen Geometry in Superplastic Tensile Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazzal, Mohammad; Abu-Farha, Fadi; Curtis, Richard

    2011-08-01

    Characterizing the behavior of superplastic materials is largely based on the uniaxial tensile test; yet the unique nature of these materials requires a particularly tailored testing methodology, different to that used with conventional materials. One of the crucial testing facets is the specimen geometry, which has a great impact on the outcome of a superplastic tensile test, as a result of the associated extreme conditions. And while researchers agree that it should take a notably different form than the typical dog-bone shape; there is no universal agreement on the specimen's particular size and dimensions, as evident by the disparities in test specimens used in the various superplastic testing efforts found throughout the literature. In view of that, this article is dedicated to understanding the effects of specimen geometry on the superplastic behavior of the material during tensile testing. Deformation of the Ti6Al4V titanium alloy is FE simulated based on a multitude of specimen geometries, covering a wide range of gauge length, gauge width, grip length, and grip width values. The study provides key insights on the influences of each geometrical parameter as well as their interactions, and provides recommendations on selecting the specimen's proportions for accurate and unified tensile testing of superplastic materials.