WorldWideScience

Sample records for terrain radiation technical

  1. Numerical simulation of radiation fog in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X.; Musson-Genon, L.; Carissimo, B.; Dupont, E.

    2009-09-01

    The interest for micro-scale modeling of the atmosphere is growing for environmental applications related, for example, to energy production, transport and urban development. The turbulence in the stable layers where pollutant dispersion is low and can lead to strong pollution events. This could be further complicated by the presence of clouds or fog and is specifically difficult in urban or industrial area due to the presence of buildings. In this context, radiation fog formation and dissipation over complex terrain were therefore investigated with a state-of-the-art model. This study is divided into two phases. The first phase is a pilot stage, which consist of employing a database from the ParisFog campaign which took place in the south of Paris during winter 2006-07 to assess the ability of the cloud model to reproduce the detailed structure of radiation fog. The second phase use the validated model for the study of influence of complex terrain on fog evolution. Special attention is given to the detailed and complete simulations and validation technique used is to compare the simulated results using the 3D cloud model of computational fluid dynamical software Code_Saturne with one of the best collected in situ data during the ParisFog campaign. Several dynamical, microphysical parameterizations and simulation conditions have been described. The resulting 3D cloud model runs at a horizontal resolution of 30 m and a vertical resolution comparable to the 1D model. First results look very promising and are able to reproduce the spatial distribution of fog. The analysis of the behavior of the different parameterized physical processes suggests that the subtle balance between the various processes is achieved.

  2. Explicit validation of a surface shortwave radiation balance model over snow-covered complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helbig, N.; Löwe, H.; Mayer, B.; Lehning, M.

    2010-09-01

    A model that computes the surface radiation balance for all sky conditions in complex terrain is presented. The spatial distribution of direct and diffuse sky radiation is determined from observations of incident global radiation, air temperature, and relative humidity at a single measurement location. Incident radiation under cloudless sky is spatially derived from a parameterization of the atmospheric transmittance. Direct and diffuse sky radiation for all sky conditions are obtained by decomposing the measured global radiation value. Spatial incident radiation values under all atmospheric conditions are computed by adjusting the spatial radiation values obtained from the parametric model with the radiation components obtained from the decomposition model at the measurement site. Topographic influences such as shading are accounted for. The radiosity approach is used to compute anisotropic terrain reflected radiation. Validations of the shortwave radiation balance model are presented in detail for a day with cloudless sky. For a day with overcast sky a first validation is presented. Validation of a section of the horizon line as well as of individual radiation components is performed with high-quality measurements. A new measurement setup was designed to determine terrain reflected radiation. There is good agreement between the measurements and the modeled terrain reflected radiation values as well as with incident radiation values. A comparison of the model with a fully three-dimensional radiative transfer Monte Carlo model is presented. That validation reveals a good agreement between modeled radiation values.

  3. 77 FR 5616 - Proposed Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C151c, Terrain Awareness and Warning System (TAWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-03

    ... (TSO)-C151c, Terrain Awareness and Warning System (TAWS) ACTION: Notice of availability and request for... second draft of Technical Standard Order (TSO)- C151c, Terrain Awareness and Warning System. Comments.... b. Addition of Localizer Performance with Vertical guidance (LPV) and Global Navigation Satellite...

  4. Quasi-analytical treatment of spatially averaged radiation transfer in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    LöWe, H.; Helbig, N.

    2012-10-01

    We provide a new quasi-analytical method to compute the subgrid topographic influences on the shortwave radiation fluxes and the effective albedo in complex terrain as required for large-scale meteorological, land surface, or climate models. We investigate radiative transfer in complex terrain via the radiosity equation on isotropic Gaussian random fields. Under controlled approximations we derive expressions for domain-averaged fluxes of direct, diffuse, and terrain radiation and the sky view factor. Domain-averaged quantities can be related to a type of level-crossing probability of the random field, which is approximated by long-standing results developed for acoustic scattering at ocean boundaries. This allows us to express all nonlocal horizon effects in terms of a local terrain parameter, namely, the mean-square slope. Emerging integrals are computed numerically, and fit formulas are given for practical purposes. As an implication of our approach, we provide an expression for the effective albedo of complex terrain in terms of the Sun elevation angle, mean-square slope, the area-averaged surface albedo, and the ratio of atmospheric direct beam to diffuse radiation. For demonstration we compute the decrease of the effective albedo relative to the area-averaged albedo in Switzerland for idealized snow-covered and clear-sky conditions at noon in winter. We find an average decrease of 5.8% and spatial patterns which originate from characteristics of the underlying relief. Limitations and possible generalizations of the method are discussed.

  5. Estimation of potential solar radiation using 50m grid digital terrain model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kurose, Y.; Nagata, K.; Ohba, K.; Maruyama, A.

    1999-01-01

    To clarify the spatial distribution of solar radiation, a model to estimate the potential incoming solar radiation with 50m grid size was developed. The model is based on individual calculation of direct and diffuse solar radiation accounting for the effect of topographic shading. Using the elevation data in the area with radius 25km, which was offered by the Digital Map 50m Grid, the effect of topographic shading is estimated as angle of elevation for surrounding configuration to 72 directions. The estimated sunshine duration under clear sky conditions agreed well with observed values at AMeDAS points of Kyushu and Shikoku region. Similarly, there is a significant agreement between estimated and observed variation of solar radiation for monthly mean conditions over complex terrain. These suggest that the potential incoming solar radiation can be estimated well over complex terrain using the model. Locations of large fields over complex terrain agreed well with the area of the abundant insolation condition, which is defined by the model. The model is available for the investigation of agrometeorological resources over complex terrain. (author)

  6. Technical advances in radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sause, W.T.

    1986-01-01

    Substantial advances have been made in radiation therapy. Many of these advances can be applied in most radiation therapy departments without expensive improvements in equipment. Changes in radiation fractionation, chemotherapeutic sensitization, intraoperative radiation, and interstitial implants can be performed with experience and improved physician training in most medium-sized departments. Advances that require investments in expensive equipment such as particle radiation and hyperthermia will need to be evaluated at designated treatment centers. 106 references

  7. Course of radiation protection: technical level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    The course handbook on radiation protection and nuclear safety, technical level prepared by scientists of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of the Argentina Republic, describes the subjects in 19 chapters and 2 annexes. These topics detailed in the text have the following aspects: radioactivity elements, interaction of the radiation and the matter, radio dosimetry, internal contamination dosimetry, principles of radiation detection, biological radiation effects, fundamentals of radiation protection, dose limits, optimization, occupational exposure, radiation shielding, radioactive waste management, criticality accidents, safe transport of radioactive materials, regulatory aspects

  8. Radiation sources and technical services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stonek, K.; Satorie, Z.; Vyskocil, I.

    1981-01-01

    Work is briefly described of the department for sealed sources production of the Institute, including leak testing and surface contamination of sealed sources. The department also provides technical services including the inspections of sealed sources used in medicine and geology and repair of damaged sources. It carries out research of the mechanical and thermal strength of sealed sources and of the possibility of reprocessing used 226 Ra sources. The despatch department is responsible for supplying the entire country with home and imported radionuclides. The department of technical services is responsible for testing imported radionuclides, assembling materials testing, industrial and medical irradiation devices, and for the collection and storage of low-level wastes on a national scale. (M.D.)

  9. Radiation protection in technical radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thiele, H.

    1980-01-01

    In on-site inspections, e.g. double-plate radiography of circumferential pipe welds Ir-192 is most frequently used. Methods, controlled area, possible personnel doses, and radiation protection measures for the inspection and construction personnel are briefly discussed. (HP) [de

  10. The All Terrain Bio nano Gear for Space Radiation Detection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ummat, Ajay; Mavroidis, Constantinos

    2007-01-01

    This paper discusses about the relevance of detecting space radiations which are very harmful and pose numerous health issues for astronauts. There are many ways to detect radiations, but we present a non-invasive way of detecting them in real-time while an astronaut is in the mission. All Terrain Bio-nano (ATB) gear system is one such concept where we propose to detect various levels of space radiations depending on their intensity and warn the astronaut of probable biological damage. A basic framework for radiation detection system which utilizes bio-nano machines is discussed. This radiation detection system is termed as 'radiation-responsive molecular assembly' (RMA) for the detection of space radiations. Our objective is to create a device which could detect space radiations by creating an environment equivalent to human cells within its structure and bio-chemically sensing the effects induced therein. For creating such an environment and further bio-chemically sensing space radiations bio-nano systems could be potentially used. These bio-nano systems could interact with radiations and signal based on the intensity of the radiations their relative biological effectiveness. Based on the energy and kind of radiation encountered, a matrix of signals has to be created which corresponds to a particular biological effect. The key advantage of such a design is its ability to interact with the radiation at e molecular scale; characterize its intensity based on energy deposition and relate it to the relative biological effectiveness based on the correspondence established through molecular structures and bond strengths of the bio-nano system

  11. Awareness for natural radiation potential zones in Archean Terrain of Chhattisgarh State

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diwan, H.D.; Pande, S.K.

    2015-01-01

    In the environment, the natural radiations emitted by rocks and soils containing radioactive minerals, largely affected the human being in various aspects. The Chhattisgarh region characterized by the mineral of natural radiations with their relative distribution found in Granitic rocks of Archean age. Adjacent to Cratonic margins, exposures of outer fringes became suitable sites for radiation spread. It constituting towards the emission of radiation by the intrinsic content of minerals present in the host rock i.e. the terrestrial sources of radiation. The Archean terrain covers the surrounding areas of oval cup shaped sedimentary basin and it lies in the S.O.I. toposheet no. 64 G. H.I.K.L. To locate the marked potential zone for natural radiation, the investigation nearby aquatic component of main river and tributaries of Mahanadi river system is important. The presence of Granitic/ Pegmatite rocks at the boundaries of shield areas became promising areas for radiation generating mineral components. Occurrence in the potential zones expressed as lense shaped deposits or strips in dimension of IX1/2 with few hundred long belt. Presence of weathering of Uraninite minerals content remain yellow orange coloured impressions on the surface. In urban areas the background radiation in form of ionic radiation by the residential dwelling units accredates radiations. It needs awareness for Natural Radiation of under zones (NRPZ) in the region. To ensure the effective awareness programme, the area under consideration of natural radiation should take care of socially sustainable activities and spatio-temporal spread to motivate and implement various safety provisions. The model experiments can be sued from R and D point of view, also to alert the people to provide 'Safety, health and welfare of society'. (author)

  12. Methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes in mountainous terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sypka, Przemysław; Starzak, Rafał; Owsiak, Krzysztof

    2016-12-01

    Solar radiation reaching densely forested slopes is one of the main factors influencing the water balance between the atmosphere, tree stands and the soil. It also has a major impact on site productivity, spatial arrangement of vegetation structure as well as forest succession. This paper presents a methodology to estimate variations in solar radiation reaching tree stands in a small mountain valley. Measurements taken in three inter-forest meadows unambiguously showed the relationship between the amount of solar insolation and the shading effect caused mainly by the contour of surrounding tree stands. Therefore, appropriate knowledge of elevation, aspect and tilt angles of the analysed planes had to be taken into consideration during modelling. At critical times, especially in winter, the diffuse and reflected components of solar radiation only reached some of the sites studied as the beam component of solar radiation was totally blocked by the densely forested mountain slopes in the neighbourhood. The cross-section contours and elevation angles of all obstructions are estimated from a digital surface model including both digital elevation model and the height of tree stands. All the parameters in a simplified, empirical model of the solar insolation reaching a given horizontal surface within the research valley are dependent on the sky view factor (SVF). The presented simplified, empirical model and its parameterisation scheme should be easily adaptable to different complex terrains or mountain valleys characterised by diverse geometry or spatial orientation. The model was developed and validated (R 2  = 0.92 , σ = 0.54) based on measurements taken at research sites located in the Silesian Beskid Mountain Range. A thorough understanding of the factors determining the amount of solar radiation reaching woodlands ought to considerably expand the knowledge of the water exchange balance within forest complexes as well as the estimation of site

  13. Technical products for radiation shielding. Shield assembled from lead blocks for radiation protection. General technical requirements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    The object of this standard description is the general technological requirements of 50 and 100 mm thick radiation protection shields assembled from lead blocks. The standard contains the definitions, types, parameters and dimensions of shields, their technical and acceptance criteria with testing methods, tagging, packaging, transportation and storage requirements, producer's liability. Some illustrated assembling examples, preferred parameters and dosimetry methods for shield inspection are given. (R.P.)

  14. Technical sheets of ionizing radiations. 2. Non-ionizing radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anon.

    1975-01-01

    The biological effects of different non-ionizing radiations are studied: ultra-violet radiation, visible radiation, infrared radiation, micrometric waves, ultrasonics. In spite of their apparent diversity these radiations are similar in their physico-chemical effects, but in view of their widely varying production methods and types of application each type is considered separately. It is pointed out that no organization resembling the CIPR exists in the field of non-ionizing radiations, the result being a great disparity amongst the different legislations in force [fr

  15. Validation of solar radiation surfaces from MODIS and reanalysis data over topographically complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todd A. Schroeder; Robbie Hember; Nicholas C. Coops; Shunlin Liang

    2009-01-01

    The magnitude and distribution of incoming shortwave solar radiation (SW) has significant influence on the productive capacity of forest vegetation. Models that estimate forest productivity require accurate and spatially explicit radiation surfaces that resolve both long- and short-term temporal climatic patterns and that account for topographic variability of the land...

  16. Radiation tolerance assurance of technical equipment in the LHC radiation monitoring for technical equipment at the LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Wijnands, Thijs; CERN. Geneva. TS Department

    2005-01-01

    In contrast with other accelerators at CERN, a large amount of technical equipment will be located in the LHC tunnel, the underground areas and in the experimental caverns where they will be exposed to radiation. Nearly all this equipment makes, to a certain extent, use of commercial microelectronics which is extremely sensitive to radiation damage, both instantaneous damage and cumulative damage. Examples in the TS Department are the electronics for the position sensors of the low beta quadrupoles, the access system, the cooling and ventilation units, the electronics for the electrical distribution, the oxygen deficiency monitors and fire detection systems. The basic effects of radiation on electronic systems and components are well understood because similar problems with radiation are encountered in the aerospace and aviation industry. Since 1998, an efficient and original Radiation Tolerance Assurance approach for the LHC machine has been established. Its aim is to minimise the effects of radiation damage...

  17. Terrain and Radiation Mapping in Post-Disaster Environments Using an Autonomous Helicopter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kochersberger

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent events have highlighted the need for unmanned remote sensing in dangerous areas, particularly where structures have collapsed or explosions have occurred, to limit hazards to first responders and increase their efficiency in planning response operations. In the case of the Fukushima nuclear reactor explosion, an unmanned helicopter capable of obtaining overhead images, gathering radiation measurements, and mapping both the structural and radiation content of the environment would have given the response team invaluable data early in the disaster, thereby allowing them to understand the extent of the damage and areas where dangers to personnel existed. With this motivation, the Unmanned Systems Lab at Virginia Tech has developed a remote sensing system for radiation detection and aerial imaging using a 90 kg autonomous helicopter and sensing payloads for the radiation detection and imaging operations. The radiation payload, which is the sensor of focus in this paper, consists of a scintillating type detector with associated software and novel search algorithms to rapidly and effectively map and locate sources of high radiation intensity. By incorporating this sensing technology into an unmanned aerial vehicle system, crucial situational awareness can be gathered about a post-disaster environment and response efforts can be expedited. This paper details the radiation mapping and localization capabilities of this system as well as the testing of the various search algorithms using simulated radiation data. The various components of the system have been flight tested over a several-year period and a new production flight platform has been built to enhance reliability and maintainability. The new system is based on the Aeroscout B1-100 helicopter platform, which has a one-hour flight endurance and uses a COFDM radio system that gives the helicopter an effective range of 7 km.

  18. Emerging applications of radiation processing. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 160 gamma irradiators and 1200 electron accelerator based processing units are in operation worldwide. In recent years the IAEA has prepared a directory of industrial gamma irradiators and held several meetings on developments in radiation technology applications. Developments involving the engineering of new sources (both isotope and electrical), high power accelerator applications, etc. have been reported recently, making a review and evaluation of this progress timely. Therefore the IAEA organized a technical meeting in Vienna, Austria, from 28 to 30 April 2003 to review the present situation and the potential contribution of radiation technology to sustainable development. Engineering developments and other features of radiation sources, both isotope and accelerator, were discussed. Recent research has concentrated on three fields: medical and food products, polymers, and environmental pollution control. The stability of radiation sterilized medical implants, as well as the uses of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials, radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications have been studied. Since separation and enrichment technologies play an important role in product recovery and pollution control, the possibility of radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and adsorbents is being investigated. Finally, aside from the technologies for flue gas and wastewater treatment already in use, further research is ongoing on the treatment of organic contaminants in both gaseous and liquid phases. Environmental applications, which also offer new opportunities, should be carefully reviewed to reflect existing regulations and current knowledge. The increasingly serious problem of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) emissions may be solved in part by the application of radiation technology. This is being studied on a pilot scale for the removal of

  19. Emerging applications of radiation processing. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2004-01-01

    Approximately 160 gamma irradiators and 1200 electron accelerator based processing units are in operation worldwide. In recent years the IAEA has prepared a directory of industrial gamma irradiators and held several meetings on developments in radiation technology applications. Developments involving the engineering of new sources (both isotope and electrical), high power accelerator applications, etc. have been reported recently, making a review and evaluation of this progress timely. Therefore the IAEA organized a technical meeting in Vienna, Austria, from 28 to 30 April 2003 to review the present situation and the potential contribution of radiation technology to sustainable development. Engineering developments and other features of radiation sources, both isotope and accelerator, were discussed. Recent research has concentrated on three fields: medical and food products, polymers, and environmental pollution control. The stability of radiation sterilized medical implants, as well as the uses of radiation processing for sterilization or decontamination of pharmaceuticals and pharmaceutical raw materials, radiation synthesis and modification of polymers for biomedical applications have been studied. Since separation and enrichment technologies play an important role in product recovery and pollution control, the possibility of radiation synthesis of stimuli-responsive membranes, hydrogels and adsorbents is being investigated. Finally, aside from the technologies for flue gas and wastewater treatment already in use, further research is ongoing on the treatment of organic contaminants in both gaseous and liquid phases. Environmental applications, which also offer new opportunities, should be carefully reviewed to reflect existing regulations and current knowledge. The increasingly serious problem of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) emissions may be solved in part by the application of radiation technology. This is being studied on a pilot scale for the removal of

  20. The technical qualified expert on radiation protection in Spain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marco Arboli, M.; Rodriguez Suarez, M.

    2002-01-01

    Education and training is considered an important tool for promoting safety culture and improving the level of competence of workers. In the different disciplines involved in Radiation Protection (PR), training programmes are being revised to ensure effective protection of individuals. In the European Union framework, the new normative and its adaptation in the Member States, as well as the past actions in each country, make the community to conclude that harmonization of educational programmes and European recognition of the qualification must be reached. An important point of these actions is the definition of the European Qualified Expert. Article 38 of the EURATOM Basic Safety Standards imposes requirements on training and education of the qualified experts and their exchange within the European Union. Since then, there has been many initiatives to seek to harmonization of the qualified expert requirements. In the Spanish education system, there has been a standard training and competent authority recognition of the high level qualified experts on radiation protection since 1986, whose programme is continuously being updating and improving. Taking into account the European actions to define the qualified expert training requirements, it has been designed an educational course for the Technical Qualified Expert on Radiation Protection. This pilot course has being carried out during May, 2002. The results of this project is shown in this paper. (Author)

  1. The NIOSH Radiation Dose Reconstruction Project: managing technical challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Matthew P; Townsend, Ronald D; Dooley, David A

    2008-07-01

    Approximately two years after promulgation of the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act, the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health Office of Compensation and Analysis Support selected a contractor team to perform many aspects of the radiation dose reconstruction process. The project scope and schedule necessitated the development of an organization involving a comparatively large number of health physicists. From the initial stages, there were many technical and managerial challenges that required continuous planning, integration, and conflict resolution. This paper identifies those challenges and describes the resolutions and lessons learned. These insights are hopefully useful to managers of similar scientific projects, especially those requiring significant data, technical methods, and calculations. The most complex challenge has been to complete defensible, individualized dose reconstructions that support timely compensation decisions at an acceptable production level. Adherence to applying claimant-favorable and transparent science consistent with the requirements of the Act has been the key to establishing credibility, which is essential to this large and complex project involving tens of thousands of individual stakeholders. The initial challenges included garnering sufficient and capable scientific staff, developing an effective infrastructure, establishing necessary methods and procedures, and integrating activities to ensure consistent, quality products. The continuing challenges include maintaining the project focus on recommending a compensation determination (rather than generating an accurate dose reconstruction), managing the associated very large data and information management challenges, and ensuring quality control and assurance in the presence of an evolving infrastructure. The lessons learned concern project credibility, claimant favorability, project priorities, quality and consistency, and critical

  2. The Gray Lecture 2001: coming technical advances in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Suit, Herman

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To review the current limits on the efficacy of radiotherapy (RT) due to technical factors and to assess the potential for major improvements in technology. Methods and Materials: The method of this review was to assess the efficacy of current RT in general terms; strategies for improving RT; historical record of technological advances; rationale for further reductions of treatment volume; and importance of defining and excluding nontarget tissues from the target volume. The basis for the interest in proton beam RT is developed, and the relative dose distributions of intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and intensity-modulated proton RT (IMPT) are discussed. The discovery of the proton and the first proposal that protons be used in RT is described. This is followed by a brief mention of the clinical outcome studies of proton RT. Likely technical advances to be integrated into advanced proton RT are considered, specifically, four-dimensional treatment planning and delivery. Finally, the increment in cost of some of these developments is presented. Results: For definitive RT, dose limits are set by the tolerance of normal tissues/structures adjacent or near to the target. Using imaging fusion of CT, MRI, positron emission tomography, magnetic resonance spectroscopic imaging, and other studies will result in improved definition of the target margins. Proton beams are likely to replace photon beams because of their physical characteristics. Namely, for each beam path, the dose deep to the target is zero, across the target it is uniform, and proximal to the target it is less. Proton therapy can use as many beams, beam angles, noncoplanar, and dynamic, as well as static, intensity modulation, as can photon plans. The ability for much greater accuracy in defining the target position in space and then maintaining the target in a constant position in the radiation beam despite target movement between and during dose fractions will be possible. The cost of proton

  3. Results of the activities of the Scientific and Technical Coordination Council for Radiation Technique and Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sille, A K [Gosudarstvennyj Komitet po Ispol' zovaniyu Atomnoj Ehnergii SSSR, Moscow

    1977-03-01

    It is reported on the activities of the Scientific and Technical Coordination Council for Radiation Technique and Technology (STCC-RTT) of the CMEA Permanent Commission for the Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy according to the programme 1971 to 1975. The STCC-RTT is concerned with technical applications such as radiation sterilization, food irradiation, radiation-induced chemical processes etc. The main tasks which have to be solved within the period from 1976 to 1980 are outlined.

  4. A Review of the New European Technical Recommendations for Monitoring Individuals Occupationally Exposed to External Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dijk, J.W.E. van; Alves, J.G.; Ambrosi, P.; Bartlett, D.T.; Currivan, L.; Fantuzzi, E.; Kamenopoulou, V.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reviews the revised Technical Recommendations for Monitoring Individuals Occupationally Exposed to External Radiation as issued by the European Commission as Radiation Protection 160. These recommendations are aimed at all stakeholders in radiation protection dosimetry with an emphasis in the responsible technical staff of approved dosimetry services. This paper briefly touches each Chapter and ends with a more in depth section on the uncertainty evaluation of dose measurements. -- Highlights: ► Recommendations on all aspects of running an approved dosimetry service. ► Radiation protection framework. ► Metrology of personal dosimeters. ► QC and QA of individual monitoring

  5. Technical information program summary: radiation protection - issues, terms, definitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    Questions concerning the health effects and risks of exposure to ionizing radiations are presented and answered on a popular level. Definitions are given for various working terms. A defense is made of the radiation protection policies of Westinghouse Hanford Company

  6. Terrain-Toolkit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Qi; Kaul, Manohar; Long, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    , as will be shown, is used heavily for query processing in spatial databases; and (3) they do not provide the surface distance operator which is fundamental for many applications based on terrain data. Motivated by this, we developed a tool called Terrain-Toolkit for terrain data which accepts a comprehensive set......Terrain data is becoming increasingly popular both in industry and in academia. Many tools have been developed for visualizing terrain data. However, we find that (1) they usually accept very few data formats of terrain data only; (2) they do not support terrain simplification well which...

  7. National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements semiannual technical progress report, March 1989--August 1989

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ney, W.R.

    1991-01-01

    This semiannual technical progress report is for the period 1 March 1989 through 31 August 1989. This National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) program is designed to provide recommendations for radiation protection based on scientific principles. During this period several reports were published covering the topics of occupational radiation exposure, medical exposure, radon control, dosimetry, and radiation protection standards. Accomplishments of various committees are also reported; including the committees on dental x-ray protection, radiation safety in uranium mining and milling, ALARA, instrumentation, records maintenance, occupational exposures of medical personnel, emergency planning, and others. (SM)

  8. Technical Basis - Spent Nuclear Fuels (SNF) Project Radiation and Contamination Trending Program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ELGIN, J.C.

    2000-01-01

    This report documents the technical basis for the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) Program radiation and contamination trending program. The program consists of standardized radiation and contamination surveys of the KE Basin, radiation surveys of the KW basin, radiation surveys of the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVD), and radiation surveys of the Canister Storage Building (CSB) with the associated tracking. This report also discusses the remainder of radiological areas within the SNFP that do not have standardized trending programs and the basis for not having this program in those areas

  9. Legal and technical analysis of the activities involving radiation applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Borges, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Activities related to radiation applications have been worldwide target of studies concerning biology, medicine, sociology, psychology and law, since prediction of the possible risks and harms associated with the use of radiation, depends on probabilities not easy to quantify, mainly in the most common low-dose situations. In Brazil, legislation generated in the last forty years did not match evolution of the scientific domains related above. This way, more recent rules not rarely conflict with older regulations, without revoking them. (author)

  10. Technical basis of radiation therapy. Practical clinical applications. 5. ed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levitt, Seymour H. [Karolinska Institutet Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Oncol-Pathol; Perez, Carlos A. [Washington Univ. Medical Center, St. Louis, MO (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Purdy, James A. [California Univ., Sacramento, CA (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology; Poortmans, Philip [Institute Verbeeten, Tilburg (Netherlands). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    2012-07-01

    This well-received book, now in its fifth edition, is unique in providing a detailed description of the technological basis of radiation therapy. Another novel feature is the collaborative writing of the chapters by North American and European authors. This considerably broadens the book's perspective and increases its applicability in daily practice throughout the world. The book is divided into two sections. The first covers basic concepts in treatment planning, including essential physics and biological principles related to time-dose-fractionation, and explains the various technological approaches to radiation therapy, such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, tomotherapy, stereotactic radiotherapy, and high and low dose rate brachytherapy. Issues relating to quality assurance, technology assessment, and cost-benefit analysis are also reviewed. The second part of the book discusses in depth the practical clinical applications of the different radiation therapy techniques in a wide range of cancer sites. All of the chapters have been written by leaders in the field. This book will serve to instruct and acquaint teachers, students, and practitioners in the various fields of oncology with the basic technological factors and approaches in radiation therapy. (orig.)

  11. Contribution of Topography and Incident Solar Radiation to Variation of Soil and Plant Litter at an Area with Heterogeneous Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe Cito Nettesheim

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Natural processes that determine soil and plant litter properties are controlled by multiple factors. However, little attention has been given to distinguishing the effects of environmental factors from the effects of spatial structure of the area on the distribution of soil and litter properties in tropical ecosystems covering heterogeneous topographies. The aim of this study was to assess patterns of soil and litter variation in a tropical area that intercepts different levels of solar radiation throughout the year since its topography has slopes predominantly facing opposing geographic directions. Soil data (pH, C, N, P, H+Al, Ca, Mg, K, Al, Na, sand, and silt and plant litter data (N, K, Ca, P, and Mg were gathered together with the geographic coordinates (to model the spatial structure of 40 sampling units established at two sites composed of slopes predominantly facing northwest and southeast (20 units each. Soil and litter chemical properties varied more among slopes within similar geographic orientations than between the slopes facing opposing directions. Both the incident solar radiation and the spatial structure of the area were relevant in explaining the patterns detected in variation of soil and plant litter. Individual contributions of incident solar radiation to explain the variation in the properties evaluated suggested that this and other environmental factors may play a particularly relevant role in determining soil and plant litter distribution in tropical areas with heterogeneous topography. Furthermore, this study corroborates that the spatial structure of the area also plays an important role in the distribution of soil and litter within this type of landscape, which appears to be consistent with the action of water movement mechanisms in such areas.

  12. Radiation and applications: Technical innovation made by industrial irradiation procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wiesner, L.

    1986-01-01

    The innovation represented by irradiation as a means of industrial process technology lies in the very special way in which energy is introduced into some object in which it initiates reactions. This is based on the penetrating capability of ionizing radiation, which can produce reactive species, especially radicals, inside an object without requiring the whole object to be subjected to such conditions as, e.g., high temperatures or pressures, which would otherwise be needed to initiate the corresponding reactions. This unique advantage of triggering off reactions by means of ionizing radiation results in possibilities of process technology no other procedure can offer. An aspect becoming more and more important is the possibility to replace expensive materials hard to process by cheaper materials brought into a specific form more easily. Irradiation processes can assign to these materials at least some of the properties and combinations of properties, respectively, of higher-grade materials. (orig.) [de

  13. Technical critique on radiation test facilities for the CTR surface and materials program

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Persiani, P.J.

    1975-02-01

    Major radiation test facilities will be necessary in the near-term (5 years) and long-term (greater than 10 years) future for the timely development and understanding of fusion confinement systems and of prototype fusion power reactors. The study includes the technical justifications and requirements for CTR Neutron and Plasma Radiation Test Facilities. The initial technical critique covers the feasibility and design problems: in upgrading the performance of the accelerator-rotating (solid TiT) target systems, and in transforming the accelerator-supersonic jet target concept into a radiation testing facility. A scoping assessment on the potential of a pulsed high-beta plasma device (dense plasma focus) is introduced to explore plasma concepts as near-term neutron and plasma radiation sources for the CTR Surface and Materials Program. (U.S.)

  14. Radiation therapy for macular degeneration: technical considerations and preliminary results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brady, Luther W.; Freire, Jorge E.; Longton, Wallace A.; Miyamoto, Curtis T.; Augsburger, James J.; Brown, Gary C.; Micaily, Bizhan; Sagerman, Robert H.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: This study was undertaken to assess the toxicity and possible benefits from the administration of low-dose external-beam irradiation for Age-Related Macular Degeneration (ARMD). The premise of the treatment is that radiation induces regression and/or promotes inactivation of the subretinal neo-vasculature, resulting in reabsorption of fluid and blood thus reducing the risk for further leakage or bleeding, as well as subretinal fibrosis. Clinically, the beneficial effect could be translated into stabilization of visual acuity and prevention of progression of the wet type of ARMD with the possibility for some visual improvement. Methods and Materials: Allegheny University Hospitals, Hahnemann, Department of Radiation Oncology, treated 278 patients prospectively beginning in January 1995 with low-dose irradiation for wet-type macular degeneration. Two hundred forty-nine patients were treated with a total dose of 14.40 Gy in eight fractions of 1.80 Gy over 10-13 elapsed days, and 27 patients with 20 Gy at 2 Gy per fraction over 12-15 days. The first two patients were treated to a total dose of 10.00 Gy in five fractions of 2.00 Gy. Patients were evaluated at 2-3 weeks and 2-3 months. A percentage (36.7%) of the patients had previously received laser treatments in the study eye, 21.9% once, 5% twice, 9.7% three or more. Subjective visual acuity and toxicity data was collected on all patients. Results: At 2-3 weeks after treatment 195 patients (70%) retained their visual acuity without change, 68 patients (24.5%) stated they had improved vision, and 15 patients (4.8%) stated their vision continued to decrease. Two to 3 months after treatment, 183 patients (65.8%) had no change in their vision. 75 patients (27%) patients had an improvement in their vision, and 20 patients (7.2%) had a decrease in visual acuity. Transient acute reactions occurred in 14 of the 278 patients treated. Conclusion: Our observations in this group of 278 patients support the conclusion

  15. Compliance with technical standards for radiological protection at radiation therapy services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eduardo, Maria Bernadete de Paula; Novaes, Hillegonda Maria Dutilh

    2004-01-01

    Radiation therapy services provide essential therapeutic procedures for cancer, one of the main causes of population morbidity and mortality. Despite their importance in the health system and their potential risks due to the use of ionizing radiation, there are few studies on such services. We evaluated compliance with technical standards for radiological protection in radiation therapy services in Sao Paulo State, Brazil. Forty-nine services were studied in 2000 through interviews with technical staff. Typologies of performance profiles focusing on structure and process variables were constructed and services compared. Important differences were observed in the services' positions in the health care system, level of complexity, and geographic distribution, with better average performance in structural conditions but very inadequate performance in patient protection, indicating the need for more effective health surveillance. (author)

  16. Activities of Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimety/Brazil as Technical and Scientific Support Organization on Occupational Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Da Silva, F.C.A.; Ferreira, P.R.; Matta, L.E.C.; Peres, M.A.L.; Godoy, J.M.; Alencar, M.A.V.; Carlos, M.T.; Souza-Santos, D.; Leocadio, J.C.; Oliveira, M.S.

    2010-01-01

    There are, in Brazil, about 126,000 workers registered on National Dose Registry System (SRD/IRD) as occupationally exposed. They work on 4,000 radioactive installations, 20 nuclear fuel cycle installations and with 90,000 x-ray diagnostic devices. There are two main Regulatory Authorities to license and control these installations on nuclear and radioactive areas, and another Regulatory Authority that is responsible for safety and health protection of workers on their labour activities. Belonging to structure of the National Commission of Nuclear Energy (CNEN-Brazil) there is an Institute dedicated to radiation protection, dosimetry and metrology of ionizing radiation, that is the Institute of Radiation Protection and Dosimetry (IRD). This paper presents two main IRD activities related to occupational radiation protection that can be seen as example of technical and scientific support to Regulatory Authorities: the Radiation Overexposure Analysis that is performed by the Radiation Overexposure Analysis Group (GADE) and the Approval of Individual Monitoring Services and Calibration Laboratory of Equipment used in Radiation Protection that is performed by the Committee for the Evaluation of Essay and Calibration Services (CASEC). (author)

  17. Ionizing radiation detection meter systems usability evaluation. Technical memorandum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Severs, Y.; Hughes, R.; Tack, D.; Bossi, L.L.M.

    2002-12-01

    In support of the Canadian Forces Nuclear Detection, Identification and Dosimetry project a usability trial of three Ionizing Radiation Detection Meter Systems (IRDMS) was conducted 18-22 June 2001 at Connaught Ranges. The systems evaluated: System 1: ANPDR 77 Operational System with PDR 77 Alpha/Beta probes and GPS (Global Positioning System) Training System; System 2: ADM 300C Operational System with ABP 100 Alpha/Beta probes and GPS Training System, and System 3: RAM R200 Operational System with PA 100M and RG12 Alpha/Beta probes and GPS Training System. Twelve military personnel (Private to Captain) determined compliance with the bid evaluation criteria. The counter-balanced study, based on a Latin square design, was divided into two assessment phases, an operational phase and a training system phase, which rotated three groups (of four participants each) concurrently through each IRDMS. Groups were trained in set-up, maintenance and operation of each bid IRDMS prior to evaluation. The operational evaluation consisted of a test/maintenance stand, an indoor/outdoor operational stand, and an indoor,/outdoor training system stand. Participants rated the utility and usability of each system, by measuring case of use/maintenance under a range of relevant operational and clothing conditions, compatibility with soldier tasks, compatibility with clothing, compatibility with equipment and operational environments, and case of learning (including an assessment of initial and refresher training implications). A 7-point Likert-like acceptability rating scale, which covered a range from completely unacceptable (1) to completely acceptable (7), was used to evaluate the measures. The combined weighted mean scores were 584.3 for System 1 (70 o /b), 682.0 for System 2 (81 %) and 756.9 for System 3 (90%) out of a total possible score of 840. Participants reported mean scores for System 1 between barely unacceptable and borderline for both indoor and outdoor operations. System 2

  18. Revised technical regulations on radiation protection and safety of 30 September 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    These revised technical regulations were made in implementation of Section 4 of Decree No 7/9038 of 30 November 1974 on radiation health and safety and lay down in detail the requirements to be met in Turkey for the use of all types of radiation sources. They set out protection plans and specify the protective equipment to be used as well as the controlled areas, i.e. areas in which radiation sources are used and which must be subject to special safety measures. Finally to obtain a license, users of radiation sources must fill in forms, the models of which are provided, giving their particulars and the specifications of the intended use and activity of the sources. (NEA) [fr

  19. Radiation effect calculation means of the Crisis Technical Center of the Nuclear Safety and Protection Institut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabol, B.; Manesse, D.; Robeau, D.

    1989-07-01

    The available calculation tools of the Crisis Technical Center (CTC), for the analysis and evaluation of radiation effects from a nuclear accident, are presented. The CTC calculation unit depends on local means, and on the National Meteorology system, in order to collect the data needed for the atmospheric waste diffusion evaluation. For the radiation dose calculations, plotters and software allowing the analysis of all waste Kinetics and all the meteorological conditions are available. The work developed by CTC calculation unit enables an easy application of the calculation tools as well as the results obtention. Images from data bases are provided to complete the obtained results [fr

  20. Proceedings of the 18th technical meeting on nuclear reactor and radiation for KURRI engineers and the 9th technical official group section 5 meeting in Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2010-03-01

    This report is a summary of 18th Technical Meeting on Nuclear Reactor and Radiation for KURRI Engineers in Kyoto University. This was also the 9th meeting for technical official group section 5 (nuclear and radiation) in Kyoto University. In the workshop, three special lectures held were: (1) 'On Border Between Subcritical and Supercritical', (2) 'Memories of Nuclear Power Plant Management for 40 Years', and (3) 'Introduction of Technical Office in Faculty of Engineering, Kyoto University'. The technical presentations held were: (1) 'Radiation Background Study of Specialty Products in Senshu Region', (2) 'Introduction of Radioactivation Analysis at KUR', (3) 'Consideration of Critical Approach Method for KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC', (4) 'Evaluation of Temperature Coefficient of KUR Low-Enrichment Fuel Reactor Core Using SRAC'. As training for technical staffs in Technical Office, we visited the facility in Ashiu Research Forest. An introduction of this facility and the comments from the participants were included in this report. (S.K.)

  1. TERRAIN, Norfolk County, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, WRIGHT COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, RANKIN COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, MITCHELL COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, DAWSON COUNTY, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, HOWARD COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, RICE COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, PIERCE, COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, DARKE COUNTY, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, JONES COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, JEFFERSON COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, Pierce County, WA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, BERKS COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, NEWTON COUNTY, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographical data that were used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, PIKE COUNTY, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, Lincoln County, AR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, KENDALL COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, LEON COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, TRAVIS COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, Bennington County, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, FRANKLIN COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, CLALLAM COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, BARNSTABLE COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, Northampton COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, POTTER COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, KITSAP COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, WAYNE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, TROUSDALE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, UNION PARISH, LOUSIANA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. Geological terrain models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaupp, V. H.; Macdonald, H. C.; Waite, W. P.

    1981-01-01

    The initial phase of a program to determine the best interpretation strategy and sensor configuration for a radar remote sensing system for geologic applications is discussed. In this phase, terrain modeling and radar image simulation were used to perform parametric sensitivity studies. A relatively simple computer-generated terrain model is presented, and the data base, backscatter file, and transfer function for digital image simulation are described. Sets of images are presented that simulate the results obtained with an X-band radar from an altitude of 800 km and at three different terrain-illumination angles. The simulations include power maps, slant-range images, ground-range images, and ground-range images with statistical noise incorporated. It is concluded that digital image simulation and computer modeling provide cost-effective methods for evaluating terrain variations and sensor parameter changes, for predicting results, and for defining optimum sensor parameters.

  12. ARAC terrain data base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Walker, H.

    1982-11-01

    A terrain data base covering the continental United States at 500-meter resolution has been generated. Its function is to provide terrain data for input to mesoscale atmospheric models that are used as part of the Atmospheric Release Advisory Capability at Lawrence Livermore Laboratory (LLNL). The structure of the data base as it exists on the LLNL computer system is described. The data base has been written to tapes for transfer to other systems and the format of these tapes is also described

  13. Radiation treatment of gaseous and liquid effluents for contaminant removal. Proceedings of a technical meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2005-12-01

    The Technical Meeting on Radiation Processing of Gaseous and Liquid Effluents conducted in Sofia, Bulgaria, 7-10 September 2004, discussed and evaluated issues related to the status and future trends in radiation application for environmental protection. Five experts from Bulgaria, India, the Republic of Korea, Poland, and the United States of America were invited to provide their experiences in this field. Twenty cost-free participants and observers - from Bulgaria, India, Lithuania, Poland and Ukraine -joined the meeting, and 15 papers in total were presented. Research and development in radiation processing of gaseous and liquid effluents is undertaken in three fields: electron beam flue gas treatment (SO x and NO x removal), wastewater purification and sewage sludge sterilization. Wastewater or sludge treatment and flue gas purification all differ from technological points of view, but they are common services and applications of environmental radiation technology applications, based mostly on electron accelerators. The technical meeting discussed new development in the field of radiation applications in environmental service, especially the status and prospects of radiation processing of gaseous and liquid effluents. Progress in the field of electron accelerators and gamma sources is crucial for routine application of the technology. Cost reduction and improvement of technical reliability are substantial especially for high power of accelerators and high activity of the sources needed for environmental applications. Environmental applications were carefully reviewed in accordance with the existing regulations and state of the art knowledge. The comparison with conventional commercial technologies was addressed as well. In flue gas treatment, applicability of the technology using different fossil fuels (coal, lignite, oil, etc.) was reviewed. The elaborated materials cover the technical and economical evaluation of the technologies. The possible applications of

  14. Program of training and technical expertise in radiation protection for personnel of medical radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliveira, Sergio R. de

    2013-01-01

    This work aims to verify the actual conditions for the training of technicians in Radiology, in relation to the knowledge of radiation protection in the field of Medical Diagnostic Radiology. To evaluate the knowledge of professionals was prepared a questionnaire on the topic, having been answered by workers with varied experience. The questionnaire was divided into three parts, being the initial self-evaluation, followed by closed and open issues, all specific knowledge. With a total of 55 questionnaires answered, it was found that 85% of respondents consider themselves able to work in the area performing the function, but when questioned about the technical details regarding the exposure to ionizing radiation, it was found that only 15% of respondents had some knowledge about the subject. In relation to Radiological Protection, was found that little more than 10% of the respondents know about the subject. The results found in this survey outlined the creation of a technical specialization course in radiation protection, which is part of the permanent staff of course of the Polytechnical School of Health of FIOCRUZ, solving, partially, one of the problems pointed out today by health bodies, that is the lack of trained personnel

  15. Promoting radiation protection in France and Europe. The key role of IRSN, French Technical Safety Organisation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Repussard, Jacques [IRSN - Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, Fontenay-aux-Roses (France). Direction des Affaires Internationales - Delegation aux Relations Internationales

    2012-07-01

    IRSN, the Institute for Radiological Protection and Nuclear Safety was set up in France under Article 5 of French Act No. 2001-398 of May 9, 2001 as the French 'Technical Safety Organization' (TSO) expert in nuclear and radiological risks. It contributes to the implementation of public policies concerning nuclear safety and security and protection of human health and environment against ionizing radiation. IRSN interacts with all the parties concerned by these policies (public authorities, operators and stakeholders) while keeping its independence of judgment. (orig.)

  16. Technical specifications manual for the MARK-1 pulsed ionizing radiation detection system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lawrence, R.S.; Harker, Y.D.; Jones, J.L.; Hoggan, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    The MARK-1 detection system was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. The completely portable system was designed for the detection and analysis of intense photon emissions from pulsed ionizing radiation sources. This manual presents the technical design specifications for the MARK-1 detection system and was written primarily to assist the support or service technician in the service, calibration, and repair of the system. The manual presents the general detection system theory, the MARK-1 component design specifications, the acquisition and control software, the data processing sequence, and the system calibration procedure. A second manual entitled: Volume 2: Operations Manual for the MARK-1 Pulsed Ionizing Radiation Detection System (USDOE Report WINCO-1108, September 1992) provides a general operational description of the MARK-1 detection system. The Operations Manual was written primarily to assist the field operator in system operations and analysis of the data

  17. Technical specifications manual for the MARK-1 pulsed ionizing radiation detection system. Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lawrence, R.S.; Harker, Y.D.; Jones, J.L.; Hoggan, J.M.

    1993-03-01

    The MARK-1 detection system was developed by the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory for the US Department of Energy Office of Arms Control and Nonproliferation. The completely portable system was designed for the detection and analysis of intense photon emissions from pulsed ionizing radiation sources. This manual presents the technical design specifications for the MARK-1 detection system and was written primarily to assist the support or service technician in the service, calibration, and repair of the system. The manual presents the general detection system theory, the MARK-1 component design specifications, the acquisition and control software, the data processing sequence, and the system calibration procedure. A second manual entitled: Volume 2: Operations Manual for the MARK-1 Pulsed Ionizing Radiation Detection System (USDOE Report WINCO-1108, September 1992) provides a general operational description of the MARK-1 detection system. The Operations Manual was written primarily to assist the field operator in system operations and analysis of the data.

  18. Submarine Salt Karst Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Augustin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst terrains that develop in bodies of rock salt (taken as mainly of halite, NaCl are special not only for developing in one of the most soluble of all rocks, but also for developing in one of the weakest rocks. Salt is so weak that many surface-piercing salt diapirs extrude slow fountains of salt that that gravity spread downslope over deserts on land and over sea floors. Salt fountains in the deserts of Iran are usually so dry that they flow at only a few cm/yr but the few rain storms a decade so soak and weaken them that they surge at dm/day for a few days. We illustrate the only case where the rates at which different parts of one of the many tens of subaerial salt karst terrains in Iran flows downslope constrains the rates at which its subaerial salt karst terrains form. Normal seawater is only 10% saturated in NaCl. It should therefore be sufficiently aggressive to erode karst terrains into exposures of salt on the thousands of known submarine salt extrusions that have flowed or are still flowing over the floors of hundreds of submarine basins worldwide. However, we know of no attempt to constrain the processes that form submarine salt karst terrains on any of these of submarine salt extrusions. As on land, many potential submarine karst terrains are cloaked by clastic and pelagic sediments that are often hundreds of m thick. Nevertheless, detailed geophysical and bathymetric surveys have already mapped likely submarine salt karst terrains in at least the Gulf of Mexico, and the Red Sea. New images of these two areas are offered as clear evidence of submarine salt dissolution due to sinking or rising aggressive fluids. We suggest that repeated 3D surveys of distinctive features (± fixed seismic reflectors of such terrains could measure any downslope salt flow and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to constrain the rates at which submarine salt karst terrains develop. Such rates are of interest to all salt tectonicians and the many

  19. National Solar Radiation Data Base, Vol. 2 - Final Technical Report (1961-1990)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maxwell, E. L.; Marion, W.; Myers, D.; Rymes, M.; Wilcox, S.

    1995-01-01

    This technical report explains the procedures used during the 4-year production of the National Solar Radiation Data Base (NSRDB) (1961-1990). It is the second volume in a two-volume report on the NSRDB. The first volume, User's Guide-National Solar Radiation Data Base, provides the information needed to use the data base products. Volume 2 concentrates on results from the R&D required to producea solar radiation data base that would represent a significant update of a previous data base (SOLMET). More than 90% of the data in the NSRDB were estimated using a model--the Meteorological/Statistical (METSTAT) model. Much of Volume 2 concerns the METSTAT model and the sources of its input data. In addition, it contains results of comparisons of the NSRBD with the previous SOLMET data base.Results of the model evaluations and data base comparisons favor the use of NSRDB data over SOLMET data to select optimum sites and estimate performance for solar energy systems. The report noted that to improve data on solar radiation, 'measured' data need to become the mainstav of future data bases.

  20. Legal and technical regulations in radiation protection and their effects on radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Betz, B.

    1975-01-01

    During the last few years, new regulations and guidelines in the field of radiation protection have been issued which affect radiotherapy, too. On September 1st, 1973 the X-ray Ordinance became effective; a few weeks later, new guidelines for radiation protections when using radioactive substances in the field of medicine were published. Of particular topical interest is the appendix of these new guidelines, in which the principles of technical competence in radiation protection when handling radioactive substances in the field of medicine are laid down uniformly for the FRG. Amongst these more recent regulations, there is also the direction by the Minister of the Interior to put the operation of accelerators in the field of medicine according to section 19 of the Atomic Energy Act under the supervision of the state and to employ newly issued administrative guidelines. After a short survey on the radiation protection laws in force, a selection of important stipulations within the new legal regulations and guidelines is discussed with a view to their effects on radiotherapy. (orig./LN) [de

  1. Probing the Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannessen, Runa

    2016-01-01

    Whether manifest in built structures or invisible infrastructures, architectures of control in the occupied Palestinian West Bank is structurally defined by endemic uncertainty. Shifting lines and frontiers are recorded on the terrain, creating elastic zones of uncertainty necessitating navigatio...... to the territory through its lines and laws, and how the very structure of the occupation has changed over the years, I seek to make visible the ways in which architectures of uncertainty compensate for the fleeting terrain that HH is probing.......Whether manifest in built structures or invisible infrastructures, architectures of control in the occupied Palestinian West Bank is structurally defined by endemic uncertainty. Shifting lines and frontiers are recorded on the terrain, creating elastic zones of uncertainty necessitating...

  2. Training on radiation protection in university area. Experience of Technical University of Catalonia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortega, X.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the different agents that are involved in training on Radiation Protection in Spain. The main circumstances which can introduce new challenges in radiation protection practices are reviewed, namely the planned modifications in the regulation framework, the mobility of European workers, the consequences of deregulation of the electric system, the moratorium of the Spanish nuclear programme and the changes in Spanish studies resulting from implementation of the European Higher Education Area. In relation to the contributions that university groups can develop in this field, the author makes some suggestions according to his own experience in the Technical University of Catalonia. It is emphasized that this contribution must be characterized by its quality, credibility and independence. It should include activities such as development of R and D studies, the implementation of accredited laboratories, organization of post-graduate courses, preparation of teaching materials and technical publications, and collaboration with public institutions, scientific and professional societies and other organizations. Finally, the other new activity that is stressed is related to the efforts required to improve information and communication to the stake holders and a growing social interest. (Author)

  3. A technical review and assessment of the BEIR V [Biological Effects of Ionizing Radiation V] report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1990-03-01

    This report was prepared by the DOE BEIR V Technical Review Committee (TRC) to provide a technical review and assessment of the National Research Council's Bilogical Effects of Ionizing Radiation (BEIR) Committee's Report entitled ''Health Effects of Exposure to Low Levels of Ionizing Radiation'' (BEIR V). This report contains seven sections. The first section serves as an introduction and reviews the charge to the TRC. The second section is a chapter-by- chapter summary of the BEIR V Report. The third section is a summary of the risk estimates and conclusions of the BEIR V Committee for genetic effects, cancer induction, and in utero effects. The fourth section is a summary and analysis of the new scientific information used by the BEIR V Committee in developing its risk recommendations and conclusions. The fifth section is an assessment of the scientific information and methods used by the BEIR V Committee in developing their risk estimates and conclusions and an analysis of the key assumptions underlying the use of these risk estimates in risk assessment. The sixth section is the TRC'S assessment of the regulatory implications of the BEIR V risk estimates and conclusions for DOE nuclear operations. The seventh and final section is the TRC'S recommended actions for DOE's consideration concerning the BEIR V Report risk estimates and conclusions. 23 refs., 5 tabs

  4. Radiation Dose Effects into LCO in Technical Specification by Iodine in Hanul units 1,2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hye Min; Lee, Seung Chan [KHNP Central Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    This study estimates the impact of the 1-th coolant system in NPP to the LCO (Limiting Condition of Operation) limits which is in the site boundary. Dose limit is merged into the effective dose from whole body and thyroid dose limits, that is possible to combine the two LCOs to a unified LCO. To estimate the limits, the radiation dose of one of the designed accidents should be chosen to check the radiation dose response. The selected accident is based on Seung Chan Lee's study at KHNP in 2011. Using the selected accident, Iodine dose effect is reviewed depending on the LCO limiting responsibility and the specific behavior. In order to evaluate the radiation dose effect in Technical Specification of Hanul 1,2, SGTR is selected for some sensitivity analysis. From the results, in Hanul site, the case of LOOP plus ADV plus GIS is the most severe case and the dose limit margin is about 110% in LCO.

  5. The technical workforce: education, training, and manpower needs in radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziemer, P.L.

    1984-01-01

    In considering our technical workforce with respect to radiation protection, three main questions face us today and will continue to face us in the future: 1. What are the present and future personnel needs in health physics and related disciplines. 2. What kinds of education and training programs are required to meet these needs. 3. What is being done and what needs to be done to provide the required education and training programs. To address these three questions, this paper summarizes recent projections on the manpower needs for professional health physicists over the next two decades. The current status of education and training programs, both for health physicists and for other personnel requiring radiation protection training, is reviewed. Attention is directed toward present enrollment and degree trends which indicate inadequate supplies of personnel to fill present and projected positions, particularly at the BS and the graduate degree levels. Information on the job market, including numbers and types of positions and salary levels, is also summarized. The question of what needs to be done in the future to provide adequate education and training programs is discussed with respect to federal policies, regulations, and industrial responsibilities. Although the federal government will continue to have responsbilities to support education and training in radiation protection, an increasingly important and critical role is seen for the private sector

  6. [Regulatory supervision and radiation survey in the area of location of former military technical bases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shandala, N K; Kiselev, S M; Titov, A V; Seregin, V A; Isaev, D V; Akhromeev, S V; Filonova, A A; Semenova, M P; Gimadova, T I; Aladova, R A; Kosnikov, A S; Shchelkanova, E S; Luk'ianets, A I

    2013-01-01

    Activities related to the rehabilitation of areas and facilities of the temporary storage of spent nuclear fuel and radioactive waste (SNF and RW) at Andreeva Bay and Gremikha on the Kola Peninsula and in the Primorsky Krai in the Russian Far East is an important component of the regulatory functions of the Federal Medical biological Agency (FMBA of Russia). Technical support to the FMBA of Russia in this activity is provided by A.L Burnazyan Federal Medical Biophysical Center Main research interests include evaluation of radiological threats to determine the priority directions of regulation, a detailed analysis of the radiation situation at areas, territories and in vicinity of temporary waste storage facilities, radiation control and environmental monitoring, the development of digital maps and geoinformation systems, project expertise in the field of rehabilitation of PVC including the management of SNF and RW Implementation of these natural, practical and theoretical works is completed by development a set of regulatory documents ensuring adherence to radiation safety for the stuff population and the environment, and the also documents governing the management of SNF and RW waste in the territories of PVC.

  7. Processing Terrain Point Cloud Data

    KAUST Repository

    DeVore, Ronald; Petrova, Guergana; Hielsberg, Matthew; Owens, Luke; Clack, Billy; Sood, Alok

    2013-01-01

    Terrain point cloud data are typically acquired through some form of Light Detection And Ranging sensing. They form a rich resource that is important in a variety of applications including navigation, line of sight, and terrain visualization

  8. Radiation protection: Creating capacity, legislation and regulation, control of exposure and emergency preparedness through technical cooperation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2007-01-01

    Every year, the IAEA technical cooperation (TC) programme provides more than US $70 million worth of training services, and equipment in approximately 100 countries and territories throughout Africa, Asia and the Pacific, Europe and Latin America. TC projects span an ever increasing range of sectors that have direct links to human and environmental health. Wherever nuclear and other radiation based technologies are applied, protecting the safety and health of employees, medical patients and the public at large is a top priority and a demanding responsibility. One of the primary aims of the TC's radiation protection programme is to help Member States fulfil their safety and security obligations. Rarely in the history of the IAEA has radiation based technology provided so much opportunity. Just as Member States - particularly developing countries - acquire the expertise needed to utilize technologies that contribute to social and economic development, they need to ensure that they have an adequate national infrastructure for radiation safety and security. Beyond the existing infrastructure for radiation safety and security, other factors increasingly call for attention. They are, on the one hand: - The development and deployment of new nuclear technologies; - Renewed interest in large scale nuclear energy production and on the other hand: - Geopolitical instability and global terrorism, which create a black market for radioactive materials; - Ongoing attempts to acquire capacity in nuclear weapons. If the world is to realize the potential of radiation based technologies for peaceful purposes, each country must be prepared to confront the associated risks. The nature of today's global environment is such that a significant threat can arise virtually any time, anywhere. Thus, there is a pressing need to strengthen the safety and security network at every level. The TC programme is committed to building a global safety regime for nuclear technology, country by country

  9. A comparison of two methods for estimating the technical costs of external beam radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayman, James A.; Lash, Kathy A.; Tao, May L.; Halman, Marc A.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To accurately assess the cost-effectiveness of treatment with external beam radiation, it is necessary to have accurate estimates of its cost. One of the most common methods for estimating technical costs has been to convert Medicare charges into costs using Medicare Cost-to-Charge Ratios (CCR). More recently, health care organizations have begun to invest in sophisticated cost-accounting systems (CAS) that are capable of providing procedure-specific cost estimates. The purpose of this study was to examine whether these competing approaches result in similar cost estimates for four typical courses of external beam radiation therapy (EBRT). Methods and Materials: Technical costs were estimated for the following treatment courses: 1) a palliative 'simple' course of 10 fractions using a single field without blocks; 2) a palliative 'complex' course of 10 fractions using two opposed fields with custom blocks; 3) a curative course of 30 fractions for breast cancer using tangent fields followed by an electron beam boost; and 4) a curative course of 35 fractions for prostate cancer using CT-planning and a 4-field technique. Costs were estimated using the CCR approach by multiplying the number of units of each procedure billed by its Medicare charge and CCR and then summing these costs. Procedure-specific cost estimates were obtained from a cost-accounting system, and overall costs were then estimated for the CAS approach by multiplying the number of units billed by the appropriate unit cost estimate and then summing these costs. All costs were estimated using data from 1997. The analysis was also repeated using data from another academic institution to estimate their costs using the CCR and CAS methods, as well as the appropriate relative value units (RVUs) and conversion factor from the 1997 Medicare Fee Schedule to estimate Medicare reimbursement for the four treatment courses. Results: The estimated technical costs for the CCR vs. CAS approaches for the four

  10. The Importance of Technical Reachback in the Adjudication of Radiation Alarms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buckley, W.M.; Allen, R.W.

    2009-01-01

    The large-scale deployment of radiation sensors at borders, ports-of-entry and other locations carries two disparate priorities: the reliable detection and identification of threat materials and the rapid characterization of non-threat materials comprised of naturally occurring radioactive materials (NORM) and legitimate radioactive materials in streams of commerce. These priorities are partially achieved through the technologies contained in the detection systems and the procedures developed for their operation. However, questions and ambiguities will occur. Without established capabilities and procedures for the operators of these detector systems to 'reach back' to trained spectroscopists and appropriate subject matter experts, the system will likely experience an unacceptable number of response operations and delays resolving alarms. Technical reachback operations need to be able to address the priorities discussed above while causing minimal perturbations in the flow of legitimate streams of commerce. Yet when necessary, reachback needs to be able to rapidly mobilize the appropriate response assets.

  11. Radiation field studies at the training and research reactor AKR of the Dresden Technical University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Leuschner, A.; Reiss, U.; Pretzsch, G.

    1983-01-01

    Results of radiation field studies in the experimental channels of the training and research reactor of the Technical University of Dresden are presented. The flux densities of thermal, intermediate and fast neutrons were determined by means of activation detectors., Gamma dose rates have been measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters. The measured results show symmetry with respect to the vertical axis of the reactor and allow to draw conclusions with regard to the efficiency of the individual layers of the shield. They are an essential basis of performing irradiation experiments in the experimental channels. The results of measurements were compared with those of shielding and design calculations. Taking into account the measuring errors and the approximations used in the computational models, no unexpected deviations have been observed. Hence, the measured and calculated results can be assessed to be in good agreement. (author)

  12. R-IDEAL: A Framework for Systematic Clinical Evaluation of Technical Innovations in Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verkooijen, Helena M; Kerkmeijer, Linda G W; Fuller, Clifton D; Huddart, Robbert; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Verheij, Marcel; Mook, Stella; Sahgal, Arjun; Hall, Emma; Schultz, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The pace of innovation in radiation oncology is high and the window of opportunity for evaluation narrow. Financial incentives, industry pressure, and patients' demand for high-tech treatments have led to widespread implementation of innovations before, or even without, robust evidence of improved outcomes has been generated. The standard phase I-IV framework for drug evaluation is not the most efficient and desirable framework for assessment of technological innovations. In order to provide a standard assessment methodology for clinical evaluation of innovations in radiotherapy, we adapted the surgical IDEAL framework to fit the radiation oncology setting. Like surgery, clinical evaluation of innovations in radiation oncology is complicated by continuous technical development, team and operator dependence, and differences in quality control. Contrary to surgery, radiotherapy innovations may be used in various ways, e.g., at different tumor sites and with different aims, such as radiation volume reduction and dose escalation. Also, the effect of radiation treatment can be modeled, allowing better prediction of potential benefits and improved patient selection. Key distinctive features of R-IDEAL include the important role of predicate and modeling studies (Stage 0), randomization at an early stage in the development of the technology, and long-term follow-up for late toxicity. We implemented R-IDEAL for clinical evaluation of a recent innovation in radiation oncology, the MRI-guided linear accelerator (MR-Linac). MR-Linac combines a radiotherapy linear accelerator with a 1.5-T MRI, aiming for improved targeting, dose escalation, and margin reduction, and is expected to increase the use of hypofractionation, improve tumor control, leading to higher cure rates and less toxicity. An international consortium, with participants from seven large cancer institutes from Europe and North America, has adopted the R-IDEAL framework to work toward coordinated, evidence

  13. New technologies applied to radiation protection training: Rp course for technical qualified expert

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Llorente Herranz, Cristina; Rodriguez, M.; Marco Arboli, Marisa

    2008-01-01

    This paper shows the development and results of the first Course for technical qualified expert in radiation protection (RP) using the advantages of Communication and Information Technologies (CITs). This project in modality b-learning has born as a result of the RP specialised course demand, the necessity of working-private life balance and working-training time combination as well as the geographic widespread of those interested. The methodology selected has been b-learning (blended learning), which consists of a mixture of e-learning plus face-to-face learning. The RP course for technical qualified RP expert has been designed for 10 weeks using online learning methodology and 2 days of face-to-face learning in a radioactive facility to take account practical sessions and the final knowledge evaluation. A multidisciplinary team of experts has elaborated the RP programme and the docent material, following national normative. The material consists of: a) Multimedia material with theoretical content to be visualised online; b) Additional material to be un-load or printed; c) Practical exercises within multimedia content; d) Practical online and face-to-face sessions. (author)

  14. Chernobyl: 30 years after - Proceedings of the technical meeting of the French Society of Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Champion, Didier; Chouha, Michel; Damette, Guy; Durand, Vanessa; Besnus, Francois; Renaud, Philippe; Adam-Guillermin, Christelle; Laurier, Dominique; Chabrier, Patrick; Chauveau, Thomas; Thiry, Yves; Menetrier, Florence; Chevillard, Sylvie; Lesueur, Fabienne; Schneider, Thierry

    2016-03-01

    The French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) organized a technical meeting on the present day situation of the Chernobyl site, 30 years after the accident of the nuclear power plant. The review deals with the situation of the facility and of its safety works, the environment, the management of wastes, the workers and populations exposure, and the health monitoring of the exposed populations. This document brings together the abstracts and the presentations (slides) of the different talks given at the meeting: 1 - The main highlights 30 years after the Chernobyl accident (Didier CHAMPION, SFRP); 2 - Circumstances, progress and consequences of the Chernobyl accident - Lessons and experience feedback for the other RBMK reactors (Michel CHOUHA, IRSN); 3 - Chernobyl, a confinement arch for 100 years (Patrick CHABRIER, Thomas CHAUVEAU - BOUYGUES); 4 - The reactor wastes management and the dismantling operations (Guy DAMETTE - IRSN); 5 - Environment contamination in the vicinity of the site (Yves THIRY - ANDRA); 6 - Impact of the accident on agriculture (Vanessa DURAND - IRSN); 7 - The fate of remediation wastes (Francois BESNUS - IRSN); 8 - Chernobyl fallouts in France (Philippe RENAUD - IRSN); 9 - The ecological consequences of the Chernobyl accident (Christelle ADAM-GUILLERMIN - IRSN); 10 - Results of liquidators and populations exposure (Florence MENETRIER - CEA); 11 - Thyroid cancers monitoring in the Chernobyl area and the role of modifying genetic factors (Fabienne LESUEUR - Institut Curie); 12 - Results of the Chernobyl accident health impact studies (Dominique LAURIER - IRSN); 13 - Impact on populations living condition (Thierry SCHNEIDER - CEPN); 14 - Molecular signature of radiation induced thyroid tumors (Sylvie CHEVILLARD - CEA)

  15. Evolution of EPA/DOE technical cooperation in remediation of radiation/mixed waste contaminated sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dyer, Robert S.; Garcia-Frias, Beverly; Wolbarst, Anthony B.; Coe, Larry J.

    1992-01-01

    The EPA Office of Radiation Programs (ORP) and the DOE Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) are cooperating in efforts related to restoration of radioactive and mixed waste sites. The impetus for these efforts derived from DOE's need to perform restoration activities according to CERCLA/RCRA requirements, and from ORP's role as a supplier of radiation expertise to federal agencies. These activities include: assessing remediation technology, developing radioanalytical protocols; matching cleanup technologies to soil characteristics; developing a process for the evaluation, selection, and appropriate use of groundwater models; reviewing incinerator practices; and addressing technical issues associated with the WIPP. Cooperative projects planned for the future include: evaluation of methodologies for streamlining the restoration process; assessment of the applicability of process knowledge for waste characterization; evaluation of recycling of radioactive metals; and expansion of selected environmental protection initiatives at the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA). Public acceptance is a crucial component of the remediation process. An underlying objective of these cooperative initiatives is to address issues of concern to the public in an open and honest fashion. (author)

  16. Radiation protection of workers in radiological emergency situation. Proceedings of the technical day

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rannou, Alain; Gosset, Eric; Lahaye, Thierry; Foucher, Laurent; Couasnon, Olivier; Bouchery, Pascal; Gaillard-Lecanu, Emmanuelle; Pectorin, Xavier; Fusil, Laurence; Boudergui, Karim; Adhemar, Bruno; Devin, Patrick; Mace, Jean-Reynald; Chevallier, Michel; Leautaud, Jean-Marc; LANCE, Benoit

    2015-03-01

    Following the Fukushima-Daichi accident, several actions have been taken in France from the lessons learnt from the accident: the elaboration of a national plan for the management of a major nuclear or radiological accident, and the safety complementary evaluations to be carried out by nuclear operators. As a complement to the measures to be implemented for the protection of the overall population in emergency radiological situation, the protection of workers mobilized for the management of the crisis has also to be taken into account in the framework of these measures. The French Society of Radiation Protection (SFRP) has organized a technical day to take stock of this question. The program comprises 4 topical sessions dealing with: the main actions taken at the national scale after the Fukushima-Daichi accident, the strategies and intervention means of nuclear operators in case of radiological emergency, the radiation protection R and D for the protection of intervenors in case of radiological emergency, and the main actions implemented at the international scale and their perspectives. This document brings together the abstracts and the presentations (slides) of the different talks given at the meeting: 1 - Health status and lessons learnt from the Fukushima accident - workers (Alain RANNOU, IRSN); 2 - National response plan to a major nuclear or radiologic accident (Eric GOSSET, SGDSN); 3 - Legal framework applicable to intervenors (Thierry LAHAYE, DGT); 4 - Prescriptions linked with complementary safety and liability studies (Laurent FOUCHER, ASN); 5 - EDF: radiological risk management in emergency situation (Pascal BOUCHERY, EDF); 6 - CEA: intervention strategy, means and radiation protection (Xavier PECTORIN, Laurence FUSIL - CEA); 7 - AREVA: FINA's Intervention and workers' radiation protection (Bruno ADHEMAR, Patrick DEVIN - AREVA); 8 - Intervention in radiological emergency situation: the INTRA (Robots intervention on accidents) economic

  17. [Experience of the development special medical technical laboratory for studies of effects caused by potent electromagnetic radiation in biologic objects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetsky, B N; Kalyada, T V; Petrov, S V

    2015-01-01

    This article covers topics of creating special medical technical laboratory for medial and biologic studies concerning influence of potent high-frequency elecromagnetic radiation on various biologic objects. The authors gave example of such laboratory, described its construction features, purpose and main characteristics of the included devices.

  18. Level of perception of technical terms regarding the effect of radiation on the human body by residents of Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Yoshitoku; Yoshida, Yasuko; Isogai, Emiko; Hayase, Takashi; Nakamura, Kozue; Saito, Mitsuo; Arizono, Koji

    2017-10-27

    This study aimed to examine the level of perception of the technical terms related to the effect of radiation on the human body among residents of the six prefectures of Miyagi, Fukushima, Tokyo, Aichi, Hiroshima, and Nagasaki in Japan. Miyagi and Fukushima were selected as devastated area by Great East Japan Earthquake. Tokyo and Aichi were selected as control. Hiroshima and Nagasaki were selected as the A-bombed area. A total of 1030 respondents, 172, 173, 171, 173, 171, and 170, respectively, were surveyed. Differences in the recognition level of technical terms related to the effect of radiation on the human body among residents of the six prefectures were assessed. The highest recognition levels were reported by the respondents from Fukushima (17 items). Those from Miyagi scored the second highest recognition levels (10 out of the 17 terms); the second highest recognition levels for the remaining seven terms were marked by the respondents of Tokyo. Respondents in the Tohoku region had a better recognition for the technical terminology relevant to the effect of radiation on the human body. Our findings indicate a need for continued, comprehensive risk communication pertaining to health hazards of radiation exposure in Tohoku region. Concerted efforts by central/local governments and other stakeholders are required to allay the anxiety/stress related to radiation exposure among the residents.

  19. The relationship between technical parameters of external beam radiation therapy and complications for localized prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kitamura, Kei; Shirato, Hiroki; Suzuki, Keishiro

    2000-01-01

    This study was performed to review retrospectively the clinical course of chronic rectal bleeding as a complication of external beam radiation therapy for localized prostate cancer and to analyze the relationship between technical parameters of radiation therapy and the complications. Seventy-one patients with stages A2, B and C were treated with local-field radiotherapy (total dose 52.5-66 Gy, daily dose 2.0-3.28 Gy, field area 30-81 cm 2 , number of fields 3-15 ports, planning simulations X-ray or CT-based) between 1989 and 1998 at three institutions. The protocols were consistent during this same period at these institutions. Multivariate analysis revealed pretreatment PSA and Gleason sum to be statistically significant predictors of 5 year prostatic specific antigen (PSA) relapse-free rates in a median follow-up period of 42 months (range 12-119 months). The significant risk factors for higher grading of acute morbidity were a biological equivalent dose, α/β=10 (BED 10 ) ≥65 Gy, dose per fraction ≥3.0 Gy, field area ≥42 cm 2 , fewer ports and X-ray planning simulation. However, no parameter was associated with higher grading of late morbidity. Eleven patients (15.4%) experienced a late GI complication: grade 1 (4.2%), grade 2 (9.8%), grade 3 (1.4%). The median time to occurrence of rectal bleeding was 12 months after radiotherapy and the mean duration of morbidity was 11 months. Higher total dose and dose per fraction, larger field area, fewer ports and X-ray simulation increased the grades of acute morbidity. A majority of chronic rectal bleedings were transient and responded to conservative treatment. (author)

  20. Information measures for terrain visualization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaventura, Xavier; Sima, Aleksandra A.; Feixas, Miquel; Buckley, Simon J.; Sbert, Mateu; Howell, John A.

    2017-02-01

    Many quantitative and qualitative studies in geoscience research are based on digital elevation models (DEMs) and 3D surfaces to aid understanding of natural and anthropogenically-influenced topography. As well as their quantitative uses, the visual representation of DEMs can add valuable information for identifying and interpreting topographic features. However, choice of viewpoints and rendering styles may not always be intuitive, especially when terrain data are augmented with digital image texture. In this paper, an information-theoretic framework for object understanding is applied to terrain visualization and terrain view selection. From a visibility channel between a set of viewpoints and the component polygons of a 3D terrain model, we obtain three polygonal information measures. These measures are used to visualize the information associated with each polygon of the terrain model. In order to enhance the perception of the terrain's shape, we explore the effect of combining the calculated information measures with the supplementary digital image texture. From polygonal information, we also introduce a method to select a set of representative views of the terrain model. Finally, we evaluate the behaviour of the proposed techniques using example datasets. A publicly available framework for both the visualization and the view selection of a terrain has been created in order to provide the possibility to analyse any terrain model.

  1. Technical support for the Ukrainian State Committee for Nuclear Radiation Safety on specific waste issues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, C.A.

    1995-01-01

    The government of Ukraine, a now-independent former member of the Soviet Union, has asked the United States to assist its State Committee for Nuclear and Radiation Safety (SCNRS) in improving its regulatory control in technical fields for which it has responsibility. The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) is providing this assistance in several areas, including management of radioactive waste and spent fuel. Radioactive wastes resulting from nuclear power plant operation, maintenance, and decommissioning must be stored and ultimately disposed of appropriately. In addition, radioactive residue from radioisotopes used in various industrial and medical applications must be managed. The objective of this program is to provide the Ukrainian SCNRS with the information it needs to establish regulatory control over uranium mining and milling activities in the Zheltye Vody (Yellow Waters) area and radioactive waste disposal in the Pripyat (Chernobyl) area among others. The author of this report, head of the Environmental Technology Section, Health Sciences Research Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory, accompanied NRC staff to Ukraine to meet with SCNRS staff and visit sites in question. The report highlights problems at the sites visited and recommends license conditions that SCNRS can require to enhance safety of handling mining and milling wastes. The author's responsibility was specifically for the visit to Zheltye Vody and the mining and milling waste sites associated with that facility. An itinerary for the Zheltye Vody portion of the trip is included as Appendix A

  2. Radiations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pujol Mora, J.

    1999-01-01

    The exposition to ionizing radiations is a constant fact in the life of the human being and its utilization as diagnostic and therapeutic method is generalized. However, it is notorious how as years go on, the fear to the ionizing radiation seems to persist too, and this fact is not limited to the common individual, but to the technical personnel and professional personnel that labors with them same. (S. Grainger) [es

  3. 14 CFR 91.223 - Terrain awareness and warning system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... to the terrain awareness and warning system audio and visual warnings. (d) Exceptions. Paragraphs (a... after March 29, 2002. Except as provided in paragraph (d) of this section, no person may operate a... minimum meets the requirements for Class B equipment in Technical Standard Order (TSO)-C151. (b) Airplanes...

  4. Turbulence in complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Jakob [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmosheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a model of the spectral velocity-tensor in neutral flow over complex terrain. The resulting equations are implemented in a computer code using the mean flow generated by a linear mean flow model as input. It estimates turbulence structure over hills (except on the lee side if recirculation is present) in the so-called outer layer and also models the changes in turbulence statistics in the vicinity roughness changes. The generated turbulence fields are suitable as input for dynamic load calculations on wind turbines and other tall structures and is under implementation in the collection of programs called WA{sup s}P Engineering. (au) EFP-97; EU-JOULE-3. 15 refs.

  5. Goals, tasks and aspects of activity of Ukrainian State Scientific and Technical Center on Nuclear and Radiation Safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kovbasenko, Yu.

    2001-01-01

    The goal of SSTC NRS activities is scientific, technical, analytical and expert support to the Nuclear Regulatory Department as a State Nuclear and Radiation Safety Regulatory Authority.The main tasks are: 1. Development and improvement of normative and legal framework in the field of nuclear power use in Ukraine; 2. Expert support in making regulatory decisions; 3. Research and development work on improvement engineering and operational safety of nuclear power facilities in Ukraine. The organizational structure of SSTC NRS is also given

  6. On characterizing terrain visibility graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Evans

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A terrain is an $x$-monotone polygonal line in the $xy$-plane. Two vertices of a terrain are mutually visible if and only if there is no terrain vertex on or above the open line segment connecting them. A graph whose vertices represent terrain vertices and whose edges represent mutually visible pairs of terrain vertices is called a terrain visibility graph. We would like to find properties that are both necessary and sufficient for a graph to be a terrain visibility graph; that is, we would like to characterize terrain visibility graphs.Abello et al. [Discrete and Computational Geometry, 14(3:331--358, 1995] showed that all terrain visibility graphs are “persistent”. They showed that the visibility information of a terrain point set implies some ordering requirements on the slopes of the lines connecting pairs of points in any realization, and as a step towards showing sufficiency, they proved that for any persistent graph $M$ there is a total order on the slopes of the (pseudo lines in a generalized configuration of points whose visibility graph is $M$.We give a much simpler proof of this result by establishing an orientation to every triple of vertices, reflecting some slope ordering requirements that are consistent with $M$ being the visibility graph, and prove that these requirements form a partial order. We give a faster algorithm to construct a total order on the slopes. Our approach attempts to clarify the implications of the graph theoretic properties on the ordering of the slopes, and may be interpreted as defining properties on an underlying oriented matroid that we show is a restricted type of $3$-signotope.

  7. Direct Penetrating Radiation Monitoring Systems: Technical Evaluation for Use at Area G, Los Alamos National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    D. Kraig; W. A. Treadaway; R. J. Wechsler

    1999-01-01

    Recent advances and commercialization of electret-ion-chamber (EIC) technology for photon measurements prompted us to consider EKs as a replacement for our TLD system. After laboratory tests indicated that both systems gave adequate results for controlled exposures, throughout 1998 we conducted field tests with paired TLDs and EICS, in LANL technical areas and in public areas. We had approximately 30 paired sampling sites at Area G. At each sampling site, we deployed three TLDs and three EICS. The EICS were contained in air-tight jars, each of which was placed in a Tyvek envelope and hung about 1 m above the ground. The dosimeters were read (and, if necessary, replaced) every three months. At the sites outside Area G, the TLD readings for the first two quarters were statistically significantly higher than those of the EICS: group average exposures were 38 and 36, compared with 33 mR (both quarters) for the EICS; during quarter 3, the EIC average (40 mR) was higher than the TLD average (34 mR); and during quarter 4, the two systems were statistically the same: EIC = 42, TLD = 41 with a p-value of 0.61. We are still evaluating these differences and performing additional laboratory studies to determine causes. At the Area G sites,we noticed that several of the TLDs gave much higher readings than their co-located EICS; we believe that the TLDs were over-responding by ∼50% to the low-energy (60-keV) gamma radiation associated with 241 Am, whereas the EICS were responding accurately. We conclude that EICS are more accurate at a wide range of gamma energies and are preferable to TLDs in environments where a significant fraction of the photons are low energy

  8. Intraarticular Sacroiliac Joint Injection Under Computed Tomography Fluoroscopic Guidance: A Technical Note to Reduce Procedural Time and Radiation Dose

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paik, Nam Chull

    2016-01-01

    PurposeA technique for computed tomography fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided intraarticular (IA) sacroiliac joint (SIJ) injection was devised to limit procedural time and radiation dose.MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective analysis and waived the requirement for informed consent. Overall, 36 consecutive diagnostic or therapeutic IA SIJ injections (unilateral, 20; bilateral, 16) performed in 34 patients (female, 18; male, 16) with a mean age of 45.5 years (range 20–76 years) under CTF guidance were analyzed, assessing technical success (i.e., IA contrast spread), procedural time, and radiation dose.ResultsAll injections were successful from a technical perspective and were free of serious complications. Respective median procedural times and effective doses of SIJ injection were as follows: unilateral, 5.28 min (range 3.58–8.00 min) and 0.11 millisievert (mSv; range 0.07–0.24 mSv); and bilateral, 6.72 min (range 4.17–21.17 min) and 0.11 mSv (range 0.09–0.51 mSv).ConclusionsGiven the high rate of technical success achieved in limited time duration and with little radiation exposure, CTF-guided IA SIJ injection is a practical and low-risk procedure.

  9. Intraarticular Sacroiliac Joint Injection Under Computed Tomography Fluoroscopic Guidance: A Technical Note to Reduce Procedural Time and Radiation Dose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paik, Nam Chull, E-mail: pncspine@gmail.com [Arumdaun Wooldul Spine Hospital, Department of Radiology (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-07-15

    PurposeA technique for computed tomography fluoroscopy (CTF)-guided intraarticular (IA) sacroiliac joint (SIJ) injection was devised to limit procedural time and radiation dose.MethodsOur Institutional Review Board approved this retrospective analysis and waived the requirement for informed consent. Overall, 36 consecutive diagnostic or therapeutic IA SIJ injections (unilateral, 20; bilateral, 16) performed in 34 patients (female, 18; male, 16) with a mean age of 45.5 years (range 20–76 years) under CTF guidance were analyzed, assessing technical success (i.e., IA contrast spread), procedural time, and radiation dose.ResultsAll injections were successful from a technical perspective and were free of serious complications. Respective median procedural times and effective doses of SIJ injection were as follows: unilateral, 5.28 min (range 3.58–8.00 min) and 0.11 millisievert (mSv; range 0.07–0.24 mSv); and bilateral, 6.72 min (range 4.17–21.17 min) and 0.11 mSv (range 0.09–0.51 mSv).ConclusionsGiven the high rate of technical success achieved in limited time duration and with little radiation exposure, CTF-guided IA SIJ injection is a practical and low-risk procedure.

  10. International conference on non-military radiation emergencies: [Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1986-01-01

    The subject of this report was limited to non-military radiation emergencies because such events needed to be addressed and the topic was considered to be manageable. The Conference theme developed around the lessons learned from the radiation emergencies at Chernobyl, Three Mile Island, and Windscale. Specific topics to be considered included acute and long-term effects of radiation exposure; frequency and nature of radiation emergencies; national standards for exposures to ionizing radiation; plans and procedures for responding to emergencies at the hospital, community, and national levels; and responsibilities of physicians and other health professionals regarding radiation exposures and emergencies

  11. Radiation research at the Technical University of Lodz 1970-80

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroh, J.; Pekala, W.

    1980-01-01

    A review is presented on both fundamental and applied research carried out in the Institute of Applied Radiation Chemistry (IARC) in the period 1970-1980. The fundamental research refers mainly to the properties and behaviour of electrons and ions in low temperature glasses. The applied work concerns radiation induced polymerization, modification of polymers, organic synthesis and radiation chemistry of food. (author)

  12. TERRAIN, HENRY COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, BARREN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, LOWNDES COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, FRANKLIN COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, HARRISON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, LOGAN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, LAWRENCE COUNTY, Ohio USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, SEBASTIAN COUNTY, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographical data that were used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, MONROE COUNTY, Michigan USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, ALLENDALE COUNTY, SOUTH CAROLINA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, WAKULLA COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, BRADFORD COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, GADSDEN COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, LEVY COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, WOODFORD COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, POWELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, TALLAPOOSA COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN Submission for CHICKASAW, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, CHEROKEE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, JEFFERSON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, POWESHIEK COUNTY, IOWA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, RANDOLPH COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, ELMORE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, WASHINGTON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, WASHINGTON COUNTY, Ohio USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, WINNESHIEK COUNTY, IOWA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, WAYNE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, MCLEAN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, WINSTON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, CHAMBERS COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, PERRY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, ESTILL COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, NATCHITOCHES PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, CLINTON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, CHILTON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, GRAYSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, GARRARD COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, Sedgwick COUNTY, Kansas USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, MACOMB COUNTY, MI, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, MARSHALL COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. Terrain Data, Caroline COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, SUWANNEE COUNTY, FLORIDA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, CHOCTAW COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, CARLISLE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, SIMPSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, GRAVES COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, MADISON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, TANEY COUNTY, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, FRANKLIN PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, Catahoula PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, RICHLAND PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, OVERTON COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, STEWART COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, MOREHOUSE PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, ALLEN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, LEWIS COUNTY, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, BUFFALO COUNTY, WISCONSIN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, MARENGO COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, CLARKE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, HART COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, HOUSTON COUNTY, TN, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, JESSAMINE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, LAWRENCE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, BALLARD COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, NELSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, EVANGELINE PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. Terrain Adaptive Reconfiguration of Mobility

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Develop an algorithm (and software) to automatically adapt a reconfigurable robot to different types of terrains for improved mobility, that compared to SOA:...

  20. TERRAIN, MENIFEE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, SHELBY COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, Platte County, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, SCOTT COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, FAYETTE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, MUHLENBERG COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, CARTER COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, SANTA CRUZ COUNTY, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. NPSNET: Dynamic Terrain and Cultured Feature Depiction

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-09-01

    defaults. bridge(terrain *ptr, vertex pos, bridge mattype bmat ); This constructor takes only the pointer to the underlying terrain, a placement, and a...material to use for construction. bridge(terrain *ptr, vertex pos, bridge-mattype bmat , float dir); This constructor takes a terrain pointer, a...placement position, a material to use, and a direction to run. bridge(terrain *ptr, vertex pos, bridge-mattype bmat , float dir, float width, float height

  10. Radiation protection education and training for physicians. Technical qualification for radiation protection and radiation protection instruction for physicians. More important than ever

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loecker, Hubert

    2017-01-01

    The medical application of ionizing radiation - especially X-ray diagnostics - is contributing most of the civilizing radiation exposure of the population. More than 80 percent of occupationally exposed persons work in nuclear medicine. Therefore radiation protection in medicine and instruction and training of physicians is more important than ever.

  11. A Socio-Technical Analysis of Knowledgeable Practice in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano, Reynaldo Garza

    2012-01-01

    The role of the modern radiation therapist is directed and driven by the organizational system. Changes affecting their role are implemented as a response to changes in the industry. Operations of the modern cancer center, with new and changing treatment technologies bring questions regarding the learning process of radiation therapists at a time…

  12. Notification determining technical standards concerning prevention of radiation injuries by electron capture detectors for gas chromatography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    This rule is established under the provisions of the law on the prevention of radiation injuries by radioisotopes, the ordinance and the regulation for the execution of the law. This rule is applied to electron capture detectors for gas chromatography under the law. Basic terms are defined, such as detector radiation source, detector container and carrier gas. The detectors shall consist of detector radiation sources and containers, and the containers must be such that the radiation sources can not be easily taken away and never cause the danger to fall off. The induction and discharge mouths of the detector containers shall be shut tightly with caps, etc. The main structures and radiation sources of detectors shall be made of materials, which are difficult to corrode, and do not melt and easily cause chemical change below 800 deg. C. Detector radiation sources shall be made of metals plated with nickel 63 less than 20 milli-curie. The radiation dose rate on the surface of a detector shall be shielded to less than 0.06 milli-rem an hour. The temperature of detectors and carrier gas shall not exceed 350 deg. C. Corrosive gas shall not be used as carrier gas. The period of effective indication is 5 years. The method of washing, and the conditions of leak, heat-resistance and shock-resistance examinations are defined, respectively. (Okada, K.)

  13. Considerations of health benefit-cost analysis for activities involving ionizing radiation exposure and alternatives. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1977-01-01

    The report deals with development of methodology for the health benefit-cost analysis of activities that result in radiation exposure to humans. It attempts to frame the problems and to communicate the necessary elements of the complex technical process required for this method of analysis. The main thrust of the report is to develop a methodology for analyzing the benefits and costs of these activities. Application of the methodology is demonstrated for nuclear power production and medical uses of radiation, but no definitive analysis is attempted. The report concludes that benefit-cost analysis can be effectively applied to these applications and that it provides a basis for more informed governmental decision-making and for public participation in evaluating the issues of radiation exposure. It notes, however, that for cases where national policy is involved, decisions must inevitably be made on the basis of value judgements to which such analyses can make only limited contributions. An important conclusion is that a significant reduction in radiation exposure to the population is apparently achievable by development of methods for eliminating unproductive medical X-ray exposure

  14. Processing Terrain Point Cloud Data

    KAUST Repository

    DeVore, Ronald

    2013-01-10

    Terrain point cloud data are typically acquired through some form of Light Detection And Ranging sensing. They form a rich resource that is important in a variety of applications including navigation, line of sight, and terrain visualization. Processing terrain data has not received the attention of other forms of surface reconstruction or of image processing. The goal of terrain data processing is to convert the point cloud into a succinct representation system that is amenable to the various application demands. The present paper presents a platform for terrain processing built on the following principles: (i) measuring distortion in the Hausdorff metric, which we argue is a good match for the application demands, (ii) a multiscale representation based on tree approximation using local polynomial fitting. The basic elements held in the nodes of the tree can be efficiently encoded, transmitted, visualized, and utilized for the various target applications. Several challenges emerge because of the variable resolution of the data, missing data, occlusions, and noise. Techniques for identifying and handling these challenges are developed. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  15. A Technical Approach to the Evaluation of Radiofrequency Radiation Emissions from Mobile Telephony Base Stations

    OpenAIRE

    Buckus, Raimondas; Struk?inskien?, Birute; Raistenskis, Juozas; Stukas, Rimantas; ?idlauskien?, Aurelija; ?erkauskien?, Rimant?; Isopescu, Dorina Nicolina; Stabryla, Jan; Cretescu, Igor

    2017-01-01

    During the last two decades, the number of macrocell mobile telephony base station antennas emitting radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in residential areas has increased significantly, and therefore much more attention is being paid to RF EMR and its effects on human health. Scientific field measurements of public exposure to RF EMR (specifically to radio frequency radiation) from macrocell mobile telephony base station antennas and RF electromagnetic field (EMF) intensity p...

  16. Safety evaluation methods applied at the Technical department of the Institute for radiation protection and nuclear safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crabol, B.

    1990-12-01

    Institute of radiation protection and nuclear safety (IPSN) has established a Technical emergency center (CTC) for nuclear facilities with the aim to supply the public with technical data analysis of incidents, mainly, all the predicted consequences of radioactive release into the environment. From technical point of view, the functioning of CTC relies on the work of two units, one in charge of the state of accident installation, and the second responsible for evaluation of radiological environmental effects. The latter is concerned with the meteorological situation, it relies sometimes on local, and sometimes on national weather forecast in order to compile data needed for calculating atmospheric transport at the and in the vicinity of the affected site, and further in the region and across the borders. For this analysis the Unit possesses operational computer codes. The code (SIROCCO) can take into account the kinetics of particulates and all the time dependent meteorological conditions. This calculation model can either treat the dispersed isotopes or isotope chains (rare gases, cesium isotopes, iodine isotopes...). One version of this code enables calculation of the consequences at medium and long distances using the methods of Meteorologie Nationale [fr

  17. Complex terrain and wind lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingoel, F.

    2009-08-15

    This thesis includes the results of a PhD study about complex terrain and wind lidars. The study mostly focuses on hilly and forested areas. Lidars have been used in combination with cups, sonics and vanes, to reach the desired vertical measurement heights. Several experiments are performed in complex terrain sites and the measurements are compared with two different flow models; a linearised flow model LINCOM and specialised forest model SCADIS. In respect to the lidar performance in complex terrain, the results showed that horizontal wind speed errors measured by a conically scanning lidar can be of the order of 3-4% in moderately-complex terrain and up to 10% in complex terrain. The findings were based on experiments involving collocated lidars and meteorological masts, together with flow calculations over the same terrains. The lidar performance was also simulated with the commercial software WAsP Engineering 2.0 and was well predicted except for some sectors where the terrain is particularly steep. Subsequently, two experiments were performed in forested areas; where the measurements are recorded at a location deep-in forest and at the forest edge. Both sites were modelled with flow models and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated by LINCOM model was only reliable between 1 and 2 tree height (h) above canopy. The SCADIS model reported better correlation with the measurements in forest up to approx6h. At the forest edge, LINCOM model was used by allocating a slope half-in half out of the forest based on the suggestions of previous studies. The optimum slope angle was reported as 17 deg.. Thus, a suggestion was made to use WAsP Engineering 2.0 for forest edge modelling with known limitations and the applied method. The SCADIS model worked better than the LINCOM model at the forest edge but the model reported closer results to the measurements at upwind than the downwind and this should be

  18. Hospital waste sterilization: a technical and economic comparison between radiation and microwave treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tata, A.; Beone, F.

    1995-01-01

    Hospital waste (HW) disposal is becoming a problem of increasing importance in almost all industrially advanced countries. In Italy the yearly hospital waste production is about 250,000 tons and only 60,000 are treated by incineration at present time. As by a recent Italian law a meaningful percentage of HW (50 to 60%), corresponding to food residuals, plastic, paper, various organic materials, etc., could be landfilled as municipal refuses if preliminarily submitted to a suitable sterilization treatment. Under this perspective, sterilization/sanitation techniques represent now a technically and commercially viable alternative to HW thermal destruction that, besides more and more socially and politically less accepted. Electron Beam (EB) and Microwave (MW) treatments are two of the most interesting and emerging HW sterilization techniques, and, based on engineering real data, a technical and economic comparison is carried out, focusing vantages and limits of each process. (author)

  19. Treinta y Tres stratigraphic terrain: ex Cuchilla Dionisio terrain. Uruguay

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bossi, J.

    2010-01-01

    From 1998 we are discussing if the eastern area of ZCSB is an allochtonous block named TCD or if it belongs to Dom Feliciano belt with an age of 500 - 700 Ma. This crustal block is difficult to study because Laguna Merin Graben cut it in two around 4000 k m2 crustal fragments distant s more de 100 km between them. Southern block which was named T PE by Masquelín (2006) was demonstrated as allochtonous by Bossi and Gaucher (2004) destroying the Cdf model but seriously complicating the stratigraphic terminology. It is proposed to do some changes in order to profit the general agreement about allochtomy. The CDT with change by Treinta y Tres terrane; T PE become sub - terrain Punta del Este; sub - terrain Cuchilla Dionisio for the septetrional block. From 1998 we are discussing if the eastern area of ZCSB is an allochtonous block named TCD or if it belongs to Dom Feliciano belt with an age of 500 - 700 Ma. This crustal block is difficult to study because Laguna Merín Graben cut it in two around 4000 k m2 crustal fragments distant s more de 100 km between them. Southern block which was named T PE by Masquelín (2006) was demonstrated as allochtonous by Bossi and Gaucher (2004) destroying the CDF model but seriously complicating the stratigraphic terminology. It is proposed to do some changes in order to profit the general agreement about allochtomy. The CDT with change by Treinta y Tres terrain; TPE become sub - terrain Punta del Este; sub - terrain Cuchilla Dionisio for the septetrional block

  20. Role of the Technical Aspects of Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy Treatment of Prostate Cancer: A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clemente, Stefania, E-mail: clemente_stefania@libero.it [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata Rionero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy); Nigro, Roberta [Azienda Sanitaria Locale Rieti, Roma (Italy); Oliviero, Caterina [Istituto di Ricovero e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Centro di Riferimento Oncologico della Basilicata Rionero in Vulture, Potenza (Italy); Marchioni, Chiara [Azienda Sanitaria Locale Rieti, Roma (Italy); Esposito, Marco [Azienda Sanitaria, Firenze (Italy); Giglioli, Francesca Romana [Azienda Ospedaliera Città della Salute e della Scienza di Torino, Torino (Italy); Mancosu, Pietro [Humanitas Clinical and Research Hospital, Rozzano, Milano (Italy); Marino, Carmelo [Humanitas Centro Catanese di Oncologia, Catania (Italy); Russo, Serenella [Azienda Sanitaria, Firenze (Italy); Stasi, Michele [Azienda Ospedaliera Ordine Mauriziano di Torino, Torino (Italy); Strigari, Lidia [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Roma (Italy); Veronese, Ivan [Universita' degli Studi di Milano, Milano (Italy); Landoni, Valeria [Istituto Nazionale Tumori Regina Elena, Roma (Italy)

    2015-01-01

    The increasing use of moderate (<35 fractions) and extreme (<5 fractions) hypofractionated radiation therapy in prostate cancer is yielding favorable results, both in terms of maintained biochemical response and toxicity. Several hypofractionation (HF) schemes for the treatment of prostate cancer are available, although there is considerable variability in the techniques used to manage intra-/interfraction motion and deliver radiation doses. We performed a review of the published studies on HF regimens as a topic of interest for the Stereotactic Ablative Radiotherapy working group, which is part of the Italian Association of Medical Physics. Aspects of organ motion management (imaging for contouring, target volume definition, and rectum/bladder preparation) and treatment delivery (prostate localization, image guided radiation therapy strategy and frequency) were evaluated and categorized to assess outcome relative to disease control and toxicity. Despite the heterogeneity of the data, some interesting trends that emerged from the review might be useful in identifying an optimum HF strategy.

  1. Technical qualification requirements and training programs for radiation protection personnel at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Copenhaver, E.D.; Houser, B.S.; Butler, H.M. Jr.; Bogard, J.S.; Fair, M.F.; Haynes, C.E.; Parzyck, D.C.

    1986-04-01

    This document deals with the policies and practices of the Environmental and Occupational Safety Division (EOSD) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in regard to the selection, training, qualification, and requalification of radiation protection staff assigned to reactor and nonreactor nuclear facilities. Included are personnel at facilities that: (1) operate reactors or particle accelerators; (2) produce, process, or store radioactive liquid or solid waste; (3) conduct separations operations; (4) engage in research with radioactive materials and radiation sources; and (5) conduct irradiated materials inspection, fuel fabrication, deconamination, or recovery operations. The EOSD personnel also have environmental surveillance and operational and industrial safety responsibilities related to the total Laboratory

  2. Radiation protection rules for the technical application of sealed radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1982-10-01

    The standard is limited to operation containers and radiation equipment in which the radiation is made useful according to one or both of the following techniques for the application purpose: 1) by opening an aperture on the operation container without driving out the emitter (working position of the emitter in the operation container). 2) By driving out the emitter from the operation container within solid or flexible guide pipes (working position of the emitter outside the operation container). The regulations are not valid furthermore for operation containers and equipment which are to take up emitters with activities greater than 185 ps (5,000 Ci). (orig./HP) [de

  3. The radiation accident at Institute for Energy Technology Sept. 1982. Some technical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berteig, L.; Flatby, J.

    1985-01-01

    On September 2, 1982 a radiation accident with overexposure of one person happened at the gamma irradiation plant at Institute for Energy Technology, Kjeller, Norway. This person died from the radiation injury 13 days later. In the report reference is made to the work of different groups and bodies in connection with the accident. An analysis of the causes of the accident is given. For admittance control to the irradiation area there were generally two independent door interlock systems, one irradiation source position related and the other radiation related. The latter was dismantled for repair at the time of the accident. A micro-switch failure left the source in an unshielded position, initiated a green light on the control panel and released the interlock system of the door. According to working instructions a mobile radiation monitor should have been checked for proper function and carried by anyone entering the irradiation room. This seems not to have been carried out correctly. The conditions set forth for the restarting of the irradiation plant are presented. (orig./HP)

  4. R-IDEAL : A Framework for Systematic Clinical Evaluation of Technical Innovations in Radiation Oncology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkooijen, Helena M; Kerkmeijer, LGW; Fuller, Clifton D; Huddart, Robbert; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Verheij, Marcel; Mook, Stella; Sahgal, Arjun; Hall, Emma; Schultz, Chris

    2017-01-01

    The pace of innovation in radiation oncology is high and the window of opportunity for evaluation narrow. Financial incentives, industry pressure, and patients' demand for high-tech treatments have led to widespread implementation of innovations before, or even without, robust evidence of improved

  5. Technical Basis for Expedited Processing of Radiation Dose Assessments for NTPR Hiroshima and Nagasaki Participants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-01

    phenomena can include processes such as wind, rainfall runoff and infiltration, and flooding. Although soil samples taken in the area of Nishiyama...1980), weathering effects have been postulated to account for inconsistencies found in measurements of soil samples from the Nishiyama Reservoir...Processing of Radiation Dose Assessments for NTPR Hiroshima and Nagasaki Participants DISTRIBUTION A. Approved for public release; distribution is

  6. Radiological protection. Technical recommendations for monitoring the exposure of individuals to external radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1975-01-01

    Advice is given on the assessment of personal doses received by each worker. The objectives of individual monitoring programs and the requirements which personal dosemeters should satisfy are given. The paper is mainly concerned with assessment of doses due to photon and electron radiations

  7. The provision of Technical Co-operation: The model project for upgrading radiation protection infrastructure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barretto, P.M.C.

    2001-01-01

    The paper describes the IAEA's systematic effort to address the inadequate situation in many of its Member States with regard to radiation protection and safety. For this effort a special project was created and implemented in the past five years to create or strengthen existing radiation protection infrastructure in 52 countries where such infrastructure was non-existent or not appropriate for the type of practice involved. The implementation of this project focused on the development of qualified human resources, assistance for introduction of appropriate legislation and equipment for inspection and analysis. Workplans were tailored to the individual needs of each participating country and the elements of these workplans were grouped into five milestones -- regulatory framework, occupational exposure control, medical exposure control, public exposure control, and emergency preparedness and response capabilities. By the end of 2000 more than 70% of the participating countries had radiation protection laws promulgated and a regulatory authority established; 46% had regulations adopted and 42% had a system of notification, authorization and control of radiation sources operational. During the five years of implementation, 555 fellows received individual training, another 2278 participated in training courses, over 1000 expert missions were fielded and equipment worth about US $6 million was provided. The total cost was over US $17 million. (author)

  8. Development of radiative-cooling materials. Final technical report: FY 1980-1981

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-01-01

    Work on research and development on glazing and selective emitter materials that will enhance day and night sky radiative cooling is described. The emphasis is on glazing development with a secondary interest in the appropriate selective emitter. The testing focused on the individual material properties. (MHR)

  9. Automatic terrain modeling using transfinite element analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan; Calo, Victor M.

    2010-01-01

    An automatic procedure for modeling terrain is developed based on L2 projection-based interpolation of discrete terrain data onto transfinite function spaces. The function space is refined automatically by the use of image processing techniques

  10. The assessment of occupational protection conditions in workplaces with high levels of exposure to natural radiation. Report from a technical committee meeting. Working material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2002-01-01

    Occupational exposure from natural radiation is, in the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) 2000 Report, estimated to contribute to more than 80 percent of the world-wide annual collective dose from occupational exposure, uranium mining excluded. The Agency's Radiation Safety Standards Series, the Requirements, and the Safety Guides (jointly sponsored by the Agency and the International Labour Office), address the control of occupational exposures from natural sources of radiation. In addition, some Safety Reports on specific issues are in the process of being finalized. Following upon recommendations to the Agency from its Member States to provide further guidance on the control of occupational exposure to natural radiation, a Technical Committee Meeting on Assessment of Occupational Radiation Protection Conditions in Workplaces with High Levels of Exposure to Natural Radiation was held in Vienna from 7 to 11 May 2001. The objective of the meeting was to produce an inventory of problem areas, make an assessment of the problem and propose a draft work plan for the Agency, This IAEA Working Material includes the report from the meeting, including the presentations made. Based on the recommendations made by the Technical Committee, a work plan is being initiated, implying that more attention will be paid to occupational exposure from natural radiation sources in the Occupational Radiation Protection programme

  11. Nuclear Reaction Data and Uncertainties for Radiation Damage. Summary Report of the Technical Meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, P.J.; Sjöstrand, H.; Simakov, S.P.

    2016-08-01

    This Meeting was organized to implement the recommendation of the second Research Coordinated Meeting (RCM) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Coordinated Research Project (CRP) “Primary Radiation Damage Cross Sections” to analyse the accuracy and consistency of the radiation damage-relevant nuclear data in the major nuclear data evaluations with the eventual goal of identifying the most reliable data and providing quantitative uncertainty estimates. Participants have considered the status of the primary nuclear data, such as reaction recoils spectra in the latest releases of ENDF, JEFF, JENDL, FENDL, ROSFOND and TENDL nuclear data libraries, and the ways of deriving the damage quantities KERMA, NRT- or arc-dpa and gas production cross sections as well as the recipes for an assessment of their uncertainties. This report contains the contemporary view of the Meeting participants on these issues in the form of a consolidated set of statements, recommendations and individual summaries. (author)

  12. Spectra of Velocity components over Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panofsky, H. A.; Larko, D.; Lipschut, R.

    1982-01-01

    : When air moves over terrain with changed characteristics, then (1) for wavelengths very short relative to the fetch over the new terrain, the spectral densities are in equilibrium with the new terrain. (1) for wavelengths long compared to this fetch, spectral densities remain unchanged if the ground...

  13. Delayed immunologic effects of low dose radiation in Japanese A-bomb survivors. Technical progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makinodan, Takashi.

    1985-01-01

    Samples collected from 832 A-bomb survivors were analyzed for natural killer activity, interleukin production, interferon production, serum interferon levels, and circulating immune complex levels. The most striking finding was a significant radiation-sex interaction for NK activity. The NK of females exposed to 100+ rads was decreased compared to those exposed to 0 to 99 rads. A significant increase in NK activity with age ATB was observed, as well as an increase with age in circulating immune complex

  14. Renal denervation for refractory hypertension. Technical aspects, complications and radiation exposure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheurig-Muenkler, C.; Kroencke, T.J.; Powerski, M.J. [Charite Universitatesmedizin, Berlin (Germany). Radiologie; Weiss, W.; Toelle, M.; Giet, M. van der; Zidek, W. [Charite Universitatesmedizin, Berlin (Germany). Nephrologie; Foert, E. [DRK Klinikum Berlin Mitte, Berlin (Germany). Radiologie

    2013-06-15

    Purpose: To analyze procedural details, complications and radiation exposure in renal denervation (RDN) using the Medtronic Symplicity {sup registered} device in the treatment of refractory hypertension. Materials and Methods: Fifty three consecutive patients underwent RDN. The number of ablations per artery, peri-procedural complications, procedure time (PT), fluoroscopy time (FT), dose-area product (DAP) and procedure-related complications were documented. Additionally, the radiation dose was compared between obese (body mass index {>=} 30 kg/m{sup 2}) and non-obese patients. Results: Bilateral RDN was performed in 50/53 (94 %) cases and with a minimum of 4 ablations per artery in 33/50 (66 %), the mean count being 5.4 (range R: 2 - 13) on the right and 4.3 (R: 1 - 10) on the left. The FT and DAP decreased significantly over the first 12 procedures, reaching a steady state with a median FT of 11.2 min (R: 7.5 - 27) and a median DAP of 4796 cGy x cm{sup 2} (R: 1076 - 21 371), resulting in an effective dose of 15.7 mSv. The median PT was 57 min (R: 40 - 70). Obese patients had a 3.3-fold higher radiation dose (p < 0.001). We observed one severe spasm and one imminent respiratory depression, both resolved without sequelae. Conclusion: For an experienced interventionalist, RDN has a short learning curve with a low risk profile. The radiation dose does not exceed that of other renal artery interventions, but is explicitly higher in obese patients, who account for a large portion of patients with refractory hypertension. (orig.)

  15. Cloud Scavenging Effects on Aerosol Radiative and Cloud-nucleating Properties - Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogren, John A.; Sheridan, Patrick S.; Andrews, Elisabeth

    2009-03-05

    The optical properties of aerosol particles are the controlling factors in determining direct aerosol radiative forcing. These optical properties depend on the chemical composition and size distribution of the aerosol particles, which can change due to various processes during the particles’ lifetime in the atmosphere. Over the course of this project we have studied how cloud processing of atmospheric aerosol changes the aerosol optical properties. A counterflow virtual impactor was used to separate cloud drops from interstitial aerosol and parallel aerosol systems were used to measure the optical properties of the interstitial and cloud-scavenged aerosol. Specifically, aerosol light scattering, back-scattering and absorption were measured and used to derive radiatively significant parameters such as aerosol single scattering albedo and backscatter fraction for cloud-scavenged and interstitial aerosol. This data allows us to demonstrate that the radiative properties of cloud-processed aerosol can be quite different than pre-cloud aerosol. These differences can be used to improve the parameterization of aerosol forcing in climate models.

  16. A Combined Tissue Kinetics and Dosimetric Model of Respiratory Tissue Exposed to Radiation. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John R. Ford

    2005-01-01

    Existing dosimetric models of the radiation response of tissues are essentially static. Consideration of changes in the cell populations over time has not been addressed realistically. For a single acute dose this is not a concern, but for modeling chronic exposures or fractionated acute exposures, the natural turnover and progression of cells could have a significant impact on a variety of endpoints. This proposal addresses the shortcomings of current methods by combining current dose-based calculation techniques with information on the cell turnover for a model tissue. The proposed model will examine effects at the single-cell level for an exposure of a section of human bronchiole. The cell model will be combined with Monte Carlo calculations of doses to cells and cell nuclei due to varying dose-rates of different radiation qualities. Predictions from the model of effects on survival, apoptosis rates, and changes in the number of cycling and differentiating cells will be tested experimentally. The availability of dynamic dosimetric models of tissues at the single-cell level will be useful for analysis of low-level radiation exposures and in the development of new radiotherapy protocols

  17. Policy and technical matters for the application of ICRP 1977 recommendations to Japanese radiation protection regulations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamada, Tatsuji

    1987-01-01

    Tens years has passed since 1977 when the ICRP recommendations were made, and the work of revising the Japanese radiation regulations in response to the recommendations is almost completed. The work has been conducted mainly by an elemental group established under the Radiation Council. The elemental group submitted the first interim report to the Council in 1980, which presented recommendations on the objectives of radiation protection, dose equivalent limits for the general public, facilities inspection and products testing, medical surveillance, etc. After making deliberations in response to studies by the ICRP working group, the elemental group compiled the second interim report in July 1981. Further studies were conducted and the final report was submitted to the Council in March 1983. The final report covered the definitions of such terms as 'dose equivalent', dose equivalent limit for workers, exposure dose in the event of emergency, dose equivalent limit for the general public, various standards for protection, classification of workers by working conditions, classification of work sites monitoring of exposure dose, and implementation of medical surveillance. After making deliberations, the Council submitted a report in 1986 to government agencies concerned, whose contents are almost the same as those of the above final report except for some amendments. (Nogami, K.)

  18. Computer aided dosimetry and verification of exposure to radiation. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Waller, D.; Stodilka, R.Z.; Leach, K.E.; Prud'homme-Lalonde, L.

    2002-06-01

    In the timeframe following the September 11th attacks on the United States, increased emphasis has been placed on Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) preparedness. Of prime importance is rapid field assessment of potential radiation exposure to Canadian Forces field personnel. This work set up a framework for generating an 'expert' computer system for aiding and assisting field personnel in determining the extent of radiation insult to military personnel. Data was gathered by review of the available literature, discussions with medical and health physics personnel having hands-on experience dealing with radiation accident victims, and from experience of the principal investigator. Flow charts and generic data fusion algorithms were developed. Relationships between known exposure parameters, patient interview and history, clinical symptoms, clinical work-ups, physical dosimetry, biological dosimetry, and dose reconstruction as critical data indicators were investigated. The data obtained was examined in terms of information theory. A main goal was to determine how best to generate an adaptive model (i.e. when more data becomes available, how is the prediction improved). Consideration was given to determination of predictive algorithms for health outcome. In addition, the concept of coding an expert medical treatment advisor system was developed. (author)

  19. Computer aided dosimetry and verification of exposure to radiation. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waller, D. [SAIC Canada (Canada); Stodilka, R.Z.; Leach, K.E.; Prud' homme-Lalonde, L. [Defence R and D Canada (DRDC), Radiation Effects Group, Space Systems and Technology, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada)

    2002-06-15

    In the timeframe following the September 11th attacks on the United States, increased emphasis has been placed on Chemical, Biological, Radiological and Nuclear (CBRN) preparedness. Of prime importance is rapid field assessment of potential radiation exposure to Canadian Forces field personnel. This work set up a framework for generating an 'expert' computer system for aiding and assisting field personnel in determining the extent of radiation insult to military personnel. Data was gathered by review of the available literature, discussions with medical and health physics personnel having hands-on experience dealing with radiation accident victims, and from experience of the principal investigator. Flow charts and generic data fusion algorithms were developed. Relationships between known exposure parameters, patient interview and history, clinical symptoms, clinical work-ups, physical dosimetry, biological dosimetry, and dose reconstruction as critical data indicators were investigated. The data obtained was examined in terms of information theory. A main goal was to determine how best to generate an adaptive model (i.e. when more data becomes available, how is the prediction improved). Consideration was given to determination of predictive algorithms for health outcome. In addition, the concept of coding an expert medical treatment advisor system was developed. (author)

  20. Nuclear chemistry on the Czech Technical University in Prague after introduction of structured study and foundation of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    John, J.

    2007-01-01

    In this presentation the author (head of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry) give a short review of history of the Department of Nuclear Chemistry and of the Centre for Radiochemistry and Radiation Chemistry of the Czech Technical University in Prague. Education in structured study in specialisation of nuclear chemistry in bachelor level, master level, as well as post-graduate study in nuclear chemistry with academic degree PhD. are realised. Some scientific results are presented

  1. Radiation processing of fruits and vegetables-a technically and economically feasible technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moy, J H

    1986-12-31

    Exporting fresh tropical fruits and vegetables to non-infested areas often requires an approved and efficacious quarantine treatment. The feasibility and efficacy of the gamma-radiation process has been demonstrated through quality retention of fresh commodities irradiated at 0.26-0.30 kGy for fruit fly control. Experimental results have shown that papayas and mangoes can be irradiated at up to 1.0 kGy without any adverse effects on their organoleptic and nutrient qualities. Thus it is possible to combine irradiation within this dose level with other techniques to extend the shelf-life of fruits. For example, the shelf-life of papayas can be extended 3-4 days longer after hot water treatment (49 degrees C for 20 minutes for decay control followed by gamma-radiation at 0.75 kGy.) Slowing of the fruit`s respiration results in a delay in its ripening. Irradiation at 0.30 to 0.50 kGy preserves the organoleptic qualities of California citrus and stone fruits. Citrus can tolerate higher doses than stone fruits especially if refrigeration follows irradiation. The extension of shelf-life of irradiated onions and potatoes at low dose (0.02 - 0.15 kGy) through sprout inhibition has been established by a number of studies. The prospect of low dose irradiation of fruits and vegetables is good because problems previously existing as barriers to early commercialization of the radiation process are being resolved. These include: government regulations; economic feasibility; and industry interest. Further efforts are needed, however, to develop international trade agreements on irradiated foods and to launch a consumer education program so as to instil confidence and increase consumer acceptance of the safety and benefits of irradiated foods

  2. Radiation processing of fruits and vegetables-a technically and economically feasible technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moy, J. H.

    1985-01-01

    Exporting fresh tropical fruits and vegetables to non-infested areas often requires an approved and efficacious quarantine treatment. The feasibility and efficacy of the gamma-radiation process has been demonstrated through quality retention of fresh commodities irradiated at 0.26-0.30 kGy for fruit fly control. Experimental results have shown that papayas and mangoes can be irradiated at up to 1.0 kGy without any adverse effects on their organoleptic and nutrient qualities. Thus it is possible to combine irradiation within this dose level with other techniques to extend the shelf-life of fruits. For example, the shelf-life of papayas can be extended 3-4 days longer after hot water treatment (49 degrees C for 20 minutes for decay control followed by gamma-radiation at 0.75 kGy.) Slowing of the fruit's respiration results in a delay in its ripening. Irradiation at 0.30 to 0.50 kGy preserves the organoleptic qualities of California citrus and stone fruits. Citrus can tolerate higher doses than stone fruits especially if refrigeration follows irradiation. The extension of shelf-life of irradiated onions and potatoes at low dose (0.02 - 0.15 kGy) through sprout inhibition has been established by a number of studies. The prospect of low dose irradiation of fruits and vegetables is good because problems previously existing as barriers to early commercialization of the radiation process are being resolved. These include: government regulations; economic feasibility; and industry interest. Further efforts are needed, however, to develop international trade agreements on irradiated foods and to launch a consumer education program so as to instil confidence and increase consumer acceptance of the safety and benefits of irradiated foods

  3. Scientific/Technical Report: Improvement in compensation and crystal growth of cadmium zinc telluride radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kelvin G. Lynn; Kelly A. Jones

    2007-01-01

    Comparison of actual accomplishments with goals and objectives: (1) Growth of 12 ingots--Washington State University (WSU) more than met this goal for the project by growing 12 final ingots for the year. Nine of the twelve crystal growth ingots resolved gamma radiation at room temperature. The other three ingots where resistivity of ∼ 3 x 10 8 Ohm*cm for CG32a, CG36, and CG42 lower than expected, however none of these were tried with blocking contacts. All ingots were evaluated from tip to heel. In these three cases, the group III, dopant Aluminum (Al) was not detected to a level to compensate the Cd vacancies in the cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) thus the ingots were lower resistivity. The nine ingots that were successful radiation detectors averaged a bulk resistivity of 1.25 x 10 10 Ohm*cm and with a average μτ product for electrons of ∼ 2 x 10 -4 cm 2 /V with a 1/4 microsecond shaping time with samples ∼2 mm in thickness. (2) Attempt new compensations techniques--WSU also met this goal. Several doping schemes were attempted and investigated with various amounts of excess Tellurium added to the growth. The combination of Al and Erbium (Er) were first attempted for these ingots and subsequently CG34 was grown with Al, Er and Holmium. These compensation techniques produced radiation detectors and are currently under investigation. These growths were made with significant different doping levels to determine the affect of the dopants. CG43 was doped with Indium and Er. Indium was introduced instead of Al to determine if Indium is more soluble than Al for CZT and was less oxidized. This may decrease the amount of low resistivity ingots grown by doping with Indium instead of Al. (3) Grow large single crystals--Several changes in approach occurred in the crystal growth furnace. Steps were taken to maximize the crystal growth interface during growth by modifying liners, quartz, heat sinks, crucibles and various growth steps and temperature profiles. CG39 ingot

  4. An advanced APD-based spectroscopic radiation monitor. Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell Woodring, PhD; James Christian, PhD

    2007-01-01

    A highly sensitized radiation imager is under development through DOE SBIR contract DE-FG02-99ER 82866. This imager will be extraordinarily useful to the DOE in its decontamination and decommissioning activities. The basis for this advanced, state-of-the-art radiation imager is a new type of photon detector, an avalanche photodiode (APD). Only recently has APD technology advanced to the point where it is useful for applications like the radiation imager. To date, the major drawback in the use of avalanche photodiodes was the inability to use many of them in a single application because of the need for many channels of readout, complicated device holders, and dead space between detectors. RMD has solved this dilemma through the development of compact arrays of APDs. Additionally, the fabrication technique has been refined to the point were the bulk production of large quantities of arrays is now feasible. These new APD arrays have excellent application flexibility. The capability to tailor the detector properties; such as size, sensitivity, pixellation, and pitch make APD arrays excellent candidates for a variety of photosensing schemes previously dominated by photomultiplier tubes (PMT). In fact, at RMD it is currently possible to make APD arrays with 2-mm 2 detectors (pixels) in monolithic square arrays 14 pixels on a side (196 detectors). As proposed in Phase II work, paneling 9 of these arrays (as the basis of a highly sensitive radiation imager) would make a photodetector that was 100 cm 2 in sensitive area. This results in approximately 1800 individual detectors that require data sampling and control. This is an enormous electronics load. To reduce the electronics complexity for the readout scheme of APD arrays (one of the major aspects of the proposed Phase II research) individual detectors (in the array) will be grouped together on common readout lines by rows and columns. This row-column-addressing scheme reduces the readout complexity from 1800 to 90 if 42

  5. Technical Note: Response measurement for select radiation detectors in magnetic fields

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reynolds, M., E-mail: michaelreynolds@ualberta.net [Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Fallone, B. G. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Departments of Oncology and Physics, University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada); Rathee, S. [Department of Medical Physics, Cross Cancer Institute, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2, Canada and Department of Oncology, Medical Physics Division,University of Alberta, 11560 University Avenue, Edmonton, Alberta T6G 1Z2 (Canada)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Dose response to applied magnetic fields for ion chambers and solid state detectors has been investigated previously for the anticipated use in linear accelerator–magnetic resonance devices. In this investigation, the authors present the measured response of selected radiation detectors when the magnetic field is applied in the same direction as the radiation beam, i.e., a longitudinal magnetic field, to verify previous simulation only data. Methods: The dose response of a PR06C ion chamber, PTW60003 diamond detector, and IBA PFD diode detector is measured in a longitudinal magnetic field. The detectors are irradiated with buildup caps and their long axes either parallel or perpendicular to the incident photon beam. In each case, the magnetic field dose response is reported as the ratio of detector signals with to that without an applied longitudinal magnetic field. The magnetic field dose response for each unique orientation as a function of magnetic field strength was then compared to the previous simulation only studies. Results: The measured dose response of each detector in longitudinal magnetic fields shows no discernable response up to near 0.21 T. This result was expected and matches the previously published simulation only results, showing no appreciable dose response with magnetic field. Conclusions: Low field longitudinal magnetic fields have been shown to have little or no effect on the dose response of the detectors investigated and further lend credibility to previous simulation only studies.

  6. Technical report. The application of probability-generating functions to linear-quadratic radiation survival curves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendal, W S

    2000-04-01

    To illustrate how probability-generating functions (PGFs) can be employed to derive a simple probabilistic model for clonogenic survival after exposure to ionizing irradiation. Both repairable and irreparable radiation damage to DNA were assumed to occur by independent (Poisson) processes, at intensities proportional to the irradiation dose. Also, repairable damage was assumed to be either repaired or further (lethally) injured according to a third (Bernoulli) process, with the probability of lethal conversion being directly proportional to dose. Using the algebra of PGFs, these three processes were combined to yield a composite PGF that described the distribution of lethal DNA lesions in irradiated cells. The composite PGF characterized a Poisson distribution with mean, chiD+betaD2, where D was dose and alpha and beta were radiobiological constants. This distribution yielded the conventional linear-quadratic survival equation. To test the composite model, the derived distribution was used to predict the frequencies of multiple chromosomal aberrations in irradiated human lymphocytes. The predictions agreed well with observation. This probabilistic model was consistent with single-hit mechanisms, but it was not consistent with binary misrepair mechanisms. A stochastic model for radiation survival has been constructed from elementary PGFs that exactly yields the linear-quadratic relationship. This approach can be used to investigate other simple probabilistic survival models.

  7. The technical approach: The IAEA action plan on the safety of radiation sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bilbao, A.; Wrixon, A.; Ortiz-Lopez, P.

    2001-01-01

    As part of the measures to strengthen international co-operation in nuclear, radiation and waste safety, the report refers to the implementation of the Action Plan for the Safety of Radiation Sources and the Security of Radioactive Materials. Starting with background information, the report references the main results of the Dijon Conference and of General Conference resolution GC(42)/RES/12 in September 1998, describing the actions taken by the Secretariat pursuant such resolution and also by the Board of Governors, in its sessions of March and September 1999, as well as by the General Conference, in October 1999 when by resolution GC(43)/RES/10 the Action Plan was endorsed and the Secretariat was urged to implement it. Finally, the report provides information on the status of implementation of the seven areas covered by the Action Plan and on the suggested further actions to be carried out for its implementation taking into account the decisions of the Board in its meeting of 11 September 2000 and the resolutions GC(44)/RES/11, GC(44)/RES/13 and GC(44)/RES/16 of the forty-fourth regular session of the General Conference. (author)

  8. Declarative Terrain Modeling for Military Training Games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruben M. Smelik

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Military training instructors increasingly often employ computer games to train soldiers in all sorts of skills and tactics. One of the difficulties instructors face when using games as a training tool is the creation of suitable content, including scenarios, entities, and corresponding terrain models. Terrain plays a key role in many military training games, as for example, in our case game Tactical Air Defense. However, current manual terrain editors are both too complex and too time-consuming to be useful for instructors; automatic terrain generation methods show a lot of potential, but still lack user control and intuitive editing capabilities. We present a novel way for instructors to model terrain for their training games: instead of constructing a terrain model using complex modeling tools, instructors can declare the required properties of their terrain using an advanced sketching interface. Our framework integrates terrain generation methods and manages dependencies between terrain features in order to automatically create a complete 3D terrain model that matches the sketch. With our framework, instructors can easily design a large variety of terrain models that meet their training requirements.

  9. On the accuracy of X-ray lithography using synchrotron radiation for the fabrication of technical separation nozzle elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Becker, E.W.; Ehrfeld, W.; Muenchmeyer, D.

    1984-04-01

    As a method for the fabrication of technical separation nozzle elements with extremely small characteristic dimensions, the Institut fuer Kernverfahrenstechnik of the University and the Nuclear Research Centre of Karlsruhe in co-operation with the Siemens AG, Munich, and the Fraunhofer Institute for Solid-State Technology, Munich, are developping the LIGA-process. In this process, poly(methylmethacrylate) layers of an approximate thickness of 0.5 mm are structured by means of X-ray depth-lithography using synchrotron radiation. Subsequently, the nozzle structures are electroformed with nickel using the PMMA-layers as a mould. The manufacturing precision which can be obtained by X-ray depth-lithography was investigated by means of computer simulation of both the irradiation and the development step. In the first step the precision is limited by diffraction, photoelectrons, and beam divergency, respectively. It is shown, that under appropriate conditions each of these effects contributes only some 0.1 μm to errors at the structure edges. The simulation of the development step is based on experiments on the dissolution properties of both irradiated and unirradiated PMMA in a special developing agent. From the results of the computer simulation it can be seen, that the ratio of the slit length to the smallest width which is required for the fabrication of separation nozzles and the required precision are already obtainable in the one-step lithographic process at a characteristic wavelength of 0.2 nm. If an extreme structure height in combination with high precision is required or if a radiation source with a longer characteristic wavelength has to be used, the multi-step process can be applied. The calculations may easily be adapted to different manufacturing parameters concerning the radiation source or the developer characteristic. (orig.) [de

  10. Automatic Computer Mapping of Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smedes, H. W.

    1971-01-01

    Computer processing of 17 wavelength bands of visible, reflective infrared, and thermal infrared scanner spectrometer data, and of three wavelength bands derived from color aerial film has resulted in successful automatic computer mapping of eight or more terrain classes in a Yellowstone National Park test site. The tests involved: (1) supervised and non-supervised computer programs; (2) special preprocessing of the scanner data to reduce computer processing time and cost, and improve the accuracy; and (3) studies of the effectiveness of the proposed Earth Resources Technology Satellite (ERTS) data channels in the automatic mapping of the same terrain, based on simulations, using the same set of scanner data. The following terrain classes have been mapped with greater than 80 percent accuracy in a 12-square-mile area with 1,800 feet of relief; (1) bedrock exposures, (2) vegetated rock rubble, (3) talus, (4) glacial kame meadow, (5) glacial till meadow, (6) forest, (7) bog, and (8) water. In addition, shadows of clouds and cliffs are depicted, but were greatly reduced by using preprocessing techniques.

  11. Research on 3-D terrain correction methods of airborne gamma-ray spectrometry survey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yanyang; Liu Qingcheng; Zhang Zhiyong

    2008-01-01

    The general method of height correction is not effectual in complex terrain during the process of explaining airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data, and the 2-D terrain correction method researched in recent years is just available for correction of section measured. A new method of 3-D sector terrain correction is studied. The ground radiator is divided into many small sector radiators by the method, then the irradiation rate is calculated in certain survey distance, and the total value of all small radiate sources is regarded as the irradiation rate of the ground radiator at certain point of aero- survey, and the correction coefficients of every point are calculated which then applied to correct to airborne gamma-ray spectrometry data. The method can achieve the forward calculation, inversion calculation and terrain correction for airborne gamma-ray spectrometry survey in complex topography by dividing the ground radiator into many small sectors. Other factors are considered such as the un- saturated degree of measure scope, uneven-radiator content on ground, and so on. The results of for- ward model and an example analysis show that the 3-D terrain correction method is proper and effectual. (authors)

  12. A Technical Approach to the Evaluation of Radiofrequency Radiation Emissions from Mobile Telephony Base Stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimondas Buckus

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available During the last two decades, the number of macrocell mobile telephony base station antennas emitting radiofrequency (RF electromagnetic radiation (EMR in residential areas has increased significantly, and therefore much more attention is being paid to RF EMR and its effects on human health. Scientific field measurements of public exposure to RF EMR (specifically to radio frequency radiation from macrocell mobile telephony base station antennas and RF electromagnetic field (EMF intensity parameters in the environment are discussed in this article. The research methodology is applied according to the requirements of safety norms and Lithuanian Standards in English (LST EN. The article presents and analyses RF EMFs generated by mobile telephony base station antennas in areas accessible to the general public. Measurements of the RF electric field strength and RF EMF power density were conducted in the near- and far-fields of the mobile telephony base station antenna. Broadband and frequency-selective measurements were performed outside (on the roof and on the ground and in a residential area. The tests performed on the roof in front of the mobile telephony base station antennas in the near-field revealed the presence of a dynamic energy interaction within the antenna electric field, which changes rapidly with distance. The RF EMF power density values on the ground at distances of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 m from the base station are very low and are scattered within intervals of 0.002 to 0.05 μW/cm2. The results were compared with international exposure guidelines (ICNIRP.

  13. A Technical Approach to the Evaluation of Radiofrequency Radiation Emissions from Mobile Telephony Base Stations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckus, Raimondas; Strukčinskienė, Birute; Raistenskis, Juozas; Stukas, Rimantas; Šidlauskienė, Aurelija; Čerkauskienė, Rimantė; Isopescu, Dorina Nicolina; Stabryla, Jan; Cretescu, Igor

    2017-03-01

    During the last two decades, the number of macrocell mobile telephony base station antennas emitting radiofrequency (RF) electromagnetic radiation (EMR) in residential areas has increased significantly, and therefore much more attention is being paid to RF EMR and its effects on human health. Scientific field measurements of public exposure to RF EMR (specifically to radio frequency radiation) from macrocell mobile telephony base station antennas and RF electromagnetic field (EMF) intensity parameters in the environment are discussed in this article. The research methodology is applied according to the requirements of safety norms and Lithuanian Standards in English (LST EN). The article presents and analyses RF EMFs generated by mobile telephony base station antennas in areas accessible to the general public. Measurements of the RF electric field strength and RF EMF power density were conducted in the near- and far-fields of the mobile telephony base station antenna. Broadband and frequency-selective measurements were performed outside (on the roof and on the ground) and in a residential area. The tests performed on the roof in front of the mobile telephony base station antennas in the near-field revealed the presence of a dynamic energy interaction within the antenna electric field, which changes rapidly with distance. The RF EMF power density values on the ground at distances of 50, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 m from the base station are very low and are scattered within intervals of 0.002 to 0.05 μW/cm². The results were compared with international exposure guidelines (ICNIRP).

  14. Socio technical modelling of a nuclear: case study applied to the Ionizing Radiation Metrology National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Acar, Maria Elizabeth Dias

    2015-01-01

    A methodology combining process mapping and analysis; knowledge elicitation mapping and critical analysis; and socio technical analysis based on social network analysis was conceived. The methodology was applied to a small knowledge intensive organization - LNMRI, and has allowed the appraisal of the main intellectual assets and their ability to evolve. In this sense, based on real issues such as attrition, the impacts of probable future scenarios were assessed. For such task, a multimodal network of processes, knowledge objects and people was analyzed using a set of appropriate metrics and means, including sphere of influence of key nodes. To differentiate the ability of people's role playing in the processes, some nodes' attributes were used to provide partition criteria for the network and thus the ability to differentiate the impact of potential loss of supervisors and operators. The proposed methodology has allowed for: 1) the identification of knowledge objects and their sources; 2) mapping and ranking of these objects according to their relevance and 3) the assessment of vulnerabilities in LNMRI's network structure and 4) revealing of informal mechanisms of knowledge sharing The conceived methodological framework has proved to be a robust tool for a broad diagnosis to support succession planning and also the organizational strategic planning. (author)

  15. Atmospheric dispersion in complex terrain: Angra-1 nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lima e Silva Filho, P.P. de

    1986-01-01

    The Angra 1 plant is located in a very complex terrain, what makes the environmental impact assessment very difficult, regarding to the atmospheric transport problem as well as to the diffusion problem. Three main characteristics are responsible for that situation: the location at the shoreline, the complex topography and the high roughness of the terrain. Those characteristics generate specific phenomena and utilization of parameters from other sites are not convenient. Considering financial and technical viabilities, we must look for the local parameters, disregarding the easy, although risky, attitude of applying parameters and models incovenient to the Angra site. Some of those aspects are more important, and among them we will discuss the Plume Rise, the Critical Height, the Drainage Flow and the Atmospheric Dispersion Coefficients. (Author) [pt

  16. Technical and clinical evaluation of an improved-contrast screen-film combination for radiation therapy portal localization imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haus, Arthur G.; Dickerson, Robert E.; Huff, Kenneth E.; Monte, Suzanne; Schlager, Barbara A.; Atanas, Meri; Matloubieh, Ahmad

    1996-01-01

    Radiation Oncology Center, Highland Hospital, Rochester, NY. indicate the monitor units setting for both methods are similar. Initial clinical results indicate portal images made with the new combination are superior to those obtained with the conventional combination. The new portal images have significantly higher contrast, show clearer definition of structures, and are much easier to read. Conclusion: The prototype screen-film combination provided portal localization images with improved image quality due to significantly higher film contrast compared to the conventional commercially available combination. The prototype combination provided radiation oncologists with more detail, especially in difficult cases such as the pelvis and oblique lung. In addition the images were much easier to read and interpret. Technical factors (monitor units) were similar for both methods. The prototype film can be processed in a conventional rapid process film processor

  17. A Technical Report on the Effect of Electromagnetic Radiation From a Mobile Phone on Mice Organs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elgenaidi A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available To The Editor: Exposure to electromagnetic radiation (EMR from mobile phones can cause detrimental effects on cell function, chromosomal aberrations, and tissue injuries [1-6]. The rapid expansion of mobile phones has lead to widespread concern for their safety. We examined the histopathological effects of direct exposure to this EMR from mobile phones in adult male Swiss albino mice. The animals were obtained from the biotechnology center, Tripoli, Libya, weighing from 25-30 grams, aged 10-12 weeks. The experiments were approved by state authorities and fol¬lowed guidelines of Egyptian law for animal protection. Mice were fed standard diets and water ad libitum. Plastic cages (diameter 45 cm by 11 cm height were designed for this work. The roof of the cage was designed to receive the mobile phone from a distance of about 10 cm from the cage floor [7]. EMR was emitted from the Nokia 1112 device with a dimension of 104×44×17 in connection with Libyan network (Misurata, Libya. The distance between phone and mice was about 10 cm. The GSM mobile phones operate with microwave carrier frequencies in the GHz range (850–1900 MHz [8-10].

  18. Chromium Waste Treatment from Leather Manufacture Using Electron Beam Radiation Technic

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Didiek Herhady, R.; Sukarsono, R.

    2007-01-01

    Leather manufacture chromium waste treatment using chemical methods have an essential disadvantage, because of the production of the secondary contamination of wastes and separated sediments used by reagents. Therefore, a new technique is needed to solve this problem. The aim of the research to learn the advantages of electron beam radiation for chromium waste treatment. Water radiolysis can be produced by the interaction between electron beam and water or liquid substances. This phenomenon produces many reducing agents and ions that could reduce chromium concentrations in the liquid waste. Ethyl alcohol as a scavenger was added in the waste samples, then the pH of varied from 1, 4, 8 to 12, then were irradiated. Irradiation were done by Electron Beam Machine with dose 15, 25, and 35 kGy. After irradiation, chromium concentration in the samples were analyzed by AAS and UV-vis spectrophotometer. The results had shown that chromium could be reduced by high dose electron beam. The optimum reduction of chromium was achieved at liquid waste pH 8 and irradiation dose 35 kGy. (author)

  19. On the interaction of non-ionizing radiation with people. Technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruderman, M.A.; MacDonald, G.J.

    1980-03-01

    This report examines the physical basis for many of the thermal and non-thermal interactions between microwaves and the human body. Although a microwave beam incident on the human body dissipates, on the average, about the same amount of heat as does normal metabolism, it can actually dissipate considerably more heat in certain local regions of the body because of strong beam focusing effects (e.g., within the brain), flow of induced currents through small, constricted areas of the body (e.g., ankle, neck) and differences in electrical properties among body tissues. Since relatively large heat dissipation can occur on a local level, it would appear more rational to determine a maximum permissive radiation exposure in terms of maximum allowed dissipation in a specific sensitive part of the body rather than, as is presently done, in terms of external beam intensity (the present U.S. standard is 10 milliwatts/sq cm). For non-thermal processes, no special biological process or structure has been identified as likely to be especially sensitive to microwave fields or frequencies. The experimental results designed to explore the non-thermal effect of microwaves were studied. The results of all experiments purporting to demonstrate a significant non-thermal biological effect have been disputed; in fact, very few experiments in the entire field have ever been replicated -- a situation which should be rectified.

  20. Radiation measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Go, Sung Jin; Kim, Seung Guk; No, Gyeong Seok; Park, Myeong Hwan; Ann, Bong Seon

    1998-03-01

    This book explains technical terms about radiation measurement, which are radiation, radiation quantity and unit such as prefix of international unit, unit for defence purposes of radiation, coefficient of radiation and interaction, kinds and principles of radiation detector, ionization chamber, G-M counter, G-M tube, proportional counter, scintillation detector, semiconductor radiation detector, thermoluminescence dosimeter, PLD, others detector, radiation monitor, neutron detector, calibration of radiation detector, statistics of counting value, activation analysis and electronics circuit of radiation detector.

  1. Complex Terrain and Wind Lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat

    software WAsP Engineering 2.0 and was well predicted except for some sectors where the terrain is particularly steep. Subsequently, two experiments were performed in forested areas; where the measurements are recorded at a location deep-in forest and at the forest edge. Both sites were modelled with flow...... edge, LINCOM model was used by allocating a slope half-in half out of the forest based on the suggestions of previous studies. The optimum slope angle was reported as 17º. Thus, a suggestion was made to use WAsP Engineering 2.0 for forest edge modelling with known limitations and the applied method...

  2. Atmospheric processes over complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banta, Robert M.; Berri, G.; Blumen, William; Carruthers, David J.; Dalu, G. A.; Durran, Dale R.; Egger, Joseph; Garratt, J. R.; Hanna, Steven R.; Hunt, J. C. R.

    1990-06-01

    A workshop on atmospheric processes over complex terrain, sponsored by the American Meteorological Society, was convened in Park City, Utah from 24 vto 28 October 1988. The overall objective of the workshop was one of interaction and synthesis--interaction among atmospheric scientists carrying out research on a variety of orographic flow problems, and a synthesis of their results and points of view into an assessment of the current status of topical research problems. The final day of the workshop was devoted to an open discussion on the research directions that could be anticipated in the next decade because of new and planned instrumentation and observational networks, the recent emphasis on development of mesoscale numerical models, and continual theoretical investigations of thermally forced flows, orographic waves, and stratified turbulence. This monograph represents an outgrowth of the Park City Workshop. The authors have contributed chapters based on their lecture material. Workshop discussions indicated interest in both the remote sensing and predictability of orographic flows. These chapters were solicited following the workshop in order to provide a more balanced view of current progress and future directions in research on atmospheric processes over complex terrain.

  3. The use of symbolic computation in radiative, energy, and neutron transport calculations. Technical report, 15 August 1992--14 August 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frankel, J.I.

    1995-01-01

    This investigation uses symbolic computation in developing analytical methods and general computational strategies for solving both linear and nonlinear, regular and singular, integral and integro-differential equations which appear in radiative and combined mode energy transport. This technical report summarizes the research conducted during the first nine months of the present investigation. The use of Chebyshev polynomials augmented with symbolic computation has clearly been demonstrated in problems involving radiative (or neutron) transport, and mixed-mode energy transport. Theoretical issues related to convergence, errors, and accuracy have also been pursued. Three manuscripts have resulted from the funded research. These manuscripts have been submitted to archival journals. At the present time, an investigation involving a conductive and radiative medium is underway. The mathematical formulation leads to a system of nonlinear, weakly-singular integral equations involving the unknown temperature and various Legendre moments of the radiative intensity in a participating medium. Some preliminary results are presented illustrating the direction of the proposed research

  4. Annual meeting on nuclear technology '88. Technical session on focal points of the atomic energy law and the radiation protection law in 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1988-06-01

    This issue of Annual Meeting on Nuclear Technology reports presents the papers of the technical session on 'Focal points of the atomic energy law and the radiation protection law in 1988'. The titles are: Is there a binding link between decisions of the atomic energy authority and criminal law? Conclusions to be drawn from the Alkem case court decision. - Recent developments in atomic energy law. - Current radiation protection law. - Codetermination at plant level in a nuclear installation. - The legal position of foreigners from neigbour countries in the field of atomic energy law. The licensing of nuclear installations near the border. (RST) [de

  5. Improved visibility computation on massive grid terrains

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fishman, J.; Haverkort, H.J.; Toma, L.; Wolfson, O.; Agrawal, D.; Lu, C.-T.

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes the design and engineering of algorithms for computing visibility maps on massive grid terrains. Given a terrain T, specified by the elevations of points in a regular grid, and given a viewpoint v, the visibility map or viewshed of v is the set of grid points of T that are

  6. Computing visibility on terrains in external memory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haverkort, H.J.; Toma, L.; Zhuang, Yi

    2007-01-01

    We describe a novel application of the distribution sweeping technique to computing visibility on terrains. Given an arbitrary viewpoint v, the basic problem we address is computing the visibility map or viewshed of v, which is the set of points in the terrain that are visible from v. We give the

  7. Terrain Classification of Norwegian Slab Avalanche Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallandvik, Linda; Aadland, Eivind; Vikene, Odd Lennart

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to rely on snow conditions, weather, and human factors when making judgments about avalanche risk because these variables are dynamic and complex; terrain, however, is more easily observed and interpreted. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate (1) the type of terrain in which historical fatal snow avalanche accidents in Norway…

  8. Parallel Implementation of the Terrain Masking Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-01

    contains behavior rules which can define a computation or an algorithm. It can communicate with other process nodes, it can contain local data, and it can...terrain maskirg calculation is being performed. It is this algorithm that comsumes about seventy percent of the total terrain masking calculation time

  9. A GPS inspired Terrain Referenced Navigation algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Terrain Referenced Navigation (TRN) refers to a form of localization in which measurements of distances to the terrain surface are matched with a digital elevation map allowing a vehicle to estimate its own position within the map. The main goal of this dissertation is to improve TRN performance

  10. Radiation protection of workers in the mining and milling of radioactive ores. Code of practice and technical addendum. 1983 ed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1983-01-01

    This Code of Practice sets forth the means of ensuring protection against ionizing radiation for workers engaged in mining and milling of radioactive ores: general provisions outlining the responsibilities of the employer and the worker, limits of radiation exposure, administrative organization of radiation protection, radiation surveillance, engineering and administrative protective measures and medical surveillance. It is designed to facilitate the preparation and adoption of national and local regulations and factory rules for radiation protection in mining and milling of radioactive ores.

  11. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2013-01-01

    The chapter one presents the composition of matter and atomic theory; matter structure; transitions; origin of radiation; radioactivity; nuclear radiation; interactions in decay processes; radiation produced by the interaction of radiation with matter

  12. New high-fidelity terrain modeling method constrained by terrain semanteme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Zhou

    Full Text Available Production of higher-fidelity digital elevation models is important; as such models are indispensable components of space data infrastructure. However, loss of terrain features is a constant problem for grid digital elevation models, although these models have already been defined in such a way that their distinct usage as data sources in terrain modeling processing is prohibited. Therefore, in this study, the novel concept-terrain semanteme is proposed to define local space terrain features, and a new process for generating grid digital elevation models based on this new concept is designed. A prototype system is programmed to test the proposed approach; the results indicate that terrain semanteme can be applied in the process of grid digital elevation model generation, and that usage of this new concept improves the digital elevation model fidelity. Moreover, the terrain semanteme technique can be applied for recovery of distorted digital elevation model regions containing terrain semantemes, with good recovery efficiency indicated by experiments.

  13. Terrain assessment guidelines : CAGC best practice. Version 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    This terrain classification assessment guideline discussed the steps required for personnel to understand terrain hazards present during seismic operations. Maps and other sources must be used to classify terrain steepness and surface conditions using geographical information systems (GIS), LIDAR, or satellite photographs. The impact of managing steep terrain within projects must also be considered when class 3, 4, 5, or 6 terrain has been identified. Terrains must also be classified according to colours. Secondary terrain assessments must be conducted when class 3, 4, 5, or 6 terrain has been identified. Terrain management plans should included methods of keeping untrained workers out of areas with classes greater than 3. Methods of entering and exiting steep terrain must be identified. Workers must be trained to work in areas with steep terrains. Methods of rescue and evacuation must also be established. Procedures were outlined for all terrain classes. Footwear, head protection and general safety requirements were outlined. 14 figs.

  14. Modern technical and technological solutions of radiation control to combat illicit trafficking of nuclear and radioactive materials across borders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Frymire, A.; Kagan, L.; Stavrov, A.

    2006-01-01

    an integral part of the common task to be solved. It is very important that after the radioactive source has been detected such procedures as saving, transferring and analyzing of the information should be successfully completed. This requires performing the independent remote control of the status of a portal monitor, technical and methodological support and monitoring of personnel actions. This part of the task can be solved by creating the specialized automated system. The portal monitors and the RAVEN (Radiation Alarm and Video Event Notification) system developed and manufactured by the company TSA Systems Ltd is one and the most successful and efficient examples of how this task can be accomplished. RAVEN was designed to both capture and view data and video images relating to a radiological detection incident. Stored sets of data and video can be used in the rapid identification of the method of transportation of radioactive substances. Quick review of the incident can be made by using the on screen controls that allow the user to step through each image and pause whenever necessary. This allows the user to relay any identifying information to response personnel in the field for possible secondary inspection or other interdiction. Local Alarm Stations (LAS) can be configured to only display information that will be useful to the local user. The Central Alarm Station (CAS) can be configured to display much more detailed information that is useful for alarm trending and other data analysis. Multiple LAS or CAS locations can easily be established and through the use of wireless routers these locations can be mobile. Multi-layered password protection will restrict unauthorized access to sensitive data or video and will protect the privacy of innocent individuals. Graphs of detection levels along with the ability to view which individual detector is displaying the most activity will allow the user to better understand where in a large container the radioactive

  15. Proceeding of the 20th technical meeting on nuclear reactor and radiation for KURRI engineers and the 11th technical official group section 5 meeting in Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2012-04-01

    Five presentations were given with a focus on the measures for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident. (1) 'Support activities of KURRI on the measures for the Fukushima nuclear accident': Introduction of the state of personal dispatch and support activities for radiation survey performed at evacuation centers. (2) 'New RI usage-emitting α-ray aiming at single cell': Developing state of a new cell irradiation effect observation system that can perform the localized irradiation of RI-derived He ion while targeting single cell under a microscope. (3) 'Reactivity measurement system at Kyoto University research reactor (KUR)': Explanation of the composition and performance of the system of real time display on the output, reactivity, and cooling water temperature of KUR, etc. and the introduction of that this system used in student experiments. (4) 'Introduction of GPS-linked automatic radiation measuring system, KURAMA': Introduction of a voluntarily developed vehicle-mounted type radiation measurement system that takes into account the local conditions of Fukushima (KURAMA). (5) 'Internal exposure dose evaluation of staff members dispatched to Fukushima': Indication of the methods and results of dose assessment, and report on that exposure management has been properly performed. The 3 of 5 papers presented at the entitled meeting are indexed individually. (A.O.)

  16. Radiation dose reduction in CT-guided sacroiliac joint injections to levels of pulsed fluoroscopy: a comparative study with technical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artner J

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Juraj Artner, Balkan Cakir, Heiko Reichel, Friederike LattigDepartment of Orthopaedic Surgery, University of Ulm, RKU, GermanyBackground: The sacroiliac (SI joint is frequently the primary source of low back pain. Over the past decades, a number of different SI injection techniques have been used in its diagnosis and therapy. Despite the concerns regarding exposure to radiation, image-guided injection techniques are the preferred method to achieve safe and precise intra-articular needle placement. The following study presents a comparison of radiation doses, calculated for fluoroscopy and CT-guided SI joint injections in standard and low-dose protocol and presents the technical possibility of CT-guidance with maximum radiation dose reduction to levels of fluoroscopic-guidance for a precise intra-articular injection technique.Objective: To evaluate the possibility of dose reduction in CT-guided sacroiliac joint injections to pulsed-fluoroscopy-guidance levels and to compare the doses of pulsed-fluoroscopy-, CT-guidance, and low-dose CT-guidance for intra-articular SI joint injections.Study design: Comparative study with technical considerations.Methods: A total of 30 CT-guided intra-articular SI joint injections were performed in January 2012 in a developed low-dose mode and the radiation doses were calculated. They were compared to 30 pulsed-fluoroscopy-guided SI joint injections, which were performed in the month before, and to five injections, performed in standard CT-guided biopsy mode for spinal interventions. The statistical significance was calculated with the SPSS software using the Mann–Whitney U-Test. Technical details and anatomical considerations were provided.Results: A significant dose reduction of average 94.01% was achieved using the low-dose protocol for CT-guided SI joint injections. The radiation dose could be approximated to pulsed-fluoroscopy-guidance levels.Conclusion: Radiation dose of CT-guided SI joint injections can be

  17. TERRAIN, CITY OF DALLAS, DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain Submission for Cass County, MO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain Submission for Bark River PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. DCS Terrain Submission for Lee County MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for Mono, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain for Greer County, Oklahoma, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Angelina County, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. Terrain Sumbission for Howard County NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN Submission for Outagamie Countywide DFIRM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR VOLUSIA COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  7. Terrain, CEDAR RAPIDS, LINN COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DOGWOOD RUN TERRAIN, YORK COUNTY, PA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data includes digital elevation models, LIDAR derived contours, LIDAR three-dimensional spot elevations and breaklines, field surveyed ground elevations and...

  9. DCS Terrain Submission for Irwin, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for Stephens, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN Submission for Waushara Countywide DFIRM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Dawes County, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. DCS Terrain for Middlesex County, NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Seminole, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. DCS Terrain Submission for Chemung County, NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain Submission for Garvin, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain Submission for Winston County, AL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain for Jasper County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN DATA CAPTURE STANDARDS, Bedford PA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data includes digital elevation models, LIDAR derived contours, LIDAR three-dimensional spot elevations and breaklines, field surveyed ground elevations and...

  20. TERRAIN DATA, CITY OF CARSON CITY, NV

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, ESSEX COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS - Coastal PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain Submission for Fulton County, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Miami County, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submittal for Socorro County NM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  5. DCS Terrain for HOUSTON COUNTY, ALABAMA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. Digital Terrain Submittal for Duval County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain for Clay County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR KNOX COUNTY, TN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, UPPER CUMBERLAND WATERSHED, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR PUTNAM COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  11. DCS Terrain Submission for Sioux Falls

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR SHELBY COUNTY, TN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  13. DCS Terrain Submission for Mohave, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Albany County NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  15. DCS Terrain Submission for Gunnison County, CO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain for Hancock County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, ST. CLAIR COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain for Lincoln County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain for Greene County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, CERRO GORDO COUNTY, IOWA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for Merced, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain Submission for Ouachita, AR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Lewis County, KY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain for Pickens County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. DCS Terrain for Williamson County, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submission for Clark, AR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain Submission for Lake County, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DCS Terrain Submission for Drew AR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, Priest Lake, Bonner County, Idaho USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for Mason County, KY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, Pointe Coupee PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Carter, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. Terrain Data, Queen Anne's COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain for Gilmer County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. DCS Terrain Submission for Houston TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain for Marion County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain for Washington County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain Submission for Chippewa County, Wisconsin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain Submission for Lancaster County, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. DCS Terrain Submission for Benton County, AR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for Cass County, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain Submission for Brazos TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain for Cobb County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain for Harris County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN Submission for CHISAGO COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submission for Pike County, KY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain Submission for Chariton County, MO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. AAN Tactical Roles in Complex Urban Terrain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Funkhouser, Anthony

    1998-01-01

    .... The infantryman will assume the responsibility for tasks such as mobility. However, many experts predict the future battlefields will consist of complex urban terrain where much of the world population is occupying...

  9. TERRAIN, ST. LOUIS COUNTY, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for Lagrange County, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. DCS TERRAIN Submission for STEARNS COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Logan, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. Program of training and technical expertise in radiation protection for personnel of medical radiology; Programa de capacitacao e especializacao tecnica em protecao radiologica para profissionais em radiologia medica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Sergio R. de, E-mail: oliveirasr@fiocruz.br [Fundacao Oswaldo Cruz (EPSJV/FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Escola Politecnica de Saude Joaquim Venancio

    2013-07-01

    This work aims to verify the actual conditions for the training of technicians in Radiology, in relation to the knowledge of radiation protection in the field of Medical Diagnostic Radiology. To evaluate the knowledge of professionals was prepared a questionnaire on the topic, having been answered by workers with varied experience. The questionnaire was divided into three parts, being the initial self-evaluation, followed by closed and open issues, all specific knowledge. With a total of 55 questionnaires answered, it was found that 85% of respondents consider themselves able to work in the area performing the function, but when questioned about the technical details regarding the exposure to ionizing radiation, it was found that only 15% of respondents had some knowledge about the subject. In relation to Radiological Protection, was found that little more than 10% of the respondents know about the subject. The results found in this survey outlined the creation of a technical specialization course in radiation protection, which is part of the permanent staff of course of the Polytechnical School of Health of FIOCRUZ, solving, partially, one of the problems pointed out today by health bodies, that is the lack of trained personnel.

  14. Productive uncertainty. Notes on Terrain Vague

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Marullo

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Terrain vague is usually synonym for a place exceeding the traditional categories of the city. Juxtaposing entropy to definite zones of containment, abandonment and emptiness to consolidated urban fabric, ceaseless transformation to historical stratification, informality and illegal activities to controlled jurisdictions, the terrain vague acts a sort of ruin, where the city is at the point of both being forgotten and disclosing its imminent future, eluding any of its regular uses and functioning mechanisms.

  15. Automatic terrain modeling using transfinite element analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2010-05-31

    An automatic procedure for modeling terrain is developed based on L2 projection-based interpolation of discrete terrain data onto transfinite function spaces. The function space is refined automatically by the use of image processing techniques to detect regions of high error and the flexibility of the transfinite interpolation to add degrees of freedom to these areas. Examples are shown of a section of the Palo Duro Canyon in northern Texas.

  16. (Review Draft) Radiation Site Cleanup Regulations: Technical Support Document For The Development Of Radionuclide Cleanup Levels For Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document describes parts of the technical analysis being undertaken in support of standards that ensure certain sites are cleaned up to a level that is protective of human health and the environment before they are released for public use.

  17. Nanodosimetry and nanodosimetric-based models of radiation action for radon alpha particles. Final performance technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaider, M.

    1997-01-01

    The goal of this project was to develop theoretical/computational tools for evaluating the risks incurred by populations exposed to radon alpha particles. Topics of concern include the following: compound dual radiation action (general aspects); a mathematical formalism describing the yield of radiation induced single-and double-strand DNA breaks, and its dependence on radiation quality; a study of the excited states in cytosine and guanine stacks in the Hartree-Fock and exciton approximations; nanodosimetry of radon alpha particles; application of the HSEF to assessing radiation risks in the practice of radiation protection; carcinogenic risk coefficients at environmental levels of radon exposures: a microdosimetric approach; and hit-size effectiveness approach in radiation protection

  18. Technical Training: Technical Training Seminar

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    TECHNICAL TRAINING Monique Duval tel. 74924 technical.training@cern.ch Monday 9 February 2004 From 10:00 to 12:00 - IT Auditorium - bldg. 31, 3rd floor ANSOFT High-Frequency Seminar David Prestaux, Application Engineer, ANSOFT F-78535 BUC, France This Technical Training seminar will present two Ansoft application products: Ansoft HFSS and Ansoft Designer. Ansoft HFSS makes use of the Finite Element Method (FEM) to calculate field solutions from first principles. It can accurately predict all high-frequency behaviours such as dispersion, mode conversion, and losses due to materials and radiation. Ansoft Designer is a suite of design tools to fully integrate high-frequency, physics-based electromagnetic simulations into a seamless system-level simulation environment. Ansoft Designer uses a simple interface to give complete control over every design task, by a method allowing multiple solvers, Solver on Demand. • Introduction • Overview of the Ansoft Total solution • Ansoft HFSS 9...

  19. Action of radiations on some biological model systems. Technical progress report, 1 October 1975--1 June 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stein, G.

    1976-01-01

    Work during the period 1st October 1975 to 1st June 1976 is reviewed. The topics investigated include: investigation of the action of ionizing radiation on enzyme proteins, using the technique of pulse rdiolysis; the use of fast nanosecond laser pulse techniques in the study of biochemical and biological model systems; and the action of ionizing radiation on mammalian cells, particularly at low doses. Using chromatin as the model substance, radiation biological processes at the nucleoprotein level were investigated

  20. Radiation Effects on the Sorption and Mobilization of Radionuclides during Transport through the Geosphere - Final Technical Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, L.M.; Eqing, R.C.; Hayes, K.F.

    2004-01-01

    Site restoration activities at DOE facilities and the permanent disposal of nuclear waste inevitably involve understanding the behavior of materials in a radiation field. Radionuclide decay and the associated radiation fields lead to physical and chemical changes that can degrade or enhance important material properties. Alpha-decay of the actinide elements and beta-decay of the fission products lead to atomic-scale changes in materials (radiation damage and transmutation)

  1. Progress Toward Electrostatic Radiation Shielding of Interplanetary Spacecraft: Strategies, Concepts and Technical Challenges of Human Exploration Beyond Low Earth Orbit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzger, Philip T.; Lane, John E.; Youngquist, Robert C.

    2004-01-01

    The radiation problem is a serious obstacle to solar system exploration. Electrostatic shielding was previously dismissed as unworkable. This was based on the false assumption that radial symmetry is needed to provide isotropic protection. KSC recently demonstrated the feasibility of asymmetric, multipole electrostatic shielding. Combined with passive shielding it might solve the radiation problem

  2. Investigation of space radiation effects in polymeric film-forming materials. Technical report, 12 Jun 1974 - 11 Aug. 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giori, C.; Yamauchi, T.; Jarke, F.

    1975-10-01

    The literature search in the field of ultraviolet radiation effects that was conducted during the previous program, Contract No. NAS1-12549, has been expanded to include the effects of charged particle radiation and high energy electromagnetic radiation. The literature from 1958 to 1969 was searched manually, while the literature from 1969 to present was searched by using a computerized keyword system. The information generated from this search was utilized for the design of an experimental program aimed at the development of materials with improved resistance to the vacuum-radiation environment of space. Preliminary irradiation experiments were performed which indicate that the approaches and criteria employed are very promising and may provide a solution to the challenging problem of polymer stability to combined ultraviolet/high energy radiation. (Author)

  3. Recommendations to the Technical Steering Panel regarding approach for estimating individual radiation doses resulting from releases of radionuclides to the Columbia River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Napier, B.A.; Brothers, A.J.

    1992-07-01

    At the direction of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle staff have reviewed and analyzed available data regarding possible historical radiation doses to individuals resulting from radionuclide releases to the Columbia River. The objective of this review was to recommend to the TSP the spatial and temporal scope and level of effort on Columbia River work to most effectively extend work performed in Phase I of the project (PNL 1991a, PNL 1991b) to meet the project objectives. A number of options were analyzed. Four stretches of the Columbia River and adjacent Pacific coastal waters were defined and investigated for four time periods. Radiation doses arising from ten potentially major exposure pathways were evaluated for each of the time/location combinations, and several alternative methods were defined for estimating the doses from each pathway. Preliminary cost estimates were also developed for implementing dose estimation activities for each of the possible combinations

  4. Evaluation of radiation protection and technical procedures in Wad Madani Heart Diseases and Surgery Center (WHDSC) (cardiac catheterization laboratory)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gesmallah, A. H. A.

    2013-07-01

    The purpose of this study is conducted in order to evaluate the application of radiation protection program, evaluate the design of cardiac catheterization laboratory, evaluate the effectiveness of radiation protection devices, evaluate personal monitoring, usage of G-Arm x-ray machine, to evaluate the responsibilities of radiation protection officer (RPO), to assess monitoring devices if available, and to assess patient patient dose in Wad Madani hear disease and surgery center in a period from march 2013 to june 2013. The most data in this study was obtained from the results of the team of quality assurance and control of radiation safety institute when they visited hospital on 14/2/2011 for inspection and calibration for issue of registration and licenses, except the data of patients dose which obtained from exposure parameters and dosimetric information's in the archive of G-arm x-ray fluoroscopic machine (which were 110 of cardiac catheterization diagnostic and therapeutic cases, 60 of adult patients and 50 of children. The patient data included age, weight, kv, mAs, DAP, air kerma, and fluoro time. The results of this study show that there is radiation protection program need correction and partially applied, the design of cardiac catheterization laboratory is accepted according to radiation safety institute team of quality control. Also the study shows that the radiation protection program devices are available and good condition and enough in number. The study shows that there are no personal monitoring devices and services and the radiological technologist are well trained to dial with the G-arm x-ray machine and to apply the radiation protection program effectively. Also the study states that the radiation protection officer could apply his responsibilities partially. Finally the study shows that there is a direct linear relationship between the patient's weight and (DAP, air kerma, kv, and mAs) concludes that there is excessive radiation dose in cardiac

  5. Wind farms in hostile terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1999-07-01

    This report summarises the results of a study aimed at reducing risks associated with wind farms in hostile conditions, evaluating and refining design procedures for such sites, and reviewing the results in terms of the current design practice. The scientific and technical background to the study is described, and measurements taken at two hostile sites in the UK and Italy, the wind data, wind turbine loads, the impact of icing, and wind turbine design for hostile conditions are examined, and actual and planned activities are compared.

  6. Planning and design considerations in karst terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J. A.; Greene, R. W.; Ottoson, R. S.; Graham, T. C.

    1988-10-01

    This article discusses the various steps that the authors feel are necessary to the successful progression of an engineered project sited in karst terrain. The procedures require a multidisciplined approach with liaison and cooperation among the various parties to the project. Initially, the prospective owner must have sufficient understanding of the potential engineering problems to incorporate the engineering geologist into the early stages of any planned acquisition. The first step in an investigation should include a review of the available geologic information, aerial photo interpretation, consultation with the State Geological Survey, and a geologic reconnaissance of the prospective site and surrounding area. A go-no-go decision as to purchase can often been made at an early time. Although, in some instances, more study is needed for a particularly intriguing property. The second stage should consider the various planning alternatives that are feasible based upon the limited available information. At this stage planning/purchase decisions can be made as to purchasing options, value of the property, design constraints, and the possible economic penalties that could be associated with the potential site construction. Various planning and construction alternatives should be considered in this phase of the work. The third stage should include a site investigation program of moderate size, consisting of test pits and/or exploratory borings. The borings should be drilled using water as the drilling fluid, with an experienced crew and qualified technical inspection. The authors find the use of geophysical techniques can be extremely misleading unless used in conjunction with exploratory drilling. Successful evaluations using geophysical procedures occur only under ideal conditions. The geotechnical viability of the plan and preliminary design should be investigated in the fourth phase. Additionally, the physical parameters required for the design of structures

  7. Recommendations to the Technical Steering Panel regarding approach for estimating individual radiation doses resulting from releases of radionuclides to the Columbia River

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brothers, A.J.; Napier, B.A.

    1992-08-01

    At the direction of the Technical Steering Panel (TSP) of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project, Battelle staff have reviewed and analyzed available data regarding possible historical radiation doses to individuals resulting from radionuclide releases to the Columbia River. The objective of this review was to recommend to the TSP the spatial and temporal scope and level of effort on Columbia River work to most effectively extend work performed in Phase I of the project to meet the project objectives. Four stretches of the Columbia River and adjacent Pacific coastal waters were defined and investigated for four time periods. Radiation doses arising from ten potentially major exposure pathways were evaluated for each of the time/location combinations, and several alternative methods were defined for estimating the doses from each pathway. Preliminary cost estimates were also developed for implementing dose estimation activities for each of the possible combinations. The number of combinations of the alternatives is obviously very large. A ''value of information'' (VOI) decision analysis tool was developed and applied to the problem of selecting a few ''optimal'' sets of alternatives to consider. This VOI analysis relies on both available data and the judgement of technical experts. Input data and the algorithms used are described

  8. Legal and technical analysis of the activities involving radiation applications. Analise tecnico-juridica das atividades envolvendo aplicacoes de radiacoes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borges, J C [Universidade Federal, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Coordenacao dos Programas de Pos-graduacao de Engenharia

    1991-01-01

    Activities related to radiation applications have been worldwide target of studies concerning biology, medicine, sociology, psychology and law, since prediction of the possible risks and harms associated with the use of radiation, depends on probabilities not easy to quantify, mainly in the most common low-dose situations. In Brazil, legislation generated in the last forty years did not match evolution of the scientific domains related above. This way, more recent rules not rarely conflict with older regulations, without revoking them. (author).

  9. Selection method of terrain matching area for TERCOM algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qieqie; Zhao, Long

    2017-10-01

    The performance of terrain aided navigation is closely related to the selection of terrain matching area. The different matching algorithms have different adaptability to terrain. This paper mainly studies the adaptability to terrain of TERCOM algorithm, analyze the relation between terrain feature and terrain characteristic parameters by qualitative and quantitative methods, and then research the relation between matching probability and terrain characteristic parameters by the Monte Carlo method. After that, we propose a selection method of terrain matching area for TERCOM algorithm, and verify the method correctness with real terrain data by simulation experiment. Experimental results show that the matching area obtained by the method in this paper has the good navigation performance and the matching probability of TERCOM algorithm is great than 90%

  10. Wind field and dispersion modelling in complex terrain

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bartzis, J.G.; Varvayanni, M.; Catsaros, N.; Konte, K.; Amanatidis, G.

    1991-01-01

    Dispersion of airborne radioactive material can have an important environmental impact. Its prediction remains a difficult problem, especially over complex and inhomogeneous terrain, or under complicated atmospheric conditions. The ADREA-I code, a three-dimensional transport code especially designed for terrains of high complexity can be considered as contribution to the solution of the above problem. The code development has been initiated within the present CEC Radiation Program. New features are introduced into the code to describe the anomalous topography, the turbulent diffusion and numerical solution procedures. In this work besides a brief presentation of the main features of the code, a number of applications will be presented with the aim on one hand to illustrate the capability and reliability of the code and on the other hand to clarify the effects on windfield and dispersion in special cases of interest. Within the framework of ADREA-I verification studies, a I-D simulation of the experimental Wangara Day-33 mean boundary layer was attempted, reproducing the daytime wind speeds, temperatures, specific humidities and mixing depths. In order to address the effect of surface irregularities and inhomogeneities on contamination patterns, the flow field and dispersion were analyzed over a 2-D, 1000m high mountain range, surrounded by sea, with a point source assumed 40km offshore from one coastline. This terrain was studied as representing a greater Athens area idealization. The effects of a 2-D, 1000m high mountain range of Gaussian shape on long range transport has also been studied in terms of influence area, wind and concentration profile distortions and dry deposition patterns

  11. Highly passable propulsive device for UGVs on rugged terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gradetsky Valery

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the priority functional tasks of both industrial and mobile robotics is to perform operations for moving payloads in space. Typically, researchers pay attention to control the movement of the robot on different soils. It is necessary to underline the specificity of the movements of mobile robots, the main functional purpose of which is the movement of different objects. Unlike other robot applications there is the fact that transported cargo may have different mass-dimensional characteristics. The payload should be comparable to the mass of the mobile robot. This article addresses the issue of passability on rough terrain for a mobile robot performing the transport task and proposed a technical solution in the field of mechanics of propulsion to improve propelling of the traction wheel of the mobile robot with the ground.

  12. Technical note: Fu-Liou-Gu and Corti-Peter model performance evaluation for radiative retrievals from cirrus clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lolli, Simone; Campbell, James R.; Lewis, Jasper R.; Gu, Yu; Welton, Ellsworth J.

    2017-06-01

    We compare, for the first time, the performance of a simplified atmospheric radiative transfer algorithm package, the Corti-Peter (CP) model, versus the more complex Fu-Liou-Gu (FLG) model, for resolving top-of-the-atmosphere radiative forcing characteristics from single-layer cirrus clouds obtained from the NASA Micro-Pulse Lidar Network database in 2010 and 2011 at Singapore and in Greenbelt, Maryland, USA, in 2012. Specifically, CP simplifies calculation of both clear-sky longwave and shortwave radiation through regression analysis applied to radiative calculations, which contributes significantly to differences between the two. The results of the intercomparison show that differences in annual net top-of-the-atmosphere (TOA) cloud radiative forcing can reach 65 %. This is particularly true when land surface temperatures are warmer than 288 K, where the CP regression analysis becomes less accurate. CP proves useful for first-order estimates of TOA cirrus cloud forcing, but may not be suitable for quantitative accuracy, including the absolute sign of cirrus cloud daytime TOA forcing that can readily oscillate around zero globally.

  13. Terrain Simplification Research in Augmented Scene Modeling

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    environment. As one of the most important tasks in augmented scene modeling, terrain simplification research has gained more and more attention. In this paper, we mainly focus on point selection problem in terrain simplification using triangulated irregular network. Based on the analysis and comparison of traditional importance measures for each input point, we put forward a new importance measure based on local entropy. The results demonstrate that the local entropy criterion has a better performance than any traditional methods. In addition, it can effectively conquer the "short-sight" problem associated with the traditional methods.

  14. A review of biological effects and potential risks associated with ultraviolet radiation as used in dentistry. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mills, L.F.; Lytle, C.D.; Andersen, F.A.; Hellman, K.B.; Bockstahler, L.E.

    1975-10-01

    Several dental procedures, recently developed and currently in use by the dental profession, involve the use of near or far ultraviolet (UV) radiation in the oral cavity. Recent studies on the biological effects of near and far UV radiation suggest potential risks to individuals from excessive UV exposure. In this paper the dental procedures are briefly described, the bases for UV safety standards are reviewed, effects of UV exposure to the skin and eyes and how these effects may relate to oral mucosa exposure are considered, potential modes of action by UV radiation on oral tissues as suggested by cell culture studies are summarized, and potential risks from UV exposure of individuals which might result from the dental procedures are discussed

  15. Radiation/turbulence interactions in pulverized-coal flames. Second year technical progress report, September 30, 1994--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menguec, M.P.; McDonough, J.M.; Manickavsagam, S.; Mukerji, S.; Wang, D.; Ghosal, S.; Swabb, S.

    1995-12-31

    Our goal in this project is to investigate the interaction of radiation and turbulence in coalfired laboratory scale flames and attempt to determine the boundaries of the ``uncertainty domain`` in Figure 3 more rigorously. We have three distinct objectives: (1) To determine from experiments the effect of turbulent fluctuations on the devolatilization/pyrolysis of coal particles and soot yield, and to measure the change in the ``effective`` radiative properties of particulates due to turbulence interactions; (2) To perform local small-scale simulations to investigate the radiation-turbulence interactions in coal-fired flames starting from first principles; and (3) To develop a thorough and rigorous, but computationally practical, turbulence model for coal flames, starting from the experimental observations and small scale simulations.

  16. Technical Report on the Development of Novel Technology for Reducing the Toxicity of Mistletoe Lectin by using Radiation Fusion Technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Ju Woon; Kim, Jae Hun; Choi, Jong Il; Song, Beom Seok; Yoon, Yo Han; Jung, Pil Mun; Sung, Nak Yun

    2009-10-01

    The aim of this study was conducted to investigate the effect of irradiation on detoxification, structural change, and physiological change of Mistletoe lectin. Optimal irradiation dose was determined from the result of having maximum detoxification and remaining the immunological activity Irradiation technology could be effective method for detoxification of Mistletoe lectin containing the immunological activity. The results indicate the feasibility of novel technology for reduction of the toxicity of Mistletoe lectin by using radiation technology. Practical state though clinical test is needed to extend biomedicine field using radiation technology and improve of public health by the control of the disease that gradually increase every year

  17. Realization of radiation-chemical processes in national economy-important stage of scientific and technical progress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breger, A.Kh.

    1975-01-01

    Realization of energy resourses of the atomic power engineering will greatly contribute to the scientific and technological progress. The dominat role play the radiochemical methods of properties modification applied for the well-known materials and for the production of materials with modern operating characteristics necessary for their application in different branches of industry and agriculture. Radiation modeling of products from polyolefine, wood-plastic and concrete-polymer materials are considered as well as the processes in ''thin'' units of agitating systems. The future developments and present state of the art of radiation sources are presented

  18. Studies in chemical dynamics and radiation chemistry. Technical progress report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuppermann, A.

    1975-01-01

    Research progress in the following areas is reported: low energy electron scattering; photoelectron spectrometry; elementary reactions by photolysis at variable wavelengths; collisions in crossed molecular beams; and, diffusion kinetics in the radiation chemistry of water. Publications related to the work are included. (JGB)

  19. Baseline study of effects of ionizing radiation on the chromosomes of the marine worm, 'Neanthes arenaceodentata'. Technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pesch, G.G.; Young, J.S.

    1981-09-01

    Between 1946 and 1970 the United States disposed of low level radioactive waste at several sites in the Atlantic and Pacific Ocean. In 1972 the Environmental Protection Agency was authorized under the Marine Protection Research and Sanctuaries Act (PL-92-532) to regulate all ocean disposal activities. This Act requires EPA to establish a program for reviewing and evaluating ocean dumping permit applications. Before EPA can approve permits for ocean dumping of radioactive waste, it will be necessary to determine how such wastes may affect marine biota. The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility of using a marine coastal worm, Neanthes arenaceodentata, as a cytogenetic model for assessing radiation damage to ocean organisms. Groups of worms were exposed to cobalt-60, then slide preparations were made and scored for gross chromosome aberrations and damage. All the levels of ionizing radiation tested from 180-680 rads were found to cause significant chromosome damage in N. arenaceodentata. The nature of this damage depended on dose, dose-rate and DNA repair capability of the worm. Worms responded to the same dose range as do mice. Since mice are accepted models for studying radiation effects on humans, this study supports the utility of using this species to study radiation effects on marine organisms

  20. Mammography with and without radiolucent positioning sheets : Comparison of projected breast area, pain experience, radiation dose and technical image quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Janine; ten Voorde, Marloes; van Engen, Ruben E.; van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; Pijnappel, Ruud; Droogh-de Greve, Kitty; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To compare projected breast area, image quality, pain experience and radiation dose between mammography performed with and without radiolucent positioning sheets. Methods: 184 women screened in the Dutch breast screening programme (May-June 2012) provided written informed consent to have

  1. Mammography with and without radiolucent positioning sheets: Comparison of projected breast area, pain experience, radiation dose and technical image quality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmers, Janine; ten Voorde, Marloes; van Engen, Ruben E.; van Landsveld-Verhoeven, Cary; Pijnappel, Ruud; Droogh-de Greve, Kitty; den Heeten, Gerard J.; Broeders, Mireille J. M.

    2015-01-01

    To compare projected breast area, image quality, pain experience and radiation dose between mammography performed with and without radiolucent positioning sheets. 184 women screened in the Dutch breast screening programme (May-June 2012) provided written informed consent to have one additional image

  2. Radiofrequency radiation-induced calcium-ion-efflux enhancement from human and other neuroblastoma cells in culture: [Final technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dutta, S.K.; Ghosh, B.; Blackman, C.F.

    1988-01-01

    In order to test the generality of radiofrequency-radiation-induced change in alternation of 45 Ca/sup 2/plus// efflux from avian and feline brain tissues, human neuroblastoma cells were exposed to electromagnetic radiation at 147 MHz, amplitude modulated (AM) at 16 Hz, at specific absorption rates (SAR) of 0.1, 0.05, 0.01, 0.005, 0.001, and 0.0005 Wkg. Significant 45 Ca/sup 2/plus// efflux was obtained at SAR values of 0.05 and 0.005 Wkg. Enchanced efflux at 0.05 Wkg peaked at the 13-to-16 Hz and at the 57.5-to-60 Hz modulation ranges. A Chinese hamster-mouse hybrid neuroblastoma was also shown to exhibit enchanced radiation-induced 45 Ca/sup 2/plus// efflux at an SAR of 0.05 Wkg, using 147 MHz, AM at 16 hz. These results confirm that amplitude-modulated radiofrequency radiation can induce response in cells of nervous tissue origin from widely different animal species including humans. The results are also consistent with reports of similar findings in avian and feline brain tissue reported by others and indicate the general nature of the phenomenon. 9 refs., 3 tabs

  3. Final Technical Report Radiation Hard Tight Pitch GaInP SPAD Arrays for High Energy Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harmon, Eric

    2018-01-26

    The specialized photodetectors used in high energy physics experiments often need to remain extremely sensitive for years despite radiation induced damage caused by the constant bombardment of high energy particles. To solve this problem, LightSpin Technologies, Inc. in collaboration with Prof. Bradley Cox and the University of Virginia is developing radiation-hard GaInP photodetectors which are projected to be extraordinarily radiation hard, theoretically capable of withstanding a 100,000-fold higher radiation dose than silicon. In this Phase I SBIR project, LightSpin investigated the performance and radiation hardness of fifth generation GaInP SPAD arrays. These fifth generation devices used a new planar processing approach that enables very tight pitch arrays to be produced. High performance devices with SPAD pitches of 11, 15, and 25 μm were successfully demonstrated, which greatly increased the dynamic range and maximum count rate of the devices. High maximum count rates are critical when considering radiation hardness, since radiation damage causes a proportional increase in the dark count rate, causing SPAD arrays with low maximum count rates (large SPAD pitches) to fail. These GaInP SPAD array Photomultiplier Chips™ were irradiated with protons, electrons, and neutrons. Initial irradiation results were disappointing, with the post-irradiation devices exhibiting excessively high dark currents. The degradation was traced to surface leakage currents that were largely eliminated through the use of trenches etched around the exterior of the Photomultiplier Chip™ (not between SPAD elements). A second round of irradiations on Photomultiplier Chips™ with trenches proved substantially more successful, with post-irradiation dark currents remaining relatively low, though dark count rates were observed to increase at the highest doses. Preliminary analysis of the post-irradiation devices is promising … many of the irradiated Photomultiplier Chips™ still

  4. TouchTerrain: A simple web-tool for creating 3D-printable topographic models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiuk, Franciszek J.; Harding, Chris; Renner, Alex Raymond; Winer, Eliot

    2017-12-01

    An open-source web-application, TouchTerrain, was developed to simplify the production of 3D-printable terrain models. Direct Digital Manufacturing (DDM) using 3D Printers can change how geoscientists, students, and stakeholders interact with 3D data, with the potential to improve geoscience communication and environmental literacy. No other manufacturing technology can convert digital data into tangible objects quickly at relatively low cost; however, the expertise necessary to produce a 3D-printed terrain model can be a substantial burden: knowledge of geographical information systems, computer aided design (CAD) software, and 3D printers may all be required. Furthermore, printing models larger than the build volume of a 3D printer can pose further technical hurdles. The TouchTerrain web-application simplifies DDM for elevation data by generating digital 3D models customized for a specific 3D printer's capabilities. The only required user input is the selection of a region-of-interest using the provided web-application with a Google Maps-style interface. Publically available digital elevation data is processed via the Google Earth Engine API. To allow the manufacture of 3D terrain models larger than a 3D printer's build volume the selected area can be split into multiple tiles without third-party software. This application significantly reduces the time and effort required for a non-expert like an educator to obtain 3D terrain models for use in class. The web application is deployed at http://touchterrain.geol.iastate.edu/

  5. Maintaining Contour Trees of Dynamic Terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Mølhave, Thomas; Revsbæk, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of maintaining the contour tree T of a terrain Sigma, represented as a triangulated xy-monotone surface, as the heights of its vertices vary continuously with time. We characterize the combinatorial changes in T and how they relate to topological changes in Sigma. We present ...

  6. Declarative terrain modeling for military training games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelik, R.M.; Tutenel, T.; Kraker, J.K.. de; Bidarra, R.

    2010-01-01

    Military training instructors increasingly often employ computer games to train soldiers in all sorts of skills and tactics. One of the difficulties instructors face when using games as a training tool is the creation of suitable content, including scenarios, entities, and corresponding terrain

  7. Wind turbine wake measurement in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Menke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    SCADA data from a wind farm and high frequency time series measurements obtained with remote scanning systems have been analysed with focus on identification of wind turbine wake properties in complex terrain. The analysis indicates that within the flow regime characterized by medium to large dow...

  8. Photometric diversity of terrains on Triton

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillier, J.; Veverka, J.; Helfenstein, P.; Lee, P.

    1994-01-01

    Voyager disk-resolved images of Triton in the violet (0.41 micrometers) and green (0.56 micrometer wavelengths have been analyzed to derive the photometric characteristics of terrains on Triton. Similar conclusions are found using two distinct but related definitions of photometric units, one based on color ratio and albedo properties (A. S. McEwen, 1990), the other on albedo and brightness ratios at different phase angles (P. Lee et al., 1992). A significant diversity of photometric behavior, much broader than that discovered so far on any other icy satellite, occurs among Triton's terrains. Remarkably, differences in photometric behavior do not correlate well with geologic terrain boundaries defined on the basis of surface morphology. This suggests that in most cases photometric properties on Triton are controlled by thin deposits superposed on underlying geologic units. Single scattering albedos are 0.98 or higher and asymmetry factors range from -0.35 to -0.45 for most units. The most distinct scattering behavior is exhibited by the reddish northern units already identified as the Anomalously Scattering Region (ASR), which scatters light almost isotropically with g = -0.04. In part due to the effects of Triton's clouds and haze, it is difficult to constrain the value of bar-theta, Hapke's macroscopic roughness parameter, precisely for Triton or to map differences in bar-theta among the different photometric terrains. However, our study shows that Triton must be relatively smooth, with bar-theta less than 15-20 degs and suggests that a value of 14 degs is appropriate. The differences in photometric characteristics lead to significantly different phase angle behavior for the various terrains. For example, a terrain (e.g., the ASR) that appears dark relative to another at low phase angles will reverse its contrast (become relatively brighter) at larger phase angles. The photometric parameters have been used to calculate hemispherical albedos for the units and to

  9. Radiation survey of dwellings in Cane Valley, Arizona and Utah, for use of uranium mill tailings. Final technical note

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hans, J.M. Jr; Douglas, R.L.

    1975-08-01

    A radiation survey was conducted in the Cane Valley area of Monument Valley, on the Navajo Reservation, to identify dwellings in which uranium mill tailings had been used and to assess the resulting radiation exposures. Sixteen of the 37 dwellings surveyed were found to have tailings and/or uranium ore used in their construction. Tailings were used in concrete floors, exterior stucco, mortar for stone footings, cement floor patchings, and inside as cement 'plaster'. Uranium ore was found in footings, walls, and in one fireplace. Other structures, not used as dwellings, were also identified as having tailings and ore use. Gamma ray exposure rates were measured inside dwellings and structures identified as having tailings and/or ore used in their construction. Indoor radon progeny samples were collected in occupied dwellings where practical

  10. Improved technical success and radiation safety of adrenal vein sampling using rapid, semi-quantitative point-of-care cortisol measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Michael M; Taranto, Mario; Ramsay, Duncan; van Schie, Greg; Glendenning, Paul; Gillett, Melissa J; Vasikaran, Samuel D

    2018-01-01

    Objective Primary aldosteronism is a curable cause of hypertension which can be treated surgically or medically depending on the findings of adrenal vein sampling studies. Adrenal vein sampling studies are technically demanding with a high failure rate in many centres. The use of intraprocedural cortisol measurement could improve the success rates of adrenal vein sampling but may be impracticable due to cost and effects on procedural duration. Design Retrospective review of the results of adrenal vein sampling procedures since commencement of point-of-care cortisol measurement using a novel single-use semi-quantitative measuring device for cortisol, the adrenal vein sampling Accuracy Kit. Success rate and complications of adrenal vein sampling procedures before and after use of the adrenal vein sampling Accuracy Kit. Routine use of the adrenal vein sampling Accuracy Kit device for intraprocedural measurement of cortisol commenced in 2016. Results Technical success rate of adrenal vein sampling increased from 63% of 99 procedures to 90% of 48 procedures ( P = 0.0007) after implementation of the adrenal vein sampling Accuracy Kit. Failure of right adrenal vein cannulation was the main reason for an unsuccessful study. Radiation dose decreased from 34.2 Gy.cm 2 (interquartile range, 15.8-85.9) to 15.7 Gy.cm 2 (6.9-47.3) ( P = 0.009). No complications were noted, and implementation costs were minimal. Conclusions Point-of-care cortisol measurement during adrenal vein sampling improved cannulation success rates and reduced radiation exposure. The use of the adrenal vein sampling Accuracy Kit is now standard practice at our centre.

  11. TECHNICAL COORDINATION

    CERN Multimedia

    A. Ball

    Overview From a technical perspective, CMS has been in “beam operation” state since 6th November. The detector is fully closed with all components operational and the magnetic field is normally at the nominal 3.8T. The UXC cavern is normally closed with the radiation veto set. Access to UXC is now only possible during downtimes of LHC. Such accesses must be carefully planned, documented and carried out in agreement with CMS Technical Coordination, Experimental Area Management, LHC programme coordination and the CCC. Material flow in and out of UXC is now strictly controlled. Access to USC remains possible at any time, although, for safety reasons, it is necessary to register with the shift crew in the control room before going down.It is obligatory for all material leaving UXC to pass through the underground buffer zone for RP scanning, database entry and appropriate labeling for traceability. Technical coordination (notably Stephane Bally and Christoph Schaefer), the shift crew and run ...

  12. Radiation protection education and training for physicians. Technical qualification for radiation protection and radiation protection instruction for physicians. More important than ever; Aus- und Fortbildung im Strahlenschutz fuer Aerzte. Fachkunde im Strahlenschutz und Strahlenschutzausbildung fuer Aerzte. Wichtiger denn je.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loecker, Hubert [Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - Deutsches Forschungszentrum fuer Gesundheit und Umwelt (GmbH), Neuherberg (Germany). Inst. fuer Strahlenschutz

    2017-07-01

    The medical application of ionizing radiation - especially X-ray diagnostics - is contributing most of the civilizing radiation exposure of the population. More than 80 percent of occupationally exposed persons work in nuclear medicine. Therefore radiation protection in medicine and instruction and training of physicians is more important than ever.

  13. Local-scale stratigraphy of grooved terrain on Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Head, James W.; Helfenstein, Paul; Plescia, Jeffrey B.

    1987-01-01

    The surface of the Jovian satellite, Ganymede, is divided into two main units, dark terrain cut by arcuate and subradial furrows, and light terrain consisting largely of areas with pervasive U-shaped grooves. The grooved terrain may be subdivided on the basis of pervasive morphology of groove domains into four terrain types: (1) elongate bands of parallel grooves (groove lanes); (2) polygonal domains of parallel grooves (grooved polygons); (3) polygonal domains of two orthogonal groove sets (reticulate terrain); and (4) polygons having two to several complexly cross-cutting groove sets (complex grooved terrain). Reticulate terrain is frequently dark and not extensively resurfaced, and grades to a more hummocky terrain type. The other three grooved terrain types have almost universally been resurfaced by light material during their emplacement. The sequence of events during grooved terrain emplacement has been investigated. An attempt is made to integrate observed geologic and tectonic patterns to better constrain the relative ages and styles of emplacement of grooved terrain types. A revised model of grooved terrain emplacement is proposed and is tested using detailed geologic mapping and measurement of crater density.

  14. Radiation protection research projects. Program report 2015. Report on research program radiation protection of the Federal ministry for environment, nature conservation and reactor safety with technical and administrative steering by the Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz; Strahlenschutzforschung. Programmreport 2015. Bericht ueber das vom Bundesamt fuer Strahlenschutz fachlich begleitete und administrativ umgesetzte Forschungsprogramm Strahlenschutz des Bundesministeriums fuer Umwelt, Naturschutz, Bau und Reaktorsicherheit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmitt-Hannig, Annemarie; Loebke-Reinl, Angelika; Peter, Josef; Goedde, Ralph; Hachenberger, Claudia; Trugenberger-Schnabel, Angela (comps.)

    2016-08-15

    On behalf of the Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety (BMUB) the Federal Office for Radiation Protection (BfS) awards research grants for projects in the field of radiation protection. The findings of these projects serve as decision aiding information in the development of radiation protection regulations as well as in the fulfilment of specific tasks in the field of radiation protection. The tasks of the Federal Office for Radiation Protection involve planning, technical and administrative preparation, awarding of contracts, general support as well as the technical evaluation of research and study projects. This report provides information on results, i. e. preliminary (in the form of status reports) and, where applicable, final results of radiation protection projects within the BMUB's Environmental Research Plan for the year 2015.

  15. Simulation and Analysis of the Topographic Effects on Snow-Free Albedo over Rugged Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalei Hao

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Topography complicates the modeling and retrieval of land surface albedo due to shadow effects and the redistribution of incident radiation. Neglecting topographic effects may lead to a significant bias when estimating land surface albedo over a single slope. However, for rugged terrain, a comprehensive and systematic investigation of topographic effects on land surface albedo is currently ongoing. Accurately estimating topographic effects on land surface albedo over a rugged terrain presents a challenge in remote sensing modeling and applications. In this paper, we focused on the development of a simplified estimation method for snow-free albedo over a rugged terrain at a 1-km scale based on a 30-m fine-scale digital elevation model (DEM. The proposed method was compared with the radiosity approach based on simulated and real DEMs. The results of the comparison showed that the proposed method provided adequate computational efficiency and satisfactory accuracy simultaneously. Then, the topographic effects on snow-free albedo were quantitatively investigated and interpreted by considering the mean slope, subpixel aspect distribution, solar zenith angle, and solar azimuth angle. The results showed that the more rugged the terrain and the larger the solar illumination angle, the more intense the topographic effects were on black-sky albedo (BSA. The maximum absolute deviation (MAD and the maximum relative deviation (MRD of the BSA over a rugged terrain reached 0.28 and 85%, respectively, when the SZA was 60° for different terrains. Topographic effects varied with the mean slope, subpixel aspect distribution, SZA and SAA, which should not be neglected when modeling albedo.

  16. Influence of late radiation effects on the immunological parameters of aging. Final technical report, September 1977-August 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makinodan, T.

    1983-01-01

    A series of tests of immunologic function were used in assessing the immune status of individuals who survived the atomic bombs in Japan in 1945. A-bomb survivors (n=189) residing in the US were recruited to participate in the study. Survivors exposed to varying low doses of radiation (S/sub +/ group) had healthier immune responses than those exposed to O rads (S 0 group). The difference was significant for natural cytotoxicity (p = .028). Less striking differences with the same trend (i.e., S/sub +/ healthier than S 0 ) were observed with: the mixed lymphocyte reactions, mitogenic response to PHA, interferon production, serum interferon levels (all S/sub +/ > S 0 ), frequency of detectable immune complexes, rheumatoid factor, and antimitochondrial antibodies (all S/sub +/ > S 0 ). In order to study the Japanese A-bomb survivors, a collaborative study was initiated with the Radiation Research Effects Foundation in Hiroshima, Japan. Immunologic tests were performed on blood samples from 278 individuals including 202 survivors of whom approximately one-third each were exposed to 0, 1-99, and 100+ rads at the time of the bomb. A decrease in immune responses was observed with increasing exposure. It is interesting that, consistent with our findings on the American survivors, the Japanese survivors exposed to 1-9 rads showed a small increase in natural cytotoxicity compared to the group exposed to 0 rads. Females showed a stronger dose-related decline than males (who may have shown a slight increase) with natural cytotoxicity, and both groups showed a small effect with interleukin 2 production. With both tests males were higher than females. Natural cytotoxicity increased significantly with age, as did serum immune complex levels. In the pilot study of the murine model for plasmacytoma formation, it was shown that age and radiation may both predispose to plasmacytoma formation. 22 references, 5 tables

  17. Development of scintillators on the basis of AIIBVI compounds for radiation instruments used in medical and technical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starzhinskiy N. G.

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Physico-technological problems of preparation and main properties of scintillation materials based on zinc selenide and other AIIBVI compounds are considered. Effects have been determined of dopant properties on formation processes of complex lattice defects playing the role of luminescence centers. It is shown that such property features as high light output and very low afterglow level, as well as a unique combination of scintillation and semiconductor properties allow application of these materials in different fields of radiation instrument technologies.

  18. Biological dosimeter for cellular damage and repair by ionizing radiation. Final technical progress report, May 1, 1993 - April 30, 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cress, A.E.

    1998-01-01

    The authors have investigated the alteration of chromatin domains in Human T and B cells after ionizing radiation using three DNA specific dyes, Feulgen, Hoechst and 7-amino actinomycin D. Characterization and differentiation of T and B cells was accomplished using only 4 of a possible 32 image features with the CAS and Quaritex QX7 Digital Image Systems. Human B and T cells were irradiated with 1, 5 and 10 Gy and analyzed during a 1.5 hour recovery period. The chosen features detect a dose dependent change in DNA domains which can be observed as early as 1.5 hours after a 1Gv exposure. The results suggest that the ability of DNA specific dyes to stain chromatin can be used as an early sensitive indicator of DNA damage. The observed alteration of chromatin staining suggests that chromatin structure does observably change in a significant manner during a DNA repair interval. Since these alteration can be detected with DNA specific dyes that stain both AT rich, GC rich or total DNA, these data suggest that a global alteration of the chromatin is occurring after exposure to ionizing radiation

  19. Technical progress report: Completion of spectral rotating shadowband radiometers and analysis of atmospheric radiation measurement spectral shortwave data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalsky, J.; Harrison, L. [State Univ. of New York, Albany, NY (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Our goal in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is the improvement of radiation models used in general circulation models (GCMs), especially in the shortwave, (1) by providing improved shortwave radiometric measurements for the testing of models and (2) by developing methods for retrieving climatologically sensitive parameters that serve as input to shortwave and longwave models. At the Atmospheric Sciences Research Center (ASRC) in Albany, New York, we are acquiring downwelling direct and diffuse spectral irradiance, at six wavelengths, plus downwelling broadband longwave, and upwelling and downwelling broadband shortwave irradiances that we combine with National Weather Service surface and upper air data from the Albany airport as a test data set for ARM modelers. We have also developed algorithms to improve shortwave measurements made at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) ARM site by standard thermopile instruments and by the multifilter rotating shadowband radiometer (MFRSR) based on these Albany data sets. Much time has been spent developing techniques to retrieve column aerosol, water vapor, and ozone from the direct beam spectral measurements of the MFRSR. Additionally, we have had success in calculating shortwave surface albedo and aerosol optical depth from the ratio of direct to diffuse spectral reflectance.

  20. Software tools for radiation protection developed by students of the Czech Technical University in Prague in cooperation with the National Radiation Protection Institute (SURO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helebrant, J.; Kuca, P; Landa, M.

    2017-01-01

    The paper deals with software tools focused on radiation protection, which were created within the framework of cooperation between the SURO, and FSV CVUT. The tools were created mainly in the framework of bachelor and master's theses on topics listed by the SURO. This is the development of additional specialized tools / extensions (so-called plugins) for the QGIS open-source application used at the SURO for data processing from field measurements and their presentation in the form of map outputs (using free map data such as OpenStreetMap). Students' work is a functional and ideally debug plug-in for QGIS, including complete documentation and source code released under the GNU GPL license - all the plugins thus created will be available to those interested in the public. (authors)

  1. Technical memory 2007

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2009-01-01

    The technical memory 2007 of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (ARN) of the Argentine Republic, compiles the papers published in the subject on radiation protection and nuclear safety, and presented in journals, technical reports, congress or meetings of these specialities by personnel of the mentioned institution during 2007. In this edition the documents are presented on: environmental protection; transport of radioactive materials; regulations; research reactors and nuclear power plants; biological radiation effects; therapeutic uses of ionizing radiation and radioprotection of patients; internal dosimetry; physical dosimetry; knowledge management; radioactive waste management [es

  2. GIS TECHNOLOGY AND TERRAIN ORTHOPHOTOMAP MAKING FOR MILITARY APPLICATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elshan Hashimov

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, it is shown that GIS and photogrammetry technologiyes, determination of searching target coordinates for the operational desicion making are very important for the military application, for the combat control. With aim of orthophotomap making of the terrain and identification of terrain supervision there has been constructed 3D model for choosen mountainous terrain of Azerbaijan Republic using GIS technology. Based on this model there has been obtained a terrain profile and carried out mapping. Using ArcGis software there has been investigated possibility remain control on obserbvable and unobservable parties of terrain on supervision line from supervision point to target point.

  3. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, J.H.

    1986-01-01

    The basic facts about radiation are explained, along with some simple and natural ways of combating its ill-effects, based on ancient healing wisdom as well as the latest biochemical and technological research. Details are also given of the diet that saved thousands of lives in Nagasaki after the Atomic bomb attack. Special comment is made on the use of radiation for food processing. (U.K.)

  4. Dosimetry and technical radiation protection at the RA reactor in 1979, Report on the project 'Operation and maintenance of the RA reactor'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ninkovic, M. et al.

    1979-12-01

    This report include the analysis of the dosimetry and technical radiation protection results collected during 1979. The first part shows the data about the fundamental exposure to radiation and the statistical review of the total number of measurements. The following are included as well: measured values of radioactive gases and aerosol contents in air; contamination level of surfaces, clothes and uncovered parts of the staff bodies. Analysis of the personnel exposure is presented in the second part of the report. It was stated that the maximum individual external dose was 9.5 mGy, and the exposure dose was 1/5 lower than the annual dose limit for all the exposed personnel. It was estimated that that the internal contamination is negligible compared to the external contamination. This statement was based on the frequency of tasks in the contaminated zones, undertaken control and protection measures, as well as on the evaluation of the expected internal contamination. Comparative evaluation of the occupational exposures is given for the past five years. This showed that the exposure in 1979 was approximately on the same level as the mean value during past four years. The third part of the report covers the numerical data about the quantity of the collected radioactive waste, total size of contaminated and decontaminated surfaces and number of decontaminated objects. A brief analysis of the accidents occurred during this year under regular reactor operating conditions, maintenance and repair is given at the end. It was stated that there has been no accident that would cause exposure higher than the prescribed limits or any significant contamination of the working space or environment. The more detailed analyses concerned with radiation protection aspects of the irregularities noticed on the nuclear fuel elements were described in the Annex. It was concluded that the mentioned problems did not cause any leaks. This was significant for planning and manipulating the

  5. Application of Digital Terrain Model to volcanology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Achilli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional reconstruction of the ground surface (Digital Terrain Model, DTM, derived by airborne GPS photogrammetric surveys, is a powerful tool for implementing morphological analysis in remote areas. High accurate 3D models, with submeter elevation accuracy, can be obtained by images acquired at photo scales between 1:5000-1:20000. Multitemporal DTMs acquired periodically over volcanic area allow the monitoring of areas interested by crustal deformations and the evaluation of mass balance when large instability phenomena or lava flows have occurred. The work described the results obtained from the analysis of photogrammetric data collected over the Vulcano Island from 1971 to 2001. The data, processed by means of the Digital Photogrammetry Workstation DPW 770, provided DTM with accuracy ranging between few centimeters to few decimeters depending on the geometric image resolution, terrain configuration and quality of photographs.

  6. Radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Winther, J.F.; Ulbak, K.; Dreyer, L.; Pukkala, E.; Oesterlind, A.

    1997-01-01

    Exposure to solar and ionizing radiation increases the risk for cancer in humans. Some 5% of solar radiation is within the ultraviolet spectrum and may cause both malignant melanoma and non-melanocytic skin cancer; the latter is regarded as a benign disease and is accordingly not included in our estimation of avoidable cancers. Under the assumption that the rate of occurrence of malignant melanoma of the buttocks of both men and women and of the scalp of women would apply to all parts of the body in people completely unexposed to solar radiation, it was estimated that approximately 95% of all malignant melanomas arising in the Nordic populations around the year 2000 will be due to exposure to natural ultraviolet radiation, equivalent to an annual number of about 4700 cases, with 2100 in men and 2600 in women, or some 4% of all cancers notified. Exposure to ionizing radiation in the Nordic countries occurs at an average effective dose per capita per year of about 3 mSv (Iceland, 1.1 mSv) from natural sources, and about 1 mSv from man-made sources. While the natural sources are primarily radon in indoor air, natural radionuclides in food, cosmic radiation and gamma radiation from soil and building materials, the man-made sources are dominated by the diagnostic and therapeutic use of ionizing radiation. On the basis of measured levels of radon in Nordic dwellings and associated risk estimates for lung cancer derived from well-conducted epidemiological studies, we estimated that about 180 cases of lung cancer (1% of all lung cancer cases) per year could be avoided in the Nordic countries around the year 2000 if indoor exposure to radon were eliminated, and that an additional 720 cases (6%) could be avoided annually if either radon or tobacco smoking were eliminated. Similarly, it was estimated that the exposure of the Nordic populations to natural sources of ionizing radiation other than radon and to medical sources will each give rise to an annual total of 2120

  7. EARTHWORK VOLUME CALCULATION FROM DIGITAL TERRAIN MODELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    JANIĆ Milorad

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Accurate calculation of cut and fill volume has an essential importance in many fields. This article shows a new method, which has no approximation, based on Digital Terrain Models. A relatively new mathematical model is developed for that purpose, which is implemented in the software solution. Both of them has been tested and verified in the praxis on several large opencast mines. This application is developed in AutoLISP programming language and works in AutoCAD environment.

  8. Technical and economic aspects of thermo-chemical decomposition of biomass in the processes of transformation of it in power-consuming energy/carriers by the use of the concentrated gel of sun radiation, has been considered

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sultanova, K.D.; Mustafayeva, R.M.; Rzayev, P.F.

    2007-01-01

    Full text: The technical and economic assessment of process of thermo-chemical decomposition of biomass in the processes of transformation of it in power-consuming energy/carriers by the use of the concentrated gel of sun radiation, has been considered

  9. 1980, a revolution in silicon detectors, from energy spectrometer to radiation imager: Some technical and historical details

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heijne, Erik H.M.

    2008-01-01

    Silicon nuclear particle detectors were introduced just 50 years ago, after single crystal manufacturing was mastered. A major change took place around 1980 when the 'planar' Metal Oxide Semiconductor (MOS) technology developed in microelectronics was systematically applied also in detector construction. With the simultaneous introduction of matched readout chips this eventually would lead to pixelized matrix detectors that function as radiation imaging devices. The critical contributions to this revolution by Josef Kemmer and Paul Burger are described. Performance of the segmented planar technology detectors improved significantly in comparison with the earlier spectrometric diodes. With efficient industrial support the use of silicon detectors in many new applications has become possible and detector systems with a sensitive area of several tens to >100m 2 have been constructed recently

  10. IEEE Committee on Man and Radiation--COMAR technical information statement radiofrequency safety and utility Smart Meters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushberg, Jerrold T; Foster, Kenneth R; Hatfield, James B; Thansandote, Arthur; Tell, Richard A

    2015-03-01

    This Technical Information Statement describes Smart Meter technology as used with modern electric power metering systems and focuses on the radio frequency (RF) emissions associated with their operation relative to human RF exposure limits. Smart Meters typically employ low power (-1 W or less) transmitters that wirelessly send electric energy usage data to the utility company several times per day in the form of brief, pulsed emissions in the unlicensed frequency bands of 902-928 MHz and 2.4-2.48 GHz or on other nearby frequencies. Most Smart Meters operate as wireless mesh networks where each Smart Meter can communicate with other neighboring meters to relay data to a data collection point in the region. This communication process includes RF emissions from Smart Meters representing energy usage as well as the relaying of data from other meters and emissions associated with maintaining the meter's hierarchy within the wireless network. As a consequence, most Smart Meters emit RF pulses throughout the day, more at certain times and less at others. However, the duty cycle associated with all of these emissions is very small, typically less than 1%, and most of the time far less than 1%, meaning that most Smart Meters actually transmit RF fields for only a few minutes per day at most. The low peak power of Smart Meters and the very low duty cycles lead to the fact that accessible RF fields near Smart Meters are far below both U.S. and international RF safety limits whether judged on the basis of instantaneous peak power densities or time-averaged exposures. This conclusion holds for Smart Meters alone or installed in large banks of meters.

  11. Phase 2 Study of Docetaxel, Cisplatin, and Concurrent Radiation for Technically Resectable Stage III-IV Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Inohara, Hidenori, E-mail: hinohara@ent.med.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Faculty of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Takenaka, Yukinori; Yoshii, Tadashi; Nakahara, Susumu; Yamamoto, Yoshifumi; Tomiyama, Yoichiro [Department of Otorhinolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery, Osaka University Faculty of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Seo, Yuji; Isohashi, Fumiaki; Suzuki, Osamu; Yoshioka, Yasuo; Sumida, Iori; Ogawa, Kazuhiko [Department of Radiation Oncology, Osaka University Faculty of Medicine, Suita, Osaka (Japan)

    2015-04-01

    Purpose: We investigated the efficacy and safety of weekly low-dose docetaxel and cisplatin therapy concurrent with conventionally fractionated radiation in patients with technically resectable stage III-IV squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. Methods and Materials: Between March 2004 and October 2011, we enrolled 117 patients, of whom 116 were analyzable (43 had oropharyngeal cancer, 54 had hypopharyngeal cancer, and 19 had laryngeal cancer), and 85 (73%) had stage IV disease. Radiation consisted of 66 Gy in 33 fractions. Docetaxel, 10 mg/m{sup 2}, followed by cisplatin, 20 mg/m{sup 2}, administered on the same day were given once a week for 6 cycles. The primary endpoint was overall complete response (CR) rate after chemoradiation therapy. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oropharyngeal cancer was examined by PCR. Results: Of 116 patients, 82 (71%) completed treatment per protocol; 102 (88%) received the full radiation therapy dose; and 90 (78%) and 12 (10%) patients received 6 and 5 chemotherapy cycles, respectively. Overall CR rate was 71%. After median follow-up of 50.9 months (range: 15.6-113.9 months for surviving patients), 2-year and 4-year overall survival rates were 82% and 68%, respectively. Cumulative 2-year and 4-year local failure rates were 27% and 28%, respectively, whereas distant metastasis rates were 15% and 22%, respectively. HPV status in oropharyngeal cancer was not associated with treatment efficacy. Acute toxicity included grade 3 and 4 in-field mucositis in 73% and 5% of patients, respectively, whereas myelosuppression and renal injury were minimal. No patients died of toxicity. Feeding tube dependence in 8% and tracheostomy in 1% of patients were evident at 2 years postchemoradiation therapy in patients who survived without local treatment failure. Conclusions: Local control and survival with this regimen were satisfactory. Although acute toxicity, such as mucositis, was common, late toxicity, such as laryngoesophageal

  12. Technical report on the development of egg allergy vaccine using novel technology fused with radiation technology and biotechnology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Myung Woo; Lee, Ju Woon; Kim, Jae Hun

    2007-01-15

    Type I allergy has become increasingly prevalent over the past few decades. Current immunotherapy for allergic disease is effective in the treatment of respiratory allergies by administration of natural allergen extracts. Injection of food allergen extract can bring on high rate of adverse systemic reaction. Such traditional injection immunotherapy for food allergy is currently not recommended because of the allergic side effects of the therapy. Therefore, effective preventive and therapeutic strategies for food allergy are urgently needed. Allergenicity of allergen by a treatment of radiation were decreased and irradiated allergen was showed immunological change in vivo. Here this study presents an approach for vaccination of irradiated allergen to prevent allergic response and the feasibility for allergy treatment by modified allergen. Gamma irradiation of OVA caused a reduced humoral and cellular immune responses specific to the allergen OVA in preventive and therapeutic effects, and its related mechanisms were associated with down-regulation of OVA-specific T cell activation in preventive effect. From adoptive cell transfer experiment results. T cell of spleen cells is critical role in the suppressive effect of humoral and cellular response on OVA-induced allergy.

  13. Technical report on the development of egg allergy vaccine using novel technology fused with radiation technology and biotechnology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Myung Woo; Lee, Ju Woon; Kim, Jae Hun

    2007-01-01

    Type I allergy has become increasingly prevalent over the past few decades. Current immunotherapy for allergic disease is effective in the treatment of respiratory allergies by administration of natural allergen extracts. Injection of food allergen extract can bring on high rate of adverse systemic reaction. Such traditional injection immunotherapy for food allergy is currently not recommended because of the allergic side effects of the therapy. Therefore, effective preventive and therapeutic strategies for food allergy are urgently needed. Allergenicity of allergen by a treatment of radiation were decreased and irradiated allergen was showed immunological change in vivo. Here this study presents an approach for vaccination of irradiated allergen to prevent allergic response and the feasibility for allergy treatment by modified allergen. Gamma irradiation of OVA caused a reduced humoral and cellular immune responses specific to the allergen OVA in preventive and therapeutic effects, and its related mechanisms were associated with down-regulation of OVA-specific T cell activation in preventive effect. From adoptive cell transfer experiment results. T cell of spleen cells is critical role in the suppressive effect of humoral and cellular response on OVA-induced allergy

  14. Ab initio Based Modeling of Radiation Effects in Multi-Component Alloys: Final Scientific/Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dane Morgan

    2010-06-10

    The project began March 13, 2006, allocated for three years, and received a one year extension from March 13, 2009 to March 12, 2010. It has now completed 48 of 48 total months. The project was focused on using ab initio methods to gain insights into radiation induced segregation (RIS) in Ni-Fe-Cr alloys. The project had the following key accomplishments • Development of a large database of ab initio energetics that can be used by many researchers in the future for increased understanding of this system. For example, we have the first calculations showing a dramatic stabilization effect of Cr-Cr interstitial dumbbells in Ni. • Prediction of both vacancy and interstitial diffusion constants for Ni-Cr and Ni-Fe for dilute Cr and Fe. This work included generalization of widely used multifrequency models to make use of ab initio derived energetics and thermodynamics. • Prediction of qualitative trends of RIS from vacancy and interstitial mechanisms, suggesting the two types of defect fluxes drive Cr RIS in opposite directions. • Detailed kinetic Monte Carlo modeling of diffusion by vacancy mechanism in Ni-Cr as a function of Cr concentration. The results demonstrate that Cr content can have a significant effect on RIS. • Development of a quantitative RIS transport model, including models for thermodynamic factors and boundary conditions.

  15. Digital terrain data base - new possibilities of 3D terrain modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mateja Rihtaršič

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available GISs has brought new dimensions in the field of digital terrain modelling, too. Modem DTMs must be real (relational databases with high degree of "intelligence". This paper presents some of the demands, ivhich have to be solved in modern digital terrain databases, together with main steps of their's generation. Problems, connected to regional level, multi-pur pose use, new possibilities and direct integration into GIS are presented. The practical model was created across smaller test area, so few lines with practical experiences can be droped, too.

  16. Enterprise Terrain Data Standards for Joint Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-03

    e.g., bombs /shells, vehicles, etc.) or environmental factors (e.g., weather). • Riverine and ocean surface and bathymetry. o Wave/swell generation...Attachment 2 Terrain Generation Capability St an da rd iz ed S ch em a & At tr ib ut es...F or m at Pl at fo rm In de pe nd en t O pe ra tin g Sy st em In de pe nd en t Geospatial Source & Industry Formats Utilized by the Specification

  17. The research frontier and beyond: granitic terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twidale, C. R.

    1993-07-01

    Investigations of granite forms and landscapes over the past two centuries suggest that many features, major and minor, are shaped by fracture-controlled subsurface weathering, and particularly moisture-driven alteration: in other words etch forms are especially well represented in granitic terrains. Commonly referred to as two stage forms, many are in reality multistage in origin, for the structural contrasts exploited by weathering and erosion that are essential to the mechanism originated as magmatic, thermal or tectonic events in the distant geological past. Fracture patterns are critical to landform and landscape development in granitic terrains, but other structural factors also come into play. Location with respect to water table and moisture contact are also important. Once exposed and comparatively dry, granite forms tend to stability; they are developed and diversified, and many are gradually destroyed as new, epigene, forms evolve, but many granite forms persist over long ages. Reinforcement effects frequently play a part in landform development. Several granite forms are convergent, i.e. features of similar morphology evolve under the influence of different processes, frequently in contrasted environments. On the other hand many landforms considered to be typical of granitic terrains are also developed in bedrock that is petrologically different but physically similar to granite; and in particular is subdivided by fractures of similar pattern and density. To date, most of the general statements concerning the evolution of granitic terrains have been based in work in the tropics but other climatic settings, and notably those of cold land, are now yielding significant results. Future research will extend and develop these avenues, but biotic factors, and particularly the role of bacteria, in such areas as weathering, will take on a new importance. Structural variations inherited from the magnetic, thermal and tectonic events to which granite bodies have

  18. Morphological modeling of terrains and volume data

    CERN Document Server

    Comic, Lidija; Magillo, Paola; Iuricich, Federico

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the mathematical background behind discrete approaches to morphological analysis of scalar fields, with a focus on Morse theory and on the discrete theories due to Banchoff and Forman. The algorithms and data structures presented are used for terrain modeling and analysis, molecular shape analysis, and for analysis or visualization of sensor and simulation 3D data sets. It covers a variety of application domains including geography, geology, environmental sciences, medicine and biology. The authors classify the different approaches to morphological analysis which are all ba

  19. Wind resource assessment in heterogeneous terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderwel, C.; Placidi, M.; Ganapathisubramani, B.

    2017-03-01

    variance in thrust and power also appears to be significant in the presence of secondary flows. Finally, there are substantial differences in the dispersive and turbulent stresses across the terrain, which could lead to variable fatigue life depending on the placement of the turbines within such heterogeneous terrain. Overall, these results indicate the importance of accounting for heterogeneous terrain when siting individual turbines and wind farms. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  20. Gravity Terrain Effect of the Seafloor Topography in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lun-Tao Tong Tai-Rong Guo

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Gravity terrain correction is used to compensate for the gravitational effects of the topography residual to the Bouguer plate. The seafloor topography off the eastern offshore of Taiwan is extremely rugged, and the depth of the sea bottom could be greater than 5000 m. In order to evaluate the terrain effect caused by the seafloor topography, a modern computer algorithm is used to calculate the terrain correction based on the digital elevation model (DEM.

  1. Wind flow simulation over flat terrain using CFD based software

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petrov, Peter; Terziev, Angel; Genovski, Ivan

    2009-01-01

    Velocity distribution recognition over definite place (terrain) is very important because due to that the zones with high energy potential could be defined (the fields with high velocities). This is a precondition for optimal wind turbine generators micro-sitting. In current work a simulation of the open flow over the flat terrain using the CFD based software is reviewed. The simulations are made of a real fluid flow in order to be defined the velocity fields over the terrain

  2. Terrain Commander: Unattended Ground-Based Surveillance System

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steadman, Bob

    2000-01-01

    .... Terrain Commander OASIS provides next generation target detection, classification, and tracking through smart sensor fusion of beamforming acoustic, seismic, passive infrared, and magnetic sensors...

  3. Functional Decomposition of Modeling and Simulation Terrain Database Generation Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yakich, Valerie R; Lashlee, J. D

    2008-01-01

    .... This report documents the conceptual procedure as implemented by Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training, and Support and decomposes terrain database construction using the Integration Definition for Function Modeling (IDEF...

  4. Survivor shielding. Part C. Improvements in terrain shielding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Egbert, Stephen D.; Kaul, Dean C.; Roberts, James A.; Kerr, George D.

    2005-01-01

    A number of atomic-bomb survivors were affected by shielding provided by terrain features. These terrain features can be a small hill, affecting one or two houses, or a high mountain that shields large neighborhoods. In the survivor dosimetry system, terrain shielding can be described by a transmission factor (TF), which is the ratio between the dose with and without the terrain present. The terrain TF typically ranges between 0.1 and 1.0. After DS86 was implemented at RERF, the terrain shielding categories were examined and found to either have a bias or an excessive uncertainty that could readily be removed. In 1989, an improvement in the terrain model was implemented at RERF in the revised DS86 code, but the documentation was not published. It is now presented in this section. The solution to the terrain shielding in front of a house is described in this section. The problem of terrain shielding of survivors behind Hijiyama mountain at Hiroshima and Konpirasan mountain at Nagasaki has also been recognized, and a solution to this problem has been included in DS02. (author)

  5. Estimating Slopes In Images Of Terrain By Use Of BRDF

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholl, Marija S.

    1995-01-01

    Proposed method of estimating slopes of terrain features based on use of bidirectional reflectivity distribution function (BRDF) in analyzing aerial photographs, satellite video images, or other images produced by remote sensors. Estimated slopes integrated along horizontal coordinates to obtain estimated heights; generating three-dimensional terrain maps. Method does not require coregistration of terrain features in pairs of images acquired from slightly different perspectives nor requires Sun or other source of illumination to be low in sky over terrain of interest. On contrary, best when Sun is high. Works at almost all combinations of illumination and viewing angles.

  6. A Multi-Scale Validation Strategy for Albedo Products over Rugged Terrain and Preliminary Application in Heihe River Basin, China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xingwen Lin

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available The issue for the validation of land surface remote sensing albedo products over rugged terrain is the scale effects between the reference albedo measurements and coarse scale albedo products, which is caused by the complex topography. This paper illustrates a multi-scale validation strategy specified for coarse scale albedo validation over rugged terrain. A Mountain-Radiation-Transfer-based (MRT-based albedo upscaling model was proposed in the process of multi-scale validation strategy for aggregating fine scale albedo to coarse scale. The simulated data of both the reference coarse scale albedo and fine scale albedo were used to assess the performance and uncertainties of the MRT-based albedo upscaling model. The results showed that the MRT-based model could reflect the albedo scale effects over rugged terrain and provided a robust solution for albedo upscaling from fine scale to coarse scale with different mean slopes and different solar zenith angles. The upscaled coarse scale albedos had the great agreements with the simulated coarse scale albedo with a Root-Mean-Square-Error (RMSE of 0.0029 and 0.0017 for black sky albedo (BSA and white sky albedo (WSA, respectively. Then the MRT-based model was preliminarily applied for the assessment of daily MODerate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Albedo Collection V006 products (MCD43A3 C6 over rugged terrain. Results showed that the MRT-based model was effective and suitable for conducting the validation of MODIS albedo products over rugged terrain. In this research area, it was shown that the MCD43A3 C6 products with full inversion algorithm, were generally in agreement with the aggregated coarse scale reference albedos over rugged terrain in the Heihe River Basin, with the BSA RMSE of 0.0305 and WSA RMSE of 0.0321, respectively, which were slightly higher than those over flat terrain.

  7. Addressing terrain masking in orbital reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Sharad; Cico, Luke

    2012-06-01

    During aerial orbital reconnaissance, a sensor system is mounted on an airborne platform for imaging a region on the ground. The latency between the image acquisition and delivery of information to the end-user is critical and must be minimized. Due to fine ground pixel resolution and a large field-of-view for wide-area surveillance applications, a massive volume of data is gathered and imagery products are formed using a real-time multi-processor system. The images are taken at oblique angles, stabilized and ortho-rectified. The line-of-sight of the sensor to the ground is often interrupted by terrain features such as mountains or tall structures as depicted in Figure1. The ortho-rectification process renders the areas hidden from the line-of sight of the sensor with spurious information. This paper discusses an approach for addressing terrain masking in size, weight, and power (SWaP) and memory-restricted onboard processing systems.

  8. Archaean TTG of Vodlozero Terrain, Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekulaev, Valery; Arestova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    The Vodlozero terrain is the largest (about 270*240 km) early Archaean fragment of Fennoscandian Shield and composes its eastern part. The granitoids of TTG suite are predominant component of the terrain. The greenstone belts are placed along the margins of the terrain. Several stages of TTG formation can be distinguished in Achaean crust history. (1) The oldest TTG are trondhjemites and tonalities with age of 3240 Ma. They contain rare and small amphibolite inclusions of the same age. These TTG are characterized by high Sr (av. 412 ppm), Sr/Y (70), (La/Yb)n (54) and low Y (av. 7 ppm), Yb (0.32 ppm) and Nb (4 ppm). It was shown (Lobach-Zhuchenko et al., 2000), that the source of these TTG could be basic rocks, having composition similar with TH1 by K.Condie. (2) The tonalities and granodiorites with age of 3150 Ma are disposed near greenstone belts and contain compared to TTG of the first group less Sr (av. 250 ppm), Sr/Y (22), (La/Yb)n (18) and more K, Rb (av. 70 ppm), Ba (470 ppm), Y (11 ppm),Yb (1.16 ppm). TTG of both groups have identical T(DM)Nd (3250-3400 Ma) and differences in composition is evidently connected with lower level of source melting of the second group and also with K-metasomatism. The volcanics of the greenstone belts have age 3020 - 2940 Ma. Dykes of gabbro-amphibolites and andesites with the same age and composition cut TTG of the first and the second groups. The age of the third TTG group is about 2900 Ma ago. These rocks form leucosoma of migmatites within TTG of the second group. The composition of the third TTG and Nd isotope data suppose their origin by the melting of ancient TTG crust simultaneously with greenstone belt emplacement. The fourth TTG group with age 2780-2850 Ma forms a small intrusions, cutting older TTG and greenstone rocks. Their composition is similar to 3150 Ma TTG. Nd isotope data indicate that these TTG have younger (about 2850 Ma) source. Thus there are four TTG groups formed into interval more 400 Ma. The age and

  9. Technical writing versus technical writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dillingham, J. W.

    1981-01-01

    Two terms, two job categories, 'technical writer' and 'technical author' are discussed in terms of industrial and business requirements and standards. A distinction between 'technical writing' and technical 'writing' is made. The term 'technical editor' is also considered. Problems inherent in the design of programs to prepare and train students for these jobs are discussed. A closer alliance between industry and academia is suggested as a means of preparing students with competent technical communication skills (especially writing and editing skills) and good technical skills.

  10. Neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation of rectal cancer with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: summary of technical and dosimetric features and early clinical experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richetti, Antonella; Fogliata, Antonella; Clivio, Alessandro; Nicolini, Giorgia; Pesce, Gianfranco; Salati, Emanuela; Vanetti, Eugenio; Cozzi, Luca

    2010-01-01

    To report about initial technical and clinical experience in preoperative radiation treatment of rectal cancer with volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc ® (RA) technology. Twenty-five consecutive patients (pts) were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma with stage T2-T4, N0-1. Dose prescription was 44 Gy in 22 fractions (or 45 Gy in 25 fractions). Delivery was performed with single arc with a 6 MV photon beam. Twenty patients were treated preoperatively, five did not receive surgery. Twenty-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy with oral capecitabine. A comparison with a cohort of twenty patients with similar characteristics treated with conformal therapy (3DC) is presented as well. From a dosimetric point of view, RA improved conformality of doses (CI 95% = 1.1 vs. 1.4 for RA and 3DC), presented similar target coverage with lower maximum doses, significant sparing of femurs and significant reduction of integral and mean dose to healthy tissue. From the clinical point of view, surgical reports resulted in a down-staging in 41% of cases. Acute toxicity was limited to Grade 1-2 diarrhoea in 40% and Grade 3 in 8% of RA pts, 45% and 5% of 3DC pts, compatible with known effects of concomitant chemotherapy. RA treatments were performed with an average of 2.0 vs. 3.4 min of 3DC. RA proved to be a safe, qualitatively advantageous treatment modality for rectal cancer, showing some improved results in dosimetric aspects

  11. Neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation of rectal cancer with Volumetric Modulated Arc Therapy: summary of technical and dosimetric features and early clinical experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salati Emanuela

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To report about initial technical and clinical experience in preoperative radiation treatment of rectal cancer with volumetric modulated arcs with the RapidArc® (RA technology. Methods Twenty-five consecutive patients (pts were treated with RA. All showed locally advanced rectal adenocarcinoma with stage T2-T4, N0-1. Dose prescription was 44 Gy in 22 fractions (or 45 Gy in 25 fractions. Delivery was performed with single arc with a 6 MV photon beam. Twenty patients were treated preoperatively, five did not receive surgery. Twenty-three patients received concomitant chemotherapy with oral capecitabine. A comparison with a cohort of twenty patients with similar characteristics treated with conformal therapy (3DC is presented as well. Results From a dosimetric point of view, RA improved conformality of doses (CI95% = 1.1 vs. 1.4 for RA and 3DC, presented similar target coverage with lower maximum doses, significant sparing of femurs and significant reduction of integral and mean dose to healthy tissue. From the clinical point of view, surgical reports resulted in a down-staging in 41% of cases. Acute toxicity was limited to Grade 1-2 diarrhoea in 40% and Grade 3 in 8% of RA pts, 45% and 5% of 3DC pts, compatible with known effects of concomitant chemotherapy. RA treatments were performed with an average of 2.0 vs. 3.4 min of 3DC. Conclusion RA proved to be a safe, qualitatively advantageous treatment modality for rectal cancer, showing some improved results in dosimetric aspects.

  12. ATRAN Terrain Sensing Guidance-The Grand-Daddy System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Richard F.; Evans, Donald C.

    1980-12-01

    ATRAN was the pioneer terrain sensing guidance system developed in the 1950 era and deployed in Europe on the Air Force's mobile, ground launched TM-76A MACE cruise missile in the late 1950's and early 1960's. The background, principles and technology are described for this system which was the forerunner of todays modern autonomous standoff terrain sensing guided weapons.

  13. Colour based off-road environment and terrain type classification

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, P.; Mark, W. van der; Heuvel, J.C. van den; Groen, F.C.A.

    2005-01-01

    Terrain classification is an important problem that still remains to be solved for off-road autonomous robot vehicle guidance. Often, obstacle detection systems are used which cannot distinguish between solid obstacles such as rocks or soft obstacles such as tall patches of grass. Terrain

  14. What Influences Youth to Operate All-Terrain Vehicles Safely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummon, A. H.; Heaney, C. A.; Dellinger, W. A.; Wilkins, J. R., III

    2014-01-01

    The operation of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) by youth has contributed to the incidence of serious and fatal injuries among children. This study explored factors related to the frequency with which youth wore a helmet and refrained from engaging in three risky driving behaviors (driving at risky speeds, on paved roads and on unfamiliar terrain)…

  15. 47 CFR 1.959 - Computation of average terrain elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Computation of average terrain elevation. 1.959 Section 1.959 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Wireless Radio Services Applications and Proceedings Application Requirements and Procedures § 1.959 Computation of average terrain elevation. Except a...

  16. 47 CFR 80.759 - Average terrain elevation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Average terrain elevation. 80.759 Section 80.759 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES STATIONS IN THE MARITIME SERVICES Standards for Computing Public Coast Station VHF Coverage § 80.759 Average terrain elevation. (a)(1) Draw radials...

  17. Terrain Perception in a Shape Shifting Rolling-Crawling Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchida Masataka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrain perception greatly enhances the performance of robots, providing them with essential information on the nature of terrain being traversed. Several living beings in nature offer interesting inspirations which adopt different gait patterns according to nature of terrain. In this paper, we present a novel terrain perception system for our bioinspired robot, Scorpio, to classify the terrain based on visual features and autonomously choose appropriate locomotion mode. Our Scorpio robot is capable of crawling and rolling locomotion modes, mimicking Cebrenus Rechenburgi, a member of the huntsman spider family. Our terrain perception system uses Speeded Up Robust Feature (SURF description method along with color information. Feature extraction is followed by Bag of Word method (BoW and Support Vector Machine (SVM for terrain classification. Experiments were conducted with our Scorpio robot to establish the efficacy and validity of the proposed approach. In our experiments, we achieved a recognition accuracy of over 90% across four terrain types namely grass, gravel, wooden deck, and concrete.

  18. Experiment S-5: Synoptic Terrain Photography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.

    1966-01-01

    The Synoptic Terrain Photography Experiment (S-5) was successfully conducted during the Gemini V mission, the second of the Gemini flights on which it was carried. This report summarizes briefly the methods and results of the experiment. Interpretation of the many excellent pictures obtained is in progress, and a full report is not possible at this time; instead, representative pictures will be presented and described. The purpose of the experiment was to obtain a large number of high-quality color photographs of selected land areas from geologic and geographic study. Southern Mexico, eastern Africa, and Australia were given high priority, but it was stressed that good pictures of any cloud-free land area would be useful. The same camera (Hasselblad 500 C) and film (Ektachrome MS) used on the Gemini III and IV missions were carried on the Gemini V flight.

  19. Conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Bingöl

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Conically scanning lidars assume the flow to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying a risk that the lidar will derive an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured by collocating a meteorological mast and a lidar at two Greek sites, one hilly and one mountainous. The maximum error for the sites investigated is of the order of 10 %. In order to predict the error for various wind directions the flows at both sites are simulated with the linearized flow model, WAsP Engineering 2.0. The measurement data are compared with the model predictions with good results for the hilly site, but with less success at the mountainous site. This is a deficiency of the flow model, but the methods presented in this paper can be used with any flow model.

  20. Radiation and radiation effects; Strahlung und Strahlenwirkung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumaier, S. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany). Arbeitsgruppe Strahlenschutz; Janssen, H. [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt, Berlin (Germany). Abt. Ionisierende Strahlung

    2006-12-15

    The average dose incurred by the German population is about 4 millisievert p.a., about half of which results from natural radiation sources. The second half is caused nearly completely by medical applications. Only a very small fraction of the annual dose results from technical applications. This special issue of PTB focuses on the measuring problems relating to natural radiation sources and technical applications of ionizing radiation. The current contribution also outlines some important aspects of radiation exposure from medical applications. (orig.)

  1. Slip estimation methods for proprioceptive terrain classification using tracked mobile robots

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masha, Ditebogo F

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that proprioceptive measurements such as terrain slip can be used for terrain classification. This paper investigates the suitability of four simple slip estimation methods for differentiating between indoor and outdoor terrain...

  2. Technical memory 1999

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    2000-01-01

    The technical memory 1999 of the Nuclear Regulatory Authority (NRA) of the Argentine Republic, compile the papers published in the subject on radiation protection and nuclear safety, safeguards and physical protection, and presented in congress or meetings of these specialities by personnel of the mentioned institution during 1999

  3. Basic and engineering studies of radiation induced reactions in the liquid phase. Final technical report, June 1, 1970-May 31, 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1978-06-01

    Laboratory studies reported on are ionic polymerization under superdry conditions, emulsion polymerization, and vinyl chloride polymerization. Engineering studies include the effect of moisture level on radiation-induced solution polymerization, effect of dose rate on radiation-induced emulsion polymerization of styrene, the effect of soap exchange in styrene emulsion polymerization, pilot plant studies of radiation induced emulsion polymerization of vinyl chloride, pilot plant studies of radiation-induced emulsion copolymerization of vinyl chloride with vinyl acetate, pilot plant study of radiation-induced graft emulsion polymerization of styrene onto polyvinyl chloride and poly(vinyl chloride-vinyl acetate), and radiation-induced precipitation polymerization of vinyl chloride in a flow reactor

  4. TopoSCALE v.1.0: downscaling gridded climate data in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiddes, J.; Gruber, S.

    2014-02-01

    Simulation of land surface processes is problematic in heterogeneous terrain due to the the high resolution required of model grids to capture strong lateral variability caused by, for example, topography, and the lack of accurate meteorological forcing data at the site or scale it is required. Gridded data products produced by atmospheric models can fill this gap, however, often not at an appropriate spatial resolution to drive land-surface simulations. In this study we describe a method that uses the well-resolved description of the atmospheric column provided by climate models, together with high-resolution digital elevation models (DEMs), to downscale coarse-grid climate variables to a fine-scale subgrid. The main aim of this approach is to provide high-resolution driving data for a land-surface model (LSM). The method makes use of an interpolation of pressure-level data according to topographic height of the subgrid. An elevation and topography correction is used to downscale short-wave radiation. Long-wave radiation is downscaled by deriving a cloud-component of all-sky emissivity at grid level and using downscaled temperature and relative humidity fields to describe variability with elevation. Precipitation is downscaled with a simple non-linear lapse and optionally disaggregated using a climatology approach. We test the method in comparison with unscaled grid-level data and a set of reference methods, against a large evaluation dataset (up to 210 stations per variable) in the Swiss Alps. We demonstrate that the method can be used to derive meteorological inputs in complex terrain, with most significant improvements (with respect to reference methods) seen in variables derived from pressure levels: air temperature, relative humidity, wind speed and incoming long-wave radiation. This method may be of use in improving inputs to numerical simulations in heterogeneous and/or remote terrain, especially when statistical methods are not possible, due to lack of

  5. Environmental impacts of forest road construction on mountainous terrain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caliskan, Erhan

    2013-03-15

    Forest roads are the base infrastructure foundation of forestry operations. These roads entail a complex engineering effort because they can cause substantial environmental damage to forests and include a high-cost construction. This study was carried out in four sample sites of Giresun, Trabzon(2) and Artvin Forest Directorate, which is in the Black Sea region of Turkey. The areas have both steep terrain (30-50% gradient) and very steep terrain (51-80% gradient). Bulldozers and hydraulic excavators were determined to be the main machines for forest road construction, causing environmental damage and cross sections in mountainous areas.As a result of this study, the percent damage to forests was determined as follows: on steep terrain, 21% of trees were damaged by excavators and 33% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction, and on very steep terrain, 27% of trees were damaged by excavators and 44% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction. It was also determined that on steep terrain, when excavators were used, 12.23% less forest area was destroyed compared with when bulldozers were used and 16.13% less area was destroyed by excavators on very steep terrain. In order to reduce the environmental damage on the forest ecosystem, especially in steep terrains, hydraulic excavators should replace bulldozers in forest road construction activities.

  6. Environmental Impacts of Forest Road Construction on Mountainous Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Caliskan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Forest roads are the base infrastructure foundation of forestry operations. These roads entail a complex engineering effort because they can cause substantial environmental damage to forests and include a high-cost construction. This study was carried out in four sample sites of Giresun, Trabzon(2 and Artvin Forest Directorate, which is in the Black Sea region of Turkey. The areas have both steep terrain (30-50% gradient and very steep terrain (51-80% gradient. Bulldozers and hydraulic excavators were determined to be the main machines for forest road construction, causing environmental damage and cross sections in mountainous areas.As a result of this study, the percent damage to forests was determined as follows: on steep terrain, 21% of trees were damaged by excavators and 33% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction, and on very steep terrain, 27% of trees were damaged by excavators and 44% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction. It was also determined that on steep terrain, when excavators were used, 12.23% less forest area was destroyed compared with when bulldozers were used and 16.13% less area was destroyed by excavators on very steep terrain. In order to reduce the environmental damage on the forest ecosystem, especially in steep terrains, hydraulic excavators should replace bulldozers in forest road construction activities.

  7. Terrain aided navigation for autonomous underwater vehicles with coarse maps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhou, Ling; Cheng, Xianghong; Zhu, Yixian

    2016-01-01

    Terrain aided navigation (TAN) is a form of geophysical localization technique for autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs) operating in GPS-denied environments. TAN performance on sensor-rich AUVs has been evaluated in sea trials. However, many challenges remain before TAN can be successfully implemented on sensor-limited AUVs, especially with coarse maps. To improve TAN performance over coarse maps, a Gaussian process (GP) is proposed for the modeling of bathymetric terrain and integrated into the particle filter (GP-PF). GP is applied to provide not only the bathymetric value prediction through learning a set of bathymetric data from coarse maps but also the variance of the prediction. As a measurement update, calculated on bathymetric deviation is performed through the PF to obtain absolute and bounded positioning accuracy. Through the analysis of TAN performance on experimental data for two different terrains with map resolutions of 10–50 m, both the ability of the proposed model to represent the actual bathymetric terrain with accuracy and the effect of the GP-PF for TAN on sensor-limited systems in suited terrain are demonstrated. The experiment results further verify that there is an inverse relationship between the coarseness of the map and the overall TAN accuracy in rough terrains, but there is hardly any relationship between them in relatively flat terrains. (paper)

  8. Self-Supervised Learning of Terrain Traversability from Proprioceptive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Max; Howard, Andrew B.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Robust and reliable autonomous navigation in unstructured, off-road terrain is a critical element in making unmanned ground vehicles a reality. Existing approaches tend to rely on evaluating the traversability of terrain based on fixed parameters obtained via testing in specific environments. This results in a system that handles the terrain well that it trained in, but is unable to process terrain outside its test parameters. An adaptive system does not take the place of training, but supplements it. Whereas training imprints certain environments, an adaptive system would imprint terrain elements and the interactions amongst them, and allow the vehicle to build a map of local elements using proprioceptive sensors. Such sensors can include velocity, wheel slippage, bumper hits, and accelerometers. Data obtained by the sensors can be compared to observations from ranging sensors such as cameras and LADAR (laser detection and ranging) in order to adapt to any kind of terrain. In this way, it could sample its surroundings not only to create a map of clear space, but also of what kind of space it is and its composition. By having a set of building blocks consisting of terrain features, a vehicle can adapt to terrain that it has never seen before, and thus be robust to a changing environment. New observations could be added to its library, enabling it to infer terrain types that it wasn't trained on. This would be very useful in alien environments, where many of the physical features are known, but some are not. For example, a seemingly flat, hard plain could actually be soft sand, and the vehicle would sense the sand and avoid it automatically.

  9. Dosimetry and technical radiation protection at the RA in 1974; Dozimetrija i tehnicka zastita od zracenja kod reaktora RA u 1974. godini

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ninkovic, M [Institute of Nuclear Sciences Boris Kidric, Vinca, Beograd (Serbia and Montenegro)

    1975-01-15

    This report include the analysis of the dosimetry and technical radiation protection results collected during 1974. The first part shows the data about the fundamental exposure to radiation and the statistical review of the total number of measurements. The following are included as well: measured values of radioactive gases and aerosol contents in air; contamination level of surfaces, clothes and uncovered parts of the staff bodies. Analysis of the personnel exposure is presented in the second part of the report. It was stated that the maximum individual external dose was 2.13R, and the exposure dose was 1/5 lower than of the annual dose limit for 90% of the exposed personnel. It was estimated that that the internal contamination is negligible compared to the external contamination. This statement was based on the frequency of tasks in the contaminated zones, undertaken control and protection measures, as well as on the evaluation of the expected internal contamination. Comparative evaluation of the occupational exposures is given for the past five years. This showed that the exposure in 1974 was lower than during previous years. The third part of the report covers the numerical data about the quantity of the collected radioactive waste, total size of contaminated and decontaminated surfaces and number of decontaminated objects. A brief analysis of the accidents occurred during this year under regular reactor operating conditions, maintenance and repair is given at the end. It was stated that there has been no accident that would cause exposure higher than the prescribed limits or any significant contamination of the working space or environment. Maximum individual dose was 1.4 R, and contamination of the uncovered parts of the bodies was about 6 MDNK (maximum permissible contamination level) [Serbo-Croat] U ovom radu prikazani su rezultati sakupljeni u toku godine u okviru dozimetrijske kontrole i tehnicke zastite kod reaktora. U prvom delu rada izlozeni su

  10. Reorienting with terrain slope and landmarks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardi, Daniele; Newcombe, Nora S; Shipley, Thomas F

    2013-02-01

    Orientation (or reorientation) is the first step in navigation, because establishing a spatial frame of reference is essential for a sense of location and heading direction. Recent research on nonhuman animals has revealed that the vertical component of an environment provides an important source of spatial information, in both terrestrial and aquatic settings. Nonetheless, humans show large individual and sex differences in the ability to use terrain slope for reorientation. To understand why some participants--mainly women--exhibit a difficulty with slope, we tested reorientation in a richer environment than had been used previously, including both a tilted floor and a set of distinct objects that could be used as landmarks. This environment allowed for the use of two different strategies for solving the task, one based on directional cues (slope gradient) and one based on positional cues (landmarks). Overall, rather than using both cues, participants tended to focus on just one. Although men and women did not differ significantly in their encoding of or reliance on the two strategies, men showed greater confidence in solving the reorientation task. These facts suggest that one possible cause of the female difficulty with slope might be a generally lower spatial confidence during reorientation.

  11. Pneumatic tyres interacting with deformable terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekakos, C. A.; Papazafeiropoulos, G.; O'Boy, D. J.; Prins, J.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a numerical model of a deformable tyre interacting with a deformable road has been developed with the use of the finite element code ABAQUS (v. 6.13). Two tyre models with different widths, not necessarily identical to any real industry tyres, have been created purely for research use. The behaviour of these tyres under various vertical loads and different inflation pressures is studied, initially in contact with a rigid surface and then with a deformable terrain. After ensuring that the tyre model gives realistic results in terms of the interaction with a rigid surface, the rolling process of the tyre on a deformable road was studied. The effects of friction coefficient, inflation pressure, rebar orientation and vertical load on the overall performance are reported. Regarding the modelling procedure, a sequence of models were analysed, using the coupling implicit - explicit method. The numerical results reveal that not only there is significant dependence of the final tyre response on the various initial driving parameters, but also special conditions emerge, where the desired response of the tyre results from specific optimum combination of these parameters.

  12. Ecological Approach to Pilot Terrain Awareness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, C.

    2009-01-01

    The upgrade of the flight deck instruments from electro-mechanical dials and gauges towards computer-driven systems and interfaces was a necessary step to accommodate the increasing demands in flight technical performance and safety. The upgrade was a relatively slow process, however, where new

  13. DCS Terrain submission for Washoe County NV PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Lewis and Clark County, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. DCS Terrain for Bullcoh County GA MAPMOD04-08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain Submittal for Thomas County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DIGITAL TERRAIN DCS DATABASE for ALLEN PARISH, LA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain Submission for Chippewa County, MI (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain for Roscommon County, MI (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. DCS Terrain Submission for Clay County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. Cross-Coupled Control for All-Terrain Rovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Reina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile robots are increasingly being used in challenging outdoor environments for applications that include construction, mining, agriculture, military and planetary exploration. In order to accomplish the planned task, it is critical that the motion control system ensure accuracy and robustness. The achievement of high performance on rough terrain is tightly connected with the minimization of vehicle-terrain dynamics effects such as slipping and skidding. This paper presents a cross-coupled controller for a 4-wheel-drive/4-wheel-steer robot, which optimizes the wheel motors’ control algorithm to reduce synchronization errors that would otherwise result in wheel slip with conventional controllers. Experimental results, obtained with an all-terrain rover operating on agricultural terrain, are presented to validate the system. It is shown that the proposed approach is effective in reducing slippage and vehicle posture errors.

  2. Terrain, BIG BLUE RIVER TRIBUTARY NO 44, GAGE COUNTY, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Monmouth County, New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submission for Los Alamos County, New Mexico, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. DCS Terrain Submission for Los Angeles County, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION for MORRIS COUNTY, NEW JERSEY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain for Appling County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DCS Terrain for Laurens County GA MAPMOD04-08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, City of El Dorado, Butler County, KS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submittal for Santa Fe County, New Mexico, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. Terrain Submission for Crawford County, MI (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  12. Terrain Submission for Dickinson County, MI (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  13. DCS Terrain Submittal for Sumter County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Lake Kaweah PMR - Tulare County, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. Terrain Submission for Alcona County, MI (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, CITY OF NORWALK, FAIRFIELD COUNTY, CONNECTICUT - Levee PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain for Wayne County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. Laser altimetry and terrain analysis: A revolution in geomorphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anders, N.; Seijmonsbergen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Terrain analysis in geomorphology has undergone a serious quantitative revolution over recent decades. Lidar information has been efficiently used to automatically classify discrete landforms, map forest structures, and provide input for models simulating landscape development, e.g. channel incision

  19. DCS Terrain Submission for Gold Star Canyon Study

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN DATA, DELANEY CREEK WATERSHED, HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for Forked Gulch in Canon City CO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain Submittal for Lamar County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Mercer County New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submittal for Washita County, Oklahoma, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. DCS Terrain Submission for Hunterdon County New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submittal for Pike County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain for Effingham Co GA (FY2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DCS Terrain Submission for Missoula County,Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. Terrain Submission for Mason County, MI (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for LeFlore, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. DCS Terrain Submission for Pine County, MN (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for McCook County, SD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  13. DCS Terrain Submittal for Dougherty County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, CITY OF ANSONIA, NEW HAVEN COUNTY, CONNECTICUT - Levee PMR

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. Optimization of Wind Farm Layout in Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Yang, Jianchuan; Li, Chenqi

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic site selection for wind farms in complex terrain is a technological difficulty in the development of onshore wind farms. This paper presented a method for optimizing wind farm layout in complex terrain. This method employed Lissaman and Jensen wake models, took wind velocity distribut......Microscopic site selection for wind farms in complex terrain is a technological difficulty in the development of onshore wind farms. This paper presented a method for optimizing wind farm layout in complex terrain. This method employed Lissaman and Jensen wake models, took wind velocity...... are subject to boundary conditions and minimum distance conditions. The improved genetic algorithm (GA) for real number coding was used to search the optimal result. Then the optimized result was compared to the result from the experienced layout method. Results show the advantages of the present method...

  16. DCS Terrain Submission for Randolph County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain Submission for Washburn County, Wisconsin, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. CITY OF RADFORD TERRAIN, CITY OF RADFORD, VA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data includes digital elevation models, LIDAR derived contours, LIDAR three-dimensional spot elevations and breaklines, field surveyed ground elevations and...

  19. Lunar All-Terrain Utility Vehicle for EVA, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC proposes to develop a new type of planetary rover called a Lunar All-terrain Utility Vehicle ("Lunar ATV") to assist extra-vehicular activities...

  20. DCS Terrain Submission for Jackson County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for New Castle County, DE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. Spatial and temporal variability of hyperspectral signatures of terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, K. F.; Perovich, D. K.; Koenig, G. G.

    2008-04-01

    Electromagnetic signatures of terrain exhibit significant spatial heterogeneity on a range of scales as well as considerable temporal variability. A statistical characterization of the spatial heterogeneity and spatial scaling algorithms of terrain electromagnetic signatures are required to extrapolate measurements to larger scales. Basic terrain elements including bare soil, grass, deciduous, and coniferous trees were studied in a quasi-laboratory setting using instrumented test sites in Hanover, NH and Yuma, AZ. Observations were made using a visible and near infrared spectroradiometer (350 - 2500 nm) and hyperspectral camera (400 - 1100 nm). Results are reported illustrating: i) several difference scenes; ii) a terrain scene time series sampled over an annual cycle; and iii) the detection of artifacts in scenes. A principal component analysis indicated that the first three principal components typically explained between 90 and 99% of the variance of the 30 to 40-channel hyperspectral images. Higher order principal components of hyperspectral images are useful for detecting artifacts in scenes.

  3. TERRAIN submission for Rock River Risk Map, Dane County Portion

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN submission for Rock River RiskMap DFIRM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. Lunar All-Terrain Utility Vehicle for EVA, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC proposes to develop a new type of planetary rover called a Lunar All-terrain Utility Vehicle ("LATUV") to assist extra-vehicular activities in...

  6. TERRAIN, CITY OF GRAND PRAIRIE, DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. VTAC: virtual terrain assisted impact assessment for cyber attacks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argauer, Brian J.; Yang, Shanchieh J.

    2008-03-01

    Overwhelming intrusion alerts have made timely response to network security breaches a difficult task. Correlating alerts to produce a higher level view of intrusion state of a network, thus, becomes an essential element in network defense. This work proposes to analyze correlated or grouped alerts and determine their 'impact' to services and users of the network. A network is modeled as 'virtual terrain' where cyber attacks maneuver. Overlaying correlated attack tracks on virtual terrain exhibits the vulnerabilities exploited by each track and the relationships between them and different network entities. The proposed impact assessment algorithm utilizes the graph-based virtual terrain model and combines assessments of damages caused by the attacks. The combined impact scores allow to identify severely damaged network services and affected users. Several scenarios are examined to demonstrate the uses of the proposed Virtual Terrain Assisted Impact Assessment for Cyber Attacks (VTAC).

  8. DCS Terrain Submittal for Harmon County, Oklahoma, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. Exploration of Extreme Terrain Using a Polyhedral Rover

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Exploring celestial bodies with extreme terrains in our solar system, like Mars, Europa, Enceladus, and asteroids, are of great importance to NASA because these...

  10. Terrain Mapping and Classification in Outdoor Environments Using Neural Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Alberto Yukinobu Hata; Denis Fernando Wolf; Gustavo Pessin; Fernando Osório

    2009-01-01

    This paper describes a three-dimensional terrain mapping and classification technique to allow the operation of mobile robots in outdoor environments using laser range finders. We propose the use of a multi-layer perceptron neural network to classify the terrain into navigable, partially navigable, and non-navigable. The maps generated by our approach can be used for path planning, navigation, and local obstacle avoidance. Experimental tests using an outdoor robot and a laser sensor demonstra...

  11. Imagining Technicities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liboriussen, Bjarke; Plesner, Ursula

    2011-01-01

    to the elements of taste and skill. In the final analysis those references were synthesized as five imagined technicities: the architect, the engineer, the client, the Chinese, and the Virtual World native. Because technicities are often assumed and rarely discussed as actants who influence practice, their role......, this article focuses on innovative uses of virtual worlds in architecture. We interviewed architects, industrial designers and other practitioners. Conceptually supported by an understanding of technicity found in Cultural Studies, the interviews were then coded with a focus on interviewees’ references...... in cooperation and development of ICTs seems to pass unnoticed. However, since they are aligned into ICTs, technicities impact innovation....

  12. Stratigraphy of the layered terrain in Valles Marineris, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, G.; Strom, Roger G.

    1991-01-01

    The layered terrain in Valles Marineris provides information about its origin and the geologic history of this canyon system. Whether the terrain is sedimentary material deposited in a dry or lacustrine environment, or volcanic material related to the tectonics of the canyon is still controversial. However, recent studies of Gangis Layered Terrain suggests a cyclic sequence of deposition and erosion under episodic lacustrine conditions. The stratigraphic studies are extended to four other occurrences of layered terrains in Valles Marineris in an attempt to correlate and distinguish between depositional environments. The Juvantae Chasma, Hebes Chasma, Ophir and Candor Chasmata, Melas Chasma, and Gangis Layered Terrain were examined. Although there are broad similarities among the layered terrains, no two deposits are exactly alike. This suggests that there was no synchronized regional depositional processes to form all the layered deposits. However, the similar erosional style of the lower massive weakly bedded unit in Hebes, Gangis, and Ophir-Candor suggests it may have been deposited under similar circumstances.

  13. Method for Measuring the Information Content of Terrain from Digital Elevation Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lujin Hu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available As digital terrain models are indispensable for visualizing and modeling geographic processes, terrain information content is useful for terrain generalization and representation. For terrain generalization, if the terrain information is considered, the generalized terrain may be of higher fidelity. In other words, the richer the terrain information at the terrain surface, the smaller the degree of terrain simplification. Terrain information content is also important for evaluating the quality of the rendered terrain, e.g., the rendered web terrain tile service in Google Maps (Google Inc., Mountain View, CA, USA. However, a unified definition and measures for terrain information content have not been established. Therefore, in this paper, a definition and measures for terrain information content from Digital Elevation Model (DEM, i.e., a digital model or 3D representation of a terrain’s surface data are proposed and are based on the theory of map information content, remote sensing image information content and other geospatial information content. The information entropy was taken as the information measuring method for the terrain information content. Two experiments were carried out to verify the measurement methods of the terrain information content. One is the analysis of terrain information content in different geomorphic types, and the results showed that the more complex the geomorphic type, the richer the terrain information content. The other is the analysis of terrain information content with different resolutions, and the results showed that the finer the resolution, the richer the terrain information. Both experiments verified the reliability of the measurements of the terrain information content proposed in this paper.

  14. Wind farm design in complex terrain: the FarmOpt methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ju

    Designing wind farms in complex terrain is becoming more and more important, especially for countries like China, where a large portion of the territory is featured as complex terrain. Although potential richer wind resources could be expected at complex terrain sites (thanks to the terrain effec...

  15. Risk terrain modeling predicts child maltreatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, Dyann; Bachmann, Michael; Bachmann, Brittany A; Pedigo, Christian; Bui, Minh-Thuy; Coffman, Jamye

    2016-12-01

    As indicated by research on the long-term effects of adverse childhood experiences (ACEs), maltreatment has far-reaching consequences for affected children. Effective prevention measures have been elusive, partly due to difficulty in identifying vulnerable children before they are harmed. This study employs Risk Terrain Modeling (RTM), an analysis of the cumulative effect of environmental factors thought to be conducive for child maltreatment, to create a highly accurate prediction model for future substantiated child maltreatment cases in the City of Fort Worth, Texas. The model is superior to commonly used hotspot predictions and more beneficial in aiding prevention efforts in a number of ways: 1) it identifies the highest risk areas for future instances of child maltreatment with improved precision and accuracy; 2) it aids the prioritization of risk-mitigating efforts by informing about the relative importance of the most significant contributing risk factors; 3) since predictions are modeled as a function of easily obtainable data, practitioners do not have to undergo the difficult process of obtaining official child maltreatment data to apply it; 4) the inclusion of a multitude of environmental risk factors creates a more robust model with higher predictive validity; and, 5) the model does not rely on a retrospective examination of past instances of child maltreatment, but adapts predictions to changing environmental conditions. The present study introduces and examines the predictive power of this new tool to aid prevention efforts seeking to improve the safety, health, and wellbeing of vulnerable children. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  16. Comprehension of radiation for RI license

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guk, Jin Sun

    2005-08-01

    This book starts with theoretical nuclear energy which explains technical terms such as nuclear physics and chemistry, RI and utilization of radiation, radiochemistry and radiation chemistry, radiation biology. It also explains radiation measurements technology including radiation detector and measurements radiation measurements circuit, measuring of energy spectrum. Radiation protection monitoring for radiation protection. It deals with nuclear law, enforcement regulation and ordinance.

  17. SU-E-CAMPUS-J-04: Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT): Review of Technical Standards and Credentialing in Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giaddui, T; Chen, W; Yu, J; Gong, Y; Galvin, J; Xiao, Y; Cui, Y; Yin, F; Craig, T; Dawson, L; Al-Hallaq, H; Chmura, S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To review IGRT credentialing experience and unexpected technical issues encountered in connection with advanced radiotherapy technologies as implemented in RTOG clinical trials. To update IGRT credentialing procedures with the aim of improving the quality of the process, and to increase the proportion of IGRT credentialing compliance. To develop a living disease site-specific IGRT encyclopedia. Methods: Numerous technical issues were encountered during the IGRT credentialing process. The criteria used for credentialing review were based on: image quality; anatomy included in fused data sets and shift results. Credentialing requirements have been updated according to the AAPM task group reports for IGRT to ensure that all required technical items are included in the quality review process. Implementation instructions have been updated and expanded for recent protocols. Results: Technical issues observed during the credentialing review process include, but are not limited to: poor quality images; inadequate image acquisition region; poor data quality; shifts larger than acceptable; no soft tissue surrogate. The updated IGRT credentialing process will address these issues and will also include the technical items required from AAPM: TG 104; TG 142 and TG 179 reports. An instruction manual has been developed describing a remote credentialing method for reviewers. Submission requirements are updated, including images/documents as well as facility questionnaire. The review report now includes summary of the review process and the parameters that reviewers check. We have reached consensus on the minimum IGRT technical requirement for a number of disease sites. RTOG 1311(NRG-BR002A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for the Treatment of Multiple Metastases) is an example, here; the protocol specified the minimum requirement for each anatomical sites (with/without fiducials). Conclusion: Technical issues are identified and reported. IGRT

  18. SU-E-CAMPUS-J-04: Image Guided Radiation Therapy (IGRT): Review of Technical Standards and Credentialing in Radiotherapy Clinical Trials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giaddui, T; Chen, W; Yu, J; Gong, Y; Galvin, J; Xiao, Y [Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA (United States); Cui, Y; Yin, F [Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (United States); Craig, T; Dawson, L [The Princess Margaret Cancer Centre - UHN, Toronto, ON (Canada); Al-Hallaq, H; Chmura, S [The University of Chicago, Chicago, IL. (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To review IGRT credentialing experience and unexpected technical issues encountered in connection with advanced radiotherapy technologies as implemented in RTOG clinical trials. To update IGRT credentialing procedures with the aim of improving the quality of the process, and to increase the proportion of IGRT credentialing compliance. To develop a living disease site-specific IGRT encyclopedia. Methods: Numerous technical issues were encountered during the IGRT credentialing process. The criteria used for credentialing review were based on: image quality; anatomy included in fused data sets and shift results. Credentialing requirements have been updated according to the AAPM task group reports for IGRT to ensure that all required technical items are included in the quality review process. Implementation instructions have been updated and expanded for recent protocols. Results: Technical issues observed during the credentialing review process include, but are not limited to: poor quality images; inadequate image acquisition region; poor data quality; shifts larger than acceptable; no soft tissue surrogate. The updated IGRT credentialing process will address these issues and will also include the technical items required from AAPM: TG 104; TG 142 and TG 179 reports. An instruction manual has been developed describing a remote credentialing method for reviewers. Submission requirements are updated, including images/documents as well as facility questionnaire. The review report now includes summary of the review process and the parameters that reviewers check. We have reached consensus on the minimum IGRT technical requirement for a number of disease sites. RTOG 1311(NRG-BR002A Phase 1 Study of Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy (SBRT) for the Treatment of Multiple Metastases) is an example, here; the protocol specified the minimum requirement for each anatomical sites (with/without fiducials). Conclusion: Technical issues are identified and reported. IGRT

  19. Reliability of individual doses relating to the epidemiological studies on nuclear industry workers in Japan (1). Historical changes on definition of radiation dose, historical changes on technical standards of measurement and radiation workplace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numakunai, Takao; Ishiguro, Hideharu; Kawada, Yasushi; Minami, Kentaro; Yoshimoto, Yasuhiko.

    1997-01-01

    Records of radiation workers collected in the Research Organization for Information of Science and Technology, concerning individual doses from 1957 to 1992 were used for epidemiological studies for obtaining the scientific information of the effect of low dose radiation. Since many changes were made on definition of radiation dose, dosimetry technology and so on during such a long time period, reliability of recorded individual doses and of their measurement should be evaluated for validation, which is the purpose of this paper. Followings were discussed and validation was made. Historical changes on standards for radiation protection: ICRP Recommendation and ICRU Report, and changes of law concerning radiation dose in Japan and of dose standards. Changes on dosimetry for radiation protection: ICRP Recommendation and working place dosimetry, trends of investigations for introduction of measured practical doses, ICRU sphere as a receptor, and introduction of measured practical doses. Characteristics of radiation field and radiation exposure: Radiation source and characteristics of radiation field; Research and development organizations for atomic power, atomic power plants, facilities for nuclear fuel, Classification of radiation works and characteristics of the exposure; BWR, PWR, GCR. Changes on the standards of individual dosemeter and on its use: method to use individual dosemeter and its installation, measurement of individual dose and Japanese Industrial Standard (JIS); Standard of the film badge for X and gamma rays, Standard of the film badge for neutron, Standard for thermoluminescence dosemeter, and changes on selection of the major apparatus and on its use. (K.H.)

  20. Comprehensive approach to an assessment of removal consequences of low doses ionizing radiation influence in background of technic genius load (as an example of Pavlodar region of the Republic of Kazakstan)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Slazhneva, T.I.; Korchevskij, A.A.; Orazgalieva, V.D.; Milyaev, A.D.

    1996-01-01

    The 'Prophylaxis' and 'Test site' comprehensive programmes are carried out for estimation of inhabitants health changes by both the Semipalatinsk test side influence and the significant technic genius pollution of environment called of industry development. It is defined, that Pavlodar region is object of radiation influence of Semipalatinsk test site. There are consequences of operation of industry enterprises (of power engineering, metallurgy, oil-chemistry) on large territory of the region. Aggravation of this region's population health was established during deepened study of sick rate with medical examination of more 12000 inhabitants and special onco-epidemical, cytological, medical genetic, immune researches. The character of chromosomal aberrations and oncological pathologies is testified about the essential influence of test site factors on health aggravation. System analysis shows, that low radiation doses are affected life quality and region population health