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Sample records for terrain park injuries

  1. Terrain Park Injuries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moffat, Craig

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study examined demographics, injury pattern, and hospital outcome in patients injured in winter resort terrain parks.Methods: The study included patients >12 years of age who presented to a regional trauma center with an acute injury sustained at a winter resort. Emergency department (ED research assistants collected patient injury and helmet use information using a prospectively designed questionnaire. ED and hospital data were obtained from trauma registry and hospital records.Results: Seventy-two patients were injured in a terrain park, and 263 patients were injured on non-terrain park slopes. Patients injured in terrain parks were more likely to be male [68/72 (94% vs. 176/263 (67%, p<0.0001], younger in age [23 ± 7 vs. 36 ± 17, p<0.0001], live locally [47/72 (65% vs. 124/263 (47%, p=0.006], use a snowboard [50/72 (69% vs. 91/263 (35%, p<0.0001], hold a season pass [46/66 (70% vs. 98/253 (39%, p<0.0001], and sustain an upper extremity injury [29/72 (40% vs. 52/263 (20%, p<0.001] when compared to patients injured on non-terrain park slopes. There were no differences between the groups in terms of EMS transport to hospital, helmet use, admission rate, hospital length of stay, and patients requiring specialty consultation in the ED.Conclusions: Patients injured in terrain parks represent a unique demographic within winter resort patrons. Injury severity appears to be similar to those patients injured on non-terrain park slopes.[West J Emerg Med. 2009;10(4:257-262.

  2. Evaluation of skiing and snowboarding injuries sustained in terrain parks versus traditional slopes.

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    Brooks, M Alison; Evans, Michael D; Rivara, Frederick P

    2010-04-01

    This study compares skiing and snowboarding injuries in terrain parks versus slopes at two ski areas, 2000-05. A total of 3953 (26.7%) injuries occurred in terrain parks, predominantly among young male snowboarders. Terrain park injuries were more likely to be severe, involving head (RR 1.31, 95% CI 1.16 to 1.48) or back (RR 1.96, 95% CI 1.67 to 2.29).

  3. Mountain bike terrain park-related injuries: an emerging cause of morbidity.

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    Romanow, Nicole T R; Hagel, Brent E; Nguyen, Michelle; Embree, Tania; Rowe, Brian H

    2014-01-01

    This case-control study describes the profile of bicyclists injured in mountain bike terrain parks (MBTPs) and examines risk factors for severe injury among MBTP riders. Cases were hospitalised bicyclists injured in MBTPs. Controls were bicyclists injured in MBTPs who were discharged from the emergency department. No significant differences were observed in the distribution of age and sex between cases and controls. A higher proportion of cases compared with controls suffered a head injury (22%), fracture (41%) or internal organ injury (32%). Controls suffered a higher proportion of superficial injuries (26%), sprains (10%) or wounds (16%). Upper extremity protective equipment (e.g. elbow or shoulder pads) was used more by cases than controls (23% vs. 11%, p = 0.03). Riders who self-reported cycling faster than usual had significantly higher risk of severe injury compared with others. The risk of severe injury may be reduced by encouraging bicyclists to control their speed or by modifying MBTP design to limit the opportunity to gain speed.

  4. Feature-specific terrain park-injury rates and risk factors in snowboarders: a case–control study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kelly; Meeuwisse, Willem H; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Emery, Carolyn A; Wishart, Jillian; Romanow, Nicole T R; Rowe, Brian H; Goulet, Claude; Hagel, Brent E

    2014-01-01

    Background Snowboarding is a popular albeit risky sport and terrain park (TP) injuries are more severe than regular slope injuries. TPs contain man-made features that facilitate aerial manoeuvres. The objectives of this study were to determine overall and feature-specific injury rates and the potential risk factors for TP injuries. Methods Case–control study with exposure estimation, conducted in an Alberta TP during two ski seasons. Cases were snowboarders injured in the TP who presented to ski patrol and/or local emergency departments. Controls were uninjured snowboarders in the same TP. κ Statistics were used to measure the reliability of reported risk factor information. Injury rates were calculated and adjusted logistic regression was used to calculate the feature-specific odds of injury. Results Overall, 333 cases and 1261 controls were enrolled. Reliability of risk factor information was κ>0.60 for 21/24 variables. The overall injury rate was 0.75/1000 runs. Rates were highest for jumps and half-pipe (both 2.56/1000 runs) and lowest for rails (0.43/1000 runs) and quarter-pipes (0.24/1000 runs). Compared with rails, there were increased odds of injury for half-pipe (OR 9.63; 95% CI 4.80 to 19.32), jumps (OR 4.29; 95% CI 2.72 to 6.76), mushroom (OR 2.30; 95% CI 1.20 to 4.41) and kickers (OR 1.99; 95% CI 1.27 to 3.12). Conclusions Higher feature-specific injury rates and increased odds of injury were associated with features that promote aerial manoeuvres or a large drop to the ground. Further research is required to determine ways to increase snowboarder safety in the TP. PMID:24184587

  5. Listening to a personal music player is associated with fewer but more serious injuries among snowboarders in a terrain park: a case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kelly; Meeuwisse, Willem; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Emery, Carolyn A; Gushue, Shantel; Wishart, Jillian; Romanow, Nicole; Rowe, Brian H; Goulet, Claude; Hagel, Brent E

    2015-01-01

    Some snowboarders listen to music on a personal music player and the objective was to determine if listening to music was associated with injury in a terrain park. A case-control study was conducted at a terrain park in Alberta, Canada during the 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 winter seasons. Cases were snowboarders who were injured in the terrain park and presented to either the ski patrol and/or a nearby emergency department (ED). Demographic, environmental and injury characteristics were collected from standardised ski patrol Accident Report Forms, ED medical records and telephone interviews. Controls were uninjured snowboarders using the same terrain park and were interviewed as they approached the lift-line on randomly selected days and times. Multivariable logistic regression determined if listening to music was associated with the odds of snowboard injury. Overall, 333 injured cases and 1261 non-injured controls were enrolled; 69 (21%) cases and 425 (34%) controls were listening to music. Snowboarders listening to music had significantly lower odds of injury compared with those not listening to music (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 0.68; 95% CI 0.48 to 0.98). Snowboarders listening to music had significantly higher odds of presenting to the ED versus ski patrol only compared with those not listening to music (adjusted OR 2.09; 95% CI 1.07 to 4.05). While listening to music decreased the odds of any injury in the terrain park, it increased the odds of an injury resulting in ED presentation. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  6. Trampoline Park and Home Trampoline Injuries.

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    Kasmire, Kathryn E; Rogers, Steven C; Sturm, Jesse J

    2016-09-01

    Trampoline parks, indoor recreational facilities with wall-to-wall trampolines, are increasing in number and popularity. The objective was to identify trends in emergency department visits for trampoline park injuries (TPIs) and compare TPI characteristics with home trampoline injuries (HTIs). Data on trampoline injuries from the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System from 2010 to 2014 were analyzed. Sample weights were applied to estimate yearly national injury trends; unweighted cases were used for comparison of injury patterns. Estimated US emergency department visits for TPI increased significantly, from 581 in 2010 to 6932 in 2014 (P = .045), whereas HTIs did not increase (P = .13). Patients with TPI (n = 330) were older than patients with HTI (n = 7933) (mean 13.3 vs 9.5 years, respectively, P trampoline parks and homes. Compared with HTIs, TPIs were less likely to involve head injury (odds ratio [OR] 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.46-0.89), more likely to involve lower extremity injury (OR 2.39; 95% CI, 1.91-2.98), more likely to be a dislocation (OR 2.12; 95% CI, 1.10-4.09), and more likely to warrant admission (OR 1.76; 95% CI, 1.19-2.61). TPIs necessitating hospital admission included open fractures and spinal cord injuries. TPI mechanisms included falls, contact with other jumpers, and flips. TPI patterns differed significantly from HTIs. TPIs are an emerging concern; additional investigation and strategies are needed to prevent injury at trampoline parks. Copyright © 2016 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  7. Designing, Building, Measuring and Testing a Constant Equivalent Fall Height Terrain Park Jump

    CERN Document Server

    Petrone, Nicola; McNeil, James A; Hubbard, Mont

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has presented both a theoretical foundation for designing terrain park jumps that control landing impact and computer software to accomplish this task. US ski resorts have been reluctant to adopt this more engineered approach to jump design, in part due to questions of feasibility. The present study demonstrates this feasibility. It describes the design, construction, measurement and experimental testing of such a jump. It improves on previous efforts with more complete instrumentation, a larger range of jump distances, and a new method for combining jumper- and board-mounted accelerometer data to estimate equivalent fall height, a measure of impact severity. It unequivocally demonstrates the efficacy of the engineering design approach, namely that it is possible and practical to design and build free style terrain park jumps with landing surface shapes that control for landing impact as predicted by the theory.

  8. Injury and illness encountered in Shenandoah National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, Joseph D; Holstege, Christopher P

    2009-01-01

    There have been no studies to date exploring the nature of injuries and illness experienced by individuals in a National Park in the southeastern United States. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence of such illnesses and injuries to visitors in Shenandoah National Park. This study was a retrospective review of the case incident reports from Shenandoah National Park from 2003 to 2007. Data obtained included age, sex, time and date report was received, medical symptoms, trauma type, location of injury, mechanism of injury, level of care, time to patient, time to disposition, disposition type, location, and activity at time of event. There were 159 total cases, corresponding to a reported incident rate of 2.7 persons reported injured or ill per 100 000 visitors to Shenandoah National Park. A total of 23.3% of all reported injuries occurred in persons less than 18 years of age. The most common reported adult injury was soft tissue injury, with the most common anatomical location being the distal lower extremity. The most common activity in which adults were involved at the time of the injury was hiking. Of the pediatric trauma cases, the most common mechanism of injury was a fall. Of the adult medical illnesses, the most common complaint was chest pain. The pattern of adult and pediatric trauma is consistent among several geographically different National Parks in the United States and represents an injury pattern that all wilderness/outdoor care providers need to be competent to treat. Among adult visitors, the most common medical complaint was chest pain, a complaint more prevalent at Shenandoah National Park compared to other parks. Knowing that trauma injury patterns are relatively similar to those of other parks but that medical illness is more locale specific can help health care providers tailor their resource allotment and health management protocols.

  9. All-terrain vehicle, trampoline and scooter injuries and their prevention in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Deborah

    2006-06-01

    Childhood injuries are the leading cause of death in children and result in significant healthcare utilization. Injuries specifically related to all terrain vehicles, trampolines and scooter usage can be devastating and are often preventable. Our understanding of how and why these injuries occur can aid in preventing morbidity and mortality. The popularity of all-terrain vehicles, nonmotorized scooters and trampolines has soared over recent years. This increased usage has led to a tremendous rise in injuries in children utilizing these recreational activities. Many of the injuries occur in younger children who may not possess the motor and cognitive skills necessary to safely engage in these activities. These activities lead to a number of head and extremity injuries, most of which can be attenuated by the use of protective gear such as helmets and protective padding. Understanding the nature of these injuries can lead to advocacy and hopefully legislation to prevent further injuries from occurring.

  10. Imaging findings in 512 children following all-terrain vehicle injuries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Chetan C.; Greenberg, Bruce S. [Arkansas Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States); University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States); Ramakrishnaiah, Raghu H. [University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Department of Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States); Bhutta, Sadaf T. [Arkansas Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Little Rock, AR (United States); Parnell-Beasley, Donna N. [Arkansas Children' s Hospital, Pediatric Surgery and Trauma, Little Rock, AR (United States)

    2009-07-15

    Injuries related to all-terrain vehicle (ATV) use by children have increased in recent years, and the pattern of these injuries is not well known among radiologists. Our purpose was to identify different radiologically diagnosed injuries in children suffering ATV-related trauma and determine associations among various injuries as well as between injuries and outcome. The study included 512 consecutive children suffering from ATV injuries treated at a tertiary care pediatric hospital. All imaging studies were reviewed and correlated with injury frequency and outcome using multivariate analysis. Head injuries occurred in 244 children (48%) and in five of six deaths. Calvarial skull fractures occurred in 104 children and were associated with brain, subdural and epidural injuries. Brain and orbit injuries were associated with long-term disability. A total of 227 extremity fractures were present in 172 children (34%). The femur was the most commonly fractured bone. Nine children had partial foot amputations. Multiorgan injuries occurred in nearly half of the 97 children with torso injuries. Determinants for long-term disability or death were head injuries (odds ratio 3.4) and extremity fractures (odds ratio 3.3). Head and extremity injuries are the two most common injuries in children suffering ATV injuries and are associated with long-term disability. ATV use by children is dangerous and is a significant threat to child safety. (orig.)

  11. The epidemiology of mountain bike park injuries at the Whistler Bike Park, British Columbia (BC), Canada.

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    Ashwell, Zachary; McKay, Mary Pat; Brubacher, Jeffery R; Gareau, Annie

    2012-06-01

    To describe the epidemiology of injuries sustained during the 2009 season at Whistler Mountain Bike Park. A retrospective chart review was performed of injured bike park cyclists presenting to the Whistler Health Clinic between May 16 and October 12, 2009. Of 898 cases, 86% were male (median age, 26 years), 68.7% were Canadian, 19.4% required transport by the Whistler Bike Patrol, and 8.4% arrived by emergency medical services. Identification of 1759 specific injury diagnoses was made, including 420 fractures in 382 patients (42.5%). Upper extremity fractures predominated (75.4%), 11.2% had a traumatic brain injury, and 8.5% were transferred to a higher level of care: 7 by helicopter, 62 by ground, and 5 by personal vehicle. Two patients refused transfer. Mountain bikers incurred many injuries with significant morbidity while riding in the Whistler Mountain Bike Park in 2009. Although exposure information is unavailable, these findings demonstrate serious risks associated with this sport and highlight the need for continued research into appropriate safety equipment and risk avoidance measures. Copyright © 2012 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Injury severity in pediatric all-terrain vehicle-related trauma in Nova Scotia.

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    Jessula, Samuel; Murphy, Nadia; Yanchar, Natalie L

    2017-05-01

    In 2004-2005, legislation restricting all-terrain vehicle (ATV) use by children and an extensive social marketing campaign intended to reduce pediatric ATV-related morbidity. The frequency, nature, and severity of pediatric ATV-associated trauma were compared before and after such interventions. A retrospective cohort study was performed for all pediatric ATV-related injuries that presented to the provincial level 1 pediatric trauma center from 1998 to 2014. National databases were queried for ATV-related injury hospitalizations (n=258), trauma center emergency department visits (n=342), and admissions (n=136) in Nova Scotia from 2002 to 2014. Admissions between 1998 and 2003 (n=68) and 2006-2014 (n=60) were compared using chi square analysis for age and gender distribution, length of stay, critical care admission, helmet use, mechanism, and severity of injury. Admissions, trauma center emergency room visits and admissions initially decreased following legislative and social marketing interventions and subsequently gradually increased. Interventions resulted in no significant difference in age or gender distribution, length of hospital stay, critical care admission, helmet use, and mechanism of injury. There was a significantly higher proportion of severe injuries post interventions. Legislation and social marketing interventions had a short-term decrease on the frequency of ATV-related injuries and no sustained effect on the frequency, nature, and severity of ATV-related injuries. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Notes from the Field: Injuries Associated with Bison Encounters - Yellowstone National Park, 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherry, Cara; Leong, Kirsten; Wallen, Rick; Buttke, Danielle

    2016-03-25

    Since 1980, bison have injured more pedestrian visitors to Yellowstone National Park (Yellowstone) than any other animal (1). After the occurrence of 33 bison-related injuries during 1983-1985 (range = 10-13/year), the park implemented successful outreach campaigns (1) to reduce the average number of injuries to 0.8/year (range = 0-2/year) during 2010-2014 (unpublished data, National Park Service, September 2015). During May-July 2015, five injuries associated with bison encounters occurred (Table). Case reports were reviewed to evaluate circumstances surrounding these injuries to inform prevention.

  14. High-resolution aeromagnetic mapping of volcanic terrain, Yellowstone National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, Carol A.; Morgan, Lisa A.

    2002-06-01

    High-resolution aeromagnetic data acquired over Yellowstone National Park (YNP) show contrasting patterns reflecting differences in rock composition, types and degree of alteration, and crustal structures that mirror the variable geology of the Yellowstone Plateau. The older, Eocene, Absaroka Volcanic Supergroup, a series of mostly altered, andesitic volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks partially exposed in mountains on the eastern margin of YNP, produces high-amplitude, positive magnetic anomalies, strongly contrasting with the less magnetic, younger, latest Cenozoic, Yellowstone Plateau Group, primarily a series of fresh and variably altered rhyolitic rocks covering most of YNP. The Yellowstone caldera is the centerpiece of the Yellowstone Plateau; part of its boundary can be identified on the aeromagnetic map as a series of discontinuous, negative magnetic anomalies that reflect faults or zones along which extensive hydrothermal alteration is localized. The large-volume rhyolitic ignimbrite deposits of the 0.63-Ma Lava Creek Tuff and the 2.1-Ma Huckleberry Ridge Tuff, which are prominent lithologies peripheral to the Yellowstone caldera, produce insignificant magnetic signatures. A zone of moderate amplitude positive anomalies coincides with the mapped extent of several post-caldera rhyolitic lavas. Linear magnetic anomalies reflect the rectilinear fault systems characteristic of resurgent domes in the center of the caldera. Peripheral to the caldera, the high-resolution aeromagnetic map clearly delineates flow unit boundaries of pre- and post-caldera basalt flows, which occur stratigraphically below the post-caldera rhyolitic lavas and are not exposed extensively at the surface. All of the hot spring and geyser basins, such as Norris, Upper and Lower Geyser Basins, West Thumb, and Gibbon, are associated with negative magnetic anomalies, reflecting hydrothermal alteration that has destroyed the magnetic susceptibility of minerals in the volcanic rocks. Within

  15. Age and the risk of All-Terrain Vehicle-related injuries in children and adolescents: a cross sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLean, Lianne; Russell, Kelly; McFaull, Steven; Warda, Lynne; Tenenbein, Milton; McGavock, Jonathan

    2017-03-17

    The study was designed to determine if youth injuries related to all-terrain vehicle (ATV) use compared to older adolescents and adults. We performed cross sectional study of children and adults presenting to pediatric and adult emergency departments between 1990 and 2009 in Canada. The primary exposure variable was age injuries than females and passengers. Helmet use was associated with significant protection from head injuries (aOR: 0.59; 95% CI: 0.44-0.78). Youth under 16 years are at an increased risk of head injuries and fractures. For youth and adults presenting to emergency departments with an ATV-related injury, moderate to serious injuries associated with ATV use are more common among drivers and males. Helmet use protected against head injuries, suggesting minimum age limits for ATV use and helmet use are warranted.

  16. Assessing the risk of foliar injury from ozone on vegetation in parks in the U.S. National Park Service's Vital Signs Network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kohut, Robert [Boyce Thompson Institute for Plant Research, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States)], E-mail: rjk9@cornell.edu

    2007-10-15

    The risk of ozone injury to plants was assessed in support of the National Park Service's Vital Signs Monitoring Network program. The assessment examined bioindicator species, evaluated levels of ozone exposure, and investigated soil moisture conditions during periods of exposure for a 5-year period in each park. The assessment assigned each park a risk rating of high, moderate, or low. For the 244 parks for which assessments were conducted, the risk of foliar injury was high in 65 parks, moderate in 46 parks, and low in 131 parks. Among the well-known parks with a high risk of ozone injury are Gettysburg, Valley Forge, Delaware Water Gap, Cape Cod, Fire Island, Antietam, Harpers Ferry, Manassas, Wolf Trap Farm Park, Mammoth Cave, Shiloh, Sleeping Bear Dunes, Great Smoky Mountains, Joshua Tree, Sequoia and Kings Canyon, and Yosemite. - An assessment of the risk of foliar ozone injury on plants was conducted for 269 parks in support of the U.S. National Park Service's Vital Signs Monitoring Network Program.

  17. Safety factors related to all-terrain vehicle injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Sohail R; McKenna, Christine; Miller, Marianne; Shultz, Barbara; Upperman, Jeffrey S; Gaines, Barbara A

    2012-10-01

    All-terrain vehicle (ATV)-related injuries are a significant source of pediatric trauma. We hypothesized that these injuries are caused by poor safety behavior. To test this hypothesis, we surveyed both injured and uninjured ATV riders. A prospective convenience sample-based survey was initiated at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, a Level I pediatric trauma center. Patients with an ATV-related injury were asked to complete the survey for the study group (INJ), while uninjured pediatric ATV-riders completed the survey for the control group (UnINJ). The Fisher's exact probability test was used for data analysis. There were 38 surveys completed for INJ and 11 for UnINJ. Both groups had similar demographics. ATVs in both groups were mostly used for recreation, and most of the INJ patients were in a rural setting. Half of the ATVs were purchased second hand, and less than half were purchased from a dealer. Most dealers reviewed age recommendations for ATV use; however, many safety recommendations were not followed. INJ group had a higher percentage of children riding inappropriately sized ATVs and a lower rate of helmet use when compared with UnINJ group. In addition, there were a significant number of regulatory violations in the INJ group, including nine children (24%) riding as passengers and 5 (13%) driving on a road. These data suggest that there may be decreased safety behavior among injured pediatric ATV-riders; however, uninjured riders also demonstrate poor safety habits. The study showed that dealers do review safety regulations with consumers; however, most of the ATVs are not purchased through dealers. Therefore, we may need to shift our safety and educational focus to reach these families. Prognostic/epidemiologic study, level III.

  18. Injury and frequency of use of playground equipment in public schools and parks in Brisbane, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nixon, J; Acton, C; Wallis, B; Ballesteros, M; Battistutta, D

    2003-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of use of play equipment in public schools and parks in Brisbane, Australia, and to estimate an annual rate of injury per use of equipment, overall and for particular types of equipment. Methods: Injury data on all children injured from playground equipment and seeking medical attention at the emergency department of either of the two children's hospitals in the City of Brisbane were obtained for the years 1996 and 1997. Children were observed at play on five different pieces of play equipment in a random sample of 16 parks and 16 schools in the City of Brisbane. Children injured in the 16 parks and schools were counted, and rates of injury and use were calculated. Results: The ranked order for equipment use in the 16 schools was climbing equipment (3762 uses), horizontal ladders (2309 uses), and slides (856 uses). Each horizontal ladder was used 2.6 times more often than each piece of climbing equipment. Each horizontal ladder was used 7.8 times more than each piece of climbing equipment in the sample of public parks. Slides were used 4.6 times more than climbing equipment in parks and 1.2 times more in public schools. The annual injury rate for the 16 schools and 16 parks under observation was 0.59/100 000 and 0.26/100 000 uses of equipment, respectively. Conclusions: This study shows that annual number of injuries per standardized number of uses could be used to determine the relative risk of particular pieces of playground equipment. The low overall rate of injuries/100 000 uses of equipment in this study suggests that the benefit of further reduction of injury in this community may be marginal and outweigh the economic costs in addition to reducing challenging play opportunities. PMID:12966007

  19. 2003 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-05-23

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for the East Tennessee Technology Park (K-25).The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  20. Middle Cerebral Artery Stroke as Amusement Park Injury: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abby Baumgartle

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Strokes as amusement park injuries are rare, but have been reported in the literature. Only about 20 cases of cerebrovascular accidents after amusement park visits have been described. We report a healthy 12-year-old boy who presented with facial droop, slurred speech, and inability to use his right arm after riding roller coasters at a local amusement park. He was evaluated and found to have a left middle cerebral artery (MCA infarction. The patient was treated with anticoagulants and has recovered with no major residual symptoms. It is likely that his neurological symptoms occurred due to the high head accelerations experienced on the roller coasters, which are more detrimental to children due to immature cervical spine development and muscle strength. Early diagnosis of dissection and stroke results in a favorable prognosis. Providers and parents should be aware of the potential risk of roller coasters and act quickly on neurologic changes in children that have recently been to an amusement park.

  1. Optimising seat design for all-terrain vehicle injury prevention: wide variability illustrates need for evidence-based standardisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jennissen, Charles A; Miller, Nathan S; Tang, Kaiyang; Denning, Gerene M

    2014-04-01

    All-terrain vehicle (ATV)-related deaths and injuries are a growing public health concern, particularly in rural and suburban communities. More engineering approaches that address vehicle safety and promote injury prevention are critically needed. Our study was designed to determine the variability in seat characteristics among 2012 model-year, adult-size ATVs. Measurements of 67 models were performed using an image-based method. Seat characteristics were compared by manufacturer and by ATV type (sport vs utility). There were significant differences in seat length and seat placement among manufacturers and between sport and utility ATVs. Seat lengths ranged from 19.8 to 37.0 inches, with sport models significantly longer than utility models. Longer seats resulted from the back of the seat extending further beyond the rear axle and/or the seat front extending closer to the handle grips. Seat front to handle grip distances ranged from 3.25 to 16.5 inches. Combined data showed a strong inverse correlation between seat length and the distance from the seat front to the handle grips, but no significant correlation with wheelbase or engine size. We found wide variability in seat length and placement for adult-size ATVs. However, existing seat specifications were identified that may be a good starting point for improved seat design. Optimal design would allow for safe operation while reducing the likelihood of multiple riders and use by underaged operators, both major risk factors for ATV-related deaths and injuries. Ultimately, regulations may be needed to ensure standardised seat design is incorporated throughout the ATV industry.

  2. All-terrain vehicle-related injuries and deaths in Newfoundland and Labrador between 2003 and 2013: a retrospective trauma registry review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Holly; Whalen, Desmond; Alani, Sabrina; Rogers, Peter; MacLean, Cathy

    2017-07-11

    Injury and death involving all-terrain vehicles (ATV) has been reported in a number of Canadian provinces. The objective of this study is to describe the frequency, nature, severity, population affected, immediate health costs, efficacy of related legislation, and helmet use in ATV related injuries and deaths in Newfoundland and Labrador (NL). A retrospective review of injured or deceased ATV riders of all ages entered in the Newfoundland and Labrador Trauma Registry from 2003 to 2013 was conducted. Variables studied included demographics, injury type and severity, use of helmets, admission/discharge dates, and referring/receiving institution. Data was also obtained from the Newfoundland and Labrador Center for Health Information (NLCHI) and included all in-hospital deaths and hospitalizations due to ATVs between 1995 and 2013. There were a total of 298 patients registered in the trauma registry, resulting in 2759 admission days, nine deaths, and a total estimated immediate healthcare system cost in excess of $1.6 million. More males (N=253, 84.9%) than females (N=45, 15.1%) were injured in ATV related incidents, t(20)=7.12, p<.0001. Head and thorax injuries were the most serious. 38.6% of patients were confirmed to be wearing helmets. Mean injury severity scores are as follows: head injury (M=11, SD=9.51), thorax (M=10, SD=8.3), abdominal/pelvis (M=9, SD=7.62), upper extremity (M=9, SD=8.53), other injuries (M=9, SD=10.56) lower extremity (M=8, SD=8.34), and spine (M=8, SD=6.52). This study describes ATV related injuries and deaths in NL. Information from this study may guide physician practice, public education, and future legislation.

  3. Real-world evaluation of the effectiveness of reversing camera and parking sensor technologies in preventing backover pedestrian injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keall, M D; Fildes, B; Newstead, S

    2017-02-01

    Backover injuries to pedestrians are a significant road safety issue, but their prevalence is underestimated as the majority of such injuries are often outside the scope of official road injury recording systems, which just focus on public roads. Based on experimental evidence, reversing cameras have been found to be effective in reducing the rate of collisions when reversing; the evidence for the effectiveness of reverse parking sensors has been mixed. The wide availability of these technologies in recent model vehicles provides impetus for real-world evaluations using crash data. A logistic model was fitted to data from crashes that occurred on public roads constituting 3172 pedestrian injuries in New Zealand and four Australian States to estimate the odds of backover injury (compared to other sorts of pedestrian injury crashes) for the different technology combinations fitted as standard equipment (both reversing cameras and sensors; just reversing cameras; just sensors; neither cameras nor sensors) controlling for vehicle type, jurisdiction, speed limit area and year of manufacture restricted to the range 2007-2013. Compared to vehicles without any of these technologies, reduced odds of backover injury were estimated for all three of these technology configurations: 0.59 (95% CI 0.39-0.88) for reversing cameras by themselves; 0.70 (95% CI 0.49-1.01) for both reversing cameras and sensors; 0.69 (95% CI 0.47-1.03) for reverse parking sensors by themselves. These findings are important as they are the first to our knowledge to present an assessment of real-world safety effectiveness of these technologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Seasonal development of ozone-induced foliar injury on tall milkweed (Asclepias exaltata) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souza, Lara [Department of Biology, 572 Rivers Street, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608 (United States)]. E-mail: lsouza@utk.edu; Neufeld, Howard S. [Department of Biology, 572 Rivers Street, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608 (United States); Chappelka, Arthur H. [School of Forestry and Wildlife Sciences, 108 M White-Smith Hall, Auburn University, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States); Burkey, Kent O. [US Department of Agriculture, Agricultural Research Service, Plant Science Research Unit and Department of Crop Science, North Carolina State University, 3908 Inwood Road, Raleigh, NC 26703 (United States); Davison, Alan W. [School of Biology, Ridley Building, University of Newcastle, Newcastle Upon Tyne, NE1 7RU (United Kingdom)

    2006-05-15

    The goals of this study were to document the development of ozone-induced foliar injury, on a leaf-by-leaf basis, and to develop ozone exposure relationships for leaf cohorts and individual tall milkweeds (Asclepias exaltata L.) in Great Smoky Mountains National Park. Plants were classified as either ozone-sensitive or insensitive based on the amount of foliar injury. Sensitive plants developed injury earlier in the season and to a greater extent than insensitive plants. Older leaf cohorts were more likely to belong to high injury classes by the end of each of the two growing seasons. In addition, leaf loss was more likely for older cohorts (2000) and lower leaf positions (2001) than younger cohorts and upper leaves, respectively. Most leaves abscised without prior ozone-like stippling or chlorosis. Failure to take this into account can result in underestimation of the effects of ozone on these plants. - Leaf loss was not necessarily accompanied by symptoms of foliar ozone injury.

  5. Comparing the characteristics of snowboarders injured in a terrain park who present to the ski patrol, the emergency department or both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Kelly; Meeuwisse, Willem; Nettel-Aguirre, Alberto; Emery, Carolyn A; Wishart, Jillian; Romanow, Nicole T R; Rowe, Brian H; Goulet, Claude; Hagel, Brent E

    2014-01-01

    Ski patrol report forms are a common data source in ski/snowboard research, but it is unclear if those who only present to the emergency department (ED) are systematically different from those who see the ski patrol. To determine the proportion and characteristics of injured snowboarders who bypass the ski patrol before presenting to the ED, three groups of injured snowboarders were compared: presented to the ED only, ski patrol only and ski patrol and ED. Data were collected from ski patrol Accident Report Forms (ARFs), ED medical records and telephone interviews. There were 333 injured snowboarders (ED only: 34, ski patrol only: 107, both: 192). Ability, time of day, snow conditions or drugs/alcohol predicted ED only presentation. Concussions (RRR: 4.66; 95% CI: 1.83, 11.90), sprains/strains (RRR: 4.22; 95% CI: 1.87, 9.49), head/neck (RRR: 2.90; 95% CI: 1.48, 5.78), trunk (RRR: 4.17; 95% CI: 1.92, 9.09) or lower extremity (RRR: 3.65; 95% CI: 1.32, 10.07) injuries were significantly more likely to present to ski patrol only versus ski patrol and ED. In conclusion, snowboarders who presented to the ED only had similar injuries as those who presented to both.

  6. 2010 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Health, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2011-08-16

    The U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  7. 2007 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety, and Security

    2009-07-13

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of illness and injury surveillance activities that provide an early warning system to detect health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  8. 2008 East Tennessee Technology Park Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Health and Safety, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2010-10-26

    The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The Illness and Injury Surveillance Program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  9. Skiing and snowboarding head injuries in 2 areas of the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greve, Mark W; Young, David J; Goss, Andrew L; Degutis, Linda C

    2009-01-01

    To explore the use of helmets in skiers and snowboarders injured at ski runs and terrain parks in Colorado and the northeast United States and to examine differences in head injury severity in terrain parks as compared to ski runs. This was a retrospective cohort study. We reviewed emergency department medical records of injured skiers at 9 medical facilities in Colorado, New York, and Vermont to examine the frequency of helmet use, type of terrain on which injuries occurred, and effect of injury event type and helmet use on change in mental status. Injuries that occurred from July 2002 to July 2004 were included. Eligible patients were skiers and snowboarders who sustained a head injury as defined by International Classification of Diseases-9 codes for acute head injuries. Data elements included event location, mechanism of injury, helmet use, loss of consciousness, neurologic findings, Glasgow Coma Scale score, and initial outcome. Data were entered into SPSS for analysis. Of 1013 patients, 52.6% were skiing, 46.7% were snowboarding, and the remainder engaged in other activities such as sledding or using a sit ski. Most (78.7%) were using a ski run, whereas 19.1% were at a terrain park when their injuries occurred, and 37.1% were wearing helmets. Most injuries (74.1%) occurred when the victim hit his/her head on the snow; 10.0% and 13.1% occurred in collisions with other skiers and fixed objects, respectively. There were significantly fewer instances of loss of consciousness in fall events in the Colorado group (chi(2): 4.127; P < .05), a significantly lower incidence of loss of consciousness in helmet users who struck a fixed object (chi(2): 5.800; P < .05), and a significantly higher incidence of skiers colliding with fixed objects in the Northeast (chi(2): 14.05; P < .005). There were significantly more documented head injuries in terrain parks, even when controlling for helmet use (chi(2): 5.800; P < .05). There is an increased risk of head injury, regardless

  10. Snowboarding injuries: trends over time and comparisons with alpine skiing injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Suezie; Endres, Nathan K; Johnson, Robert J; Ettlinger, Carl F; Shealy, Jasper E

    2012-04-01

    Participation in snowboarding as a winter sport is comparable to alpine skiing concerning the demographics of the participants, risk of injury, and variation in types of injuries sustained. To examine the types of snowboarding injuries and changes in injury patterns over time. We also sought to highlight important differences in injury patterns between snowboarders and alpine skiers as affected by age, experience, and sex. Case control; Level of evidence, 3. Data were collected on injured snowboarders and skiers in a base-lodge clinic of a ski resort in Vermont over 18 seasons (1988-2006) and included extensive information about injury patterns, demographics, and experience. Control data were also obtained during this time period to provide information about the population at risk. The injury rates were assessed as mean days between injuries (MDBI). The average MDBI for all injuries among snowboarders was 345 as compared with 400 for skiers (the lower the number, the higher the injury rate). The most common type of injury for snowboarders was a wrist injury (MDBI, 1258), while for skiers, it was an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) sprain (MDBI, 2332). Wrist injuries accounted for 27.6% of all snowboard injuries and 2.8% of skiing injuries, and ACL injuries composed 1.7% of all snowboard injuries and 17.2% of skiing injuries. Among snowboarders, more wrist injuries, shoulder soft tissue injuries, ankle injuries, concussions, and clavicle fractures were seen, while skiers had more ACL sprains, medial collateral ligament (MCL) sprains of the knee, lateral collateral ligament (LCL) sprains of the knee, lower extremity contusions, and tibia fractures. The trend analysis revealed an increased incidence of clavicle fractures (P snowboarders over time. Skiers had a decrease in thumb metacarpophalangeal-ulnar collateral ligament (MCP-UCL) injuries (P snowboarders. When examining the location of injury, 21.8% of snowboard injuries occurred in the terrain park compared with 6

  11. National Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Transportation — National Park Service unit boundaries (NTAD). These park boundaries signify legislative boundary definitions and local park names have been consolidated according to...

  12. Head Injuries in Urban Environment Skiing and Snowboarding: A Retrospective Study on Injury Severity and Injury Mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenroos, A; Handolin, L

    2017-11-01

    During the last decade urban skiing and snowboarding has gained a lot of popularity. In urban skiing/snowboarding riders try to balance on handrails and jump off buildings. Previous studies in skiing and snowboarding accidents have mostly been conducted at hospitals located close to alpine terrain with big ski resort areas. The aim of this study is to evaluate the types and severity of traumatic brain injuries occurring in small, suburban hills and in urban environment, and to characterize injury patterns to find out the specific mechanisms of injuries behind. This study included all patients admitted to the Helsinki University Hospital Trauma Unit from 2006 to 2015 with a head injury (ICD 10 S06-S07) from skiing or snowboarding accidents in Helsinki capital area. Head injuries that did not require a CT-scan, and injuries older than 24 hours were excluded from this study. There were a total of 72 patients that met the inclusion criteria Mean length of stay in hospital was 2.95 days. According to the AIS classification, 30% had moderate, 14% had severe, and 10% had critical head injuries. Patients who got injured in terrain parks or on streets where more likely to be admitted to ICU than those injured on slopes. Based on GOS score at discharge, 78% were classified as having a good recovery from the injury, 13% had a moderate disability, 5% had a severe disability and 3% of the injuries were fatal. There were no statistically significant differences in decreased GOS between the accident sites. Head injuries occurring in small suburban hills and in urban environments can be serious and potentially fatal. The profile and severity of skiing injuries in urban environments and small, suburban hills is comparable to those on alpine terrain.

  13. What Influences Youth to Operate All-Terrain Vehicles Safely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummon, A. H.; Heaney, C. A.; Dellinger, W. A.; Wilkins, J. R., III

    2014-01-01

    The operation of all-terrain vehicles (ATVs) by youth has contributed to the incidence of serious and fatal injuries among children. This study explored factors related to the frequency with which youth wore a helmet and refrained from engaging in three risky driving behaviors (driving at risky speeds, on paved roads and on unfamiliar terrain)…

  14. DIORAMA Earth Terrain Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werley, Kenneth Alan [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-03-10

    When simulating near-surface nuclear detonations, the terrain of the Earth can have an effect on the observed outputs. The critical parameter is called the “height of burst”. In order to model the effect of terrain on the simulations we have incorporated data from multiple sources to give 9 km resolution data with global coverage.

  15. TERRAIN, UNION PARISH, LOUSIANA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, KENDALL COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, DELAWARE COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, CEDAR COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, Norfolk County, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, DARKE COUNTY, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, DAWSON COUNTY, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, Hampden County, Massachusetts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, RICE COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, WRIGHT COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, MERCER COUNTY, OHIO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, HANCOCK COUNTY, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, JEFFERSON COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, FULTON COUNTY, OH

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, Bennington County, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, SNOHOMISH COUNTY, WASHINGTON

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, TROUSDALE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, WAYNE COUNTY, TENNESSEE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, BARNSTABLE COUNTY, MASSACHUSETTS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, POTTER COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, Northampton COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  16. Colored corn starch dust explosion-related ocular injuries at a Taiwan water park: A preliminary report from a single medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Yi-Lin; Yeh, Lung-Kun; Tsai, Yueh-Ju; Chen, Shin-Yi

    2016-01-01

    To elucidate the manifestations of ocular injuries in the colored corn starch dust explosion at a Taiwan water park. This is a retrospective, non-comparative, consecutive-interventional case series. Fifty explosion-injury patients on 27 June 2015 treated at Chang-Gung Memorial Hospital, Linkou, were included. Thorough ophthalmic examinations were based on emergent triage and consecutive ophthalmological consultations. Multiple ocular and systemic parameters were assessed. Of the 100 eyes in the 50 cases reviewed, 22 cases were male and 28 cases were female. The mean age was 22.08 ± 4.64 years, and the mean burn total body surface area (TBSA) of patients was 45.92 ± 20.30%. Of the 50 patients, 20 had Grade 1 ocular burns, and the others were without ocular involvement. Two of the 20 cases that presented Grade 1 ocular burns died within 1 month due to other systemic complications. The most common ocular manifestations among those with ocular injuries included periocular swelling (75%), followed by conjunctival chemosis (65%), conjunctival hyperemia (50%), singed eyelashes (20%), cornea epithelial defects (10%), and punctate keratopathy (5%). It is worth mentioning that one patient developed herpes simplex keratitis due to stress 3 weeks after being burned. Half of the 50 patients had facial burns. Specifically, the patients with a greater TBSA presented more significant ocular-burn manifestations than those patients with lower TBSA. Prompt ophthalmologic consultations are particularly necessary for mass burn-casualty patients with facial burns, inhalation injuries, and greater TBSA. The inspection and control of all ignition sources and the manipulation of dust with low concentrations and in an open space are crucial factors to prevent future dust explosions.

  17. Submarine Salt Karst Terrains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nico Augustin

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Karst terrains that develop in bodies of rock salt (taken as mainly of halite, NaCl are special not only for developing in one of the most soluble of all rocks, but also for developing in one of the weakest rocks. Salt is so weak that many surface-piercing salt diapirs extrude slow fountains of salt that that gravity spread downslope over deserts on land and over sea floors. Salt fountains in the deserts of Iran are usually so dry that they flow at only a few cm/yr but the few rain storms a decade so soak and weaken them that they surge at dm/day for a few days. We illustrate the only case where the rates at which different parts of one of the many tens of subaerial salt karst terrains in Iran flows downslope constrains the rates at which its subaerial salt karst terrains form. Normal seawater is only 10% saturated in NaCl. It should therefore be sufficiently aggressive to erode karst terrains into exposures of salt on the thousands of known submarine salt extrusions that have flowed or are still flowing over the floors of hundreds of submarine basins worldwide. However, we know of no attempt to constrain the processes that form submarine salt karst terrains on any of these of submarine salt extrusions. As on land, many potential submarine karst terrains are cloaked by clastic and pelagic sediments that are often hundreds of m thick. Nevertheless, detailed geophysical and bathymetric surveys have already mapped likely submarine salt karst terrains in at least the Gulf of Mexico, and the Red Sea. New images of these two areas are offered as clear evidence of submarine salt dissolution due to sinking or rising aggressive fluids. We suggest that repeated 3D surveys of distinctive features (± fixed seismic reflectors of such terrains could measure any downslope salt flow and thus offer an exceptional opportunity to constrain the rates at which submarine salt karst terrains develop. Such rates are of interest to all salt tectonicians and the many

  18. National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jill S. Baron; Craig D. Allen; Erica Fleishman; Lance Gunderson; Don McKenzie; Laura Meyerson; Jill Oropeza; Nate Stephenson

    2008-01-01

    Covering about 4% of the United States, the 338,000 km2 of protected areas in the National Park System contain representative landscapes of all of the nation's biomes and ecosystems. The U.S. National Park Service Organic Act established the National Park System in 1916 "to conserve the scenery and the natural and historic objects and...

  19. Flow on noisy terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsirogiannis, Konstantinos; Haverkort, Herman

    2011-01-01

    Computing watersheds on triangulated terrain models in a robust manner is a difficult task as it is sensitive to noise that appears in the elevation values of the input. This is amplified by the existence of many very small watersheds (corresponding to spurious minima) that obscure the overall hy...... to use a robust flow model together with exact arithmetic....

  20. Good terrain geometry, cheap!

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchaineau, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)]|[Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Wolinsky, M.; Sigeti, D.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1997-04-01

    Real-time terrain rendering for interactive visualization remains a demanding task. We present a novel algorithm with several advantages over previous methods: our method is unusually stingy with polygons yet achieves real-time performance and is scalable to arbitrary regions and resolutions. The method provides a continuous terrain mesh of specified triangle count having provably minimum error in restricted but reasonably general classes of permissible meshes and error metrics. Our method provides an elegant solution to guaranteeing certain elusive types of consistency in scenes produced by multiple scene generators which share a common finest-resolution database but which otherwise operate entirely independently. This consistency is achieved by exploiting the freedom of choice of error metric allowed by the algorithm to provide, for example, multiple exact lines-of-sight in real-time. Our methods rely on an off-line pre-processing phase to construct a multi-scale data structure consisting of triangular terrain approximations enhanced ({open_quotes}thickened{close_quotes}) with world-space error information. In real time, this error data is efficiently transformed into screen-space where it is used to guide a greedy top-down triangle subdivision algorithm which produces the desired minimal error continuous terrain mesh. Our algorithm has been implemented and it operates at real-time rates.

  1. Navigating Hypermasculine Terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Ann-Karina Eske

    2017-01-01

    imposed by a street-based hypermasculine script. The analysis rests on an ethnographic study among 25 young Danish women aged 13 to 23 experienced in engaging in street-based physical violence. The study suggests that explorations of female tactics can provide a useful method of analysis for understanding...... female agency in (hyper)masculine social terrains....

  2. Parks & Benefits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandt, Jesper; Christensen, Andreas Aagaard; Holmes, Esbern

    2011-01-01

    if it is based on ignorance of the integrated character of nature and people'(Gunderson and Holling 2002). This is the main reason why general models for sustainability are so difficult to develop. However, a nature park designated to fulfill protection purposes through stakeholder cooperation might fulfill......, based on Natura2000-designations and -statistics. Outside the parks focus is put on park-stakeholder relations and the landscape adaptability of feudal agricultural structures. Many nature parks are related to cultural landscapes with a high concentration of manorial estates with strong traditions...

  3. Gatineau Park: a case study of managing recreation in the wildland-urban interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul Heintzman

    2007-01-01

    Gatineau Park, a few kilometers from the Parliament Buildings in Ottawa, is a classic example of a park confronted by management issues related to the wildland-urban interface. The park, comprising 36,300 hectares of forested and hilly Canadian Shield terrain stretching 50 kilometres in length, extends into the National Capital region, which has a population of over...

  4. Park It!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorius, Tara Cady

    2010-01-01

    Many artists visit national parks to draw, paint and take photographs of some of the most amazing scenery on earth. Raw nature is one of the greatest inspirations to an artist, and artists can be credited for helping inspire the government to create the National Park System. This article features Thomas Moran (1837-1926), one of the artists who…

  5. ParkIndex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczynski, Andrew T; Schipperijn, Jasper; Hipp, J Aaron

    2016-01-01

    using ArcGIS 9.3 and the Community Park Audit Tool. Four park summary variables - distance to nearest park, and the number of parks, amount of park space, and average park quality index within 1 mile were analyzed in relation to park use using logistic regression. Coefficients for significant park...... significance for researchers and professionals in diverse disciplines....

  6. Park Districts

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Parks Districts layer is part of a dataset contains administrative boundaries for Vermont's Agency of Natural Resources. The dataset includes feature classes for...

  7. Mountain Biking: Does Rough Terrain Make Rugged Riders?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinque, Chris

    1987-01-01

    No formal research has been conducted on the training effects and injury risks of all-terrain bicycles in mountain biking, but experience indicates they are apparently safe and may provide greater fitness benefits than traditional bicycles. The bicycles are described, and their apparent benefits are discussed. (MT)

  8. Washboard Terrain on Pluto

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Jeffrey M.; White, Oliver L.; Howard, Alan D.; Umurhan, Orkan M.; Schenk, Paul M.; Beyer, Ross A.; McKinnnon, William B.; Singer, Kelsi N.; Lauer, Tod R.; Cheng, Andrew F.; Young, Leslie; Stern, S. Alan; Weaver, Harold A.; Olkin, Catherine; Ennico, Kimberly; New Horizons Science Team

    2017-10-01

    Washboard texture or patterning consists of fields of parallel to sub-parallel ridges typically spaced ~1-2 km crest to crest and a few 100 m in amplitude (Fig. 4a in Moore et al., 2016, Science, 351, 1284-1293). For the most part, underlying topography can be easily discerned. We will refer to discrete, well-bounded patches of these landforms as Washboard Terrain (WT). WT is observed to occur along the rim, and just beyond the rim, of Sputnik basin from the West to NNW. Where it is seen in high-resolution data, it has clearly defined limits, beyond which it would be able to be seen if it were there. WT doesn’t occur at very low latitudes or very high latitudes (ranging from 22°N to 62°N). WT seems to occur most conspicuously on relatively level, gently sloping terrain. It is restricted to elevations between ~-2 km to area in which WT occurs is the sinuous valley network, which is suspected to have been formed, or at least substantially modified, by glaciation. WT also appears to occur mainly on an intermediate-albedo reddish material, where seen in enhanced color data. Where it occurs in level terrain, WT tends to trend ENE - there doesn’t seem to be a strong local control of its orientation in response to valley drainage directions. WT can display a greater range of orientations where it occurs in higher-relief (not higher elevation) settings such as spurs. WT appears superposed on very ancient landscapes, but is itself cratered locally by clusters of small (~1-3 km) craters, which may be secondaries. This implies that WT may be intermediate in age. Of several working hypotheses, we currently provisionally favor that WT may be akin to terrestrial recessional moraines (or de Geer moraines) associated with the retreat of a higher stand of N2 glaciation that once overfilled Sputnik basin. These putative moraine features may owe their spacing to superseasonal retreat on Milankovitch timescales of ~1 Ma. If this hypothesis has validity, then perhaps the

  9. Turbulence in complex terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, Jakob [Risoe National Lab., Wind Energy and Atmosheric Physics Dept., Roskilde (Denmark)

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to develop a model of the spectral velocity-tensor in neutral flow over complex terrain. The resulting equations are implemented in a computer code using the mean flow generated by a linear mean flow model as input. It estimates turbulence structure over hills (except on the lee side if recirculation is present) in the so-called outer layer and also models the changes in turbulence statistics in the vicinity roughness changes. The generated turbulence fields are suitable as input for dynamic load calculations on wind turbines and other tall structures and is under implementation in the collection of programs called WA{sup s}P Engineering. (au) EFP-97; EU-JOULE-3. 15 refs.

  10. Polygonal terrains on Mars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Pina

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The presence of water ice on Mars is well established. Some featureson the planet point to the occurrence of processes similar to those that take place in periglacial areas of Earth. One of the clues for this is the existence of small-scale polygonal terrains. In this paper, we present a methodology that aims at the automated identification of polygonal patterns on high-spatial resolution images of the surface of Mars. In the context of the research project TERPOLI, this step will be complemented with a full characterization, in both geometric and topological terms, of thenetworks detected. In this manner, we hope to collect data that will lead to a better understanding of the conditions of formation of the polygons, and of their temporal evolution; namely, we intend to identify different groups of polygons and to compare them with terrestrial examples.

  11. On characterizing terrain visibility graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Evans

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available A terrain is an $x$-monotone polygonal line in the $xy$-plane. Two vertices of a terrain are mutually visible if and only if there is no terrain vertex on or above the open line segment connecting them. A graph whose vertices represent terrain vertices and whose edges represent mutually visible pairs of terrain vertices is called a terrain visibility graph. We would like to find properties that are both necessary and sufficient for a graph to be a terrain visibility graph; that is, we would like to characterize terrain visibility graphs.Abello et al. [Discrete and Computational Geometry, 14(3:331--358, 1995] showed that all terrain visibility graphs are “persistent”. They showed that the visibility information of a terrain point set implies some ordering requirements on the slopes of the lines connecting pairs of points in any realization, and as a step towards showing sufficiency, they proved that for any persistent graph $M$ there is a total order on the slopes of the (pseudo lines in a generalized configuration of points whose visibility graph is $M$.We give a much simpler proof of this result by establishing an orientation to every triple of vertices, reflecting some slope ordering requirements that are consistent with $M$ being the visibility graph, and prove that these requirements form a partial order. We give a faster algorithm to construct a total order on the slopes. Our approach attempts to clarify the implications of the graph theoretic properties on the ordering of the slopes, and may be interpreted as defining properties on an underlying oriented matroid that we show is a restricted type of $3$-signotope.

  12. Heterogeneous Parking Market Subject to Parking Rationing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Asadi Bagloee

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Different types of drivers and parking spaces delineate a heterogeneous parking market for which the literature has yet to provide a model applicable to the real world. The main obstacle is computational complexities of considering various parking restrictions along with traffic congestion on the road network. In this study, the heterogeneity aspects are considered within a Logit parking choice model. A mathematical programming problem was introduced to explicitly consider parking capacities and parking rationing constraints. The parking rationing is defined as any arrangement to reserve parking space for some specific demand such as parking permit, private parking, VIP parking, and different parking durations. Introduction of parking rationing in the presence of other constraints is a unique factor in this study which makes the model more realistic. The algorithm was tested on a central business district case study. The results prove that the algorithm is able to converge rapidly. Among the algorithm’s output are shadow prices of the parking capacity and parking rationing constraints. The shadow prices contain important information which is key to addressing a variety of parking issues, such as the location of parking shortages, identification of fair parking charges, viability of parking permits, and the size of reserved parking.

  13. Maryon Park

    OpenAIRE

    Bertoli, Giasco

    2018-01-01

    Tiré du site Internet de Onestar Press: "Maryon Park is the place Michelangelo Antonioni chose, in 1966, to shoot the scenes that would become cult images from his film "Blow Up", and deservedly so. The park is located in Charlton, southeast of London, a place that's hardly changed since Antonioni shot there. I first went there to shoot a series of photos on March 7 and 8, 2007. I returned again on March 7, 2014. I called the series “Maryon Park”. I used a medium format, six by seven inch col...

  14. ParkIndex

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaczynski, Andrew T; Schipperijn, Jasper; Hipp, J Aaron

    2016-01-01

    A lack of comprehensive and standardized metrics for measuring park exposure limits park-related research and health promotion efforts. This study aimed to develop and demonstrate an empirically-derived and spatially-represented index of park access (ParkIndex) that would allow researchers...... using ArcGIS 9.3 and the Community Park Audit Tool. Four park summary variables - distance to nearest park, and the number of parks, amount of park space, and average park quality index within 1 mile were analyzed in relation to park use using logistic regression. Coefficients for significant park...... of park use across all cells in KCMO ranged from 17 to 77 out of 100. ParkIndex represents a standardized metric of park access that combines elements of both park availability and quality, was developed empirically, and can be represented spatially. This tool has both practical and conceptual...

  15. TERRAIN Submission for CHICKASAW, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, HART COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, LEVY COUNTY, FL, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, CHOCTAW COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, CULLMAN COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, NELSON COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, MENIFEE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, GREENE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, CLARKE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. TERRAIN, ESTILL COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, ELMORE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, MARSHALL COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. TERRAIN, ANNE ARUNDEL COUNTY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, LIMESTONE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. TERRAIN, HALE COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, RUSSELL COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, OHIO COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. TERRAIN, JEFFERSON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. TERRAIN, MCCREARY COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. TERRAIN, FAYETTE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. TERRAIN, WAYNE COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. TERRAIN, MADISON COUNTY, ALABAMA USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. TERRAIN, MONROE COUNTY, Michigan USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. TERRAIN, CAMPBELL COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. TERRAIN, Metcalfe COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN, CRITTENDEN COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. TERRAIN, Cedar COUNTY, Missouri USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. TERRAIN, TRIGG COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. TERRAIN, Fleming COUNTY, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. Spectra of Velocity components over Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Panofsky, H. A.; Larko, D.; Lipschut, R.

    1982-01-01

    Spectra have been measured over a variety of types of complex terrain: on tops of hills and escarpments, over land downstream of a water surface, and over rolling terrain. Differences between spectra over many types of complex terrain, and over uniform terrain, can be explained by these hypotheses...

  5. Smart parking barrier

    KAUST Repository

    Alharbi, Abdulrazaq M.

    2016-05-06

    Various methods and systems are provided for smart parking barriers. In one example, among others, a smart parking barrier system includes a movable parking barrier located at one end of a parking space, a barrier drive configured to control positioning of the movable parking barrier, and a parking controller configured to initiate movement of the parking barrier, via the barrier drive. The movable parking barrier can be positioned between a first position that restricts access to the parking space and a second position that allows access to the parking space. The parking controller can initiate movement of the movable parking barrier in response to a positive identification of an individual allowed to use the parking space. The parking controller can identify the individual through, e.g., a RFID tag, a mobile device (e.g., a remote control, smartphone, tablet, etc.), an access card, biometric information, or other appropriate identifier.

  6. Complete Scene Recovery and Terrain Classification in Textured Terrain Meshes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyhyun Um

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Terrain classification allows a mobile robot to create an annotated map of its local environment from the three-dimensional (3D and two-dimensional (2D datasets collected by its array of sensors, including a GPS receiver, gyroscope, video camera, and range sensor. However, parts of objects that are outside the measurement range of the range sensor will not be detected. To overcome this problem, this paper describes an edge estimation method for complete scene recovery and complete terrain reconstruction. Here, the Gibbs-Markov random field is used to segment the ground from 2D videos and 3D point clouds. Further, a masking method is proposed to classify buildings and trees in a terrain mesh.

  7. Processing Terrain Point Cloud Data

    KAUST Repository

    DeVore, Ronald

    2013-01-10

    Terrain point cloud data are typically acquired through some form of Light Detection And Ranging sensing. They form a rich resource that is important in a variety of applications including navigation, line of sight, and terrain visualization. Processing terrain data has not received the attention of other forms of surface reconstruction or of image processing. The goal of terrain data processing is to convert the point cloud into a succinct representation system that is amenable to the various application demands. The present paper presents a platform for terrain processing built on the following principles: (i) measuring distortion in the Hausdorff metric, which we argue is a good match for the application demands, (ii) a multiscale representation based on tree approximation using local polynomial fitting. The basic elements held in the nodes of the tree can be efficiently encoded, transmitted, visualized, and utilized for the various target applications. Several challenges emerge because of the variable resolution of the data, missing data, occlusions, and noise. Techniques for identifying and handling these challenges are developed. © 2013 Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics.

  8. Complex Terrain and Wind Lidars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bingöl, Ferhat

    This thesis includes the results of a PhD study about complex terrain and wind lidars. The study mostly focuses on hilly and forested areas. Lidars have been used in combination with cups, sonics and vanes, to reach the desired vertical measurement heights. Several experiments are performed...... in complex terrain sites and the measurements are compared with two different flow models; a linearised flow model LINCOM and specialised forest model SCADIS. In respect to the lidar performance in complex terrain, the results showed that horizontal wind speed errors measured by a conically scanning lidar...... models and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated by LINCOM model was only reliable between 1 and 2 tree height (h) above canopy. The SCADIS model reported better correlation with the measurements in forest up to ∼6h. At the forest...

  9. Iapetus Bright and Dark Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    Saturn's outermost large moon, Iapetus, has a bright, heavily cratered icy terrain and a dark terrain, as shown in this Voyager 2 image taken on August 22, 1981. Amazingly, the dark material covers precisely the side of Iapetus that leads in the direction of orbital motion around Saturn (except for the poles), whereas the bright material occurs on the trailing hemisphere and at the poles. The bright terrain is made of dirty ice, and the dark terrain is surfaced by carbonaceous molecules, according to measurements made with Earth-based telescopes. Iapetus' dark hemisphere has been likened to tar or asphalt and is so dark that no details within this terrain were visible to Voyager 2. The bright icy hemisphere, likened to dirty snow, shows many large impact craters. The closest approach by Voyager 2 to Iapetus was a relatively distant 600,000 miles, so that our best images, such as this, have a resolution of about 12 miles. The dark material is made of organic substances, probably including poisonous cyano compounds such as frozen hydrogen cyanide polymers. Though we know a little about the dark terrain's chemical nature, we do not understand its origin. Two theories have been developed, but neither is fully satisfactory--(1) the dark material may be organic dust knocked off the small neighboring satellite Phoebe and 'painted' onto the leading side of Iapetus as the dust spirals toward Saturn and Iapetus hurtles through the tenuous dust cloud, or (2) the dark material may be made of icy-cold carbonaceous 'cryovolcanic' lavas that were erupted from Iapetus' interior and then blackened by solar radiation, charged particles, and cosmic rays. A determination of the actual cause, as well as discovery of any other geologic features smaller than 12 miles across, awaits the Cassini Saturn orbiter to arrive in 2004.

  10. Complex terrain and wind lidars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bingoel, F.

    2009-08-15

    This thesis includes the results of a PhD study about complex terrain and wind lidars. The study mostly focuses on hilly and forested areas. Lidars have been used in combination with cups, sonics and vanes, to reach the desired vertical measurement heights. Several experiments are performed in complex terrain sites and the measurements are compared with two different flow models; a linearised flow model LINCOM and specialised forest model SCADIS. In respect to the lidar performance in complex terrain, the results showed that horizontal wind speed errors measured by a conically scanning lidar can be of the order of 3-4% in moderately-complex terrain and up to 10% in complex terrain. The findings were based on experiments involving collocated lidars and meteorological masts, together with flow calculations over the same terrains. The lidar performance was also simulated with the commercial software WAsP Engineering 2.0 and was well predicted except for some sectors where the terrain is particularly steep. Subsequently, two experiments were performed in forested areas; where the measurements are recorded at a location deep-in forest and at the forest edge. Both sites were modelled with flow models and the comparison of the measurement data with the flow model outputs showed that the mean wind speed calculated by LINCOM model was only reliable between 1 and 2 tree height (h) above canopy. The SCADIS model reported better correlation with the measurements in forest up to approx6h. At the forest edge, LINCOM model was used by allocating a slope half-in half out of the forest based on the suggestions of previous studies. The optimum slope angle was reported as 17 deg.. Thus, a suggestion was made to use WAsP Engineering 2.0 for forest edge modelling with known limitations and the applied method. The SCADIS model worked better than the LINCOM model at the forest edge but the model reported closer results to the measurements at upwind than the downwind and this should be

  11. Evaluating Terrain Irregularity by Robot Posture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomas Luneckas

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available A method that allows evaluate the terrain irregularity by a robot posture is presented in this paper. A necessity to evaluate terrain irregularity is pointed out. Description of irregular terrain is given. A possibility to evaluate terrain irregularity by feet coordinate standard deviation is proposed. When deviation is σ = 0, all robots are in one plane. Bigger σ the more robot legs are scattered, meaning robot is walking in irregular terrain. A method to evaluate robot horizontality according to terrain by position of three planes is introduced.Article in Lithuanian

  12. National Environmental Research Parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-07-01

    The National Environmental Research Parks are outdoor laboratories that provide opportunities for environmental studies on protected lands that act as buffers around Department of Energy (DOE) facilities. The research parks are used to evaluate the environmental consequences of energy use and development as well as the strategies to mitigate these effects. They are also used to demonstrate possible environmental and land-use options. The seven parks are: Fermilab National Environmental Research Park; Hanford National Environmental Research Park; Idaho National Environmental Research Park; Los Alamos National Environmental Research Park; Nevada National Environmental Research Park; Oak Ridge National Environmental Research Park; and Savannah River National Environmental Research Park. This document gives an overview of the events that led to the creation of the research parks. Its main purpose is to summarize key points about each park, including ecological research, geological characteristics, facilities, and available databases.

  13. Digital terrain tapes: user guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    1980-01-01

    DMATC's digital terrain tapes are a by-product of the agency's efforts to streamline the production of raised-relief maps. In the early 1960's DMATC developed the Digital Graphics Recorder (DGR) system that introduced new digitizing techniques and processing methods into the field of three-dimensional mapping. The DGR system consisted of an automatic digitizing table and a computer system that recorded a grid of terrain elevations from traces of the contour lines on standard topographic maps. A sequence of computer accuracy checks was performed and then the elevations of grid points not intersected by contour lines were interpolated. The DGR system produced computer magnetic tapes which controlled the carving of plaster forms used to mold raised-relief maps. It was realized almost immediately that this relatively simple tool for carving plaster molds had enormous potential for storing, manipulating, and selectively displaying (either graphically or numerically) a vast number of terrain elevations. As the demand for the digital terrain tapes increased, DMATC began developing increasingly advanced digitizing systems and now operates the Digital Topographic Data Collection System (DTDCS). With DTDCS, two types of data elevations as contour lines and points, and stream and ridge lines are sorted, matched, and resorted to obtain a grid of elevation values for every 0.01 inch on each map (approximately 200 feet on the ground). Undefined points on the grid are found by either linear or or planar interpolation.

  14. Urban Terrain Analysis Training Aids

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    Continue on reverse aide If necessary and iden t i f y by b lock number) MOBA a Combat-In-Cities Training Aids for Urban Combat Urban Terrain ZQ...Urban Areas Working Group of the Military Operations Research Society; the joint DARCOM-TRADOC (U.S. Army) MOUT conferences; and a special MOBA

  15. Traversable terrain classification for outdoor autonomous robots using single 2D laser scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Christian; Blas, Morten Rufus; Andersen, Nils Axel

    2006-01-01

    , curvature, slope, width and invalid data. These are then used to extract road borders, traversable terrain and identify obstacles. Experimental results are shown and discussed. The results were obtained using a DTU developed mobile robot, and the autonomous tests were conducted in a national park......Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses seven distinctly different classifiers: raw height, roughness, step size...

  16. Terrain Classification for Outdoor Autonomous Robots using 2D Laser Scans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rufus Blas, Morten; Riisgaard, Søren; Ravn, Ole

    2005-01-01

    Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses four distinctly different classifiers: raw height, step size, slope, and ro...... with a department developed Medium Mobile Robot and tests conducted in a national park environment......Interpreting laser data to allow autonomous robot navigation on paved as well as dirt roads using a fixed angle 2D laser scanner is a daunting task. This paper introduces an algorithm for terrain classification that fuses four distinctly different classifiers: raw height, step size, slope...

  17. An automated system for terrain database construction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L. F.; Fretz, R. K.; Logan, T. L.; Bryant, N. A.

    1987-01-01

    An automated Terrain Database Preparation System (TDPS) for the construction and editing of terrain databases used in computerized wargaming simulation exercises has been developed. The TDPS system operates under the TAE executive, and it integrates VICAR/IBIS image processing and Geographic Information System software with CAD/CAM data capture and editing capabilities. The terrain database includes such features as roads, rivers, vegetation, and terrain roughness.

  18. Handling Massive and Dynamic Terrain Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Revsbæk, Morten

    analyzing flood risk and visibility, to producing nautical charts. Many algorithms and much commercial software have been developed to help analyze terrain models. However, significant algorithmic challenges arise from the increasing detail (and therefore size) of modern terrain models. Furthermore, terrain...

  19. Single-incision video-assisted thoracoscopic evaluation and emergent surgery for severe lung and chest wall injury after thoracic trauma in a water park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sesma, Julio; Alvarez, Melodie; Lirio, Francisco; Galvez, Carlos; Galiana, Maria; Baschwitz, Benno; Fornes, Francisca; Bolufer, Sergio

    2017-08-01

    Thoracic trauma is a challenging situation with potential severe chest wall and intrathoracic organ injuries. We present a case of emergent surgery in a 23-year-old man with hemorrhagic shock due to massive lung and chest wall injury after thoracic trauma in a water slide. We performed a SI-VATS approach in order to define intrathoracic and chest wall injuries, and once checked the extension of the chest wall injury, we added a middle size thoracotomy just over the affected area in order to stabilize rib fractures with Judet plates, that had caused massive laceration in left lower lobe (LLL) and injured the pericardium causing myocardical tear. After checking bronchial and vascular viability of LLL we suggested a lung parenchyma preserving technique with PTFE protected pulmonary primary suture in order to avoid a lobectomy. Chest tubes were removed on 3(rd) postoperative day and patient was discharged on 14(th) postoperative day. He has already recovered his normal activity 6 months after surgery.

  20. Prediction models in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marti, I.; Nielsen, Torben Skov; Madsen, Henrik

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the work is to investigatethe performance of HIRLAM in complex terrain when used as input to energy production forecasting models, and to develop a statistical model to adapt HIRLAM prediction to the wind farm. The features of the terrain, specially the topography, influence...... are calculated using on-line measurements of power production as well as HIRLAM predictions as input thus taking advantage of the auto-correlation, which is present in the power production for shorter pediction horizons. Statistical models are used to discribe the relationship between observed energy production...... the performance of HIRLAM in particular with respect to wind predictions. To estimate the performance of the model two spatial resolutions (0,5 Deg. and 0.2 Deg.) and different sets of HIRLAM variables were used to predict wind speed and energy production. The predictions of energy production for the wind farms...

  1. A Research on Wind Farm Micro-sitting Optimization in Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Yang, Jianchuan; Li, Chenqi

    2013-01-01

    turbines’ park coordinates which subject to the boundary and minimum distance conditions between two wind turbines. A Cross Particle Swarm Optimization (CPSO) method is developed and applied to optimize the layout for a certain wind farm case. Compared with the uniform and experience method, results show......Wind farm layout optimization in complex terrain is a pretty difficult issue for onshore wind farm. In this article, a novel optimization method is proposed to optimize the layout for wind farms in complex terrain. This method utilized Lissaman and Jensen wake models for taking the terrain height...... and the wake loss from the upstream turbines into the wind turbine power output calculation. Wind direction is divided into sixteen sections, and the wind speed is processed using the Weibull distribution. The objective is to maximize the total wind farm power output and the free design variables are the wind...

  2. Assessing the importance of terrain parameters on glide avalanche release

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peitzsch, Erich H.; Hendrikx, Jordy; Fagre, Daniel B.

    2014-01-01

    Glide snow avalanches are dangerous and difficult to predict. Despite recent research there is still a lack of understanding regarding the controls of glide avalanche release. Glide avalanches often occur in similar terrain or the same locations annually and observations suggest that topography may be critical. Thus, to gain an understanding of the terrain component of these types of avalanches we examined terrain parameters associated with glide avalanche release as well as areas of consistent glide crack formation but no subsequent avalanches. Glide avalanche occurrences visible from the Going-to-the-Sun Road corridor in Glacier National Park, Montana from 2003-2013 were investigated using an avalanche database derived of daily observations each year from April 1 to June 15. This yielded 192 glide avalanches in 53 distinct avalanche paths. Each avalanche occurrence was digitized in a GIS using satellite, oblique, and aerial imagery as reference. Topographical parameters such as area, slope, aspect, elevation and elevation were then derived for the entire dataset utilizing GIS tools and a 10m DEM. Land surface substrate and surface geology were derived from National Park Service Inventory and Monitoring maps and U.S. Geological Survey surface geology maps, respectively. Surface roughness and glide factor were calculated using a four level classification index. . Then, each avalanche occurrence was aggregated to general avalanche release zones and the frequencies were compared. For this study, glide avalanches released in elevations ranging from 1300 to 2700 m with a mean aspect of 98 degrees (east) and a mean slope angle of 38 degrees. The mean profile curvature for all glide avalanches was 0.15 and a plan curvature of -0.01, suggesting a fairly linear surface (i.e. neither convex nor concave). The glide avalanches occurred in mostly bedrock made up of dolomite and limestone slabs and talus deposits with very few occurring in alpine meadows. However, not all glide

  3. Characterization of Course and Terrain and Their Effect on Skier Speed in World Cup Alpine Ski Racing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgien, Matthias; Crivelli, Philip; Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2015-01-01

    World Cup (WC) alpine ski racing consists of four main competition disciplines (slalom, giant slalom, super-G and downhill), each with specific course and terrain characteristics. The International Ski Federation (FIS) has regulated course length, altitude drop from start to finish and course setting in order to specify the characteristics of the respective competition disciplines and to control performance and injury-related aspects. However to date, no detailed data on course setting and its adaptation to terrain is available. It is also unknown how course and terrain characteristics influence skier speed. Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize course setting, terrain geomorphology and their relationship to speed in male WC giant slalom, super-G and downhill. The study revealed that terrain was flatter in downhill compared to the other disciplines. In all disciplines, variability in horizontal gate distance (gate offset) was larger than in gate distance (linear distance from gate to gate). In giant slalom the horizontal gate distance increased with terrain inclination, while super-G and downhill did not show such a connection. In giant slalom and super-G, there was a slight trend towards shorter gate distances as the steepness of the terrain increased. Gates were usually set close to terrain transitions in all three disciplines. Downhill had a larger proportion of extreme terrain inclination changes along the skier trajectory per unit time skiing than the other disciplines. Skier speed decreased with increasing steepness of terrain in all disciplines except for downhill. In steep terrain, speed was found to be controllable by increased horizontal gate distances in giant slalom and by shorter gate distances in giant slalom and super-G. Across the disciplines skier speed was largely explained by course setting and terrain inclination in a multiple linear model. PMID:25760039

  4. Characterization of course and terrain and their effect on skier speed in World Cup alpine ski racing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Gilgien

    Full Text Available World Cup (WC alpine ski racing consists of four main competition disciplines (slalom, giant slalom, super-G and downhill, each with specific course and terrain characteristics. The International Ski Federation (FIS has regulated course length, altitude drop from start to finish and course setting in order to specify the characteristics of the respective competition disciplines and to control performance and injury-related aspects. However to date, no detailed data on course setting and its adaptation to terrain is available. It is also unknown how course and terrain characteristics influence skier speed. Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize course setting, terrain geomorphology and their relationship to speed in male WC giant slalom, super-G and downhill. The study revealed that terrain was flatter in downhill compared to the other disciplines. In all disciplines, variability in horizontal gate distance (gate offset was larger than in gate distance (linear distance from gate to gate. In giant slalom the horizontal gate distance increased with terrain inclination, while super-G and downhill did not show such a connection. In giant slalom and super-G, there was a slight trend towards shorter gate distances as the steepness of the terrain increased. Gates were usually set close to terrain transitions in all three disciplines. Downhill had a larger proportion of extreme terrain inclination changes along the skier trajectory per unit time skiing than the other disciplines. Skier speed decreased with increasing steepness of terrain in all disciplines except for downhill. In steep terrain, speed was found to be controllable by increased horizontal gate distances in giant slalom and by shorter gate distances in giant slalom and super-G. Across the disciplines skier speed was largely explained by course setting and terrain inclination in a multiple linear model.

  5. Characterization of course and terrain and their effect on skier speed in World Cup alpine ski racing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilgien, Matthias; Crivelli, Philip; Spörri, Jörg; Kröll, Josef; Müller, Erich

    2015-01-01

    World Cup (WC) alpine ski racing consists of four main competition disciplines (slalom, giant slalom, super-G and downhill), each with specific course and terrain characteristics. The International Ski Federation (FIS) has regulated course length, altitude drop from start to finish and course setting in order to specify the characteristics of the respective competition disciplines and to control performance and injury-related aspects. However to date, no detailed data on course setting and its adaptation to terrain is available. It is also unknown how course and terrain characteristics influence skier speed. Therefore, the aim of the study was to characterize course setting, terrain geomorphology and their relationship to speed in male WC giant slalom, super-G and downhill. The study revealed that terrain was flatter in downhill compared to the other disciplines. In all disciplines, variability in horizontal gate distance (gate offset) was larger than in gate distance (linear distance from gate to gate). In giant slalom the horizontal gate distance increased with terrain inclination, while super-G and downhill did not show such a connection. In giant slalom and super-G, there was a slight trend towards shorter gate distances as the steepness of the terrain increased. Gates were usually set close to terrain transitions in all three disciplines. Downhill had a larger proportion of extreme terrain inclination changes along the skier trajectory per unit time skiing than the other disciplines. Skier speed decreased with increasing steepness of terrain in all disciplines except for downhill. In steep terrain, speed was found to be controllable by increased horizontal gate distances in giant slalom and by shorter gate distances in giant slalom and super-G. Across the disciplines skier speed was largely explained by course setting and terrain inclination in a multiple linear model.

  6. State Park Trails

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — This data set is a collection of ArcView shapefiles (by park) of trails within statutory boundaries of individual MN State Parks, State Recreation Areas and State...

  7. Parks of Chapel Hill

    Data.gov (United States)

    Town of Chapel Hill, North Carolina — Hours, location, and amenity information for Chapel Hill parks as shown on the Town of Chapel Hill's website. Includes a map with points for each park location.

  8. Landscapes in the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park, South Africa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaretha W. van Rooyen

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A landscape map of the Kalahari Gemsbok National Park is presented. Mapping is at a finer scale than previous vegetation and habitat maps for the same area. The landscapes were grouped into seven large classes and a total of 20 landscapes were mapped. A description of the terrain morphology, soil and vegetation of each landscape is provided. Landscapes that are focal points for the large animals of the region include the calcrete outcrops, riverbeds and pans. These landscapes cover only about 10% of the total area of the region. This map can be used as basis for park planning, management, research and other applications.

  9. A GPS inspired Terrain Referenced Navigation algorithm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vaman, D.

    2014-01-01

    Terrain Referenced Navigation (TRN) refers to a form of localization in which measurements of distances to the terrain surface are matched with a digital elevation map allowing a vehicle to estimate its own position within the map. The main goal of this dissertation is to improve TRN performance

  10. Terrain Classification of Norwegian Slab Avalanche Accidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallandvik, Linda; Aadland, Eivind; Vikene, Odd Lennart

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to rely on snow conditions, weather, and human factors when making judgments about avalanche risk because these variables are dynamic and complex; terrain, however, is more easily observed and interpreted. Therefore, this study aimed to investigate (1) the type of terrain in which historical fatal snow avalanche accidents in Norway…

  11. Remote sensing of Earth terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, J. A.

    1992-01-01

    Research findings are summarized for projects dealing with the following: application of theoretical models to active and passive remote sensing of saline ice; radiative transfer theory for polarimetric remote sensing of pine forest; scattering of electromagnetic waves from a dense medium consisting of correlated Mie scatterers with size distribution and applications to dry snow; variance of phase fluctuations of waves propagating through a random medium; theoretical modeling for passive microwave remote sensing of earth terrain; polarimetric signatures of a canopy of dielectric cylinders based on first and second order vector radiative transfer theory; branching model for vegetation; polarimetric passive remote sensing of periodic surfaces; composite volume and surface scattering model; and radar image classification.

  12. Human Robotic Systems (HRS): Extreme Terrain Mobility Element

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — During 2014, the Extreme Terrain Mobility project element is developing five technologies:Exoskeleton Development for ISS EvaluationExtreme Terrain Mobility...

  13. Hydrographic Basins Analysis Using Digital Terrain Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihaela, Pişleagă; -Minda Codruţa, Bădăluţă; Gabriel, Eleş; Daniela, Popescu

    2017-10-01

    The paper, emphasis the link between digital terrain modelling and studies of hydrographic basins, concerning the hydrological processes analysis. Given the evolution of computing techniques but also of the software digital terrain modelling made its presence felt increasingly, and established itself as a basic concept in many areas, due to many advantages. At present, most digital terrain modelling is derived from three alternative sources such as ground surveys, photogrammetric data capture or from digitized cartographic sources. A wide range of features may be extracted from digital terrain models, such as surface, specific points and landmarks, linear features but also areal futures like drainage basins, hills or hydrological basins. The paper highlights how the use appropriate software for the preparation of a digital terrain model, a model which is subsequently used to study hydrographic basins according to various geomorphological parameters. As a final goal, it shows the link between digital terrain modelling and hydrographic basins study that can be used to optimize the correlation between digital model terrain and hydrological processes in order to obtain results as close to the real field processes.

  14. Terrain identification for RHex-type robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordonez, Camilo; Shill, Jacob; Johnson, Aaron; Clark, Jonathan; Collins, Emmanuel

    2013-05-01

    Terrain identification is a key enabling ability for generating terrain adaptive behaviors that assist both robot planning and motor control. This paper considers running legged robots from the RHex family) which the military plans to use in the field to assist troops in reconnaissance tasks. Important terrain adaptive behaviors include the selection of gaits) modulation of leg stiffness) and alteration of steering control laws that minimize slippage) maximize speed and/or reduce energy consumption. These terrain adaptive behaviors can be enabled by a terrain identification methodology that combines proprioceptive sensors already available in RHex-type robots. The proposed classification approach is based on the characteristic frequency signatures of data from leg observers) which combine current sensing with a dynamic model of the leg motion. The paper analyzes the classification accuracy obtained using both a single leg and groups of legs (through a voting scheme) on different terrains such as vinyl) asphalt) grass) and pebbles. Additionally) it presents a terrain classifier that works across various gait speeds and in fact almost as good as an overly specialized classifier.

  15. Parking Space Verification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høg Peter Jensen, Troels; Thomsen Schmidt, Helge; Dyremose Bodin, Niels

    2018-01-01

    With the number of privately owned cars increasing, the issue of locating an available parking space becomes apparant. This paper deals with the verification of vacant parking spaces, by using a vision based system looking over parking areas. In particular the paper proposes a binary classifier...... system, based on a Convolutional Neural Network, that is capable of determining if a parking space is occupied or not. A benchmark database consisting of images captured from different parking areas, under different weather and illumination conditions, has been used to train and test the system....... The system shows promising performance on the database with an accuracy of 99.71% overall and is robust to the variations in parking areas and weather conditions....

  16. Wind turbine wake measurement in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose; Larsen, Gunner Chr.; Menke, Robert

    2016-01-01

    SCADA data from a wind farm and high frequency time series measurements obtained with remote scanning systems have been analysed with focus on identification of wind turbine wake properties in complex terrain. The analysis indicates that within the flow regime characterized by medium to large...... downstream distances (more than 5 diameters) from the wake generating turbine, the wake changes according to local atmospheric conditions e.g. vertical wind speed. In very complex terrain the wake effects are often “overruled” by distortion effects due to the terrain complexity or topology....

  17. Paleontology. A Curriculum and Activity Guide to Mammoth Cave National Park. [Grades] 1-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Park Service (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Mammoth Cave (Kentucky) was designated as a national park in 1941 because of its beautiful hills and valleys, scenic rivers, and the vast cave system located within its boundaries. Outstanding physiographic features include karst terrains, sandstone capped plateaus, and bluffs overlooking rivers and streams, which provide an unusually wide variety…

  18. Avalanche modeling in forested terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, M.; Bartelt, P. A.; Bebi, P.; Grêt-Regamey, A.

    2010-12-01

    Mountain forests are a valuable defense against snow avalanches. Currently, however, little quantitative information is available to estimate the effect of forest structure on the motion of avalanches. Avalanche flow is strongly influenced by the condition and composition of vegetation in the avalanche path. This potential decelerating effect has, however, not yet been quantified. We apply the numerical avalanche dynamics program RAMMS to simulate several well documented small avalanche events in forests. The two-dimensional model RAMMS predicts avalanche run-out distances, flow velocities and impact pressures in complex three-dimensional terrain by numerically solving a system of partial differential equations governing avalanche flow. Based on detailed data on forest conditions and avalanche characteristics such as release areas, fracture heights and length collected in forested areas, where avalanches were observed, we modify the input parameters of the RAMMS model to match the observations. We compare the model output with observed run-out distances in order to quantify the decelerating effects of different forest structures. Implementing avalanche forest interactions into numerical avalanche simulations will open new fields of application for avalanche models, e.g. for managing mountain forests and by better accounting for mountain forests as an effective biological protection measure against snow avalanches in natural hazard mapping and landscape planning.

  19. DCS Terrain Submission for Pike County, KY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  20. Defending Critical Infrastructure as Cyber Key Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    AU/ACSC/2016 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY Defending Critical Infrastructure as Cyber Key Terrain by Derek Molle, Civ, USAF...20 Converged Enterprise Network...23 Logically Isolated Enterprise

  1. Visualization of Features in 3D Terrain

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Steve Dübel; Heidrun Schumann

    2017-01-01

    In 3D terrain analysis, topographical characteristics, such as mountains or valleys, and geo-spatial data characteristics, such as specific weather conditions or objects of interest, are important features...

  2. DCS Terrain Submission for Charlton Co GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain for HOUSTON COUNTY, ALABAMA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submission for Mohave, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN, CITY OF DALLAS, DALLAS COUNTY, TEXAS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submission for Newton, MS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain for ELBERT County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. TERRAIN Submission for Forest Countywide DFIRM

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. DCS Terrain Submission for Ector, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. TERRAIN, CERRO GORDO COUNTY, IOWA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. TERRAIN, UPPER CUMBERLAND WATERSHED, KENTUCKY USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Tyler TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. Digital Terrain Submittal for Duval County, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for Albany County NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  15. DCS Terrain Submission for Citrus County FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain Submission for Woodward, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain Submission for Merced, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain Submission for Sanders County, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. DCS Terrain for Middlesex County, NJ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  20. Terrain, CEDAR RAPIDS, LINN COUNTY, IA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  1. DCS Terrain Submission for Ulster County NY

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain Submission for Caddo, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS TERRAIN Submission for STEARNS COUNTY, MN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submission for Lagrange County, IN

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. DCS Terrain Submission for Cass County, MO

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submission for Cass County, TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain Submission for Brazos TX

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DCS Terrain Submission for Logan, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  9. DCS Terrain Submission for Carter, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. DCS Terrain Submission for Stephens, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION FOR MARTIN COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Sioux Falls

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. DCS Terrain Submission for Mayes, OK

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain for Schley County, GA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  15. Automatic terrain modeling using transfinite element analysis

    KAUST Repository

    Collier, Nathan

    2010-05-31

    An automatic procedure for modeling terrain is developed based on L2 projection-based interpolation of discrete terrain data onto transfinite function spaces. The function space is refined automatically by the use of image processing techniques to detect regions of high error and the flexibility of the transfinite interpolation to add degrees of freedom to these areas. Examples are shown of a section of the Palo Duro Canyon in northern Texas.

  16. Terrain classification for a quadruped robot

    OpenAIRE

    Degrave, Jonas; Van Cauwenbergh, Robin; wyffels, Francis; Waegeman, Tim; Schrauwen, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    Using data retrieved from the Puppy II robot at the University of Zurich (UZH), we show that machine learning techniques with non-linearities and fading memory are effective for terrain classification, both supervised and unsupervised, even with a limited selection of input sensors. The results indicate that most information for terrain classification is found in the combination of tactile sensors and proprioceptive joint angle sensors. The classification error is small enough to have a robot...

  17. iPark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Bin; Fantini, Ernesto Nicolas; Jensen, Christian S.

    2013-01-01

    where the geo-spatial aspect is not just a tag on other content, but is the primary content, e.g., a city street map with up-to-date road construction data. Along these lines, the iPark system aims to turn volumes of GPS data obtained from vehicles into information about the locations of parking spaces...

  18. The topography of chaos terrain on Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, G.; Prockter, L. M.; Schenk, P.

    2010-12-01

    Chaos terrain and lenticulae are commonly observed surface features unique to the Galilean satellite Europa. Chaos terrain occurs as discrete regions of the satellite’s surface 10s to 100s of km in size that are disrupted into isolated plates surrounded by hummocky matrix material. Lenticulae occur as positive- or negative-relief domes km to 10s of km in diameter that can disrupt the original surface in a manner similar to chaos terrain. Evidence suggests that they each form via an endogenic process involving the interaction of a mobile substrate with the brittle surface and it has been proposed that ice shell thinning or surface yielding coupled with brine production represents the most plausible mechanism for the formation of these features. These similarities in morphology and formation mechanism indicate they may represent a continuum process. We explore whether larger chaos terrain represent the coalescence of smaller lenticulae by examining topography within chaos to determine whether it contains domes on length scales similar to lenticulae. Schenk and Pappalardo (2004) alluded to the presence of several prominent domes within Conamara Chaos and we have previously shown that at least 4 and as many as 9 domes with length scales similar to lenticulae are present within and along the margins of the feature. This was accomplished by using Fourier analysis to decompose the topographic signature of Conamara Chaos and the surrounding terrain into discrete wavelength components. A low-pass filter was then used to strip away shorter wavelength components of the topography associated with the region and determine if longer wavelength features were present within the terrain. Here we present new work identifying the presence, size, and distribution of domes within the boundaries of other chaos terrains across the surface of Europa and discuss implications for chaos formation.

  19. Bicycle Parking and Locking

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Jonas

    2017-01-01

    Cars, trains, and bicycles are designed to be on the move. Mobilities studies have theorized and analyzed these modes of transport as powerful entities slicing through, and speeding-up, cities. Yet they also stand still, being parked and locked, immobilized and secured, until their next trip....... This article contributes with new insights into parking and locking - ‘moorings’ - to cycling literature. It presents an ethnography of ‘design moorings’ and practices associated with parking and locking bikes. The main case study is the very pro-cycling city of Copenhagen. Yet to explore what is unique about...

  20. Geology of Joshua Tree National Park geodatabase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, Robert E.; Matti, Jonathan C.; Cossette, Pamela M.

    2015-09-16

    The database in this Open-File Report describes the geology of Joshua Tree National Park and was completed in support of the National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and in cooperation with the National Park Service (NPS). The geologic observations and interpretations represented in the database are relevant to both the ongoing scientific interests of the USGS in southern California and the management requirements of NPS, specifically of Joshua Tree National Park (JOTR).Joshua Tree National Park is situated within the eastern part of California’s Transverse Ranges province and straddles the transition between the Mojave and Sonoran deserts. The geologically diverse terrain that underlies JOTR reveals a rich and varied geologic evolution, one that spans nearly two billion years of Earth history. The Park’s landscape is the current expression of this evolution, its varied landforms reflecting the differing origins of underlying rock types and their differing responses to subsequent geologic events. Crystalline basement in the Park consists of Proterozoic plutonic and metamorphic rocks intruded by a composite Mesozoic batholith of Triassic through Late Cretaceous plutons arrayed in northwest-trending lithodemic belts. The basement was exhumed during the Cenozoic and underwent differential deep weathering beneath a low-relief erosion surface, with the deepest weathering profiles forming on quartz-rich, biotite-bearing granitoid rocks. Disruption of the basement terrain by faults of the San Andreas system began ca. 20 Ma and the JOTR sinistral domain, preceded by basalt eruptions, began perhaps as early as ca. 7 Ma, but no later than 5 Ma. Uplift of the mountain blocks during this interval led to erosional stripping of the thick zones of weathered quartz-rich granitoid rocks to form etchplains dotted by bouldery tors—the iconic landscape of the Park. The stripped debris filled basins along the fault zones.Mountain ranges

  1. New Mexico Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the locations of parks in New Mexico, in point form, with limited attributes, compiled using available data from a...

  2. State Park Statutory Boundaries

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Legislative statutory boundaries for sixty six state parks, six state recreation areas, and eight state waysides. These data are derived principally from DNR's...

  3. Allegheny County Parks Outlines

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Shows the size and shape of the nine Allegheny County parks. If viewing this description on the Western Pennsylvania Regional Data Center’s open data portal...

  4. Norbury Park Murals

    OpenAIRE

    Barret, George, the elder (Irish landscapist, 1728 or 1732-1784)

    2007-01-01

    Norbury Park, near Box Hill was built by William Lock (1732-1810) in 1770. Lock commissioned Barret to paint the continuous mural. Cipriani did the figures estruary for the murals. Images courtesy of the Courtauld Institute of Art.

  5. New Mexico State Parks

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — This dataset provides an initial version of the generalized physical boundaries of New Mexico State Parks, in polygonal form with limited attributes, compiled using...

  6. Improved Inlet Conditions for Terrain CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Grønnegaard

    The atmospheric boundary layer flow over different types of terrain is studied through simulations made with the finite volume CFD code of Ellipsys 2D and 3D. The simulations are compared to measurements made at the Høvsøre test site and over the hill of Askervein.The primary objective...... for describing the flow after a change in the surface roughness. The derivation of these expressions is based on a range of simulations of flows over flat terrain with different types of roughness changes.The derived expressions show good agreement with simulations and could, as intended, be used to define inlet...... conditions for flow simulations over terrain, where an upstream roughness change is thought to have an influence. More thorough experimental verification is however, thought necessary to make the expressions sufficiently reliable. The same goes for the simulations-based conclusions regarding the flow over...

  7. Ozone distribution in remote ecologically vulnerable terrain of the southern Sierra Nevada, CA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanne Panek; David Saah; Annie Esperanza; Andrzej Bytnerowicz; Witold Fraczek; Ricardo. Cisneros

    2013-01-01

    Ozone concentration spatial patterns remain largely uncharacterized across the extensive wilderness areas of the Sierra Nevada, CA, despite being downwind of major pollution sources. These natural areas, including four national parks and four national forests, contain forest species that are susceptible to ozone injury. Forests stressed by ozone are also more...

  8. Parks awash in light pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    The first-ever nationwide survey of light pollution impacts on the U.S. National Park System has found that light pollution is a pervasive threat to national parks, and interferes with visitors' ability to observe stars and the night sky. The survey, which queried National Park Service (NPS) staff, found that dark night skies are a vital park resource, and that light pollution is considered a resource problem in many parks.The survey credited the National Park Service with already taking some steps to reduce light pollution within parks, but added that the agency can do more to deal with the problem.

  9. SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY PARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslav Milutinović

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The establishment of science and technology parks is necessarily accompanied by the establishment of a base of professional staff as the foundation of the park and the base of the potential management that will manage the park and the professional staff. Science and Technology Park is a broader term used to describe a variety of attempts directed at enhancing the entrepreneurship development by means of establishing knowledge – based, small and medium-sized enterprises. The enterprise at the top of the technology pyramid receives support in the form of capital, administration, space and access to new information technologies. The overall objective of the development of industrial enterprises in the technology park is the introduction of economically profitable production with the efficient usage of nonrenewable resources and the application of the highest environmental standards. Achieving the primary developmental objective of the Technology Park includes: creating a favorable business atmosphere in the local community, attractive to both foreign and domestic investors – providing support to the establishment of small and medium-sized enterprises using different models of joint ventures and direct foreign investment.

  10. SAR clutter simulation with terrain effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greig, David W.; Scott, Iain

    2002-02-01

    A model for the signal returns from terrain features for a Synthetic Aperture Radar is developed. A standard range-azimuth geometry is used to divide the surface area into cells for which clutter returns are generated. This geometry is extended to a spherical Earth to introduce effects due to varying terrain height and slope, and to determine areas of shadow. The calculation of phase variation in the returned pulses at the IQ level required to successfully form a SAR is discussed. The technique is illustrated with an example which demonstrates the effect of look angle on SAR images.

  11. A lightning multiple casualty incident in Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spano, Susanne J; Campagne, Danielle; Stroh, Geoff; Shalit, Marc

    2015-03-01

    Multiple casualty incidents (MCIs) are uncommon in remote wilderness settings. This is a case report of a lightning strike on a Boy Scout troop hiking through Sequoia and Kings Canyon National Parks (SEKI), in which the lightning storm hindered rescue efforts. The purpose of this study was to review the response to a lightning-caused MCI in a wilderness setting, address lightning injury as it relates to field management, and discuss evacuation options in inclement weather incidents occurring in remote locations. An analysis of SEKI search and rescue data and a review of current literature were performed. A lightning strike at 10,600 feet elevation in the Sierra Nevada Mountains affected a party of 5 adults and 7 Boy Scouts (age range 12 to 17 years old). Resources mobilized for the rescue included 5 helicopters, 2 ambulances, 2 hospitals, and 15 field and 14 logistical support personnel. The incident was managed from strike to scene clearance in 4 hours and 20 minutes. There were 2 fatalities, 1 on scene and 1 in the hospital. Storm conditions complicated on-scene communication and evacuation efforts. Exposure to ongoing lightning and a remote wilderness location affected both victims and rescuers in a lightning MCI. Helicopters, the main vehicles of wilderness rescue in SEKI, can be limited by weather, daylight, and terrain. Redundancies in communication systems are vital for episodes of radio failure. Reverse triage should be implemented in lightning injury MCIs. Education of both wilderness travelers and rescuers regarding these issues should be pursued. Copyright © 2015 Wilderness Medical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. F-16 MMC Strafe in Mountainous Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    i AU/ACSC/2016 AIR COMMAND AND STAFF COLLEGE AIR UNIVERSITY F-16 MMC Strafe in Mountainous Terrain by Jared P. White, Maj, USAF...Modular mission computer ( MMC ) 6.2 OFP introduced auto-ground collision avoidance software into the digital flight control computer (DFLCC). AGCAS

  13. Declarative terrain modeling for military training games

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smelik, R.M.; Tutenel, T.; Kraker, J.K.. de; Bidarra, R.

    2010-01-01

    Military training instructors increasingly often employ computer games to train soldiers in all sorts of skills and tactics. One of the difficulties instructors face when using games as a training tool is the creation of suitable content, including scenarios, entities, and corresponding terrain

  14. Visualization of Large Terrains Made Easy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstrom, P; Pascucci, V

    2001-08-07

    We present an elegant and simple to implement framework for performing out-of-core visualization and view-dependent refinement of large terrain surfaces. Contrary to the recent trend of increasingly elaborate algorithms for large-scale terrain visualization, our algorithms and data structures have been designed with the primary goal of simplicity and efficiency of implementation. Our approach to managing large terrain data also departs from more conventional strategies based on data tiling. Rather than emphasizing how to segment and efficiently bring data in and out of memory, we focus on the manner in which the data is laid out to achieve good memory coherency for data accesses made in a top-down (coarse-to-fine) refinement of the terrain. We present and compare the results of using several different data indexing schemes, and propose a simple to compute index that yields substantial improvements in locality and speed over more commonly used data layouts. Our second contribution is a new and simple, yet easy to generalize method for view-dependent refinement. Similar to several published methods in this area, we use longest edge bisection in a top-down traversal of the mesh hierarchy to produce a continuous surface with subdivision connectivity. In tandem with the refinement, we perform view frustum culling and triangle stripping. These three components are done together in a single pass over the mesh. We show how this framework supports virtually any error metric, while still being highly memory and compute efficient.

  15. Maintaining Contour Trees of Dynamic Terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Mølhave, Thomas; Revsbæk, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We study the problem of maintaining the contour tree T of a terrain Sigma, represented as a triangulated xy-monotone surface, as the heights of its vertices vary continuously with time. We characterize the combinatorial changes in T and how they relate to topological changes in Sigma. We present...... an augmented contour tree and a join/split tree....

  16. Scaling Terrain Attributes By Fractal Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrain attributes derived from grid digital elevation models (DEMs) are commonly used in distributed hydrologic models. However, many attribute estimations are biased by DEM grid cell size. For example, land surface slopes estimated from 30-m DEMs are, on average, less than slopes estimated from ...

  17. 77 FR 51733 - Special Regulations; Areas of the National Park System, New River Gorge National River, Bicycle...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    ... River Gorge on rolling, forested terrain. The trail has been built according to the frontcountry trail... Administrative Road. ] Stone Cliff Trail 2.7 Existing Administrative Road. Terry Top Trail 1.7 Existing... Creek Rail Rend Trail. Trail. Fayetteville Trail Headhouse Trail..... Stone Cliff Trail. Park Loop Trail...

  18. Model-Based Method for Terrain-Following Display Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-06-15

    A model-based method for terrain-following display design and evaluation is described. The basic approach centers on the use of a pilot/ vehicle...data. Terrain-following, Mathematical modeling, Aircraft display design , Optimal control model.

  19. Investigation of Terrain Analysis and Classification Methods for Ground Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-27

    alignment was verified after every 5 tests, by driving the wheel over a flat, rigid, aluminum plate covered with a thin layer of polyurethane foam in...primarily to their shape , and not to loss of traction between a wheel and the terrain. In contrast, non-geometric hazards are regions of terrain that are...classifier to label the terrain patch. Pairs of terrain class labels and associated visual features are stored in memory . When sufficient data is accumulated

  20. Large-Eddy Simulation of turbine wake in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, J.; Troldborg, N.; Sørensen, N. N.; Patton, E. G.; Sullivan, P. P.

    2017-05-01

    We present Large-Eddy Simulation results of a turbine wake in realistic complex terrain with slopes above 0.5. By comparing simulations including and without the wind turbine we can estimate the induction factor, a, and we show how the presence of a strong recirculation zone in the terrain dictates the positioning of the wake. This last finding is in contrast to what would happen in gentle terrain with no substantial increase of turbulent kinetic energy in the terrain induced wakes.

  1. Memento Park, Budapest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariann Simon

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available After the 1990 change of the political system in Hungary the Budapest Municipal Council displayed about 40 statues from the former communist and socialist regime in a park. This paper aims at presenting the story of the park from the first idea up to now, giving a parallel analysis of the political intentions, cultural reactions and the changes in the architectural concept and realisation. The twenty-year history of the park is an example of the vague common memory: the way from the first laud opening of the place celebrating the recent change of the political system up to the inauguration of the second phase devoted to the memory of the uprising in 1956 remembered in the silence of candlelight.

  2. Local-scale stratigraphy of grooved terrain on Ganymede

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murchie, Scott L.; Head, James W.; Helfenstein, Paul; Plescia, Jeffrey B.

    1987-01-01

    The surface of the Jovian satellite, Ganymede, is divided into two main units, dark terrain cut by arcuate and subradial furrows, and light terrain consisting largely of areas with pervasive U-shaped grooves. The grooved terrain may be subdivided on the basis of pervasive morphology of groove domains into four terrain types: (1) elongate bands of parallel grooves (groove lanes); (2) polygonal domains of parallel grooves (grooved polygons); (3) polygonal domains of two orthogonal groove sets (reticulate terrain); and (4) polygons having two to several complexly cross-cutting groove sets (complex grooved terrain). Reticulate terrain is frequently dark and not extensively resurfaced, and grades to a more hummocky terrain type. The other three grooved terrain types have almost universally been resurfaced by light material during their emplacement. The sequence of events during grooved terrain emplacement has been investigated. An attempt is made to integrate observed geologic and tectonic patterns to better constrain the relative ages and styles of emplacement of grooved terrain types. A revised model of grooved terrain emplacement is proposed and is tested using detailed geologic mapping and measurement of crater density.

  3. The effect of trampoline parks on presentations to the Christchurch Emergency Department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roffe, Lloyd; Pearson, Scott; Sharr, Johnathan; Ardagh, Michael

    2018-01-19

    To analyse trampoline-related injuries suffered after the opening of two new trampoline parks in Christchurch. Data was collected from three 90-day periods. All trampoline-related injuries were collected from electronic documentation and coding. Those injured after both arenas opened were contacted and a semi-structured interview performed. In the 90 days after both parks opened there were 602 claims for trampoline-related injuries with 106 hospital presentations (55% male). This was a significant increase (ptrampoline park allowed two or more people to use the same trampoline at the same time, and had over twice as many presentations (33%, n=35) than the other trampoline park (14%, n=15). Christchurch saw a significant increase in trampoline-related injuries after the opening of two new parks. These injuries involved an older group of children, affected predominantly the lower limbs and were more severe than those reported from the use of domestic trampolines. Consistent with past research, the trampoline park allowing multiple users had a higher proportion of presentations and more injuries requiring operative intervention.

  4. Suicides in national parks--United States, 2003-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-03

    In 2007, the year for which the most recent national data on fatalities are available, 34,598 suicides occurred in the United States (rate: 11.3 per 100,000 population); 79% were among males. In 2009, an estimated 374,486 visits to hospital emergency departments occurred for self-inflicted injury, of which approximately 262,000 (70%) could be attributed to suicidal behavior. The majority (58%) were among females. Most suicides (77%) occur in the home, but many occur in public places, including national parks. In addition to the loss of life, suicides consume park resources and staff time and can traumatize witnesses. To describe the characteristics of and trends in suicides in national parks, CDC and the National Park Service (NPS) analyzed reports of suicide events (suicides and attempted suicides) occurring in the parks during 2003-2009. During this 7-year span, 84 national parks reported 286 suicide events, an average of 41 events per year. Of the 286 events, 68% were fatal. The two most commonly used methods were firearms and falls. Consistent with national patterns, 83% of suicides were among males. A comprehensive, multicomponent approach is recommended to prevent suicide events, including enhanced training for park employees, site-specific barriers, and collaboration with communities.

  5. Hydrologic Terrain Processing Using Parallel Computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarboton, D. G.; Watson, D. W.; Wallace, R. M.; Schreuders, K.; Tesfa, T. K.

    2009-12-01

    Topography in the form of Digital Elevation Models (DEMs), is widely used to derive information for the modeling of hydrologic processes. Hydrologic terrain analysis augments the information content of digital elevation data by removing spurious pits, deriving a structured flow field, and calculating surfaces of hydrologic information derived from the flow field. The increasing availability of high-resolution terrain datasets for large areas poses a challenge for existing algorithms that process terrain data to extract this hydrologic information. This paper will describe parallel algorithms that have been developed to enhance hydrologic terrain pre-processing so that larger datasets can be more efficiently computed. Message Passing Interface (MPI) parallel implementations have been developed for pit removal, flow direction, and generalized flow accumulation methods within the Terrain Analysis Using Digital Elevation Models (TauDEM) package. The parallel algorithm works by decomposing the domain into striped or tiled data partitions where each tile is processed by a separate processor. This method also reduces the memory requirements of each processor so that larger size grids can be processed. The parallel pit removal algorithm is adapted from the method of Planchon and Darboux that starts from a high elevation then progressively scans the grid, lowering each grid cell to the maximum of the original elevation or the lowest neighbor. The MPI implementation reconciles elevations along process domain edges after each scan. Generalized flow accumulation extends flow accumulation approaches commonly available in GIS through the integration of multiple inputs and a broad class of algebraic rules into the calculation of flow related quantities. It is based on establishing a flow field through DEM grid cells, that is then used to evaluate any mathematical function that incorporates dependence on values of the quantity being evaluated at upslope (or downslope) grid cells

  6. Recreational travel fatalities in US national parks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heggie, Travis W; Heggie, Tracey M; Kliewer, Colin

    2008-01-01

    Injuries are a public health problem affecting traveling populations such as tourists visiting National Parks. This study investigates the distribution of visitor fatalities in US National Park Service (NPS) units and identifies the predeath activities and contributing factors associated with them. A retrospective study was conducted of visitor fatalities from all NPS units during 2003 and 2004. There were 356 reported fatalities during 2003 and 2004. Fatalities were most common during the summer months and on weekends. Males accounted for 75% of the reported fatalities, and visitors aged 20 to 29 and 50 to 59 years accounted for 51% of all deaths. Only 99 of 388 (26%) NPS units reported at least 1 fatality, and only 10 units reported 10 or more fatalities. However, these 10 units were responsible for 36% of all fatalities. Lake Mead National Recreation Area, Blue Ridge Parkway, Grand Canyon National Park, Great Smoky Mountains National Park, and Yosemite National Park reported the highest number of fatalities. Domestic visitors accounted for 73% of the fatalities, and European visitors accounted for 13%. Transportation and water-based activities recorded the highest number of fatalities. Motor vehicle crashes accounted for 20% of fatalities and was followed by suicide (17%), swimming (11%), hiking (10%), plane crashes (9%), climbing (6%), and boating (5%) incidents. Fatalities in NPS units are not widespread and are related to more common events such as motor vehicle crashes, suicide, swimming, and hiking rather than exotic causes such as bears or other wildlife. It is recommended that preventive techniques first be developed in the 10 NPS units responsible for 36% of the total NPS-wide fatalities.

  7. "South Park" vormistab roppused muusikalivormi

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Animafilm "South Park : suurem, pikem ja lõikamata" ("South Park . Bigger, Longer & Uncut") : Stsenaristid Trey Parker, Matt Stone ja Pam Brady : režissöör Trey Parker : Ameerika Ühendriigid 1999

  8. Allegheny County Park Rangers Outreach

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Launched in June 2015, the Allegheny County Park Rangers program reached over 48,000 people in its first year. Park Rangers interact with residents of all ages and...

  9. Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myint, Steven; Jain, Abhinandan

    2012-01-01

    This software solved the problem of displaying terrains that are usually too large to be displayed on standard workstations in real time. The software can visualize terrain data sets composed of billions of vertices, and can display these data sets at greater than 30 frames per second. The Large Terrain Continuous Level of Detail 3D Visualization Tool allows large terrains, which can be composed of billions of vertices, to be visualized in real time. It utilizes a continuous level of detail technique called clipmapping to support this. It offloads much of the work involved in breaking up the terrain into levels of details onto the GPU (graphics processing unit) for faster processing.

  10. Exploring Jurassic Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Patricia E.; Wiley, Clyde

    1993-01-01

    Describes several student-tested activities built around "Jurassic Park." The activities feature students engaged in role-playing scenarios, investigative research projects, journal writing and communications skills activities, cooperative learning groups, and learning experiences that make use of reading skills and mathematical knowledge. (PR)

  11. Application of Digital Terrain Model to volcanology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Achilli

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Three-dimensional reconstruction of the ground surface (Digital Terrain Model, DTM, derived by airborne GPS photogrammetric surveys, is a powerful tool for implementing morphological analysis in remote areas. High accurate 3D models, with submeter elevation accuracy, can be obtained by images acquired at photo scales between 1:5000-1:20000. Multitemporal DTMs acquired periodically over volcanic area allow the monitoring of areas interested by crustal deformations and the evaluation of mass balance when large instability phenomena or lava flows have occurred. The work described the results obtained from the analysis of photogrammetric data collected over the Vulcano Island from 1971 to 2001. The data, processed by means of the Digital Photogrammetry Workstation DPW 770, provided DTM with accuracy ranging between few centimeters to few decimeters depending on the geometric image resolution, terrain configuration and quality of photographs.

  12. SAR Polarimetric Scattering from Natural Terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-17

    calculate the polarimetric speckle statistics (amplitude and phase difference), followed by a comparison with theoretical distributions . For fully developed...AFRL-AFOSR-JP-TR-2017-0013 SAR Polarimetric Scattering from Natural Terrains Kun-Shan Chen National Central University Final Report 02/17/2017... DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. AF Office Of Scientific Research (AFOSR)/ IOA Arlington, Virginia 22203 Air Force Research

  13. Mean Flow and Turbulence in Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-03-01

    empirical power law relationship: aO(T) ( 0 ) x (T0 ) (7) Although the value of x varies with stability, wind speed, and height above the surface, a value...Elevation: 27 ft Terrain: flat river flood plane Vegetation: plowed field with arass at tower base, treeline 100 yds to N Structures: electronic shelter...NNW of tower, radar dish above SW building Comrmn ent: hiih winds indicative of this site, temperature sensor at 6-foot level has possible heating

  14. Recent Military Operations on Urban Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-07-01

    SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Is. KEY WORDS (Continue on reverse. *do If nec.siay and id’ntif• ’ by block neumber) MOBA Egypt Israel C 3 MOUT Jordan Jerusalem Urban...Air Force IDF Israeli Defense Forces m meter mm meters MOBA military operations in built-up areas MOUT military operations on urban terrain TOE table...characteristics of the operation been exploited? 3. What equipment or tactical modifications were made for this MOBA operation? 4. How did Egypt prepare the city

  15. Astronomy in the National Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordgren, Tyler E.

    2009-01-01

    American national parks are fertile grounds for astronomy and planetary science outreach. They are some of the last remaining dark-sky sites the typical visitor (both U.S. and international) can still experience easily. An internal National Park Service (NPS) study shows a dark starry sky is an integral part of what visitors consider their park experience. As a result, the NPS Night Sky Team (a coordinated group of park rangers and astronomers) is measuring and monitoring the sky brightness over the parks in an attempt to promote within the park service protection of the night sky as a natural resource. A number of parks (e.g. Grand Canyon National Park) are currently expanding their night sky related visitor programs in order to take advantage of this resource and visitor interest. The national parks and their visitors are therefore an ideal audience fully "primed” to learn about aspects of astronomy or planetary science that can be, in any way, associated with the night sky. As one of the astronomers on the NPS Night Sky Team, I have been working with park service personnel on ways to target park visitors for astronomical outreach. The purpose of this outreach is twofold: 1) Strengthen popular investment in preserving dark skies, 2) Strengthen popular investment in current astronomical research. A number of avenues already being used to introduce astronomy outreach into the parks (beyond the simple "star party") will be presented.

  16. Mobility versus terrain: a game theoretic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bednarz, David; Muench, Paul

    2016-05-01

    Mobility and terrain are two sides of the same coin. You cannot describe mobility unless you describe the terrain. For example, if my world is trench warfare, the tank may be the ideal vehicle. If my world is urban warfare, clearing buildings and such, the tank may not be an ideal vehicle, perhaps an anthropomorphic robot would be better. We seek a general framework for mobility that captures the relative value of different mobility strategies. Game theory is positively the right way to analyze the interactions of rational players who behave strategically. In this paper, we will describe the interactions between a mobility player, who is trying to make it from point A to point B with one chance to refuel, and a terrain player who is trying to minimize that probability by placing an obstacle somewhere along the path from A to B. In previous work [1], we used Monte Carlo methods to analyze this mobility game, and found optimal strategies for a discretized version of the game. Here we show the relationship of this game to a classic game of timing [2], and use solution methods from that literature to solve for optimal strategies in a continuous version of this mobility game.

  17. Pitted terrains on Vesta: Thermophysical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capria, M.; Tosi, F.; De Sanctis, M.; Turrini, D.; Ammannito, E.; Capaccioni, F.; Fonte, S.; Frigeri, A.; Longobardo, A.; Palomba, E.; Zambon, F.; Schroeder, S.; Denevi, B.; Williams, D.; Scully, J.; Russell, C.; Raymond, C.

    2014-07-01

    Launched in 2007, the Dawn spacecraft, after one year spent orbiting Vesta, is now on its way to Ceres. In the science payload, the Visible and Infrared mapping spectrometer (VIR) is devoted to the study of the mineralogical composition and thermophysical properties of Vesta's surface [1]. Disk-resolved surface temperatures of Vesta have been determined from the infrared spectra measured by VIR [2]. The observed temperatures, together with a thermophysical model, have been used to constrain the thermal properties of a large part of the surface of the asteroid [3]. The average thermal inertia of the surface is quite low, consistent with a widespread presence of a dust layer. While the global thermal inertia is low, the characterization of its surface in terms of regions showing peculiar thermophysical properties gives us the possibility to identify specific areas with different thermal and structural characteristics. These variations can be linked to strong albedo variations that have been observed, or to other physical and structural characteristics of the first few centimeters of the soil. The highest values of thermal inertia have been determined on areas coinciding with locations where pitted terrains have been found [4]. Pitted terrains, first identified on Mars, have been found in association with 4 craters on Vesta: Marcia, Cornelia, Licinia, and Numisia. The Marcia area is characterized by high hydrogen and OH content [5]. By analogy with Mars, the formation of these terrains is thought to be due to the rapid release of volatiles, triggered by heating from an impact event. A question arises on the origin of volatiles: hydrated minerals, or ground, buried ice? In order to discuss the second hypothesis, we have to assume that a comet impact delivers ice that gets buried under a layer of regolith. Successively, another impact on the same area would give origin to the pitted terrain. The buried ice has obviously to survive for the time between the two impacts

  18. Playground Safety is Associated With Playground, Park, and Neighborhood Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suminski, Richard; Presley, Terry; Wasserman, Jason A; Mayfield, Carlene A; McClain, Elizabeth; Johnson, Mariah

    2015-03-01

    More than 200,000 children each year are treated at emergency departments for injuries occurring on playgrounds. Empirically derived data are needed to elucidate factors associated with playground safety and reduce injury rates. Determine if neighborhood, park and playground characteristics are significantly associated with playground safety. A 24-item report card developed by the National Program for Playground Safety was used to assess playground safety at 41 public parks in a small to midsized, Midwestern city. Trained assessors evaluated the parks and playgrounds in June/July and used a standardized method to count the numbers of users. Data from the 2010 U.S. Census were used to describe the neighborhoods surrounding the parks. The average safety score for all playgrounds was 77.4% which denotes acceptable safety levels. However, 17.1% of the playgrounds were potentially hazardous and in need of corrective measures. Playgrounds were safer in neighborhoods with more youth (safety levels need to be improved to reduce the risk of physical injuries. Future studies examining cause-effect associations between environmental features and playground safety are warranted.

  19. Pedestrian and traffic safety in parking lots at SNL/NM : audit background report.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Paul Ernest

    2009-03-01

    This report supplements audit 2008-E-0009, conducted by the ES&H, Quality, Safeguards & Security Audits Department, 12870, during fall and winter of FY 2008. The study evaluates slips, trips and falls, the leading cause of reportable injuries at Sandia. In 2007, almost half of over 100 of such incidents occurred in parking lots. During the course of the audit, over 5000 observations were collected in 10 parking lots across SNL/NM. Based on benchmarks and trends of pedestrian behavior, the report proposes pedestrian-friendly features and attributes to improve pedestrian safety in parking lots. Less safe pedestrian behavior is associated with older parking lots lacking pedestrian-friendly features and attributes, like those for buildings 823, 887 and 811. Conversely, safer pedestrian behavior is associated with newer parking lots that have designated walkways, intra-lot walkways and sidewalks. Observations also revealed that motorists are in widespread noncompliance with parking lot speed limits and stop signs and markers.

  20. The energy Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manheimer, Wallace

    2005-10-01

    If world development is to continue, per capita energy use in the developing world must increase to levels in the developed world. Restrictions on how much CO2 mankind can responsibly put into the atmosphere complicate the task further. Studies show that by 2050 the world will require an additional 10-30 terawatts (TW) of carbon free power, at least as much additional, as the 10 TW generated today with fossil fuel. Neither mined uranium nor renewable energy is capable of sustained power production at this level. This paper proposes, an "energy park", a self contained unit a square mile or two in area which supplies about 7 GW of electrical power or hydrogen, emits no CO2, has little or no proliferation problem, and cleans up its own waste. Most of the energy is supplied by conventional nuclear power plants. However the nuclear fuel is bred by a fusion reactor, which is the key to the energy park. The waste cleanup is done by a combination of fission, fusion, and patience. There is neither long time storage nor long distance travel for materials with proliferation risk or long lived radio nuclides. Thus only thorium comes into the park, and only electricity and hydrogen go out.

  1. Terrain-surface Estimation from Body Configurations of Passive Linkages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Chugo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A passive linkage mechanism is used for increasing the mobile performance of a wheeled vehicle on uneven ground. The mechanism changes its shape according to the terrain and enables all the wheels to remain grounded while the vehicle operates over rough terrain. This means that the shape of the passive linkage mechanism must correspond to that of the terrain surface, so that the vehicle can estimate the shape of the surface while passing over it. This paper proposes a new terrain-surface estimation scheme that uses a passive linkage mechanism. Our key concept is to enable changes in the vehicle body's configuration to correspond to those in the terrain's shape. Using this concept, our mobile platform estimates the shape of terrain surfaces without using external sensors; the estimated surface shapes are used to adjust the reference velocities of individual wheels, thereby improving the mobile performance of the vehicle. We test our proposed scheme by experiments using a prototype vehicle.

  2. Integrating Terrain Maps Into a Reactive Navigation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ayanna; Werger, Barry; Seraji, Homayoun

    2006-01-01

    An improved method of processing information for autonomous navigation of a robotic vehicle across rough terrain involves the integration of terrain maps into a reactive navigation strategy. Somewhat more precisely, the method involves the incorporation, into navigation logic, of data equivalent to regional traversability maps. The terrain characteristic is mapped using a fuzzy-logic representation of the difficulty of traversing the terrain. The method is robust in that it integrates a global path-planning strategy with sensor-based regional and local navigation strategies to ensure a high probability of success in reaching a destination and avoiding obstacles along the way. The sensor-based strategies use cameras aboard the vehicle to observe the regional terrain, defined as the area of the terrain that covers the immediate vicinity near the vehicle to a specified distance a few meters away.

  3. Morphological modeling of terrains and volume data

    CERN Document Server

    Comic, Lidija; Magillo, Paola; Iuricich, Federico

    2014-01-01

    This book describes the mathematical background behind discrete approaches to morphological analysis of scalar fields, with a focus on Morse theory and on the discrete theories due to Banchoff and Forman. The algorithms and data structures presented are used for terrain modeling and analysis, molecular shape analysis, and for analysis or visualization of sensor and simulation 3D data sets. It covers a variety of application domains including geography, geology, environmental sciences, medicine and biology. The authors classify the different approaches to morphological analysis which are all ba

  4. Quantification of rock slope terrain properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkwein, Axel; Gerber, Werner

    2017-04-01

    Rockfall trajectory simulation codes need information on the terrain properties to formulate appropriate rebound models. Usually, the manuals of rockfall simulation codes give sketches or photographs of terrain samples [1,2]. Based on these the user can select suitable terrains for the simulation area. We now would like to start a discussion whether it is possible to numerically quantify the terrain properties which would make the ground assignment more objective. Different ground properties play a role for the interaction between a falling rock and the ground: • Elastic deformation • plastic deformation • Energy absorption • friction • hardness • roughness • surface vs. underground • etc. The question is now whether it is possible to quantify above parameters and to finally provide tables that contain appropriate simulation parameters. In a first attempt we suggest different methods or parameters that might be evaluated in situ: • Small scale drop tests • Light weight deflectometer (LWD) • Particle sizes • Sliding angle • Particle distribution • Soil cover • Water content Of course, above measurements will never perfectly fit to different mountain slopes. However, if a number of measurements has been made their spreading will give an idea on the natural variability of the ground properties. As an example, the following table gives an idea on how the ME and Evd values vary for different soils. Table 1: LWD measurements on different soil types [3] Ground type Soil layer Soil humidityEvd (median)σ (median)Evd (average) Humus-carb. < 10cm dry 17.4 6.8 15.6 Regosol 10 - 30cm dry 8.6 3.9 9.4 Brownish 30 - 50cm dry 12.1 3.2 11.7 Calcaric 30 - 50cm dry 7.5 3.3 7.0 Acid brownish70 - 100cmdry 7.8 2.1 7.7 Fahlgley 10 - 30cm dry 9.2 4.0 7.7 References [1] Bartelt P et al (2016) RAMMS::rockfall user manual v1.6. SLF, Davos. [2] Dorren L.K.A., 2015. Rockyfor3D (v5.2) revealed - Transparent description of the complete 3D rockfall model. ecoris

  5. UNIFIED REPRESENTATION FOR COLLABORATIVE VISUALIZATION OF PLANETARY TERRAIN DATA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to apply to planetary terrain mapping an alternative, multiresolution method, subdivision surfaces (subdivs), in place of conventional digital elevation...

  6. LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — LUNAR TERRAIN AND ALBEDO RECONSTRUCTION FROM APOLLO IMAGERY ARA V NEFIAN*, TAEMIN KIM, MICHAEL BROXTON, AND ZACH MORATTO Abstract. Generating accurate three...

  7. T-transformation: traversability analysis for navigation on rugged terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Cang; Borenstein, Johann

    2004-09-01

    In order to maneuver autonomously on rough terrain, a mobile robot must constantly decide whether to traverse or circumnavigate terrain features ahead. This ability is called Obstacle Negotiation (ON). A critical aspect of ON is the so-called traversability analysis, which evaluates the level of difficulty associated with the traversal of the terrain. This paper presents a new method for traversability analysis, called T-transformation. It is implemented in a local terrain map as follows: (1) For each cell in the local terrain map, a square terrain patch is defined that symmetrically overlays the cell; (2) a plane is fitted to the data points in the terrain patch using a least-square approach and the slope of the least-squares plane and the residual of the fit are computed and used to calculate the Traversability Index (TI) for that cell; (3) after each cell is assigned a TI value, the local terrain map is transformed into a traversability map. The traversability map is further transformed into a traversability field histogram where each element represents the overall level of difficulty to move along the corresponding direction. Based on the traversability field histogram our reactive ON system then computes the steering and velocity commands to move the robot toward the intended goal while avoiding areas of poor traversability. The traversability analysis algorithm and the overall ON system were verified by extensive simulation. We verified our method partially through experiments on a Segway Robotics Mobility Platform (RMP), albeit only on flat terrain.

  8. Functional Decomposition of Modeling and Simulation Terrain Database Generation Process

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yakich, Valerie R; Lashlee, J. D

    2008-01-01

    .... This report documents the conceptual procedure as implemented by Lockheed Martin Simulation, Training, and Support and decomposes terrain database construction using the Integration Definition for Function Modeling (IDEF...

  9. Tool for Viewing Faults Under Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegel, Herbert, L.; Li, P. Peggy

    2005-01-01

    Multi Surface Light Table (MSLT) is an interactive software tool that was developed in support of the QuakeSim project, which has created an earthquake- fault database and a set of earthquake- simulation software tools. MSLT visualizes the three-dimensional geometries of faults embedded below the terrain and animates time-varying simulations of stress and slip. The fault segments, represented as rectangular surfaces at dip angles, are organized into collections, that is, faults. An interface built into MSLT queries and retrieves fault definitions from the QuakeSim fault database. MSLT also reads time-varying output from one of the QuakeSim simulation tools, called "Virtual California." Stress intensity is represented by variations in color. Slips are represented by directional indicators on the fault segments. The magnitudes of the slips are represented by the duration of the directional indicators in time. The interactive controls in MSLT provide a virtual track-ball, pan and zoom, translucency adjustment, simulation playback, and simulation movie capture. In addition, geographical information on the fault segments and faults is displayed on text windows. Because of the extensive viewing controls, faults can be seen in relation to one another, and to the terrain. These relations can be realized in simulations. Correlated slips in parallel faults are visible in the playback of Virtual California simulations.

  10. Child safety in parks' playgrounds (a case study in Tehran’s sub-district parks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Mirlouhi Falavarjani

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and aimsSafety is a complex concept and multidisciplinary science which is included some difference areas from industrial sectors to urban public arenas. Parks and playgrounds as important public places should be considered in terms of health and safety, especially for kids as prominent social vulnerable citizens. According to CPSC, 147 deaths havebeen reported for under 15 year old child during Jan 1990 to Aug 2000. Every 2.5 minute, kid suffers playground related accident. The main objective in this study is safety assessment ofplaygrounds among the selected parks.MethodsIn this case study, deductive approach and cross-sectional survey was followed, and some parks and playgrounds were selected among five urban counties in Tehran. Our volunteered samples were 160 parents. Playgrounds and related equipment were assessed in terms of safety, as well.ResultsOur findings show that more than 68% of playground equipment might create hazardous condition for kids. Lack of sustain maintenance for both of equipment and playground surface make some risky area for the mentioned group. Statistical analysis by SPSSWin 13 showed that more than 78 % of parents are worry about their child in terms of playground safetyproblems. Safety assessment of swings and slides showed that there are safety based problems in 89% of cases. Due to statistical reports of Tehran Emergency center, 10-12 and 8-10 year old kids suffer play based accident more than others. Reported traumas showed that face and skull and then feet suffered mechanical injury more than other limbs.ConclusionSurely, safety and health considerations are known as Municipality responsibilities, so for safety improvement in parks an integration safety system should be happened. HSE_MS seems a reliable approach for the mention goal. For improvement of exist parks and playground some related standard should be follows such as CPSC standards, EN 1176, and EN 1177. Also anthropometric data development

  11. Enhancing Parking Behavior Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Anitoaei, Teodora

    2016-01-01

    A review of navigation systems nowadays shows that new features are required in the automotive field. One such feature is suggesting a parking space within a positioning system. In the new global context of navigation, finding a parkingplace has become a central issue for all drivers. The research question for this study is what happens when you get to the destination or when you don’t need to use a GPS to arrive to your destination? This thesis has two major purposes:(1) to investigate an ef...

  12. Automated Car Park Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabros, J. P.; Tabañag, D.; Espra, A.; Gerasta, O. J.

    2015-06-01

    This study aims to develop a prototype for an Automated Car Park Management System that will increase the quality of service of parking lots through the integration of a smart system that assists motorist in finding vacant parking lot. The research was based on implementing an operating system and a monitoring system for parking system without the use of manpower. This will include Parking Guidance and Information System concept which will efficiently assist motorists and ensures the safety of the vehicles and the valuables inside the vehicle. For monitoring, Optical Character Recognition was employed to monitor and put into list all the cars entering the parking area. All parking events in this system are visible via MATLAB GUI which contain time-in, time-out, time consumed information and also the lot number where the car parks. To put into reality, this system has a payment method, and it comes via a coin slot operation to control the exit gate. The Automated Car Park Management System was successfully built by utilizing microcontrollers specifically one PIC18f4550 and two PIC16F84s and one PIC16F628A.

  13. Range Analysis and Terrain Preference of Adult Southern White Rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum in a South African Private Game Reserve: Insights into Carrying Capacity and Future Management.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Thompson

    Full Text Available The Southern white rhinoceros (Ceratotherium simum is a threatened species, central to the tourism appeal of private game reserves in South Africa. Privately owned reserves in South Africa tend to be smaller than government run reserves such as Kruger National Park. Because of their relatively small size and the often heterogeneous nature of the landscape private game reserve managers benefit from detailed knowledge of white rhinoceros terrain selection preferences, which can be assessed from their ranging behaviours. We collected adult and sub-adult white rhinoceros distribution data over a 15 month period, calculating individual range size using kernel density estimation analysis within a GIS. From this, terrain selectivity was calculated using 50% and 95% kernels to extract terrain composition values. Jacob's correction of the Ivlev's selectivity index was subsequently applied to the terrain composition of each individual to identify trends in selectivity. Results reveal that adult males hold exclusive territories considerably smaller than those found in previous work conducted in "open" or large reserves. Similarly, results for the size of male versus female territories were also not in keeping with those from previous field studies, with males, rather than females, having the larger territory requirement. Terrain selection for both genders and age classes (adult and sub-adult showed a strong preference for open grassland and avoidance of hill slope and riparian terrains. This research reveals white rhinoceros terrain selection preferences and how they influence range requirements in small, closed reserves. We conclude that this knowledge will be valuable in future white rhinoceros conservation management in small private game reserves, particularly in decisions surrounding removal of surplus individuals or augmentation of existing populations, calculation of reserve carrying capacity and future private reserve acquisition.

  14. Parking Spoorzone Delft : Addressing expected parking challenges 2015-2017

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Piccot, C.; Groenendijk, L.; Rot, M.; Van der Meijs, P.; Rakers, T.; Negenborn, R.R.; Annema, J.A.; Pel, A.; Vleugel, J.

    2014-01-01

    This project is carried out on request of the BVOW, the interest group of the neighbourhoods Olofsbuurt and Westerkwartier in Delft, in order to propose solutions for the parking issue of Spoorzone Delft expected between 2015 and 2017. They are worried that parking disturbances will emerge in their

  15. Wind modelling over complex terrain using CFD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Matias; Owen, Herbert; Folch, Arnau; Prieto, Luis; Cosculluela, Luis

    2015-04-01

    The present work deals with the numerical CFD modelling of onshore wind farms in the context of High Performance Computing (HPC). The CFD model involves the numerical solution of the Reynolds-Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations together with a κ-ɛ turbulence model and the energy equation, specially designed for Atmospheric Boundary Layer (ABL) flows. The aim is to predict the wind velocity distribution over complex terrain, using a model that includes meteorological data assimilation, thermal coupling, forested canopy and Coriolis effects. The modelling strategy involves automatic mesh generation, terrain data assimilation and generation of boundary conditions for the inflow wind flow distribution up to the geostrophic height. The CFD model has been implemented in Alya, a HPC multi physics parallel solver able to run with thousands of processors with an optimal scalability, developed in Barcelona Supercomputing Center. The implemented thermal stability and canopy physical model was developed by Sogachev in 2012. The k-ɛ equations are of non-linear convection diffusion reaction type. The implemented numerical scheme consists on a stabilized finite element formulation based on the variational multiscale method, that is known to be stable for this kind of turbulence equations. We present a numerical formulation that stresses on the robustness of the solution method, tackling common problems that produce instability. The iterative strategy and linearization scheme is discussed. It intends to avoid the possibility of having negative values of diffusion during the iterative process, which may lead to divergence of the scheme. These problems are addressed by acting on the coefficients of the reaction and diffusion terms and on the turbulent variables themselves. The k-ɛ equations are highly nonlinear. Complex terrain induces transient flow instabilities that may preclude the convergence of computer flow simulations based on steady state formulation of the

  16. Archaean TTG of Vodlozero Terrain, Fennoscandian Shield

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekulaev, Valery; Arestova, Natalia

    2014-05-01

    The Vodlozero terrain is the largest (about 270*240 km) early Archaean fragment of Fennoscandian Shield and composes its eastern part. The granitoids of TTG suite are predominant component of the terrain. The greenstone belts are placed along the margins of the terrain. Several stages of TTG formation can be distinguished in Achaean crust history. (1) The oldest TTG are trondhjemites and tonalities with age of 3240 Ma. They contain rare and small amphibolite inclusions of the same age. These TTG are characterized by high Sr (av. 412 ppm), Sr/Y (70), (La/Yb)n (54) and low Y (av. 7 ppm), Yb (0.32 ppm) and Nb (4 ppm). It was shown (Lobach-Zhuchenko et al., 2000), that the source of these TTG could be basic rocks, having composition similar with TH1 by K.Condie. (2) The tonalities and granodiorites with age of 3150 Ma are disposed near greenstone belts and contain compared to TTG of the first group less Sr (av. 250 ppm), Sr/Y (22), (La/Yb)n (18) and more K, Rb (av. 70 ppm), Ba (470 ppm), Y (11 ppm),Yb (1.16 ppm). TTG of both groups have identical T(DM)Nd (3250-3400 Ma) and differences in composition is evidently connected with lower level of source melting of the second group and also with K-metasomatism. The volcanics of the greenstone belts have age 3020 - 2940 Ma. Dykes of gabbro-amphibolites and andesites with the same age and composition cut TTG of the first and the second groups. The age of the third TTG group is about 2900 Ma ago. These rocks form leucosoma of migmatites within TTG of the second group. The composition of the third TTG and Nd isotope data suppose their origin by the melting of ancient TTG crust simultaneously with greenstone belt emplacement. The fourth TTG group with age 2780-2850 Ma forms a small intrusions, cutting older TTG and greenstone rocks. Their composition is similar to 3150 Ma TTG. Nd isotope data indicate that these TTG have younger (about 2850 Ma) source. Thus there are four TTG groups formed into interval more 400 Ma. The age and

  17. 75 FR 5767 - All Terrain Vehicle Chinese Language Webinar; Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-04

    ... COMMISSION All Terrain Vehicle Chinese Language Webinar; Meeting AGENCY: Consumer Product Safety Commission... Terrain Vehicle Chinese Language Webinar. The webinar will focus on CPSC's requirements for ATV's.... Chinese language speakers can access the webinar at http://www.cpsc.gov/webcast/index_ch.html . English...

  18. Large-Eddy Simulation of turbine wake in complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berg, Jacob; Troldborg, Niels; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2017-01-01

    We present Large-Eddy Simulation results of a turbine wake in realistic complex terrain with slopes above 0.5. By comparing simulations including and without the wind turbine we can estimate the induction factor, a, and we show how the presence of a strong recirculation zone in the terrain dictates...

  19. Terrain Perception in a Shape Shifting Rolling-Crawling Robot

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fuchida Masataka

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Terrain perception greatly enhances the performance of robots, providing them with essential information on the nature of terrain being traversed. Several living beings in nature offer interesting inspirations which adopt different gait patterns according to nature of terrain. In this paper, we present a novel terrain perception system for our bioinspired robot, Scorpio, to classify the terrain based on visual features and autonomously choose appropriate locomotion mode. Our Scorpio robot is capable of crawling and rolling locomotion modes, mimicking Cebrenus Rechenburgi, a member of the huntsman spider family. Our terrain perception system uses Speeded Up Robust Feature (SURF description method along with color information. Feature extraction is followed by Bag of Word method (BoW and Support Vector Machine (SVM for terrain classification. Experiments were conducted with our Scorpio robot to establish the efficacy and validity of the proposed approach. In our experiments, we achieved a recognition accuracy of over 90% across four terrain types namely grass, gravel, wooden deck, and concrete.

  20. Stereo based Obstacle Detection with Uncertainty in Rough Terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mark, W. van der; Heuvel, J.C. van den; Groen, F.C.A.

    2007-01-01

    Autonomous robot vehicles that operate in offroad terrain should avoid obstacle hazards. In this paper we present a stereo vision based method that is able to cluster reconstructed terrain points into obstacles by evaluating their relative angles and distances. In our approach, constraints are

  1. Conically scanning lidar error in complex terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferhat Bingöl

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Conically scanning lidars assume the flow to be homogeneous in order to deduce the horizontal wind speed. However, in mountainous or complex terrain this assumption is not valid implying a risk that the lidar will derive an erroneous wind speed. The magnitude of this error is measured by collocating a meteorological mast and a lidar at two Greek sites, one hilly and one mountainous. The maximum error for the sites investigated is of the order of 10 %. In order to predict the error for various wind directions the flows at both sites are simulated with the linearized flow model, WAsP Engineering 2.0. The measurement data are compared with the model predictions with good results for the hilly site, but with less success at the mountainous site. This is a deficiency of the flow model, but the methods presented in this paper can be used with any flow model.

  2. Ecology of an urban park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derek J. Coleman

    1977-01-01

    A controversial issue in the city of Kitchener, Ontario, involves the proposed extension of a boulevard through Lakeside Park. A study of this proposal revealed several facets of human interrelations with an urban park. Most important, there was a large gap between the perception and the reality of environmental quality. This has several practical implications in...

  3. An Amusement Park Physics Competition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, Rachel F.

    2010-01-01

    Amusement park physics is a popular way to reinforce physics concepts and to motivate physics learners. This article describes a novel physics competition where students use simple tools to take amusement park ride measurements and use the data to answer challenging exam questions. Research into the impact of participating in the competition…

  4. Great Smoky Mountains National Park Hydro Plus

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Park Hydro Plus is a value-added attribution of data produced by Great Smoky Mountains National Park and published by the USGS NHD. Not to be confused with the USGS...

  5. Computational snow avalanche simulation in forested terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teich, M.; Fischer, J.-T.; Feistl, T.; Bebi, P.; Christen, M.; Grêt-Regamey, A.

    2014-08-01

    Two-dimensional avalanche simulation software operating in three-dimensional terrain is widely used for hazard zoning and engineering to predict runout distances and impact pressures of snow avalanche events. Mountain forests are an effective biological protection measure against avalanches; however, the protective capacity of forests to decelerate or even to stop avalanches that start within forested areas or directly above the treeline is seldom considered in this context. In particular, runout distances of small- to medium-scale avalanches are strongly influenced by the structural conditions of forests in the avalanche path. We present an evaluation and operationalization of a novel detrainment function implemented in the avalanche simulation software RAMMS for avalanche simulation in forested terrain. The new approach accounts for the effect of forests in the avalanche path by detraining mass, which leads to a deceleration and runout shortening of avalanches. The relationship is parameterized by the detrainment coefficient K [kg m-1 s-2] accounting for differing forest characteristics. We varied K when simulating 40 well-documented small- to medium-scale avalanches, which were released in and ran through forests of the Swiss Alps. Analyzing and comparing observed and simulated runout distances statistically revealed values for K suitable to simulate the combined influence of four forest characteristics on avalanche runout: forest type, crown closure, vertical structure and surface cover, for example, values for K were higher for dense spruce and mixed spruce-beech forests compared to open larch forests at the upper treeline. Considering forest structural conditions within avalanche simulations will improve current applications for avalanche simulation tools in mountain forest and natural hazard management.

  6. Groundwater flood hazards in lowland karst terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naughton, Owen; McCormack, Ted

    2016-04-01

    The spatial and temporal complexity of flooding in karst terrains pose unique flood risk management challenges. Lowland karst landscapes can be particularly susceptible to groundwater flooding due to a combination of limited drainage capacity, shallow depth to groundwater and a high level of groundwater-surface water interactions. Historically the worst groundwater flooding to have occurred in the Rep. of Ireland has been centred on the Gort Lowlands, a karst catchment on the western coast of Ireland. Numerous notable flood events have been recorded throughout the 20th century, but flooding during the winters of 2009 and 2015 were the most severe on record, inundating an area in excess of 20km2 and causing widespread and prolonged disruption and damage to property and infrastructure. Effective flood risk management requires an understanding of the recharge, storage and transport mechanisms during flood conditions, but is often hampered by a lack of adequate data. Using information gathered from the 2009 and 2015 events, the main hydrological and geomorphological factors which influence flooding in this complex lowland karst groundwater system under are elucidated. Observed flood mechanisms included backwater flooding of sinks, overland flow caused by the overtopping of sink depressions, high water levels in turlough basins, and surface ponding in local epikarst watersheds. While targeted small-scale flood measures can locally reduce the flood risk associated with some mechanisms, they also have the potential to exacerbate flooding down-catchment and must be assessed in the context of overall catchment hydrology. This study addresses the need to improve our understanding of groundwater flooding in karst terrains, in order to ensure efficient flood prevention and mitigation in future and thus help achieve the aims of the EU Floods Directive.

  7. Predicting Potential Evaporation in Topographically Complex Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koohafkan, M.; Thompson, S. E.; Hamilton, M. P.

    2012-12-01

    Predicting and understanding the water cycle in topographically complex terrain poses challenges for upscaling point-scale measurements of water and energy balance and for downscaling observations made from remote sensing or predictions made via global circulation models. This study evaluates hydrologic and climate data drawn from a spatially-distributed wireless sensor network at the Blue Oak Ranch Reserve near San Jose, California to investigate the influence of topographic variation, landscape position, and local ecology (vegetation) on one core component of the water balance: potential evaporation. High-resolution observations of solar radiation, ambient temperature, wind speed, and relative humidity are combined with canopy maps generated from LiDAR flyovers to develop spatially-distributed predictions of potential evaporation. These data are compared to estimates of EP based on inverse modeling of surface soil moisture data. Preliminary results suggest that the spatial structure of microclimate at Blue Oak Ranch Reserve is dominated by variations around the elevation gradient, with strong nocturnal inversions hypothesized to reflect the influence of the coastal marine layer. Estimates of EP based on the Penman-Monteith equation suggest that EP could vary by up to a factor of 5 across the site, with differences in vapor pressure deficit and canopy height largely responsible for this variability. The results suggest that a) large differences in the timing and magnitude of water stress could arise in topographically complex terrain due to localized differences in energy balance, and b) both localized and regional effects need to be accounted for when downscaling climate data over topographically complex sites. 2) Color map showing preliminary estimates of annual EP incorporating canopy information (spatially-distributed values of aerodynamic resistance and LAI) drawn from LiDAR imagery. The effect of the resistance on the dynamics is striking in its ability to

  8. Qualitative analysis of wind-turbine wakes over hilly terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyvärinen, A.; Segalini, A.

    2017-05-01

    In this work, wind-turbine wakes are studied over flat and hilly terrains. Measurements made by using stereoscopic PIV are compared to data obtained from numerical simulations using RANS equations and an actuator-disc method. The numerical and experimental data show similar qualitative trends, indicating that the wind-turbine wake is perturbed by the presence of the hills. Additionally, a faster flow recovery at hub height is seen with the hilly terrain, indicating that the hills presence is beneficial for downstream turbines exposed to wake-interaction effects. The Jensen wake model is implemented over the hilly terrain and it is shown that this model cannot accurately capture the wake modulations induced by the hills. However, by superimposing a wind-turbine wake simulated over flat terrain on the hilly-terrain flow field, it is illustrated that the commonly-used wake-superposition technique can yield reasonable results if the used wake model has sufficient accuracy.

  9. Statistical Modeling of Robotic Random Walks on Different Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naylor, Austin; Kinnaman, Laura

    Issues of public safety, especially with crowd dynamics and pedestrian movement, have been modeled by physicists using methods from statistical mechanics over the last few years. Complex decision making of humans moving on different terrains can be modeled using random walks (RW) and correlated random walks (CRW). The effect of different terrains, such as a constant increasing slope, on RW and CRW was explored. LEGO robots were programmed to make RW and CRW with uniform step sizes. Level ground tests demonstrated that the robots had the expected step size distribution and correlation angles (for CRW). The mean square displacement was calculated for each RW and CRW on different terrains and matched expected trends. The step size distribution was determined to change based on the terrain; theoretical predictions for the step size distribution were made for various simple terrains. It's Dr. Laura Kinnaman, not sure where to put the Prefix.

  10. All Terrain Vehicle (ATV crashes in an unregulated environment: A prospective study of 56 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushrek Alani

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available All terrain vehicle (ATV use is increasing at a rapid pace in settings without proper safety regulations. Aim: To define injury patterns, impairments, and outcomes among patients injured in ATV crashes; to determine prevalence of protective equipment use; and to define the potential role of injury prevention in addressing the problem. Methods: During a recent 10 month period, 56 patients were reported as injured in ATV crashes seriously enough to require admission and were prospectively entered into a study-specific database. Patient demographics, site of crash, prior ATV experience, and use of safety equipment were recorded. Injuries were characterized by body system and tabulated. Outcomes, including deaths and impairments, were defined. Results: There were 47 males (84% and 9 females (16%. Most injuries occurred in patients older than 18 years, but 20% occurred in children less than 14 years of age. Helmet use was confirmed in 12%. Three patients died (5% mortality. Significant disability occurred in 19 patients (34% and was permanent in 4 (7%. Head, face and musculoskeletal injuries were most common. Conclusions: ATV crashes can cause serious injuries including death and permanent disability. The lack of awareness of the injury potential for this popular recreational activity has escalated the risk of injury, and the absence of safety programs and regulations has further aggravated the problem. Based on these data, a public education program, compulsory use of helmets and other protective clothing, and penalties for non-compliance should be implemented. Interventions at recreation sites and the point of ATV sale may be most beneficial.

  11. Slip estimation methods for proprioceptive terrain classification using tracked mobile robots

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Masha, Ditebogo F

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent work has shown that proprioceptive measurements such as terrain slip can be used for terrain classification. This paper investigates the suitability of four simple slip estimation methods for differentiating between indoor and outdoor terrain...

  12. Military Operations on Urban Terrain (Mout) Bibliography

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-09-01

    192-198, by Paul A. Jureidini, et al. Alexandria, Virginia. June 1979. 169p. U 167.52 ABT Associates, Inc. The Urb-Coin Game . Arlington, A 89 pU...C. Scharfen. MenloPark, California. December 1975. 159p. DARPA United States Advanced Research Projects Agency. Effects MOBA II of Built-Up Areas on... MOBA III Operations in Built-Up.Areas in the Fulda Corridor, dC Yar 2000 (U). Arlington, Virginia. June 1977. AD B039 537 Unitod States Air Command and

  13. All-terrain vehicle dealership point-of-sale child safety compliance in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafner, John W; Getz, Marjorie A; Begley, Brandon

    2012-08-01

    In 2008, an estimated 37,700 children younger than 16 were treated in US emergency departments for nonfatal all-terrain vehicle (ATV) injuries. This study identifies safety guidelines and recommendations dealers convey to consumers at the point of sale. A telephone survey of all 2004 licensed motorcycle dealers in Illinois was conducted. Trained investigators, using aliases and posing as a parent of a 13-year-old teenager, spoke with dealership personnel. Investigators indicated they wished to purchase an ATV with the dealership, but had no knowledge of ATV use or safety issues. The telephone call's true purpose was concealed during the survey. Specific responses from the salesperson, models and brands of ATVs, price quotes, engine sizes, and safety information/recommendations were recorded in a written survey instrument. One hundred twenty-seven ATV dealers completed the survey. A salesperson most often fielded the telephone interview (124/127). Telephone interviews by male investigators were longer than those by female interviewers (5 minutes 37 seconds vs 3 minutes 51 seconds; P = 0.001). Dealers recommended Consumer Product Safety Commission-based child-size ATVs (point-of-purchase training. All-terrain vehicle dealers in Illinois recommend child-size vehicles, safety training, and helmet use for the majority of telephone inquiries. Injury prevention efforts targeting ATV dealers may be less needed than those using other populations.

  14. CERN in the park

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN will be the centre of debate at a 'Café scientifique' on Monday 29 April. The aim of the Cafés scientifiques, which are organised by the association of Bancs Publics, is to kindle discussion between ordinary people and specialists in a scientific field. This Monday, Maurice Bourquin, President of the CERN Council, Hans Hoffmann, Director of Technology Transfer and Scientific Computing at CERN, Gilbert Guignard, a physicist at CERN, and Ruhal Floris, who teaches mathematical didactics at the University of Geneva, will explain the usefulness and contributions to science of the world's biggest laboratory for particle physics. What is CERN for? Monday 29 April at 18.30 Musée d'histoire des sciences, Geneva (in the park Perle du Lac) Entry free Wine and buffet after the discussion

  15. Perception of urban park soundscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tse, Man Sze; Chau, Chi Kwan; Choy, Yat Sze; Tsui, Wai Keung; Chan, Chak Ngai; Tang, Shiu Keung

    2012-04-01

    A number of studies have been initiated to explore how to improve the soundscape quality in urban parks. However, good soundscape quality in parks cannot be provided without a thorough understanding of the complex relationships among sound, environment, and individuals. As acoustic comfort is considered to be an important outcome of soundscape quality, this study investigates the relative impacts of the factors influencing acoustic comfort evaluation by formulating a multivariate ordered logit model. This study also explores the inter-relationships among acoustic comfort evaluation, acceptability of the environment, and preference to stay in a park using a path model. A total of 595 valid responses were obtained from interview surveys administered in four parks in Hong Kong while objective sound measurements were carried out at the survey spots concurrently. The findings unveil that acoustic comfort evaluation, besides visual comfort evaluation of landscape, also plays an important role on users' acceptability of the urban park environment. Compared with all the studied acoustic related factors, acoustic comfort evaluation serves as a better proxy for park users' preference to stay in urban parks. Hearing the breeze will significantly increase the likelihood of individuals in giving high acoustic comfort evaluation. Conversely, hearing the sounds from heavy vehicles or sounds from bikes will significantly reduce the likelihood in giving a high acoustic evaluation.

  16. Understanding parking habits at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Anaïs Schaeffer

    2016-01-01

    The SMB department is setting up a monitoring system in certain CERN car parks in order to evaluate their occupancy rates and subsequently make them easier to use.    Vehicle registration plate readers (red triangles) are now installed at the entrances and exits of the Le Cèdres car park (in orange) and of the Building 4 and 5 one (in blue). The 2 other car parks (Building 40 in violet and “high-voltage” in green) will be equipped at a later stage. Vehicle registration plate readers are now installed at the entrances and exits of the Les Cèdres car park and of the Building 4 and 5 car park, both on the Meyrin site. The information collected by these readers will allow the occupancy levels of these car parks to be analysed throughout the day, establishing periods of peak usage and the pattern of vehicle movements. “We have been experiencing parking problems at CERN for several years n...

  17. Aftermath of Griffith Park Fire

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    In mid-May 2007, wind-driven flames raced through Griffith Park in Los Angeles, forcing hasty evacuations and threatening numerous famous landmarks and tourist spots, such as the Los Angeles Zoo and the Hollywood Sign. Ultimately, no one was injured in the fire, which may have been started by a cigarette. About 800 acres burned in the urban park, which is itself a Hollywood landmark, having been the location for several movies, including Rebel Without A Cause. This image of the park was captured by the Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer (ASTER) on NASA's Terra satellite on June 6, 2007, about a month after the fire. ASTER detects both visible and infrared wavelengths of light, and both kinds have been used to make this image. Vegetation appears in various shades of red, while the burned areas appear charcoal. Roads and dense urban areas appear purplish-gray or white. Water is dark blue. Large burned areas are evident in the northwest and southeast parts of the park, with scattered smaller patches along the southern margin. Some botanical gardens and parts of a bird sanctuary, as well as some park structures like restrooms, were destroyed. The park's unburned, natural vegetation appears brick red, while the irrigated golf courses adjacent to the park are bright red. NASA image created by Jesse Allen, using data provided courtesy of the NASA/GSFC/MITI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team.

  18. Environmental Impacts of Forest Road Construction on Mountainous Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erhan Caliskan

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Forest roads are the base infrastructure foundation of forestry operations. These roads entail a complex engineering effort because they can cause substantial environmental damage to forests and include a high-cost construction. This study was carried out in four sample sites of Giresun, Trabzon(2 and Artvin Forest Directorate, which is in the Black Sea region of Turkey. The areas have both steep terrain (30-50% gradient and very steep terrain (51-80% gradient. Bulldozers and hydraulic excavators were determined to be the main machines for forest road construction, causing environmental damage and cross sections in mountainous areas.As a result of this study, the percent damage to forests was determined as follows: on steep terrain, 21% of trees were damaged by excavators and 33% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction, and on very steep terrain, 27% of trees were damaged by excavators and 44% of trees were damaged by bulldozers during forest road construction. It was also determined that on steep terrain, when excavators were used, 12.23% less forest area was destroyed compared with when bulldozers were used and 16.13% less area was destroyed by excavators on very steep terrain. In order to reduce the environmental damage on the forest ecosystem, especially in steep terrains, hydraulic excavators should replace bulldozers in forest road construction activities.

  19. Self-Supervised Learning of Terrain Traversability from Proprioceptive Sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajracharya, Max; Howard, Andrew B.; Matthies, Larry H.

    2009-01-01

    Robust and reliable autonomous navigation in unstructured, off-road terrain is a critical element in making unmanned ground vehicles a reality. Existing approaches tend to rely on evaluating the traversability of terrain based on fixed parameters obtained via testing in specific environments. This results in a system that handles the terrain well that it trained in, but is unable to process terrain outside its test parameters. An adaptive system does not take the place of training, but supplements it. Whereas training imprints certain environments, an adaptive system would imprint terrain elements and the interactions amongst them, and allow the vehicle to build a map of local elements using proprioceptive sensors. Such sensors can include velocity, wheel slippage, bumper hits, and accelerometers. Data obtained by the sensors can be compared to observations from ranging sensors such as cameras and LADAR (laser detection and ranging) in order to adapt to any kind of terrain. In this way, it could sample its surroundings not only to create a map of clear space, but also of what kind of space it is and its composition. By having a set of building blocks consisting of terrain features, a vehicle can adapt to terrain that it has never seen before, and thus be robust to a changing environment. New observations could be added to its library, enabling it to infer terrain types that it wasn't trained on. This would be very useful in alien environments, where many of the physical features are known, but some are not. For example, a seemingly flat, hard plain could actually be soft sand, and the vehicle would sense the sand and avoid it automatically.

  20. Examination of Gunnison River influences on Cactus Park Lake Beds using Heavy Mineral and Geochemical Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoepfer, S. D.; Benage, M. C.

    2008-12-01

    Unaweep Canyon is an enigmatic wind gap across the Uncompahgre Plateau in western Colorado. It is widely accepted that the ancestral Gunnison River once flowed through Unaweep Canyon and Cactus Park, a tributary to Unaweep Canyon. Newly discovered lake deposits in Cactus Park raise several important questions regarding the timing of events leading to the abandonment of Unaweep Canyon by the ancestral Gunnison River. Heavy minerals and trace elements of Cactus Park lake beds and ancestral Gunnison River sediments were compared to determine whether or not the ancestral Gunnison River was present at the time the Cactus Park Lake was filling with sediment. It is possible that the formation of this lake facilitated the eventual abandonment of Cactus Park and Unaweep Canyon by the ancestral Gunnison River. Alternatively, abandonment could have preceded the formation of the lake. In the latter scenario, the composition of the lake beds should differ significantly from modern or ancient Gunnison River deposits. Results of the analyses show that the Gunnison River and Cactus Park Lake samples form two distinct groups based on differences in elemental concentrations and heavy mineral percentages. Gunnison River sediments associated with volcanic terrains contain elevated copper and manganese concentrations with 7.5 times more manganese and 4.5 times more copper normalized to aluminum compared to samples of Mancos Shale. Mancos Shale is a likely source for the Cactus Park lake beds . These values would require the Cactus Park lake beds to be composed of 70-92 percent Mancos material,. The Gunnison River heavy mineral percentages are: total weathered grains (16.94-18.75), augite plus hornblende (21.43-32.26%), ZTR (31.45-32.14), hornblende (16.07-17.74%) and tourmaline (26.79-29.84%). Cactus Park lake bed samples have more weathered grains (26.56-46.83%), less augite plus hornblende (5.47-17.50), lower ZTR values (15.63-22.67), less hornblende (1.48-9.33%) and less tourmaline

  1. Routing, construction and maintenance of pipelines in landslide terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stepanek, M. [Geo-Enginering (M.S.T.) Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)

    1999-07-01

    Factors influencing the location and routing of pipelines, and the effects of unstable terrain features on construction and maintenance are discussed. Examples from northwestern Alberta and northeastern British Columbia are cited to illustrate the various techniques, such as overhead crossings of valleys and directional drilling to install pipelines below streams, adopted by pipeline construction companies to deal with the challenges presented by sensitive and unstable terrain. The case histories cited also serve to emphasize the importance of terrain analysis and the proper identification of potential problem areas. 5 refs., 7 figs.

  2. Hybrid RANS/LES applied to complex terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Andreas; Sørensen, Niels N.

    2011-01-01

    Large Eddy Simulation (LES) of the wind in complex terrain is limited by computational cost. The number of computational grid points required to resolve the near-ground turbulent structures (eddies) are very high. The traditional solution to the problem has been to apply a wall function...... aspect ratio in the RANS layer and thereby resolve the mean near-wall velocity profile. The method is applicable to complex terrain and the benefits of traditional LES are kept intact. Using the hybrid method, simulations of the wind over a natural complex terrain near Wellington in New Zealand...

  3. Park, People and Biodiversity Conservation in Kaziranga National Park, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Das

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Kaziranga National Park (henceforth, KNP is a protected area situated in the North Eastern part of India. The park is a World Heritage Site and has a very rich ecosystem. KNP is an attractive tourist destination and occupies a significant place in the life and culture of the people living in this part of the country. Conservation of the park started more than a century ago, and local people have often contested such efforts. This is mainly because indigenous people have been facing displacement and deprivation from resources, which they have been using for centuries. Besides deprivation, wild animals often damage their properties and paddy fields. This leads to resentment among local people and become potential cause of grudge in the form of encroachment, poaching, biodiversity loss, and excessive collection of forest products. As a result, conservation measures may fail to deliver desired outcome. This paper tries to examine the gains and losses for living around KNP and assess the park-people relation. We conduct a case study in some periphery villages of the park and find that people have been suffering from difficulty in rearing livestock and loss caused by wild animal. However, people gain from tourism business. Based on the findings we recommend extension of tourism/allied activities and community welfare measures. The findings may be used to derive policy implication for sustainable management of the park.

  4. Influence of Parking Price on Parking Garage Users’ Behaviour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Simićević

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Parking charge is a powerful tool for solving parking and traffic congestion problems. In order to achieve the expected effects without any adverse impact it is necessary to understand well the users’ responses to this policy. This paper, based on a sample of interviewed parking garage users, has developed binary logit model for identification and quantification of characteristics of users and trips, on which the acceptance of parking price is dependent. In addition, multinomial logit model has been made in order to predict what the users will opt for when faced with an increase in parking price. For the first time the parameter “shorten duration” has been introduced which has shown to be the most significant in making behaviour-related decisions. The results show that the users with the purpose work are the most sensitive to an increase in parking charge, what can be deemed positive for policy makers. However, great sensitivity of the users with the purpose shopping should cause their concern. The results of the multinomial model show that they would not discontinue coming into the area after all.

  5. Jurassic Park: Adventure in Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shams, Marcia; Boteler, Trina

    1993-01-01

    Describes using the movie "Jurassic Park" as a foundation for a middle school interdisciplinary unit involving science, math, language arts, history, and geography. Suggested books and activities are presented. (PR)

  6. Full-Automatic Parking registration and payment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agerholm, Niels; Lahrmann, Harry; Jørgensen, Brian

    2014-01-01

    As part of ITS Platform North Denmark, a full-automatic GNSS-based parking payment (PP) system was developed (PP app). On the basis of the parking position and parking time, the PP app can determine the price of parking and collect the amount from the car owner’s bank account. The driver is infor...

  7. Forest Vegetation Monitoring Protocol for National Parks in the North Coast and Cascades Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodward, Andrea; Hutten, Karen M.; Boetsch, John R.; Acker, Steven A.; Rochefort, Regina M.; Bivin, Mignonne M.; Kurth, Laurie L.

    2009-01-01

    Plant communities are the foundation for terrestrial trophic webs and animal habitat, and their structure and species composition are an integrated result of biological and physical drivers (Gates, 1993). Additionally, they have a major role in geologic, geomorphologic and soil development processes (Jenny, 1941; Stevens and Walker, 1970). Throughout most of the Pacific Northwest, environmental conditions support coniferous forests as the dominant vegetation type. In the face of anthropogenic climate change, forests have a global role as potential sinks for atmospheric carbon (Goodale and others, 2002). Consequently, knowledge of the status of forests in the three large parks of the NCCN [that is, Mount Rainier (MORA), North Cascades (NOCA), and Olympic (OLYM) National Parks] is fundamental to understanding the condition of Pacific Northwest ecosystems. Diverse climate and soil properties across the Pacific Northwest result in a variety of forest types (Franklin and Dyrness, 1973; Franklin and others, 1988; Henderson and others, 1989, 1992). The mountainous terrain of Mount Rainier, North Cascades, and Olympic National Parks create steep elevational and precipitation gradients within and among the parks: collectively, these parks span from sea level to more than 4,200 m; and include areas with precipitation from 90 to more than 500 cm. The resulting forests range from coastal rainforests with dense understories and massive trees draped with epiphytes; to areas with drought-adapted Ponderosa pines; to high-elevation subalpine fir forests interspersed with meadows just below treeline (table 1). These forests, in turn, are the foundation for other biotic communities constituting Pacific Northwest ecosystems.

  8. Cashing in on Curb Parking

    OpenAIRE

    Shoup, Donald C.

    1994-01-01

    Whether you're driving to work, to a doctor's appointment, or to dinner with a friend, you don't want to reach your destination and then circle the neighborhood for 40 minutes looking for a parking space. You want even less to compete with dozens of other cars looking for that same vacant space, while dodging double-parked cars and listening to honking and cursing.

  9. Architectural heritage or theme park

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ignasi Solà-Morales

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The growing parallelism between the perception and the consumer use of theme parks and architectural heritage gives rise to a reflection about the fact that the architectural object has been turned into a museum piece, stripped  of its original value and its initial cultural substance to become images exposed to multiple gazes, thus producing what the author calis the "Theme Park effect", with consequences on protected architecture.

  10. Changing perspectives in urban park management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chan, Chung-shing; Marafa, Lawal M.; Konijnendijk, Cecil Cornelis

    2015-01-01

    park management in Hong Kong were also revealed through a cross-reference of the perceived I–P levels of indicators by managers. These problems include a prolonged shortage of funding by the park authority, the lack of integration of managerial and educational functions of urban parks, and a less......Urban parks provide numerous benefits to our society. In densely populated metropolises such as Hong Kong, urban parks are in high demand. A variety of indicators can be used as tools for improving park planning and management. Facing a dynamic society and increasing user expectations, urban park...... managers in Hong Kong have encountered different challenges over time, and the quest for changing park managerial strategies. In 2004, a set of indicators for urban park management in Hong Kong was produced as part of a Master's research. Local park managers were asked about their views on the respective...

  11. Lunar All-Terrain Utility Vehicle for EVA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC proposes to develop a new type of planetary rover called a Lunar All-terrain Utility Vehicle ("LATUV") to assist extra-vehicular activities in...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Hunterdon County New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. Classification of Mars Terrain Using Multiple Data Sources

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Classification of Mars Terrain Using Multiple Data Sources Alan Kraut1, David Wettergreen1 ABSTRACT. Images of Mars are being collected faster than they can be...

  14. Lunar All-Terrain Utility Vehicle for EVA Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — ProtoInnovations, LLC proposes to develop a new type of planetary rover called a Lunar All-terrain Utility Vehicle ("Lunar ATV") to assist extra-vehicular activities...

  15. DCS Terrain for Chatham Co GA (FY2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain for Effingham Co GA (FY2010)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. Bladed Terrain on Pluto: Possible Origins and Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, J. M.; Howard, A. D.; Umurhan, O. M.; White, O. L.; Schenk, P. M.; Beyer, R. A.; Grundy, W. M.; Young, L. A.; Stern, S. A.; Weaver, H. A.; hide

    2017-01-01

    We conclude that Bladed Terrain on Pluto is a deposit of massive CH4, which preferentially precipitates at high elevations, and has since its initial formation, undergone episodes of sublimation erosion that has given this deposit its characteristic texture.

  18. Weather in Mountainous Terrain (Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Weather in Mountainous Terrain (Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support) Fiesta Resort & Conference Center Tempe, AZ February 1...Meteorology Overcoming Scientific Barriers to Weather Support Fiesta Resort & Conference Center Tempe, AZ February 1 & 2, 2010 Hosted by University

  19. DCS Terrain Submission for Clay County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  20. TERRAIN DATA CAPTURE STANDARDS, LUZERNE COUNTY, PA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data includes digital elevation models, LIDAR derived contours, LIDAR three-dimensional spot elevations and breaklines, field surveyed ground elevations and...

  1. Laser altimetry and terrain analysis: A revolution in geomorphology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Anders, N.; Seijmonsbergen, H.

    2008-01-01

    Terrain analysis in geomorphology has undergone a serious quantitative revolution over recent decades. Lidar information has been efficiently used to automatically classify discrete landforms, map forest structures, and provide input for models simulating landscape development, e.g. channel incision

  2. DCS Terrain for Tift County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain Submission for Eau Claire County, Wisconsin

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submission for Johnson County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. TERRAIN DATA, DELANEY CREEK WATERSHED, HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FL

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  6. TERRAIN, CITY OF SEWARD, KENAI PENINSULA BOROUGH, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain Submission for Pine County, MN (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  8. TERRAIN, City of El Dorado, Butler County, KS

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  9. DCS Terrain Submittal for Washita County, Oklahoma, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  10. Terrain, BIG BLUE RIVER TRIBUTARY NO 44, GAGE COUNTY, NE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  11. DCS Terrain Submission for Randolph County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for Jackson County, AR, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. DCS Terrain Submission for McCook County, SD

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  14. DCS Terrain Submission for La Paz County, AZ

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  15. DCS Terrain Submission for Los Angeles County, CA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  16. DCS Terrain Submittal for Macon County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  17. DCS Terrain Submission for Lake Kaweah PMR - Tulare County, California

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  18. DCS Terrain Submission for Monmouth County, New Jersey

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  19. Cross-Coupled Control for All-Terrain Rovers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulio Reina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mobile robots are increasingly being used in challenging outdoor environments for applications that include construction, mining, agriculture, military and planetary exploration. In order to accomplish the planned task, it is critical that the motion control system ensure accuracy and robustness. The achievement of high performance on rough terrain is tightly connected with the minimization of vehicle-terrain dynamics effects such as slipping and skidding. This paper presents a cross-coupled controller for a 4-wheel-drive/4-wheel-steer robot, which optimizes the wheel motors’ control algorithm to reduce synchronization errors that would otherwise result in wheel slip with conventional controllers. Experimental results, obtained with an all-terrain rover operating on agricultural terrain, are presented to validate the system. It is shown that the proposed approach is effective in reducing slippage and vehicle posture errors.

  20. Cross-coupled control for all-terrain rovers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, Giulio

    2013-01-08

    Mobile robots are increasingly being used in challenging outdoor environments for applications that include construction, mining, agriculture, military and planetary exploration. In order to accomplish the planned task, it is critical that the motion control system ensure accuracy and robustness. The achievement of high performance on rough terrain is tightly connected with the minimization of vehicle-terrain dynamics effects such as slipping and skidding. This paper presents a cross-coupled controller for a 4-wheel-drive/4-wheel-steer robot, which optimizes the wheel motors' control algorithm to reduce synchronization errors that would otherwise result in wheel slip with conventional controllers. Experimental results, obtained with an all-terrain rover operating on agricultural terrain, are presented to validate the system. It is shown that the proposed approach is effective in reducing slippage and vehicle posture errors.

  1. DCS Terrain Submittal for Pike County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  2. DCS Terrain Submittal for Taylor County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  3. DCS Terrain for Montgomery County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  4. DCS Terrain Submittal for Crisp County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  5. DCS Terrain Submission for Chippewa County, MI (Countywide DFIRM)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describe the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  6. DCS Terrain Submittal for Mitchell County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  7. DCS Terrain for Wilcox County GA MapMod08

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix M: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  8. DCS TERRAIN SUBMISSION for MORRIS COUNTY, NEW JERSEY, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that were used to create...

  9. CITY OF RADFORD TERRAIN, CITY OF RADFORD, VA, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data includes digital elevation models, LIDAR derived contours, LIDAR three-dimensional spot elevations and breaklines, field surveyed ground elevations and...

  10. LandingNav: Terrain Guided Automated Precision Landing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Phase I effort successfully demonstrated the feasibility of a terrain guided automated precision landing sensor using an innovative multi-field-of-view stereo...

  11. DCS Terrain Submittal for Thomas County, Georgia, USA

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  12. DCS Terrain Submission for New Castle County, DE

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Emergency Management Agency, Department of Homeland Security — Terrain data, as defined in FEMA Guidelines and Specifications, Appendix N: Data Capture Standards, describes the digital topographic data that was used to create...

  13. Calibrated L-Band Terrain Measurements and Analysis Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-02-01

    space of these three parameters, points corresponding to samples from different terrain types will be well separated. And not only will points for...different terrain types be quite distinct, but also dif- ferent regions of the three-parameter space will characterize differ- ent surface types. The...planned to examine goodness of fit of both the IG and log- 4-4 normal distributions to histograms based on various samples, using 86 the Kolmogoroff -Smirnov

  14. Roller skating injuries in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inkelis, S H; Stroberg, A J; Keller, E L; Christenson, P D

    1988-06-01

    Many children who roller skate sustain injuries. To determine the type and severity of these mishaps, the medical records of 76 children less than 16 years of age with roller skating injuries presenting to two pediatric emergency departments were reviewed. Seventy-five percent were girls, and 25% were boys. The upper extremity was the most common body part injured (74%) (P less than 0.0001). Lower extremity injuries occurred in 12%, head and face injuries in 10%, and chest injuries in 4%. The most common type of injury was a fracture (69%), with the wrist and forearm being most frequently fractured (53%). Hospitalization and long-term sequelae were infrequent. Younger children (less than or equal to 9) had an increased frequency of fracture injury (P less than 0.02). This is most likely because maturation of lower and upper extremity speed, strength, agility, coordination, balance, and reaction time and morphologically stronger bones combine to afford relative protection to the older child. Physicians and parents need to be aware of a child's skill level before the child is encouraged to roller skate. Measures which may decrease the likelihood of injury include protective gear, instruction in roller skating technique, learning to skate in an uncongested area on level, familiar terrain, and learning to fall properly.

  15. Learned navigation in unknown terrains: A retraction method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nageswara S. V.; Stoltzfus, N.; Iyengar, S. Sitharama

    1989-01-01

    The problem of learned navigation of a circular robot R, of radius delta (is greater than or equal to 0), through a terrain whose model is not a-priori known is considered. Two-dimensional finite-sized terrains populated by an unknown (but, finite) number of simple polygonal obstacles are also considered. The number and locations of the vertices of each obstacle are unknown to R. R is equipped with a sensor system that detects all vertices and edges that are visible from its present location. In this context two problems are covered. In the visit problem, the robot is required to visit a sequence of destination points, and in the terrain model acquisition problem, the robot is required to acquire the complete model of the terrain. An algorithmic framework is presented for solving these two problems using a retraction of the freespace onto the Voronoi diagram of the terrain. Algorithms are then presented to solve the visit problem and the terrain model acquisition problem.

  16. Stratigraphy of the layered terrain in Valles Marineris, Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komatsu, G.; Strom, Roger G.

    1991-01-01

    The layered terrain in Valles Marineris provides information about its origin and the geologic history of this canyon system. Whether the terrain is sedimentary material deposited in a dry or lacustrine environment, or volcanic material related to the tectonics of the canyon is still controversial. However, recent studies of Gangis Layered Terrain suggests a cyclic sequence of deposition and erosion under episodic lacustrine conditions. The stratigraphic studies are extended to four other occurrences of layered terrains in Valles Marineris in an attempt to correlate and distinguish between depositional environments. The Juvantae Chasma, Hebes Chasma, Ophir and Candor Chasmata, Melas Chasma, and Gangis Layered Terrain were examined. Although there are broad similarities among the layered terrains, no two deposits are exactly alike. This suggests that there was no synchronized regional depositional processes to form all the layered deposits. However, the similar erosional style of the lower massive weakly bedded unit in Hebes, Gangis, and Ophir-Candor suggests it may have been deposited under similar circumstances.

  17. Terrain on Europa under Changing Lighting Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    These images obtained by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft show the same region of Europa under different lighting conditions. The upper image was obtained on June 28th, 1996 during Galileo's first orbit around Jupiter under 'high-sun' conditions -- the equivalent of taking a picture from a high altitude at noon (with the sun directly overhead). Note that albedo (light/dark) features are emphasized. Compare this to the lower image containing a higher-resolution inset. This (inset) image was taken on November 6th, 1996 during the spacecraft's third orbit under 'low-sun' illumination -- the equivalent of taking a picture from a high altitude at sunrise or sunset. Note that in this image the albedo features are not readily apparent. Instead, the topography of the terrain is emphasized. Planetary geologists use information from images acquired under a variety of lighting conditions to identify different types of structures and interpret how they formed. Note that the bright linear features in the upper image are seen to be ridges in the lower image. The circular feature on the right side of both images, Cilix, is approximately 25 kilometers (15 miles) across.The area seen in the upper image is 312 kilometers (187 miles) by 570 kilometers (342 miles) across; the area covered by the inset is 36 kilometers (22 miles) by 315 kilometers (190 miles) across. Both of these images are centered near 2 South latitude, 185 West longitude. North is to the top of the frames.The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  18. Strain in Archean Granite-Greenstone terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, C. M.; Bailey, R. C.

    2009-12-01

    A long-standing problem in Archean tectonics is the mode of origin of granite-greenstone belts. Based on structural and morphological similarities to salt domes and Rayleigh-Taylor structures, diapirism has long been an obvious but controversial candidate, as it implies the operation of vertical tectonics in the Archean. Current strain patterns are one of the few field observables available to test hypotheses about the kinematic history of granite-greenstone belts. Previous laboratory (Dixon & Summers, 1983) and numerical (Mareschal & West, 1980) experiments which have been used to predict strain in diapiric structures may not be realistic because of the lack of large thermally activated viscosity contrasts in these models. We have numerically modeled temperature-dependent, non-Newtonian visco-elastic solid-state diapirism under conditions appropriate to Archean crust (Robin & Bailey, 2009). Here we present analyses of strain derived from these models. Our results show important differences from those of previous modelers. These include the formation of narrow high strain zones in the greenstone at the batholith contact and in the axis of the keel, with a low-strain zone between the two, as well as only very small strains in the batholith itself. This suggests that strain recorded in the granitic domes of granite-greenstone terrains must be unrelated to the diapiric overturn mechanism. Our strain analyses should be useful for comparison with published and future field observations, and provide a basis for the interpretation of strain in these ubiquitous Archean structures. Principle strain directions for an evolved diapir resulting from an altered basaltic crust deposited over a granitic basement. Viscosities are temperature- and stress-dependent and viscoelastic.

  19. Back Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... extending from your neck to your pelvis. Back injuries can result from sports injuries, work around the house or in the garden, ... back is the most common site of back injuries and back pain. Common back injuries include Sprains ...

  20. Electrical Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... it can pass through your body and cause injuries. These electrical injuries can be external or internal. You may have one or both types. External injuries are skin burns. Internal injuries include damage to ...

  1. Testicular Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Sports 5 Ideas for Eco-Friendly Celebrations Testicular Injuries KidsHealth > For Teens > Testicular Injuries Print A A ... addressed as soon as possible. continue Serious Testicular Injuries Examples of serious testicular injury are testicular torsion ...

  2. Incentives and Disincentives for Day Visitors to Park and Ride Public Transportation at Acadia National Park

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    F Matthew Holly; Jeffrey C Hallo; Elizabeth D Baldwin; Fran P Mainella

    2010-01-01

    ... (National Park Service, 2009). To protect the parks natural resources and provide for superior visitor experiences, the National Park Service established the fare-free Island Explorer bus service in 1999 to transport visitors...

  3. Integrated terrain mapping with digital Landsat images in Queensland, Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinove, Charles Joseph

    1979-01-01

    Mapping with Landsat images usually is done by selecting single types of features, such as soils, vegetation, or rocks, and creating visually interpreted or digitally classified maps of each feature. Individual maps can then be overlaid on or combined with other maps to characterize the terrain. Integrated terrain mapping combines several terrain features into each map unit which, in many cases, is more directly related to uses of the land and to methods of land management than the single features alone. Terrain brightness, as measured by the multispectral scanners in Landsat 1 and 2, represents an integration of reflectance from the terrain features within the scanner's instantaneous field of view and is therefore more correlatable with integrated terrain units than with differentiated ones, such as rocks, soils, and vegetation. A test of the feasibilty of the technique of mapping integrated terrain units was conducted in a part of southwestern Queensland, Australia, in cooperation with scientists of the Queensland Department of Primary Industries. The primary purpose was to test the use of digital classification techniques to create a 'land systems map' usable for grazing land management. A recently published map of 'land systems' in the area (made by aerial photograph interpretation and ground surveys), which are integrated terrain units composed of vegetation, soil, topography, and geomorphic features, was used as a basis for comparison with digitally classified Landsat multispectral images. The land systems, in turn, each have a specific grazing capacity for cattle (expressed in beasts per km 2 ) which is estimated following analysis of both research results and property carrying capacities. Landsat images, in computer-compatible tape form, were first contrast-stretched to increase their visual interpretability, and digitally classified by the parallelepiped method into distinct spectral classes to determine their correspondence to the land systems classes and

  4. Smart parking management and navigation system

    KAUST Repository

    Saadeldin, Mohamed

    2017-11-09

    Various examples are provided for smart parking management, which can include navigation. In one example, a system includes a base station controller configured to: receive a wireless signal from a parking controller located at a parking space; determine a received signal strength indicator (RSSI) from the wireless signal; and identify a presence of a vehicle located at the parking space based at least in part on the RSSI. In another example, a method includes receiving a wireless signals from a base station controller and a parking controller located at a parking space; determining RSSIs from the wireless signals; and determining a location of the mobile computing device in a parking facility based at least in part on the RSSIs. In another example, a RSSI can be received, a parking occupancy can be determined using the RSSI, and an electronic record can be updated based on the parking occupancy.

  5. Planning and design considerations in karst terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, J. A.; Greene, R. W.; Ottoson, R. S.; Graham, T. C.

    1988-10-01

    This article discusses the various steps that the authors feel are necessary to the successful progression of an engineered project sited in karst terrain. The procedures require a multidisciplined approach with liaison and cooperation among the various parties to the project. Initially, the prospective owner must have sufficient understanding of the potential engineering problems to incorporate the engineering geologist into the early stages of any planned acquisition. The first step in an investigation should include a review of the available geologic information, aerial photo interpretation, consultation with the State Geological Survey, and a geologic reconnaissance of the prospective site and surrounding area. A go-no-go decision as to purchase can often been made at an early time. Although, in some instances, more study is needed for a particularly intriguing property. The second stage should consider the various planning alternatives that are feasible based upon the limited available information. At this stage planning/purchase decisions can be made as to purchasing options, value of the property, design constraints, and the possible economic penalties that could be associated with the potential site construction. Various planning and construction alternatives should be considered in this phase of the work. The third stage should include a site investigation program of moderate size, consisting of test pits and/or exploratory borings. The borings should be drilled using water as the drilling fluid, with an experienced crew and qualified technical inspection. The authors find the use of geophysical techniques can be extremely misleading unless used in conjunction with exploratory drilling. Successful evaluations using geophysical procedures occur only under ideal conditions. The geotechnical viability of the plan and preliminary design should be investigated in the fourth phase. Additionally, the physical parameters required for the design of structures

  6. Free Parking for All in Shopping Malls

    OpenAIRE

    Hasker, Kevin; Inci, Eren

    2012-01-01

    We show why a shopping mall prefers to provide parking for free and embed the parking costs in the prices of the goods. This holds if the mall has monopoly power or prices competitively; if there is parking validation or a trade-off between shopping and parking spaces. It is also the second-best social optimum. Generally, the equilibrium lot size is too small, yielding a rationale for minimum parking requirements. In urban malls, parking fees may be positive because individuals can use the lo...

  7. Science parks as knowledge organizations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Finn

    gained agrowing importance in the new economy. If we shift focus to organizationtheory discussions on new knowledge and innovation has specialized in relationto the process of creation, managing, organizing, sharing, transferring etc. ofknowledge. The evaluation of science parks has to relate......Recent studies of the impact of science parks have questioned traditionalassumption about the effect of the parks on innovation and economic growth.Most studies tend to measure the effect by rather traditional measures, revenue,survival of new firms, without taking into account, that knowledge has...... to the changed role ofknowledge in the creation of economic growth. With the help of the concept ofthe ba from Nonanka, the article discuss if or how traditional organized scienceparks can become central actors in the new knowledge production or has to beviewed as an outdated institution from the industrial...

  8. Smart parking management system with decal electronics system

    KAUST Repository

    Hussain, Muhammad Mustafa

    2017-09-21

    Various examples are related to parking management, including identifying and reserving empty parking spaces. In one example, a smart parking space system includes a parking controller located at a parking space. The parking controller can identify a vehicle located at the parking space via an input sensor or a transceiver that initiates wireless communication with an electronic tag associated with the vehicle; and communicate a parking vacancy associated with the parking space to a remote computing device based at least in part on the identification of the vehicle. In another example, a computing device can receive parking vacancy data associated with a parking space from a parking controller; determine a parking vacancy associated with the parking space using the parking vacancy data; and encode for display on a client device a network page that includes an indication of the parking vacancy associated with the parking space.

  9. On autonomous terrain model acquistion by a mobile robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, N. S. V.; Iyengar, S. S.; Weisbin, C. R.

    1987-01-01

    The following problem is considered: A point robot is placed in a terrain populated by an unknown number of polyhedral obstacles of varied sizes and locations in two/three dimensions. The robot is equipped with a sensor capable of detecting all the obstacle vertices and edges that are visible from the present location of the robot. The robot is required to autonomously navigate and build the complete terrain model using the sensor information. It is established that the necessary number of scanning operations needed for complete terrain model acquisition by any algorithm that is based on scan from vertices strategy is given by the summation of i = 1 (sup n) N(O sub i)-n and summation of i = 1 (sup n) N(O sub i)-2n in two- and three-dimensional terrains respectively, where O = (O sub 1, O sub 2,....O sub n) set of the obstacles in the terrain, and N(O sub i) is the number of vertices of the obstacle O sub i.

  10. Everglades National Park Including Biscayne National Park. Activity Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruehrwein, Dick

    Intended to help elementary school children learn about the resources of the Everglades and Biscayne National Parks, this activity book includes information, puzzles, games, and quizzes. The booklet deals with concepts related to: (1) the seasons; (2) fire ecology; (3) water; (4) fish; (5) mammals; (6) mosquitos; (7) birds; (8) venomous snakes;…

  11. The Improved Kriging Interpolation Algorithm for Local Underwater Terrain Based on Fractal Compensation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengyun Chen

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The interpolation-reconstruction of local underwater terrain using the underwater digital terrain map (UDTM is an important step for building an underwater terrain matching unit and directly affects the accuracy of underwater terrain matching navigation. The Kriging method is often used in terrain interpolation, but, with this method, the local terrain features are often lost. Therefore, the accuracy cannot meet the requirements of practical application. Analysis of the geographical features is performed on the basis of the randomness and self-similarity of underwater terrain. We extract the fractal features of local underwater terrain with the fractal Brownian motion model, compensating for the possible errors of the Kriging method with fractal theory. We then put forward an improved Kriging interpolation method based on this fractal compensation. Interpolation-reconstruction tests show that the method can simulate the real underwater terrain features well and that it has good usability.

  12. Great Smoky Mountains National Park Geology

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The Digital Geologic Units of Great Smoky Mountains National Park and Vicinity, Tennessee and North Carolina consists of geologic units mapped as area (polygon)...

  13. Catoctin Mountain Park Tract and Boundary Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — These ESRI shape files are of National Park Service tract and boundary data that was created by the Land Resources Division. Tracts are numbered and created by the...

  14. San Francisco SFpark and parking information systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    SFpark is a demonstration of a new approach to parking management that : will evaluate the effectiveness of demand-responsive pricing and real-time : information on parking availability for reducing congestion and greenhouse gas : emissions and provi...

  15. Badlands National Park Tract and Boundary Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — These ESRI shape files are of National Park Service tract and boundary data that was created by the Land Resources Division. Tracts are numbered and created by the...

  16. Adminstrative Boundary for Glacier National Park, Montana

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The current administrative boundary of Glacier National Park, Montana. This data is based on 1:24000 scale USGS quad mapping published in 1968, but was revised in...

  17. Introduction Wind farms in complex terrains: an introduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredsson, P H; Segalini, A

    2017-04-13

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing sources of sustainable energy production. As more wind turbines are coming into operation, the best locations are already becoming occupied by turbines, and wind-farm developers have to look for new and still available areas-locations that may not be ideal such as complex terrain landscapes. In these locations, turbulence and wind shear are higher, and in general wind conditions are harder to predict. Also, the modelling of the wakes behind the turbines is more complicated, which makes energy-yield estimates more uncertain than under ideal conditions. This theme issue includes 10 research papers devoted to various fluid-mechanics aspects of using wind energy in complex terrains and illustrates recent progress and future developments in this important field.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  18. Selection of key terrain attributes for SOC model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greve, Mogens Humlekrog; Adhikari, Kabindra; Chellasamy, Menaka

    of predictors in Digital soil mapping of SOC. But there are no rules only few empirical guidelines on which digital terrain attributes to use. The aim of this paper was to select and the evaluate 21 digital terrain attributes and use the best for mapping. A typical 7500 km2 region located in Denmark...... was selected, total 2,514,820 data mining models were constructed by 71 differences grid from 12m to 2304m and 22 attributes, 21 attributes derived by DTM and the original elevation. Relative importance and usage of each attributes in every model were calculated. Comprehensive impact rates of each attribute...... which was processed by weighting, grouping, summation and normalization was taken as the important indicator in SOC model. The results showed that there use differences in the SOC model using different terrain attributes. Relative Slope Position(RSP), Channel Altitude(Chnl_alti),and Standard High...

  19. ISOSTATICALLY DISTURBED TERRAIN OF NORTHWESTERN ANDES MOUNTAINS FROM SPECTRALLY CORRELATED FREE-AIR AND GRAVITY TERRAIN DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hernández P Orlando

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Recently revised models on global tectonics describe the convergence of the North Andes, Nazca, Caribbean and South American Plates and their seismicity, volcanism, active faulting and extreme
    topography. The current plate boundaries of the area are mainly interpreted from volcanic and seismic datasets with variable confidence levels. New insights on the isostatic state and plate boundaries of
    the northwestern Andes Mountains can be obtained from the spectral analysis of recently available gravity and topography data.
    Isostatically disturbed terrain produces free-air anomalies that are highly correlated with the gravity effects of the terrain. The terrain gravity effects (TGE and free air gravity anomalies (FAGA of the
    Andes mountains spectral correlation data confirms that these mountains are isostatically disturbed. Strong negative terrain-correlated FAGA along western South America and the Greater and Lesser Antilles are consistent with anomalously deepened mantle displaced by subducting oceanic plates.

    Inversion of the compensated terrain gravity effects (CTGE reveals plate subduction systems with alternating shallower and steeper subduction angles. The gravity modeling highlights crustal
    deformation from plate collision and subduction and other constraints on the tectonism of the plate boundary zones for the region.

  20. National Zoological Park Branch Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenyon, Kay A.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the functions of the National Zoological Park Branch of the Smithsonian Institution Libraries, which is dedicated to supporting the special information needs of the zoo. Topics covered include the library's history, collection, programs, services, future plans, and relations with other zoo libraries. (two references) (Author/CLB)

  1. Ordance Survey Office, Phoenix Park

    OpenAIRE

    Brocas, Samuel Frederick (Irish cityscape painter, watercolorist, and draftsman, 1792-1847)

    2008-01-01

    The Ordnance Survey 'Office was located in Mountjoy House in the Phoenix Park. Mountjoy House was originally built in 1728. It later housed the mounted escort of the Lord Lieutenant who resided in the Vice-Regal Lodge (now Aras an Uachtarain). Mountjoy House and its surrounding buildings still serve as the headquarters.' (www.osi.ie/en/alist/history.aspx)

  2. 'Shockley park' stirs racism row

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwynne, Peter

    2009-07-01

    A local authority in Northern California has encountered unexpected resistance to its decision to name a park after the Nobel-prize-winning physicist William Shockley, with a coalition of churches and civic groups preparing to petition against the name at a meeting scheduled for 23 July.

  3. Accessibility and usability of parks and playgrounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Meredith A; Devan, Hemakumar; Fitzgerald, Harry; Han, Karen; Liu, Li-Ting; Rouse, Jack

    2017-09-08

    Public parks and playgrounds are an environment for leisure activity, which all generations can enjoy at low or no financial cost. Evaluating the accessibility and usability of parks and playgrounds is crucial because their design, environment (natural and built) and safety could restrict participation of persons with disabilities. To evaluate the accessibility and usability of 21 public parks and playgrounds in three metropolitan cities of New Zealand. Secondary aims were to compare the accessibility and usability by park type (destination or neighborhood) and deprivation level (high and low). Twenty-one parks were evaluated. A stratified random sampling was used to select 18 parks (six from each city). Three additional parks were purposely selected (one from each city) at the request of each respective city council. The parks and playgrounds were evaluated using a customized tool. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. None of the parks we evaluated met the national standards and/or international guidelines for park and playground design. We identified potential accessibility and usability issues with car parking spaces, path surfaces and play equipment as well as lack of lighting and fencing. The presence of amenities (e.g. toilets and drinking fountains) was more common in destination parks. Fewer parks in areas of higher deprivation had accessible car parking spaces and main paths wider than 1.5 m. Our evaluation identified potential design, environmental and safety barriers to park and playground based participation for persons with disabilities across the lifespan. A larger, more comprehensive evaluation of parks and playgrounds is required. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  4. Evaluating Urban Parking Policies with Agent-Based Model of Driver Parking Behavior

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martens, C.J.C.M.; Benenson, I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an explicit agent-based model of parking search in a city. In the model, “drivers” drive toward their destination, search for parking, park, remain at the parking place, and leave. The city’s infrastructure is represented by a high-resolution geographic information system (GIS)

  5. The impact of park development on the lives of local inhabitants within Gros Morne National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margot Herd; Paul. Heintzman

    2012-01-01

    The creation of a national park changes the local community's relationship to the land. In 1973, Parks Canada created Gros Morne National Park around existing communities and only relocated a small number of inhabitants to nearby communities. While park creation placed some restrictions on traditional activities, compromises were made to allow the continuation of...

  6. The on-street parking premium and car drivers' choice between street and garage parking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kobus, M.B.W.; Gutierrez Puigarnau, E.; Rietveld, P.; van Ommeren, J.N.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a methodology to estimate the effect of parking prices on car drivers' choice between street and garage parking. Our key identifying assumption is that the marginal benefit of parking duration does not depend on this choice. The endogeneity of parking duration is acknowledged in the

  7. Exact and approximate computations of watersheds on triangulated terrains

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tsirogiannis, Konstantinos; de Berg, Mark

    2011-01-01

    The natural way of modeling water flow on a triangulated terrain is to make the fundamental assumption that water follows the direction of steepest descent (dsd). However, computing watersheds and other flow-related structures according to the dsd model in an exact manner is difficult: the dsd...... implementation that computes watersheds on triangulated terrains following strictly the dsd model and using exact arithmetic, and we experimentally investigate its computational cost. Our experiments show that the algorithm cannot handle large data sets effectively, due to the bit-sizes needed in the exact...

  8. Terrain Quantization Model Based on Global Subdivision Grid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MENG Li

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To solve the current problems in terrain quantization, such as the limitation of grid levels, the difficulties in data organization and management, and other issues, a quadrilateral terrain quantization model based on global subdivision grid is proposed. The model adopts GeoSOT as the spatial reference, and realize the correlation and retrieval of quantization data among different layers based on GeoSOT location identification code, which provides methods of the the quantization procession, the organization and storage, the data aggregation of the vector data and regular grid data.

  9. Robotic concepts for operation in barren terrain. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowling, K. [Carnegie-Mellon Univ., Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    1993-01-01

    We have performed a series of studies and configurations for robots that are capable of operating in rough barren terrains. The environments we are targeting are like those of the moon or other planets in the roughness and starkness of the terrains, the loose and hard materials that range from sandy slopes to boulder fields, and the extremes of temperature that are encountered in such places. We present a mission scenario, requirements and then present and evaluate a mechanism design. Additional subsystem issues of power, communication, sensing, and computing are all addressed with respect to these requirements.

  10. SmartPark Technology Demonstration Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-01

    The purpose of FMCSAs SmartPark initiative is to determine the feasibility of a technology for providing truck parking space availability in real time to truckers on the road. SmartPark consists of two phases. Phase I was a field operational test ...

  11. Environmental interpretation in Uganda's national parks

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was undertaken in three of Uganda's forested national parks to provide informatiun on the status of environmental interpretation. Sixty questionnaires were administered to range guides and park wardens in Kibale, Rwenzori, and Mnunt. Elgon :"'ational Parks to collect information on job description of rangers and ...

  12. Theme Parks: Program Variety and Employment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Jack B.

    1983-01-01

    This article describes a number of privately operated theme parks, explains why the parks have been successful, and looks at career opportunities for leisure professionals in this expanding area. Implications for recreation education are pointed out, and names and addresses of major companies in the theme park business are provided. (PP)

  13. 36 CFR 7.45 - Everglades National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Everglades National Park. 7... SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.45 Everglades National Park. (a) Information... Everglades National Park may be transported through the park only over Indian Key Pass, Sand Fly Pass, Rabbit...

  14. 36 CFR 7.10 - Zion National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Zion National Park. 7.10 Section 7.10 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.10 Zion National Park. (a) Vehicle convoy requirements. (1...

  15. 36 CFR 7.38 - Isle Royale National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Isle Royale National Park. 7.38 Section 7.38 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.38 Isle Royale National Park. (a) Aircraft...

  16. 36 CFR 7.23 - Badlands National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Badlands National Park. 7.23 Section 7.23 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.23 Badlands National Park. (a) Commercial vehicles. (1...

  17. 36 CFR 7.14 - Great Smoky Mountains National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... National Park. 7.14 Section 7.14 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.14 Great Smoky Mountains National Park. (a) Fishing—(1) License. A person fishing within the park must have in possession the proper...

  18. 36 CFR 7.47 - Carlsbad Caverns National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Carlsbad Caverns National Park. 7.47 Section 7.47 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.47 Carlsbad Caverns National Park. (a...

  19. 36 CFR 7.54 - Theodore Roosevelt National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Theodore Roosevelt National Park. 7.54 Section 7.54 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.54 Theodore Roosevelt National Park. (a...

  20. 36 CFR 7.25 - Hawaii Volcanoes National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. 7.25 Section 7.25 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.25 Hawaii Volcanoes National Park. (a...

  1. 36 CFR 7.74 - Virgin Islands National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Virgin Islands National Park. 7.74 Section 7.74 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.74 Virgin Islands National Park. (a) (b...

  2. 36 CFR 7.56 - Acadia National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Acadia National Park. 7.56 Section 7.56 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.56 Acadia National Park. (a) Designated Snowmobile Routes...

  3. 36 CFR 7.11 - Saguaro National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Saguaro National Park. 7.11 Section 7.11 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.11 Saguaro National Park. (a) Bicycles. That portion of the...

  4. 36 CFR 7.33 - Voyageurs National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Voyageurs National Park. 7.33 Section 7.33 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.33 Voyageurs National Park. (a) Fishing. Unless otherwise...

  5. 36 CFR 7.5 - Mount Rainier National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mount Rainier National Park. 7.5 Section 7.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.5 Mount Rainier National Park. (a...

  6. 36 CFR 7.2 - Crater Lake National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Crater Lake National Park. 7.2 Section 7.2 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.2 Crater Lake National Park. (a) Fishing...

  7. 36 CFR 7.39 - Mesa Verde National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mesa Verde National Park. 7.39 Section 7.39 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.39 Mesa Verde National Park. (a) Visiting of...

  8. 36 CFR 7.15 - Shenandoah National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Shenandoah National Park. 7.15 Section 7.15 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.15 Shenandoah National Park. (a) Backcountry...

  9. 36 CFR 7.66 - North Cascades National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false North Cascades National Park. 7.66 Section 7.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.66 North Cascades National Park. (a...

  10. 36 CFR 7.41 - Big Bend National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Big Bend National Park. 7.41 Section 7.41 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.41 Big Bend National Park. (a) Fishing; closed waters...

  11. 36 CFR 7.44 - Canyonlands National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Canyonlands National Park. 7.44 Section 7.44 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.44 Canyonlands National Park. (a) Motorized...

  12. 36 CFR 7.93 - Guadalupe Mountains National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Guadalupe Mountains National Park. 7.93 Section 7.93 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.93 Guadalupe Mountains National Park...

  13. 36 CFR 7.18 - Hot Springs National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hot Springs National Park. 7.18 Section 7.18 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.18 Hot Springs National Park. (a) Commercial...

  14. 36 CFR 7.7 - Rocky Mountain National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Rocky Mountain National Park. 7.7 Section 7.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.7 Rocky Mountain National Park. (a...

  15. Eye Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your face helps protect your eyes from injury. Still, injuries can damage your eye, sometimes severely enough that you could lose your vision. Most eye injuries are preventable. If you play sports or work ...

  16. Ocular Injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Ocular Injury En Español What causes eye injuries ? Injuries ... only the eyelid but the structures that drain tears from the eye. Lacerations of the eyelid or ...

  17. Sports Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... sometimes you can injure yourself when you play sports or exercise. Accidents, poor training practices, or improper ... can also lead to injuries. The most common sports injuries are Sprains and strains Knee injuries Swollen ...

  18. gPark: Vehicle Parking Management System Using Smart Glass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rana E. Ahmed

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent advances in wearable technologies have opened new avenues for their applications in various fields. This paper presents the design, implementation, and testing results for a vehicle parking management system using smart Glass technology. The management system consists of four major interconnected applications. The most important one, running on the smart Glass, scans the vehicle number plate and extracts the related information in real time. The vehicle information is sent to the remote server for checking of any violation. The server sends the updates back to the Glass that allows the parking attendant to take further actions, if needed. The system was tested in real-life scenarios, and it was found that the detection accuracy up to 75% can be easily achieved with current hardware and software capabilities of the Google Glass.

  19. Head Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ATV) Safety Balance Disorders Knowing Your Child's Medical History First Aid: Falls First Aid: Head Injuries Preventing Children's Sports Injuries Getting Help: Know the Numbers Concussions Stay ...

  20. Integrating land cover and terrain characteristics to explain plague ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) statistical method was used to clarify the relationships between land cover and terrain variables with small mammals and fleas. Results indicate that elevation positively influenced the presence of small mammals. The presence of fleas was clearly influenced by land management features ...

  1. Scalable Algorithms for Large High-Resolution Terrain Data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølhave, Thomas; Agarwal, Pankaj K.; Arge, Lars Allan

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we demonstrate that the technology required to perform typical GIS computations on very large high-resolution terrain models has matured enough to be ready for use by practitioners. We also demonstrate the impact that high-resolution data has on common problems. To our knowledge, so...

  2. Modeling Air-Quality in Complex Terrain Using Mesoscale and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Air-quality in a complex terrain (Colorado-River-Valley/Grand-Canyon Area, Southwest U.S.) is modeled using a higher-order closure mesoscale model and a higher-order closure dispersion model. Non-reactive tracers have been released in the Colorado-River valley, during winter and summer 1992, to study the ...

  3. Terrain Mapping and Obstacle Detection Using Gaussian Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten; Massaro, Alessandro Salvatore; Bayramoglu, Enis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a probabilistic method for extracting terrain maps from a scene and use the information to detect potential navigation obstacles within it. The method uses Gaussian process regression (GPR) to predict an estimate function and its relative uncertainty. To test the new met...

  4. Terrain Mapping and Obstacle Detection using Gaussian Processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjærgaard, Morten; Massaro, Alessandro Salvatore; Bayramoglu, Enis

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we consider a probabilistic method for extracting terrain maps from a scene and use the information to detect potential navigation obstacles within it. The method uses Gaussian process regression (GPR) to predict an estimate function and its relative uncertainty. To test the new met...

  5. The retrieval of land surface albedo in rugged terrain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gao, B.; Jia, L.; Menenti, M.

    2012-01-01

    Land surface albedo may be derived from the satellite data through the estimation of a bidirectional reflectance distribution function (BRDF) model and angular integration. However many BRDF models do not consider explicitly the topography. In rugged terrain, the topography influences the observed

  6. How fine is fine enough when doing CFD terrain simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Bechmann, Andreas; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    The present work addresses the problem of establishing the necessary grid resolution to obtain a given level of numerical accuracy using a CFD model for prediction of flow over terrain. It is illustrated, that a very high resolution may be needed if the numerical difference between consecutive...

  7. How fine is fine enough when doing CFD terrain simulations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Niels N.; Bechmann, Andreas; Réthoré, Pierre-Elouan

    2012-01-01

    The present work addresses the problemof establishing the necessary grid resolution to obtain a given level of numerical accuracy using a CFD model for prediction of flow over terrain. It is illustrated, that a very high resolution may be needed if the numerical difference between consecutive...

  8. Simulation of Wind Farms in Flat & Complex terrain using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prospathopoulos, John; Cabezon, D.; Politis, E.S.

    2010-01-01

    Use of computational fluid dynamic (CFD) methods to predict the power production from wind entire wind farms in flat and complex terrain is presented in this paper. Two full 3D Navier–Stokes solvers for incompressible flow are employed that incorporate the k–ε and k–ω turbulence models respectively...

  9. Prediction of wind energy distribution in complex terrain using CFD

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Li, Chenqi; Yang, Jianchuan

    2013-01-01

    Based on linear models, WAsP software predicts wind energy distribution, with a good accuracy for flat terrain, but with a large error under complicated topography. In this paper, numerical simulations are carried out using the FLUENT software on a mesh generated by the GAMBIT and ARGIS software...

  10. Shape-assisted body reorientation enhances trafficability through cluttered terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chen; Pullin, Andrew; Haldane, Duncan; Fearing, Ronald; Full, Robert

    2014-11-01

    Many birds and fishes have slender, streamlined bodies that reduce fluid dynamic drag and allow fast and efficient locomotion. Similarly, numerous terrestrial animals run through cluttered terrain where 3-D, multi-component obstacles like grass, bushes, trees, walls, doors, and pillars also resist motion, but it is unknown whether their body shape plays a major role. Here, we challenged discoid cockroaches that possess a rounded, thin, nearly ellipsoidal body to run through tall, narrowly spaced, grass-like beams. The animals primarily rolled their body to the side to maneuver through the obstacle gaps. Reduction of body roundness by artificial shells inhibited this side roll maneuver, resulting in a lower traversal probability and a longer traversal time (P robot of a nearly cuboidal body. The rounded shell enabled the robot to use passive side rolling to maneuver through beams. To explain the mechanism, we developed a simple physics model to construct an energy landscape of the body-terrain interaction, which allowed estimation of body forces and torques exerted by the beams. Our model revealed that, by passive interaction with the terrain, a rounded body (ellipsoid) rolled more easily than an angular body (cuboid) to access energy valleys between energy barriers caused by obstacles. Our study is the first to demonstrate that a terradynamically ``streamlined'' shape can reduce terrain resistance and enhance trafficability by assisting body reorientation.

  11. Hydrogeophysical study of parts of charnockite terrain of Akure ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hydrogeophysical study of parts of Charnockite terrain of Akure, southwestern Nigeria was carried out using the electrical resistivity method. The study involved one hundred and fifty two (152) Schlumberger geoelectric soundings (with seven (7) of them parametric)) alongside static water level measurements in 102 ...

  12. Prediction of characteristics of coastal plain soils using terrain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soil properties determined include depth, sand, silt, clay, electrical and hydraulic conductivity, bulk density, pH, exchangeable calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium and acidity, available phosphorus, organic carbon, base saturation, crystalline and amorphous iron and aluminium oxides. The terrain attributes derived ...

  13. Effect of terrains on the volatiles of Cabernet Sauvignon wines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    These odorants are associated with “fruity'' and ''ripe fruit'' odor descriptors. Wine from flat land with higher OAVs of ethyl octanoate and isoamyl acetate seems to have more intense fruity aromas (pineapple, pear and banana), with floral notes. Keywords: Cabernet Sauvignon wines, volatiles, terrains, Loess Plateau region, ...

  14. Effect of terrains on the volatiles of Cabernet Sauvignon wines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-04-24

    Apr 24, 2012 ... from flat land with higher OAVs of ethyl octanoate and isoamyl acetate seems to have more intense fruity aromas (pineapple, pear and banana), with floral notes. Key words: Cabernet Sauvignon wines, volatiles, terrains, Loess Plateau region, headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME), gas ...

  15. Planning Routes Across Economic Terrains: Maximizing Utility, Following Heuristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hang; Maddula, Soumya V.; Maloney, Laurence T.

    2010-01-01

    We designed an economic task to investigate human planning of routes in landscapes where travel in different kinds of terrain incurs different costs. Participants moved their finger across a touch screen from a starting point to a destination. The screen was divided into distinct kinds of terrain and travel within each kind of terrain imposed a cost proportional to distance traveled. We varied costs and spatial configurations of terrains and participants received fixed bonuses minus the total cost of the routes they chose. We first compared performance to a model maximizing gain. All but one of 12 participants failed to adopt least-cost routes and their failure to do so reduced their winnings by about 30% (median value). We tested in detail whether participants’ choices of routes satisfied three necessary conditions (heuristics) for a route to maximize gain. We report failures of one heuristic for 7 out of 12 participants. Last of all, we modeled human performance with the assumption that participants assign subjective utilities to costs and maximize utility. For 7 out 12 participants, the fitted utility function was an accelerating power function of actual cost and for the remaining 5, a decelerating power function. We discuss connections between utility aggregation in route planning and decision under risk. Our task could be adapted to investigate human strategy and optimality of route planning in full-scale landscapes. PMID:21833269

  16. CALCULATION OF CHEMICAL ATMOSPHERE ESTIMATION GIVEN THE COMPLEX TERRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Biliaiev

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The 3D numerical model was used to simulate the toxic gas dispersion over a complex terrain after an accident spillage. The model is based on the K-gradient transport model and the model of potential flow. The results of numerical experiment are presented.

  17. Group Dynamics and Decision Making: Backcountry Recreationists in Avalanche Terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, Leslie Shay

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe and determine the prevalence of decision-making characteristics of recreational backcountry groups when making a decision of where to travel and ride in avalanche terrain from the perspective of individuals. Decision-making characteristics encompassed communication, decision-making processes, leadership,…

  18. Evaluation of topographic index in relation to terrain roughness and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    are upslope area, topographic index, stream power index, radiation index .... flat areas. The effect of smoothening and dis- cretisation were closely related to local terrain characteristics. However, the assessment of the topographic index is very ...... case study of two protected areas in Himalayan foothills;. Biodiversity and ...

  19. Effects of All-Terrain Vehicles on Stream Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anne Chin; Deven M. Rohrer; Daniel A. Marion; J. Alan Clingenpeel

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - This paper reports preliminary results from research conducted in the Ouachita National Forest to assess the effects of all-terrain vehicle (ATV) trails on stream characteristics. The study focuses on the Wolf Pen Gap Trail that has been in use since 1991. We examine whether that the trail system has caused increased sediment input to and...

  20. Terrain And Laboratory Conductivity Studies Of Flood Plains Of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A shallow electromagnetic study (electrical conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements) and laboratory conductivity sampling of the flood plains of Oluwatuyi/Oshinle area of Akure have been undertaken. This is with the aim of correlating the terrain conductivity mapping with laboratory measurements to establish ...

  1. Representations and Metrics for Time-Varying Terrain Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-06

    simpler computational models, such as deterministic finite automata , for which computational equivalence is computable that we are also investigating...Surge ............................................................... 10 3.3 Application of Interactive Mesh Differencing Tool...terrain analysis applications of the uncertainty band around the ridge surface The surface and volume structure will both be multi-resolution and

  2. Sculpting Mountains: Interactive Terrain Modeling Based on Subsurface Geology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordonnier, Guillaume; Cani, Marie-Paule; Benes, Bedrich; Braun, Jean; Galin, Eric

    2017-03-29

    Most mountain ranges are formed by the compression and folding of colliding tectonic plates. Subduction of one plate causes large-scale asymmetry while their layered composition (or stratigraphy) explains the multi-scale folded strata observed on real terrains. We introduce a novel interactive modeling technique to generate visually plausible, large scale terrains that capture these phenomena. Our method draws on both geological knowledge for consistency and on sculpting systems for user interaction. The user is provided hands-on control on the shape and motion of tectonic plates, represented using a new geologically-inspired model for the Earth crust. The model captures their volume preserving and complex folding behaviors under collision, causing mountains to grow. It generates a volumetric uplift map representing the growth rate of subsurface layers. Erosion and uplift movement are jointly simulated to generate the terrain. The stratigraphy allows us to render folded strata on eroded cliffs. We validated the usability of our sculpting interface through a user study, and compare the visual consistency of the earth crust model with geological simulation results and real terrains.

  3. Flow and wakes in complex terrain and offshore

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barthelmie, Rebecca J.; Schepers, J.G.; Pihl, Sander van der

    2007-01-01

    The paper presents research conducted in the Flow workpackage of the EU funded UPWIND project which focuses on improving models for flow within and downwind of large wind farms in complex terrain and offshore. The main activity is modelling the behaviour of wind turbine wakes in order to improve ...

  4. Interactive Editing of GigaSample Terrain Fields

    KAUST Repository

    Treib, Marc

    2012-05-01

    Previous terrain rendering approaches have addressed the aspect of data compression and fast decoding for rendering, but applications where the terrain is repeatedly modified and needs to be buffered on disk have not been considered so far. Such applications require both decoding and encoding to be faster than disk transfer. We present a novel approach for editing gigasample terrain fields at interactive rates and high quality. To achieve high decoding and encoding throughput, we employ a compression scheme for height and pixel maps based on a sparse wavelet representation. On recent GPUs it can encode and decode up to 270 and 730 MPix/s of color data, respectively, at compression rates and quality superior to JPEG, and it achieves more than twice these rates for lossless height field compression. The construction and rendering of a height field triangulation is avoided by using GPU ray-casting directly on the regular grid underlying the compression scheme. We show the efficiency of our method for interactive editing and continuous level-of-detail rendering of terrain fields comprised of several hundreds of gigasamples. © 2012 The Author(s).

  5. Crustal Structure around Ordos Terrain Derived from Ambient Noise Tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Ning, J.; Tang, Y.; Chen, Y. J.

    2011-12-01

    We performed Rayleigh wave tomography around Ordos terrain by applying the ambient noise method to broadband seismic data. The data was recorded at 85 temporary stations of PKU array operated along Yinchuan-Jinan and 410 permanent stations of CEA network operated between Eastern margin of Tibetan plateau and Huabei basin. Receiver function technique was also applied to study Moho discontinuity in Southern Ordos by PKU array. We developed a new stacking technique to obtain high-quality dispersion curves of Rayleigh waves from cross correlation of seismic ambient noise. This technique is based on phase-matched filter and was implemented in a four-step iterative process: signal compression, stacking, signal extraction and signal decompression. We stack all the compressed Estimated Green Functions that have almost the same path to improve signal to noise ratio. Results show that this new stacking method is stable and can improve the quality of ambient noise inversion. The inversion results present in this study are consistent with tectonic nature in this region. S velocity at depths of 0-10 km beneath Huabei plain, Sichuan basin and Ordos terrain are obviously lower than those beneath Eastern margin of Tibetan plateau. That is probably due to the thick sediments in Huabei plain, Sichuan basin and Ordos block. S velocity beneath Lvliang-Taihang region keeps high in whole crust and this may relate to Cenozoic intrusion of mantle material here. Our results revealed that the crust is thick in the southern part of the Ordos terrain while it is a little thin in the northern part. This confirmed the result given by Chen et al. (2010) and explained the contradiction between the work of Chen's and former results. The contrasting crustal thickness of the Ordos terrain is also in accord with our Receiver Function results. Receiver functions revealed two interfaces at about 40 km and 60 km in southern part of the Ordos terrain, comparing with only one located at about 40 km depth

  6. Synthesis and interpretation of surface-water quality and aquatic biota data collected in Shenandoah National Park, Virginia, 1979-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jastram, John D.; Snyder, Craig D.; Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Rice, Karen C.

    2013-01-01

    Shenandoah National Park in northern and central Virginia protects 777 square kilometers of mountain terrain in the Blue Ridge physiographic province and more than 90 streams containing diverse aquatic biota. Park managers and visitors are interested in the water quality of park streams and its ability to support healthy coldwater communities and species, such as the native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis), that are at risk in the eastern United States. Despite protection from local stressors, however, the water quality of streams in the park is at risk from many regional stressors, including atmospheric pollution, decline in the health of the surrounding forests because of invasive forest pests, and global climate change. In 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the National Park Service, undertook a study to compile, analyze, and synthesize available data on water quality, aquatic macroinvertebrates, and fish within Shenandoah National Park. Specifically, the effort focused on creating a comprehensive water-resources database for the park that can be used to evaluate temporal trends and spatial patterns in the available data, and characterizing those data to better understand interrelations among water quality, aquatic macroinvertebrates, fish, and the landscape.

  7. Flight-appropriate 3D Terrain-rendering Toolkit for Synthetic Vision Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TerraBlocksTM 3D terrain data format and terrain-block-rendering methodology provides an enabling basis for successful commercial deployment of...

  8. Autonomous terrain characterization and modelling for dynamic control of unmanned vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukder, A.; Manduchi, R.; Castano, R.; Owens, K.; Matthies, L.; Castano, A.; Hogg, R.

    2002-01-01

    This end-to-end obstacle negotiation system is envisioned to be useful in optimized path planning and vehicle navigation in terrain conditions cluttered with vegetation, bushes, rocks, etc. Results on natural terrain with various natural materials are presented.

  9. Buddingtonite in Menlo Park, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pampeyan, Earl H.

    2010-01-01

    The mineral buddingtonite, named after A.F. Buddington, long-time professor of petrology at Princeton University, was first identified at the Sulfur Bank mine in Lake County, California (Erd and others, 1964). The ammonium feldspar was recognized in Menlo Park, California, in 1964 by the author, with Erd's help, shortly before publication of the original description of the new mineral. Subsequently, buddingtonite has been widely recognized in hydrothermal mineral deposits and has been used in remote-sensing applications by the mineral industry. Buddingtonite also has been identified in the Phosphoria Formation and in oil shales of the Green River Formation. This paper briefly describes the geologic setting and mineralogy of the occurrences of buddingtonite and other ammonium-bearing minerals in the vicinity of Menlo Park.

  10. Rough terrain motion planning for actively reconfigurable mobile robots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brunner, Michael

    2015-02-05

    In the aftermath of the Tohoku earthquake and the nuclear meltdown at the power plant of Fukushima Daiichi in 2011, reconfigurable robots like the iRobot Packbot were deployed. Instead of humans, the robots were used to investigate contaminated areas. Other incidents are the two major earthquakes in Northern Italy in May 2012. Besides many casualties, a large number of historical buildings was severely damaged. Due to the imminent danger of collapse, it was too dangerous for rescue personnel to enter many of the buildings. Therefore, the sites were inspected by reconfigurable robots, which are able to traverse the rubble and debris of the partially destroyed buildings. This thesis develops a navigation system enabling wheeled and tracked robots to safely traverse rough terrain and challenging structures. It consists of a planning mechanism and a controller. The focus of this thesis, however, is on the contribution to motion planning. The planning scheme employs a hierarchical approach to motion planning for actively reconfigurable robots in rough environments. Using a map of the environment the algorithm estimates the traversability under the consideration of uncertainties. Based on this analysis, an initial path search determines an approximate solution with respect to the robot's operating limits.Subsequently, a detailed planning step refines the initial path where it is required. The refinement step considers the robot's actuators and stability in addition to the quantities of the first search. Determining the robot-terrain interaction is very important in rough terrain. This thesis presents two path refinement approaches: a deterministic and a randomized approach. The experimental evaluation investigates the separate components of the planning scheme, the robot-terrain interaction for instance.In simulation as well as in real world experiments the evaluation demonstrates the necessity of such a planning algorithm in rough terrain and it provides

  11. Sovremennoje iskusstvo v angliskom parke

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2003-01-01

    Performance-kunsti rühmituse Virus (Alan Holligan, Stewart Bennett ja Ewan Robertson Edinburghist) projekt "Sekkumine - kaasaegne kunst inglise pargis" toimub Väliskunsti muuseumis, Mikkeli muuseumis ja selle ümbruses. Inspiratsiooniks on Kadrioru park ning parginäitused Mikkeli ja Väliskunsti muuseumis. Radical Loyalty projektist, millele pani aluse Chris Evans (Glasgow) 2002. a. ja mille raames plaanitakse skulptuuripargi rajamist Järvakandisse. Evansi projekt presentatsiooni formaadis toimub Mikkeli muuseumis video ja fotode abil

  12. Heritage Park Facilities PV Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hobaica, Mark [City of Henderson Nevada, Henderson, NV (United States)

    2013-09-26

    Project Objective: To procure a photovoltaic array (PV) system which will generate approximately 256kW of power to be used for the operations of the Aquatic Complex and the adjacent Senior Facility at the Heritage Park. This project complies with the EERE’s work and objectives by promoting the development and deployment of an energy system that will provide current and future generations with clean, efficient, affordable, and reliable energy.

  13. Patterns of outdoor recreational injury in northern British Columbia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besserer, Floyd A; Caron, Nadine R

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the patterns of severe injury documented at a northern British Columbia regional trauma center based on age, sex, month of year, activity type, injury type, and injury severity as they relate to participation in outdoor recreational activities. A retrospective analysis of data abstracted from the British Columbia Trauma Registry for patients sustaining injuries between April 1, 2004, and March 31, 2007, while engaged in outdoor recreational activities in the Northern Health Authority. The British Columbia Trauma Registry inclusion criteria are as follows: 1) admitted for treatment of injuries sustained from the transfer of external energy or force; 2) admitted to the facility within 7 days of injury; and 3) length of stay more than 2 days or in-hospital mortality. In all, 159 patients met study criteria. August and September were peak injury months (mean 7.3 and 7.0 per month, respectively). The highest injury patterns involved cycling (n = 31), all-terrain vehicle operation (n = 30), horseback riding (n = 22), and snowmobiling (n = 22). Of the 159 patients, 76.1% were male, with a peak age distribution between 10 years and 19 years (22%). Males were more commonly injured than females among cycling (83.9%), all-terrain vehicle (86.7%), and snowmobile (100%) traumas. Females were more commonly injured from horseback riding events (42.1%). This study emphasizes the need for rapid translation of research findings into injury prevention awareness and programming in northern British Columbia, particularly relating to cycling, horseback riding, snowmobiling, and all-terrain vehicle operation. Further investigation is required to analyze long-term outcomes for this common injury population. Wilderness Medical Society.

  14. Legislation in Québec for all-terrain vehicles: are we doing enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaudin, Marianne; Dunand, Laure; Piché, Nelson; Rousseau, Elizabeth; St-Vil, Dickens

    2014-03-01

    All-terrain vehicle (ATV) legislation in Québec is among the most restrictive in Canada. The purpose of our study was to characterize the pediatric ATV traumas in our center and determine the impact of legislation. Retrospective chart review of all patients seen in the emergency department after an ATV injury was done from 2005 to 2011. Seventy-tree patients (50 boys and 23 girls) with a mean age of 11 years (range, 3-17 years) were identified. Forty-nine percent were drivers, 40% were passengers, and 11% unknown. Forty-five percent did not reach the legal age of 16 years. Helmet use was documented in 36%. Eighty-five percent were admitted to the floor, and 15% were discharged from the emergency department. Intensive care unit stay was necessary in 21%, and 60% were operated on. Most of the surgeries were for orthopedic, either extremities, spine, or pelvic (80%). The most frequent types of trauma were extremities (30%), head (30%), and face (25%). Head trauma was severe in 23%. Hospitalization rates for ATV injuries have remained unchanged in the last years. Despite implementation of ATV legislation regarding helmet use and minimal legal age, a lot of our patients did not obey these rules. This study demonstrates that strong legislation did not have a real impact on ATV morbidity in children. It is essential to develop strategies to enforce ATV users to respect legislation.

  15. Digital terrain model evaluation and computation of the terrain correction and indirect effect in South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denizar Blitzkow

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The main objectives of this paper are to compare digital terrain models, to show the generated models for South America and to present two applications. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM produced the most important and updated height information in the world. This paper addresses the attention to comparisons of the following models: SRTM3, DTM2002, GLOBE, GTOPO30, ETOPO2 and ETOPO5, at the common points of the grid. The comparisons are limited by latitudes 60º S and 25 º N and longitudes 100 º W and 25 º W. All these data, after some analysis, have been used to create three models for South America: SAM_1mv1, SAM_1mv2 (both of 1' grid spacing and SAM_30s (30" grid spacing. Besides this effort, the three models as well as STRM were evaluated using Bench Marks (BM in Brazil and Argentina. This paper also shows two important geodesy and geophysics applications using the SAM_1mv1: terrain correction (one of the reductions applied to the gravity acceleration and indirect effect (a consequence of the reduction of the external mass to the geoid. These are important at Andes for a precise geoid computation.Los objetivos principales de este documento son comparar modelos digitales del continente; enseñar los modelos generados para Sudamérica y presentar dos aplicaciones. Shuttle Radar Topography Mission (SRTM produjo la información más importante y más actualizada de las altitudes del mundo. Este trabajo centra su atención en las comparaciones de los modelos siguientes: SRTM3, DTM2002, GLOBO, GTOPO30, ETOPO2 y ETOPO5, en los puntos comunes de la rejilla. Las comparaciones son limitadas por las latitudes 60º S y 25 º N y longitudes 100 º W y 25 º W. Todos estos datos, después de los análisis, se han utilizado para crear tres modelos para Sudamérica: SAM_1mv1, SAM_1mv2 (1' de espaciamiento de la rejilla y SAM_30s (30" de espaciamiento de la rejilla. Los tres modelos bien como el STRM fueron evaluados usando puntos de referencia de

  16. Inhalation Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inhalation injuries are acute injuries to your respiratory system and lungs. They can happen if you breathe in toxic substances, such as smoke (from fires), chemicals, particle pollution, and gases. Inhalation injuries can also be caused by extreme heat; these are a type of thermal injuries. ...

  17. Analyzing complex wake-terrain interactions and its implications on wind-farm performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tabib, Mandar; Rasheed, Adil; Fuchs, Franz

    2016-09-01

    Rotating wind turbine blades generate complex wakes involving vortices (helical tip-vortex, root-vortex etc.).These wakes are regions of high velocity deficits and high turbulence intensities and they tend to degrade the performance of down-stream turbines. Hence, a conservative inter-turbine distance of up-to 10 times turbine diameter (10D) is sometimes used in wind-farm layout (particularly in cases of flat terrain). This ensures that wake-effects will not reduce the overall wind-farm performance, but this leads to larger land footprint for establishing a wind-farm. In-case of complex-terrain, within a short distance (say 10D) itself, the nearby terrain can rise in altitude and be high enough to influence the wake dynamics. This wake-terrain interaction can happen either (a) indirectly, through an interaction of wake (both near tip vortex and far wake large-scale vortex) with terrain induced turbulence (especially, smaller eddies generated by small ridges within the terrain) or (b) directly, by obstructing the wake-region partially or fully in its flow-path. Hence, enhanced understanding of wake- development due to wake-terrain interaction will help in wind farm design. To this end the current study involves: (1) understanding the numerics for successful simulation of vortices, (2) understanding fundamental vortex-terrain interaction mechanism through studies devoted to interaction of a single vortex with different terrains, (3) relating influence of vortex-terrain interactions to performance of a wind-farm by studying a multi-turbine wind-farm layout under different terrains. The results on interaction of terrain and vortex has shown a much faster decay of vortex for complex terrain compared to a flatter-terrain. The potential reasons identified explaining the observation are (a) formation of secondary vortices in flow and its interaction with the primary vortex and (b) enhanced vorticity diffusion due to increased terrain-induced turbulence. The implications of

  18. Configuration study of large wind parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundberg, Stefan

    2003-07-01

    In this thesis, layouts of various large-scale wind parks, using both AC as well as DC, are investigated. Loss modelling of the wind park components as well as calculations of the energy capture of the turbines using various electrical systems are performed, and the energy production cost of the various park configurations is determined. The most interesting candidate for a DC transmission based wind park was investigated more in detail, the series DC wind park. Finally, the power quality impact in the PCC (point of common coupling) was studied. It was found that from an energy capture point of view, the difference in energy production between various wind turbine systems is very small. Of all the investigated wind park configurations, the wind park with the series connected DC wind turbines seems to have the best potential to give the lowest energy production cost, if the transmission distance is longer then 10-20 km. Regarding the series DC wind park it was found that it is the most difficult one to control. However, a control algorithm for the series park and its turbines was derived and successfully tested. Still, several more details regarding the control of the series wind park has to be dealt with.

  19. A new method for determination of most likely landslide initiation points and the evaluation of digital terrain model scale in terrain stability mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Tarolli

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper introduces a new approach for determining the most likely initiation points for landslides from potential instability mapped using a terrain stability model. This approach identifies the location with critical stability index from a terrain stability model on each downslope path from ridge to valley. Any measure of terrain stability may be used with this approach, which here is illustrated using results from SINMAP, and from simply taking slope as an index of potential instability. The relative density of most likely landslide initiation points within and outside mapped landslide scars provides a way to evaluate the effectiveness of a terrain stability measure, even when mapped landslide scars include run out zones, rather than just initiation locations. This relative density was used to evaluate the utility of high resolution terrain data derived from airborne laser altimetry (LIDAR for a small basin located in the Northeastern Region of Italy. Digital Terrain Models were derived from the LIDAR data for a range of grid cell sizes (from 2 to 50 m. We found appreciable differences between the density of most likely landslide initiation points within and outside mapped landslides with ratios as large as three or more with the highest ratios for a digital terrain model grid cell size of 10 m. This leads to two conclusions: (1 The relative density from a most likely landslide initiation point approach is useful for quantifying the effectiveness of a terrain stability map when mapped landslides do not or can not differentiate between initiation, runout, and depositional areas; and (2 in this study area, where landslides occurred in complexes that were sometimes more than 100 m wide, a digital terrain model scale of 10 m is optimal. Digital terrain model scales larger than 10 m result in loss of resolution that degrades the results, while for digital terrain model scales smaller than 10 m the physical processes responsible for triggering

  20. Paediatric injury from indoor trampoline centres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Christopher S; Adams, Susan; Brown, Julie

    2017-10-01

    Indoor trampoline parks are increasing as a source of injuries among children. We conducted a prospective cohort study, with semi-structured interview and medical record review, of children aged trampoline park. In a 6-month period in 2014, 40 such children (55% female) presented to the department. Common mechanisms were individual jumpers falling while attempting a somersault or trick, landing awkwardly on an obstacle such as a ball or protective padding, and multiple users on a single trampoline. Most sustained soft tissue injuries (n=22, 55%) and fractured bones (n=15, 37.5%). One child sustained an unstable cervical fracture/dislocation. Unlike domestic trampolines, where the majority of injuries occur from falling off, most trampoline-park injuries occur on the trampoline surface. These differences require injury prevention strategies that engage children, carers and businesses to meet best practice design and management standards. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  1. The Rocks and Fossils of Glacier National Park: The Story of Their Origin and History

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Clyde P.; Rezak, Richard

    1959-01-01

    The story of Glacier National Park begins about 500 million years ago, at a time when there were no mountains in the region - only a vast, exceedingly shallow sea, bordered by desolate plains. The sand, clay, and mud, in part very limy, that were laid down in this sea eventually hardened into the rocks that are now known as the Belt series. These are the principal rocks in the park. Scattered through these rocks are crinkled, limy masses of many forms, the remains of deposits made by colonies of algae. After the Belt series was laid down, successive seas slowly advanced and retreated through long ages across what is now Glacier National Park, burying the Belt rocks under younger ones. After another very long time, a gentle uplift, the forerunner of later events, brought this part of the continent above the reach of sea water for the last time. Much later, some 50 million years ago, the disturbance became far more intense. To climax this upheaval, a mass of rock thousands of feet thick and hundreds of miles long was shoved eastward for 35 miles or more. This tremendous dislocation, well exposed along the eastern boundary of the park, is known as the Lewis overthrust. When the rocks of the region emerged from the sea they began to be attacked by erosion. As successive periods of crustal movement and erosion continued, the younger rocks were slowly stripped off the Belt series and sculpture of the latter by weather and water shaped the early Rocky Mountains. The final episode in the park's geologic past was the ice age, beginning about a million years ago. Repeated advances and retreats of the great glaciers in the high valleys accentuated the mountain terrain and developed the scenic grandeur that is now Glacier National Park. One may say that the park is still in the ice age, for some glaciers still exist. The present report, companion to two more technical reports on the region, informally presents the story of the park's development through past eras for readers

  2. Evaluation of terrain geomorphometric characteristics for ground clearance charts production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirko A. Borisov

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Geomorphometric exploration applied in the military terrain analysis is based on the GIS methodology of spatial analyses and is related primarily to military terrain analyses. It includes relief assessment aiming at producing ground clearance charts for the analysis of terrain maneuverability and its deployment, cover and concealment possibilities. An evaluation analysis of geomorphological parameters was performed for the Avala test area using a few terrain parameters (visibility, terrain aspect and slope as well as some terrain qualitative categories (e.g. vegetation density. Terrain slope Slope and aspect are morphometric terrain parameters that can be derived directly from the DTM using some GIS operations. Slope is the first derivative of a surface and has both magnitude and direction. Slope is perhaps the most important aspect of the surface form, since surfaces are formed completely of slopes, and slope angles control the gravitational force available for geomorphic work. Mathematically, the tangent of the slope angle is the first derivative of altitude, and it is a tangent or percent slope as this surface parameter is generally referred to. Slope is defined at each point as the slope of a plane tangent to the surface at that point. In practice, however, slope is generally measured over a finite distance, especially when data are obtained from a contour map. Terrain aspect Aspect is also the first derivative of a surface and has both magnitude and direction. The term aspect is defined as the direction of the biggest slope vector on the tangent plane projected onto the horizontal plane. Aspect is the bearing (or azimuth of the slope direction, and its angle ranges from 0 to 360°. Analyses of terrain slope and ground clearance for military forces The analysis of land assessment of the Avala test area included the definition of relief categories in relation to cover and concealment purposes with the aim to include the geomorphological basis

  3. Using game engine for 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Che Mat, Ruzinoor; Shariff, Abdul Rashid Mohammed; Nasir Zulkifli, Abdul; Shafry Mohd Rahim, Mohd; Hafiz Mahayudin, Mohd

    2014-06-01

    This paper reviews on the 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data using game engines that are available in the market as well as open source. 3D terrain visualisation is a technique used to visualise terrain information from GIS data such as a digital elevation model (DEM), triangular irregular network (TIN) and contour. Much research has been conducted to transform the 2D view of map to 3D. There are several terrain visualisation softwares that are available for free, which include Cesium, Hftool and Landserf. This review paper will help interested users to better understand the current state of art in 3D terrain visualisation of GIS data using game engines.

  4. Open Days: information on CERN parking

    CERN Multimedia

    2013-01-01

    The organising team for the Open Days (28-29 September) would like to inform you that some parking sites in Meyrin and Prévessin will have to be kept free as of 18 September for the installation of tents and marquees.   Next week, CERN Management will address parking concerns and give you more information on other parking possibilities. The Open Day organising team thanks you for your cooperation and apologises for any inconvenience.

  5. Comparing English, Mandarin, and Russian Hydrographic and Terrain Categories

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Chen-Chieh [National University of Singapore; Sorokine, Alexandre [ORNL

    2013-01-01

    The paper compares hydrographic and terrain categories in the geospatial data standards of the US, Taiwan, and Russian Federation where the dominant languages used are from di erent language families. It aims to identify structural and semantic di erences between similar categories across three geospatial data standards. By formalizing the data standard structures and identifying the properties that di erentiate sibling categories in each geospatial data standard using well-known formal relations and quality universals, we develop a common basis on which hydrographic and terrain categories in the three data standards can be compared. The result suggests that all three data standards structure categories with a mixture of relations with di erent meaning even though most of them are well-known relations in top-level ontologies. Similar categories can be found across all three standards but exact match between similar categories are rare.

  6. Quantifying Traversability of Terrain for a Mobile Robot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Ayanna; Seraji, Homayoun; Werger, Barry

    2005-01-01

    A document presents an updated discussion on a method of autonomous navigation for a robotic vehicle navigating across rough terrain. The method involves, among other things, the use of a measure of traversability, denoted the fuzzy traversability index, which embodies the information about the slope and roughness of terrain obtained from analysis of images acquired by cameras mounted on the robot. The improvements presented in the report focus on the use of the fuzzy traversability index to generate a traversability map and a grid map for planning the safest path for the robot. Once grid traversability values have been computed, they are utilized for rejecting unsafe path segments and for computing a traversalcost function for ranking candidate paths, selected by a search algorithm, from a specified initial position to a specified final position. The output of the algorithm is a set of waypoints designating a path having a minimal-traversal cost.

  7. Terrain, expérimentation et sciences sociales

    OpenAIRE

    Fleury-Vilatte, Béatrice; Walter, Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Consacrés au terrain et à la méthode expérimentale, ces « Échanges » donnent la parole à cinq chercheurs appartenant à différentes disciplines. C’est du côté de la mythologie que Stéphane Olivesi place le terrain dès lors qu’il en situe les usages et légitimations dans le champ académique. Pour sa part, Thierry Meyer mène une réflexion sur la validité externe des approches expérimentales. Françoise Bernard et Robert-Vincent Joule discutent de l’intérêt à intégrer une méthodologie d’inspiratio...

  8. Hierarchical stochastic model of terrain subsidence during tunnel excavation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janda, Tomáš; Šejnoha, Jiří; Šejnoha, Michal

    2017-09-01

    In this contribution the Bayesian statistical method is applied to assess the expected probability distribution of the terrain subsidence in the course of tunnel excavation. The approach utilizes a number of simplifying assumptions regarding the system kinematics to arrive at a very simple model with just a few degrees of freedom. This deterministic model together with the intrinsic uncertainties of its parameters and measurement inaccuracies are used to formulate the stochastic model which defines a distribution of the predicted values of terrain subsidence. Assuming the measured data to be fixed, the stochastic model thus defines the likelihood function of the model parameters which is directly used for updating their prior distribution. This way the model parameters can be incrementally updated with each excavation step and the prediction of the model refined.

  9. Introduction Wind farms in complex terrains: an introduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfredsson, P. H.; Segalini, A.

    2017-01-01

    Wind energy is one of the fastest growing sources of sustainable energy production. As more wind turbines are coming into operation, the best locations are already becoming occupied by turbines, and wind-farm developers have to look for new and still available areas—locations that may not be ideal such as complex terrain landscapes. In these locations, turbulence and wind shear are higher, and in general wind conditions are harder to predict. Also, the modelling of the wakes behind the turbines is more complicated, which makes energy-yield estimates more uncertain than under ideal conditions. This theme issue includes 10 research papers devoted to various fluid-mechanics aspects of using wind energy in complex terrains and illustrates recent progress and future developments in this important field. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Wind energy in complex terrains’. PMID:28265020

  10. Optimization of Wind Farm Layout in Complex Terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xu, Chang; Yang, Jianchuan; Li, Chenqi

    2013-01-01

    Microscopic site selection for wind farms in complex terrain is a technological difficulty in the development of onshore wind farms. This paper presented a method for optimizing wind farm layout in complex terrain. This method employed Lissaman and Jensen wake models, took wind velocity....... To calculate the output of each section, we used the wind speed distribution and its probability density as well as the wake loss between wind turbines for every section. The objective function is maximization of the whole wind farm's power output and the free variables are the wind turbines' coordinates which...... distribution law and wake loss between different turbines into consideration and calculated the sheltering area effect of wake loss from upstream wind turbines on downstream wind turbines. Wind direction was divided into sixteen sections, and the wind speed was processed by the Weibull distribution...

  11. Exploring en-route parking type and parking-search route choice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaplan, Sigal; Bekhor, Sholomo

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the first phase of an on-going research investigating the joint choice of parking type, parking facility and cruising-for-parking route. The importance of this issue derives from the significant share of cruising-for-parking traffic in urban areas, the relevance of parking...... policies as travel demand management tools, the growing interest in parking guidance information systems, and the need for representing parking-search behavior in traffic assignment and micro-simulation models. This paper addresses two main topics. First, the development of a methodological framework...... is introduced, including a behavioral model, its mathematical representation and the variable specification. Second, the design of a two-wave field survey accompanies the framework, with the aim of revealing the determinants of cruising-for-parking by retrieving both self-reported and GPS data. This paper...

  12. Incentives and Disincentives for Day Visitors to Park and Ride Public Transportation at Acadia National Park

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    F Matthew Holly; Jeffrey C Hallo; Elizabeth D Baldwin; Fran P Mainella

    2010-01-01

    .... As parks and protected areas such as Acadia continue to implement alternative transportation strategies, it is important to understand both who is likely to use public transportation in parks and why...

  13. Brick castles of Panemune regional park: Aspects of regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inga Genytė

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The regeneration of brick castles of Panemunė Regional Park in Lithuania was influenced by the political, economic, and social environment. The motives of their regeneration was the function of state border defence, installation of fortifications for the occupation of new lands, function of defence of the state internal and transit trade routes, function of the protection of noblemen’s property, and the function of strengthening of the territorial control. Two characteristic castle development tendencies were revealed: one witnessed further development under local construction traditions, while another reflected the examples of the European construction. The architecture of castles was shaped by the military tactics, development of military technique, local terrain, the wellbeing of the castle owners, their hierarchical role and demands, construction traditions, and the development of construction technology. The architectural forms varied from dungeon to palace. The changing social demands encouraged the choice of new solutions for castle regeneration in order to increase the comfort level conditions and cost-effectiveness of the premises.

  14. Terrain traversability analysis methods for unmanned ground vehicles: A survey

    OpenAIRE

    Papadakis, Panagiotis

    2013-01-01

    International audience; Motion planning for unmanned ground vehicles (UGV) constitutes a domain of research where several disciplines meet, ranging from artificial intelligence and machine learning to robot perception and computer vision. In view of the plurality of related applications such as planetary exploration, search and rescue, agriculture, mining and off-road exploration, the aim of the present survey is to review the field of 3D terrain traversability analysis that is employed at a ...

  15. A Survey of Terrain Modeling Technologies and Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-09-01

    esthetically pleasing, is not the best representa- tion of the true digital terrain elevations. The results also show that this Automatic Feature...economical and easily available in the market . • With independent control of quality of data immediately after delivery and before final payment...recommended by the GDATP/GIST team). Collection LIDAR data from an airplane must more economical and easily available in market . • With independent

  16. Functional Decomposition of Modeling and Simulation Terrain Database Generation Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-19

    necessary, the method selected depends upon the relative maturity of functionality between the soft - ware products. Attribute values such as the...most important M&S key thrust areas are (1) credibly modeling mili- tary systems and Soldiers and (2) developing realistic environmental representa...distributor of M&S terrain databases is a logical extension of its geospatial core competencies and consistent with its role as an Army Geo - spatial

  17. An Intelligent Assistant for Construction of Terrain Databases

    OpenAIRE

    Rowe, Neil C.; Reed, Chris; Jackson, Leroy; Baer, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    1998 Command and Control Research and Technology Symposium, Monterey CA, June 1998, 481-486. We describe TELLUSPLAN, an intelligent assistant for the problem of bargaining between user goals and system resources in the integration of terrain databases from separate source databases. TELLUSPLAN uses nondeterministic methods from artificial intelligence and a detailed cost model to infer the most reasonable compromise with the user's needs. Supported by the Army Artificial Int...

  18. Mountain Terrain Atmospheric Modeling and Observations (MATERHORN) Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-09

    been edited and appeared in the journal Boundary Layer Meteorology. It is entitled: Mountainous Terrain: Results from MATERJ-IORN-X (June 2016...Nocturnal Boundary-Layer Evolution on a Slope at the Foot of a Desert Mountain , Journal of Applied Meteorology. 54( 4), 732-751. Marjanovic, N., Wharton...Layer Heights over an Isolated Mountain : Cases from the MA TERHORN-2012 Experiment. Journal o.f Applied Meteorology and Climatology, 55, 1927- 1952

  19. The effect of terrain slope on firefighter safety zone effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bret Butler; J. Forthofer; K. Shannon; D. Jimenez; D. Frankman

    2010-01-01

    The current safety zone guidelines used in the US were developed based on the assumption that the fire and safety zone were located on flat terrain. The minimum safe distance for a firefighter to be from a flame was calculated as that corresponding to a radiant incident energy flux level of 7.0kW-m-2. Current firefighter safety guidelines are based on the assumption...

  20. Amphibians of Olympic National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    ,

    2000-01-01

    Amphibians evolved from fishes about 360 million years ago and were the first vertebrates adapted to life on land. The word amphibian means "double life." It refers to the life history of many amphibians, which spend part of their life in water and part on land. There are three major groups of amphibians: salamanders, frogs, and toads, and caecilians. Salamanders, frogs, and toads can be found in Olympic National Park (ONP), but caecilians live only in tropical regions. Many amphibians are generalist predators, eating almost any prey they can fit into their mouths.

  1. Park Accessibility Impacts Housing Prices in Seoul

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Han Park

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Housing prices are determined by a variety of factors, including the features of the building and the neighborhood environment, and a potential buyer decides to buy a house after reviewing these factors and concluding that it is worth the price. We used Hedonic Price Methods to find the relationship between monetary value of house and access conditions to urban parks. Two meaningful results were discovered in this study: first, as the distance from the park increases, the value of the park inherent in the housing price decreases; second, the greater walking accessibility, to the park, the higher the park value inherent in housing prices. Despite presenting shorter distances to walk and more entrances, poorly accessible zones were deemed as such due to the necessity of crossing an arterial road. This indicates that the results can define accessibility not as the Euclidian distance but as the shortest walking distance while considering crossroads and park entrances. The results of this study have significant implications for urban park economic impact analyses in Seoul. Also, the increase in housing prices closer to parks supports the idea that access is dependent on the residents’ socioeconomic status. Lastly, the results of this study can improve walking accessibility to the park.

  2. Topological Landscapes: A Terrain Metaphor for ScientificData

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weber, Gunther H.; Bremer, Peer-Timo; Pascucci, Valerio

    2007-08-01

    Scientific visualization and illustration tools are designed to help people understand the structure and complexity of scientific data with images that are as informative and intuitive as possible. In this context, the use of metaphors plays an important role, since they make complex information easily accessible by using commonly known concepts. In this paper we propose a new metaphor, called 'Topological Landscapes', which facilitates understanding the topological structure of scalar functions. The basic idea is to construct a terrain with the same topology as a given dataset and to display the terrain as an easily understood representation of the actual input data. In this projection from an n-dimensional scalar function to a two-dimensional (2D) model we preserve function values of critical points, the persistence (function span) of topological features, and one possible additional metric property (in our examples volume). By displaying this topologically equivalent landscape together with the original data we harness the natural human proficiency in understanding terrain topography and make complex topological information easily accessible.

  3. Performance of a wind turbine over a ridged terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santoni, Christian; Ciri, Umberto; Leonardi, Stefano

    2016-11-01

    Performance of wind turbines is affected by their interaction with the topography. Low momentum flow from the terrain may impinge the turbine resulting in fatigue loads that may reduce durability. However, at the same time it may promote the transport of momentum and kinetic energy into the wake improving the power production on the downstream turbines. In order to address how the topography affects the flow, Large Eddy Simulations of a wind turbine located on a wavy surface are performed. The height variation of the topography is described by a sinusoidal wave. Two different amplitudes were considered, 0 . 10 D and 0 . 05 D , where D is the rotor diameter. The wavelength has been kept constant to 3 D . The effect of the relative position of rotor and terrain geometry was assessed by placing the turbine either at the crest or at the trough of the undulated wall. NREL-5MW turbine blades were modeled using the actuator line model whereas the tower, nacelle and topography using the immersed boundary method. A simulation of a wind turbine on a flat terrain was performed as reference case. The performance of the turbine was evaluated in terms of the power production and blade load fluctuations, as well as for the energy entrainment into the wake of the turbine. The numerical simulations were performed on XSEDE TACC under Grant No. CTS070066. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation, Grant Number IIA-1243482 (the WINDINSPIRE project).

  4. ROAMing terrain (Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duchaineau, M.; Wolinsky, M.; Sigeti, D.E.; Miller, M.C.; Aldrich, C.; Mineev, M.

    1997-07-01

    Terrain visualization is a difficult problem for applications requiring accurate images of large datasets at high frame rates, such as flight simulation and ground-based aircraft testing using synthetic sensor stimulation. On current graphics hardware, the problem is to maintain dynamic, view-dependent triangle meshes and texture maps that produce good images at the required frame rate. We present an algorithm for constructing triangle meshes that optimizes flexible view-dependent error metrics, produces guaranteed error bounds, achieves specified triangle counts directly, and uses frame-to-frame coherence to operate at high frame rates for thousands of triangles per frame. Our method, dubbed Real-time Optimally Adapting Meshes (ROAM), uses two priority queues to drive split and merge operations that maintain continuous triangulations built from pre-processed bintree triangles. We introduce two additional performance optimizations: incremental triangle stripping and priority-computation deferral lists. ROAM execution time is proportionate to the number of triangle changes per frame, which is typically a few percent of the output mesh size, hence ROAM performance is insensitive to the resolution and extent of the input terrain. Dynamic terrain and simple vertex morphing are supported.

  5. CFD three dimensional wake analysis in complex terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castellani, F.; Astolfi, D.; Terzi, L.

    2017-11-01

    Even if wind energy technology is nowadays fully developed, the use of wind energy in very complex terrain is still challenging. In particular, it is challenging to characterize the combination effects of wind ow over complex terrain and wake interactions between nearby turbines and this has a practical relevance too, for the perspective of mitigating anomalous vibrations and loads as well improving the farm efficiency. In this work, a very complex terrain site has been analyzed through a Reynolds-averaged CFD (Computational Fluid Dynamics) numerical wind field model; in the simulation the inuence of wakes has been included through the Actuator Disk (AD) approach. In particular, the upstream turbine of a cluster of 4 wind turbines having 2.3 MW of rated power is studied. The objective of this study is investigating the full three-dimensional wind field and the impact of three-dimensionality on the evolution of the waked area between nearby turbines. A post-processing method of the output of the CFD simulation is developed and this allows to estimate the wake lateral deviation and the wake width. The reliability of the numerical approach is inspired by and crosschecked through the analysis of the operational SCADA (Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition) data of the cluster of interest.

  6. A city park on top of shops and a dike

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Veelen, P.C.; Voorendt, M.Z.; van der Zwet, C; Kothuis, Baukje; Kok, Matthijs

    2017-01-01

    The Roof Park ('Dakpark’) is an elevated park on a former railway yard in the Delfshaven quarter in Rotterdam. The park is located on top of the roof of a new shopping centre, which includes a parking garage (hence its name, ‘dak’ means ‘roof’). The park is the

  7. 36 CFR 7.13 - Yellowstone National Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Yellowstone National Park. 7... SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.13 Yellowstone National Park. (a) Commercial... Yellowstone National Park; said point being approximately in latitude 44°18′22.8″ N., at longitude 110°20′04.8...

  8. 78 FR 44596 - Minor Boundary Revision at Yosemite National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... National Park Service Minor Boundary Revision at Yosemite National Park AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. ACTION: Notification of Boundary Revision. SUMMARY: The boundary of Yosemite National Park is... boundary of Yosemite National Park. DATES: The effective date of this boundary revision is July 24, 2013...

  9. 36 CFR 7.78 - Harpers Ferry National Historical Park.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Harpers Ferry National Historical Park. 7.78 Section 7.78 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.78 Harpers Ferry National...

  10. Snowboarding injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sachtleben, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    Snowboarding has gained immense popularity during the past 30 years and continues to appeal to many young participants. Injury patterns and characteristics of injuries seen commonly in snowboarders have rapidly evolved during this time. Risk factors have emerged, and various methods of reducing injuries to snowboarders have been investigated. It is important that medical providers are knowledgeable about this growing sport and are prepared to adequately evaluate and treat snowboarding injuries. This article will review the issues and discuss diagnostic and treatment principles regarding injuries seen commonly in snowboarders. Injury prevention should be emphasized, particularly with young riders and beginners.

  11. 78 FR 22470 - Special Regulations; Areas of the National Park System; Yellowstone National Park; Winter Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... barometric pressure (high altitude) exception. The SAE J1161 test procedures require barometric pressure... National Park Service 36 CFR Part 7 RIN 1024-AE15 Special Regulations; Areas of the National Park System... make the park cleaner and quieter than what has been authorized during the previous four winter seasons...

  12. 76 FR 28388 - Special Regulations, Areas of the National Park System, Mammoth Cave National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-17

    ... surface was designed to offer a comparatively easy, family-style bicycle trail as opposed to the single... National Park Service (NPS) proposes to designate four bicycle routes within Mammoth Cave National Park... in order to allow off- road bicycle use on routes outside of developed park areas. Authorizing routes...

  13. Noise management of industrial parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senden, Virgini [HFP Acoustical Consultants Corp (Canada)], email: virgini.senden@hfpacoustical.com

    2011-07-01

    Because of industrial development, more noise-producing facilities are being built, with negative noise impacts on local residents' lives and comfort. The question raised by this paper is which way would be the best to ensure both acceptable noise impact, and efficient industrial facilities operations? The author presents two approaches: the {sup r}egional noise management plan{sup ,} adopted in Alberta, leaves the different industries present in the region in charge of noise emissions, working both together and individually to maintain acceptable noise pollution levels. The zoned industrial parks approach, in effect in the Netherlands, where industrial parks are situated within a noise zone, outside of which noise impact should be reduced to levels that do not disturb residents. Both approaches are effective, but demand a great deal of effort to achieve noise efficiency. The Alberta approach, thanks to its specificity and the collaborative work of all actors involved, facilitates continuous improvement while the Dutch approach is more rigid, but better suited to industry realities and the space that is available in the Netherlands.

  14. 75 FR 3488 - Acadia National Park; Bar Harbor, ME; Acadia National Park Advisory Commission; Notice of Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-21

    ... National Park Service Acadia National Park; Bar Harbor, ME; Acadia National Park Advisory Commission.... 92-463, 86 Stat. 770, 5 U.S.C. App. 1, Sec. 10), that the Acadia National Park Advisory Commission... concerning this meeting may be obtained from the Superintendent, Acadia National Park, P.O. Box 177, Bar...

  15. 76 FR 61266 - Special Regulations; Areas of the National Park System, Grand Teton National Park, Bicycle Routes...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-04

    ..., Grand Teton National Park, Bicycle Routes, Fishing and Vessels AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior... (Park) as routes for bicycle use. National Park Service (NPS) regulations require issuance of a special regulation to designate bicycle routes that are located off park roads and outside developed areas. The first...

  16. Trampoline injuries

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Nysted, M; Drogset, J O

    2006-01-01

    To describe the mechanism, location and types of injury for all patients treated for trampoline-associated injuries at St Olav's University Hospital, Trondheim, Norway, from March 2001to October 2004...

  17. Golf Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... driver and go! Seek the advice of a sports medicine specialist in your area if any injury occurs ... Golf Injuries Tip Sheet. American Orthopedic Society for Sports Medicine. 2009. www.sportsmed.org www.uskidsgolf.com www. ...

  18. Spinal injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000029.htm Spinal injury To use the sharing features on this page, ... move anyone who you think may have a spinal injury, unless it is absolutely necessary. For example, if ...

  19. Urethral Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... include pelvic fractures and straddle injuries to the perineum. The perineum is the area between the anus and the ... tissues of the penis, scrotum, abdominal wall, or perineum. Complications that can result from urethral injuries include ...

  20. Knee Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Staying Safe Videos for Educators Search English Español Knee Injuries KidsHealth / For Teens / Knee Injuries What's in ... can do to protect them. What's in a Knee? The knee is a joint , actually the largest ...

  1. Mapping wilderness character in Olympic National Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    James Tricker; Peter Landres; Jennifer Chenoweth; Roger Hoffman; Scott Ruth

    2013-01-01

    The Olympic Wilderness was established November 16, 1988 when President Ronald Reagan signed the Washington Park Wilderness Act. A total of 876,447 acres or 95% of Olympic National Park (OLYM) was designated as wilderness and became a part of the National Wilderness Preservation System, wherein wilderness character would be preserved. The purpose of this project was to...

  2. Marketing national parks: oxymoron or opportunity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan K. Hogenauer

    2002-01-01

    Although the "national park" concept is universally acknowledged, marketing of the 4,000+ areas so designated worldwide varies dramatically. Some park systems - such as those of Canada and Australia ? are extensively marketed, in the sense that considerable resources are devoted to traditional strategic and tactical approaches to the potential user. Other...

  3. Parking regulations on the CERN sites

    CERN Multimedia

    General Infrastructure Services Department

    2010-01-01

    The site surveillance service is also responsible for supervising compliance with the parking regulations on the CERN site. In that context, it ensures that the following rules are complied with on the CERN car park: Vehicles may not be left on a CERN car park for longer than 5 consecutive working days. However, CERN users are entitled to leave their vehicles parked at CERN for a longer period in the car park near Building 588 , subject to completing the application form "Demande d'autorisation pour un stationnement de longue durée" (application for a long-term parking permit) and sending it to the Reception and Access Control Service (access.surveillance@cern.ch) prior to departure.   Parking spaces, which are in short supply in many crowded areas of the CERN site, must not be occupied by abandoned vehicles/wrecks. The service organizes the disposal of such vehicles. Any CERN users wishing to get rid of a private vehicle parked on one of the CERN car pa...

  4. Urban forests and parks as privacy refuges

    Science.gov (United States)

    William E. Hammitt

    2002-01-01

    Urban forests and parks are forested areas that can serve as refuges for privacy. This article presents a conceptual argument for urban forests and parks as privacy refuges, and data that support the argument. On-site visitors (n = 610) to four Cleveland, Ohio, U.S., Metroparks were surveyed in 1995. Results indicated that considerable amounts of privacy were obtained...

  5. Instruction and Delight: Theme Parks and Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Margaret J.

    Education continues to operate as an enclave of elite culture and is battling for interest and respect with the mass media, technology, and the popular arts. These cultures must be brought together. Using the creative ideas generated by theme parks is an effective method of importing popular culture into the schools. Theme parks provide a total…

  6. Domestic parking estimation using remotely sensed data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramzi, Ahmed

    2012-10-01

    Parking is an integral part of the traffic system everywhere. Provision of parking facilities to meet peak of demands parking in cities of millions is always a real challenge for traffic and transport experts. Parking demand is a function of population and car ownership which is obtained from traffic statistics. Parking supply in an area is the number of legal parking stalls available in that area. The traditional treatment of the parking studies utilizes data collected either directly from on street counting and inquiries or indirectly from local and national traffic censuses. Both methods consume time, efforts, and funds. Alternatively, it is reasonable to make use of the eventually available data based on remotely sensed data which might be flown for other purposes. The objective of this work is to develop a new approach based on utilization of integration of remotely sensed data, field measurements, censuses and traffic records of the studied area for studying domestic parking problems in residential areas especially in informal areas. Expected outcomes from the research project establish a methodology to manage the issue and to find the reasons caused the shortage in domestics and the solutions to overcome this problems.

  7. Spatial Vegetation Data for Voyageurs National Park Vegetation Mapping Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — The vegetation spatial database coverage is of Voyageurs National Park and extended environs, covering 156,886 hectares (387,674 acres). Voyageurs National Park...

  8. Cape Cod National Seashore parking management system pilot synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    The Cape Cod National Seashore (CACO) has undertaken a program to improve parking management at its beach parking lots, and to provide information about parking availability to CACO visitors. This project will build upon work already accomplished, to...

  9. Great Smoky Mountains National Park Brook Trout Genetics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) is committed to monitoring ecological and evolutionary functions and processes of park ecosystems. Brook trout (Salvelinus...

  10. Mesa Verde National Park Wastewater Treatment Facility NPDES Permit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Under NPDES permit number CO-0034398, the United States Department of the Interior, National Park Service, Mesa Verde National Park is authorized to discharge from the Mesa Verde National Park wastewater treatment plant, in Montezuma County, Colo.

  11. Tendon Injuries

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... What OT Can Do: Video For Professionals Ethics Tendon Injuries When a person experiences a tendon injury in the hand that affects the ability ... plan. What can a person with a hand tendon injury do? Implement a home exercise program recommended ...

  12. iParking: an intelligent indoor location-based smartphone parking service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jingbin; Chen, Ruizhi; Chen, Yuwei; Pei, Ling; Chen, Liang

    2012-10-31

    Indoor positioning technologies have been widely studied with a number of solutions being proposed, yet substantial applications and services are still fairly primitive. Taking advantage of the emerging concept of the connected car, the popularity of smartphones and mobile Internet, and precise indoor locations, this study presents the development of a novel intelligent parking service called iParking. With the iParking service, multiple parties such as users, parking facilities and service providers are connected through Internet in a distributed architecture. The client software is a light-weight application running on a smartphone, and it works essentially based on a precise indoor positioning solution, which fuses Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN) signals and the measurements of the built-in sensors of the smartphones. The positioning accuracy, availability and reliability of the proposed positioning solution are adequate for facilitating the novel parking service. An iParking prototype has been developed and demonstrated in a real parking environment at a shopping mall. The demonstration showed how the iParking service could improve the parking experience and increase the efficiency of parking facilities. The iParking is a novel service in terms of cost- and energy-efficient solution.

  13. Capacity Analysis Of Parking Lot And Volume Of Vehicle Toward Sustainable Parking Convenience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herdiansyah, Herdis; Sugiyanto; Guntur Octavianto, Andrew; Guntur Aritonang, Edison; Nova Imaduddin, Malya; Dedi; Rilaningrum, Magfira

    2017-10-01

    The development of human's population is having effect on the increase of facilities and transportation needs. One of the primary problems is the availability of parking area. This has occurred in Universitas Indonesia (UI), mainly in Salemba Campus. The availability of land is not as equal as the number of vehicles, which are to be parked, that is why the convenience of students, lecturers and employees at UI is unsatisfactory. The purpose of this paper is to know the level of parking convenience that is affected by the capacity of parking lots and the volume of vehicles in UI Salemba Campus. The results of this research indicate Salemba campus's parking index. The motor index is still in the category of medium (index 0.945) and the car parking index has less category with a parking index 0.485. While with the location of research object being behind the UI Salemba campus, the results obtained were both the motor and the car are still in the category of “enough” with the parking index of, that is 0.657 for the motor and 0.777 for the car. So theoretically, the parking management at Salemba Campus is in an unsustainable parking degree because, if there is no long-term solution, it will increase congestion in the surrounding area and intensify the dissatisfaction of existing parking users.

  14. iParking: An Intelligent Indoor Location-Based Smartphone Parking Service

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Chen

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Indoor positioning technologies have been widely studied with a number of solutions being proposed, yet substantial applications and services are still fairly primitive. Taking advantage of the emerging concept of the connected car, the popularity of smartphones and mobile Internet, and precise indoor locations, this study presents the development of a novel intelligent parking service called iParking. With the iParking service, multiple parties such as users, parking facilities and service providers are connected through Internet in a distributed architecture. The client software is a light-weight application running on a smartphone, and it works essentially based on a precise indoor positioning solution, which fuses Wireless Local Area Network (WLAN signals and the measurements of the built-in sensors of the smartphones. The positioning accuracy, availability and reliability of the proposed positioning solution are adequate for facilitating the novel parking service. An iParking prototype has been developed and demonstrated in a real parking environment at a shopping mall. The demonstration showed how the iParking service could improve the parking experience and increase the efficiency of parking facilities. The iParking is a novel service in terms of cost- and energy-efficient solution.

  15. New Literacies in Schome Park

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillen, Julia

    In this chapter I deploy a synthesis of methods I term virtual literacy ethnography to investigate the diverse literacy practices of the Schome Park project (SPP). This project worked with teenagers on the first European "closed" (i.e. protected) island in the 3D virtual world Teen Second LifeTM (TSL) as described in the previous chapter. Firstly I introduce an ethnographic perspective on this lengthy, rich project and reflect on my own interpretive approach. Introducing my own focus of interest, the new literacy practices fostered by the environment and in particular activities I judge to be especially creative, I begin to develop the methodology of a "virtual literacy ethnography". I show how the diverse multimodal affordances of the communicative domains are imaginatively exploited by the students, supported by peers and staff in an environment characterised by "fluid leadership". I include some analysis of literacy work around a genre traditionally valued by educators, a dictionary, which I was not involved in at the time. I suggest this is an exemplar literacy practice, creative in itself and illustrative of the methodological possibilities and of course limitations linked with the technologies utilised. Traditional distinctions between "reading" and "writing" become permeable in interesting ways as new creative practices, fostered by the environment of the Schome Park programme, emerged. I offer support for Kress's (2005) claim that changes in writing and reading practices amount to a "revolution in the world of communication." In conclusion, I claim that virtual literacy ethnography, as I have proposed it here, can be fruitful in exploring the complexity and creativity of the students' literacy practices, although more developmental work is needed.

  16. TERRAIN TECTONICS OF THE CENTRAL ASIAN FOLDED BELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Buslov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The terrain analysis concept envisages primarily a possibility of approximation of fragments / terrains of various geodynamic settings which belong to different plates. The terrain analysis can supplement the theory of plate tectonics in solving problems of geodynamics and tectonics of regions of the crust with complex structures. The Central Asian belt is among such complicated regions. Terrain structures occurred as a result of combined movements in the system of 'frontal' and/or oblique subduction – collision. In studies of geological objects, it is required first of all to prove their (vertical and horizontal autochthony in relations to each other and then proceed to paleogeodynamic, paleotectonic and paleogeographic reconstructions. Obviously, such a complex approach needs data to be obtained by a variety of research methods, including those applied to study geologic structures, stratigraphy, paleontology, paleogeography, lithothlogy, geochemistry, geochronology, paleomagnetism etc. Only by correlating such data collected from inter-disciplinary studies of the regions, it is possible to establish reliable characteristics of the geological settings and avoid mistakes and misinterpretations that may be associated with the 'stratigraphic' approach to solutions of both regional and global problems of geodynamics and tectonics of folded areas. The terrain analysis of the Central Asian folded belt suggests that its tectonic structure combines marginal continental rock complexes that were formed by the evolution of two major oceanic plates. One of them is the plate of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. As the analogue of the current Indo-Atlantic segment of Earth, it is characterised by the presence of continental blocks in the composition of the oceanic crust and the formation of oceanic basins resulting from the breakup of Rodinia and Gondvana. In the course of its evolution, super-continents disintegrated, and the blocks were reunited into the Kazakhstan

  17. TERRAIN TECTONICS OF THE CENTRAL ASIAN FOLDED BELT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. M. Buslov

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The terrain analysis concept envisages primarily a possibility of approximation of fragments / terrains of various geodynamic settings which belong to different plates. The terrain analysis can supplement the theory of plate tectonics in solving problems of geodynamics and tectonics of regions of the crust with complex structures. The Central Asian belt is among such complicated regions. Terrain structures occurred as a result of combined movements in the system of 'frontal' and/or oblique subduction – collision. In studies of geological objects, it is required first of all to prove their (vertical and horizontal autochthony in relations to each other and then proceed to paleogeodynamic, paleotectonic and paleogeographic reconstructions. Obviously, such a complex approach needs data to be obtained by a variety of research methods, including those applied to study geologic structures, stratigraphy, paleontology, paleogeography, lithothlogy, geochemistry, geochronology, paleomagnetism etc. Only by correlating such data collected from inter-disciplinary studies of the regions, it is possible to establish reliable characteristics of the geological settings and avoid mistakes and misinterpretations that may be associated with the 'stratigraphic' approach to solutions of both regional and global problems of geodynamics and tectonics of folded areas. The terrain analysis of the Central Asian folded belt suggests that its tectonic structure combines marginal continental rock complexes that were formed by the evolution of two major oceanic plates. One of them is the plate of the Paleo-Asian Ocean. As the analogue of the current Indo-Atlantic segment of Earth, it is characterised by the presence of continental blocks in the composition of the oceanic crust and the formation of oceanic basins resulting from the breakup of Rodinia and Gondvana. In the course of its evolution, super-continents disintegrated, and the blocks were reunited into the Kazakhstan

  18. Linearized simulation of flow over wind farms and complex terrains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalini, Antonio

    2017-04-13

    The flow over complex terrains and wind farms is estimated here by numerically solving the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The equations are linearized around the unperturbed incoming wind profile, here assumed logarithmic. The Boussinesq approximation is used to model the Reynolds stress with a prescribed turbulent eddy viscosity profile. Without requiring the boundary-layer approximation, two new linear equations are obtained for the vertical velocity and the wall-normal vorticity, with a reduction in the computational cost by a factor of 8 when compared with a primitive-variables formulation. The presence of terrain elevation is introduced as a vertical coordinate shift, while forestry or wind turbines are included as body forces, without any assumption about the wake structure for the turbines. The model is first validated against some available experiments and simulations, and then a simulation of a wind farm over a Gaussian hill is performed. The speed-up effect of the hill is clearly beneficial in terms of the available momentum upstream of the crest, while downstream of it the opposite can be said as the turbines face a decreased wind speed. Also, the presence of the hill introduces an additional spanwise velocity component that may also affect the turbines' operations. The linear superposition of the flow over the hill and the flow over the farm alone provided a first estimation of the wind speed along the farm, with discrepancies of the same order of magnitude for the spanwise velocity. Finally, the possibility of using a parabolic set of equations to obtain the turbulent kinetic energy after the linearized model is investigated with promising results.This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  19. Linearized simulation of flow over wind farms and complex terrains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Segalini, Antonio

    2017-03-01

    The flow over complex terrains and wind farms is estimated here by numerically solving the linearized Navier-Stokes equations. The equations are linearized around the unperturbed incoming wind profile, here assumed logarithmic. The Boussinesq approximation is used to model the Reynolds stress with a prescribed turbulent eddy viscosity profile. Without requiring the boundary-layer approximation, two new linear equations are obtained for the vertical velocity and the wall-normal vorticity, with a reduction in the computational cost by a factor of 8 when compared with a primitive-variables formulation. The presence of terrain elevation is introduced as a vertical coordinate shift, while forestry or wind turbines are included as body forces, without any assumption about the wake structure for the turbines. The model is first validated against some available experiments and simulations, and then a simulation of a wind farm over a Gaussian hill is performed. The speed-up effect of the hill is clearly beneficial in terms of the available momentum upstream of the crest, while downstream of it the opposite can be said as the turbines face a decreased wind speed. Also, the presence of the hill introduces an additional spanwise velocity component that may also affect the turbines' operations. The linear superposition of the flow over the hill and the flow over the farm alone provided a first estimation of the wind speed along the farm, with discrepancies of the same order of magnitude for the spanwise velocity. Finally, the possibility of using a parabolic set of equations to obtain the turbulent kinetic energy after the linearized model is investigated with promising results. This article is part of the themed issue 'Wind energy in complex terrains'.

  20. Management approach of Keibul Lamjao National Park in Loktak Lake, Manipur using water balance analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliza, Khwairakpam; Khosa, Rakesh; Gosain, Ashvani; Nema, Arvind

    2017-04-01

    Keibul Lamjao National Park (KLNP) is situated in Loktak Lake which is a Ramsar designated and Montreaux record listed wetland. KLNP, the only floating national park in the world, is the only natural home of Manipur's brow-antlered deer popularly known as Sangai. Naturally, this natural park has ecological phenomenon of sinking during dry season and staying afloat during rainy season. The primary objective of this study is to formulate management approach for the conservation of KLNP by developing water balance models and correlating to the ecological processes of KLNP. Lake water balance models for two scenarios, Pre and Post Ithai barrage construction have been developed considering various parameters such as direct precipitation, runoff from the sub-basins, evaporation from the open water surface, evapotranspiration from Phumdis and domestic consumption. Hydropower generation, irrigation purposes and releases through the Ithai Barrage are also considered in Post Ithai barrage scenario. Run-off from each sub-basins have been simulated from hydrological-hydraulic models developed using Coupled MIKE SHE, MIKE 11 and SWAT. SWAT is used to model hilly terrain region of each hydrological-hydraulic models and runoff obtain from SWAT have been integrated as input data in MIKE SHE-MIKE11 models. Models have been calibrated and validated using observed runoff for hydrological-hydraulic models and observed lake water level for water balance models. The performance of each hydrological-hydrodynamic and water balance models have been assessed using Nash-Sutcliffe coefficient (E) and Coefficient of determination (R2) and the overall efficiency is found to be greater than 0.80. The obtained results have been investigated for causal correlation with the deteriorating ecological condition of the national park to formulate management approach. Results demonstrate the requirement to consider ecology of KLNP while developing wetland water-level management plans.

  1. Wind farm design in complex terrain: the FarmOpt methodology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feng, Ju; Shen, Wen Zhong; Hansen, Kurt Schaldemose

    Designing wind farms in complex terrain is becoming more and more important, especially for countries like China, where a large portion of the territory is featured as complex terrain. Although potential richer wind resources could be expected at complex terrain sites (thanks to the terrain effects......), they also expose many challenges for wind farm designers/developers. In this study, we present the FarmOpt methodology for designing wind farms in complex terrain, which combines the state-of-the-art wind resource assessment methods with engineering wake models adapted for complex terrain and advanced...... layout optimization algorithms. Various constraints are also modelled and considered in the design optimization problem for maximizing the annual energy production (AEP). A case study is presented to illustrate the effectiveness of the methodology. Further developments of the FarmOpt tool are also...

  2. Atmospheric studies in complex terrain: a planning guide for future studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orgill, M.M.

    1981-02-01

    The objective of this study is to assist the US Department of Energy in Conducting its atmospheric studies in complex terrain (ASCOT0 by defining various complex terrain research systems and relating these options to specific landforms sites. This includes: (1) reviewing past meteorological and diffusion research on complex terrain; (2) relating specific terrain-induced airflow phenomena to specific landforms and time and space scales; (3) evaluating the technical difficulty of modeling and measuring terrain-induced airflow phenomena; and (4) avolving severdal research options and proposing candidate sites for continuing and expanding field and modeling work. To evolve research options using variable candidate sites, four areas were considered: site selection, terrain uniqueness and quantification, definition of research problems and research plans. 36 references, 111 figures, 20 tables.

  3. Program Merges SAR Data on Terrain and Vegetation Heights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siqueira, Paul; Hensley, Scott; Rodriguez, Ernesto; Simard, Marc

    2007-01-01

    X/P Merge is a computer program that estimates ground-surface elevations and vegetation heights from multiple sets of data acquired by the GeoSAR instrument [a terrain-mapping synthetic-aperture radar (SAR) system that operates in the X and bands]. X/P Merge software combines data from X- and P-band digital elevation models, SAR backscatter magnitudes, and interferometric correlation magnitudes into a simplified set of output topographical maps of ground-surface elevation and tree height.

  4. Complementary terrain/single beacon-based AUV navigation

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Maurya, P.; Curado, T.F.; António, P.

    Complementary Terrain/Single Beacon-Based AUV Navigation � Pramod Maurya ∗,∗∗ Francisco Curado Teixeira ∗∗∗ Anto´nio Pascoal ∗ ∗ Laboratory for Robotics and Systems in Engineering and Science, Instituto Superior Te´cnico, Av. Rovisco Pais 1, 1049-001 Lisboa... new architecture that brings together TAN and SBN whereby a TAN algorithm is also fed with the ranges between the marine robot and an underwater transponder installed at a known location. Our aim is to show analytically, via the computation...

  5. Evaluating planetary digital terrain models-The HRSC DTM test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heipke, C.; Oberst, J.; Albertz, J.; Attwenger, M.; Dorninger, P.; Dorrer, E.; Ewe, M.; Gehrke, S.; Gwinner, K.; Hirschmuller, H.; Kim, J.R.; Kirk, R.L.; Mayer, H.; Muller, Jan-Peter; Rengarajan, R.; Rentsch, M.; Schmidt, R.; Scholten, F.; Shan, J.; Spiegel, M.; Wahlisch, M.; Neukum, G.

    2007-01-01

    The High Resolution Stereo Camera (HRSC) has been orbiting the planet Mars since January 2004 onboard the European Space Agency (ESA) Mars Express mission and delivers imagery which is being used for topographic mapping of the planet. The HRSC team has conducted a systematic inter-comparison of different alternatives for the production of high resolution digital terrain models (DTMs) from the multi look HRSC push broom imagery. Based on carefully chosen test sites the test participants have produced DTMs which have been subsequently analysed in a quantitative and a qualitative manner. This paper reports on the results obtained in this test. ?? 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Micro- and meso-scale effects of forested terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dellwik, Ebba; Mann, Jakob; Sogachev, Andrey

    2011-01-01

    The height and rotor diameter of modern wind turbines are so extensive, that the wind conditions they encounter often are well above the surface layer, where traditionally it is assumed that wind direction and turbulent fluxes are constant with respect to height, if the surface is homogenous...... scales are the height of the planetary boundary layer and the Monin-Obukhov length, which both are related to the energy balance of the surface. Examples of important micro- and meso-scale effects of forested terrain are shown using data and model results from recent and ongoing experiments. For micro...

  7. Spinal Cord Injury 101

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ... Injury Chart Spinal Cord Injury Facts and Figures Care and Treatment After SCI Spinal Cord Injury Rehabilitation ...

  8. The Cyber War: Maintaining and Controlling the Key Cyber Terrain of the Cyberspace Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-26

    geographic position. The definition of critical geographic terrain is clear. It may include a hill, a crossing point of a river or lake, or a valley.1...serve as a definition of key cyber terrain. The five planes are also illustrated in Figure 1.14 1) Supervisory Plane. The supervisory plane provides...terrain (e.g., adversary characteristics and possible adversary actions) are consistent. • A claim or hypothesis is meaningful to a specific real

  9. Optimal parking orbits for manned Mars missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cupples, Michael L.; Nordwall, Jill A.

    This paper summarizes a Mars parking orbit optimization effort. This parking orbit study includes the selection of optimal elliptic Mars parking orbits that meet mission constraints and that include pertinent apsidal misalignment losses. Mars missions examined are for the opportunity years of 2014, 2016, and 2018. For these mission opportunities, it is shown that the optimal parking orbits depend on the year that the mission occurs and are coupled with the outbound, Mars stay, and return phases of the mission. Constraints included in the parking orbit optimization process are periapsis lighting angle (related to a daylight landing requirement), periapsis latitude (related to a landing latitude range requirement) and the vehicle Trans-Earth-Injection stage mass. Also, effects of mission abort requirements on optimal parking orbits are investigated. Off-periapsis maneuvers for Mars orbit capture were found to be cost effective in reducing the mission delta-V for the 2016 abort from Mars capture scenario. The total capture and departure delta-V was `split' between the capture maneuver and the departure maneuver to reduce the 2016 Mars departure delta-V to below the level of the corresponding stage of the 2014 baseline mission. Landing results are provided that show Mars landing site access from the optimal elliptic parking orbits for Mars excursion vehicles with low (0.2) and high (1.3 and 1.6) lift to drag ratio.

  10. THE COMPETITIVENESS FACTORS OF INDUSTRIAL PARKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kóródi László

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available 2013 Romania shows the bigger economic development than in the last years and increases the GDP by 3,5%, that was the most significant growth in the EU. The biggest contributing sector to this expansion is the industry. This sector contributed the most with 2,3% to this growth. The importance of the industry in a country’s development not only the Romania`s case, but for other economies too. More and more authors emphasise the importance of Industrial parks, they act as pull factors. The effects of the industrial placements like the industrial parks are multiple regarding a region’s development and competitiveness. The most of these benefits are well known already, but the competitiveness of the industrial parks is not a frequent theme, tough this will contribute to the competitiveness of the region. What are the basic and decisive factors that influence the final decision of the companies to choose a particular industrial park? While analysing the competitiveness factors of industrial parks I intend to emphasize the reasons and factors that influences companies in their decision to appear in the industrial parks that they are resident in. The purpose of this paper is to present all the important factors in the same place that make an industrial park competitive. First I want to present the factors that were identified by now based on theoretical, and practical experiences starting from some second hand information. The caracteristics of the successful parks will br presented with the well-kown examples, and also with caese not known to everybody. Some of the reasons why industrial companies chooses a park are well kown, for example the placement, the good accesibility, for which is essential a good infrastructure. Another decisive factor is the suport of the state and the local autorities, the most important factors are tax and other costs relief. There are more things that influance companies in choosing their sites.

  11. Demographics, nature and treatment of orthopaedic trauma injuries occurring in an agricultural context in the West of Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Byrne, F J

    2011-03-01

    Farming is a major industry in the West of Ireland. This prospective study examined the age profile, nature and treatment of orthopaedic injuries occurring in agricultural surroundings presenting at the Orthopaedic Unit of Merlin Park Hospital, Galway.

  12. A Large-scale Terrain Transmission Mechanism Based on Hybrid P2P

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    YU Zhanwu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In large scale terrain roaning systems, the terrain visualization components are usually running on the localhost and terrain datasets are stored in the remote server.The server should guarantee the certain response delay and realize the teal-time tendering of huge-scale terrain when the number of user is limited. However. as the number of clients is quickly increasing, the server performance will no rapidly to satisfy the client real-time tendering requirement. Peer-to-peer (P2P technologies can efficiently reduce the bandwidth consumption of the server by the means of utilizing the client nodes' resource. The paper combines the C/S and peer-to-peer into 2 new data transmission mode for large terrain data transmission. First, it gives a new model for data transmission and new' structure for client node. Then it presents the management of peers and the look-up of terrain blocks in the new mode. Also it presents a kind of optimal algorithm for terrain block scheduling. The optimal algorithm can improve the terrain data transmitting speed and be adapted to the network change. Fault-tolerance and security are also considered in the paper. We build a prototype system and compare the new mechanism with traditional unicast mode. Experimental results have shown that the new mechanism can make the server's bad lighter than the old mode in the case of equal number of user requests and improve greatly the response time of the terrain block request.

  13. Parking demand estimation in shopping malls

    OpenAIRE

    Sokolič, Maja

    2005-01-01

    The estimation of parking demand is for traffic and urban planning very important process. We can get good estimation of parking demands with calculating norms. The present work focuses on existing parking norms in two ways, with inquiries and with traffic counting (registration plates recording) at different shopping malls on an average week day. In the end of this work we made comparison of results. For this research we choose Shopping malls: Intermarket Brežice, TA-BU Krško, BTC Novo mesto...

  14. The North America tapestry of time and terrain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Kate E.; Howell, David G.; Vigil, Jose F.

    2003-01-01

    The North America Tapestry of Time and Terrain (1:8,000,000 scale) is a product of the US Geological Survey in the I-map series (I-2781). This map was prepared in collaboration with the Geological Survey of Canada and the Mexican Consejo Recursos de Minerales. This cartographic Tapestry is woven from a geologic map and a shaded relief image. This digital combination reveals the geologic history of North America through the interrelation of rock type, topography and time. Regional surface processes as well as continent-scale tectonic events are exposed in the three dimensions of space and the fourth dimension, geologic time. The large map shows the varying age of bedrock underlying North America, while four smaller maps show the distribution of four principal types of rock: sedimentary, volcanic, plutonic and metamorphic.This map expands the original concept of the 2000 Tapestry of Time and Terrain, by José F. Vigil, Richard J. Pike and David G. Howell, which covered the conterminous United States. The U.S. Tapestry poster and website have been popular in classrooms, homes, and even the Google office building, and we anticipate the North America Tapestry will have a similarly wide appeal, and to a larger audience.

  15. Navigating a Mobile Robot Across Terrain Using Fuzzy Logic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seraji, Homayoun; Howard, Ayanna; Bon, Bruce

    2003-01-01

    A strategy for autonomous navigation of a robotic vehicle across hazardous terrain involves the use of a measure of traversability of terrain within a fuzzy-logic conceptual framework. This navigation strategy requires no a priori information about the environment. Fuzzy logic was selected as a basic element of this strategy because it provides a formal methodology for representing and implementing a human driver s heuristic knowledge and operational experience. Within a fuzzy-logic framework, the attributes of human reasoning and decision- making can be formulated by simple IF (antecedent), THEN (consequent) rules coupled with easily understandable and natural linguistic representations. The linguistic values in the rule antecedents convey the imprecision associated with measurements taken by sensors onboard a mobile robot, while the linguistic values in the rule consequents represent the vagueness inherent in the reasoning processes to generate the control actions. The operational strategies of the human expert driver can be transferred, via fuzzy logic, to a robot-navigation strategy in the form of a set of simple conditional statements composed of linguistic variables. These linguistic variables are defined by fuzzy sets in accordance with user-defined membership functions. The main advantages of a fuzzy navigation strategy lie in the ability to extract heuristic rules from human experience and to obviate the need for an analytical model of the robot navigation process.

  16. Walking Robots Dynamic Control Systems on an Uneven Terrain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MUNTEANU, M. S.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents ZPM dynamic control of walking robots, developing an open architecture real time control multiprocessor system, in view of obtaining new capabilities for walking robots. The complexity of the movement mechanism of a walking robot was taken into account, being a repetitive tilting process with numerous instable movements and which can lead to its turnover on an uneven terrain. The control system architecture for the dynamic robot walking is presented in correlation with the control strategy which contains three main real time control loops: balance robot control using sensorial feedback, walking diagram control with periodic changes depending on the sensorial information during each walk cycle, predictable movement control based on a quick decision from the previous experimental data. The results obtained through simulation and experiments show an increase in mobility, stability in real conditions and obtaining of high performances related to the possibility of moving walking robots on terrains with a configuration as close as possible to real situations, respectively developing new technological capabilities of the walking robot control systems for slope movement and walking by overtaking or going around obstacles.

  17. An extensible framework for provenance in human terrain visual analytics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Rick; Slingsby, Aiden; Dykes, Jason; Xu, Kai; Wood, Jo; Nguyen, Phong H; Stephens, Derek; Wong, B L William; Zheng, Yongjun

    2013-12-01

    We describe and demonstrate an extensible framework that supports data exploration and provenance in the context of Human Terrain Analysis (HTA). Working closely with defence analysts we extract requirements and a list of features that characterise data analysed at the end of the HTA chain. From these, we select an appropriate non-classified data source with analogous features, and model it as a set of facets. We develop ProveML, an XML-based extension of the Open Provenance Model, using these facets and augment it with the structures necessary to record the provenance of data, analytical process and interpretations. Through an iterative process, we develop and refine a prototype system for Human Terrain Visual Analytics (HTVA), and demonstrate means of storing, browsing and recalling analytical provenance and process through analytic bookmarks in ProveML. We show how these bookmarks can be combined to form narratives that link back to the live data. Throughout the process, we demonstrate that through structured workshops, rapid prototyping and structured communication with intelligence analysts we are able to establish requirements, and design schema, techniques and tools that meet the requirements of the intelligence community. We use the needs and reactions of defence analysts in defining and steering the methods to validate the framework.

  18. Wind Power Curve Modeling in Simple and Complex Terrain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bulaevskaya, V. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Wharton, S. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Irons, Z. [Enel Green Power North America, Andover, MA (United States); Qualley, G. [Pentalum, Colleyville, TX (United States)

    2015-02-09

    Our previous work on wind power curve modeling using statistical models focused on a location with a moderately complex terrain in the Altamont Pass region in northern California (CA). The work described here is the follow-up to that work, but at a location with a simple terrain in northern Oklahoma (OK). The goal of the present analysis was to determine the gain in predictive ability afforded by adding information beyond the hub-height wind speed, such as wind speeds at other heights, as well as other atmospheric variables, to the power prediction model at this new location and compare the results to those obtained at the CA site in the previous study. While we reach some of the same conclusions at both sites, many results reported for the CA site do not hold at the OK site. In particular, using the entire vertical profile of wind speeds improves the accuracy of wind power prediction relative to using the hub-height wind speed alone at both sites. However, in contrast to the CA site, the rotor equivalent wind speed (REWS) performs almost as well as the entire profile at the OK site. Another difference is that at the CA site, adding wind veer as a predictor significantly improved the power prediction accuracy. The same was true for that site when air density was added to the model separately instead of using the standard air density adjustment. At the OK site, these additional variables result in no significant benefit for the prediction accuracy.

  19. Compliant Biped Walking on Uneven Terrain with Point Feet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenqi Hou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we aim to realize compliant biped walking on uneven terrain with point feet. A control system is designed for a 5-link planar biped walker. According to the role that each leg plays, the control system is decomposed into two parts: the swing leg control and the support leg control. The trajectory of the swing foot is generated in real-time to regulate the walking speed. By considering the reaction torque of the swing leg's hip joint as disturbance, a sliding model controller is implemented at the support leg's hip joint to control the torso's posture angle. In order to make sure the landing foot does not rebound after impact, the vertical contact force control is set as the internal loop of the hip's height control. In simulation, the control system is tested on a virtual 5-link planar biped walker in Matlab. Finally, stable biped walking is realized on uneven terrain with roughness up to 2cm.

  20. Autonomous Path Tracking Steering Controller for Extraterrestrial Terrain Exporation Rover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Sonsalla, Roland; Kirchner, Frank

    Extraterrestrial surface missions typically use a robotic rover platform to carry the science instrumentation (e.g.,the twin MER rovers). Due to the risks in the rover path (i.e. low trafficability of unrecognized soil patches), it is proposed in the FASTER footnote{\\url{https://www.faster-fp7-space.eu}} project that two rovers should be used. A micro scout rover is used for determining the traversability of the terrain and collaborate with a primary rover to lower the risk of entering hazardous areas. That will improve the mission safety and the effective traverse speed for planetary rover exploration. This paper presents the design and implementation of the path following controller for micro scout rover. The objective to synthesize a control law which allows the rover to autonomously follow a desired path in a stable manner. Furthermore, the software architecture controlling the rover and all its subsystems is depicted. The performance of the designed controller is discussed and demonstrated with realistic simulations and experiments, conclusions and an outlook of future work are also given. Key words: Micro Rover, Scout Rover, Mars Exploration, Multi-Rover Team, Mobile, All-Terrain, Hybrid-Legged Wheel, Path Following, Automatic Steer, nonlinear systems.