WorldWideScience

Sample records for test experimental science

  1. Nuclear test experimental science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Middleton, C.; Bucciarelli, G.; Carter, J.; Cherniak, J.; Donohue, M.L.; Kirvel, R.D.; MacGregor, P.; Reid, S. (eds.)

    1989-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory under the following topics: prompt diagnostics; experimental modeling, design, and analysis; detector development; streak-camera data systems; weapons supporting research.

  2. Nuclear Test-Experimental Science: Annual report, fiscal year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Struble, G.L.; Donohue, M.L.; Bucciarelli, G.; Hymer, J.D.; Kirvel, R.D.; Middleton, C.; Prono, J.; Reid, S.; Strack, B. (eds.)

    1988-01-01

    Fiscal year 1988 has been a significant, rewarding, and exciting period for Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's nuclear testing program. It was significant in that the Laboratory's new director chose to focus strongly on the program's activities and to commit to a revitalized emphasis on testing and the experimental science that underlies it. It was rewarding in that revolutionary new measurement techniques were fielded on recent important and highly complicated underground nuclear tests with truly incredible results. And it was exciting in that the sophisticated and fundamental problems of weapons science that are now being addressed experimentally are yielding new challenges and understanding in ways that stimulate and reward the brightest and best of scientists. During FY88 the program was reorganized to emphasize our commitment to experimental science. The name of the program was changed to reflect this commitment, becoming the Nuclear Test-Experimental Science (NTES) Program.

  3. Helping parents to motivate adolescents in mathematics and science: an experimental test of a utility-value intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harackiewicz, Judith M; Rozek, Christopher S; Hulleman, Chris S; Hyde, Janet S

    2012-08-01

    The pipeline toward careers in science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) begins to leak in high school, when some students choose not to take advanced mathematics and science courses. We conducted a field experiment testing whether a theory-based intervention that was designed to help parents convey the importance of mathematics and science courses to their high school-aged children would lead them to take more mathematics and science courses in high school. The three-part intervention consisted of two brochures mailed to parents and a Web site, all highlighting the usefulness of STEM courses. This relatively simple intervention led students whose parents were in the experimental group to take, on average, nearly one semester more of science and mathematics in the last 2 years of high school, compared with the control group. Parents are an untapped resource for increasing STEM motivation in adolescents, and the results demonstrate that motivational theory can be applied to this important pipeline problem.

  4. Network Science Experimentation Vision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    capabilities and performance of a heterogeneous collection of interdependent networks . This report outlines and discusses an experimentation vision that...has been shown to depend upon the capabilities and performance of a heterogeneous collection of interdependent networks . Such a collection of networks ...well as tactical military networks . In particular, wireless tactical networks can be simulated with high fidelity, using off the shelf simulation

  5. Historical science, experimental science, and the scientific method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Carol E.

    2001-11-01

    Many scientists believe that there is a uniform, interdisciplinary method for the practice of good science. The paradigmatic examples, however, are drawn from classical experimental science. Insofar as historical hypotheses cannot be tested in controlled laboratory settings, historical research is sometimes said to be inferior to experimental research. Using examples from diverse historical disciplines, this paper demonstrates that such claims are misguided. First, the reputed superiority of experimental research is based upon accounts of scientific methodology (Baconian inductivism or falsificationism) that are deeply flawed, both logically and as accounts of the actual practices of scientists. Second, although there are fundamental differences in methodology between experimental scientists and historical scientists, they are keyed to a pervasive feature of nature, a time asymmetry of causation. As a consequence, the claim that historical science is methodologically inferior to experimental science cannot be sustained.

  6. Software Testing as Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Gallesdic

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The most widespread opinion among people who have some connection with software testing is that this activity is an art. In fact, books have been published widely whose titles refer to it as art, role or process. But because software complexity is increasing every year, this paper proposes a new approach, conceiving the test as a science. This is because the processes by which they are applied are the steps of the scientific method: inputs, processes, outputs. The contents of this paper examines the similarities and test characteristics as science.

  7. Software Testing as Science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid Gallesdic

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The most widespread opinion among people who have some connection with software testing is that this activity is an art. In fact, books have been published widely whose titles refer to it as art, role or process. But because software complexity is increasing every year, this paper proposes a new approach, conceiving the test as a science. This is because the processes by which they are applied are the steps of the scientific method: inputs, processes, outputs. The contents of this paper examines the similarities and test characteristics as science.

  8. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Experimental Approaches ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 10. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Experimental Approaches to Molecular Microbiology and Cell Biology. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 10 October 2017 pp 971-971 ...

  9. Book Review "Cambridge handbook of experimental political science"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimmelikhuijsen, Stephan

    2014-01-01

    Experimentation has formed the basis for modern scientific discovery. Francis Bacon (1561– 1626), “the father of empiricism,” was one of the first to propose a method of science based on experimentation that results in new theories that can again be tested by experimentation. At first, experiments

  10. Experimental Physical Sciences Vitae 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Del Mauro, Diana [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Patterson, Eileen Frances [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fronzak, Hannah Kristina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cruz, James Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Kramer, Robert W. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martin, Genevieve [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Robinson, Richard Cecil [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Trujillo, Carlos Genaro [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valdez, Sandra M. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-01-18

    Frequently our most basic research experiments stimulate solutions for some of the most intractable national security problems, such as nuclear weapons stewardship, homeland security, intelligence and information analysis, and nuclear and alternative energy. This publication highlights our talented and creative staff who deliver solutions to these complex scientific and technological challenges by conducting cutting-edge multidisciplinary physical science research.

  11. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 10. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 10 October 2017 pp 976-976. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  12. Science Academies Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 3. Science Academies Refresher Course in Experimental Physics. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 3 March 2017 pp 330-330. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 2. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 2 February 2017 pp 188-188. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  14. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 1. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics. Information and Announcements Volume 19 Issue 1 January 2014 pp 97-97. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  15. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 10. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 10 October 2017 pp 974-974. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  16. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 8. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics. Information and Announcements Volume 20 Issue 8 August 2015 pp 755-755. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  17. Science Academies' Seventieth Refresher Course in Experimental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 20; Issue 2. Science Academies' Seventieth Refresher Course in Experimental Physics. Information and Announcements Volume 20 Issue 2 February 2015 pp 184-184. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  18. Science Academies' Sixtieth Refresher Course in Experimental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 19; Issue 1. Science Academies' Sixtieth Refresher Course in Experimental Physics. Information and Announcements Volume 19 Issue 1 January 2014 pp 98-98. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  19. Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas Performance through Science Winter 2017

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kippen, Karen Elizabeth [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Cruz, James Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hockaday, Mary Yvonne P. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Lacerda, Alex Hugo [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Wilburn, Wesley Scott [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Batha, Steven H. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Bronkhorst, Curt Allan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Brown, Eric [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Carnes, Jay Russell [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Del Mauro, Diana [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); DeYoung, Anemarie [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Freibert, Franz Joseph [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Fronzak, Hannah Kristina [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Gray, III, George Thompson [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Hooks, Daniel Edwin [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martineau, Rick Lorne [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Martz, Joseph Christopher [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Migliori, Albert [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Poling, Charles C. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Prestridge, Katherine Philomena [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schraad, Mark William [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Stevens, Michael Francis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); White, Morgan Curtis [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-02-23

    This issue of Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas focuses on the integrated science that plays a critical role in Los Alamos National Laboratory’s support of the nation’s nuclear deterrent. I hope you will enjoy reading about these accomplishments, opportunities, and challenges.

  20. Reflections on experimental science Martin Perl

    CERN Document Server

    Perl, Martin Lewis

    1996-01-01

    This is a collection of important lecture and original articles and commentaries by Martin Perl, discoverer of the tau lepton and the third generation of elementary particles, and this year's Nobel Prize winner. This book contains a fascinating and realistic picture of experimental science based on the high energy physics research work carried out by him. Using reprints of his articles with his commentaries, the author presents the various aspects of experimental research in science: the pleasures and risks of experimental work; the pain and frustration with experiments that are useless or fai

  1. Can Science Test Supernatural Worldviews?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fishman, Yonatan I.

    2009-01-01

    Several prominent scientists, philosophers, and scientific institutions have argued that science cannot test supernatural worldviews on the grounds that (1) science presupposes a naturalistic worldview (Naturalism) or that (2) claims involving supernatural phenomena are inherently beyond the scope of scientific investigation. The present paper…

  2. Experimental soft-matter science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagel, Sidney R.

    2017-04-01

    Soft materials consist of basic units that are significantly larger than an atom but much smaller than the overall dimensions of the sample. The label "soft condensed matter" emphasizes that the large basic building blocks of these materials produce low elastic moduli that govern a material's ability to withstand deformations. Aside from softness, there are many other properties that are also caused by the large size of the constituent building blocks. Soft matter is dissipative, disordered, far from equilibrium, nonlinear, thermal and entropic, slow, observable, gravity affected, patterned, nonlocal, interfacially elastic, memory forming, and active. This is only a partial list of how matter created from large component particles is distinct from "hard matter" composed of constituents at an atomic scale. Issues inherent in soft matter raise problems that are broadly important in diverse areas of science and require multiple modes of attack. For example, far-from-equilibrium behavior is confronted in biology, chemistry, geophysics, astrophysics, and nuclear physics. Similarly, issues dealing with disorder appear broadly throughout many branches of inquiry wherever rugged landscapes are invoked. This article reviews the discussions that occurred during a workshop held on 30-31 January 2016 in which opportunities in soft-matter experiment were surveyed. Soft matter has had an exciting history of discovery and continues to be a fertile ground for future research.

  3. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Academy of Sciences to cater to the BSc and MSc levels. All experiments verify physical laws and principles and ... teaching at UG/PG level. College/University teachers having at least a Master's ... Motivated students of MSc/PhD Physics who have a keen interest in Experimental Physics and in teaching physics, may also ...

  4. 27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

    CERN Multimedia

    Laurent Egli

    2012-01-01

    27 Febuary 2012 - US DoE Associate Director of Science for High Energy Physics J. Siegrist visiting the LHC superconducting magnet test hall with adviser J.-P. Koutchouk and engineer M. Bajko; in CMS experimental cavern with Spokesperson J. Incadela;in ATLAS experimental cavern with Deputy Spokesperson A. Lankford; in ALICE experimental cavern with Spokesperson P. Giubellino; signing the guest book with Director for Accelerators and Technology S. Myers.

  5. Experimental tests of fundamental symmetries

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jungmann, K. P.

    2014-01-01

    Ongoing experiments and projects to test our understanding of fundamental inter- actions and symmetries in nature have progressed significantly in the past few years. At high energies the long searched for Higgs boson has been found; tests of gravity for antimatter have come closer to reality;

  6. Experimental tests of vacuum energy

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2015-01-01

    While the current vacuum energy of the Universe is very small, in our standard cosmological picture it has been much larger at earlier epochs. We try to address the question of what are possible ways to try to experimentally verify this. One direction is to look for systems where vacuum energy constitutes a non-negligible fraction of the total energy, and study the properties of those. Another possibility is to focus on the epochs around cosmic phase transitions, when the vacuum energy is of the same order as the total energy. Along these lines we investigate properties of neutron stars and the imprint of phase transitions on primordial gravitational waves.

  7. Animal experimentation in forensic sciences: How far have we come?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaneo, C; Maderna, E; Rendinelli, A; Gibelli, D

    2015-09-01

    In the third millennium where ethical, ethological and cultural evolution seem to be leading more and more towards an inter-species society, the issue of animal experimentation is a moral dilemma. Speaking from a self-interested human perspective, avoiding all animal testing where human disease and therapy are concerned may be very difficult or even impossible; such testing may not be so easily justifiable when suffering-or killing-of non human animals is inflicted for forensic research. In order to verify how forensic scientists are evolving in this ethical issue, we undertook a systematic review of the current literature. We investigated the frequency of animal experimentation in forensic studies in the past 15 years and trends in publication in the main forensic science journals. Types of species, lesions inflicted, manner of sedation or anesthesia and euthanasia were examined in a total of 404 articles reviewed, among which 279 (69.1%) concerned studies involving animals sacrificed exclusively for the sake of the experiment. Killing still frequently includes painful methods such as blunt trauma, electrocution, mechanical asphyxia, hypothermia, and even exsanguination; of all these animals, apparently only 60.8% were anesthetized. The most recent call for a severe reduction if not a total halt to the use of animals in forensic sciences was made by Bernard Knight in 1992. In fact the principle of reduction and replacement, frequently respected in clinical research, must be considered the basis for forensic science research needing animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Formal specification is an experimental science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjorner, D. [Technical Univ., Lyngby (Denmark)

    1992-09-01

    Traditionally, abstract models of large, complex systems have been given in free-form mathematics, combining - often in ad-hoc, not formally supported ways - notions from the disciplines of partial differential equations, functional analysis, mathematical statistics, etc. Such models have been very useful for assimilation of information, analysis (investigation), and prediction (simulation). These models have, however, usually not been helpful in deriving computer representations of the modelled systems - for the purposes of computerized monitoring and control, Computing science, concerned with how to construct objects that can exist within the computer, offers ways of complementing, and in some cases, replacing or combining traditional mathematical models. Formal, model-, as well as property-oriented, specifications in the styles of denotational (respectively, algebraic semantics) represent major approaches to such modelling. In this expository, discursive paper we illustrate what we mean by model-oriented specifications of large, complex technological computing systems. The three modelling examples covers the introvert programming methodological subject of SDEs: software development environments, the distributed computing system subject of wfs`s: (transaction) work flow systems, and the extrovert subject of robots: robotics! the thesis is, just as for mathematical modelling, that we can derive much understanding, etc., from experimentally creating such formally specified models - on paper - and that we gain little in additionally building ad-hoc prototypes. Our models are expressed in a model-oriented style using the VDM specification language Meta-IV In this paper the models only reflect the {open_quotes}data modelling{close_quotes} aspects. We observe that such data models are more easily captured in the model-oriented siyle than in the algebraic semantics property-oriented style which originally was built of the abstraction of operations. 101 refs., 4 figs.

  9. Students' epistemologies about experimental physics: Validating the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics

    CERN Document Server

    Wilcox, Bethany R

    2015-01-01

    Student learning in instructional physics labs represents a growing area of research that includes investigations of students' beliefs and expectations about the nature of experimental physics. To directly probe students' epistemologies about experimental physics and support broader lab transformation efforts at the University of Colorado Boulder (CU) and elsewhere, we developed the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics (E-CLASS). Previous work with this assessment has included establishing the accuracy and clarity of the instrument through student interviews and preliminary testing. Several years of data collection at multiple institutions has resulted in a growing national data set of student responses. Here, we report on results of the analysis of these data to investigate the statistical validity and reliability of the E-CLASS as a measure of students' epistemologies for a broad student population. We find that the E-CLASS demonstrates an acceptable level of both validi...

  10. Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas: MaRIE (draft)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shlachter, Jack [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-09-08

    To achieve breakthrough scientific discoveries in the 21st century, a convergence and integration of world-leading experimental facilities and capabilities with theory, modeling, and simulation is necessary. In this issue of Experimental Physical Sciences Vistas, I am excited to present our plans for Los Alamos National Laboratory's future flagship experimental facility, MaRIE (Matter-Radiation Interactions in Extremes). MaRIE is a facility that will provide transformational understanding of matter in extreme conditions required to reduce or resolve key weapons performance uncertainties, develop the materials needed for advanced energy systems, and transform our ability to create materials by design. Our unique role in materials science starting with the Manhattan Project has positioned us well to develop a contemporary materials strategy pushing the frontiers of controlled functionality - the design and tailoring of a material for the unique demands of a specific application. Controlled functionality requires improvement in understanding of the structure and properties of materials in order to synthesize and process materials with unique characteristics. In the nuclear weapons program today, improving data and models to increase confidence in the stockpile can take years from concept to new knowledge. Our goal with MaRIE is to accelerate this process by enhancing predictive capability - the ability to compute a priori the observables of an experiment or test and pertinent confidence intervals using verified and validated simulation tools. It is a science-based approach that includes the use of advanced experimental tools, theoretical models, and multi-physics codes, simultaneously dealing with multiple aspects of physical operation of a system that are needed to develop an increasingly mature predictive capability. This same approach is needed to accelerate improvements to other systems such as nuclear reactors. MaRIE will be valuable to many national

  11. Teaching science problem solving: An overview of experimental work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taconis, R.; Ferguson-Hessler, M. G. M.; Broekkamp, H.

    2001-04-01

    The traditional approach to teaching science problem solving is having the students work individually on a large number of problems. This approach has long been overtaken by research suggesting and testing other methods, which are expected to be more effective. To get an overview of the characteristics of good and innovative problem-solving teaching strategies, we performed an analysis of a number of articles published between 1985 and 1995 in high-standard international journals, describing experimental research into the effectiveness of a wide variety of teaching strategies for science problem solving. To characterize the teaching strategies found, we used a model of the capacities needed for effective science problem solving, composed of a knowledge base and a skills base. The relations between the cognitive capacities required by the experimental or control treatments and those of the model were specified and used as independent variables. Other independent variables were learning conditions such as feedback and group work. As a dependent variable we used standardized learning effects. We identified 22 articles describing 40 experiments that met the standards we deemed necessary for a meta-analysis. These experiments were analyzed both with quantitative (correlational) methods and with a systematic qualitative method. A few of the independent variables were found to characterize effective strategies for teaching science problem solving. Effective treatments all gave attention to the structure and function (the schemata) of the knowledge base, whereas attention to knowledge of strategy and the practice of problem solving turned out to have little effect. As for learning conditions, both providing the learners with guidelines and criteria they can use in judging their own problem-solving process and products, and providing immediate feedback to them were found to be important prerequisites for the acquisition of problem-solving skills. Group work did not lead to

  12. Experimental Concepts for Testing Seismic Hazard Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzocchi, W.; Jordan, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Seismic hazard analysis is the primary interface through which useful information about earthquake rupture and wave propagation is delivered to society. To account for the randomness (aleatory variability) and limited knowledge (epistemic uncertainty) of these natural processes, seismologists must formulate and test hazard models using the concepts of probability. In this presentation, we will address the scientific objections that have been raised over the years against probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). Owing to the paucity of observations, we must rely on expert opinion to quantify the epistemic uncertainties of PSHA models (e.g., in the weighting of individual models from logic-tree ensembles of plausible models). The main theoretical issue is a frequentist critique: subjectivity is immeasurable; ergo, PSHA models cannot be objectively tested against data; ergo, they are fundamentally unscientific. We have argued (PNAS, 111, 11973-11978) that the Bayesian subjectivity required for casting epistemic uncertainties can be bridged with the frequentist objectivity needed for pure significance testing through "experimental concepts." An experimental concept specifies collections of data, observed and not yet observed, that are judged to be exchangeable (i.e., with a joint distribution independent of the data ordering) when conditioned on a set of explanatory variables. We illustrate, through concrete examples, experimental concepts useful in the testing of PSHA models for ontological errors in the presence of aleatory variability and epistemic uncertainty. In particular, we describe experimental concepts that lead to exchangeable binary sequences that are statistically independent but not identically distributed, showing how the Bayesian concept of exchangeability generalizes the frequentist concept of experimental repeatability. We also address the issue of testing PSHA models using spatially correlated data.

  13. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2016-02-20

    University teachers having at least a Master's degree in Physics are eligible to apply. ... Motivated students of M.Sc./Ph.D. Physics who have a keen interest in. Experimental Physics and in teaching physics, may also apply. Prof.

  14. Experimental apparatus to test air trap valves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemos De Lucca, Y. de F.; de Aquino, G. A.; Filho, J. G. D.

    2010-08-01

    It is known that the presence of trapped air within water distribution pipes can lead to irregular operation or even damage to the distribution systems and their components. The presence of trapped air may occur while the pipes are being filled with water, or while the pumping systems are in operation. The formation of large air pockets can produce the water hammer phenomenon, the instability and the loss of pressure in the water distribution networks. As a result, it can overload the pumps, increase the consumption of electricity, and damage the pumping system. In order to avoid its formation, all of the trapped air should be removed through "air trap valves". In Brazil, manufacturers frequently have unreliable sizing charts, which cause malfunctioning of the "air trap valves". The result of these malfunctions causes accidents of substantial damage. The construction of a test facility will provide a foundation of technical information that will be used to help make decisions when designing a system of pipelines where "air trap valves" are used. To achieve this, all of the valve characteristics (geometric, mechanic, hydraulic and dynamic) should be determined. This paper aims to describe and analyze the experimental apparatus and test procedure to be used to test "air trap valves". The experimental apparatus and test facility will be located at the University of Campinas, Brazil at the College of Civil Engineering, Architecture, and Urbanism in the Hydraulics and Fluid Mechanics laboratory. The experimental apparatus will be comprised of various components (pumps, steel pipes, butterfly valves to control the discharge, flow meter and reservoirs) and instrumentation (pressure transducers, anemometer and proximity sensor). It should be emphasized that all theoretical and experimental procedures should be defined while taking into consideration flow parameters and fluid properties that influence the tests.

  15. Experimental apparatus to test air trap valves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lemos De Lucca, Y de F [CTH-DAEE-USP/FAAP/UNICAMP (Brazil); Aquino, G A de [SABESP/UNICAMP (Brazil); Filho, J G D, E-mail: yvone.lucca@gmail.co [Water Resources Department, University of Campinas-UNICAMP, Av. Albert Einstein, 951, Cidade Universitaria-Barao Geraldo-Campinas, S.P., 13083-852 (Brazil)

    2010-08-15

    It is known that the presence of trapped air within water distribution pipes can lead to irregular operation or even damage to the distribution systems and their components. The presence of trapped air may occur while the pipes are being filled with water, or while the pumping systems are in operation. The formation of large air pockets can produce the water hammer phenomenon, the instability and the loss of pressure in the water distribution networks. As a result, it can overload the pumps, increase the consumption of electricity, and damage the pumping system. In order to avoid its formation, all of the trapped air should be removed through 'air trap valves'. In Brazil, manufacturers frequently have unreliable sizing charts, which cause malfunctioning of the 'air trap valves'. The result of these malfunctions causes accidents of substantial damage. The construction of a test facility will provide a foundation of technical information that will be used to help make decisions when designing a system of pipelines where 'air trap valves' are used. To achieve this, all of the valve characteristics (geometric, mechanic, hydraulic and dynamic) should be determined. This paper aims to describe and analyze the experimental apparatus and test procedure to be used to test 'air trap valves'. The experimental apparatus and test facility will be located at the University of Campinas, Brazil at the College of Civil Engineering, Architecture, and Urbanism in the Hydraulics and Fluid Mechanics laboratory. The experimental apparatus will be comprised of various components (pumps, steel pipes, butterfly valves to control the discharge, flow meter and reservoirs) and instrumentation (pressure transducers, anemometer and proximity sensor). It should be emphasized that all theoretical and experimental procedures should be defined while taking into consideration flow parameters and fluid properties that influence the tests.

  16. Geomorphology, Science (Experimental): 5343.09.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dade County Public Schools, Miami, FL.

    Performance objectives are stated for this secondary school instructional unit concerned with aspects of earth science with emphases on the internal and external forces that bring about changes in the earth's crust. Lists of films and state-adopted and other texts are presented. Included are a course outline summarizing the unit content; numerous…

  17. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Experimental Biology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2012-10-28

    Oct 28, 2012 ... The Course will consist of stimulating experiments in different branches of biological sciences covering diverse techniques in cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, molecular biology and animal behaviour. The hands-on experiments would be accompanied by special lectures by eminent scientists in ...

  18. Science Column: Reconstruction: The Experimental Side of Digital Forensics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fred Cohen

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Many in digital forensics seem to forget that the science part of digital forensics means experimentation and that implies a whole lot of things that most practitioners never learned.(see PDF for full column

  19. Science Column: Reconstruction: The Experimental Side of Digital Forensics

    OpenAIRE

    Fred Cohen

    2013-01-01

    Many in digital forensics seem to forget that the science part of digital forensics means experimentation and that implies a whole lot of things that most practitioners never learned.(see PDF for full column)

  20. Experimental tests of relativistic gravitation theories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, J. D.

    1971-01-01

    Experimental tests were studied for determining the potential uses of future deep space missions in studies of relativistic gravity. The extensions to the parametrized post-Newtonian framework to take explicit account of the solar system's center of mass relative to the mean rest frame of the Universe is reported. Discoveries reported include the Machian effects of motion relative to the universal rest frame. Summaries of the JPL research are included.

  1. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-12-18

    Dec 18, 2017 ... A Refresher Course in Experimental Physics will be held at the Department of Physics, Panjab. University, Chandigarh held from 18 December 2017 to 2 January 2018 for the benefit of faculty involved in teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses. The Course aims to familiarize the teachers with a ...

  2. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Experimental Biology ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A refresher course on 'Experimental Biology: Orthodox to Modern' will be held at PG and Research Department of Botany, St.Joseph's College, Tiruchirappalli , Tamil Nadu for two weeks from 07 November to 19 November. 2016. The objective of this course is to improvise on teaching methodologies and also get familiar ...

  3. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    include Refresher Courses for getting API scores. Applications are invited from teachers with experience in teaching undergraduate and postgradu- ate courses in Engineering and Physics. Motivated research scholars, students of BSc and MSc. Physics courses with keen interest in Experimental Physics may also apply.

  4. Science Academies' Sixtieth Refresher Course in Experimental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2014-03-15

    Mar 15, 2014 ... and M.Sc. Physics courses and Ph.D students with keen interest in Experimental Physics. The participa- tion of faculty and students from universities and colleges from Western India is preferred. The number of seats will be about 25. Selected participants will be provided required local hospitality during the.

  5. Science Academies Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-08-25

    Aug 25, 2017 ... A Refresher Course in Experimental Physics will be held in Christ Church College, Kanpur, from 10th to. 25th August 2017 for the benefit of faculty involved in teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Participants in this course will gain hands on experience with about twenty five experiments, ...

  6. Science Academies' 93rd Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 9. Science Academies' 93rd Refresher Course in Experimental Physics. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 9 September 2017 pp 901-901. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  7. Science Academies' XLVII Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 18; Issue 2. Science Academies' XLVII Refresher Course in Experimental Physics. Information and Announcements Volume 18 Issue 2 February 2013 pp 194-194. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Science Academies' 91st Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 22; Issue 7. Science Academies' 91st Refresher Course in Experimental Physics. Information and Announcements Volume 22 Issue 7 July 2017 pp 716-716. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  9. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics 20 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi. The National Academy of Sciences, India, Allahabad. In collaboration with Department of Physics G.B. Pant University for Agriculture and Technology, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand. A Refresher Course in Experimental Physics will be held at G.B.P.U.A & T, Pantnagar, Uttarakhand, ...

  10. Mars Science Laboratory Spacecraft Assembled for Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    The major components of NASA's Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft cruise stage atop the aeroshell, which has the descent stage and rover inside were connected together in October 2008 for several weeks of system testing, including simulation of launch vibrations and deep-space environmental conditions. These components will be taken apart again, for further work on each of them, after the environmental testing. The Mars Science Laboratory spacecraft is being assembled and tested for launch in 2011. This image was taken inside the Spacecraft Assembly Facility at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., which manages the Mars Science Laboratory Project for the NASA Science Mission Directorate, Washington. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology.

  11. Experimental testing of constructivism and related theories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidelman, U

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this article is to show that experimental scientific methods can be applied to explain how the analytic mechanism of the left cerebral hemisphere and the synthetic mechanism of the right one create complex cognitive constructions like ontology and mathematics. Nominalism and ordinal mathematical concepts are related to the analytic left hemisphere while Platonism and cardinal mathematical concepts are related to the synthetic right one. Thus persons with a dominant left hemisphere tend to prefer nominalist ontology and have more aptitude for ordinal mathematics than for cardinal mathematics, while persons with a dominant right hemisphere tend to prefer platonist ontology and have more aptitude for cardinal mathematics than for ordinal mathematics. It is further explained how the Kantism temporal mode of perceiving experience can be related to the left hemisphere while the Kantian spatial mode of perceiving experience can be related to the right hemisphere. This relation can be tested experimentally, thus the Kantian source of constructivism, and through it constructivism itself, can be tested experimentally.

  12. Roles and applications of biomedical ontologies in experimental animal science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuya, Hiroshi

    2012-01-01

    A huge amount of experimental data from past studies has played a vital role in the development of new knowledge and technologies in biomedical science. The importance of computational technologies for the reuse of data, data integration, and knowledge discoveries has also increased, providing means of processing large amounts of data. In recent years, information technologies related to "ontologies" have played more significant roles in the standardization, integration, and knowledge representation of biomedical information. This review paper outlines the history of data integration in biomedical science and its recent trends in relation to the field of experimental animal science.

  13. Statistical test theory for the behavioral sciences

    CERN Document Server

    de Gruijter, Dato N M

    2007-01-01

    Since the development of the first intelligence test in the early 20th century, educational and psychological tests have become important measurement techniques to quantify human behavior. Focusing on this ubiquitous yet fruitful area of research, Statistical Test Theory for the Behavioral Sciences provides both a broad overview and a critical survey of assorted testing theories and models used in psychology, education, and other behavioral science fields. Following a logical progression from basic concepts to more advanced topics, the book first explains classical test theory, covering true score, measurement error, and reliability. It then presents generalizability theory, which provides a framework to deal with various aspects of test scores. In addition, the authors discuss the concept of validity in testing, offering a strategy for evidence-based validity. In the two chapters devoted to item response theory (IRT), the book explores item response models, such as the Rasch model, and applications, incl...

  14. Confronting Science: The Dilemma of Genetic Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zallen, Doris T.

    1997-01-01

    Considers the opportunities and ethical issues involved in genetic testing. Reviews the history of genetics from the first discoveries of Gregor Mendel, through the spurious pseudo-science of eugenics, and up to the discovery of DNA by James Watson and Francis Crick. Explains how genetic tests are done. (MJP)

  15. Consistency from the perspective of an experimental systems approach to the sciences and their epistemic objects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans-Jörg Rheinberger

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that the development of the modern sciences is rooted in experiment. Yet for a long time, experimentation did not occupy a prominent role, neither in philosophy nor in history of science. With the 'practical turn' in studying the sciences and their history, this has begun to change. This paper is concerned with systems and cultures of experimentation and the consistencies that are generated within such systems and cultures. The first part of the paper exposes the forms of historical and structural coherence that characterize the experimental exploration of epistemic objects. In the second part, a particular experimental culture in the life sciences is briefly described as an example. A survey will be given of what it means and what it takes to analyze biological functions in the test tube.

  16. On experimentation across science, design and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boris, Stefan Darlan

    2016-01-01

    The article describes how the principal idea behind the landscape laboratories has been to develop a 1:1 platform where researchers, practitioners and lay people can meet and cooperate on the development and testing of new design concepts for establishing and managing urban landscapes. This is so......The article describes how the principal idea behind the landscape laboratories has been to develop a 1:1 platform where researchers, practitioners and lay people can meet and cooperate on the development and testing of new design concepts for establishing and managing urban landscapes....... This is something, which is becoming increasingly relevant, as landscape architects and urban planners today have to address the challenges confronting urbanism due to the continued entanglement of urbanisation and anthropogenic processes. These are challenges where the act of destabilizing dichotomies (inside....../outside, natural/manmade, etc.) is one out of several reasons for not only continuing but also strengthening the landscape laboratories as testing grounds for future urban landscapes and green spaces in the Anthropocene....

  17. Mars Science Laboratory Workstation Test Set

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henriquez, David A.; Canham, Timothy K.; Chang, Johnny T.; Villaume, Nathaniel

    2009-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory developed the Workstation TestSet (WSTS) is a computer program that enables flight software development on virtual MSL avionics. The WSTS is the non-real-time flight avionics simulator that is designed to be completely software-based and run on a workstation class Linux PC.

  18. Experimental test of the Pauli Exclusion Principle

    CERN Document Server

    Barabash, A S

    2009-01-01

    A short review is given of three experimental works on tests of the Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) in which the author has been involved during the last 10 years. In the first work a search for anomalous carbon atoms was done and a limit on the existence of such atoms was determined, $^{12}\\tilde{\\mathrm C}$ / $^{12}$C $< 2.5\\times10^{-12}$. In the second work PEP was tested with the NEMO-2 detector and the limits on the violation of PEP for p-shell nucleons in $^{12}$C were obtained. Specifically, transitions to the fully occupied $1s_{1/2}$-shell yielded a limit of $4.2\\times10^{24}$ y for the process with the emission of a $\\gamma$-quantum. Similarly limits of $3.1\\times10^{24}$ y for $\\beta^-$ and $2.6\\times10^{24}$ y for $\\beta^+$ Pauli-forbidded transition of $^{12}$C $\\to$ $^{12}\\tilde{\\mathrm N}$($^{12}\\tilde{\\mathrm B}$) are reported. In the third work it was assumed that PEP is violated for neutrinos, and thus, neutrinos obey at least partly the Bose-Einstein statistics. Consequences of the viol...

  19. Science Academies' 83rd Refresher Course on Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    undergraduate and postgraduate courses in Physics. Participants in this course will gain hands on experience with about 25 experiments designed by Professor R. Srinivasan, the Course Director, Indian Academy of Sciences. Professor R. Srinivasan has conducted such Refresher course in Experimental Physics in more ...

  20. "Exploratory experimentation" as a probe into the relation between historiography and philosophy of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schickore, Jutta

    2016-02-01

    This essay utilizes the concept "exploratory experimentation" as a probe into the relation between historiography and philosophy of science. The essay traces the emergence of the historiographical concept "exploratory experimentation" in the late 1990s. The reconstruction of the early discussions about exploratory experimentation shows that the introduction of the concept had unintended consequences: Initially designed to debunk philosophical ideas about theory testing, the concept "exploratory experimentation" quickly exposed the poverty of our conceptual tools for the analysis of experimental practice. Looking back at a number of detailed analyses of experimental research, we can now appreciate that the concept of exploratory experimentation is too vague and too elusive to fill the desideratum whose existence it revealed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Development of experimental systems for material sciences under microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanii, Jun; Obi, Shinzo; Kamimiyata, Yotsuo; Ajimine, Akio

    1988-01-01

    As part of the Space Experiment Program of the Society of Japanese Aerospace Companies, three experimental systems (G452, G453, G454) have been developed for materials science studies under microgravity by the NEC Corporation. These systems are to be flown as Get Away Special payloads for studying the feasibility of producing new materials. Together with the experimental modules carrying the hardware specific to the experiment, the three systems all comprise standard subsystems consisting of a power supply, sequence controller, temperature controller, data recorder, and video recorder.

  2. Ecotoxicity testing: science, politics and ethics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Colin H

    2008-02-01

    Animal welfare organisations have long been concerned about the use of animals for ecotoxicity testing. Ecotoxicity testing is a necessary part of the statutory risk assessment of chemicals that may be released into the environment. It is sometimes also carried out during the development of new chemicals and in the investigation of pollution in the field. This review considers the existing requirements for ecotoxicity testing, with particular reference to practices in the European Union, including the recent REACH system proposals, before discussing criticisms that have been made of existing practices for environmental risk assessment. These criticisms have been made on scientific and ethical grounds, as well as on questions of cost. A case is made for greater investment in the development of alternative testing methods, which could improve the science, as well as serving the cause of animal welfare. It has frequently been suggested that the statutory requirements for environmental risk assessment are too rigid and bureaucratic. A case is made for flexibility and the greater involvement of scientists in the risk assessment procedure, in the interests of both improved science and improved animal welfare.

  3. Comments on cognitive science in the experimental analysis of behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, E K; Higgins, S T; Bickel, W K

    1982-01-01

    Arguments are increasingly being made for the inclusion of cognitive science in the experimental analysis of behavior (TEAB). These arguments are described, and a critical analysis of them is presented, especially in regards to the logic of objective inference and the renewed use of cognitive intervening variables. In addition, one particular defining feature of cognitive processes (i.e., the absence of an immediate controlling stimulus) is described, along with alternative points of view stressing molar-molecular levels of analysis and historical causation. Finally, comments are made on the use of cognitive concepts and language in the behavioral sciences. On all of these issues, counter-arguments are based on available material in behavior analysis metatheory, concepts, and experimental practices.

  4. Experimental Test Plan DOE Tidal and River Reference Turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neary, Vincent S [ORNL; Hill, Craig [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Chamorro, Leonardo [St. Anthony Falls Laboratory, 2 Third Avenue SE, Minneapolis, MN 55414; Gunawan, Budi [ORNL

    2012-09-01

    Our aim is to provide details of the experimental test plan for scaled model studies in St. Anthony Falls Laboratory (SAFL) Main Channel at the University of Minnesota, including a review of study objectives, descriptions of the turbine models, the experimental set-up, instrumentation details, instrument measurement uncertainty, anticipated experimental test cases, post-processing methods, and data archiving for model developers.

  5. Career concerns incentives: An experimental test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Alexander; Morgenstern, Albrecht; Raab, Philippe

    2009-01-01

    Holmström's (1982/99) career concerns model has become a workhorse for analyzing agency issues in many elds. The underlying signal jamming argument requires players to use information in a Bayesian way, which is difficult to directly test with eld data: typically little is known about the informa......Holmström's (1982/99) career concerns model has become a workhorse for analyzing agency issues in many elds. The underlying signal jamming argument requires players to use information in a Bayesian way, which is difficult to directly test with eld data: typically little is known about...

  6. Experimental immunological screening tests on pidotimod.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, G; Manzardo, S

    1994-12-01

    Pidotimod ((R)-3-[(S)-(5-oxo-2-pyrrolidinyl) carbonyl]-thiazolidine-4-carboxylic acid, PGT/1A, CAS 121808-62-6), a new biological response modifier, was administered to immunodepressed (by prednisolone, cyclophosphamide or methotrexate) mice by oral and intraperitoneal route (respectively up to 400 and 200 mg/kg) during several days (up to 9 days). The stimulatory action of the drug on cell-mediated immunity is investigated by measuring the rosette formation by the murine splenic lymphocytes ex vivo, by T- and B-lymphocytes ex vivo proliferative response to mitogens, by dinitrochlorobenzene delayed hypersensitivity induced on the ear, by the graft-versus-host reaction with immunodepressed mice as donors. In all tests pidotimod reveals a potent action in restoring the depressed reactivity. The action of pidotimod on humoral immunity is showed in two tests where the antibody response is induced by a thymus dependent (sheep erythrocytes) or a thymus independent (lipopolysaccharide) antigen. Pidotimod was active in both tests. Macrophage functions, anion superoxide production and the non-stimulated ex vivo chemotaxis reveal that pidotimod significantly reduces the immunodepressant action of prednisolone; particularly in i.p. treated mice the chemotaxis is likely to be restored to the levels of the non-immunodepressed controls. The colloidal china ink blood clearance in vivo in immunodepressed mice, after pidotimod treatment, results similar to that found in the control mice.

  7. Experimentally testing the standard cosmological model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schramm, D.N. (Chicago Univ., IL (USA) Fermi National Accelerator Lab., Batavia, IL (USA))

    1990-11-01

    The standard model of cosmology, the big bang, is now being tested and confirmed to remarkable accuracy. Recent high precision measurements relate to the microwave background; and big bang nucleosynthesis. This paper focuses on the latter since that relates more directly to high energy experiments. In particular, the recent LEP (and SLC) results on the number of neutrinos are discussed as a positive laboratory test of the standard cosmology scenario. Discussion is presented on the improved light element observational data as well as the improved neutron lifetime data. alternate nucleosynthesis scenarios of decaying matter or of quark-hadron induced inhomogeneities are discussed. It is shown that when these scenarios are made to fit the observed abundances accurately, the resulting conclusions on the baryonic density relative to the critical density, {Omega}{sub b}, remain approximately the same as in the standard homogeneous case, thus, adding to the robustness of the standard model conclusion that {Omega}{sub b} {approximately} 0.06. This latter point is the deriving force behind the need for non-baryonic dark matter (assuming {Omega}{sub total} = 1) and the need for dark baryonic matter, since {Omega}{sub visible} < {Omega}{sub b}. Recent accelerator constraints on non-baryonic matter are discussed, showing that any massive cold dark matter candidate must now have a mass M{sub x} {approx gt} 20 GeV and an interaction weaker than the Z{sup 0} coupling to a neutrino. It is also noted that recent hints regarding the solar neutrino experiments coupled with the see-saw model for {nu}-masses may imply that the {nu}{sub {tau}} is a good hot dark matter candidate. 73 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Experimental tests of the cellular tensegrity hypothesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamenović, Dimitrije; Mijailovich, Srboljub M; Tolić-Nørrelykke, Iva Marija; Wang, Ning

    2003-01-01

    The tensegrity model depicts the cytoskeleton (CSK) as a prestressed network of interconnected filaments. The prestress is generated by the CSK contractile apparatus and is partly balanced by traction at the cell-substrate interface and partly by CSK internal compression elements such as microtubules (MTs). A key feature of tensegrity is that the shear modulus (G) must increase in proportion with the prestress. Here we have tested that prediction as well as the idea that compression of MTs balance a portion of the cell prestress. Airway smooth muscle cells were studied. Traction microscopy was used to calculate traction. Because traction must be balanced by the stress within the cell, the prestress could be computed. Cell G was measured by oscillatory magnetic cytometry. The prestress was modulated using graded concentrations of contracting (histamine) or relaxing (isoproterenol) agonists and by disrupting MTs by colchicine. It was found that G increased in proportion with the prestress and that compression of MTs balanced a significant, but a relatively small fraction of the prestress. Taken together, these results do not disprove other models of cell deformability, nor they prove tensegrity. However, they do support a priori predictions of tensegrity. As such, it may not be necessary to invoke more complex mechanisms to explain these central features of cell deformability.

  9. 1st International Conference on Computational and Experimental Biomedical Sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Jorge, RM

    2015-01-01

    This book contains the full papers presented at ICCEBS 2013 – the 1st International Conference on Computational and Experimental Biomedical Sciences, which was organized in Azores, in October 2013. The included papers present and discuss new trends in those fields, using several methods and techniques, including active shape models, constitutive models, isogeometric elements, genetic algorithms, level sets, material models, neural networks, optimization, and the finite element method, in order to address more efficiently different and timely applications involving biofluids, computer simulation, computational biomechanics, image based diagnosis, image processing and analysis, image segmentation, image registration, scaffolds, simulation, and surgical planning. The main audience for this book consists of researchers, Ph.D students, and graduate students with multidisciplinary interests related to the areas of artificial intelligence, bioengineering, biology, biomechanics, computational fluid dynamics, comput...

  10. Experimental testing of exchangeable cutting inserts cutting ability

    OpenAIRE

    Čep, Robert; Janásek, Adam; Čepová, Lenka; Petrů, Jana; Hlavatý, Ivo; Car, Zlatan; Hatala, Michal

    2013-01-01

    The article deals with experimental testing of the cutting ability of exchangeable cutting inserts. Eleven types of exchangeable cutting inserts from five different manufacturers were tested. The tested cutting inserts were of the same shape and were different especially in material and coating types. The main aim was both to select a suitable test for determination of the cutting ability of exchangeable cutting inserts and to design such testing procedure that could make it possible...

  11. Numerical Modeling and Experimental Testing of a Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zurkinden, Andrew Stephen; Kramer, Morten; Ferri, Francesco

    numerical values for comparison with the experimental test results which were carried out in the same time. It is for this reason why Chapter 4 does consist exclusively of numerical values. Experimental values and measured time series of wave elevations have been used throughout the report in order to a...

  12. Asian students excel in science testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    Asian countries claimed four of the five top spots in science achievement for eighth grade students, according to a December 5 report on the Third International Mathematics and Science Study - Repeat (TIMSS-R). The top five are: Chinese Taipei, Singapore, Hungary, Japan, and the Republic of Korea.In mathematics, Asian countries scored a clean sweep. The top five are: Singapore, the Republic of Korea, Chinese Taipei, Hong Kong SAR,and Japan.

  13. Students’ ability in science: Results from a test development study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cigdem Akkanat

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Student’s ability to use and manipulate scientific concepts has been widely explored; however there is still a need to define the characteristics and nature of science ability. Also, the tests and performance scales that require minimal conceptual knowledge to measure this ability are relatively less common. The aim of this study was to develop an objective measure of science ability of gifted middle school students. In order to assess this ability, Science Ability Test Battery was developed by the researchers. The test battery was divided into two sub scales containing; a multiple choice questions achievement test (Science Ability Test and a performance assessment (Science Performance Test. The initial Science Ability Test consisted of 23 multiple choice items with one correct answer that required students to use science process skills and reasoning. In the study, stratified sampling was used. The test was administered to 280 middle school students in Turkey and the missing data from 26 students were excluded. In order to obtain a proof of content validity, the researchers elicited feedback from five experts in the field of science education and gifted education and necessary corrections were made in accordance of their views and suggestions. This study will be followed by another research to further analyse validity and reliability of the test.

  14. NASA IMAGESEER: NASA IMAGEs for Science, Education, Experimentation and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moigne, Jacqueline; Grubb, Thomas G.; Milner, Barbara C.

    2012-01-01

    A number of web-accessible databases, including medical, military or other image data, offer universities and other users the ability to teach or research new Image Processing techniques on relevant and well-documented data. However, NASA images have traditionally been difficult for researchers to find, are often only available in hard-to-use formats, and do not always provide sufficient context and background for a non-NASA Scientist user to understand their content. The new IMAGESEER (IMAGEs for Science, Education, Experimentation and Research) database seeks to address these issues. Through a graphically-rich web site for browsing and downloading all of the selected datasets, benchmarks, and tutorials, IMAGESEER provides a widely accessible database of NASA-centric, easy to read, image data for teaching or validating new Image Processing algorithms. As such, IMAGESEER fosters collaboration between NASA and research organizations while simultaneously encouraging development of new and enhanced Image Processing algorithms. The first prototype includes a representative sampling of NASA multispectral and hyperspectral images from several Earth Science instruments, along with a few small tutorials. Image processing techniques are currently represented with cloud detection, image registration, and map cover/classification. For each technique, corresponding data are selected from four different geographic regions, i.e., mountains, urban, water coastal, and agriculture areas. Satellite images have been collected from several instruments - Landsat-5 and -7 Thematic Mappers, Earth Observing-1 (EO-1) Advanced Land Imager (ALI) and Hyperion, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). After geo-registration, these images are available in simple common formats such as GeoTIFF and raw formats, along with associated benchmark data.

  15. NASA IMAGESEER: NASA IMAGEs for Science, Education, Experimentation, and Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Moigne, Jacqueline; Grubb, Thomas G.; Milner, Barbara C.

    2012-06-01

    A number of web-accessible databases, including medical, military or other image data, offer universities and other users the ability to teach or research new Image Processing techniques on relevant and well-documented data. However, NASA images have traditionally been difficult for researchers to find, are often only available in hard-to-use formats, and do not always provide sufficient context and background for a non-NASA Scientist user to understand their content. The new IMAGESEER (IMAGEs for Science, Education, Experimentation and Research) database seeks to address these issues. Through a graphically-rich web site for browsing and downloading all of the selected datasets, benchmarks, and tutorials, IMAGESEER provides a widely accessible database of NASA-centric, easy to read, image data for teaching or validating new Image Processing algorithms. As such, IMAGESEER fosters collaboration between NASA and research organizations while simultaneously encouraging development of new and enhanced Image Processing algorithms. The first prototype includes a representative sampling of NASA multispectral and hyperspectral images from several Earth Science instruments, along with a few small tutorials. Image processing techniques are currently represented with cloud detection, image registration, and map cover/classification. For each technique, corresponding data are selected from four different geographic regions, i.e., mountains, urban, water coastal, and agriculture areas. Satellite images have been collected from several instruments - Landsat-5 and -7 Thematic Mappers, Earth Observing -1 (EO-1) Advanced Land Imager (ALI) and Hyperion, and the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS). After geo-registration, these images are available in simple common formats such as GeoTIFF and raw formats, along with associated benchmark data.

  16. Steel Fibers Reinforced Concrete Pipes - Experimental Tests and Numerical Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doru, Zdrenghea

    2017-10-01

    The paper presents in the first part a state of the art review of reinforced concrete pipes used in micro tunnelling realised through pipes jacking method and design methods for steel fibres reinforced concrete. In part two experimental tests are presented on inner pipes with diameters of 1410mm and 2200mm, and specimens (100x100x500mm) of reinforced concrete with metal fibres (35 kg / m3). In part two experimental tests are presented on pipes with inner diameters of 1410mm and 2200mm, and specimens (100x100x500mm) of reinforced concrete with steel fibres (35 kg / m3). The results obtained are analysed and are calculated residual flexural tensile strengths which characterise the post-cracking behaviour of steel fibres reinforced concrete. In the third part are presented numerical simulations of the tests of pipes and specimens. The model adopted for the pipes test was a three-dimensional model and loads considered were those obtained in experimental tests at reaching breaking forces. Tensile stresses determined were compared with mean flexural tensile strength. To validate tensile parameters of steel fibres reinforced concrete, experimental tests of the specimens were modelled with MIDAS program to reproduce the flexural breaking behaviour. To simulate post - cracking behaviour was used the method σ — ε based on the relationship stress - strain, according to RILEM TC 162-TDF. For the specimens tested were plotted F — δ diagrams, which have been superimposed for comparison with the similar diagrams of experimental tests. The comparison of experimental results with those obtained from numerical simulation leads to the following conclusions: - the maximum forces obtained by numerical calculation have higher values than the experimental values for the same tensile stresses; - forces corresponding of residual strengths have very similar values between the experimental and numerical calculations; - generally the numerical model estimates a breaking force greater

  17. AeroValve Experimental Test Data Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noakes, Mark W. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2014-09-01

    This report documents the collection of experimental test data and presents performance characteristics for the AeroValve brand prototype pneumatic bidirectional solenoid valves tested at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in July/August 2014 as part of a validation of AeroValve energy efficiency claims. The test stand and control programs were provided by AeroValve. All raw data and processing are included in the report attachments.

  18. Development of a fault test experimental facility model using Matlab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Iraci Martinez; Moraes, Davi Almeida, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    The Fault Test Experimental Facility was developed to simulate a PWR nuclear power plant and is instrumented with temperature, level and pressure sensors. The Fault Test Experimental Facility can be operated to generate normal and fault data, and these failures can be added initially small, and their magnitude being increasing gradually. This work presents the Fault Test Experimental Facility model developed using the Matlab GUIDE (Graphical User Interface Development Environment) toolbox that consists of a set of functions designed to create interfaces in an easy and fast way. The system model is based on the mass and energy inventory balance equations. Physical as well as operational aspects are taken into consideration. The interface layout looks like a process flowchart and the user can set the input variables. Besides the normal operation conditions, there is the possibility to choose a faulty variable from a list. The program also allows the user to set the noise level for the input variables. Using the model, data were generated for different operational conditions, both under normal and fault conditions with different noise levels added to the input variables. Data generated by the model will be compared with Fault Test Experimental Facility data. The Fault Test Experimental Facility theoretical model results will be used for the development of a Monitoring and Fault Detection System. (author)

  19. Science Academies' Sixty-sixth Refresher Course in Experimental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    2014-09-30

    Sep 30, 2014 ... at Vidya Vikas Institute of Engineering and Technology,. # 127-128, Lalitadripura Post, Mysore-Bannur Road, Mysore 570 028. Sponsored by Indian Academy of Sciences, Bangalore,. Indian National Science Academy, New Delhi, The National Academy of Sciences, India, Allahabad. A Refresher Course ...

  20. Experimental Comparison of Inquiry and Direct Instruction in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobern, William W.; Schuster, David; Adams, Betty; Applegate, Brooks; Skjold, Brandy; Undreiu, Adriana; Loving, Cathleen C.; Gobert, Janice D.

    2010-01-01

    There are continuing educational and political debates about "inquiry" versus "direct" teaching of science. Traditional science instruction has been largely direct but in the US, recent national and state science education standards advocate inquiry throughout K-12 education. While inquiry-based instruction has the advantage of modelling aspects…

  1. Bladder tissue biomechanical behavior: Experimental tests and constitutive formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Natali, A N; Audenino, A L; Artibani, W; Fontanella, C G; Carniel, E L; Zanetti, E M

    2015-09-18

    A procedure for the constitutive analysis of bladder tissues mechanical behavior is provided, by using a coupled experimental and computational approach. The first step pertains to the design and development of mechanical tests on specimens from porcine bladders. The bladders have been harvested, and the specimens have been subjected to uniaxial cyclic tests at different strain rates along preferential directions, considering the distribution of tissue fibrous components. Experimental results showed the anisotropic, non-linear and time-dependent stress-strain behavior, due to tissue conformation with fibers distributed along preferential directions and their interaction phenomena with ground substance. In detail, experimental data showed a greater tissue stiffness along transversal direction. Viscous behavior was assessed by strain rate dependence of stress-strain curves and hysteretic phenomena. The second step pertains the development of a specific fiber-reinforced visco-hyperelastic constitutive model, in the light of bladder tissues structural conformation and experimental results. Constitutive parameters have been identified by minimizing the discrepancy between model and experimental data. The agreement between experimental and model results represent a term for evaluating the reliability of the constitutive models by means of the proposed operational procedure. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Real-World Experimentation Comparing Time-Sharing and Batch Processing in Teaching Computer Science,

    Science.gov (United States)

    effectiveness of time-sharing and batch processing in teaching computer science . The experimental design was centered on direct, ’real world’ comparison...ALGOL). The experimental sample involved all introductory computer science courses with a total population of 415 cadets. The results generally

  3. The concept verification testing of materials science payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griner, C. S.; Johnston, M. H.; Whitaker, A.

    1976-01-01

    The concept Verification Testing (CVT) project at the Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, is a developmental activity that supports Shuttle Payload Projects such as Spacelab. It provides an operational 1-g environment for testing NASA and other agency experiment and support systems concepts that may be used in shuttle. A dedicated Materials Science Payload was tested in the General Purpose Laboratory to assess the requirements of a space processing payload on a Spacelab type facility. Physical and functional integration of the experiments into the facility was studied, and the impact of the experiments on the facility (and vice versa) was evaluated. A follow-up test designated CVT Test IVA was also held. The purpose of this test was to repeat Test IV experiments with a crew composed of selected and trained scientists. These personnel were not required to have prior knowledge of the materials science disciplines, but were required to have a basic knowledge of science and the scientific method.

  4. SPSS for applied sciences basic statistical testing

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Cole

    2013-01-01

    This book offers a quick and basic guide to using SPSS and provides a general approach to solving problems using statistical tests. It is both comprehensive in terms of the tests covered and the applied settings it refers to, and yet is short and easy to understand. Whether you are a beginner or an intermediate level test user, this book will help you to analyse different types of data in applied settings. It will also give you the confidence to use other statistical software and to extend your expertise to more specific scientific settings as required.The author does not use mathematical form

  5. Elementary Science Indoors and Out: Teachers, Time, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Sarah J.; Tugurian, Linda P.; Thomson, Margareta M.

    2013-01-01

    In this article, we present the results from a mixed-methods research study aimed to document indoor and outdoor fifth grade science experiences in one school in the USA in the context of accountability and standardized testing. We used quantitative measures to explore students' science knowledge, environmental attitudes, and outdoor comfort…

  6. Exploring Science Teachers' Perceptions of Experimentation: Implications for Restructuring School Practical Work

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Bing; Li, Xiaoxiao

    2017-01-01

    It is commonly recognised that practical work has a distinctive and central role in science teaching and learning. Although a large number of studies have addressed the definitions, typologies, and purposes of practical work, few have consulted practicing science teachers. This study explored science teachers' perceptions of experimentation for…

  7. Impact of looping on middle school science standardized achievement tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, Tammy M.

    Looping may be defined as a teacher remaining with a group of students for multiple academic years. In this quantitative study, looping was examined as a factor on science achievement. State-wide eighth grade school level 2010 Pennsylvania System of School Assessment (PSSA) data were used. By responding to a mailing, school administrators indicated if 2010 eighth grade students had or had not been looped. The schools' percentage of advanced and proficient Science PSSA data were used to determine if the independent variable had a significant impact on science achievement. The results of the independent t-test analysis suggest that looping does not contribute to science achievement for this study sample.

  8. A crosscultural validation of a test of science related attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalili, Khalil Y.

    A test for measuring science attitudes, named Test of Science Related Attitudes (TOSRA), was initially developed in Australia by Fraser (1977, 1978). This study investigated the crosscultural validity of this instrument when used with American high school students. Three hundred and thirty-six students (12th and 11th graders) in three high schools in suburban Chicago took the test. The results of the study, confirming previous validation of the test, revealed that the seven subscales of TOSRA were, in general, highly reliable. The discriminant validity of each of these scales, however, was found to be generally low. The item/scale correlation for all but four items of the test met Shrigley's (Journal of Research in Science Teaching, 20(1), 87-89, 1983) criterion of being more than 0.30. The results of the principal components with varimax rotation did not support the distinctiveness of the subscale structure of the test.

  9. Experimental method for testing diffraction properties of reflection waveguide holograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yi; Kang, Ming-Wu; Wang, Bao-Ping

    2014-07-01

    Waveguide holograms' diffraction properties include peak wavelength and diffraction efficiency, which play an important role in determining their display performance. Based on the record and reconstruction theory of reflection waveguide holograms, a novel experimental method for testing diffraction properties is introduced and analyzed in this paper, which uses a plano-convex lens optically contacted to the surface of the substrate plate of the waveguide hologram, so that the diffracted light beam can be easily detected. Then an experiment is implemented. The designed reconstruction wavelength of the test sample is 530 nm, and its diffraction efficiency is 100%. The experimental results are a peak wavelength of 527.7 nm and a diffraction efficiency of 94.1%. It is shown that the tested value corresponds well with the designed value.

  10. The Propagation of Errors in Experimental Data Analysis: A Comparison of Pre-and Post-Test Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorard, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Experimental designs involving the randomization of cases to treatment and control groups are powerful and under-used in many areas of social science and social policy. This paper reminds readers of the pre-and post-test, and the post-test only, designs, before explaining briefly how measurement errors propagate according to error theory. The…

  11. VIEWS OF A GROUP OF PRE-SERVICE SCIENCE TEACHERS ON THE USE OF EXPERIMENTAL ACTIVITIES IN SCIENCE TEACHING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elaine A. Colagrande

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Teachers often consider experimental activities to be fundamental to the teaching of scientific concepts. However, there are different views about their purpose in science classes; these views are linked to teachers' different understandings of the construction of scientific knowledge. It was analyzed the views of 19 pre-service science teachers (PST on the use of experimental activities in science classes. These PSTs were enrolled in the subject of science teacher training course of a Brazilian federal university. In their course work, the PSTS were organized into groups and they participated in a pedagogical activity during which they reported their views on two experimental scripts. They answered questions about how they would use these experiments in the future. The activity occurred in two stages: the first was before studying texts on the nature of science with an emphasis on the role of experimentation in the foundation of hypotheses; the second stage was after this. The data analysis was performed using the content analysis technique. The results suggest the importance of debates and deep themes in training courses for science teachers, so that experimental activities are not seen reductively and only as ways to motivate classes or to complement theory, but rather as potential aids in the construction of scientific meaning.

  12. Experimental Conditions - Metabolonote | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available switchLanguage; BLAST Search Image Search Home About Archive Update History Data List Contact us Metabol... and Data Analysis (D) etc. Data file File name: metabolonote_experimental_conditions.zip File URL: ftp://ft...p.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/metabolonote/LATEST/metabolonote_experimental_conditio...ns.zip File size: 15 KB Simple search URL http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/metabolonote_experiment...y of This Database Site Policy | Contact Us Experimental Conditions - Metabolonote | LSDB Archive ...

  13. Experimental Investigation of Mars Science Laboratory Entry Vehicle Aeroheating in AEDC Hypervelocity Tunnel 9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Brian R.; Collier, Arnold S.

    2017-01-01

    An experimental investigation of the aeroheating environment of the Mars Science Laboratory entry vehicle was conducted in the Arnold Engineering Development Complex Hypervelocity Wind Tunnel 9. Testing was performed on a 6-in. (0.1524 m) diameter model in the tunnel's Mach 8 and Mach 10 nozzles at free stream Reynolds numbers from 4.1×10*exp 6)/ft to 49×10(exp 6)/ft and from 1.2×10(exp 6)/ft to 19×10(exp 6)/ft, respectively, using pure nitrogen test gas. These conditions spanned the boundary layer flow regimes from completely laminar to fully turbulent flow over the entire forebody. A computational fluid dynamics study was conducted in support of the wind tunnel testing. Laminar and turbulent solutions were generated for all wind tunnel test conditions and comparisons of predicted heating distributions were performed with the data. These comparisons showed agreement for most cases to within the estimated +/-12% experimental uncertainty margin for fully-laminar or fully-turbulent conditions, while transitional heating data were bounded by laminar and turbulent predictions. These results helped to define uncertainty margins on the use of computational tools for vehicle design.

  14. An experimental approach for science laboratories in the contest of science of primary education degree course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giacomo Bozzo

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available International literature in science education has shown the importance of introducing scientific studies in primary school, in order to give pupils competences and skills necessary for their life. Consequently, prospective primary teachers need to improve their scientific knowledge and to plan new experimental activities for primary school students. In this context, we have planned an educational learning path for prospective primary teachers, focused on specific conceptual knows of kinematics. The proposed activities are based on an empirical approach, avoiding in the first step any formal introduction of the observed phenomena, which could be difficult to understand, especially for students of science of primary education degree course. In this context, the educational technologies have given a fundamental support, since they have offered to prospective teachers the possibility to focus their attention only on the involved physics concepts and principles.Un approccio sperimentale per i laboratori scientifici nei corsi di laurea in Scienze della Formazione PrimariaStudi recenti hanno evidenziato la necessità di introdurre le discipline scientifiche sin dalla scuola primaria, per consentire alle future generazioni di vivere in modo critico e consapevole nel mondo reale. I futuri insegnanti hanno, quindi, la necessità di approfondire le loro conoscenze in ambito scientifico e di progettare valide attività laboratoriali per gli alunni di scuola primaria. In questo contesto si inserisce la nostra azione formativa rivolta agli studenti di Scienze della Formazione Primaria (SFP, mirata ad affrontare alcune difficoltà nell’apprendimento della Fisica, ben note in letteratura. L’attività didattica proposta è basata sull’osservazione diretta dei fenomeni fisici, evitando, nella fase iniziale, ogni genere di introduzione formale che possa risultare di difficile comprensione per gli studenti di SFP. Il supporto delle tecnologie didattiche ha

  15. Elementary Science Indoors and Out: Teachers, Time, and Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Sarah J.; Tugurian, Linda P.; Thomson, Margareta M.

    2013-10-01

    In this article, we present the results from a mixed-methods research study aimed to document indoor and outdoor fifth grade science experiences in one school in the USA in the context of accountability and standardized testing. We used quantitative measures to explore students' science knowledge, environmental attitudes, and outdoor comfort levels, and via qualitative measures, we examined views on science education and environmental issues from multiple sources, including the school's principal, teachers, and students. Students' science knowledge in each of the four objectives specified for grade 5 significantly improved during the school year. Qualitative data collected through interviews and observations found limited impressions of outdoor science. Findings revealed that, despite best intentions and a school culture that supported outdoor learning, it was very difficult in practice for teachers to supplement their classroom science instruction with outdoor activities. They felt constrained by time and heavy content demands and decided that the most efficient way of delivering science instruction was through traditional methods. Researchers discuss potentials and obstacles for the science community to consider in supporting teachers and preparing elementary school teachers to provide students with authentic experiential learning opportunities. We further confront teachers' and students' perceptions that science is always best and most efficiently learned inside the classroom through traditional text-driven instruction.

  16. EMERGE - ESnet/MREN Regional Science Grid Experimental NGI Testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mambretti, Joe; DeFanti, Tom; Brown, Maxine

    2001-07-31

    This document is the final report on the EMERGE Science Grid testbed research project from the perspective of the International Center for Advanced Internet Research (iCAIR) at Northwestern University, which was a subcontractor to this UIC project. This report is a compilation of information gathered from a variety of materials related to this project produced by multiple EMERGE participants, especially those at Electronic Visualization Lab (EVL) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Argonne National Lab and iCAIR. The EMERGE Science Grid project was managed by Tom DeFanti, PI from EVL at UIC.

  17. An Experimental Clinical Science Fellowship in Cardiovascular-Renal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chasis, Herbert; Campbell, Charles I.

    1974-01-01

    Describes the New York Heart Association's experimental program aimed at evaluating a method of developing physicians disciplined by research and competent both as teachers and in the care of patients (clinical scientists). (Author)

  18. Improving plant bioaccumulation science through consistent reporting of experimental data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fantke, Peter; Arnot, Jon A.; Doucette, William J.

    2016-01-01

    Experimental data and models for plant bioaccumulation of organic contaminants play a crucial role for assessing the potential human and ecological risks associated with chemical use. Plants are receptor organisms and direct or indirect vectors for chemical exposures to all other organisms. As new...... experimental data are generated they are used to improve our understanding of plant-chemical interactions that in turn allows for the development of better scientific knowledge and conceptual and predictive models. The interrelationship between experimental data and model development is an ongoing, never......-ending process needed to advance our ability to provide reliable quality information that can be used in various contexts including regulatory risk assessment. However, relatively few standard experimental protocols for generating plant bioaccumulation data are currently available and because of inconsistent...

  19. Fidelity of test development process within a national science grant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumfield, Teresa E.

    In 2002, a math-science partnership (MSP) program was initiated by a national science grant. The purpose of the MSP program was to promote the development, implementation, and sustainability of promising partnerships among institutions of higher education, K-12 schools and school systems, as well as other important stakeholders. One of the funded projects included a teacher-scientist collaborative that instituted a professional development system to prepare teachers to use inquiry-based instructional modules. The MSP program mandated evaluations of its funded projects. One of the teacher-scientist collaborative project's outcomes specifically focused on teacher and student science content and process skills. In order to provide annual evidence of progress and to measure the impact of the project's efforts, and because no appropriate science tests were available to measure improvements in content knowledge of participating teachers and their students, the project contracted for the development of science tests. This dissertation focused on the process of test development within an evaluation and examined planned (i.e., expected) and actual (i.e., observed) test development, specifically concentrating on the factors that affected the actual test development process. Planned test development was defined as the process of creating tests according to the well-established test development procedures recommended by the AERA/APA/NCME 1999 Standards for Educational and Psychological Testing. Actual test development was defined as the process of creating tests as it actually took place. Because case study provides an in-depth, longitudinal examination of an event (i.e., case) in a naturalistic setting, it was selected as the appropriate methodology to examine the difference between planned and actual test development. The case (or unit of analysis) was the test development task, a task that was bounded by the context in which it occurred---and over which this researcher had

  20. Learning Political Science with Prediction Markets: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Cali Mortenson; Sami, Rahul

    2012-01-01

    Prediction markets are designed to aggregate the information of many individuals to forecast future events. These markets provide participants with an incentive to seek information and a forum for interaction, making markets a promising tool to motivate student learning. We carried out a quasi-experiment in an introductory political science class…

  1. Good science and experimentation are needed in road ecology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ree, van der R.; Jaeger, J.A.G.; Rytwinski, T.; Grift, van der E.A.

    2015-01-01

    Scientifically rigorous research that produces accurate information is required to identify and mitigate the negative impacts of roads and traffic on wildlife, communities and ecosystems. The current approach to road planning and construction is not conducive to doing good science or incorporating

  2. Target Soil Impact Verification: Experimental Testing and Kayenta Constitutive Modeling.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Broome, Scott Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Flint, Gregory Mark [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Dewers, Thomas [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Newell, Pania [Sandia National Laboratories (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This report details experimental testing and constitutive modeling of sandy soil deformation under quasi - static conditions. This is driven by the need to understand constitutive response of soil to target/component behavior upon impact . An experimental and constitutive modeling program was followed to determine elastic - plastic properties and a compressional failure envelope of dry soil . One hydrostatic, one unconfined compressive stress (UCS), nine axisymmetric compression (ACS) , and one uniaxial strain (US) test were conducted at room temperature . Elastic moduli, assuming isotropy, are determined from unload/reload loops and final unloading for all tests pre - failure and increase monotonically with mean stress. Very little modulus degradation was discernable from elastic results even when exposed to mean stresses above 200 MPa . The failure envelope and initial yield surface were determined from peak stresses and observed onset of plastic yielding from all test results. Soil elasto - plastic behavior is described using the Brannon et al. (2009) Kayenta constitutive model. As a validation exercise, the ACS - parameterized Kayenta model is used to predict response of the soil material under uniaxial strain loading. The resulting parameterized and validated Kayenta model is of high quality and suitable for modeling sandy soil deformation under a range of conditions, including that for impact prediction.

  3. MOTIVATION AND PERFORMANCE IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION: AN EXPERIMENTAL TEST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan A. Moreno

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to analyse, experimentally, the relationships between motivation and performance in a lateral movement test in physical education. The study group consisted of 363 students (227 boys and 136 girls, aged between 12 and 16, who were randomly divided into three groups: an experimental group in which an incremental ability belief was induced, another experimental group in which an entity ability belief was induced, and a control group where there was no intervention. Measurements were made of situational intrinsic motivation, perceived competence in executing the task and performance. The results revealed that the incremental group reported higher scores on the situational intrinsic motivation scale. The entity group demonstrated better performance in the first test attempt than the incremental group but, in the second attempt, the performance was similar in the different groups. Perhaps the initial differences in performance disappeared because the incremental group counted on improving in the second attempt. These results are discussed in relation to the intensity with which the teacher conveys information relating to incremental ability belief of the pupil to increase intrinsic motivation and performance

  4. CSI Flight Computer System and experimental test results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Dean W., Jr.; Peri, F., Jr.; Schuler, P.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the CSI Computer System (CCS) and the experimental tests performed to validate its functionality. This system is comprised of two major components: the space flight qualified Excitation and Damping Subsystem (EDS) which performs controls calculations; and the Remote Interface Unit (RIU) which is used for data acquisition, transmission, and filtering. The flight-like RIU is the interface between the EDS and the sensors and actuators positioned on the particular structure under control. The EDS and RIU communicate over the MIL-STD-1553B, a space flight qualified bus. To test the CCS under realistic conditions, it was connected to the Phase-0 CSI Evolutionary Model (CEM) at NASA Langley Research Center. The following schematic shows how the CCS is connected to the CEM. Various tests were performed which validated the ability of the system to perform control/structures experiments.

  5. Central Computer Science Concepts to Research-Based Teacher Training in Computer Science: An Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zendler, Andreas; Klaudt, Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The significance of computer science for economics and society is undisputed. In particular, computer science is acknowledged to play a key role in schools (e.g., by opening multiple career paths). The provision of effective computer science education in schools is dependent on teachers who are able to properly represent the discipline and whose…

  6. Experimental Design for the INL Sample Collection Operational Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amidan, Brett G.; Piepel, Gregory F.; Matzke, Brett D.; Filliben, James J.; Jones, Barbara

    2007-12-13

    This document describes the test events and numbers of samples comprising the experimental design that was developed for the contamination, decontamination, and sampling of a building at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This study is referred to as the INL Sample Collection Operational Test. Specific objectives were developed to guide the construction of the experimental design. The main objective is to assess the relative abilities of judgmental and probabilistic sampling strategies to detect contamination in individual rooms or on a whole floor of the INL building. A second objective is to assess the use of probabilistic and Bayesian (judgmental + probabilistic) sampling strategies to make clearance statements of the form “X% confidence that at least Y% of a room (or floor of the building) is not contaminated. The experimental design described in this report includes five test events. The test events (i) vary the floor of the building on which the contaminant will be released, (ii) provide for varying or adjusting the concentration of contaminant released to obtain the ideal concentration gradient across a floor of the building, and (iii) investigate overt as well as covert release of contaminants. The ideal contaminant gradient would have high concentrations of contaminant in rooms near the release point, with concentrations decreasing to zero in rooms at the opposite end of the building floor. For each of the five test events, the specified floor of the INL building will be contaminated with BG, a stand-in for Bacillus anthracis. The BG contaminant will be disseminated from a point-release device located in the room specified in the experimental design for each test event. Then judgmental and probabilistic samples will be collected according to the pre-specified sampling plan. Judgmental samples will be selected based on professional judgment and prior information. Probabilistic samples will be selected in sufficient numbers to provide desired confidence

  7. Analyses of the OSU-MASLWR Experimental Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Mascari

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, considering the sustainability of the nuclear technology in the energy mix policy of developing and developed countries, the international community starts the development of new advanced reactor designs. In this framework, Oregon State University (OSU has constructed, a system level test facility to examine natural circulation phenomena of importance to multi-application small light water reactor (MASLWR design, a small modular pressurized water reactor (PWR, relying on natural circulation during both steady-state and transient operation. The target of this paper is to give a review of the main characteristics of the experimental facility, to analyse the main phenomena characterizing the tests already performed, the potential transients that could be investigated in the facility, and to describe the current IAEA International Collaborative Standard Problem that is being hosted at OSU and the experimental data will be collected at the OSU-MASLWR test facility. A summary of the best estimate thermal hydraulic system code analyses, already performed, to analyze the codes capability in predicting the phenomena typical of the MASLWR prototype, thermal hydraulically characterized in the OSU-MASLWR facility, is presented as well.

  8. Using Experimental Data To Test And Improve Susy Theories

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, T

    2004-01-01

    There are several pieces of evidence that our world is described by a supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model. In this thesis, I assume this is the case and study how to use experimental data to test and improve supersymmetric standard models. Several experimental signatures and their implications are covered in this thesis: the result of the branching ratio of b → sγ is used to put constraints on SUSY models; the measured time-dependent CP asymmetry in the B → &phis;KS process is used to test unification scale models; the excess of positrons from cosmic rays helps us to test the property of the Lightest Supersymmetric Particle and the Cold Dark Matter production mechanisms; the LEP higgs search results are used to classify SUSY models; SUSY signatures at the Tevatron are used to distinguish different unification scale models; by considering the μ problem, SUSY theories are improved. Due to the large unknown parameter space, all of the above inputs should be used ...

  9. ScienceAcademies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    levels. All experiments verify physical laws and principles and yield reasonably accurate results. The Course is particularly aimed at teachers teaching at UG/PG level. College/University teachers ... Motivated students of MSc/PhD Physics who have a keen interest in Experimental Physics and in teaching physics, may also ...

  10. Reactions of Atoms and Molecules, Science (Experimental): 5316.02.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buffaloe, Jacquelin F.

    This course, intended for first year chemistry students, introduces the mole concept through the use of experimentation. Performance objectives are specified and a course outline is given. A total of 42 experiments from eight texts, sources for eight demonstrations, and suggestions for accompanying film strips and film loops are included. Lists of…

  11. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics 10 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-05-25

    May 25, 2017 ... A Refresher Course in Experimental Physics will be held at Goa University, Goa from 10 to 25 May 2017 for the benefit of faculty involved in teaching ... experiments are in (a) mechanics, (b) heat, (c) electricity both DC and AC, (d) magnetism, (e) relaxation,. (f) phase sensitive detection technique, and (g) ...

  12. Science Academies' 92nd Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-11-21

    Nov 21, 2017 ... A Refresher Course in Experimental Physics will be held at Goa University, Goa from. 6 to 21 November 2017 for the benefit of faculty involved in teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Participants in this course will gain hands-on experience with about twenty five out of forty experiments, with ...

  13. Science Academies' 93rd Refresher Course in Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-30

    Sep 30, 2017 ... A Refresher Course in Experimental Physics will be held at the Department of Physics, Indian. Institute of Technology Patna, Bihta, India from November 07–22, 2017 for the benefit of faculty involved in teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Participants in this course will gain hands-on ...

  14. Science Academies Seventy-Fifth Refresher Course in Experimental ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Experimental Physics will be held at Goa University, Goa from 10 to 25 May 2016 for the benefit of faculty involved in teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Participants in this course will gain hands on experience with about twenty five out of forty experiments, with a low cost kit ...

  15. Science Academies' Refresher Course on Experimental Physics 13 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2017-09-28

    Sep 28, 2017 ... A Refresher Course in Experimental Physics will be held at Post-Graduate and Research Department of Physics,. Bishop Moore College, Mavelikara, Kerala, , from 1328 September, 2017 for the benefit of faculty involved in teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Participants in this course will ...

  16. Science Academies' 82nd Refresher Course on Experimental Physics

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    A Refresher Course in Experimental Physics will be held at Department of Physics, Kakatiya University, Warangal from 6 to 21 December 2016 for the benefit of faculty involved in teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses. The Course aims to familiarize the participants to gain hands on experience with set of new ...

  17. Science Academies' Refresher Course in Experimental Physics 9 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A Refresher Course in Experimental Physics will be held at Bahra University, Waknaghat, HP, from 9th to. 24th May 2017 for the benefit of faculty involved in teaching undergraduate and postgraduate courses. Par- ticipants in this course will gain hands on experience with about twenty five experiments, with a low cost kit.

  18. The role of experimental forests in science and management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theresa B. Jain

    2012-01-01

    Happy 100 years to the Priest River Experimental Forest (PREF)! PREF, which is managed by the Research and Development Branch of the USDA Forest Service, celebrated its centennial in September 2011. It was established in northern Idaho to provide useful information that would improve forest management in the western part of District One at a time when US forestry was...

  19. Design of Pump as Turbine Experimental Test Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zariatin D. L.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design process of experimental test facility for pump as turbine hydropower system. Three design possibilities that related to the PAT condition of operation was developed and analyzed by using CFD Software. It is found that the First Variant with a straight flow to the PAT will produce higher velocity, which is needed to generate more rotation of the shaft generator, in order to generate more electric power. The strength of PAT construction was analyzed by using FEM software. It was found that the maximum stress is 6 MPa and can be concluded that the construction is appropriate to the design requirement.

  20. Students' Epistemologies about Experimental Physics: Validating the Colorado Learning Attitudes about Science Survey for Experimental Physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Bethany R.; Lewandowski, H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Student learning in instructional physics labs represents a growing area of research that includes investigations of students' beliefs and expectations about the nature of experimental physics. To directly probe students' epistemologies about experimental physics and support broader lab transformation efforts at the University of Colorado Boulder…

  1. Experimental test of escape theory: accessibility to implicit suicidal mind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Junhua; Wu, Shengjun; Miao, Danmin

    2013-08-01

    This study tested the Escape Theory prediction that individuals blaming themselves for failure experience increased accessibility to implicit suicidal mind. One hundred and thirty-eight undergraduate medical students were randomly assigned to three groups: failure-related priming, success-related priming, and control. Following experimental conditions, participants completed a death/suicide Implicit Association Test. Results revealed significant differences between groups in accessibility to implicit suicidal mind. Furthermore, priming manipulation interacted with individual differences in locus of control (LOC). Significant differences in accessibility to implicit suicidal mind were observed in individuals with internal LOC, while effects of priming manipulation were eliminated in individuals with external LOC. © 2013 The American Association of Suicidology.

  2. Experimentally testing Hardy’s theorem on nonlocality with entangled mixed states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Dai-He; Dai, Mao-Chun; Guo, Wei-Jie; Wei, Lian-Fu

    2017-04-01

    Hardy’s theorem on nonlocality has been verified by a series of experiments with two-qubit entangled pure states. However, in this paper we demonstrate the experimental test of the theorem by using the two-photon entangled mixed states. We first investigate the generic logic in Hardy’s proof of nonlocality, which can be applied for arbitrary two-qubit mixed polarization entangled states and can be reduced naturally to the well-known logic tested successfully by the previous pure state experiments. Then, the optimized violations of locality for various experimental parameters are delivered by the numerical method. Finally, the logic argued above for testing Hardy’s theorem on nonlocality is demonstrated experimentally by using the mixed entangled-photon pairs generated via pumping two type-I BBO crystals. Our experimental results shows that Hardy’s proof of nonlocality can also be verified with two-qubit polarization entangled mixed states, with a violation of about 3.4 standard deviations. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61308008 and U1330201).

  3. Is Physicality an Important Aspect of Learning through Science Experimentation among Kindergarten Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zacharia, Zacharias C.; Loizou, Eleni; Papaevripidou, Marios

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether physicality (actual and active touch of concrete material), as such, is a necessity for science experimentation learning at the kindergarten level. We compared the effects of student experimentation with Physical Manipulatives (PM) and Virtual Manipulatives (VM) on kindergarten students'…

  4. Apparatus and Experimental Procedures to Test Crystal Collimation

    CERN Document Server

    Montesano, S

    2012-01-01

    UA9 is an experimental setup operated in the CERN-SPS in view of investigating the feasibility of halo collimation assisted by bent crystals. The test collimation system is composed of one crystal acting as primary halo deflector in the horizontal plane and an absorber. Different crystals are tested in turn using two-arm goniometers with an angular reproducibility of better than 10 microrad. The performance of the system is assessed through the study of the secondary and tertiary halo in critical areas, by using standard machine instrumentation and few customized equipments. The alignment of the crystal is verified by measuring the loss rate close to the crystal position. The collimation efficiency is computed by intercepting the deflected halo with a massive collimator or with an imaging device installed into a Roman Pot. The leakage of the system is evaluated in the dispersion suppressor by means of movable aperture restrictions. In this contribution the setup and the experimental methods in use are revisit...

  5. Experimentally testing Taylor's stress, coping and adaptation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gidron, Yori; Nyklicek, Ivan

    2009-10-01

    Taylor (1995) constructed a comprehensive framework of stress and adaptation, which considers internal and external resources/impediments as moderators, based on previous studies and models. However, most past research used correlation designs and has not taken into account all of the framework's components within one study. This study tested the effects of the event (minor, major), primary appraisal (benign, severe), coping (problem-focused coping (PFC) versus emotion-focused coping), external resources (with/without social support), and internal impediments (hostility), on estimated distress (dependent variable) in written imagined stressful daily scenarios. All components except hostility were experimentally manipulated within subjects in the scenarios. The scenarios were rated by 281 Dutch students. The variables event, appraisal, and social support significantly and independently affected estimated distress. Event and appraisal synergistically interacted in relation to estimated distress. Finally, appraisal interacted with coping such that the distress-reducing effects of PFC occurred only in benign events, while coping did not affect estimated distress in severely appraised events. This study experimentally tested most components of Taylor's framework, and showed that events, appraisal, and social resources were independent determinants of estimated distress, and that appraisal interacts in a complex manner with the event and with coping.

  6. Experimental test campaign on an ITER divertor mock-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dell' Orco, G. E-mail: giovanni.dellorco@brasimone.enea.it; Malavasi, A.; Merola, M.; Polazzi, G.; Simoncini, M.; Zito, D

    2002-11-01

    In 1998, in the frame of the European R and D on ITER high heat flux components, the fabrication of a full scale ITER Divertor Outboard mock-up was launched. It comprised a Cassette Body (CB), designed with some mechanical and hydraulic simplifications with respect to the reference body and its actively cooled Dummy Armour Prototype (DAP). This DAP consists of a Vertical Target (VT), a Wing (WI) and a Dump Target (DT), manufactured by European industries, which are integrated to the Gas Box Liner (GBL) supplied by the Russian Federation ITER Home Team. In 1999, in parallel with the manufacturing activity, the ITER European Home Team decided to assign to ENEA a Task for checking the component integration and performing the thermal-hydraulic and thermal mechanical testing of the DAP and CB. In 1999-2000, ENEA performed the experimental campaign at Brasimone Labs. The present work presents the experimental results of the component integration and the thermal-hydraulic and thermo-mechanical fatigue tests.

  7. Using Test Data to Find Misconceptions in Secondary Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Travis T.; Arsenault, Mike

    2017-01-01

    Students, as well as teachers, often learn what makes sense to them, even when it is wrong. These misconceptions are a problem. The authors sought a quick, quantitative way of identifying student misconceptions in secondary science. Using the University of Toronto's National Biology Competition test data, this article presents a method of quickly…

  8. Students' Ability in Science: Results from a Test Development Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkanat, Cigdem; Gokdere, Murat

    2017-01-01

    Student's ability to use and manipulate scientific concepts has been widely explored; however there is still a need to define the characteristics and nature of science ability. Also, the tests and performance scales that require minimal conceptual knowledge to measure this ability are relatively less common. The aim of this study was to develop an…

  9. [Reduction of animal experiments in experimental drug testing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Behrensdorf-Nicol, H; Krämer, B

    2014-10-01

    In order to ensure the quality of biomedical products, an experimental test for every single manufactured batch is required for many products. Especially in vaccine testing, animal experiments are traditionally used for this purpose. For example, efficacy is often determined via challenge experiments in laboratory animals. Safety tests of vaccine batches are also mostly performed using laboratory animals. However, many animal experiments have clear inherent disadvantages (low accuracy, questionable transferability to humans, unclear significance). Furthermore, for ethical reasons and animal welfare aspects animal experiments are also seen very critical by the public. Therefore, there is a strong trend towards replacing animal experiments with methods in which no animals are used ("replacement"). If a replacement is not possible, the required animal experiments should be improved in order to minimize the number of animals necessary ("reduction") and to reduce pain and suffering caused by the experiment to a minimum ("refinement"). This "3R concept" is meanwhile firmly established in legislature. In recent years many mandatory animal experiments have been replaced by alternative in vitro methods or improved according to the 3R principles; numerous alternative methods are currently under development. Nevertheless, the process from the development of a new method to its legal implementation takes a long time. Therefore, supplementary regulatory measures to facilitate validation and acceptance of new alternative methods could contribute to a faster and more consequent implementation of the 3R concept in the testing of biomedical products.

  10. Experimental innovations in surface science a guide to practical laboratory methods and instruments

    CERN Document Server

    Yates, John T

    2015-01-01

    This book is a new edition of a classic text on experimental methods and instruments in surface science. It offers practical insight useful to chemists, physicists, and materials scientists working in experimental surface science. This enlarged second edition contains almost 300 descriptions of experimental methods. The more than 50 active areas with individual scientific and measurement concepts and activities relevant to each area are presented in this book. The key areas covered are: Vacuum System Technology, Mechanical Fabrication Techniques, Measurement Methods, Thermal Control, Delivery of Adsorbates to Surfaces, UHV Windows, Surface Preparation Methods, High Area Solids, Safety. The book is written for researchers and graduate students.

  11. Experimental information - RED | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ba.nbdc00315-003 Description of data contents Detailed information of the experiment of each array glass. Da...ta file File name: red_experiment_info.zip File URL: ftp://ftp.biosciencedbc.jp/archive/red/LATEST/red_experiment... 2,158 entries Data item Description Info ID ID of the experimental information Research ID Research ID (Sub...rsion) g : Rice8987 g_array (Full insert version) others : Other types blank : Unknown glass ID Array glass ID experiment..._info.zip File size: 20.3 KB Simple search URL http://togodb.biosciencedbc.jp/togodb/view/red_experim

  12. Experimental design with applications in management, engineering and the sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Paul D; Celli, Giovana B

    2018-01-01

    This text introduces and provides instruction on the design and analysis of experiments for a broad audience. Formed by decades of teaching, consulting, and industrial experience in the Design of Experiments field, this new edition contains updated examples, exercises, and situations covering the science and engineering practice. This text minimizes the amount of mathematical detail, while still doing full justice to the mathematical rigor of the presentation and the precision of statements, making the text accessible for those who have little experience with design of experiments and who need some practical advice on using such designs to solve day-to-day problems. Additionally, an intuitive understanding of the principles is always emphasized, with helpful hints throughout.

  13. SOURCES OF DIFFERENCES IN CALCULATIONS AND EXPERIMENTAL TEST RESULTS OF FATIGUE LIFE OF STRUCTURAL ELEMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef SZALA

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Calculation results are the base for evaluation of fatigue life of structural elements during machine design processes. It results from the fact that there are no material objects in the phase of existence of a product. Reliability of tests results is an essential element in the calculation fatigue life evaluation method and it can be evaluated by comparison of the results with experimental ones. In the paper there was performed an analysis of the chosen factors essentially influencing conformity of calculation results and experimental test ones connected with basic elements of a calculation algorithm including: - elaboration and analysis of service loadings of a structural element, - determination and analysis of cyclic properties of structural elements, - selection of fatigue damage accumulation hypothesis being a description of fatigue life processes. The mentioned analysis was illustrated with examples of fatigue life tests performed in the Machine Design Department of the University of Technology and Agriculture within the research grant no. 2221/B/T02/2010/39 financed by The Ministry of Science and Higher Education and National Science Centre.

  14. Integral Test Facility PKL: Experimental PWR Accident Investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Umminger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigations of the thermal-hydraulic behavior of pressurized water reactors under accident conditions have been carried out in the PKL test facility at AREVA NP in Erlangen, Germany for many years. The PKL facility models the entire primary side and significant parts of the secondary side of a pressurized water reactor (PWR at a height scale of 1 : 1. Volumes, power ratings and mass flows are scaled with a ratio of 1 : 145. The experimental facility consists of 4 primary loops with circulation pumps and steam generators (SGs arranged symmetrically around the reactor pressure vessel (RPV. The investigations carried out encompass a very broad spectrum from accident scenario simulations with large, medium, and small breaks, over the investigation of shutdown procedures after a wide variety of accidents, to the systematic investigation of complex thermal-hydraulic phenomena. This paper presents a survey of test objectives and programs carried out to date. It also describes the test facility in its present state. Some important results obtained over the years with focus on investigations carried out since the beginning of the international cooperation are exemplarily discussed.

  15. Using computer-based tests for information science

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Callear

    1997-12-01

    Full Text Available The introduction of objective testing using computer software does not necessarily represent innovative assessment. Where tests occur as an add-on to a course, are timeconstrained, closed-book, invigilated, and where there is little (or no feedback of results to the students, such testing is best regarded as an innovative technique for traditional summative assessment. A computer-based examination of this nature using the commercial software Question Mark has been operating for a number of years in the Department of Information Science at Portsmouth, in the second-year unit for Logic Programming, with student numbers up to 160.

  16. The Relationship between Academic Averages of Primary School Science and Technology Class and Test Sub-Test Scores of Placement Test of Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzeller, Cem Oktay

    2012-01-01

    In this research, the relationship between written exam scores of science and technology class of 6th, 7th, and 8th grades, project, participation in class activities and performance work, year-end academic success point averages and sub-test raw scores of LDT science of 6th, 7th and 8th grades. Academic success point averages were used as…

  17. Experimental temperature measurements for the energy amplifier test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calero, J. [Centro de Estudios y Experimentacion de Obras Publicas (CEDEX), Madrid (Spain); Cennini, P. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Gallego, E. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM), E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Galvez, J. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)]|[Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Garcia Tabares, L. [Centro de Estudios y Experimentacion de Obras Publicas (CEDEX), Madrid (Spain); Gonzalez, E. [Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Jaren, J. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Lopez, C. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Lorente, A. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM), E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Martinez Val, J.M. [Universidad Politecnica de Madrid (UPM), E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Oropesa, J. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Rubbia, C. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Rubio, J.A. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)]|[Centro de Investigaciones Energeticas Medioambientales y Tecnologicas (CIEMAT), E-28040 Madrid (Spain); Saldana, F. [European Laboratory for Particle Physics, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Tamarit, J. [Centro de Estudios y Experimentacion de Obras Publicas (CEDEX), Madrid (Spain); Vieira, S. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid (UAM), E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    1996-06-21

    A uranium thermometer has been designed and built in order to make local power measurements in the first energy amplifier test (FEAT). Due to the experimental conditions power measurements of tens to hundreds of nW were required, implying a sensitivity in the temperature change measurements of the order of 1 mK. A uranium thermometer accurate enough to match that sensitivity has been built. The thermometer is able to determine the absolute energetic gain obtained in a tiny subcritical uranium assembly exposed to a proton beam of kinetic energies between 600 MeV and 2.75 GeV. In addition, the thermometer measurements have provided information about the spatial power distribution and the shape of the neutron spallation cascade. (orig.).

  18. Testing experimental subunit furunculosis vaccines for rainbow trout

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marana, Moonika H.; Chettri, Jiwan Kumar; Skov, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida (AS) is the etiological agent of typical furunculosis in salmonid fish. The disease causes bacterial septicemia and is a major fish health problem in salmonid aquaculture worldwide, inducing high morbidity and mortality. In this study we vaccinated rainbow...... trout with subunit vaccines containing protein antigens that were selected based on an in silico antigen discovery approach. Thus, the proteome of AS strain A449 was analyzed by an antigen discovery platform and its proteins consequently ranked by their predicted ability to evoke protective immune...... response against AS. Fourteen proteins were prepared in 3 different experimental subunit vaccine combinations and used to vaccinate rainbow trout by intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection. We tested the proteins for their ability to elicit antibody production and protection. Thus, fish were exposed to virulent...

  19. Science and society: different bioethical approaches towards animal experimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brom, Frans W A

    2002-01-01

    respect their integrity. By weighing these prima facie duties, the moral problem of animal experimentation exists in finding which duty actually has to be considered as the decisive duty. It will be argued that these three views, even though they will all justify animal experimentation to some extent, will do so in practice under different conditions. Many current conflicts regarding the use of animals for research may be better understood in light of the conflict between the three bioethical perspectives provided by these views.

  20. Test and Validation of the Mars Science Laboratory Robotic Arm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, M.; Collins, C.; Leger, P.; Kim, W.; Carsten, J.; Tompkins, V.; Trebi-Ollennu, A.; Florow, B.

    2013-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory Robotic Arm (RA) is a key component for achieving the primary scientific goals of the mission. The RA supports sample acquisition by precisely positioning a scoop above loose regolith or accurately preloading a percussive drill on Martian rocks or rover-mounted organic check materials. It assists sample processing by orienting a sample processing unit called CHIMRA through a series of gravity-relative orientations and sample delivery by positioning the sample portion door above an instrument inlet or the observation tray. In addition the RA facilitates contact science by accurately positioning the dust removal tool, Alpha Particle X-Ray Spectrometer (APXS) and the Mars Hand Lens Imager (MAHLI) relative to surface targets. In order to fulfill these seemingly disparate science objectives the RA must satisfy a variety of accuracy and performance requirements. This paper describes the necessary arm requirement specification and the test campaign to demonstrate these requirements were satisfied.

  1. Science Library of Test Items. Volume Sixteen. Mastery Testing Program. Series 6. Tests M66-M91.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New South Wales Dept. of Education, Sydney (Australia).

    As part of a series of tests to measure mastery of specific skills in the natural sciences, print masters of tests 66 through 91 are provided. Among the areas covered are: carbon compounds; evolution; map reading; genetics; energy; chemical formulae; electricity; graphs; metric measures; solubility; and physical separations. Many tests contain…

  2. Comparison of different experimental techniques used for wax deposition testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allenson, Stephen; Johnston, Angela [Nalco Energy Services, Sugar Land, TX (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Crude oils consist of various fractions of hydrocarbons, including n-paraffins. The paraffins precipitate out of oil below the temperature called WAT (wax appearance temperature) and accumulate in flow lines and pipelines causing major transport problems. Prediction of paraffin deposition is, therefore, a key element of flow assurance programs. The purpose of this study was to develop a general and reliable approach to prediction of wax deposition based on a critical comparison of several practical lab techniques. Wax deposition study was conducted on five separate crude oils by using a varying protocols and equipment. One experimental technique was a cold stress test of wax deposition combined with ketone precipitation of waxy paraffin crystals. Another set of experiments were carried out for wax deposits formed on the surface of U-tubes and cold fingers of different designs. A comparison of the effectiveness of several wax inhibitors was conducted for these crude oils by using the selected deposition techniques. In each test method the amount of precipitated wax was recorded and compared. The deposits were characterized by melting point, qualitative and quantitative analysis of the wax components using DSC, SARA and HTGC analyses. Efficiency of paraffin inhibitors was correlated with a profile of n-paraffins distribution in the deposits. The limitations and advantages of different deposition techniques were analyzed and discussed. (author)

  3. Neural networks used to monitor an experimental test workbench

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moraes, Davi Almeida; Pereira, Iraci Martinez, E-mail: dmoraes@dk8.com.br, E-mail: martinez@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-07-01

    This work presents the application of neural networks in an experimental workbench. This bench was developed with the purpose of conducting real time tests and data acquisition. The method applied for this work allowed to generate faulty data in a gradual and controlled way through the binary combination of double action valves. Using the SCADA application (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition), it became possible to acquire data for analysis in Matlab / Simulink software. This bench has two reservoirs: a reservoir that has sensors for recording pressure and temperature variables for later analysis, and another reservoir that has level sensors. Four models were used to develop the respective practical experiments. In the first model, it was possible to perform all practical tests of the plant, as well as mechanical changes like repositioning of some mechanical components, piping, sensors and electrovalves. In the second model, it was noticed that the positioning of the flow meter, located after the pump output, prevented a good measurement of the flow variable. In the third model, it was perceived that the number of failures initially adopted, made the data too confusing for the neural network analysis. In the last model, it was possible to obtain a performance of 96.6% of hits after the reconfiguration for 4 controlled faults. (author)

  4. Experimental facility for testing nuclear instruments for planetary landing missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golovin, Dmitry; Mitrofanov, Igor; Litvak, Maxim; Kozyrev, Alexander; Sanin, Anton; Vostrukhin, Andrey

    2017-04-01

    The experimental facility for testing and calibration of nuclear planetology instruments has been built in the frame of JINR and Space Research Institute (Moscow) cooperation. The Martian soil model from silicate glass with dimensions 3.82 x 3.21 m and total weight near 30 tons has been assembled in the facility. The glass material was chosen for imitation of dry Martian regolith. The heterogeneous model has been proposed and developed to achieve the most possible similarity with Martian soil in part of the average elemental composition by adding layers of necessary materials, such as iron, aluminum, and chlorine. The presence of subsurface water ice is simulated by adding layers of polyethylene at different depths inside glass model assembly. Neutron generator was used as a neutron source to induce characteristic gamma rays for testing active neutron and gamma spectrometers to define elements composition of the model. The instrumentation was able to detect gamma lines attributed to H, O, Na, Mg, Al, Si, Cl, K, Ca and Fe. The identified elements compose up to 95 wt % of total mass of the planetary soil model. This results will be used for designing scientific instruments to performing experiments of active neutron and gamma ray spectroscopy on the surface of the planets during Russian and international missions Luna-Glob, Luna-Resource and ExoMars-2020.

  5. InChIKey collision resistance: an experimental testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pletnev Igor

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract InChIKey is a 27-character compacted (hashed version of InChI which is intended for Internet and database searching/indexing and is based on an SHA-256 hash of the InChI character string. The first block of InChIKey encodes molecular skeleton while the second block represents various kinds of isomerism (stereo, tautomeric, etc.. InChIKey is designed to be a nearly unique substitute for the parent InChI. However, a single InChIKey may occasionally map to two or more InChI strings (collision. The appearance of collision itself does not compromise the signature as collision-free hashing is impossible; the only viable approach is to set and keep a reasonable level of collision resistance which is sufficient for typical applications. We tested, in computational experiments, how well the real-life InChIKey collision resistance corresponds to the theoretical estimates expected by design. For this purpose, we analyzed the statistical characteristics of InChIKey for datasets of variable size in comparison to the theoretical statistical frequencies. For the relatively short second block, an exhaustive direct testing was performed. We computed and compared to theory the numbers of collisions for the stereoisomers of Spongistatin I (using the whole set of 67,108,864 isomers and its subsets. For the longer first block, we generated, using custom-made software, InChIKeys for more than 3 × 1010 chemical structures. The statistical behavior of this block was tested by comparison of experimental and theoretical frequencies for the various four-letter sequences which may appear in the first block body. From the results of our computational experiments we conclude that the observed characteristics of InChIKey collision resistance are in good agreement with theoretical expectations.

  6. Historical evolution of main trends in academic rehearsals in Natural Experimental Sciences in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marquez, Rolando

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Historical analysis of data plays a key role in scientific research for understanding reality. This is a common starting point for the majority o studies in didactics, particular in the didactic of experimental sciences. The objective of this paper is to characterize the historical tendencies concerning methods and procedures of conducted science experiments in Cuba. On the basis of the application of the “Scientific Method”, several indicators are proposed.

  7. Historical evolution of main trends in academic rehearsals in Natural Experimental Sciences in Cuba

    OpenAIRE

    Marquez, Rolando

    2011-01-01

    Historical analysis of data plays a key role in scientific research for understanding reality. This is a common starting point for the majority o studies in didactics, particular in the didactic of experimental sciences. The objective of this paper is to characterize the historical tendencies concerning methods and procedures of conducted science experiments in Cuba. On the basis of the application of the “Scientific Method”, several indicators are proposed.

  8. Mars Science Laboratory Flight Software Boot Robustness Testing Project Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Brian

    2011-01-01

    On the surface of Mars, the Mars Science Laboratory will boot up its flight computers every morning, having charged the batteries through the night. This boot process is complicated, critical, and affected by numerous hardware states that can be difficult to test. The hardware test beds do not facilitate testing a long duration of back-to-back unmanned automated tests, and although the software simulation has provided the necessary functionality and fidelity for this boot testing, there has not been support for the full flexibility necessary for this task. Therefore to perform this testing a framework has been build around the software simulation that supports running automated tests loading a variety of starting configurations for software and hardware states. This implementation has been tested against the nominal cases to validate the methodology, and support for configuring off-nominal cases is ongoing. The implication of this testing is that the introduction of input configurations that have yet proved difficult to test may reveal boot scenarios worth higher fidelity investigation, and in other cases increase confidence in the robustness of the flight software boot process.

  9. An experimental test of whether habitat corridors affect pollen transfer.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Townsend, Patricia A.; Levey, Douglas J.

    2005-02-01

    Abstract. Negative effects of habitat fragmentation are thought to be diminished when habitat patches are joined by a corridor. A key assumption is that corridors facilitate exchange rates of organisms between otherwise isolated patches. If the organisms are pollinators, corridors may be important for maintaining genetically viable populations of the plants that they pollinate. We tested the hypothesis that corridors increase the movement of insect pollinators into patches of habitat and thereby increase pollen transfer for two species of plants, one pollinated by butterflies (Lantana camara) and the other by bees and wasps (Rudbeckia hirta). We worked in an experimental landscape consisting of 40 greater than or equal to 1-ha patches of early-successional habitat in a matrix of forest. Within each of eight experimental units, two patches were connected by a corridor (150 X 25 m), and three were not. Patch shape varied to control for the area added by the presence of a corridor. Differences in patch shape also allowed us to test alternative hypotheses of how corridors might function. The Traditional Corridor Hypothesis posits that corridors increase immigration and emigration by functioning as movement conduits between patches. The Drift Fence Hypothesis posits that corridors function by ‘‘capturing’’ organisms dispersing through the matrix, redirecting them into associated habitat patches. Using fluorescent powder to track pollen, we found that pollen transfer by butterflies between patches connected by a corridor was significantly higher than between unconnected patches (all values mean plus or minus 1 SE: 59% plus or minus 9.2% vs. 25% plus or minus 5.2% of flowers receiving pollen). Likewise, pollen transfer by bees and wasps was significantly higher between connected patches than between unconnected patches (30% plus or minus 4.2% vs. 14.5% plus or minus 2.2%). These results support the Traditional Corridor Hypothesis. There was little support, however

  10. The material realization of science from Habermas to experimentation and referential realism

    CERN Document Server

    Radder, Hans

    2012-01-01

    This book develops a conception of science as a multi-dimensional practice, which includes experimental action and production, conceptual-theoretical interpretation, and formal-mathematical work. On this basis, it addresses the topical issue of scientific realism and expounds a detailed, referentially realist account of the natural sciences. This account is shown to be compatible with the frequent occurrence of conceptual discontinuities in the historical development of the sciences. Referential realism exploits several fruitful ideas of Jürgen Habermas, especially his distinction between objectivity and truth; it builds on a in-depth analysis of scientific experiments, including their material realization; and it is developed through an extensive case study in the history and philosophy of quantum mechanics. The new postscript explains how the book relates to several important issues in recent philosophy of science and science studies.

  11. Clinical trials transparency and the Trial and Experimental Studies Transparency (TEST) act.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logvinov, Ilana

    2014-03-01

    Clinical trial research is the cornerstone for successful advancement of medicine that provides hope for millions of people in the future. Full transparency in clinical trials may allow independent investigators to evaluate study designs, perform additional analysis of data, and potentially eliminate duplicate studies. Current regulatory system and publishers rely on investigators and pharmaceutical industries for complete and accurate reporting of results from completed clinical trials. Legislation seems to be the only way to enforce mandatory disclosure of results. The Trial and Experimental Studies Transparency (TEST) Act of 2012 was introduced to the legislators in the United States to promote greater transparency in research industry. Public safety and advancement of science are the driving forces for the proposed policy change. The TEST Act may benefit the society and researchers; however, there are major concerns with participants' privacy and intellectual property protection. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Experimental Testing for Stability Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources Components with Storage Devices and Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mihet-Popa, Lucian; Groza, Voicu; Isleifsson, Fridrik Rafn

    2012-01-01

    Experimental Testing for Stability Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources Components with Storage Devices and Loads......Experimental Testing for Stability Analysis of Distributed Energy Resources Components with Storage Devices and Loads...

  13. An experimental test for indirect benefits in Drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ödeen Anders

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Despite much empirical attention, tests for indirect benefits of mate choice have rarely considered the major components of sexual and nonsexual offspring fitness relevant to a population. Here we use a novel experimental design to test for the existence of any indirect benefits in a laboratory adapted population of D. melanogaster. Our experiment compared the fitness (mating success, longevity, and productivity of individuals possessing genomes that derived two generations previously from males that were either entirely successful (studs or wholly unsuccessful (duds at achieving mates in three subsequent rounds of mating trials. Results Males from the stud treatment were 30% more successful on average at securing mates than males from the dud treatment. In contrast, we found no difference between treatments in measures of productivity or of longevity when measured in a mixed-sex environment. In the absence of females, however, males in the stud treatment outlived males in the dud treatment. Conclusion Our results suggest that mating with successful males in this population provides an indirect benefit to females and that, at least in this environment, the benefit arises primarily through the production of more attractive male offspring. However, it is unclear whether this represents solely a traditional sexy sons benefit or whether there is an additional good genes component (with male offspring simply allocating their surplus condition to traits that enhance their mating success. The lack of any detectable differences in female fitness between the two treatments suggests the former, although the longevity advantage of males in the stud treatment when females were absent is consistent with the latter. Determining the effect of this indirect benefit on the evolution of female mate preferences (or resistance will require comparable data on the direct costs of mating with various males, and an understanding of how these costs

  14. Environmental testing of an experimental digital safety channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korsah, K.; Tanaka, T.J.; Wilson, T.L. Jr.; Wood, R.T.

    1996-09-01

    This document presents the results of environmental stress tests performed on an experimental digital safety channel (EDSC) assembled at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the NRC-sponsored Qualification of Advanced Instrumentation and Controls (W) System program. The objective of this study is to investigate failure modes and vulnerabilities of microprocessor-based technologies when subjected to environmental stressors. The study contributes to the technical basis for environmental qualification of safety-related digital I&C systems. The EDSC employs technologies and digital subsystems representative of those proposed for use in advanced light-water reactors (ALWRs) or for retrofits in existing plants. Subsystems include computers, electrical and optical serial communication links, fiber-optic network links, analog-to-digital and digital-to-analog converters, and multiplexers. The EDSC was subjected to selected stressors that are a potential risk to digital equipment in a mild environment. The selected stressors were electromagnetic and radio-frequency interference (EMYRFI), temperature, humidity, and smoke exposure. The stressors were applied over ranges that were considerably higher than what the channel is likely to experience in a normal nuclear power plant environment. Ranges of stress were selected at a sufficiently high level to induce errors so that failure modes that are characteristic of the technologies employed could be identified.

  15. National test of an experimental hospital pharmacy management information system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolar, M H

    1983-11-01

    An experimental hospital pharmacy management information system (HPMIS) was evaluated in a national pilot test. Approximately 250 information and materials packets were distributed to hospitals that had inquired about the project. Monthly data on pharmacy expenses, personnel use, and productivity were collected for a six-month period by participating hospitals. This information was processed quarterly and converted into the HPMIS indicators; results were categorized according to hospital characteristics and locations. A questionnaire soliciting opinions about the system was sent to participants at the end of the data-collection period. One hundred six hospitals agreed to participate; 84 hospitals submitted data for at least one quarterly period. The range of values for most indicators varied 100-fold; this was attributed to misinterpretation of data item definitions. Based on indicator values, drug and personnel expenses and supportive-personnel use were greater in unit dose hospitals than in hospitals without total unit dose drug distribution systems. Both drug and fluid costs and the extent of supportive-personnel use increased with increasing hospital size. Data-collection time was less in hospitals with computerized pharmacy operations. Responses to the questionnaire indicated that the clinical services indicators were favored the least; however, only a few changes in the data-collection format of the system were suggested. HPMIS appears to be a useful work-measurement tool but needs to be simplified if it to serve as the standard for these systems.

  16. Tuberculin test in nursing and human-sciences students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Golchin

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Tuberculosis (TB is a leading cause of death worldwide due to any single infectious agent. It seems that health care workers including nursing students can be affected easier than the other people, because of probable contacts in hospital. The risk of TB infection in nursing students has not estimated in Iran, so we conducted this study to compare the results of tuberculin test in the beginning and the end of educational course for nursing and human-sciences student. Methods: In a Cohort study, 320 students (160 nursing and 160 human-sciences underwent PPD skin test (5 units RT 23 at the beginning and the end of educational course by expert technician. The data of remaining students (123 nursing and 111 human-sciences were analyzed by SPSS software using Wilcoxson and Mann-Whitney tests. Results: The frequency distribution of skin reaction in nursing students was negative (0-4 mm: 93.7%, suspected (5-9 mm: 4.4% and significant (≥15mm: 1.9% at the beginning of study, while it was negative( 75.5 %, suspected (9.8%, positive (10-14 mm 3.3% and significant (11.4% at the end of study. The frequency of skin reaction in human-sciences student was negative (93.7%, suspected (0.6%, positive (1.3% and significant (4.4% at the beginning of study, while it was negative (79.3%, significant (10.8%, suspected (8.1% and positive (1.8% at the end of study. The difference in that proportion of nursing students and control group with positive and significant PPD test at the end of study was statistically significant. The difference for the above proportions between two groups was not statistically significant. Conclusion: All subjects had no significant difference regarding to age, indigenous area and PPD test. Both groups have the same chance for exposure to M. Tuberculosis. The rate of new TB infection in Iranian community has diminished in comparison with the last few decades. Although risk of new infection may be a little bit more after age

  17. Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle Jettison Mechanism Engineering and Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldirola, L.; Schmid, B.

    2015-09-01

    The IXV (Intermediate eXperimental Vehicle) is a project of the European Space Agency that aims to develop an autonomous atmospheric re-entry system. A flight model has been launched on a Vega rocket on the 11th of February 2015 and after descending from an altitude of 420km splashed down in the Pacific Ocean. In the frame of this project RUAG space has developed the entire cold structure and the mechanisms able to eject the panels closing the parachute and floatation balloons bays. Panels ejection allows respectively parachutes deployment, reducing the IXV re-entry speed from Mach 1.5 to few meters per second just before the splash down, and buoyancy balloons inflation which let the vehicle float on the sea surface until arrival of the recovery ship.Such panels and the relevant mechanisms had to be designed not only to guarantee the correct external aerodynamic shape needed for the flight performance, but also to provide enough stiffness and strength to the IXV structure, being capable of transfer high shear loads.Moreover the floatation doors design enclosed both the hold down and release mechanism, based on a non- explosive separation nut, and the jettison springs, therefore particular attention had to be put to prevent any damage to the panel during the release which could have potentially led to jamming of the panel itself which jeopardise the floatation balloon deployment. The chosen design was therefore based on a spherical joint, so that shear load can be withstand and bending moment on the jettison-able panels limited at the same time.Test activities have been performed at mechanism level for environmental and preliminary functional qualification, subsystem level, including dummy panel jettison and full scale IXV drop test, to complete the functional qualification and system level test to close qualification campaign.The purpose of this paper is to present the mechanism design and the activities performed to qualify at component and sub-system level the

  18. Experimental Testing of a Van De Graaff Generator as an Electromagnetic Pulse Generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF A VAN DE GRAAFF GENERATOR AS AN ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE GENERATOR THESIS...protection in the United States AFIT-ENP-MS-16-S-075 EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF A VAN DE GRAAFF GENERATOR AS AN ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE GENERATOR...RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT-ENP-MS-16-S-075 EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF A VAN DE GRAAFF GENERATOR AS AN ELECTROMAGNETIC PULSE GENERATOR

  19. Persistent Confusions about Hypothesis Testing in the Social Sciences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Thron

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper analyzes common confusions involving basic concepts in statistical hypothesis testing. One-third of the social science statistics textbooks examined in the study contained false statements about significance level and/or p-value. We infer that a large proportion of social scientists are being miseducated about these concepts. We analyze the causes of these persistent misunderstandings, and conclude that the conventional terminology is prone to abuse because it does not clearly represent the conditional nature of probabilities and events involved. We argue that modifications in terminology, as well as the explicit introduction of conditional probability concepts and notation into the statistics curriculum in the social sciences, are necessary to prevent the persistence of these errors.

  20. General Science, Ninth Grade: Theme I and Theme II. Student Laboratory Manual. Experimental.

    Science.gov (United States)

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This ninth grade student manual was developed to be used in conjunction with some of the experimental science activities described in the teacher's guide. It contains laboratory worksheets for: (1) measurement; (2) basic energy concepts; (3) heat energy; (4) light; (5) sound; (6) electricity; and (7) present and future energy resources. Additional…

  1. US Forest Service experimental forests and ranges: an untapped resource for social science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susan Charnley; Lee K. Cerveny

    2011-01-01

    For a century, US Forest Service experimental forests and ranges (EFRs) have been a resource for scientists conducting long-term research relating to forestry and range management social science research has been limited, despite the history of occupation and current use of these sites for activities ranging from resource extraction and recreation to public education....

  2. Test-enhanced learning: the potential for testing to promote greater learning in undergraduate science courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brame, Cynthia J; Biel, Rachel

    2015-01-01

    Testing within the science classroom is commonly used for both formative and summative assessment purposes to let the student and the instructor gauge progress toward learning goals. Research within cognitive science suggests, however, that testing can also be a learning event. We present summaries of studies that suggest that repeated retrieval can enhance long-term learning in a laboratory setting; various testing formats can promote learning; feedback enhances the benefits of testing; testing can potentiate further study; and benefits of testing are not limited to rote memory. Most of these studies were performed in a laboratory environment, so we also present summaries of experiments suggesting that the benefits of testing can extend to the classroom. Finally, we suggest opportunities that these observations raise for the classroom and for further research. © 2015 C. J. Brame and R. Biel. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2015 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  3. Promises and pitfalls of Web-based experimentation in the advance of replicable psychological science: A reply to Plant (2015).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Steenbergen, Henk; Bocanegra, Bruno R

    2016-12-01

    In a recent letter, Plant (2015) reminded us that proper calibration of our laboratory experiments is important for the progress of psychological science. Therefore, carefully controlled laboratory studies are argued to be preferred over Web-based experimentation, in which timing is usually more imprecise. Here we argue that there are many situations in which the timing of Web-based experimentation is acceptable and that online experimentation provides a very useful and promising complementary toolbox to available lab-based approaches. We discuss examples in which stimulus calibration or calibration against response criteria is necessary and situations in which this is not critical. We also discuss how online labor markets, such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk, allow researchers to acquire data in more diverse populations and to test theories along more psychological dimensions. Recent methodological advances that have produced more accurate browser-based stimulus presentation are also discussed. In our view, online experimentation is one of the most promising avenues to advance replicable psychological science in the near future.

  4. Exploration of offering photoelectric experimental general elective courses for college students of science and technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tao, Shen; Sun, Binchao

    2017-08-01

    The necessity of offering photoelectric experiment general elective courses, such as the experiments of modern optical and innovational photoelectric design for non optic-electric's science and engineering students were discussed based on the analysis of the status quo and problems in experimental general elective course in science and engineering colleges of our country. And the characters of photoelectric disciplines, the goal of science and engineering quality-oriented education and the reform of science education at home and abroad were also considered. The instructional objectives, contents and characteristics of the courses were investigated. The specific methods, the CDIO (conceive, design, implement and operate) mode in the general courses has been proposed; the experiences and practical effects of offering these courses were concluded.

  5. The effect of instructional methodology on high school students natural sciences standardized tests scores

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, P. E.

    Educators have recently come to consider inquiry based instruction as a more effective method of instruction than didactic instruction. Experience based learning theory suggests that student performance is linked to teaching method. However, research is limited on inquiry teaching and its effectiveness on preparing students to perform well on standardized tests. The purpose of the study to investigate whether one of these two teaching methodologies was more effective in increasing student performance on standardized science tests. The quasi experimental quantitative study was comprised of two stages. Stage 1 used a survey to identify teaching methods of a convenience sample of 57 teacher participants and determined level of inquiry used in instruction to place participants into instructional groups (the independent variable). Stage 2 used analysis of covariance (ANCOVA) to compare posttest scores on a standardized exam by teaching method. Additional analyses were conducted to examine the differences in science achievement by ethnicity, gender, and socioeconomic status by teaching methodology. Results demonstrated a statistically significant gain in test scores when taught using inquiry based instruction. Subpopulation analyses indicated all groups showed improved mean standardized test scores except African American students. The findings benefit teachers and students by presenting data supporting a method of content delivery that increases teacher efficacy and produces students with a greater cognition of science content that meets the school's mission and goals.

  6. Performance-based alternative assessments as a means of eliminating gender achievement differences on science tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Norman Merrill

    1998-09-01

    Historically, researchers have reported an achievement difference between females and males on standardized science tests. These differences have been reported to be based upon science knowledge, abstract reasoning skills, mathematical abilities, and cultural and social phenomena. This research was designed to determine how mastery of specific science content from public school curricula might be evaluated with performance-based assessment models, without producing gender achievement differences. The assessment instruments used were Harcourt Brace Educational Measurement's GOALSsp°ler: A Performance-Based Measure of Achievement and the performance-based portion of the Stanford Achievement Testspcopyright, Ninth Edition. The identified independent variables were test, gender, ethnicity, and grade level. A 2 x 2 x 6 x 12 (test x gender x ethnicity x grade) factorial experimental design was used to organize the data. A stratified random sample (N = 2400) was selected from a national pool of norming data: N = 1200 from the GOALSsp°ler group and N = 1200 from the SAT9spcopyright group. The ANOVA analysis yielded mixed results. The factors of test, gender, ethnicity by grade, gender by grade, and gender by grade by ethnicity failed to produce significant results (alpha = 0.05). The factors yielding significant results were ethnicity, grade, and ethnicity by grade. Therefore, no significant differences were found between female and male achievement on these performance-based assessments.

  7. Experimental Test for epsilon-Expansions with n=4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ott, H. R.; Kjems, Jørgen

    1980-01-01

    epsilon (Porson)-expansion calculations predict the magnetic phase transitions of the Ce monochalcogenides to be first order. We present experimental evidence that the transitions in CeSe and CeTe are continuous.......epsilon (Porson)-expansion calculations predict the magnetic phase transitions of the Ce monochalcogenides to be first order. We present experimental evidence that the transitions in CeSe and CeTe are continuous....

  8. Experimentally Testing the Mulitverse/Many-Worlds Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipler, Frank

    2014-06-01

    Many-Worlds quantum mechanics is NOT experimentally equivalent to standard quantum mechanics. I shall demonstrate this fact and investigate its consequences. I first show the Schrödinger equation is a special case of the classical Hamilton-Jacobi equation, with |Ψ|2 being most naturally interpreted as a quantity proportional to the density of universes in the multiverse. I then show that with this interpretation for |Ψ|2, we can test the multiverse theory, because in the multiverse theory, the Born Interpretation is derived from this assumption, not merely assumed as in standard quantum theory, and the derivation gives us a means of computing how fast |Ψ|2 will build up from individual particles in an experiment, a computation I shall show cannot be done in standard quantum mechanics. In some types of experiments, the observed pattern will approach the final Born pattern as 1/N1/2, and in other types of experiments, the approach will be as 1/N, where N is the number of observed “particles.” The multiverse meaning of has other advantages over the standard probability amplitude meaning, because if is a universe density amplitude, need not be restricted to being a Hilbert space function. In particular, delta functions and plane waves are NOT functions in any Hilbert space, but they are both used extensively in quantum mechanics, though disallowed by the axioms of standard quantum mechanics. Finally, I shall show that multiverse experiments have important implications for cosmology. The Wheeler-DeWitt equation for quantum gravity, applied to a spatially closed Friedman radiation universe in conformal time, is mathematically the Schrödinger equation for a simple harmonic oscillator. I show that if the wave function of the universe were a delta function at the initial singularity — I show that the universes being exactly classical now implies such a universal wave function — then we are overwhelmingly likely to find ourselves in a closed universe that is

  9. The peel test in experimental adhesive fracture mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, G. P.; Devries, K. L.; Williams, M. L.

    1974-01-01

    Several testing methods have been proposed for obtaining critical energy release rate or adhesive fracture energy in bond systems. These tests include blister, cone, lap shear, and peel tests. Peel tests have been used for many years to compare relative strengths of different adhesives, different surface preparation techniques, etc. The present work demonstrates the potential use of the peel test for obtaining adhesive fracture energy values.

  10. Game-XP: Action Games as Experimental Paradigms for Cognitive Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Wayne D

    2017-04-01

    Why games? How could anyone consider action games an experimental paradigm for Cognitive Science? In 1973, as one of three strategies he proposed for advancing Cognitive Science, Allen Newell exhorted us to "accept a single complex task and do all of it." More specifically, he told us that rather than taking an "experimental psychology as usual approach," we should "focus on a series of experimental and theoretical studies around a single complex task" so as to demonstrate that our theories of human cognition were powerful enough to explain "a genuine slab of human behavior" with the studies fitting into a detailed theoretical picture. Action games represent the type of experimental paradigm that Newell was advocating and the current state of programming expertise and laboratory equipment, along with the emergence of Big Data and naturally occurring datasets, provide the technologies and data needed to realize his vision. Action games enable us to escape from our field's regrettable focus on novice performance to develop theories that account for the full range of expertise through a twin focus on expertise sampling (across individuals) and longitudinal studies (within individuals) of simple and complex tasks. Copyright © 2017 Cognitive Science Society, Inc.

  11. Statistical Power in Experimental Audit Studies: Cautions and Calculations for Matched Tests With Nominal Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuolo, Mike; Uggen, Christopher; Lageson, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Given their capacity to identify causal relationships, experimental audit studies have grown increasingly popular in the social sciences. Typically, investigators send fictitious auditors who differ by a key factor (e.g., race) to particular experimental units (e.g., employers) and then compare treatment and control groups on a dichotomous outcome…

  12. Materials Science Research Rack-1 Fire Suppressant Distribution Test Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieland, P. O.

    2002-01-01

    Fire suppressant distribution testing was performed on the Materials Science Research Rack-1 (MSRR-1), a furnace facility payload that will be installed in the U.S. Lab module of the International Space Station. Unlike racks that were tested previously, the MSRR-1 uses the Active Rack Isolation System (ARIS) to reduce vibration on experiments, so the effects of ARIS on fire suppressant distribution were unknown. Two tests were performed to map the distribution of CO2 fire suppressant throughout a mockup of the MSRR-1 designed to have the same component volumes and flowpath restrictions as the flight rack. For the first test, the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 60 percent, achieved within 45 s of discharge initiation, meeting the requirement to reach 50 percent throughout the rack within 1 min. For the second test, one of the experiment mockups was removed to provide a worst-case configuration, and the average maximum CO2 concentration for the rack was 58 percent. Comparing the results of this testing with results from previous testing leads to several general conclusions that can be used to evaluate future racks. The MSRR-1 will meet the requirements for fire suppressant distribution. Primary factors that affect the ability to meet the CO2 distribution requirements are the free air volume in the rack and the total area and distribution of openings in the rack shell. The length of the suppressant flowpath and degree of tortuousness has little correlation with CO2 concentration. The total area of holes in the rack shell could be significantly increased. The free air volume could be significantly increased. To ensure the highest maximum CO2 concentration, the PFE nozzle should be inserted to the stop on the nozzle.

  13. A National Survey of Middle and High School Science Teachers' Responses to Standardized Testing: Is Science Being Devalued in Schools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydeniz, Mehmet; Southerland, Sherry A.

    2012-01-01

    This study explored American high school and middle school science teachers' attitudes toward the use of standardized testing for accountability purposes, their justification for the attitudes they hold and the impact of standardized testing on their instructional and assessment practices. A total of 161 science teachers participated in the study.…

  14. Probeware in 8th Grade Science: A Quasi-Experimental Study on Attitude and Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyer, John F., III

    The use of probeware in the delivery of science instruction has become quite widespread over the past few decades. The current emphasis on Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) education, especially in the case of underrepresented populations, seems to have accelerated the inclusion of probeware into curriculum. This quasi-experimental study sought to examine the effects of a direct replacement of traditional science tools with computer-based probeware on student achievement and student attitude toward science. Data analysis was conducted for large comparison groups and then for target STEM groups of African-American, low socioeconomic status, and female. Student achievement was measured by the Energy Concept Inventory and student attitude was measured by the Attitude Toward Science Inventory. The results showed that probeware did not have a significant effect on student achievement for almost all comparison groups. Analysis of student attitude toward science revealed that the use of probeware significantly affected overall student attitude as well as student attitude in several disaggregated subscales of attitude. These findings hold for both the comparison groups and the target STEM groups. Limitations of the study and suggestions for future research are presented.

  15. Microminipig, a non-rodent experimental animal optimized for life science research: preface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaneko, Naoki; Itoh, Katzuhiko; Sugiyama, Atsushi; Izumi, Yasukatsu

    2011-01-01

    Fuji Micra Inc. has recently achieved success in a challenging and prospective project that produces the smallest pig in the world, the "Microminipig", at a breeding farm at the foothills of Mt. Fuji in Japan. Microminipigs weigh approximately 7.0 kg at 6 months of age when they are mature. Microminipigs have been provided to several research organizations in Japan as a non-rodent experimental animal optimized for life science research.

  16. Experimental Applications of Automatic Test Markup Language (ATML)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lansdowne, Chatwin A.; McCartney, Patrick; Gorringe, Chris

    2012-01-01

    The authors describe challenging use-cases for Automatic Test Markup Language (ATML), and evaluate solutions. The first case uses ATML Test Results to deliver active features to support test procedure development and test flow, and bridging mixed software development environments. The second case examines adding attributes to Systems Modelling Language (SysML) to create a linkage for deriving information from a model to fill in an ATML document set. Both cases are outside the original concept of operations for ATML but are typical when integrating large heterogeneous systems with modular contributions from multiple disciplines.

  17. Does injustice reduce cognitive performance? An experimental test

    OpenAIRE

    Correia, I.; Lopes, A.-R.; Alcântara, P.; Alves, H.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper we report two experimental studies showing for the first time that injustice causes a reduction in cognitive performance in complex tasks. The two experiments (Study 1, n = 106, Study 2, n = 90) used two different paradigms. In Study 1 participants were exposed to injustice happening to other people. In Study 2 participants themselves were the targets of injustice. In both studies the dependent variable was cognitive performance in a complex task. Specifically, in Study 1, parti...

  18. Flight test guidelines for homebuilt and experimental aircraft

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    White, WJ

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available and Control Checks ................................................ 90 8.10.1 Stability Definitions .................................................................................... 91 8.10.2 Static Longitudinal Stability Testing... ........................................................... 92 8.10.3 Lateral-Directional Stability Control Tests .................................................. 94 Chapter 9 Envelope Expansion ......................................................................................... 97 9.1 Introduction...

  19. First experimental test of Bell inequalities performed using a non ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We describe the realisation of a new test of Bell inequalities using a new scheme obtained by the superposition of type I parametric down conversion produced in two different non-linear crystals pumped by the same laser, but with different polarisations. This experiment is the first test of Bell inequalities using a ...

  20. The role of testing realism on experimentally obtained stereotype strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Errol R; Whitfield, Richard C

    2011-01-01

    It has been shown (Hoffmann 2009) that pencil-and-paper tests, when used to determine stereotype strength, may yield data quite different to that obtained from hardware tests. The purpose of this research was to determine the level of realism required in order to have stereotypes that are consistent with real-world values. It is surprising that there does not appear to be any published research addressing this problem; all previous researches have considered either paper/pencil or hardware tests or sometimes both, but no level of simulation in between these techniques. In order to determine the effect of level of testing realism, a specific example was chosen to test, that of water tap operation stereotypes. Tests used verbal questioning, photographs of tap arrangements, a partial hardware arrangement and finally a full hardware setup. The results of these four levels of realism were very different and illustrated that, only with a full realistic simulation, did participants respond as might be expected in a real-world environment, illustrating the importance of testing realism when determining population stereotypes. This result has strong implications for product designers when selecting appropriate layouts of displays and controls and the linkages relating these. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd and The Ergonomics Society. All rights reserved.

  1. Engineering Tests of Experimental Ammonia Process Printer-Developer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1950-07-06

    have characteristics suitable for printing on Ozalid Dryphoto, sepia paper. The actual exposure and development of the anaonia process prints were...Evaluation of Tests and Investigations 26 14. Compliance with Military Characteristics 28 15. Sumwry of Modifications Accomplished and/or 28...engineering tests conducted on an e:xperiuental 42-inch ammonia process printer-developer genorallyr con- forming to military characteristics established by

  2. [Animal experimental tests of a new filling material (Isocap)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riethe, P; Rotgans, J; Schmalz, G

    1978-09-01

    An experimental investigation with animals (Rhesus monkeys) concerning pulp tolerance to two premeasured dosages of calcium hydroxide cement (Reocap and Reocap-E) as well as a pre-measured dosage of filling material (Isocap) in an injection capsule was carried out (78 class V cavities). As with the negative controls, a very slight reaction, or none at all, developed in response to the two calcium hydroxide cements and the new filling material, with and without application of capping material. When five other accidentally exposed pulpae were dissected, direct capping under the corresponding preconditions (punctate exposed pulpa, longer storage period for calcium hydroxide cement) showed the characteristic formation of reparative dentin.

  3. Experimental prospects for C, P, T, CP, and CPT tests

    CERN Document Server

    Bevan, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Discrete symmetry violation in the weak interaction is central to the Standard Model of particle physics, however the origin of these violations is not well understood. Nor are we able to provide a satisfactory explanation of the Universal dominance of matter over antimatter, an issue related to CP violation. As a result study of discrete symmetry violation remains a topic of broad interest. These proceedings discuss experimental prospects of studying C, P, T, CP and CPT symmetries in a number of contexts, including the use of triple product asymmetries and entangled neutral meson systems.

  4. Microgrids research: A review of experimental microgrids and test systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lidula, N.W.A.; Rajapakse, A.D. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, 75A Chancellor' s Circle, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, Manitoba R3T 5V6 (Canada)

    2011-01-15

    A microgrid is particularly a portion of the power distribution system that comprises distributed generation, energy storage and loads. To be capable of operating in parallel to the grid, as an autonomous power island and in transition modes, microgrids must be robust in controlling the local voltage and frequency, and protecting the network and equipment connected to the microgrid. It also needs to facilitate demand side management and resynchronization. This paper presents a review of existing microgrid test networks around the world (North America, Europe and Asia) and some significantly different microgrid simulation networks present in the literature. Paper is focused on the test systems and available microgrid control options. A summary table comparing and contrasting the existing test systems is presented. The paper is concluded highlighting the worthy findings and possible areas of research that would enhance practical use of microgrid facilities. (author)

  5. Experimental Testing of Game-Theoretic Predictions: The Ultimatum Game

    OpenAIRE

    Matysková, Ludmila

    2011-01-01

    This thesis focuses on testing of game theoretical predictions in the ultimatum game by means of controlled experiments. This game has become one of the most scrutinized games from the area of bargaining game theory. The theoretical division of the reward, which the players bargain over, is such that one player gets virtually all the reward while the second player is left with nothing. Because of such an extreme division of the reward, the game represents a severe test for the theory. In fact...

  6. Big Bounce Genesis and Possible Experimental Tests: A Brief Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeuk-Kwan Edna Cheung

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available We review the recent status of big bounce genesis as a new possibility of using dark matter particles’ mass and interaction cross-section to test the existence of a bounce universe at the early stage of evolution in our currently-observed universe. To study the dark matter production and evolution inside the bounce universe, called big bounce genesis for short, we propose a model independent approach. We shall present the motivation for proposing big bounce, as well as the model independent predictions, which can be tested by dark matter direct searches. A positive finding shall have profound impact on our understanding of the early universe physics.

  7. Experimental tests of truncated diffusion in fault damage zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Anna; Hashida, Toshiyuki; Li, Kewen; Horne, Roland N.

    2016-11-01

    Fault zones affect the flow paths of fluids in groundwater aquifers and geological reservoirs. Fault-related fracture damage decreases to background levels with increasing distance from the fault core according to a power law. This study investigated mass transport in such a fault-related structure using nonlocal models. A column flow experiment is conducted to create a permeability distribution that varies with distance from a main conduit. The experimental tracer response curve is preasymptotic and implies subdiffusive transport, which is slower than the normal Fickian diffusion. If the surrounding area is a finite domain, an upper truncated behavior in tracer response (i.e., exponential decline at late times) is observed. The tempered anomalous diffusion (TAD) model captures the transition from subdiffusive to Fickian transport, which is characterized by a smooth transition from power-law to an exponential decline in the late-time breakthrough curves.

  8. PLANCK, the Satellite: a New Experimental Test of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rabounski D.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If the origin of a microwave background (EMB is the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole anisotropy measured at different altitudes from the surface of the Earth? The mathematical methods of the General Theory of Relativity are applied herein to answer these questions. The density of the EMB is answered by means of Einstein's equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The dipole anisotropy, which is due to the rapid motion of the source (the Earth in the weak intergalactic field, is analysed by using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons, which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the EMB decreases with altitude so that the density of its energy at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25km. Furthermore, the density at the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites should be only 10$^{-7}$ of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the EMB doesn't depend on altitude from the surface of the Earth, it should be the same irrespective of the altitude at which measurements are taken. This result is in support to the experimental and observational analysis conducted by P.-M.Robitaille, according to which the 2.7K microwave background, first observed by Penzias and Wilson, is not of cosmic origin, but of the Earth, and is generated by the oceans. WMAP indicated the same anisotropy of the microwave background at the 2nd Lagrange point that near the Earth. Therefore when PLANCK, which is planned on July, 2008, will manifest the 2.7K monopole microwave signal deceased at the 2nd Langrange point, it will be a new experimental verification of Einstein's theory.

  9. PLANCK, the Satellite: a New Experimental Test of General Relativity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borissova L.

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available If the origin of a microwave background (EMB is the Earth, what would be its density and associated dipole anisotropy measured at different altitudes from the surface of the Earth? The mathematical methods of the General Theory of Relativity are applied herein to answer these questions. The density of the EMB is answered by means of Einstein’s equations for the electromagnetic field of the Earth. The dipole anisotropy, which is due to the rapid motion of the source (the Earth in the weak intergalactic field, is analysed by using the geodesic equations for light-like particles (photons, which are mediators for electromagnetic radiation. It is shown that the EMB decreases with altitude so that the density of its energy at the altitude of the COBE orbit (900km is 0.68 times less than that at the altitude of a U2 aeroplane (25 km. Furthermore, the density at the 2nd Lagrange point (1.5 million km, the position of the WMAP and PLANCK satellites should be only 1E-7 of the value detected by a U2 aeroplane or at the COBE orbit. The dipole anisotropy of the EMB doesn’t depend on altitude from the surface of the Earth, it should be the same irrespective of the altitude at which measurements are taken. This result is in support to the experimental and observational analysis conducted by P.-M. Robitaille, according to which the 2.7 K microwave background, first observed by Penzias and Wilson, is not of cosmic origin, but of the Earth, and is generated by the oceans. WMAP indicated the same anisotropy of the microwave background at the 2nd Lagrange point that near the Earth. Therefore when PLANCK, which is planned on July, 2008, will manifest the 2.7 K monopole microwave signal deceased at the 2nd Langrange point, it will be a new experimental verification of Einstein’s theory.

  10. 78 FR 51678 - Market Tests of Experimental Postal Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-21

    ... relationships with up to ten qualifying online e-commerce companies to offer same-day local delivery. Id. at 2. Buyers may request same-day delivery by using a qualifying online e-commerce platform, purchasing items... year,'' subject to adjustments for inflation. Id. 3641(e)(1). The Commission may exempt the market test...

  11. Proposed experimental test of the theory of hole superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, J. E.

    2016-06-01

    The theory of hole superconductivity predicts that in the reversible transition between normal and superconducting phases in the presence of a magnetic field there is charge flow in direction perpendicular to the normal-superconductor phase boundary. In contrast, the conventional BCS-London theory of superconductivity predicts no such charge flow. Here we discuss an experiment to test these predictions.

  12. Experimental patch testing with chromium-coated materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bregnbak, David; Thyssen, Jacob P; Jellesen, Morten Stendahl

    2017-01-01

    Chromium coatings on metal alloys can be decorative, and prevent corrosion and metal ion release. We recently showed that handling of a chromium-containing disc resulted in chromium deposition on the skin. To examine patch test reactivity to chromium-coated discs. We included 15 patients: 10 chro...

  13. Experimental testing of moorings for large floating wave energy converters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Jonas Bjerg; Ferri, Francesco; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the outcome of a test campaign, which investigates the behaviour of a synthetic mooring system applied to the Floating Power Plant wave energy converter. The study investigates the motion and tension response under operational and extreme sea states expected at the deployment...

  14. An Experimental Test of the Contingency Model of Leadership Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chemers, Martin M.; Skrzypek, George J.

    The present experiment provided a test of Fiedler's (1967) Contingency Model of Leadership Effectiveness, i.e., the relationship of leader style to group effectiveness is mediated by situational demands. Thirty-two 4 man task groups composed of military academy cadets were run in the experiment. In accordance with the Contingency Model, leaders…

  15. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. L. Orlandi

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy. In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al(99∶Si(1 and tungsten (W wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  16. Design and experimental tests of free electron laser wire scanners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orlandi, G. L.; Heimgartner, P.; Ischebeck, R.; Loch, C. Ozkan; Trovati, S.; Valitutti, P.; Schlott, V.; Ferianis, M.; Penco, G.

    2016-09-01

    SwissFEL is a x-rays free electron laser (FEL) driven by a 5.8 GeV linac under construction at Paul Scherrer Institut. In SwissFEL, wire scanners (WSCs) will be complementary to view-screens for emittance measurements and routinely used to monitor the transverse profile of the electron beam during FEL operations. The SwissFEL WSC is composed of an in-vacuum beam-probe—motorized by a stepper motor—and an out-vacuum pick-up of the wire signal. The mechanical stability of the WSC in-vacuum hardware has been characterized on a test bench. In particular, the motor induced vibrations of the wire have been measured and mapped for different motor speeds. Electron-beam tests of the entire WSC setup together with different wire materials have been carried out at the 250 MeV SwissFEL Injector Test Facility (SITF, Paul Scherrer Institut, CH) and at FERMI (Elettra-Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy). In particular, a comparative study of the relative measurement accuracy and the radiation-dose release of Al (99 )∶Si (1 ) and tungsten (W) wires has been carried out. On the basis of the outcome of the bench and electron-beam tests, the SwissFEL WSC can be qualified as a high resolution and machine-saving diagnostic tool in consideration of the mechanical stability of the scanning wire at the micrometer level and the choice of the wire material ensuring a drastic reduction of the radiation-dose release with respect to conventional metallic wires. The main aspects of the design, laboratory characterization and electron beam tests of the SwissFEL WSCs are presented.

  17. Habitat fragmentation, vole population fluctuations, and the ROMPA hypothesis: An experimental test using model landscapes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Batzli, George O

    2016-11-01

    Increased habitat fragmentation leads to smaller size of habitat patches and to greater distance between patches. The ROMPA hypothesis (ratio of optimal to marginal patch area) uniquely links vole population fluctuations to the composition of the landscape. It states that as ROMPA decreases (fragmentation increases), vole population fluctuations will increase (including the tendency to display multi-annual cycles in abundance) because decreased proportions of optimal habitat result in greater population declines and longer recovery time after a harsh season. To date, only comparative observations in the field have supported the hypothesis. This paper reports the results of the first experimental test. I used prairie voles, Microtus ochrogaster, and mowed grassland to create model landscapes with 3 levels of ROMPA (high with 25% mowed, medium with 50% mowed and low with 75% mowed). As ROMPA decreased, distances between patches of favorable habitat (high cover) increased owing to a greater proportion of unfavorable (mowed) habitat. Results from the first year with intensive live trapping indicated that the preconditions for operation of the hypothesis existed (inversely density dependent emigration and, as ROMPA decreased, increased per capita mortality and decreased per capita movement between optimal patches). Nevertheless, contrary to the prediction of the hypothesis that populations in landscapes with high ROMPA should have the lowest variability, 5 years of trapping indicated that variability was lowest with medium ROMPA. The design of field experiments may never be perfect, but these results indicate that the ROMPA hypothesis needs further rigorous testing. © 2016 International Society of Zoological Sciences, Institute of Zoology/Chinese Academy of Sciences and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  18. Experimental and numerical analysis of Al6063 duralumin using Taylor impact test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grązka M.

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents results of experimental and numerical analysis of dynamic behaviour Al6063 duralumin. Dynamical experiments were made using Taylor impact test. Experimental results at next step of study were used in numerical analyses of dynamic yield stress of tested material and model parameters of the Johnson–Cook constitutive equation. The main aim of this analysis is to find out dynamical properties of Al6063 duralumin tested in Taylor impact test.

  19. Orthogonal test and experimental study on fire floating pump

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J. R.; Zheng, J. F.; Fu, D. P.; Wang, P.

    2013-12-01

    In order to develop high efficiency fire floating pump, 250YYB-250 fire floating pump was taken as an example. The orthogonal experiment of L9 (34), which contains factors with three levels of blade numbers of impeller, outlet angle, impeller fold-angle, was performed to design nine types of impellers. Numerical simulation of whole flow field based on Fluent was adopted to perform an orthogonal test, the order of geometric parameters affects the performance of fire floating pump with complex impeller. The best design scheme for pump model was acquired. Meanwhile, the optimized design scheme was determined, and corresponding test was carried out. It demonstrated that the efficiency of the final optimal design model pump at rated flow point is of 85%. The efficiency is higher than the national standards, which verified the feasibility of the method of orthogonal design in pump design.

  20. Experimental test of macroscopic realism in a superconducting flux qubit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Knee, George; Yeh, Mao-Chuang; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Toida, Hiraku; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Shiro; Leggett, Anthony; Munro, William

    A superconducting flux qubit has been considered a macroscopic quantum system because its energy eigenstates correspond to clockwise and anti-clockwise macroscopic current. In order to test macroscopic realism in a superconducting flux qubit, we can measure the violation of the traditional Leggett-Garg inequality (LGI). The LGI is always satisfied if realism is correct, however it can be violated in systems that do not obey realism, for example microscopic systems (atoms, photons) described by quantum mechanics. To show violation of realism in a quantum system, we used a Josephson bifurcation amplifier (JBA) to read out the quantum state of our system in a fast, but low back-action fashion. We tested macroscopic realism with a simplified (but equivalent) LGI and obtained strong and significant evidence for the superposition of states of nontrivial macroscopic objects.

  1. First experimental data of the cryogenic safety test facility PICARD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidt, C.; Henriques, A.; Stamm, M.; Grohmann, S.

    2017-02-01

    The test facility PICARD, which stands for Pressure Increase in Cryostats and Analysis of Relief Devices, has been designed and constructed for cryogenic safety experiments. With a cryogenic liquid volume of 100 L, a nominal design pressure of 16 bar(g) and the capacity of measuring helium mass flow rates through safety relief devices up to 4 kg/s, the test facility allows the systematic investigation of hazardous incidents in cryostats under realistic conditions. In the course of experiments, the insulating vacuum is vented with atmospheric air or gaseous nitrogen at ambient temperature under variation of the venting diameter, the thermal insulation, the cryogenic fluid, the liquid level and the set pressure in order to analyze the impact on the heat flux and hence on the process dynamics. A special focus will be on the occurrence and implications of two-phase flow during expansion and on measuring the flow coefficients of safety devices at cryogenic temperatures. This paper describes the commissioning and the general performance of the test facility at liquid helium temperatures. Furthermore, the results of first venting experiments are presented.

  2. Building a Science of Animal Minds: Lloyd Morgan, Experimentation, and Morgan's Canon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Simon; Goodrich, Grant

    2017-08-01

    Conwy Lloyd Morgan (1852-1936) is widely regarded as the father of modern comparative psychology. Yet, Morgan initially had significant doubts about whether a genuine science of comparative psychology was even possible, only later becoming more optimistic about our ability to make reliable inferences about the mental capacities of non-human animals. There has been a fair amount of disagreement amongst scholars of Morgan's work about the nature, timing, and causes of this shift in Morgan's thinking. We argue that Morgan underwent two quite different shifts of attitude towards the proper practice of comparative psychology. The first was a qualified acceptance of the Romanesian approach to comparative psychology that he had initially criticized. The second was a shift away from Romanes' reliance on systematizing anecdotal evidence of animal intelligence towards an experimental approach, focused on studying the development of behaviour. We emphasize the role of Morgan's evolving epistemological views in bringing about the first shift - in particular, his philosophy of science. We emphasize the role of an intriguing but overlooked figure in the history of comparative psychology in explaining the second shift, T. Mann Jones, whose correspondence with Morgan provided an important catalyst for Morgan's experimental turn, particularly the special focus on development. We also shed light on the intended function of Morgan's Canon, the methodological principle for which Morgan is now mostly known. The Canon can only be properly understood by seeing it in the context of Morgan's own unique experimental vision for comparative psychology.

  3. 75 FR 16874 - Market Test of “Samples Co-Op Box” Experimental Product

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Market Test of ``Samples Co-Op Box'' Experimental Product AGENCY: Postal Service TM . ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY...) that it will begin a market test of its ``Samples Co-Op Box'' experimental product on May 1, 2010. The...

  4. 76 FR 71087 - Market Test of Experimental Product: “First-Class Tracer”

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office POSTAL SERVICE Market Test of Experimental Product: ``First-Class Tracer'' AGENCY: Postal Service \\TM\\. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY... 39 U.S.C. 3641(c)(1) that it will begin a market test of its ``First-Class Tracer'' experimental...

  5. Sexual selection's impacts on ecological specialization: an experimental test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfennig, Karin S; Pfennig, David W; Porter, Cody; Martin, Ryan A

    2015-05-22

    In many species, individuals specialize on different resources, thereby reducing competition. Such ecological specialization can promote the evolution of alternative ecomorphs-distinct phenotypes adapted for particular resources. Elucidating whether and how this process is influenced by sexual selection is crucial for understanding how ecological specialization promotes the evolution of novel traits and, potentially, speciation between ecomorphs. We evaluated the population-level effects of sexual selection (as mediated by mate choice) on ecological specialization in spadefoot toad tadpoles that express alternative ecomorphs. We manipulated whether sexual selection was present or reversed by mating females to their preferred versus non-preferred males, respectively. We then exposed their tadpoles to resource competition in experimental mesocosms. The resulting distribution of ecomorphs was similar between treatments, but sexual selection generated poorer trait integration in, and lower fitness of, the more specialized carnivore morph. Moreover, disruptive and directional natural selection were weaker in the sexual selection present treatment. Nevertheless, this effect on disruptive selection was smaller than previously documented effects of ecological opportunity and competitor density. Thus, sexual selection can inhibit adaptation to resource competition and thereby hinder ecological specialization, particularly when females obtain fitness benefits from mate choice that offset the cost of producing competitively inferior offspring. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Development and first experimental tests of Faraday cup array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokůpek, J; Kaufman, J; Margarone, D; Krůs, M; Velyhan, A; Krása, J; Burris-Mog, T; Busold, S; Deppert, O; Cowan, T E; Korn, G

    2014-01-01

    A new type of Faraday cup, capable of detecting high energy charged particles produced in a high intensity laser-matter interaction environment, has recently been developed and demonstrated as a real-time detector based on the time-of-flight technique. An array of these Faraday cups was designed and constructed to cover different observation angles with respect to the target normal direction. Thus, it allows reconstruction of the spatial distribution of ion current density in the subcritical plasma region and the ability to visualise its time evolution through time-of-flight measurements, which cannot be achieved with standard laser optical interferometry. This is a unique method for two-dimensional visualisation of ion currents from laser-generated plasmas. A technical description of the new type of Faraday cup is introduced along with an ad hoc data analysis procedure. Experimental results obtained during campaigns at the Petawatt High-Energy Laser for Heavy Ion Experiments (GSI, Darmstadt) and at the Prague Asterix Laser System (AS CR) are presented. Advantages and limitations of the used diagnostic system are discussed.

  7. Reliability of four experimental mechanical pain tests in children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søe, Ann-Britt Langager; Thomsen, Lise L; Tornoe, Birte

    2013-01-01

    In order to study pain in children, it is necessary to determine whether pain measurement tools used in adults are reliable measurements in children. The aim of this study was to explore the intrasession reliability of pressure pain thresholds (PPT) in healthy children. Furthermore, the aim was a...... was also to study the intersession reliability of the following four tests: (1) Total Tenderness Score; (2) PPT; (3) Visual Analog Scale score at suprapressure pain threshold; and (4) area under the curve (stimulus-response functions for pressure versus pain)....

  8. Experimental Design for Testing Local Lorentz Invariance Violations in Gravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ya-Fen; Tan, Yu-Jie; Shao, Cheng-Gang

    2017-09-01

    Local Lorentz invariance is an important component of General Relativity. Testing for Local Lorentz invariance can not only probe the foundation stone of General Relativity but also help to explore the unified theory for General Relativity and quantum mechanics. In this paper, we search the Local Lorentz invariance violation associated with operators of mass dimension d=6 in the pure-gravity sector with short-range gravitational experiments. To enlarge the Local Lorentz invariance violation signal effectively, we design a new experiment in which the constraints of all fourteen violation coefficients may be improved by about one order of magnitude

  9. Experimental seismic test of fluid coupled co-axial cylinders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, M. L.; Brown, S. J.; Lestingi, J. F.

    1979-01-01

    The dynamic response of fluid coupled coaxial cylindrical shells is of interest to the nuclear industry with respect to the seismic design of the reactor vessel and thermal liner. The experiments described present a series of tests which investigate the effect of the annular clearance between the cylinders (gap) on natural frequency, damping, and seismic response of both the inner and outer cylinders. The seismic input is a time history base load to the flexible fluid filled coaxial cylinders. The outer cylinder is elastically supported at both ends while the inner cylinder is supported only at the base (lower) end.

  10. Hypertelescopes: potential science gains, current testing and prospects in space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labeyrie, A.

    2016-09-01

    In the way of giant dilute telescopes, the hypertelescope is a many-aperture interferometer, which provides direct high resolution images with efficient light concentration. Pending future versions in space, a prototype terrestrial hypertelescope is under test in a high valley of the southern Alps. A moving focal gondola, suspended 101 m above small static mirrors, is driven under computer control with millimeter accuracy. The coude focus at ground level has been qualified by observing a Vega image focused by one of the mirrors and transmitted through the gondola. Upgrades under way for multi-beam interference include full autoguiding, the installation of several cameras on the gondola and adaptive optics for cophasing. Science observing is expected to begin in a few years, and other potential sites are considered for a larger meta-aperture, in the kilometer range. Future space versions, utilizing a 10-1000 km flotilla of small mirrors, are also considered and proposed to NASA and ESA, but require different technical developments.

  11. Reactivity to alcohol assessment measures: an experimental test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walters, Scott T; Vader, Amanda M; Harris, T Robert; Jouriles, Ernest N

    2009-08-01

    Previous research has suggested that alcohol screening and assessment may affect drinking. This study was a randomized test of reactivity to alcohol assessment questionnaires among a group of heavy drinking college students. A total of 147 university students completed a screening questionnaire and were randomized to either immediate assessment or delayed assessment. The immediate assessment group completed a set of drinking questionnaires at baseline, 3, 6 and 12 months, while the delayed assessment group completed questionnaires only at 12 months. Primary outcomes included overall volume of drinking, risky drinking and use of risk reduction behaviors. We found a significant effect of assessment on measures of risky drinking and risk reduction behaviors, but not on overall volume of drinking. Specifically, at 12 months, participants who had previously completed drinking assessments had a lower peak blood alcohol concentration (BAC) (d = -0.373), were more likely to report a low score on the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT; odds ratio = 2.55) and tended to use more strategies to moderate their alcohol consumption (d = 0.352). Risk reduction behaviors that were affected tended to be those that limited alcohol consumption, rather than those that minimized consequences. These results may have implications for the development of brief interventions.

  12. The Limitations of Standardized Science Tests as Benchmarks for Artificial Intelligence Research: Position Paper

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    In this position paper, I argue that standardized tests for elementary science such as SAT or Regents tests are not very good benchmarks for measuring the progress of artificial intelligence systems in understanding basic science. The primary problem is that these tests are designed to test aspects of knowledge and ability that are challenging for people; the aspects that are challenging for AI systems are very different. In particular, standardized tests do not test knowledge that is obvious...

  13. Experimental testing of the noise-canceling processor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Michael D; Baer, Ralph N; Simpson, Harry J

    2011-09-01

    Signal-processing techniques for localizing an acoustic source buried in noise are tested in a tank experiment. Noise is generated using a discrete source, a bubble generator, and a sprinkler. The experiment has essential elements of a realistic scenario in matched-field processing, including complex source and noise time series in a waveguide with water, sediment, and multipath propagation. The noise-canceling processor is found to outperform the Bartlett processor and provide the correct source range for signal-to-noise ratios below -10 dB. The multivalued Bartlett processor is found to outperform the Bartlett processor but not the noise-canceling processor. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  14. Experimental Testing of the Langlee Wave Energy Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lavelle, John; Kofoed, Jens Peter

    2011-01-01

    Aalborg University carried out wave tank testing a 1:20 scale model of Langlee, an oscillating wave-surge type of Wave Energy Converter (WEC). Langlee is designed to operate in deep water, with the hinged flaps attached to a, moored, semi-submerged reference frame. Langlee has a novel flap...... arrangement, with the flaps placed symmetrically opposing each other on a floating reference structure. This minimises the net force on the reference frame and increases the stability of the reference frame under optimal wave conditions. This paper presents the results and analysis from the wave tanks, which...... addressed the following: The Power Take Offs (PTOs) were simulated using a motor to resist the motion of the wings, according to the damping profile. Torque and velocity measurements were used to predict the wave- to mechanical-power conversion efficiency of the device. A number of wing types...

  15. ANALYSIS OF STUDENTS’ DECISION MAKING TO SOLVE SCIENCE REASONING TEST OF TRENDS IN INTERNATIONAL MATHEMATICS AND SCIENCE STUDY (TIMSS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Novianawati

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to determine students’ decision making strategy to answer TIMSS science reasoning test in cognitive reasoning domain. This research is quantitative descriptive research. The result shows that students tend to use compensatory strategy for decision making in solving multiple-choice questions and use rational category to answer essay questions. The result shows that more than half of students have been able to answer the questions TIMSS science tests correctly.

  16. Science as Knowledge, Practice, and Map Making: The Challenge of Defining Metrics for Evaluating and Improving DOE-Funded Basic Experimental Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodnarczuk, M.

    1993-03-01

    Industrial R&D laboratories have been surprisingly successful in developing performance objectives and metrics that convincingly show that planning, management, and improvement techniques can be value-added to the actual output of R&D organizations. In this paper, I will discuss the more difficult case of developing analogous constructs for DOE-funded non-nuclear, non-weapons basic research, or as I will refer to it - basic experimental science. Unlike most industrial R&D or the bulk of applied science performed at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL), the purpose of basic experimental science is producing new knowledge (usually published in professional journals) that has no immediate application to the first link (the R) of a planned R&D chain. Consequently, performance objectives and metrics are far more difficult to define. My claim is that if one can successfully define metrics for evaluating and improving DOE-funded basic experimental science (which is the most difficult case), then defining such constructs for DOE-funded applied science should be much less problematic. With the publication of the DOE Standard - Implementation Guide for Quality Assurance Programs for Basic and Applied Research (DOE-ER-STD-6001-92) and the development of a conceptual framework for integrating all the DOE orders, we need to move aggressively toward the threefold next phase: (1) focusing the management elements found in DOE-ER-STD-6001-92 on the main output of national laboratories - the experimental science itself; (2) developing clearer definitions of basic experimental science as practice not just knowledge; and (3) understanding the relationship between the metrics that scientists use for evaluating the performance of DOE-funded basic experimental science, the management elements of DOE-ER-STD-6001-92, and the notion of continuous improvement.

  17. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luke Holman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Observer bias and other "experimenter effects" occur when researchers' expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work "blind," meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind.

  18. Evidence of Experimental Bias in the Life Sciences: Why We Need Blind Data Recording.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Luke; Head, Megan L; Lanfear, Robert; Jennions, Michael D

    2015-07-01

    Observer bias and other "experimenter effects" occur when researchers' expectations influence study outcome. These biases are strongest when researchers expect a particular result, are measuring subjective variables, and have an incentive to produce data that confirm predictions. To minimize bias, it is good practice to work "blind," meaning that experimenters are unaware of the identity or treatment group of their subjects while conducting research. Here, using text mining and a literature review, we find evidence that blind protocols are uncommon in the life sciences and that nonblind studies tend to report higher effect sizes and more significant p-values. We discuss methods to minimize bias and urge researchers, editors, and peer reviewers to keep blind protocols in mind.

  19. Criterion-Referenced Tests in Science: An Investigation of Reliability, Validity, and Standards-Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lang, Harry G.

    1982-01-01

    Reliability, validity, and standards-setting procedure for a criterion-referenced test (Test of Metric Skills) were examined for use in science curricula. Results indicate a number of factors influencing test reliability/validity and that science teachers need to be aware of these factors to enhance accuracy of their judgments. (Author/JN)

  20. Prueba de Ciencia Primer Grado (Science Test for the First Grade). [In Spanish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puerto Rico State Dept. of Education, Hato Rey.

    This document consists of three parts: (1) a manual for administering the science test to first graders (in Spanish), (2) a copy of the test itself (pictorial), and (3) a list of expected competencies in science for the first three grades (in English). The test consists of 25, four-choice items. For each item, the administrator reads a statement…

  1. Experimentation and problem-based learning as alternative for the science teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.B. Soares

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimentation  and  problem-based  learning  may  aid  to  diminish  the  lack  of student  interest  in  science  teaching  and  its  contents.  These  tools  help  in understanding and in approaches in the scientific method to contextualize and give meaning to science teaching. Thus, this descriptive study presents an alternative developed from experimental activities carried out in short courses to 185 students from public schools in Uruguaiana-RS. With the problem-based learning, seven courses were offered in the period 2010-2011 lasting for five days. The courses were divided into four stages: problematization, with the theme "The food and our health";  experiment  and  theory,  these  phases  occur  together,  where  students define  the  protocol  to  be  followed  in  order  to  try  to  answer  questions experimentally using books and internet to sustain the practice theoretically; and closing, the students show the results of experiments carried out during the course through  theater,  music,  posters  or  slides.  Since  students  are  the  agents responsible for the development of this work the experimental activities through learning situations based on problems triggered a strong interest and involvement of students in the school contents. In conclusion, this method of experimentation and problem-based learning instigates the interest by scientific knowledge and turns the teaching of science in a practice innovative teaching.

  2. The emergence of modern statistics in agricultural science: analysis of variance, experimental design and the reshaping of research at Rothamsted Experimental Station, 1919-1933.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolini, Giuditta

    2015-01-01

    During the twentieth century statistical methods have transformed research in the experimental and social sciences. Qualitative evidence has largely been replaced by quantitative results and the tools of statistical inference have helped foster a new ideal of objectivity in scientific knowledge. The paper will investigate this transformation by considering the genesis of analysis of variance and experimental design, statistical methods nowadays taught in every elementary course of statistics for the experimental and social sciences. These methods were developed by the mathematician and geneticist R. A. Fisher during the 1920s, while he was working at Rothamsted Experimental Station, where agricultural research was in turn reshaped by Fisher's methods. Analysis of variance and experimental design required new practices and instruments in field and laboratory research, and imposed a redistribution of expertise among statisticians, experimental scientists and the farm staff. On the other hand the use of statistical methods in agricultural science called for a systematization of information management and made computing an activity integral to the experimental research done at Rothamsted, permanently integrating the statisticians' tools and expertise into the station research programme. Fisher's statistical methods did not remain confined within agricultural research and by the end of the 1950s they had come to stay in psychology, sociology, education, chemistry, medicine, engineering, economics, quality control, just to mention a few of the disciplines which adopted them.

  3. Experimental testing of spanwise morphing trailing edge concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pankonien, Alexander; Inman, Daniel J.

    2013-04-01

    Aircraft wings with smooth, hinge-less morphing ailerons exhibit increased chordwise aerodynamic efficiency over conventional hinged ailerons. Ideally, the wing would also use these morphing ailerons to smoothly vary its airfoil shape between spanwise stations to optimize the lift distribution and further increase aerodynamic efficiency. However, the mechanical complexity or added weight of achieving such a design has traditionally exceeded the potential aerodynamic gains. By expanding upon the previously developed cascading bimorph concept, this work uses embedded Macro-Fiber Composites and a flexure box mechanism, created using multi-material 3D printing, to achieve the Spanwise Morphing Trailing Edge (SMTE) concept. The morphing actuators are spaced spanwise along the wing with an elastomer spanning the gaps between them, which allows for optimization of the spanwise lift distribution while maintaining the continuity and efficiency of the morphing trailing edge. The concept is implemented in a representative section of a UAV wing with a 305 mm chord. A novel honeycomb skin is created from an elastomeric material using a 3D printer. The actuation capabilities of the concept are evaluated with and without spanning material on a test stand, free of aerodynamic loads. In addition, the actuation restrictions of the spanning elastomer, necessary in adapting the morphing concept from 2D to 3D, are characterized. Initial aerodynamic results from the 1'×1' wind-tunnel also show the effects of aerodynamic loading on the actuation range of the SMTE concept for uniform morphing.

  4. High school science teacher perceptions of the science proficiency testing as mandated by the State of Ohio Board of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffery, Samuel Shird

    There is a correlation between the socioeconomic status of secondary schools and scores on the State of Ohio's mandated secondary science proficiency tests. In low scoring schools many reasons effectively explain the low test scores as a result of the low socioeconomics. For example, one reason may be that many students are working late hours after school to help with family finances; parents may simply be too busy providing family income to realize the consequences of the testing program. There are many other personal issues students face that may cause them to score poorly an the test. The perceptions of their teachers regarding the science proficiency test program may be one significant factor. These teacher perceptions are the topic of this study. Two sample groups ware established for this study. One group was science teachers from secondary schools scoring 85% or higher on the 12th grade proficiency test in the academic year 1998--1999. The other group consisted of science teachers from secondary schools scoring 35% or less in the same academic year. Each group of teachers responded to a survey instrument that listed several items used to determine teachers' perceptions of the secondary science proficiency test. A significant difference in the teacher' perceptions existed between the two groups. Some of the ranked items on the form include teachers' opinions of: (1) Teaching to the tests; (2) School administrators' priority placed on improving average test scores; (3) Teacher incentive for improving average test scores; (4) Teacher teaching style change as a result of the testing mandate; (5) Teacher knowledge of State curriculum model; (6) Student stress as a result of the high-stakes test; (7) Test cultural bias; (8) The tests in general.

  5. Experimental tests on a new harvesting system for Burley tobacco

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Faugno

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The globalization of the tobacco production has led to a drop in competitiveness of the Italian tobacco on the world market. Burley is the main variety of tobacco cropped in Campania region of Southern Italy. Its leaves have to be sewn, in the curing phase. Aim of this work is to show the results of the implementation of a new harvest machine prototype. Basically, the machine used for Bright tobacco, totally mechanical harvested, which doesn’t need to be sewn because it requires an indirect-fire treatment into the curing furnaces. The machine was modified in order to mechanize harvesting of Burley tobacco, and tested on four cultivars of Burley tobacco under three different planting layouts. The Burley tobacco leaves can be harvested mechanically by pulling individual leaves off the stalk; leaves are then sorted and tied in bundles prior to sewing. A mechanical burley tobacco harvesting system was evaluated. This machine consists in realizing a leaves orientation system based on the different weight between the leaf blade and the stalk enhanced by an air flow. The measurements taken were harvest timing, work capacity, and quality standards of the work carried out. The results, in terms of user time, range from 6.67 h/ha to 7.80 h/ha while in terms of operational efficiency are between 88% and 89%. The average user capacity recorded for the four cultivars is equal to 0.14 ha/h, a value far from the one recorded for the same harvesting machine used for Bright tobacco (0.25 ha/h. The harvest timing capacity, range from 0.51 t/h to 0.99 t/h. The work productivity goes from 0.17 t to 0.33 t per hour of human unit respectively. The average number of detached leaves, depending on the cultivar, has been between 523 and 744. Concerning the leaf orientation, a general percentage of 73% was achieved.

  6. Research exemption/experimental use in the European Union: patents do not block the progress of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenichen, Hans-Rainer; Pitz, Johann

    2014-11-06

    In the public debate about patents, specifically in the area of biotechnology, the position has been taken that patents block the progress of science. As we demonstrate in this review, this is not the case in the European Union (EU). The national patent acts of the EU member states define research and experimental use exemptions from patent infringement that allow sufficient room for research activities to promote innovation. This review provides a comparative overview of the legal requirements and the extent and limitations of experimental use exemptions, including the so-called Bolar provision, in Germany, the United Kingdom, France, Spain, Italy, and The Netherlands. The legal framework in the respective countries is illustrated with reference to practical examples concerning tests on patent-protected genetic targets and antibodies. Specific questions concerning the use of patent-protected research tools, the outsourcing of research activities, and the use of preparatory and supplying acts for experimental purposes that are necessary for conducting experiments are covered. Copyright © 2015 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  7. Tests of the space gamma spectrometer prototype at the JINR experimental facility with different types of neutron generators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litvak, M. L.; Vostrukhin, A. A.; Golovin, D. V.; Dubasov, P. V.; Zontikov, A. O.; Kozyrev, A. S.; Krylov, A. R.; Krylov, V. A.; Mitrofanov, I. G.; Mokrousov, M. I.; Repkin, A. N.; Timoshenko, G. N.; Udovichenko, K. V.; Shvetsov, V. N.

    2017-07-01

    The results of the tests of the HPGe gamma spectrometer performed with a planetary soil model and different types of pulse neutron generators are presented. All measurements have been performed at the experimental nuclear planetary science facility (Joint Institute for Nuclear Research) for the physical calibration of active gamma and neutron spectrometers. The aim of the study is to model a space experiment on determining the elemental composition of Martian planetary matter by neutron-induced gamma spectroscopy. The advantages and disadvantages of a gas-filled neutron generator in comparison with a vacuum-tube neutron generator are examined.

  8. Experimental information - RED II INAHO | LSDB Archive [Life Science Database Archive metadata

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ategory2 Experimental category 2 Experimental category3 Experimental category 3 Experimental category4 Experimental category 4 Keywor...d Experimental keyword Method Method Experiment Date 1 E

  9. Cone penetration and bevameter geotechnical tests in lunar regolith simulants: discrete element method analysis and experimentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulchitsky, A. V.; Johnson, J.; Duvoy, P.; Wilkinson, A.; Creager, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    For in situ resource utilization on the Moon, asteroids, Mars, or other space body it is necessary to be able to simulate the interaction of mobile platforms and excavation machines with the regolith for engineering design, planning, and operations. For accurate simulations, tools designed to measure regolith properties will need to be deployed and interpreted. Two such tools are the penetrometer, used to measure a soil strength index as a function of depth, and the bevameter, used to characterize regolith surface properties of strength, friction and sinkage. The penetrometer interrogates regolith properties from the surface to a depth limited only by the capabilities of the instrument to penetrate the regolith while a bevameter interrogates only the upper few centimeters needed to describe a mobility platform's traction and sinkage. Interpretation of penetrometer and bevameter data can be difficult, especially on low gravity objects. We use the discrete element method (DEM) model to simulate the large regolith deformations and failures associated with the tests to determine regolith properties. The DEM simulates granular material behavior using large aggregates of distinct particles. Realistic physics of particle-particle interaction introduces many granular specific phenomena such as interlocking and force chain formation that cannot be represented using continuum methods. In this work, experiments using a cone penetrometer test (CPT) and bevameter on lunar simulants JSC-1A and GRC-1 were performed at NASA Glenn Research Center. These tests were used to validate the physics in the COUPi DEM model. COUPi is a general physical DEM code being developed to model machine/regolith interactions as part of a NASA Lunar Science Institute sponsored project on excavation and mobility modeling. The experimental results were used in this work to build an accurate model to simulate the lunar regolith. The CPT consists of driving an instrumented cone with opening angle of 60

  10. Student science achievement and the integration of Indigenous knowledge on standardized tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dupuis, Juliann; Abrams, Eleanor

    2017-09-01

    In this article, we examine how American Indian students in Montana performed on standardized state science assessments when a small number of test items based upon traditional science knowledge from a cultural curriculum, "Indian Education for All", were included. Montana is the first state in the US to mandate the use of a culturally relevant curriculum in all schools and to incorporate this curriculum into a portion of the standardized assessment items. This study compares White and American Indian student test scores on these particular test items to determine how White and American Indian students perform on culturally relevant test items compared to traditional standard science test items. The connections between student achievement on adapted culturally relevant science test items versus traditional items brings valuable insights to the fields of science education, research on student assessments, and Indigenous studies.

  11. Tools for Science Inquiry Learning: Tool Affordances, Experimentation Strategies, and Conceptual Understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumbacher, Engin; Salehi, Shima; Wieman, Carl; Blikstein, Paulo

    2017-12-01

    Manipulative environments play a fundamental role in inquiry-based science learning, yet how they impact learning is not fully understood. In a series of two studies, we develop the argument that manipulative environments (MEs) influence the kind of inquiry behaviors students engage in, and that this influence realizes through the affordances of MEs, independent of whether they are physical or virtual. In particular, we examine how MEs shape college students' experimentation strategies and conceptual understanding. In study 1, students engaged in two consecutive inquiry tasks, first on mass and spring systems and then on electric circuits. They either used virtual or physical MEs. We found that the use of experimentation strategies was strongly related to conceptual understanding across tasks, but that students engaged differently in those strategies depending on what ME they used. More students engaged in productive strategies using the virtual ME for electric circuits, and vice versa using the physical ME for mass and spring systems. In study 2, we isolated the affordance of measurement uncertainty by comparing two versions of the same virtual ME for electric circuits—one with and one without noise—and found that the conditions differed in terms of productive experimentation strategies. These findings indicate that measures of inquiry processes may resolve apparent ambiguities and inconsistencies between studies on MEs that are based on learning outcomes alone.

  12. Standardized Tests as Outcome Measures for Evaluating Instructional Interventions in Mathematics and Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sussman, Joshua Michael

    This three-paper dissertation explores problems with the use of standardized tests as outcome measures for the evaluation of instructional interventions in mathematics and science. Investigators commonly use students' scores on standardized tests to evaluate the impact of instructional programs designed to improve student achievement. However, evidence suggests that the standardized tests may not measure, or may not measure well, the student learning caused by the interventions. This problem is special case of a basic problem in applied measurement related to understanding whether a particular test provides accurate and useful information about the impact of an educational intervention. The three papers explore different aspects of the issue and highlight the potential benefits of (a) using particular research methods and of (b) implementing changes to educational policy that would strengthen efforts to reform instructional intervention in mathematics and science. The first paper investigates measurement problems related to the use of standardized tests in applied educational research. Analysis of the research projects funded by the Institute of Education Sciences (IES) Mathematics and Science Education Program permitted me to address three main research questions. One, how often are standardized tests used to evaluate new educational interventions? Two, do the tests appear to measure the same thing that the intervention teaches? Three, do investigators establish validity evidence for the specific uses of the test? The research documents potential problems and actual problems related to the use of standardized tests in leading applied research, and suggests changes to policy that would address measurement issues and improve the rigor of applied educational research. The second paper explores the practical consequences of misalignment between an outcome measure and an educational intervention in the context of summative evaluation. Simulated evaluation data and a

  13. An Experimental Test of the Effects of Gender Constancy on Sex Typing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Andrea E.; Bigler, Rebecca S.; Ruble, Diane N.

    2009-01-01

    This study provides an experimental test of the hypothesis that level of gender constancy understanding affects children's sex typing. Preschool-age children (N = 62, mean age = 47 months) were randomly assigned to experimental lessons that taught that biological traits (including gender) are either fixed (pro-constancy condition) or mutable…

  14. ANALYS OF EXPERIMENTAL HYBRID CAR TESTING RESULTS ON URBAN DRIVING CYCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Serikov

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The experimental hybrid car testing results are presented. The estimation of hybrid car draft-speed characteristics, energy and ecological indicators on urban driving cycle are given.

  15. Design and Development of a Testing Device for Experimental Measurements of Foundation Slabs on the Subsoil

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Čajka, Radim; Křivý, Vít; Sekanina, David

    2011-01-01

    The paper deals with technical solutions and construction of a testing stand designed for experimental measurements of deformations and state of stress of foundation structures placed on the subsoil...

  16. Engineering and science positioning tests in Flanders: powerful predictors for study success?

    OpenAIRE

    Vanderoost, Jef; Van Soom, Carolien; Langie, Greet; Van den Bossche, Johan; Callens, Riet; Vandewalle, Joos; De Laet, Tinne

    2015-01-01

    A new battery of positioning tests for Science and Engineering was broadly implemented in Flanders in the summer of 2013. The goal of the non-mandatory and non-binding positioning test is to allow future students, with a clear choice for engineering or science, to position themselves with respect to the required prior knowledge and skills and to stimulate students to participate in a remediation program if necessary. For each engineering or science bachelor under study, a specific position...

  17. Systematic Testing should not be a Topic in the Computer Science Curriculum!

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Henrik Bærbak

    2003-01-01

    In this paper we argue that treating "testing" as an isolated topic is a wrong approach in computer science and software engineering teaching. Instead testing should pervade practical topics and exercises in the computer science curriculum to teach students the importance of producing software...

  18. Sciences Humaines Assessment, Manitoba 1991. Preliminary Report: Test Data. French Immersion Program = Evaluation en sciences humaines, Manitoba 1991. Rapport preliminaire: donnees des tests. Programme d'immersion Francaise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    The "sciences humaines" provincial assessment was conducted in June 1991 in Franco-Manitoban (Canadian) schools and in the French immersion program. Tests were administered to students in grades 8 and 10. Test results are presented in two preliminary reports, one for Franco-Manitoban schools and the present report for French immersion…

  19. Development of test stand for experimental investigation of chemical and physical phenomena in Liquid Rocket Engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Andrade Santos

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this work was to present the specification of an experimental firing test stand for liquid rocket engines (LRE and develop a program for control and acquisition of data. It provides conditions to test rocket engines with thrust from 50 to 100 kgf. A methodology for laboratory work implementation using information technology, which will allow the automatic and remote functioning of the test stand, permits users to input the necessary data to conduct tests safely, achieve accurate measurements and obtain reliable results. The control of propellant mass flow rates by pressure regulators and other system valves, as well as the test stand data acquisition, are carried out automatically through LabVIEW commercial software. The test stand program is a readable, scalable and maintainable code. The test stand design and its development represent the state of art of experimental apparatus in LRE testing.

  20. A Placement Test for Computer Science: Design, Implementation, and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugent, Gwen; Soh, Leen-Kiat; Samal, Ashok; Lang, Jeff

    2006-01-01

    An introductory CS1 course presents problems for educators and students due to students' diverse background in programming knowledge and exposure. Students who enroll in CS1 also have different expectations and motivations. Prompted by the curricular guidelines for undergraduate programmes in computer science released in 2001 by the ACM/IEEE, and…

  1. Political science. Reverse-engineering censorship in China: randomized experimentation and participant observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gary; Pan, Jennifer; Roberts, Margaret E

    2014-08-22

    Existing research on the extensive Chinese censorship organization uses observational methods with well-known limitations. We conducted the first large-scale experimental study of censorship by creating accounts on numerous social media sites, randomly submitting different texts, and observing from a worldwide network of computers which texts were censored and which were not. We also supplemented interviews with confidential sources by creating our own social media site, contracting with Chinese firms to install the same censoring technologies as existing sites, and--with their software, documentation, and even customer support--reverse-engineering how it all works. Our results offer rigorous support for the recent hypothesis that criticisms of the state, its leaders, and their policies are published, whereas posts about real-world events with collective action potential are censored. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  2. The resource to Investigative and Experimental Work: perceptions of science teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Manoel da Silva Malheiro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at researching the perceptions that Portuguese teachers have about using Investigative Experimental Work (IEW and Problem Solving (PS, which has as its main objectives: I understanding the motivations that mobilize teachers to use these strategies; and ii identify the advantages, that are associated to them. The research was qualitative in nature and involved six Natural Sciences teachers, who teach 2nd and 3rd cycles of basic education in three schools in the municipality of Porto, who agreed to participate in a semi-structured interview, conducted in schools where they teach. Data analysis established that teachers value the use of EW and PS, considering them to be strategies that make the classes more interactive and stimulating for students' and result in better learning. They also recognize that these strategies constitute didactic opportunities for investigation and that real life problem solving can promote autonomous learning.

  3. Experimental Design and Validation of an Accelerated Random Vibration Fatigue Testing Methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Yu Jiang(Center for Statistical and Theoretical Condensed Matter Physics, Zhejiang Normal University, Jinhua City, Zhejiang Province 321004, China); Gun Jin Yun; Li Zhao; Junyong Tao

    2015-01-01

    Novel accelerated random vibration fatigue test methodology and strategy are proposed, which can generate a design of the experimental test plan significantly reducing the test time and the sample size. Based on theoretical analysis and fatigue damage model, several groups of random vibration fatigue tests were designed and conducted with the aim of investigating effects of both Gaussian and non-Gaussian random excitation on the vibration fatigue. First, stress responses at a weak point of a ...

  4. Effects of Experimental Conditions on Estimation Uncertainty of Weibull Distribution: Applications for Crack Initiation Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jae Phil; Bahn, Chi Bum [Pusan National University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    It is well known that stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the main material-related issues in operating nuclear reactors. To predict the initiation time of SCC, the Weibull distribution is widely used as a statistical model representing SCC reliability. The typical experimental procedure of an SCC initiation test involves an interval-censored cracking test with several specimens. From the result of the test, the experimenters can estimate the parameters of Weibull distribution by maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) or median rank regression (MRR). However, in order to obtain the sufficient accuracy of the Weibull estimators, it is hard for experimenters to determine the proper number of test specimens and censoring intervals. Therefore, in this work, the effects of some experimental conditions on estimation uncertainties of Weibull distribution were studied through the Monte Carlo simulation. The main goal of this work is to suggest quantitative estimation uncertainties for experimenters who want to develop probabilistic SCC initiation model by a cracking test. Widely used MRR and MLE are considered as estimation methods of Weibull distribution. By using a Monte Carlo simulation, uncertainties of MRR and ML estimators were quantified in various experimental cases. And we compared the uncertainties between the TDCI and TICI cases.

  5. A380 pavement experimental program-rigid campaign : slab pattern, instrumentation, static test procedure, fatigue test introduction

    OpenAIRE

    LERAT, P; FABRE, C; BALAY, JM

    2003-01-01

    The paper describes several experimentations on rigid pavements at Toulouse Blagnac airport, tested with heavy aircraft landing gear simulator developed by Airbus S.A.S. The main contributors of this program are Airbus, the French Civil Aviation Administration (STBA) and the French Road and Bridges Laboratory (LCPC). The first part of the program (1998 2000) deals with bituminous pavement. In 2001-2002-2003 the program has focused on Rigid tests. The main aim has been therefore to improve th...

  6. The implications of content versus item validity on science tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarroch, William L.

    The use of content validity as the primary assurance of the measurement accuracy for science assessment examinations is questioned. An alternative accuracy measure, item validity, is proposed. Item validity is based on research using qualitative comparisons between (a) student answers to objective items on the examination, (b) clinical interviews with examinees designed to ascertain their knowledge and understanding of the objective examination items, and (c) student answers to essay examination items prepared as an equivalent to the objective examination items. Calculations of item validity are used to show that selected objective items from the science assessment examination overestimated the actual student understanding of science content. Overestimation occurs when a student correctly answers an examination item, but for a reason other than that needed for an understanding of the content in question. There was little evidence that students incorrectly answered the items studied for the wrong reason, resulting in underestimation of the students' knowledge. The equivalent essay items were found to limit the amount of mismeasurement of the students' knowledge. Specific examples are cited and general suggestions are made on how to improve the measurement accuracy of objective examinations.

  7. Guided-Inquiry Lessons Raise Scores on the Sixth Grade Georgia Science Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Purlie M.

    At the local level, G Middle School has the highest district-wide percentage of 6th grade science students who are not meeting standards. It is imperative that G middle school take corrective action to reduce the number of students failing to meet state science standards. Dewey's theory of conceptual framework, which involves knowledge constructed on a person's personal experience and mind activity through active forms of learning, guided this study. The goal of the study was to determine whether inquiry-based science modules produce greater 6th grade science achievement, as measured by an equivalent instrument of the science section of the Georgia Criterion-Referenced Competency Test, when compared to traditional instruction among eastern Georgia 6th graders. The sample consisted of 230 students in the nonintervention group and 119 students in the intervention group. All students were from intact classes. At the end of the intervention, an independent t test was conducted to analyze the scores. According to the study t test, (t = 12.33, df = 304.56, p project's potential impact on social change includes increasing student motivation towards, comprehension of, and interest in science concepts. At the local level, these inquiry lessons can be shared with science teachers across grade levels and within the district to improve county-wide science scores. An increase in student interest and comprehension of science concepts could ultimately lead to the United States producing more students in the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education.

  8. Experimental test results from an environmental protection agency test method for determination of vapor suppressant effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tock, Richard W.; Ahern, Daniel W.

    2005-04-01

    The results obtained from laboratory experiments conducted using Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) subpart WWWW of 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) part 63 (1)-test method are discussed in this article. The original test method was developed to measure the effectiveness of wax suppressants used to reduce hazardous air pollutant (HAP) emissions from unsaturated polyester (UP)/vinyl ester resins. Wax additions of ˜1.5% by weight to commercial UP resins suppress HAP emissions through the formation of surface barrier films. However, the tests performed in this study included the use of limestone and an adjunct, organic fiber reinforcement, rather than the wax. The addition of either commercial product to the UP formulations tested in this study was also shown to reduce HAP emissions. Suppression was a combination of absorption and an increased diffusion path barrier for the volatile organic carbon (VOC) components. Based on the limited data obtained, it was shown that the oil absorption characteristics of the two adjunct products could be used to estimate the expected level of vapor suppression for a specific resin formulation. Values reported in the literature for the oil adsorption characteristics of the adjunct limestone and the commercial biomass fiber were used in the laboratory tests. Although the oil adsorption characteristic of any ingredient added to a base resin formulation is indicative of its potential for emissions reduction, the EPA test protocol is still required to be performed for validation. Such screening tests will always be needed due to the variability associated with commercial UP resins and the evolution of customized UP/fiberglass composite formulations developed by custom molding shops.

  9. Factors that affect the physical science career interest of female students: Testing five common hypotheses

    OpenAIRE

    Zahra Hazari; Geoff Potvin; Robynne M. Lock; Florin Lung; Gerhard Sonnert; Philip M. Sadler

    2013-01-01

    There are many hypotheses regarding factors that may encourage female students to pursue careers in the physical sciences. Using multivariate matching methods on national data drawn from the Persistence Research in Science and Engineering (PRiSE) project (n=7505), we test the following five commonly held beliefs regarding what factors might impact females’ physical science career interest: (i) having a single-sex physics class, (ii) having a female physics teacher, (iii) having female scienti...

  10. The 2010 Desert Rats Science Operations Test: Outcomes and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppler, D. B.

    2011-01-01

    The Desert RATS 2010 Team tested a variety of science operations management techniques, applying experience gained during the manned Apollo missions and the robotic Mars missions. This test assessed integrated science operations management of human planetary exploration using real-time, tactical science operations to oversee daily crew science activities, and a night shift strategic science operations team to conduct strategic level assessment of science data and daily traverse results. In addition, an attempt was made to collect numerical metric data on the outcome of the science operations to assist test evaluation. The two most important outcomes were 1) the production of significant (almost overwhelming) volume of data produced during daily traverse operations with two rovers, advanced imaging systems and well trained, scientifically proficient crew-members, and 2) the degree to which the tactical team s interaction with the surface crew enhanced science return. This interaction depended on continuous real-time voice and data communications, and the quality of science return from any human planetary exploration mission will be based strongly on the aggregate interaction between a well trained surface crew and a dedicated science operations support team using voice and imaging data from a planet s surface. In addition, the scientific insight developed by both the science operations team and the crews could not be measurable by simple numerical quantities, and its value will be missed by a purely metric-based evaluation of test outcome. In particular, failure to recognize the critical importance of this qualitative type interaction may result in mission architecture choices that will reduce science return.

  11. Impact Testing for Materials Science at NASA - MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikapizye, Mitch

    2010-01-01

    The Impact Testing Facility (ITF) at NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center is host to different types of guns used to study the effects of high velocity impacts. The testing facility has been and continues to be utilized for all NASA missions where impact testing is essential. The Facility has also performed tests for the Department of Defense, other corporations, as well as universities across the nation. Current capabilities provided by Marshall include ballistic guns, light gas guns, exploding wire gun, and the Hydrometeor Impact Gun. A new plasma gun has also been developed which would be able to propel particles at velocities of 20km/s. This report includes some of the guns used for impact testing at NASA Marshall and their capabilities.

  12. The effects of experimenter gender on state social physique anxiety and strength in a testing environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamarche, Larkin; Gammage, Kimberley L; Gabriel, David A

    2011-02-01

    Social influences can impact self-presentational concerns such as social physique anxiety (SPA), concerns over one's body being evaluated by others. In addition, social influences may also impact performance on a physical test. In a physical testing environment, one social factor that influences SPA and which may also influence the outcomes of a physical test is experimenter gender. The present study examined the influence of experimenter gender on SPA and actual muscle strength in an experimental testing environment. Male (n = 50) and female (n = 50) university students were randomly assigned to either a male or female experimenter. Before strength testing, state SPA (SPA-S) was assessed. Actual strength was represented by the score obtained during the maximum voluntary contraction (MVC) test. Two 2 × 2 (participant gender × gender of the experimenter) analyses of variance were conducted with SPA-S and strength as the dependent variables. For SPA-S, a significant main effect was found only for participant gender (F(1,95) = 14.08, p < 0.01, η² = 0.13), with women scoring significantly higher than men. For MVC, there was a significant effect for participant gender (F(1,96) = 48.08, p < 0.001, η² = 0.33), with men, as expected, having significantly higher strength values than women. Although the gender of the experimenter did not influence SPA-S or muscle strength, other forms of anxiety (e.g., fitness anxiety) may be relevant in this setting. Future research should also investigate other factors in the testing environment (e.g., type of task) that may be more influential on psychological or performance outcomes.

  13. An Experimental Test of a Biodynamic Method of Weed Suppression: The Biodynamic Seed Peppers

    OpenAIRE

    Bruce Kenneth Kirchoff

    2016-01-01

    An experimental test of a biodynamic agriculture method of weed suppression was carried out in growth chambers to establish the feasibility of the method as a preliminary to field trials. Four generations of Brassica rapa plants were used in a randomized block design. Treated flats received ashed seeds prepared according to biodynamic indications. Seed weight and counts were measured at the end of each generation, and germination of the control and experimental seed was investigated at the en...

  14. In vitro testing of an experimental dental composite resin and adhesive system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alb, Camelia; Alb, S; Dudea, Diana; Nicola, Codruţa; Moldovan, Mărioara; Culic, B; Buduru, Smaranda; Mesaros, Anca

    2010-01-01

    In vitro testing of new experimental materials has been introduced for many years as a method to evaluate them in simulated conditions, before the clinical trials. Our study has investigated a new experimental composite resin C1 and adhesive system Ad1 by scanning electron microscope (SEM) studies and microleakage tests. Both in vitro test were performed on extracted human teeth, that were prepared for standardized class II and V restorations and restored with three composite resins (experimental C1, TetricCeram TC and Solitaire2 S2) and their total-etch adhesive systems (Ad1, Excite EX and GlumaOneBond GB). Teeth were sectioned and investigated under the SEM microscope for the interfaces created and under the optical microscope for dye penetration and microleakage. The Romanian experimental composite C1 has shown lower alpha "ideal" interfaces than TC and S2, with no significant difference between the latter. Microleakage was significantly lower at the enamel margin and significantly higher at the gingival margin placed below the CEJ for all three compared composites. C1 presented similar dye penetration scores with the commercial available systems. The differences in SEM analysis can be attributed to higher viscosity and handling properties in the experimental adhesive Adl and to technique sensitivity. Further investigation is required to obtain better working properties for the experimental adhesive and higher "ideal" scores at the interfaces. Also the SEM investigation is more sensitive than the optical microscope analysis.

  15. So ware-Defined Network Solutions for Science Scenarios: Performance Testing Framework and Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Settlemyer, Bradley [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Kettimuthu, R. [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Boley, Josh [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Katramatos, Dimitrios [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL); Rao, Nageswara S. [ORNL; Sen, Satyabrata [ORNL; Liu, Qiang [ORNL

    2018-01-01

    High-performance scientific work flows utilize supercomputers, scientific instruments, and large storage systems. Their executions require fast setup of a small number of dedicated network connections across the geographically distributed facility sites. We present Software-Defined Network (SDN) solutions consisting of site daemons that use dpctl, Floodlight, ONOS, or OpenDaylight controllers to set up these connections. The development of these SDN solutions could be quite disruptive to the infrastructure, while requiring a close coordination among multiple sites; in addition, the large number of possible controller and device combinations to investigate could make the infrastructure unavailable to regular users for extended periods of time. In response, we develop a Virtual Science Network Environment (VSNE) using virtual machines, Mininet, and custom scripts that support the development, testing, and evaluation of SDN solutions, without the constraints and expenses of multi-site physical infrastructures; furthermore, the chosen solutions can be directly transferred to production deployments. By complementing VSNE with a physical testbed, we conduct targeted performance tests of various SDN solutions to help choose the best candidates. In addition, we propose a switching response method to assess the setup times and throughput performances of different SDN solutions, and present experimental results that show their advantages and limitations.

  16. Factors that Affect the Physical Science Career Interest of Female Students: Testing Five Common Hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Potvin, Geoff; Lock, Robynne M.; Lung, Florin; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.

    2013-01-01

    There are many hypotheses regarding factors that may encourage female students to pursue careers in the physical sciences. Using multivariate matching methods on national data drawn from the Persistence Research in Science and Engineering (PRiSE) project ("n" = 7505), we test the following five commonly held beliefs regarding what…

  17. Negotiating Identity and Science Teaching in a High-Stakes Testing Environment: An Elementary Teacher's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upadhyay, Bhaskar

    2009-01-01

    This study draws upon a qualitative case study to investigate the impact of the high-stakes test environment on an elementary teacher's identities and the influence of identity maintenance on science teaching. Drawing from social identity theory, I argue that we can gain deep insight into how and why urban elementary science teachers engage in…

  18. Experimental results from the sounding vehicle Sonda III test campaign in the Pilot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Batista P. Falcão Filho

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The Pilot Transonic Wind Tunnel of the Institute of Aeronautics and Space has conducted the first test campaign of a sounding vehicle, Sonda III. The campaign is part of a project whose activities and final results are presented in this paper. During the test campaign, many activities were performed to increase the productivity and accuracy of the tunnel. These activities included calibration procedures, corrective and preventive trials, development of auxiliary devices, and theoretical and experimental analysis. Two tasks are described in details: the development and tests performed with the static pressure probe and the automatic re-entry flap actuation system. Several tests were carried out with the Sonda III at Mach numbers ranging from 0.3 to 1.0, at stagnation pressures of 70, 94, and 110 kPa. Experimental results include global aerodynamic coefficients (using internal balance and pressure distribution over essential regions of the test article (using pressure sensitive paint technique.

  19. Development of a Synchronous-Generator Experimental Bench for Standstill Time-Domain Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.A. Arjona

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of an experimental bench for performing time-domain tests on synchronousmachines at standstill. The test bench allows the collection of experimental data which can then be used in theparameter estimation of mathematical models of synchronous motors and generators. The system development isbased on the LabVIEW programming language. It effortlessly allows the calibration of voltage and current sensors, thed-q magnetic axis positioning of the synchronous generator, and the spectral analysis from the collected data. Inaddition, the testing environment includes non-sophisticated instrumentation elements and a power amplifier. Thisexperimental bench has a friendly user interface which guides the user throughout a defined methodology to allow theachievement of the different time domain tests on synchronous machines. A 7kVA, 220V, 60Hz synchronousgenerator was used to show the functionality and usefulness of the test bench in research and teaching electricalmachine theory.

  20. Experimental and Computational Study of Ductile Fracture in Small Punch Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betül Gülçimen Çakan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A unified experimental-computational study on ductile fracture initiation and propagation during small punch testing is presented. Tests are carried out at room temperature with unnotched disks of different thicknesses where large-scale yielding prevails. In thinner specimens, the fracture occurs with severe necking under membrane tension, whereas for thicker ones a through thickness shearing mode prevails changing the crack orientation relative to the loading direction. Computational studies involve finite element simulations using a shear modified Gurson-Tvergaard-Needleman porous plasticity model with an integral-type nonlocal formulation. The predicted punch load-displacement curves and deformed profiles are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  1. Experimental Breeder Reactor II (EBR-II) Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pardini, J.A.; Brubaker, R.C.; Veith, D.J.; Giorgis, G.C.; Walker, D.E.; Seim, O.S.

    1982-01-01

    The Fuel-Performance Test Facility (FPTF) is the latest in a series of special EBR-II instrumented in-core test facilities. A flow control valve in the facility is programmed to vary the coolant flow, and thus the temperature, in an experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it and coupled to it. In this way, thermal transients can be simulated in that subassembly without changing the temperatures in surrounding subassemblies. The FPTF also monitors sodium flow and temperature, and detects delayed neutrons in the sodium effluent from the experimental-irradiation subassembly beneath it. This facility also has an acoustical detector (high-temperature microphone) for detecting sodium boiling.

  2. Impact of Emotional Intelligence Enhancement on Test Anxiety among EFL Learners: an Experimental Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Ebrahimi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Emotional Intelligence (EI also EQ is an affective factor capable of being enhanced, (Test Anxiety is another affective factor capable of being reduced. The present study is based on examination of possible impact(s of enhancing Emotional Intelligence on the reduction of Test Anxiety among Iranian university students. For this purpose, 45 students in intervention and control conditions completed the "Emotional Intelligence Questionnaire" and filled Sarason Test Anxiety Scale; afterwards, they received instructions on EQ and strategies to enhance it. At the end of the course, the same Test Anxiety Questionnaire was administered to the participants. By the use of descriptive statistics and independent samples t-test the data were analyzed. The analysis of the data uncovered that there is a significant difference in the reduction of students' Test Anxiety in experimental group. The results can shed light on how students’ emotional intelligence enhancement influences Test Anxiety and also possibly in a broader scale, testing outcomes.

  3. Heritage Education: Exploring the Conceptions of Teachers and Administrators from the Perspective of Experimental and Social Science Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Roque Jimenez; Lopez, Jose Maria Cuenca; Listan, D. Mario Ferreras

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a research project into heritage education. Taking an interdisciplinary perspective from within the field of Experimental and Social Science Education, it presents an analysis of teachers' and administrators' conceptions of heritage, its teaching and its dissemination in Spain. A statistical description is provided of the…

  4. Recognizing history in range ecology: 100 years of science and management on the Santa Rita Experimental Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nathan F. Sayre

    2003-01-01

    At the centennial of the Santa Rita Experimental Range, historical analysis is called for on two levels. First, as a major site in the history of range ecology, the Santa Rita illuminates past successes and failures in science and management and the ways in which larger social, economic, and political factors have shaped scientific research. Second, with the turn away...

  5. Changes in Critical Thinking Skills Following a Course on Science and Pseudoscience: A Quasi-Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Carmen P.; Miller, Nathan A.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed changes in paranormal beliefs and general critical thinking skills among students (n = 23) enrolled in an experimental course designed to teach distinguishing science from pseudoscience and a comparison group of students (n = 30) in an advanced research methods course. On average, both courses were successful in reducing paranormal…

  6. Advantages of the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system for the rat colon rupture pressure test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chengdong; Guo, Xuan; Li, Zhen; Qian, Shuwen; Zheng, Feng; Qin, Haiqing

    2013-01-01

    Many studies have been conducted on colorectal anastomotic leakage to reduce the incidence of anastomotic leakage. However, how to precisely determine if the bowel can withstand the pressure of a colorectal anastomosis experiment, which is called anastomotic bursting pressure, has not been determined. A task force developed the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system to provide precise measurement of the maximum pressure that an anastomotic colon can withstand, and to compare it with the commonly used method such as the mercury and air bag pressure manometer in a rat colon rupture pressure test. Forty-five male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly divided into the manual ball manometry (H) group, the tracing machine manometry pressure gauge head (MP) group, and the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system (ME) group. The rats in each group were subjected to a cut colon rupture pressure test after injecting anesthesia in the tail vein. Colonic end-to-end anastomosis was performed, and the rats were rested for 1 week before anastomotic bursting pressure was determined by one of the three methods. No differences were observed between the normal colon rupture pressure and colonic anastomotic bursting pressure, which were determined using the three manometry methods. However, several advantages, such as reduction in errors, were identified in the ME group. Different types of manometry methods can be applied to the normal rat colon, but the colonic anastomotic bursting pressure test using the experimental animal hollow organ mechanical testing system is superior to traditional methods. Copyright © 2013 Surgical Associates Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cause and Effect: Testing a Mechanism and Method for the Cognitive Integration of Basic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulasegaram, Kulamakan; Manzone, Julian C; Ku, Cheryl; Skye, Aimee; Wadey, Veronica; Woods, Nicole N

    2015-11-01

    Methods of integrating basic science with clinical knowledge are still debated in medical training. One possibility is increasing the spatial and temporal proximity of clinical content to basic science. An alternative model argues that teaching must purposefully expose relationships between the domains. The authors compared different methods of integrating basic science: causal explanations linking basic science to clinical features, presenting both domains separately but in proximity, and simply presenting clinical features First-year undergraduate health professions students were randomized to four conditions: (1) science-causal explanations (SC), (2) basic science before clinical concepts (BC), (3) clinical concepts before basic science (CB), and (4) clinical features list only (FL). Based on assigned conditions, participants were given explanations for four disorders in neurology or rheumatology followed by a memory quiz and diagnostic test consisting of 12 cases which were repeated after one week. Ninety-four participants completed the study. No difference was found on memory test performance, but on the diagnostic test, a condition by time interaction was found (F[3,88] = 3.05, P science and clinical concepts may not guarantee cognitive integration. Although cause-and-effect explanations may not be possible for all domains, making explicit and specific connections between domains will likely facilitate the benefits of integration for learners.

  8. Elementary Science Education in Classrooms and Outdoors: Stakeholder views, gender, ethnicity, and testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrier, Sarah J.; Thomson, Margareta M.; Tugurian, Linda P.; Tate Stevenson, Kathryn

    2014-09-01

    In this article, we present a mixed-methods study of 2 schools' elementary science programs including outdoor instruction specific to each school's culture. We explore fifth-grade students in measures of science knowledge, environmental attitudes, and outdoor comfort levels including gender and ethnic differences. We further examine students' science and outdoor views and activity choices along with those of adults (teachers, parents, and principals). Significant differences were found between pre- and posttest measures along with gender and ethnic differences with respect to students' science knowledge and environmental attitudes. Interview data exposed limitations of outdoor learning at both schools including standardized test pressures, teachers' views of science instruction, and desultory connections of alternative learning settings to 'school' science.

  9. Evaluation of experimental factors that influence the application and discrimination capability of the product consistency test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shade, J.W.; Piepel, G.F.

    1991-06-01

    It is desirable to have a means of monitoring possible changes in waste glass durability during protection so that the product remains within acceptable limits. A leach test called the Product Consistency test (PCT) was developed by Savannah River Laboratory (SRL) as such a production test for the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF). This report examines some of the experimental factors that may be used in the PCT that could influence test precision and its ability to function as intended. An experiment was performed to investigate the effects (on pH and elemental releases of Al, Fe, K, Na, Si, B, Li, and Mn) of modifications to the test conditions of the Product Consistency Test (PCT). The experiment was replicated three times; each replicate involved leach testing two glasses with each of 24 different sets of PCT conditions. 6 refs., 1 fig., 12 tabs.

  10. Les apports de l'experimentation assistee par ordinateur (ExAO) en pedagogie par projet en Sciences de la nature au collegial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcotte, Alice

    The goals of this research were to conceptualize and to produce a test synthesis model for the Sciences program, where the student had to demonstrate his or her competency using the approach Considering New Situations from Acquired Knowledge. The test took the form of a student-structured project utilizing the experimental process: the student's scientific investigation was supported and facilitated by computer-assisted experimentation (CAEx). The model of action was elaborated in developmental research within the school setting, tested in biology, and continued in an interdisciplinary context. Our study focused on the advantages and the constraints of this new learning environment, which modify laboratories using traditional instrumentation. The final research was not to evaluate a type of test synthesis, but to propose and to improve this model of test synthesis based on experimental process and supported by CAEx. In order to implement the competency approach within an integration activity, we chose a cooperative learning environment contained within the pedagogical project. This didactic environment was inspired by socio-constructivism which involves students in open scientific problem-solving. Computer-assisted experimentation turned out to be a valuable tool for this environment, facilitating the implementation of the scientific process by increased induction. Resistance to confronted and uncircumvented reality changes students' perception of scientific knowledge. They learn to integrate the building of this knowledge, and then to realize the extent of their learning and their training. Students' opinions, which were gathered from questionnaires, reveal that they favorably perceive this type of environment in interaction with their peers and the experimentation. While this new knowledge contributes to CAEx within the pedagogical project, the products of this research included a teaching guide for the test synthesis, a booklet featuring the projects carried out

  11. Experimental and numerical study on mechanical properties of aluminum alloy under uniaxial tensile test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Daghfas

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective is to model the behavior of 7075 aluminum alloy and built an experimental database to identify the model parameters. The first part of the paper presents an experimental database on 7075 aluminum alloy. Thus, uniaxial tensile tests are carried in three loading directions relative to the rolling direction, knowing that the fatigue of aircraft structures is traditionally managed based on the assumption of uniaxial loads. From experimental database, the mechanical properties are extracted, particularly the various fractures owing to pronounced anisotropy relating to material. In second part, plastic anisotropy is then modeled using the identification strategy which depends on yield criteria, hardening law and evolution law. In third part, a comparison with experimental data shows that behavior model can successfully describe the anisotropy of the Lankford coefficient.

  12. An Automated, Experimenter-Free Method for the Standardised, Operant Cognitive Testing of Rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivalan, Marion; Munawar, Humaira; Fuchs, Anna; Winter, York

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of human pathology are essential for biomedical research. However, a recurring issue in the use of animal models is the poor reproducibility of behavioural and physiological findings within and between laboratories. The most critical factor influencing this issue remains the experimenter themselves. One solution is the use of procedures devoid of human intervention. We present a novel approach to experimenter-free testing cognitive abilities in rats, by combining undisturbed group housing with automated, standardized and individual operant testing. This experimenter-free system consisted of an automated-operant system (Bussey-Saksida rat touch screen) connected to a home cage containing group living rats via an automated animal sorter (PhenoSys). The automated animal sorter, which is based on radio-frequency identification (RFID) technology, functioned as a mechanical replacement of the experimenter. Rats learnt to regularly and individually enter the operant chamber and remained there for the duration of the experimental session only. Self-motivated rats acquired the complex touch screen task of trial-unique non-matching to location (TUNL) in half the time reported for animals that were manually placed into the operant chamber. Rat performance was similar between the two groups within our laboratory, and comparable to previously published results obtained elsewhere. This reproducibility, both within and between laboratories, confirms the validity of this approach. In addition, automation reduced daily experimental time by 80%, eliminated animal handling, and reduced equipment cost. This automated, experimenter-free setup is a promising tool of great potential for testing a large variety of functions with full automation in future studies.

  13. An Automated, Experimenter-Free Method for the Standardised, Operant Cognitive Testing of Rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marion Rivalan

    Full Text Available Animal models of human pathology are essential for biomedical research. However, a recurring issue in the use of animal models is the poor reproducibility of behavioural and physiological findings within and between laboratories. The most critical factor influencing this issue remains the experimenter themselves. One solution is the use of procedures devoid of human intervention. We present a novel approach to experimenter-free testing cognitive abilities in rats, by combining undisturbed group housing with automated, standardized and individual operant testing. This experimenter-free system consisted of an automated-operant system (Bussey-Saksida rat touch screen connected to a home cage containing group living rats via an automated animal sorter (PhenoSys. The automated animal sorter, which is based on radio-frequency identification (RFID technology, functioned as a mechanical replacement of the experimenter. Rats learnt to regularly and individually enter the operant chamber and remained there for the duration of the experimental session only. Self-motivated rats acquired the complex touch screen task of trial-unique non-matching to location (TUNL in half the time reported for animals that were manually placed into the operant chamber. Rat performance was similar between the two groups within our laboratory, and comparable to previously published results obtained elsewhere. This reproducibility, both within and between laboratories, confirms the validity of this approach. In addition, automation reduced daily experimental time by 80%, eliminated animal handling, and reduced equipment cost. This automated, experimenter-free setup is a promising tool of great potential for testing a large variety of functions with full automation in future studies.

  14. An Experimental Test of a Craving Management Technique for Adolescents in Substance-Abuse Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florsheim, Paul; Heavin, Sarah; Tiffany, Stephen; Colvin, Peter; Hiraoka, Regina

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes an experiment designed to test an imagery-based craving management technique with a sample of adolescents diagnosed with substance-use disorders. Seventy adolescents between the ages of 14 and 18 (41 males) were recruited through two substance-abuse treatment programs. The experimental procedure involved stimulating craving…

  15. Testing the theory of emissions trading : Experimental evidence on alternative mechanisms for global carbon trading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaassen, Ger; Nentjes, Andries; Smith, Mark

    2005-01-01

    Simulation models and theory prove that emission trading converges to market equilibrium. This paper sets out to test these results using experimental economics. Three experiments are conducted for the six largest carbon emitting industrialized regions. Two experiments use auctions, the first a

  16. Tableau tool for testing satisfiability in LTL: Implementation and experimental analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goranko, Valentin; Kyrilov, Angelo; Shkatov, Dmitry

    2010-01-01

    We report on the implementation and experimental analysis of an incremental multi-pass tableau-based procedure `a la Wolper for testing satisfiability in the linear time temporal logic LTL, based on a breadthfirst search strategy. We describe the implementation and discuss the performance...

  17. No aspiration to win? An experimental test of the aspiration level model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diecidue, E.; Levy, M.; van de Ven, J.

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature studies the effects of aspiration levels on people’s choices. Researchers often assume an aspiration level at zero, which helps to explain several empirical phenomena. In two experiments, we test this assumption. Our experimental design exploits the discontinuity in the

  18. Experimental Aeroelastic Models Design and Wind Tunnel Testing for Correlation with New Theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Several examples of experimental model designs, wind tunnel tests and correlation with new theory are presented in this paper. The goal is not only to evaluate a new theory, new computational method or new aeroelastic phonomenon, but also to provide new insights into nonlinear aeroelastic phenomena, flutter, limit cycle oscillation (LCO and gust response.

  19. 'Mind genomics': the experimental, inductive science of the ordinary, and its application to aspects of food and feeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moskowitz, Howard R

    2012-11-05

    The paper introduces the empirical science of 'mind genomics', whose objective is to understand the dimensions of ordinary, everyday experience, identify mind-set segments of people who value different aspects of that everyday experience, and then assign a new person to a mind-set by a statistically appropriate procedure. By studying different experiences using experimental design of ideas, 'mind genomics' constructs an empirical, inductive science of perception and experience, layer by layer. The ultimate objective of 'mind genomics' is a large-scale science of experience created using induction, with the science based upon emergent commonalities across many different types of daily experience. The particular topic investigated in the paper is the experience of healthful snacks, what makes a person 'want' them, and the dollar value of different sensory aspects of the healthful snack. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. ENGINEERING DESIGN OPTIMIZATION OF HEEL TESTING EQUIPMENT IN THE EXPERIMENTAL VALIDATION OF SAFE WALKING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiano Fragassa

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental test methods for the evaluation of the resistance of heels of ladies' shoes in the case of impact loads are fully defined by International Organization for Standardization (ISO procedures that indicate all the conditions of experiment. A first Standard (ISO 19553 specifies the test method for determining the strength of the heels in the case of single impact. The result offers a valuation of the liability to fail under the sporadic heavy blows. A second Standard (ISO 19556 details a method for testing the capability of heels of women' shoes to survive to the repetition of small impacts provoked by normal walking. These Standards strictly define the features for two different testing devices (with specific materials, geometries, weights, etc. and all the experimental procedures to be followed during tests. On the contrary, this paper describes the technical solutions adopted to design one single experimental device able to perform impact testing of heels in both conditions. Joining the accuracy of mechanic movements with the speed of an electronic control system, a new and flexible equipment for the complete characterization of heels respect to (single or fatigue impacts was developed. Moreover a new level of performances in experimental validation of heel resistance was introduced by the versatility of the user-defined software control programs, able to encode every complex time-depending cycle of impact loads. Dynamic simulations permitted to investigate the impacts on heel in different conditions of testing, optimizing the machine design. The complexity of real stresses on shoes during an ordinary walk and in other common situations (as going up and downstairs was considered for a proper dimensioning.

  1. Trajectory Reconstruction and Uncertainty Analysis Using Mars Science Laboratory Pre-Flight Scale Model Aeroballistic Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugo, Rafael A.; Tolson, Robert H.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2013-01-01

    As part of the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) trajectory reconstruction effort at NASA Langley Research Center, free-flight aeroballistic experiments of instrumented MSL scale models was conducted at Aberdeen Proving Ground in Maryland. The models carried an inertial measurement unit (IMU) and a flush air data system (FADS) similar to the MSL Entry Atmospheric Data System (MEADS) that provided data types similar to those from the MSL entry. Multiple sources of redundant data were available, including tracking radar and on-board magnetometers. These experimental data enabled the testing and validation of the various tools and methodologies that will be used for MSL trajectory reconstruction. The aerodynamic parameters Mach number, angle of attack, and sideslip angle were estimated using minimum variance with a priori to combine the pressure data and pre-flight computational fluid dynamics (CFD) data. Both linear and non-linear pressure model terms were also estimated for each pressure transducer as a measure of the errors introduced by CFD and transducer calibration. Parameter uncertainties were estimated using a "consider parameters" approach.

  2. Experimental and numerical study of drill bit drop tests on Kuru granite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmeau, Marion; Kane, Alexandre; Hokka, Mikko

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an experimental and numerical study of Kuru grey granite impacted with a seven-buttons drill bit mounted on an instrumented drop test machine. The force versus displacement curves during the impact, so-called bit-rock interaction (BRI) curves, were obtained using strain gauge measurements for two levels of impact energy. Moreover, the volume of removed rock after each drop test was evaluated by stereo-lithography (three-dimensional surface reconstruction). A modified version of the Holmquist-Johnson-Cook (MHJC) material model was calibrated using Kuru granite test results available from the literature. Numerical simulations of the single drop tests were carried out using the MHJC model available in the LS-DYNA explicit finite-element solver. The influence of the impact energy and additional confining pressure on the BRI curves and the volume of the removed rock is discussed. In addition, the influence of the rock surface shape before impact was evaluated using two different mesh geometries: a flat surface and a hyperbolic surface. The experimental and numerical results are compared and discussed in terms of drilling efficiency through the mechanical specific energy. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  3. Experimental Testing Procedures and Dynamic Model Validation for Vanadium Redox Flow Battery Storage System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baccino, Francesco; Marinelli, Mattia; Nørgård, Per Bromand

    2013-01-01

    The paper aims at characterizing the electrochemical and thermal parameters of a 15 kW/320 kWh vanadium redox flow battery (VRB) installed in the SYSLAB test facility of the DTU Risø Campus and experimentally validating the proposed dynamic model realized in Matlab-Simulink. The adopted testing...... procedure consists of analyzing the voltage and current values during a power reference step-response and evaluating the relevant electrochemical parameters such as the internal resistance. The results of different tests are presented and used to define the electrical characteristics and the overall...

  4. Performance of commercially available serological diagnostic tests to detect Leishmania infantum infection on experimentally infected dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Cortés, Alhelí; Ojeda, Ana; Todolí, Felicitat; Alberola, Jordi

    2013-01-31

    Leishmania infantum (syn. Leishmania chagasi) is the etiological agent of a widespread serious zoonotic disease that affects both humans and dogs. Prevalence and incidence of the canine infection are important parameters to determine the risk and the ways to control this reemergent zoonosis. Unfortunately, there is not a gold standard test for Leishmania infection. Our aim was to assess the operative validity of commercial tests used to detect antibodies to Leishmania in serum samples from experimental infections. Three ELISA tests (LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test, INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA, and INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA VET), three immunochromatographic tests (INGEZIM(®) LEISHMACROM, SNAP(®) Leishmania, and WITNESS(®) Leishmania), and one IFAT were evaluated. LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA test achieved the highest sensitivity and accuracy (both 0.98). Specificity was 1 for all tests except for IFAT. All tests but IFAT obtained a positive predictive value of 1, while the maximum negative predictive value was achieved by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.93). The best positive likelihood ratio was obtained by INGEZIM(®) LEISHMANIA VET (30.26), while the best negative likelihood ratio was obtained by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.02). The highest diagnostic odds ratio was achieved by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (729.00). The largest area under the ROC curve was obtained by LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test (0.981). Quantitative ELISA based tests performmed better than qualitative tests ("Rapid Tests"), and the test best suited to detect Leishmania in infected dogs and to provide clinically useful information was LEISCAN(®) Leishmania ELISA Test. This and other results point also to the need of revising the status of IFAT as a gold standard for the diagnosis of leishmaniasis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Experimental Issues in Testing a Semiactive Technique to Control Earthquake Induced Vibration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicola Caterino

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the issues to deal with when approaching experimental testing of structures equipped with semiactive control (SA systems. It starts from practical experience authors gained in a recent wide campaign on a large scale steel frame structure provided with a control system based on magnetorheological dampers. The latter are special devices able to achieve a wide range of physical behaviours using low-power electrical currents. Experimental activities involving the use of controllable devices require special attention in solving specific aspects that characterize each of the three phases of the SA control loop: acquisition, processing, and command. Most of them are uncommon to any other type of structural testing. This paper emphasizes the importance of the experimental assessment of SA systems and shows how many problematic issues likely to happen in real applications are also present when testing these systems experimentally. This paper highlights several problematic aspects and illustrates how they can be addressed in order to achieve a more realistic evaluation of the effectiveness of SA control solutions. Undesired and unavoidable effects like delays and control malfunction are also remarked. A discussion on the way to reduce their incidence is also offered.

  6. Pupil Perceptions of National Tests in Science: Perceived Importance, Invested Effort, and Test Anxiety

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eklof, Hanna; Nyroos, Mikaela

    2013-01-01

    Although large-scale national tests have been used for many years in Swedish compulsory schools, very little is known about how pupils actually react to these tests. The question is relevant, however, as pupil reactions in the test situation may affect test performance as well as future attitudes towards assessment. The question is relevant also…

  7. Graphic tests of Easterlin's hypothesis: science or art?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, A; Higgs, R

    1984-01-01

    Richard Easterlin believes that the postwar fertility cycle is uniquely consistent with the hypothesis of his relative income model of fertility, yet a closer examination of his evidence shows that the case for the relative income explanation is much weaker than initially appears. Easterlin finds the postwar baby boom a transparent event. Couples who entered the labor market in the postwar period have very low material aspirations. Having grown up during the Great Depression and World War II, they were content with a modest level of living. Their labor market experience was very good. Tight restrictions on immigration kept aliens from coming in to fill the gap. Thus the members of his generation occupied an unprecedented position. They could easily meet and even exceed their expectations. This high level of relative income meant that they could have more of everything they wanted, including children. For the children born during the baby boom, all this was reversed, and hence the needs of the baby bust were sown. To test this hypothesis, Easterlin compared the movements of relative income and fertility over the postwar years using a graph. 4 published versions of the graph are presented. The graph shows that relative income and fertility did move together over the cycle, apparently very closely. Easterlin's measure of fertility is the total fertility rate (TFR). There is no such direct measure of relative income. Easterlin develops 2 proxies based on changing economic conditions believed to shape the level of material aspirations. His preferred measure, labeled R or income in his graph, relates the income experience of young couples in the years previous to marriage to that of their parents in the years before the young people left home. Because of the available data limit construction of this index to the years after 1956, another measure, labeled Re or employment in Easterlin's graphs, is constructed for the pre-1956 period. This measure relates the average of

  8. An experimental test of the effects of gender constancy on sex typing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arthur, Andrea E; Bigler, Rebecca S; Ruble, Diane N

    2009-12-01

    This study provides an experimental test of the hypothesis that level of gender constancy understanding affects children's sex typing. Preschool-age children (N=62, mean age=47 months) were randomly assigned to experimental lessons that taught that biological traits (including gender) are either fixed (pro-constancy condition) or mutable (anti-constancy condition). Posttests revealed that the lessons were effective; children in the pro-constancy condition showed higher gender constancy and appearance-reality distinction scores than did children in the anti-constancy condition. Sex typing did not, however, differ between treatment conditions at immediate and 3-month posttesting.

  9. Design and experimental tests of a novel neutron spin analyzer for wide angle spin echo spectrometers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouquet, Peter; Farago, Bela; Andersen, Ken H.; Bentley, Phillip M.; Pastrello, Gilles; Sutton, Iain; Thaveron, Eric; Thomas, Frederic [Institut Laue-Langevin, BP 156, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Moskvin, Evgeny [Helmholtzzentrum Berlin, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Pappas, Catherine [Helmholtzzentrum Berlin, Glienicker Strasse 100, D-14109 Berlin (Germany); Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Mekelweg 15, 2629 JB Delft (Netherlands)

    2009-09-15

    This paper describes the design and experimental tests of a novel neutron spin analyzer optimized for wide angle spin echo spectrometers. The new design is based on nonremanent magnetic supermirrors, which are magnetized by vertical magnetic fields created by NdFeB high field permanent magnets. The solution presented here gives stable performance at moderate costs in contrast to designs invoking remanent supermirrors. In the experimental part of this paper we demonstrate that the new design performs well in terms of polarization, transmission, and that high quality neutron spin echo spectra can be measured.

  10. Cryo-Vacuum Testing of the Integrated Science Instrument Module for the James Webb Space Telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Davila, P. S.; Drury, M. P.; Glazer, S. D.; Krom, J. R.; Lundquist, R. A.; Mann, S. D.; McGuffey, D. B.; Perry, R. L.; Ramey, D. D.

    2011-01-01

    With delivery of the science instruments for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) expected in 2012, current plans call for the first cryo-vacuum test of the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) to be carried out at GSFC in early 2013. Plans are well underway for conducting this ambitious test, which will perform critical verifications of a number of optical, thermal, and operational requirements of the IS 1M hardware, at its deep cryogenic operating temperature. We describe here the facilities, goals, methods, and timeline for this important Integration & Test milestone in the JWST program.

  11. Why Students Answer TIMSS Science Test Items the Way They Do

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harlow, Ann; Jones, Alister

    2004-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore how Year 8 students answered Third International Mathematics and Science Study (TIMSS) questions and whether the test questions represented the scientific understanding of these students. One hundred and seventy-seven students were tested using written test questions taken from the science test used in the Third International Mathematics and Science Study. The degree to which a sample of 38 children represented their understanding of the topics in a written test compared to the level of understanding that could be elicited by an interview is presented in this paper. In exploring student responses in the interview situation this study hoped to gain some insight into the science knowledge that students held and whether or not the test items had been able to elicit this knowledge successfully. We question the usefulness and quality of data from large-scale summative assessments on their own to represent student scientific understanding and conclude that large scale written test items, such as TIMSS, on their own are not a valid way of exploring students'' understanding of scientific concepts. Considerable caution is therefore needed in exploiting the outcomes of international achievement testing when considering educational policy changes or using TIMSS data on their own to represent student understanding.

  12. Illusions of scientific legitimacy: misrepresented science in the direct-to-consumer genetic-testing marketplace.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vashlishan Murray, Amy B; Carson, Michael J; Morris, Corey A; Beckwith, Jon

    2010-11-01

    Marketers of genetic tests often openly or implicitly misrepresent the utility of genetic information. Scientists who are well aware of the current limitations to the utility of such tests are best placed to publicly counter misrepresentations of the science. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Differential Item Functioning (DIF) among Spanish-Speaking English Language Learners (ELLs) in State Science Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilich, Maria O.

    Psychometricians and test developers evaluate standardized tests for potential bias against groups of test-takers by using differential item functioning (DIF). English language learners (ELLs) are a diverse group of students whose native language is not English. While they are still learning the English language, they must take their standardized tests for their school subjects, including science, in English. In this study, linguistic complexity was examined as a possible source of DIF that may result in test scores that confound science knowledge with a lack of English proficiency among ELLs. Two years of fifth-grade state science tests were analyzed for evidence of DIF using two DIF methods, Simultaneous Item Bias Test (SIBTest) and logistic regression. The tests presented a unique challenge in that the test items were grouped together into testlets---groups of items referring to a scientific scenario to measure knowledge of different science content or skills. Very large samples of 10, 256 students in 2006 and 13,571 students in 2007 were examined. Half of each sample was composed of Spanish-speaking ELLs; the balance was comprised of native English speakers. The two DIF methods were in agreement about the items that favored non-ELLs and the items that favored ELLs. Logistic regression effect sizes were all negligible, while SIBTest flagged items with low to high DIF. A decrease in socioeconomic status and Spanish-speaking ELL diversity may have led to inconsistent SIBTest effect sizes for items used in both testing years. The DIF results for the testlets suggested that ELLs lacked sufficient opportunity to learn science content. The DIF results further suggest that those constructed response test items requiring the student to draw a conclusion about a scientific investigation or to plan a new investigation tended to favor ELLs.

  14. Usability Testing as a Method to Refine a Health Sciences Library Website.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denton, Andrea H; Moody, David A; Bennett, Jason C

    2016-01-01

    User testing, a method of assessing website usability, can be a cost-effective and easily administered process to collect information about a website's effectiveness. A user experience (UX) team at an academic health sciences library has employed user testing for over three years to help refine the library's home page. Test methodology used in-person testers using the "think aloud" method to complete tasks on the home page. Review of test results revealed problem areas of the design and redesign; further testing was effective in refining the page. User testing has proved to be a valuable method to engage users and provide feedback to continually improve the library's home page.

  15. SIRHEX—A new experimental facility for high heat flux testing of plasma facing components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunze, André, E-mail: andre.kunze@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (Germany); Ghidersa, Bradut-Eugen [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Neutron Physics and Reactor Technology (Germany); Bonelli, Flavia [Politecnico di Torino, Dipartimento Energia (Italy)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Commercial infrared heaters have been qualified for future First Wall experiments. • In first tests surface heat flux densities up to 470 kW/m were achieved. • The homogeneity of the heat distribution stayed within ±5% of the nominal value. • With the heaters a typical ITER pulse can be reproduced. • An adequate testing strategy will be required to improve heater lifetime. - Abstract: SIRHEX (“Surface Infrared Radiation Heating Experiment”) is a small-scale experimental facility at KIT, which has been built for testing and qualifying high heat flux radiation heaters for blanket specific conditions using an instrumented water cooled target. This paper describes the SIRHEX facility and the experimental set-up for the heater tests. The results of a series of tests focused on reproducing homogeneous surface heat flux densities up to 500 kW/m{sup 2} will be presented and the impact of the heater performance on the design of the First Wall test rig will be discussed.

  16. What Is the Teacher Doing? What Are the Students Doing? An Application of the Draw-a-Science-Teacher-Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minogue, James

    2010-01-01

    This study documents the use of the Draw-a-Science-Teacher-Test as diagnostic tool for both preservice teacher beliefs about science teaching and science methods course effectiveness. Direct comparison of pre-course to post-course images from 50 preservice elementary teachers was undertaken using McNemar's test. Results indicated statistically…

  17. A Novel Experimental and Modelling Strategy for Nanoparticle Toxicity Testing Enabling the Use of Small Quantities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marinda van Pomeren

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Metallic nanoparticles (NPs differ from other metal forms with respect to their large surface to volume ratio and subsequent inherent reactivity. Each new modification to a nanoparticle alters the surface to volume ratio, fate and subsequently the toxicity of the particle. Newly-engineered NPs are commonly available only in low quantities whereas, in general, rather large amounts are needed for fate characterizations and effect studies. This challenge is especially relevant for those NPs that have low inherent toxicity combined with low bioavailability. Therefore, within our study, we developed new testing strategies that enable working with low quantities of NPs. The experimental testing method was tailor-made for NPs, whereas we also developed translational models based on different dose-metrics allowing to determine dose-response predictions for NPs. Both the experimental method and the predictive models were verified on the basis of experimental effect data collected using zebrafish embryos exposed to metallic NPs in a range of different chemical compositions and shapes. It was found that the variance in the effect data in the dose-response predictions was best explained by the minimal diameter of the NPs, whereas the data confirmed that the predictive model is widely applicable to soluble metallic NPs. The experimental and model approach developed in our study support the development of (ecotoxicity assays tailored to nano-specific features.

  18. Bridging the Gap of Standardized Animals Models for Blast Neurotrauma: Methodology for Appropriate Experimental Testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    VandeVord, Pamela J; Leonardi, Alessandra Dal Cengio; Ritzel, David

    2016-01-01

    Recent military combat has heightened awareness to the complexity of blast-related traumatic brain injuries (bTBI). Experiments using animal, cadaver, or biofidelic physical models remain the primary measures to investigate injury biomechanics as well as validate computational simulations, medical diagnostics and therapies, or protection technologies. However, blast injury research has seen a range of irregular and inconsistent experimental methods for simulating blast insults generating results which may be misleading, cannot be cross-correlated between laboratories, or referenced to any standard for exposure. Both the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command and the National Institutes of Health have noted that there is a lack of standardized preclinical models of TBI. It is recommended that the blast injury research community converge on a consistent set of experimental procedures and reporting of blast test conditions. This chapter describes the blast conditions which can be recreated within a laboratory setting and methodology for testing in vivo models within the appropriate environment.

  19. Experimental testing of focusing properties of subwavelength photon sieves using exposure method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenbo; Zhang, Xiaohua

    2016-04-01

    An exposure method is proposed to test the focusing properties of subwavelength photon sieves. To solve the problems caused by the subwavelength photon sieves (such as short focal length and small focal spot size), a grating moiré fringe phase detection technique and a microcontact sensor with lead zirconium titanate (PZT) stepping hybrid technique are used in the experimental setup. The focusing properties of the subwavelength photon sieves are tested by this setup. The results show that the focal length and the focal spot size are close to the designed value. Finally, the intensity distribution of the focal spot is proposed. This research result will be beneficial for understanding the focusing properties of subwavelength photon sieves, will help us to improve the imaging quality, and will provide a good experimental basis for practical applications in the nanolithography field.

  20. Experimental adhesives with different hydrophilicity: microshear test in after 1, 7, and 90 days' storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hori, Frederico Seidi; de Carvalho, Rubens Côrte

    2012-04-01

    To assess the microshear bond strength of 3 experimental adhesives with different degrees of hydrophilicity after 1, 7 and 90 days of storage. The bonding effectiveness of three experimental two-step etch-and-rinse adhesives (bis- GMA, bis-EMA/bis-GMA, polybutadiene [C6H12]) and one commercial adhesive (Single Bond) to sound hydrated dentin was determined using the microshear test with delimitation of the adhesive area after 1, 7, and 90 days of storage in water at 37°C. Two-way ANOVA was performed at the 0.05 probability level. The fractures were classified as adhesive, cohesive in dentin, cohesive in resin, and mixed. The experimental adhesives showed values in the range of 11.31 to 12.96 MPa, with polybutadiene (PBH) showing the lowest bond strengths, bis-GMA the highest, and bis-EMA/bis-GMA intermediary values. Single Bond yielded bond strengths of approximately 24 MPa. Water storage decreased the bond strength in all adhesives. Adhesive fractures were predominant in experimental adhesives, while mixed fractures were the most frequent type in the Single Bond group. The experimental dentin adhesives of this study were able to form resin tags, but they could not penetrate into the collagen fibers and form hybrid layers. The resulting low bond strength decreased with increasing length of storage.

  1. Understanding Scientific Methodology in the Historical and Experimental Sciences via Language Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodick, Jeff; Argamon, Shlomo; Chase, Paul

    2009-01-01

    A key focus of current science education reforms involves developing inquiry-based learning materials. However, without an understanding of how working scientists actually "do" science, such learning materials cannot be properly developed. Until now, research on scientific reasoning has focused on cognitive studies of individual scientific fields.…

  2. Mapping science through bibliometric triangulation: an experimental approach applied to water research

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wen, Bei; Horlings, Edwin; van der Zouwen, Marielle; Van den Besselaar, P.A.A.

    2016-01-01

    The idea of constructing science maps based on bibliographic data has intrigued researchers for decades, and various techniques have been developed to map the structure of research disciplines. Most science mapping studies use a single method. However, as research fields have various properties, a

  3. Science Plan for the Nuclear Electric Propulsion Space Test Program (NEPSTP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauk, B. H.; Bythrow, P. F.; Gatsonis, N. A.; McNutt, R. L., Jr.

    1993-06-01

    NEPSTP is an unclassified, international space mission sponsored by the Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) as a testbed for the development of Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) technologies. The mission will utilize the Russian manufactured Topaz II thermionic nuclear reactor and a variety of advanced experimental electric thrusters from international sources. The NEPSTP Spacecraft will be inserted into a nuclear safe circular orbit, and the electric thrusters will be utilized to drive the spacecraft in a spiral pattern to high earth orbit. This paper gives an overview of the Science Plan for the NEPSTP mission. The science activities discussed incude: (1) Evaluation of the performance of the Topaz II reactor in orbit; (2) Evaluation of the performances and degradations of the electric thrusters; (3) Evaluation of the so-called 'induced environment' around the NEPSTP Spacecraft; and, (4) Science of opportunity consistent with (1), (2), and (3). With regard to the third goal, the environment induced in the vicinity of an NEP driven spacecraft is unique, and its severity may degrade the performances of advanced sensors and some spacecraft subsystems. Thus, NEPSTP has an aggressive program to diagnose induced environment effects and develop predictive understanding of that environment for future systems. The Science Plan includes: (A) The utilization on the spacecraft of suite of science instruments, a science boom, and other spacecraft liens; (B) A data analysis and evaluation plan; (C) Various operational experiments; and, (D) The development of theoretical and empirical models.

  4. Determination of Operation Characteristics of a Synchronous Generator by Static Experimental Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ILINA, I.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the determination of the operation characteristics of a Synchronous Generator (SG using static experimental tests (current and voltage decay tests. Using these tests the magnetization characteristic, the machine parameters (synchronous magnetization inductances and differential magnetization inductances, the no-load characteristic and the external characteristic were determined. The magnetization characteristic, the parameters and the operational characteristics provide important information about the performance of synchronous generator, machine which is currently used in most power plants. Compared to classical experimental methods with moving rotor and numerical methods of field computation that require the knowledge of geometric dimensions and material properties, static experimental methods are distinguished by several advantages: simple implementation for any type of SG, quick results, low power consumption and no effect on the drive system where the machine is integrated. The mathematical model of SG uses dedicated Matlab-Simulink programs and the results obtained by static methods are compared with those obtained by classical methods. Also to better approach the phenomenon of magnetic saturation and a more accurate estimate of the parameters, the magnetization characteristic, synchronous magnetization inductances and differential magnetization inductances are determined versus the total magnetizing current.

  5. Validation of an experimental polyurethane model for biomechanical studies on implant supported prosthesis - tension tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariane Miyashiro

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: The complexity and heterogeneity of human bone, as well as ethical issues, frequently hinder the development of clinical trials. The purpose of this in vitro study was to determine the modulus of elasticity of a polyurethane isotropic experimental model via tension tests, comparing the results to those reported in the literature for mandibular bone, in order to validate the use of such a model in lieu of mandibular bone in biomechanical studies. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Forty-five polyurethane test specimens were divided into 3 groups of 15 specimens each, according to the ratio (A/B of polyurethane reagents (PU-1: 1/0.5, PU-2: 1/1, PU-3: 1/1.5. RESULTS: Tension tests were performed in each experimental group and the modulus of elasticity values found were 192.98 MPa (SD=57.20 for PU-1, 347.90 MPa (SD=109.54 for PU-2 and 304.64 MPa (SD=25.48 for PU-3. CONCLUSION: The concentration of choice for building the experimental model was 1/1.

  6. Ultrasonic Testing of Thick Walled Austenitic Welds: Modelling and Experimental Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, B.; Müller, W.; Spies, M.; Schmitz, V.; Zimmer, A.; Langenberg, K.-J.; Mletzko, U.

    2006-03-01

    The testing of austenitic welds is difficult due to the elastically anisotropic properties of the weld grains. Therefore the normal rules for the selection of testing conditions as appropriate wave modes, frequencies and incident angles cannot be applied in the usual way. In last years several tools for simulation of the wave propagation in such testing situations were developed. In the paper these tools are applied to a austenitic weld containing a crack grown by intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGSCC). It is demonstrated that by the combined application of several simulation tools a stepwise narrowing of the parameter space can be achieved. Eventually an optimized testing configuration is defined. The approach is validated experimentally.

  7. Cryo-Vacuum Testing of the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Vila, M. Begona; Van Campen, Julie M.; Birkmann, Stephen M.; Comber, Brian J.; Fatig, Curtis C.; Glasse, Alistair C. H.; Glazer, Stuart D.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Mann, Steven D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    In late 2015 early 2016, a major cryo-vacuum test was carried out for the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope. This test comprised the final cryo-certification and calibration test of the ISIM before its delivery for integration with the rest of the JWST observatory. Over the roughly 100-day period of the round-the-clock test program, the full complement of ISIM flight instruments, structure, harness radiator, and electronics were put through a comprehensive program of thermal, optical, electrical, and operational tests. We briefly summarize the goals, setup, execution, and key results for this critical JWST milestone.

  8. Behavioral science foundations of the Rorschach test: research and clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acklin, M W

    1999-12-01

    Never without its critics, the Rorschach Test continues to be widely used in clinical settings. The test continues to be criticized vigorously. Rorschach critics appear to fall into two broad groups: those leveling valid methodological concerns about the test s behavioral science foundations and method critics who appear to deny the validity of the test on strictly a priori or theoretical considerations. Many critics do not appear to be acquainted with the extensive Rorschach research literature. The current paper provides an overview of several domains of applied and laboratory Rorschach behavioral science, including statistical power analysis, interobserver agreement and interrater reliability, Rorschach assessment of thought disorder, and emerging research linking Rorschach variables with diagnostic criteria from the DSM-IV, as a means of educating both adherents and detractors alike concerning the test s scientific track record and applicability to clinical assessment.

  9. Experimental study on the flight dynamics of a bioinspired ornithopter: free flight testing and wind tunnel testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jun-Seong; Han, Jae-Hung

    2012-09-01

    This study experimentally shows the flight dynamics of a bioinspired ornithopter using two different types of approach: (1) free flight testing, and (2) wind tunnel testing. An ornithopter is flown in straight and level flight with a fixed wingbeat frequency and tail elevation angle. A three-dimensional visual tracking system is applied to follow the retro-reflective markers on the ornithopter and record the flight trajectories. The unique oscillatory behavior of the body in the longitudinal plane is observed in the free flight testing and the detailed wing and tail deformations are also obtained. Based on the trim flight data, a specially devised tether device is designed and employed to emulate the free flight conditions in the wind tunnel. The tether device provides minimal mechanical interference and longitudinal flight dynamic characteristics similar to those of free flight. On introducing a pitching moment disturbance to the body, the oscillation recovered to the original trajectory turns out to be a stable limit-cycle oscillation (LCO). During the wind tunnel testing, the magnitude of LCO is effectively suppressed by active tail motion.

  10. Cryo Testing of tbe James Webb Space Telescope's Integrated Science Instrument Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    VanCampen, Julie

    2004-01-01

    The Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope will be integrated and tested at the Environmental Test Facilities at Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). The cryogenic thermal vacuum testing of the ISIM will be the most difficult and problematic portion of the GSFC Integration and Test flow. The test is to validate the coupled interface of the science instruments and the ISIM structure and to sufficiently stress that interface while validating image quality of the science instruments. The instruments and the structure are not made from the same materials and have different CTE. Test objectives and verification rationale are currently being evaluated in Phase B of the project plan. The test program will encounter engineering challenges and limitations, which are derived by cost and technology many of which can be mitigated by facility upgrades, creative GSE, and thorough forethought. The cryogenic testing of the ISIM will involve a number of risks such as the implementation of unique metrology techniques, mechanical, electrical and optical simulators housed within the cryogenic vacuum environment. These potential risks are investigated and possible solutions are proposed.

  11. "They Sweat for Science": The Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and Self-Experimentation in American Exercise Physiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Andi

    2015-08-01

    In many scientific fields, the practice of self-experimentation waned over the course of the twentieth century. For exercise physiologists working today, however, the practice of self-experimentation is alive and well. This paper considers the role of the Harvard Fatigue Laboratory and its scientific director, D. Bruce Dill, in legitimizing the practice of self-experimentation in exercise physiology. Descriptions of self-experimentation are drawn from papers published by members of the Harvard Fatigue Lab. Attention is paid to the ethical and practical justifications for self-experimentation in both the lab and the field. Born out of the practical, immediate demands of fatigue protocols, self-experimentation performed the long-term, epistemological function of uniting physiological data across time and space, enabling researchers to contribute to a general human biology program.

  12. Developing Science Virtual Test to Measure Students’ Critical Thinking on Living Things and Environmental Sustainability Theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbar, M. N.; Firman, H.; Rusyati, L.

    2017-02-01

    Critical thinking is skill and ability to use of risk taking creativity to make a decision and knowledge as a result, analysis and synthesis that, evaluation, to acquire, information search, to develop thinking, as an individual aware of his or her own thinking. The aim of this study is to develop the science virtual test to measure students’ critical thinking on living things and environmental sustainability theme. The research method that is used in this research was descriptive research. The development of science virtual test item consist of five steps: (1) content analysis; (2) constructing the instrument (multiple choice) based on the elements of critical thinking by Inch; (3) validity judgment of the instrument by the expert; (4) legibility test of the instrument; (5) conducting the large field test. On the large field test was gained the results of validity and reliability of the test, difficulty index, discriminating power, and quality of distractor. The subjects of research were 8th grade students at International Junior High School in Bandung with 125 total of respondents. The coefficient alpha (α) was 0.747, the reliability of the test was categorized as ‘high’ and value of RXY correlation was 0.63 which mean that the validity of the test was categorized as ‘high’. These means that science virtual test can be used to measure student’s critical thinking with a good consistency. It is expected for other researcher to take this description as one of the basic information to be considered in developing science virtual test for improving students’ critical thinking by various kind of topic.

  13. Tracer tests in a fractured dolomite: 1. Experimental design and observed tracer recoveries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meigs, Lucy C.; Beauheim, Richard L.

    2001-05-01

    A series of tracer tests has been conducted in a 7-m-thick fractured dolomite at two sites in southeastern New Mexico. The tests were designed to evaluate transport processes, especially matrix diffusion, in fractured, permeable media. Both single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) and multiwell convergent flow (MWCF) tests were conducted. Seventeen different organic tracers (he fluorobenzoic and chlorobenzoic acids) and iodide were used as conservative tracers for the tests. The MWCF tests included repeated tracer injections while pumping the central well at different rates, injection of tracers with different aqueous diffusion coefficients, and injection of tracers into both the full and partial formation thickness. This paper describes the tracer test sites and aquifer characteristics, the experimental methods, and the tracer data produced. The tracer test results provide a high-quality data set for a critical evaluation of the conceptual model for transport. Both the SWIW and MWCF tracer test data showed gradual mass recovery and breakthrough (or recovery) curve tailing consistent with matrix diffusion. However, the SWIW recovery curves did not display the -1.5 log-log slope expected from a conventional double-porosity medium with a single rate of diffusion. The breakthrough curves from MWCF tests conducted at two different pumping rates showed similar peak heights, which is also not what was expected with a conventional double-porosity model. However, the peak heights were different for two tracers with different aqueous diffusion coefficients that were injected simultaneously in one test, consistent with the effects of matrix diffusion. The complexity of the tracer test results suggests that a simple double- porosity conceptual model for transport in the Culebra with a single rate of diffusion is overly simplistic.

  14. Testing the Efficacy of Student Explorations of Earth Science Museum Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, K.; Phipps, M.; Tzenis, C.; Morin, P. J.; Hamilton, P.

    2009-12-01

    With their rock and mineral displays, fossil exhibits and hands-on nature, museum exhibits are a proven resource for elementary and secondary earth science education. However, due to a number of obstacles this success has not been emulated at the undergraduate level. Self-guided student explorations of science museum exhibits appear to be an effective way to circumvent these obstacles and easily expand earth science programs to include museum resources and tap their potential. Preliminary testing of this concept as an extra credit option by the University of Minnesota and the Science Museum of Minnesota not only showed that students enthusiastically respond to such explorations, but that explorations can be remarkably effective in changing student understanding of science concepts. Previously, a number of factors discouraged the integration of museum resources into undergraduate programs. Museum displays geared towards the general public often lack the level of detailed information necessary to integrate them into undergraduate science curriculum. Consequently, without an experienced guide (such as the course instructor), exhibits are of limited use. The logistics of arranging class visits can be daunting and given the limited opportunities for class trips, earth science instructors justifiably tend to choose field over museum experiences. However, well-designed explorations of the exhibits allow students to guide themselves through the exhibits, on their own or with friends and family, greatly expanding the range of course experiences with minimal cost to the program infrastructure. Student response to the preliminary testing of an exploration of dinosaur and pterosaur displays was very encouraging. Nearly half the class, 84 out of 176 students, volunteered to travel the eight miles to the museum to complete an exploration of the fossil gallery. When asked their likeliness of recommending the experience to others on a scale of 1-10 with 1 being “I would not

  15. Pedagogical experimentations about participating science, in a european class, in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgio, Marion

    2015-04-01

    A european class is, in France, a class in which we teach a subject in a foreign language, for example science in English. I led, in my European class, during a seven weeks session, group work activities about different participating science actions. There were groups composed of three or four 16 years old students. Each group chose one type of participating science activity among : - Leading a visioconference with an IODP mission on board the Joides Resolution. - Being part of a "science songs community" with Tom Mc Fadden They divided the work and some of them studied the websites and contacted the actors to present the pedagogical or scientific background of their subject. Others had a concrete production like the organization of a visioconference with the Joides Resolution or the creation of a pedagogical song about geology. I will present some results of their work and explain the students motivation linked to this active learning method.

  16. A selection of experimental test cases for the validation of CFD codes, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-08-01

    This report presents the results of a study by Working Group 14 of the AGARD Fluid Dynamics Panel. This group was formed to establish an accessible, detailed experimental data base for the validation of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) codes. The thirty nine test cases that are documented cover the subsonic, transonic, and supersonic flow regimes and five classes of geometries. Included in the five classes of geometries are: two dimensional airfoils; three dimensional wings, designed for predominantly attached flow conditions; slender bodies, typical of missile type configurations; delta wings, characterized by a conical type of vortex flow; and complex configurations, either in a geometrical sense or because of complicated flow interactions. The report is presented in two volumes. Volume 1 provides a review of the theoretical and experimental requirements, a general introduction and summary of the test cases, and recommendations for the future. Volume 2 contains detailed information on the test cases. The relevant data of all test cases has been compiled on floppy disks, which can be obtained through National Centers.

  17. Experimental characterization of an adaptive aileron: lab tests and FE correlation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amendola, Gianluca; Dimino, Ignazio; Amoroso, Francesco; Pecora, Rosario

    2016-04-01

    Like any other technology, morphing has to demonstrate system level performance benefits prior to implementation onto a real aircraft. The current status of morphing structures research efforts (as the ones, sponsored by the European Union) involves the design of several subsystems which have to be individually tested in order to consolidate their general performance in view of the final integration into a flyable device. This requires a fundamental understanding of the interaction between aerodynamic, structure and control systems. Important worldwide research collaborations were born in order to exchange acquired experience and better investigate innovative technologies devoted to morphing structures. The "Adaptive Aileron" project represents a joint cooperation between Canadian and Italian research centers and leading industries. In this framework, an overview of the design, manufacturing and testing of a variable camber aileron for a regional aircraft is presented. The key enabling technology for the presented morphing aileron is the actuation structural system, integrating a suitable motor and a load-bearing architecture. The paper describes the lab test campaign of the developed device. The implementation of a distributed actuation system fulfills the actual tendency of the aeronautical research to move toward the use of electrical power to supply non-propulsive systems. The aileron design features are validated by targeted experimental tests, demonstrating both its adaptive capability and robustness under operative loads and its dynamic behavior for further aeroelastic analyses. The experimental results show a satisfactory correlation with the numerical expectations thus validating the followed design approach.

  18. Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV) Experimental Aerodynamics Test Program Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holland, Scott D.; Woods, William C.; Engelund, Walter C.

    2000-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the experimental aerodynamics test program to ensure mission success for the autonomous flight of the Hyper-X Research Vehicle (HXRV). The HXRV is a 12-ft long, 2700 lb lifting body technology demonstrator designed to flight demonstrate for the first time a fully airframe integrated scramjet propulsion system. Three flights are currently planned, two at Mach 7 and one at Mach 10, beginning in the fall of 2000. The research vehicles will be boosted to the prescribed scramjet engine test point where they will separate from the booster, stabilize. and initiate engine test. Following 5+ seconds of powered flight and 15 seconds of cowl-open tares, the cowl will close and the vehicle will fly a controlled deceleration trajectory which includes numerous control doublets for in-flight aerodynamic parameter identification. This paper reviews the preflight testing activities, wind tunnel models, test rationale. risk reduction activities, and sample results from wind tunnel tests supporting the flight trajectory of the HXRV from hypersonic engine test point through subsonic flight termination.

  19. Experimental and Sampling Design for the INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piepel, Gregory F.; Amidan, Brett G.; Matzke, Brett D.

    2009-02-16

    This report describes the experimental and sampling design developed to assess sampling approaches and methods for detecting contamination in a building and clearing the building for use after decontamination. An Idaho National Laboratory (INL) building will be contaminated with BG (Bacillus globigii, renamed Bacillus atrophaeus), a simulant for Bacillus anthracis (BA). The contamination, sampling, decontamination, and re-sampling will occur per the experimental and sampling design. This INL-2 Sample Collection Operational Test is being planned by the Validated Sampling Plan Working Group (VSPWG). The primary objectives are: 1) Evaluate judgmental and probabilistic sampling for characterization as well as probabilistic and combined (judgment and probabilistic) sampling approaches for clearance, 2) Conduct these evaluations for gradient contamination (from low or moderate down to absent or undetectable) for different initial concentrations of the contaminant, 3) Explore judgment composite sampling approaches to reduce sample numbers, 4) Collect baseline data to serve as an indication of the actual levels of contamination in the tests. A combined judgmental and random (CJR) approach uses Bayesian methodology to combine judgmental and probabilistic samples to make clearance statements of the form "X% confidence that at least Y% of an area does not contain detectable contamination” (X%/Y% clearance statements). The INL-2 experimental design has five test events, which 1) vary the floor of the INL building on which the contaminant will be released, 2) provide for varying the amount of contaminant released to obtain desired concentration gradients, and 3) investigate overt as well as covert release of contaminants. Desirable contaminant gradients would have moderate to low concentrations of contaminant in rooms near the release point, with concentrations down to zero in other rooms. Such gradients would provide a range of contamination levels to challenge the sampling

  20. Bending and Shear Experimental Tests and Numerical Analysis of Composite Slabs Made Up of Lightweight Concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. P. Alvarez Rabanal

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to understand the structural behaviour of composite slabs. These composite slabs are made of steel and different kinds of concrete. The methodology used in this paper combines experimental studies with advanced techniques of numerical simulations. In this paper, four types of concrete were used in order to study their different structural strengths in composite slabs. The materials used were three lightweight concretes, a normal concrete, and a cold conformed steel deck which has embossments to increase the adherence between concrete and steel. Furthermore, two lengths of slabs were studied to compare structural behaviours between short and long slabs. m-k experimental tests were carried out to obtain the flexural behaviour of the composite slabs. These tests provide dimensionless coefficients to compare different sizes of slabs. Nonlinear numerical simulations were performed by means of the finite element method (FEM. Four different multilinear isotropic hardening laws were used to simulate the four concretes. Coulomb friction contact was used to model the coefficient of friction between steel and concrete. Finally, a chemical bond was included to consider sliding resistance in the contact surface between steel and concrete. Experimental and numerical results are in good agreement; therefore, numerical models can be used to improve and optimize lightweight composite slabs.

  1. Experimental tests and GEANT4 simulations of detectors for the EXL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zamora, J.C.; Kroell, T.; Schmid, M. v.; Ilieva, S. [IKP, TU Darmstadt (Germany); Davinson, T.; Woods, P.J. [University of Edinburgh (United Kingdom); Egelhof, P.; Mutterer, M. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); Eremin, V. [PTI, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Kalantar, N.; Najafi, M.A.; Rigollet, C.; Walle, J. van de [KVI, Groningen (Netherlands); Scarpaci, J.A. [IPN, Orsay (France); Streicher, B. [GSI, Darmstadt (Germany); KVI, Groningen (Netherlands)

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the EXL project is the investigation of light-ion reactions in inverse kinematics by using the storage ring NESR (at FAIR) and a universal detector system providing high resolution and large solid angle coverage in kinematically complete measurements. The design of this detector system includes different silicon (Si(Li) and DSSD) detectors for tracking and energy measurements, as well as CsI scintillators for an external calorimeter shell. Prototypes of these detectors have already been constructed and tested in experiments, e.g., one performed at KVI with 135 MeV protons. Nevertheless, some questions have arisen regarding the complete understanding of the single detector response, and also, the possible influence in neighbor ones. In order to comprehend the experimental response of these detectors, we have performed GEANT4 simulations for the different tested devices. Simulations describe the experimental results successfully, what will help us to investigate more complex processes, such as light cross-talk between scintillation crystals or charge cross-talk in DSSD. Current status of the simulations and comparison with the experimental results are discussed.

  2. Experimental and numerical analysis of Izod impact test of cortical bone tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Wahab, A. A.; Silberschmidt, V. V.

    2012-05-01

    Bones can only sustain loads until a certain limit, beyond which they fail. Usually, the reasons for bone fracture are traumatic falls, sports injuries, and engagement in transport or industrial accidents. A proper treatment of bones and prevention of their fracture can be supported by in-depth understanding of deformation and fracture behavior of this tissue in such dynamic events. In this paper, a combination of experimental and numerical analysis was carried out in order to comprehend the fracture behavior of cortical bone tissue. Experimental tests were performed to study the transient dynamic behavior of cortical bone tissue under impact bending loading. The variability of absorbed energy for different cortex positions and notch depths was studied using Izod impact tests. Also, Extended Finite-Element Method implemented into the commercial finite-element software Abaqus was used to simulate the crack initiation and growth processes in a cantilever beam of cortical bone exposed to impact loading using the Izod loading scheme. The simulation results show a good agreement with the experimental data.

  3. [Morphologic characteristics of the testes in breeding rams after experimental loading with industrial emissions containing copper].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vrzgulová, M; Vrzgula, L; Bíres, J

    1995-04-01

    The aim of this work was to experimentally evaluate the effect of feeding industrial emissions from a copper-producing plant upon Cu accumulation in the testes of six Merino breeding rams. In the experimental animals (4) the daily copper intake from the exhalations was 15 mg/kg l.w. Administration was continued until the haemolytic crisis appeared (on day 42 in one animal and on day 50 of the experiment in the other animals). The tissue of the testes was examined by both optic and electron microscopy. The patho-anatomical picture of the organs was characterized by general icterus which was also evident on the sectional surfaces of the testes. In the right and left testis of the experimental animals Cu levels were found that were twice higher than those of the controls (Tab. IV). The toxic effect of copper became evident by the destruction of all developmental stages of germinative cells mainly by that the integrity of the cell membranes was damaged thus resulting in a gradual release of the germinative cells, into the tubular lumen. In extreme cases the tubules were lined with nuclei only and the residual cytoplasm of Sertoli cells (Sertoli cells--only syndrome). Ruptures of the cytoplasmic membranes were also observed on the Leydig cells. Thickening of the tubular lamina propria was caused by homogenization and enormous invagination of the lamellar layer, which was rather predominant on the periphery of the organ (Fig. 2). In the deeper layers of the testes reduction of the cellular and non-cellular layers of the tubular walls occurred which frequently resulted in the rupture of the basement membrane.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Experimental testing of the digital multichannel analyzer for gamma spectrometry measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novković Dušan

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The results of experimental testing of the digital multichannel analyzer which digitalizes the signal after a preamplifier are presented. The recordings of some of the characteristics of the spectrometer containing a digital MCA, such as full-peak efficiency, net area ratio of the two peaks and the stability of the peak position, were carried out under different input counting rates, with different radioactive sources. The tested MCA has shown some excellent features, like the stability of the peak position over a long-term period and flexibility in the adjusting of optimum measurement conditions. However, the performed tests have also shown some serious and unexpected disadvantages of the digital MCA when it operates under certain circumstances, one of them having to do with the automatic tuning of live-time correction at low-input counting rates.

  5. What factors make science test items especially difficult for students from minority groups?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Are Turmo

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Substantial gaps in science performance between majority and minority students are often found instandardized tests used in primary school. But at the item level, the gaps may vary significantly. Theaims of this study are: (1 to identify features of the test items in science (grade 5 and grade 8 students that can potentially explain group differences; and (2 to analyze what factors make test itemsespecially difficult for minority students. Explanatory variables such as reading load, item difficulty,item writing load, and use of the multiple-choice format are found to be major factors. The analysis reveals no empirical relationships between performance gap and either item subject domain, item test location, or the number of illustrations used in the item. Subtle issues regarding the design ofitems may influence the size of the performance gap at item level over and above the main explanatory variables. The gap can be reduced significantly by choosing “minority friendly” items.

  6. EPOS Multi-Scale Laboratory platform: a long-term reference tool for experimental Earth Sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trippanera, Daniele; Tesei, Telemaco; Funiciello, Francesca; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Scarlato, Piergiorgio; Rosenau, Matthias; Elger, Kirsten; Ulbricht, Damian; Lange, Otto; Calignano, Elisa; Spiers, Chris; Drury, Martin; Willingshofer, Ernst; Winkler, Aldo

    2017-04-01

    With continuous progress on scientific research, a large amount of datasets has been and will be produced. The data access and sharing along with their storage and homogenization within a unique and coherent framework is a new challenge for the whole scientific community. This is particularly emphasized for geo-scientific laboratories, encompassing the most diverse Earth Science disciplines and typology of data. To this aim the "Multiscale Laboratories" Work Package (WP16), operating in the framework of the European Plate Observing System (EPOS), is developing a virtual platform of geo-scientific data and services for the worldwide community of laboratories. This long-term project aims at merging the top class multidisciplinary laboratories in Geoscience into a coherent and collaborative network, facilitating the standardization of virtual access to data, data products and software. This will help our community to evolve beyond the stage in which most of data produced by the different laboratories are available only within the related scholarly publications (often as print-version only) or they remain unpublished and inaccessible on local devices. The EPOS multi-scale laboratory platform will provide the possibility to easily share and discover data by means of open access, DOI-referenced, online data publication including long-term storage, managing and curation services and to set up a cohesive community of laboratories. The WP16 is starting with three pilot cases laboratories: (1) rock physics, (2) palaeomagnetic, and (3) analogue modelling. As a proof of concept, first analogue modelling datasets have been published via GFZ Data Services (http://doidb.wdc-terra.org/search/public/ui?&sort=updated+desc&q=epos). The datasets include rock analogue material properties (e.g. friction data, rheology data, SEM imagery), as well as supplementary figures, images and movies from experiments on tectonic processes. A metadata catalogue tailored to the specific communities

  7. 33 CFR 334.150 - Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. 334.150 Section 334.150 Navigation and... RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.150 Severn River at Annapolis, Md.; experimental test area, U.S. Navy Marine Engineering Laboratory. (a) The restricted area. The waters of Severn River shoreward of a line...

  8. Experimental test of host specificity in a behaviour-modifying trematode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez, R.N.; Fredensborg, Brian Lund

    2015-01-01

    Host behavioural modification by parasites is a common and well-documented phenomenon. However, knowledge on the complexity and specificity of the underlying mechanisms is limited, and host specificity among manipulating parasites has rarely been experimentally verified. We tested the hypothesis...... that the ability to infect and manipulate host behaviour is restricted to phylogenetically closely related hosts. Our model system consisted of the brain-encysting trematode Euhaplorchis sp. A and six potential fish intermediate hosts from the Order Cyprinodontiformes. Five co-occurring cyprinids were examined...... for naturally acquired brain infections. Then we selected three species representing three levels of taxonomic relatedness to a known host to experimentally evaluate their susceptibility to infection, and the effect of infection status on behaviours presumably linked to increased trophic transmission. We found...

  9. Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) at SLAC and its Radiological Considerations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mao, X.S.; Leitner, M.Santana; Vollaire, J.

    2011-08-22

    Facility for Advanced Accelerator Experimental Tests (FACET) in SLAC will be used to study plasma wakefield acceleration. FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design a maze wall to separate FACET project and LCLS project to allow persons working in FACET side during LCLS operation. Also FLUKA Monte Carlo code was used to design the shielding for FACET dump to get optimum design for shielding both prompt and residual doses, as well as reducing environmental impact. FACET will be an experimental facility that provides short, intense pulses of electrons and positrons to excite plasma wakefields and study a variety of critical issues associated with plasma wakefield acceleration [1]. This paper describes the FACET beam parameters, the lay-out and its radiological issues.

  10. EXPERIMENTAL TESTS OF QUANTUM MECHANICS PAULI EXCLUSION PRINCIPLE VIOLATION (THE VIP EXPERIMENT) AND FUTURE PERSPECTIVES

    CERN Document Server

    Curceanu, C; Bragadireanu, M; Pietreanu, T; Sperandio, L; Marton, J; Sirghi, D L; Widmann, E; Ishiwatari, T; Zmeskal, J; Ponta, T; Laubenstein, M; Cargnelli, M; Milotti, E; Bartalucci, S; Iliescu, M; Guaraldo, C; Doce, O V; Bertolucci, S; Egger, J P; Vidal, A R; Sirghi, F; Di Matteo, S

    2011-01-01

    The Pauli exclusion principle (PEP) is one of the basic principles of modern physics. Being at the very basis of our understanding of matter, as many other fundamental principles it spurs, presently, a lively debate on its possible limits, deeply rooted in the very foundations of Quantum Field Theory. Therefore, it is extremely important to test the limits of its validity. Quon theory provides a suitable mathematical framework of possible violation of PEP, where the violation parameter q translates into a probability of violating PEP. Experimentally, setting a bound on PEP violation means confining the violation parameter to a value very close to either 1 (for bosons) or -1 (for fermions). The VIP (VIolation of the Pauli exclusion principle) experiment established a limit on the probability that PEP is violated by electrons, using the method of searching for PEP forbidden atomic transitions in copper. We describe the experimental method, the obtained results, both in terms of the q-parameter from quon theory ...

  11. Towards optimal experimental tests on the reality of the quantum state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee, George C.

    2017-02-01

    The Barrett-Cavalcanti-Lal-Maroney (BCLM) argument stands as the most effective means of demonstrating the reality of the quantum state. Its advantages include being derived from very few assumptions, and a robustness to experimental error. Finding the best way to implement the argument experimentally is an open problem, however, and involves cleverly choosing sets of states and measurements. I show that techniques from convex optimisation theory can be leveraged to numerically search for these sets, which then form a recipe for experiments that allow for the strongest statements about the ontology of the wavefunction to be made. The optimisation approach presented is versatile, efficient and can take account of the finite errors present in any real experiment. I find significantly improved low-cardinality sets which are guaranteed partially optimal for a BCLM test in low Hilbert space dimension. I further show that mixed states can be more optimal than pure states.

  12. Adaptive support for aircraft panel testing: New method and its experimental verification on a beam structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachau, Delf; Baschke, Manuel

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic transmissibility of aircraft panels is measured in full-scale test rigs. The panels are supported at their frames. These boundary conditions do not take into account the dynamic influence of the fuselage, which is significant in the frequency range below 300 Hz. This paper introduces a new adaptive boundary system (ABS). It combines accelerometers and electrodynamic shakers with real-time signal processing. The ABS considers the dynamic effect of the fuselage on the panel. The frames are dominating the dynamic behaviour of a fuselage in the low-frequency range. Therefore, the new method is applied to a beam representing a frame of the aircraft structure. The experimental results are evaluated and the precision of the ABS is discussed. The theoretical apparent mass representing the cut-off part of a frame is calculated and compared with the apparent mass, as provided by the ABS. It is explained how the experimental set-up limits the precision of the ABS.

  13. An Experimental Test of a Biodynamic Method of Weed Suppression: The Biodynamic Seed Peppers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Kenneth Kirchoff

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available An experimental test of a biodynamic agriculture method of weed suppression was carried out in growth chambers to establish the feasibility of the method as a preliminary to field trials. Four generations of Brassica rapa plants were used in a randomized block design. Treated flats received ashed seeds prepared according to biodynamic indications. Seed weight and counts were measured at the end of each generation, and germination of the control and experimental seed was investigated at the end of generation four. The biodynamic seed peppers, created and applied as described here, had no effect on seed production or viability, and did not effectively inhibit reproduction of the targeted species over the course of four consecutive treatments.

  14. Language Effects in International Testing: The Case of PISA 2006 Science Items

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Masri, Yasmine H.; Baird, Jo-Anne; Graesser, Art

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the extent to which language versions (English, French and Arabic) of the same science test are comparable in terms of item difficulty and demands. We argue that language is an inextricable part of the scientific literacy construct, be it intended or not by the examiner. This argument has considerable implications on methodologies…

  15. AI in Informal Science Education: Bringing Turing Back to Life to Perform the Turing Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Avelino J.; Hollister, James R.; DeMara, Ronald F.; Leigh, Jason; Lanman, Brandan; Lee, Sang-Yoon; Parker, Shane; Walls, Christopher; Parker, Jeanne; Wong, Josiah; Barham, Clayton; Wilder, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes an interactive museum exhibit featuring an avatar of Alan Turing that informs museum visitors about artificial intelligence and Turing's seminal Turing Test for machine intelligence. The objective of the exhibit is to engage and motivate visiting children in the hope of sparking an interest in them about computer science and…

  16. Semantic Similarity Measures for the Generation of Science Tests in Basque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldabe, Itziar; Maritxalar, Montse

    2014-01-01

    The work we present in this paper aims to help teachers create multiple-choice science tests. We focus on a scientific vocabulary-learning scenario taking place in a Basque-language educational environment. In this particular scenario, we explore the option of automatically generating Multiple-Choice Questions (MCQ) by means of Natural Language…

  17. Advancing the Science of Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Testing for Better Safety Evaluation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bal-Price, Anna; Coecke, Sandra; Costa, Lucio

    2012-01-01

    Bal-Price AK, Coecke S, Costa L, Crofton KM, Fritsche E, Goldberg A, Grandjean P, Lein PJ, Li A, Lucchini R, Mundy WR, Padilla S, Persico A, Seiler AEM, Kreysa J. Conference Report: Advancing the Science of Developmental Neurotoxicity (DNT) Testing for Better Safety Evaluation. Altex 2012: 29: 202-15....

  18. Experimental and Theoretical Study of Air Flow with Obstruction Through Test Section of Wind Tunnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hayder Kraidy Rashid

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper estimates the sound and flow generated by a turbulent air flow in a duct from the knowledge of mean quantities (average velocity and sound pressure level.The sound excitation by fluid flow through duct can be used to predict fluid behavior. This behavior can be carried out by discovering the relation between sound excitation and fluid flow parameters like Reynolds number, Strouhal number and frequencies of turbulent fluid flow. However, the fluid flow container stability has to be taken in account simultaneously with fluid flow effect on sound generation and propagation. The experimental system used in this work is air flow through subsonic wind tunnel duct.The sound pressure levels of air flows through test section of subsonic wind tunnel (at three air flow velocities2.5, 7.3 and 12.5 m/s respectively were carried out experimentally. The sound excitation or generation by air flow throughout the test section of subsonic wind tunnel without any obstruction can't be used to imagine the fluid behavior. To predict fluid flow properties,an infinite cylinder was immersed in order to obstruct the air flow and generate a new source of sound.This case is relevant to a wide range of engineering applications including aircraft landing gear, rail pantographs and automotive side-mirrors. Sound measurements have been taken in an anechoic room at Babylon University. ANSYS program software is used to simulate all experimental results.The experimental and theoretical data that were presented in this paper will give further insight into the underlying sound generation mechanism.In the presented work, the linkage between sound generation and CFD results using thepresented work results and ANSYS simulation results was done.The results discuss the effects of fluid flow parameters such as Reynolds and Strouhal numbers on the sound generation, propagation features and vice-versa. The results are compared with other researchers which give good agreements.

  19. Allergy skin test responses during experimental infection with respiratory syncytial virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skoner, David P; Gentile, Deborah A; Angelini, Betty; Doyle, William J

    2006-06-01

    Allergy skin testing is one of the most frequently performed physician office procedures. Many factors can affect the results of those tests, including the well-defined suppressive effect of systemic antihistamines. False-positive allergen skin test results are known to occur; however, contributing factors are not well understood. To determine whether a viral upper respiratory tract infection affects allergy skin test responsiveness. We performed skin tests with histamine and a panel of geographically relevant inhalant allergens on 16 adults before and 3, 6, and 21 days after experimental exposure to respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), a virus that causes signs and symptoms of a cold. The RSV exposure, with and without documented infection, caused increased wheal and flare areas to histamine and allergen and de novo positive allergen test responses in individuals with no measurable responses at baseline. These were noted as late as 21 days after RSV exposure and may be consistent with mediation by up-regulated neurogenic inflammation during RSV infection. These results may have implications for explaining the cause of such well-known complications of RSV infection as otitis media, bronchiolitis, and asthmatic exacerbation.

  20. On the Force Drop Off Phenomenon in Shaker Testing in Experimental Modal Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Sergio Varoto

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The Electrodynamic Vibration Exciter (shakers has been one of the most employed excitation sources in modal tests. The shaker is an electromechanical device that provides a mechanical motion due to the input signal sent to its coil. Despite being widely used, it is well known that the shaker interacts with the structure under test. In particular, when the structure passes through a given resonance, the force delivered by the shaker abruptly decreases, causing the so called drop off phenomenon. This paper aims to study this force drop off phenomenon in the single shaker modal testing. Analytical models are developed to help in understanding the physical principles involved in the interaction between the shaker and the structure under test. Experimental analyses are performed using different shakers as well as excitation signals, in order to evaluate the effects of the input signal, as well as the power amplifier operational modes, on the structure dynamics. Preliminary tests revealed that significant distortions might occur during vibration tests using shakers and these distortions significantly affect the determination of the structure response.

  1. Experimental Validation of Depth Cameras for the Parameterization of Functional Balance of Patients in Clinical Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco-Ángel Moreno

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In clinical practice, patients’ balance can be assessed using standard scales. Two of the most validated clinical tests for measuring balance are the Timed Up and Go (TUG test and the MultiDirectional Reach Test (MDRT. Nowadays, inertial sensors (IS are employed for kinematic analysis of functional tests in the clinical setting, and have become an alternative to expensive, 3D optical motion capture systems. In daily clinical practice, however, IS-based setups are yet cumbersome and inconvenient to apply. Current depth cameras have the potential for such application, presenting many advantages as, for instance, being portable, low-cost and minimally-invasive. This paper aims at experimentally validating to what extent this technology can substitute IS for the parameterization and kinematic analysis of the TUG and the MDRT tests. Twenty healthy young adults were recruited as participants to perform five different balance tests while kinematic data from their movements were measured by both a depth camera and an inertial sensor placed on their trunk. The reliability of the camera’s measurements is examined through the Interclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC, whilst the Pearson Correlation Coefficient (r is computed to evaluate the correlation between both sensor’s measurements, revealing excellent reliability and strong correlations in most cases.

  2. Experimental test on impeller clocking effect in a multistage centrifugal pump

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minggao Tan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the effects of clocking effect on performance and vibration intensity of a five-stage centrifugal pump were investigated by experimental tests. The vibration characteristics of five positions in the pump were measured, including axial direction of the pump and horizontal and vertical directions of pump inlet and outlet. There are eight clocking schemes between the impellers in the test, which are arranged by orthogonal experimental design. The test results show that the clocking effect of impellers has little effect on the head and efficiency of the five-stage pump in the whole flow rate. Compared with the results of 0° stagger angle clocking scheme between each impeller, in the whole flow rate, the pulsation of pump head and efficiency is just 1.5% and 1.3%, respectively, under other clocking schemes of impellers. Instead, the impeller clocking has a significant effect on the vibration characteristics of the model pump. The maximum vibration intensity of the five-stage pump locates in the vertical direction of pump inlet within the whole flow rate. Under the best clocking scheme of impellers, the maximum vibration intensity of the pump can decrease by 23.1% and the mean vibration intensity can decrease by 17.3%.

  3. Numerical and Experimental Dynamic Analysis of IC Engine Test Beds Equipped with Highly Flexible Couplings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Cocconcelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Driveline components connected to internal combustion engines can be critically loaded by dynamic forces due to motion irregularity. In particular, flexible couplings used in engine test rig are usually subjected to high levels of torsional oscillations and time-varying torque. This could lead to premature failure of the test rig. In this work an effective methodology for the estimation of the dynamic behavior of highly flexible couplings in real operational conditions is presented in order to prevent unwanted halts. The methodology addresses a combination of numerical models and experimental measurements. In particular, two mathematical models of the engine test rig were developed: a torsional lumped-parameter model for the estimation of the torsional dynamic behavior in operative conditions and a finite element model for the estimation of the natural frequencies of the coupling. The experimental campaign addressed torsional vibration measurements in order to characterize the driveline dynamic behavior as well as validate the models. The measurements were achieved by a coder-based technique using optical sensors and zebra tapes. Eventually, the validated models were used to evaluate the effect of design modifications of the coupling elements in terms of natural frequencies (torsional and bending, torsional vibration amplitude, and power loss in the couplings.

  4. Development of an axial suspended AMB experimental bench for load and disturbance tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Gouws

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the development of an axial suspended active magnetic bearing (AMB experimental bench for load and disturbance tests. This test bench must be capable of levitating a 2 kg steel disc at a stable working distance of 3 mm and a maximum attraction distance of 6 mm. The suspension is accomplished by two electromagnets producing upward and downward attraction forces to support the steel disc. An inductive sensor measures the position of the steel disc and relays this to a PC based controller board (dSPACE® controller. The control system uses this information to regulate the electromagnetic force on the steel disc. The intent is to construct this system using relatively low-cost, low-precision components, and still be able to stably levitate the 2 kg steel disc with high precision. The dSPACE® software (ControlDesk® was used for data acquisition. In this paper, an overview of the system design is presented, followed by the axial AMB model design, inductive sensor design, actuating unit design and controller development and implementation. The paper concludes with results obtained from the dSPACE® controller and evaluation of the axial suspended AMB experimental bench with load and disturbance tests.

  5. Short communication: On recognizing the proper experimental unit in animal studies in the dairy sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bello, Nora M; Kramer, Matthew; Tempelman, Robert J; Stroup, Walter W; St-Pierre, Normand R; Craig, Bruce A; Young, Linda J; Gbur, Edward E

    2016-11-01

    Sound design of experiments combined with proper implementation of appropriate statistical methods for data analysis are critical for producing meaningful scientific results that are both replicable and reproducible. This communication addresses specific aspects of design and analysis of experiments relevant to the dairy sciences and, in so doing, responds to recent concerns raised in a letter to the editor of the Journal of Dairy Science regarding journal policy for research publications on pen-based animal studies. We further elaborate on points raised, rectify interpretation of important concepts, and show how aspects of statistical inference and elicitation of research conclusions are affected. Copyright © 2016 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Curricular constraints, high-stakes testing and the reality of reform in high school science classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coble, Jennifer

    Through a series of open-ended interviews, this study investigated the beliefs of six third year high school science teachers about how they implement science education reform ideals in their practice and the contextual challenges they face as they attempt to implement reform. The teachers argue that the lack of connection between their curricula and students' lives serves as a significant obstacle to them utilizing more inquiry-based and student-centered strategies. In their science classes that are not subject to a high stakes exam, the teachers shared instances where they engage students in inquiry by refraining the focus of their curricula away from the decontextualized factual information and onto how the information relates to human experience. In their science classes subject to a high stakes test, however, the teachers confessed to feeling no choice but to utilize more teacher-centered strategies focused on information transmission. This study provides an in depth analysis of how the presence of high stakes tests discourages teachers from utilizing reform based teaching strategies within high school science classrooms.

  7. Cryo-vacuum testing of the JWST Integrated Science Instrument Module (SPIE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimble, Randy A.; Vila, M. Begona; Van Campen, Julie; Birkmann, Stephan M.; Comber, Brian J.; Fatig, Curtis C.; Glasse, Alistair C. H.; Glazer, Stuart D.; Kelly, Douglas M.; Mann, Steven D.; hide

    2016-01-01

    In late 2015/early 2016, a major cryo-vacuum test was carried out for the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST). This test comprised the final cryo-certification and calibration test of the ISIM, after its ambient environmental test program (vibration, acoustics, EMI/EMC), and before its delivery for integration with the rest of the JWST observatory. Over the 108-day period of the round-the-clock test program, the full complement of ISIM flight instruments, structure, harness radiator, and electronics were put through a comprehensive program of thermal, optical, electrical, and operational tests. The test verified the health and excellent performance of the instruments and ISIM systems, proving the ISIM element's readiness for integration with the telescope. We report here on the context, goals, setup, execution, and key results for this critical JWST milestone.

  8. Factors that affect the physical science career interest of female students: Testing five common hypotheses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Hazari

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available There are many hypotheses regarding factors that may encourage female students to pursue careers in the physical sciences. Using multivariate matching methods on national data drawn from the Persistence Research in Science and Engineering (PRiSE project (n=7505, we test the following five commonly held beliefs regarding what factors might impact females’ physical science career interest: (i having a single-sex physics class, (ii having a female physics teacher, (iii having female scientist guest speakers in physics class, (iv discussing the work of female scientists in physics class, and (v discussing the underrepresentation of women in physics class. The effect of these experiences on physical science career interest is compared for female students who are matched on several factors, including prior science interests, prior mathematics interests, grades in science, grades in mathematics, and years of enrollment in high school physics. No significant effects are found for single-sex classes, female teachers, female scientist guest speakers, and discussing the work of female scientists. However, discussions about women’s underrepresentation have a significant positive effect.

  9. Factors that affect the physical science career interest of female students: Testing five common hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Potvin, Geoff; Lock, Robynne M.; Lung, Florin; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.

    2013-12-01

    There are many hypotheses regarding factors that may encourage female students to pursue careers in the physical sciences. Using multivariate matching methods on national data drawn from the Persistence Research in Science and Engineering (PRiSE) project (n=7505), we test the following five commonly held beliefs regarding what factors might impact females’ physical science career interest: (i) having a single-sex physics class, (ii) having a female physics teacher, (iii) having female scientist guest speakers in physics class, (iv) discussing the work of female scientists in physics class, and (v) discussing the underrepresentation of women in physics class. The effect of these experiences on physical science career interest is compared for female students who are matched on several factors, including prior science interests, prior mathematics interests, grades in science, grades in mathematics, and years of enrollment in high school physics. No significant effects are found for single-sex classes, female teachers, female scientist guest speakers, and discussing the work of female scientists. However, discussions about women’s underrepresentation have a significant positive effect.

  10. Experimental setup and realization of thin film specimens for microtensile tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malhaire, Christophe; Seguineau, Cédric; Ignat, Michel; Josserond, Charles; Debove, Laurent; Brida, Sebastiano; Desmarres, Jean-Michel; Lafontan, Xavier

    2009-02-01

    This paper describes a microtensile test system and the design as the realization of the samples dedicated to the tensile experiments. Two different technologies for the development of miniaturized specimens are detailed: self-standing tensile samples sustained by silicon frames and metal on polymer specimens obtained by laser cutting. The design of the samples has been optimized by means of finite element simulations. Aluminum beams with very large length on thickness ratio have been released from their silicon substrate using a standard etching process. Stress/strain curves are derived from experimental force/displacement values and discussed in terms of Young's modulus values and critical parameters (flow and rupture stresses).

  11. Results of experimental tests and calibrations of the surface neutron moisture measurement probe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, W.T.; Bussell, J.H., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-13

    The surface neutron moisture probe has been tested both to demonstrate that is is able to operate in the expected in-tank temperature and gamma-ray fields and to provide detector responses to known moisture concentration materials. The probe will properly function in a simultaneous high temperature (80 degrees C) and high gamma radiation field (210 rad/hr)environment. Comparisons between computer model predicted and experimentally measured detector responses to changes in moisture provide a basis for the probe calibration to in-tank moisture concentrations.

  12. Minimum scale controlled topology optimization and experimental test of a micro thermal actuator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heo, S.; Yoon, Gil Ho; Kim, Y.Y.

    2008-01-01

    This paper is concerned with the optimal topology design, fabrication and test of a micro thermal actuator. Because the minimum scale was controlled during the design optimization process, the production yield rate of the actuator was improved considerably; alternatively, the optimization design...... without scale control resulted in a very low yield rate. Using the minimum scale controlling topology design method developed earlier by the authors, micro thermal actuators were designed and fabricated through a MEMS process. Moreover, both their performance and production yield were experimentally...

  13. Experimental tests on the air cooling of the CLIC vertex detector

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Ramos, Fernando; Nuiry, Francois-Xavier

    2016-01-01

    The strict requirements in terms of material budget for the inner region of the CLIC detector concept require the use of a dry gas for the cooling of the respective sensors. This, in conjunction with the compactness of the inner volumes, poses several challenges for the design of a cooling system that is able to fulfil the required detector specifications. This note summarizes the results obtained from experimental tests on the air cooling of the CLIC vertex detector as well as their comparison with the corresponding computational fluid dynamics simulations.

  14. Mechanical-physical experimental tests on lime mortars and bricks reinforced with hemp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, Antonio; Dessı, Enzo; Landolfo, Raffaele

    2017-11-01

    Hemp is an agricultural product used for various applications. In the Civil Engineering field, only a limited use of this natural material, called the "green pig" since exploitation of all its constituent parts is allowed, has been done. For this reason, in the paper an experimental activity on lime mortars and bricks reinforced with hemp components has been performed. Compression and bending tests have been carried out on specimens manufactured with hemp shives and fibres, respectively. The achieved results have shown that hemp products change the failure modes from brittle to ductile, leaving basically unaltered the strength capacity of reinforced specimens with respect to unreinforced ones.

  15. Selected issues concerning calculations and experimental tests of transport means construction elements fatigue life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan LIGAJ

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of an algorithm of fatigue life of structural components of road and rail vehicles as well as sea vessels and aircrafts involves three groups of activities connected with: development of fatigue load spectra on the basis measurement of service loads, determination of the construction material fatigue properties and a selection of the best hypothesis for estimating the fatigue damage to be used for a phenomenological description of the fatigue process. The above listed groups of problems include the main causes of differences that occur between the calculation results and the results of fatigue life experimental tests. Evaluation of these differences is the main goal of this article.

  16. Validation of a Wave-Body Interaction Model by Experimental Tests

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferri, Francesco; Kramer, Morten; Pecher, Arthur

    2013-01-01

    Within the wave energy field, numerical simulation has recently acquired a worldwide consent as being a useful tool, besides physical model testing. The main goal of this work is the validation of a numerical model by experimental results. The numerical model is based on a linear wave-body intera......-body interaction theory, applied for a point absorber wave energy converter. The results show that the ratio floater size/wave amplitude is a key parameter for the validity of the applied theory....

  17. Science to the people! (and experimental politics): searching for the roots of participatory discourse in science and technology in the 1970s in France.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quet, Mathieu

    2014-08-01

    The current conception of political participation in governmental institutions is deeply marked by the notions of deliberation and precaution. This normative conception of participatory politics neglects, backgrounds or disqualifies other participatory practices, in so far as they are not connected to deliberation and precaution. However, participation has not always been defined in such a restricted way: the current conception of participation is a product of the 1980s and 1990s. In this paper, the meaning ascribed to the notion of participation in the 1970s in France is explored through the study of discourses produced in three fields: the Science Policy Division of the OECD, the French radical science movement, and the emerging STS academic field. As is shown, some of the bases of the current notion of participation originate in the 1970s. Nevertheless, it is argued that in these years, the notion of participation has more to do with experimentation than with deliberation and precaution. Therefore, the conception of participation in the 1970s differs greatly from the current one. Methodologically, this paper combines tools offered by the social history of science and the French school of discourse analysis.

  18. Longitudinal analysis of standardized test scores of students in the Science Writing Heuristic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chanlen, Niphon

    The purpose of this study was to examine the longitudinal impacts of the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) approach on student science achievement measured by the Iowa Test of Basic Skills (ITBS). A number of studies have reported positive impact of an inquiry-based instruction on student achievement, critical thinking skills, reasoning skills, attitude toward science, etc. So far, studies have focused on exploring how an intervention affects student achievement using teacher/researcher-generated measurement. Only a few studies have attempted to explore the long-term impacts of an intervention on student science achievement measured by standardized tests. The students' science and reading ITBS data was collected from 2000 to 2011 from a school district which had adopted the SWH approach as the main approach in science classrooms since 2002. The data consisted of 12,350 data points from 3,039 students. The multilevel model for change with discontinuity in elevation and slope technique was used to analyze changes in student science achievement growth trajectories prior and after adopting the SWH approach. The results showed that the SWH approach positively impacted students by initially raising science achievement scores. The initial impact was maintained and gradually increased when students were continuously exposed to the SWH approach. Disadvantaged students who were at risk of having low science achievement had bigger benefits from experience with the SWH approach. As a result, existing problematic achievement gaps were narrowed down. Moreover, students who started experience with the SWH approach as early as elementary school seemed to have better science achievement growth compared to students who started experiencing with the SWH approach only in high school. The results found in this study not only confirmed the positive impacts of the SWH approach on student achievement, but also demonstrated additive impacts found when students had longitudinal experiences

  19. Experimental testing of centrifugal pump: small and medium sized enterprise product

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail, R.; Paddiyatu, F.; Khafidh, M.; Nugroho, S.; Sugiyanto, S.; Jamari, J.

    2014-06-01

    This paper reports the experimental testing for centrifugal pump for fisherman ship, manufactured by small and medium sized enterprises in Central Java Province, Indonesia. The research covers material analysis, component observation, endurance and vibration test. Six centrifugal pumps are tested and three main pump components are discussed: shaft, bearings and seals. The results show that the material of the shaft is predicted to support and transmit the load from the engine to impeller. The problem found in the tolerance and geometry accuracy of the shaft which causes difficulties during assembling process, excessive wear and leakage during testing. From the endurance and vibration test, the ball bearings fail and lock the shaft due to the fatigue on the rolling elements and raceways. The oil seal and water seal also fail in maintaining the oil and water in the chamber and induce the unlubricated system for the ball bearings. Some suggestions are delivered to improve the product quality of the centrifugal pump. A good quality of the centrifugal pump for fishermen ship and long life span is expected to be produced by local SMEs to win the free trade competition in the Indonesian market.

  20. Science Literacy: How do High School Students Solve PISA Test Items?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wati, F.; Sinaga, P.; Priyandoko, D.

    2017-09-01

    The Programme for International Students Assessment (PISA) does assess students’ science literacy in a real-life contexts and wide variety of situation. Therefore, the results do not provide adequate information for the teacher to excavate students’ science literacy because the range of materials taught at schools depends on the curriculum used. This study aims to investigate the way how junior high school students in Indonesia solve PISA test items. Data was collected by using PISA test items in greenhouse unit employed to 36 students of 9th grade. Students’ answer was analyzed qualitatively for each item based on competence tested in the problem. The way how students answer the problem exhibits their ability in particular competence which is influenced by a number of factors. Those are students’ unfamiliarity with test construction, low performance on reading, low in connecting available information and question, and limitation on expressing their ideas effectively and easy-read. As the effort, selected PISA test items can be used in accordance teaching topic taught to familiarize students with science literacy.

  1. Carbon nanotube thin film strain sensors: comparison between experimental tests and numerical simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bo Mi; Loh, Kenneth J.

    2017-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes can be randomly deposited in polymer thin film matrices to form nanocomposite strain sensors. However, a computational framework that enables the direct design of these nanocomposite thin films is still lacking. The objective of this study is to derive an experimentally validated and two-dimensional numerical model of carbon nanotube-based thin film strain sensors. This study consisted of two parts. First, multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-Pluronic strain sensors were fabricated using vacuum filtration, and their physical, electrical, and electromechanical properties were evaluated. Second, scanning electron microscope images of the films were used for identifying topological features of the percolated MWCNT network, where the information obtained was then utilized for developing the numerical model. Validation of the numerical model was achieved by ensuring that the area ratios (of MWCNTs relative to the polymer matrix) were equivalent for both the experimental and modeled cases. Strain sensing behavior of the percolation-based model was simulated and then compared to experimental test results.

  2. THE DEVELOPMENT AND EXPERIMENTAL TESTING OF A FUZZY CONTROL SYSTEM FOR BATCH DISTILLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.M.Frattini Fileti

    2002-03-01

    Full Text Available The present work describes the development and implementation of fuzzy control algorithms in order to control on-line the overhead product composition of a batch distillation column. Firstly, the influence of design parameters was evaluated through computational simulations and then the algorithms were experimentally tested by monitoring a pilot column. Binary mixtures of n-hexane/n-heptane were distilled. Temperature measurements and vapor-liquid equilibrium data are the basis for the inference of overhead and bottom compositions. Two different operational strategies were used for the experimental runs: constant overhead product composition and previously determined set-point trajectory. Using the first strategy, the performance of the fuzzy controllers is compared to the performance of conventional feedback digital controllers. Experimental results show that fuzzy control presents a better performance than the conventional digital feedback control and also that fuzzy controllers were able to deal successfully with variable set-point strategy, albeit using constant design parameter values. Under conventional control, the average reflux rate implemented was higher than the average reflux rate implemented with fuzzy algorithms. Consequently, the process becomes less time- and energy-consuming under fuzzy control. Since fuzzy methodology is a promising new way of looking at process control problems and their solutions, the results of this work could provide control system designers with a better evaluation of the potential worth of fuzzy control.

  3. Temperature control of a PEM fuel cell test bench for experimental MEA assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    More, J.J.; Puleston, P.F.; Kunusch, C. [LEICI, Departamento de Electrotecnia, Universidad Nacional de La Plata (UNLP), calle 1 esq. 47 s/n, 1900 La Plata (Argentina); Consejo de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia, N 1917, C1033AAJ, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Visintin, A. [Consejo de Investigaciones Cientificas y Tecnicas (CONICET), Av. Rivadavia, N 1917, C1033AAJ, Ciudad Autonoma de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Instituto de Investigaciones Fisico-Quimicas Teoricas y Aplicadas (INIFTA), Diag. 113 y 64 s/n, 1900, La Plata (Argentina)

    2010-06-15

    This paper presents the design, implementation and testing of a temperature control for a laboratory PEM fuel cell stack work bench intended for evaluation of experimental MEAs. The controller design is based on a thermal model of the fuel cell stack developed by the authors. The model is extended to the complete temperature range by considering a nonlinear description of the heating resistances. Its parameters are experimentally adjusted and its accuracy is validated in all the temperature operating range. Then, the temperature control is developed, using a proportional-integral structure with anti-windup features. It is implemented in a PC connected to an ad-hoc equipment of acquisition and control, that drives distributed cycles actuators to energize two heating resistances. The controller proved to be capable of regulating the stack temperature in a wide operating range, while eliminating the ripple typical of ON-OFF actuators. Finally, experimental results of closed loop operation are presented, demonstrating the good performance of the proposed control set up and thermal model. (author)

  4. Experimental test of the new analytic matrix formalism for spin dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. S. Morozov

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available We recently started testing Chao’s proposed new matrix formalism for describing the spin dynamics due to a single spin resonance. The Chao formalism is probably the first fundamental improvement of the Froissart-Stora equation in that it allows analytic calculations of the beam polarization’s behavior inside a resonance. We tested the Chao formalism using a 1.85  GeV/c polarized deuteron beam stored in COSY, by sweeping an rf dipole’s frequency through 200 Hz, while varying the distance from the sweep’s end frequency to an rf-induced spin resonance’s central frequency. Since the Froissart-Stora equation itself can make no prediction inside a resonance, we compared our experimental data with the predictions of the Chao formalism and those of an empirical two-fluid model based on the Froissart-Stora equation. The data strongly favor the Chao formalism.

  5. Comparison of experimental tests and theory for a rectangular two-channel dielectric wakefield accelerator structure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. V. Shchelkunov

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Experimental results are reported for test beam acceleration and deflection in a two-channel, cm-scale, rectangular dielectric-lined wakefield accelerator structure energized by a 14-MeV drive beam. The dominant waveguide mode of the structure is at ∼30  GHz, and the structure is configured to exhibit a high transformer ratio (∼12∶1. Accelerated bunches in the narrow secondary channel of the structure are continuously energized via Cherenkov radiation that is emitted by a drive bunch moving in the wider primary channel. Observed energy gains and losses, transverse deflections, and changes in the test bunch charge distribution compare favorably with predictions of theory.

  6. Vibratory sensory testing in acute compartment syndromes: a clinical and experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, J H; Mackinnon, S E; Beatty, S E; Dellon, A L; O'Brien, J P

    1987-05-01

    Invasive and noninvasive diagnostic testing was correlated in 11 patients with acute compartmental syndromes of the forearm. The excellent correlation between diminished perception of vibration and increasing compartmental pressure suggested that 256 cycle per second (cps) vibratory stimuli may be useful clinically in determining the appropriate time for surgical intervention in the acute compartmental syndrome. In 12 adult male volunteers, elevated compartment pressures were created in the anterior tibial compartment of the leg. A decrease in perception to 256 cycle per second (cps) vibratory stimulus was the earliest sensory abnormality to occur with elevated tissue compartment pressures. Analysis of variance showed significantly that 256-cps vibration was the most reliable and earliest sensory modality to change at pressures of 35 to 40 mmHg. These clinical and experimental findings support the use of the 256-cps tuning fork as a noninvasive diagnostic test in the evaluation of the patient with suspected acute compartment syndrome.

  7. Experimental Tests Concerning the Behaviour of the Steel-Concrete Composite Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Dan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The design of the building structures situated in a seismic area deals with some spe¬cial provisions in order to satisfy the design concept for earthquake loads. Thus, some inelastic deformations must be concentrated in predefined zones for seismic energy dissi¬pation. Therefore, it is important to evaluate correctly the load bearing capacity of each basic structural element, such as beams, columns and joints too. At the "Politehnica" University of Timisoara, it was developed an experimental test program for a specific steel and composite (steel-concrete joint. Two load hypotheses were considered in order to simulate the permanent loads and the horizontal (seismic loads, respectively, acting on the structure and the corresponding joints. Two series of joints were tested in laboratory for monotonous and cyclic behavior. Both the steel and the steel-concrete joints were studied. A comparative study between the steel and the steel-concrete composite joints is presented.

  8. Design, construction and testing of a radon experimental chamber; Diseno, construccion y pruebas de una camara experimental de radon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chavez B, A.; Balcazar G, M

    1991-10-15

    To carry out studies on the radon behavior under controlled and stable conditions it was designed and constructed a system that consists of two parts: a container of mineral rich in Uranium and an experimentation chamber with radon united one to the other one by a step valve. The container of uranium mineral approximately contains 800 gr of uranium with a law of 0.28%; the radon gas emanated by the mineral is contained tightly by the container. When the valve opens up the radon gas it spreads to the radon experimental chamber; this contains 3 accesses that allow to install different types of detectors. The versatility of the system is exemplified with two experiments: 1. With the radon experimental chamber and an associated spectroscopic system, the radon and two of its decay products are identified. 2. The design of the system allows to couple the mineral container to other experimental geometries to demonstrate this fact it was coupled and proved a new automatic exchanger system of passive detectors of radon. The results of the new automatic exchanger system when it leave to flow the radon freely among the container and the automatic exchanger through a plastic membrane of 15 m. are shown. (Author)

  9. Improving Hispanic students' performance on science standardized tests: Successful practices from four elementary campuses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Yvonne Lynne

    This qualitative, descriptive multiple case study took place in a Southwest Texas city bordering Mexico. The study examined specific resources and practices used in four different exemplary-rated elementary school campuses, with standardized test data reflecting 93% or more of their 5th-grade Hispanic student population passing the state mandated standardized science test. The sample for this study included one principal, one assistant principal, and three 5th-grade teachers from each campus. In total, the sample participants consisted of four principals, four assistant principals, and 12 5th-grade teachers. Data collection involved conducting in-depth, semi-structured interviews guided by five literature-based, researcher-generated questions. Fifth grade teachers and administrators reflected and reported upon their pedagogy for best practices in helping Hispanic students achieve success. Analysis of the data revealed eight themes: (a) successful schools have committed teachers, an environment conducive to learning, and incorporate best practices that work for all students; (b) curriculum alignment is very important; (c) teachers have access to a variety of resources; (d) teacher collaboration and planning is very important; (e) science camps, science reviews, and hands-on centers are effective in preparing students for the standardized test; (f) the most effective instructional practices include high emphasis on vocabulary, hands-on and differentiated instruction, and the 5E Model; (g) teachers see value in self-contained, dual-language classes; and (h) professional development and performance feedback are important to educators. The results of this study provide educational leaders with specific science instructional resources, practices, and interventions proven effective for the 5 th-grade Hispanic student population in passing the science state standardized test.

  10. Scaling Analysis Techniques to Establish Experimental Infrastructure for Component, Subsystem, and Integrated System Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabharwall, Piyush [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); O' Brien, James E. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); McKellar, Michael G. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Housley, Gregory K. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Bragg-Sitton, Shannon M. [Idaho National Laboratory (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Hybrid energy system research has the potential to expand the application for nuclear reactor technology beyond electricity. The purpose of this research is to reduce both technical and economic risks associated with energy systems of the future. Nuclear hybrid energy systems (NHES) mitigate the variability of renewable energy sources, provide opportunities to produce revenue from different product streams, and avoid capital inefficiencies by matching electrical output to demand by using excess generation capacity for other purposes when it is available. An essential step in the commercialization and deployment of this advanced technology is scaled testing to demonstrate integrated dynamic performance of advanced systems and components when risks cannot be mitigated adequately by analysis or simulation. Further testing in a prototypical environment is needed for validation and higher confidence. This research supports the development of advanced nuclear reactor technology and NHES, and their adaptation to commercial industrial applications that will potentially advance U.S. energy security, economy, and reliability and further reduce carbon emissions. Experimental infrastructure development for testing and feasibility studies of coupled systems can similarly support other projects having similar developmental needs and can generate data required for validation of models in thermal energy storage and transport, energy, and conversion process development. Experiments performed in the Systems Integration Laboratory will acquire performance data, identify scalability issues, and quantify technology gaps and needs for various hybrid or other energy systems. This report discusses detailed scaling (component and integrated system) and heat transfer figures of merit that will establish the experimental infrastructure for component, subsystem, and integrated system testing to advance the technology readiness of components and systems to the level required for commercial

  11. Managing the Mars Science Laboratory Thermal Vacuum Test for Safety and Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Jordan P.

    2010-01-01

    The Mars Science Laboratory is a NASA/JPL mission to send the next generation of rover to Mars. Originally slated for launch in 2009, development problems led to a delay in the project until the next launch opportunity in 2011. Amidst the delay process, the Launch/Cruise Solar Thermal Vacuum Test was undertaken as risk reduction for the project. With varying maturity and capabilities of the flight and ground systems, undertaking the test in a safe manner presented many challenges. This paper describes the technical and management challenges and the actions undertaken that led to the ultimate safe and successful execution of the test.

  12. Advanced development of the spectrum sciences Model 5005-TF, single-event test fixture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ackermann, M.R.; Browning, J.S. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA)); Hughlock, B.W. (Boeing Aerospace and Electronics Co., Seattle, WA (USA)); Lum, G.K. (Lockheed Missiles and Space Co., Sunnyvale, CA (USA)); Tsacoyeanes, W.C. (Draper (Charles Stark) Lab., Inc., Cambridge, MA (USA)); Weeks, M.D. (Spectrum Sciences, Inc., Santa Clara, CA (USA))

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the advanced development of the Spectrum Sciences Model 5005-TF, Single-Event Test Fixture. The Model 5005-TF uses a Californium-252 (Cf-252) fission-fragment source to test integrated circuits and other devices for the effects of single-event phenomena. Particle identification methods commonly used in high-energy physics research and nuclear engineering have been incorporated into the Model 5005-TF for estimating the particle charge, mass, and energy parameters. All single-event phenomena observed in a device under test (DUT) are correlated with an identified fission fragment, and its linear energy transfer (LET) and range in the semiconductor material of the DUT.

  13. Infrared Thermography Assessment of Thermal Bridges in Building Envelope: Experimental Validation in a Test Room Setup

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Bianchi

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Thermal infrared imaging is a valuable tool to perform non-destructive qualitative tests and to investigate buildings envelope thermal-energy behavior. The assessment of envelope thermal insulation, ventilation, air leakages, and HVAC performance can be implemented through the analysis of each thermogram corresponding to an object surface temperature. Thermography also allows the identification of thermal bridges in buildings’ envelope that, together with windows and doors, constitute one of the weakest component increasing thermal losses. A quantitative methodology was proposed in previous researches by the authors in order to evaluate the effect of such weak point on the energy balance of the whole building. In the present work, in-field experimental measurements were carried out with the purpose of evaluating the energy losses through the envelope of a test room experimental field. In-situ thermal transmittance of walls, ceiling and roof were continuously monitored and each element was characterized by its own thermal insulation capability. Infrared thermography and the proposed quantitative methodology were applied to assess the energy losses due to thermal bridges. The main results show that the procedure confirms to be a reliable tool to quantify the incidence of thermal bridges in the envelope thermal losses.

  14. Predicting epistasis: an experimental test of metabolic control theory with bacterial transcription and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLean, R C

    2010-03-01

    Epistatic interactions between mutations are thought to play a crucial role in a number of evolutionary processes, including adaptation and sex. Evidence for epistasis is abundant, but tests of general theoretical models that can predict epistasis are lacking. In this study, I test the ability of metabolic control theory to predict epistasis using a novel experimental approach that combines phenotypic and genetic perturbations of enzymes involved in gene expression and protein synthesis in the bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa. These experiments provide experimental support for two key predictions of metabolic control theory: (i) epistasis between genes involved in the same pathway is antagonistic; (ii) epistasis becomes increasingly antagonistic as mutational severity increases. Metabolic control theory is a general theory that applies to any set of genes that are involved in the same linear processing chain, not just metabolic pathways, and I argue that this theory is likely to have important implications for predicting epistasis between functionally coupled genes, such as those involved in antibiotic resistance. Finally, this study highlights the fact that phenotypic manipulations of gene activity provide a powerful method for studying epistasis that complements existing genetic methods.

  15. Comparison of a fast analytical model of radiation damage effects in CCDs with experimental tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prod'homme, Thibaut; Weiler, Michael; Brown, Scott W.; Short, Alexander D. T.; Brown, Anthony G. A.

    2010-07-01

    ESA's Gaia mission aims to create a complete and highly accurate stereoscopic map of the Milky Way. The stellar parallaxes will be determined at the micro-arcsecond level, as a consequence the measurement of the stellar image location on the CCD must be highly accurate. The solar wind protons will create charge traps in the CCDs of Gaia, which will induce large charge loss and distort the stellar images causing a degradation of the location measurement accuracy. Accurate modelling of the stellar image distortion induced by radiation is required to mitigate these effects. We assess the capability of a fast physical analytical model of radiation damage effects called the charge distortion model (CDM) to reproduce experimental data. To realize this assessment we developed a rigorous procedure that compares at the sub-pixel level the model outcomes to damaged images extracted from the experimental tests. We show that CDM can reproduce accurately up to a certain level the test data acquired on a highly irradiated device operated in time delay integration mode for different signal levels and different illumination histories. We discuss the potential internal and external factors that contributed to limit the agreement between the data and the charge distortion model. To investigate these limiting factors further, we plan to apply our comparison procedure on a synthetic dataset generated through detailed Monte-Carlo simulations at the CCD electrode level.

  16. Experimental testing of a liquid bipropellant rocket engine using nitrous oxide and ethanol diluted with water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillip, Jeff; Morales, Rudy; Youngblood, Stewart; Saul, W. Venner; Grubelich, Mark; Hargather, Michael

    2016-11-01

    A research scale liquid bipropellant rocket engine testing facility was constructed at New Mexico Tech to perform research with various propellants. The facility uses a modular engine design that allows for variation of nozzle geometry and injector configurations. Initial testing focused on pure nitrous oxide and ethanol propellants, operating in the range of 5.5-6.9 MPa (800-1000 psi) chamber pressure with approximately 667 N (150 lbf) thrust. The system is instrumented with sensors for temperature, pressure, and thrust. Experimentally found values for specific impulse are in the range of 250-260 s which match computational predictions. Exhaust flow visualization is performed using high speed schlieren imaging. The engine startup and steady state exhaust flow features are studied through these videos. Computational and experimental data are presented for a study of dilution of the ethanol-nitrous oxide propellants with water. The study has shown a significant drop in chamber temperature compared to a small drop in specific impulse with increasing water dilution.

  17. Modeling of the charge-state separation at ITEP experimental facility for material science based on a Bernas ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barminova, H Y; Saratovskyh, M S

    2016-02-01

    The experiment automation system is supposed to be developed for experimental facility for material science at ITEP, based on a Bernas ion source. The program CAMFT is assumed to be involved into the program of the experiment automation. CAMFT is developed to simulate the intense charged particle bunch motion in the external magnetic fields with arbitrary geometry by means of the accurate solution of the particle motion equation. Program allows the consideration of the bunch intensity up to 10(10) ppb. Preliminary calculations are performed at ITEP supercomputer. The results of the simulation of the beam pre-acceleration and following turn in magnetic field are presented for different initial conditions.

  18. Factors that encourage females to pursue physical science careers: Testing five common hypotheses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazari, Zahra; Potvin, Geoff; Lock, Robynne M.; Lung, Florin; Sadler, Philip M.; Sonnert, Gerhard

    2012-03-01

    There are many hypotheses regarding factors that may encourage female students to pursue careers in the physical sciences. Using Propensity Score Matching (PSM) on national data (n=7505) drawn from the Persistence Research in Science and Engineering (PRiSE) project, we test five commonly held beliefs including having a single-sex physics class, having a female physics teacher, having female scientist guest speakers in physics class, discussing the work of women scientists in physics class, and discussing the under-representation of women in physics class. The effect of these experiences is compared for female students who are matched on several factors, including parental education, prior science/math interests, and academic background, thereby controlling for the effect of many confounding variables.

  19. Structural Solutions for Low-Cost Bamboo Frames: Experimental Tests and Constructive Assessments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauro Sassu

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Experimental tests and constructive assessments are presented for a simple bamboo framed structure with innovative low-cost and low technology joints, specifically conceived for small buildings in developing countries. Two full scale one-storey bamboo frames have been designed by using the simplest joints solution among three different tested typologies. The entire building process is based on low-technology and natural materials: bamboo canes, wooden cylinders, plywood plates and canapé rods. The first full scale specimen (Unit A is a one-storey single deck truss structure subjected to monotonic collapse test; the second full scale specimen (Unit B is a one-storey double deck truss structure used to evaluate the construction time throughout assembling tests. The first full scale specimen showed ductility in collapse and ease in strengthening; the second one showed remarkable ease and speed in assembling structural elements. Finally several constructive solutions are suggested for the design of simple one-storey buildings; they are addressed to four purposes (housing, school, chapel, health center by the composition of the proposed full scale bamboo frames. Ease of use and maintenance with a low level of technology contribute to application in developing countries although not exclusively.

  20. The use of experimental bending tests to more accurate numerical description of TBC damage process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadowski, T.; Golewski, P.

    2016-04-01

    Thermal barrier coatings (TBCs) have been extensively used in aircraft engines to protect critical engine parts such as blades and combustion chambers, which are exposed to high temperatures and corrosive environment. The blades of turbine engines are additionally exposed to high mechanical loads. These loads are created by the high rotational speed of the rotor (30 000 rot/min), causing the tensile and bending stresses. Therefore, experimental testing of coated samples is necessary in order to determine strength properties of TBCs. Beam samples with dimensions 50×10×2 mm were used in those studies. The TBC system consisted of 150 μm thick bond coat (NiCoCrAlY) and 300 μm thick top coat (YSZ) made by APS (air plasma spray) process. Samples were tested by three-point bending test with various loads. After bending tests, the samples were subjected to microscopic observation to determine the quantity of cracks and their depth. The above mentioned results were used to build numerical model and calibrate material data in Abaqus program. Brittle cracking damage model was applied for the TBC layer, which allows to remove elements after reaching criterion. Surface based cohesive behavior was used to model the delamination which may occur at the boundary between bond coat and top coat.

  1. SEALEX in-situ experiments-performance tests of repository seals: experimental observations and modelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokni Nadia

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes observations and numerical analysis of SEALEX performance tests installed in Tournemire Underground Research Laboratory (URL. One of the objectives of the large scale in-situ tests is to investigate the impact of technological gaps on the long term performance of bentonite based seals. The swelling cores consist of pre-compacted blocks of a natural sodic Wyoming bentonite (MX80 type mixed with quartz sand in a ratio of 70/30 (in dry mass with different geometries (monolithic disks or four jointed disks. Several technological gaps exist within the in situ tests: Gaps between the blocks and annular gap with variable width between the bentonite-based core and the host rock. All the tests are extensively instrumented for monitoring the main Hydro-Mechanical (HM variables. Comparison of the experimental results showed that the presence of technological gaps constituted new hydration sources (annular gaps and flow paths (gaps between the blocks that changed the saturation kinetics. A coupled HM formulation that incorporates the relevant processes involved in the problem under consideration has been adopted to analyse the effect of the annular technological gap on dry density homogenization of the bentonite based core as hydration progresses. Technological gaps were demonstrated to have an impact on dry density distribution.

  2. Elementary Teachers' Beliefs About Teaching Science and Classroom Practice: An Examination of Pre/Post NCLB Testing in Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milner, Andrea R.; Sondergeld, Toni A.; Demir, Abdulkadir; Johnson, Carla C.; Czerniak, Charlene M.

    2011-03-01

    The impact of No Child Left Behind (NCLB) mandated state science assessment on elementary teachers' beliefs about teaching science and their classroom practice is relatively unknown. For many years, the teaching of science has been minimized in elementary schools in favor of more emphasis on reading and mathematics. This study examines the dynamics of bringing science to the forefront of assessment in elementary schools and the resulting teacher belief and instructional shifts that take place in response to NCLB. Results indicated that teachers' beliefs about teaching science remained unchanged despite policy changes mandated in NCLB. Teacher beliefs related to their perceptions of what their administrators and peer groups' think they should be doing influenced their practice the most. Most teachers reported positive feelings and attitudes about science and reported that their students had positive feelings and attitudes about science; however, teachers reported teaching science less as a result of NCLB. Implications for elementary science education reform and policy are discussed.

  3. Tools and Methods to Create Scenarios for Experimental Research in the Network Science Research Laboratory (NSRL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    among the nodes, you can choose to create more wireless networks by adding more clouds, or you can create a wired connection between 2 nodes. To make...traditional wireless networking challenges as well as more general network science research issues. NSRL is capable of doing this by providing a...the .eel file through EMANE. Click on the square blue Ethernet hub on the left panel. Select the cloud (which is a wireless local area network [LAN

  4. Test spectra experimental construction for evaluating gamma-spectrometry computer codes for the 235U determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karfopoulos Konstantinos L.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The determination of 235U in environmental samples from its 185.72 keV photons may require the deconvolution of the multiplet photopeak at ~186 keV, due to the co-existence of the 186.25 keV photons of 226Ra in the spectrum. Successful deconvolution depends on many parameters, such as the detector characteristics, the activity concentration of the 235U and 226Ra in the sample, the background continuum in the 186 keV energy region and the gamma-spectrometry computer code used. In this work two sets of experimental test spectra were constructed for examining the deconvolution of the multiplet photopeak performed by different codes. For the construction of the test spectra, a high-resolution low energy germanium detector was used. The first series consists of 140 spectra and simulates environmental samples containing various activity concentration levels of 235U and 226Ra. The second series consists of 280 spectra and has been derived by adding 137Cs, corresponding to various activity concentration levels, to specific first series test spectra. As the 137Cs backscatter edge is detected in the energy region of the multiplet photopeak at ~186 keV, this second series of test spectra tests the analysis of the multiplet photopeak in high background continuum conditions. The analysis of the test spectra is performed by two different g-spectrometry analysis codes: (a spectrum unix analysis code, a computer code developed in-house and (b analysis of germanium detector spectra, a program freely available from the IAEA. The results obtained by the two programs are compared in terms of photopeak detection and photopeak area determination.

  5. Integrated experimental test program on waterhammer pressure pulses and associated structural responses within a feedwater sparger

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nurkkala, P.; Hoikkanen, J. [Imatran Voima Oy, Vantaa (Finland)

    1997-12-31

    This paper describes the methods and systems as utilized in an integrated experimental thermohydraulic/mechanics analysis test program on waterhammer pressure pulses within a revised feedwater sparger of a Loviisa generation VVER-440-type reactor. This program was carried out in two stages: (1) measurements with a strictly limited set of operating parameters at Loviisa NPP, and (2) measurements with the full set of operating parameters on a test article simulating the revised feedwater sparger. The experiments at Loviisa NPS served as an invaluable source of information on the nature of waterhammer pressure pulses and structural responses. These tests thus helped to set the objectives and formulate the concept for series of tests on a test article to study the water hammer phenomena. The heavily instrumented full size test article of a steam generator feedwater sparger was placed within a pressure vessel simulating the steam generator. The feedwater sparger was subjected to the full range of operating parameters which were to result in waterhammer pressure pulse trains of various magnitudes and duration. Two different designs of revised feedwater sparger were investigated (i.e. `grounded` and `with goose neck`). The following objects were to be met within this program: (1) establish the thermohydraulic parameters that facilitate the occurrence of water hammer pressure pulses, (2) provide a database for further analysis of the pressure pulse phenomena, (3) establish location and severity of these water hammer pressure pulses, (4) establish the structural response due to these pressure pulses, (5) provide input data for structural integrity analysis. (orig.). 3 refs.

  6. GUEST EDITORS' INTRODUCTION: Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data: inhomogeneous targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belkebir, Kamal; Saillard, Marc

    2005-12-01

    This special section deals with the reconstruction of scattering objects from experimental data. A few years ago, inspired by the Ipswich database [1 4], we started to build an experimental database in order to validate and test inversion algorithms against experimental data. In the special section entitled 'Testing inversion algorithms against experimental data' [5], preliminary results were reported through 11 contributions from several research teams. (The experimental data are free for scientific use and can be downloaded from the web site.) The success of this previous section has encouraged us to go further and to design new challenges for the inverse scattering community. Taking into account the remarks formulated by several colleagues, the new data sets deal with inhomogeneous cylindrical targets and transverse electric (TE) polarized incident fields have also been used. Among the four inhomogeneous targets, three are purely dielectric, while the last one is a `hybrid' target mixing dielectric and metallic cylinders. Data have been collected in the anechoic chamber of the Centre Commun de Ressources Micro-ondes in Marseille. The experimental setup as well as the layout of the files containing the measurements are presented in the contribution by J-M Geffrin, P Sabouroux and C Eyraud. The antennas did not change from the ones used previously [5], namely wide-band horn antennas. However, improvements have been achieved by refining the mechanical positioning devices. In order to enlarge the scope of applications, both TE and transverse magnetic (TM) polarizations have been carried out for all targets. Special care has been taken not to move the target under test when switching from TE to TM measurements, ensuring that TE and TM data are available for the same configuration. All data correspond to electric field measurements. In TE polarization the measured component is orthogonal to the axis of invariance. Contributions A Abubakar, P M van den Berg and T M

  7. Comparative Cognitive Task Analyses of Experimental Science and Instructional Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieman, Carl

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate instructional labs in physics generate intense opinions. Their advocates are passionate as to their importance for teaching physics as an experimental activity and providing "hands-on" learning experiences, while their detractors (often but not entirely students) offer harsh criticisms that they are pointless, confusing and…

  8. Technology transfer: taking science from the books to the ground at Bent Creek Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julia Kirschman

    2014-01-01

    Technology transfer has been an important part of the research program at Bent Creek Experimental Forest (Bent Creek) since its establishment in 1925. Our stated mission is to develop and disseminate knowledge and strategies for restoring, managing, sustaining, and enhancing the vegetation and wildlife of upland hardwood-dominated forest ecosystems of the Southern...

  9. Striving for solid science: Preregistration and direct replication in experimental psychology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rusz, D.; Bijleveld, E.H.; Kompier, M.A.J.

    2018-01-01

    Recently, experimental psychologists have been thinking a lot about how to do research in such a way that their findings can be replicated. As a result, it is becoming more and more common (a) to preregister one's own hypotheses and analysis plan online and (b) to conduct direct replications of

  10. Regenerative response and endocrine disrupters in crinoid echinoderms: an old experimental model, a new ecotoxicological test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candia Carnevali, M D

    2005-01-01

    The regenerative phenomena that reproduce developmental processes in adult organisms and are regulated by endocrine and neurohumoral mechanisms can provide new sensitive tests for monitoring the effects of exposure to anthropogenic chemicals such as endocrine disrupter (ED) contaminants. These pollutants in fact can be bioaccumulated by the organisms, causing dysfunctions in steroid hormone production/metabolism and activities and inducing dramatic effects on reproductive competence, development and growth in many animals, man included. Current research is exploring the effects of exposure to different classes of compounds well known for their ED activity, such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), nonylphenols and organotins, on regenerative potential of echinoderms, a relatively unexplored and promising applied approach which offers the unique chance to study physiological developmental processes in adult animals. The selected test species is the crinoid Antedon mediterranea, which represents a valuable experimental model for investigation into the regenerative process from the macroscopic to the molecular level. The present study employs an integrated approach which combines exposure experiments, chemical analysis and biological analysis utilizing classical methods of light (LM) and electron (TEM and SEM) microscopy and immunocytochemistry. The experiments were carried out on experimentally induced arm regenerations in controlled conditions with exposure concentrations comparable to those of moderately polluted coastal zones in order to reproduce common conditions of exposure to environmental contaminants. The results of the exposure tests were analysed in terms of effects at the whole organism, at the tissue and cellular level, and possible sites of action of EDs. Our results show that prolonged exposure to these compounds significantly affects the regenerative mechanisms by inducing appreciable anomalies in terms of regeneration times, overall growth, general

  11. Experimental evidence shows no fractionation of strontium isotopes ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) among soil, plants, and herbivores: implications for tracking wildlife and forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flockhart, D T Tyler; Kyser, T Kurt; Chipley, Don; Miller, Nathan G; Norris, D Ryan

    2015-01-01

    Strontium isotopes ((87)Sr/(86)Sr) can be useful biological markers for a wide range of forensic science applications, including wildlife tracking. However, one of the main advantages of using (87)Sr/(86)Sr values, that there is no fractionation from geological bedrock sources through the food web, also happens to be a critical assumption that has never been tested experimentally. We test this assumption by measuring (87)Sr/(86)Sr values across three trophic levels in a controlled greenhouse experiment. Adult monarch butterflies were raised on obligate larval host milkweed plants that were, in turn, grown on seven different soil types collected across Canada. We found no significant differences between (87)Sr/(86)Sr values in leachable Sr from soil minerals, organic soil, milkweed leaves, and monarch butterfly wings. Our results suggest that strontium isoscapes developed from (87)Sr/(86)Sr values in bedrock or soil may serve as a reliable biological marker in forensic science for a range of taxa and across large geographic areas.

  12. The Tarsal Bone Test: A Basic Test of Health Sciences Students' Knowledge of Lower Limb Anatomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Manuel Castillo-López

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. The aim of the present study was to design an easy-to-use tool, the tarsal bone test (TBT, to provide a snapshot of podiatry students’ basic anatomical knowledge of the bones of the lower limb. Methods. The study included 254 podiatry students from three different universities, 145 of them were first-year students and 109 were in their fourth and final years. The TBT was administered without prior notice to the participants and was to be completed in 5 minutes. Results. The results show that 97.2% of the subjects (n=247 correctly labelled all tarsal bones, while the other 2.8% (n=7 incorrectly labelled at least one bone, that was either the cuboid (7 times or the navicular (6 times. Although only one fourth-year student inaccurately identified one bone, no significant differences in the distribution of the correct and incorrect responses were found between first and fourth-year students. Conclusions. The TBT seems to be a straightforward and easy-to-apply instrument, and provides an objective view of the level of knowledge acquired at different stages of podiatry studies.

  13. A test of order-constrained hypotheses for circular data with applications to human movement science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baayen, Corine; Klugkist, Irene; Mechsner, Franz

    2012-01-01

    Researchers studying the movements of the human body often encounter data measured in angles (e.g., angular displacements of joints). The evaluation of these circular data requires special statistical methods. The authors introduce a new test for the analysis of order-constrained hypotheses for circular data. Through this test, researchers can evaluate their expectations regarding the outcome of an experiment directly by representing their ideas in the form of a hypothesis containing inequality constraints. The resulting data analysis is generally more powerful than one using standard null hypothesis testing. Two examples of circular data from human movement science are presented to illustrate the use of the test. Results from a simulation study show that the test performs well.

  14. Life sciences flight experiments program, life sciences project division, procurement quality provisions

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, G.

    1980-01-01

    Methods are defined for implementing quality assurance policy and requirements for life sciences laboratory equipment, experimental hardware, integration and test support equipment, and integrated payloads.

  15. Statistical hypothesis testing and common misinterpretations: Should we abandon p-value in forensic science applications?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taroni, F; Biedermann, A; Bozza, S

    2016-02-01

    Many people regard the concept of hypothesis testing as fundamental to inferential statistics. Various schools of thought, in particular frequentist and Bayesian, have promoted radically different solutions for taking a decision about the plausibility of competing hypotheses. Comprehensive philosophical comparisons about their advantages and drawbacks are widely available and continue to span over large debates in the literature. More recently, controversial discussion was initiated by an editorial decision of a scientific journal [1] to refuse any paper submitted for publication containing null hypothesis testing procedures. Since the large majority of papers published in forensic journals propose the evaluation of statistical evidence based on the so called p-values, it is of interest to expose the discussion of this journal's decision within the forensic science community. This paper aims to provide forensic science researchers with a primer on the main concepts and their implications for making informed methodological choices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Determining the cognitive structures of science teacher candidates on “evolution” through word association test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arzu ÖNEL

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This study tried to determine the conceptual comprehension of science teacher candidates on evolution. As part of this target, the Word Association Test was applied. This study was conducted with the participation of 146 teacher candidates studying in the Department of Science Education. Of the 146 teacher candidates, 89 mostly wrote the words; “evolution” (f=43, “Darwin” (f=36, and “ape” (f=10 as primary concepts in the word association test. This result illustrated that when the word “evolution” was pronounced, 61% of teacher candidates firstly remembered these three words as primary concepts. This study has demonstrated once more that there are misunderstandings and missing data on the evolutionary theory despite the past 156 years from the emergence of this theory.

  17. Experimental Durability Testing of 4H SiC JFET Integrated Circuit Technology at 727 C

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spry, David; Neudeck, Phil; Chen, Liangyu; Chang, Carl; Lukco, Dorothy; Beheim, Glenn M

    2016-01-01

    We have reported SiC integrated circuits (IC's) with two levels of metal interconnect that have demonstrated prolonged operation for thousands of hours at their intended peak ambient operational temperature of 500 C [1, 2]. However, it is recognized that testing of semiconductor microelectronics at temperatures above their designed operating envelope is vital to qualification. Towards this end, we previously reported operation of a 4H-SiC JFET IC ring oscillator on an initial fast thermal ramp test through 727 C [3]. However, this thermal ramp was not ended until a peak temperature of 880 C (well beyond failure) was attained. Further experiments are necessary to better understand failure mechanisms and upper temperature limit of this extreme-temperature capable 4H-SiC IC technology. Here we report on additional experimental testing of custom-packaged 4H-SiC JFET IC devices at temperatures above 500 C. In one test, the temperature was ramped and then held at 727 C, and the devices were periodically measured until electrical failure was observed. A 4H-SiC JFET on this chip electrically functioned with little change for around 25 hours at 727 C before rapid increases in device resistance caused failure. In a second test, devices from our next generation 4H-SiC JFET ICs were ramped up and then held at 700 C (which is below the maximum deposition temperature of the dielectrics). Three ring oscillators functioned for 8 hours at this temperature before degradation. In a third experiment, an alternative die attach of gold paste and package lid was used, and logic circuit operation was demonstrated for 143.5 hours at 700 C.

  18. The DETER Project: Advancing the Science of Cyber Security Experimentation and Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-10

    such use. DETER is currently setting up a Moodle [5] server, slated to be made public in Fall 2010, that will host educational content and facilitate...Security Research,” in Proceedings of Tridentcom, March 2006. [4] Emulab Testbed Web page, http://www.emulab.net [5] Moodle Course Management Tool

  19. An experimental test of the fluctuation relation in an active camphor boat system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paroor, H. M.; Nambiar, N.; Bandi, M. M.

    The Gallavotti-Cohen fluctuation relation (FR) posits a specific symmetry between positive and negative fluctuations in entropy production, or a related quantity (e.g power) for systems in non-equilibrium stationary state. Successful tests in a variety of systems suggest the FR may be more generally applicable than the conditions under which it was originally derived. Systems where the FR fails are therefore valuable for the insight they provide into the FR's general success. It has recently been suggested that ``active matter'' should not satisfy the fluctuation-dissipation theorem or FR. We experimentally test this possibility in a system of active camphor boats, self-propelled by surface tension gradients at air-water interfaces. The boats interact via short-range capillary attraction which competes with long-range surface tension mediated repulsion. Tuning interaction strength with number density, we test the FR through the statistics of power as one goes from a free non-interacting camphor boat, through a few weakly interacting boats to several, strongly interacting boats. We present preliminary results of our experiments and data analysis.

  20. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, L.; Carrillo, D.; Gavela, D.; Lara, A.; Rodríguez, E.; Gutiérrez, J. L.; Calero, J.; Toral, F.; Samoshkin, A.; Gudkov, D.; Riddone, G.

    2014-05-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e+e- collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS first prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wakefields, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing, electron beam and arc welding were used to complete the assembly. Finally, several tests such as dimensional control and leak testing were carried out to validate design and fabrication methods. In addition, RF measurements at low power were made to study frequency tuning.

  1. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of Direct Tension Test for Cylindrical Concrete Specimens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung J. Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Concrete cracking strength can be defined as the tensile strength of concrete subjected to pure tension stress. However, as it is difficult to apply direct tension load to concrete specimens, concrete cracking is usually quantified by the modulus of rupture for flexural members. In this study, a new direct tension test setup for cylindrical specimens (101.6 mm in diameter and 203.2 mm in height similar to those used in compression test is developed. Double steel plates are used to obtain uniform stress distributions. Finite element analysis for the proposed test setup is conducted. The uniformity of the stress distribution along the cylindrical specimen is examined and compared with rectangular cross section. Fuzzy image pattern recognition method is used to assess stress uniformity along the specimen. Moreover, the probability of cracking at different locations along the specimen is evaluated using probabilistic finite element analysis. The experimental and numerical results of the cracking location showed that gravity effect on fresh concrete during setting time might affect the distribution of concrete cracking strength along the height of the structural elements.

  2. Blast Testing Issues and TBI: Experimental Models That Lead to Wrong Conclusions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Needham, Charles E; Ritzel, David; Rule, Gregory T; Wiri, Suthee; Young, Leanne

    2015-01-01

    Over the past several years, we have noticed an increase in the number of blast injury studies published in peer-reviewed biomedical journals that have utilized improperly conceived experiments. Data from these studies will lead to false conclusions and more confusion than advancement in the understanding of blast injury, particularly blast neurotrauma. Computational methods to properly characterize the blast environment have been available for decades. These methods, combined with a basic understanding of blast wave phenomena, enable researchers to extract useful information from well-documented experiments. This basic understanding must include the differences and interrelationships of static pressure, dynamic pressure, reflected pressure, and total or stagnation pressure in transient shockwave flows, how they relate to loading of objects, and how they are properly measured. However, it is critical that the research community effectively overcomes the confusion that has been compounded by a misunderstanding of the differences between the loading produced by a free field explosive blast and loading produced by a conventional shock tube. The principles of blast scaling have been well established for decades and when properly applied will do much to repair these problems. This paper provides guidance regarding proper experimental methods and offers insights into the implications of improperly designed and executed tests. Through application of computational methods, useful data can be extracted from well-documented historical tests, and future work can be conducted in a way to maximize the effectiveness and use of valuable biological test data.

  3. Blast Testing Issues and TBI; Experimental Models that Lead to Wrong Conclusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles E. Needham

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Over the past several years we have noticed an increase in the number of blast injury studies published in peer-reviewed biomedical journals that have utilized improperly conceived experiments. Data from these studies will lead to false conclusions and more confusion than advancement in the understanding of blast injury, particularly blast neurotrauma. Computational methods to properly characterize the blast environment have been available for decades. These methods, combined with a basic understanding of blast wave phenomena enable researchers to extract useful information from well documented experiments. This basic understanding must include the differences and interrelationships of static pressure, dynamic pressure, reflected pressure, and total or stagnation pressure in transient shockwave flows, how they relate to loading of objects, and how they are properly measured. However, it is critical that the research community effectively overcomes the confusion that has been compounded by a misunderstanding of the differences between the loading produced by a free field explosive blast and loading produced by a conventional shock tube. The principles of blast scaling have been well established for decades and when properly applied will do much to repair these problems.This paper provides guidance regarding proper experimental methods and offers insights into the implications of improperly designed and executed tests. Through application of computational methods, useful data can be extracted from well documented historical tests, and future work can be conducted in a way to maximize the effectiveness and use of valuable biological test data.

  4. Informatics for materials science and engineering data-driven discovery for accelerated experimentation and application

    CERN Document Server

    Rajan, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Materials informatics: a 'hot topic' area in materials science, aims to combine traditionally bio-led informatics with computational methodologies, supporting more efficient research by identifying strategies for time- and cost-effective analysis. The discovery and maturation of new materials has been outpaced by the thicket of data created by new combinatorial and high throughput analytical techniques. The elaboration of this ""quantitative avalanche""-and the resulting complex, multi-factor analyses required to understand it-means that interest, investment, and research are revisiting in

  5. Multi-Column Experimental Test Bed for Xe/Kr Separation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenhalgh, Mitchell Randy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Garn, Troy Gerry [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Welty, Amy Keil [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Lyon, Kevin Lawrence [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Watson, Tony Leroy [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)ry

    2015-08-31

    Previous research studies have shown that INL-developed engineered form sorbents are capable of capturing both Kr and Xe from various composite gas streams. The previous experimental test bed provided single column testing for capacity evaluations over a broad temperature range. To advance research capabilities, the employment of an additional column to study selective capture of target species to provide a defined final gas composition for waste storage was warranted. The second column addition also allows for compositional analyses of the final gas product to provide for final storage determinations. The INL krypton capture system was modified by adding an additional adsorption column in order to create a multi-column test bed. The purpose of this modification was to investigate the separation of xenon from krypton supplied as a mixed gas feed. The extra column was placed in a Stirling Ultra-low Temperature Cooler, capable of controlling temperatures between 190 and 253K. Additional piping and valves were incorporated into the system to allow for a variety of flow path configurations. The new column was filled with the AgZ-PAN sorbent which was utilized as the capture medium for xenon while allowing the krypton to pass through. The xenon-free gas stream was then routed to the cryostat filled with the HZ-PAN sorbent to capture the krypton at 191K. Selectivities of xenon over krypton were determined using the new column to verify the system performance and to establish the operating conditions required for multi-column testing. Results of these evaluations verified that the system was operating as designed and also demonstrated that AgZ-PAN exhibits excellent selectivity for xenon over krypton in air at or near room temperature. Two separation tests were performed utilizing a feed gas consisting of 1000 ppmv xenon and 150 ppmv krypton with the balance being made up of air. The AgZ-PAN temperature was held at 295 or 253K while the HZ-PAN was held at 191K for both

  6. An Experimental Approach to Determine the Flight Dynamics of NASA’s Mars Science Lab Capsule

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Transducer Module ( PTM ) packages and performed the free-flight experiments at ARL’s Transonic Experimental Facility at Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD...trajectory of the MSL capsule with instrumented MSL- PTM models, and recording flight data used for subsequent trajectory reconstruction. The method...tracking radar for lifting MSL-6 flight body. ...........................11 Figure 14. MSL- PTM CAD model assembly shown in exploded view

  7. At-risk high school seniors: Science remediation for Georgia's High School Graduation Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carroll, Carolyn M.

    State departments of education have created a system of accountability for the academic achievement of students under the mandate of the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001. The Georgia Department of Education established the Georgia High School Graduation Test (GHSGT) as their method of evaluating the academic achievement of high school students. The GHSGT consist of five sections and students must pass all five sections before students they are eligible to receive a diploma. The purpose of the study was to examine the effects of teacher-lead and computer based remediation for a group of high school seniors who have been unsuccessful in passing the science portion of the GHSGT. The objectives of this study include (a) Identify the most effective method of remediation for at-risk students on the science section of the GHSGT, and (b) evaluate the methods of remediation for at-risk students on the science section of GHSGT available to high school students. The participants of this study were at-risk seniors enrolled in one high school during the 2007-2008 school year. The findings of this research study indicated that at-risk students who participated in both types of remediation, teacher-led and computer-based, scored significantly higher than the computer-based remediation group alone. There was no significant relationship between the test scores and the number of times the students were tested.

  8. Experimentally testing and assessing the predictive power of species assembly rules for tropical canopy ants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayle, Tom M; Eggleton, Paul; Manica, Andrea; Yusah, Kalsum M; Foster, William A

    2015-01-01

    Understanding how species assemble into communities is a key goal in ecology. However, assembly rules are rarely tested experimentally, and their ability to shape real communities is poorly known. We surveyed a diverse community of epiphyte-dwelling ants and found that similar-sized species co-occurred less often than expected. Laboratory experiments demonstrated that invasion was discouraged by the presence of similarly sized resident species. The size difference for which invasion was less likely was the same as that for which wild species exhibited reduced co-occurrence. Finally we explored whether our experimentally derived assembly rules could simulate realistic communities. Communities simulated using size-based species assembly exhibited diversities closer to wild communities than those simulated using size-independent assembly, with results being sensitive to the combination of rules employed. Hence, species segregation in the wild can be driven by competitive species assembly, and this process is sufficient to generate observed species abundance distributions for tropical epiphyte-dwelling ants. PMID:25622647

  9. Testing the developmental distinctiveness of male proactive and reactive aggression with a nested longitudinal experimental intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Edward D; Vitaro, Frank; Lacourse, Eric; Fontaine, Nathalie M G; Carbonneau, Rene; Tremblay, Richard E

    2010-01-01

    An experimental preventive intervention nested into a longitudinal study was used to test the developmental distinctiveness of proactive and reactive aggression. The randomized multimodal preventive intervention targeted a subsample of boys rated disruptive by their teachers. These boys were initially part of a sample of 895 boys, followed from kindergarten to 17 years of age. Semiparametric analyses of developmental trajectories for self-reported proactive and reactive aggression (between 13 and 17 years of age) indicated three trajectories for each type of aggression that varied in size and shape (Low, Moderate, and High Peaking). Intent-to-treat comparisons between the boys in the prevention group and the control group confirmed that the preventive intervention between 7 and 9 years of age, which included parenting skills and social skills training, could impact the development of reactive more than proactive aggression. The intervention effect identified in reactive aggression was related to a reduction in self-reported coercive parenting. The importance of these results for the distinction between subtypes of aggressive behaviors and the value of longitudinal-experimental studies from early childhood onward is discussed. (c) 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Does structural complexity determine the morphology of assemblages? An experimental test on three continents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heloise Gibb

    Full Text Available Understanding how species will respond to global change depends on our ability to distinguish generalities from idiosyncrasies. For diverse, but poorly known taxa, such as insects, species traits may provide a short-cut to predicting species turnover. We tested whether ant traits respond consistently to habitat complexity across geographically independent ant assemblages, using an experimental approach and baits. We repeated our study in six paired simple and complex habitats on three continents with distinct ant faunas. We also compared traits amongst ants with different foraging strategies. We hypothesised that ants would be larger, broader, have longer legs and more dorsally positioned eyes in simpler habitats. In agreement with predictions, ants had longer femurs and dorsally positioned eyes in simple habitats. This pattern was most pronounced for ants that discovered resources. Body size and pronotum width responded as predicted for experimental treatments, but were inconsistent across continents. Monopolising ants were smaller, with shorter femurs than those that occupied or discovered resources. Consistent responses for several traits suggest that many, but not all, aspects of morphology respond predictably to habitat complexity, and that foraging strategy is linked with morphology. Some traits thus have the potential to be used to predict the direction of species turnover, changes in foraging strategy and, potentially, evolution in response to changes in habitat structure.

  11. Experimental human pain models: a review of standardised methods for preclinical testing of analgesics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staahl, Camilla; Drewes, Asbjørn Mohr

    2004-09-01

    Treatment of pain is one of the major challenges in clinical medicine. However, it is often difficult to evaluate the effect of a treatment, as the many symptoms of the underlying diseases often confound this assessment. Furthermore, as the pain mechanisms in many diseases are poorly understood, the limited successful trial and error approach is most often used in the selection of analgesics. Hence, there is a need for new methods in the characterization and treatment of pain. Human experimental pain models offer the possibility to explore the pain system under controlled settings. The models can also be used to screen the analgesic profiles of drugs targeted to treat pain. This review gives a brief introduction to the methods used to evoke and assess pain in the skin, muscle and viscera. New methods using multimodal stimulation and activation of central pain mechanisms can to a higher degree mimic the clinical situation, and such methods are recommended in the future screening of analgesics. Examples of the use of experimental pain models in the testing of analgesics are given. With these models the therapeutic spectrum may be defined from a differentiated knowledge on the effect of drugs on the pain system. Such information may be used in the future guidelines for trials and clinical use of analgesics.

  12. Testing Local Adaptation in a Natural Great Tit-Malaria System: An Experimental Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Jenkins

    Full Text Available Finding out whether Plasmodium spp. are coevolving with their vertebrate hosts is of both theoretical and applied interest and can influence our understanding of the effects and dynamics of malaria infection. In this study, we tested for local adaptation as a signature of coevolution between malaria blood parasites, Plasmodium spp. and its host, the great tit, Parus major. We conducted a reciprocal transplant experiment of birds in the field, where we exposed birds from two populations to Plasmodium parasites. This experimental set-up also provided a unique opportunity to study the natural history of malaria infection in the wild and to assess the effects of primary malaria infection on juvenile birds. We present three main findings: i there was no support for local adaptation; ii there was a male-biased infection rate; iii infection occurred towards the end of the summer and differed between sites. There were also site-specific effects of malaria infection on the hosts. Taken together, we present one of the few experimental studies of parasite-host local adaptation in a natural malaria system, and our results shed light on the effects of avian malaria infection in the wild.

  13. Evaluation of Airplane Boarding/Deboarding Strategies: A Surrogate Experimental Test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengjie Qiang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Optimally organizing passengers boarding/deboarding an airplane offers a potential way to reduce the airplane turn time. The main contribution of our work is that we evaluate seven boarding strategies and two structured deboarding strategies by using a surrogate experimental test. Instead of boarding a real or mocked airplane, we carried out the experiment by organizing 40 participants to board a school bus with ten rows of four seats, symmetrically distributed on a single, central aisle. Experimental results confirm that the optimized strategies, i.e., Steffen and Steffen-lug, are superior to the traditional ones, i.e., Back-to-front, Window-to-aisle, and Random in time-saving and stability. However, the two structured deboarding strategies failed to reduce the deboarding time, and this result strongly suggests the prerequisites of applying such strategies only when, on average, passengers have a large amount of luggage. Besides, we further carried out a questionnaire survey of participants’ preferences on seat layout and discussed how those preferences influence the boarding time.

  14. An experimental test of the information model for negotiation of biparental care.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Meade

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Theoretical modelling of biparental care suggests that it can be a stable strategy if parents partially compensate for changes in behaviour by their partners. In empirical studies, however, parents occasionally match rather than compensate for the actions of their partners. The recently proposed "information model" adds to the earlier theory by factoring in information on brood value and/or need into parental decision-making. This leads to a variety of predicted parental responses following a change in partner work-rate depending on the information available to parents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We experimentally test predictions of the information model using a population of long-tailed tits. We show that parental information on brood need varies systematically through the nestling period and use this variation to predict parental responses to an experimental increase in partner work-rate via playback of extra chick begging calls. When parental information is relatively high, partial compensation is predicted, whereas when parental information is low, a matching response is predicted. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We find that although some responses are consistent with predictions, parents match a change in their partner's work-rate more often than expected and we discuss possible explanations for our findings.

  15. Experimental tests for heritable morphological color plasticity in non-native brown trout (Salmo trutta populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter A H Westley

    Full Text Available The success of invasive species is frequently attributed to phenotypic plasticity, which facilitates persistence in novel environments. Here we report on experimental tests to determine whether the intensity of cryptic coloration patterns in a global invader (brown trout, Salmo trutta was primarily the result of plasticity or heritable variation. Juvenile F1 offspring were created through experimental crosses of wild-caught parents and reared for 30 days in the laboratory in a split-brood design on either light or dark-colored gravel substrate. Skin and fin coloration quantified with digital photography and image analysis indicated strong plastic effects in response to substrate color; individuals reared on dark substrate had both darker melanin-based skin color and carotenoid-based fin colors than other members of their population reared on light substrate. Slopes of skin and fin color reaction norms were parallel between environments, which is not consistent with heritable population-level plasticity to substrate color. Similarly, we observed weak differences in population-level color within an environment, again suggesting little genetic control on the intensity of skin and fin colors. Taken as whole, our results are consistent with the hypothesis that phenotypic plasticity may have facilitated the success of brown trout invasions and suggests that plasticity is the most likely explanation for the variation in color intensity observed among these populations in nature.

  16. Development of a High-fidelity Experimental Substructure Test Rig for Grid-scored Sandwich Panels in Wind Turbine Blades

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laustsen, Steffen; Lund, Erik; Kühlmeier, L.

    2014-01-01

    . The development of a full-scale numerical model is detailed, and the necessary experimental set-up is described. Further, the numerical and experimental results obtained are compared, and an idealised set of boundary conditions for a chosen blade substructure is presented. Fromthis, the development of a test rig...

  17. Experimental implementation and proof of principle for a radionuclidic purity test solely based on half-life measurement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Thomas; Jensen, Mikael

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we present the results of an experimental implementation of the method (Jorgensen et al., 2012) for testing the radionuclidic purity (RNP) of F-18 compounds.The overall limitations of the experimental methods and their possible impacts on RNP detectability have been identified. We...

  18. Ground tests with active neutron instrumentation for the planetary science missions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Litvak, M.L., E-mail: litvak@mx.iki.rssi.ru [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Mitrofanov, I.G.; Sanin, A.B. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Jun, I. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA USA (United States); Kozyrev, A.S. [Space Research Institute, RAS, Moscow 117997 (Russian Federation); Krylov, A.; Shvetsov, V.N.; Timoshenko, G.N. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation); Starr, R. [Catholic University of America, Washington DC (United States); Zontikov, A. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-11

    We present results of experimental work performed with a spare flight model of the DAN/MSL instrument in a newly built ground test facility at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. This instrument was selected for the tests as a flight prototype of an active neutron spectrometer applicable for future landed missions to various solid solar system bodies. In our experiment we have fabricated simplified samples of planetary material and tested the capability of neutron activation methods to detect thin layers of water/water ice lying on top of planetary dry regolith or buried within a dry regolith at different depths.

  19. Mitigating Physiological Responses to Layoff Threat: An Experimental Test of the Efficacy of Two Coping Interventions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahira M. Probst

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the current study was to assess real-time physiological reactions to the threat of layoffs and to determine whether the use of an emotion-focused vs. problem-focused coping intervention would be more efficacious in attenuating these physiological reactions. A 2 (coping intervention × 4 (within-subjects time points mixed experimental design was used to test the hypotheses. Eighty-four undergraduates participated in this laboratory experiment during which their galvanic skin response (GSR and heart rate (HR were continuously monitored. Analyses indicate that individuals instructed to utilize an emotion-focused coping strategy experienced a significantly greater decline in their GSR compared to those utilizing the problem-focused coping method. Results suggest organizations conducting layoffs might focus first on dealing with the emotional aftermath of downsizing before focusing on problem-solving tasks, such as resume writing and other traditional outplacement activities.

  20. Experimental Study on the Compressive Strength of Big Mobility Concrete with Nondestructive Testing Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huai-Shuai Shang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available An experimental study of C20, C25, C30, C40, and C50 big mobility concrete cubes that came from laboratory and construction site was completed. Nondestructive testing (NDT was carried out using impact rebound hammer (IRH techniques to establish a correlation between the compressive strengths and the rebound number. The local curve for measuring strength of the regression method is set up and its superiority is proved. The rebound method presented is simple, quick, and reliable and covers wide ranges of concrete strengths. The rebound method can be easily applied to concrete specimens as well as existing concrete structures. The final results were compared with previous ones from the literature and also with actual results obtained from samples extracted from existing structures.

  1. Soil gas and radon entry into a simple test structure: Comparison of experimental and modelling results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, C.E.; Søgaard-Hansen, J.; Majborn, B.

    1994-01-01

    A radon test structure has been established at a field site at Riso National Laboratory. Measurements have been made of soil gas entry rates, pressure couplings and radon depletion. The experimental results have been compared with results obtained from measured soil parameters and a two......-dimensional steady-state numerical model of Darcy flow and combined diffusive and advective transport of radon. For most probe locations, the calculated values of the pressure couplings and the radon depletion agree well with the measured values, thus verifying important elements of the Darcy flow approximation......, and the ability of the model to treat combined diffusive and advective transport of radon. However, the model gives an underestimation of the soil gas entry rate. Even if it is assumed that the soil has a permeability equal to the highest of the measured values, the model underestimates the soil gas entry rate...

  2. Mitigating Physiological Responses to Layoff Threat: An Experimental Test of the Efficacy of Two Coping Interventions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Probst, Tahira M; Jiang, Lixin

    2016-03-18

    The purpose of the current study was to assess real-time physiological reactions to the threat of layoffs and to determine whether the use of an emotion-focused vs. problem-focused coping intervention would be more efficacious in attenuating these physiological reactions. A 2 (coping intervention) × 4 (within-subjects time points) mixed experimental design was used to test the hypotheses. Eighty-four undergraduates participated in this laboratory experiment during which their galvanic skin response (GSR) and heart rate (HR) were continuously monitored. Analyses indicate that individuals instructed to utilize an emotion-focused coping strategy experienced a significantly greater decline in their GSR compared to those utilizing the problem-focused coping method. Results suggest organizations conducting layoffs might focus first on dealing with the emotional aftermath of downsizing before focusing on problem-solving tasks, such as resume writing and other traditional outplacement activities.

  3. A strict experimental test of macroscopic realism in a superconducting flux qubit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knee, George C; Kakuyanagi, Kosuke; Yeh, Mao-Chuang; Matsuzaki, Yuichiro; Toida, Hiraku; Yamaguchi, Hiroshi; Saito, Shiro; Leggett, Anthony J; Munro, William J

    2016-11-04

    Macroscopic realism is the name for a class of modifications to quantum theory that allow macroscopic objects to be described in a measurement-independent manner, while largely preserving a fully quantum mechanical description of the microscopic world. Objective collapse theories are examples which aim to solve the quantum measurement problem through modified dynamical laws. Whether such theories describe nature, however, is not known. Here we describe and implement an experimental protocol capable of constraining theories of this class, that is more noise tolerant and conceptually transparent than the original Leggett-Garg test. We implement the protocol in a superconducting flux qubit, and rule out (by ∼84 s.d.) those theories which would deny coherent superpositions of 170 nA currents over a ∼10 ns timescale. Further, we address the 'clumsiness loophole' by determining classical disturbance with control experiments. Our results constitute strong evidence for the superposition of states of nontrivial macroscopic distinctness.

  4. Experimental Investigation of Properties of Foam Concrete for Industrial Floors in Testing Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlcek, Jozef; Drusa, Marian; Scherfel, Walter; Sedlar, Bronislav

    2017-12-01

    Foam concrete (FC), as a mixture of cement, water, additives and technical foam, is well known for more than 30 years. It is building material with good mechanical properties, low thermal conductivity, simple and even high technological treatment. Foam concrete contains closed void pores, what allows achieving low bulk density and spare of raw materials. Thanks to its properties, it is usable as a replacement of conventional subbase layers of the industrial floors, the transport areas or as a part of the foundation structures of the buildings. Paper presents the preparation of the testing field (physical model) which was created for experimental investigation of the foam concrete subbase layer of the industrial floor in a real scale.

  5. Correlation of the Health Sciences Reasoning Test with student admission variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Wendy C; Persky, Adam; Blalock, Susan J

    2013-08-12

    To assess the association between scores on the Health Sciences Reasoning Test (HSRT) and pharmacy student admission variables. During the student admissions process, cognitive data, including undergraduate grade point average and Pharmacy College Admission Test (PCAT) scores, were collected from matriculating doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) students. Between 2007 and 2009, the HSRT was administered to 329 first-year PharmD students. Correlations between HSRT scores and cognitive data, previous degree, and gender were examined. After controlling for other predictors, 3 variables were significantly associated with HSRT scores: percentile rank on the reading comprehension (padmission criteria.

  6. Optical Testing and Verification Methods for the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module Element

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonille, Scott R.; Miskey, Cherie L.; Ohl, Raymond G.; Rohrbach, Scott O.; Aronstein, David L.; Bartoszyk, Andrew E.; Bowers, Charles W.; Cofie, Emmanuel; Collins, Nicholas R.; Comber, Brian J.; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.6m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy (40K). The JWST Observatory includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) that contains four science instruments (SI) and the fine guider. The SIs are mounted to a composite metering structure. The SI and guider units were integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as a suite using the Optical Telescope Element SIMulator (OSIM). OSIM is a full field, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator. SI performance, including alignment and wave front error, were evaluated using OSIM. We describe test and analysis methods for optical performance verification of the ISIM Element, with an emphasis on the processes used to plan and execute the test. The complexity of ISIM and OSIM drove us to develop a software tool for test planning that allows for configuration control of observations, associated scripts, and management of hardware and software limits and constraints, as well as tools for rapid data evaluation, and flexible re-planning in response to the unexpected. As examples of our test and analysis approach, we discuss how factors such as the ground test thermal environment are compensated in alignment. We describe how these innovative methods for test planning and execution and post-test analysis were instrumental in the verification program for the ISIM element, with enough information to allow the reader to consider these innovations and lessons learned in this successful effort in their future testing for other programs.

  7. An experimental test of condition-dependent male and female mate choice in zebra finches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holveck, Marie-Jeanne; Geberzahn, Nicole; Riebel, Katharina

    2011-01-01

    In mating systems with social monogamy and obligatory bi-parental care, such as found in many songbird species, male and female fitness depends on the combined parental investment. Hence, both sexes should gain from choosing mates in high rather than low condition. However, theory also predicts that an individual's phenotypic quality can constrain choice, if low condition individuals cannot afford prolonged search efforts and/or face higher risk of rejection. In systems with mutual mate choice, the interaction between male and female condition should thus be a better predictor of choice than either factor in isolation. To address this prediction experimentally, we manipulated male and female condition and subsequently tested male and female mating preferences in zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata, a songbird species with mutual mate choice and obligatory bi-parental care. We experimentally altered phenotypic quality by manipulating the brood size in which the birds were reared. Patterns of association for high- or low-condition individuals of the opposite sex differed for male and female focal birds when tested in an 8-way choice arena. Females showed repeatable condition-assortative preferences for males matching their own rearing background. Male preferences were also repeatable, but not predicted by their own or females' rearing background. In combination with a brief review of the literature on condition-dependent mate choice in the zebra finch we discuss whether the observed sex differences and between-studies differences arise because males and females differ in context sensitivity (e.g. male-male competition suppressing male mating preferences), sampling strategies or susceptibility to rearing conditions (e.g. sex-specific effect on physiology). While a picture emerges that juvenile and current state indeed affect preferences, the development and context-dependency of mutual state-dependent mate choice warrants further study.

  8. An experimental test of condition-dependent male and female mate choice in zebra finches.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marie-Jeanne Holveck

    Full Text Available In mating systems with social monogamy and obligatory bi-parental care, such as found in many songbird species, male and female fitness depends on the combined parental investment. Hence, both sexes should gain from choosing mates in high rather than low condition. However, theory also predicts that an individual's phenotypic quality can constrain choice, if low condition individuals cannot afford prolonged search efforts and/or face higher risk of rejection. In systems with mutual mate choice, the interaction between male and female condition should thus be a better predictor of choice than either factor in isolation. To address this prediction experimentally, we manipulated male and female condition and subsequently tested male and female mating preferences in zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata, a songbird species with mutual mate choice and obligatory bi-parental care. We experimentally altered phenotypic quality by manipulating the brood size in which the birds were reared. Patterns of association for high- or low-condition individuals of the opposite sex differed for male and female focal birds when tested in an 8-way choice arena. Females showed repeatable condition-assortative preferences for males matching their own rearing background. Male preferences were also repeatable, but not predicted by their own or females' rearing background. In combination with a brief review of the literature on condition-dependent mate choice in the zebra finch we discuss whether the observed sex differences and between-studies differences arise because males and females differ in context sensitivity (e.g. male-male competition suppressing male mating preferences, sampling strategies or susceptibility to rearing conditions (e.g. sex-specific effect on physiology. While a picture emerges that juvenile and current state indeed affect preferences, the development and context-dependency of mutual state-dependent mate choice warrants further study.

  9. Development and experimental validation of a thermoelectric test bench for laboratory lessons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Rodríguez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The refrigeration process reduces the temperature of a space or a given volume while the power generation process employs a source of thermal energy to generate electrical power. Because of the importance of these two processes, training of engineers in this area is of great interest. In engineering courses it is normally studied the vapor compression and absorption refrigeration, and power generation systems such as gas turbine and steam turbine. Another type of cooling and generation less studied within the engineering curriculum, having a great interest, it is cooling and thermal generation based on Peltier and Seebeck effects. The theoretical concepts are useful, but students have difficulties understanding the physical meaning of their possible applications. Providing students with tools to test and apply the theory in real applications, will lead to a better understanding of the subject. Engineers must have strong theoretical, computational and also experimental skills. A prototype test bench has been built and experimentally validated to perform practical lessons of thermoelectric generation and refrigeration. Using this prototype students learn the most effective way of cooling systems and thermal power generation as well as basic concepts associated with thermoelectricity. It has been proven that students learn the process of data acquisition, and the technology used in thermoelectric devices. These practical lessons are implemented for a 60 people group of students in the development of subject of Thermodynamic including in the Degree in Engineering in Industrial Technologies of Public University of Navarra. Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE An experimental test of insect-mediated colonisation of damaged Pinus radiata trees by sapstain fungi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James K McCarthy

    Full Text Available Vector-pathogen dynamics play a central role in understanding tree health and forest dynamics. There is substantial evidence that bark beetles act as spore vectors for many species of fungi that cause 'sapstain' discolouration of damaged trees and timber. However, the direct quantitative link between vector-mediated spore dispersal and subsequent sapstain colonisation of wood is not fully understood. Here, we used caged versus uncaged experimental logs to test whether the exclusion of bark beetles quantitatively alters the distribution and intensity of sapstain fungal spread within damaged trees. Using generalised linear mixed models, we tested the effect of bark beetle exclusion on sapstain intensity within and among cut logs at two plantation forest sites. Overall, sapstain was found on all logs regardless of caging treatment, indicating that sapstain colonisation can occur (to some degree without arthropod vectors, probably via wind, rain-splash and, potentially, latent endophytic development. This was supported by the dominance of Diplodia pinea in fungal isolations taken from trees felled at the site, as this fungal species is known to disperse independently of bark beetles. However, the intensity of sapstain within and among experimental logs was significantly greater in uncaged than in caged logs, where beetle colonisation was significantly greater. This appeared to be driven by a significant within-log association between the intensity of staining and the intensity of beetle, and other arthropod, tunnelling and feeding activities. Taken together, these results strongly suggest that the dominant mechanism underlying the role of bark beetles in sapstain development in this study system is not vector-mediated spore dispersal, per se, but rather the facilitation of spore entry and hyphal development through tunnelling and feeding activities. We discuss the implications of these findings for forest management and the effective salvage

  10. Reliability of a science admission test (HAM-Nat) at Hamburg medical school

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hissbach, Johanna; Klusmann, Dietrich; Hampe, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The University Hospital in Hamburg (UKE) started to develop a test of knowledge in natural sciences for admission to medical school in 2005 (Hamburger Auswahlverfahren für Medizinische Studiengänge, Naturwissenschaftsteil, HAM-Nat). This study is a step towards establishing the HAM-Nat. We are investigating parallel forms reliability, the effect of a crash course in chemistry on test results, and correlations of HAM-Nat test results with a test of scientific reasoning (similar to a subtest of the "Test for Medical Studies", TMS). Methods: 316 first-year students participated in the study in 2007. They completed different versions of the HAM-Nat test which consisted of items that had already been used (HN2006) and new items (HN2007). Four weeks later half of the participants were tested on the HN2007 version of the HAM-Nat again, while the other half completed the test of scientific reasoning. Within this four week interval students were offered a five day chemistry course. Results: Parallel forms reliability for four different test versions ranged from rtt=.53 to rtt=.67. The retest reliabilities of the HN2007 halves were rtt=.54 and rtt =.61. Correlations of the two HAM-Nat versions with the test of scientific reasoning were r=.34 und r=.21. The crash course in chemistry had no effect on HAM-Nat scores. Conclusions: The results suggest that further versions of the test of natural sciences will not easily conform to the standards of internal consistency, parallel-forms reliability and retest reliability. Much care has to be taken in order to assemble items which could be used interchangeably for the construction of new test versions. The test of scientific reasoning and the HAM-Nat are tapping different constructs. Participation in a chemistry course did not improve students’ achievement, probably because the content of the course was not coordinated with the test and many students lacked of motivation to do well in the second test. PMID:21866246

  11. Reliability of a science admission test (HAM-Nat) at Hamburg medical school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hissbach, Johanna; Klusmann, Dietrich; Hampe, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    The University Hospital in Hamburg (UKE) started to develop a test of knowledge in natural sciences for admission to medical school in 2005 (Hamburger Auswahlverfahren für Medizinische Studiengänge, Naturwissenschaftsteil, HAM-Nat). This study is a step towards establishing the HAM-Nat. We are investigating parallel forms reliability, the effect of a crash course in chemistry on test results, and correlations of HAM-Nat test results with a test of scientific reasoning (similar to a subtest of the "Test for Medical Studies", TMS). 316 first-year students participated in the study in 2007. They completed different versions of the HAM-Nat test which consisted of items that had already been used (HN2006) and new items (HN2007). Four weeks later half of the participants were tested on the HN2007 version of the HAM-Nat again, while the other half completed the test of scientific reasoning. Within this four week interval students were offered a five day chemistry course. Parallel forms reliability for four different test versions ranged from r(tt)=.53 to r(tt)=.67. The retest reliabilities of the HN2007 halves were r(tt)=.54 and r(tt )=.61. Correlations of the two HAM-Nat versions with the test of scientific reasoning were r=.34 und r=.21. The crash course in chemistry had no effect on HAM-Nat scores. The results suggest that further versions of the test of natural sciences will not easily conform to the standards of internal consistency, parallel-forms reliability and retest reliability. Much care has to be taken in order to assemble items which could be used interchangeably for the construction of new test versions. The test of scientific reasoning and the HAM-Nat are tapping different constructs. Participation in a chemistry course did not improve students' achievement, probably because the content of the course was not coordinated with the test and many students lacked of motivation to do well in the second test.

  12. Parametric experimental tests of steam gasification of pine wood in a fluidized bed reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Vecchione

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Among Renewable Energy Sources (RES, biomass represent one of the most common and suitable solution in order to contribute to the global energy supply and to reduce greenhouse gases (GHG emissions. The disposal of some residual biomass, as pruning from pine trees, represent a problem for agricultural and agro-industrial sectors. But if the residual biomass are used for energy production can become a resource. The most suitable energy conversion technology for the above-mentioned biomass is gasification process because the high C/N ratio and the low moisture content, obtained from the analysis. In this work a small-pilot bubbling-bed gasification plant has been designed, constructed and used in order to obtain, from the pine trees pruning, a syngas with low tar and char contents and high hydrogen content. The activities showed here are part of the activities carried out in the European 7FP UNIfHY project. In particular the aim of this work is to develop experimental test on a bench scale steam blown fluidized bed biomass gasifier. These tests will be utilized in future works for the simulations of a pilot scale steam fluidized bed gasifier (100 kWth fed with different biomass feedstock. The results of the tests include produced gas and tar composition as well gas, tar and char yield. Tests on a bench scale reactor (8 cm I.D. were carried out varying steam to biomass ratio from 0.5, 0.7 and 1 to 830°C.

  13. Análise da incerteza experimental na determinacão da vida usando ensaio acelerado Analysis of experimental uncertainties on life determination using accelerated life testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alvaro José Abackerli

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Os estudos de confiabilidade e os ensaios acelerados de vida vêm sendo empregados por um grande número de empresas, principalmente devido a sua importância no desenvolvimento de produtos. Os ensaios acelerados consistem em colocar o produto em funcionamento para avaliar a sua probabilidade de falha ao longo do tempo, determinando-se a partir disso as chances dele sobreviver a um determinado tempo de uso, chamado de missão e, muitas vezes, associado aos prazos de garantia. Nos ensaios acelerados, as chamadas cargas de estresse são tratadas como variáveis cujos valores são nominalmente definidos. Deste modo, nos testes acelerados não são ponderadas as incertezas inerentes ao arranjo experimental, tampouco suas influências nos resultados obtidos por meio dos testes. Neste trabalho, métodos de Monte Carlo e dados reais de ensaios acelerados são usados para ilustrar os efeitos das incertezas na vida prevista de relés. Por meio deles, mostra-se também o impacto da incerteza experimental nas decisões gerenciais sobre a vida do produto, durante o seu desenvolvimento. Os resultados indicam que a incerteza presente nos ensaios acelerados pode ser significativa, mostrando, portanto, sua relevância tanto no desenvolvimento do produto quanto na definição de períodos de garantia.Reliability and accelerated life testing have been increasingly used by companies due to their importance in product development. Accelerated life testing involves activating products under defined conditions and evaluating the -probability of their survival after a defined life time, usually called mission, which is closely related to product's warranty. Usually, the stress loads are set at nominal values during accelerated testing procedures. Therefore, accelerated test procedures do not account for either the actual experimental uncertainties related to experimental test conditions or their influences on test results. In this work, actual accelerated life testing

  14. Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future Test Bed and Data Infrastructure Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams, Dean N. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Foster, I. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Van Dam, Kerstin Kleese [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Shipman, G. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2014-05-04

    The collaborative Climate Science for a Sustainable Energy Future (CSSEF) project started in July 2011 with the goal of accelerating the development of climate model components (i.e., atmosphere, ocean and sea ice, and land surface) and enhancing their predictive capabilities while incorporating uncertainty quantification (UQ). This effort required accessing and converting observational data sets into specialized model testing and verification data sets and building a model development test bed, where model components and sub-models can be rapidly evaluated. CSSEF’s prototype test bed demonstrated, how an integrated testbed could eliminate tedious activities associated with model development and evaluation, by providing the capability to constantly compare model output—where scientists store, acquire, reformat, regrid, and analyze data sets one-by-one—to observational measurements in a controlled test bed.

  15. Maritime Science and Technology Experimentation Capability Project: Maritime Capability Evaluation Laboratory (MCEL) Data Centre Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-01

    Servers for Test Network 2 Eyes (2 x switch) d. Servers for Test Network 4 Eyes (2 x switch) We have not looked at the Telco requirements for the...MCEL facility however the facility will require a Telco closet. Some facilities have a joint Unclass network room which will include Telco and the...enclave and 1 switch port for the 4Eyes enclave. This switch will be located within the telco /Unclass network room. The distribution layer switch’s

  16. Mantle temperatures, and tests of experimentally calibrated olivine-melt equilibria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putirka, K. D.

    2005-12-01

    Because the ratio Mgol/Mgliq (Kd(Mg)) is sensitive to T, olivine-liquid Kd's have long been used as geothermometers, and more recently, maximum Fo contents from volcanic rocks have been used to estimate mantle potential temperatures. Such estimates by Putirka (2005, G3) indicate higher mantle equilibration temperatures at Hawaii, compared to temperatures derived from earlier calibrations. Several published models were thus tested for their ability to reproduce T for 862 experimental data. The Putirka (2005) models did not include P corrections, which are added here: lnKd(Mg)=-1.88 + 30.85P(GPa)/T(C) - 0.04[H2O]liq + 0.068[Na2O+K2O]liq + 3629.7/T(C) + 0.0087[SiO2]liq - 0.015[CaO]liq lnKd(Fe)= -2.92 - 0.05[H2O]liq + 0.0264[Na2O+K2O]liq + 2976.13/T(C) + 0.01847[SiO2]liq + 0.0171[Al2O3]liq - 0.039[CaO]liq + 33.17P(GPa)/T(C) In these expressions, Kd(Mg) and Kd(Fe) are the partition coefficients for Mg and Fe between olivine and liquid, expressed as cation fractions; compositional corrections are in weight percent. The models are calibrated from 785 experimental data (P = 0.0001-15.5 GPa; 1213-2353 K). In the tests, the expressions of Beattie (1993) performed exceptionally well for dry systems with MgOliq 17 wt. %; new models are therefore needed. Over the greater compositional range, model 1 above can be inverted to yield T with a SEE of 56 K, and an average mean (systematic) error of +3 K for 856 experimental data; this compares to a systematic error of -26 K for Beattie (1993) and -36 K for Ford et al. (1983). For use in equation (1) of Putirka (2005), the models above are also more precise at both low and high MgO, and hydrous and non-hydrous systems compared to Beattie (1993) and Ford et al. (1983). Herzberg (pers. comm.) has modeled olivine-melt pairs for Hawaii and MOR's, which are in accord with Putirka (2005); these pairs are used to test for the effects of systematic model error on estimates of mantle temperatures. The Beattie (1993) and Ford (1983) models

  17. Experimental education of Astronomy across the seedbeds of investigation in sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taborda, E.

    2009-05-01

    In Colombia, the geographic situation help us in the moment of make academic work of astronomic observation, due to the opportunity of look almost the totality of the nocturnal sky in the hemispheres north and south in on night generating the possibility of make easy our labor as educators and to the astronomy and the related science with the students learn and the socialize in fundamental areas as mathematics, physic, chemistry, biology, art, technology, geography and history between others fundamental areas. In our presentation will be show the results of 3 years of in which we the students of primary and high school studies as a descriptive study of these research. we need economic help for the aid to this event.

  18. Systems Design and Experimental Evaluation of a High-Altitude Relight Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paxton, Brendan

    Novel advances in gas turbine engine combustor technology, led by endeavors into fuel efficiency and demanding environmental regulations, have been fraught with performance and safety concerns. While the majority of low emissions gas turbine engine combustor technology has been necessary for power generation applications, the push for ultra-low NOx combustion in aircraft jet engines has been ever present. Recent state-of-the-art combustor designs notably tackle historic emissions challenges by operating at fuel-lean conditions, which are characterized by an increase in the amount of air flow sent to the primary combustion zone. While beneficial in reducing NOx emissions, the fuel-lean mechanisms that characterize these combustor designs rely heavily upon high-energy and high-velocity air flows to sufficiently mix and atomize fuel droplets, ultimately leading to flame stability concerns during low-power operation. When operating at high-altitude conditions, these issues are further exacerbated by the presence of low ambient air pressures and temperatures, which can lead to engine flame-out situations and hamper engine relight attempts. To aid academic and industrial research ventures into improving the high-altitude lean blow-out and relight performance of modern gas turbine engine combustor technologies, the High-Altitude Relight Test Facility (HARTF) was designed and constructed at the University of Cincinnati (UC) Combustion and Fire Research Laboratory (CFRL). Following its construction, an experimental evaluation of its abilities to facilitate optically-accessible ignition, combustion, and spray testing for gas turbine engine combustor hardware at simulated high-altitude conditions was performed. In its evaluation, performance limit references were established through testing of the HARTF vacuum and cryogenic air-chilling capabilities. These tests were conducted with regard to end-user control---the creation and the maintenance of a realistic high

  19. Experimental Tests on the Composite Foam Sandwich Pipes Subjected to Axial Load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Feng; Zhao, QiLin; Xu, Kang; Zhang, DongDong

    2015-12-01

    Compared to the composite thin-walled tube, the composite foam sandwich pipe has better local flexural rigidity, which can take full advantage of the high strength of composite materials. In this paper, a series of composite foam sandwich pipes with different parameters were designed and manufactured using the prefabricated polyurethane foam core-skin co-curing molding technique with E-glass fabric prepreg. The corresponding axial-load compressive tests were conducted to investigate the influence factors that experimentally determine the axial compressive performances of the tubes. In the tests, the detailed failure process and the corresponding load-displacement characteristics were obtained; the influence rules of the foam core density, surface layer thickness, fiber ply combination and end restraint on the failure modes and ultimate bearing capacity were studied. Results indicated that: (1) the fiber ply combination, surface layer thickness and end restraint have a great influence on the ultimate load bearing capacity; (2) a reasonable fiber ply combination and reliable interfacial adhesion not only optimize the strength but also transform the failure mode from brittle failure to ductile failure, which is vital to the fully utilization of the composite strength of these composite foam sandwich pipes.

  1. Experimental test of genetic rescue in isolated populations of brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Zachary L.; Coombs, Jason A.; Hudy, Mark; Nislow, Keith H.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic rescue is an increasingly considered conservation measure to address genetic erosion associated with habitat loss and fragmentation. The resulting gene flow from facilitating migration may improve fitness and adaptive potential, but is not without risks (e.g., outbreeding depression). Here, we conducted a test of genetic rescue by translocating ten (five of each sex) brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from a single source to four nearby and isolated stream populations. To control for the demographic contribution of translocated individuals, ten resident individuals (five of each sex) were removed from each recipient population. Prior to the introduction of translocated individuals, the two smallest above-barrier populations had substantially lower genetic diversity, and all populations had reduced effective number of breeders relative to adjacent below-barrier populations. In the first reproductive bout following translocation, 31 of 40 (78%) translocated individuals reproduced successfully. Translocated individuals contributed to more families than expected under random mating and generally produced larger full-sibling families. We observed relatively high (>20%) introgression in three of the four recipient populations. The translocations increased genetic diversity of recipient populations by 45% in allelic richness and 25% in expected heterozygosity. Additionally, strong evidence of hybrid vigour was observed through significantly larger body sizes of hybrid offspring relative to resident offspring in all recipient populations. Continued monitoring of these populations will test for negative fitness effects beyond the first generation. However, these results provide much-needed experimental data to inform the potential effectiveness of genetic rescue-motivated translocations.

  2. Sex Allocation in a Polyembryonic Parasitoid with Female Soldiers: An Evolutionary Simulation and an Experimental Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bügler, Max; Rempoulakis, Polychronis; Shacham, Roei; Keasar, Tamar; Thuijsman, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Parasitoid wasps are convenient subjects for testing sex allocation theory. However, their intricate life histories are often insufficiently captured in simple analytical models. In the polyembryonic wasp Copidosoma koehleri, a clone of genetically identical offspring develops from each egg. Male clones contain fewer individuals than female clones. Some female larvae develop into soldiers that kill within-host competitors, while males do not form soldiers. These features complicate the prediction of Copidosoma’s sex allocation. We developed an individual-based simulation model, where numerous random starting strategies compete and recombine until a single stable sex allocation evolves. Life-history parameter values (e.g., fecundity, clone-sizes, larval survival) are estimated from experimental data. The model predicts a male-biased sex allocation, which becomes more extreme as the probability of superparasitism (hosts parasitized more than once) increases. To test this prediction, we reared adult parasitoids at either low or high density, mated them, and presented them with unlimited hosts. As predicted, wasps produced more sons than daughters in all treatments. Males reared at high density (a potential cue for superparasitism) produced a higher male bias in their offspring than low-density males. Unexpectedly, female density did not affect offspring sex ratios. We discuss possible mechanisms for paternal control over offspring sex. PMID:23755142

  3. Sex allocation in a polyembryonic parasitoid with female soldiers: an evolutionary simulation and an experimental test.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Max Bügler

    Full Text Available Parasitoid wasps are convenient subjects for testing sex allocation theory. However, their intricate life histories are often insufficiently captured in simple analytical models. In the polyembryonic wasp Copidosoma koehleri, a clone of genetically identical offspring develops from each egg. Male clones contain fewer individuals than female clones. Some female larvae develop into soldiers that kill within-host competitors, while males do not form soldiers. These features complicate the prediction of Copidosoma's sex allocation. We developed an individual-based simulation model, where numerous random starting strategies compete and recombine until a single stable sex allocation evolves. Life-history parameter values (e.g., fecundity, clone-sizes, larval survival are estimated from experimental data. The model predicts a male-biased sex allocation, which becomes more extreme as the probability of superparasitism (hosts parasitized more than once increases. To test this prediction, we reared adult parasitoids at either low or high density, mated them, and presented them with unlimited hosts. As predicted, wasps produced more sons than daughters in all treatments. Males reared at high density (a potential cue for superparasitism produced a higher male bias in their offspring than low-density males. Unexpectedly, female density did not affect offspring sex ratios. We discuss possible mechanisms for paternal control over offspring sex.

  4. Experimentally Testing Hydrothermal Vent Origin of Life on Enceladus and Other Icy/Ocean Worlds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barge, Laura M; White, Lauren M

    2017-09-01

    We review various laboratory strategies and methods that can be utilized to simulate prebiotic processes and origin of life in hydrothermal vent systems on icy/ocean worlds. Crucial steps that could be simulated in the laboratory include simulations of water-rock chemistry (e.g., serpentinization) to produce hydrothermal fluids, the types of mineral catalysts and energy gradients produced in vent interfaces where hydrothermal fluids interface with the surrounding seawater, and simulations of biologically relevant chemistry in flow-through gradient systems (i.e., far-from-equilibrium experiments). We describe some examples of experimental designs in detail, which are adaptable and could be used to test particular hypotheses about ocean world energetics or mineral/organic chemistry. Enceladus among the ocean worlds provides an ideal test case, since the pressure at the ocean floor is more easily simulated in the lab. Results for Enceladus could be extrapolated with further experiments and modeling to understand other ocean worlds. Key Words: Enceladus-Ocean worlds-Icy worlds-Hydrothermal vent-Iron sulfide-Gradient. Astrobiology 17, 820-833.

  5. Finite element model of bamboo culm (Phyllostachys sp. and its comparison to two experimental tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Václav Sebera

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of the work was to build up a general parametric finite-element model of a bamboo culm in ANSYS computational system. Subsequently the model was compared to a experimental measurements of chosen mechanical properties – three point bending test and brasil test. A pa­ra­me­ter being compared was a force, which is necessary to exert to deform a sample on given strain. In this work two parametric models were created. First one is including dividing barrier – diaphragm. A mesh of the culm wall is mapped and is divided into three layers with different orthotropic material models in cylindrical coordinate system with respect to the culm axis. By contrast the barrier – diaphragm – is represented by free mesh with isotropic material model. Both FE models are fully parametric and three-dimensional. Hence they are very well utilizable for both further research of the bamboo itself and constructions from it.

  6. VIP 2: Experimental tests of the Pauli Exclusion Principle for electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Pichler, A; Bazzi, M.; Bertolucci, S.; Berucci, C.; Bragadireanu, M.; Cargnelli, M.; Clozza, A.; Curceanu, C.; De Paolis, L.; Di Matteo, S.; D'Uffizi, A.; Egger, J.-P.; Guaraldo, C.; Iliescu, M.; Ishiwatari, T.; Laubenstein, M.; Marton, J.; Milotti, E.; Pietreanu, D.; Piscicchia, K.; Ponta, T.; Sbardella, E.; Scordo, A.; Shi, H.; Sirghi, D.; Sirghi, F.; Sperandio, L.; Vazquez-Doce, O.; Widmann, E.; Zmeskal, J.

    2015-01-01

    The Pauli Exclusion Principle (PEP) was famously discovered in 1925 by the austrian physicist Wolfgang Pauli. Since then, it underwent several experimental tests. Starting in 2006, the VIP (Violation of the Pauli Principle) experiment looked for 2p to 1s X-ray transitions in copper, where 2 electrons are present in the 1s state before the transition happens. These transitions violate the PEP, and the lack of detection of the corresponding X-ray photons lead to a preliminary upper limit for the violation of the PEP of 4.7 * 10^(-29). The follow-up experiment VIP 2 is currently in the testing phase and will be transported to its final destination, the underground laboratory of Gran Sasso in Italy, in autumn 2015. Several improvements compared to its predecessor like the use of new X-ray detectors and active shielding from background gives rise to a goal for the improvement of the upper limit of the probability for the violation of the Pauli Exclusion Principle of 2 orders of magnitude.

  7. Experimental and Modeling Studies of Crush, Puncture, and Perforation Scenarios in the Steven Impact Test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vandersall, K S; Chidester, S K; Forbes, J W; Garcia, F; Greenwood, D W; Switzer, L L; Tarver, C M

    2002-06-28

    The Steven test and associated modeling has greatly increased the fundamental knowledge of practical predictions of impact safety hazards for confined and unconfined explosive charges. Building on a database of initial work, experimental and modeling studies of crush, puncture, and perforation scenarios were investigated using the Steven impact test. The descriptions of crush, puncture, and perforation arose from safety scenarios represented by projectile designs that ''crush'' the energetic material or either ''puncture'' with a pinpoint nose or ''perforate'' the front cover with a transportation hook. As desired, these scenarios offer different aspects of the known mechanisms that control ignition: friction, shear and strain. Studies of aged and previously damaged HMX-based high explosives included the use of embedded carbon foil and carbon resistor gauges, high-speed cameras, and blast wave gauges to determine the pressure histories, time required for an explosive reaction, and the relative violence of those reactions, respectively. Various ignition processes were modeled as the initial reaction rate expression in the Ignition and Growth reaction rate equations. Good agreement with measured threshold velocities, pressure histories, and times to reaction was calculated for LX-04 impacted by several projectile geometries using a compression dependent ignition term and an elastic-plastic model with a reasonable yield strength for impact strain rates.

  8. Experimental and Numerical Evaluation of Rock Dynamic Test with Split-Hopkinson Pressure Bar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kang Peng

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Feasibility of rock dynamic properties by split-Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB was experimentally and numerically evaluated with ANSYS/LS-DYNA. The effects of different diameters, different loading rates, and different propagation distances on wave dispersion of input bars in SHPB with rectangle and half-sine wave loadings were analyzed. The results show that the dispersion effect on the diameter of input bar, loading rate, and propagation distance under half-sine waveform loading is ignorable compared with the rectangle wave loading. Moreover, the degrees of stress uniformity under rectangle and half-sine input wave loadings are compared in SHPB tests, and the time required for stress uniformity is calculated under different above-mentioned loadings. It is confirmed that the stress uniformity can be realized more easily using the half-sine pulse loading compared to the rectangle pulse loading, and this has significant advantages in the dynamic test of rock-like materials. Finally, the Holmquist-Johnson-Concrete constitutive model is introduced to simulate the failure mechanism and failure and fragmentation characteristics of rock under different strain rates. And the numerical results agree with that obtained from the experiment, which confirms the effectiveness of the model and the method.

  9. Testing the Validity of Local Flux Laws in an Experimental Eroding Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, K. E.; Roering, J. J.; Ellis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Linking sediment transport to landscape evolution is fundamental to interpreting climate and tectonic signals from topography and sedimentary deposits. Most geomorphic process laws consist of simple continuum relationships between sediment flux and local topography. However, recent work has shown that nonlocal formulations, whereby sediment flux depends on upslope conditions, are more accurate descriptions of sediment motion, particularly in steep topography. Discriminating between local and nonlocal processes in natural landscapes is complicated by the scarcity of high-resolution topographic data and by the difficulty of measuring sediment flux. To test the validity of local formulations of sediment transport, we use an experimental erosive landscape that combines disturbance-driven, diffusive sediment transport and surface runoff. We conducted our experiments in the eXperimental Landscape Model at St. Anthony Falls Laboratory a 0.5 x 0.5 m test flume filled with crystalline silica (D50 = 30μ) mixed with water to increase cohesion and preclude surface infiltration. Topography is measured with a sheet laser scanner; total sediment flux is tracked with a series of load cells. We simulate uplift (relative baselevel fall) by dropping two parallel weirs at the edges of the experiment. Diffusive sediment transport in our experiments is driven by rainsplash from a constant head drip tank fitted with 625 blunt needles of fixed diameter; sediment is mobilized both through drop impact and the subsequent runoff of the drops. To drive advective transport, we produce surface runoff via a ring of misters that produce droplets that are too small to disturb the sediment surface on impact. Using the results from five experiments that systematically vary the time of drip box rainfall relative to misting rainfall, we calculate local erosion in our experiments by differencing successive time-slices of topography and test whether these patterns are related to local topographic

  10. Experimental Implementation of a Kochen-Specker Set of Quantum Tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vincenzo D’Ambrosio

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The conflict between classical and quantum physics can be identified through a series of yes-no tests on quantum systems, without it being necessary that these systems be in special quantum states. Kochen-Specker (KS sets of yes-no tests have this property and provide a quantum-versus-classical advantage that is free of the initialization problem that affects some quantum computers. Here, we report the first experimental implementation of a complete KS set that consists of 18 yes-no tests on four-dimensional quantum systems and show how to use the KS set to obtain a state-independent quantum advantage. We first demonstrate the unique power of this KS set for solving a task while avoiding the problem of state initialization. Such a demonstration is done by showing that, for 28 different quantum states encoded in the orbital-angular-momentum and polarization degrees of freedom of single photons, the KS set provides an impossible-to-beat solution. In a second experiment, we generate maximally contextual quantum correlations by performing compatible sequential measurements of the polarization and path of single photons. In this case, state independence is demonstrated for 15 different initial states. Maximum contextuality and state independence follow from the fact that the sequences of measurements project any initial quantum state onto one of the KS set’s eigenstates. Our results show that KS sets can be used for quantum-information processing and quantum computation and pave the way for future developments.

  11. Features of the Upgraded Imaging for Hypersonic Experimental Aeroheating Testing (IHEAT) Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Michelle L.; Rufer, Shann J.

    2016-01-01

    The Imaging for Hypersonic Experimental Aeroheating Testing (IHEAT) software is used at the NASA Langley Research Center to analyze global aeroheating data on wind tunnel models tested in the Langley Aerothermodynamics Laboratory. One-dimensional, semi-infinite heating data derived from IHEAT are used in the design of thermal protection systems for hypersonic vehicles that are exposed to severe aeroheating loads, such as reentry vehicles during descent and landing procedures. This software program originally was written in the PV-WAVE(Registered Trademark) programming language to analyze phosphor thermography data from the two-color, relative-intensity system developed at Langley. To increase the efficiency, functionality, and reliability of IHEAT, the program was migrated to MATLAB(Registered Trademark) syntax and compiled as a stand-alone executable file labeled version 4.0. New features of IHEAT 4.0 include the options to perform diagnostic checks of the accuracy of the acquired data during a wind tunnel test, to extract data along a specified multi-segment line following a feature such as a leading edge or a streamline, and to batch process all of the temporal frame data from a wind tunnel run. Results from IHEAT 4.0 were compared on a pixel level to the output images from the legacy software to validate the program. The absolute differences between the heat transfer data output from the two programs were on the order of 10(exp -5) to 10(exp -7). IHEAT 4.0 replaces the PV-WAVE(Registered Trademark) version as the production software for aeroheating experiments conducted in the hypersonic facilities at NASA Langley.

  12. Experimental Investigation of Tensile Test on Connection of Cold-formed Cut-curved Steel Section

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Mohd Syahrul Hisyam Mohd; Muftah, Fadhluhartini; Rahman, Nurul Farraheeda Abdul; Fakri Muda, Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Cold-formed steel (CFS) is widely used as structural and non-structural components such as roof trusses and purlin. A CFS channel section with double intermediate web stiffener and lipped is chosen based on the broader usage in roof truss construction. CFS section is cut to form cold-formed pre-cut-curved steel section and lastly strengthened by several types of method or likely known as connection to establish the cold-formed cut-curved steel (CFCCS) section. CFCCS is proposed to be used as a top chord section in the roof truss system. The CFCCS is to resist the buckling phenomena of the roof truss structure and reduced the compression effect on the top chord. The tensile test connection of CFCCS section, especially at the flange element with eight types of connection by welding, plate with self-drilling screw and combination is investigated. The flange element is the weakest part that must be solved first other than the web element because they are being cut totally, 100% of their length for curving process. The testing is done using a universal testing machine for a tensile load. From the experiment, specimen with full welding has shown as a good result with an ultimate load of 13.37 kN and reported having 35.41% when compared with normal specimen without any of connection methods. Furthermore, the experimental result is distinguished by using Eurocode 3. The failure of a full welding specimen is due to breaking at the welding location. Additionally, all specimens with either full weld or spot weld or combination failed due to breaking on weld connection, but specimen with flange plate and self-drilling screw failed due to tilting and bearing. Finally, the full welding specimen is chosen as a good connection to perform the strengthening method of CFCCS section.

  13. Experimental Test of the “Special State” Theory of Quantum Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence S. Schulman

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available An experimental test of the “special state” theory of quantum measurement is proposed. It should be feasible with present-day laboratory equipment and involves a slightly elaborated Stern–Gerlach setup. The “special state” theory is conservative with respect to quantum mechanics, but radical with respect to statistical mechanics, in particular regarding the arrow of time. In this article background material is given on both quantum measurement and statistical mechanics aspects. For example, it is shown that future boundary conditions would not contradict experience, indicating that the fundamental equal-a-priori-probability assumption at the foundations of statistical mechanics is far too strong (since future conditioning reduces the class of allowed states. The test is based on a feature of this theory that was found necessary in order to recover standard (Born probabilities in quantum measurements. Specifically, certain systems should have “noise” whose amplitude follows the long-tailed Cauchy distribution. This distribution is marked by the occasional occurrence of extremely large signals as well as a non-self-averaging property. The proposed test is a variant of the Stern–Gerlach experiment in which protocols are devised, some of which will require the presence of this noise, some of which will not. The likely observational schemes would involve the distinction between detection and non-detection of that “noise”. The signal to be detected (or not would be either single photons or electric fields (and related excitations in the neighborhood of the ends of the magnets.

  14. Experimental studies in fluid mechanics and materials science using acoustic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinh, E. H.; Robey, J.; Arce, A.; Gaspar, M.

    1987-01-01

    Ground-based and short-duration low gravity experiments have been carried out with the use of ultrasonic levitators to study the dynamics of freely suspended liquid drops under the influence of predominantly capillary and acoustic radiation forces. Some of the effects of the levitating field on the shape as well as the fluid flow fields within the drop have been determined. The development and refinement of measurement techniques using levitated drops with size on the order of 2 mm in diameter have yielded methods having direct application to experiments in microgravity. In addition, containerless melting, undercooling, and freezing of organic materials as well as low melting metals have provided experimental data and observations on the application of acoustic positioning techniques to materials studies.

  15. Gas migration in KBS-3 buffer bentonite. Sensitivity of test parameters to experimental boundary conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harrington, J.F.; Horseman, S.T. [British Geological Survey, Nottingham (United Kingdom)

    2003-01-01

    In the current Swedish repository design concept, hydrogen gas can be generated inside a waste canister by anaerobic corrosion of the ferrous metal liner. If the gas generation rate exceeds the diffusion rate of gas molecules in the buffer porewater, gas will accumulate in the void-space of a canister until its pressure becomes large enough for it to enter the bentonite as a discrete gaseous phase. Three long tenn gas injection tests have been performed on cylinders of pre-compacted MX80 bentonite. Two of these tests were undertaken using a custom-designed constant volume and radial flow (CVRF) apparatus. Gas was injected at a centrally located porous filter installed in the clay before hydration. Arrangements were made for gas to flow to three independently monitored sink-filter arrays mounted around the specimen. Axial and radial total stresses and internal porewater pressures were continuously monitored. Breakthrough and peak gas pressures were substantially larger than the sum of the swelling pressure and the external porewater. The third test was performed. using an apparatus which radially constrains the specimen during gas flow. Observed sensitivity of the breakthrough and peak gas pressures to the test boundary conditions suggests that gas entry must be accompanied by dilation of the bentonite fabric. In other words, there is a tendency for the volume of the specimen to increase during this process. The experimental evidence is consistent with the flow of gas along a relatively small number of crack-like pathways which propagate through the clay as gas pressure increases. Gas entry and breakthrough under constant volume boundary conditions causes a substantial increase in the total stress and the internal porewater pressure. It is possible to determine the point at which gas enters the clay by monitoring changes in these parameters. Localisation of gas flow within multiple pathways results, in nonuniform discharge rates at the sinks. When gas injection

  16. Individual response technology to promote active learning within the caring sciences: An experimental research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedén, Lena; Ahlstrom, Linda

    2016-01-01

    One major challenge in delivering lectures to large and diverse classes is the maintenance of a high standard of lecturing in order to engage students and increase their participation and involvement. The lecturer's assignment is to arrange and prepare the lecture before teaching, hence enabling students' enhanced learning. Individual response technology could encourage students' active learning and activate higher cognitive levels. The aim of this study was to evaluate individual response technology as a complement during lectures for students in higher education, in terms of the students' experiences of participation, engagement, and active learning. Also of interest was whether this technology can be considered a supportive technical system. Data were collected through a questionnaire where levels of each condition were reported on a numeric rating scale (0-10) at baseline and after the introduction of individual response technology. To get a broader perspective, two types of lectures (pediatric and statistical) were included, giving a total of four assessment times. The participants comprised 59 students in Bachelor of Nursing program at a Swedish metropolitan university. Overall, when individual response technology was used, students reported increased experience of engagement (n=82, mean 6.1 vs. n=65, mean 7.3, pactive learning (n=92, mean 7.3 vs. n=79, mean 8.2 plearning within the caring sciences. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. The inquiry continuum: Science teaching practices and student performance on standardized tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jernnigan, Laura Jane

    Few research studies have been conducted related to inquiry-based scientific teaching methodologies and NCLB-required state testing. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between the strategies used by seventh-grade science teachers in Illinois and student scores on the Illinois Standards Achievement Test (ISAT) to aid in determining best practices/strategies for teaching middle school science. The literature review defines scientific inquiry by placing teaching strategies on a continuum of scientific inquiry methodologies from No Inquiry (Direct Instruction) through Authentic Inquiry. Five major divisions of scientific inquiry: structured inquiry, guided inquiry, learning cycle inquiry, open inquiry, and authentic inquiry, have been identified and described. These five divisions contain eight sub-categories: demonstrations; simple or hands-on activities; discovery learning; variations of learning cycles; problem-based, event-based, and project-based; and student inquiry, science partnerships, and Schwab's enquiry. Quantitative data were collected from pre- and posttests and surveys given to the participants: five seventh grade science teachers in four Academic Excellence Award and Spotlight Award schools and their 531 students. Findings revealed that teachers reported higher inquiry scores for themselves than for their students; the two greatest reported factors limiting teachers' use of inquiry were not enough time and concern about discipline and large class size. Although the correlation between total inquiry and mean difference of pre- and posttest scores was not statistically significant, the survey instrument indicated how often teachers used inquiry in their classes, not the type of inquiry used. Implications arose from the findings that increase the methodology debate between direction instruction and inquiry-based teaching strategies; teachers are very knowledgeable about the Illinois state standards, and various inquiry-based methods

  18. On sky testing of the SOFIA telescope in preparation for the first science observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harms, Franziska; Wolf, Jürgen; Waddell, Patrick; Dunham, Edward; Reinacher, Andreas; Lampater, Ulrich; Jakob, Holger; Bjarke, Lisa; Adams, Sybil; Grashuis, Randy; Meyer, Allan; Bower, Kenneth; Schweikhard, Keith; Keilig, Thomas

    2009-08-01

    SOFIA, the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy, is an airborne observatory that will study the universe in the infrared spectrum. A Boeing 747-SP aircraft will carry a 2.5 m telescope designed to make sensitive infrared measurements of a wide range of astronomical objects. In 2008, SOFIA's primary mirror was demounted and coated for the first time. After reintegration into the telescope assembly in the aircraft, the alignment of the telescope optics was repeated and successive functional and performance testing of the fully integrated telescope assembly was completed on the ground. The High-speed Imaging Photometer for Occultations (HIPO) was used as a test instrument for aligning the optics and calibrating and tuning the telescope's pointing and control system in preparation for the first science observations in flight. In this paper, we describe the mirror coating process, the subsequent telescope testing campaigns and present the results.

  19. A campaign to end animal testing: introducing the PETA International Science Consortium Ltd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddart, Gilly; Brown, Jeffrey

    2014-12-01

    The successful development and validation of non-animal techniques, or the analysis of existing data to satisfy regulatory requirements, provide no guarantee that this information will be used in place of animal experiments. In order to advocate for the replacement of animal-based testing requirements, the PETA International Science Consortium Ltd (PISC) liaises with industry, regulatory and research agencies to establish and promote clear paths to validation and regulatory use of non-animal techniques. PISC and its members use an approach that identifies, promotes and verifies the implementation of good scientific practices in place of testing on animals. Examples of how PISC and its members have applied this approach to minimise the use of animals for the Registration, Evaluation, Authorisation and Restriction of Chemicals regulation in the EU and testing of cosmetics on animals in India, are described. 2014 FRAME.

  20. Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex II: Neutron Scattering Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenji Nakajima

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The neutron instruments suite, installed at the spallation neutron source of the Materials and Life Science Experimental Facility (MLF at the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC, is reviewed. MLF has 23 neutron beam ports and 21 instruments are in operation for user programs or are under commissioning. A unique and challenging instrumental suite in MLF has been realized via combination of a high-performance neutron source, optimized for neutron scattering, and unique instruments using cutting-edge technologies. All instruments are/will serve in world-leading investigations in a broad range of fields, from fundamental physics to industrial applications. In this review, overviews, characteristic features, and typical applications of the individual instruments are mentioned.

  1. Towards Test Driven Development for Computational Science with pFUnit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rilee, Michael L.; Clune, Thomas L.

    2014-01-01

    Developers working in Computational Science & Engineering (CSE)/High Performance Computing (HPC) must contend with constant change due to advances in computing technology and science. Test Driven Development (TDD) is a methodology that mitigates software development risks due to change at the cost of adding comprehensive and continuous testing to the development process. Testing frameworks tailored for CSE/HPC, like pFUnit, can lower the barriers to such testing, yet CSE software faces unique constraints foreign to the broader software engineering community. Effective testing of numerical software requires a comprehensive suite of oracles, i.e., use cases with known answers, as well as robust estimates for the unavoidable numerical errors associated with implementation with finite-precision arithmetic. At first glance these concerns often seem exceedingly challenging or even insurmountable for real-world scientific applications. However, we argue that this common perception is incorrect and driven by (1) a conflation between model validation and software verification and (2) the general tendency in the scientific community to develop relatively coarse-grained, large procedures that compound numerous algorithmic steps.We believe TDD can be applied routinely to numerical software if developers pursue fine-grained implementations that permit testing, neatly side-stepping concerns about needing nontrivial oracles as well as the accumulation of errors. We present an example of a successful, complex legacy CSE/HPC code whose development process shares some aspects with TDD, which we contrast with current and potential capabilities. A mix of our proposed methodology and framework support should enable everyday use of TDD by CSE-expert developers.

  2. Foot-and-Mouth Disease in Red Deer - Experimental Infection and Test Methods Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelberger, R; Nfon, C; Swekla, K; Zhang, Z; Hole, K; Bittner, H; Salo, T; Goolia, M; Embury-Hyatt, C; Bueno, R; Hannah, M; Swainsbury, R; O'Sullivan, C; Spence, R; Clough, R; McFadden, A; Rawdon, T; Alexandersen, S

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate a number of foot-and-mouth disease (FMD) test methods for use in red deer. Ten animals were intranasally inoculated with the FMD virus (FMDV) O UKG 11/2001, monitored for clinical signs, and samples taken regularly (blood, serum, oral swabs, nasal swabs, probang samples and lesion swabs, if present) over a 4-week period. Only one animal, deer 1103, developed clinical signs (lesions under the tongue and at the coronary band of the right hind hoof). It tested positive by 3D and IRES real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) in various swabs, lesion materials and serum. In a non-structural protein (NSP) in-house ELISA (NSP-ELISA-IH), one commercial ELISA (NSP-ELISA-PR) and a commercial antibody NSP pen side test, only deer 1103 showed positive results from day post-inoculation (dpi) 14 onwards. Two other NSP-ELISAs detected anti-NSP serum antibodies with lower sensitivity. It also showed rising antibody levels in the virus neutralization test (VNT), the in-house SPO-ELISA-IH and the commercial SPO-ELISA-PR at dpi 9, and in another two commercial SPO-ELISAs at dpi 12 (SPO-ELISA-IV) and dpi 19 (SPO-ELISA-IZ), respectively. Six of the red deer that had been rRT-PCR and antibody negative were re-inoculated intramuscularly with the same O-serotype FMDV at dpi 14. None of these animals became rRT-PCR or NSP-ELISA positive, but all six animals became positive in the VNT, the in-house SPO-ELISA-IH and the commercial SPO-ELISA-PR. Two other commercial SPO-ELISAs were less sensitive or failed to detect animals as positive. The rRT-PCRs and the four most sensitive commercial ELISAs that had been used for the experimentally inoculated deer were further evaluated for diagnostic specificity (DSP) using 950 serum samples and 200 nasal swabs from non-infected animals. DSPs were 100% for the rRT-PCRs and between 99.8 and 100% for the ELISAs. © 2015 The Authors. Transboundary and Emerging Diseases Published by Blackwell

  3. Concept, Implementation and Testing of PRESTo: Real-time experimentation in Southern Italy and worldwide applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zollo, Aldo; Emolo, Antonio; Festa, Gaetano; Picozzi, Matteo; Elia, Luca; Martino, Claudio; Colombelli, Simona; Brondi, Piero; Caruso, Alessandro

    2016-04-01

    The past two decades have witnessed a huge progress in the development, implementation and testing of Earthquakes Early Warning Systems (EEWS) worldwide, as the result of a joint effort of the seismological and earthquake engineering communities to set up robust and efficient methodologies for the real-time seismic risk mitigation. This work presents an overview of the worldwide applications of the system PRESTo (PRobabilistic and Evolutionary early warning SysTem), which is the highly configurable and easily portable platform for Earthquake Early Warning developed by the RISSCLab group of the University of Naples Federico II. In particular, we first present the results of the real-time experimentation of PRESTo in Suthern Italy on the data streams of the Irpinia Seismic Network (ISNet), in Southern Italy. ISNet is a dense high-dynamic range, earthquake observing system, which operates in true real-time mode, thanks to a mixed data transmission system based on proprietary digital terrestrial links, standard ADSL and UMTS technologies. Using the seedlink protocol data are transferred to the network center unit, running the software platform PRESTo which is devoted to process the real-time data streaming, estimate source parameters and issue the alert. The software platform PRESTo uses a P-wave, network-based approach which has evolved and improved during the time since its first release. In its original version consisted in a series of modules, aimed at the event detection/picking, probabilistic real-time earthquake location and magnitude estimation, prediction of peak ground motion at distant sites through ground motion prediction equations for the area. In the recent years, PRESTo has been also implemented at the accelerometric and broad-band seismic networks in South Korea, Romania, North-East Italy, and Turkey and off-line tested in Iberian Peninsula, Israel, and Japan. Moreover, the feasibility of a PRESTo-based, EEWS at national scale in Italy, has been tested

  4. Inquiry-based laboratory investigations and student performance on standardized tests in biological science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patke, Usha

    Achievement data from the 3rd International Mathematics and Sciences Study and Program for International Student Assessment in science have indicated that Black students from economically disadvantaged families underachieve at alarming rates in comparison to White and economically advantaged peer groups. The study site was a predominately Black, urban school district experiencing underachievement. The purpose of this correlational study was to examine the relationship between students' use of inquiry-based laboratory investigations and their performance on the Biology End of Course Test, as well as to examine the relationship while partialling out the effects of student gender. Constructivist theory formed the theoretical foundation of the study. Students' perceived levels of experience with inquiry-based laboratory investigations were measured using the Laboratory Program Variable Inventory (LPVI) survey. LPVI scores of 256 students were correlated with test scores and were examined by student gender. The Pearson correlation coefficient revealed a small direct correlation between students' experience in inquiry-based laboratory investigation classes and standardized test scores on the Biology EOCT. A partial correlational analysis indicated that the correlation remained after controlling for gender. This study may prompt a change from teacher-centered to student-centered pedagogy at the local site in order to increase academic achievement for all students. The results of this study may also influence administrators and policy makers to initiate local, state, or nationwide curricular development. A change in curriculum may promote social change as students become more competent, and more able, to succeed in life beyond secondary school.

  5. An Overview of Integration and Test of the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drury, Michael; Becker, Neil; Bos, Brent; Davila, Pamela; Frey, Bradley; Hylan, Jason; Marsh, James; McGuffey, Douglas; Novak, Maria; Ohl, Raymond; hide

    2007-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.6m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic IR space astronomy (approx.40K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SI) including a Guider. The SIs and Guider are mounted to a composite metering structure with outer dimensions of 2.1x2.2x1.9m. The SI and Guider units are integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center as an instrument suite using a high-fidelity, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator that features a 1.5m diameter powered mirror. The SIs are integrated and aligned to the structure under ambient, clean room conditions. SI performance, including focus, pupil shear and wavefront error, is evaluated at the operating temperature. We present an overview of the ISIM integration within the context of Observatory-level construction. We describe the integration and verification plan for the ISIM element, including an overview of our incremental verification approach, ambient mechanical integration and test plans and optical alignment and cryogenic test plans. We describe key ground support equipment and facilities.

  6. An experimental study of chest compression during chiropractic manipulation of the thoracic spine using an anthropomorphic test device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemper, Brian D; Hallman, Jason J; Peterson, Boyd M

    2011-06-01

    Chiropractic manipulation of the thoracic spine may induce chest deformations in the anterior-posterior direction. Yet, few studies have examined the biomechanical response of the chest associated with these manipulations. Consequently, an experimental analysis was undertaken to quantify chest compressions resulting from chiropractic thoracic spine manipulations and to estimate amount of risk for injury. A 2-part study approach was used with a Hybrid III anthropomorphic test dummy. In part 1, the dummy was positioned prone on a chiropractic table and subjected to thoracic spine manipulation by 2 experienced doctors of chiropractic. Chest compressions were quantified in the anterior-posterior direction. Manipulation forces were self-selected, with "typical" and "maximum" efforts examined. In part 2, the dummy was positioned beneath a force-instrumented mechanical piston device. Using the piston, chest compressions were induced with magnitudes identical to those recorded during chiropractic manipulation as well as magnitudes sufficient to induce injury. In all trials, force measurements were recorded. Thoracic manipulations incorporating the typical and maximum efforts by the chiropractors resulted in maximum chest compressions attaining 1.8% and 4.5% of total chest depth, respectively. According to previously developed correlations between chest compression and injury severity defined using the Abbreviated Injury Scale (AIS), maximum chest compression measured during this study was only 22.7% of the compression required for greater than 10% risk of an AIS 1 injury. Abbreviated Injury Scale 1 level injuries are graded as minor severity and correspond to sternum contusion or fracture of a single rib. Results from this preliminary study showed that maximum chest compression during thoracic spine manipulation corresponded to minimal risk of AIS 1 level injuries. Copyright © 2011 National University of Health Sciences. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. CFD simulation and experimental analysis of erosion in a slurry tank test rig

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Hans-Jörg

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Erosion occurring in equipment dealing with liquid-solid mixtures such as pipeline parts, slurry pumps, liquid-solid stirred reactors and slurry mixers in various industrial applications results in operational failure and economic costs. A slurry erosion tank test rig is designed and was built to investigate the erosion rates of materials and the influencing parameters such as flow velocity and turbulence, flow angle, solid particle concentration, particles size distribution, hardness and target material properties on the material loss and erosion profiles. In the present study, a computational fluid dynamics (CFD tool is used to simulate the erosion rate of sample plates in the liquid-solid slurry mixture in a cylindrical tank. The predictions were made in a steady state and also transient manner, applying the flow at the room temperature and using water and sand as liquid and solid phases, respectively. The multiple reference frame method (MRF is applied to simulate the flow behavior and liquid-solid interactions in the slurry tank test rig. The MRF method is used since it is less demanding than sliding mesh method (SM and gives satisfactory results. The computational domain is divided into three regions: a rotational or MRF zone containing the mixer, a rotational zone (MRF containing the erosion plates and a static zone (outer liquid zone. It is observed that changing the MRF zone diameter and height causes a very low impact on the results. The simulated results were obtained for two kinds of hard metals namely stainless steel and ST-50 under some various operating conditions and are found in good agreement with the experimental results.

  8. A critical experimental test of synchrotron radiation theory with 3rd generation light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geloni, Gianluca [European XFEL GmbH, Hamburg (Germany); Kocharyan, Vitali; Saldin, Evgeni [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany)

    2016-05-15

    A recent ''beam splitting'' experiment at LCLS apparently demonstrated that after a microbunched electron beam is kicked on a large angle compared to the divergence of the FEL radiation, the microbunching wave front is readjusted along the new direction of motion of the kicked beam. Therefore, coherent radiation from an undulator placed after the kicker is emitted along the kicked direction without suppression. This strong emission of coherent undulator radiation in the kicked direction cannot be explained in the framework of conventional synchrotron radiation theory. In a previous paper we explained this puzzle. We demonstrated that, in accelerator physics, the coupling of fields and particles is based, on the one hand, on the use of results from particle dynamics treated according to the absolute time convention and, on the other hand, on the use of Maxwell equations treated according to the standard (Einstein) synchronization convention. Here lies the misconception which led to the strong qualitative disagreement between theory and experiment. After the ''beam splitting'' experiment at LCLS, it became clear that the conventional theory of synchrotron radiation cannot ensure the correct description of coherent and spontaneous emission from a kicked electron beam, nor the emission from a beam with finite angular divergence, in an undulator or a bending magnet. However, this result requires further experimental confirmation. In this publication we propose an uncomplicated and inexpensive experiment to test synchrotron radiation theory at 3rd generation light sources.

  9. Experimental testing of hot mix asphalt mixture made of recycled aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafi, Muhammad Masood; Qadir, Adnan; Siddiqui, Salman Hameed

    2011-12-01

    The migration of population towards big cities generates rapid construction activities. These activities not only put pressure on natural resources but also produce construction, renovation and demolition waste. There is an urgent need to find out ways to handle this waste owing to growing environmental concerns. This can reduce pressure on natural resources as well. This paper presents the results of experimental studies which were carried out on hot mix asphalt mixture samples. These samples were manufactured by adding recycled aggregates (RA) with natural crushed stone aggregates (CSA). Three levels of addition of RA were considered in the presented studies. RA were obtained from both the concrete waste of construction, renovation and demolition activities and reclaimed asphalt pavement. Separate samples were manufactured with the coarse and fine aggregate fractions of both types of RA. Samples made with CSA were used as control specimens. The samples were prepared and tested using the Marshall method. The performance of the samples was investigated in terms of density-void and stability/flow analysis and was compared with the performance criteria as given by National Highway Authority for wearing course material in Pakistan. Based on this data optimum asphalt contents were determined. All the samples made by adding up to 50% RA conform to the specification requirements of wearing course material as given by National Highway Authority in terms of optimum asphalt contents, voids in mineral aggregates and stability/flow. A statistical analysis of variation of these samples confirmed that addition is also possible statistically.

  10. Preliminary experimental results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinches on primary test stand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xian-Bin; Zhou, Shao-Tong; Dan, Jia-Kun; Ren, Xiao-Dong; Wang, Kun-Lun; Zhang, Si-Qun; Li, Jing; Xu, Qiang; Cai, Hong-Chun; Duan, Shu-Chao; Ouyang, Kai; Chen, Guang-Hua; Ji, Ce; Wei, Bing; Feng, Shu-Ping; Wang, Meng; Xie, Wei-Ping; Deng, Jian-Jun; Zhou, Xiu-Wen; Yang, Yi

    2015-07-01

    The Primary Test Stand (PTS) developed at the China Academy of Engineering Physics is a 20 TW pulsed power driver, which can deliver a ˜10 MA, 70 ns rise-time (10%-90%) current to a short-circuit load and has important applications in Z-pinch driven inertial confinement fusion and high energy density physics. Preliminary results of tungsten wire-array Z-pinch experiments on PTS are presented. The load geometries investigated include 15-mm-tall cylindrical single and nested arrays with diameter ranging from 13 mm to 30 mm, consisting of 132-300 tungsten wires with 5-10 μm in diameter. Multiple diagnostics were fielded to characterize the x-ray radiation from wire-array Z pinches. The x-ray peak power (˜50 TW) and total radiated energy (˜500 kJ) were obtained from a single 20-mm-diam array with 80-ns stagnation time. The highest x-ray peak power up to 80 TW with 2.4 ns FWHM was achieved by using a nested array with 20-mm outer diameter, and the total x-ray energy from the nested array is comparable to that of single array. Implosion velocity estimated from the time-resolved image measurement exceeds 30 cm/μs. The detailed experimental results and other findings are presented and discussed.

  11. Evaluating ecosystem services provided by non-native species: an experimental test in California grasslands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Claudia; Hallett, Lauren M; Harpole, W Stanley; Suding, Katharine N

    2014-01-01

    The concept of ecosystem services--the benefits that nature provides to human's society--has gained increasing attention over the past decade. Increasing global abiotic and biotic change, including species invasions, is threatening the secure delivery of these ecosystem services. Efficient evaluation methods of ecosystem services are urgently needed to improve our ability to determine management strategies and restoration goals in face of these new emerging ecosystems. Considering a range of multiple ecosystem functions may be a useful way to determine such strategies. We tested this framework experimentally in California grasslands, where large shifts in species composition have occurred since the late 1700's. We compared a suite of ecosystem functions within one historic native and two non-native species assemblages under different grazing intensities to address how different species assemblages vary in provisioning, regulatory and supporting ecosystem services. Forage production was reduced in one non-native assemblage (medusahead). Cultural ecosystem services, such as native species diversity, were inherently lower in both non-native assemblages, whereas most other services were maintained across grazing intensities. All systems provided similar ecosystem services under the highest grazing intensity treatment, which simulated unsustainable grazing intensity. We suggest that applying a more comprehensive ecosystem framework that considers multiple ecosystem services to evaluate new emerging ecosystems is a valuable tool to determine management goals and how to intervene in a changing ecosystem.

  12. Methodology for the calculation of response factors through experimental tests and validation with simulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, K.; Flores, I.; Escudero, C.; Apaolaza, A. [Construction Quality Control Laboratory of the Basque Goverment, C/Aguirrelanda no 10, 01013 Vitoria-Gasteiz (Spain); Sala, J.M. [Thermal Engineering Department, Basque Country University (UPV/EHU), Alameda Urquijo s/n, 48013 Bilbao (Spain)

    2010-04-15

    One of the most simple and intuitive methods employed to characterise a building solution in transient regime is based on the use of response factors. Its acquisition by calculation is an appropriate approach when the thermo-physical properties of the materials are known. However, in a great number of building products these data are not available and thus large errors in the calculation may be incurred, which cannot be quantified. In this work, a dynamic testing method is presented inside a guarded hot-box unit, where the response factors of a wall can be obtained without requiring the corresponding material properties. This method has been validated by means of a finite volumes simulation code for a wall which thermal characteristics are perfectly defined. Although the errors committed when adding the response factors and comparing them with the transmittance values are higher in the experiment than in the numerical analysis, there is a good agreement between the heat flows obtained experimentally and with the simulation. (author)

  13. Development and testing of a double length pets for the CLIC experimental area

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez, L; Gavela, D; Lara, A; Rodríguez, E; Gutiérrez, J L; Calero, J; Toral, F; Samoshkin, A; Gudkov, D; Riddone, G

    2014-01-01

    CLIC (compact linear collider) is a future e þ e collider based on normal-conducting technology, currently under study at CERN. Its design is based on a novel two-beam acceleration scheme. The main beam gets RF power extracted from a drive beam through power extraction and transfer structures (PETS). The technical feasibility of CLIC is currently being proved by its Third Test Facility (CTF3) which includes the CLIC experimental area (CLEX). Two Double Length CLIC PETS will be installed in CLEX to validate their performance with beam. This paper is focused on the engineering design, fabrication and validation of this PETS fi rst prototype. The design consists of eight identical bars, separated by radial slots in which damping material is located to absorb transverse wake fi elds, and two compact couplers placed at both ends of the bars to extract the generated power. The PETS bars are housed inside a vacuum tank designed to make the PETS as compact as possible. Several joint techniques such as vacuum brazing...

  14. The Load Capacity Model and Experimental Tests of a New Yielding Steel Prop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanlong Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available As the mining depth increases year by year, the deformation and failure of deep roadway become more and more serious, and new support equipment with high supporting force and yieldable character is quite necessary for mining safety. In this research, a new yielding steel prop with high stable load capacity was introduced, which features sustaining large deformation in the field. Based on principle stress method and elastic-plastic theory, a mathematical model of load capacity was proposed for the new prop. The results show that the stable load capacity of the prop increases linearly with the increase of the effective number of the steel balls. Meanwhile, the stable load capacity of the prop increases initially and decreases afterwards with the increase of the radius of the steel ball. Under the fixed radius of the steel ball, the stable load capacity will increase with the decrease of the gap between the inner tube and the outer tube. The stable load capacity of the prop calculated using the theoretical model quantitatively agrees with that of the experimental tests, with only an error within 5%.

  15. Evaluating ecosystem services provided by non-native species: an experimental test in California grasslands.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Stein

    Full Text Available The concept of ecosystem services--the benefits that nature provides to human's society--has gained increasing attention over the past decade. Increasing global abiotic and biotic change, including species invasions, is threatening the secure delivery of these ecosystem services. Efficient evaluation methods of ecosystem services are urgently needed to improve our ability to determine management strategies and restoration goals in face of these new emerging ecosystems. Considering a range of multiple ecosystem functions may be a useful way to determine such strategies. We tested this framework experimentally in California grasslands, where large shifts in species composition have occurred since the late 1700's. We compared a suite of ecosystem functions within one historic native and two non-native species assemblages under different grazing intensities to address how different species assemblages vary in provisioning, regulatory and supporting ecosystem services. Forage production was reduced in one non-native assemblage (medusahead. Cultural ecosystem services, such as native species diversity, were inherently lower in both non-native assemblages, whereas most other services were maintained across grazing intensities. All systems provided similar ecosystem services under the highest grazing intensity treatment, which simulated unsustainable grazing intensity. We suggest that applying a more comprehensive ecosystem framework that considers multiple ecosystem services to evaluate new emerging ecosystems is a valuable tool to determine management goals and how to intervene in a changing ecosystem.

  16. A Stability Formula for Plastic-Tipped Bullets Part 2: Experimental Testing

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Michael W

    2014-01-01

    Part 1 of this paper describes a modification of the original Miller twist rule for computing gyroscopic bullet stability that is better suited to plastic-tipped bullets. The original Miller twist rule assumes a bullet of constant density, but it also works well for conventional copper (or gilding metal) jacketed lead bullets because the density of copper and lead are sufficiently close. However, the original Miller twist rule significantly underestimates the gyroscopic stability of plastic-tipped bullets, because the density of plastic is much lower than the density of copper and lead. Here, a new amended formula is developed for the gyroscopic stability of plastic-tipped bullets by substituting the length of just the metal portion for the total length in the (1 + L2) term of the original Miller twist rule. Part 2 describes experimental testing of this new formula on three plastic-tipped bullets. The new formula is relatively accurate for plastic-tipped bullets whose metal portion has nearly uniform density,...

  17. An Experimental Test of Women's Body Dissatisfaction Reduction through Self-Affirmation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bucchianeri, Michaela M; Corning, Alexandra F

    2012-07-01

    Body dissatisfaction (BD)--a health concern in its own right-often is positioned early in the causal chain toward eating pathology, and is a practical point of intervention for those aiming to reduce its negative health consequences. One approach to reducing people's resistance to receipt of other unwanted health information (e.g. about smoking) has been through the application of self-affirmation theory. This theory asserts that the self needs to maintain its integrity and, as such, when incoming information is threatening, one's defensive shields are activated and it is deflected. One way to reduce defensiveness, however, is to bolster some other aspect of the self. We applied a one-shot, self-affirmation-based manipulation via a randomised controlled design (N=86) to a group of body-dissatisfied college women and compared its effects to a control group. All hypotheses predicted by self-affirmation theory were supported: Women who were self-affirmed exhibited (a) greater openness to threatening information about the dangers of BD, (b) lower BD, and (c) greater intention to reduce criticism of their bodies. The present study provided an experimental test of a mechanism of action which might prove useful in a comprehensive intervention program. © 2012 The Authors. Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being © 2012 The International Association of Applied Psychology.

  18. Investigation of the existence of self compacting properties in high performance concrete through experimental tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heitor H. Yoshida

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available The self compacting concrete is characterized by its capacity to flow inside the formwork filling it exclusively by the force of the gravity with adequate cohesion and viscosity in such a way that segregation does not occur. One of its characteristic is the presence of fines which provide the necessary cohesion,and grains with maximum diameter of 20 mm. This work presents some procedures and experimental methods that make it possible to evaluate self compacting properties of high performance concrete. First, a bibliographical review on the subject was carried out, and later, the equipment used for the accomplishment of the assays were manufactured, in order to verify the properties related to the self compacting concrete: cohesion, viscosity and segregation. As for the work, two concretes were produced with Portland ARI Cement, thick sand, stone powder, sand 0, superplasticizer made of ether-carboxilate chains that differentiate from each other for the presence of active silica in one of them and fly ash in the other. Based on the results, it was verified whether the high performance concrete had self compacting characteristics. In this case, both were considered positive. It was also analyzed the behavior of these concretes in their hardened state by means of the compressive strength test. The Self Compacting Concrete has many advantages such as: reduction in the number of employees, shorter construction period, the non-use of the vibrator and the filling of formworks with high density of… or of complex geometry.

  19. Computer-mediated communication and interpersonal attraction: an experimental test of two explanatory hypotheses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antheunis, Marjolijn L; Valkenburg, Patti M; Peter, Jochen

    2007-12-01

    The aims of this study were (a) to investigate the influence of computer-mediated communication (CMC) on interpersonal attraction and (b) to examine two underlying processes in the CMC-interpersonal attraction relationship. We identified two variables that may mediate the influence of CMC on interpersonal attraction: self-disclosure and direct questioning. Focusing on these potential mediating variables, we tested two explanatory hypotheses: the CMC-induced direct questioning hypothesis and the CMC-induced self-disclosure hypothesis. Eighty-one cross-sex dyads were randomly assigned to one of three experimental conditions: text-only CMC, visual CMC, and face-to-face communication. We did not find a direct effect of CMC on interpersonal attraction. However, we did find two positive indirect effects of text-only CMC on interpersonal attraction: text-only CMC stimulated both self-disclosure and direct questioning, both of which in turn enhanced interpersonal attraction. Results are discussed in light of uncertainty reduction theory and CMC theories.

  20. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, Ruben P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bellah, Wendy [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-03-04

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  1. LLNL Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Potable Water System Operations Plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ocampo, R. P. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Bellah, W. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2015-09-14

    The existing Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site 300 drinking water system operation schematic is shown in Figures 1 and 2 below. The sources of water are from two Site 300 wells (Well #18 and Well #20) and San Francisco Public Utilities Commission (SFPUC) Hetch-Hetchy water through the Thomas shaft pumping station. Currently, Well #20 with 300 gallons per minute (gpm) pump capacity is the primary source of well water used during the months of September through July, while Well #18 with 225 gpm pump capacity is the source of well water for the month of August. The well water is chlorinated using sodium hypochlorite to provide required residual chlorine throughout Site 300. Well water chlorination is covered in the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Experimental Test Site (Site 300) Chlorination Plan (“the Chlorination Plan”; LLNL-TR-642903; current version dated August 2013). The third source of water is the SFPUC Hetch-Hetchy Water System through the Thomas shaft facility with a 150 gpm pump capacity. At the Thomas shaft station the pumped water is treated through SFPUC-owned and operated ultraviolet (UV) reactor disinfection units on its way to Site 300. The Thomas Shaft Hetch- Hetchy water line is connected to the Site 300 water system through the line common to Well pumps #18 and #20 at valve box #1.

  2. The testing of Sanocrysin: science, profit, and innovation in clinical trial design, 1926-31.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabriel, Joseph M

    2014-10-01

    This article provides a detailed analysis of the origins and significance of the 1926 clinical trial of Sanocrysin, a gold compound thought at the time to be useful in the treatment of tuberculosis. This experiment is generally considered to be the first clinical trial in the United States that used a formal system of randomization to divide research subjects into treatment and nontreatment groups; it was probably also the first clinical trial in the United States to use placebo shams in a nontreatment control group to overcome the problem of what researchers at the time called "psychic influence." As such, it was an extremely important moment in the history of clinical trial design. Yet, as I argue, the Sanocrysin experiment also needs to be understood in terms of both the regulatory environment at the time and the commercial interests of Parke, Davis & Company, the pharmaceutical manufacturer that was intent on introducing the drug. Although some historians argue that therapeutic reformers in the twentieth century used experimental science to rein in the commercial forces of the market, this article suggests that, at least in this case, the promotion of rigorous clinical science and the pursuit of corporate profit were deeply intertwined. © The Author 2013. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. The development and validation of a test of science critical thinking for fifth graders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mapeala, Ruslan; Siew, Nyet Moi

    2015-01-01

    The paper described the development and validation of the Test of Science Critical Thinking (TSCT) to measure the three critical thinking skill constructs: comparing and contrasting, sequencing, and identifying cause and effect. The initial TSCT consisted of 55 multiple choice test items, each of which required participants to select a correct response and a correct choice of critical thinking used for their response. Data were obtained from a purposive sampling of 30 fifth graders in a pilot study carried out in a primary school in Sabah, Malaysia. Students underwent the sessions of teaching and learning activities for 9 weeks using the Thinking Maps-aided Problem-Based Learning Module before they answered the TSCT test. Analyses were conducted to check on difficulty index (p) and discrimination index (d), internal consistency reliability, content validity, and face validity. Analysis of the test-retest reliability data was conducted separately for a group of fifth graders with similar ability. Findings of the pilot study showed that out of initial 55 administered items, only 30 items with relatively good difficulty index (p) ranged from 0.40 to 0.60 and with good discrimination index (d) ranged within 0.20-1.00 were selected. The Kuder-Richardson reliability value was found to be appropriate and relatively high with 0.70, 0.73 and 0.92 for identifying cause and effect, sequencing, and comparing and contrasting respectively. The content validity index obtained from three expert judgments equalled or exceeded 0.95. In addition, test-retest reliability showed good, statistically significant correlations ([Formula: see text]). From the above results, the selected 30-item TSCT was found to have sufficient reliability and validity and would therefore represent a useful tool for measuring critical thinking ability among fifth graders in primary science.

  4. Perceptions of teaching African American students who succeed during science testing: A hermeneutic phenomenological study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Tevis Tramaine

    The purpose of this hermeneutic phenomenological research was to explore the perceptions of teachers as they instruct African American students who are successful on the North Carolina End-of-Grade Science test. The study identified thoughts, feelings, emotions, and challenges that teachers faced when instructing successful African American students from Title I schools in rural community classrooms. The research study analysis utilized NVivo10RTM software and identified common themes in the data. Five themes emerged from interviews with five fifth- and eighth-grade science teachers. Based on the teachers' perceptions, the findings revealed: (a) teachers experience an emotional journey in high poverty schools; (b) investments encompass sacrificing whatever is needed to help students become successful; (c) relationships should be developed between the teacher and student; (d) intentionality is a part of teachers' daily interaction with students; and (e) teachers encounter a challenging opportunity instructing African American students in science. This study provides valuable data in understanding the experiences of teachers as they instruct successful African American students and the challenges, obstacles, and triumphs teachers face when working with this population of students. The implications of the study suggest that educational leaders provide emotional support to help teachers manage the plethora of emotions experienced on a daily basis. Future study of successful teachers of African American students may further inform the dearth of literature surrounding the experience of successful teachers of minority students.

  5. Subduction indices in Calabro-Sicilian arc : Training for Experimental Skills Testing and collaborative work for students in scientific terminal class in high school.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gendron, Faustine; Bollori, Lucas; Villeneuve, Felix

    2017-04-01

    In France, at the end of the last year in high school, students of the scientific terminal class have written exams in all subjects they are studying, and in "Life and Earth's Sciences", they also have an Experimental Skills Testing in order to rate them in scientific approach. This one-hour evaluation is made of four steps: - During the first evaluation, students have to show that they are able to propose a scientific strategy connected to a scientific problem. - During the second evaluation, they have to experiment. - During the third evaluation, they have to introduce their results. - During the last evaluation, they have to deduce and conclude. The final testing take place at the end of May, but during all the school year, teachers have to train their students, and it's impossible to make them work on real subjects. Therefore, it's necessary to produce new subjects every year. Linked to a fall school in Sicily last October, my colleagues and I have decided to create a new Experimental Skills Test to use new examples and illustrate subduction in the Mediterranean Sea with Aeolian Islands. We would like to make our pupils understand what the Aeolian volcanism is due to, by using information, equipment and software, etc. we have in our classrooms in our high school. Since we have found several ways for our students to prove that the Aeolian Islands are linked to a subduction zone, we have decided, following our research, to divide the new experimental skills testing in three different tests, in order to make students train on most of the equipment and then to share their results to produce a collaborative final work.

  6. Experimental Tests of Parameters Characterizing the Cooperation of Powered Roof Support Base and Floor of Low Bearing Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markowicz, Józef; Rajwa, Sylwester; Szweda, Stanisław

    2016-12-01

    Results of experimental tests aiming at determination of base pressure on the floor, carried out within "Geosoft" project, are presented. The tests included stand tests carried out with use of unique measuring instrumentation and special hydraulic cushion as well as tests of load of roof support set to load in operating longwall panel. The measurement results confirmed the necessity to consider the 3D model of cooperation of base and floor. Factors having impact on distribution of base pressure on the floor and its maximal value were identified, taking into account the test results.

  7. Relevance of Item Analysis in Standardizing an Achievement Test in Teaching of Physical Science in B.Ed Syllabus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, S. Maria Josephine Arokia; Edannur, Sreekala

    2015-01-01

    This paper focused on the analysis of test items constructed in the paper of teaching Physical Science for B.Ed. class. It involved the analysis of difficulty level and discrimination power of each test item. Item analysis allows selecting or omitting items from the test, but more importantly item analysis is a tool to help the item writer improve…

  8. Validation of science virtual test to assess 8th grade students' critical thinking on living things and environmental sustainability theme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusyati, Lilit; Firman, Harry

    2017-05-01

    This research was motivated by the importance of multiple-choice questions that indicate the elements and sub-elements of critical thinking and implementation of computer-based test. The method used in this research was descriptive research for profiling the validation of science virtual test to measure students' critical thinking in junior high school. The participant is junior high school students of 8th grade (14 years old) while science teacher and expert as the validators. The instrument that used as a tool to capture the necessary data are sheet of an expert judgment, sheet of legibility test, and science virtual test package in multiple choice form with four possible answers. There are four steps to validate science virtual test to measure students' critical thinking on the theme of "Living Things and Environmental Sustainability" in 7th grade Junior High School. These steps are analysis of core competence and basic competence based on curriculum 2013, expert judgment, legibility test and trial test (limited and large trial test). The test item criterion based on trial test are accepted, accepted but need revision, and rejected. The reliability of the test is α = 0.747 that categorized as `high'. It means the test instruments used is reliable and high consistency. The validity of Rxy = 0.63 means that the validity of the instrument was categorized as `high' according to interpretation value of Rxy (correlation).

  9. An Experimental Test of Buffer Utility as a Technique for Managing Pool-Breeding Amphibians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Jessica S Veysey; Babbitt, Kimberly J

    2015-01-01

    Vegetated buffers are used extensively to manage wetland-dependent wildlife. Despite widespread application, buffer utility has not been experimentally validated for most species. To address this gap, we conducted a six-year, landscape-scale experiment, testing how buffers of different widths affect the demographic structure of two amphibian species at 11 ephemeral pools in a working forest of the northeastern U.S. We randomly assigned each pool to one of three treatments (i.e., reference, 100m buffer, 30m buffer) and clearcut to create buffers. We captured all spotted salamanders and wood frogs breeding in each pool and examined the impacts of treatment and hydroperiod on breeding-population abundance, sex ratio, and recapture rate. The negative effects of clearcutting tended to increase as forest-buffer width decreased and be strongest for salamanders and when other stressors were present (e.g., at short-hydroperiod pools). Recapture rates were reduced in the 30m, but not 100m, treatment. Throughout the experiment for frogs, and during the first year post-cut for salamanders, the predicted mean proportion of recaptured adults in the 30m treatment was only 62% and 40%, respectively, of that in the reference treatment. Frog sex ratio and abundance did not differ across treatments, but salamander sex ratios were increasingly male-biased in both cut treatments. By the final year, there were on average, only about 40% and 65% as many females predicted in the 100m and 30m treatments, respectively, compared to the first year. Breeding salamanders at short-hydroperiod pools were about 10% as abundant in the 100m versus reference treatment. Our study demonstrates that buffers partially mitigate the impacts of habitat disturbance on wetland-dependent amphibians, but buffer width and hydroperiod critically mediate that process. We provide the first experimental evidence showing that 30-m-wide buffers may be insufficient for maintaining resilient breeding populations of pool

  10. An Experimental Test of Buffer Utility as a Technique for Managing Pool-Breeding Amphibians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica S Veysey Powell

    Full Text Available Vegetated buffers are used extensively to manage wetland-dependent wildlife. Despite widespread application, buffer utility has not been experimentally validated for most species. To address this gap, we conducted a six-year, landscape-scale experiment, testing how buffers of different widths affect the demographic structure of two amphibian species at 11 ephemeral pools in a working forest of the northeastern U.S. We randomly assigned each pool to one of three treatments (i.e., reference, 100m buffer, 30m buffer and clearcut to create buffers. We captured all spotted salamanders and wood frogs breeding in each pool and examined the impacts of treatment and hydroperiod on breeding-population abundance, sex ratio, and recapture rate. The negative effects of clearcutting tended to increase as forest-buffer width decreased and be strongest for salamanders and when other stressors were present (e.g., at short-hydroperiod pools. Recapture rates were reduced in the 30m, but not 100m, treatment. Throughout the experiment for frogs, and during the first year post-cut for salamanders, the predicted mean proportion of recaptured adults in the 30m treatment was only 62% and 40%, respectively, of that in the reference treatment. Frog sex ratio and abundance did not differ across treatments, but salamander sex ratios were increasingly male-biased in both cut treatments. By the final year, there were on average, only about 40% and 65% as many females predicted in the 100m and 30m treatments, respectively, compared to the first year. Breeding salamanders at short-hydroperiod pools were about 10% as abundant in the 100m versus reference treatment. Our study demonstrates that buffers partially mitigate the impacts of habitat disturbance on wetland-dependent amphibians, but buffer width and hydroperiod critically mediate that process. We provide the first experimental evidence showing that 30-m-wide buffers may be insufficient for maintaining resilient breeding

  11. An experimental test plan for the characterization of molten salt thermochemical properties in heat transport systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattrick Calderoni

    2010-09-01

    Molten salts are considered within the Very High Temperature Reactor program as heat transfer media because of their intrinsically favorable thermo-physical properties at temperatures starting from 300 C and extending up to 1200 C. In this context two main applications of molten salt are considered, both involving fluoride-based materials: as primary coolants for a heterogeneous fuel reactor core and as secondary heat transport medium to a helium power cycle for electricity generation or other processing plants, such as hydrogen production. The reference design concept here considered is the Advanced High Temperature Reactor (AHTR), which is a large passively safe reactor that uses solid graphite-matrix coated-particle fuel (similar to that used in gas-cooled reactors) and a molten salt primary and secondary coolant with peak temperatures between 700 and 1000 C, depending upon the application. However, the considerations included in this report apply to any high temperature system employing fluoride salts as heat transfer fluid, including intermediate heat exchangers for gas-cooled reactor concepts and homogenous molten salt concepts, and extending also to fast reactors, accelerator-driven systems and fusion energy systems. The purpose of this report is to identify the technical issues related to the thermo-physical and thermo-chemical properties of the molten salts that would require experimental characterization in order to proceed with a credible design of heat transfer systems and their subsequent safety evaluation and licensing. In particular, the report outlines an experimental R&D test plan that would have to be incorporated as part of the design and operation of an engineering scaled facility aimed at validating molten salt heat transfer components, such as Intermediate Heat Exchangers. This report builds on a previous review of thermo-physical properties and thermo-chemical characteristics of candidate molten salt coolants that was generated as part of the

  12. Comparison of thermal performance between test cells with different coverage systems for experimental typical day of heat in Brazilian Southeastern

    OpenAIRE

    Cardoso, Grace; Vecchia, Francisco

    2017-01-01

    This article shows experimentally the thermal performance of two test cells with different coverage systems, Light Green Roof (LGR) and ceramic roof by analyzing internal surface temperatures (IST) in the ceiling and dry bulb temperatures (DBT). The objective was to evaluate the spatial distribution of temperatures in buildings according to spatial and temporal Dynamic Climatology approaches. An experimental, typical day for heat conditions was determined. The data of the main climatic variab...

  13. Test Methodology Development for Experimental Structural Assessment of ASC Planar Spring Material for Long-Term Durability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Gunjin; Abdullah, A. B. M.; Binienda, Wieslaw; Krause, David L.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    2014-01-01

    A vibration-based testing methodology has been developed that will assess fatigue behavior of the metallic material of construction for the Advanced Stirling Convertor displacer (planar) spring component. To minimize the testing duration, the test setup is designed for base-excitation of a multiplespecimen arrangement, driven in a high-frequency resonant mode; this allows completion of fatigue testing in an accelerated period. A high performance electro-dynamic exciter (shaker) is used to generate harmonic oscillation of cantilever beam specimens, which are clasped on the shaker armature with specially-designed clamp fixtures. The shaker operates in closed-loop control with dynamic specimen response feedback provided by a scanning laser vibrometer. A test coordinator function synchronizes the shaker controller and the laser vibrometer to complete the closed-loop scheme. The test coordinator also monitors structural health of the test specimens throughout the test period, recognizing any change in specimen dynamic behavior. As this may be due to fatigue crack initiation, the test coordinator terminates test progression and then acquires test data in an orderly manner. Design of the specimen and fixture geometry was completed by finite element analysis such that peak stress does not occur at the clamping fixture attachment points. Experimental stress evaluation was conducted to verify the specimen stress predictions. A successful application of the experimental methodology was demonstrated by validation tests with carbon steel specimens subjected to fully-reversed bending stress; high-cycle fatigue failures were induced in such specimens using higher-than-prototypical stresses

  14. Site characterization data from the Area 5 science boreholes, Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blout, D.O.; Hammermeister, P.; Zukosky, K.A.

    1995-02-01

    The Science Borehole Project consists of eight boreholes that were drilled (from 45.7 m [150 ft] to 83.8 m [275 ft] depth) in Area 5 of the Nevada Test Site, Nye County, Nevada, on behalf of the US Department of Energy. These boreholes are part of the Area 5 Site Characterization Program developed to meet data needs associated with regulatory requirements applicable to the disposal of low-level and mixed waste at this site. This series of boreholes was specifically designed to characterize parameters controlling near-surface gas transport and to monitor changes in these and liquid flow-related parameters over time. These boreholes are located along the four sides of the approximately 2.6-km{sup 2} (1-mi{sup 2}) Area 5 Radioactive Waste Management Site to provide reasonable spatial coverage for sampling and characterization. Laboratory testing results of samples taken from core and drill cuttings are reported.

  15. Life sciences Spacelab Mission Development test 3 (SMD 3) data management report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moseley, E. C.

    1977-01-01

    Development of a permanent data system for SMD tests was studied that would simulate all elements of the shuttle onboard, telemetry, and ground data systems that are involved with spacelab operations. The onboard data system (ODS) and the ground data system (GDS) were utilized. The air-to-ground link was simulated by a hardwired computer-to-computer interface. A patch board system was used on board to select experiment inputs, and the downlink configuration from the ODS was changed by a crew keyboard entry to support each experiment. The ODS provided a CRT display of experiment parameters to enable the crew to monitor experiment performance. An onboard analog system, with recording capability, was installed to handle high rate data and to provide a backup to the digital system. The GDS accomplished engineering unit conversion and limit sensing, and provided realtime parameter display on CRT's in the science monitoring area and the test control area.

  16. Assessment of analytical and experimental techniques utilized in conducting plume technology tests 575 and 593. [exhaust flow simulation (wind tunnel tests) of scale model Space Shuttle Orbiter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, L. R.; Sulyma, P. R.; Tevepaugh, J. A.; Penny, M. M.

    1976-01-01

    Since exhaust plumes affect vehicle base environment (pressure and heat loads) and the orbiter vehicle aerodynamic control surface effectiveness, an intensive program involving detailed analytical and experimental investigations of the exhaust plume/vehicle interaction was undertaken as a pertinent part of the overall space shuttle development program. The program, called the Plume Technology program, has as its objective the determination of the criteria for simulating rocket engine (in particular, space shuttle propulsion system) plume-induced aerodynamic effects in a wind tunnel environment. The comprehensive experimental program was conducted using test facilities at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and Ames Research Center. A post-test examination of some of the experimental results obtained from NASA-MSFC's 14 x 14-inch trisonic wind tunnel is presented. A description is given of the test facility, simulant gas supply system, nozzle hardware, test procedure and test matrix. Analysis of exhaust plume flow fields and comparison of analytical and experimental exhaust plume data are presented.

  17. Integration des sciences et de la langue: Creation et experimentation d'un modele pedagogique pour ameliorer l'apprentissage des sciences en milieu francophone minoritaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormier, Marianne

    Les faibles resultats en sciences des eleves du milieu francophone minoritaire, lors d'epreuves au plan national et international, ont interpelle la recherche de solutions. Cette these avait pour but de creer et d'experimenter un modele pedagogique pour l'enseignement des sciences en milieu linguistique minoritaire. En raison de la presence de divers degres de francite chez la clientele scolaire de ce milieu, plusieurs elements langagiers (l'ecriture, la discussion et la lecture) ont ete integres a l'apprentissage scientifique. Nous avions recommande de commencer le processus d'apprentissage avec des elements langagiers plutot informels (redaction dans un journal, discussions en dyades...) pour progresser vers des activites langagieres plus formelles (redaction de rapports ou d'explications scientifiques). En ce qui a trait a l'apprentissage scientifique, le modele preconisait une demarche d'evolution conceptuelle d'inspiration socio-constructiviste tout en s'appuyant fortement sur l'apprentissage experientiel. Lors de l'experimentation du modele, nous voulions savoir si celui-ci provoquait une evolution conceptuelle chez les eleves, et si, simultanement, le vocabulaire scientifique de ces derniers s'enrichissait. Par ailleurs, nous cherchions a comprendre comment les eleves vivaient leurs apprentissages dans le cadre de ce modele pedagogique. Une classe de cinquieme annee de l'ecole de Grande-Digue, dans le Sud-est du Nouveau-Brunswick, a participe a la mise a l'essai du modele en etudiant les marais sales locaux. Lors d'entrevues initiales, nous avons remarque que les connaissances des eleves au sujet des marais sales etaient limitees. En effet, s'ils etaient conscients que les marais etaient des lieux naturels, ils ne pouvaient pas necessairement les decrire avec precision. Nous avons egalement constate que les eleves utilisaient surtout des mots communs (plantes, oiseaux, insectes) pour decrire le marais. Les resultats obtenus indiquent que les eleves ont

  18. Genetic research and testing in sport and exercise science: a review of the issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wackerhage, Henning; Miah, Andy; Harris, Roger C; Montgomery, Hugh E; Williams, Alun G

    2009-09-01

    This review is based on the BASES position stand on "Genetic Research and Testing in Sport and Exercise Science". Our aims are first to introduce the reader to research in sport and exercise genetics and then to highlight ethical problems arising from such research and its applications. Sport and exercise genetics research in the form of transgenic animal and human association studies has contributed significantly to our understanding of exercise physiology and there is potential for major new discoveries. Researchers starting out in this field will have to ensure an appropriate study design to avoid, for example, statistically underpowered studies. Ethical concerns arise more from the applications of genetic research than from the research itself, which is assessed by ethical committees. Possible applications of genetic research are genetic performance tests or genetic tests to screen, for example, for increased risk of sudden death during sport. The concerns are that genetic performance testing could be performed on embryos and could be used to select embryos for transplantation or abortion. Screening for risk of sudden death may reduce deaths during sporting events but those that receive a positive diagnosis may suffer severe psychological consequences. Equally, it will be almost impossible to keep a positive diagnosis confidential if the individual tested is an elite athlete.

  19. Bio science: genetic genealogy testing and the pursuit of African ancestry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Alondra

    2008-10-01

    This paper considers the extent to which the geneticization of 'race' and ethnicity is the prevailing outcome of genetic testing for genealogical purposes. The decoding of the human genome precipitated a change of paradigms in genetics research, from an emphasis on genetic similarity to a focus on molecular-level differences among individuals and groups. This shift from lumping to splitting spurred ongoing disagreements among scholars about the significance of 'race' and ethnicity in the genetics era. I characterize these divergent perspectives as 'pragmatism' and 'naturalism'. Drawing upon ethnographic fieldwork and interviews, I argue that neither position fully accounts for how understandings of 'race' and ethnicity are being transformed with genetic genealogy testing. While there is some acquiescence to genetic thinking about ancestry, and by implication, 'race', among African-American and black British consumers of genetic genealogy testing, test-takers also adjudicate between sources of genealogical information and from these construct meaningful biographical narratives. Consumers engage in highly situated 'objective' and 'affiliative' self-fashioning, interpreting genetic test results in the context of their 'genealogical aspirations'. I conclude that issues of site, scale, and subjectification must be attended to if scholars are to understand whether and to what extent social identities are being transformed by recent developments in genetic science.

  20. Alternative Testing Strategies for Nanomaterials: State of the Science and Considerations for Risk Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatkin, J A; Ong, K J

    2016-08-01

    The rapid growth of the nanotechnology industry has warranted equal progress in the nanotoxicology and risk assessment fields. In vivo models have traditionally been used to determine human and environmental risk for chemicals; however, the use of these tests has limitations, and there are global appeals to develop reliable alternatives to animal testing. Many have investigated the use of alternative (nonanimal) testing methods and strategies have quickly developed and resulted in the generation of large toxicological data sets for numerous nanomaterials (NMs). Due to the novel physicochemical properties of NMs that are related to surface characteristics, the approach toward toxicity test development has distinct considerations from traditional chemicals, bringing new requirements for adapting these approaches for NMs. The methodical development of strategies that combine multiple alternative tests can be useful for predictive NM risk assessment and help screening-level decision making. This article provides an overview of the main developments in alternative methods and strategies for reducing uncertainty in NM risk assessment, including advantages and disadvantages of in vitro, ex vivo, and in silico methods, and examples of existing comprehensive strategies. In addition, knowledge gaps are identified toward improvements for experimental and strategy design, specifically highlighting the need to represent realistic exposure scenarios and to consider NM-specific concerns such as characterization, assay interferences, and standardization. Overall, this article aims to improve the reliability and utility of alternative testing methods and strategies for risk assessment of manufactured NMs. © 2016 Society for Risk Analysis.