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Sample records for terminal repeat sequences

  1. Reverse transcriptase domain sequences from tree peony (Paeonia suffruticosa) long terminal repeat retrotransposons: sequence characterization and phylogenetic analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Da-Long; Hou, Xiao-Gai; Jia, Tian

    2014-05-04

    Tree peony is an important horticultural plant worldwide of great ornamental and medicinal value. Long terminal repeat retrotransposons (LTR-retrotransposons) are the major components of most plant genomes and can substantially impact the genome in many ways. It is therefore crucial to understand their sequence characteristics, genetic distribution and transcriptional activity; however, no information about them is available in tree peony. Ty1-copia-like reverse transcriptase sequences were amplified from tree peony genomic DNA by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with degenerate oligonucleotide primers corresponding to highly conserved domains of the Ty1-copia-like retrotransposons in this study. PCR fragments of roughly 270 bp were isolated and cloned, and 33 sequences were obtained. According to alignment and phylogenetic analysis, all sequences were divided into six families. The observed difference in the degree of nucleotide sequence similarity is an indication for high level of sequence heterogeneity among these clones. Most of these sequences have a frame shift, a stop codon, or both. Dot-blot analysis revealed distribution of these sequences in all the studied tree peony species. However, different hybridization signals were detected among them, which is in agreement with previous systematics studies. Reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) indicated that Ty1-copia retrotransposons in tree peony were transcriptionally inactive. The results provide basic genetic and evolutionary information of tree peony genome, and will provide valuable information for the further utilization of retrotransposons in tree peony.

  2. Mapping of a major osteomagenic determinant of murine leukemia virus RFB-14 to non-long terminal repeat sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Østergaard, Mette; Pedersen, Lene; Schmidt, Jörg

    1997-01-01

    the pathogenic potential of recombinant viruses between RFB-14 and the nonosteomagenic, highly leukemogenic SL3-3 MuLV. The recombinants were constructed so as to reveal whether a major determinant of osteomagenicity maps to sequences within or outside the long terminal repeats (LTR). Our data show that a major...... determinant of the osteoma-inducing potential of RFB-14 MuLV maps to the non-LTR region of the genome. Furthermore, we demonstrate that a strong determinant of leukemogenicity is harbored by the non-LTR region of SL3-3 MuLV....

  3. Repeated DNA sequences in fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dutta, S.K.

    1974-11-01

    Several fungal species, representatives of all broad groups like basidiomycetes, ascomycetes and phycomycetes, were examined for the nature of repeated DNA sequences by DNA:DNA reassociation studies using hydroxyapatite chromatography. All of the fungal species tested contained 10 to 20 percent repeated DNA sequences. There are approximately 100 to 110 copies of repeated DNA sequences of approximately 4 x 10/sup 7/ daltons piece size of each. Repeated DNA sequence homoduplexes showed on average 5/sup 0/C difference of T/sub e/50 (temperature at which 50 percent duplexes dissociate) values from the corresponding homoduplexes of unfractionated whole DNA. It is suggested that a part of repetitive sequences in fungi constitutes mitochondrial DNA and a part of it constitutes nuclear DNA. (auth)

  4. Estimation of long terminal repeat element content in the Helicoverpa zea genome from high-throughput sequencing of bacterial artificial chromosome pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coates, Brad S; Abel, Craig A; Perera, Omaththage P

    2017-04-01

    The lepidopteran pest insect Helicoverpa zea feeds on cultivated corn and cotton across the Americas where control remains challenging owing to the evolution of resistance to chemical and transgenic insecticidal toxins, yet genomic resources remain scarce for this species. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) library having a mean genomic insert size of 145 ± 20 kbp was created from a laboratory strain of H. zea, which provides ∼12.9-fold coverage of a 362.8 ± 8.8 Mbp (0.37 ± 0.09 pg) flow cytometry estimated haploid genome size. Assembly of Illumina HiSeq 2000 reads generated from 14 pools that encompassed all BAC clones resulted in 165 485 genomic contigs (N50 = 3262 bp; 324.6 Mbp total). Long terminal repeat (LTR) protein coding regions annotated from 181 contigs included 30 Ty1/copia, 78 Ty3/gypsy, and 73 BEL/Pao elements, of which 60 (33.1%) encoded all five functional polyprotein (pol) domains. Approximately 14% of LTR elements are distributed non-randomly across pools of BAC clones.

  5. Novel expressed sequence tag- simple sequence repeats (EST-SSR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using different bioinformatic criteria, the SUCEST database was used to mine for simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Among 42,189 clusters, 1,425 expressed sequence tag- simple sequence repeats (EST-SSRs) were identified in silico. Trinucleotide repeats were the most abundant SSRs detected. Of 212 primer pairs ...

  6. Adeno-associated virus inverted terminal repeats stimulate gene editing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirsch, M L

    2015-02-01

    Advancements in genome editing have relied on technologies to specifically damage DNA which, in turn, stimulates DNA repair including homologous recombination (HR). As off-target concerns complicate the therapeutic translation of site-specific DNA endonucleases, an alternative strategy to stimulate gene editing based on fragile DNA was investigated. To do this, an episomal gene-editing reporter was generated by a disruptive insertion of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) inverted terminal repeat (ITR) into the egfp gene. Compared with a non-structured DNA control sequence, the ITR induced DNA damage as evidenced by increased gamma-H2AX and Mre11 foci formation. As local DNA damage stimulates HR, ITR-mediated gene editing was investigated using DNA oligonucleotides as repair substrates. The AAV ITR stimulated gene editing >1000-fold in a replication-independent manner and was not biased by the polarity of the repair oligonucleotide. Analysis of additional human DNA sequences demonstrated stimulation of gene editing to varying degrees. In particular, inverted yet not direct, Alu repeats induced gene editing, suggesting a role for DNA structure in the repair event. Collectively, the results demonstrate that inverted DNA repeats stimulate gene editing via double-strand break repair in an episomal context and allude to efficient gene editing of the human chromosome using fragile DNA sequences.

  7. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    2006-12-18

    Dec 18, 2006 ... Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are the repetitive sequence motifs of 1–6 bp (Schlotterer 2000). They are scattered throughout the genomes of all the known organisms ranging from viruses to eukaryotes (Heller et al. 1982; Ellegren 2004). The origin, evolution and ubiquitous occurrence ...

  8. Deep Sequencing Analysis of Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1 Long Terminal Repeat 5' Region from Patients with Tropical Spastic Paraparesis/Human T Cell Lymphotropic Virus Type 1-Associated Myelopathy and Asymptomatic Carriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rego, Filipe Ferreira de Almeida; de Oliveira, Tulio; Giovanetti, Marta; Galvão-Castro, Bernardo; Gonçalves, Marilda de Souza; Alcantara, Luiz Carlos

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze patients by deep sequencing the human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) region in order to determine if minor and/or major mutations in this promoter region might be associated with tropical spastic paraparesis (TSP)/human T cell lymphotropic virus type 1-associated myelopathy (HAM) outcome or proviral load or HTLV-1 expression. This study is a cross-sectional analyze of 29 HTLV-1-infected patients with TSP/HAM or asymptomatic carriers. Proviral DNA from those subjects was submitted to a nested PCR for the HTLV-1 LTR5' region. The HTLV-1 LTR5' purified products were submitted to deep sequencing using the Ion Torrent sequencing technology (Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA). We found that samples with low proviral load showed more detected minor mutations than the samples with high proviral load. Mutations in 136 positions were found over the 520-bp analyzed fragment of HTLV-1 LTR5' with at least 1% frequency. Eleven mutations were present in the previously determined major transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and in more than one patient, indicating that there might be a differential HTLV-1 expression comparing individuals or in comparing different cells from the same individual. Three mutations were statistically significant using the Fisher nonparametric test between the groups but were not present in previously determined TFBS (G126C/T, G306C, and C479T). Those mutations that were not present in previously determined TFBS were statistically significant in this study and were most frequent in patients with low proviral load or in asymptomatic carriers. Although those mutations were not present in previously determined TFBS, one of those mutations (G306C/A) was present in an Sp-1 binding site determined by in silico analysis, and its presence abrogated the site for Sp-1 binding and created a new possible ATF binding site.

  9. Multineuronal Spike Sequences Repeat with Millisecond Precision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koki eMatsumoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Cortical microcircuits are nonrandomly wired by neurons. As a natural consequence, spikes emitted by microcircuits are also nonrandomly patterned in time and space. One of the prominent spike organizations is a repetition of fixed patterns of spike series across multiple neurons. However, several questions remain unsolved, including how precisely spike sequences repeat, how the sequences are spatially organized, how many neurons participate in sequences, and how different sequences are functionally linked. To address these questions, we monitored spontaneous spikes of hippocampal CA3 neurons ex vivo using a high-speed functional multineuron calcium imaging technique that allowed us to monitor spikes with millisecond resolution and to record the location of spiking and nonspiking neurons. Multineuronal spike sequences were overrepresented in spontaneous activity compared to the statistical chance level. Approximately 75% of neurons participated in at least one sequence during our observation period. The participants were sparsely dispersed and did not show specific spatial organization. The number of sequences relative to the chance level decreased when larger time frames were used to detect sequences. Thus, sequences were precise at the millisecond level. Sequences often shared common spikes with other sequences; parts of sequences were subsequently relayed by following sequences, generating complex chains of multiple sequences.

  10. A substrate specificity-determining unit of three Lin12-Notch repeat modules is formed in trans within the pappalysin-1 dimer and requires a sequence stretch C-terminal to the third module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyer, Kathrin; Boldt, Henning Bünsow; Poulsen, Christine Bruun

    2007-01-01

    Members of the pappalysin family of metzincin metalloproteinases, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A, pappalysin-1) and PAPP-A2 (pappalysin-2), regulate the bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) by specific proteolytic inactivation of IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). PAPP-A...... cleaves IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-5, whereas PAPP-A2 cleaves only IGFBP-5. The pappalysins contain three Lin12-Notch repeat (LNR1-3) modules, previously considered unique to the Notch receptor family in which they function to regulate receptor cleavage. In contrast to the Notch receptor where three LNR modules...... are tandemly arranged, LNR3 is separated by more than 1000 residues from LNR1-2 in the pappalysin sequence. Each of the three LNR modules of PAPP-A is required for proteolysis of IGFBP-4, but not IGFBP-5. However, we here find that a C-terminal truncated variant of PAPP-A, which lacks LNR3 and therefore...

  11. Optimization of sequence alignment for simple sequence repeat regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ogbonnaya Francis C

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microsatellites, or simple sequence repeats (SSRs, are tandemly repeated DNA sequences, including tandem copies of specific sequences no longer than six bases, that are distributed in the genome. SSR has been used as a molecular marker because it is easy to detect and is used in a range of applications, including genetic diversity, genome mapping, and marker assisted selection. It is also very mutable because of slipping in the DNA polymerase during DNA replication. This unique mutation increases the insertion/deletion (INDELs mutation frequency to a high ratio - more than other types of molecular markers such as single nucleotide polymorphism (SNPs. SNPs are more frequent than INDELs. Therefore, all designed algorithms for sequence alignment fit the vast majority of the genomic sequence without considering microsatellite regions, as unique sequences that require special consideration. The old algorithm is limited in its application because there are many overlaps between different repeat units which result in false evolutionary relationships. Findings To overcome the limitation of the aligning algorithm when dealing with SSR loci, a new algorithm was developed using PERL script with a Tk graphical interface. This program is based on aligning sequences after determining the repeated units first, and the last SSR nucleotides positions. This results in a shifting process according to the inserted repeated unit type. When studying the phylogenic relations before and after applying the new algorithm, many differences in the trees were obtained by increasing the SSR length and complexity. However, less distance between different linage had been observed after applying the new algorithm. Conclusions The new algorithm produces better estimates for aligning SSR loci because it reflects more reliable evolutionary relations between different linages. It reduces overlapping during SSR alignment, which results in a more realistic

  12. Repeat Sequence Proteins as Matrices for Nanocomposites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drummy, L.; Koerner, H; Phillips, D; McAuliffe, J; Kumar, M; Farmer, B; Vaia, R; Naik, R

    2009-01-01

    Recombinant protein-inorganic nanocomposites comprised of exfoliated Na+ montmorillonite (MMT) in a recombinant protein matrix based on silk-like and elastin-like amino acid motifs (silk elastin-like protein (SELP)) were formed via a solution blending process. Charged residues along the protein backbone are shown to dominate long-range interactions, whereas the SELP repeat sequence leads to local protein/MMT compatibility. Up to a 50% increase in room temperature modulus and a comparable decrease in high temperature coefficient of thermal expansion occur for cast films containing 2-10 wt.% MMT.

  13. Short-sequence DNA repeats in prokaryotic genomes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); S. Scherer; L. van Alphen (Loek); H.A. Verbrugh (Henri)

    1998-01-01

    textabstractShort-sequence DNA repeat (SSR) loci can be identified in all eukaryotic and many prokaryotic genomes. These loci harbor short or long stretches of repeated nucleotide sequence motifs. DNA sequence motifs in a single locus can be identical and/or

  14. Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) analysis of wild and cultivated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... simple sequence repeat (ISSR) polymorphism in the genus Oryza. Theor. Appl. Genet. 100: 1311-1320. Kantety RV, Zeng X, Bennetzen JL, Zehr BE (1995). Assessment of genetic diversity in dent and popcorn (Zea mays L.) inbred lines using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) amplification. Mol. Breed.

  15. Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) analysis of wild and cultivated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inter Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) analysis of wild and cultivated rice species from Ethiopia. ... African Journal of Biotechnology ... The genetic diversity of three wild rice populations of Ethiopia along with three cultivated rice populations were studied using Inter simple sequence repeats (ISSRs) as a molecular marker.

  16. Intraspecific variability of the terminal inverted repeats of the linear chromosome of Streptomyces ambofaciens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choulet, Frédéric; Gallois, Alexandre; Aigle, Bertrand; Mangenot, Sophie; Gerbaud, Claude; Truong, Chantal; Francou, François-Xavier; Borges, Frédéric; Fourrier, Céline; Guérineau, Michel; Decaris, Bernard; Barbe, Valérie; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Leblond, Pierre

    2006-09-01

    The sequences of the terminal inverted repeats (TIRs) ending the linear chromosomal DNA of two Streptomyces ambofaciens strains, ATCC23877 and DSM40697 (198 kb and 213 kb, respectively), were determined from two sets of recombinant cosmids. Among the 215 coding DNA sequences (CDSs) predicted in the TIRs of strain DSM40697, 65 are absent in the TIRs of strain ATCC23877. Reciprocally, 45 of the 194 predicted CDSs are specific to the ATCC23877 strain. The strain-specific CDSs are located mainly at the terminal end of the TIRs. Indeed, although TIRs appear almost identical over 150 kb (99% nucleotide identity), large regions of DNA of 60 kb (DSM40697) and 48 kb (ATCC23877), mostly spanning the ends of the chromosome, are strain specific. These regions are rich in plasmid-associated genes, including genes encoding putative conjugal transfer functions. The strain-specific regions also share a G+C content (68%) lower than that of the rest of the genome (from 71% to 73%), a percentage that is more typical of Streptomyces plasmids and mobile elements. These data suggest that exchanges of replicon extremities have occurred, thereby contributing to the terminal variability observed at the intraspecific level. In addition, the terminal regions include many mobile genetic element-related genes, pseudogenes, and genes related to adaptation. The results give insight into the mechanisms of evolution of the TIRs: integration of new information and/or loss of DNA fragments and subsequent homogenization of the two chromosomal extremities.

  17. Development of simple sequence repeat markers in cymbopogon species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Verma, Vijeshwar; Shahi, Ashok Kumar; Qazi, Gulam Nab; Balyan, Harindra Singh

    2007-03-01

    The genus Cymbopogon comprises about 140 species, which produce characteristic aromatic essential oils. However, the phenotypic identification of species of Cymbopogon has been difficult as a result of widespread occurrence of natural variants, which differ in ploidy levels and chemotaxonomic complexities. Therefore, we have developed a set of simple sequence repeat markers from a genomic library of Cymbopogon jwarancusa to help in the precise identification of the species (including accessions) of Cymbopogon. For this purpose, we isolated 16 simple sequence repeat containing genomic deoxyribonucleic acid clones of C. jwarancusa, which contained a total of 32 simple sequence repeats with a range of 1 to 3 simple sequence repeats per clone. The majority (68.8%) of the 32 simple sequence repeats comprised dinucleotide repeat motifs followed by simple sequence repeats with trinucleotide (21.8%) and other higher order repeat motifs. Eighteen (81.8%) of the 22 designed primers for the above simple sequence repeats amplified products of expected sizes, when tried with genomic DNA of C. jwarancusa, the source species. Thirteen (72.2%) of the 18 functional primers detected polymorphism among the three species of Cymbopogon (C. flexuosus, C. pendulus and C. jwarancusa) and amplified a total of 95 alleles (range 1-18 alleles) with a PIC value of 0.44 to 0.96 per simple sequence repeat. Thus, the higher allelic range and high level of polymorphism demonstrated by the newly developed simple sequence repeat markers are likely to have many applications such as in improvement of essential oil quality by authentication of Cymbopogon species and varieties and mapping or tagging the genes controlling agronomically important traits of essential oils, which can further be utilized in marker assisted breeding.

  18. Do women with a repeat termination of pregnancy prefer a medical or a surgical regimen?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Worm Frandsen, Maja; Rørbye, Christina; Nilas, Lisbeth

    2014-01-01

    We compared the risk of a repeat termination and the method of termination in women with a prior medical or surgical termination, or both, in a cohort study of women with a pregnancy termination at gestational age ≤63 days in 1999-2001. Within 5 years, 24% (330/1379) had a repeat abortion......, and repeat terminations were more frequent in the surgical [27% (159/588)] than the medical group [22% (171/791)] (p medical in 49% (83/171) of women with an earlier medical termination, compared with 13% (21/159) (p ... surgical termination. In 125 women who had experienced both procedures, 37% (46/125) of the next terminations were performed medically and 63% (79/125) surgically (p surgical termination....

  19. simple sequence repeats (EST-SSR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-19

    Jan 19, 2012 ... repeats (EST-SSR) markers characterized by new bioinformatic criteria reveal high genetic similarity in sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) breeding lines. Kittipat Ukoskit1*, Penjun Thipmongkolcharoen1 and Prasert Chatwachirawong2. 1Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Science and Technology, ...

  20. Identification and chromosomal localization of repeat sequences ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    The aim of this research was to identify and localise re- peat sequences in Korean cattle (Hanwoo), which may be a basis for future genetic studies. To achieve this, a Han- woo BAC library containing a total of 150,000 clones with an average size of 130–140 kb was constructed us- ing two different restriction enzymes ...

  1. Sequence organization in African trypanosome minicircles is defined by 18 base pair inverted repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasmer, D P; Stuart, K

    1986-03-01

    We have found that minicircles of African trypanosomes contain 18 base pair sequences that occur as 3 or 4 pairs of imperfect inverted repeats. The 18 base pair sequence is polar; one half is almost perfectly conserved, while the other half has a more variable sequence. The distribution of the 18 base pair sequences in minicircles defines two classes of sequences ('A' and 'B' segments) that have distinct characteristics. 'A' segments vary considerably in length and contain about 10% more G+C than 'B' segments which are all about 100 base pairs long. The 18 base pair sequences are absent from minicircles of other kinetoplastids. Thus, 'B' segments along with their terminal 18 base pair sequences superficially resemble insertion sequences. Minicircles of African trypanosomes therefore conserve their organization but have only limited nucleotide sequence homology.

  2. A 135-kilodalton surface antigen of Mycoplasma hominis PG21 contains multiple directly repeated sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ladefoged, Søren; Birkelund, Svend; Hauge, S

    1995-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody was used to characterize a 135-kDa surface-located membrane protein (Lmp1) generally present in Mycoplasma hominis strains. The monoclonal antibody, 552, was applied to identify the corresponding gene in an expression library of M. hominis PG21 DNA. The M. hominis PG21 lmp1......,000, was identified. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence predicted a hydrophilic protein with a basic pI (10.0). The N-terminal 24 amino acids were a typical leader sequence. Downstream from the first 726 nucleotides, six similar direct repeats of 471 nucleotides were found. In repeat 7, a single...

  3. Sequence conservation of an avian centromeric repeated DNA component.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, C S; Brooks, J E; de Kloet, E; de Kloet, S R

    1994-06-01

    The approximately 190-bp centromeric repeat monomers of the spur-winged lapwing (Vanellus spinosus, Charadriidae), the Chilean flamingo (Phoenicopterus chilensis, Phoenicopteridae), the sarus crane (Grus antigone, Gruidae), parrots (Psittacidae), waterfowl (Anatidae), and the merlin (Falco columbarius, Falconidae) contain elements that are interspecifically highly variable, as well as elements (trinucleotides and higher order oligonucleotides) that are highly conserved in sequence and relative location within the repeat. Such conservation suggests that the centromeric repeats of these avian species have evolved from a common ancestral sequence that may date from very early stages of avian radiation.

  4. Differentiating Schistosoma haematobium from Related Animal Schistosomes by PCR Amplifying Inter-Repeat Sequences Flanking Newly Selected Repeated Sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Abbasi, Ibrahim; HAMBURGER, JOSEPH; Kariuki, Curtis; Peter L Mungai; Muchiri, Eric M.; King, Charles H.

    2012-01-01

    In schistosomiasis elimination programs, successful discrimination of Schistosoma haematobium from the related animal Schistosoma parasites will be essential for accurate detection of human parasite transmission. Polymerase chain reaction assays employing primers from two newly selected repeated sequences, named Sh73 and Sh77, did not discriminate S. haematobium when amplifying Sh73-77 intra- or inter-repeats. However, amplification between Sh73 and the previously described DraI repeat exhibi...

  5. Development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers that are ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) markers were developed through data mining of 3,803 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) previously published. A total of 144 di- to penta-type SSRs were identified and they were screened for polymorphism between two turnip cultivars, 'Tsuda' and 'Yurugi Akamaru'. Out of 90 EST-SSRs for ...

  6. Identification of repeats in DNA sequences using nucleotide distribution uniformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Changchuan

    2017-01-07

    Repetitive elements are important in genomic structures, functions and regulations, yet effective methods in precisely identifying repetitive elements in DNA sequences are not fully accessible, and the relationship between repetitive elements and periodicities of genomes is not clearly understood. We present an ab initio method to quantitatively detect repetitive elements and infer the consensus repeat pattern in repetitive elements. The method uses the measure of the distribution uniformity of nucleotides at periodic positions in DNA sequences or genomes. It can identify periodicities, consensus repeat patterns, copy numbers and perfect levels of repetitive elements. The results of using the method on different DNA sequences and genomes demonstrate efficacy and accuracy in identifying repeat patterns and periodicities. The complexity of the method is linear with respect to the lengths of the analyzed sequences. The Python programs in this study are freely available to the public upon request or at https://github.com/cyinbox/DNADU. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A mouse mammary tumor virus-like long terminal repeat superantigen in human breast cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yue; Jiang, Jian-Dong; Xu, Dongping; Li, Yan; Qu, Chunfeng; Holland, James F; Pogo, Beatriz G-T

    2004-06-15

    We previously reported a 660-bp mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-like env gene sequence in approximately 38% of human breast cancer DNA, but not in normal breasts or other tumors. This MMTV-like env gene sequence was expressed in 66% of the env gene-positive human breast cancers. An entire proviral structure was identified in human breast cancer DNA with high homology to MMTV and low homology to known human endogenous retrovirus. MMTV-like long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences were also detected in 41.5% of human breast cancers. They contain hormone-responsive elements, TEF-1 family elements, and the open reading frame for the superantigen (SAg). We have now amplified and sequenced MMTV-like sag sequences from 10 human breast cancers, and we found that they are highly homologous to those of MMTV. However, deletions and insertions at the COOH-terminal of sag were observed. The immune function of the human MMTV-like LTR SAg was also investigated. The sag gene was cloned and expressed in a human B-cell line (Ramos). T-cell proliferation and cytokine releasing assays were performed after cocultivation of T cells with irradiated Ramos SAg-expressing cells. The results indicate that expression of the human SAg stimulates T-cell activation in vitro, as the mouse SAg does. Because the T-cell responses in vitro are considered similar to those in vivo, these results suggest that the human LTR SAg might also play a role in human breast carcinogenesis.

  8. A new family of retroviral long terminal repeat elements in the human genome identified by their homologies to an element 5{prime} to the spider monkey haptoglobin gene

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erickson, L.M.; Maeda, N. [Univ. of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC (United States)

    1995-06-10

    A new family of retroviral long terminal repeats that we name Spm-LTR has been identified as a result of DNA sequence comparisons between the entire Gen-Bank databank and an element, SPHP, located 5{prime} to the haptoglobin gene of spider monkeys. The 18 human Spm-LTR sequences so identified fall into three subtypes. There is no sequence similarity between Spm-LTR elements and any endogenous retroviral LTR sequences previously reported except for general features that define LTRs. However, a previously described repeated sequence (MER-4) forms a portion of the Spm-LTR sequence. 13 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  9. Comparison of the carboxy-terminal DP-repeat region in the co-chaperones Hop and Hip.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Gregory M; Huffman, Holly; Smith, David F

    2003-01-01

    Functional steroid receptor complexes are assembled and maintained by an ordered pathway of interactions involving multiple components of the cellular chaperone machinery. Two of these components, Hop and Hip, serve as co-chaperones to the major heat shock proteins (Hsps), Hsp70 and Hsp90, and participate in intermediate stages of receptor assembly. In an effort to better understand the functions of Hop and Hip in the assembly process, we focused on a region of similarity located near the C-terminus of each co-chaperone. Contained within this region is a repeated sequence motif we have termed the DP repeat. Earlier mutagenesis studies implicated the DP repeat of either Hop or Hip in Hsp70 binding and in normal assembly of the co-chaperones with progesterone receptor (PR) complexes. We report here that the DP repeat lies within a protease-resistant domain that extends to or is near the C-terminus of both co-chaperones. Point mutations in the DP repeats render the C-terminal regions hypersensitive to proteolysis. In addition, a Hop DP mutant displays altered proteolytic digestion patterns, which suggest that the DP-repeat region influences the folding of other Hop domains. Although the respective DP regions of Hop and Hip share sequence and structural similarities, they are not functionally interchangeable. Moreover, a double-point mutation within the second DP-repeat unit of Hop that converts this to the sequence found in Hip disrupts Hop function; however, the corresponding mutation in Hip does not alter its function. We conclude that the DP repeats are important structural elements within a C-terminal domain, which is important for Hop and Hip function.

  10. Ligand-Binding Properties of the Carboxyl-Terminal Repeat Domain of Streptococcus mutans Glucan-Binding Protein A

    OpenAIRE

    Haas, Wolfgang; Banas, Jeffrey A.

    2000-01-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypot...

  11. Adeno-associated virus inverted terminal repeats stimulate gene editing

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, ML

    2014-01-01

    Advancements in genome editing have relied on technologies to specifically damage DNA which, in turn, stimulates DNA repair including homologous recombination (HR). As off-target concerns complicate the therapeutic translation of site-specific DNA endonucleases, an alternative strategy to stimulate gene editing based on fragile DNA was investigated. To do this, an episomal gene-editing reporter was generated by a disruptive insertion of the adeno-associated virus (AAV) inverted terminal repea...

  12. Evolution Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats in Plant Genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Zhen; Wang, Yanping; Wang, Qingmei; Li, Aixian; Hou, Fuyun; Zhang, Liming

    2015-01-01

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widespread units on genome sequences, and play many important roles in plants. In order to reveal the evolution of plant genomes, we investigated the evolutionary regularities of SSRs during the evolution of plant species and the plant kingdom by analysis of twelve sequenced plant genome sequences. First, in the twelve studied plant genomes, the main SSRs were those which contain repeats of 1-3 nucleotides combination. Second, in mononucleotide SSRs, the A/T percentage gradually increased along with the evolution of plants (except for P. patens). With the increase of SSRs repeat number the percentage of A/T in C. reinhardtii had no significant change, while the percentage of A/T in terrestrial plants species gradually declined. Third, in dinucleotide SSRs, the percentage of AT/TA increased along with the evolution of plant kingdom and the repeat number increased in terrestrial plants species. This trend was more obvious in dicotyledon than monocotyledon. The percentage of CG/GC showed the opposite pattern to the AT/TA. Forth, in trinucleotide SSRs, the percentages of combinations including two or three A/T were in a rising trend along with the evolution of plant kingdom; meanwhile with the increase of SSRs repeat number in plants species, different species chose different combinations as dominant SSRs. SSRs in C. reinhardtii, P. patens, Z. mays and A. thaliana showed their specific patterns related to evolutionary position or specific changes of genome sequences. The results showed that, SSRs not only had the general pattern in the evolution of plant kingdom, but also were associated with the evolution of the specific genome sequence. The study of the evolutionary regularities of SSRs provided new insights for the analysis of the plant genome evolution.

  13. Development of specific simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bulk segregant analysis (BSA) using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were deployed to identify the location and genetic effect of this gene. We have generated new set of SSR markers to identify progenies carrying TGMS gene in a cross TGMS/PTT1. The TGMS gene was located on chromosome 2 with 0.0 cM ...

  14. Inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) and morphological diversity in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Morphological characteristics as well as inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) molecular markers were used to study the species relationship in Onosma species (Boraginaceae) in Iran. Principal component analysis (PCA) showed that morphological characters like caule leaf size and shape, bract shape, corolla shape, ...

  15. Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers as reproducible and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Rose is one of the most important cultivated ornamental plants in the world. A molecular approach using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers was applied to seven species of Rosa. To obtain clear and reproducible bands on 2% agarose gels, 9 ISSR primers and 5 parameters (annealing temperature, DNA ...

  16. Validating simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for introgression ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low hybridization efficiency (22.5%) was achieved using the anther dehiscence method. Such low hybridization efficiency requires use of molecular markers to easily identify plants harbouring the required genotypes. Key words: Stay-green, drought tolerance, quantitative trait loci (QTL), simple sequence repeat (SSR) ...

  17. Evaluation of genetic diversity in rice using simple sequence repeats ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The dendrogram revealed 8 major distinct clusters. Higher range of similarity values for related genotypes using simple sequence repeats (SSR) provides greater confidence for the assessment of genetic diversity and relationships. The polymorphism information content (PIC) value for the SSR loci ranged from 0.36 to 0.98.

  18. Analysis of B-genome derived simple sequence repeat (SSR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A study was conducted to investigate the genetic variability between 40 Musa genotypes maintained at the Musa germplasm collection of the International Institute for Tropical Agriculture, Ibadan using nine B-genome derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. The nine primers produced reproducible and discrete ...

  19. Large cryptic internal sequence repeats in protein structures from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    [Sarani R, Udayaprakash N A, Subashini R, Mridula P, Yamane T and Sekar K 2009 Large cryptic internal sequence repeats in protein structures from Homo sapiens; J. Biosci. 34 103–112]. Keywords. Propensity; structure–function correlation; human genome; structural plasticity; three-dimensional structure; identical and.

  20. Comparative effectiveness of inter-simple sequence repeat and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    iisr

    2013-10-10

    Oct 10, 2013 ... whereas RAPD markers showed segregation based on geographical location as well as species based. Key words: Garcinia, genetic diversity, inter-simple sequence repeats, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, principal component analysis. INTRODUCTION. Garcinia is a large genus with 240 species ...

  1. Genetic relationships revealed by simple sequence repeat (SSR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic relationships revealed by simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers among Ghanaian cassava cultivars released by different research groups. ... Genetic diversity was observed within populations (HS = 0.552) and, therefore, suggesting a low rate of inter-population gene flow among the individuals constituting the ...

  2. Use of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers for screening blue ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The findings suggest the need for caution to be taken during introduction of exotic germplasm and recognize the value of resistance trait to susceptible Brazilian germplasm when breeding for blue disease resistance. Key words: Cotton blue disease, cotton single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), simple sequence repeat

  3. Inter simple sequence repeat analysis of genetic diversity of five ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper studied the genetic diversity of five cultivated pepper species using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis. The amplicons of 13 out of 15 designed primers were stable polymorphic and therefore were used as genetic biomarkers. 135 total clear bands were obtained, of which 102 were polymorphic bands ...

  4. Using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers to study genetic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-04-10

    Apr 10, 2012 ... Inter simple sequence repeat (ISSRs) are semi arbitrary markers amplified by. PCR in the presence of one primer complementary to a target microsatellite. Amplification in the presence of non- anchored primers also has been called microsatellite- primed PCR (Karp et al., 1997). Each band corresponds.

  5. Study of simple sequence repeat (SSR) polymorphism for biotic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... as recurrent parent was investigated using 128 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers covered on chromosome number 1-12. The results reveal that 36 HRM primers showed distinct polymorphism among the donor and recurrent parents studied indicating the robust nature of microsatellites in revealing polymorphism.

  6. Roles of the amino terminal region and repeat region of the Plasmodium berghei circumsporozoite protein in parasite infectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra Aldrich

    Full Text Available The circumsporozoite protein (CSP plays a key role in malaria sporozoite infection of both mosquito salivary glands and the vertebrate host. The conserved Regions I and II have been well studied but little is known about the immunogenic central repeat region and the N-terminal region of the protein. Rodent malaria Plasmodium berghei parasites, in which the endogenous CS gene has been replaced with the avian Plasmodium gallinaceum CS (PgCS sequence, develop normally in the A. stephensi mosquito midgut but the sporozoites are not infectious. We therefore generated P. berghei transgenic parasites carrying the PgCS gene, in which the repeat region was replaced with the homologous region of P. berghei CS (PbCS. A further line, in which both the N-terminal region and repeat region were replaced with the homologous regions of PbCS, was also generated. Introduction of the PbCS repeat region alone, into the PgCS gene, did not rescue sporozoite species-specific infectivity. However, the introduction of both the PbCS repeat region and the N-terminal region into the PgCS gene completely rescued infectivity, in both the mosquito vector and the mammalian host. Immunofluorescence experiments and western blot analysis revealed correct localization and proteolytic processing of CSP in the chimeric parasites. The results demonstrate, in vivo, that the repeat region of P. berghei CSP, alone, is unable to mediate sporozoite infectivity in either the mosquito or the mammalian host, but suggest an important role for the N-terminal region in sporozoite host cell invasion.

  7. Repeated cycles of chilling and warming effectively terminate prolonged larval diapause in the chestnut weevil, Curculio sikkimensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higaki, Morio

    2006-05-01

    Curculio sikkimensis (Coleoptera: Curculionidae) requires one or more years to complete its life cycle, owing to prolonged larval diapause. To compare the effects of temperature cycles and total periods of chilling on the termination of prolonged diapause, larvae were subjected to different chilling (5 degrees C) and warming (20 degrees C) cycles ranging from 30 to 720 days, and all cycles were repeated until the sum of chilling and warming periods reached 720 days. The prolonged diapause of C. sikkimensis was more effectively terminated by repeated cycles of chilling and warming than by prolonging the continuous chilling period. However, extremely short temperature cycles were not highly effective in enhancing diapause termination, even when such cycles were repeated many times. To examine the role of warming periods on diapause termination, diapause larvae were subjected to a sequence of chilling (120 days at 5 degrees C) and warming (240 days at 20 degrees C) with a warming period (0-120 days at 20 degrees C) inserted in the chilling period. Diapause larvae that were not reactivated in the first chilling period required exposure to a certain period of warming before they were able to complete diapause development in the subsequent chilling. Thus, C. sikkimensis appears to spread its reactivation times over several years in response to seasonal temperature cycles.

  8. Computer Simulation Studies of CTG Triplet Repeat Sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasaiah, Jayendran. C.; Lynch, Joshua

    1998-03-01

    Long segments of CTG trinucleotide repeats in human DNA are correlated with a class of neurological diseases (myotonic dystrophy, fragile-X syndrome, and Kenndy's disease). These diseases are characterized by genetic anticipation and are thought to arise from replication errors caused by unusual conformations of CTG repeat segments. We have studied the properties of a single short segment of double starnded DNA with CTG repeats in 0.5 M sodium chloride solution with molecular dynamics simulations. The simulations are carried out in the micro canonical ensemble using an all-atom force field with CHARMM parameters. The TIPS3 water model is used to simulate a molecular solvent. Electrostatic interactions are calculated by Ewald summation and the equations of motion integrated using a Verlet algorithm in conjunction with SHAKE constrained dynamics to maintain bond lengths. The simulation of CTG repeat sequence is compared with a control system containing CAG triplet repeats to determine possible differencesin the conformation and elasticity of the two sequences.

  9. Heat-shock induction of the human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geelen, J. L.; Minnaar, R. P.; Boom, R.; van der Noordaa, J.; Goudsmit, J.

    1988-01-01

    Rat cell lines were established in which the bacterial chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene under control of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) long terminal repeat (LTR) was stably integrated. The cell lines showed a repressed phenotype for CAT expression, but could be induced for it by

  10. Characterization of simple sequence repeats (SSRs from Phlebotomus papatasi (Diptera: Psychodidae expressed sequence tags (ESTs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamarsheh Omar

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phlebotomus papatasi is a natural vector of Leishmania major, which causes cutaneous leishmaniasis in many countries. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs, or microsatellites, are common in eukaryotic genomes and are short, repeated nucleotide sequence elements arrayed in tandem and flanked by non-repetitive regions. The enrichment methods used previously for finding new microsatellite loci in sand flies remain laborious and time consuming; in silico mining, which includes retrieval and screening of microsatellites from large amounts of sequence data from sequence data bases using microsatellite search tools can yield many new candidate markers. Results Simple sequence repeats (SSRs were characterized in P. papatasi expressed sequence tags (ESTs derived from a public database, National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI. A total of 42,784 sequences were mined, and 1,499 SSRs were identified with a frequency of 3.5% and an average density of 15.55 kb per SSR. Dinucleotide motifs were the most common SSRs, accounting for 67% followed by tri-, tetra-, and penta-nucleotide repeats, accounting for 31.1%, 1.5%, and 0.1%, respectively. The length of microsatellites varied from 5 to 16 repeats. Dinucleotide types; AG and CT have the highest frequency. Dinucleotide SSR-ESTs are relatively biased toward an excess of (AXn repeats and a low GC base content. Forty primer pairs were designed based on motif lengths for further experimental validation. Conclusion The first large-scale survey of SSRs derived from P. papatasi is presented; dinucleotide SSRs identified are more frequent than other types. EST data mining is an effective strategy to identify functional microsatellites in P. papatasi.

  11. De Novo Methylation of Repeated Sequences in Coprinus Cinereus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freedman, T.; Pukkila, P. J.

    1993-01-01

    We have examined the stability of duplicated DNA sequences in the sexual phase of the life cycle of the basidiomycete fungus, Coprinus cinereus. We observed premeiotic de novo methylation in haploid nuclei containing either a triplication, a tandem duplication, or an ectopic duplication. Methylation changes were not observed in unique sequences. Repeated sequences underwent methylation changes during the dikaryotic stage. In one cross, 27% of the segregants exhibited methylation-directed gene inactivation. However, all auxotrophs eventually reverted to prototrophy. C to T transition mutations were not observed in this study. Our studies also revealed one inversion that occurred in 50% of the segregants in a single triplication cross, and a single pop-out event that occurred during vegetative growth. These alterations were similar to changes reported in experiments with duplicated sequences in Neurospora crassa and Ascobolus immersus. However, significant differences were also noted. First, the extent of methylation was much less in C. cinereus than in the other two fungi. Second, CpG sequences appeared to be the preferred targets of methylation. PMID:8244000

  12. Differentiating Schistosoma haematobium from related animal schistosomes by PCR amplifying inter-repeat sequences flanking newly selected repeated sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Ibrahim; Hamburger, Joseph; Kariuki, Curtis; Mungai, Peter L; Muchiri, Eric M; King, Charles H

    2012-12-01

    In schistosomiasis elimination programs, successful discrimination of Schistosoma haematobium from the related animal Schistosoma parasites will be essential for accurate detection of human parasite transmission. Polymerase chain reaction assays employing primers from two newly selected repeated sequences, named Sh73 and Sh77, did not discriminate S. haematobium when amplifying Sh73-77 intra- or inter-repeats. However, amplification between Sh73 and the previously described DraI repeat exhibited discriminative banding patterns for S. haematobium and Schistosoma bovis (sensitivity 1 pg and 10 pg, respectively). It also enabled banding pattern discrimination of Schistosoma curassoni and Schistosoma intercalatum, but Schistosoma mattheei and Schistosoma margrebowiei did not yield amplicons. Similar inter-repeat amplification between Sh77 and DraI yielded amplicons with discriminative banding for S. haematobium, and S. bovis; however, S. mattheei was detected only at low sensitivity (1 ng). The Sh73/DraI assay detected snails infected with S. haematobium, S. bovis, or both, and should prove useful for screening snails where discrimination of S. haematobium from related schistosomes is required.

  13. [Repeated requests for termination of pregnancy. Some socio-cultural and psychological aspects].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattauer, B; Peyrot, D; Aussiloux, M T

    1984-04-01

    Characteristics of 170 women seeking abortions who had had no previous pregnancy terminations and 63 who had 1 or more previous terminations were compared. 49 women aged 20-43 had had 1 previous abortion, 9 aged 21-38 had had 2, 3 aged 29-33 had had 3, 1 aged 37 had had 4, and 1 aged 37 had had 5 previous abortions. 5 women, of whom 4 had had previous terminations, did not undergo abortions after completing the interviews. Among women seeking repeat abortions, 39.21% had psychological motivations, 36.04% had family motivations, and 26.9% had social motivations. Family motivations included difficulties with existing children and instability of the couple, while social motivations included preference for other activities, single marital status, and immaturity of the mother. Among sociocultural factors associated with repeated abortions, death and divorce were uncommon, unlike the situation in 1st abortions. Familial and social factors associated with repeat abortions were, in declining order of frequency, abandonment, difficult schooling, geographic or social instability, and conjugal conflicts. Religious practice was associated with a reduced risk of repeat abortion. Among psychological factors associated with repeat abortion, passivity, dependence, and immaturity were associated with a doubled risk, as were sadomasochistic or depressive personality and previous psychiatric treatment. Failure to use contraception, associated with ambivalence in relation to desire for children or moral aversion to the use of contraception, were other factors. Women with defective parental images had 3 times the risk of repeat abortion. Previous difficulties of pregnancy or delivery were associated with a higher risk of repeat abortion.

  14. Ligand-binding properties of the carboxyl-terminal repeat domain of Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haas, W; Banas, J A

    2000-02-01

    Streptococcus mutans glucan-binding protein A (GbpA) has sequence similarity in its carboxyl-terminal domain with glucosyltransferases (GTFs), the enzymes responsible for catalyzing the synthesis of the glucans to which GbpA and GTFs can bind and which promote S. mutans attachment to and accumulation on the tooth surface. It was predicted that this C-terminal region, comprised of what have been termed YG repeats, represents the GbpA glucan-binding domain (GBD). In an effort to test this hypothesis and to quantitate the ligand-binding specificities of the GbpA GBD, several fusion proteins were generated and tested by affinity electrophoresis or by precipitation of protein-ligand complexes, allowing the determination of binding constants. It was determined that the 16 YG repeats in GbpA comprise its GBD and that GbpA has a greater affinity for dextran (a water-soluble form of glucan) than for mutan (a water-insoluble form of glucan). Placement of the GBD at the carboxyl terminus was necessary for maximum glucan binding, and deletion of as few as two YG repeats from either end of the GBD reduced the affinity for dextran by over 10-fold. Interestingly, the binding constant of GbpA for dextran was 34-fold higher than that calculated for the GBDs of two S. mutans GTFs, one of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-soluble glucan and the other of which catalyzes the synthesis of water-insoluble glucan.

  15. Retrotransposons and tandem repeat sequences in the nuclear genomes of cryptomonad algae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Hameed; Kozera, Catherine; Curtis, Bruce A; Bussey, Jillian Tarrant; Theophilou, Stan; Bowman, Sharen; Archibald, John M

    2007-02-01

    The cryptomonads are an enigmatic group of unicellular eukaryotic algae that possess two nuclear genomes, having acquired photosynthesis by the uptake and retention of a eukaryotic algal endosymbiont. The endosymbiont nuclear genome, or nucleomorph, of the cryptomonad Guillardia theta has been completely sequenced: at only 551 kilobases (kb) and with a gene density of approximately 1 gene/kb, it is a model of compaction. In contrast, very little is known about the structure and composition of the cryptomonad host nuclear genome. Here we present the results of two small-scale sequencing surveys of fosmid clone libraries from two distantly related cryptomonads, Rhodomonas salina CCMP1319 and Cryptomonas paramecium CCAP977/2A, corresponding to approximately 150 and approximately 235 kb of sequence, respectively. Very few of the random end sequences determined in this study show similarity to known genes in other eukaryotes, underscoring the considerable evolutionary distance between the cryptomonads and other eukaryotes whose nuclear genomes have been completely sequenced. Using a combination of fosmid clone end-sequencing, Southern hybridizations, and PCR, we demonstrate that Ty3-gypsy long-terminal repeat (LTR) retrotransposons and tandem repeat sequences are a prominent feature of the nuclear genomes of both organisms. The complete sequence of a 30.9-kb genomic fragment from R. salina was found to contain a full-length Ty3-gypsy element with near-identical LTRs and a chromodomain, a protein module suggested to mediate the site-specific integration of the retrotransposon. The discovery of chromodomain-containing retroelements in cryptomonads further expands the known distribution of the so-called chromoviruses across the tree of eukaryotes.

  16. Identification of multiple binding sites for the THAP domain of the Galileo transposase in the long terminal inverted-repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzo, Mar; Liu, Danxu; Ruiz, Alfredo; Chalmers, Ronald

    2013-08-01

    Galileo is a DNA transposon responsible for the generation of several chromosomal inversions in Drosophila. In contrast to other members of the P-element superfamily, it has unusually long terminal inverted-repeats (TIRs) that resemble those of Foldback elements. To investigate the function of the long TIRs we derived consensus and ancestral sequences for the Galileo transposase in three species of Drosophilids. Following gene synthesis, we expressed and purified their constituent THAP domains and tested their binding activity towards the respective Galileo TIRs. DNase I footprinting located the most proximal DNA binding site about 70 bp from the transposon end. Using this sequence we identified further binding sites in the tandem repeats that are found within the long TIRs. This suggests that the synaptic complex between Galileo ends may be a complicated structure containing higher-order multimers of the transposase. We also attempted to reconstitute Galileo transposition in Drosophila embryos but no events were detected. Thus, although the limited numbers of Galileo copies in each genome were sufficient to provide functional consensus sequences for the THAP domains, they do not specify a fully active transposase. Since the THAP recognition sequence is short, and will occur many times in a large genome, it seems likely that the multiple binding sites within the long, internally repetitive, TIRs of Galileo and other Foldback-like elements may provide the transposase with its binding specificity. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. MSDB: A Comprehensive Database of Simple Sequence Repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avvaru, Akshay Kumar; Saxena, Saketh; Sowpati, Divya Tej; Mishra, Rakesh Kumar

    2017-06-01

    Microsatellites, also known as Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs), are short tandem repeats of 1-6 nt motifs present in all genomes, particularly eukaryotes. Besides their usefulness as genome markers, SSRs have been shown to perform important regulatory functions, and variations in their length at coding regions are linked to several disorders in humans. Microsatellites show a taxon-specific enrichment in eukaryotic genomes, and some may be functional. MSDB (Microsatellite Database) is a collection of >650 million SSRs from 6,893 species including Bacteria, Archaea, Fungi, Plants, and Animals. This database is by far the most exhaustive resource to access and analyze SSR data of multiple species. In addition to exploring data in a customizable tabular format, users can view and compare the data of multiple species simultaneously using our interactive plotting system. MSDB is developed using the Django framework and MySQL. It is freely available at http://tdb.ccmb.res.in/msdb. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution.

  18. Functional angucycline-like antibiotic gene cluster in the terminal inverted repeats of the Streptomyces ambofaciens linear chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Xiuhua; Aigle, Bertrand; Girardet, Jean-Michel; Mangenot, Sophie; Pernodet, Jean-Luc; Decaris, Bernard; Leblond, Pierre

    2004-02-01

    Streptomyces ambofaciens has an 8-Mb linear chromosome ending in 200-kb terminal inverted repeats. Analysis of the F6 cosmid overlapping the terminal inverted repeats revealed a locus similar to type II polyketide synthase (PKS) gene clusters. Sequence analysis identified 26 open reading frames, including genes encoding the beta-ketoacyl synthase (KS), chain length factor (CLF), and acyl carrier protein (ACP) that make up the minimal PKS. These KS, CLF, and ACP subunits are highly homologous to minimal PKS subunits involved in the biosynthesis of angucycline antibiotics. The genes encoding the KS and ACP subunits are transcribed constitutively but show a remarkable increase in expression after entering transition phase. Five genes, including those encoding the minimal PKS, were replaced by resistance markers to generate single and double mutants (replacement in one and both terminal inverted repeats). Double mutants were unable to produce either diffusible orange pigment or antibacterial activity against Bacillus subtilis. Single mutants showed an intermediate phenotype, suggesting that each copy of the cluster was functional. Transformation of double mutants with a conjugative and integrative form of F6 partially restored both phenotypes. The pigmented and antibacterial compounds were shown to be two distinct molecules produced from the same biosynthetic pathway. High-pressure liquid chromatography analysis of culture extracts from wild-type and double mutants revealed a peak with an associated bioactivity that was absent from the mutants. Two additional genes encoding KS and CLF were present in the cluster. However, disruption of the second KS gene had no effect on either pigment or antibiotic production.

  19. Always look on both sides: phylogenetic information conveyed by simple sequence repeat allele sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie Barthe

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeat (SSR markers are widely used tools for inferences about genetic diversity, phylogeography and spatial genetic structure. Their applications assume that variation among alleles is essentially caused by an expansion or contraction of the number of repeats and that, accessorily, mutations in the target sequences follow the stepwise mutation model (SMM. Generally speaking, PCR amplicon sizes are used as direct indicators of the number of SSR repeats composing an allele with the data analysis either ignoring the extent of allele size differences or assuming that there is a direct correlation between differences in amplicon size and evolutionary distance. However, without precisely knowing the kind and distribution of polymorphism within an allele (SSR and the associated flanking region (FR sequences, it is hard to say what kind of evolutionary message is conveyed by such a synthetic descriptor of polymorphism as DNA amplicon size. In this study, we sequenced several SSR alleles in multiple populations of three divergent tree genera and disentangled the types of polymorphisms contained in each portion of the DNA amplicon containing an SSR. The patterns of diversity provided by amplicon size variation, SSR variation itself, insertions/deletions (indels, and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs observed in the FRs were compared. Amplicon size variation largely reflected SSR repeat number. The amount of variation was as large in FRs as in the SSR itself. The former contributed significantly to the phylogenetic information and sometimes was the main source of differentiation among individuals and populations contained by FR and SSR regions of SSR markers. The presence of mutations occurring at different rates within a marker's sequence offers the opportunity to analyse evolutionary events occurring on various timescales, but at the same time calls for caution in the interpretation of SSR marker data when the distribution of within

  20. Tracking neural correlates of successful learning over repeated sequence observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinemann, Natalie A.; Moisello, Clara; Ghilardi, M. Felice; Kelly, Simon P.

    2016-01-01

    The neural correlates of memory formation in humans have long been investigated by exposing subjects to diverse material and comparing responses to items later remembered to those forgotten. Tasks requiring memorization of sensory sequences afford unique possibilities for linking neural memorization processes to behavior, because, rather than comparing across different items of varying content, each individual item can be examined across the successive learning states of being initially unknown, newly learned, and eventually, fully known. Sequence learning paradigms have not yet been exploited in this way, however. Here, we analyze the event-related potentials of subjects attempting to memorize sequences of visual locations over several blocks of repeated observation, with respect to pre- and post-block recall tests. Over centro-parietal regions, we observed a rapid P300 component superimposed on a broader positivity, which exhibited distinct modulations across learning states that were replicated in two separate experiments. Consistent with its well-known encoding of surprise, the P300 deflection monotonically decreased over blocks as locations became better learned and hence more expected. In contrast, the broader positivity was especially elevated at the point when a given item was newly learned, i.e., started being successfully recalled. These results implicate the Broad Positivity in endogenously-driven, intentional memory formation, whereas the P300, in processing the current stimulus to the degree that it was previously uncertain, indexes the cumulative knowledge thereby gained. The decreasing surprise/P300 effect significantly predicted learning success both across blocks and across subjects. This presents a new, neural-based means to evaluate learning capabilities independent of verbal reports, which could have considerable value in distinguishing genuine learning disabilities from difficulties to communicate the outcomes of learning, or perceptual

  1. A blackberry (Rubus L.) expressed sequence tag library for the development of simple sequence repeat markers

    OpenAIRE

    Lewers, Kim S; Saski, Chris A; Cuthbertson, Brandon J; Henry, David C; Staton, Meg E; Main, Dorrie S; Dhanaraj, Anik L; Rowland, Lisa J; Tomkins, Jeff P

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background The recent development of novel repeat-fruiting types of blackberry (Rubus L.) cultivars, combined with a long history of morphological marker-assisted selection for thornlessness by blackberry breeders, has given rise to increased interest in using molecular markers to facilitate blackberry breeding. Yet no genetic maps, molecular markers, or even sequences exist specifically for cultivated blackberry. The purpose of this study is to begin development of these tools by ge...

  2. Terminal Bacteroid Differentiation Is Associated With Variable Morphological Changes in Legume Species Belonging to the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, Jesús; Szűcs, Attila; Boboescu, Iulian Z; Gherman, Vasile D; Kondorosi, Éva; Kereszt, Attila

    2016-03-01

    Medicago and closely related legume species from the inverted repeat-lacking clade (IRLC) impose terminal differentiation onto their bacterial endosymbionts, manifested in genome endoreduplication, cell enlargement, and loss of cell-division capacity. Nodule-specific cysteine-rich (NCR) secreted host peptides are plant effectors of this process. As bacteroids in other IRLC legumes, such as Cicer arietinum and Glycyrrhiza lepidota, were reported not to display features of terminal differentiation, we investigated the fate of bacteroids in species from these genera as well as in four other species representing distinct genera of the phylogenetic tree for this clade. Bacteroids in all tested legumes proved to be larger in size and DNA content than cultured cells; however, the degree of cell elongation was rather variable in the different species. In addition, the reproductive ability of the bacteroids isolated from these legumes was remarkably reduced. In all IRLC species with available sequence data, the existence of NCR genes was found. These results indicate that IRLC legumes provoke terminal differentiation of their endosymbionts with different morphotypes, probably with the help of NCR peptides.

  3. A blackberry (Rubus L.) expressed sequence tag library for the development of simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewers, Kim S; Saski, Chris A; Cuthbertson, Brandon J; Henry, David C; Staton, Meg E; Main, Dorrie S; Dhanaraj, Anik L; Rowland, Lisa J; Tomkins, Jeff P

    2008-06-20

    The recent development of novel repeat-fruiting types of blackberry (Rubus L.) cultivars, combined with a long history of morphological marker-assisted selection for thornlessness by blackberry breeders, has given rise to increased interest in using molecular markers to facilitate blackberry breeding. Yet no genetic maps, molecular markers, or even sequences exist specifically for cultivated blackberry. The purpose of this study is to begin development of these tools by generating and annotating the first blackberry expressed sequence tag (EST) library, designing primers from the ESTs to amplify regions containing simple sequence repeats (SSR), and testing the usefulness of a subset of the EST-SSRs with two blackberry cultivars. A cDNA library of 18,432 clones was generated from expanding leaf tissue of the cultivar Merton Thornless, a progenitor of many thornless commercial cultivars. Among the most abundantly expressed of the 3,000 genes annotated were those involved with energy, cell structure, and defense. From individual sequences containing SSRs, 673 primer pairs were designed. Of a randomly chosen set of 33 primer pairs tested with two blackberry cultivars, 10 detected an average of 1.9 polymorphic PCR products. This rate predicts that this library may yield as many as 940 SSR primer pairs detecting 1,786 polymorphisms. This may be sufficient to generate a genetic map that can be used to associate molecular markers with phenotypic traits, making possible molecular marker-assisted breeding to compliment existing morphological marker-assisted breeding in blackberry.

  4. Characterization and N-terminal sequence of human platelet proteoglycan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Périn, J P; Bonnet, F; Maillet, P; Jollès, P

    1988-01-01

    Human platelet proteoglycan (P.PG) was prepared from a 4 M-guanidinium chloride platelet extract in the presence of proteinase inhibitors. The purification procedure included CsCl-density-gradient centrifugation, DEAE-Sepharose CL-6B ion-exchange chromatography and f.p.l.c. on a Mono Q HR 5/5 column. P.PG was recovered as a polydisperse molecule, but the protein core appeared to be at least 90% homogeneous. This observation could be due to partial proteolysis of the core protein during extraction. The N-terminal sequence of the human P.PG core protein was determined up to residue 66 and was shown to be highly homologous to the propeptide of an embryonic rat yolk-sac tumour proteoglycan (PG19); the significance of this homology is discussed. Images Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:3214420

  5. Sequence-structure-function relations of the mosquito leucine-rich repeat immune proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Povelones Michael

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and characterisation of factors governing innate immune responses in insects has driven the elucidation of many immune system components in mammals and other organisms. Focusing on the immune system responses of the malaria mosquito, Anopheles gambiae, has uncovered an array of components and mechanisms involved in defence against pathogen infections. Two of these immune factors are LRIM1 and APL1C, which are leucine-rich repeat (LRR containing proteins that activate complement-like defence responses against malaria parasites. In addition to their LRR domains, these leucine-rich repeat immune (LRIM proteins share several structural features including signal peptides, patterns of cysteine residues, and coiled-coil domains. Results The identification and characterisation of genes related to LRIM1 and APL1C revealed putatively novel innate immune factors and furthered the understanding of their likely molecular functions. Genomic scans using the shared features of LRIM1 and APL1C identified more than 20 LRIM-like genes exhibiting all or most of their sequence features in each of three disease-vector mosquitoes with sequenced genomes: An. gambiae, Aedes aegypti, and Culex quinquefasciatus. Comparative sequence analyses revealed that this family of mosquito LRIM-like genes is characterised by a variable number of 6 to 14 LRRs of different lengths. The "Long" LRIM subfamily, with 10 or more LRRs, and the "Short" LRIMs, with 6 or 7 LRRs, also share the signal peptide, cysteine residue patterning, and coiled-coil sequence features of LRIM1 and APL1C. The "TM" LRIMs have a predicted C-terminal transmembrane region, and the "Coil-less" LRIMs exhibit the characteristic LRIM sequence signatures but lack the C-terminal coiled-coil domains. Conclusions The evolutionary plasticity of the LRIM LRR domains may provide templates for diverse recognition properties, while their coiled-coil domains could be involved in the formation

  6. Determinants of Genomic RNA Encapsidation in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Long Terminal Repeat Retrotransposons Ty1 and Ty3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Pachulska-Wieczorek

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Long-terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons are transposable genetic elements that replicate intracellularly, and can be considered progenitors of retroviruses. Ty1 and Ty3 are the most extensively characterized LTR retrotransposons whose RNA genomes provide the template for both protein translation and genomic RNA that is packaged into virus-like particles (VLPs and reverse transcribed. Genomic RNAs are not divided into separate pools of translated and packaged RNAs, therefore their trafficking and packaging into VLPs requires an equilibrium between competing events. In this review, we focus on Ty1 and Ty3 genomic RNA trafficking and packaging as essential steps of retrotransposon propagation. We summarize the existing knowledge on genomic RNA sequences and structures essential to these processes, the role of Gag proteins in repression of genomic RNA translation, delivery to VLP assembly sites, and encapsidation.

  7. Simple sequence repeats provide a substrate for phenotypic variation in the Neurospora crassa circadian clock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd P Michael

    2007-08-01

    Full Text Available WHITE COLLAR-1 (WC-1 mediates interactions between the circadian clock and the environment by acting as both a core clock component and as a blue light photoreceptor in Neurospora crassa. Loss of the amino-terminal polyglutamine (NpolyQ domain in WC-1 results in an arrhythmic circadian clock; this data is consistent with this simple sequence repeat (SSR being essential for clock function.Since SSRs are often polymorphic in length across natural populations, we reasoned that investigating natural variation of the WC-1 NpolyQ may provide insight into its role in the circadian clock. We observed significant phenotypic variation in the period, phase and temperature compensation of circadian regulated asexual conidiation across 143 N. crassa accessions. In addition to the NpolyQ, we identified two other simple sequence repeats in WC-1. The sizes of all three WC-1 SSRs correlated with polymorphisms in other clock genes, latitude and circadian period length. Furthermore, in a cross between two N. crassa accessions, the WC-1 NpolyQ co-segregated with period length.Natural variation of the WC-1 NpolyQ suggests a mechanism by which period length can be varied and selected for by the local environment that does not deleteriously affect WC-1 activity. Understanding natural variation in the N.crassa circadian clock will facilitate an understanding of how fungi exploit their environments.

  8. Foamy Virus Vector Carries a Strong Insulator in Its Long Terminal Repeat Which Reduces Its Genotoxic Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Michael Aaron; Arumugam, Paritha; Pillis, Devin Marie; Loberg, Anastacia; Nasimuzzaman, Mohammed; Lynn, Danielle; van der Loo, Johannes Christiaan Maria; Dexheimer, Phillip Joseph; Keddache, Mehdi; Bauer, Thomas Roy; Hickstein, Dennis Durand; Russell, David William; Malik, Punam

    2018-01-01

    Strong viral enhancers in gammaretrovirus vectors have caused cellular proto-oncogene activation and leukemia, necessitating the use of cellular promoters in "enhancerless" self-inactivating integrating vectors. However, cellular promoters result in relatively low transgene expression, often leading to inadequate disease phenotype correction. Vectors derived from foamy virus, a nonpathogenic retrovirus, show higher preference for nongenic integrations than gammaretroviruses/lentiviruses and preferential integration near transcriptional start sites, like gammaretroviruses. We found that strong viral enhancers/promoters placed in foamy viral vectors caused extremely low immortalization of primary mouse hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells compared to analogous gammaretrovirus/lentivirus vectors carrying the same enhancers/promoters, an effect not explained solely by foamy virus' modest insertional site preference for nongenic regions compared to gammaretrovirus/lentivirus vectors. Using CRISPR/Cas9-mediated targeted insertion of analogous proviral sequences into the LMO2 gene and then measuring LMO2 expression, we demonstrate a sequence-specific effect of foamy virus, independent of insertional bias, contributing to reduced genotoxicity. We show that this effect is mediated by a 36-bp insulator located in the foamy virus long terminal repeat (LTR) that has high-affinity binding to the CCCTC-binding factor. Using our LMO2 activation assay, LMO2 expression was significantly increased when this insulator was removed from foamy virus and significantly reduced when the insulator was inserted into the lentiviral LTR. Our results elucidate a mechanism underlying the low genotoxicity of foamy virus, identify a novel insulator, and support the use of foamy virus as a vector for gene therapy, especially when strong enhancers/promoters are required.IMPORTANCE Understanding the genotoxic potential of viral vectors is important in designing safe and efficacious vectors for gene

  9. SMRT Sequencing of Long Tandem Nucleotide Repeats in SCA10 Reveals Unique Insight of Repeat Expansion Structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McFarland, Karen N; Liu, Jilin; Landrian, Ivette; Godiska, Ronald; Shanker, Savita; Yu, Fahong; Farmerie, William G; Ashizawa, Tetsuo

    2015-01-01

    A large, non-coding ATTCT repeat expansion causes the neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10). In a subset of SCA10 patients, interruption motifs are present at the 5' end of the expansion and strongly correlate with epileptic seizures. Thus, interruption motifs are a predictor of the epileptic phenotype and are hypothesized to act as a phenotypic modifier in SCA10. Yet, the exact internal sequence structure of SCA10 expansions remains unknown due to limitations in current technologies for sequencing across long extended tracts of tandem nucleotide repeats. We used the third generation sequencing technology, Single Molecule Real Time (SMRT) sequencing, to obtain full-length contiguous expansion sequences, ranging from 2.5 to 4.4 kb in length, from three SCA10 patients with different clinical presentations. We obtained sequence spanning the entire length of the expansion and identified the structure of known and novel interruption motifs within the SCA10 expansion. The exact interruption patterns in expanded SCA10 alleles will allow us to further investigate the potential contributions of these interrupting sequences to the pathogenic modification leading to the epilepsy phenotype in SCA10. Our results also demonstrate that SMRT sequencing is useful for deciphering long tandem repeats that pose as "gaps" in the human genome sequence.

  10. SMRT Sequencing of Long Tandem Nucleotide Repeats in SCA10 Reveals Unique Insight of Repeat Expansion Structure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen N McFarland

    Full Text Available A large, non-coding ATTCT repeat expansion causes the neurodegenerative disorder, spinocerebellar ataxia type 10 (SCA10. In a subset of SCA10 patients, interruption motifs are present at the 5' end of the expansion and strongly correlate with epileptic seizures. Thus, interruption motifs are a predictor of the epileptic phenotype and are hypothesized to act as a phenotypic modifier in SCA10. Yet, the exact internal sequence structure of SCA10 expansions remains unknown due to limitations in current technologies for sequencing across long extended tracts of tandem nucleotide repeats. We used the third generation sequencing technology, Single Molecule Real Time (SMRT sequencing, to obtain full-length contiguous expansion sequences, ranging from 2.5 to 4.4 kb in length, from three SCA10 patients with different clinical presentations. We obtained sequence spanning the entire length of the expansion and identified the structure of known and novel interruption motifs within the SCA10 expansion. The exact interruption patterns in expanded SCA10 alleles will allow us to further investigate the potential contributions of these interrupting sequences to the pathogenic modification leading to the epilepsy phenotype in SCA10. Our results also demonstrate that SMRT sequencing is useful for deciphering long tandem repeats that pose as "gaps" in the human genome sequence.

  11. Assembly of Repeat Content Using Next Generation Sequencing Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    labutti, Kurt; Kuo, Alan; Grigoriev, Igor; Copeland, Alex

    2014-03-17

    Repetitive organisms pose a challenge for short read assembly, and typically only unique regions and repeat regions shorter than the read length, can be accurately assembled. Recently, we have been investigating the use of Pacific Biosciences reads for de novo fungal assembly. We will present an assessment of the quality and degree of repeat reconstruction possible in a fungal genome using long read technology. We will also compare differences in assembly of repeat content using short read and long read technology.

  12. Chromosomal organization of simple sequence repeats in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... to the oligonucleotide repeat. The intercalary, centromeric and telomeric bands were observed along the chromosomes, and for each particular repeat every chromosome pair presented a similar pattern, allowing karyotypic analysis with all the SSRs tested. Our study is the first in mollusks to show the application of SSR in ...

  13. Rescue of avian adeno-associated virus from a recombinant plasmid containing deletions in the viral inverted terminal repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jianye; Zhu, Liqian; Zhu, Jun; Zhang, Xinjun; Tao, Jie; Duan, Qiangde; Zhu, Guoqiang

    2012-01-01

    We have previously reported the complete genome sequence of avian adeno-associated virus (AAAV) strain YZ-1, isolated from healthy chickens in China. In this study, we describe the successful rescue of infectious virions from a recombinant plasmid containing the genome of YZ-1 with deletions in the viral inverted terminal repeats (ITRs). The complete genome of YZ-1 was cloned into a bacterial plasmid by a modified "A-T" cloning method. Six recombinant plasmids were selected for further experiments. Sequence analysis indicated that the six clones shared identical internal sequences except for the various deletions within ITRs at either end of the cloned genome. The recombinant plasmid pYZ525, harboring a YZ-1 genome with a 96-nt deletion at the 5' end, was used to transfect CEL or HEK293 cells in the presence of the CELO virus or a helper plasmid, and rescued virions were obtained by both of the methods despite the presence of the deletions. Here, for the first time, we provide evidence that a certain number of nt deletions in the ITRs are not lethal for the rescue of viable AAAV from recombinant plasmids. This study provides insight into the unique biology of AAAV and the mechanism of viral replication.

  14. A blackberry (Rubus L. expressed sequence tag library for the development of simple sequence repeat markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Main Dorrie S

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent development of novel repeat-fruiting types of blackberry (Rubus L. cultivars, combined with a long history of morphological marker-assisted selection for thornlessness by blackberry breeders, has given rise to increased interest in using molecular markers to facilitate blackberry breeding. Yet no genetic maps, molecular markers, or even sequences exist specifically for cultivated blackberry. The purpose of this study is to begin development of these tools by generating and annotating the first blackberry expressed sequence tag (EST library, designing primers from the ESTs to amplify regions containing simple sequence repeats (SSR, and testing the usefulness of a subset of the EST-SSRs with two blackberry cultivars. Results A cDNA library of 18,432 clones was generated from expanding leaf tissue of the cultivar Merton Thornless, a progenitor of many thornless commercial cultivars. Among the most abundantly expressed of the 3,000 genes annotated were those involved with energy, cell structure, and defense. From individual sequences containing SSRs, 673 primer pairs were designed. Of a randomly chosen set of 33 primer pairs tested with two blackberry cultivars, 10 detected an average of 1.9 polymorphic PCR products. Conclusion This rate predicts that this library may yield as many as 940 SSR primer pairs detecting 1,786 polymorphisms. This may be sufficient to generate a genetic map that can be used to associate molecular markers with phenotypic traits, making possible molecular marker-assisted breeding to compliment existing morphological marker-assisted breeding in blackberry.

  15. Structure and possible function of a G-quadruplex in the long terminal repeat of the proviral HIV-1 genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nicola, Beatrice; Lech, Christopher J; Heddi, Brahim; Regmi, Sagar; Frasson, Ilaria; Perrone, Rosalba; Richter, Sara N; Phan, Anh Tuân

    2016-07-27

    The long terminal repeat (LTR) of the proviral human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 genome is integral to virus transcription and host cell infection. The guanine-rich U3 region within the LTR promoter, previously shown to form G-quadruplex structures, represents an attractive target to inhibit HIV transcription and replication. In this work, we report the structure of a biologically relevant G-quadruplex within the LTR promoter region of HIV-1. The guanine-rich sequence designated LTR-IV forms a well-defined structure in physiological cationic solution. The nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) structure of this sequence reveals a parallel-stranded G-quadruplex containing a single-nucleotide thymine bulge, which participates in a conserved stacking interaction with a neighboring single-nucleotide adenine loop. Transcription analysis in a HIV-1 replication competent cell indicates that the LTR-IV region may act as a modulator of G-quadruplex formation in the LTR promoter. Consequently, the LTR-IV G-quadruplex structure presented within this work could represent a valuable target for the design of HIV therapeutics. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Local repeat sequence organization of an intergenic spacer in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The amplification yielded the same uniquely ``sequence-scrambled” product, whether the template used for PCR was total cellular DNA, chloroplast DNA or a plasmid clone DNA corresponding to that region. The PCR product, a ``unique” new sequence, had lost the repetitive organization of the template genome where it ...

  17. Investigation of a Quadruplex-Forming Repeat Sequence Highly Enriched in Xanthomonas and Nostoc sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rehm, Charlotte; Wurmthaler, Lena A; Li, Yuanhao; Frickey, Tancred; Hartig, Jörg S

    2015-01-01

    In prokaryotes simple sequence repeats (SSRs) with unit sizes of 1-5 nucleotides (nt) are causative for phase and antigenic variation. Although an increased abundance of heptameric repeats was noticed in bacteria, reports about SSRs of 6-9 nt are rare. In particular G-rich repeat sequences with the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex (G4) structures have received little attention. In silico analysis of prokaryotic genomes show putative G4 forming sequences to be abundant. This report focuses on a surprisingly enriched G-rich repeat of the type GGGNATC in Xanthomonas and cyanobacteria such as Nostoc. We studied in detail the genomes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 (Xcc), Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 (Xac), and Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120 (Ana). In all three organisms repeats are spread all over the genome with an over-representation in non-coding regions. Extensive variation of the number of repetitive units was observed with repeat numbers ranging from two up to 26 units. However a clear preference for four units was detected. The strong bias for four units coincides with the requirement of four consecutive G-tracts for G4 formation. Evidence for G4 formation of the consensus repeat sequences was found in biophysical studies utilizing CD spectroscopy. The G-rich repeats are preferably located between aligned open reading frames (ORFs) and are under-represented in coding regions or between divergent ORFs. The G-rich repeats are preferentially located within a distance of 50 bp upstream of an ORF on the anti-sense strand or within 50 bp from the stop codon on the sense strand. Analysis of whole transcriptome sequence data showed that the majority of repeat sequences are transcribed. The genetic loci in the vicinity of repeat regions show increased genomic stability. In conclusion, we introduce and characterize a special class of highly abundant and wide-spread quadruplex-forming repeat sequences in bacteria.

  18. Definition of a fundamental repeating unit in streptococcal glucosyltransferase glucan-binding regions and related sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giffard, P M; Jacques, N A

    1994-06-01

    The C-termini of the glucosyltransferases (Gtfs) of oral streptococci are responsible for glucan binding. These glucan-binding domains (GBDs) are composed of a series of repeated sequences that have been classified into four different classes (A-D) by virtue of sequence similarity and which, by inference, have been suggested to be of functional importance. In contrast, we propose that repeat sequences evolve in response to selection for an increase in the number of copies of a particular domain through multiple duplication events occurring at different times. According to this hypothesis, repeats should possess various degrees of similarity, especially if only key residues are of functional importance. Analysis of the GBDs of the Gtfs indicated that a common fundamental repeat, designated the "YG" repeat, could be discerned within the "A", "B", "C", and "D" repeats. Similar elements were also conserved in the ligand-binding repeats of the Clostridium difficile toxins and the lysins and the PspA protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae, suggesting that similar selective pressures had also been imposed on these sequences. Analysis of the "YG" repeats present in the GtfJ and GtfK of Streptococcus salivarius indicated that some of the "YG" repeats in the GBDs of these proteins had arisen as a result of duplication events involving a series of three sequential "YG" repeats.

  19. Analysis of sequence diversity through internal transcribed spacers and simple sequence repeats to identify Dendrobium species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y T; Chen, R K; Lin, S J; Chen, Y C; Chin, S W; Chen, F C; Lee, C Y

    2014-04-08

    The Orchidaceae is one of the largest and most diverse families of flowering plants. The Dendrobium genus has high economic potential as ornamental plants and for medicinal purposes. In addition, the species of this genus are able to produce large crops. However, many Dendrobium varieties are very similar in outward appearance, making it difficult to distinguish one species from another. This study demonstrated that the 12 Dendrobium species used in this study may be divided into 2 groups by internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence analysis. Red and yellow flowers may also be used to separate these species into 2 main groups. In particular, the deciduous characteristic is associated with the ITS genetic diversity of the A group. Of 53 designed simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs, 7 pairs were polymorphic for polymerase chain reaction products that were amplified from a specific band. The results of this study demonstrate that these 7 SSR primer pairs may potentially be used to identify Dendrobium species and their progeny in future studies.

  20. a stable simple sequence repeat marker for resistance to white ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    ADN extraits pour une analyse moléculaire. Huit marqueurs SSR et dix ISSRs ont été utilisés. Ces marqueurs ont été essayés sur des lignées parentales et produits de backcross afin de déterminer la différence entre résistants. (score 1) et susceptibles (score 5). Simple analyse de marqueurs a été réalisée au travers du ...

  1. Novel Y-chromosome Short Tandem Repeat Variants Detected Through the Use of Massively Parallel Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David H. Warshauer

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Massively parallel sequencing (MPS technology is capable of determining the sizes of short tandem repeat (STR alleles as well as their individual nucleotide sequences. Thus, single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs within the repeat regions of STRs and variations in the pattern of repeat units in a given repeat motif can be used to differentiate alleles of the same length. In this study, MPS was used to sequence 28 forensically-relevant Y-chromosome STRs in a set of 41 DNA samples from the 3 major U.S. population groups (African Americans, Caucasians, and Hispanics. The resulting sequence data, which were analyzed with STRait Razor v2.0, revealed 37 unique allele sequence variants that have not been previously reported. Of these, 19 sequences were variations of documented sequences resulting from the presence of intra-repeat SNPs or alternative repeat unit patterns. Despite a limited sampling, two of the most frequently-observed variants were found only in African American samples. The remaining 18 variants represented allele sequences for which there were no published data with which to compare. These findings illustrate the great potential of MPS with regard to increasing the resolving power of STR typing and emphasize the need for sample population characterization of STR alleles.

  2. Investigation of a Quadruplex-Forming Repeat Sequence Highly Enriched in Xanthomonas and Nostoc sp.

    OpenAIRE

    Charlotte Rehm; Wurmthaler, Lena A.; Yuanhao Li; Tancred Frickey; Hartig, Jörg S.

    2015-01-01

    In prokaryotes simple sequence repeats (SSRs) with unit sizes of 1-5 nucleotides (nt) are causative for phase and antigenic variation. Although an increased abundance of heptameric repeats was noticed in bacteria, reports about SSRs of 6-9 nt are rare. In particular G-rich repeat sequences with the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex (G4) structures have received little attention. In silico analysis of prokaryotic genomes show putative G4 forming sequences to be abundant. This report focuses...

  3. Local repeat sequence organization of an intergenic spacer in the ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    sequence-scrambled” product, whether the template used for PCR was total cellular DNA, chloroplast DNA or a plasmid clone DNA corresponding .... than that of nuclear genome (Sager and Ishida 1963), we tested several A + T rich .... secondary structures that could have led to such a PCR- amplification product. We are ...

  4. Development of expressed sequence tag and expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat marker resources for Musa acuminata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Marco A N; de Oliveira Cruz, Viviane; Emediato, Flavia L; de Camargo Teixeira, Cristiane; Souza, Manoel T; Matsumoto, Takashi; Rennó Azevedo, Vânia C; Ferreira, Claudia F; Amorim, Edson P; de Alencar Figueiredo, Lucio Flavio; Martins, Natalia F; de Jesus Barbosa Cavalcante, Maria; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; da Silva, Orzenil Bonfim; Pappas, Georgios J; Pignolet, Luc; Abadie, Catherine; Ciampi, Ana Y; Piffanelli, Pietro; Miller, Robert N G

    2012-01-01

    Banana (Musa acuminata) is a crop contributing to global food security. Many varieties lack resistance to biotic stresses, due to sterility and narrow genetic background. The objective of this study was to develop an expressed sequence tag (EST) database of transcripts expressed during compatible and incompatible banana-Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Mf) interactions. Black leaf streak disease (BLSD), caused by Mf, is a destructive disease of banana. Microsatellite markers were developed as a resource for crop improvement. cDNA libraries were constructed from in vitro-infected leaves from BLSD-resistant M. acuminata ssp. burmaniccoides Calcutta 4 (MAC4) and susceptible M. acuminata cv. Cavendish Grande Naine (MACV). Clones were 5'-end Sanger sequenced, ESTs assembled with TGICL and unigenes annotated using BLAST, Blast2GO and InterProScan. Mreps was used to screen for simple sequence repeats (SSRs), with markers evaluated for polymorphism using 20 diploid (AA) M. acuminata accessions contrasting in resistance to Mycosphaerella leaf spot diseases. A total of 9333 high-quality ESTs were obtained for MAC4 and 3964 for MACV, which assembled into 3995 unigenes. Of these, 2592 displayed homology to genes encoding proteins with known or putative function, and 266 to genes encoding proteins with unknown function. Gene ontology (GO) classification identified 543 GO terms, 2300 unigenes were assigned to EuKaryotic orthologous group categories and 312 mapped to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. A total of 624 SSR loci were identified, with trinucleotide repeat motifs the most abundant in MAC4 (54.1 %) and MACV (57.6 %). Polymorphism across M. acuminata accessions was observed with 75 markers. Alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 8, totalling 289. The polymorphism information content ranged from 0.08 to 0.81. This EST collection offers a resource for studying functional genes, including transcripts expressed in banana-Mf interactions. Markers are

  5. Solution structure of the Arabidopsis thaliana telomeric repeat-binding protein DNA binding domain: a new fold with an additional C-terminal helix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sue, Shih-Che; Hsiao, Hsin-Hao; Chung, Ben C-P; Cheng, Ying-Hsien; Hsueh, Kuang-Lung; Chen, Chung Mong; Ho, Chia Hsing; Huang, Tai-Huang

    2006-02-10

    The double-stranded telomeric repeat-binding protein (TRP) AtTRP1 is isolated from Arabidopsis thaliana. Using gel retardation assays, we defined the C-terminal 97 amino acid residues, Gln464 to Val560 (AtTRP1(464-560)), as the minimal structured telomeric repeat-binding domain. This region contains a typical Myb DNA-binding motif and a C-terminal extension of 40 amino acid residues. The monomeric AtTRP1(464-560) binds to a 13-mer DNA duplex containing a single repeat of an A.thaliana telomeric DNA sequence (GGTTTAG) in a 1:1 complex, with a K(D) approximately 10(-6)-10(-7) M. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) examination revealed that the solution structure of AtTRP1(464-560) is a novel four-helix tetrahedron rather than the three-helix bundle structure found in typical Myb motifs and other TRPs. Binding of the 13-mer DNA duplex to AtTRP1(464-560) induced significant chemical shift perturbations of protein amide resonances, which suggests that helix 3 (H3) and the flexible loop connecting H3 and H4 are essential for telomeric DNA sequence recognition. Furthermore, similar to that in hTRF1, the N-terminal arm likely contributes to or stabilizes DNA binding. Sequence comparisons suggested that the four-helix structure and the involvement of the loop residues in DNA binding may be features unique to plant TRPs.

  6. Clusters of nucleotide substitutions and insertion/deletion mutations are associated with repeat sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J McDonald

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The genome-sequencing gold rush has facilitated the use of comparative genomics to uncover patterns of genome evolution, although their causal mechanisms remain elusive. One such trend, ubiquitous to prokarya and eukarya, is the association of insertion/deletion mutations (indels with increases in the nucleotide substitution rate extending over hundreds of base pairs. The prevailing hypothesis is that indels are themselves mutagenic agents. Here, we employ population genomics data from Escherichia coli, Saccharomyces paradoxus, and Drosophila to provide evidence suggesting that it is not the indels per se but the sequence in which indels occur that causes the accumulation of nucleotide substitutions. We found that about two-thirds of indels are closely associated with repeat sequences and that repeat sequence abundance could be used to identify regions of elevated sequence diversity, independently of indels. Moreover, the mutational signature of indel-proximal nucleotide substitutions matches that of error-prone DNA polymerases. We propose that repeat sequences promote an increased probability of replication fork arrest, causing the persistent recruitment of error-prone DNA polymerases to specific sequence regions over evolutionary time scales. Experimental measures of the mutation rates of engineered DNA sequences and analyses of experimentally obtained collections of spontaneous mutations provide molecular evidence supporting our hypothesis. This study uncovers a new role for repeat sequences in genome evolution and provides an explanation of how fine-scale sequence contextual effects influence mutation rates and thereby evolution.

  7. RePS: a sequence assembler that masks exact repeats identified from the shotgun data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jun; Wong, Gane Ka-Shu; Ni, Peixiang

    2002-01-01

    We describe a sequence assembler, RePS (repeat-masked Phrap with scaffolding), that explicitly identifies exact 20mer repeats from the shotgun data and removes them prior to the assembly. The established software is used to compute meaningful error probabilities for each base. Clone-end-pairing i...

  8. Reverse Transcription in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Long-Terminal Repeat Retrotransposon Ty3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason W. Rausch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Converting the single-stranded retroviral RNA into integration-competent double-stranded DNA is achieved through a multi-step process mediated by the virus-coded reverse transcriptase (RT. With the exception that it is restricted to an intracellular life cycle, replication of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae long terminal repeat (LTR-retrotransposon Ty3 genome is guided by equivalent events that, while generally similar, show many unique and subtle differences relative to the retroviral counterparts. Until only recently, our knowledge of RT structure and function was guided by a vast body of literature on the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV enzyme. Although the recently-solved structure of Ty3 RT in the presence of an RNA/DNA hybrid adds little in terms of novelty to the mechanistic basis underlying DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H activity, it highlights quite remarkable topological differences between retroviral and LTR-retrotransposon RTs. The theme of overall similarity but distinct differences extends to the priming mechanisms used by Ty3 RT to initiate (− and (+ strand DNA synthesis. The unique structural organization of the retrotransposon enzyme and interaction with its nucleic acid substrates, with emphasis on polypurine tract (PPT-primed initiation of (+ strand synthesis, is the subject of this review.

  9. Kinetics of HIV-1 long terminal repeat trans-activation. Use of intragenic ribozyme to assess rate-limiting steps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeang, K. T.; Berkhout, B.

    1992-01-01

    We have examined, using self-cleaving ribozymes, the intracellular trans-activation kinetics of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) by viral protein Tat. Experiments were designed to effect a competition (during RNA chain elongation) between cleavage of a

  10. Repeat Associated Non-AUG Translation (RAN Translation Dependent on Sequence Downstream of the ATXN2 CAG Repeat.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel R Scoles

    Full Text Available Spinocerebellar ataxia type 2 (SCA2 is a progressive autosomal dominant disorder caused by the expansion of a CAG tract in the ATXN2 gene. The SCA2 disease phenotype is characterized by cerebellar atrophy, gait ataxia, and slow saccades. ATXN2 mutation causes gains of toxic and normal functions of the ATXN2 gene product, ataxin-2, and abnormally slow Purkinje cell firing frequency. Previously we investigated features of ATXN2 controlling expression and noted expression differences for ATXN2 constructs with varying CAG lengths, suggestive of repeat associated non-AUG translation (RAN translation. To determine whether RAN translation occurs for ATXN2 we assembled various ATXN2 constructs with ATXN2 tagged by luciferase, HA or FLAG tags, driven by the CMV promoter or the ATXN2 promoter. Luciferase expression from ATXN2-luciferase constructs lacking the ATXN2 start codon was weak vs AUG translation, regardless of promoter type, and did not increase with longer CAG repeat lengths. RAN translation was detected on western blots by the anti-polyglutamine antibody 1C2 for constructs driven by the CMV promoter but not the ATXN2 promoter, and was weaker than AUG translation. Strong RAN translation was also observed when driving the ATXN2 sequence with the CMV promoter with ATXN2 sequence downstream of the CAG repeat truncated to 18 bp in the polyglutamine frame but not in the polyserine or polyalanine frames. Our data demonstrate that ATXN2 RAN translation is weak compared to AUG translation and is dependent on ATXN2 sequences flanking the CAG repeat.

  11. Activation of the Long Terminal Repeat of Human Endogenous Retrovirus K by Melanoma-Specific Transcription Factor MITF-M

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iyoko Katoh

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The human and Old World primate genomes possess conserved endogenous retrovirus sequences that have been implicated in evolution, reproduction, and carcinogenesis. Human endogenous retrovirus (HERV-K with 5′LTR-gag-pro-pol-env-rec/np9-3′LTR sequences represents the newest retrovirus family that integrated into the human genome 1 to 5 million years ago. Although a high-level expression of HERV-K in melanomas, breast cancers, and terato-carcinomas has been demonstrated, the mechanism of the lineage-specific activation of the long terminal repeat (LTR remains obscure. We studied chromosomal HERV-K expression in MeWo melanoma cells in comparison with the basal expression in human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK293 cells. Cloned LTR of HERV-K (HML-2.HOM was also characterized by mutation and transactivation experiments. We detected multiple transcriptional initiator (Inr sites in the LTR by rapid amplification of complementary DNA ends (5′ RACE. HEK293 and MeWo showed different Inr usage. The most potent Inr was associated with a TATA box and three binding motifs of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF. Both chromosomal HERV-K expression and the cloned LTR function were strongly activated in HEK293 by transfection with MITF-M, a melanocyte/melanoma–specific isoform of MITF. Coexpression of MITF and the HERV-K core antigen was detected in retinal pigmented epithelium by an immunofluorescence analysis. Although malignant melanoma lines MeWo, G361, and SK-MEL-28 showed enhanced HERV-K transcription compared with normal melanocytes, the level of MITF-M messenger RNA persisted from normal to transformed melanocytes. Thus, MITF-M may be a prerequisite for the pigmented cell lineage–specific function of HERV-K LTR, leading to the high-level expression in malignant melanomas.

  12. AuNP-CTG based probing system targeting CAG repeat DNA and RNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Binh Huy; Joo, Han Na; Hwang, Do Won; Kim, Kyu Wan; Seo, Young Jun

    2017-08-15

    We have developed a AuNP-CTG based probing system that is applicable to the detection of many units of CAG repeat sequences which was synthesized by a rolling circle amplification (RCA) system with changes in fluorescence. We also demonstrate that our AuNP-CTG based probing system could transfect without using transfection reagent and detect target CAG repeat sequences in HeLa cells with dramatic changes in fluorescence. This AuNP-CTG based probing system could also be used, in conjunction with the CAG repeat RCA system, to detect target DNA. This system was so sensitive to the target DNA that it could detect even picomolar amounts with amplification of the fluorescence signal. Furthermore, we have used our gold-based CAG probing system for the detection of RNA CAG repeat sequences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Tandemly repeated sequence in 5'end of mtDNA control region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Extensive length variability was observed in 5' end sequence of the mitochondrial DNA control region of the Japanese Spanish mackerel (Scomberomorus niphonius). This length variability was due to the presence of varying numbers of a 56-bp tandemly repeated sequence and a 46-bp insertion/deletion (indel).

  14. Development of expressed sequence tag and expressed sequence tag–simple sequence repeat marker resources for Musa acuminata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passos, Marco A. N.; de Oliveira Cruz, Viviane; Emediato, Flavia L.; de Camargo Teixeira, Cristiane; Souza, Manoel T.; Matsumoto, Takashi; Rennó Azevedo, Vânia C.; Ferreira, Claudia F.; Amorim, Edson P.; de Alencar Figueiredo, Lucio Flavio; Martins, Natalia F.; de Jesus Barbosa Cavalcante, Maria; Baurens, Franc-Christophe; da Silva, Orzenil Bonfim; Pappas, Georgios J.; Pignolet, Luc; Abadie, Catherine; Ciampi, Ana Y.; Piffanelli, Pietro; Miller, Robert N. G.

    2012-01-01

    Background and aims Banana (Musa acuminata) is a crop contributing to global food security. Many varieties lack resistance to biotic stresses, due to sterility and narrow genetic background. The objective of this study was to develop an expressed sequence tag (EST) database of transcripts expressed during compatible and incompatible banana–Mycosphaerella fijiensis (Mf) interactions. Black leaf streak disease (BLSD), caused by Mf, is a destructive disease of banana. Microsatellite markers were developed as a resource for crop improvement. Methodology cDNA libraries were constructed from in vitro-infected leaves from BLSD-resistant M. acuminata ssp. burmaniccoides Calcutta 4 (MAC4) and susceptible M. acuminata cv. Cavendish Grande Naine (MACV). Clones were 5′-end Sanger sequenced, ESTs assembled with TGICL and unigenes annotated using BLAST, Blast2GO and InterProScan. Mreps was used to screen for simple sequence repeats (SSRs), with markers evaluated for polymorphism using 20 diploid (AA) M. acuminata accessions contrasting in resistance to Mycosphaerella leaf spot diseases. Principal results A total of 9333 high-quality ESTs were obtained for MAC4 and 3964 for MACV, which assembled into 3995 unigenes. Of these, 2592 displayed homology to genes encoding proteins with known or putative function, and 266 to genes encoding proteins with unknown function. Gene ontology (GO) classification identified 543 GO terms, 2300 unigenes were assigned to EuKaryotic orthologous group categories and 312 mapped to Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathways. A total of 624 SSR loci were identified, with trinucleotide repeat motifs the most abundant in MAC4 (54.1 %) and MACV (57.6 %). Polymorphism across M. acuminata accessions was observed with 75 markers. Alleles per polymorphic locus ranged from 2 to 8, totalling 289. The polymorphism information content ranged from 0.08 to 0.81. Conclusions This EST collection offers a resource for studying functional genes, including

  15. Investigation of a Quadruplex-Forming Repeat Sequence Highly Enriched in Xanthomonas and Nostoc sp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte Rehm

    Full Text Available In prokaryotes simple sequence repeats (SSRs with unit sizes of 1-5 nucleotides (nt are causative for phase and antigenic variation. Although an increased abundance of heptameric repeats was noticed in bacteria, reports about SSRs of 6-9 nt are rare. In particular G-rich repeat sequences with the propensity to fold into G-quadruplex (G4 structures have received little attention. In silico analysis of prokaryotic genomes show putative G4 forming sequences to be abundant. This report focuses on a surprisingly enriched G-rich repeat of the type GGGNATC in Xanthomonas and cyanobacteria such as Nostoc. We studied in detail the genomes of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris ATCC 33913 (Xcc, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri str. 306 (Xac, and Nostoc sp. strain PCC7120 (Ana. In all three organisms repeats are spread all over the genome with an over-representation in non-coding regions. Extensive variation of the number of repetitive units was observed with repeat numbers ranging from two up to 26 units. However a clear preference for four units was detected. The strong bias for four units coincides with the requirement of four consecutive G-tracts for G4 formation. Evidence for G4 formation of the consensus repeat sequences was found in biophysical studies utilizing CD spectroscopy. The G-rich repeats are preferably located between aligned open reading frames (ORFs and are under-represented in coding regions or between divergent ORFs. The G-rich repeats are preferentially located within a distance of 50 bp upstream of an ORF on the anti-sense strand or within 50 bp from the stop codon on the sense strand. Analysis of whole transcriptome sequence data showed that the majority of repeat sequences are transcribed. The genetic loci in the vicinity of repeat regions show increased genomic stability. In conclusion, we introduce and characterize a special class of highly abundant and wide-spread quadruplex-forming repeat sequences in bacteria.

  16. Porcine (GT)n sequences: structure and association with dispersed and tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilke, K; Jung, M; Chen, Y; Geldermann, H

    1994-05-01

    Loci containing (GT)n repeats were isolated from three different plasmid libraries with inserts of porcine genomic DNA between 140 and 200, 200 and 300, and 350 and 400 bp. Sequencing showed that the average repeat length and the fraction of perfect repeats were increased in the libraries containing longer inserts (> or = 200 bp). The polymorphism of (GT)n loci containing at least 10 repeat units was analyzed using the polymerase chain reaction and an automated DNA sequencer. Nearly all tested loci are polymorphic and can therefore be used as marker loci for gene mapping and for other applications. The (GT)n loci were categorized into three classes: (1) loci containing the (GT)n repeats associated with a SINE element, (2) loci containing the (GT)n repeats associated with one or more other simple repeats, and (3) loci containing (GT)n as the only detected repetitive element. At most loci of the first class, the (GT)n repeat was in a fixed configuration adjacent to the 3' end of the SINE. The findings support the notion of clustering of different repeat types in the mammalian genome.

  17. The human TTAGGG repeat factors 1 and 2 bind to a subset of interstitial telomeric sequences and satellite repeats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Thomas Simonet; Elena Giulotto; Frederique Magdinier; Béatrice Horard; Pascal Barbry; Rainer Waldmann; Eric Gison; Laure-Emmanuelle Zaragosi; Claude Philippe; Kevin Lebrigand; Clémentine Schouteden; Adeline Augereau; Serge Bauwens; Jing Ye; Marco Santagostino

    2011-01-01

    The study of the proteins that bind to telomeric DNA in mammals has provided a deep understanding of the mech anisms involved in chromosome-end protection. However, very little is known on the binding of these proteins to nontelomeric DNA sequences. The TTAGGG DNA repeat proteins 1 and 2 (TRF1 and TRF2) bind to mammalian telomeres as part of the shelterin complex and are essential for maintaining chromosome end stability. In this study, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation with high-throughput sequencing to map at high sensitivity and resolution the human chromosomal sites to which TRF1 and TRF2 bind. While most of the identified sequences correspond to telomeric regions, we showed that these two proteins also bind to extratelomeric sites. The vast majority of these extratelomeric sites contains interstitial telomeric sequences (or ITSs). However, we also identified non-iTS sites, which correspond to centromeric and pericentromeric satellite DNA. Interestingly, the TRF-binding sites are often located in the proximity of genes or within introns. We propose that TRF1 and TRF2 couple the functional state of telomeres to the long-range organization of chromosomes and gene regulation networks by binding to extratelomeric sequences.

  18. Developing expressed sequence tag libraries and the discovery of simple sequence repeat markers for two species of raspberry (Rubus L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Background: Due to a relatively high level of codominant inheritance and transferability within and among taxonomic groups, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are important elements in comparative mapping and delineation of genomic regions associated with traits of economic importance. Expressed S...

  19. Young age and termination of pregnancy during the second trimester are risk factors for repeat second-trimester abortion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentula, Maarit J; Niinimäki, Maarit; Suhonen, Satu; Hemminki, Elina; Gissler, Mika; Heikinheimo, Oskari

    2010-08-01

    The objective of the study was to characterize women undergoing a termination of pregnancy (TOP) during the second trimester and to evaluate the risk factors and timing of repeat TOP. This nationwide retrospective cohort study investigated 41,750 women who underwent TOP during the first (n = 39,850) or second (n = 1900) trimester in Finland in 2000-2005. The follow-up time was until repeat TOP or until Dec. 31, 2006. TOP during the second trimester increases the risk of repeat TOP (hazard ratio [HR], 1.4; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.3-1.6), repeat second-trimester TOP (HR, 3.8; 95% CI, 2.9-5.1), and repeat TOP after 16 weeks of gestation (HR, 5.0; 95% CI, 3.3-7.7). The other risk factor for these is young age (HR, 7.0, 95% CI, 5.3-9.3; and HR, 12.5; 95% CI, 3.1-50.4 for age factors for repeat second-trimester TOP. Special focus on these women might be effective in decreasing repeat abortions. Copyright (c) 2010 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Characterization of two families of tandem repeated DNA sequences in Potamogeton pectinatus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccarelli, Marilena; Sarri, Vania; Minelli, Stefania; Gelati, Maria Teresa

    2008-11-01

    DNA sequences belonging to two families of tandem repeats, PpeRsa1 (362-364 bp in length, 62% A+T residues) and PpeRsa2 (355-359 bp in length, 59% A+T residues), have been isolated from the Potamogeton pectinatus L. genome. The two sequence families do not share significant nucleotide sequence similarity, even if an evolutionary relationship between them could be assumed. The comparison of the cleaving activity of isoschizomeres that are either sensitive or insensitive to methylation of cytosine residues in the target sequence revealed high methylation in both sequence families. The copy number per 1C DNA of PpeRsa1- and PpeRsa2-related sequences is estimated to be 4.92 x 10(4) and 7.96 x 10(4), respectively. Taken together, these sequences account for about 7.5% of the entire genome of P. pectinatus. The chromosomal organization of these sequences was investigated by fluorescent in situ hybridization. PpeRsa1 and PpeRsa2 repeats found related sequences in 52 chromosomes of the P. pectinatus complement (2n = 78). The related sequences were localized around the centromeres and at the chromosome ends in three pairs of chromosomes, while they were found only at the chromosome ends in the remaining pairs. Twenty-six chromosomes did not show any hybridization signal. The hypothesis that the species is a hybrid between a diploid parent and an allotetraploid parent is put forward.

  1. Evolutionary conservation of sequence and secondary structures inCRISPR repeats

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunin, Victor; Sorek, Rotem; Hugenholtz, Philip

    2006-09-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Palindromic Repeats (CRISPRs) are a novel class of direct repeats, separated by unique spacer sequences of similar length, that are present in {approx}40% of bacterial and all archaeal genomes analyzed to date. More than 40 gene families, called CRISPR-associated sequences (CAS), appear in conjunction with these repeats and are thought to be involved in the propagation and functioning of CRISPRs. It has been proposed that the CRISPR/CAS system samples, maintains a record of, and inactivates invasive DNA that the cell has encountered, and therefore constitutes a prokaryotic analog of an immune system. Here we analyze CRISPR repeats identified in 195 microbial genomes and show that they can be organized into multiple clusters based on sequence similarity. All individual repeats in any given cluster were inferred to form characteristic RNA secondary structure, ranging from non-existent to pronounced. Stable secondary structures included G:U base pairs and exhibited multiple compensatory base changes in the stem region, indicating evolutionary conservation and functional importance. We also show that the repeat-based classification corresponds to, and expands upon, a previously reported CAS gene-based classification including specific relationships between CRISPR and CAS subtypes.

  2. Sequences spanning the leader-repeat junction mediate CRISPR adaptation to phage in Streptococcus thermophilus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunzhou; Chesne, Megan T.; Terns, Rebecca M.; Terns, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    CRISPR-Cas systems are RNA-based immune systems that protect prokaryotes from invaders such as phages and plasmids. In adaptation, the initial phase of the immune response, short foreign DNA fragments are captured and integrated into host CRISPR loci to provide heritable defense against encountered foreign nucleic acids. Each CRISPR contains a ∼100–500 bp leader element that typically includes a transcription promoter, followed by an array of captured ∼35 bp sequences (spacers) sandwiched between copies of an identical ∼35 bp direct repeat sequence. New spacers are added immediately downstream of the leader. Here, we have analyzed adaptation to phage infection in Streptococcus thermophilus at the CRISPR1 locus to identify cis-acting elements essential for the process. We show that the leader and a single repeat of the CRISPR locus are sufficient for adaptation in this system. Moreover, we identified a leader sequence element capable of stimulating adaptation at a dormant repeat. We found that sequences within 10 bp of the site of integration, in both the leader and repeat of the CRISPR, are required for the process. Our results indicate that information at the CRISPR leader-repeat junction is critical for adaptation in this Type II-A system and likely other CRISPR-Cas systems. PMID:25589547

  3. Cloning and Characterization of a Human Genomic Sequence that Alleviates Repeat-Induced Gene Silencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Fukuma

    Full Text Available Plasmids bearing a mammalian replication initiation region (IR and a nuclear matrix attachment region (MAR are spontaneously amplified in transfected mammalian cells, and such amplification generates chromosomal homogeneously staining regions (HSRs or extrachromosomal double minutes (DMs. This method provides a novel, efficient, and rapid way to establish cells that stably produce high levels of recombinant proteins. However, because IR/MAR plasmids are amplified as repeats, they are frequently targeted by repeat-induced gene silencing (RIGS, which silences a variety of repeated sequences in transgenes and the genome. To address this problem, we developed a novel screening system using the IR/MAR plasmid to isolate human genome sequences that alleviate RIGS. The screen identified a 3,271 bp sequence (B-3-31 that elevated transgene expression without affecting the amplification process. Neither non-B structure (i.e., the inverted repeats or bending nor known epigenetic modifier elements such as MARs, insulators, UCOEs, or STARs could explain the anti-silencing activity of B-3-31. Instead, the activity was distributed throughout the entire B-3-31 sequence, which was extremely A/T-rich and CpG-poor. Because B-3-31 effectively and reproducibly alleviated RIGS of repeated genes, it could be used to increase recombinant protein production.

  4. Sequences spanning the leader-repeat junction mediate CRISPR adaptation to phage in Streptococcus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Yunzhou; Chesne, Megan T; Terns, Rebecca M; Terns, Michael P

    2015-02-18

    CRISPR-Cas systems are RNA-based immune systems that protect prokaryotes from invaders such as phages and plasmids. In adaptation, the initial phase of the immune response, short foreign DNA fragments are captured and integrated into host CRISPR loci to provide heritable defense against encountered foreign nucleic acids. Each CRISPR contains a ∼100-500 bp leader element that typically includes a transcription promoter, followed by an array of captured ∼35 bp sequences (spacers) sandwiched between copies of an identical ∼35 bp direct repeat sequence. New spacers are added immediately downstream of the leader. Here, we have analyzed adaptation to phage infection in Streptococcus thermophilus at the CRISPR1 locus to identify cis-acting elements essential for the process. We show that the leader and a single repeat of the CRISPR locus are sufficient for adaptation in this system. Moreover, we identified a leader sequence element capable of stimulating adaptation at a dormant repeat. We found that sequences within 10 bp of the site of integration, in both the leader and repeat of the CRISPR, are required for the process. Our results indicate that information at the CRISPR leader-repeat junction is critical for adaptation in this Type II-A system and likely other CRISPR-Cas systems.

  5. Development of expressed sequence tag-simple sequence repeat markers for Chrysanthemum morifolium and closely related species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H; Zhang, Q X; Sun, M; Pan, H T; Kong, Z X

    2015-07-13

    With the development of chrysanthemum breeding in recent years, an increasing number of wild species in genera related to Chrysanthemum were introduced to extend the genetic resources and facilitate the genetic improvement of chrysanthemums via hybridization. However, few simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are available for marker-assisted breeding and population genetic studies of chrysanthemum and closely related species. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in public databases and cross-species transferable markers are considered to be a cost-effective means for developing sequence-based markers. In this study, 25 EST-SSRs were successfully developed from Chrysanthemum EST sequences for Chrysanthemum morifolium and closely related species. In total, 4164 unigene sequences were assembled from 7180 ESTs of chrysanthemum in GenBank, which were subsequently used to screen for the presence of microsatellites with the SSRIT software. The screening criteria were 8, 5, 4, and 3 repeating units for di-, tri-, tetra-, and penta- and higher-order nucleotides, respectively. Moreover, 310 SSR loci from 296 sequences were identified, and 198 primer pairs for SSR amplification were designed with the Primer Premier 5.0 software, of which 25 SSR loci showed polymorphic amplification in 52 species and varieties belonging to Chrysanthemum, Ajania, and Opisthopappus. The application of EST-SSR markers to the identification of intergeneric hybrids between Chrysanthemum and Ajania was demonstrated. Therefore, EST-SSRs can be developed for species that lack gene sequences or ESTs by utilizing ESTs of closely related species.

  6. A Novel Terminal-Repeat Retrotransposon in Miniature (TRIM) Is Massively Expressed in Echinococcus multilocularis Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koziol, Uriel; Radio, Santiago; Smircich, Pablo; Zarowiecki, Magdalena; Fernández, Cecilia; Brehm, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    Taeniid cestodes (including the human parasites Echinococcus spp. and Taenia solium) have very few mobile genetic elements (MGEs) in their genome, despite lacking a canonical PIWI pathway. The MGEs of these parasites are virtually unexplored, and nothing is known about their expression and silencing. In this work, we report the discovery of a novel family of small nonautonomous long terminal repeat retrotransposons (also known as terminal-repeat retrotransposons in miniature, TRIMs) which we have named ta-TRIM (taeniid TRIM). ta-TRIMs are only the second family of TRIM elements discovered in animals, and are likely the result of convergent reductive evolution in different taxonomic groups. These elements originated at the base of the taeniid tree and have expanded during taeniid diversification, including after the divergence of closely related species such as Echinococcus multilocularis and Echinococcus granulosus. They are massively expressed in larval stages, from a small proportion of full-length copies and from isolated terminal repeats that show transcriptional read-through into downstream regions, generating novel noncoding RNAs and transcriptional fusions to coding genes. In E. multilocularis, ta-TRIMs are specifically expressed in the germinative cells (the somatic stem cells) during asexual reproduction of metacestode larvae. This would provide a developmental mechanism for insertion of ta-TRIMs into cells that will eventually generate the adult germ line. Future studies of active and inactive ta-TRIM elements could give the first clues on MGE silencing mechanisms in cestodes. PMID:26133390

  7. Detection of reverse transcriptase termination sites using cDNA ligation and massive parallel sequencing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kielpinski, Lukasz J; Boyd, Mette; Sandelin, Albin

    2013-01-01

    Detection of reverse transcriptase termination sites is important in many different applications, such as structural probing of RNAs, rapid amplification of cDNA 5' ends (5' RACE), cap analysis of gene expression, and detection of RNA modifications and protein-RNA cross-links. The throughput...... amplification, Illumina adapters and index sequences are introduced, thereby allowing amplicons to be pooled and sequenced on the standard Illumina platform for genomic DNA sequencing. Moreover, we demonstrate how to map sequencing reads and perform analysis of the sequencing data with freely available tools...

  8. Highly repeated DNA sequences in birds: the structure and evolution of an abundant, tandemly repeated 190-bp DNA fragment in parrots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madsen, C S; de Kloet, D H; Brooks, J E; de Kloet, S R

    1992-10-01

    Up to 6.8% of the parrot (Psittaciformes) genome consists of a tandemly repeated, 190-bp sequence (P1) located in the centromere of many if not all chromosomes. Monomer repeats from 10 different psittacine species representing four subfamilies were isolated and cloned. The intraspecific sequence variation ranged from 1.5 to 7%. The interspecific sequence variation ranged from less than 3% between two species of cockatoos to approximately 45% between cockatoos and other parrots. The monomer sequences of all 10 parrot species contained several conserved (> 90%) sequence elements at identical locations within the repeat. A comparison with tandemly repeated DNA sequences in other avian species showed that several of these conserved elements were also present at similar locations within the 184-bp repeat of the Chilean flamingo (Phoenicopterus chilensis), suggesting a great antiquity of the repeat. One of the elements was also found in the tandemly repeated sequences of the crane (Gruidae) and falcon (Falconidae) families. The data were used for the construction of a partial most parsimonious relationship that supports a regional subdivision of the Psittaciformes.

  9. Simple sequence repeats in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) expressed sequence tags: a new resource for evolutionary genetic studies of passerines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slate, Jon; Hale, Matthew C; Birkhead, Timothy R

    2007-02-14

    Passerines (perching birds) are widely studied across many biological disciplines including ecology, population biology, neurobiology, behavioural ecology and evolutionary biology. However, understanding the molecular basis of relevant traits is hampered by the paucity of passerine genomics tools. Efforts to address this problem are underway, and the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) will be the first passerine to have its genome sequenced. Here we describe a bioinformatic analysis of zebra finch expressed sequence tag (EST) Genbank entries. A total of 48,862 ESTs were downloaded from GenBank and assembled into contigs, representing an estimated 17,404 unique sequences. The unique sequence set contained 638 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites of length > or =20 bp and purity > or =90% and 144 simple sequence repeats of length > or =30 bp. A chromosomal location for the majority of SSRs was predicted by BLASTing against assembly 2.1 of the chicken genome sequence. The relative exonic location (5' untranslated region, coding region or 3' untranslated region) was predicted for 218 of the SSRs, by BLAST search against the ENSEMBL chicken peptide database. Ten loci were examined for polymorphism in two zebra finch populations and two populations of a distantly related passerine, the house sparrow Passer domesticus. Linkage was confirmed for four loci that were predicted to reside on the passerine homologue of chicken chromosome 7. We show that SSRs are abundant within zebra finch ESTs, and that their genomic location can be predicted from sequence similarity with the assembled chicken genome sequence. We demonstrate that a useful proportion of zebra finch EST-SSRs are likely to be polymorphic, and that they can be used to build a linkage map. Finally, we show that many zebra finch EST-SSRs are likely to be useful in evolutionary genetic studies of other passerines.

  10. Simple sequence repeats in zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata expressed sequence tags: a new resource for evolutionary genetic studies of passerines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birkhead Timothy R

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Passerines (perching birds are widely studied across many biological disciplines including ecology, population biology, neurobiology, behavioural ecology and evolutionary biology. However, understanding the molecular basis of relevant traits is hampered by the paucity of passerine genomics tools. Efforts to address this problem are underway, and the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata will be the first passerine to have its genome sequenced. Here we describe a bioinformatic analysis of zebra finch expressed sequence tag (EST Genbank entries. Results A total of 48,862 ESTs were downloaded from GenBank and assembled into contigs, representing an estimated 17,404 unique sequences. The unique sequence set contained 638 simple sequence repeats (SSRs or microsatellites of length ≥20 bp and purity ≥90% and 144 simple sequence repeats of length ≥30 bp. A chromosomal location for the majority of SSRs was predicted by BLASTing against assembly 2.1 of the chicken genome sequence. The relative exonic location (5' untranslated region, coding region or 3' untranslated region was predicted for 218 of the SSRs, by BLAST search against the ENSEMBL chicken peptide database. Ten loci were examined for polymorphism in two zebra finch populations and two populations of a distantly related passerine, the house sparrow Passer domesticus. Linkage was confirmed for four loci that were predicted to reside on the passerine homologue of chicken chromosome 7. Conclusion We show that SSRs are abundant within zebra finch ESTs, and that their genomic location can be predicted from sequence similarity with the assembled chicken genome sequence. We demonstrate that a useful proportion of zebra finch EST-SSRs are likely to be polymorphic, and that they can be used to build a linkage map. Finally, we show that many zebra finch EST-SSRs are likely to be useful in evolutionary genetic studies of other passerines.

  11. Characterization and Amplification of Gene-Based Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers in Date Palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yongli; Keremane, Manjunath; Prakash, Channapatna S; He, Guohao

    2017-01-01

    The paucity of molecular markers limits the application of genetic and genomic research in date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.). Availability of expressed sequence tag (EST) sequences in date palm may provide a good resource for developing gene-based markers. This study characterizes a substantial fraction of transcriptome sequences containing simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from the EST sequences in date palm. The EST sequences studied are mainly homologous to those of Elaeis guineensis and Musa acuminata. A total of 911 gene-based SSR markers, characterized with functional annotations, have provided a useful basis not only for discovering candidate genes and understanding genetic basis of traits of interest but also for developing genetic and genomic tools for molecular research in date palm, such as diversity study, quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping, and molecular breeding. The procedures of DNA extraction, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of these gene-based SSR markers, and gel electrophoresis of PCR products are described in this chapter.

  12. Applications of inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) rDNA in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR)-PCR technique was used to assess genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships between Lymnaea natalensis collected from Giza, Ismailia, Damietta, and Beheira governorates in Egypt and compared with lab-bred snail in addition to characterization of watercourses from these ...

  13. Read length and repeat resolution: exploring prokaryote genomes using next-generation sequencing technologies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt J Cahill

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are a growing number of next-generation sequencing technologies. At present, the most cost-effective options also produce the shortest reads. However, even for prokaryotes, there is uncertainty concerning the utility of these technologies for the de novo assembly of complete genomes. This reflects an expectation that short reads will be unable to resolve small, but presumably abundant, repeats. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a simple model of repeat assembly, we develop and test a technique that, for any read length, can estimate the occurrence of unresolvable repeats in a genome, and thus predict the number of gaps that would need to be closed to produce a complete sequence. We apply this technique to 818 prokaryote genome sequences. This provides a quantitative assessment of the relative performance of various lengths. Notably, unpaired reads of only 150nt can reconstruct approximately 50% of the analysed genomes with fewer than 96 repeat-induced gaps. Nonetheless, there is considerable variation amongst prokaryotes. Some genomes can be assembled to near contiguity using very short reads while others require much longer reads. CONCLUSIONS: Given the diversity of prokaryote genomes, a sequencing strategy should be tailored to the organism under study. Our results will provide researchers with a practical resource to guide the selection of the appropriate read length.

  14. Read length and repeat resolution: Exploring prokaryote genomes using next-generation sequencing technologies

    KAUST Repository

    Cahill, Matt J.

    2010-07-12

    Background: There are a growing number of next-generation sequencing technologies. At present, the most cost-effective options also produce the shortest reads. However, even for prokaryotes, there is uncertainty concerning the utility of these technologies for the de novo assembly of complete genomes. This reflects an expectation that short reads will be unable to resolve small, but presumably abundant, repeats. Methodology/Principal Findings: Using a simple model of repeat assembly, we develop and test a technique that, for any read length, can estimate the occurrence of unresolvable repeats in a genome, and thus predict the number of gaps that would need to be closed to produce a complete sequence. We apply this technique to 818 prokaryote genome sequences. This provides a quantitative assessment of the relative performance of various lengths. Notably, unpaired reads of only 150nt can reconstruct approximately 50% of the analysed genomes with fewer than 96 repeat-induced gaps. Nonetheless, there is considerable variation amongst prokaryotes. Some genomes can be assembled to near contiguity using very short reads while others require much longer reads. Conclusions: Given the diversity of prokaryote genomes, a sequencing strategy should be tailored to the organism under study. Our results will provide researchers with a practical resource to guide the selection of the appropriate read length. 2010 Cahill et al.

  15. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers in the evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DNA samples of six hybrids of Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens were analyzed with ten inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) primers, which produced 52 polymorphic bands out of 87 bands with polymorphism average of 60%. ISSR patterns scored five distinguishable species-specific bands; two for C.

  16. De novo transcriptome assembly of Zanthoxylum bungeanum using Illumina sequencing for evolutionary analysis and simple sequence repeat marker development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Shijing; Zhao, Lili; Liu, Zhenshan; Liu, Yulin; Yang, Tuxi; Wei, Anzhi

    2017-12-01

    Zanthoxylum, an ancient economic crop in Asia, has a satisfying aromatic taste and immense medicinal values. A lack of genomic information and genetic markers has limited the evolutionary analysis and genetic improvement of Zanthoxylum species and their close relatives. To better understand the evolution, domestication, and divergence of Zanthoxylum, we present a de novo transcriptome analysis of an elite cultivar of Z. bungeanum using Illumina sequencing; we then developed simple sequence repeat markers for identification of Zanthoxylum. In total, we predicted 45,057 unigenes and 22,212 protein coding sequences, approximately 90% of which showed significant similarities to known proteins in databases. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that Zanthoxylum is relatively recent and estimated to have diverged from Citrus ca. 36.5-37.7 million years ago. We also detected a whole-genome duplication event in Zanthoxylum that occurred 14 million years ago. We found no protein coding sequences that were significantly under positive selection by Ka/Ks. Simple sequence repeat analysis divided 31 Zanthoxylum cultivars and landraces into three major groups. This Zanthoxylum reference transcriptome provides crucial information for the evolutionary study of the Zanthoxylum genus and the Rutaceae family, and facilitates the establishment of more effective Zanthoxylum breeding programs.

  17. Development, characterization, and annotation of potential simple sequence repeats by transcriptome sequencing in pears (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, H; Cai, B H; Lü, Z Q; Gao, Z H; Qiao, Y S

    2016-09-23

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs), one of the most powerful molecular markers, can be used for DNA fingerprinting, variety identification, genetic mapping, and marker-assisted selection. Using the pear's (Pyrus pyrifolia Nakai) 75,764 unigenes (55,676,271 bp) obtained by deep transcriptome sequencing, a total of 10,622 novel SSRs were identified in 9154 unigenes, accounting for 14.02% of all unigenes. The average length and distribution of these SSRs was about 16 bp and 5.24 kb, respectively. Dinucleotide repeat motifs were the main type, with a frequency of 55.87%, followed by trinucleotides (24.45%). There were 159 kinds of repeat motifs existing in the pear transcriptome. AG/CT was the most frequent motif, accounting for 49.64%. All 9154 SSR-containing unigenes were functionally annotated using Nr (NCBI non-redundant protein database), Nt (NCBI non-redundant nucleotide database), and the Swiss-Prot database, and were classified further by Gene Ontology and Clusters of Orthologous Groups. In addition, a total of 4300 primer pairs were designed from all SSR loci obtained. Of these, 40 primers were randomly selected for PCR amplification and polyacrylamide gel (PAGE) analysis. Among the 40 primer pairs, 31 were successfully separated via PAGE. These findings also confirm that mining SSRs using next-generating sequencing technologies is a fast, effective, and reliable approach.

  18. Simple sequence repeat markers for kānuka (Kunzeaspp.; Myrtaceae) present in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goeke, Dagmar F; Mitchell, Caroline M; Lange, Claudia; Houliston, Gary J

    2017-04-01

    We developed simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers to facilitate population genetic studies on kānuka ( Kunzea spp.; Myrtaceae). A shotgun sequencing library was constructed from leaf material of K. robusta using a Roche 454 Junior sequencer, and a total of 3174 putative SSR regions were identified. Sixteen polymorphic markers were optimized for multiplex PCR on 10 endemic New Zealand Kunzea species. Each of these loci cross-amplified in all tested species. The amplified di-, tri-, and pentanucleotide repeats resulted in eight to 24 alleles per locus for a total of 220 specimens. The mean observed and expected heterozygosity per locus ranged from 0.18 to 0.77 and 0.33 to 0.82, respectively. The SSR markers we produced are valuable for phylogenetic and population studies on all endemic Kunzea spp. and may also be useful for studies on closely related Kunzea species from Australia.

  19. 3′ terminal diversity of MRP RNA and other human noncoding RNAs revealed by deep sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Post-transcriptional 3′ end processing is a key component of RNA regulation. The abundant and essential RNA subunit of RNase MRP has been proposed to function in three distinct cellular compartments and therefore may utilize this mode of regulation. Here we employ 3′ RACE coupled with high-throughput sequencing to characterize the 3′ terminal sequences of human MRP RNA and other noncoding RNAs that form RNP complexes. Results The 3′ terminal sequence of MRP RNA from HEK293T cells has a distinctive distribution of genomically encoded termini (including an assortment of U residues) with a portion of these selectively tagged by oligo(A) tails. This profile contrasts with the relatively homogenous 3′ terminus of an in vitro transcribed MRP RNA control and the differing 3′ terminal profiles of U3 snoRNA, RNase P RNA, and telomerase RNA (hTR). Conclusions 3′ RACE coupled with deep sequencing provides a valuable framework for the functional characterization of 3′ terminal sequences of noncoding RNAs. PMID:24053768

  20. 3' terminal diversity of MRP RNA and other human noncoding RNAs revealed by deep sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldfarb, Katherine C; Cech, Thomas R

    2013-09-21

    Post-transcriptional 3' end processing is a key component of RNA regulation. The abundant and essential RNA subunit of RNase MRP has been proposed to function in three distinct cellular compartments and therefore may utilize this mode of regulation. Here we employ 3' RACE coupled with high-throughput sequencing to characterize the 3' terminal sequences of human MRP RNA and other noncoding RNAs that form RNP complexes. The 3' terminal sequence of MRP RNA from HEK293T cells has a distinctive distribution of genomically encoded termini (including an assortment of U residues) with a portion of these selectively tagged by oligo(A) tails. This profile contrasts with the relatively homogenous 3' terminus of an in vitro transcribed MRP RNA control and the differing 3' terminal profiles of U3 snoRNA, RNase P RNA, and telomerase RNA (hTR). 3' RACE coupled with deep sequencing provides a valuable framework for the functional characterization of 3' terminal sequences of noncoding RNAs.

  1. Upstream short sequence repeats regulate expression of the alpha C protein of group B Streptococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puopolo, Karen M; Madoff, Lawrence C

    2003-11-01

    Group B streptococci (GBS) express a family of repeat-containing surface proteins, the prototype of which is the alpha C protein expressed in type Ia/C strain A909. We have isolated a series of mutant GBS strains by mouse-passage of A909 that do not produce normal levels of the alpha C protein. Polymerase chain reaction amplification and sequencing of the gene encoding the alpha C protein, bca, from four mutant strains revealed the presence of a full-length gene in each strain. However, Northern and RT-PCR analysis revealed greatly reduced levels of RNA encoding the alpha C protein. Sequence analysis of the mutant genes found the coding region unchanged from the wild-type gene in each case, but variation was observed in a specific locus located 110 bp upstream of the start codon. The presence of a 5-nucleotide repeat, AGATT, and a string of adenine residues mark this locus. Both deletion and expansion of the AGATT motif were associated with the complete null phenotype. Deletions in the string of adenine residues were associated with both a decreased-production phenotype and a complete null phenotype. Cloning of this upstream region into a green-fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter system in GBS demonstrated promoter activity that was completely abolished by changes in the pentanucleotide repeat or adenine string. Primer extension studies of the wild-type strain revealed one dominant and two minor transcription start sites. Primer extension studies of the null and low-expression mutant strains revealed that the dominant transcript is completely absent in each mutant. The short sequence repeat locus is located at position - 55 to - 78 relative to the start site of the dominant transcript. We have demonstrated in vitro phase variation in expression of the alpha C protein associated with variation at the pentanucleotide repeat locus. We conclude that this short sequence repeat motif is located upstream of the dominant promoter for the alpha C protein and represents a

  2. Cytogenetic Diversity of Simple Sequences Repeats in Morphotypes of Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Jin-shuang; Sun, Cheng-zhen; Zhang, Shu-ning; Hou, Xi-lin; Bonnema, Guusje

    2016-01-01

    A significant fraction of the nuclear DNA of all eukaryotes is comprised of simple sequence repeats (SSRs). Although these sequences are widely used for studying genetic variation, linkage mapping and evolution, little attention had been paid to the chromosomal distribution and cytogenetic diversity of these sequences. In this paper, we report the distribution characterization of mono-, di-, and tri-nucleotide SSRs in Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was used to characterize the cytogenetic diversity of SSRs among morphotypes of B. rapa ssp. chinensis. The proportion of different SSR motifs varied among morphotypes of B. rapa ssp. chinensis, with tri-nucleotide SSRs being more prevalent in the genome of B. rapa ssp. chinensis. We determined the chromosomal locations of mono-, di-, and tri-nucleotide repeat loci. The results showed that the chromosomal distribution of SSRs in the different morphotypes is non-random and motif-dependent, and allowed us to characterize the relative variability in terms of SSR numbers and similar chromosomal distributions in centromeric/peri-centromeric heterochromatin. The differences between SSR repeats with respect to abundance and distribution indicate that SSRs are a driving force in the genomic evolution of B. rapa species. Our results provide a comprehensive view of the SSR sequence distribution and evolution for comparison among morphotypes B. rapa ssp. chinensis. PMID:27507974

  3. DNA CTG triplet repeats involved in dynamic mutations of neurologically related gene sequences form stable duplexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G. K.; Jie, J.; Fox, G. E.; Gao, X.

    1995-01-01

    DNA triplet repeats, 5'-d(CTG)n and 5'-d(CAG)n, are present in genes which have been implicated in several neurodegenerative disorders. To investigate possible stable structures formed by these repeating sequences, we have examined d(CTG)n, d(CAG)n and d(CTG).d(CAG)n (n = 2 and 3) using NMR and UV optical spectroscopy. These studies reveal that single stranded (CTG)n (n > 2) forms stable, antiparallel helical duplexes, while the single stranded (CAG)n requires at least three repeating units to form a duplex. NMR and UV melting experiments show that the Tm increases in the order of [(CAG)3]2 CTG)3]2 CTG)3. The (CTG)3 duplex is stable and exhibits similar NMR spectra in solutions containing 0.1-4 M NaCl and at a pH range from 4.6 to 8.8. The (CTG)3 duplex, which contains multiple-T.T mismatches, displays many NMR spectral characteristics similar to those of B-form DNA. However, unique NOE and 1H-31P coupling patterns associated with the repetitive T.T mismatches in the CTG repeats are discerned. These results, in conjunction with recent in vitro studies suggest that longer CTG repeats may form hairpin structures, which can potentially cause interruption in replication, leading to dynamic expansion or deletion of triplet repeats.

  4. [Effect of tandem repeats adjacent to 3'-terminal of FLO1 on the flocculation function of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yue, Feng; Du, Zhaoli; Guo, Xuena; He, Xiuping; Zhang, Borun

    2013-12-04

    Many tandem repeats exist in FLO1 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which might have great regulatory effect on the conformation and function of flocculation protein (flocculin). In this study, we analyzed the effect of 3'-terminal tandem repeats B, C and D complete deletion on the function of flocculin. We constructed the derived gene FLO1 bcd with complete deletion of tandem repeats B, C and D of FLO1 by fusion PCR. We then constructed plasmid pYCF1 bcd by insertion of FLO1 bcd into YCp50, and transformed such plasmid, pYCF1 and YCp50 into S. cerevisiae YS58 separately to generate recombinant strains YSF1 bcd, YSF1 and YSP50. We compared the flocculation ability and characteristics of these strains. Compared to YSF1, YSF1 bcd displayed only a slight reduction (4%) in flocculation ability in optimal flocculation buffer (50 mmol/L NaAC, pH 4.5). Moreover, the dependence of flocculation on Ca2+, sensitivity to metal ions and ethanol, and the specificity to different sugars showed no obvious difference between strains YSF1 and YSF1 bcd. However, strain YSF1 bcd displayed much higher flocculation levels than strain YSF1 under conditions with extreme pH, high temperature, or high concentration of mannose. Combined deletion of tandem repeats B, C and D adjacent to the 3'-terminal of FLO1 increases the conformation stability of flocculin in response to changes of pH, temperature or concentration of mannose in environment, but does not influence the other characteristics of flocculation.

  5. Developing expressed sequence tag libraries and the discovery of simple sequence repeat markers for two species of raspberry (Rubus L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushakra, Jill M; Lewers, Kim S; Staton, Margaret E; Zhebentyayeva, Tetyana; Saski, Christopher A

    2015-10-26

    Due to a relatively high level of codominant inheritance and transferability within and among taxonomic groups, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are important elements in comparative mapping and delineation of genomic regions associated with traits of economic importance. Expressed sequence tags (ESTs) are a source of SSRs that can be used to develop markers to facilitate plant breeding and for more basic research across genera and higher plant orders. Leaf and meristem tissue from 'Heritage' red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) and 'Bristol' black raspberry (R. occidentalis) were utilized for RNA extraction. After conversion to cDNA and library construction, ESTs were sequenced, quality verified, assembled and scanned for SSRs.  Primers flanking the SSRs were designed and a subset tested for amplification, polymorphism and transferability across species. ESTs containing SSRs were functionally annotated using the GenBank non-redundant (nr) database and further classified using the gene ontology database. To accelerate development of EST-SSRs in the genus Rubus (Rosaceae), 1149 and 2358 cDNA sequences were generated from red raspberry and black raspberry, respectively. The cDNA sequences were screened using rigorous filtering criteria which resulted in the identification of 121 and 257 SSR loci for red and black raspberry, respectively. Primers were designed from the surrounding sequences resulting in 131 and 288 primer pairs, respectively, as some sequences contained more than one SSR locus. Sequence analysis revealed that the SSR-containing genes span a diversity of functions and share more sequence identity with strawberry genes than with other Rosaceous species. This resource of Rubus-specific, gene-derived markers will facilitate the construction of linkage maps composed of transferable markers for studying and manipulating important traits in this economically important genus.

  6. Cytogenetic Analysis of Populus trichocarpa - Ribosomal DNA, Telomere Repeat Sequence, and Marker-selected BACs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tuskan, Gerald A [ORNL; Gunter, Lee E [ORNL; DiFazio, Stephen P [West Virginia University

    2009-01-01

    The 18S-28S rDNA and 5S rDNA loci in Populus trichocarpa were localized using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Two 18S-28S rDNA sites and one 5S rDNA site were identified and located at the ends of 3 different chromosomes. FISH signals from the Arabidopsis -type telomere repeat sequence were observed at the distal ends of each chromosome. Six BAC clones selected from 2 linkage groups based on genome sequence assembly (LG-I and LG-VI) were localized on 2 chromosomes, as expected. BACs from LG-I hybridized to the longest chromosome in the complement. All BAC positions were found to be concordant with sequence assembly positions. BAC-FISH will be useful for delineating each of the Populus trichocarpa chromosomes and improving the sequence assembly of this model angiosperm tree species.

  7. In silico analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats from chloroplast genomes of Solanaceae species

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evandro Vagner Tambarussi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The availability of chloroplast genome (cpDNA sequences of Atropa belladonna, Nicotiana sylvestris, N.tabacum, N. tomentosiformis, Solanum bulbocastanum, S. lycopersicum and S. tuberosum, which are Solanaceae species,allowed us to analyze the organization of cpSSRs in their genic and intergenic regions. In general, the number of cpSSRs incpDNA ranged from 161 in S. tuberosum to 226 in N. tabacum, and the number of intergenic cpSSRs was higher than geniccpSSRs. The mononucleotide repeats were the most frequent in studied species, but we also identified di-, tri-, tetra-, pentaandhexanucleotide repeats. Multiple alignments of all cpSSRs sequences from Solanaceae species made the identification ofnucleotide variability possible and the phylogeny was estimated by maximum parsimony. Our study showed that the plastomedatabase can be exploited for phylogenetic analysis and biotechnological approaches.

  8. DNA sequence of the lactose operon: the lacA gene and the transcriptional termination region.

    OpenAIRE

    Hediger, M A; Johnson, D F; Nierlich, D P; Zabin, I

    1985-01-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli spans approximately 5300 base pairs and includes the lacZ, lacY, and lacA genes in addition to the operator, promoter, and transcription termination regions. We report here the sequence of the lacA gene and the region distal to it, confirming the sequence of thiogalactoside transacetylase and completing the sequence of the lac operon. The lacA gene is characterized by use of rare codons, suggesting an origin from a plasmid, transposon, or virus gene. UUG is ...

  9. The human receptor for urokinase plasminogen activator. NH2-terminal amino acid sequence and glycosylation variants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behrendt, N; Rønne, E; Ploug, M

    1990-01-01

    The receptor for human urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA) was purified from phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate-stimulated U937 cells by temperature-induced phase separation of detergent extracts, followed by affinity chromatography with immobilized diisopropyl fluorophosphate-treated u....... The protein has a high content of cysteine residues. The NH2-terminal sequence is not closely related to any known sequence. The identification of the purified and sequenced protein with the human u-PA receptor is based on the following findings: 1) the ability of the purified protein to bind u-PA and its...

  10. Expressed Sequence Tag-Simple Sequence Repeat (EST-SSR Marker Resources for Diversity Analysis of Mango (Mangifera indica L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalie L. Dillon

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a collection of 24,840 expressed sequence tags (ESTs generated from five mango (Mangifera indica L. cDNA libraries was mined for EST-based simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. Over 1,000 ESTs with SSR motifs were detected from more than 24,000 EST sequences with di- and tri-nucleotide repeat motifs the most abundant. Of these, 25 EST-SSRs in genes involved in plant development, stress response, and fruit color and flavor development pathways were selected, developed into PCR markers and characterized in a population of 32 mango selections including M. indica varieties, and related Mangifera species. Twenty-four of the 25 EST-SSR markers exhibited polymorphisms, identifying a total of 86 alleles with an average of 5.38 alleles per locus, and distinguished between all Mangifera selections. Private alleles were identified for Mangifera species. These newly developed EST-SSR markers enhance the current 11 SSR mango genetic identity panel utilized by the Australian Mango Breeding Program. The current panel has been used to identify progeny and parents for selection and the application of this extended panel will further improve and help to design mango hybridization strategies for increased breeding efficiency.

  11. Marker-assisted sex differentiation in date palm using simple sequence repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Elmeer, Khaled; Mattat, Imene

    2012-01-01

    Microsatellite markers containing simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are a valuable tool for genetic analysis. Our objective was to identify microsatellite markers that could be used to differentiate between male and female date palm (Phoenix dactylifera). The date palm is a dioecious plant whose sex cannot be determined until it reaches a reproductive age between 5 and 10 years. An early selection and/or differentiation of young seedlings into males and females could enhance breeding and assist ...

  12. Transferability of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers Developed in Litchi chinensis to Blighia sapida (Sapindaceae)

    OpenAIRE

    Ekué, Marius; Gailing, Oliver; Finkeldey,Reiner

    2009-01-01

    Ackee (Blighia sapida, Sapindaceae) is a multipurpose fruit tree species of high economic importance, native to the Guinean forests of West Africa, and belongs to the same family as that of lychee (Litchi chinensis). In this study, a set of 12 primer pairs for simple sequence repeats (SSRs) previously developed for lychee has been evaluated for polymorphism in 16 ackee trees from different populations. Seven primer pairs have been found to be transferable, and four have revealed polymorphisms...

  13. Cytogenetic Analysis of Populus trichocarpa - Ribosomal DNA, Telomere Repeat Sequence, and Marker-selected BACs

    Science.gov (United States)

    M.N. lslam-Faridi; C.D. Nelson; S.P. DiFazio; L.E. Gunter; G.A. Tuskan

    2009-01-01

    The 185-285 rDNA and 55 rDNA loci in Populus trichocarpa were localized using fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH). Two 185-285 rDNA sites and one 55 rDNA site were identified and located at the ends of 3 different chromosomes. FISH signals from the Arabidopsis-type telomere repeat sequence were observed at the distal ends of each chromosome. Six BAC clones...

  14. Cloning and characterization of a tandemly repeated DNA sequence in the crane family (Gruidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z Q; Lin, C C; Hodgetts, R B

    1989-08-01

    A tandemly repeated DNA sequence possessing a unique PstI site has been characterized in several species of the crane family. The "Pst family" comprises at least 8800 monomer units 187 base pairs (bp) in length and constitutes 0.14% of the genome of the sarus crane (Grus antigone). The array is located in the centromeric heterochromatin of chromosome 2 in the two species where in situ hybridizations of a cloned monomer to metaphase chromosome spreads were carried out. DNA sequence comparisons between five monomer units from G. antigone revealed a high degree of homology between four of the individual repeats, while the fifth was somewhat divergent. The G + C content deduced from the DNA sequence makes it likely that the Pst family constitutes part of a density satellite seen in profiles of crane DNA centrifuged to equilibrium in CsCl. The common occurrence of tandem arrays such as the Pst family, with repeat lengths close to 200 bp, leads us to an hypothesis implicating nucleosomes in the evolution of such families.

  15. RISCI - Repeat Induced Sequence Changes Identifier: a comprehensive, comparative genomics-based, in silico subtractive hybridization pipeline to identify repeat induced sequence changes in closely related genomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background - The availability of multiple whole genome sequences has facilitated in silico identification of fixed and polymorphic transposable elements (TE). Whereas polymorphic loci serve as makers for phylogenetic and forensic analysis, fixed species-specific transposon insertions, when compared to orthologous loci in other closely related species, may give insights into their evolutionary significance. Besides, TE insertions are not isolated events and are frequently associated with subtle sequence changes concurrent with insertion or post insertion. These include duplication of target site, 3' and 5' flank transduction, deletion of the target locus, 5' truncation or partial deletion and inversion of the transposon, and post insertion changes like inter or intra element recombination, disruption etc. Although such changes have been studied independently, no automated platform to identify differential transposon insertions and the associated array of sequence changes in genomes of the same or closely related species is available till date. To this end, we have designed RISCI - 'Repeat Induced Sequence Changes Identifier' - a comprehensive, comparative genomics-based, in silico subtractive hybridization pipeline to identify differential transposon insertions and associated sequence changes using specific alignment signatures, which may then be examined for their downstream effects. Results - We showcase the utility of RISCI by comparing full length and truncated L1HS and AluYa5 retrotransposons in the reference human genome with the chimpanzee genome and the alternate human assemblies (Celera and HuRef). Comparison of the reference human genome with alternate human assemblies using RISCI predicts 14 novel polymorphisms in full length L1HS, 24 in truncated L1HS and 140 novel polymorphisms in AluYa5 insertions, besides several insertion and post insertion changes. We present comparison with two previous studies to show that RISCI predictions are broadly in

  16. Exploiting BAC-end sequences for the mining, characterization and utility of new short sequences repeat (SSR) markers in Citrus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Manosh Kumar; Chai, Lijun; Mayer, Christoph; Xu, Qiang; Guo, Wenwu; Deng, Xiuxin

    2012-05-01

    The aim of this study was to develop a large set of microsatellite markers based on publicly available BAC-end sequences (BESs), and to evaluate their transferability, discriminating capacity of genotypes and mapping ability in Citrus. A set of 1,281 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed from the 46,339 Citrus clementina BAC-end sequences (BES), of them 20.67% contained SSR longer than 20 bp, corresponding to roughly one perfect SSR per 2.04 kb. The most abundant motifs were di-nucleotide (16.82%) repeats. Among all repeat motifs (TA/AT)n is the most abundant (8.38%), followed by (AG/CT)n (4.51%). Most of the BES-SSR are located in the non-coding region, but 1.3% of BES-SSRs were found to be associated with transposable element (TE). A total of 400 novel SSR primer pairs were synthesized and their transferability and polymorphism tested on a set of 16 Citrus and Citrus relative's species. Among these 333 (83.25%) were successfully amplified and 260 (65.00%) showed cross-species transferability with Poncirus trifoliata and Fortunella sp. These cross-species transferable markers could be useful for cultivar identification, for genomic study of Citrus, Poncirus and Fortunella sp. Utility of the developed SSR marker was demonstrated by identifying a set of 118 markers each for construction of linkage map of Citrus reticulata and Poncirus trifoliata. Genetic diversity and phylogenetic relationship among 40 Citrus and its related species were conducted with the aid of 25 randomly selected SSR primer pairs and results revealed that citrus genomic SSRs are superior to genic SSR for genetic diversity and germplasm characterization of Citrus spp.

  17. New modules for the repeated internal and N-terminal epitope tagging of genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauss, Robert; Trautwein, Mark; Sommer, Thomas; Spang, Anne

    2005-01-15

    Epitope tagging is a powerful method for the rapid analysis of protein function. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae epitope tags are introduced easily into chromosomal loci by homologous recombination using a simple PCR-based strategy. Although quite a number of tools exist for C-terminal tagging as well as N-terminal tagging of proteins expressed by heterologous promoters, there are only very limited possibilities to tag proteins at the N-terminus and retain the endogenous expression level. Furthermore, no PCR-templates for internal tagging have been reported. Here we describe new modules that are suitable for both the repeated N-terminal and internal tagging of proteins, leaving their endogenous promoters intact. The tags include 6xHA, 9xMyc, yEGFP, TEV-GST-6xHIS, ProtA, TEV-ProtA and TEV-ProtA-7xHIS in conjunction with different heterologous selection markers. Copyright 2004 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  18. Repeated-Sprint Sequences During Female Soccer Matches Using Fixed and Individual Speed Thresholds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Fábio Y; Pereira, Lucas A; Loturco, Irineu; Rosseti, Marcelo; Moura, Felipe A; Bradley, Paul S

    2017-07-01

    Nakamura, FY, Pereira, LA, Loturco, I, Rosseti, M, Moura, FA, and Bradley, PS. Repeated-sprint sequences during female soccer matches using fixed and individual speed thresholds. J Strength Cond Res 31(7): 1802-1810, 2017-The main objective of this study was to characterize the occurrence of single sprint and repeated-sprint sequences (RSS) during elite female soccer matches, using fixed (20 km·h) and individually based speed thresholds (>90% of the mean speed from a 20-m sprint test). Eleven elite female soccer players from the same team participated in the study. All players performed a 20-m linear sprint test, and were assessed in up to 10 official matches using Global Positioning System technology. Magnitude-based inferences were used to test for meaningful differences. Results revealed that irrespective of adopting fixed or individual speed thresholds, female players produced only a few RSS during matches (2.3 ± 2.4 sequences using the fixed threshold and 3.3 ± 3.0 sequences using the individually based threshold), with most sequences composing of just 2 sprints. Additionally, central defenders performed fewer sprints (10.2 ± 4.1) than other positions (fullbacks: 28.1 ± 5.5; midfielders: 21.9 ± 10.5; forwards: 31.9 ± 11.1; with the differences being likely to almost certainly associated with effect sizes ranging from 1.65 to 2.72), and sprinting ability declined in the second half. The data do not support the notion that RSS occurs frequently during soccer matches in female players, irrespective of using fixed or individual speed thresholds to define sprint occurrence. However, repeated-sprint ability development cannot be ruled out from soccer training programs because of its association with match-related performance.

  19. Development of Genomic Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) by Enrichment Libraries in Date Palm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Faifi, Sulieman A; Migdadi, Hussein M; Algamdi, Salem S; Khan, Mohammad Altaf; Al-Obeed, Rashid S; Ammar, Megahed H; Jakse, Jerenj

    2017-01-01

    Development of highly informative markers such as simple sequence repeats (SSR) for cultivar identification and germplasm characterization and management is essential for date palms genetic studies. The present study documents the development of SSR markers and assesses genetic relationships of commonly grown date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cultivars in different geographical regions of Saudi Arabia. A total of 93 novel simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were screened for their ability to detect polymorphism in date palm. Around 71% of genomic SSRs are dinucleotide, 25% trinucleotide, 3% tetranucleotide, and 1% pentanucleotide motives and show 100% polymorphism. The Unweighted Pair Group Method with Arithmetic Mean (UPGMA) cluster analysis illustrates that cultivars trend to group according to their class of maturity, region of cultivation, and fruit color. Analysis of molecular variations (AMOVA) reveals genetic variation among and within cultivars of 27% and 73%, respectively, according to the geographical distribution of the cultivars. Developed microsatellite markers are of additional value to date palm characterization, tools which can be used by researchers in population genetics, cultivar identification, as well as genetic resource exploration and management. The cultivars tested exhibited a significant amount of genetic diversity and could be suitable for successful breeding programs. Genomic sequences generated from this study are available at the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI), Sequence Read Archive (Accession numbers. LIBGSS_039019).

  20. Cytogenetic diversity of simple sequences repeats in morphotypes of Brassica rapa ssp. chinensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinshuang Zheng

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available A significant fraction of the nuclear DNA of all eukaryotes is occupied by simple sequence repeats (SSRs. Although thesis sequences have sparked great interest as a means of studying genetic variation, linkage mapping and evolution, little attention had been paid to the chromosomal distribution and cytogenetic diversity of these sequences. This paper report the long-range organization of all possible classes of mono-, di- and tri-nucleotide SSRs in Brassica rapa. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH was used to characterize the cytogenetic diversity of SSRs among morphotypes of B. rapa ssp. chinensis. The proportion of different SSR motifs varied among morphtypes of B. rapa, with trinucleotide SSRs more prevalent in the genome of B. rapa ssp. chinensis. The chromosomal characterizations of mono-, di- and tri-nucleotide repeats have been acquired. The data has revealed the non-random and motif-dependent chromosome distribution of SSRs in different morphtypes, and allowed the relative variability characterized by SSRs amount and similar chromosomal distribution in centromeric/peri-centromeric heterochromatin. The differences of SSRs in the abundance and distribution indicated the driving force of SSRs in relationship with the evolution of B. rapa species. The results provided a comprehensive view on the SSR sequence distribution and evolution for comparison among morphtypes B. rapa ssp. chinensis.

  1. Automation of C-terminal sequence analysis of 2D-PAGE separated proteins

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    P.P. Moerman

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Experimental assignment of the protein termini remains essential to define the functional protein structure. Here, we report on the improvement of a proteomic C-terminal sequence analysis method. The approach aims to discriminate the C-terminal peptide in a CNBr-digest where Met-Xxx peptide bonds are cleaved in internal peptides ending at a homoserine lactone (hsl-derivative. pH-dependent partial opening of the lactone ring results in the formation of doublets for all internal peptides. C-terminal peptides are distinguished as singlet peaks by MALDI-TOF MS and MS/MS is then used for their identification. We present a fully automated protocol established on a robotic liquid-handling station.

  2. The structure, organization and radiation of Sadhu non-long terminal repeat retroelements in Arabidopsis species

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    Rangwala Sanjida H

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sadhu elements are non-autonomous retroposons first recognized in Arabidopsis thaliana. There is a wide degree of divergence among different elements, suggesting that these sequences are ancient in origin. Here we report the results of several lines of investigation into the genomic organization and evolutionary history of this element family. Results We present a classification scheme for Sadhu elements in A. thaliana, describing derivative elements related to the full-length elements we reported previously. We characterized Sadhu5 elements in a set of A. thaliana strains in order to trace the history of radiation in this subfamily. Sequences surrounding the target sites of different Sadhu insertions are consistent with mobilization by LINE retroelements. Finally, we identified Sadhu elements grouping into distinct subfamilies in two related species, Arabidopsis arenosa and Arabidopsis lyrata. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that the Sadhu retroelement family has undergone target primed reverse transcription-driven retrotransposition during the divergence of different A. thaliana strains. In addition, Sadhu elements can be found at moderate copy number in three distinct Arabidopsis species, indicating that the evolutionary history of these sequences can be traced back at least several millions of years.

  3. Isolation, characterization and amplification of simple sequence repeat loci in coffee

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    Marco-Aurelio Cristancho

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple sequence repeat (microsatellite loci in coffee were identified in clones isolated from enriched andrandom genomic libraries. It was shown that coffee is a plant species with low microsatellite frequency. However, the averagedistance between two loci, estimated at 127kb for poly (AG, is one of the shortest of all plant genomes. In contrast, thedistance between two poly (AC loci, estimated at 769kb, is one of the largest in plant genomes. Coffee (ACn microsatellites arefrequently associated with other microsatellites, mainly (ATn motifs, while (AGn microsatellites are not normally associatedwith other microsatellites and have a higher number of perfect motifs. Dinucleotide repeats (AG and (AC were found in ATrichregions in coffee. Sequence analysis of (ACn microsatellites identified in coffee revealed the possible association of theserepeated elements with miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs. In addition, some of the evaluated SSRmarkers produced transposon-like amplification patterns in tetraploid genotypes. Of 12 SSR markers developed, nine werepolymorphic in diploid genotypes while 5 were polymorphic in tetraploid genotypes, confirming a greater genetic diversity indiploid species.

  4. MultiLoc: prediction of protein subcellular localization using N-terminal targeting sequences, sequence motifs and amino acid composition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höglund, Annette; Dönnes, Pierre; Blum, Torsten; Adolph, Hans-Werner; Kohlbacher, Oliver

    2006-05-15

    Functional annotation of unknown proteins is a major goal in proteomics. A key annotation is the prediction of a protein's subcellular localization. Numerous prediction techniques have been developed, typically focusing on a single underlying biological aspect or predicting a subset of all possible localizations. An important step is taken towards emulating the protein sorting process by capturing and bringing together biologically relevant information, and addressing the clear need to improve prediction accuracy and localization coverage. Here we present a novel SVM-based approach for predicting subcellular localization, which integrates N-terminal targeting sequences, amino acid composition and protein sequence motifs. We show how this approach improves the prediction based on N-terminal targeting sequences, by comparing our method TargetLoc against existing methods. Furthermore, MultiLoc performs considerably better than comparable methods predicting all major eukaryotic subcellular localizations, and shows better or comparable results to methods that are specialized on fewer localizations or for one organism. http://www-bs.informatik.uni-tuebingen.de/Services/MultiLoc/

  5. Development of simple sequence repeat markers and diversity analysis in alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zan; Yan, Hongwei; Fu, Xinnian; Li, Xuehui; Gao, Hongwen

    2013-04-01

    Efficient and robust molecular markers are essential for molecular breeding in plant. Compared to dominant and bi-allelic markers, multiple alleles of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers are particularly informative and superior in genetic linkage map and QTL mapping in autotetraploid species like alfalfa. The objective of this study was to enrich SSR markers directly from alfalfa expressed sequence tags (ESTs). A total of 12,371 alfalfa ESTs were retrieved from the National Center for Biotechnology Information. Total 774 SSR-containing ESTs were identified from 716 ESTs. On average, one SSR was found per 7.7 kb of EST sequences. Tri-nucleotide repeats (48.8 %) was the most abundant motif type, followed by di-(26.1 %), tetra-(11.5 %), penta-(9.7 %), and hexanucleotide (3.9 %). One hundred EST-SSR primer pairs were successfully designed and 29 exhibited polymorphism among 28 alfalfa accessions. The allele number per marker ranged from two to 21 with an average of 6.8. The PIC values ranged from 0.195 to 0.896 with an average of 0.608, indicating a high level of polymorphism of the EST-SSR markers. Based on the 29 EST-SSR markers, assessment of genetic diversity was conducted and found that Medicago sativa ssp. sativa was clearly different from the other subspecies. The high transferability of those EST-SSR markers was also found for relative species.

  6. Genome wide characterization of simple sequence repeats in watermelon genome and their application in comparative mapping and genetic diversity analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simple sequence repeats (SSR) or microsatellite markers are one of the most informative and versatile DNA-based markers. The use of next-generation sequencing technologies allow whole genome sequencing and make it possible to develop large numbers of SSRs through bioinformatic analysis of genome da...

  7. Distinct repeat motifs at the C-terminal region of CagA of Helicobacter pylori strains isolated from diseased patients and asymptomatic individuals in West Bengal, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chattopadhyay Santanu

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Infection with Helicobacter pylori strains that express CagA is associated with gastritis, peptic ulcer disease, and gastric adenocarcinoma. The biological function of CagA depends on tyrosine phosphorylation by a cellular kinase. The phosphate acceptor tyrosine moiety is present within the EPIYA motif at the C-terminal region of the protein. This region is highly polymorphic due to variations in the number of EPIYA motifs and the polymorphism found in spacer regions among EPIYA motifs. The aim of this study was to analyze the polymorphism at the C-terminal end of CagA and to evaluate its association with the clinical status of the host in West Bengal, India. Results Seventy-seven H. pylori strains isolated from patients with various clinical statuses were used to characterize the C-ternimal polymorphic region of CagA. Our analysis showed that there is no correlation between the previously described CagA types and various disease outcomes in Indian context. Further analyses of different CagA structures revealed that the repeat units in the spacer sequences within the EPIYA motifs are actually more discrete than the previously proposed models of CagA variants. Conclusion Our analyses suggest that EPIYA motifs as well as the spacer sequence units are present as distinct insertions and deletions, which possibly have arisen from extensive recombination events. Moreover, we have identified several new CagA types, which could not be typed by the existing systems and therefore, we have proposed a new typing system. We hypothesize that a cagA gene encoding higher number EPIYA motifs may perhaps have arisen from cagA genes that encode lesser EPIYA motifs by acquisition of DNA segments through recombination events.

  8. Nuclear Receptor HNF4α Binding Sequences are Widespread in Alu Repeats

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    Bolotin Eugene

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alu repeats, which account for ~10% of the human genome, were originally considered to be junk DNA. Recent studies, however, suggest that they may contain transcription factor binding sites and hence possibly play a role in regulating gene expression. Results Here, we show that binding sites for a highly conserved member of the nuclear receptor superfamily of ligand-dependent transcription factors, hepatocyte nuclear factor 4alpha (HNF4α, NR2A1, are highly prevalent in Alu repeats. We employ high throughput protein binding microarrays (PBMs to show that HNF4α binds > 66 unique sequences in Alu repeats that are present in ~1.2 million locations in the human genome. We use chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP to demonstrate that HNF4α binds Alu elements in the promoters of target genes (ABCC3, APOA4, APOM, ATPIF1, CANX, FEMT1A, GSTM4, IL32, IP6K2, PRLR, PRODH2, SOCS2, TTR and luciferase assays to show that at least some of those Alu elements can modulate HNF4α-mediated transactivation in vivo (APOM, PRODH2, TTR, APOA4. HNF4α-Alu elements are enriched in promoters of genes involved in RNA processing and a sizeable fraction are in regions of accessible chromatin. Comparative genomics analysis suggests that there may have been a gain in HNF4α binding sites in Alu elements during evolution and that non Alu repeats, such as Tiggers, also contain HNF4α sites. Conclusions Our findings suggest that HNF4α, in addition to regulating gene expression via high affinity binding sites, may also modulate transcription via low affinity sites in Alu repeats.

  9. N-terminal N-myristoylation of proteins: prediction of substrate proteins from amino acid sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer-Stroh, Sebastian; Eisenhaber, Birgit; Eisenhaber, Frank

    2002-04-05

    Myristoylation by the myristoyl-CoA:protein N-myristoyltransferase (NMT) is an important lipid anchor modification of eukaryotic and viral proteins. Automated prediction of N-terminal N-myristoylation from the substrate protein sequence alone is necessary for large-scale sequence annotation projects but it requires a low rate of false positive hits in addition to a sufficient sensitivity. Our previous analysis of substrate protein sequence variability, NMT sequences and 3D structures has revealed motif properties in addition to the known PROSITE motif that are utilized in a new predictor described here. The composite prediction function (with separate ad hoc parameterization (a) for queries from non-fungal eukaryotes and their viruses and (b) for sequences from fungal species) consists of terms evaluating amino acid type preferences at sequences positions close to the N terminus as well as terms penalizing deviations from the physical property pattern of amino acid side-chains encoded in multi-residue correlation within the motif sequence. The algorithm has been validated with a self-consistency and two jack-knife tests for the learning set as well as with kinetic data for model substrates. The sensitivity in recognizing documented NMT substrates is above 95 % for both taxon-specific versions. The corresponding rate of false positive prediction (for sequences with an N-terminal glycine residue) is close to 0.5 %; thus, the technique is applicable for large-scale automated sequence database annotation. The predictor is available as public WWW-server with the URL http://mendel.imp.univie.ac.at/myristate/. Additionally, we propose a version of the predictor that identifies a number of proteolytic protein processing sites at internal glycine residues and that evaluates possible N-terminal myristoylation of the protein fragments.A scan of public protein databases revealed new potential NMT targets for which the myristoyl modification may be of critical importance for

  10. Behavior of Repeating Earthquake Sequences in Central California and the Implications for Subsurface Fault Creep

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Templeton, D C; Nadeau, R; Burgmann, R

    2007-07-09

    Repeating earthquakes (REs) are sequences of events that have nearly identical waveforms and are interpreted to represent fault asperities driven to failure by loading from aseismic creep on the surrounding fault surface at depth. We investigate the occurrence of these REs along faults in central California to determine which faults exhibit creep and the spatio-temporal distribution of this creep. At the juncture of the San Andreas and southern Calaveras-Paicines faults, both faults as well as a smaller secondary fault, the Quien Sabe fault, are observed to produce REs over the observation period of March 1984-May 2005. REs in this area reflect a heterogeneous creep distribution along the fault plane with significant variations in time. Cumulative slip over the observation period at individual sequence locations is determined to range from 5.5-58.2 cm on the San Andreas fault, 4.8-14.1 cm on the southern Calaveras-Paicines fault, and 4.9-24.8 cm on the Quien Sabe fault. Creep at depth appears to mimic the behaviors seen of creep on the surface in that evidence of steady slip, triggered slip, and episodic slip phenomena are also observed in the RE sequences. For comparison, we investigate the occurrence of REs west of the San Andreas fault within the southern Coast Range. Events within these RE sequences only occurred minutes to weeks apart from each other and then did not repeat again over the observation period, suggesting that REs in this area are not produced by steady aseismic creep of the surrounding fault surface.

  11. NFAT5 regulates HIV-1 in primary monocytes via a highly conserved long terminal repeat site.

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    Shahin Ranjbar

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available To replicate, HIV-1 capitalizes on endogenous cellular activation pathways resulting in recruitment of key host transcription factors to its viral enhancer. RNA interference has been a powerful tool for blocking key checkpoints in HIV-1 entry into cells. Here we apply RNA interference to HIV-1 transcription in primary macrophages, a major reservoir of the virus, and specifically target the transcription factor NFAT5 (nuclear factor of activated T cells 5, which is the most evolutionarily divergent NFAT protein. By molecularly cloning and sequencing isolates from multiple viral subtypes, and performing DNase I footprinting, electrophoretic mobility shift, and promoter mutagenesis transfection assays, we demonstrate that NFAT5 functionally interacts with a specific enhancer binding site conserved in HIV-1, HIV-2, and multiple simian immunodeficiency viruses. Using small interfering RNA to ablate expression of endogenous NFAT5 protein, we show that the replication of three major HIV-1 viral subtypes (B, C, and E is dependent upon NFAT5 in human primary differentiated macrophages. Our results define a novel host factor-viral enhancer interaction that reveals a new regulatory role for NFAT5 and defines a functional DNA motif conserved across HIV-1 subtypes and representative simian immunodeficiency viruses. Inhibition of the NFAT5-LTR interaction may thus present a novel therapeutic target to suppress HIV-1 replication and progression of AIDS.

  12. Characterization and phylogenetic relationships among microsporidia infecting silkworm, Bombyx mori, using inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR) and small subunit rRNA (SSU-rRNA) sequence analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rao, S N; Nath, B S.u.r.e.n.d.r.a; Saratchandra, B

    2005-01-01

    This study is the first report on the genetic characterization and relationships among different microsporidia infecting the silkworm, Bombyx mori, using inter simple sequence repeat PCR (ISSR-PCR) analysis...

  13. IS1630 of Mycoplasma fermentans, a Novel IS30-Type Insertion Element That Targets and Duplicates Inverted Repeats of Variable Length and Sequence during Insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calcutt, Michael J.; Lavrrar, Jennifer L.; Wise, Kim S.

    1999-01-01

    A new insertion sequence (IS) of Mycoplasma fermentans is described. This element, designated IS1630, is 1,377 bp long and has 27-bp inverted repeats at the termini. A single open reading frame (ORF), predicted to encode a basic protein of either 366 or 387 amino acids (depending on the start codon utilized), occupies most of this compact element. The predicted translation product of this ORF has homology to transposases of the IS30 family of IS elements and is most closely related (27% identical amino acid residues) to the product of the prototype of the group, IS30. Multiple copies of IS1630 are present in the genomes of at least two M. fermentans strains. Characterization and comparison of nine copies of the element revealed that IS1630 exhibits unusual target site specificity and, upon insertion, duplicates target sequences in a manner unlike that of any other IS element. IS1630 was shown to have the striking ability to target and duplicate inverted repeats of variable length and sequence during transposition. IS30-type elements typically generate 2- or 3-bp target site duplications, whereas those created by IS1630 vary between 19 and 26 bp. With the exception of two recently reported IS4-type elements which have the ability to generate variable large duplications (B. B. Plikaytis, J. T. Crawford, and T. M. Shinnick, J. Bacteriol. 180:1037–1043, 1998; E. M. Vilei, J. Nicolet, and J. Frey, J. Bacteriol. 181:1319–1323, 1999), such large direct repeats had not been observed for other IS elements. Interestingly, the IS1630-generated duplications are all symmetrical inverted repeat sequences that are apparently derived from rho-independent transcription terminators of neighboring genes. Although the consensus target site for IS30 is almost palindromic, individual target sites possess considerably less inverted symmetry. In contrast, IS1630 appears to exhibit an increased stringency for inverted repeat recognition, since the majority of target sites had no

  14. Sequence variations in C9orf72 downstream of the hexanucleotide repeat region and its effect on repeat-primed PCR interpretation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordin, Angelica; Akimoto, Chizuru; Wuolikainen, Anna

    2017-01-01

    A large GGGGCC-repeat expansion mutation (HREM) in C9orf72 is the most common known cause of ALS and FTD in European populations. Sequence variations immediately downstream of the HREM region have previously been observed and have been suggested to be one reason for difficulties in interpreting RP...

  15. Development of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR Markers of Sesame (Sesamum indicum from a Genome Survey

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    Xin Wei

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Sesame (Sesamum indicum, an important oil crop, is widely grown in tropical and subtropical regions. It provides part of the daily edible oil allowance for almost half of the world’s population. A limited number of co-dominant markers has been developed and applied in sesame genetic diversity and germplasm identity studies. Here we report for the first time a whole genome survey used to develop simple sequence repeat (SSR markers and to detect the genetic diversity of sesame germplasm. From the initial assembled sesame genome, 23,438 SSRs (≥5 repeats were identified. The most common repeat motif was dinucleotide with a frequency of 84.24%, followed by 13.53% trinucleotide, 1.65% tetranucleotide, 0.3% pentanucleotide and 0.28% hexanucleotide motifs. From 1500 designed and synthesised primer pairs, 218 polymorphic SSRs were developed and used to screen 31 sesame accessions that from 12 countries. STRUCTURE and phylogenetic analyses indicated that all sesame accessions could be divided into two groups: one mainly from China and another from other countries. Cluster analysis classified Chinese major sesame varieties into three groups. These novel SSR markers are a useful tool for genetic linkage map construction, genetic diversity detection, and marker-assisted selective sesame breeding.

  16. The impact of CRISPR repeat sequence on structures of a Cas6 protein-RNA complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Ruiying; Zheng, Han; Preamplume, Gan; Shao, Yaming; Li, Hong [FSU

    2012-03-15

    The repeat-associated mysterious proteins (RAMPs) comprise the most abundant family of proteins involved in prokaryotic immunity against invading genetic elements conferred by the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR) system. Cas6 is one of the first characterized RAMP proteins and is a key enzyme required for CRISPR RNA maturation. Despite a strong structural homology with other RAMP proteins that bind hairpin RNA, Cas6 distinctly recognizes single-stranded RNA. Previous structural and biochemical studies show that Cas6 captures the 5' end while cleaving the 3' end of the CRISPR RNA. Here, we describe three structures and complementary biochemical analysis of a noncatalytic Cas6 homolog from Pyrococcus horikoshii bound to CRISPR repeat RNA of different sequences. Our study confirms the specificity of the Cas6 protein for single-stranded RNA and further reveals the importance of the bases at Positions 5-7 in Cas6-RNA interactions. Substitutions of these bases result in structural changes in the protein-RNA complex including its oligomerization state.

  17. Development of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers of sesame (Sesamum indicum) from a genome survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xin; Wang, Linhai; Zhang, Yanxin; Qi, Xiaoqiong; Wang, Xiaoling; Ding, Xia; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Xiurong

    2014-04-22

    Sesame (Sesamum indicum), an important oil crop, is widely grown in tropical and subtropical regions. It provides part of the daily edible oil allowance for almost half of the world's population. A limited number of co-dominant markers has been developed and applied in sesame genetic diversity and germplasm identity studies. Here we report for the first time a whole genome survey used to develop simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and to detect the genetic diversity of sesame germplasm. From the initial assembled sesame genome, 23,438 SSRs (≥5 repeats) were identified. The most common repeat motif was dinucleotide with a frequency of 84.24%, followed by 13.53% trinucleotide, 1.65% tetranucleotide, 0.3% pentanucleotide and 0.28% hexanucleotide motifs. From 1500 designed and synthesised primer pairs, 218 polymorphic SSRs were developed and used to screen 31 sesame accessions that from 12 countries. STRUCTURE and phylogenetic analyses indicated that all sesame accessions could be divided into two groups: one mainly from China and another from other countries. Cluster analysis classified Chinese major sesame varieties into three groups. These novel SSR markers are a useful tool for genetic linkage map construction, genetic diversity detection, and marker-assisted selective sesame breeding.

  18. A conserved unusual posttranscriptional processing mediated by short, direct repeated (SDR) sequences in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Xiangli; Luo, Di; Gao, Shaopei; Ren, Guangjun; Chang, Lijuan; Zhou, Yuke; Luo, Xiaoli; Li, Yuxiang; Hou, Pei; Tang, Wei; Lu, Bao-Rong; Liu, Yongsheng

    2010-01-01

    In several stress responsive gene loci of monocot cereal crops, we have previously identified an unusual posttranscriptional processing mediated by paired presence of short direct repeated (SDR) sequences at 5' and 3' splicing junctions that are distinct from conventional (U2/U12-type) splicing boundaries. By using the known SDR-containing sequences as probes, 24 plant candidate genes involved in diverse functional pathways from both monocots and dicots that potentially possess SDR-mediated posttranscriptional processing were predicted in the GenBank database. The SDRs-mediated posttranscriptional processing events including cis- and trans-actions were experimentally detected in majority of the predicted candidates. Extensive sequence analysis demonstrates several types of SDR-associated splicing peculiarities including partial exon deletion, exon fragment repetition, exon fragment scrambling and trans-splicing that result in either loss of partial exon or unusual exonic sequence rearrangements within or between RNA molecules. In addition, we show that the paired presence of SDR is necessary but not sufficient in SDR-mediated splicing in transient expression and stable transformation systems. We also show prokaryote is incapable of SDR-mediated premRNA splicing. Copyright 2010 Institute of Genetics and Developmental Biology and the Genetics Society of China. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Genotyping and Molecular Identification of Date Palm Cultivars Using Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayesh, Basim M

    2017-01-01

    Molecular markers are credible for the discrimination of genotypes and estimation of the extent of genetic diversity and relatedness in a set of genotypes. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers rapidly reveal high polymorphic fingerprints and have been used frequently to determine the genetic diversity among date palm cultivars. This chapter describes the application of ISSR markers for genotyping of date palm cultivars. The application involves extraction of genomic DNA from the target cultivars with reliable quality and quantity. Subsequently the extracted DNA serves as a template for amplification of genomic regions flanked by inverted simple sequence repeats using a single primer. The similarity of each pair of samples is measured by calculating the number of mono- and polymorphic bands revealed by gel electrophoresis. Matrices constructed for similarity and genetic distance are used to build a phylogenetic tree and cluster analysis, to determine the molecular relatedness of cultivars. The protocol describes 3 out of 9 tested primers consistently amplified 31 loci in 6 date palm cultivars, with 28 polymorphic loci.

  20. Identification of apple cultivars on the basis of simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, G S; Zhang, Y G; Tao, R; Fang, J G; Dai, H Y

    2014-09-12

    DNA markers are useful tools that play an important role in plant cultivar identification. They are usually based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and include simple sequence repeats (SSRs), inter-simple sequence repeats, and random amplified polymorphic DNA. However, DNA markers were not used effectively in the complete identification of plant cultivars because of the lack of known DNA fingerprints. Recently, a novel approach called the cultivar identification diagram (CID) strategy was developed to facilitate the use of DNA markers for separate plant individuals. The CID was designed whereby a polymorphic maker was generated from each PCR that directly allowed for cultivar sample separation at each step. Therefore, it could be used to identify cultivars and varieties easily with fewer primers. In this study, 60 apple cultivars, including a few main cultivars in fields and varieties from descendants (Fuji x Telamon) were examined. Of the 20 pairs of SSR primers screened, 8 pairs gave reproducible, polymorphic DNA amplification patterns. The banding patterns obtained from these 8 primers were used to construct a CID map. Each cultivar or variety in this study was distinguished from the others completely, indicating that this method can be used for efficient cultivar identification. The result contributed to studies on germplasm resources and the seedling industry in fruit trees.

  1. Differentiation of Schistosoma haematobium from related schistosomes by PCR amplifying an inter-repeat sequence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbasi, Ibrahim; King, Charles H; Sturrock, Robert F; Kariuki, Curtis; Muchiri, Eric; Hamburger, Joseph

    2007-05-01

    Schistosoma haematobium infects nearly 150 million people, primarily in Africa, and is transmitted by select species of local bulinid snails. These snails can host other related trematode species as well, so that effective detection and monitoring of snails infected with S. haematobium requires a successful differentiation between S. haematobium and any closely related schistosome species. To enable differential detection of S. haematobium DNA by simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), we designed and tested primer pairs from numerous newly identified Schistosoma DNA repeat sequences. However, all pairs tested were found unsuitable for this purpose. Differentiation of S. haematobium from S. bovis, S. mattheei, S. curassoni, and S. intercalatum (but not from S. margrebowiei) was ultimately accomplished by PCR using one primer from a newly identified repeat, Sh110, and a second primer from a known schistosomal splice-leader sequence. For evaluation of residual S. haematobium transmission after control interventions, this differentiation tool will enable accurate monitoring of infected snails in areas where S. haematobium is sympatric with the most prevalent other schistosome species.

  2. Formation and Repair of Mismatches Containing Ribonucleotides and Oxidized Bases at Repeated DNA Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli, Piera; Minoprio, Anna; Bossa, Cecilia; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2015-10-23

    The cellular pool of ribonucleotide triphosphates (rNTPs) is higher than that of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates. To ensure genome stability, DNA polymerases must discriminate against rNTPs and incorporated ribonucleotides must be removed by ribonucleotide excision repair (RER). We investigated DNA polymerase β (POL β) capacity to incorporate ribonucleotides into trinucleotide repeated DNA sequences and the efficiency of base excision repair (BER) and RER enzymes (OGG1, MUTYH, and RNase H2) when presented with an incorrect sugar and an oxidized base. POL β incorporated rAMP and rCMP opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG) and extended both mispairs. In addition, POL β was able to insert and elongate an oxidized rGMP when paired with dA. We show that RNase H2 always preserves the capacity to remove a single ribonucleotide when paired to an oxidized base or to incise an oxidized ribonucleotide in a DNA duplex. In contrast, BER activity is affected by the presence of a ribonucleotide opposite an 8-oxodG. In particular, MUTYH activity on 8-oxodG:rA mispairs is fully inhibited, although its binding capacity is retained. This results in the reduction of RNase H2 incision capability of this substrate. Thus complex mispairs formed by an oxidized base and a ribonucleotide can compromise BER and RER in repeated sequences. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  3. Formation and Repair of Mismatches Containing Ribonucleotides and Oxidized Bases at Repeated DNA Sequences*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilli, Piera; Minoprio, Anna; Bossa, Cecilia; Bignami, Margherita; Mazzei, Filomena

    2015-01-01

    The cellular pool of ribonucleotide triphosphates (rNTPs) is higher than that of deoxyribonucleotide triphosphates. To ensure genome stability, DNA polymerases must discriminate against rNTPs and incorporated ribonucleotides must be removed by ribonucleotide excision repair (RER). We investigated DNA polymerase β (POL β) capacity to incorporate ribonucleotides into trinucleotide repeated DNA sequences and the efficiency of base excision repair (BER) and RER enzymes (OGG1, MUTYH, and RNase H2) when presented with an incorrect sugar and an oxidized base. POL β incorporated rAMP and rCMP opposite 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (8-oxodG) and extended both mispairs. In addition, POL β was able to insert and elongate an oxidized rGMP when paired with dA. We show that RNase H2 always preserves the capacity to remove a single ribonucleotide when paired to an oxidized base or to incise an oxidized ribonucleotide in a DNA duplex. In contrast, BER activity is affected by the presence of a ribonucleotide opposite an 8-oxodG. In particular, MUTYH activity on 8-oxodG:rA mispairs is fully inhibited, although its binding capacity is retained. This results in the reduction of RNase H2 incision capability of this substrate. Thus complex mispairs formed by an oxidized base and a ribonucleotide can compromise BER and RER in repeated sequences. PMID:26338705

  4. Simple sequence repeats in Neurospora crassa: distribution, polymorphism and evolutionary inference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Park Jongsun

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Simple sequence repeats (SSRs have been successfully used for various genetic and evolutionary studies in eukaryotic systems. The eukaryotic model organism Neurospora crassa is an excellent system to study evolution and biological function of SSRs. Results We identified and characterized 2749 SSRs of 963 SSR types in the genome of N. crassa. The distribution of tri-nucleotide (nt SSRs, the most common SSRs in N. crassa, was significantly biased in exons. We further characterized the distribution of 19 abundant SSR types (AST, which account for 71% of total SSRs in the N. crassa genome, using a Poisson log-linear model. We also characterized the size variation of SSRs among natural accessions using Polymorphic Index Content (PIC and ANOVA analyses and found that there are genome-wide, chromosome-dependent and local-specific variations. Using polymorphic SSRs, we have built linkage maps from three line-cross populations. Conclusion Taking our computational, statistical and experimental data together, we conclude that 1 the distributions of the SSRs in the sequenced N. crassa genome differ systematically between chromosomes as well as between SSR types, 2 the size variation of tri-nt SSRs in exons might be an important mechanism in generating functional variation of proteins in N. crassa, 3 there are different levels of evolutionary forces in variation of amino acid repeats, and 4 SSRs are stable molecular markers for genetic studies in N. crassa.

  5. Structure of even/odd trinucleotide repeat sequences modulates persistence of non-B conformations and conversion to duplex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa, Amalia Avila; Cattie, Douglas; Delaney, Sarah

    2011-05-31

    Expansion of trinucleotide repeats (TNR) has been implicated in the emergence of neurodegenerative diseases. Formation of non-B conformations such as hairpins by these repeat sequences during DNA replication and/or repair has been proposed as a contributing factor to expansion. In this work we employed a combination of fluorescence, chemical probing, optical melting, and gel shift assays to characterize the structure of a series of (CTG)(n) sequences and the kinetic parameters describing their interaction with a complementary sequence. Our structure-based experiments using chemical probing reveal that sequences containing an even or odd number of CTG repeats adopt stem-loop hairpins that differ from one another by the absence or presence of a stem overhang. Furthermore, we find that this structural difference dictates the rate at which the TNR hairpins convert to duplex with a complementary CAG sequence. Indeed, the rate constant describing conversion to (CAG)(10)/(CTG)(n) duplex is slower for sequences containing an even number of CTG repeats than for sequences containing an odd number of repeats. Thus, when both the CAG and CTG hairpins have an even number of the repeats, they display a longer lifetime relative to when the CTG hairpin has an odd number of repeats. The difference in lifetimes observed for these TNR hairpins has implications toward their persistence during DNA replication or repair events and could influence their predisposition toward expansion. Taken together, these results contribute to our understanding of trinucleotide repeats and the factors that regulate persistence of hairpins in these repetitive sequences and conversion to canonical duplex.

  6. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in three genomes of Candida species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Dongmei

    2016-06-15

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites, which composed of tandem repeated short units of 1-6 bp, have been paying attention continuously. Here, the distribution, composition and polymorphism of microsatellites and compound microsatellites were analyzed in three available genomes of Candida species (Candida dubliniensis, Candida glabrata and Candida orthopsilosis). The results show that there were 118,047, 66,259 and 61,119 microsatellites in genomes of C. dubliniensis, C. glabrata and C. orthopsilosis, respectively. The SSRs covered more than 1/3 length of genomes in the three species. The microsatellites, which just consist of bases A and (or) T, such as (A)n, (T)n, (AT)n, (TA)n, (AAT)n, (TAA)n, (TTA)n, (ATA)n, (ATT)n and (TAT)n, were predominant in the three genomes. The length of microsatellites was focused on 6 bp and 9 bp either in the three genomes or in its coding sequences. What's more, the relative abundance (19.89/kbp) and relative density (167.87 bp/kbp) of SSRs in sequence of mitochondrion of C. glabrata were significantly great than that in any one of genomes or chromosomes of the three species. In addition, the distance between any two adjacent microsatellites was an important factor to influence the formation of compound microsatellites. The analysis may be helpful for further studying the roles of microsatellites in genomes' origination, organization and evolution of Candida species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Chromatin features of plant telomeric sequences at terminal versus internal positions

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    Eva eMajerová

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic mechanisms are involved in regulation of crucial cellular processes in eukaryotic organisms. Data on the epigenetic features of plant telomeres and their epigenetic regulation were published mostly for Arabidopsis thaliana, in which the presence of interstitial telomeric repeats (ITRs may interfere with genuine telomeres in most analyses. Here, we studied the epigenetic landscape and transcription of telomeres and ITRs in Nicotiana tabacum with long telomeres and no detectable ITRs, and in Ballantinia antipoda with large blocks of pericentromeric ITRs and relatively short telomeres. Chromatin of genuine telomeres displayed heterochromatic as well as euchromatic marks, while ITRs were just heterochromatic. Methylated cytosines were present at telomeres and ITRs, but showed a bias with more methylation towards distal telomere positions and different blocks of B. antipoda ITRs methylated to different levels. Telomeric transcripts TERRA (G-rich and ARRET (C-rich were identified in both plants and their levels varied among tissues with a maximum in blossoms. Plants with substantially different proportions of internally and terminally located telomeric repeats are instrumental in clarifying the chromatin status of telomeric repeats at distinct chromosome locations.

  8. DNA sequence of the lactose operon: the lacA gene and the transcriptional termination region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hediger, M A; Johnson, D F; Nierlich, D P; Zabin, I

    1985-10-01

    The lac operon of Escherichia coli spans approximately 5300 base pairs and includes the lacZ, lacY, and lacA genes in addition to the operator, promoter, and transcription termination regions. We report here the sequence of the lacA gene and the region distal to it, confirming the sequence of thiogalactoside transacetylase and completing the sequence of the lac operon. The lacA gene is characterized by use of rare codons, suggesting an origin from a plasmid, transposon, or virus gene. UUG is the translation initiation codon. A preliminary examination of 3' end of the lac messenger in the region distal to the lacA gene indicates several endpoints. A predominant one is located at the 3' end of a G + C-rich hairpin structure, which may be involved in termination of transcription or in post-transcriptional processing. An open reading frame of 702 base pairs is present on the complementary strand downstream from lacA.

  9. Isolation and N-terminal sequencing of a novel cadmium-binding protein from Boletus edulis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collin-Hansen, C.; Andersen, R. A.; Steinnes, E.

    2003-05-01

    A Cd-binding protein was isolated from the popular edible mushroom Boletus edulis, which is a hyperaccumulator of both Cd and Hg. Wild-growing samples of B. edulis were collected from soils rich in Cd. Cd radiotracer was added to the crude protein preparation obtained from ethanol precipitation of heat-treated cytosol. Proteins were then further separated in two consecutive steps; gel filtration and anion exchange chromatography. In both steps the Cd radiotracer profile showed only one distinct peak, which corresponded well with the profiles of endogenous Cd obtained by atomic absorption spectrophotometry (AAS). Concentrations of the essential elements Cu and Zn were low in the protein fractions high in Cd. N-terminal sequencing performed on the Cd-binding protein fractions revealed a protein with a novel amino acid sequence, which contained aromatic amino acids as well as proline. Both the N-terminal sequencing and spectrofluorimetric analysis with EDTA and ABD-F (4-aminosulfonyl-7-fluoro-2, 1, 3-benzoxadiazole) failed to detect cysteine in the Cd-binding fractions. These findings conclude that the novel protein does not belong to the metallothionein family. The results suggest a role for the protein in Cd transport and storage, and they are of importance in view of toxicology and food chemistry, but also for environmental protection.

  10. A C-terminal PDZ domain-binding sequence is required for striatal distribution of the dopamine transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rickhag, Karl Mattias; Hansen, Freja Herborg; Sørensen, Gunnar

    2013-01-01

    The dopamine transporter mediates reuptake of dopamine from the synaptic cleft. The cellular mechanisms controlling dopamine transporter levels in striatal nerve terminals remain poorly understood. The dopamine transporters contain a C-terminal PDZ (PSD-95/Discs-large/ZO-1) domain-binding sequence...

  11. Domain organization within repeated DNA sequences: application to the study of a family of transposable elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tempel, Sébastien; Giraud, Mathieu; Lavenier, Dominique; Lerman, Israël-César; Valin, Anne-Sophie; Couée, Ivan; Amrani, Abdelhak El; Nicolas, Jacques

    2006-08-15

    The analysis of repeated elements in genomes is a fascinating domain of research that is lacking relevant tools for transposable elements (TEs), the most complex ones. The dynamics of TEs, which provides the main mechanism of mutation in some genomes, is an essential component of genome evolution. In this study we introduce a new concept of domain, a segmentation unit useful for describing the architecture of different copies of TEs. Our method extracts occurrences of a terminus-defined family of TEs, aligns the sequences, finds the domains in the alignment and searches the distribution of each domain in sequences. After a classification step relative to the presence or the absence of domains, the method results in a graphical view of sequences segmented into domains. Analysis of the new non-autonomous TE AtREP21 in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana reveals copies of very different sizes and various combinations of domains which show the potential of our method. DomainOrganizer web page is available at www.irisa.fr/symbiose/DomainOrganizer/.

  12. Mating Type and Simple Sequence Repeat Markers Indicate a Clonal Population of Phyllosticta citricarpa in Florida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Nan-Yi; Zhang, Ke; Huguet-Tapia, Jose C; Rollins, Jeffrey A; Dewdney, Megan M

    2016-11-01

    Phyllosticta citricarpa, the citrus black spot pathogen, was first identified in Florida in March 2010. Subsequently, this pathogen has become established in Florida but can be easily confused with the endemic nonpathogenic citrus endophyte P. capitalensis. In this study, the mating-type (MAT) loci of P. citricarpa and P. capitalensis were identified via draft genome sequencing and were characterized at the structural and sequence levels. P. citricarpa was determined to have an idiomorphic, heterothallic MAT locus structure, whereas P. capitalensis was found to have a single MAT locus consistent with a homothallic mating system. A survey of P. citricarpa isolates from Florida revealed that only the MAT1-2 idiomorph existed in the Floridian population. In contrast, isolates collected from Australia exhibited a 1:1 ratio of MAT1-1 and MAT1-2 isolates. Development and analysis of simple sequence repeat markers revealed a single multilocus genotype (MLG) in the Floridian population (n = 70) and 11 MLG within the Australian population (n = 24). These results indicate that isolates of P. citricarpa from Florida are likely descendent from a single clonal lineage and are reproducing asexually. The disease management focus in Florida will need to be concentrated on the production and dispersal of pycnidiospores.

  13. Comparative mapping between quercus and castanea using simple-sequence repeats (SSRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreneche, T; Casasoli, M; Russell, K; Akkak, A; Meddour, H; Plomion, C; Villani, F; Kremer, A

    2004-02-01

    Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers from Quercus and Castanea were used for comparative mapping between Quercus robur (L.) and Castanea sativa (Mill.). We tested the transferability of SSRs developed in Quercus to Castanea and vice-versa. In total, 47% (25) of the Quercus SSRs and 63% (19) of the Castanea SSRs showed a strong amplification product in the non-source species. From these 44 putative comparative anchor tags, 19 (15 from Quercus and 4 from Castanea) were integrated in two previously established genetic linkage maps for the two genera. SSR loci were sequenced to confirm the orthology of the markers. The combined information from both genetic mapping and sequence analysis were used to determine the homeology between seven linkage groups, aligned on the basis of pairs or triplets of common markers, while two additional groups were matched using a single microsatellite marker. Orthologous loci identified between Q. robur and C. sativa will be useful as anchor loci for comparative mapping studies within the Fagaceae family.

  14. Creation of a novel telomere-cutting endonuclease based on the EN domain of telomere-specific non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon, TRAS1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitake Kazutoshi

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ends of chromosomes, termed telomeres consist of repetitive DNA. The telomeric sequences shorten with cell division and, when telomeres are critically abbreviated, cells stop proliferating. However, in cancer cells, by the expression of telomerase which elongates telomeres, the cells can continue proliferating. Many approaches for telomere shortening have been pursued in the past, but to our knowledge, cutting telomeres in vivo has not so far been demonstrated. In addition, there is lack of information on the cellular effects of telomere shortening in human cells. Results Here, we created novel chimeric endonucleases to cut telomeres by fusing the endonuclease domain (TRAS1EN of the silkworm's telomere specific non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon TRAS1 to the human telomere-binding protein, TRF1. An in vitro assay demonstrated that the TRAS1EN-TRF1 chimeric endonucleases (T-EN and EN-T cut the human (TTAGGGn repeats specifically. The concentration of TRAS1EN-TRF1 chimeric endonucleases necessary for the cleavage of (TTAGGGn repeats was about 40-fold lower than that of TRAS1EN alone. When TRAS1EN-TRF1 endonucleases were introduced into human U2OS cancer cells using adenovirus vectors, the enzymes localized at telomeres of nuclei, cleaved and shortened the telomeric DNA by double-strand breaks. When human U2OS and HFL-1 fibroblast cells were infected with EN-T recombinant adenovirus, their cellular proliferation was suppressed for about 2 weeks after infection. In contrast, the TRAS1EN mutant (H258A chimeric endonuclease fused with TRF1 (ENmut-T did not show the suppression effect. The EN-T recombinant adenovirus induced telomere shortening in U2OS cells, activated the p53-dependent pathway and caused the senescence associated cellular responses, while the ENmut-T construct did not show such effects. Conclusions A novel TRAS1EN-TRF1 chimeric endonuclease (EN-T cuts the human telomeric repeats (TTAGGGn specifically in

  15. Analysis of simple sequence repeats in rice bean (Vigna umbellata using an SSR-enriched library

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lixia Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Rice bean (Vigna umbellata Thunb., a warm-season annual legume, is grown in Asia mainly for dried grain or fodder and plays an important role in human and animal nutrition because the grains are rich in protein and some essential fatty acids and minerals. With the aim of expediting the genetic improvement of rice bean, we initiated a project to develop genomic resources and tools for molecular breeding in this little-known but important crop. Here we report the construction of an SSR-enriched genomic library from DNA extracted from pooled young leaf tissues of 22 rice bean genotypes and developing SSR markers. In 433,562 reads generated by a Roche 454 GS-FLX sequencer, we identified 261,458 SSRs, of which 48.8% were of compound form. Dinucleotide repeats were predominant with an absolute proportion of 81.6%, followed by trinucleotides (17.8%. Other types together accounted for 0.6%. The motif AC/GT accounted for 77.7% of the total, followed by AAG/CTT (14.3%, and all others accounted for 12.0%. Among the flanking sequences, 2928 matched putative genes or gene models in the protein database of Arabidopsis thaliana, corresponding with 608 non-redundant Gene Ontology terms. Of these sequences, 11.2% were involved in cellular components, 24.2% were involved molecular functions, and 64.6% were associated with biological processes. Based on homolog analysis, 1595 flanking sequences were similar to mung bean and 500 to common bean genomic sequences. Comparative mapping was conducted using 350 sequences homologous to both mung bean and common bean sequences. Finally, a set of primer pairs were designed, and a validation test showed that 58 of 220 new primers can be used in rice bean and 53 can be transferred to mung bean. However, only 11 were polymorphic when tested on 32 rice bean varieties. We propose that this study lays the groundwork for developing novel SSR markers and will enhance the mapping of qualitative and quantitative traits and marker

  16. Nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location and protein stoichiometry influence base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E.; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Wilson, David M.; Merienne, Karine

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >fourteen genetic disorders, including Huntington’s disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights as to how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely due to the lower level of APE1, FEN1 and LIG1. Damage located towards the 5’ end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired accumulating incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the centre or at the 3’ end of the repeats or within a control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5’ end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly under the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome, and suggest that a suboptimal LP-BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability. PMID:22497302

  17. The nucleotide sequence, DNA damage location, and protein stoichiometry influence the base excision repair outcome at CAG/CTG repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goula, Agathi-Vasiliki; Pearson, Christopher E; Della Maria, Julie; Trottier, Yvon; Tomkinson, Alan E; Wilson, David M; Merienne, Karine

    2012-05-08

    Expansion of CAG/CTG repeats is the underlying cause of >14 genetic disorders, including Huntington's disease (HD) and myotonic dystrophy. The mutational process is ongoing, with increases in repeat size enhancing the toxicity of the expansion in specific tissues. In many repeat diseases, the repeats exhibit high instability in the striatum, whereas instability is minimal in the cerebellum. We provide molecular insights into how base excision repair (BER) protein stoichiometry may contribute to the tissue-selective instability of CAG/CTG repeats by using specific repair assays. Oligonucleotide substrates with an abasic site were mixed with either reconstituted BER protein stoichiometries mimicking the levels present in HD mouse striatum or cerebellum, or with protein extracts prepared from HD mouse striatum or cerebellum. In both cases, the repair efficiency at CAG/CTG repeats and at control DNA sequences was markedly reduced under the striatal conditions, likely because of the lower level of APE1, FEN1, and LIG1. Damage located toward the 5' end of the repeat tract was poorly repaired, with the accumulation of incompletely processed intermediates as compared to an AP lesion in the center or at the 3' end of the repeats or within control sequences. Moreover, repair of lesions at the 5' end of CAG or CTG repeats involved multinucleotide synthesis, particularly at the cerebellar stoichiometry, suggesting that long-patch BER processes lesions at sequences susceptible to hairpin formation. Our results show that the BER stoichiometry, nucleotide sequence, and DNA damage position modulate repair outcome and suggest that a suboptimal long-patch BER activity promotes CAG/CTG repeat instability.

  18. C-Terminal Repeats of Clostridium difficile Toxin A Induce Production of Chemokine and Adhesion Molecules in Endothelial Cells and Promote Migration of Leukocytes▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Chiou-Yueh; Lin, Chun-Nan; Chang, Chuan-Fa; Lin, Chun-Hung; Lien, Huei-Ting; Chen, Jen-Yang; Chia, Jean-San

    2008-01-01

    The C-terminal repeating sequences of Clostridium difficile toxin A (designated ARU) are homologous to the carbohydrate-binding domain of streptococcal glucosyltransferases (GTFs) that were recently identified as potent modulins. To test the hypothesis that ARU might exert a similar biological activity on endothelial cells, recombinant ARU (rARU), which was noncytotoxic to cell cultures, was analyzed using human umbilical vein endothelial cells. The rARU could bind directly to endothelial cells in a serum- and calcium-dependent manner and induce the production of interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in a dose-dependent manner. An oligosaccharide binding assay indicated that rARU, but not GTFC, binds preferentially to Lewis antigens and 3′HSO3-containing oligosaccharides. Binding of rARU to human endothelial or intestinal cells correlated directly with the expression of Lewis Y antigen. Bound rARU directly activated mitogen-activated protein kinases and the NF-κB signaling pathway in endothelial cells to release biologically active chemokines and adhesion molecules that promoted migration in a transwell assay and the adherence of polymorphonuclear and mononuclear cells to the endothelial cells. These results suggest that ARU may bind to multiple carbohydrate motifs to exert its biological activity on human endothelial cells. PMID:18160482

  19. Transferability of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Markers Developed in Litchi chinensis to Blighia sapida (Sapindaceae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekué, Marius R M; Gailing, Oliver; Finkeldey, Reiner

    2009-01-01

    Ackee (Blighia sapida, Sapindaceae) is a multipurpose fruit tree species of high economic importance, native to the Guinean forests of West Africa, and belongs to the same family as that of lychee (Litchi chinensis). In this study, a set of 12 primer pairs for simple sequence repeats (SSRs) previously developed for lychee has been evaluated for polymorphism in 16 ackee trees from different populations. Seven primer pairs have been found to be transferable, and four have revealed polymorphisms. However, the average number of alleles per locus has dropped from 4.9 for lychee to 3.7 for ackee. Characterization of the four polymorphic markers in 279 individuals belonging to14 different ackee populations from Benin has revealed that the numbers of alleles per locus range from two to 14 with a mean number of 5.8. The observed and expected heterozygosities range between 0.020 to 0.359 and 0.020 to 0.396, respectively.

  20. Off-target effects of sulforaphane include the derepression of long terminal repeats through histone acetylation events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baier, Scott R; Zbasnik, Richard; Schlegel, Vicki; Zempleni, Janos

    2014-06-01

    Sulforaphane is a naturally occurring isothiocyanate in cruciferous vegetables. Sulforaphane inhibits histone deacetylases, leading to the transcriptional activation of genes including tumor suppressor genes. The compound has attracted considerable attention in the chemoprevention of prostate cancer. Here we tested the hypothesis that sulforaphane is not specific for tumor suppressor genes but also activates loci such as long terminal repeats (LTRs), which might impair genome stability. Studies were conducted using chemically pure sulforaphane in primary human IMR-90 fibroblasts and in broccoli sprout feeding studies in healthy adults. Sulforaphane (2.0 μM) caused an increase in LTR transcriptional activity in cultured cells. Consumption of broccoli sprouts (34, 68 or 102 g) by human volunteers caused a dose dependent elevation in LTR mRNA in circulating leukocytes, peaking at more than a 10-fold increase. This increase in transcript levels was associated with an increase in histone H3 K9 acetylation marks in LTR 15 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from subjects consuming sprouts. Collectively, this study suggests that sulforaphane has off-target effects that warrant further investigation when recommending high levels of sulforaphane intake, despite its promising activities in chemoprevention. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Female Choice Reveals Terminal Investment in Male Mealworm Beetles, Tenebrio molitor, after a Repeated Activation of the Immune System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krams, I; Daukšte, J; Kivleniece, I; Krama, T; Rantala, MJ; Ramey, G; Šauša, L

    2011-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that secondary sexual traits reflect immunocompetence of males in many animal species. This study experimentally investigated whether a parasite-like immunological challenge via a nylon implant affects sexual attractiveness of males in Tenebrio molitor L. (Coleoptera: Tenebrionidae) Although a single immunological challenge significantly reduced sexual attractiveness and locomotor activity of males, it had no adverse effect on their survival. A second immune challenge of the same males increased their attractiveness. However, it was found that the repeated challenge significantly reduced locomotor activity of males and caused higher mortality. This result indicates terminal investment on sexual signaling, which is supposedly based on a trade-off between pheromone production and energy expenditures needed for such activities as recovery of immune system and locomotor activity. When the third implantation was carried out in the same group of males, melanization of nylon implants was found to be lower in more attractive than in less attractive males. This suggests that males that became sexually attractive after the second immune challenge did not invest in recovery of their immune system. PMID:21864151

  2. Derepression of an endogenous long terminal repeat activates the CSF1R proto-oncogene in human lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamprecht, Björn; Walter, Korden; Kreher, Stephan; Kumar, Raman; Hummel, Michael; Lenze, Dido; Köchert, Karl; Bouhlel, Mohamed Amine; Richter, Julia; Soler, Eric; Stadhouders, Ralph; Jöhrens, Korinna; Wurster, Kathrin D; Callen, David F; Harte, Michael F; Giefing, Maciej; Barlow, Rachael; Stein, Harald; Anagnostopoulos, Ioannis; Janz, Martin; Cockerill, Peter N; Siebert, Reiner; Dörken, Bernd; Bonifer, Constanze; Mathas, Stephan

    2010-05-01

    Mammalian genomes contain many repetitive elements, including long terminal repeats (LTRs), which have long been suspected to have a role in tumorigenesis. Here we present evidence that aberrant LTR activation contributes to lineage-inappropriate gene expression in transformed human cells and that such gene expression is central for tumor cell survival. We show that B cell-derived Hodgkin's lymphoma cells depend on the activity of the non-B, myeloid-specific proto-oncogene colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor (CSF1R). In these cells, CSF1R transcription initiates at an aberrantly activated endogenous LTR of the MaLR family (THE1B). Derepression of the THE1 subfamily of MaLR LTRs is widespread in the genome of Hodgkin's lymphoma cells and is associated with impaired epigenetic control due to loss of expression of the corepressor CBFA2T3. Furthermore, we detect LTR-driven CSF1R transcripts in anaplastic large cell lymphoma, in which CSF1R is known to be expressed aberrantly. We conclude that LTR derepression is involved in the pathogenesis of human lymphomas, a finding that might have diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic implications.

  3. Genome-wide analysis of simple sequence repeats in the model medicinal mushroom Ganoderma lucidum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Jun; Xu, Haibin; Song, Jingyuan; Xu, Jiang; Zhu, Yingjie; Chen, Shilin

    2013-01-10

    Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) or microsatellites are one of the most popular sources of genetic markers and play a significant role in gene function and genome organization. We identified SSRs in the genome of Ganoderma lucidum and analyzed their frequency and distribution in different genomic regions. We also compared the SSRs in G. lucidum with six other Agaricomycetes genomes: Coprinopsis cinerea, Laccaria bicolor, Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Postia placenta, Schizophyllum commune and Serpula lacrymans. Based on our search criteria, the total number of SSRs found ranged from 1206 to 6104 and covered from 0.04% to 0.15% of the fungal genomes. The SSR abundance was not correlated with the genome size, and mono- to tri-nucleotide repeats outnumbered other SSR categories in all of the species examined. In G. lucidum, a repertoire of 2674 SSRs was detected, with mono-nucleotides being the most abundant. SSRs were found in all genomic regions and were more abundant in non-coding regions than coding regions. The highest SSR relative abundance was found in introns (108 SSRs/Mb), followed by intergenic regions (84 SSRs/Mb). A total of 684 SSRs were found in the protein-coding sequences (CDSs) of 588 gene models, with 81.4% of them being tri- or hexa-nucleotides. After scanning for InterPro domains, 280 of these genes were successfully annotated, and 215 of them could be assigned to Gene Ontology (GO) terms. SSRs were also identified in 28 bioactive compound synthesis-related gene models, including one 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGR), three polysaccharide biosynthesis genes and 24 cytochrome P450 monooxygenases (CYPs). Primers were designed for the identified SSR loci, providing the basis for the future development of SSR markers of this medicinal fungus. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the Terminal Sequencing and Spacing System for Performance Based Navigation Arrivals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thipphavong, Jane; Jung, Jaewoo; Swenson, Harry N.; Martin, Lynne; Lin, Melody; Nguyen, Jimmy

    2013-01-01

    NASA has developed the Terminal Sequencing and Spacing (TSS) system, a suite of advanced arrival management technologies combining timebased scheduling and controller precision spacing tools. TSS is a ground-based controller automation tool that facilitates sequencing and merging arrivals that have both current standard ATC routes and terminal Performance-Based Navigation (PBN) routes, especially during highly congested demand periods. In collaboration with the FAA and MITRE's Center for Advanced Aviation System Development (CAASD), TSS system performance was evaluated in human-in-the-loop (HITL) simulations with currently active controllers as participants. Traffic scenarios had mixed Area Navigation (RNAV) and Required Navigation Performance (RNP) equipage, where the more advanced RNP-equipped aircraft had preferential treatment with a shorter approach option. Simulation results indicate the TSS system achieved benefits by enabling PBN, while maintaining high throughput rates-10% above baseline demand levels. Flight path predictability improved, where path deviation was reduced by 2 NM on average and variance in the downwind leg length was 75% less. Arrivals flew more fuel-efficient descents for longer, spending an average of 39 seconds less in step-down level altitude segments. Self-reported controller workload was reduced, with statistically significant differences at the p less than 0.01 level. The RNP-equipped arrivals were also able to more frequently capitalize on the benefits of being "Best-Equipped, Best- Served" (BEBS), where less vectoring was needed and nearly all RNP approaches were conducted without interruption.

  5. Codon usage bias in 5' terminal coding sequences reveals distinct enrichment of gene functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Huiling; Rahman, Siddiq Ur; Mao, Yuanhui; Xu, Xiaodong; Tao, Shiheng

    2017-10-01

    Codon bias at the 5' terminal of coding sequence (CDS) is known to be distinct from the rest of the CDS. A number of events occur in this short region to regulate early translation elongation and co-translational translocation. In the genes encoding secretory proteins, there is a special signal sequence which has a higher occurrence of rare codons. In this study, we analyzed codon bias of secretory genes in several eukaryotes. The results showed that secretory genes in the species except mammals had a higher occurrence of rare codons in the 5' terminal of CDS, and the bias was greater than the same region of non-secretory genes. GO analysis revealed that secretory genes containing rare codon clusters in different regions were responsible for various roles in gene functions. Moreover, codon bias in the region encoding the hydrophobic region of protein is similar in secretory and non-secretory genes, indicating that codon bias in secretory genes was partly influenced by amino acid bias. Rare codon clusters are found more frequently in specific regions, and continuous rare codons are not favoured probably because they will increase the probability of ribosome collision and drop-off. Based on ribosome profiling data, there is no significant difference in the average translation efficiencies between rare and optimal codons. Higher ribosomal density in the 5' terminal may result from ribosome pausing which could be involved in different translation events. These findings collectively provided rich information on codon bias in secretory genes, which may shed light on the co-effect of codon bias, mRNA structure and tRNA abundance in translational regulations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Low-pass shotgun sequencing of the barley genome facilitates rapid identification of genes, conserved non-coding sequences and novel repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graner Andreas

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Barley has one of the largest and most complex genomes of all economically important food crops. The rise of new short read sequencing technologies such as Illumina/Solexa permits such large genomes to be effectively sampled at relatively low cost. Based on the corresponding sequence reads a Mathematically Defined Repeat (MDR index can be generated to map repetitive regions in genomic sequences. Results We have generated 574 Mbp of Illumina/Solexa sequences from barley total genomic DNA, representing about 10% of a genome equivalent. From these sequences we generated an MDR index which was then used to identify and mark repetitive regions in the barley genome. Comparison of the MDR plots with expert repeat annotation drawing on the information already available for known repetitive elements revealed a significant correspondence between the two methods. MDR-based annotation allowed for the identification of dozens of novel repeat sequences, though, which were not recognised by hand-annotation. The MDR data was also used to identify gene-containing regions by masking of repetitive sequences in eight de-novo sequenced bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC clones. For half of the identified candidate gene islands indeed gene sequences could be identified. MDR data were only of limited use, when mapped on genomic sequences from the closely related species Triticum monococcum as only a fraction of the repetitive sequences was recognised. Conclusion An MDR index for barley, which was obtained by whole-genome Illumina/Solexa sequencing, proved as efficient in repeat identification as manual expert annotation. Circumventing the labour-intensive step of producing a specific repeat library for expert annotation, an MDR index provides an elegant and efficient resource for the identification of repetitive and low-copy (i.e. potentially gene-containing sequences regions in uncharacterised genomic sequences. The restriction that a particular

  7. Characterization of the restriction enzyme-like endonuclease encoded by the Entamoeba histolytica non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon EhLINE1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Vijay Pal; Mandal, Prabhat Kumar; Rao, Desirazu N; Bhattacharya, Sudha

    2009-12-01

    The genome of the human pathogen Entamoeba histolytica, a primitive protist, contains non-long terminal repeat retrotransposable elements called EhLINEs. These encode reverse transcriptase and endonuclease required for retrotransposition. The endonuclease shows sequence similarity with bacterial restriction endonucleases. Here we report the salient enzymatic features of one such endonuclease. The kinetics of an EhLINE1-encoded endonuclease catalyzed reaction, determined under steady-state and single-turnover conditions, revealed a significant burst phase followed by a slower steady-state phase, indicating that release of product could be the slower step in this reaction. For circular supercoiled DNA the K(m) was 2.6 x 10(-8) M and the k(cat) was 1.6 x 10(-2) sec(-1). For linear E. histolytica DNA substrate the K(m) and k(cat) values were 1.3 x 10(-8) M and 2.2 x 10(-4) sec(-1) respectively. Single-turnover reaction kinetics suggested a noncooperative mode of hydrolysis. The enzyme behaved as a monomer. While Mg(2+) was required for activity, 60% activity was seen with Mn(2+) and none with other divalent metal ions. Substitution of PDX(12-14)D (a metal-binding motif) with PAX(12-14)D caused local conformational change in the protein tertiary structure, which could contribute to reduced enzyme activity in the mutated protein. The protein underwent conformational change upon the addition of DNA, which is consistent with the known behavior of restriction endonucleases. The similarities with bacterial restriction endonucleases suggest that the EhLINE1-encoded endonuclease was possibly acquired from bacteria through horizontal gene transfer. The loss of strict sequence specificity for nicking may have been subsequently selected to facilitate spread of the retrotransposon to intergenic regions of the E. histolytica genome.

  8. Transcriptome characterisation and simple sequence repeat marker discovery in the seagrass Posidonia oceanica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Esposito, D; Orrù, L; Dattolo, E; Bernardo, L; Lamontanara, A; Orsini, L; Serra, I A; Mazzuca, S; Procaccini, G

    2016-12-20

    Posidonia oceanica is an endemic seagrass in the Mediterranean Sea, where it provides important ecosystem services and sustains a rich and diverse ecosystem. P. oceanica meadows extend from the surface to 40 meters depth. With the aim of boosting research in this iconic species, we generated a comprehensive RNA-Seq data set for P. oceanica by sequencing specimens collected at two depths and two times during the day. With this approach we attempted to capture the transcriptional diversity associated with change in light and other depth-related environmental factors. Using this extensive data set we generated gene predictions and identified an extensive catalogue of potential Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) markers. The data generated here will open new avenues for the analysis of population genetic features and functional variation in P. oceanica. In total, 79,235 contigs were obtained by the assembly of 70,453,120 paired end reads. 43,711 contigs were successfully annotated. A total of 17,436 SSR were identified within 13,912 contigs.

  9. Next generation sequencing (NGS database for tandem repeats with multiple pattern 2°-shaft multicore string matching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chinta Someswara Rao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing (NGS technologies have been rapidly applied in biomedical and biological research in recent years. To provide the comprehensive NGS resource for the research, in this paper , we have considered 10 loci/codi/repeats TAGA, TCAT, GAAT, AGAT, AGAA, GATA, TATC, CTTT, TCTG and TCTA. Then we developed the NGS Tandem Repeat Database (TandemRepeatDB for all the chromosomes of Homo sapiens, Callithrix jacchus, Chlorocebus sabaeus, Gorilla gorilla, Macaca fascicularis, Macaca mulatta, Nomascus leucogenys, Pan troglodytes, Papio anubis and Pongo abelii genome data sets for all those locis. We find the successive occurence frequency for all the above 10 SSR (simple sequence repeats in the above genome data sets on a chromosome-by-chromosome basis with multiple pattern 2° shaft multicore string matching.

  10. Origin and evolution of the transcribed repeated sequences of the Y chromosome lampbrush loops of Drosophila hydei

    OpenAIRE

    Hareven, Dana; Zuckerman, Mathi; Lifschytz, Eliezer

    1986-01-01

    The molecular evolution and patterns of conservation of clones from four Y chromosome lampbrush loops of Drosophila hydei were investigated. Each loop contains a discrete family of transcribed repeats that are only slightly conserved even in the hydei subgroup species. Sequencing of clones from the four D. hydei loops indicates that all transcribed repeats evolved from A+T-rich elements of the genome. Evidence is presented that suggests a Y-specific family evolved as a result of the transposi...

  11. Long Terminal Repeat Circular DNA as Markers of Active Viral Replication of Human T Lymphotropic Virus-1 in Vivo

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    James M Fox

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Clonal expansion of human T-lymphotropic virus type-1 (HTLV-1 infected cells in vivo is well documented. Unlike human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1, HTLV-1 plasma RNA is sparse. The contribution of the “mitotic” spread of HTLV-1 compared with infectious spread of the virus to HTLV-1 viral burden in established infection is uncertain. Since extrachromosomal long terminal repeat (LTR DNA circles are indicators of viral replication in HIV-1 carriers with undetectable plasma HIV RNA, we hypothesised that HTLV-1 LTR circles could indicate reverse transcriptase (RT usage and infectious activity. 1LTR and 2LTR DNA circles were measured in HTLV-1 cell lines and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC of asymptomatic carriers (ACs and patients with HTLV-1-associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/TSP or adult T cell leukaemia/lymphoma (ATLL. 1LTR DNA circles were detected in 14/20 patients at a mean of 1.38/100 PBMC but did not differentiate disease status nor correlate with HTLV-1 DNA copies. 2LTR DNA circles were detected in 30/31 patients and at higher concentrations in patients with HTLV-1-associated diseases, independent of HTLV-1 DNA load. In an incident case the 2LTR DNA circle concentration increased 2.1 fold at the onset of HAM/TSP compared to baseline. Detectable and fluctuating levels of HTLV-1 DNA circles in patients indicate viral RT usage and virus replication. Our results indicate HTLV-1 viral replication capacity is maintained in chronic infection and may be associated with disease onset.

  12. Identification of evolutionarily conserved non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in human coding sequences.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ivanov, Ivaylo P

    2011-05-01

    In eukaryotes, it is generally assumed that translation initiation occurs at the AUG codon closest to the messenger RNA 5\\' cap. However, in certain cases, initiation can occur at codons differing from AUG by a single nucleotide, especially the codons CUG, UUG, GUG, ACG, AUA and AUU. While non-AUG initiation has been experimentally verified for a handful of human genes, the full extent to which this phenomenon is utilized--both for increased coding capacity and potentially also for novel regulatory mechanisms--remains unclear. To address this issue, and hence to improve the quality of existing coding sequence annotations, we developed a methodology based on phylogenetic analysis of predicted 5\\' untranslated regions from orthologous genes. We use evolutionary signatures of protein-coding sequences as an indicator of translation initiation upstream of annotated coding sequences. Our search identified novel conserved potential non-AUG-initiated N-terminal extensions in 42 human genes including VANGL2, FGFR1, KCNN4, TRPV6, HDGF, CITED2, EIF4G3 and NTF3, and also affirmed the conservation of known non-AUG-initiated extensions in 17 other genes. In several instances, we have been able to obtain independent experimental evidence of the expression of non-AUG-initiated products from the previously published literature and ribosome profiling data.

  13. Genome-Wide Characterization of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Loci in Chinese Jujube and Jujube SSR Primer Transferability

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Jing; Zhao, Jin; Liu, Mengjun; Liu, Ping; Dai, Li; Zhao, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba), an economically important species in the Rhamnaceae family, is a popular fruit tree in Asia. Here, we surveyed and characterized simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in the jujube genome. A total of 436,676 SSR loci were identified, with an average distance of 0.93 Kb between the loci. A large proportion of the SSRs included mononucleotide, dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeat motifs, which accounted for 64.87%, 24.40%, and 8.74% of all repeats, respectively. Amon...

  14. Fluorescent in situ hybridization of the telomere repeat sequence in hamster sperm nuclear structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lara, J; Wydner, K L; Hyland, K M; Ward, W S

    1993-11-01

    The flat, hooked-shaped architecture of the hamster sperm nucleus makes this an excellent model for in situ hybridization studies of the three dimensional structure of the genome. We have examined the structure of the telomere repeat sequence (TTAGGG)n with respect to the various nuclear structures present in hamster spermatozoa, using fluorescent in situ hybridization. In fully condensed, mature sperm nuclei, the telomere sequences appeared as discrete spots of various sizes interspersed throughout the volume of the nuclei. While the pattern of these signals was non-random, it varied significantly in different nuclei. These discrete telomere foci were seen to gradually lengthen into linear, beaded signals as sperm nuclei were decondensed, in vitro, and were not associated with the nuclear annulus. We also examined the relationship of telomeres to the sperm nuclear matrix, a residual nuclear structure that retains the original size and shape of the nucleus. In these structures the DNA extends beyond the perimeter of the nucleus to form a halo around it, representing the arrangement of the chromosomal DNA into loop domains attached at their bases to the nuclear matrix. Telomere signals in these structures were also linear and equal in length to those of the decondensed nuclei, and each signal represented part of a single DNA loop domain. The telomeres were attached at one end to the nuclear matrix and extended into the halo. Sperm nuclear matrices treated with Eco RI retained the telomere signals. These data support sperm DNA packaging models in which DNA is coiled into discrete foci, rather than spread out linearly along the length of the sperm nucleus.

  15. Prunus serotina Amygdalin Hydrolase and Prunasin Hydrolase : Purification, N-Terminal Sequencing, and Antibody Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, C P; Swain, E; Poulton, J E

    1992-09-01

    In black cherry (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) seed homogenates, amygdalin hydrolase (AH) participates with prunasin hydrolase (PH) and mandelonitrile lyase in the sequential degradation of (R)-amygdalin to HCN, benzaldehyde, and glucose. Four isozymes of AH (designated AH I, I', II, II') were purified from mature cherry seeds by concanavalin A-Sepharose 4B chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, and chromatofocusing. All isozymes were monomeric glycoproteins with native molecular masses of 52 kD. They showed similar kinetic properties (pH optima, K(m), V(max)) but differed in their isoelectric points and N-terminal amino acid sequences. Analytical isoelectric focusing revealed the presence of subisozymes of each isozyme. The relative abundance of these isozymes and/or subisozymes varied from seed to seed. Three isozymes of PH (designated PH I, IIa, and IIb) were purified to apparent homogeneity by affinity, ion-exchange, and hydroxyapatite chromatography and by nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. PH I and PH IIb are 68-kD monomeric glycoproteins, whereas PH IIa is dimeric (140 kD). The N-terminal sequences of all PH and AH isozymes showed considerable similarity. Polyclonal antisera raised in rabbits against deglycosylated AH I or a mixture of the three deglycosylated PH isozymes were not monospecific as judged by immunoblotting analysis, but also cross-reacted with the opposing glucosidase. Monospecific antisera deemed suitable for immunocytochemistry and screening of expression libraries were obtained by affinity chromatography. Each antiserum recognized all known isozymes of the specific glucosidase used as antigen.

  16. Simple sequence repeat markers in genetic divergence and marker-assisted selection of rice cultivars: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Shubhneet; Panesar, Parmjit S; Bera, Manab B; Kaur, Varinder

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing of rice genome has facilitated the understanding of rice evolution and has been utilized extensively for mining of DNA markers to facilitate marker-assisted breeding. Simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers that are tandemly repeated nucleotide sequence motifs flanked by unique sequences are presently the maker of choice in rice improvement due to their abundance, co-dominant inheritance, high levels of allelic diversity, and simple reproducible assay. The current level of genome coverage by SSR markers in rice is sufficient to employ them for genotype identification and marker-assisted selection in breeding for mapping of genes and quantitative trait loci analysis. This review provides comprehensive information on the mapping and applications of SSR markers in investigation of rice cultivars to study their genetic divergence and marker-assisted selection of important agronomic traits.

  17. Activation of prothrombin III. The partial amino acid sequences at the amino terminal of prothrombin and the intermediates of activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heldebrant, C.M. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN); Noyes, C.; Kingdon, H.S.; Mann, K.G.

    1973-01-01

    The partial amino acid sequences at the amino terminal of prothrombin and the intermediates of activation have been determined. These data indicate that the products of the first step of activation, whether derived from the action of factor Xa or thrombin, are identical. The data also show that the activation of prothrombin proceeds by the sequential cleavage of the amino terminal region of prothrombin and the intermediates, and confirm the mechanism of prothrombin activation.

  18. A short C-terminal sequence is necessary and sufficient for the targeting of chitinases to the plant vacuole.

    OpenAIRE

    Neuhaus, J.M. (John M.); Sticher, L.; Meins, F; Boller, T.

    1991-01-01

    Tobacco contains different isoforms of chitinase (EC 3.2.1.14), a hydrolase thought to be involved in the defense against pathogens. Deduced amino acid sequences for putatively vacuolar, basic chitinases differ from the homologous extracellular, acidic isoforms by the presence of a C-terminal extension. To examine the role of this C-terminal extension in protein sorting, Nicotiana silvestris plants were stably transformed with chimeric genes coding for tobacco basic chitinase A with and witho...

  19. Diversity Analysis of Polyporus umbellatus in China Using Inter-simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Meng-Meng; Xing, Yong-Mei; Guo, Shun-Xing

    2015-01-01

    Polyporus (P.) umbellatus, an endangered medicinal fungus in China, is distributed throughout most areas of the country. Thirty-seven natural P. umbellatus samples collected from 12 provinces in China were subjected to the inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) assay to investigate the genetic diversity within and among the 11 natural populations. Nine ISSR primers selected from 100 primers produced 88 discernible DNA bands, with 46 being polymorphic. The frequency of polymorphism varied from 19.57 to 93.48% with an average of 61.26% across all populations. At the population level, the within-population variance was much greater (92.04%) than the between-population variance (7.96%) as revealed by analysis of molecular variance. Eleven P. umbellatus populations were grouped into two major clusters, and the clustering pattern displayed four groups using the unweighted pair-group method with an arithmetic mean dendrogram. Principal coordinate analysis further indicated that the genetic diversity of P. umbellatus strains was unevenly distributed and displayed a clustered distribution pattern instead. Within these clusters, subgrouping (Henan and Hubei) and cluster II (Jilin and Heilongjiang) related to the geographic distribution were evident. The present study provides the first global overview of P. umbellatus diversity analysis in China, which may open up new opportunities in comparative genetic research on this medicinal fungus in other countries.

  20. Simple sequence repeats and compositional bias in the bipartite Ralstonia solanacearum GMI1000 genome

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    Vandamme Peter

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ralstonia solanacearum is an important plant pathogen. The genome of R. solananearum GMI1000 is organised into two replicons (a 3.7-Mb chromosome and a 2.1-Mb megaplasmid and this bipartite genome structure is characteristic for most R. solanacearum strains. To determine whether the megaplasmid was acquired via recent horizontal gene transfer or is part of an ancestral single chromosome, we compared the abundance, distribution and compositon of simple sequence repeats (SSRs between both replicons and also compared the respective compositional biases. Results Our data show that both replicons are very similar in respect to distribution and composition of SSRs and presence of compositional biases. Minor variations in SSR and compositional biases observed may be attributable to minor differences in gene expression and regulation of gene expression or can be attributed to the small sample numbers observed. Conclusions The observed similarities indicate that both replicons have shared a similar evolutionary history and thus suggest that the megaplasmid was not recently acquired from other organisms by lateral gene transfer but is a part of an ancestral R. solanacearum chromosome.

  1. The Cipher Code of Simple Sequence Repeats in “Vampire Pathogens”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Geng; Bello-Orti, Bernardo; Aragon, Virginia; Tucker, Alexander W.; Luo, Rui; Ren, Pinxing; Bi, Dingren; Zhou, Rui; Jin, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Blood inside mammals is a forbidden area for the majority of prokaryotic microbes; however, red blood cells tropism microbes, like “vampire pathogens” (VP), succeed in matching scarce nutrients and surviving strong immunity reactions. Here, we found VP of Mycoplasma, Rhizobiales, and Rickettsiales showed significantly higher counts of (AG)n dimeric simple sequence repeats (Di-SSRs) in the genomes, coding and non-coding regions than non Vampire Pathogens (N_VP). Regression analysis indicated a significant correlation between GC content and the span of (AG)n-Di-SSR variation. Gene Ontology (GO) terms with abundance of (AG)3-Di-SSRs shared by the VP strains were associated with purine nucleotide metabolism (FDR < 0.01), indicating an adaptation to the limited availability of purine and nucleotide precursors in blood. Di-amino acids coded by (AG)n-Di-SSRs included all three six-fold code amino acids (Arg, Leu and Ser) and significantly higher counts of Di-amino acids coded by (AG)3, (GA)3, and (TC)3 in VP than N_VP. Furthermore, significant differences (P < 0.001) on the numbers of triplexes formed from (AG)n-Di-SSRs between VP and N_VP in Mycoplasma suggested the potential role of (AG)n-Di-SSRs in gene regulation. PMID:26215592

  2. Single sequence repeat markers associated with partial resistance in sunflower to Phoma macdonaldii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robab DAVAR

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Phoma black stem of sunflower, caused by Phoma macdonaldii, occurs in many countries. The objective of the present study was to estimate the number of markers and genomic regions in sunflower associating with Phoma black stem resistance. Genetic variability among 32 sunflower genotypes, including recombinant inbred lines and their parents, M7 mutant lines developed by gamma irradiation, and some genotypes from different countries of origin, was evaluated using simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. Eighty-eight markers were generated at 38 SSR loci, with a mean number of alleles per locus of 2.32. Using susceptibility data of 32 sunflower genotypes against seven P. macdonaldii isolates (Darvishzadeh et al., 2007, one to four markers were associated with each of seven different P. macdonaldii isolates. To reduce the probability of false positives, a sequential Bonferroni-experiment-wise P-value was used for each marker trait association tested. The identified markers showed a promising trend, although they did not pass the more stringent bar of statistical significance, and should be studied further.

  3. Genetic characterization of autochthonous grapevine cultivars from Eastern Turkey by simple sequence repeats (SSRs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadiye Peral Eyduran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available In this research, two well-recognized standard grape cultivars, Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot, together with eight historical autochthonous grapevine cultivars from Eastern Anatolia in Turkey, were genetically characterized by using 12 pairs of simple sequence repeat (SSR primers in order to evaluate their genetic diversity and relatedness. All of the used SSR primers produced successful amplifications and revealed DNA polymorphisms, which were subsequently utilized to evaluate the genetic relatedness of the grapevine cultivars. Allele richness was implied by the identification of 69 alleles in 8 autochthonous cultivars with a mean value of 5.75 alleles per locus. The average expected heterozygosity and observed heterozygosity were found to be 0.749 and 0.739, respectively. Taking into account the generated alleles, the highest number was recorded in VVC2C3 and VVS2 loci (nine and eight alleles per locus, respectively, whereas the lowest number was recorded in VrZAG83 (three alleles per locus. Two main clusters were produced by using the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic mean dendrogram constructed on the basis of the SSR data. Only Cabernet Sauvignon and Merlot cultivars were included in the first cluster. The second cluster involved the rest of the autochthonous cultivars. The results obtained during the study illustrated clearly that SSR markers have verified to be an effective tool for fingerprinting grapevine cultivars and carrying out grapevine biodiversity studies. The obtained data are also meaningful references for grapevine domestication.

  4. Simple Sequence Repeat Analysis of Selected NSIC-registered Coffee Varieties in the Philippines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy May C. Santos

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Coffee (Coffea sp. is an important commercial crop worldwide. Three species of coffee are used as beverage, namely Coffea arabica, C. canephora, and C. liberica. Coffea arabica L. is the most cultivated among the three coffee species due to its taste quality, rich aroma, and low caffeine content. Despite its inferior taste and aroma, C. canephora Pierre ex A. Froehner, which has the highest caffeine content, is the second most widely cultivated because of its resistance to coffee diseases. On the other hand, C. liberica W.Bull ex Hierncomes is characterized by its very strong taste and flavor. The Philippines used to be a leading exporter of coffee until coffee rust destroyed the farms in Batangas, home of the famous Kapeng Barako. The country has been attempting to revive the coffee industry by focusing on the production of specialty coffee with registered varieties on the National Seed Industry Council (NSIC. Correct identification and isolation of pure coffee beans are the main factors that determine coffee’s market value. Local farms usually misidentify and mix coffee beans of different varieties, leading to the depreciation of their value. This study used simple sequence repeat (SSR markers to evaluate and distinguish Philippine NSIC-registered coffee species and varieties. The neighbor-joining tree generated using PAUP showed high bootstrap support, separating C. arabica, C. canephora, and C. liberica from each other. Among the twenty primer pairs used, seven were able to distinguish C. arabica, nine for C. liberica, and one for C. canephora.

  5. Genetic diversity analysis of okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) by inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, C Y; Zhang, C; Wang, P; Hu, S; Chang, H P; Xiao, W J; Lu, X T; Jiang, S B; Ye, J Z; Guo, X H

    2014-04-25

    Okra (Abelmoschus esculentus L.) is not only a nutrient-rich vegetable but also an important medicinal herb. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers were employed to investigate the genetic diversity and differentiation of 24 okra genotypes. In this study, the PCR products were separated by electrophoresis on 8% nondenaturing polyacrylamide gel and visualized by silver staining. The 22 ISSR primers produced 289 amplified DNA fragments, and 145 (50%) fragments were polymorphic. The 289 markers were used to construct the dendrogram based on the unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA) cluster analysis. The dendrogram indicated that 24 okras were clustered into 4 geographically distinct groups. The average polymorphism information content (PIC) was 0.531929, which showed that the majority of primers were informative. The high values of allele frequency, genetic diversity, and heterozygosity showed that primer-sample combinations produced measurable fragments. The mean distances ranged from 0.045455 to 0.454545. The dendrogram indicated that the ISSR markers succeeded in distinguishing most of the 24 varieties in relation to their genetic backgrounds and geographical origins.

  6. Estimation of genetic structure of a Mycosphaerella musicola population using inter-simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peixouto, Y S; Dórea Bragança, C A; Andrade, W B; Ferreira, C F; Haddad, F; Oliveira, S A S; Darosci Brito, F S; Miller, R N G; Amorim, E P

    2015-07-17

    Among the diseases affecting banana (Musa sp), yellow Sigatoka, caused by the fungal pathogen Mycosphaerella musicola Leach, is considered one of the most important in Brazil, causing losses throughout the year. Understanding the genetic structure of pathogen populations will provide insight into the life history of pathogens, including the evolutionary processes occurring in agrosystems. Tools for estimating the possible emergence of pathogen variants with altered pathogenicity, virulence, or aggressiveness, as well as resistance to systemic fungicides, can also be developed from such data. The objective of this study was to analyze the genetic diversity and population genetics of M. musicola in the main banana-producing regions in Brazil. A total of 83 isolates collected from different banana cultivars in the Brazilian states of Bahia, Rio Grande do Norte, and Minas Gerais were evaluated using inter-simple sequence repeat markers. High variability was detected between the isolates, and 85.5% of the haplotypes were singletons in the populations. The highest source of genetic diversity (97.22%) was attributed to variations within populations. Bayesian cluster analysis revealed the presence of 2 probable ancestral groups, however, showed no relationship to population structure in terms of collection site, state of origin, or cultivar. Similarly, we detected noevidence of genetic recombination between individuals within different states, indicating that asexual cycles play a major role in M. musicola reproduction and that long-distance dispersal of the pathogen is the main factor contributing to the lack of population structure in the fungus.

  7. Haplotyping of Rice Genotypes Using Simple Sequence Repeat Markers Associated with Salt Tolerance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.D. Chowdhury

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Salt stress is a major problem in most of the rice growing areas in the world. A major QTL Saltol associated with salt tolerance at the seedling stage has been mapped on chromosome 1 in rice. This study aimed to characterize the haplotype diversity at Saltol and additional QTLs associated with salt tolerance. Salt tolerance at the seedling stage was assessed in 54 rice genotypes in the scale of 1 to 9 score at EC = 10 dSm-1 under controlled environmental conditions. Seven new breeding lines including three KMR3/O. rufipogon introgression lines showed similar salt tolerant ability as FL478 and can be good sources of new genes/alleles for salt tolerance. Simple sequence repeat (SSR marker RM289 showed only two alleles and RM8094 showed seven alleles. Polymorphic information content value varied from 0.55 for RM289 to 0.99 for RM8094 and RM493. Based on 14 SSR markers, the 54 lines were clearly separated into two major clusters. Fourteen haplotypes were identified based on Saltol linked markers with FL478 as the reference. Alleles of RM8094 and RM3412 can discriminate between the salt tolerant and susceptible genotypes clearly and hence can be useful in marker-assisted selection at the seedling stage. Other markers RM10720 on chromosome 1 and RM149 and RM264 on chromosome 8 can also distinguish tolerant and susceptible lines but with lesser stringency.

  8. Molecular identification of Aquilaria spp. by using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azhari, Hanif; Mohamad, Azhar; Othman, Roohaida

    2015-09-01

    Aquilaria species are very important economic plant for production of resin locally known as gaharu in Malaysia. There are five species that can be found in Malaysia and the most important Aquilaria species for gaharu production is A. malaccensis. Molecular markers for Aquilaria species are still insufficient and require more efficient, robust and reproducible molecular marker. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers are highly polymorphic and have high reproducibility which will be useful in areas of genetic diversity, phylogenetic studies, gene tagging, genome mapping and evolutionary biology in a wide range of crop species. Five selected ISSR primers were used to identify four Aquilaria species commonly found in Malaysia namely A. malaccensis, A. sub-integra, A. crassna and A. hirta. All the primers showed sufficient polymorphism to distinguish between the four species. Hence, the markers derived from ISSR can be used for molecular identification of Aquilaria spp. in ensuring homogenous species for plantation which may improve the quality of resin derived from known and certified materials.

  9. Terminal Bacteroid Differentiation Is Associated With Variable Morphological Changes in Legume Species Belonging to the Inverted Repeat-Lacking Clade

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Montiel, Jesús; Szűcs, Attila; Boboescu, Iulian Z; Gherman, Vasile D; Kondorosi, Éva; Kereszt, Attila

    2016-01-01

    .... As bacteroids in other IRLC legumes, such as Cicer arietinum and Glycyrrhiza lepidota, were reported not to display features of terminal differentiation, we investigated the fate of bacteroids...

  10. Bipartite Topology of Treponema pallidum Repeat Proteins C/D and I: OUTER MEMBRANE INSERTION, TRIMERIZATION, AND PORIN FUNCTION REQUIRE A C-TERMINAL β-BARREL DOMAIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anand, Arvind; LeDoyt, Morgan; Karanian, Carson; Luthra, Amit; Koszelak-Rosenblum, Mary; Malkowski, Michael G; Puthenveetil, Robbins; Vinogradova, Olga; Radolf, Justin D

    2015-05-08

    We previously identified Treponema pallidum repeat proteins TprC/D, TprF, and TprI as candidate outer membrane proteins (OMPs) and subsequently demonstrated that TprC is not only a rare OMP but also forms trimers and has porin activity. We also reported that TprC contains N- and C-terminal domains (TprC(N) and TprC(C)) orthologous to regions in the major outer sheath protein (MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)) of Treponema denticola and that TprC(C) is solely responsible for β-barrel formation, trimerization, and porin function by the full-length protein. Herein, we show that TprI also possesses bipartite architecture, trimeric structure, and porin function and that the MOSP(C)-like domains of native TprC and TprI are surface-exposed in T. pallidum, whereas their MOSP(N)-like domains are tethered within the periplasm. TprF, which does not contain a MOSP(C)-like domain, lacks amphiphilicity and porin activity, adopts an extended inflexible structure, and, in T. pallidum, is tightly bound to the protoplasmic cylinder. By thermal denaturation, the MOSP(N) and MOSP(C)-like domains of TprC and TprI are highly thermostable, endowing the full-length proteins with impressive conformational stability. When expressed in Escherichia coli with PelB signal sequences, TprC and TprI localize to the outer membrane, adopting bipartite topologies, whereas TprF is periplasmic. We propose that the MOSP(N)-like domains enhance the structural integrity of the cell envelope by anchoring the β-barrels within the periplasm. In addition to being bona fide T. pallidum rare outer membrane proteins, TprC/D and TprI represent a new class of dual function, bipartite bacterial OMP. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  11. Genome-Wide Characterization of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Loci in Chinese Jujube and Jujube SSR Primer Transferability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing; Zhao, Jin; Liu, Mengjun; Liu, Ping; Dai, Li; Zhao, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba), an economically important species in the Rhamnaceae family, is a popular fruit tree in Asia. Here, we surveyed and characterized simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in the jujube genome. A total of 436,676 SSR loci were identified, with an average distance of 0.93 Kb between the loci. A large proportion of the SSRs included mononucleotide, dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeat motifs, which accounted for 64.87%, 24.40%, and 8.74% of all repeats, respectively. Among the mononucleotide repeats, A/T was the most common, whereas AT/TA was the most common dinucleotide repeat. A total of 30,565 primer pairs were successfully designed and screened using a series of criteria. Moreover, 725 of 1,000 randomly selected primer pairs were effective among 6 cultivars, and 511 of these primer pairs were polymorphic. Sequencing the amplicons of two SSRs across three jujube cultivars revealed variations in the repeats. The transferability of jujube SSR primers proved that 35/64 SSRs could be transferred across family boundary. Using jujube SSR primers, clustering analysis results from 15 species were highly consistent with the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (APGIII) System. The genome-wide characterization of SSRs in Chinese jujube is very valuable for whole-genome characterization and marker-assisted selection in jujube breeding. In addition, the transferability of jujube SSR primers could provide a solid foundation for their further utilization.

  12. Genome-Wide Characterization of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR Loci in Chinese Jujube and Jujube SSR Primer Transferability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Xiao

    Full Text Available Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba, an economically important species in the Rhamnaceae family, is a popular fruit tree in Asia. Here, we surveyed and characterized simple sequence repeats (SSRs in the jujube genome. A total of 436,676 SSR loci were identified, with an average distance of 0.93 Kb between the loci. A large proportion of the SSRs included mononucleotide, dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeat motifs, which accounted for 64.87%, 24.40%, and 8.74% of all repeats, respectively. Among the mononucleotide repeats, A/T was the most common, whereas AT/TA was the most common dinucleotide repeat. A total of 30,565 primer pairs were successfully designed and screened using a series of criteria. Moreover, 725 of 1,000 randomly selected primer pairs were effective among 6 cultivars, and 511 of these primer pairs were polymorphic. Sequencing the amplicons of two SSRs across three jujube cultivars revealed variations in the repeats. The transferability of jujube SSR primers proved that 35/64 SSRs could be transferred across family boundary. Using jujube SSR primers, clustering analysis results from 15 species were highly consistent with the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (APGIII System. The genome-wide characterization of SSRs in Chinese jujube is very valuable for whole-genome characterization and marker-assisted selection in jujube breeding. In addition, the transferability of jujube SSR primers could provide a solid foundation for their further utilization.

  13. Genome-Wide Characterization of Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR) Loci in Chinese Jujube and Jujube SSR Primer Transferability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jing; Zhao, Jin; Liu, Mengjun; Liu, Ping; Dai, Li; Zhao, Zhihui

    2015-01-01

    Chinese jujube (Ziziphus jujuba), an economically important species in the Rhamnaceae family, is a popular fruit tree in Asia. Here, we surveyed and characterized simple sequence repeats (SSRs) in the jujube genome. A total of 436,676 SSR loci were identified, with an average distance of 0.93 Kb between the loci. A large proportion of the SSRs included mononucleotide, dinucleotide and trinucleotide repeat motifs, which accounted for 64.87%, 24.40%, and 8.74% of all repeats, respectively. Among the mononucleotide repeats, A/T was the most common, whereas AT/TA was the most common dinucleotide repeat. A total of 30,565 primer pairs were successfully designed and screened using a series of criteria. Moreover, 725 of 1,000 randomly selected primer pairs were effective among 6 cultivars, and 511 of these primer pairs were polymorphic. Sequencing the amplicons of two SSRs across three jujube cultivars revealed variations in the repeats. The transferability of jujube SSR primers proved that 35/64 SSRs could be transferred across family boundary. Using jujube SSR primers, clustering analysis results from 15 species were highly consistent with the Angiosperm Phylogeny Group (APGIII) System. The genome-wide characterization of SSRs in Chinese jujube is very valuable for whole-genome characterization and marker-assisted selection in jujube breeding. In addition, the transferability of jujube SSR primers could provide a solid foundation for their further utilization. PMID:26000739

  14. Triplet repeat sequences in human DNA can be detected by hybridization to a synthetic (5'-CGG-3')17 oligodeoxyribonucleotide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Behn-Krappa, A; Mollenhauer, J; Doerfler, W

    1993-01-01

    The seemingly autonomous amplification of naturally occurring triplet repeat sequences in the human genome has been implicated in the causation of human genetic disease, such as the fragile X (Martin-Bell) syndrome, myotonic dystrophy (Curshmann-Steinert), spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy...

  15. Cultivar identification, pedigree verification, and diversity analysis among Peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) Cultivars based on Simple Sequence Repeat markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    The genetic relationships and pedigree inferences among peach (Prunus persica (L.) Batsch) accessions and breeding lines used in genetic improvement were evaluated using 15 simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. A total of 80 alleles were detected among the 37 peach accessions with an average of 5.53...

  16. Distribution and evolution of repeated sequences in genomes of Triatominae (Hemiptera-Reduviidae inferred from genomic in situ hybridization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Pita

    Full Text Available The subfamily Triatominae, vectors of Chagas disease, comprises 140 species characterized by a highly homogeneous chromosome number. We analyzed the chromosomal distribution and evolution of repeated sequences in Triatominae genomes by Genomic in situ Hybridization using Triatoma delpontei and Triatoma infestans genomic DNAs as probes. Hybridizations were performed on their own chromosomes and on nine species included in six genera from the two main tribes: Triatomini and Rhodniini. Genomic probes clearly generate two different hybridization patterns, dispersed or accumulated in specific regions or chromosomes. The three used probes generate the same hybridization pattern in each species. However, these patterns are species-specific. In closely related species, the probes strongly hybridized in the autosomal heterochromatic regions, resembling C-banding and DAPI patterns. However, in more distant species these co-localizations are not observed. The heterochromatic Y chromosome is constituted by highly repeated sequences, which is conserved among 10 species of Triatomini tribe suggesting be an ancestral character for this group. However, the Y chromosome in Rhodniini tribe is markedly different, supporting the early evolutionary dichotomy between both tribes. In some species, sex chromosomes and autosomes shared repeated sequences, suggesting meiotic chromatin exchanges among these heterologous chromosomes. Our GISH analyses enabled us to acquire not only reliable information about autosomal repeated sequences distribution but also an insight into sex chromosome evolution in Triatominae. Furthermore, the differentiation obtained by GISH might be a valuable marker to establish phylogenetic relationships and to test the controversial origin of the Triatominae subfamily.

  17. The terminal immunoglobulin-like repeats of LigA and LigB of Leptospira enhance their binding to gelatin binding domain of fibronectin and host cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Pin Lin

    Full Text Available Leptospira spp. are pathogenic spirochetes that cause the zoonotic disease leptospirosis. Leptospiral immunoglobulin (Ig-like protein B (LigB contributes to the binding of Leptospira to extracellular matrix proteins such as fibronectin, fibrinogen, laminin, elastin, tropoelastin and collagen. A high-affinity Fn-binding region of LigB has been localized to LigBCen2, which contains the partial 11th and full 12th Ig-like repeats (LigBCen2R and 47 amino acids of the non-repeat region (LigBCen2NR of LigB. In this study, the gelatin binding domain of fibronectin was shown to interact with LigBCen2R (K(D = 1.91+/-0.40 microM. Not only LigBCen2R but also other Ig-like domains of Lig proteins including LigAVar7'-8, LigAVar10, LigAVar11, LigAVar12, LigAVar13, LigBCen7'-8, and LigBCen9 bind to GBD. Interestingly, a large gain in affinity was achieved through an avidity effect, with the terminal domains, 13th (LigA or 12th (LigB Ig-like repeat of Lig protein (LigAVar7'-13 and LigBCen7'-12 enhancing binding affinity approximately 51 and 28 fold, respectively, compared to recombinant proteins without this terminal repeat. In addition, the inhibited effect on MDCKs cells can also be promoted by Lig proteins with terminal domains, but these two domains are not required for gelatin binding domain binding and cell adhesion. Interestingly, Lig proteins with the terminal domains could form compact structures with a round shape mediated by multidomain interaction. This is the first report about the interaction of gelatin binding domain of Fn and Lig proteins and provides an example of Lig-gelatin binding domain binding mediating bacterial-host interaction.

  18. Rabbit and human antibodies to a repeated amino acid sequence of a Plasmodium falciparum antigen, Pf 155, react with the native protein and inhibit merozoite invasion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berzins, K; Perlmann, H; Wåhlin, B; Carlsson, J; Wahlgren, M; Udomsangpetch, R; Björkman, A; Patarroyo, M E; Perlmann, P

    1986-02-01

    The Plasmodium falciparum-derived antigen of Mr 155,000 designated Pf 155, deposited in the membrane of infected erythrocytes, contains at least two blocks of tandemly repeated amino acid sequences. The peptide Glu-Glu-Asn-Val-Glu-His-Asp-Ala, which corresponds to a subunit of a C-terminally located repeat, was synthesized. Rabbits immunized with the octapeptide conjugated with either keyhole limpet hemocyanine or tetanus toxoid formed antibodies against the octapeptide. These antibodies reacted with Pf 155 as detected by immunoblotting or a modified immunofluorescence assay. Sera from humans exposed to P. falciparum also contained antibodies binding to the octapeptide in a dot-blot immunoassay. Their anti-octapeptide titers were correlated with their immunofluorescence titers in the assay detecting Pf 155 and other parasite antigens in the membrane of infected erythrocytes. Human octapeptide-reactive antibodies were isolated on an affinity column with the octapeptide conjugated to bovine serum albumin as ligand. These human antibodies reacted with Pf 155 in immunoblotting and strongly stained the surface of infected erythrocytes in the modified immunofluorescence assay. Approximately 20% of this immunofluorescence activity in a high-titered human serum could be recovered from the octapeptide column, indicating that a significant fraction of these anti-parasite antibodies react with epitopes associated with the octapeptide. Furthermore, the human octapeptide-reactive antibodies very efficiently inhibited merozoite reinvasion into erythrocytes in vitro. Similarly purified rabbit antibodies also significantly inhibited reinvasion. Our results suggest that the C-terminal segment of repeated peptides in Pf 155 is a major antigenic region of the molecule and may contain target sites for protective immunity in P. falciparum malaria.

  19. Peptide maps and N-terminal sequences of polypeptides from early region 1A of human adenovirus 5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, J F; Evelegh, C M; Branton, P E; Bayley, S T

    1984-01-01

    Experiments exploring the reasons for a multiplicity of products from early region 1A of adenovirus 5 are described. Labeled early region 1A products from wild-type virus were synthesized in infected cells and in a cell-free system programmed with mRNA from infected cells, immunoprecipitated specifically with an antipeptide serum, E1A-C1, directed against the C-terminal sequence of E1A products, and separated by gel electrophoresis. Two-dimensional maps of [35S]methionine-labeled peptides were consistent with antigens of 52,000 daltons (52K) and 48.5K being from the 13S mRNA and antigens of 50K, 45K, and 35K from the 12S mRNA. Partial N-terminal sequences of 52K, 50K, 48.5K, and 45K synthesized in vitro showed that each of these antigens was initiated at the predicted ATG at nucleotide 560 in the DNA sequence. These results eliminate multiple initiation sites and proteolytic cleavage at the N-terminal end as sources of antigen diversity. Peptide maps and N-terminal sequences were obtained in a similar way for E1A products from the Ad5 deletion mutant dl1504, which lacks the normal initiator codon. As predicted, these polypeptides are initiated at the next ATG, 15 codons downstream in the wild-type sequence. These results are discussed in relation to Kozak's ribosomal scanning model. Images PMID:6699947

  20. Discovery of Highly Divergent Repeat Landscapes in Snake Genomes Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    OpenAIRE

    Todd A. Castoe*; Hall, Kathryn T; Guibotsy Mboulas, Marcel L.; Gu, Wanjun; de Koning, A. P. Jason; Samuel E Fox; Poole, Alexander W.; Vemulapalli, Vijetha; Daza, Juan M.; Mockler, Todd; Eric N. Smith; Feschotte, Cédric; Pollock, David D.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive assessment of genomic repeat content in two snake genomes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus). These two genomes are both relatively small (∼1.4 Gb) but have surprisingly extensive differences in the abundance and expansion histories of their repeat elements. In the python, the readily identifiable repeat element content is low (21%), similar to bird genomes, whereas that of the copperhead is higher ...

  1. Genetic Diversity and Structure of Lolium Species Surveyed on Nuclear Simple Sequence Repeat and Cytoplasmic Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongwei Cai

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available To assess the genetic diversity and population structure of Lolium species, we used 32 nuclear simple sequence repeat (SSR markers and 7 cytoplasmic gene markers to analyze a total of 357 individuals from 162 accessions of 9 Lolium species. This survey revealed a high level of polymorphism, with an average number of alleles per locus of 23.59 and 5.29 and an average PIC-value of 0.83 and 0.54 for nuclear SSR markers and cytoplasmic gene markers, respectively. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA revealed that 16.27 and 16.53% of the total variation was due to differences among species, with the remaining 56.35 and 83.47% due to differences within species and 27.39 and 0% due to differences within individuals in 32 nuclear SSR markers set and 6 chloroplast gene markers set, respectively. The 32 nuclear SSR markers detected three subpopulations among 357 individuals, whereas the 6 chloroplast gene markers revealed three subpopulations among 160 accessions in the STRUCTURE analysis. In the clustering analysis, the three inbred species clustered into a single group, whereas the outbreeding species were clearly divided, especially according to nuclear SSR markers. In addition, almost all Lolium multiflorum populations were clustered into group C4, which could be further divided into three subgroups, whereas Lolium perenne populations primarily clustered into two groups (C2 and C3, with a few lines that instead grouped with L. multiflorum (C4 or Lolium rigidum (C6. Together, these results will useful for the use of Lolium germplasm for improvement and increase the effectiveness of ryegrass breeding.

  2. Genetic diversity analysis of Bt cotton genotypes in Pakistan using simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, I; Iram, A; Iqbal, M Z; Nawaz, M; Hasni, S M; Jamil, S

    2012-03-14

    The popularity of genetically modified insect resistant (Bt) cotton has promoted large scale monocultures, which is thought to worsen the problem of crop genetic homogeneity. Information on genetic diversity among Bt cotton varieties is lacking. We evaluated genetic divergence among 19 Bt cotton genotypes using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. Thirty-seven of 104 surveyed primers were found informative. Fifty-two primers selected on the basis of reported intra-hirsutum polymorphism in a cotton marker database showed a high degree of polymorphism, 56% compared to 13% for randomly selected primers. A total of 177 loci were amplified, with an average of 1.57 loci per primer, generating 38 markers. The amplicons ranged in size from 98 to 256 bp. The genetic similarities among the 19 genotypes ranged from 0.902 to 0.982, with an average of 0.947, revealing a lack of diversity. Similarities among genotypes from public sector organizations were higher than genotypes developed by private companies. Hybrids were found to be more distant compared to commercial cultivars and advanced breeding lines. Cluster analysis grouped the 19 Bt cotton genotypes into three major clusters and two independent entries. Cultivars IR-3701, Ali Akbar-802 and advanced breeding line VH-259 grouped in subcluster B2, with very narrow genetic distances despite dissimilar parentage. We found a very high level of similarity among Pakistani-bred Bt cotton varieties, which means that genetically diverse recurrent parents should be included to enhance genetic diversity. The intra-hirsutum polymorphic SSRs were found to be highly informative for molecular genetic diversity studies in these cotton varieties.

  3. Intercistronic as well as terminal sequences are required for efficient amplification of brome mosaic virus RNA3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, R; Ahlquist, P

    1987-05-01

    The genome of brome mosaic virus (BMV) is divided among messenger polarity RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 (3.2, 2.9, and 2.1 kilobases, respectively). cis-Acting sequences required for BMV RNA amplification were investigated with RNA3. By using expressible cDNA clones, deletions were constructed throughout RNA3 and tested in barley protoplasts coinoculated with RNA1 and RNA2. In contrast to requirements for 5'- and 3'-terminal noncoding sequences, either of the two RNA3 coding regions can be deleted individually and both can be simultaneously inactivated by N-terminal frameshift mutations without significantly interfering with amplification of RNA3 or production of its subgenomic mRNA. However, simultaneous major deletions in both coding regions greatly attenuate RNA3 accumulation. RNA3 levels can be largely restored by insertion of a heterologous, nonviral sequence in such mutants, suggesting that RNA3 requires physical separation of its terminal domains or a minimum overall size for normal replication or stability. Unexpectedly, deletions in a 150-base segment of the intercistronic noncoding region drastically reduce RNA3 accumulation. This segment contains a sequence element homologous to sequences found near the 5' ends of BMV RNA1 and RNA2 and in analogous positions in the three genomic RNAs of the related cucumber mosaic virus, suggesting a possible role in plus-strand synthesis.

  4. De novo transcriptome assembly of Zanthoxylum bungeanum using Illumina sequencing for evolutionary analysis and simple sequence repeat marker development

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, Shijing; Zhao, Lili; Liu, Zhenshan; Liu, Yulin; Yang, Tuxi; Wei, Anzhi

    2017-01-01

    Zanthoxylum, an ancient economic crop in Asia, has a satisfying aromatic taste and immense medicinal values. A lack of genomic information and genetic markers has limited the evolutionary analysis and genetic improvement of Zanthoxylum species and their close relatives. To better understand the evolution, domestication, and divergence of Zanthoxylum, we present a de novo transcriptome analysis of an elite cultivar of Z. bungeanum using Illumina sequencing; we then developed simple sequence re...

  5. AB103. A sequence variation of short tandem repeat observed in paternity cases using massively parallel sequencing technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukawutthiya, Poonyapat; Sathirapatyaa, Tikumphorn; Vongpaisarnsina, Kornkiat

    2017-01-01

    Background STR has been regularly used as genetic marker in paternity testing. The current standard procedure of STR allele detection based on DNA fragment analysis using CE. However, the MPS offers the high-throughput sequencing with lower cost per nucleotide. This technology has increase an opportunity for STR allele detection in national database and paternity testing as well. The high degree polymorphism of STR makes them informative that is an influence of their high mutation rate. Moreover, the usefulness even in homozygous alleles is determined by sequence variation in particular STR marker. In this study, we compare a STR allele designation from CE and a STR sequencing from MPS. The sequence variation has observed in particular STR. Methods The DNA of eighteen families were analyzed on a CE using two commercial test kits, while a MPS analysis was performed using MiSeq FG×TM forensic genomics system (Illumina). Results The results from MPS platforms showed totally concordant with CE data and also demonstrated the advantage of sequencing-based method in homozygous alleles. The sequencing variation of STR was detected and identified an inherited pattern even on homozygous alleles. For example, locus D3S1358 of child DNA was typed homozygous allele 16,16 on CE while distinguishable sequence suggested (TCTA)1(TCTG)3(TCTA)12 from father and (TCTA)1(TCTG)2(TCTA)13 from mother, respectively. The variety of STR allele sequences that indicated the allele inherited was detected in 8 of 18 families (44%) in our analysis. The sequence polymorphism was demonstrated in markers, including D2S1338, D3S1358, D4S2408, D5S818, D8S1179, D9S1122 and D21S11. Moreover, the success identification of STR inherited pattern of allele sharing among family also increases a CPI in paternity testing. Conclusions The results from MPS platforms showed totally concordant with CE data. The sequence variation of STR from MPS could be indicated the allele inherited pattern in paternity and

  6. Repeated DNA sequences in the microbat species Miniopterus schreibersi (Vespertilionidae; Chiroptera).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barragán, M J L; Martínez, S; Marchal, J A; Bullejos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R; Sánchez, A

    2002-01-01

    Repetitive DNA sequences represent a substantial component of eukaryotic genomes. These sequences have been described and characterized in many mammalian species. However, little information about repetitive DNA sequences is available in bat species. Here we describe an EcoRI family of repetitive DNA sequences present in the species Miniopterus schreibersi. These repetitive sequences are 57.85%, A-T rich, organized in tandem, and with a monomer unit length of 904 bp. Methylation analysis using the isoesquizomer pair MspI and HpaII indicates that the cytosines present in the sequences CCGG are partially methylated. Furthermore, Southern blot analysis demonstrated that these DNA sequences are absent in the genomes of four related microbat species and suggest that it could be specific to the M. schreibersi genome.

  7. Role of the striatum, cerebellum and frontal lobes in the automatization of a repeated visuomotor sequence of movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyon, J; Laforce, R; Bouchard, G; Gaudreau, D; Roy, J; Poirier, M; Bédard, P J; Bédard, F; Bouchard, J P

    1998-07-01

    Recently, Doyon et al. [20] demonstrated that lesions to both the striatum and to the cerebellum in humans produce a similar deficit in the learning of a repeated visuomotor sequence, which occurs late in the acquisition process. We now report the results of two experiments that were designed to examine whether this impairment was due to a lack of automatization of the repeating sequence of finger movements by using a dual-task paradigm and by testing for long-term retention of this skill. In Experiment 1, the performance of groups of patients with Parkinson's disease, or with damage to the cerebellum or to the frontal lobes, was compared to that of matched control subjects on the Repeated Sequence Test (primary task) and the Brooks' Matrices Test (secondary task). These two tests were administered concomitantly in both early and late learning phases of the visuomotor sequence. Overall, the groups did not differ in their ability to execute the primary task. By contrast, in accordance with the predictions, patients in Stages 2-3 of Parkinson's disease or with a cerebellar lesion failed to reveal the expected increase in performance on the secondary task seen with learning, suggesting that the latter groups of patients did not have access to the same level of residual cognitive resources to complete the matrices compared to controls. In Experiment 2, the same groups of patients and control subjects were retested again 10-18 months later. They were given four blocks of 100 trials each of the repeating sequence task, followed by a questionnaire and a self-generation task that measured their declarative knowledge of that sequence. The results revealed a long-term retention impairment only in patients who changed from Stage I to Stage II of the disease (suggesting further striatal degeneration) during the one-year interval, or who had a cerebellar lesion. By contrast, performance of the three clinical groups did not differ from controls on declarative memory tests. These

  8. Use of short tandem repeat sequences to study Mycobacterium leprae in leprosy patients in Malawi and India.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K Young

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Inadequate understanding of the transmission of Mycobacterium leprae makes it difficult to predict the impact of leprosy control interventions. Genotypic tests that allow tracking of individual bacterial strains would strengthen epidemiological studies and contribute to our understanding of the disease.Genotyping assays based on variation in the copy number of short tandem repeat sequences were applied to biopsies collected in population-based epidemiological studies of leprosy in northern Malawi, and from members of multi-case households in Hyderabad, India. In the Malawi series, considerable genotypic variability was observed between patients, and also within patients, when isolates were collected at different times or from different tissues. Less within-patient variability was observed when isolates were collected from similar tissues at the same time. Less genotypic variability was noted amongst the closely related Indian patients than in the Malawi series.Lineages of M. leprae undergo changes in their pattern of short tandem repeat sequences over time. Genetic divergence is particularly likely between bacilli inhabiting different (e.g., skin and nerve tissues. Such variability makes short tandem repeat sequences unsuitable as a general tool for population-based strain typing of M. leprae, or for distinguishing relapse from reinfection. Careful use of these markers may provide insights into the development of disease within individuals and for tracking of short transmission chains.

  9. De novo transcriptome sequencing reveals a considerable bias in the incidence of simple sequence repeats towards the downstream of 'Pre-miRNAs' of black pepper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Nisha; Asha, Srinivasan; Mallika, Vijayan; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing has an advantageon transformational development of species with limited available sequence data as it helps to decode the genome and transcriptome. We carried out the de novo sequencing using illuminaHiSeq™ 2000 to generate the first leaf transcriptome of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.), an important spice variety native to South India and also grown in other tropical regions. Despite the economic and biochemical importance of pepper, a scientifically rigorous study at the molecular level is far from complete due to lack of sufficient sequence information and cytological complexity of its genome. The 55 million raw reads obtained, when assembled using Trinity program generated 2,23,386 contigs and 1,28,157 unigenes. Reports suggest that the repeat-rich genomic regions give rise to small non-coding functional RNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most abundant type of non-coding regulatory RNAs. In spite of the widespread research on miRNAs, little is known about the hair-pin precursors of miRNAs bearing Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs). We used the array of transcripts generated, for the in silico prediction and detection of '43 pre-miRNA candidates bearing different types of SSR motifs'. The analysis identified 3913 different types of SSR motifs with an average of one SSR per 3.04 MB of thetranscriptome. About 0.033% of the transcriptome constituted 'pre-miRNA candidates bearing SSRs'. The abundance, type and distribution of SSR motifs studied across the hair-pin miRNA precursors, showed a significant bias in the position of SSRs towards the downstream of predicted 'pre-miRNA candidates'. The catalogue of transcripts identified, together with the demonstration of reliable existence of SSRs in the miRNA precursors, permits future opportunities for understanding the genetic mechanism of black pepper and likely functions of 'tandem repeats' in miRNAs.

  10. De novo transcriptome sequencing reveals a considerable bias in the incidence of simple sequence repeats towards the downstream of 'Pre-miRNAs' of black pepper.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Joy

    Full Text Available Next generation sequencing has an advantageon transformational development of species with limited available sequence data as it helps to decode the genome and transcriptome. We carried out the de novo sequencing using illuminaHiSeq™ 2000 to generate the first leaf transcriptome of black pepper (Piper nigrum L., an important spice variety native to South India and also grown in other tropical regions. Despite the economic and biochemical importance of pepper, a scientifically rigorous study at the molecular level is far from complete due to lack of sufficient sequence information and cytological complexity of its genome. The 55 million raw reads obtained, when assembled using Trinity program generated 2,23,386 contigs and 1,28,157 unigenes. Reports suggest that the repeat-rich genomic regions give rise to small non-coding functional RNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs are the most abundant type of non-coding regulatory RNAs. In spite of the widespread research on miRNAs, little is known about the hair-pin precursors of miRNAs bearing Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs. We used the array of transcripts generated, for the in silico prediction and detection of '43 pre-miRNA candidates bearing different types of SSR motifs'. The analysis identified 3913 different types of SSR motifs with an average of one SSR per 3.04 MB of thetranscriptome. About 0.033% of the transcriptome constituted 'pre-miRNA candidates bearing SSRs'. The abundance, type and distribution of SSR motifs studied across the hair-pin miRNA precursors, showed a significant bias in the position of SSRs towards the downstream of predicted 'pre-miRNA candidates'. The catalogue of transcripts identified, together with the demonstration of reliable existence of SSRs in the miRNA precursors, permits future opportunities for understanding the genetic mechanism of black pepper and likely functions of 'tandem repeats' in miRNAs.

  11. Tracking of intercalary DNA sequences integrated into tandem repeat arrays in rye Secale vavilovii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Achrem

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The structure of repetitive sequences of the JNK block present in the pericentromeric region of the 2RL chromosome was studied in Secale vavilovii. Amplification of sequences present between the JNK sequences led to the identification of seven abnormal DNA fragments. Two of these fragments showed high similarity to the glutamate 5-kinase gene and putative alcohol dehydrogenase gene of trypanosomatid from the genus Leishmania, whose presence can be explained by horizontal gene transfer (HGT. Other fragments were similar to mitochondrial gene for ribosomal protein S4 in plants and to the glycoprotein (G gene of the IHNV virus. Presumably, they are pseudogenes inserted into the JNK heterochromatin region. Within this region, also fragments similar to the rye repetitive sequence and chromosome 3B in wheat were found. There is no known mechanism that would explain how foreign sequences were inserted into the block region of tandem repetitive sequences of the JNK family.

  12. The conserved residue Arg46 in the N-terminal heptad repeat domain of HIV-1 gp41 is critical for viral fusion and entry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyi Wang

    Full Text Available During the process of HIV-1 fusion with the target cell, the N-terminal heptad repeat (NHR of gp41 interacts with the C-terminal heptad repeat (CHR to form fusogenic six-helix bundle (6-HB core. We previously identified a crucial residue for 6-HB formation and virus entry--Lys63 (K63 in the C-terminal region of NHR (aa 54-70, which forms a hydrophobic cavity. It can form an important salt bridge with Asp121 (D121 in gp41 CHR. Here, we found another important conserved residue for virus fusion and entry, Arg46 (R46, in the N-terminal region of NHR (aa 35-53, which forms a hydrogen bond with a polar residue, Asn43 (N43, in NHR, as a part of the hydrogen-bond network. R46 can also form a salt bridge with a negatively charged residue, Glu137 (E137, in gp41 CHR. Substitution of R46 with the hydrophobic residue Ala (R46A or the negatively charged residue Glu (R46E resulted in disruption of the hydrogen bond network, breakage of the salt bridge and reduction of 6-HB's stability, leading to impairment of viral fusion and decreased inhibition of N36, an NHR peptide. Similarly, CHR peptide C34 with substitution of E137 for Ala (E137A or Arg (E137R also exhibited reduced inhibitory activity against HIV-1 infection and HIV-1-mediated cell-to-cell fusion. These results suggest that the positively charged residue R46 and its hydrogen bond network, together with the salt bridge between R46 and E137, are important for viral fusion and entry and may therefore serve as a target for designing novel HIV fusion/entry inhibitors.

  13. The Ma Gene for Complete-Spectrum Resistance to Meloidogyne Species in Prunus Is a TNL with a Huge Repeated C-Terminal Post-LRR Region1[C][W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverie, Michel; Dirlewanger, Elisabeth; Bosselut, Nathalie; Van Ghelder, Cyril; Voisin, Roger; Kleinhentz, Marc; Lafargue, Bernard; Abad, Pierre; Rosso, Marie-Noëlle; Chalhoub, Boulos; Esmenjaud, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Root-knot nematode (RKN) Meloidogyne species are major polyphagous pests of most crops worldwide, and cultivars with durable resistance are urgently needed because of nematicide bans. The Ma gene from the Myrobalan plum (Prunus cerasifera) confers complete-spectrum, heat-stable, and high-level resistance to RKN, which is remarkable in comparison with the Mi-1 gene from tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), the sole RKN resistance gene cloned. We report here the positional cloning and the functional validation of the Ma locus present at the heterozygous state in the P.2175 accession. High-resolution mapping totaling over 3,000 segregants reduced the Ma locus interval to a 32-kb cluster of three Toll/Interleukin1 Receptor-Nucleotide Binding Site-Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) genes (TNL1–TNL3), including a pseudogene (TNL2) and a truncated gene (TNL3). The sole complete gene in this interval (TNL1) was validated as Ma, as it conferred the same complete-spectrum and high-level resistance (as in P.2175) using its genomic sequence and native promoter region in Agrobacterium rhizogenes-transformed hairy roots and composite plants. The full-length cDNA (2,048 amino acids) of Ma is the longest of all Resistance genes cloned to date. Its TNL structure is completed by a huge post-LRR (PL) sequence (1,088 amino acids) comprising five repeated carboxyl-terminal PL exons with two conserved motifs. The amino-terminal region (213 amino acids) of the LRR exon is conserved between alleles and contrasts with the high interallelic polymorphisms of its distal region (111 amino acids) and of PL domains. The Ma gene highlights the importance of these uncharacterized PL domains, which may be involved in pathogen recognition through the decoy hypothesis or in nuclear signaling. PMID:21482634

  14. Discovery of highly divergent repeat landscapes in snake genomes using high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoe, Todd A; Hall, Kathryn T; Guibotsy Mboulas, Marcel L; Gu, Wanjun; de Koning, A P Jason; Fox, Samuel E; Poole, Alexander W; Vemulapalli, Vijetha; Daza, Juan M; Mockler, Todd; Smith, Eric N; Feschotte, Cédric; Pollock, David D

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive assessment of genomic repeat content in two snake genomes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus). These two genomes are both relatively small (∼1.4 Gb) but have surprisingly extensive differences in the abundance and expansion histories of their repeat elements. In the python, the readily identifiable repeat element content is low (21%), similar to bird genomes, whereas that of the copperhead is higher (45%), similar to mammalian genomes. The copperhead's greater repeat content arises from the recent expansion of many different microsatellites and transposable element (TE) families, and the copperhead had 23-fold greater levels of TE-related transcripts than the python. This suggests the possibility that greater TE activity in the copperhead is ongoing. Expansion of CR1 LINEs in the copperhead genome has resulted in TE-mediated microsatellite expansion ("microsatellite seeding") at a scale several orders of magnitude greater than previously observed in vertebrates. Snakes also appear to be prone to horizontal transfer of TEs, particularly in the copperhead lineage. The reason that the copperhead has such a small genome in the face of so much recent expansion of repeat elements remains an open question, although selective pressure related to extreme metabolic performance is an obvious candidate. TE activity can affect gene regulation as well as rates of recombination and gene duplication, and it is therefore possible that TE activity played a role in the evolution of major adaptations in snakes; some evidence suggests this may include the evolution of venom repertoires.

  15. Discovery of Highly Divergent Repeat Landscapes in Snake Genomes Using High-Throughput Sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castoe, Todd A.; Hall, Kathryn T.; Guibotsy Mboulas, Marcel L.; Gu, Wanjun; de Koning, A.P. Jason; Fox, Samuel E.; Poole, Alexander W.; Vemulapalli, Vijetha; Daza, Juan M.; Mockler, Todd; Smith, Eric N.; Feschotte, Cédric; Pollock, David D.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive assessment of genomic repeat content in two snake genomes, the venomous copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix) and the Burmese python (Python molurus bivittatus). These two genomes are both relatively small (∼1.4 Gb) but have surprisingly extensive differences in the abundance and expansion histories of their repeat elements. In the python, the readily identifiable repeat element content is low (21%), similar to bird genomes, whereas that of the copperhead is higher (45%), similar to mammalian genomes. The copperhead's greater repeat content arises from the recent expansion of many different microsatellites and transposable element (TE) families, and the copperhead had 23-fold greater levels of TE-related transcripts than the python. This suggests the possibility that greater TE activity in the copperhead is ongoing. Expansion of CR1 LINEs in the copperhead genome has resulted in TE-mediated microsatellite expansion (“microsatellite seeding”) at a scale several orders of magnitude greater than previously observed in vertebrates. Snakes also appear to be prone to horizontal transfer of TEs, particularly in the copperhead lineage. The reason that the copperhead has such a small genome in the face of so much recent expansion of repeat elements remains an open question, although selective pressure related to extreme metabolic performance is an obvious candidate. TE activity can affect gene regulation as well as rates of recombination and gene duplication, and it is therefore possible that TE activity played a role in the evolution of major adaptations in snakes; some evidence suggests this may include the evolution of venom repertoires. PMID:21572095

  16. Quality control metrics improve repeatability and reproducibility of single-nucleotide variants derived from whole-genome sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, W; Soika, V; Meehan, J; Su, Z; Ge, W; Ng, H W; Perkins, R; Simonyan, V; Tong, W; Hong, H

    2015-08-01

    Although many quality control (QC) methods have been developed to improve the quality of single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) in SNV-calling, QC methods for use subsequent to single-nucleotide polymorphism-calling have not been reported. We developed five QC metrics to improve the quality of SNVs using the whole-genome-sequencing data of a monozygotic twin pair from the Korean Personal Genome Project. The QC metrics improved both repeatability between the monozygotic twin pair and reproducibility between SNV-calling pipelines. We demonstrated the QC metrics improve reproducibility of SNVs derived from not only whole-genome-sequencing data but also whole-exome-sequencing data. The QC metrics are calculated based on the reference genome used in the alignment without accessing the raw and intermediate data or knowing the SNV-calling details. Therefore, the QC metrics can be easily adopted in downstream association analysis.

  17. Intercistronic as well as terminal sequences are required for efficient amplification of brome mosaic virus RNA3.

    OpenAIRE

    French, R; Ahlquist, P

    1987-01-01

    The genome of brome mosaic virus (BMV) is divided among messenger polarity RNA1, RNA2, and RNA3 (3.2, 2.9, and 2.1 kilobases, respectively). cis-Acting sequences required for BMV RNA amplification were investigated with RNA3. By using expressible cDNA clones, deletions were constructed throughout RNA3 and tested in barley protoplasts coinoculated with RNA1 and RNA2. In contrast to requirements for 5'- and 3'-terminal noncoding sequences, either of the two RNA3 coding regions can be deleted in...

  18. Rapid functional and sequence differentiation of a tandemly repeated species-specific multigene family in Drosophila

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clifton, Bryan D.; Sanz, Pablo Librado; Yeh, Shu-Dan

    2017-01-01

    results in their inaccurate representation in genome assemblies. The presumed testis-specific, chimeric gene Sdic originated, and tandemly expanded in Drosophila melanogaster, contributing to increased male-male competition. Using various types of massively parallel sequencing data, we studied...

  19. Repeated DNA sequences in the microbat species Miniopterus schreibersi (Vespertilionidae; Chiroptera)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Barragán, M J L; Martínez, S; Marchal, J A; Bullejos, M; Díaz de la Guardia, R; Sánchez, A

    2002-01-01

    .... Furthermore, Southern blot analysis demonstrated that these DNA sequences are absent in the genomes of four related microbat species and suggest that it could be specific to the M. schreibersi genome.

  20. The cooperative activity between the carboxyl-terminal TSP1 repeats and the CUB domains of ADAMTS13 is crucial for recognition of von Willebrand factor under flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ping; Pan, Weilan; Rux, Ann H; Sachais, Bruce S; Zheng, X Long

    2007-09-15

    ADAMTS13 cleaves von Willebrand factor (VWF) between Tyr(1605) and Met(1606) residues at the central A2 subunit. The amino-terminus of ADAMTS13 protease appears to be sufficient to bind and cleave VWF under static and denatured condition. However, the role of the carboxyl-terminus of ADAMTS13 in substrate recognition remains controversial. Present study demonstrates that ADAMTS13 cleaves VWF in a rotation speed- and protease concentration-dependent manner on a mini vortexer. Removal of the CUB domains (delCUB) or truncation after the spacer domain (MDTCS) significantly impairs its ability to cleave VWF under the same condition. ADAMTS13 and delCUB (but not MDTCS) bind VWF under flow with dissociation constants (K(D)) of about 50 nM and about 274 nM, respectively. The isolated CUB domains are neither sufficient to bind VWF detectably nor capable of inhibiting proteolytic cleavage of VWF by ADAMTS13 under flow. Addition of the TSP1 5-8 (T5-8CUB) or TSP1 2-8 repeats (T2-8CUB) to the CUB domains restores the binding affinity toward VWF and the inhibitory effect on cleavage of VWF by ADAMTS13 under flow. These data demonstrate directly and quantitatively that the cooperative activity between the middle carboxyl-terminal TSP1 repeats and the distal carboxyl-terminal CUB domains may be crucial for recognition and cleavage of VWF under flow.

  1. Identification and Mapping of Simple Sequence Repeat Markers from Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Bacterial Artificial Chromosome End Sequences for Genome Characterization and Genetic–Physical Map Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juana M. Córdoba

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Microsatellite markers or simple sequence repeat (SSR loci are useful for diversity characterization and genetic–physical mapping. Different in silico microsatellite search methods have been developed for mining bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC end sequences for SSRs. The overall goal of this study was genome characterization based on SSRs in 89,017 BAC end sequences (BESs from the G19833 common bean ( L. library. Another objective was to identify new SSR taking into account three tandem motif identification programs (Automated Microsatellite Marker Development [AMMD], Tandem Repeats Finder [TRF], and SSRLocator [SSRL]. Among the microsatellite search engines, SSRL identified the highest number of SSRs; however, when primer design was attempted, the number dropped due to poor primer design regions. Automated Microsatellite Marker Development software identified many SSRs with valuable AT/TA or AG/TC motifs, while TRF found fewer SSRs and produced no primers. A subgroup of 323 AT-rich, di-, and trinucleotide SSRs were selected from the AMMD results and used in a parental survey with DOR364 and G19833, of which 75 could be mapped in the corresponding population; these represented 4052 BAC clones. Together with 92 previously mapped BES- and 114 non-BES-derived markers, a total of 280 SSRs were included in the polymerase chain reaction (PCR-based map, integrating a total of 8232 BAC clones in 162 contigs from the physical map.

  2. De novo Transcriptome Sequencing Reveals a Considerable Bias in the Incidence of Simple Sequence Repeats towards the Downstream of ‘Pre-miRNAs’ of Black Pepper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joy, Nisha; Asha, Srinivasan; Mallika, Vijayan; Soniya, Eppurathu Vasudevan

    2013-01-01

    Next generation sequencing has an advantageon transformational development of species with limited available sequence data as it helps to decode the genome and transcriptome. We carried out the de novo sequencing using illuminaHiSeq™ 2000 to generate the first leaf transcriptome of black pepper (Piper nigrum L.), an important spice variety native to South India and also grown in other tropical regions. Despite the economic and biochemical importance of pepper, a scientifically rigorous study at the molecular level is far from complete due to lack of sufficient sequence information and cytological complexity of its genome. The 55 million raw reads obtained, when assembled using Trinity program generated 2,23,386 contigs and 1,28,157 unigenes. Reports suggest that the repeat-rich genomic regions give rise to small non-coding functional RNAs. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are the most abundant type of non-coding regulatory RNAs. In spite of the widespread research on miRNAs, little is known about the hair-pin precursors of miRNAs bearing Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs). We used the array of transcripts generated, for the in silico prediction and detection of ‘43 pre-miRNA candidates bearing different types of SSR motifs’. The analysis identified 3913 different types of SSR motifs with an average of one SSR per 3.04 MB of thetranscriptome. About 0.033% of the transcriptome constituted ‘pre-miRNA candidates bearing SSRs’. The abundance, type and distribution of SSR motifs studied across the hair-pin miRNA precursors, showed a significant bias in the position of SSRs towards the downstream of predicted ‘pre-miRNA candidates’. The catalogue of transcripts identified, together with the demonstration of reliable existence of SSRs in the miRNA precursors, permits future opportunities for understanding the genetic mechanism of black pepper and likely functions of ‘tandem repeats’ in miRNAs. PMID:23469176

  3. DNA polymorphism among Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. elaeidis populations from oil palm, using a repeated and dispersed sequence "Palm".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mouyna, I; Renard, J L; Brygoo, Y

    1996-07-31

    A worldwide collection, of 76 F. oxysporum f.sp. elaeidis isolates (Foe), and of 21 F. oxysporum isolates from the soil of several palm grove was analysed by RFLP. As a probe, we used a random DNA fragment (probe 46) from a genomic library of a Foe isolate. This probe contains two different types of sequence, one being repeated and dispersed in the genome "Palm", the other being a single-copy sequence. All F. oxysporum isolates from the palm-grove soils were non-pathogenic to oil palm. They all had a simple restriction pattern with one band homologous to the single-copy sequence of probe 46. All Foe isolates were pathogenic to oil palm and they all had complex patterns due to hybridization with "Palm". This repetitive sequence reveals that Foe isolates are distinct from the other F. oxysporum palm-grove soils isolates. The sequence can reliably discriminate pathogenic from non-pathogenic oil palm isolates. Based on DNA fingerprint similarities, Foe populations were divided into ten groups consisting of isolates with the same geographic origin. Isolates from Brazil and Ecuador were an exception to that rule as they had the same restriction pattern as a few isolates from the Ivory Coast, suggesting they may originated from Africa.

  4. Survey and analysis of simple sequence repeats in the Laccaria bicolor genome, with development of microsatellite markers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Labbe, Jessy L [ORNL; Murat, Claude [INRA, Nancy, France; Morin, Emmanuelle [INRA, Nancy, France; Le Tacon, F [UMR, France; Martin, Francis [INRA, Nancy, France

    2011-01-01

    It is becoming clear that simple sequence repeats (SSRs) play a significant role in fungal genome organization, and they are a large source of genetic markers for population genetics and meiotic maps. We identified SSRs in the Laccaria bicolor genome by in silico survey and analyzed their distribution in the different genomic regions. We also compared the abundance and distribution of SSRs in L. bicolor with those of the following fungal genomes: Phanerochaete chrysosporium, Coprinopsis cinerea, Ustilago maydis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Aspergillus nidulans, Magnaporthe grisea, Neurospora crassa and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Using the MISA computer program, we detected 277,062 SSRs in the L. bicolor genome representing 8% of the assembled genomic sequence. Among the analyzed basidiomycetes, L. bicolor exhibited the highest SSR density although no correlation between relative abundance and the genome sizes was observed. In most genomes the short motifs (mono- to trinucleotides) were more abundant than the longer repeated SSRs. Generally, in each organism, the occurrence, relative abundance, and relative density of SSRs decreased as the repeat unit increased. Furthermore, each organism had its own common and longest SSRs. In the L. bicolor genome, most of the SSRs were located in intergenic regions (73.3%) and the highest SSR density was observed in transposable elements (TEs; 6,706 SSRs/Mb). However, 81% of the protein-coding genes contained SSRs in their exons, suggesting that SSR polymorphism may alter gene phenotypes. Within a L. bicolor offspring, sequence polymorphism of 78 SSRs was mainly detected in non-TE intergenic regions. Unlike previously developed microsatellite markers, these new ones are spread throughout the genome; these markers could have immediate applications in population genetics.

  5. Evaluation of genetic diversity amongst Descurainia sophia L. genotypes by inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker

    OpenAIRE

    Saki, Sahar; Bagheri, Hedayat; Deljou, Ali; Zeinalabedini, Mehrshad

    2015-01-01

    Descurainia sophia is a valuable medicinal plant in family of Brassicaceae. To determine the range of diversity amongst D. sophia in Iran, 32 naturally distributed plants belonging to six natural populations of the Iranian plateau were investigated by inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. The average percentage of polymorphism produced by 12 ISSR primers was 86 %. The PIC values for primers ranged from 0.22 to 0.40 and Rp values ranged between 6.5 and 19.9. The relative genetic diversi...

  6. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) loci mapping in the genome of perennial ryegrass

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pivorienė, O; Pašakinskienė, I; Brazauskas, G

    2008-01-01

    regions of known sequences within the current DNA databases. An ISSR fragment of 580 bp, produced by the (GACA)4TC primer present on LG6, showed a 95% identity to the Avena sativa L. transposon and repetitive DNA linked to the receptor kinase gene. A 780 bp fragment generated by (TG)8RT primer...

  7. Assessment of in silico BAC-based simple sequence repeat (SSR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    As a result, 17 SSR markers were developed and tested on one tomato commercial cultivar and eight local landraces. 12 loci (27 alleles) ... According to tomato expressed sequence tag (EST) analysis, some of these developed SSR markers, such as mono and di-nucleotide are related to some genes. The T(16) motif is ...

  8. Comparative analysis of genetic diversity among species of Chrysanthemum and its related genera using inter-simple sequence repeat and sequence-related amplified polymorphism markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, X; Zhang, F; Zhao, H; Guan, Z; Chen, S; Jiang, J; Fang, W; Chen, F

    2014-10-20

    In this study, inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSRs) and sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) were applied to assess the genetic diversity in 38 species of Chrysanthemum and related genera. A total of 204 and 567 bands were amplified by 24 ISSR and 25 SRAP primers, of which 196 (97%) and 557 (99%) were polymorphic, respectively. The ISSR-based genetic similarity ranged from 0.016 to 0.886 and averaged 0.201, while the SRAP-based genetic similarity varied from 0.010 to 0.811 and averaged 0.122. Both the ISSR and SRAP techniques revealed similar clustering patterns and grouped species of Chrysanthemum and Ajania together. The results of principal coordinate analysis corroborated the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average clustering. Additionally, results from ISSR and SRAP data were significantly correlated (r = 0.89, P chrysanthemum in future distant interspecific breeding.

  9. Race: A scalable and elastic parallel system for discovering repeats in very long sequences

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Essam

    2013-08-26

    A wide range of applications, including bioinformatics, time series, and log analysis, depend on the identification of repetitions in very long sequences. The problem of finding maximal pairs subsumes most important types of repetition-finding tasks. Existing solutions require both the input sequence and its index (typically an order of magnitude larger than the input) to fit in memory. Moreover, they are serial algorithms with long execution time. Therefore, they are limited to small datasets, despite the fact that modern applications demand orders of magnitude longer sequences. In this paper we present RACE, a parallel system for finding maximal pairs in very long sequences. RACE supports parallel execution on stand-alone multicore systems, in addition to scaling to thousands of nodes on clusters or supercomputers. RACE does not require the input or the index to fit in memory; therefore, it supports very long sequences with limited memory. Moreover, it uses a novel array representation that allows for cache-efficient implementation. RACE is particularly suitable for the cloud (e.g., Amazon EC2) because, based on availability, it can scale elastically to more or fewer machines during its execution. Since scaling out introduces overheads, mainly due to load imbalance, we propose a cost model to estimate the expected speedup, based on statistics gathered through sampling. The model allows the user to select the appropriate combination of cloud resources based on the provider\\'s prices and the required deadline. We conducted extensive experimental evaluation with large real datasets and large computing infrastructures. In contrast to existing methods, RACE can handle the entire human genome on a typical desktop computer with 16GB RAM. Moreover, for a problem that takes 10 hours of serial execution, RACE finishes in 28 seconds using 2,048 nodes on an IBM BlueGene/P supercomputer.

  10. Rapid Functional and Sequence Differentiation of a Tandemly Repeated Species-Specific Multigene Family in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clifton, Bryan D; Librado, Pablo; Yeh, Shu-Dan; Solares, Edwin S; Real, Daphne A; Jayasekera, Suvini U; Zhang, Wanting; Shi, Mijuan; Park, Ronni V; Magie, Robert D; Ma, Hsiu-Ching; Xia, Xiao-Qin; Marco, Antonio; Rozas, Julio; Ranz, José M

    2017-01-01

    Gene clusters of recently duplicated genes are hotbeds for evolutionary change. However, our understanding of how mutational mechanisms and evolutionary forces shape the structural and functional evolution of these clusters is hindered by the high sequence identity among the copies, which typically results in their inaccurate representation in genome assemblies. The presumed testis-specific, chimeric gene Sdic originated, and tandemly expanded in Drosophila melanogaster, contributing to increased male-male competition. Using various types of massively parallel sequencing data, we studied the organization, sequence evolution, and functional attributes of the different Sdic copies. By leveraging long-read sequencing data, we uncovered both copy number and order differences from the currently accepted annotation for the Sdic region. Despite evidence for pervasive gene conversion affecting the Sdic copies, we also detected signatures of two episodes of diversifying selection, which have contributed to the evolution of a variety of C-termini and miRNA binding site compositions. Expression analyses involving RNA-seq datasets from 59 different biological conditions revealed distinctive expression breadths among the copies, with three copies being transcribed in females, opening the possibility to a sexually antagonistic effect. Phenotypic assays using Sdic knock-out strains indicated that should this antagonistic effect exist, it does not compromise female fertility. Our results strongly suggest that the genome consolidation of the Sdic gene cluster is more the result of a quick exploration of different paths of molecular tinkering by different copies than a mere dosage increase, which could be a recurrent evolutionary outcome in the presence of persistent sexual selection. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society for Molecular Biology and Evolution. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Identification of the porcine homologous of human disease causing trinucleotide repeat sequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Lone Bruhn; Thomsen, Bo; Sølvsten, Christina Ane Elisabeth

    2007-01-01

    in this paper the identification of porcine noncoding and polyglutamine-encoding TNR regions and the comparison to the homologous TNRs from human, chimpanzee, dog, opossum, rat, and mouse. Several of the porcine TNR regions are highly polymorphic both within and between different breeds. The TNR regions...... are more conserved in terms of repeat length between humans and pigs than between humans and rodents suggesting that TNR lengths could be implicated in mammalian evolution. The TNRs in the FMR2, SCA6, SCA12, and Huntingtin geenes are comparable in length to alleles naturally occurring in humans, and also...... in the porcine genome of TNRs within genes that, in humans, can undergo pathogenic expansions support the usage of the pig as an alternative animal model for studies of TNR evolution, stability, and functional properties....

  12. Consistent levels of A-to-I RNA editing across individuals in coding sequences and non-conserved Alu repeats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osenberg Sivan

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adenosine to inosine (A-to-I RNA-editing is an essential post-transcriptional mechanism that occurs in numerous sites in the human transcriptome, mainly within Alu repeats. It has been shown to have consistent levels of editing across individuals in a few targets in the human brain and altered in several human pathologies. However, the variability across human individuals of editing levels in other tissues has not been studied so far. Results Here, we analyzed 32 skin samples, looking at A-to-I editing level in three genes within coding sequences and in the Alu repeats of six different genes. We observed highly consistent editing levels across different individuals as well as across tissues, not only in coding targets but, surprisingly, also in the non evolutionary conserved Alu repeats. Conclusions Our findings suggest that A-to-I RNA-editing of Alu elements is a tightly regulated process and, as such, might have been recruited in the course of primate evolution for post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms.

  13. Identification of a novel tandemly repeated sequence present in an intron of the glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI) gene in mouse and man

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Faik, P.; Walker, J.I.H.; Morgan, M.J. (Guy' s Hospital, London (United Kingdom))

    1994-05-01

    Glucose phosphate isomerase (GPI, glucose 6-phosphate ketol-isomerase, EC 5.3.1.9) is a housekeeping gene expressed in all tissues and organisms that utilize glycolysis and gluconeogenesis. Deficiency in humans leads to a rare form of nonspherocytic hemolytic anemia. The authors have isolated a 3.2-kb mouse cDNA containing glucose phosphate isomerase coding sequence and a 2.1-kb intronic sequence and a large proportion of the human gene (approaching 55 kb) in four phage [lambda] recombinants. A 4-kb intronic fragment from the human gene showing homology to the mouse intronic sequence has been isolated and sequenced. The fragment contains approximately 1.5 kb of sequence that is composited of 30 repeat units of a novel 50-kb tandemly repeated unit. The mouse intronic sequence contains 18 similar units. The human consensus sequence differs from the mouse consensus sequence at only 7 positions out of 50 (positions 16, 26, 27, 42, 43, 47, and 48). A probe containing the repeat element detects polymorphisms, specific to glucose phosphate isomerase, in human DNA. The repeat element does not appear to be present at any other loci in human DNA. The conservation of this intronic repeat element extends to pig and Chinese hamster. 26 refs., 4 figs.

  14. De novo assembly and characterization of the root transcriptome and development of simple sequence repeat markers in Paphiopedilum concolor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, D M; Zhao, C Y; Liu, X R; Liu, X F; Lin, Y J; Liu, J W; Chen, H M; L, F B

    2015-06-11

    Paphiopedilum orchids (Orchidaceae) have attracted much attention from botanists and horticulturists because of their peculiar leaves and beautiful flowers. Furthermore, the dry roots of Paphiopedilum plants have well-known medicinal uses. However, it is unknown how sensitive and plastic the root genes are to environmental changes or how these environmental changes regulate the biosynthesis of active ingredients. In this study, we chose Paphiopedilum concolor for root sequencing, as it is widely used as a parent in breeding experiments. A total of 3.77 Gb of sequence data were generated by Illumina paired-end sequencing. De novo assemblies yielded 72,952 contigs, 67,434 scaffolds, 64,304 unigenes with average lengths of 937, 1022, and 1047 bp, respectively. Based on Basic Local Alignment Search Tool with known protein sequences, 40,815 (63.5%) unigenes were annotated with an E-value cutoff of 1.0E-5. Among the unigenes, 24,605 were classified in the Gene Ontology database, 17,361 were assigned to Cluster of Orthologous Groups, and 14,170 were annotated in Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes. Among these annotations, over 1195 unigenes related to secondary metabolic pathways, as well as 609 unigenes involved in plant hormone synthesis and signal transduction, were identified. In addition, 5322 potential simple sequence repeats (SSRs) were identified, and 4989 primer pairs for 3975 sequences containing SSRs were obtained. This study provides valuable insights into the mechanisms of genes that regulate root growth and development and provides a comprehensive resource for genes related to secondary metabolism in roots and for marker-assisted studies in Paphiopedilum.

  15. Tandem repeat sequences evolutionarily related to SVA-type retrotransposons are expanded in the centromere region of the western hoolock gibbon, a small ape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Toru; Hirai, Yuriko; Jahan, Israt; Hirai, Hirohisa; Koga, Akihiko

    2012-12-01

    Hoolock hoolock (the western hoolock gibbon) is a species of the family Hylobatidae (small apes), which constitutes the superfamily Hominoidea (hominoids) together with Hominidae (great apes and human). Here, we report that centromeres or their vicinities in this gibbon species contain tandem repeat sequences that consist of 35-50-bp repeat units, and exhibit a sequence similarity with the variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) region of the SVA, LAVA and PVA transposons. SVA is a composite retrotransposon thought to have been formed by fusion of three solo elements in the common ancestor of hominoids. LAVA and PVA are recently identified retrotransposons that have the same basic structure as SVA. Thus, the large-scale tandem repeats in the centromere region may have been derived from one or more of SVA-type transposons, including the three mentioned above and other yet unknown elements, or the repeat sequences could have served as a source for such elements. Amplification of VNTR-related sequences in another gibbon species, Hoolock leuconedys (eastern hoolock gibbon), has recently been reported, but it is yet to be examined whether the large-scale tandem repeats observed in the two species originated from a single event that occurred in their common ancestor. The repeat sequences in the western hoolock gibbon are mostly 40 kb or more in length, are present in 28 of the 38 chromosomes of the somatic cells, and are homozygous for chromosomal presence/absence.

  16. Mapping of functional regions of murine retrovirus long terminal repeat enhancers: Enhancer domains interact and are not independent in their contributions to enhancer activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hollon, T.; Yoshimura, F.K. (Univ. of Washington, Seattle (USA))

    1989-08-01

    The authors have used deletion and recombinant long terminal repeat (LTR) mutants to examine enhancer activity differences between LTRs of the nonpathogenic Akv and the thymus lymphomagenic MCF13 murine retroviruses. Deletion mutant analysis revealed that major control regions for MCF13 and Akv LTR enhancer activity were similar but not identical. For both LTRs, major control regions were distinctly different in a murine T-cell and a fibroblast cell line. Recombinant enhancer analysis showed that LTRs could be divided into three regions capable of altering the level of enhancer activity through cooperative or antagonistic interaction. The contribution of each region to enhancer activity was dependent on its context with respect to the other regions. LTR enhancer function in different cell types appears to be the result of the interaction of enhancer modular elements.

  17. DR1769, a protein with N-terminal beta propeller repeats and a low-complexity hydrophilic tail, plays a role in desiccation tolerance of Deinococcus radiodurans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajpurohit, Yogendra S; Misra, Hari S

    2013-09-01

    The Deinococcus radiodurans genome encodes five putative quinoproteins. Among these, the Δdr2518 and Δdr1769 mutants became sensitive to gamma radiation. DR2518 with beta propeller repeats in the C-terminal domain was characterized as a radiation-responsive serine/threonine protein kinase in this bacterium. DR1769 contains beta propeller repeats at the N terminus, while its C-terminal domain is a proline-rich disordered structure and constitutes a low-complexity hydrophilic region with aliphatic-proline dipeptide motifs. The Δdr1769 mutant showed nearly a 3-log cycle sensitivity to desiccation at 5% humidity compared to that of the wild type. Interestingly, the gamma radiation and mitomycin C (MMC) resistance in mutant cells also dropped by ∼1-log cycle at 10 kGy and ∼1.5-fold, respectively, compared to those in wild-type cells. But there was no effect of UV (254 nm) exposure up to 800 J · m(-2). These cells showed defective DNA double-strand break repair, and the average size of the nucleoid in desiccated wild-type and Δdr1769 cells was reduced by approximately 2-fold compared to that of respective controls. However, the nucleoid in wild-type cells returned to a size almost similar to that of the untreated control, which did not happen in mutant cells, at least up to 24 h postdesiccation. These results suggest that DR1769 plays an important role in desiccation and radiation resistance of D. radiodurans, possibly by protecting genome integrity under extreme conditions.

  18. Group-sequential analysis may allow for early trial termination: illustration by an intra-observer repeatability study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerke, Oke; Vilstrup, Mie H; Halekoh, Ulrich; Hildebrandt, Malene Grubbe; Høilund-Carlsen, Poul Flemming

    2017-09-26

    Group-sequential testing is widely used in pivotal therapeutic, but rarely in diagnostic research, although it may save studies, time, and costs. The purpose of this paper was to demonstrate a group-sequential analysis strategy in an intra-observer study on quantitative FDG-PET/CT measurements, illuminating the possibility of early trial termination which implicates significant potential time and resource savings. Primary lesion maximum standardised uptake value (SUVmax) was determined twice from preoperative FDG-PET/CTs in 45 ovarian cancer patients. Differences in SUVmax were assumed to be normally distributed, and sequential one-sided hypothesis tests on the population standard deviation of the differences against a hypothesised value of 1.5 were performed, employing an alpha spending function. The fixed-sample analysis (N = 45) was compared with the group-sequential analysis strategies comprising one (at N = 23), two (at N = 15, 30), or three interim analyses (at N = 11, 23, 34), respectively, which were defined post hoc. When performing interim analyses with one third and two thirds of patients, sufficient agreement could be concluded after the first interim analysis and the final analysis. Other partitions did not suggest early stopping after adjustment for multiple testing due to one influential outlier and our small sample size. Group-sequential testing may enable early stopping of a trial, allowing for potential time and resource savings. The testing strategy must, though, be defined at the planning stage, and sample sizes must be reasonably large at interim analysis to ensure robustness against single outliers. Group-sequential testing may have a place in accuracy and agreement studies.

  19. Comparative analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) between drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes of chickpea under terminal drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important grain-legume crop that is mainly grown in rainfed areas, where terminal drought is a major constraint to its productivity. We generated expressed sequence tags (ESTs) by suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) to identify differentially expressed genes in drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes in chickpea. Results EST libraries were generated by SSH from root and shoot tissues of IC4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought resistant) exposed to terminal drought conditions by the dry down method. SSH libraries were also constructed by using 2 sets of bulks prepared from the RNA of root tissues from selected recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (10 each) for the extreme high and low root biomass phenotype. A total of 3062 unigenes (638 contigs and 2424 singletons), 51.4% of which were novel in chickpea, were derived by cluster assembly and sequence alignment of 5949 ESTs. Only 2185 (71%) unigenes showed significant BLASTX similarity (<1E-06) in the NCBI non-redundant (nr) database. Gene ontology functional classification terms (BLASTX results and GO term), were retrieved for 2006 (92.0%) sequences, and 656 sequences were further annotated with 812 Enzyme Commission (EC) codes and were mapped to 108 different KEGG pathways. In addition, expression status of 830 unigenes in response to terminal drought stress was evaluated using macro-array (dot blots). The expression of few selected genes was validated by northern blotting and quantitative real-time PCR assay. Conclusion Our study compares not only genes that are up- and down-regulated in a drought-tolerant genotype under terminal drought stress and a drought susceptible genotype but also between the bulks of the selected RILs exhibiting extreme phenotypes. More than 50% of the genes identified have been shown to be associated with drought stress in chickpea for the first time. This study not only serves as resource for marker discovery, but can provide

  20. Computational prediction of miRNAs and their targets in Phaseolus vulgaris using simple sequence repeat signatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nithin, Chandran; Patwa, Nisha; Thomas, Amal; Bahadur, Ranjit Prasad; Basak, Jolly

    2015-06-12

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are endogenous, noncoding, short RNAs directly involved in regulating gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. In spite of immense importance, limited information of P. vulgaris miRNAs and their expression patterns prompted us to identify new miRNAs in P. vulgaris by computational methods. Besides conventional approaches, we have used the simple sequence repeat (SSR) signatures as one of the prediction parameter. Moreover, for all other parameters including normalized Shannon entropy, normalized base pairing index and normalized base-pair distance, instead of taking a fixed cut-off value, we have used 99% probability range derived from the available data. We have identified 208 mature miRNAs in P. vulgaris belonging to 118 families, of which 201 are novel. 97 of the predicted miRNAs in P. vulgaris were validated with the sequencing data obtained from the small RNA sequencing of P. vulgaris. Randomly selected predicted miRNAs were also validated using qRT-PCR. A total of 1305 target sequences were identified for 130 predicted miRNAs. Using 80% sequence identity cut-off, proteins coded by 563 targets were identified. The computational method developed in this study was also validated by predicting 229 miRNAs of A. thaliana and 462 miRNAs of G. max, of which 213 for A. thaliana and 397 for G. max are existing in miRBase 20. There is no universal SSR that is conserved among all precursors of Viridiplantae, but conserved SSR exists within a miRNA family and is used as a signature in our prediction method. Prediction of known miRNAs of A. thaliana and G. max validates the accuracy of our method. Our findings will contribute to the present knowledge of miRNAs and their targets in P. vulgaris. This computational method can be applied to any species of Viridiplantae for the successful prediction of miRNAs and their targets.

  1. Precise sequence complementarity between yeast chromosome ends and two classes of just-subtelomeric sequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britten, Roy J.

    1998-01-01

    The terminal regions (last 20 kb) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes universally contain blocks of precise sequence similarity to other chromosome terminal regions. The left and right terminal regions are distinct in the sense that the sequence similarities between them are reverse complements. Direct sequence similarity occurs between the left terminal regions and also between the right terminal regions, but not between any left ends and right ends. With minor exceptions the relationships range from 80% to 100% match within blocks. The regions of similarity are composites of familiar and unfamiliar repeated sequences as well as what could be considered “single-copy” (or better “two-copy”) sequences. All terminal regions were compared with all other chromosomes, forward and reverse complement, and 768 comparisons are diagrammed. It appears there has been an extensive history of sequence exchange or copying between terminal regions. The subtelomeric sequences fall into two classes. Seventeen of the chromosome ends terminate with the Y′ repeat, while 15 end with the 800-nt “X2” repeats just adjacent to the telomerase simple repeats. The just-subterminal repeats are very similar to each other except that chromosome 1 right end is more divergent. PMID:9600891

  2. Construction of an integrated high density simple sequence repeat linkage map in cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) and its applicability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Sachiko N; Hirakawa, Hideki; Sato, Shusei; Maeda, Fumi; Ishikawa, Masami; Mori, Toshiki; Yamamoto, Yuko; Shirasawa, Kenta; Kimura, Mitsuhiro; Fukami, Masanobu; Hashizume, Fujio; Tsuji, Tomoko; Sasamoto, Shigemi; Kato, Midori; Nanri, Keiko; Tsuruoka, Hisano; Minami, Chiharu; Takahashi, Chika; Wada, Tsuyuko; Ono, Akiko; Kawashima, Kumiko; Nakazaki, Naomi; Kishida, Yoshie; Kohara, Mitsuyo; Nakayama, Shinobu; Yamada, Manabu; Fujishiro, Tsunakazu; Watanabe, Akiko; Tabata, Satoshi

    2013-02-01

    The cultivated strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) is an octoploid (2n = 8x = 56) of the Rosaceae family whose genomic architecture is still controversial. Several recent studies support the AAA'A'BBB'B' model, but its complexity has hindered genetic and genomic analysis of this important crop. To overcome this difficulty and to assist genome-wide analysis of F. × ananassa, we constructed an integrated linkage map by organizing a total of 4474 of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers collected from published Fragaria sequences, including 3746 SSR markers [Fragaria vesca expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived SSR markers] derived from F. vesca ESTs, 603 markers (F. × ananassa EST-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa ESTs, and 125 markers (F. × ananassa transcriptome-derived SSR markers) from F. × ananassa transcripts. Along with the previously published SSR markers, these markers were mapped onto five parent-specific linkage maps derived from three mapping populations, which were then assembled into an integrated linkage map. The constructed map consists of 1856 loci in 28 linkage groups (LGs) that total 2364.1 cM in length. Macrosynteny at the chromosome level was observed between the LGs of F. × ananassa and the genome of F. vesca. Variety distinction on 129 F. × ananassa lines was demonstrated using 45 selected SSR markers.

  3. Genomic 3' terminal sequence comparison of three isolates of rabbit haemorrhagic disease virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milton, I D; Vlasak, R; Nowotny, N; Rodak, L; Carter, M J

    1992-05-15

    Comparison of sequence data is necessary in older to investigate virus origins, identify features common to virulent strains, and characterize genomic organization within virus families. A virulent caliciviral disease of rabbits recently emerged in China. We have sequenced 1100 bases from the 3' ends of two independent European isolates of this virus, and compared these with previously determined calicivirus sequences. Rabbit caliciviruses were closely related, despite the different countries in which isolation was made. This supports the rapid spread of a new virus across Europe. The capsid protein sequences of these rabbit viruses differ markedly from those determined for feline calicivirus, but a hypothetical 3' open reading frame is relatively well conserved between the caliciviruses of these two different hosts and argues for a functional role.

  4. Evidence of genome duplication revealed by sequence analysis of multi-loci expressed sequence tag–simple sequence repeat bands in Panax ginseng Meyer

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    Nam-Hoon Kim

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Our data imply that the recent genome duplication has resulted in two highly similar paralogous regions in the ginseng genome. The two paralogous sequences could be differentiated by large SSR number variations and one or two additional SNPs or InDels in every 100 bp of genic region, which can serve as a reliable identifier for each locus.

  5. Multiple-locus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis of Streptococcus pneumoniae and comparison with multiple loci sequence typing

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    van Cuyck Hélène

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Streptococcus pneumoniae infections remain a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. The diversity of pneumococci was first evidenced by serotyping of their capsular polysaccharides, responsible of virulence, resolving into more than 93 serotypes. Molecular tools have been developed to track the emergence and the spread of resistant, hyper virulent or non-vaccine type clones, particularly DNA-based methods using genetic polymorphism. Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis analysis (PFGE and Multiple Loci Sequence Typing (MLST are the most frequently used genotyping techniques for S. pneumoniae. MLST is based on sequence comparison of housekeeping genes clustering isolates within sequence types. The availability of genome sequence data from different S. pneumoniae strains facilitated the search for other class of genetic markers as polymorphic DNA sequences for a Multiple-Locus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis (MLVA. This study aims at confirming the relevance of MLVA of S. pneumoniae, comparing MLST and MLVA performances when discriminating subgroups of strains belonging to the same Sequence Type (ST, and defining a restricted but universal set of MLVA markers that has at least the same discriminatory power as MLST for S. pneumoniae by applying marker sets used by different authors on 331 isolates selected in UK. Results A minimum spanning tree was built including the serotypes distribution and comparing MLVA and MLST results. 220 MLVA types were determined grouped in 10 Sequence Types (ST. MLVA differentiated ST162 in two clonal complexes. A minimal set was defined: ms 25 and ms37, ms17, ms19, ms33, ms39, and ms40 including two universal markers. The selection was based on MLVA markers with a Diversity Index >0.8 and a selection of others depending of the population tested and the aim of the study. This set of 7 MLVA markers yields strain clusters similar to those obtained by MLST. Conclusions MLVA can discriminate

  6. Molecular Analysis of Date Palm Genetic Diversity Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Sharabasy, Sherif F; Soliman, Khaled A

    2017-01-01

    The date palm is an ancient domesticated plant with great diversity and has been cultivated in the Middle East and North Africa for at last 5000 years. Date palm cultivars are classified based on the fruit moisture content, as dry, semidry, and soft dates. There are a number of biochemical and molecular techniques available for characterization of the date palm variation. This chapter focuses on the DNA-based markers random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR) techniques, in addition to biochemical markers based on isozyme analysis. These techniques coupled with appropriate statistical tools proved useful for determining phylogenetic relationships among date palm cultivars and provide information resources for date palm gene banks.

  7. Genetic integrity of somaclonal variants in tea (Camellia sinensis (L.) O Kuntze) as revealed by inter simple sequence repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Jibu; Vijayan, Deepu; Joshi, Sarvottam D; Joseph Lopez, S; Raj Kumar, R

    2006-05-17

    Adoption of inter simple sequence repeats (ISSR) technique to analyze the genetic variability of somatic embryo derived tea plants was evaluated. Morphological characterisation of the field grown plants revealed no identical character aligning with the parent, UPASI-10. Out of 40 primers, 15 exhibited concurrent polymorphism were selected for the study. Genetic variability of somaclones derived from single line cotyledonary culture ranged from 33.0 to 55.0%. A unique fragment of 1.2Kb was visible in majority of the accessions whereas the fragments below the length of 0.6Kb were noticed only in 50% of the variants. Out of 120 interactions attempted using Pearson's coefficient correlation, only 9.2% of somaclones exhibited significant similarity at genetic level. Dendrogram constructed based on simple matching coefficient revealed a distance of 2.257-3.317 between the final clusters. This strengthens the existence of wide genetic variation among the somaclones.

  8. Identification of a Simple Sequence Repeat molecular-marker set for large-scale analyses of pear germplasm

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    Gabriel Dequigiovanni

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR are molecular markers suitable to assess the genetic variation of germplasm resources; however, large-scale SSR use requires protocol optimization. The present work aimed to identify SSR markers, developed for pear and other fruit species that are effective in characterizing pear germplasm collections and in demonstrating their use in providing support for genetic breeding programs. From a total of 62 SSR markers investigated, 23 yielding reproducible and polymorphic patterns were used to genotype a sample of 42 pear accessions of the Brazilian Pear Germplasm Bank (PGB. When compared to these 23 SSR markers, a subset of eleven markers, selected based on He, PIC and PId, was used to distinguish individual accessions and perform cluster analysis with similar efficacy. Genetic diversity analysis clustered the European, Japanese and Chinese accessions in distinct groups. This markers subset constitutes a valuable tool for several applications related to pear genetic resources management and breeding.

  9. Sequence diversities of serine-aspartate repeat genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from different hosts presumably by horizontal gene transfer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Huping; Lu, Hong; Zhao, Xin

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal gene transfer (HGT) is recognized as one of the major forces for bacterial genome evolution. Many clinically important bacteria may acquire virulence factors and antibiotic resistance through HGT. The comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT in emerging pathogens. In this study, the Serine-Aspartate Repeat (Sdr) family has been compared among different sources of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) to discover sequence diversities within their genomes. Four sdr genes were analyzed for 21 different S. aureus strains and 218 mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates from Canada. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis (RF122 and mastitis isolates in this study), ovine mastitis (ED133), pig (ST398), chicken (ED98), and human methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) (TCH130, MRSA252, Mu3, Mu50, N315, 04-02981, JH1 and JH9) were highly associated with one another, presumably due to HGT. In addition, several types of insertion and deletion were found in sdr genes of many isolates. A new insertion sequence was found in mastitis isolates, which was presumably responsible for the HGT of sdrC gene among different strains. Moreover, the sdr genes could be used to type S. aureus. Regional difference of sdr genes distribution was also indicated among the tested S. aureus isolates. Finally, certain associations were found between sdr genes and subclinical or clinical mastitis isolates. Certain sdr gene sequences were shared in S. aureus strains and isolates from different species presumably due to HGT. Our results also suggest that the distributional assay of virulence factors should detect the full sequences or full functional regions of these factors. The traditional assay using short conserved regions may not be accurate or credible. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that may inadvertently enhance the contact of human and animal bacterial

  10. Sequence diversities of serine-aspartate repeat genes among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from different hosts presumably by horizontal gene transfer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huping Xue

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Horizontal gene transfer (HGT is recognized as one of the major forces for bacterial genome evolution. Many clinically important bacteria may acquire virulence factors and antibiotic resistance through HGT. The comparative genomic analysis has become an important tool for identifying HGT in emerging pathogens. In this study, the Serine-Aspartate Repeat (Sdr family has been compared among different sources of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus to discover sequence diversities within their genomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Four sdr genes were analyzed for 21 different S. aureus strains and 218 mastitis-associated S. aureus isolates from Canada. Comparative genomic analyses revealed that S. aureus strains from bovine mastitis (RF122 and mastitis isolates in this study, ovine mastitis (ED133, pig (ST398, chicken (ED98, and human methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA (TCH130, MRSA252, Mu3, Mu50, N315, 04-02981, JH1 and JH9 were highly associated with one another, presumably due to HGT. In addition, several types of insertion and deletion were found in sdr genes of many isolates. A new insertion sequence was found in mastitis isolates, which was presumably responsible for the HGT of sdrC gene among different strains. Moreover, the sdr genes could be used to type S. aureus. Regional difference of sdr genes distribution was also indicated among the tested S. aureus isolates. Finally, certain associations were found between sdr genes and subclinical or clinical mastitis isolates. CONCLUSIONS: Certain sdr gene sequences were shared in S. aureus strains and isolates from different species presumably due to HGT. Our results also suggest that the distributional assay of virulence factors should detect the full sequences or full functional regions of these factors. The traditional assay using short conserved regions may not be accurate or credible. These findings have important implications with regard to animal husbandry practices that may

  11. Empirical Comparison of Simple Sequence Repeats and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Assessment of Maize Diversity and Relatedness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamblin, Martha T.; Warburton, Marilyn L.; Buckler, Edward S.

    2007-01-01

    While Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) are extremely useful genetic markers, recent advances in technology have produced a shift toward use of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). The different mutational properties of these two classes of markers result in differences in heterozygosities and allele frequencies that may have implications for their use in assessing relatedness and evaluation of genetic diversity. We compared analyses based on 89 SSRs (primarily dinucleotide repeats) to analyses based on 847 SNPs in individuals from the same 259 inbred maize lines, which had been chosen to represent the diversity available among current and historic lines used in breeding. The SSRs performed better at clustering germplasm into populations than did a set of 847 SNPs or 554 SNP haplotypes, and SSRs provided more resolution in measuring genetic distance based on allele-sharing. Except for closely related pairs of individuals, measures of distance based on SSRs were only weakly correlated with measures of distance based on SNPs. Our results suggest that 1) large numbers of SNP loci will be required to replace highly polymorphic SSRs in studies of diversity and relatedness and 2) relatedness among highly-diverged maize lines is difficult to measure accurately regardless of the marker system. PMID:18159250

  12. Comparative analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) between drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes of chickpea under terminal drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deokar, Amit A; Kondawar, Vishwajith; Jain, Pradeep K; Karuppayil, S Mohan; Raju, N L; Vadez, Vincent; Varshney, Rajeev K; Srinivasan, R

    2011-04-22

    Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) is an important grain-legume crop that is mainly grown in rainfed areas, where terminal drought is a major constraint to its productivity. We generated expressed sequence tags (ESTs) by suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH) to identify differentially expressed genes in drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes in chickpea. EST libraries were generated by SSH from root and shoot tissues of IC4958 (drought tolerant) and ICC 1882 (drought resistant) exposed to terminal drought conditions by the dry down method. SSH libraries were also constructed by using 2 sets of bulks prepared from the RNA of root tissues from selected recombinant inbred lines (RILs) (10 each) for the extreme high and low root biomass phenotype. A total of 3062 unigenes (638 contigs and 2424 singletons), 51.4% of which were novel in chickpea, were derived by cluster assembly and sequence alignment of 5949 ESTs. Only 2185 (71%) unigenes showed significant BLASTX similarity (drought stress was evaluated using macro-array (dot blots). The expression of few selected genes was validated by northern blotting and quantitative real-time PCR assay. Our study compares not only genes that are up- and down-regulated in a drought-tolerant genotype under terminal drought stress and a drought susceptible genotype but also between the bulks of the selected RILs exhibiting extreme phenotypes. More than 50% of the genes identified have been shown to be associated with drought stress in chickpea for the first time. This study not only serves as resource for marker discovery, but can provide a better insight into the selection of candidate genes (both up- and downregulated) associated with drought tolerance. These results can be used to identify suitable targets for manipulating the drought-tolerance trait in chickpea.

  13. Comparative analysis of expressed sequence tags (ESTs between drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes of chickpea under terminal drought stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raju N L

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. is an important grain-legume crop that is mainly grown in rainfed areas, where terminal drought is a major constraint to its productivity. We generated expressed sequence tags (ESTs by suppression subtraction hybridization (SSH to identify differentially expressed genes in drought-tolerant and -susceptible genotypes in chickpea. Results EST libraries were generated by SSH from root and shoot tissues of IC4958 (drought tolerant and ICC 1882 (drought resistant exposed to terminal drought conditions by the dry down method. SSH libraries were also constructed by using 2 sets of bulks prepared from the RNA of root tissues from selected recombinant inbred lines (RILs (10 each for the extreme high and low root biomass phenotype. A total of 3062 unigenes (638 contigs and 2424 singletons, 51.4% of which were novel in chickpea, were derived by cluster assembly and sequence alignment of 5949 ESTs. Only 2185 (71% unigenes showed significant BLASTX similarity ( Conclusion Our study compares not only genes that are up- and down-regulated in a drought-tolerant genotype under terminal drought stress and a drought susceptible genotype but also between the bulks of the selected RILs exhibiting extreme phenotypes. More than 50% of the genes identified have been shown to be associated with drought stress in chickpea for the first time. This study not only serves as resource for marker discovery, but can provide a better insight into the selection of candidate genes (both up- and downregulated associated with drought tolerance. These results can be used to identify suitable targets for manipulating the drought-tolerance trait in chickpea.

  14. Global repeat discovery and estimation of genomic copy number in a large, complex genome using a high-throughput 454 sequence survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varala Kranthi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Extensive computational and database tools are available to mine genomic and genetic databases for model organisms, but little genomic data is available for many species of ecological or agricultural significance, especially those with large genomes. Genome surveys using conventional sequencing techniques are powerful, particularly for detecting sequences present in many copies per genome. However these methods are time-consuming and have potential drawbacks. High throughput 454 sequencing provides an alternative method by which much information can be gained quickly and cheaply from high-coverage surveys of genomic DNA. Results We sequenced 78 million base-pairs of randomly sheared soybean DNA which passed our quality criteria. Computational analysis of the survey sequences provided global information on the abundant repetitive sequences in soybean. The sequence was used to determine the copy number across regions of large genomic clones or contigs and discover higher-order structures within satellite repeats. We have created an annotated, online database of sequences present in multiple copies in the soybean genome. The low bias of pyrosequencing against repeat sequences is demonstrated by the overall composition of the survey data, which matches well with past estimates of repetitive DNA content obtained by DNA re-association kinetics (Cot analysis. Conclusion This approach provides a potential aid to conventional or shotgun genome assembly, by allowing rapid assessment of copy number in any clone or clone-end sequence. In addition, we show that partial sequencing can provide access to partial protein-coding sequences.

  15. N-terminal or signal peptide sequence engineering prevents truncation of human monoclonal antibody light chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, S J; Bond, N J; Milne, S; Lewis, A; Sheriff, A; Pettman, G; Pradhan, R; Higazi, D R; Hatton, D

    2017-09-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) contain short N-terminal signal peptides on each individual polypeptide that comprises the mature antibody, targeting them for export from the cell in which they are produced. The signal peptide is cleaved from each heavy chain (Hc) and light chain (Lc) polypeptide after translocation to the ER and prior to secretion. This process is generally highly efficient, producing a high proportion of correctly cleaved Hc and Lc polypeptides. However, mis-cleavage of the signal peptide can occur, resulting in truncation or elongation at the N-terminus of the Hc or Lc. This is undesirable for antibody manufacturing as it can impact efficacy and can result in product heterogeneity. Here, we describe a truncated variant of the Lc that was detected during a routine developability assessment of the recombinant human IgG1 MEDI8490 in Chinese hamster ovary cells. We found that the truncation of the Lc was caused due to the use of the murine Hc signal peptide together with a lambda Lc containing an SYE amino acid motif at the N-terminus. This truncation was not caused by mis-processing of the mRNA encoding the Lc and was not dependent on expression platform (transient or stable), the scale of the fed-batch culture or clonal lineage. We further show that using alternative signal peptides or engineering the Lc SYE N-terminal motif prevented the truncation and that this strategy will improve Lc homogeneity of other SYE lambda Lc-containing mAbs. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2017;114: 1970-1977. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Characterization of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates from Italy by multilocus sequence typing and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gasparrini, S; Alborali, G L; Pitozzi, A; Guarneri, F; Giacomini, E; Baldo, V; Scali, F; Lazzaro, M; Boniotti, M B

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate and compare the capabilities of multilocus sequence typing (MLST) and multiple locus variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) techniques to characterize Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates and to investigate the relationship between pleuromutilin resistance and genetic variability. MLST genotyping was performed on 180 B. hyodysenteriae isolates, and the results were evaluated considering profiles from 108 other strains previously reported in the database. In total, 37 sequence types were obtained. The MLVA approach completely characterized 172 strains and grouped the isolates into 22 different profiles. The combination of MLST and MLVA showed a slight increase in the discriminatory power, identifying 33 joint profiles. An antibiotic resistance analysis showed a reduction in the susceptibility to pleuromutilins over time, and a weak association between susceptibility to valnemulin and inclusion in clonal complex 4. MLST and MLVA are reliable methods for characterizing B. hyodysenteriae strains and they have comparable discriminatory power. The genotyping of B. hyodysenteriae isolates and a database of all the genetic profiles collected during the diagnostic activities could support traditional epidemiological investigations in identifying infection sources and routes of transmission among herds, and in developing more effective control measures. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Identification of repeat sequence heterogeneity at the polymorphic short tandem repeat locus HUMTH01[AATG][sub n] and reassignment of alleles in population analysis by using a locus-specific allelic ladder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Puers, C. (Institute for Forensic Medicine, Muenster (Germany)); Schumm, J.W. (Promega Corp., Madison, WI (United States)); Hammond, H.A.; Caskey, C.T.; Jin, L.

    1993-10-01

    An allelic ladder containing amplified sequences of seven alleles of the polymorphic human tyrosine hydroxylase locus, HUMTH01, was constructed and employed as a standard marker. Sequence analysis of each ladder component indicates that fragments differ by integral multiples of the AATG core repeat sequence characteristic of this locus. Individual alles are designated [open quotes]5[close quotes] through [open quotes]11,[close quotes] according to the number of complete reiterations of the core repeat contained within them. Comparison of the HUMTH01 allelic ladder with DNA samples amplified at this locus revealed core repeat length heterogeneity (i.e., deletions or insertions shorter than one core repeat) within the human population. In particular, a common allele was identified which migrates more quickly than allele 10, but more slowly than allele 9, on electrophoresis through a denaturing polyacrylamide gel. Sequence analysis of this allele, designated [open quotes]10-1,[close quotes] reveals lack of a single adenine normally present in the seventh copy of the AATG. The allelic ladder was used to reevaluate previously published population data. Results of testing for Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium and population substructure were not altered significantly by these modifications. 29 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  18. New insights into evolutionary relationships within the subfamily Lamioideae (Lamiaceae) based on pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) nuclear DNA sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Tilottama; Lindqvist, Charlotte

    2015-10-01

    Lamioideae, one of the most species-rich subfamilies within Lamiaceae, exhibits a remarkable diversity in morphology and habit and is found in many temperate to subtropical regions across the globe. Previous studies based on chloroplast DNA (cpDNA) sequence data produced a tribal classification of Lamioideae, but so far this has not been confirmed with nuclear DNA loci. We investigated sequence variation in a low-copy nuclear pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) region and compared the phylogenetic results with previously published sequence data from a concatenated data set comprising four cpDNA loci. We incorporated representatives of all 10 lamioid tribes and some unclassified taxa, analyzed the data using phylogenetic inference, and estimated divergence times and ancestral areas for major nodes. Our results showed overall topological similarities between the cpDNA and PPR phylogenies with strong support for most tribes. However, we also observed incongruence in the circumscription of some tribes, including Gomphostemmateae and Pogostemoneae and in the relationships among tribes. Our results suggest an Oligocene-Miocene origin of the Lamioideae crown group. Asia and the Mediterranean region appear to have been centers of diversity and place of origin for many lamioid tribes. This study represents the first phylogeny of subfamily Lamioideae inferred from low-copy nuclear DNA data. We show that most lamioid tribes are corroborated, although the exact circumscription of two tribes is questioned. We have shed further light on the evolutionary relationships within Lamioideae, and this study demonstrates the utility of the PPR region for such subfamilial-level phylogenetic studies. © 2015 Botanical Society of America.

  19. Numerical simulation of the Kamaishi repeating earthquake sequence: Change in magnitude due to the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Shingo; Kato, Naoyuki; Fukuda, Jun'ichi

    2015-05-01

    We conducted numerical simulations of a repeating earthquake sequence on the plate boundary off the shore of Kamaishi, northeastern Japan, assuming rate- and state-dependent friction laws. Uchida et al. 2014 reported that the Kamaishi repeating earthquakes showed an increase in magnitude and a decrease in recurrence interval after the 2011 Tohoku-oki earthquake (M9), but an approximately constant magnitude (M ~ 4.9) and a regular recurrence interval (~ 5.5 years) before the Tohoku-oki earthquake. A M5.9 event occurred just after the M9 event, and was followed by a M5.5 event. We considered a fault patch of velocity-weakening friction, with frictional parameters leading to seismic slip confined in its central part of the patch. Afterslip due to the M9 event was involved in the model to increase the loading rate on the patch. The simulation successfully reproduced increasing magnitude and decreasing recurrence time caused by the afterslip. A M6 class event, in which seismic slip spread over the entire area of the patch, occurred just after the M9 event for the aging law and the Nagata law. When we assumed the aging law with frictional parameters which lie near the boundary between leading to slip on the entire patch and slip confined in its central part, the M6 class event was followed by a M5.5 class event. Furthermore we examined a conditionally stable large patch that contained a small unstable patch. This model also reproduced a M6 class event after the M9 event. In these models, stress outside the confined area of the path is released before a dynamic event under a constant low loading rate, whereas the stress perturbation due to afterslip within the seismic cycle induces a dynamic event on the entire patch.

  20. Synthesis, Binding and Antiviral Properties of Potent Core-Extended Naphthalene Diimides Targeting the HIV-1 Long Terminal Repeat Promoter G-Quadruplexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Rosalba; Doria, Filippo; Butovskaya, Elena; Frasson, Ilaria; Botti, Silvia; Scalabrin, Matteo; Lago, Sara; Grande, Vincenzo; Nadai, Matteo; Freccero, Mauro; Richter, Sara N

    2015-12-24

    We have previously reported that stabilization of the G-quadruplex structures in the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) promoter suppresses viral transcription. Here we sought to develop new G-quadruplex ligands to be exploited as antiviral compounds by enhancing binding toward the viral G-quadruplex structures. We synthesized naphthalene diimide derivatives with a lateral expansion of the aromatic core. The new compounds were able to bind/stabilize the G-quadruplex to a high extent, and some of them displayed clear-cut selectivity toward the viral G-quadruplexes with respect to the human telomeric G-quadruplexes. This feature translated into low nanomolar anti-HIV-1 activity toward two viral strains and encouraging selectivity indexes. The selectivity depended on specific recognition of LTR loop residues; the mechanism of action was ascribed to inhibition of LTR promoter activity in cells. This is the first example of G-quadruplex ligands that show increased selectivity toward the viral G-quadruplexes and display remarkable antiviral activity.

  1. Identification of two pentatricopeptide repeat genes required for RNA editing and zinc binding by C-terminal cytidine deaminase-like domains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayes, Michael L; Giang, Karolyn; Berhane, Beniam; Mulligan, R Michael

    2013-12-20

    Many transcripts expressed from plant organelle genomes are modified by C-to-U RNA editing. Nuclear encoded pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) proteins are required as RNA binding specificity determinants in the RNA editing mechanism. Bioinformatic analysis has shown that most of the Arabidopsis PPR proteins necessary for RNA editing events include a C-terminal portion that shares structural characteristics with a superfamily of deaminases. The DYW deaminase domain includes a highly conserved zinc binding motif that shares characteristics with cytidine deaminases. The Arabidopsis PPR genes, ELI1 and DOT4, both have DYW deaminase domains and are required for single RNA editing events in chloroplasts. The ELI1 DYW deaminase domain was expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli and was shown to bind two zinc atoms per polypeptide. Thus, the DYW deaminase domain binds a zinc metal ion, as expected for a cytidine deaminase, and is potentially the catalytic component of an editing complex. Genetic complementation experiments demonstrate that large portions of the DYW deaminase domain of ELI1 may be eliminated, but the truncated genes retain the ability to restore editing site conversion in a mutant plant. These results suggest that the catalytic activity can be supplied in trans by uncharacterized protein(s) of the editosome.

  2. A New Approach for Sequencing Loading and Unloading Operations in the Seaside Area of a Container Terminal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azza Lajjam

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Due to the considerable growth in the worldwide container transportation, optimization of container terminal operations is becoming highly needed to rationalize the use of logistics resources. For this reason, we focus our study on the Quay Crane Scheduling Problem (QCSP, which is a core task of managing maritime container terminals. From this planning problem arise two decisions to be made: The first one concerns tasks assignment to quay crane and the second one consists of finding the handling sequence of tasks such that the turnaround time of cargo vessels is minimized. In this paper, we provide a mixed-integer programming (MIP model that takes into account non-crossing constraints, safety margin constraints and precedence constraints. The QCSP has been shown NP-complete, thus, we used the Ant Colony Optimization (ACO, a probabilistic technique inspired from ants’ behaviour, to find a feasible solution of such problem. The results obtained from the computational experiments indicate that the proposed method is able to produce good results while reducing the computational time.

  3. Direct evidence that the carboxyl-terminal sequence of a bacterial chemoreceptor is an unstructured linker and enzyme tether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartelli, Nicholas L; Hazelbauer, Gerald L

    2011-11-01

    Sensory adaptation in bacterial chemotaxis involves reversible methylation of specific glutamyl residues on chemoreceptors. The reactions are catalyzed by a dedicated methyltransferase and dedicated methylesterase. In Escherichia coli and related organisms, control of these enzymes includes an evolutionarily recent addition of interaction with a pentapeptide activator located at the carboxyl terminus of the receptor polypeptide chain. Effective enzyme activation requires not only the pentapeptide but also a segment of the receptor polypeptide chain between that sequence and the coiled-coil body of the chemoreceptor. This segment has features consistent with a role as a flexible and presumably unstructured linker and enzyme tether, but there has been no direct information about its structure. We used site-directed spin labeling and electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy to characterize structural features of the carboxyl-terminal 40 residues of E. coli chemoreceptor Tar. Beginning ∼ 35 residues from the carboxyl terminus and continuing to the end of the protein, spectra of spin-labeled Tar embedded in native membranes or in reconstituted proteoliposomes, exhibited mobilities characteristic of unstructured, disordered segments. Binding of methyltransferase substantially reduced mobility for positions in or near the pentapeptide but mobility for the linker sequence remained high, being only modestly reduced in a gradient of decreasing effects for 10-15 residues, a pattern consistent with the linker providing a flexible arm that would allow enzyme diffusion within defined limits. Thus, our data identify that the carboxyl-terminal linker between the receptor body and the pentapeptide is an unstructured, disordered segment that can serve as a flexible arm and enzyme tether. Copyright © 2011 The Protein Society.

  4. The C-terminal sequence of IFITM1 regulates its anti-HIV-1 activity.

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    Rui Jia

    Full Text Available The interferon-inducible transmembrane (IFITM proteins inhibit a wide range of viruses. We previously reported the inhibition of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 strain BH10 by human IFITM1, 2 and 3. It is unknown whether other HIV-1 strains are similarly inhibited by IFITMs and whether there exists viral countermeasure to overcome IFITM inhibition. We report here that the HIV-1 NL4-3 strain (HIV-1NL4-3 is not restricted by IFITM1 and its viral envelope glycoprotein is partly responsible for this insensitivity. However, HIV-1NL4-3 is profoundly inhibited by an IFITM1 mutant, known as Δ(117-125, which is deleted of 9 amino acids at the C-terminus. In contrast to the wild type IFITM1, which does not affect HIV-1 entry, the Δ(117-125 mutant diminishes HIV-1NL4-3 entry by 3-fold. This inhibition correlates with the predominant localization of Δ(117-125 to the plasma membrane where HIV-1 entry occurs. In spite of strong conservation of IFITM1 among most species, mouse IFITM1 is 19 amino acids shorter at its C-terminus as compared to human IFITM1 and, like the human IFITM1 mutant Δ(117-125, mouse IFITM1 also inhibits HIV-1 entry. This is the first report illustrating the role of viral envelope protein in overcoming IFITM1 restriction. The results also demonstrate the importance of the C-terminal region of IFITM1 in modulating the antiviral function through controlling protein subcellular localization.

  5. Filling in the Gap of Human Chromosome 4: Single Molecule Real Time Sequencing of Macrosatellite Repeats in the Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Locus.

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    Masaki Suimye Morioka

    Full Text Available A majority of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD is caused by contraction of macrosatellite repeats called D4Z4 that are located in the subtelomeric region of human chromosome 4q35. Sequencing the FSHD locus has been technically challenging due to its long size and nearly identical nature of repeat elements. Here we report sequencing and partial assembly of a BAC clone carrying an entire FSHD locus by a single molecule real time (SMRT sequencing technology which could produce long reads up to about 18 kb containing D4Z4 repeats. De novo assembly by Hierarchical Genome Assembly Process 1 (HGAP.1 yielded a contig of 41 kb containing all but a part of the most distal D4Z4 element. The validity of the sequence model was confirmed by an independent approach employing anchored multiple sequence alignment by Kalign using reads containing unique flanking sequences. Our data will provide a basis for further optimization of sequencing and assembly conditions of D4Z4.

  6. Polymerase chain reaction assay based on a highly repeated sequence of Schistosoma haematobium: a potential tool for monitoring schistosome-infested water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamburger, J; He-Na; Abbasi, I; Ramzy, R M; Jourdane, J; Ruppel, A

    2001-12-01

    We have cloned from Schistosoma haematobium genome a repeated sequence, the DraI repeated sequence, which consists of tandemly arranged 121-bp-long units and which is highly abundant (approximately 15% of the S. haematobium genome). By these features, the DraI repeat is similar to the Sm1-7 sequence of Schistosoma mansoni previously described by us. However, their nucleotide sequences are profoundly different. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) primers were designed on the basis of the DraI sequence information and were used in a PCR assay by which as little as 10 fg of schistosomal DNA as well as individual cercariae were detected. The DraI repeat cross-hybridized with DNA from Schistosoma bovis, Schistosoma magrebowiei, Schistosoma mattheei, Schistosoma curassoni, and Schistosoma intercalatum, but not with DNA from S. mansoni nor from Trichobilharzia ocellata and Echinostoma sp. A potential value of this PCR assay is suggested for monitoring free-living cercariae and infected snails only in bodies free of cross-hybridizing species.

  7. Interaction of cocaine with positive GABAA modulators on the repeated acquisition and performance of response sequences in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quinton, M S; Gerak, L R; Moerschbaecher, J M; Winsauer, P J

    2005-09-01

    Although positive GABA(A) modulators can attenuate several cocaine-induced behavioral effects, there is a paucity of data on their interaction with cocaine on transition behavior or learning. The current study examined the effects of cocaine (3.2-32 mg/kg), pregnanolone (3.2-24 mg/kg), and lorazepam (0.1-10 mg/kg) alone and in combination in rats responding under a multiple schedule of repeated acquisition and performance. In the acquisition component, subjects acquired a different three-response sequence each session, whereas in the performance component, they responded on the same three-response sequence each session. All three drugs produced dose-dependent rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects. Cocaine was the least effective in decreasing rates and the most effective in increasing the percentage of errors. In combination with pregnanolone (3.2 or 10 mg/kg), the rate-decreasing effects of cocaine were relatively unchanged in both components, but 3.2 mg/kg of pregnanolone enhanced its error-increasing effects and the 10-mg/kg dose produced a significant dose-dependent interaction on errors. The combination of cocaine with lorazepam (0.32 mg/kg, 70-min pretreatment) produced significantly greater rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects than cocaine alone. A 15-min pretreatment with the same dose of lorazepam enhanced the error-increasing effects of small doses and attenuated the effects of larger doses of cocaine. Combinations of pregnanolone and lorazepam produced greater rate-decreasing and error-increasing effects in both components than either drug alone. The present data show that cocaine is more disruptive to learning in rats than pregnanolone or lorazepam, and that the disruptive effects of cocaine can be enhanced by CNS depressants.

  8. Organelle Simple Sequence Repeat Markers Help to Distinguish Carpelloid Stamen and Normal Cytoplasmic Male Sterile Sources in Broccoli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shu, Jinshuai; Liu, Yumei; Li, Zhansheng; Zhang, Lili; Fang, Zhiyuan; Yang, Limei; Zhuang, Mu; Zhang, Yangyong; Lv, Honghao

    2015-01-01

    We previously discovered carpelloid stamens when breeding cytoplasmic male sterile lines in broccoli (Brassica oleracea var. italica). In this study, hybrids and multiple backcrosses were produced from different cytoplasmic male sterile carpelloid stamen sources and maintainer lines. Carpelloid stamens caused dysplasia of the flower structure and led to hooked or coiled siliques with poor seed setting, which were inherited in a maternal fashion. Using four distinct carpelloid stamens and twelve distinct normal stamens from cytoplasmic male sterile sources and one maintainer, we used 21 mitochondrial simple sequence repeat (mtSSR) primers and 32 chloroplast SSR primers to identify a mitochondrial marker, mtSSR2, that can differentiate between the cytoplasm of carpelloid and normal stamens. Thereafter, mtSSR2 was used to identify another 34 broccoli accessions, with an accuracy rate of 100%. Analysis of the polymorphic sequences revealed that the mtSSR2 open reading frame of carpelloid stamen sterile sources had a deletion of 51 bases (encoding 18 amino acids) compared with normal stamen materials. The open reading frame is located in the coding region of orf125 and orf108 of the mitochondrial genomes in Brassica crops and had the highest similarity with Raphanus sativus and Brassica carinata. The current study has not only identified a useful molecular marker to detect the cytoplasm of carpelloid stamens during broccoli breeding, but it also provides evidence that the mitochondrial genome is maternally inherited and provides a basis for studying the effect of the cytoplasm on flower organ development in plants. PMID:26407159

  9. Molecular characterization of three common olive (Olea europaea L.) cultivars in Palestine, using simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obaid, Ramiz; Abu-Qaoud, Hassan; Arafeh, Rami

    2014-01-01

    Eight accessions of olive trees from three common varieties in Palestine, Nabali Baladi, Nabali Mohassan and Surri, were genetically evaluated using five simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. A total of 17 alleles from 5 loci were observed in which 15 (88.2%) were polymorphic and 2 (11.8%) were monomorphic. An average of 3.4 alleles per locus was found ranging from 2.0 alleles with the primers GAPU-103 and DCA-9 to 5.0 alleles with U9932 and DCA-16. The smallest amplicon size observed was 50 bp with the primer DCA-16, whereas the largest one (450 bp) with the primer U9932. Cluster analysis with the unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average (UPGMA) showed three clusters: a cluster with four accessions from the ‘Nabali Baladi’ cultivar, another cluster with three accessions that represents the ‘Nabali Mohassen’ cultivar and finally the ‘Surri’ cultivar. The similarity coefficient for the eight olive tree samples ranged from a maximum of 100% between two accessions from Nabali Baladi and also in two other samples from Nabali Mohassan, to a minimum similarity coefficient (0.315) between the Surri and two Nabali Baladi accessions. The results in this investigation clearly highlight the genetic dissimilarity between the three main olive cultivars that have been misidentified and mixed up in the past, based on conventional morphological characters. PMID:26019564

  10. Transferability of simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers developed in guava (Psidium guajava L.) to four Myrtaceae species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rai, Manoj K; Phulwaria, Mahendra; Shekhawat, N S

    2013-08-01

    Present study demonstrated the cross-genera transferability of 23 simple sequence repeat (SSR) primer pairs developed for guava (Psidium guajava L.) to four new targets, two species of eucalypts (Eucalyptus citriodora, Eucalyptus camaldulensis), bottlebrush (Callistemon lanceolatus) and clove (Syzygium aromaticum), belonging to the family Myrtaceae and subfamily Myrtoideae. Off the 23 SSR loci assayed, 18 (78.2%) gave cross-amplification in E. citriodora, 14 (60.8%) in E. camaldulensis and 17-17 (73.9%) in C. lanceolatus and S. aromaticum. Eight primer pairs were found to be transferable to all four species. The number of alleles detected at each locus ranged from one to nine, with an average of 4.8, 2.6, 4.5 and 4.6 alleles in E. citriodora, E. camaldulensis, C. lanceolatus and S. aromaticum, respectively. The high levels of cross-genera transferability of guava SSRs may be applicable for the analysis of intra- and inter specific genetic diversity of target species, especially in E. citriodora, C. lanceolatus and S. aromaticum, for which till date no information about EST-derived as well as genomic SSR is available.

  11. Sexual genetic and simple sequence repeat (SSR) analysis for molecular marker development on the all hermaphrodite papaya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, C T; Wang, C W; Chen, F C; Chin, S W; Liu, C C; Lee, M J; Chung, W C; Chien, Y W; Chang, H J; Lee, C Y

    2015-03-30

    The papaya (Carica papaya L.) is one of the most important economic tropical fruits in the world, and the hermaphrodite is the preferred type in field cultures. We analyzed the sexual ratio of offspring from the cultivar 'Taiwan Seed Station No. 7' (T7) by a self-cross and its cross with Taichung Sunrise (TS). Female progeny from the T7 self-crossing were not observed. This finding may be caused by a lethal gene that is linked to females. In this study, we selected 192 simple sequence repeats (SSRs) to analyze the polymorphism between T7 and TS. A total of 37 SSRs were identified for T7 and TS. In addition, 14 SSRs served as the molecular makers for identification of T7, TS and their hybrid offsprings. Thus, the results show that the genetic similarity between T7 and TS is rather high. This suggests that T7 may be a mutant of TS. Phylogenetic analysis from the SSR polymorphisms of the above parent strains and 15 F1 offspring revealed the genetic distance of the F1 offspring located between T7 and TS. The results of this study may provide an opportunity for elucidating the genetic characteristics of all hermaphrodites via identification of molecular makers.

  12. Genetic Diversity of Arabica Coffee (Coffea arabica L. in Nicaragua as Estimated by Simple Sequence Repeat Markers

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    Mulatu Geleta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Coffea arabica L. (arabica coffee, the only tetraploid species in the genus Coffea, represents the majority of the world’s coffee production and has a significant contribution to Nicaragua’s economy. The present paper was conducted to determine the genetic diversity of arabica coffee in Nicaragua for its conservation and breeding values. Twenty-six populations that represent eight varieties in Nicaragua were investigated using simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. A total of 24 alleles were obtained from the 12 loci investigated across 260 individual plants. The total Nei’s gene diversity (HT and the within-population gene diversity (HS were 0.35 and 0.29, respectively, which is comparable with that previously reported from other countries and regions. Among the varieties, the highest diversity was recorded in the variety Catimor. Analysis of variance (AMOVA revealed that about 87% of the total genetic variation was found within populations and the remaining 13% differentiate the populations (FST=0.13; P<0.001. The variation among the varieties was also significant. The genetic variation in Nicaraguan coffee is significant enough to be used in the breeding programs, and most of this variation can be conserved through ex situ conservation of a low number of populations from each variety.

  13. Evaluation of genetic diversity amongst Descurainia sophia L. genotypes by inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saki, Sahar; Bagheri, Hedayat; Deljou, Ali; Zeinalabedini, Mehrshad

    2016-01-01

    Descurainia sophia is a valuable medicinal plant in family of Brassicaceae. To determine the range of diversity amongst D. sophia in Iran, 32 naturally distributed plants belonging to six natural populations of the Iranian plateau were investigated by inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. The average percentage of polymorphism produced by 12 ISSR primers was 86 %. The PIC values for primers ranged from 0.22 to 0.40 and Rp values ranged between 6.5 and 19.9. The relative genetic diversity of the populations was not high (Gst =0.32). However, the value of gene flow revealed by the ISSR marker was high (Nm = 1.03). UPGMA clustering method based on Jaccard similarity coefficient grouped the genotypes into two major clusters. Graph results from Neighbor-Net Network generated after a 1000 bootstrap test using Jaccard coefficient, and STRUCTURE analysis confirmed the UPGMA clustering. The first three PCAs represented 57.31 % of the total variation. The high levels of genetic diversity were observed within populations, which is useful in breeding and conservation programs. ISSR is found to be an eligible marker to study genetic diversity of D. sophia.

  14. Usefulness of repeated N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide measurements as incremental predictor for long-term cardiovascular outcome after vascular surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goei, Dustin; van Kuijk, Jan-Peter; Flu, Willem-Jan; Hoeks, Sanne E; Chonchol, Michel; Verhagen, Hence J M; Bax, Jeroen J; Poldermans, Don

    2011-02-15

    Plasma N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) levels improve preoperative cardiac risk stratification in vascular surgery patients. However, single preoperative measurements of NT-pro-BNP cannot take into account the hemodynamic stress caused by anesthesia and surgery. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to assess the incremental predictive value of changes in NT-pro-BNP during the perioperative period for long-term cardiac mortality. Detailed cardiac histories, rest left ventricular echocardiography, and NT-pro-BNP levels were obtained in 144 patients before vascular surgery and before discharge. The study end point was the occurrence of cardiovascular death during a median follow-up period of 13 months (interquartile range 5 to 20). Preoperatively, the median NT-pro-BNP level in the study population was 314 pg/ml (interquartile range 136 to 1,351), which increased to a median level of 1,505 pg/ml (interquartile range 404 to 6,453) before discharge. During the follow-up period, 29 patients (20%) died, 27 (93%) from cardiovascular causes. The median difference in NT-pro-BNP in the survivors was 665 pg/ml, compared to 5,336 pg/ml in the patients who died (p = 0.01). Multivariate Cox regression analyses, adjusted for cardiac history and cardiovascular risk factors (age, angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, stroke, diabetes mellitus, renal dysfunction, body mass index, type of surgery and the left ventricular ejection fraction), demonstrated that the difference in NT-pro-BNP level between pre- and postoperative measurement was the strongest independent predictor of cardiac outcome (hazard ratio 3.06, 95% confidence interval 1.36 to 6.91). In conclusion, the change in NT-pro-BNP, indicated by repeated measurements before surgery and before discharge is the strongest predictor of cardiac outcomes in patients who undergo vascular surgery. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Transcriptional and Bioinformatic Analysis Provide a Relationship between Host Response Changes to Marek’s Disease Viruses Infection and an Integrated Long Terminal Repeat

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    Ning eCui

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available GX0101, Marek’s disease virus (MDV strain with a long terminal repeat (LTR insert of reticuloendotheliosis virus (REV, was isolated from CVI988/Rispens vaccinated birds showing tumors. We have constructed a LTR deleted strain GX0101∆LTR in our previous study. To compare the host responses to GX0101 and GX0101∆LTR, chicken embryo fibroblasts (CEF cells were infected with two MDV strains and a gene-chip containing chicken genome was employed to examine gene transcription changes in host cells in the present study. Of the 42 368 chicken transcripts on the chip, there were 2199 genes that differentially expressed in CEF infected with GX0101 compared to GX0101∆LTR significantly. Differentially expressed genes were distributed to 25 possible gene networks according to their intermolecular connections and were annotated to 56 pathways. The insertion of REV LTR showed the greatest influence on cancer formation and metastasis, followed with immune changes, atherosclerosis and nervous system disorders in MDV-infected CEF cells. Based on these bio functions, GX0101 infection was predicated with a greater growth and survival inhibition but lower oncogenicity in chickens than GX0101∆LTR, at least in the acute phase of infection. In summary, the insertion of REV LTR altered the expression of host genes in response to MDV infection, possibly resulting in novel phenotypic properties in chickens. Our study has provided the evidence of retroviral insertional changes of host responses to herpesvirus infection for the first time, which will promote to elucidation of the possible relationship between the LTR insertion and the observed phenotypes.

  16. Lipid-associated membrane proteins of Mycoplasma fermentans and M. penetrans activate human immunodeficiency virus long-terminal repeats through Toll-like receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, Takashi; Kida, Yutaka; Kuwano, Koichi

    2004-09-01

    Mycoplasmas are known to enhance human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) replication, and mycoplasma-derived lipid extracts have been reported to activate nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) through Toll-like receptors (TLRs). In this study, we examined the involvement of TLRs in the activation of HIV long-terminal repeats (LTR) by mycoplasma and their active components responsible for the TLR activation. Lipid-associated membrane proteins (LAMPs) from two species of mycoplasma (Mycoplasma fermentans and M. penetrans) that are associated with acquired immune-deficiency syndrome (AIDS), were found to activate HIV LTRs in a human monocytic cell line, THP-1. NF-kappaB deletion from the LTR resulted in inhibition of the activation. The LTR activation by M. fermentans LAMPs was inhibited by a dominant negative (DN) construct of TLR1 and TLR6, whereas HIV LTR activation by M. penetrans LAMPs was inhibited by DN TLR1, but not by DN TLR6. These results indicate that the activation of HIV LTRs by M. fermentans and M. penetrans LAMPs is dependent on NF-kappaB, and that the activation of HIV LTR by M. fermentans LAMPs is mediated through TLR1, TLR2 and TLR6. In contrast, the LTR activation by M. penetrans LAMPs is carried out through TLR1 and TLR2, but not TLR6. Subsequently, the active component of M. penetrans and M. fermentans LAMPs was purified by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Interestingly, the purified lipoprotein of M. penetrans LAMPs (LPMp) was able to activate NF-kappaB through TLR1 and TLR2. On the other hand, the activation of NF-kappaB by purified lipoprotein of M. fermentans LAMPs (LPMf) was mediated through TLR2 and TLR6, but not TLR1.

  17. THE USE OF INTER SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEATS (ISSR) IN DISTINGUISHING NEIGHBORING DOUGLAS-FIR TREES AS A MEANS TO IDENTIFYING TREE ROOTS WITH ABOVE-GROUND BIOMASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    We are attempting to identify specific root fragments from soil cores with individual trees. We successfully used Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR) to distinguish neighboring old-growth Douglas-fir trees from one another, while maintaining identity among each tree's parts. W...

  18. Characterization and distribution of an interspersed repeated nucleotide sequence from Lophopyrum elongatum and mapping of a segregation-distortion factor with it.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, H B; Dvorák, J

    1990-12-01

    Repeated nucleotide sequence pLeUCD2 cloned from Lophopyrum elongatum is highly abundant in the genomes of diploid and polyploid wheatgrass species of genera Lophopyrum, Thinopyrum, Pseudoroegneria, Agropyron, Elymus, Elytrigia, and Pascopyrum but undetectable by Southern blot hybridization in Triticum and representative species of Dasypyrum, Hordeum, Psathyrostachys, Secale, Taeniatherum, Heteranthelium, and Leymus in the tribe Triticeae. The DNA fragment inserted in pLeUCD2 is 277 bp long and AT rich (65%), and contains numerous inverted and palindromic repeats. In situ DNA hybridization substantiated a previous hypothesis that the sequence is interspersed in the wheatgrass genomes. Heterogeneity and clustering of like repeats of the pLeUCD2 family along wheatgrass chromosomes was used to map a segregation-distortion factor, designated Sd-1, proximal to the Lr19 locus in recombinant chromosomes of L. ponticum chromosome 7Ag and wheat chromosome 7D.

  19. NMR solution structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biverståhl, Henrik; Andersson, August; Gräslund, Astrid; Mäler, Lena

    2004-11-30

    The structure and membrane interaction of the N-terminal sequence (1-30) of the bovine prion protein (bPrPp) has been investigated by NMR spectroscopy in phospholipid membrane mimetic systems. CD spectroscopy revealed that the peptide adopts a largely alpha-helical structure in zwitterionic bicelles as well as in DHPC micelles but has a less degree of alpha-helix structure in partly charged bicelles. The solution structure of bPrPp was determined in DHPC micelles, and an alpha-helix was found between residues Ser8 and Ile21. The residues within the helical region show slow amide hydrogen exchange. Translational diffusion measurements in zwitterionic q = 0.5 bicelles show that the peptide does not induce aggregation of the bicelles. Increased quadrupolar splittings were observed in the outer part of the (2)H spectrum of DMPC in q = 3.5 bicelles, indicating that the peptide induces a certain degree of order in the bilayer. The amide hydrogen exchange and the (2)H NMR results are consistent with a slight positive hydrophobic mismatch and that bPrPp forms a stable helix that inserts in a transmembrane location in the bilayer. The structure of bPrPp and its position in the membrane may be relevant for the understanding of how the N-terminal (1-30) part of the bovine PrP functions as a cell-penetrating peptide. These findings may lead to a better understanding of how the prion protein accumulates at the membrane surface and also how the conversion into the scrapie form is carried out.

  20. A highly conserved N-terminal sequence for teleost vitellogenin with potential value to the biochemistry, molecular biology and pathology of vitellogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folmar, L.D.; Denslow, N.D.; Wallace, R.A.; LaFleur, G.; Gross, T.S.; Bonomelli, S.; Sullivan, C.V.

    1995-01-01

    N-terminal amino acid sequences for vitellogenin (Vtg) from six species of teleost fish (striped bass, mummichog, pinfish, brown bullhead, medaka, yellow perch and the sturgeon) are compared with published N-terminal Vtg sequences for the lamprey, clawed frog and domestic chicken. Striped bass and mummichog had 100% identical amino acids between positions 7 and 21, while pinfish, brown bullhead, sturgeon, lamprey, Xenopus and chicken had 87%, 93%, 60%, 47%, 47-60%) for four transcripts and had 40% identical, respectively, with striped bass for the same positions. Partial sequences obtained for medaka and yellow perch were 100% identical between positions 5 to 10. The potential utility of this conserved sequence for studies on the biochemistry, molecular biology and pathology of vitellogenesis is discussed.

  1. Critical structural and functional roles for the N-terminal insertion sequence in surfactant protein B analogs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frans J Walther

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein B (SP-B; 79 residues belongs to the saposin protein superfamily, and plays functional roles in lung surfactant. The disulfide cross-linked, N- and C-terminal domains of SP-B have been theoretically predicted to fold as charged, amphipathic helices, suggesting their participation in surfactant activities. Earlier structural studies with Mini-B, a disulfide-linked construct based on the N- and C-terminal regions of SP-B (i.e., approximately residues 8-25 and 63-78, confirmed that these neighboring domains are helical; moreover, Mini-B retains critical in vitro and in vivo surfactant functions of the native protein. Here, we perform similar analyses on a Super Mini-B construct that has native SP-B residues (1-7 attached to the N-terminus of Mini-B, to test whether the N-terminal sequence is also involved in surfactant activity.FTIR spectra of Mini-B and Super Mini-B in either lipids or lipid-mimics indicated that these peptides share similar conformations, with primary alpha-helix and secondary beta-sheet and loop-turns. Gel electrophoresis demonstrated that Super Mini-B was dimeric in SDS detergent-polyacrylamide, while Mini-B was monomeric. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR, predictive aggregation algorithms, and molecular dynamics (MD and docking simulations further suggested a preliminary model for dimeric Super Mini-B, in which monomers self-associate to form a dimer peptide with a "saposin-like" fold. Similar to native SP-B, both Mini-B and Super Mini-B exhibit in vitro activity with spread films showing near-zero minimum surface tension during cycling using captive bubble surfactometry. In vivo, Super Mini-B demonstrates oxygenation and dynamic compliance that are greater than Mini-B and compare favorably to full-length SP-B.Super Mini-B shows enhanced surfactant activity, probably due to the self-assembly of monomer peptide into dimer Super Mini-B that mimics the functions and putative structure of native SP-B.

  2. Reproductive biology and genetic diversity of a cryptoviviparous mangrove aegiceras corniculatum (Myrsinaceae) using allozyme and intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR) analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge; Sun

    1999-12-01

    Mangroves consist of a group of taxonomically diverse species representing about 20 families of angiosperms. However, little is known about their reproductive biology, genetic structure, and the ecological and genetic factors affecting this structure. Comparative studies of various mangrove species are needed to fill such gaps in our knowledge. The pollination biology, outcrossing rate, and genetic diversity of Aegiceras corniculatum were investigated in this study. Pollination experiments suggested that the species is predominantly pollinator-dependent in fruit setting. A quantitative analysis of the mating system was performed using progeny arrays assayed for intersimple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. The multilocus outcrossing rate (tm) was estimated to be 0.653 in a wild population. Both allozyme and ISSR were used to investigate genetic variation within and among populations. The combined effects of founder events and enhanced local gene flow through seedling dispersal by ocean currents apparently played an important role in shaping the population genetic structure in this mangrove species. Both allozyme variation (P = 4.76%, A = 1.05, HE = 0.024) and ISSR diversity (P = 16.18%, A = 1.061, HE = 0.039) were very low at the species level, in comparison with other woody plants with mixed-mating or outcrossing systems. Gene differentiation among populations was also low: allozyme GST = 0.106 and ISSR GST = 0.178. The unusually high genetic identities (0.997 for allozyme and 0.992 for ISSR loci), however, suggest that these populations are probably all descended from a common ancestral population with low polymorphism.

  3. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide-Guided Therapy in Chronic Heart Failure Reduces Repeated Hospitalizations-Results From TIME-CHF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davarzani, Nasser; Sanders-van Wijk, Sandra; Karel, Joël; Maeder, Micha T; Leibundgut, Gregor; Gutmann, Marc; Pfisterer, Matthias E; Rickenbacher, Peter; Peeters, Ralf; Brunner-la Rocca, Hans-Peter

    2017-05-01

    Although heart failure (HF) patients are known to experience repeated hospitalizations, most studies evaluated only time to first event. N-Terminal B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP)-guided therapy has not convincingly been shown to improve HF-specific outcomes, and effects on recurrent all-cause hospitalization are uncertain. Therefore, we investigated the effect of NT-proBNP-guided therapy on recurrent events in HF with the use of a time-between-events approach in a hypothesis-generating analysis. The Trial of Intensified Versus Standard Medical Therapy in Elderly Patients With Congestive Heart Failure (TIME-CHF) randomized 499 HF patients, aged ≥60 years, left ventricular ejection fraction ≤45%, New York Heart Association functional class ≥I,I to NT-proBNP-guided versus symptom-guided therapy for 18 months, with further follow-up for 5.5 years. The effect of NT-proBNP-guided therapy on recurrent HF-related and all-cause hospitalizations and/or all-cause death was explored. One hundred four patients (49 NT-proBNP-guided, 55 symptom-guided) experienced 1 and 275 patients (133 NT-proBNP-guided, 142 symptom-guided) experienced ≥2 all-cause hospitalization events. Regarding HF hospitalization, 132 patients (57 NT-proBNP-guided, 75 symptom-guided) experienced 1 and 122 patients (57 NT-proBNP-guided, 65 symptom-guided) experienced ≥2 events. NT-proBNP-guided therapy was significant in preventing 2nd all-cause hospitalizations (hazard ratio [HR] 0.83; P = .01), in contrast to nonsignificant results in preventing 1st all-cause hospitalization events (HR 0.91; P = .35). This was not the case regarding HF hospitalization events (HR 0.85 [P = .14] vs HR 0.73 [P = .01]) The beneficial effect of NT-proBNP-guided therapy was seen only in patients aged <75 years, and not in those aged ≥75 years (interaction terms with P = .01 and P = .03 for all-cause hospitalization and HF hospitalization events, respectively). NT-proBNP-guided therapy

  4. Cis-acting DNA sequence at a replication origin promotes repeat expansion to fragile X full mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Jeannine; Zaninovic, Nikica; Zhan, Qiansheng; Madireddy, Advaitha; Nolin, Sarah L; Ersalesi, Nicole; Yan, Zi; Rosenwaks, Zev; Schildkraut, Carl L

    2014-09-01

    Fragile X syndrome (FXS) is caused by CGG repeat expansion that leads to FMR1 silencing. Women with a premutation allele are at risk of having a full mutation child with FXS. To investigate the mechanism of repeat expansion, we examined the relationship between a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) variant that is linked to repeat expansion in haplogroup D and a replication origin located ∼53 kb upstream of the repeats. This origin is absent in FXS human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), which have the SNP variant C, but present in the nonaffected hESCs, which have a T variant. The SNP maps directly within the replication origin. Interestingly, premutation hESCs have a replication origin and the T variant similar to nonaffected hESCs. These results suggest that a T/C SNP located at a replication origin could contribute to the inactivation of this replication origin in FXS hESCs, leading to altered replication fork progression through the repeats, which could result in repeat expansion to the FXS full mutation. © 2014 Gerhardt et al.

  5. Aerospace Ground Equipment for model 4080 sequence programmer. A standard computer terminal is adapted to provide convenient operator to device interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nissley, L. E.

    1979-01-01

    The Aerospace Ground Equipment (AGE) provides an interface between a human operator and a complete spaceborne sequence timing device with a memory storage program. The AGE provides a means for composing, editing, syntax checking, and storing timing device programs. The AGE is implemented with a standard Hewlett-Packard 2649A terminal system and a minimum of special hardware. The terminal's dual tape interface is used to store timing device programs and to read in special AGE operating system software. To compose a new program for the timing device the keyboard is used to fill in a form displayed on the screen.

  6. Determining Phylogenetic Relationships Among Date Palm Cultivars Using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) Markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haider, Nadia

    2017-01-01

    Investigation of genetic variation and phylogenetic relationships among date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) cultivars is useful for their conservation and genetic improvement. Various molecular markers such as restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs), simple sequence repeat (SSR), representational difference analysis (RDA), and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) have been developed to molecularly characterize date palm cultivars. PCR-based markers random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) are powerful tools to determine the relatedness of date palm cultivars that are difficult to distinguish morphologically. In this chapter, the principles, materials, and methods of RAPD and ISSR techniques are presented. Analysis of data generated from these two techniques and the use of these data to reveal phylogenetic relationships among date palm cultivars are also discussed.

  7. KERAGAMAN GENETIK DRINGO (Acorus calamus L. YANG DIGUNAKAN SEBAGAI TUMBUHAN OBAT PADA BEBERAPA ETNIS DI INDONESIA BERDASARKAN INTER-SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEATS (ISSR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dyah Subositi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Dringo (Acorus calamus L. used as medicinal plant in Indonesian ethnic groups. Those information based on Ristoja 2012 research. The objective of Ristoja was to provide a database of local ethnomedicine knowledge, herbal formula and medicinal plant in Indonesia. Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR markers were used to assess the genetic diversity of Dringo from 20 selected ethnic groups in Indonesia. Ten selected ISSR primers generated 82 amplified fragments with 51,2% were polymorphic. Dice coefficient was used to calculate similarity index and UPGMA was used to construct a dendogram. The genetic similarity index among accessions ranged from 76,7-100% thus indicating that low level of genetic diversity in dringo. Genetic diversity database can be useful for medicinal plant mapping and conservation especially for in situ conservation. Keywords: Dringo (Acorus calamus L., database, genetic diversity, Inter Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR

  8. Sequence conservation in the C-terminal region of spider silk proteins (Spidroin) from Nephila clavipes (Tetragnathidae) and Araneus bicentenarius (Araneidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckwitt, R; Arcidiacono, S

    1994-03-04

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been used to amplify the portion of the Spidroin 1 gene that codes for the C-terminal part of the silk protein of the spider Nephila clavipes. Along with some substitution mutations of minor consequence, the PCR-derived sequence reveals an additional base missing from the previously published Nephila Spidroin 1 sequence. Comparison of the PCR-derived sequence with the equivalent region of Spidroin 2 indicates that the insertion of this single base results in greatly increased similarity in the resulting amino acid sequences of Spidroin 1 and Spidroin 2 (75% over 97 amino acids). The same PCR primers also amplified a fragment of the same length from Araneus bicentenarius. This sequence is also very similar to Spidroin 1 of Nephila (71% over 238 bases excluding the PCR primers, which translates into 76% over 79 amino acids).

  9. CRISPRs of Enterococcus faecalis and E. hirae isolates from pig feces have species-specific repeats but share some common spacer sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katyal, Isha; Chaban, Bonnie; Ng, Beata; Hill, Janet E

    2013-07-01

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) are currently a topic of interest in microbiology due to their role as a prokaryotic immune system. Investigations of CRISPR distribution and characterization to date have focused on pathogenic bacteria, while less is known about CRISPR in commensal bacteria, where they may have a significant role in the ecology of the microbiota of humans and other animals, and act as a recorder of interactions between bacteria and viruses. A combination of PCR and sequencing was used to determine prevalence and distribution of CRISPR arrays in Enterococcus faecalis and Enterococcus hirae isolates from the feces of healthy pigs. Both type II CRISPR-Cas and Orphan CRISPR (without Cas genes) were detected in the 195 isolates examined. CRISPR-Cas was detected in 52 (46/88) and 42 % (45/107) E. faecalis and E. hirae isolates, respectively. The prevalence of Orphan CRISPR arrays was higher in E. faecalis isolates (95 %, 84/88) compared with E. hirae isolates (49 %, 53/107). Species-specific repeat sequences were identified in Orphan CRISPR arrays, and 42 unique spacer sequences were identified. Only two spacers matched previously characterized pig virome sequences, and many were apparently derived from chromosomal sequences of enterococci. Surprisingly, 17 (40 %) of the spacers were detected in both species. Shared spacer sequences are evidence of a lack of species specificity in the agents and mechanisms responsible for integration of spacers, and the abundance of spacer sequences corresponding to bacterial chromosomal sequences reflects interspecific interactions within the intestinal microbiota.

  10. Comparison of Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis and Multilocus Sequence Typing for Differentiation of Hemolytic-Uremic Syndrome-Associated Escherichia coli (HUSEC) Collection Strains▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenke, Christian; Lindstedt, Björn Arne; Harmsen, Dag; Karch, Helge; Brandal, Lin Thorstensen; Mellmann, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat analysis (MLVA) was compared to multilocus sequence typing (MLST) to differentiate hemolytic uremic syndrome-associated enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli strains. Although MLVA—like MLST—was highly discriminatory (index of diversity, 0.988 versus 0.984), a low level of concordance demonstrated the limited ability of MLVA to reflect long-term evolutionary events. PMID:21832012

  11. Reinforcement of silencing at transposons and highly repeated sequences requires the concerted action of two distinct RNA polymerases IV in Arabidopsis

    OpenAIRE

    Pontier, Dominique; Yahubyan, Galina; Vega, Danielle; Bulski, Agnès; Saez-Vasquez, Julio; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Lerbs-Mache, Silva; Colot, Vincent; Lagrange, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    Recent genetic and biochemical studies have revealed the existence in plants of a fourth RNA polymerase, RNAPIV, which mediates siRNA accumulation and DNA methylation-dependent silencing of endogenous repeated sequences. Here, we show that Arabidopsis expresses, in fact, two evolutionarily related forms of RNAPIV, hereafter referred to as RNAPIVa and RNAPIVb. These two forms contain the same second-largest subunit (NRPD2), but differ at least by their largest subunit, termed NRPD1a and NRPD1b...

  12. A Possible Mechanism of Zika Virus Associated Microcephaly: Imperative Role of Retinoic Acid Response Element (RARE Consensus Sequence Repeats in the Viral Genome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashutosh Kumar

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Owing to the reports of microcephaly as a consistent outcome in the foetuses of pregnant women infected with ZIKV in Brazil, Zika virus (ZIKV - microcephaly etiomechanistic relationship has recently been implicated. Researchers, however, are still struggling to establish an embryological basis for this interesting causal handcuff. The present study reveals robust evidence in favour of a plausible ZIKV-microcephaly cause-effect liaison. The rationale is based on: (1 sequence homology between ZIKV genome and the response element of an early neural tube developmental marker ‘retinoic acid’ in human DNA and (2 comprehensive similarities between the details of brain defects in ZIKV-microcephaly and retinoic acid embryopathy. Retinoic acid is considered as the earliest factor for regulating anteroposterior axis of neural tube and positioning of structures in developing brain through retinoic acid response elements (RARE consensus sequence (5′–AGGTCA–3′ in promoter regions of retinoic acid-dependent genes. We screened genomic sequences of already reported virulent ZIKV strains (including those linked to microcephaly and other viruses available in National Institute of Health genetic sequence database (GenBank for the RARE consensus repeats and obtained results strongly bolstering our hypothesis that ZIKV strains associated with microcephaly may act through precipitation of dysregulation in retinoic acid-dependent genes by introducing extra stretches of RARE consensus sequence repeats in the genome of developing brain cells. Additional support to our hypothesis comes from our findings that screening of other viruses for RARE consensus sequence repeats is positive only for those known to display neurotropism and cause foetal brain defects (for which maternal-foetal transmission during developing stage may be required. The numbers of RARE sequence repeats appeared to match with the virulence of screened positive viruses. Although bioinformatic

  13. Isolation and characterization of an unusual repeated sequence from the ribosomal intergenic spacer of the crucifer Sisymbrium irio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grellet, F; Delcasso-Tremousaygue, D; Delseny, M

    1989-06-01

    A recombinant plasmid containing a 433 base pair (bp) Bam HI fragment from Sisymbrium irio genomic DNA was isolated and characterized. This fragment was shown to be a ribosomal intergenic spacer (IGS) sequence which is reiterated up to six times in the IGS and extends close to the 5' end of the 18S rRNA gene. The nucleotide sequence of the cloned element is composed of 10-11 40 bp blocks that are probably derived from a common ancestor. The presence of a similar sequence can be detected in the DNA of another Sisymbrium species and in Matthiola incana. Homology was also found with the last 43 nucleotides of the radish IGS 3' end, suggesting that there is possibly a common ancestral nucleotide motif in cruciferous IGS sequences. The cloned element hybridises to RNA transcripts, indicating that the S. irio IGS repetitive sequence is at least partially transcribed during the pre-rRNA transcription process.

  14. A novel approach to propagate flavivirus infectious cDNA clones in bacteria by introducing tandem repeat sequences upstream of virus genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Szu-Yuan; Wu, Ren-Huang; Tsai, Ming-Han; Yang, Chi-Chen; Chang, Chung-Ming; Yueh, Andrew

    2014-07-01

    Despite tremendous efforts to improve the methodology for constructing flavivirus infectious cDNAs, the manipulation of flavivirus cDNAs remains a difficult task in bacteria. Here, we successfully propagated DNA-launched type 2 dengue virus (DENV2) and Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) infectious cDNAs by introducing seven repeats of the tetracycline-response element (7×TRE) and a minimal cytomegalovirus (CMVmin) promoter upstream of the viral genome. Insertion of the 7×TRE-CMVmin sequence upstream of the DENV2 or JEV genome decreased the cryptic E. coli promoter (ECP) activity of the viral genome in bacteria, as measured using fusion constructs containing DENV2 or JEV segments and the reporter gene Renilla luciferase in an empty vector. The growth kinetics of recombinant viruses derived from DNA-launched DENV2 and JEV infectious cDNAs were similar to those of parental viruses. Similarly, RNA-launched DENV2 infectious cDNAs were generated by inserting 7×TRE-CMVmin, five repeats of the GAL4 upstream activating sequence, or five repeats of BamHI linkers upstream of the DENV2 genome. All three tandem repeat sequences decreased the ECP activity of the DENV2 genome in bacteria. Notably, 7×TRE-CMVmin stabilized RNA-launched JEV infectious cDNAs and reduced the ECP activity of the JEV genome in bacteria. The growth kinetics of recombinant viruses derived from RNA-launched DENV2 and JEV infectious cDNAs displayed patterns similar to those of the parental viruses. These results support a novel methodology for constructing flavivirus infectious cDNAs, which will facilitate research in virology, viral pathogenesis and vaccine development of flaviviruses and other RNA viruses. © 2014 The Authors.

  15. Sequence heterogeneity of the envelope -like domain in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abbreviations; LTR: long terminal repeat, ORF: open-reading frame, PCR: polymerase chain reaction, RT: reverse transcriptase gene. The current study aimed to investigate the evolution of env-like sequences in the Egyptian cotton Gossypium barbadense. DNA sequence determination and analysis of env -like sequences ...

  16. Recombination-Independent Recognition of DNA Homology for Repeat-Induced Point Mutation (RIP Is Modulated by the Underlying Nucleotide Sequence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Gladyshev

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Haploid germline nuclei of many filamentous fungi have the capacity to detect homologous nucleotide sequences present on the same or different chromosomes. Once recognized, such sequences can undergo cytosine methylation or cytosine-to-thymine mutation specifically over the extent of shared homology. In Neurospora crassa this process is known as Repeat-Induced Point mutation (RIP. Previously, we showed that RIP did not require MEI-3, the only RecA homolog in Neurospora, and that it could detect homologous trinucleotides interspersed with a matching periodicity of 11 or 12 base-pairs along participating chromosomal segments. This pattern was consistent with a mechanism of homology recognition that involved direct interactions between co-aligned double-stranded (ds DNA molecules, where sequence-specific dsDNA/dsDNA contacts could be established using no more than one triplet per turn. In the present study we have further explored the DNA sequence requirements for RIP. In our previous work, interspersed homologies were always examined in the context of a relatively long adjoining region of perfect homology. Using a new repeat system lacking this strong interaction, we now show that interspersed homologies with overall sequence identity of only 36% can be efficiently detected by RIP in the absence of any perfect homology. Furthermore, in this new system, where the total amount of homology is near the critical threshold required for RIP, the nucleotide composition of participating DNA molecules is identified as an important factor. Our results specifically pinpoint the triplet 5'-GAC-3' as a particularly efficient unit of homology recognition. Finally, we present experimental evidence that the process of homology sensing can be uncoupled from the downstream mutation. Taken together, our results advance the notion that sequence information can be compared directly between double-stranded DNA molecules during RIP and, potentially, in other processes

  17. Marked phenotypic heterogeneity associated with expansion of a CAG repeat sequence at the spinocerebellar ataxia 3/Machado-Joseph disease locus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cancel, G.; Abbas, N.; Stevanin, G. [Hopital de la Salpetriere, Paris (France)] [and others

    1995-10-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia 3 locus (SCA3) for type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neurodegenerative disorders, has been mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. ADCA type I patients from families segregating SCA3 share clinical features in common with those with Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the gene of which maps to the same region. We show here that the disease gene segregating in each of three French ADCA type I kindreds and in a French family with neuropathological findings suggesting the ataxochoreic form of dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy carries an expanded CAG repeat sequence located at the same locus as that for MJD. Analysis of the mutation in these families shows a strong negative correlation between size of the expanded CAG repeat and age at onset of clinical disease. Instability of the expanded triplet repeat was not found to be affected by sex of the parent transmitting the mutation. Evidence was found for somatic and gonadal mosaicism for alleles carrying expanded trinucleotide repeats. 36 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  18. Marked Phenotypic Heterogeneity Associated with Expansion of a CAG Repeat Sequence at the Spinocerebellar Ataxia 3/Machado-Joseph Disease Locus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cancel, Géraldine; Abbas, Nacer; Stevanin, Giovanni; Dürr, Alexandra; Chneiweiss, Hervé; Néri, Christian; Duyckaerts, Charles; Penet, Christiane; Cann, Howard M.; Agid, Yves; Brice, Alexis

    1995-01-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxia 3 locus (SCA3) for type I autosomal dominant cerebellar ataxia (ADCA type I), a clinically and genetically heterogeneous group of neuro-degenerative disorders, has been mapped to chromosome 14q32.1. ADCA type I patients from families segregating SCA3 share clinical features in common with those with Machado-Joseph disease (MJD), the gene of which maps to the same region. We show here that the disease gene segregating in each of three French ADCA type I kindreds and in a French family with neuropatho-logical findings suggesting the ataxochoreic form of dentatorubropallidoluysian atrophy carries an expanded CAG repeat sequence located at the same locus as that for MJD. Analysis of the mutation in these families shows a strong negative correlation between size of the expanded CAG repeat and age at onset of clinical disease. Instability of the expanded triplet repeat was not found to be affected by sex of the parent transmitting the mutation. Evidence was found for somatic and gonadal mosaicism for alleles carrying expanded trinucleotide repeats. ImagesFigure 3Figure 5 PMID:7573040

  19. Characterization of the patterns of polymorphism in a [open quotes]cryptic repeat[close quotes] reveals a novel type of hypervariable sequence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobson, D.P.; Schmeling, P.; Sommer, S.S. (Mayo Clinic/Foundation, Rochester, MN (United States))

    1993-08-01

    Alternating purine and pyrimidine repeats (RY(i)) are an abundant source of polymorphism. The subset with long tandem repeats of GT or AC (GT(i)) have been studied extensively, but cryptic RY(i) (i.e., no single tandem repeat predominates) have received little attention. The factor IX gene has a polymorphic cryptic RY(i) of 142-216 bp. Previously, there were four known polymorphic alleles, of the form AB, A[sub 2]B, A[sub 2]B[sub 2], and A[sub 3]B[sub 2], where A = (GT)(AC)[sub 3](AT)[sub 3](GT)(AT)[sub 4] and B = A with an additional 3' AT dinucleotide. To further characterize this locus, the authors examined more than 1,700 additional human chromosomes and determined the sequences of the homologous sites in orangutans and chimpanzees. The novel alleles found in humans expand the repertoire of A/B alleles to A[sub 0-4]B[sub 1] and A[sub 1-3]B[sub 2]. The A[sub n]B[sub 2] series are abundant in Caucasians but are absent in blacks and Asians. Conversely, the A[sub 0]B[sub 1] allele is common in blacks but is not found in more than 1,700 Caucasian chromosomes. The data are compatible with a model in which recombination is more frequent than polymerase slippage at this locus. In orangutans, the RY(i) is present, but the sequence is markedly different. An A/B-type of pattern was discerned in which B differs from A by an additional six (AT) dinucleotides at the 3' end. In chimpanzees, the size of the RY(i) locus was greatly expanded, and the sequence showed a novel pattern of hypervariability in which there are many tandem repeats of the form (GT)[sub n](AC)[sub 0](AT)[sub p](GT)[sub q](AT)[sub s], where n, o, p, q, and s are different integers. The sequences of the factor IX intron 1 cryptic RY(i) in three primates provide perspective on the range of possible patterns of polymorphism. Analysis of the patterns suggests how the RY(i) can be conserved during evolution, while the precise sequence varies. 25 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs.

  20. Sequence-specific DNA alkylation and transcriptional inhibition by long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates targeting CAG/CTG trinucleotide repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asamitsu, Sefan; Kawamoto, Yusuke; Hashiya, Fumitaka; Hashiya, Kaori; Yamamoto, Makoto; Kizaki, Seiichiro; Bando, Toshikazu; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    Introducing novel building blocks to solid-phase peptide synthesis, we readily synthesized long-chain hairpin pyrrole-imidazole (PI) polyamide-chlorambucil conjugates 3 and 4 via the introduction of an amino group into a GABA (γ-turn) contained in 3, to target CAG/CTG repeat sequences, which are associated with various hereditary disorders. A high-resolution denaturing polyacrylamide sequencing gel revealed sequence-specific alkylation both strands at the N3 of adenines or guanines in CAG/CTG repeats by conjugates 3 and 4, with 11bp recognition. In vitro transcription assays using conjugate 4 revealed that specific alkylation inhibited the progression of RNA polymerase at the alkylating sites. Chiral substitution of the γ-turn with an amino group resulted in higher binding affinity observed in SPR assays. These assays suggest that conjugates 4 with 11bp recognition has the potential to cause specific DNA damage and transcriptional inhibition at the alkylating sites. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Large-scale analysis of structural, sequence and thermodynamic characteristics of A-to-I RNA editing sites in human Alu repeats

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    Eisenberg Eli

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Alu repeats in the human transcriptome undergo massive adenosine to inosine RNA editing. This process is selective, as editing efficiency varies greatly among different adenosines. Several studies have identified weak sequence motifs characterizing the editing sites, but these alone do not account for the large diversity observed. Results Here we build a dataset of 29,971 editing sites and use it to characterize editing preferences. We focus on structural aspects, studying the double-stranded RNA structure of the Alu repeats, and show the editing frequency of a given site to depend strongly on the micro-structure it resides in. Surprisingly, we find that interior loops, and especially the nucleotides at their edges, are more likely to be edited than helices. In addition, the sequence motifs characterizing editing sites vary with the micro-structure. Finally, we show that thermodynamic stability of the site is important for its editing. Conclusions Analysis of a large dataset of editing events reveals more information on sequence and structural motifs characterizing the A-to-I editing process

  2. Localization and trafficking of an isoform of the AtPRA1 family to the Golgi apparatus depend on both N- and C-terminal sequence motifs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Chan Jin; Lee, Myoung Hui; Min, Myung Ki; Hwang, Inhwan

    2011-02-01

    Prenylated Rab acceptors (PRAs) bind to prenylated Rab proteins and possibly aid in targeting Rabs to their respective compartments. In Arabidopsis, 19 isoforms of PRA1 have been identified and, depending upon the isoforms, they localize to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), Golgi apparatus and endosomes. Here, we investigated the localization and trafficking of AtPRA1.B6, an isoform of the Arabidopsis PRA1 family. In colocalization experiments with various organellar markers, AtPRA1.B6 tagged with hemagglutinin (HA) at the N-terminus localized to the Golgi apparatus in protoplasts and transgenic plants. The valine residue at the C-terminal end and an EEE motif in the C-terminal cytoplasmic domain were critical for anterograde trafficking from the ER to the Golgi apparatus. The N-terminal region contained a sequence motif for retention of AtPRA1.B6 at the Golgi apparatus. In addition, anterograde trafficking of AtPRA1.B6 from the ER to the Golgi apparatus was highly sensitive to the HA:AtPRA1.B6 level. The region that contains the sequence motif for Golgi retention also conferred the abundance-dependent trafficking inhibition. On the basis of these results, we propose that AtPRA1.B6 localizes to the Golgi apparatus and its ER-to-Golgi trafficking and localization to the Golgi apparatus are regulated by multiple sequence motifs in both the C- and N-terminal cytoplasmic domains. © 2010 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. 5'-Terminal AUGs in Escherichia coli mRNAs with Shine-Dalgarno Sequences: Identification and Analysis of Their Roles in Non-Canonical Translation Initiation.

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    Heather J Beck

    Full Text Available Analysis of the Escherichia coli transcriptome identified a unique subset of messenger RNAs (mRNAs that contain a conventional untranslated leader and Shine-Dalgarno (SD sequence upstream of the gene's start codon while also containing an AUG triplet at the mRNA's 5'- terminus (5'-uAUG. Fusion of the coding sequence specified by the 5'-terminal putative AUG start codon to a lacZ reporter gene, as well as primer extension inhibition assays, reveal that the majority of the 5'-terminal upstream open reading frames (5'-uORFs tested support some level of lacZ translation, indicating that these mRNAs can function both as leaderless and canonical SD-leadered mRNAs. Although some of the uORFs were expressed at low levels, others were expressed at levels close to that of the respective downstream genes and as high as the naturally leaderless cI mRNA of bacteriophage λ. These 5'-terminal uORFs potentially encode peptides of varying lengths, but their functions, if any, are unknown. In an effort to determine whether expression from the 5'-terminal uORFs impact expression of the immediately downstream cistron, we examined expression from the downstream coding sequence after mutations were introduced that inhibit efficient 5'-uORF translation. These mutations were found to affect expression from the downstream cistrons to varying degrees, suggesting that some 5'-uORFs may play roles in downstream regulation. Since the 5'-uAUGs found on these conventionally leadered mRNAs can function to bind ribosomes and initiate translation, this indicates that canonical mRNAs containing 5'-uAUGs should be examined for their potential to function also as leaderless mRNAs.

  4. The DUB/USP17 deubiquitinating enzymes: A gene family within a tandemly repeated sequence, is also embedded within the copy number variable Beta-defensin cluster

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    Scott Christopher J

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The DUB/USP17 subfamily of deubiquitinating enzymes were originally identified as immediate early genes induced in response to cytokine stimulation in mice (DUB-1, DUB-1A, DUB-2, DUB-2A. Subsequently we have identified a number of human family members and shown that one of these (DUB-3 is also cytokine inducible. We originally showed that constitutive expression of DUB-3 can block cell proliferation and more recently we have demonstrated that this is due to its regulation of the ubiquitination and activity of the 'CAAX' box protease RCE1. Results Here we demonstrate that the human DUB/USP17 family members are found on both chromosome 4p16.1, within a block of tandem repeats, and on chromosome 8p23.1, embedded within the copy number variable beta-defensin cluster. In addition, we show that the multiple genes observed in humans and other distantly related mammals have arisen due to the independent expansion of an ancestral sequence within each species. However, it is also apparent when sequences from humans and the more closely related chimpanzee are compared, that duplication events have taken place prior to these species separating. Conclusions The observation that the DUB/USP17 genes, which can influence cell growth and survival, have evolved from an unstable ancestral sequence which has undergone multiple and varied duplications in the species examined marks this as a unique family. In addition, their presence within the beta-defensin repeat raises the question whether they may contribute to the influence of this repeat on immune related conditions.

  5. Single Strand Annealing Plays a Major Role in RecA-Independent Recombination between Repeated Sequences in the Radioresistant Deinococcus radiodurans Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ithurbide, Solenne; Bentchikou, Esma; Coste, Geneviève; Bost, Bruno; Servant, Pascale; Sommer, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is one of the most radioresistant organisms known. It is able to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Our work aims to highlight the genes involved in recombination between 438 bp direct repeats separated by intervening sequences of various lengths ranging from 1,479 bp to 10,500 bp to restore a functional tetA gene in the presence or absence of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. The frequency of spontaneous deletion events between the chromosomal direct repeats were the same in recA+ and in ΔrecA, ΔrecF, and ΔrecO bacteria, whereas recombination between chromosomal and plasmid DNA was shown to be strictly dependent on the RecA and RecF proteins. The presence of mutations in one of the repeated sequence reduced, in a MutS-dependent manner, the frequency of the deletion events. The distance between the repeats did not influence the frequencies of deletion events in recA + as well in ΔrecA bacteria. The absence of the UvrD protein stimulated the recombination between the direct repeats whereas the absence of the DdrB protein, previously shown to be involved in DNA double strand break repair through a single strand annealing (SSA) pathway, strongly reduces the frequency of RecA- (and RecO-) independent deletions events. The absence of the DdrB protein also increased the lethal sectoring of cells devoid of RecA or RecO protein. γ-irradiation of recA + cells increased about 10-fold the frequencies of the deletion events, but at a lesser extend in cells devoid of the DdrB protein. Altogether, our results suggest a major role of single strand annealing in DNA repeat deletion events in bacteria devoid of the RecA protein, and also in recA + bacteria exposed to ionizing radiation. PMID:26517555

  6. Single Strand Annealing Plays a Major Role in RecA-Independent Recombination between Repeated Sequences in the Radioresistant Deinococcus radiodurans Bacterium.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solenne Ithurbide

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is one of the most radioresistant organisms known. It is able to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Our work aims to highlight the genes involved in recombination between 438 bp direct repeats separated by intervening sequences of various lengths ranging from 1,479 bp to 10,500 bp to restore a functional tetA gene in the presence or absence of radiation-induced DNA double strand breaks. The frequency of spontaneous deletion events between the chromosomal direct repeats were the same in recA+ and in ΔrecA, ΔrecF, and ΔrecO bacteria, whereas recombination between chromosomal and plasmid DNA was shown to be strictly dependent on the RecA and RecF proteins. The presence of mutations in one of the repeated sequence reduced, in a MutS-dependent manner, the frequency of the deletion events. The distance between the repeats did not influence the frequencies of deletion events in recA+ as well in ΔrecA bacteria. The absence of the UvrD protein stimulated the recombination between the direct repeats whereas the absence of the DdrB protein, previously shown to be involved in DNA double strand break repair through a single strand annealing (SSA pathway, strongly reduces the frequency of RecA- (and RecO- independent deletions events. The absence of the DdrB protein also increased the lethal sectoring of cells devoid of RecA or RecO protein. γ-irradiation of recA+ cells increased about 10-fold the frequencies of the deletion events, but at a lesser extend in cells devoid of the DdrB protein. Altogether, our results suggest a major role of single strand annealing in DNA repeat deletion events in bacteria devoid of the RecA protein, and also in recA+ bacteria exposed to ionizing radiation.

  7. The soybean-Phytophthora resistance locus Rps1-k encompasses coiled coil-nucleotide binding-leucine rich repeat-like genes and repetitive sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhattacharyya Madan K

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A series of Rps (resistance to Pytophthora sojae genes have been protecting soybean from the root and stem rot disease caused by the Oomycete pathogen, Phytophthora sojae. Five Rps genes were mapped to the Rps1 locus located near the 28 cM map position on molecular linkage group N of the composite genetic soybean map. Among these five genes, Rps1-k was introgressed from the cultivar, Kingwa. Rps1-k has been providing stable and broad-spectrum Phytophthora resistance in the major soybean-producing regions of the United States. Rps1-k has been mapped and isolated. More than one functional Rps1-k gene was identified from the Rps1-k locus. The clustering feature at the Rps1-k locus might have facilitated the expansion of Rps1-k gene numbers and the generation of new recognition specificities. The Rps1-k region was sequenced to understand the possible evolutionary steps that shaped the generation of Phytophthora resistance genes in soybean. Results Here the analyses of sequences of three overlapping BAC clones containing the 184,111 bp Rps1-k region are reported. A shotgun sequencing strategy was applied in sequencing the BAC contig. Sequence analysis predicted a few full-length genes including two Rps1-k genes, Rps1-k-1 and Rps1-k-2. Previously reported Rps1-k-3 from this genomic region 1 was evolved through intramolecular recombination between Rps1-k-1 and Rps1-k-2 in Escherichia coli. The majority of the predicted genes are truncated and therefore most likely they are nonfunctional. A member of a highly abundant retroelement, SIRE1, was identified from the Rps1-k region. The Rps1-k region is primarily composed of repetitive sequences. Sixteen simple repeat and 63 tandem repeat sequences were identified from the locus. Conclusion These data indicate that the Rps1 locus is located in a gene-poor region. The abundance of repetitive sequences in the Rps1-k region suggested that the location of this locus is in or near a

  8. The N-terminal extension of the P. falciparum GBP130 signal peptide is irrelevant for signal sequence function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Corinna; Barniol, Luis; Hiss, Jan A; Przyborski, Jude M

    2017-07-17

    The malaria parasite P. falciparum exports a large number of proteins to its host cell, the mature human erythrocyte. Although the function of the majority of these proteins is not well understood, many exported proteins appear to play a role in modification of the erythrocyte following invasion. Protein export to the erythrocyte is a secretory process that begins with entry to the endoplasmic reticulum. For most exported proteins, this step is mediated by hydrophobic signal peptides found towards the N-terminal end of proteins. The signal peptides present on P. falciparum exported proteins often differ in length from those found in other systems, and generally contain a highly extended N-terminal region. Here we have investigated the function of these extended N-terminal regions, using the exported parasite protein GBP130 as a model. Surprisingly, several deletions of the extended N-terminal regions of the GBP130 signal peptide have no effect on the ability of the signal peptide to direct a fluorescent reporter to the secretory pathway. Addition of the same N-terminal extension to a canonical signal peptide does not affect transport of either soluble or membrane proteins to their correct respective subcellular localisations. Finally, we show that extended signal peptides are able to complement canonical signal peptides in driving protein traffic to the apicoplast of the parasite, and are also functional in a mammalian cell system. Our study is the first detailed analysis of an extended P. falciparum signal peptide and suggests that N-terminal extensions of exported Plasmodium falciparum proteins are not required for entry to the secretory system, and are likely to be involved in other, so far unknown, processes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  9. Sequence and expression pattern of a novel human orphan G-protein-coupled receptor, GPRC5B, a family C receptor with a short amino-terminal domain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bräuner-Osborne, Hans; Krogsgaard-Larsen, P

    2000-01-01

    Query of GenBank with the amino acid sequence of human metabotropic glutamate receptor subtype 2 (mGluR2) identified a predicted gene product of unknown function on BAC clone CIT987SK-A-69G12 (located on chromosome band 16p12) as a homologous protein. The transcript, entitled GPRC5B, was cloned......-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). GPRC5B displays homology to retinoic acid-inducible gene 1 (RAIG1, 33% sequence identity) and to several family C (mGluR-like) GPCRs (20-25% sequence identity). Both RAIG1 and GPRC5B have short extracellular amino-terminal domains (ATDs) that contrast the very long ATDs characterizing...

  10. N-terminal amino acid sequences of the major outer membrane proteins from a Neisseria meningitidis group B strain isolated in Brazil

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    Salvatore Giovanni De Simone

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available The four dominant outer membrane proteins (46, 38, 33 and 28 kDa were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE in a semi-purified preparation of vesicle membranes of a Neisseria meningitidis (N44/89, B:4:P1.15:P5.5,7 strain isolated in Brazil. The N-terminal amino acid sequence for the 46 kDa and 28 kDa proteins matched that reported by others for class 1 and 5 proteins respectively, whereas the sequence (25 amino acids for the 38 kDa (class 3 protein was similar to class 1 meningococcal proteins. The sequence for the 33 kDa (class 4 was unique and not homologous to any known protein.

  11. Melon Transcriptome Characterization: Simple Sequence Repeats and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Discovery for High Throughput Genotyping across the Species

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    José Miguel Blanca

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Melon ( L. ranks among the highest-valued fruit crops worldwide. Some genomic tools are available for this crop, including a Sanger transcriptome. We report the generation of 689,054 high-quality expressed sequence tags (ESTs from two 454 sequencing runs, using normalized and nonnormalized complementary DNA (cDNA libraries prepared from four genotypes belonging to the two subspecies and the main commercial types. 454 ESTs were combined with the Sanger available ESTs and de novo assembled into 53,252 unigenes. Over 63% of the unigenes were functionally annotated with Gene Ontology (GO terms and 21% had known orthologs of (L. Heynh. Annotation distribution followed similar tendencies than that reported for , suggesting that the dataset represents a fairly complete melon transcriptome. Furthermore, we identified a set of 3298 unigenes with microsatellite motifs and 14,417 sequences with single nucleotide variants of which 11,655 single nucleotide polymorphism met criteria for use with high-throughput genotyping platforms, and 453 could be detected as cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS. A set of markers were validated, 90% of them being polymorphic in a number of variable accessions. This transcriptome provides an invaluable new tool for biological research, more so when it includes transcripts not described previously. It is being used for genome annotation and has provided a large collection of markers that will allow speeding up the process of breeding new melon varieties.

  12. Detection of short repeated genomic sequences on metaphase chromosomes using padlock probes and target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis

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    Stougaard Magnus

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In situ detection of short sequence elements in genomic DNA requires short probes with high molecular resolution and powerful specific signal amplification. Padlock probes can differentiate single base variations. Ligated padlock probes can be amplified in situ by rolling circle DNA synthesis and detected by fluorescence microscopy, thus enhancing PRINS type reactions, where localized DNA synthesis reports on the position of hybridization targets, to potentially reveal the binding of single oligonucleotide-size probe molecules. Such a system has been presented for the detection of mitochondrial DNA in fixed cells, whereas attempts to apply rolling circle detection to metaphase chromosomes have previously failed, according to the literature. Methods Synchronized cultured cells were fixed with methanol/acetic acid to prepare chromosome spreads in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides. Apart from the slide format and the chromosome spreading everything was done essentially according to standard protocols. Hybridization targets were detected in situ with padlock probes, which were ligated and amplified using target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis, and detected by fluorescence labeling. Results An optimized protocol for the spreading of condensed metaphase chromosomes in teflon-coated diagnostic well-slides was developed. Applying this protocol we generated specimens for target primed rolling circle DNA synthesis of padlock probes recognizing a 40 nucleotide sequence in the male specific repetitive satellite I sequence (DYZ1 on the Y-chromosome and a 32 nucleotide sequence in the repetitive kringle IV domain in the apolipoprotein(a gene positioned on the long arm of chromosome 6. These targets were detected with good efficiency, but the efficiency on other target sites was unsatisfactory. Conclusion Our aim was to test the applicability of the method used on mitochondrial DNA to the analysis of nuclear genomes, in particular as

  13. Structure, organization, and sequence of alpha satellite DNA from human chromosome 17: evidence for evolution by unequal crossing-over and an ancestral pentamer repeat shared with the human X chromosome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waye, J S; Willard, H F

    1986-09-01

    The centromeric regions of all human chromosomes are characterized by distinct subsets of a diverse tandemly repeated DNA family, alpha satellite. On human chromosome 17, the predominant form of alpha satellite is a 2.7-kilobase-pair higher-order repeat unit consisting of 16 alphoid monomers. We present the complete nucleotide sequence of the 16-monomer repeat, which is present in 500 to 1,000 copies per chromosome 17, as well as that of a less abundant 15-monomer repeat, also from chromosome 17. These repeat units were approximately 98% identical in sequence, differing by the exclusion of precisely 1 monomer from the 15-monomer repeat. Homologous unequal crossing-over is suggested as a probable mechanism by which the different repeat lengths on chromosome 17 were generated, and the putative site of such a recombination event is identified. The monomer organization of the chromosome 17 higher-order repeat unit is based, in part, on tandemly repeated pentamers. A similar pentameric suborganization has been previously demonstrated for alpha satellite of the human X chromosome. Despite the organizational similarities, substantial sequence divergence distinguishes these subsets. Hybridization experiments indicate that the chromosome 17 and X subsets are more similar to each other than to the subsets found on several other human chromosomes. We suggest that the chromosome 17 and X alpha satellite subsets may be related components of a larger alphoid subfamily which have evolved from a common ancestral repeat into the contemporary chromosome-specific subsets.

  14. Characterisation of interaction between NS3 and NS5B protein of classical swine fever virus by deletion of terminal sequences of NS5B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yujing; Zhu, Zailing; Wang, Ping; Yu, Jialin; Wan, Lingzhu; Chen, Jun; Xiao, Ming

    2011-03-01

    The NS3-NS5B interaction of classical swine fever virus (CSFV) is important for viral replication. For characterisation of the interaction between the NS3 and NS5B, a series of NS5B mutants with deletion of N-, C-terminal amino acids and quadruple alanine substitution mutations were produced. GST pull-down assays and immunoprecipitation analyses showed that NS5B and some NS5B mutants have NS3 binding activity. Further experimental data indicated that CSFV NS5B might contain two NS3 binding sites, one covering amino acids 63-99 located at the N-terminal end, another covering amino acids 611-642 at the C-terminal end. Assays for RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) activity revealed that CSFV NS3 is able to enhance the RdRp activity of NS5B and some NS5B mutants in vitro. The enhancement might be obtained by NS3 binding to the two terminal sequences of NS5B, which could be attractive targets for drug development against CSFV. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. An overview of the sequence features of N- and C-terminal segments of the human chemokine receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raucci, Raffaele; Costantini, Susan; Castello, Giuseppe; Colonna, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    Chemokine receptors play a crucial role in the cellular signaling enrolling extracellular ligands chemotactic proteins which recruit immune cells. They possess seven trans-membrane helices, an extracellular N-terminal region with three extracellular hydrophilic loops being important for search and recognition of specific ligand(s), and an intracellular C-terminal region with three intracellular loops that couple G-proteins. Although the functional aspects of the terminal segments of the extra-and intra-cellular G proteins are universally identified, the molecular basis on which they rest are still unclear because they are not definable by means of X-rays due to their high mobility and are not easy to study in the membrane. The purpose of this work is to define which physical-chemical properties of the terminal segments of the human chemokine receptors are at the basis of their functional mechanisms. Therefore, we have evaluated their physical-chemical properties in terms of amino acid composition, local flexibility, disorder propensity, net charge distribution and putative sites of post-translational modifications. Our results support the conclusion that all 19 C-terminal and N-terminal segments of human chemokine receptors are very flexible due to the systematic presence of intrinsic disorder. Although, the purpose of this plasticity clearly appears that of controlling and modulating the binding of ligands, we provide evidence that the overlap of linearly charged stretches, intrinsic disorder and post-translational modification sites, consistently found in these motives, is a necessary feature to exert the function. The role of the intrinsic disorder has been discussed considering the structural information coming from intrinsically disordered model compounds which support the view that the chemokine terminals have to be considered as strong polyampholytes or polyelectrolytes where conformational ensembles and structural transitions between them are modulated by

  16. The complete mitochondrial genome sequence of Euphausia pacifica (Malacostraca: Euphausiacea) reveals a novel gene order and unusual tandem repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xin; Wang, Haiqing; Wang, Minxiao; Liu, Bin

    2011-11-01

    Euphausiid krill are dominant organisms in the zooplankton population and play a central role in marine ecosystems. Euphausia pacifica (Malacostraca: Euphausiacea) is one of the most important and dominant crustaceans in the North Pacific Ocean. In this paper, we described the gene content, organization, and codon usage of the E. pacifica mitochondrial genome. The mitochondrial genome of E. pacifica is 16 898 bp in length and contains a standard set of 13 protein-coding genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 22 transfer RNA genes. Translocation of three transfer RNAs (trnL(1), trnL(2), and trnW) was found in the E. pacifica mitochondrial genome when comparing with the pancrustacean ground pattern. The rate of K(a)/K(s) in 13 protein-coding genes among three krill is much less than 1, which indicates a strong purifying selection within this group. The largest noncoding region in the E. pacifica mitochondrial genome contains one section with tandem repeats (4.7 x 154 bp), which are the largest tandem repeats found in malacostracan mitochondrial genomes so far. All analyses based on nucleotide and amino acid data strongly support the monophyly of Stomatopoda, Penaeidae, Caridea, Brachyura, and Euphausiacea. The Bayesian analysis of nucleotide and amino acid datasets strongly supports the close relationship between Euphausiacea and Decapoda, which confirms traditional findings. The maximum likelihood analysis based on amino acid data strongly supports the close relationship between Euphausiacea and Penaeidae, which destroys the monophyly of Decapoda.

  17. G-Tetraplex-Induced FRET within Telomeric Repeat Sequences Using (Py) A-(Per) A as Energy Donor-Acceptor Pair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Rajen

    2016-01-01

    G-tetraplex induced fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) within telomeric repeat sequences has been studied using a nucleoside-tethered FRET pair embedded in the human telomeric G-quadruplex forming sequence (5'-A GGG TT(Py) A GGG TT(Per) A GGG TTA GGG-3', Py=pyrene, Per=perylene). Conformational change from a single strand to an anti-parallel G-quadruplex leads to FRET from energy donor ((Py) A) to acceptor ((Per) A). The distance between the FRET donor/acceptor partners was controlled by changing the number of G-quartet spacer units. The FRET efficiency decreases with increase in G-quartet units. Overall findings indicate that this could be further used for the development of FRET-based sensing and measurement techniques. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Large scale in-silico identification and characterization of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) from de novo assembled transcriptome of Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Santosh; Shah, Niraj; Garg, Vanika; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2014-06-01

    Transcriptomic data of C. roseus offering ample sequence resources for providing better insights into gene diversity: large resource of genic SSR markers to accelerate genomic studies and breeding in Catharanthus . Next-generation sequencing is an efficient system for generating high-throughput complete transcripts/genes and developing molecular markers. We present here the transcriptome sequencing of a 26-day-old Catharanthus roseus seedling tissue using Illumina GAIIX platform that resulted in a total of 3.37 Gb of nucleotide sequence data comprising 29,964,104 reads which were de novo assembled into 26,581 unigenes. Based on similarity searches 58 % of the unigenes were annotated of which 13,580 unique transcripts were assigned 5016 gene ontology terms. Further, 7,687 of the unigenes were found to have Cluster of Orthologous Group classifications, and 4,006 were assigned to 289 Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genome pathways. Also, 5,221 (19.64 %) of transcripts were distributed to 81 known transcription factor (TF) families. In-silico analysis of the transcriptome resulted in identification of 11,004 SSRs in 26.62 % transcripts from which 2,520 SSR markers were designed which exhibited a non-random pattern of distribution. The most abundant was the trinucleotide repeats (AAG/CTT) followed by the dinucleotide repeats (AG/CT). Location specific analysis of SSRs revealed that SSRs were preferentially associated with the 5'-UTRs with a predicted role in regulation of gene expression. A PCR validation of a set of 48 primers revealed 97.9 % successful amplification, and 76.6 % of them showed polymorphism across different Catharanthus species as well as accessions of C. roseus. In summary, this study will provide an insight into understanding the seedling development and resources for novel gene discovery and SSR development for utilization in marker-assisted selective breeding in C. roseus.

  19. Survey of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and their associated Cas proteins (CRISPR/Cas) systems in multiple sequenced strains of Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostria-Hernández, Martha Lorena; Sánchez-Vallejo, Carlos Javier; Ibarra, J Antonio; Castro-Escarpulli, Graciela

    2015-08-04

    In recent years the emergence of multidrug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae strains has been an increasingly common event. This opportunistic species is one of the five main bacterial pathogens that cause hospital infections worldwide and multidrug resistance has been associated with the presence of high molecular weight plasmids. Plasmids are generally acquired through horizontal transfer and therefore is possible that systems that prevent the entry of foreign genetic material are inactive or absent. One of these systems is CRISPR/Cas. However, little is known regarding the clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and their associated Cas proteins (CRISPR/Cas) system in K. pneumoniae. The adaptive immune system CRISPR/Cas has been shown to limit the entry of foreign genetic elements into bacterial organisms and in some bacteria it has been shown to be involved in regulation of virulence genes. Thus in this work we used bioinformatics tools to determine the presence or absence of CRISPR/Cas systems in available K. pneumoniae genomes. The complete CRISPR/Cas system was identified in two out of the eight complete K. pneumoniae genomes sequences and in four out of the 44 available draft genomes sequences. The cas genes in these strains comprises eight cas genes similar to those found in Escherichia coli, suggesting they belong to the type I-E group, although their arrangement is slightly different. As for the CRISPR sequences, the average lengths of the direct repeats and spacers were 29 and 33 bp, respectively. BLAST searches demonstrated that 38 of the 116 spacer sequences (33%) are significantly similar to either plasmid, phage or genome sequences, while the remaining 78 sequences (67%) showed no significant similarity to other sequences. The region where the CRISPR/Cas systems were located is the same in all the Klebsiella genomes containing it, it has a syntenic architecture, and is located among genes encoding for proteins likely involved in

  20. Genus-specific protein binding to the large clusters of DNA repeats (short regularly spaced repeats) present in Sulfolobus genomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peng, Xu; Brügger, Kim; Shen, Biao

    2003-01-01

    that are identical in sequence to one of the repeat variants in the S. solfataricus chromosome. Repeats from the pNOB8 cluster were amplified and tested for protein binding with cell extracts from S. solfataricus. A 17.5-kDa SRSR-binding protein was purified from the cell extracts and sequenced. The protein is N...... terminally modified and corresponds to SSO454, an open reading frame of previously unassigned function. It binds specifically to DNA fragments carrying double and single repeat sequences, binding on one side of the repeat structure, and producing an opening of the opposite side of the DNA structure. It also...... with a helix-turn-helix DNA-binding motif. Although this putative motif is shared by other archaeal proteins, orthologs of SSO454 were only detected in species within the Sulfolobus genus and in the closely related Acidianus genus. We infer that the genus-specific protein induces an opening of the structure...

  1. The pugilistDominant Mutation of Drosophila melanogaster: A Simple-Sequence Repeat Disorder Reveals Localized Transport in the Eye

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rong, Yikang S.; Golic, Mary M.; Golic, Kent G.

    2016-01-01

    The pugilist-Dominant mutation results from fusion of a portion of the gene encoding the tri-functional Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase (E.C.1.5.1.5, E.C.3.5.4.9, E.C.6.3.4.3) to approximately one kb of a heterochromatic satellite repeat. Expression of this fusion gene results in an unusual ring pattern of pigmentation around the eye. We carried out experiments to determine the mechanism for this pattern. By using FLP-mediated DNA mobilization to place different pugD transgenes at pre-selected sites we found that variation in repeat length makes a strong contribution to variability of the pug phenotype. This variation is manifest primarily as differences in the thickness of the pigmented ring. We show that similar phenotypic variation can also be achieved by changing gene copy number. We found that the pugD pattern is not controlled by wingless, which is normally expressed in a similar ring pattern. Finally, we found that physical injury to a pugD eye can lead to pigment deposition in parts of the eye that would not have been pigmented in the absence of injury. Our results are consistent with a model in which a metabolite vital for pigment formation is imported from the periphery of the eye, and pugD limits the extent of its transport towards the center of the eye, thus revealing the existence of a hitherto unknown mechanism of localized transport in the eye. PMID:26999432

  2. The pugilistDominant Mutation of Drosophila melanogaster: A Simple-Sequence Repeat Disorder Reveals Localized Transport in the Eye.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yikang S Rong

    Full Text Available The pugilist-Dominant mutation results from fusion of a portion of the gene encoding the tri-functional Methylene Tetrahydrofolate Dehydrogenase (E.C.1.5.1.5, E.C.3.5.4.9, E.C.6.3.4.3 to approximately one kb of a heterochromatic satellite repeat. Expression of this fusion gene results in an unusual ring pattern of pigmentation around the eye. We carried out experiments to determine the mechanism for this pattern. By using FLP-mediated DNA mobilization to place different pugD transgenes at pre-selected sites we found that variation in repeat length makes a strong contribution to variability of the pug phenotype. This variation is manifest primarily as differences in the thickness of the pigmented ring. We show that similar phenotypic variation can also be achieved by changing gene copy number. We found that the pugD pattern is not controlled by wingless, which is normally expressed in a similar ring pattern. Finally, we found that physical injury to a pugD eye can lead to pigment deposition in parts of the eye that would not have been pigmented in the absence of injury. Our results are consistent with a model in which a metabolite vital for pigment formation is imported from the periphery of the eye, and pugD limits the extent of its transport towards the center of the eye, thus revealing the existence of a hitherto unknown mechanism of localized transport in the eye.

  3. Functional analysis reveals the possible role of the C-terminal sequences and PI motif in the function of lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) orthologues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ming-Kun; Hsieh, Wen-Ping; Yang, Chang-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    Two lily (Lilium longiflorum) PISTILLATA (PI) genes, Lily MADS Box Gene 8 and 9 (LMADS8/9), were characterized. LMADS9 lacked 29 C-terminal amino acids including the PI motif that was present in LMADS8. Both LMADS8/9 mRNAs were prevalent in the first and second whorl tepals during all stages of development and were expressed in the stamen only in young flower buds. LMADS8/9 could both form homodimers, but the ability of LMADS8 homodimers to bind to CArG1 was relatively stronger than that of LMADS9 homodimers. 35S:LMADS8 completely, and 35S:LMADS9 only partially, rescued the second whorl petal formation and partially converted the first whorl sepal into a petal-like structure in Arabidopsis pi-1 mutants. Ectopic expression of LMADS8-C (with deletion of the 29 amino acids of the C-terminal sequence) or LMADS8-PI (with only the PI motif deleted) only partially rescued petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS9/pi plants. In contrast, 35:LMADS9+L8C (with the addition of the 29 amino acids of the LMADS8 C-terminal sequence) or 35S:LMADS9+L8PI (with the addition of the LMADS8 PI motif) demonstrated an increased ability to rescue petal formation in pi mutants, which was similar to what was observed in 35S:LMADS8/pi plants. Furthermore, ectopic expression of LMADS8-M (with the MADS domain truncated) generated more severe dominant negative phenotypes than those seen in 35S:LMADS9-M flowers. These results revealed that the 29 amino acids including the PI motif in the C-terminal region of the lily PI orthologue are valuable for its function in regulating perianth organ formation. PMID:22068145

  4. Subtyping Salmonella enterica serovar enteritidis isolates from different sources by using sequence typing based on virulence genes and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fenyun; Kariyawasam, Subhashinie; Jayarao, Bhushan M; Barrangou, Rodolphe; Gerner-Smidt, Peter; Ribot, Efrain M; Knabel, Stephen J; Dudley, Edward G

    2011-07-01

    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis is a major cause of food-borne salmonellosis in the United States. Two major food vehicles for S. Enteritidis are contaminated eggs and chicken meat. Improved subtyping methods are needed to accurately track specific strains of S. Enteritidis related to human salmonellosis throughout the chicken and egg food system. A sequence typing scheme based on virulence genes (fimH and sseL) and clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs)-CRISPR-including multi-virulence-locus sequence typing (designated CRISPR-MVLST)-was used to characterize 35 human clinical isolates, 46 chicken isolates, 24 egg isolates, and 63 hen house environment isolates of S. Enteritidis. A total of 27 sequence types (STs) were identified among the 167 isolates. CRISPR-MVLST identified three persistent and predominate STs circulating among U.S. human clinical isolates and chicken, egg, and hen house environmental isolates in Pennsylvania, and an ST that was found only in eggs and humans. It also identified a potential environment-specific sequence type. Moreover, cluster analysis based on fimH and sseL identified a number of clusters, of which several were found in more than one outbreak, as well as 11 singletons. Further research is needed to determine if CRISPR-MVLST might help identify the ecological origins of S. Enteritidis strains that contaminate chickens and eggs.

  5. "Unknown genome" proteomics: a new NADP-dependent epimerase/dehydratase revealed by N-terminal sequencing, inverted PCR, and high resolution mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simeonova, Diliana Dancheva; Susnea, Iuliana; Moise, Adrian; Schink, Bernhard; Przybylski, Michael

    2009-01-01

    We present here a new approach that enabled the identification of a new protein from a bacterial strain with unknown genomic background using a combination of inverted PCR with degenerate primers derived from N-terminal protein sequences and high resolution peptide mass determination of proteolytic digests from two-dimensional electrophoretic separation. Proteins of the sulfate-reducing bacterium Desulfotignum phosphitoxidans specifically induced in the presence of phosphite were separated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis as a series of apparent soluble and membrane-bound isoforms with molecular masses of approximately 35 kDa. Inverted PCR based on N-terminal sequences and high resolution peptide mass fingerprinting by Fourier transform-ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry provided the identification of a new NAD(P) epimerase/dehydratase by specific assignment of peptide masses to a single ORF, excluding other possible ORF candidates. The protein identification was ascertained by chromatographic separation and sequencing of internal proteolytic peptides. Metal ion affinity isolation of tryptic peptides and high resolution mass spectrometry provided the identification of five phosphorylations identified in the domains 23-47 and 91-118 of the protein. In agreement with the phosphorylations identified, direct molecular weight determination of the soluble protein eluted from the two-dimensional gels by mass spectrometry provided a molecular mass of 35,400 Da, which is consistent with an average degree of three phosphorylations.

  6. Phylogenetic relationships in Disa based on non-coding trnL-trnF chloroplast sequences: evidence of numerous repeat regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellstedt, D U; Linder, H P; Harley, E H

    2001-11-01

    Sequence data from the intron and spacer of the trnL-F chloroplast region elucidate the phylogenetic relationships of the tribe Diseae (Orchidoideae: Orchidaceae). Within Diseae, 41 species of Disa, two of Brownleea, three of Satyrium, and two of Corycium were included, with five species of Habenaria sensu lato (Orchideae) and one epidendroid as outgroups. The sequences revealed substitutions and considerable length variation, due mainly to the presence of repeat motifs. Phylogenetic analysis using parsimony revealed five distinct clades. The branching order of the five weakly supported the paraphyly of Diseae, with the successive divergence of Brownleea, Corycium, Habenaria, Satyrium, and Disa. Within the monophyletic Disa, three main groupings appeared, two strongly supported clades representing sect. Racemosae and sect. Coryphaea and the third grouping containing several clades currently grouped into sections based on morphological phylogenies. Some discrepancies between the molecular phylogeny and the phylogeny based on morphological characters may require reevaluation of some of the morphological characters. The presence of different numbers of repeat motifs, both among different taxa and within taxa, indicates that these characters may be phylogenetically informative at the population level.

  7. Variable number of tandem repeat markers in the genome sequence of Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the causal agent of black leaf streak disease of banana (Musa spp).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, S A L; Van der Lee, T A J; Ferreira, C F; Te Lintel Hekkert, B; Zapater, M-F; Goodwin, S B; Guzmán, M; Kema, G H J; Souza, M T

    2010-11-09

    We searched the genome of Mycosphaerella fijiensis for molecular markers that would allow population genetics analysis of this plant pathogen. M. fijiensis, the causal agent of banana leaf streak disease, also known as black Sigatoka, is the most devastating pathogen attacking bananas (Musa spp). Recently, the entire genome sequence of M. fijiensis became available. We screened this database for VNTR markers. Forty-two primer pairs were selected for validation, based on repeat type and length and the number of repeat units. Five VNTR markers showing multiple alleles were validated with a reference set of isolates from different parts of the world and a population from a banana plantation in Costa Rica. Polymorphism information content values varied from 0.6414 to 0.7544 for the reference set and from 0.0400 and 0.7373 for the population set. Eighty percent of the polymorphism information content values were above 0.60, indicating that the markers are highly informative. These markers allowed robust scoring of agarose gels and proved to be useful for variability and population genetics studies. In conclusion, the strategy we developed to identify and validate VNTR markers is an efficient means to incorporate markers that can be used for fungicide resistance management and to develop breeding strategies to control banana black leaf streak disease. This is the first report of VNTR-minisatellites from the M. fijiensis genome sequence.

  8. The Role of the Y-Chromosome in the Establishment of Murine Hybrid Dysgenesis and in the Analysis of the Nucleotide Sequence Organization, Genetic Transmission and Evolution of Repeated Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallaseth, Ferez Soli

    The Y-chromosome presents a unique cytogenetic framework for the evolution of nucleotide sequences. Alignment of nine Y-chromosomal fragments in their increasing Y-specific/non Y-specific (male/female) sequence divergence ratios was directly and inversely related to their interspersion on these two respective genomic fractions. Sequence analysis confirmed a direct relationship between divergence ratios and the Alu, LINE-1, Satellite and their derivative oligonucleotide contents. Thus their relocation on the Y-chromosome is followed by sequence divergence rather than the well documented concerted evolution of these non-coding progenitor repeated sequences. Five of the nine Y-chromosomal fragments are non-pseudoautosomal and transcribed into heterogeneous PolyA^+ RNA and thus can be retrotransposed. Evolutionary and computer analysis identified homologous oligonucleotide tracts in several human loci suggesting common and random mechanistic origins. Dysgenic genomes represent the accelerated evolution driving sequence divergence (McClintock, 1984). Sex reversal and sterility characterizing dysgenesis occurs in C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos} derivative strains. High frequency, random, multi-locus deletion products of the feral Y^{ rm Pos}-chromosome are generated in the germlines of F1(C57BL/6J X 129/SvY^{ rm Pos})(male) and C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos}(male) but not in 129/SvY^{rm Pos}(male). Equal, 10^{-1}, 10^ {-2}, and 0 copies (relative to males) of Y^{rm Pos}-specific deletion products respectively characterize C57BL/6JY ^{rm Pos} (HC), (LC), (T) and (F) females. The testes determining loci of inactive Y^{rm Pos}-chromosomes in C57BL/6JY^{rm Pos} HC females are the preferentially deleted/rearranged Y ^{rm Pos}-sequences. Disruption of regulation of plasma testosterone and hepatic MUP-A mRNA levels, TRD of a 4.7 Kbp EcoR1 fragment suggest disruption of autosomal/X-chromosomal sequences. These data and the highly repeated progenitor (Alu, GATA, LINE-1

  9. Translation complex profile sequencing to study the in vivo dynamics of mRNA-ribosome interactions during translation initiation, elongation and termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirokikh, Nikolay E; Archer, Stuart K; Beilharz, Traude H; Powell, David; Preiss, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Messenger RNA (mRNA) translation is a tightly controlled process that is integral to gene expression. It features intricate and dynamic interactions of the small and large subunits of the ribosome with mRNAs, aided by multiple auxiliary factors during distinct initiation, elongation and termination phases. The recently developed ribosome profiling method can generate transcriptome-wide surveys of translation and its regulation. Ribosome profiling records the footprints of fully assembled ribosomes along mRNAs and thus primarily interrogates the elongation phase of translation. Importantly, it does not monitor multiple substeps of initiation and termination that involve complexes between the small ribosomal subunit (SSU) and mRNA. Here we describe a related method, termed 'translation complex profile sequencing' (TCP-seq), that is uniquely capable of recording positions of any type of ribosome-mRNA complex transcriptome-wide. It uses fast covalent fixation of translation complexes in live cells, followed by RNase footprinting of translation intermediates and their separation into complexes involving either the full ribosome or the SSU. The footprints derived from each type of complex are then deep-sequenced separately, generating native distribution profiles during the elongation, as well as the initiation and termination stages of translation. We provide the full TCP-seq protocol for Saccharomyces cerevisiae liquid suspension culture, including a data analysis pipeline. The protocol takes ∼3 weeks to complete by a researcher who is well acquainted with standard molecular biology techniques and who has some experience in ultracentrifugation and the preparation of RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) libraries. Basic Bash and UNIX/Linux command skills are required to use the bioinformatics tools provided.

  10. Optimized AIR and investigational MOLLI cardiac T1 mapping pulse sequences produce similar intra-scan repeatability in patients at 3T.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, KyungPyo; Collins, Jeremy; Lee, Daniel C; Wilcox, Jane E; Markl, Michael; Carr, James; Kim, Daniel

    2016-10-01

    This study was conducted to improve the precision of arrhythmia-insensitive rapid (AIR) cardiac T1 mapping through pulse sequence optimization and then evaluate the intra-scan repeatability in patients at 3T against investigational modified Look-Locker inversion recovery (MOLLI) T1 mapping. In the first development phase (five human subjects), we implemented and tested centric-pair k-space ordering to suppress image artifacts associated with eddy currents. In the second development phase (15 human subjects), we determined optimal flip angles to reduce the measurement variation in T1 maps. In the validation phase (35 patients), we compared the intra-scan repeatability between investigational MOLLI and optimized AIR. In 23 cardiac planes, conventional centric k-space ordering (3.7%) produced significantly (p T1 , native blood T1 , post-contrast myocardial T1 , post-contrast blood T1 ), flip angles of 55-65° produced lower measurement variation while producing results that are not significantly different from those produced with the previously used flip angle of 35° (p > 0.89, intra-class correlation coefficient ≥ 0.95 for all four measurement types). Compared with investigational MOLLI (coefficient of repeatability, CR = 40.0, 77.2, 26.5, and 25.9 ms for native myocardial, native blood, post-contrast myocardial, and post-contrast blood T1 , and 2.0% for extracellular volume (ECV) measurements, respectively), optimized AIR (CR = 54.3, 89.7, 30.5, and 14.7 ms for native myocardial, native blood, post-contrast myocardial, and post-contrast blood T1 , and 1.6% for ECV measurements, respectively) produced similar absolute intra-scan repeatability in all 35 patients in the validation phase. High repeatability is critically important for longitudinal studies, where the goal is to monitor physiologic/pathologic changes, not measurement variation. Optimized AIR cardiac T1 mapping is likely to yield high scan-retest repeatability for pre-clinical and clinical

  11. The chloroplast genome sequence of the green alga Leptosira terrestris: multiple losses of the inverted repeat and extensive genome rearrangements within the Trebouxiophyceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Turmel Monique

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the Chlorophyta – the green algal phylum comprising the classes Prasinophyceae, Ulvophyceae, Trebouxiophyceae and Chlorophyceae – the chloroplast genome displays a highly variable architecture. While chlorophycean chloroplast DNAs (cpDNAs deviate considerably from the ancestral pattern described for the prasinophyte Nephroselmis olivacea, the degree of remodelling sustained by the two ulvophyte cpDNAs completely sequenced to date is intermediate relative to those observed for chlorophycean and trebouxiophyte cpDNAs. Chlorella vulgaris (Chlorellales is currently the only photosynthetic trebouxiophyte whose complete cpDNA sequence has been reported. To gain insights into the evolutionary trends of the chloroplast genome in the Trebouxiophyceae, we sequenced cpDNA from the filamentous alga Leptosira terrestris (Ctenocladales. Results The 195,081-bp Leptosira chloroplast genome resembles the 150,613-bp Chlorella genome in lacking a large inverted repeat (IR but differs greatly in gene order. Six of the conserved genes present in Chlorella cpDNA are missing from the Leptosira gene repertoire. The 106 conserved genes, four introns and 11 free standing open reading frames (ORFs account for 48.3% of the genome sequence. This is the lowest gene density yet observed among chlorophyte cpDNAs. Contrary to the situation in Chlorella but similar to that in the chlorophycean Scenedesmus obliquus, the gene distribution is highly biased over the two DNA strands in Leptosira. Nine genes, compared to only three in Chlorella, have significantly expanded coding regions relative to their homologues in ancestral-type green algal cpDNAs. As observed in chlorophycean genomes, the rpoB gene is fragmented into two ORFs. Short repeats account for 5.1% of the Leptosira genome sequence and are present mainly in intergenic regions. Conclusion Our results highlight the great plasticity of the chloroplast genome in the Trebouxiophyceae and indicate

  12. iPreny-PseAAC: Identify C-terminal Cysteine Prenylation Sites in Proteins by Incorporating Two Tiers of Sequence Couplings into PseAAC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yan; Wang, Zu; Li, Chunhui; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2017-01-01

    Occurring at the cysteine residue in the C-terminal of a protein, prenylation is a special kind of post-translational modification (PTM), which may play a key role for statin in altering immune function. Therefore, knowledge of the prenylation sites in proteins is important for drug development as well as for in-depth understanding the biological process concerned. Given a query protein whose C-terminal contains some cysteine residues, which one can be of prenylation or none of them can be prenylated? To address this problem, we have developed a new predictor, called "iPreny-PseAAC", by incorporating two tiers of sequence pair coupling effects into the general form of PseAAC (pseudo amino acid composition). It has been observed by four different cross-validation approaches that all the important indexes in reflecting its prediction quality are quite high and fully consistent to each other. It is anticipated that the iPreny-PseAAC predictor holds very high potential to become a useful high throughput tool in identifying protein C-terminal cysteine prenylation sites and the other relevant areas. To maximize the convenience for most experimental biologists, the webserver for the new predictor has been established at http://app.aporc.org/iPreny-PseAAC/, by which users can easily get their desired results without needing to go through the mathematical details involved in this paper. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Development of Highly Informative Genome-Wide Single Sequence Repeat Markers for Breeding Applications in Sesame and Construction of a Web Resource: SisatBase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dossa, Komivi; Yu, Jingyin; Liao, Boshou; Cisse, Ndiaga; Zhang, Xiurong

    2017-01-01

    The sequencing of the full nuclear genome of sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) provides the platform for functional analyses of genome components and their application in breeding programs. Although the importance of microsatellites markers or simple sequence repeats (SSR) in crop genotyping, genetics, and breeding applications is well established, only a little information exist concerning SSRs at the whole genome level in sesame. In addition, SSRs represent a suitable marker type for sesame molecular breeding in developing countries where it is mainly grown. In this study, we identified 138,194 genome-wide SSRs of which 76.5% were physically mapped onto the 13 pseudo-chromosomes. Among these SSRs, up to three primers pairs were supplied for 101,930 SSRs and used to in silico amplify the reference genome together with two newly sequenced sesame accessions. A total of 79,957 SSRs (78%) were polymorphic between the three genomes thereby suggesting their promising use in different genomics-assisted breeding applications. From these polymorphic SSRs, 23 were selected and validated to have high polymorphic potential in 48 sesame accessions from different growing areas of Africa. Furthermore, we have developed an online user-friendly database, SisatBase (http://www.sesame-bioinfo.org/SisatBase/), which provides free access to SSRs data as well as an integrated platform for functional analyses. Altogether, the reference SSR and SisatBase would serve as useful resources for genetic assessment, genomic studies, and breeding advancement in sesame, especially in developing countries. PMID:28878802

  14. pH- and thermal-dependent conformational transition of PGAIPG, a repeated hexapeptide sequence from tropoelastin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan-Yang; Hsieh, Tzu-Feng; Wei, Yen-Shan

    2005-04-01

    The secondary structure of PGAIPG (Pro-Gly-Ala-IIe-Pro-Gly), a repeated hexapeptide of tropoelastin, in buffer solution of different pH was determined by using attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy. The thermal-dependent structural change of PGAIPG in aqueous solution or in solid state was also examined by thermal FTIR microspectroscopy. The conformation of PGAIPG in aqueous solution exhibited a pH-dependent structural characterization. A predominant peak at 1614 cm(-1) (aggregated beta-sheet) with a shoulder near 1560 cm(-1) (beta-sheet) appeared in pH 5.5-8.5 buffer solutions. A new broad shoulder at 1651 cm(-1) (random coil and/or alpha-helix) with 1614 cm(-1) was observed in the pH 4.5 buffer solution. However, the broad shoulder at 1651 cm(-1) was converted to a maximum peak at 1679 cm(-1) (beta-turn/antiparallel beta-sheet) when the pH shifted from 4.5 to 3.5, but the original pronounced peak at 1614 cm(-1) became a shoulder. Once the pH was lowered to 2.5, the IR spectrum of PGAIPG was dominated by major absorption at 1679 cm(-1) with a minor peak at 1552 cm(-1) (alpha-helix/random coil). The result indicates that the pH was a predominant factor to transform PGAIPG structure from aggregated beta-sheet (pH 8.5) to beta-turn/intermolecular antiparallel beta-sheet (pH 2.5). Moreover, a partial conformation of PGAIPG with minor alpha-helix/random coil structures was also explored in the lower pH buffer solution. There was no thermal-dependent structural change for solid-state PGAIPG. The thermal-induced formation of aggregated beta-sheet for PGAIPG in aqueous solution was found from 28 to 30 degrees C, however, which might be correlated with the formation of an opaque gel that turned from clear solution. The formation of aggregated beta-sheet structure for PGAIPG beyond 30 degrees C might be due to the intermolecular hydrogen bonded interaction between the hydrophobic PGAIPG fragments induced by coacervation.

  15. Exploring applications of procerain b, a novel protease from Calotropis procera, and characterization by N-terminal sequencing as well as peptide mass fingerprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Abhay Narayan; Dubey, Vikash Kumar

    2011-07-01

    Procerain B is a novel cysteine protease isolated from Calotropis procera by our group and published recently. We have further characterized the enzyme by N-terminal sequencing and peptide mass fingerprinting. Procerain B showed maximum sequence similarity (80%) with Asclepain. Moreover, the characteristic VDWR motif of cysteine proteases is present in procerain B. The N-terminal and peptide mass fingerprinting analysis showed a distinct nature of the enzyme. Various applications of the enzyme were also evaluated. Procerain B is very effective in milk-clotting and may be a potential candidate for this process in the cheese industry. Additionally, the enzyme has potential application as dietary supplement to aid digestion. Effects of various metal ions on milk-clotting activity were also studied. The milk-clotting activity was increased in case of few metals while others have a negative effect. It is worth mentioning that the easy availability of plant material and simple purification method makes industrial production of the enzyme feasible. A protease with easy purification and suitable properties for application is always desired.

  16. Analysis of genetic diversity of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum from eggplant by mycelial compatibility, random amplification of polymorphic DNA (RAPD and simple sequence repeat (SSR analyses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatih Mehmet Tok

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The genetic diversity and pathogenicity/virulence among 60 eggplant Sclerotinia sclerotiorum isolates collected from six different geographic regions of Turkey were analysed using mycelial compatibility groupings (MCGs, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and simple sequence repeat (SSR polymorphism. By MCG tests, the isolates were classified into 22 groups. Out of 22 MCGs, 36% were represented each by a single isolate. The isolates showed great variability for virulence regardless of MCG and geographic origin. Based on the results of RAPD and SSR analyses, 60 S. sclerotiorum isolates representing 22 MCGs were grouped in 2 and 3 distinct clusters, respectively. Analyses using RAPD and SSR markers illustrated that cluster groupings or genetic distance of S. sclerotiorum populations from eggplant were not distinctly relative to the MCG, geographical origin and virulence diversity. The patterns obtained revealed a high heterogeneity of genetic composition and suggested the occurrence of clonal and sexual reproduction of S. sclerotiorum on eggplant in the areas surveyed.

  17. Detailed topology mapping reveals substantial exposure of the "cytoplasmic" C-terminal tail (CTT sequences in HIV-1 Env proteins at the cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan D Steckbeck

    Full Text Available Substantial controversy surrounds the membrane topology of the HIV-1 gp41 C-terminal tail (CTT. While few studies have been designed to directly address the topology of the CTT, results from envelope (Env protein trafficking studies suggest that the CTT sequence is cytoplasmically localized, as interactions with intracellular binding partners are required for proper Env targeting. However, previous studies from our lab demonstrate the exposure of a short CTT sequence, the Kennedy epitope, at the plasma membrane of intact Env-expressing cells, the exposure of which is not observed on viral particles. To address the topology of the entire CTT sequence, we serially replaced CTT sequences with a VSV-G epitope tag sequence and examined reactivity of cell- and virion-surface Env to an anti-VSV-G monoclonal antibody. Our results demonstrate that the majority of the CTT sequence is accessible to antibody binding on the surface of Env expressing cells, and that the CTT-exposed Env constitutes 20-50% of the cell-surface Env. Cell surface CTT exposure was also apparent in virus-infected cells. Passive transfer of Env through cell culture media to Env negative (non-transfected cells was not responsible for the apparent cell surface CTT exposure. In contrast to the cell surface results, CTT-exposed Env was not detected on infectious pseudoviral particles containing VSV-G-substituted Env. Finally, a monoclonal antibody directed to the Kennedy epitope neutralized virus in a temperature-dependent manner in a post-attachment neutralization assay. Collectively, these results suggest that the membrane topology of the HIV gp41 CTT is more complex than the widely accepted intracytoplasmic model.

  18. Mitochondrial DNA Sequence Variation in the Eastern House Mouse, Mus Musculus: Comparison with Other House Mice and Report of a 75-Bp Tandem Repeat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prager, E. M.; Tichy, H.; Sage, R. D.

    1996-01-01

    The control region and flanking tRNAs were sequenced from 139 Mus musculus mitochondrial DNAs (mtDNAs) from mice collected at 44 localities extending from Germany to Japan. Among the 36 types of M. musculus mtDNA resolved, five have an added 75-bp direct repeat; the two copies within an individual differ by two to four base substitutions. Among 90 M. domesticus mtDNAs sequenced, 12 new types were found; 96 M. domesticus types have now been identified by sequencing this segment. Representative mtDNAs from M. castaneus, M. macedonicus, M. spicilegus and M. spretus were also sequenced. A parsimony tree for the M. musculus mtDNAs is about half as deep as the tree for the M. domesticus mtDNAs, which is consistent with the idea that M. musculus is genetically less diverse and younger than M. domesticus. The patterns of variation as a function of position are similar but not identical in M. musculus and M. domesticus mtDNAs. M. castaneus and M. musculus mtDNAs are allied, at a tree depth about three times as great as the start of intra-M. musculus divergence. The coalescence of the M. musculus and M. castaneus mtDNAs is about half as deep as their coalescence with the M. domesticus mtDNA lineages. The mtDNAs of the aboriginal M. macedonicus and M. spicilegus are each other's closest relatives, at a tree depth greater than the deepest intracommensal node. The mtDNA results support the view that the aboriginal M. spretus is the sister group of the other five species. PMID:8722794

  19. Complete plastid genome sequencing of Trochodendraceae reveals a significant expansion of the inverted repeat and suggests a Paleogene divergence between the two extant species.

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    Yan-xia Sun

    Full Text Available The early-diverging eudicot order Trochodendrales contains only two monospecific genera, Tetracentron and Trochodendron. Although an extensive fossil record indicates that the clade is perhaps 100 million years old and was widespread throughout the Northern Hemisphere during the Paleogene and Neogene, the two extant genera are both narrowly distributed in eastern Asia. Recent phylogenetic analyses strongly support a clade of Trochodendrales, Buxales, and Gunneridae (core eudicots, but complete plastome analyses do not resolve the relationships among these groups with strong support. However, plastid phylogenomic analyses have not included data for Tetracentron. To better resolve basal eudicot relationships and to clarify when the two extant genera of Trochodendrales diverged, we sequenced the complete plastid genome of Tetracentron sinense using Illumina technology. The Tetracentron and Trochodendron plastomes possess the typical gene content and arrangement that characterize most angiosperm plastid genomes, but both genomes have the same unusual ∼4 kb expansion of the inverted repeat region to include five genes (rpl22, rps3, rpl16, rpl14, and rps8 that are normally found in the large single-copy region. Maximum likelihood analyses of an 83-gene, 88 taxon angiosperm data set yield an identical tree topology as previous plastid-based trees, and moderately support the sister relationship between Buxaceae and Gunneridae. Molecular dating analyses suggest that Tetracentron and Trochodendron diverged between 44-30 million years ago, which is congruent with the fossil record of Trochodendrales and with previous estimates of the divergence time of these two taxa. We also characterize 154 simple sequence repeat loci from the Tetracentron sinense and Trochodendron aralioides plastomes that will be useful in future studies of population genetic structure for these relict species, both of which are of conservation concern.

  20. Genetic Diversity of Pinus nigra Arn. Populations in Southern Spain and Northern Morocco Revealed By Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oussama Ahrazem

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Eight Pinus nigra Arn. populations from Southern Spain and Northern Morocco were examined using inter-simple sequence repeat markers to characterize the genetic variability amongst populations. Pair-wise population genetic distance ranged from 0.031 to 0.283, with a mean of 0.150 between populations. The highest inter-population average distance was between PaCU from Cuenca and YeCA from Cazorla, while the lowest distance was between TaMO from Morocco and MA Sierra Mágina populations. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA and Nei’s genetic diversity analyses revealed higher genetic variation within the same population than among different populations. Genetic differentiation (Gst was 0.233. Cuenca showed the highest Nei’s genetic diversity followed by the Moroccan region, Sierra Mágina, and Cazorla region. However, clustering of populations was not in accordance with their geographical locations. Principal component analysis showed the presence of two major groups—Group 1 contained all populations from Cuenca while Group 2 contained populations from Cazorla, Sierra Mágina and Morocco—while Bayesian analysis revealed the presence of three clusters. The low genetic diversity observed in PaCU and YeCA is probably a consequence of inappropriate management since no estimation of genetic variability was performed before the silvicultural treatments. Data indicates that the inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR method is sufficiently informative and powerful to assess genetic variability among populations of P. nigra.

  1. DEMONSTRATION BY MASS-SPECTROMETRY THAT PSEUDO-HEVEIN AND HEVEIN HAVE RAGGED C-TERMINAL SEQUENCES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    SOEDJANAATMADJA, UMS; HOFSTEENGE, J; JERONIMUSSTRATINGH, CM; BRUINS, AP; BEINTEMA, JJ

    1994-01-01

    The primary structure of pseudo-hevein, a minor hevein component from the latex of the rubber tree, Hevea brasiliensis, was determined. Six differences with the sequence of the major hevein component were found, one of which is a replacement of tryptophan by tyrosine in the carbohydrate binding

  2. Characterization, N-terminal sequencing and classification of Tolworthcin 524: A bacteriocin produced by Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. tolworthi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Cano, Rubén D; de la Fuente-Salcido, Norma M; Salcedo-Hernández, Rubén; León-Galván, M Fabiola; Bideshi, Dennis K; Hernández-Guzmán, Gustavo; Barboza-Corona, J Eleazar

    2014-12-01

    Bacteriocins synthesized by entomopathogenic Bacillus thuringiensis are gaining attention owing to their inhibitory effects against a wide variety of pathogenic bacteria. In the present study, we purified and characterized Tolworthcin 524, a bacteriocin synthesized by B. thuringiensis subsp. tolworthi, and compared it with other bacteriocins synthesized by B. thuringiensis. Tolworthcin 524 was separated and purified from the secretome of B. thuringiensis by fast protein liquid chromatography with a gel filtration column to obtain yields of 17% and a specific activity of ∼3600U/mgprotein. The purified product showed two peptides of ∼9 and 6kDa with antimicrobial activity in a gel-screening assay. The purified product was analyzed by two-dimensional electrophoresis and the resolved peptides of ∼9 and 6kDa with isoelectric points of ∼8 were sequenced. Partial sequences (METPVVQPR and DWTCWSCLVCAACS) were obtained suggesting that the ∼9 and 6kDa correspond to the prebacteriocin and mature Tolworthcin 524, respectively. Sequences showed high identity with Thurincin H and Thuricin 17 and had a conserved motif with other bacteriocins of B. thuringiensis. Based on sequence data, Tolworthcin 524 was classified in subclass II.2 (Thuricin-like peptides) of the Bacillus bacteriocin classification scheme. The larger peptide did not harbor a sequence suggestive of a signal peptide neither did it contain the double-glycine (GG) motif characteristic of the secretion leader recognized by the ABC transport system. Implications of these properties in Tolworthcin 524 secretion are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  3. Genome-Wide Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats and Efficient Development of Polymorphic SSR Markers Based on Whole Genome Re-Sequencing of Multiple Isolates of the Wheat Stripe Rust Fungus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Huaiyong; Wang, Xiaojie; Zhan, Gangming; Wei, Guorong; Zhou, Xinli; Zhao, Jing; Huang, Lili; Kang, Zhensheng

    2015-01-01

    The biotrophic parasitic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst) causes stripe rust, a devastating disease of wheat, endangering global food security. Because the Pst population is highly dynamic, it is difficult to develop wheat cultivars with durable and highly effective resistance. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs) are widely used as molecular markers in genetic studies to determine population structure in many organisms. However, only a small number of SSR markers have been developed for Pst. In this study, a total of 4,792 SSR loci were identified using the whole genome sequences of six isolates from different regions of the world, with a marker density of one SSR per 22.95 kb. The majority of the SSRs were di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. A database containing 1,113 SSR markers were established. Through in silico comparison, the previously reported SSR markers were found mainly in exons, whereas the SSR markers in the database were mostly in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 105 polymorphic SSR markers were confirmed in silico by their identical positions and nucleotide variations with INDELs identified among the six isolates. When 104 in silico polymorphic SSR markers were used to genotype 21 Pst isolates, 84 produced the target bands, and 82 of them were polymorphic and revealed the genetic relationships among the isolates. The results show that whole genome re-sequencing of multiple isolates provides an ideal resource for developing SSR markers, and the newly developed SSR markers are useful for genetic and population studies of the wheat stripe rust fungus.

  4. Genome-Wide Analysis of Simple Sequence Repeats and Efficient Development of Polymorphic SSR Markers Based on Whole Genome Re-Sequencing of Multiple Isolates of the Wheat Stripe Rust Fungus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huaiyong Luo

    Full Text Available The biotrophic parasitic fungus Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst causes stripe rust, a devastating disease of wheat, endangering global food security. Because the Pst population is highly dynamic, it is difficult to develop wheat cultivars with durable and highly effective resistance. Simple sequence repeats (SSRs are widely used as molecular markers in genetic studies to determine population structure in many organisms. However, only a small number of SSR markers have been developed for Pst. In this study, a total of 4,792 SSR loci were identified using the whole genome sequences of six isolates from different regions of the world, with a marker density of one SSR per 22.95 kb. The majority of the SSRs were di- and tri-nucleotide repeats. A database containing 1,113 SSR markers were established. Through in silico comparison, the previously reported SSR markers were found mainly in exons, whereas the SSR markers in the database were mostly in intergenic regions. Furthermore, 105 polymorphic SSR markers were confirmed in silico by their identical positions and nucleotide variations with INDELs identified among the six isolates. When 104 in silico polymorphic SSR markers were used to genotype 21 Pst isolates, 84 produced the target bands, and 82 of them were polymorphic and revealed the genetic relationships among the isolates. The results show that whole genome re-sequencing of multiple isolates provides an ideal resource for developing SSR markers, and the newly developed SSR markers are useful for genetic and population studies of the wheat stripe rust fungus.

  5. The C-terminal sequence of RhoB directs protein degradation through an endo-lysosomal pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dolores Pérez-Sala

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Protein degradation is essential for cell homeostasis. Targeting of proteins for degradation is often achieved by specific protein sequences or posttranslational modifications such as ubiquitination. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using biochemical and genetic tools we have monitored the localization and degradation of endogenous and chimeric proteins in live primary cells by confocal microscopy and ultra-structural analysis. Here we identify an eight amino acid sequence from the C-terminus of the short-lived GTPase RhoB that directs the rapid degradation of both RhoB and chimeric proteins bearing this sequence through a lysosomal pathway. Elucidation of the RhoB degradation pathway unveils a mechanism dependent on protein isoprenylation and palmitoylation that involves sorting of the protein into multivesicular bodies, mediated by the ESCRT machinery. Moreover, RhoB sorting is regulated by late endosome specific lipid dynamics and is altered in human genetic lipid traffic disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our findings characterize a short-lived cytosolic protein that is degraded through a lysosomal pathway. In addition, we define a novel motif for protein sorting and rapid degradation, which allows controlling protein levels by means of clinically used drugs.

  6. Analysis of genetic diversity and population structure of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis) from China and Malaysia based on species-specific simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, L X; Xiao, Y; Xia, W; Yang, Y D

    2015-12-08

    Genetic diversity and patterns of population structure of the 94 oil palm lines were investigated using species-specific simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers. We designed primers for 63 SSR loci based on their flanking sequences and conducted amplification in 94 oil palm DNA samples. The amplification result showed that a relatively high level of genetic diversity was observed between oil palm individuals according a set of 21 polymorphic microsatellite loci. The observed heterozygosity (Ho) was 0.3683 and 0.4035, with an average of 0.3859. The Ho value was a reliable determinant of the discriminatory power of the SSR primer combinations. The principal component analysis and unweighted pair-group method with arithmetic averaging cluster analysis showed the 94 oil palm lines were grouped into one cluster. These results demonstrated that the oil palm in Hainan Province of China and the germplasm introduced from Malaysia may be from the same source. The SSR protocol was effective and reliable for assessing the genetic diversity of oil palm. Knowledge of the genetic diversity and population structure will be crucial for establishing appropriate management stocks for this species.

  7. Quantity Matters: Children With Dyslexia Are Impaired in a Small, but Not Large, Number of Exposures During Implicit Repeated Sequence Learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xinjie; Tong, Shelley Xiuli

    2017-08-10

    The present study investigated the onset of statistical learning and examined whether the number of exposures to a repeated sequence influences the learning performance of children with dyslexia on a serial reaction time task. Three groups of children (29 with dyslexia, 29 age-matched controls, and 30 reading level-matched controls) were administered a serial reaction time task, and their statistical learning performances after a small and a large number of exposures (40 vs. 180 exposures) were recorded and compared. Children with dyslexia showed impaired statistical learning after a small number of exposures to a sequence, but intact statistical learning after a large number of exposures. In contrast, the age-matched and reading level-matched control groups showed intact statistical learning after both small and large numbers of exposures. Children with dyslexia also exhibited a slower learning rate than either control group. These results suggest that the amount of exposure to statistical patterns influences statistical learning performance in children with dyslexia.

  8. Sequences at the interface of the fifth immunoglobulin domain and first fibronectin type III repeat of the neural cell adhesion molecule are critical for its polysialylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew G; Foley, Deirdre A; Swartzentruber, Kristin G; Colley, Karen J

    2011-02-11

    Polysialic acid is an anti-adhesive glycan that modifies a select group of mammalian proteins. The primary substrate of the polysialyltransferases (polySTs) is the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Polysialic acid negatively regulates cell adhesion, is required for proper brain development, and is expressed in specific areas of the adult brain where it promotes on-going cell migration and synaptic plasticity. The first fibronectin type III repeat (FN1) of NCAM is required for polysialylation of the N-glycans on the adjacent immunoglobulin-like domain (Ig5), and acidic residues on the surface of FN1 play a role in polyST recognition. Recent work demonstrated that the FN1 domain from the unpolysialylated olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) was able to partially replace NCAM FN1 (Foley, D. A., Swartzentruber, K. G., Thompson, M. G., Mendiratta, S. S., and Colley, K. J. (2010) J. Biol. Chem. 285, 35056-35067). Here we demonstrate that individually replacing three identical regions shared by NCAM and OCAM FN1, (500)PSSP(503) (PSSP), (526)GGVPI(530) (GGVPI), and (580)NGKG(583) (NGKG), dramatically reduces NCAM polysialylation. In addition, we show that the polyST, ST8SiaIV/PST, specifically binds NCAM and that this binding requires the FN1 domain. Replacing the FN1 PSSP sequences and the acidic patch residues decreases NCAM-polyST binding, whereas replacing the GGVPI and NGKG sequences has no effect. The location of GGVPI and NGKG in loops that flank the Ig5-FN1 linker and the proximity of PSSP to this linker suggest that GGVPI and NGKG sequences may be critical for stabilizing the Ig5-FN1 linker, whereas PSSP may play a dual role maintaining the Ig5-FN1 interface and a polyST recognition site.

  9. Sequences at the Interface of the Fifth Immunoglobulin Domain and First Fibronectin Type III Repeat of the Neural Cell Adhesion Molecule Are Critical for Its Polysialylation*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Matthew G.; Foley, Deirdre A.; Swartzentruber, Kristin G.; Colley, Karen J.

    2011-01-01

    Polysialic acid is an anti-adhesive glycan that modifies a select group of mammalian proteins. The primary substrate of the polysialyltransferases (polySTs) is the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Polysialic acid negatively regulates cell adhesion, is required for proper brain development, and is expressed in specific areas of the adult brain where it promotes on-going cell migration and synaptic plasticity. The first fibronectin type III repeat (FN1) of NCAM is required for polysialylation of the N-glycans on the adjacent immunoglobulin-like domain (Ig5), and acidic residues on the surface of FN1 play a role in polyST recognition. Recent work demonstrated that the FN1 domain from the unpolysialylated olfactory cell adhesion molecule (OCAM) was able to partially replace NCAM FN1 (Foley, D. A., Swartzentruber, K. G., Thompson, M. G., Mendiratta, S. S., and Colley, K. J. (2010) J. Biol. Chem. 285, 35056–35067). Here we demonstrate that individually replacing three identical regions shared by NCAM and OCAM FN1, 500PSSP503 (PSSP), 526GGVPI530 (GGVPI), and 580NGKG583 (NGKG), dramatically reduces NCAM polysialylation. In addition, we show that the polyST, ST8SiaIV/PST, specifically binds NCAM and that this binding requires the FN1 domain. Replacing the FN1 PSSP sequences and the acidic patch residues decreases NCAM-polyST binding, whereas replacing the GGVPI and NGKG sequences has no effect. The location of GGVPI and NGKG in loops that flank the Ig5-FN1 linker and the proximity of PSSP to this linker suggest that GGVPI and NGKG sequences may be critical for stabilizing the Ig5-FN1 linker, whereas PSSP may play a dual role maintaining the Ig5-FN1 interface and a polyST recognition site. PMID:21131353

  10. Mutations in the carboxyl-terminal hydrophobic sequence of human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B alter transport and protein chaperone binding.

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Z.; Maidji, E; Tugizov, S; Pereira, L

    1996-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B (gB) plays a role in the fusion of the virion envelope with the host cell membrane and in syncytium formation in infected cells. Hydrophobic sequences at the carboxyl terminus, amino acids (aa) 714 to 771, anchor gB in the lipid bilayer, but the unusual length of this domain suggests that it may serve another role in gB structure. To explore the function(s) of this region, we deleted aa 717 to 747 (gB deltaI mutation), aa 751 to 771 (gB deltaII mutation), ...

  11. Formation of large viroplasms and virulence of Cauliflower mosaic virus in turnip plants depend on the N-terminal EKI sequence of viral protein TAV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angèle Geldreich

    Full Text Available Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV TAV protein (TransActivator/Viroplasmin plays a pivotal role during the infection cycle since it activates translation reinitiation of viral polycistronic RNAs and suppresses RNA silencing. It is also the major component of cytoplasmic electron-dense inclusion bodies (EDIBs called viroplasms that are particularly evident in cells infected by the virulent CaMV Cabb B-JI isolate. These EDIBs are considered as virion factories, vehicles for CaMV intracellular movement and reservoirs for CaMV transmission by aphids. In this study, focused on different TAV mutants in vivo, we demonstrate that three physically separated domains collectively participate to the formation of large EDIBs: the N-terminal EKI motif, a sequence of the MAV domain involved in translation reinitiation and a C-terminal region encompassing the zinc finger. Surprisingly, EKI mutant TAVm3, corresponding to a substitution of the EKI motif at amino acids 11-13 by three alanines (AAA, which completely abolished the formation of large viroplasms, was not lethal for CaMV but highly reduced its virulence without affecting the rate of systemic infection. Expression of TAVm3 in a viral context led to formation of small irregularly shaped inclusion bodies, mild symptoms and low levels of viral DNA and particles accumulation, despite the production of significant amounts of mature capsid proteins. Unexpectedly, for CaMV-TAVm3 the formation of viral P2-containing electron-light inclusion body (ELIB, which is essential for CaMV aphid transmission, was also altered, thus suggesting an indirect role of the EKI tripeptide in CaMV plant-to-plant propagation. This important functional contribution of the EKI motif in CaMV biology can explain the strict conservation of this motif in the TAV sequences of all CaMV isolates.

  12. Toxin A from Clostridium difficile binds to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids with terminal Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clark, G.F.; Krivan, H.C.; Wilkins, T.D.; Smith, D.F.

    1987-08-15

    The binding of Toxin A isolated from Clostridium difficile to rabbit erythrocyte glycolipids has been studied. Total lipid extracts from rabbit erythrocytes were subjected to thin-layer chromatography and toxin-binding glycolipids detected by using /sup 125/I-labeled Toxin A in a direct binding overlay technique. Two major and several minor toxin-binding glycolipids were detected in rabbit erythrocytes by this method. The results of structural analyses of the major toxin-binding glycolipids were consistent with a pentasaccharide-ceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) and a branched decasaccharide-ceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3(Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-6)Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc beta 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) previously identified as the two most abundant glycolipids in rabbit erythrocytes. /sup 125/I-Toxin A binding to these glycolipids could be inhibited by bovine thyroglobulin, monospecific antiserum to the toxin, or by treatment of the glycolipids with alpha-galactosidase. The absence of toxin interaction with isoglobotriaosylceramide (Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4Glc-Cer) isolated from canine intestine suggested that the GlcNAc residue present in the terminal Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GLcNAc sequence common to all known toxin binding glycoconjugates is required for carbohydrate-specific recognition by Toxin A. These observations are consistent with the proposed carbohydrate binding specificity of Toxin A for the nonreducing terminal sequence, Gal alpha 1-3Gal beta 1-4GlcNAc.

  13. Effects of a halogenated G-quadruplex ligand from the pyridine dicarboxamide series on the terminal sequence of XpYp telomere in HT1080 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidibe, Assitan; Hamon, Florian; Largy, Eric; Gomez, Dennis; Teulade-Fichou, Marie-Paule; Trentesaux, Chantal; Riou, Jean-François

    2012-12-01

    Non-canonical four-stranded structures called G-quadruplexes can form among telomere repeats during its replication. Small molecule ligands able to interact and to stabilize G-quadruplexes were shown to disrupt the binding of essential telomeric components, such as POT1 and to trigger a telomeric dysfunction associated with a delayed growth arrest in tumor cells. We describe here the chemical synthesis and the G-quadruplex binding properties of three halogenated analogs of the 360A ligand that belongs to the 2,6 pyridine dicarboxamide series. 360A is now commonly used as a benchmark both for biophysical and cellular assays as this compound was shown to display a potent affinity and selectivity for telomeric G-quadruplex DNA over duplex DNA and to induce delayed growth inhibition in HT1080 tumor cell line. Two biophysical assays indicate that, in most cases, the presence of the halogen atom seems to slightly improve the interaction with the telomeric quadruplex. For stability reasons, the bromo derivative (360A-Br) was selected for the cellular assays. Since POT1 participates to the fine tuning of the C-strand end resection during telomere replication, we investigated the effect of 360A-Br to alter the terminal nucleotide composition of XpYp telomere in HT1080 cells using C-STELA. HT1080 cells treated for up to 24 days with 360A-Br presented some minor but significant variations of C-strand terminal nucleotide composition, also observed with a partial siRNA depletion of POT1. The relevance of these minor modifications of the telomeric C-strand resection induced by 360A-Br in HT1080 cells are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Anisakis simplex complex: ecological significance of recombinant genotypes in an allopatric area of the Adriatic Sea inferred by genome-derived simple sequence repeats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mladineo, Ivona; Trumbić, Željka; Radonić, Ivana; Vrbatović, Anamarija; Hrabar, Jerko; Bušelić, Ivana

    2017-03-01

    The genus Anisakis includes nine species which, due to close morphological resemblance even in the adult stage, have previously caused many issues in their correct identification. Recently observed interspecific hybridisation in sympatric areas of two closely related species, Anisakis simplex sensu stricto (s.s.) and Anisakis pegreffii, has raised concerns whether a F1 hybrid generation is capable of overriding the breeding barrier, potentially giving rise to more resistant/pathogenic strains infecting humans. To assess the ecological significance of anisakid genotypes in the Adriatic Sea, an allopatric area for the two above-mentioned species, we analysed data from PCR-RFLP genotyping of the ITS region and the sequence of the cytochrome oxidase 2 (cox2) mtDNA locus to discern the parental genotype and maternal haplotype of the individuals. Furthermore, using in silico genome-wide screening of the A. simplex database for polymorphic simple sequence repeats or microsatellites in non-coding regions, we randomly selected potentially informative loci that were tested and optimised for multiplex PCR. The first panel of microsatellites developed for Anisakis was shown to be highly polymorphic, sensitive and amplified in both A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii. It was used to inspect genetic differentiation of individuals showing mito-nuclear mosaicism which is characteristic for both species. The observed low level of intergroup heterozygosity suggests that existing mosaicism is likely a retention of an ancestral polymorphism rather than a recent recombination event. This is also supported by allopatry of pure A. simplex s.s. and A. pegreffii in the geographical area under study. Copyright © 2017 Australian Society for Parasitology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Discovery and mapping of a new expressed sequence tag-single nucleotide polymorphism and simple sequence repeat panel for large-scale genetic studies and breeding of Theobroma cacao L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegre, Mathilde; Argout, Xavier; Boccara, Michel; Fouet, Olivier; Roguet, Yolande; Bérard, Aurélie; Thévenin, Jean Marc; Chauveau, Aurélie; Rivallan, Ronan; Clement, Didier; Courtois, Brigitte; Gramacho, Karina; Boland-Augé, Anne; Tahi, Mathias; Umaharan, Pathmanathan; Brunel, Dominique; Lanaud, Claire

    2012-01-01

    Theobroma cacao is an economically important tree of several tropical countries. Its genetic improvement is essential to provide protection against major diseases and improve chocolate quality. We discovered and mapped new expressed sequence tag-single nucleotide polymorphism (EST-SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers and constructed a high-density genetic map. By screening 149 650 ESTs, 5246 SNPs were detected in silico, of which 1536 corresponded to genes with a putative function, while 851 had a clear polymorphic pattern across a collection of genetic resources. In addition, 409 new SSR markers were detected on the Criollo genome. Lastly, 681 new EST-SNPs and 163 new SSRs were added to the pre-existing 418 co-dominant markers to construct a large consensus genetic map. This high-density map and the set of new genetic markers identified in this study are a milestone in cocoa genomics and for marker-assisted breeding. The data are available at http://tropgenedb.cirad.fr.

  16. Genetic Variation in Safflower (Carthamus tinctorious L. for Seed Quality-Related Traits and Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolmajid M. Rezaei

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Safflower (Carthamus tinctorious L. is an oilseed crop that is valued as a source of high quality vegetable oil. The genetic diversity of 16 safflower genotypes originated from different geographical regions of Iran and some with exotic origin were evaluated. Eight different seed quality-related traits including fatty acid composition of seed oil (stearic acid, palmitic acid, oleic acid and linoleic acid, the contents of, oil, protein, fiber and ash in its seeds, as well as 20 inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR polymorphic primers were used in this study. Analysis of variance showed significant variation in genotypes for the seed quality-related traits. Based on ISSR markers, a total of 204 bands were amplified and 149 bands (about 70% of these were polymorphic. Cluster analysis based on either biochemical or molecular markers classified the genotypes into four groups, showing some similarities between molecular and biochemical markers for evaluated genotypes. A logical similarity between the genotype clusters based on molecular data with their geographical origins was observed.

  17. [Genetic diversity analysis of Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense populations from China using Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats-PCR (ISSR-PCR) technique].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, He; Zhang, Xin; Pu, Jinji; Qi, Yanxiang; Lu, Ying; Yu, Qunfang; Zhang, Huiqiang; Xie, Yixian

    2015-06-04

    We used Inter-Simple Sequence Repeats (ISSR) markers to reveal the genetic diversity of 95 Fusarium oxysporum f. sp. cubense ( FOC ) isolates from banana in China, for the rational control of the disease. Eight primers were chosen for analyzing FOC isolates to study their genetic diversity by ISSR-PCR. All isolates were clustered using Unweighted Pair-Group Method with Arithmetic means (UPGMA) analysis by NTSYSpc v2.10e software. A total of 52 sites were generated, among them 92.3% were polymorphic. Genetic distance was 0.57 to 1.00 based on the Nei's standard. Isolates were grouped into six distinct clusters (A, B, C, D, E and F) based on ISSR analysis using a genetic distance threshold of 0.68, the proportion of 51.06%, 39.58%, 5.20%, 2.08%, 1.04%, and 1.04%, respectively. There were high levels of genetic variation among the FOC isolates, and the ISSR clustering groups had obvious correlation with hosts and races of the pathogen.

  18. [Simple sequence repeat variation and small-scale spatial autocorrelation analysis on smooth-shell populations of Oncomelania hupensis in Sichuan province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Jun-tao; Zhou, Yi-biao; Zhang, Zhi-jie; Liu, Gang-ming; Yihuo, Wu-li; Wang, Hai-yin; Zhao, Gen-ming

    2009-05-01

    To analysis the spatial autocorrelation on the small-scale distribution of the genetic variation in the population of Oncomelania hupensis in Puge county, Sichuan province, using simple sequence repeat (SSR) marker. 5 pairs of SSR primer were used to amplify the genomic DNA of Oncomelania hupensis, and the alleles with frequency ranging from 15% to 85% were used to calculate Moran's I spatial autocorrelation coefficients in 14 distance band based on equal numbers of paired samples. A total of 274 alleles were scored by 5 pairs of SSR primer, the average polymorphic information content of the 274 alleles were 0.965 which indicated a high level of genetic diversity. 39 alleles showed different patterns of positive spatial autocorrelation of genetic variation, which was non-random spatial structure. When the distance band increased, the spatial auto-correlativity decreased based on the average Moran's I value at 14 distance band. The alleles which showed a negative spatial autocorrelation were not found in any distance band. The spatial distribution of the genetic variation of SSR showed positive spatial autocorrelation in the population of Oncomelania hupensis, and the spatial auto-correlativity decreased with the increase of distance band.

  19. Genetic diversity in domesticated soybean (Glycine max) and its wild progenitor (Glycine soja) for simple sequence repeat and single-nucleotide polymorphism loci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ying-Hui; Li, Wei; Zhang, Chen; Yang, Liang; Chang, Ru-Zhen; Gaut, Brandon S; Qiu, Li-Juan

    2010-10-01

    • The study of genetic diversity between a crop and its wild relatives may yield fundamental insights into evolutionary history and the process of domestication. • In this study, we genotyped a sample of 303 accessions of domesticated soybean (Glycine max) and its wild progenitor Glycine soja with 99 microsatellite markers and 554 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers. • The simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci averaged 21.5 alleles per locus and overall Nei's gene diversity of 0.77. The SNPs had substantially lower genetic diversity (0.35) than SSRs. A SSR analyses indicated that G. soja exhibited higher diversity than G. max, but SNPs provided a slightly different snapshot of diversity between the two taxa. For both marker types, the primary division of genetic diversity was between the wild and domesticated accessions. Within taxa, G. max consisted of four geographic regions in China. G. soja formed six subgroups. Genealogical analyses indicated that cultivated soybean tended to form a monophyletic clade with respect to G. soja. • G. soja and G. max represent distinct germplasm pools. Limited evidence of admixture was discovered between these two species. Overall, our analyses are consistent with the origin of G. max from regions along the Yellow River of China.

  20. Effects of genotoxicity and its consequences at the population level in sexual and asexual Artemia assessed by analysis of inter-simple sequence repeats (ISSR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukumaran, Sandhya; Grant, Alastair

    2013-09-18

    There is considerable evidence that genetic damage in organisms occurs in the environment as a result of exposure to genotoxins and ionising radiation, but we have limited understanding of the extent to which this results in adverse consequences at a population level. We used inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers to quantify genotoxic effects of the mutagen ethylmethane sulfonate (EMS) on a sexual (Artemia franciscana) and an asexual (Artemia parthenogenetica) species of brine shrimp. The method provides information similar to that obtained with assessment of RAPD (random amplification of polymorphic DNA) but is more robust. Genetic damage was transmitted to the F1 generation in both Artemia species, but the sexual species showed a greater degree of recovery, as shown by higher values of genomic template stability. There was a strong correlation between DNA damage and effects on individual fitness parameters: size, survival, reproduction and population growth. These effects persisted into the F2 generation in A. parthenogenetica, but in the sexual A. franciscana only effects on fecundity continued beyond the exposed generation, even though there were substantial alterations in ISSR patterns in the F1 generation. Genetic biomarkers can thus be indicative of effects at the population level, but sexually reproducing species have a considerable assimilative capacity for the effects of genotoxins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Genomic instability measured by inter-(simple sequence repeat) PCR and high-resolution microsatellite instability are prognostic of colorectal carcinoma survival after surgical resection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenner, Bruce M; Swede, Helen; Jones, Beth A; Anderson, Garth R; Stoler, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    During the multiyear progression to colorectal cancer, numerous genomic alterations arise in events ranging from single base mutations to gains or losses of entire chromosomes. A single genetic change might not stand out as an independent predictor of outcome. The goal of this study was to determine if more comprehensive measurements of genomic instability provide clinically relevant prognostic information. Our study included 65 sporadic colorectal cancer patients diagnosed from 1987 to 1991 with last follow-up ascertained in 2006. We estimated an overall tally of alterations using the genome-wide sampling technique of inter-(simple sequence repeat [SSR]) polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and evaluated its relationship with all-cause survival. We also extended and sensitized the Bethesda criteria for microsatellite instability (MSI), by analyzing 348 microsatellite markers instead of the normal five. We expanded the MSI categories into four levels: MSI stable (MSS), very low-level MSI, moderately low-level MSI, and classical high-level MSI. Tumors with genomic instability above the median value of 2.6% as measured by inter-SSR PCR, were associated with far greater risk of death compared to tumors with lower levels of genomic instability. Adverse outcome was most pronounced for patients presenting with stage 3 disease. A gradient of increased survival was observed across increasing MSI levels but did not reach statistical significance. Our findings suggest genomic instabilities quantified by inter-SSR PCR and increased precision in MSI values may be clinically useful tools for estimating prognosis in colorectal cancer.

  2. Reinforcement of silencing at transposons and highly repeated sequences requires the concerted action of two distinct RNA polymerases IV in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontier, Dominique; Yahubyan, Galina; Vega, Danielle; Bulski, Agnès; Saez-Vasquez, Julio; Hakimi, Mohamed-Ali; Lerbs-Mache, Silva; Colot, Vincent; Lagrange, Thierry

    2005-09-01

    Recent genetic and biochemical studies have revealed the existence in plants of a fourth RNA polymerase, RNAPIV, which mediates siRNA accumulation and DNA methylation-dependent silencing of endogenous repeated sequences. Here, we show that Arabidopsis expresses, in fact, two evolutionarily related forms of RNAPIV, hereafter referred to as RNAPIVa and RNAPIVb. These two forms contain the same second-largest subunit (NRPD2), but differ at least by their largest subunit, termed NRPD1a and NRPD1b. Unlike NRPD1a, NRPD1b possesses a reiterated CTD, a feature that also characterizes the largest subunit of RNAPII. Our data indicate that RNAPIVb is the most abundant form of RNAPIV in Arabidopsis. Selective disruption of either form of RNAPIV indicates that RNAPIVa-dependent siRNA accumulation is not sufficient per se to drive robust silencing at endogenous loci and that high levels of DNA methylation and silencing depend on siRNA that are accumulated through a pathway involving the concerted action of both RNAPIV forms. Taken together, our results imply the existence of a novel two-step mechanism in siRNA synthesis at highly methylated loci, with RNAPIVb being an essential component of a self-reinforcing loop coupling de novo DNA methylation to siRNA production.

  3. De novo transcriptome sequencing and analysis of Coccinella septempunctata L. in non-diapause, diapause and diapause-terminated states to identify diapause-associated genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Lisheng; Han, Yanhua; Ren, Xiaoyun; Huang, Jian; Chen, Hongyin

    2015-12-21

    The most common ladybird beetle, Coccinella septempunctata L., is an excellent predator of crop pests such as aphids and white flies, and it shows a wide range of adaptability, a large appetite and a high reproductive ability. Diapause research plays an important role in the artificial propagation and shelf-life extension of insect products. Although this lady beetle's regulatory, physiological and biochemical characteristics in the diapause period are well understood, the molecular mechanism of diapause remains unknown. Therefore, we collected female adults in three different states, i.e., non-diapause, diapause and diapause termination, for transcriptome sequencing. After transcriptome sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform with pretreatment, a total of 417.6 million clean reads from nine samples were filtered using the program FASTX (version 0.0). Additionally, 106,262 contigs were assembled into 82,820 unigenes with an average length of 921 bp and an N50 of 1,241 bp. All of the unigenes were annotated through BLASTX alignment against the Nr or UniProt database, and 37,872 unigenes were matched. We performed further analysis of these unigenes using the Clusters of Orthologous Groups of proteins (COG), Gene Ontology (GO), and the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases. Through pairwise comparisons of the non-diapause (ND), diapause (D), and diapause-terminated (DT) groups, 3,501 and 1,427 differentially expressed genes (DEGs) were identified between D and ND and between DT and D, respectively. Moreover, 443 of the DEGs were specifically expressed during the diapause period (i.e., DEGs that were expressed at the highest or lowest levels during diapause compared with the other stages). GO function and KEGG pathway enrichment were performed on all DEGs and showed that RNA-directed DNA polymerase activity and fatty acid metabolism were significantly affected. Furthermore, eight specific expressed genes were selected for validation using q

  4. The characterization of a new set of EST-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers as a resource for the genetic analysis of Phaseolus vulgaris

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Over recent years, a growing effort has been made to develop microsatellite markers for the genomic analysis of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) to broaden the knowledge of the molecular genetic basis of this species. The availability of large sets of expressed sequence tags (ESTs) in public databases has given rise to an expedient approach for the identification of SSRs (Simple Sequence Repeats), specifically EST-derived SSRs. In the present work, a battery of new microsatellite markers was obtained from a search of the Phaseolus vulgaris EST database. The diversity, degree of transferability and polymorphism of these markers were tested. Results From 9,583 valid ESTs, 4,764 had microsatellite motifs, from which 377 were used to design primers, and 302 (80.11%) showed good amplification quality. To analyze transferability, a group of 167 SSRs were tested, and the results showed that they were 82% transferable across at least one species. The highest amplification rates were observed between the species from the Phaseolus (63.7%), Vigna (25.9%), Glycine (19.8%), Medicago (10.2%), Dipterix (6%) and Arachis (1.8%) genera. The average PIC (Polymorphism Information Content) varied from 0.53 for genomic SSRs to 0.47 for EST-SSRs, and the average number of alleles per locus was 4 and 3, respectively. Among the 315 newly tested SSRs in the BJ (BAT93 X Jalo EEP558) population, 24% (76) were polymorphic. The integration of these segregant loci into a framework map composed of 123 previously obtained SSR markers yielded a total of 199 segregant loci, of which 182 (91.5%) were mapped to 14 linkage groups, resulting in a map length of 1,157 cM. Conclusions A total of 302 newly developed EST-SSR markers, showing good amplification quality, are available for the genetic analysis of Phaseolus vulgaris. These markers showed satisfactory rates of transferability, especially between species that have great economic and genomic values. Their diversity was comparable to

  5. Genetic analysis and molecular characterization of Chinese sesame (Sesamum indicum L.) cultivars using insertion-deletion (InDel) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kun; Yang, Minmin; Liu, Hongyan; Tao, Ye; Mei, Ju; Zhao, Yingzhong

    2014-03-19

    Sesame is an important and ancient oil crop in tropical and subtropical areas. China is one of the most important sesame producing countries with many germplasm accessions and excellent cultivars. Domestication and modern plant breeding have presumably narrowed the genetic basis of cultivated sesame. Several modern sesame cultivars were bred with a limited number of landrace cultivars in their pedigree. The genetic variation was subsequently reduced by genetic drift and selection. Characterization of genetic diversity of these cultivars by molecular markers is of great value to assist parental line selection and breeding strategy design. Three hundred and forty nine simple sequence repeat (SSR) and 79 insertion-deletion (InDel) markers were developed from cDNA library and reduced-representation sequencing of a sesame cultivar Zhongzhi 14, respectively. Combined with previously published SSR markers, 88 polymorphic markers were used to assess the genetic diversity, phylogenetic relationships, population structure, and allele distribution among 130 Chinese sesame accessions including 82 cultivars, 44 landraces and 4 wild germplasm accessions. A total of 325 alleles were detected, with the average gene diversity of 0.432. Model-based structure analysis revealed the presence of five subgroups belonging to two main groups, which were consistent with the results from principal coordinate analysis (PCA), phylogenetic clustering and analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA). Several missing or unique alleles were identified from particular types, subgroups or families, even though they share one or both parental/progenitor lines. This report presented a by far most comprehensive characterization of the molecular and genetic diversity of sesame cultivars in China. InDels are more polymorphic than SSRs, but their ability for deciphering genetic diversity compared to the later. Improved sesame cultivars have narrower genetic basis than landraces, reflecting the effect of genetic

  6. In silico polymorphism analysis for the development of simple sequence repeat and transposon markers and construction of linkage map in cultivated peanut

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirasawa Kenta

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peanut (Arachis hypogaea is an autogamous allotetraploid legume (2n = 4x = 40 that is widely cultivated as a food and oil crop. More than 6,000 DNA markers have been developed in Arachis spp., but high-density linkage maps useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding have not been constructed due to extremely low genetic diversity. Polymorphic marker loci are useful for the construction of such high-density linkage maps. The present study used in silico analysis to develop simple sequence repeat-based and transposon-based markers. Results The use of in silico analysis increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development by more than 3-fold. In total, 926 (34.2% of 2,702 markers showed polymorphisms between parental lines of the mapping population. Linkage analysis of the 926 markers along with 253 polymorphic markers selected from 4,449 published markers generated 21 linkage groups covering 2,166.4 cM with 1,114 loci. Based on the map thus produced, 23 quantitative trait loci (QTLs for 15 agronomical traits were detected. Another linkage map with 326 loci was also constructed and revealed a relationship between the genotypes of the FAD2 genes and the ratio of oleic/linoleic acid in peanut seed. Conclusions In silico analysis of polymorphisms increased the efficiency of polymorphic marker development, and contributed to the construction of high-density linkage maps in cultivated peanut. The resultant maps were applicable to QTL analysis. Marker subsets and linkage maps developed in this study should be useful for genetics, genomics, and breeding in Arachis. The data are available at the Kazusa DNA Marker Database (http://marker.kazusa.or.jp.

  7. Genetic diversity of Centella asiatica in China analyzed by inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers: combination analysis with chemical diversity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Gang; Han, Ting; He, Zhi-Gao; Zhang, Qiao-Yan; Zhang, Lei; Rahman, Khalid; Qin, Lu-Ping

    2012-01-01

    Centella asiatica is an important plant species used in traditional Chinese medicine. To help the efficient use and conservation of this species, the genetic diversity of C. asiatica populations in China was investigated using inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) markers. Fourteen natural populations comprising 162 individuals were included to estimate genetic diversity. At the species level, genetic diversity was relatively high (P = 66.33%, H = 0.2183, I = 0.3305). At the population level, the genetic diversity of JH (Jinhua, Zhejiang Province, China) and JJ (Jiujiang, Jiangxi Province, China) populations was relatively high (P = 43.88%, 38.78%, H = 0.1610, 0.1301, I = 0.2376, 0.1957, respectively), whereas the genetic diversity of GA (Guang'an, Sichuan Province, China) and EM (E'mei, Sichuan Province, China) was relatively low (P = 10.2%, 5.1%, H = 0.0383, 0.0211, I = 0.0570, 0.0309, respectively). On the basis of Nei's G(st) value, more genetic differentiation among populations was determined (G(st) = 0.6573). In addition, the 14 populations were clustered into four groups in view of abundant ISSR data, which further defined the genetic relationship among populations. Interestingly, the genetic clustering result was similar to previous chemical clustering results based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) data, which would also classify the 14 populations into four groups. Thus, we combined the clustering results and compared their difference. The combined analysis and genetic diversity data provide a scientific basis for conserving populations of relatively high genetic diversity such as JH and JJ populations and establishing good agricultural practices (GAP) for C. asiatica.

  8. Identification of a major quantitative trait locus conditioning resistance to greenbug biotype E in sorghum PI 550610 using simple sequence repeat markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Y Q; Huang, Yinghua; Porter, David R; Tauer, C G; Hollaway, Lindsey

    2007-10-01

    Greenbug, Schizaphis graminum (Rondani), represents the most important pest insect of sorghum, Sorghum bicolor (L.) Moench, in the Great Plains of the United States. Biotype E is the most widespread and dominant type not only in sorghum and wheat, Triticum aestivum L., fields, but also on many noncultivated grass species. This study was designed to determine sorghum accession PI 550610 resistance to greenbug biotype E, to map the resistance quantitative trait loci (QTLs) by using an established simple sequence repeat (SSR) linkage map and to identify SSR markers closely linked to the major resistance QTLs. In greenhouse screening tests, seedlings of PI 550610 showed strong resistance to the greenbug at a level similar to resistant accession PI550607. For QTL mapping, one F2 population containing 277 progeny and one population containing 233 F2:3 families derived from Westland A line x PI 550610 were used to genotype 132 polymorphic SSR markers and to phenotype seedling resistance to greenbug feeding. Phenotypic evaluation of sorghum seedling damage at 7, 12, 17, and 21 d postinfestation in the F2:3 families revealed that resistance variation was normally distributed. Single marker analysis indicated 16 SSRs spread over five chromosomes were significant for greenbug resistance. Composite interval and multiple interval mapping procedures indicated that a major QTL resided in the interval of 6.8 cM between SSR markers Xtxp358 and Xtxp289 on SBI-09. The results will be valuable in the development of new greenbug biotype E resistant sorghum cultivars and for the further characterization of major genes by map-based cloning.

  9. [Inducing synthesis of LacA from Trametes sp. AH28-2 and cloning & analysis of 5'-terminal sequence of transcription control of the gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Yu-Zhi; Xiao, Ya-Zhong; Fang, Wei; Zhang, Shu-Xiang; Cha, Xiang-Dong; Li, Jian-Feng; Zhou, Hong-Min

    2005-07-01

    Copper ion was necessary for the transcription of all laccase isozyme genes from Trametes sp. AH28-2, with higher concentrations of Cu2+ (1-2 mmol/L) being more favorable to the synthesis of laccase. In the glucose media containing 0.5 mmol/L Cu2+, the laccase activity of the supernate was rather low (44.3 u/L) and had an increase of 60.3% (71.0 u/L) when 4.0 mmol/L o-toluidine was added. Moreover, the activity reached up to 2584 u/L as the glucose was replaced by cellobiose. And Native-PAGE showed that LacA was the main laccase component if fungus was induced by o-toluidine or copper ions. It had been demonstrated by quantitative RT-PCR that the regulation of lacA expression, induced by o-toluidine, occurred at the transcriptional level, with the accumulation of mRNA transcripts being accompanied by the increase of laccase activity of the culture fluid. In addition, the structural gene of lacA interrupted by 10 introns was 2110 bp in length and the corresponding cDNA sequence was 1560 bp encoding a 520 aa protein, which had high similarities with other laccases from basidiomycetes. Furthermore, a length of 1881 bp of 5'-terminal sequence of transcription control of lacA, amplified by the improved inverse PCR, contained a TATA box, seven CAAT boxes as well as a number of putative cis-acting elements important for its expression, including five MREs, nine CreA-binding sites, four XREs, two STREs and seven nitrogen factor binding sites. The existence of these elements was well in agreement with the data obtained from Trametes sp. AH28-2 shaken-flask cultures.

  10. Manipulation of the N-terminal sequence of the Borna disease virus X protein improves its mitochondrial targeting and neuroprotective potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferré, Cécile A; Davezac, Noélie; Thouard, Anne; Peyrin, Jean-Michel; Belenguer, Pascale; Miquel, Marie-Christine; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel; Szelechowski, Marion

    2016-04-01

    To favor their replication, viruses express proteins that target diverse mammalian cellular pathways. Due to the limited size of many viral genomes, such proteins are endowed with multiple functions, which require targeting to different subcellular compartments. One salient example is the X protein of Borna disease virus, which is expressed both at the mitochondria and in the nucleus. Moreover, we recently demonstrated that mitochondrial X protein is neuroprotective. In this study, we sought to examine the mechanisms whereby the X protein transits between subcellular compartments and to define its localization signals, to enhance its mitochondrial accumulation and thus, potentially, its neuroprotective activity. We transfected plasmids expressing fusion proteins bearing different domains of X fused to enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) and compared their subcellular localization to that of eGFP. We observed that the 5-16 domain of X was responsible for both nuclear export and mitochondrial targeting and identified critical residues for mitochondrial localization. We next took advantage of these findings and constructed mutant X proteins that were targeted only to the mitochondria. Such mutants exhibited enhanced neuroprotective properties in compartmented cultures of neurons grown in microfluidic chambers, thereby confirming the parallel between mitochondrial accumulation of the X protein and its neuroprotective potential.-Ferré C. A., Davezac, N., Thouard, A., Peyrin, J. M., Belenguer, P., Miquel, M.-C., Gonzalez-Dunia, D., Szelechowski, M. Manipulation of the N-terminal sequence of the Borna disease virus X protein improves its mitochondrial targeting and neuroprotective potential. © FASEB.

  11. Genome Sequence of a Gammaherpesvirus from a Common Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus)

    OpenAIRE

    Davison, Andrew J.; Subramaniam, Kuttichantran; Kerr, Karen; Jacob, Jessica M.; Landrau, Nelmarie; Michael T Walsh; Wells, Randall S.; Waltzek, Thomas B.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT A herpesvirus genome was sequenced directly from a biopsy specimen of a rectal lesion from a female common bottlenose dolphin. This genome sequence comprises a unique region (161,235?bp) flanked by multiple copies of a terminal repeat (4,431?bp) and contains 72 putative genes. The virus was named common bottlenose dolphin gammaherpesvirus 1.

  12. Removing N-terminal sequences in pre-S1 domain enhanced antibody and B-cell responses by an HBV large surface antigen DNA vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guohong Ge

    Full Text Available Although the use of recombinant hepatitis B virus surface (HBsAg protein vaccine has successfully reduced global hepatitis B infection, there are still a number of vaccine recipients who do not develop detectable antibody responses. Various novel vaccination approaches, including DNA vaccines, have been used to further improve the coverage of vaccine protection. Our previous studies demonstrated that HBsAg-based DNA vaccines could induce both humoral and CMI responses in experimental animal models. However, one form of the the HBsAg antigen, the large S antigen (HBs-L, expressed by DNA vaccine, was not sufficiently immunogenic in eliciting antibody responses. In the current study, we produced a modified large S antigen DNA vaccine, HBs-L(T, which has a truncated N-terminal sequence in the pre-S1 region. Compared to the original HBs-L DNA vaccine, the HBs-L(T DNA vaccine improved secretion in cultured mammalian cells and generated significantly enhanced HBsAg-specific antibody and B cell responses. Furthermore, this improved HBsL DNA vaccine, along with other HBsAg-expressing DNA vaccines, was able to maintain predominantly Th1 type antibody responses while recombinant HBsAg protein vaccines produced in either yeast or CHO cells elicited mostly Th2 type antibody responses. Our data indicate that HBsAg DNA vaccines with improved immunogenicity offer a useful alternative choice to recombinant protein-based HBV vaccines, particularly for therapeutic purposes against chronic hepatitis infection where immune tolerance led to poor antibody responses to S antigens.

  13. Aspergillus ficuum extracellular pH 6.0 optimum acid phosphatase: purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence, and biochemical characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, A H; Cummins, B J

    1988-01-01

    An extracellular acid phosphatase, pH optimum 6.0 from crude culture filtrate of Aspergillus ficuum was purified to homogeneity using cation exchange chromatography and chromatofocusing steps. SDS-PAGE of the purified enzyme exhibited two stained bands at approximately 82-KDa and 70-KDa. The mobility of the active enzyme in gel permeation chromatography indicated the molecular mass to be about 85-KDa. In the concentrated form the enzyme appeared to be purple, the visible absorption spectrum shows a lambda max at 580 nm. On the basis of molecular mass of 82-KDa, the molar extinction coefficient of the enzyme at 280 nm and 580 nm was estimated to be 1.2 x 10(5) M-1 cm-1 and 1.3 x 10(3) M-1 cm-1 respectively. Judging by chromatofocusing, the isoelectric point of the enzyme was about 4.9. The purified enzyme was unstable at 70 degrees C. The enzyme was catalytically very active from 55 degrees to 65 degrees C with a maximum activity at 63 degrees C. The Michaelis constant of the enzyme for p-nitrophenylphosphate was 200 microM with a computed Kcat of 260 per sec. Although the enzyme was insensitive to fluoride, tartrate, and N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), it was competitively inhibited by phosphomycin (Ki = 1.00 mM) and inorganic orthophosphate (Ki = 165 microM). While the enzyme was relatively insensitive to Mn++, Cu++ and Zn++ inhibited the activity 540 fold at a concentration of 100 microM. The enzyme showed positive PAS staining and hence is a glycoprotein (28% glycosylation); the sugar composition suggests the presence of N-linked high mannose-oligosaccharides and galactose. A partial N-terminal amino acid sequence up to the thirty-fourth residue was elucidated.

  14. Susceptibility of various parental lines of commercial white leghorn layers to infection with a naturally occurring recombinant avian leukosis virus containing subgroup B envelope and subgroup J long terminal repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Jody K; Pandiri, Arun R; Fadly, Aly M

    2006-09-01

    Chickens from seven different parental lines of commercial White Leghorn layer flocks from three independent breeders were inoculated with a naturally occurring avian leukosis virus (ALV) containing an ALV-B envelope and an ALV-J long terminal repeat (LTR) termed ALV-B/J. Additional groups of chickens from the same seven parental lines were inoculated with ALV-B. Chickens were tested for ALV viremia and antibody at 0, 4, 8, 16, and 32 wk postinfection. Chickens from all parental lines studied were susceptible to infection with ALV-B with 40%-100% of inoculated chickens positive for ALV at hatch following embryo infection. Similarly, infection of egg layer flocks with the ALV-B/J recombinant virus at 8 days of embryonation induced tolerance to ALV with 86%-100% of the chickens viremic, 40%-75% of the chickens shedding virus, and only 2/125 (2%) of the chickens producing serum-neutralizing antibodies against homologous ALV-B/J recombinant virus at 32 wk postinfection. In contrast, when infected with the ALV-B/J recombinant virus at hatch, 33%-82% of the chickens were viremic, 28%-47% shed virus, and 0%-56% produced serum-neutralizing antibodies against homologous ALV-B/J recombinant virus at 32 wk postinfection. Infection with the ALV-B/J recombinant virus at embryonation and at hatch induced predominately lymphoid leukosis (LL), along with other common ALV neoplasms, including erythroblastosis, osteopetrosis, nephroblastomas, and rhabdosarcomas. No incidence of myeloid leukosis (ML) was observed in any of the commercial White Leghorn egg layer flocks infected with ALV-B/J in the present study. Data suggest that the parental line of commercial layers may influence development of ALV-B/J-induced viremia and antibody, but not tumor type. Differences in type of tumors noted in the present study and those noted in the field case where the ALV-B/J was first isolated may be attributed to differences in the genetics of the commercial layer flock in which ML was first

  15. Variable Number of Tandem Repeat Markers in the Genome Sequence of Mycosphaerella Fijiensis, the Causal Agent of Black Leaf Streak Disease of Banana (Musa spp.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mycosphaerella fijiensis, the causal agent of banana leaf streak disease (commonly known as black Sigatoka), is the most devastating pathogen attacking bananas (Musa spp). Recently the whole genome sequence of M. fijiensis became available. This sequence was screened for the presence of Variable Num...

  16. Two-dimensional gel electrophoretic analyses of Kentucky bluegrass and rye grass pollen allergens. Detection with a murine monoclonal anti-Poa p I antibody and amino terminal amino acid sequence of Poa p I allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekramoddoullah, A K

    1990-01-01

    Allergenic extracts of Kentucky bluegrass (Poa pratensis) and rye grass (Lolium perenne) pollen were shown by 2-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis to consist of several hundred protein components. The pollen extracts of the two related grasses had unique 2-D gel patterns. Two major grass pollen allergens, Poa p I and Lol p I, and their isoforms (i.e. isoallergens) were detected and localized on 2-D gels by immunoblotting with anti-Poa p I antibody mAb 60. Poa p I isoallergens were less acidic than Lol p I isoallergens. The relative proportion of four Poa p I isoallergens was (in decreasing pI): A, 13%; B, 37%; and D, 15%. The amino terminal amino acid sequences of the two major isoallergens of Poa p I were identical. However, the amino acid composition of these isoallergens showed enough differences to account for their charge differences. The amino terminal amino acid sequence of two major Poa p I isoallergens had a 70% homology in 20 amino acid overlap with the previously published amino terminal amino acid sequence of rye grass pollen allergen R-7.

  17. Palynological evidence for gradual vegetation and climate changes during the African Humid Period termination at 13°N from a Mega-Lake Chad sedimentary sequence

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    P. G. C. Amaral

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Located at the transition between the Saharan and Sahelian zones, at the center of one of the largest endorheic basins, Lake Chad is ideally located to record regional environmental changes that occurred in the past. However, until now, no Holocene archive was directly cored in this lake. In this paper, we present pollen data from the first sedimentary sequence collected in Lake Chad (13° N; 14° E; Sahel region. Dated between ca. 6700 and ca. 5000 cal yr BP, this record is continuous and encompasses part of the termination of the African Humid Period (AHP. Vegetation reconstructions are based on standard analyses of pollen diagrams and are strengthened by quantitative approaches. Potential biomes are reconstructed using the biomization method and mean annual precipitation (Pann is estimated using the modern analogues technique. Results show that, between ca. 6700 and ca. 6050 cal yr BP, a vegetation close to humid woodland or humid savanna, including elements currently found further southward, thrived in the vicinity of the Mega-Lake Chad in place of the modern dry woodland, steppe and desert vegetation. At the same time, montane forest populations extended further southward on the Adamawa Plateau. The high abundance of lowland humid pollen taxa, particularly of Uapaca, is interpreted as the result of a northward migration of the corresponding plants during the AHP. This preferential zonal occurrence of these taxa in Lake Chad Basin (LCB (rather than extrazonal is driven by more humid local and regional climate conditions at this latitude, as shown by mean Pann estimated values of ca. 800 (−400/+700 mm during this period. However, we cannot rule out that an increase of the Chari–Logone inputs into the Mega-Lake Chad might have also contributed to control the abundance of these taxa. Changes in the structure and floristic composition of the vegetation towards more open and drier formations occurred after ca. 6050 cal yr BP, following a

  18. Examination of Exhaustive Cloning Attempts Reveals that C. elegans piRNAs, Transposons, and Repeat Sequences are Efficiently Cloned in Yeast, but not in Bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Or eSagy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Genome sequencing requires insertion of random fragments of the sequenced organism’s DNA into a unicellular host, most often E. coli bacteria. This manipulation was found in the past to be analogous to naturally occurring horizontal gene transfer, and moreover has proved valuable to understanding toxicity of foreign genetic elements to E. coli. Sequencing of the C. elegans genome was similarly achieved via DNA transformation into E. coli. However, numerous attempts have proven a significant percentage of the genome unclonable using bacteria, although clonable via yeast. We examined the genomic segments that were not in bacteria but in yeast, and observed that, in line with previous hypotheses, such sequences are more repetitive on average compared with the entire C. elegans genome. In addition, we found that these gap-sequences encode significantly more for DNA transposons. Surprisingly, we discovered that although the vast majority of the C. elegans genome is in bacteria (77.5%, almost all the thousands of sequences that encode for PIWI-interacting small RNAs, or 21U-RNAs (91.6% were only in yeast. These results might help understanding why most piRNAs in C.elegans are physically clustered on particular loci on chromosome IV. In worms and in a large number of other organisms, piRNAs serve to distinguish Self from Non-Self sequences, and thus to protect the integrity of the genome against foreign genetic elements, such as transposons. We discuss the possible implications of these discoveries

  19. Rapid construction of insulated genetic circuits via synthetic sequence-guided isothermal assembly

    OpenAIRE

    Torella, Joseph P.; Boehm, Christian R.; Lienert, Florian; Chen, Jan-Hung; Way, Jeffrey C.; Silver, Pamela A.

    2013-01-01

    In vitro recombination methods have enabled one-step construction of large DNA sequences from multiple parts. Although synthetic biological circuits can in principle be assembled in the same fashion, they typically contain repeated sequence elements such as standard promoters and terminators that interfere with homologous recombination. Here we use a computational approach to design synthetic, biologically inactive unique nucleotide sequences (UNSes) that facilitate accurate ordered assembly....

  20. Generation of aggregation prone N-terminally truncated amyloid β peptides by meprin β depends on the sequence specificity at the cleavage site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, Caroline; Bien, Jessica; Isbert, Simone; Wichert, Rielana; Prox, Johannes; Altmeppen, Hermann; Kumar, Sathish; Walter, Jochen; Lichtenthaler, Stefan F; Weggen, Sascha; Glatzel, Markus; Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Pietrzik, Claus U

    2016-02-19

    The metalloprotease meprin β cleaves the Alzheimer's Disease (AD) relevant amyloid precursor protein (APP) as a β-secretase reminiscent of BACE-1, however, predominantly generating N-terminally truncated Aβ2-x variants. Herein, we observed increased endogenous sAPPα levels in the brains of meprin β knock-out (ko) mice compared to wild-type controls. We further analyzed the cellular interaction of APP and meprin β and found that cleavage of APP by meprin β occurs prior to endocytosis. The N-terminally truncated Aβ2-40 variant shows increased aggregation propensity compared to Aβ1-40 and acts even as a seed for Aβ1-40 aggregation. Additionally, we observed that different APP mutants affect the catalytic properties of meprin β and that, interestingly, meprin β is unable to generate N-terminally truncated Aβ peptides from Swedish mutant APP (APPswe). Concluding, we propose that meprin β may be involved in the generation of N-terminally truncated Aβ2-x peptides of APP, but acts independently from BACE-1.

  1. Process for creating a double-stranded polyribonucleotide sequence with terminal overhang, as well as a process for creating a double-stranded polynucleotide construct and an application

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dekker, N.H.; Veenhuizen, P.

    2005-01-01

    The invention relates to a process for creating double-stranded RNA (16) having a terminal overhang. In accordance with the invention a DNA amplification is used for this purpose, followed by a transcription of the amplified DNA. When amplifying the DNA, primer pairs are used and care is taken that

  2. Sequence of retrovirus provirus resembles that of bacterial transposable elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimotohno, Kunitada; Mizutani, Satoshi; Temin, Howard M.

    1980-06-01

    The nucleotide sequences of the terminal regions of an infectious integrated retrovirus cloned in the modified λ phage cloning vector Charon 4A have been elucidated. There is a 569-base pair direct repeat at both ends of the viral DNA. The cell-virus junctions at each end consist of a 5-base pair direct repeat of cell DNA next to a 3-base pair inverted repeat of viral DNA. This structure resembles that of a transposable element and is consistent with the protovirus hypothesis that retroviruses evolved from the cell genome.

  3. TeloPCR-seq: a high-throughput sequencing approach for telomeres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Henrietta W.; Liu, Na; Hu, Yan; King, Megan C.

    2017-01-01

    We have developed a high-throughput sequencing approach that enables us to determine terminal telomere sequences from tens of thousands of individual Schizosaccharomyces pombe telomeres. This method provides unprecedented coverage of telomeric sequence complexity in fission yeast. S. pombe telomeres are composed of modular degenerate repeats that can be explained by variation in usage of the TER1 RNA template during reverse transcription. Taking advantage of this deep sequencing approach, we find that “like” repeat modules are highly correlated within individual telomeres. Moreover, repeat module preference varies with telomere length, suggesting that existing repeats promote the incorporation of like repeats and/or that specific conformations of the telomerase holoenzyme efficiently and/or processively add repeats of like nature. After the loss of telomerase activity, this sequencing and analysis pipeline defines a population of telomeres with altered sequence content. This approach will be adaptable to study telomeric repeats in other organisms and also to interrogate repetitive sequences throughout the genome that are inaccessible to other sequencing methods. PMID:27714790

  4. Determination of amino acid compositions and NH2-terminal sequences of peptides electroblotted onto PVDF membranes from tricine-sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ploug, M; Jensen, A L; Barkholt, V.

    1989-01-01

    amounts of peptides and protein fragments (Mr 1000-20,000) in a suitable form for amino acid sequencing, directly on the blotting membrane. Conditions for electrophoresis and electroblotting were optimized with respect to high transfer yield and suitability for both amino acid analysis and sequence...... of polymorphic forms of human complement component C3....

  5. Localization of Daucus carota NMCP1 to the nuclear periphery: the role of the N-terminal region and an NLS-linked sequence motif, RYNLRR, in the tail domain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuta eKimura

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Recent ultrastructural studies revealed that a structure similar to the vertebrate nuclear lamina exists in the nuclei of higher plants. However, plant genomes lack genes for lamins and intermediate-type filament proteins, and this suggests that plant-specific nuclear coiled-coil proteins make up the lamina-like structure in plants. NMCP1 is a protein, first identified in Daucus carota cells, that localizes exclusively to the nuclear periphery in interphase cells. It has a tripartite structure comprised of head, rod, and tail domains, and includes putative nuclear localization signal (NLS motifs. We identified the functional NLS of DcNMCP1 (carrot NMCP1 and determined the protein regions required for localizing to the nuclear periphery using EGFP-fused constructs transiently expressed in Apium graveolens epidermal cells. Transcription was driven under a CaMV35S promoter, and the genes were introduced into the epidermal cells by a DNA-coated microprojectile delivery system. Of the NLS motifs, KRRRK and RRHK in the tail domain were highly functional for nuclear localization. Addition of the N-terminal 141 amino acids from DcNMCP1 shifted the localization of a region including these NLSs from the entire nucleus to the nuclear periphery. Using this same construct, the replacement of amino acids in RRHK or its preceding sequence, YNL, with alanine residues abolished localization to the nuclear periphery, while replacement of KRRRK did not affect localization. The sequence R/Q/HYNLRR/H, including YNL and the first part of the sequence of RRHK, is evolutionarily conserved in a subclass of NMCP1 sequences from many plant species. These results show that NMCP1 localizes to the nuclear periphery by a combined action of a sequence composed of R/Q/HYNLRR/H, NLS, and the N-terminal region including the head and a portion of the rod domain, suggesting that more than one binding site is implicated in localization of NMCP1.

  6. Terminating supervision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levendosky, Alytia A; Hopwood, Christopher J

    2017-03-01

    The focus of this paper is on the termination of clinical supervision. Although clinical supervision is considered the backbone of most mental health training programs, it gets relatively little theoretical or empirical attention. The termination of supervision has received even less attention. In this paper, we describe an approach to terminating supervision in our treatment team, which integrates intensive assessment with a relational perspective in a clinical science training program (Levendosky & Hopwood, 2016). We describe our established conceptual framework, review empirical evidence, and provide verbatim examples from final supervision meetings on our team to elaborate the importance of conceptualizing individual differences across trainees and parallels between supervision and psychotherapy dynamics. We conclude by emphasizing the need for research on supervision in general and supervision termination in particular. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  7. Archaeal Nucleosome Positioning by CTG Repeats

    OpenAIRE

    Sandman, Kathleen; Reeve, John N.

    1999-01-01

    DNA shape recognition determines the preferred binding sites for sequence-independent DNA binding proteins, and here we document that archaeal histones assemble archaeal nucleosomes in vitro centered preferentially within (CTG)6 and (CTG)8 repeats, close to junctions with flanking mixed-sequence DNA. Archaeal nucleosomes were not positioned by (CTG)4-, (CTG)5-, or (CTG)3AA(CTG)3-containing DNA sequences. The features of CTG repeat-containing sequences that direct eucaryal nucleosome positioni...

  8. Unmasking the roles of N- and C-terminal flanking sequences from exon 1 of huntingtin as modulators of polyglutamine aggregation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crick, Scott L; Ruff, Kiersten M; Garai, Kanchan; Frieden, Carl; Pappu, Rohit V

    2013-12-10

    Huntington disease is caused by mutational expansion of the CAG trinucleotide within exon 1 of the huntingtin (Htt) gene. Exon 1 spanning N-terminal fragments (NTFs) of the Htt protein result from aberrant splicing of transcripts of mutant Htt. NTFs typically encompass a polyglutamine tract flanked by an N-terminal 17-residue amphipathic stretch (N17) and a C-terminal 38-residue proline-rich stretch (C38). We present results from in vitro biophysical studies that quantify the driving forces for and mechanisms of polyglutamine aggregation as modulated by N17 and C38. Although N17 is highly soluble by itself, it lowers the saturation concentration of soluble NTFs and increases the driving force, vis-à-vis homopolymeric polyglutamine, for forming insoluble aggregates. Kinetically, N17 accelerates fibril formation and destabilizes nonfibrillar intermediates. C38 is also highly soluble by itself, and it lends its high intrinsic solubility to lower the driving force for forming insoluble aggregates by increasing the saturation concentration of soluble NTFs. In NTFs with both modules, N17 and C38 act synergistically to destabilize nonfibrillar intermediates (N17 effect) and lower the driving force for forming insoluble aggregates (C38 effect). Morphological studies show that N17 and C38 promote the formation of ordered fibrils by NTFs. Homopolymeric polyglutamine forms a mixture of amorphous aggregates and fibrils, and its aggregation mechanisms involve early formation of heterogeneous distributions of nonfibrillar species. We propose that N17 and C38 act as gatekeepers that control the intrinsic heterogeneities of polyglutamine aggregation. This provides a biophysical explanation for the modulation of in vivo NTF toxicities by N17 and C38.

  9. Development of a SCAR marker by inter-simple sequence repeat for diagnosis of dwarf bunt of wheat and detection of Tilletia controversa KüHN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L; Chen, W Q; Liu, T G

    2010-05-01

    Dwarf bunt of wheat, caused by Tilletia controversa KüHN: , is a destructive disease on wheat as well as an important internationally quarantined disease in many countries. The primer ISSR818 generated a polymorphic pattern displaying a 867-bp DNA fragment specific for T. controversa. The marker was converted into a sequence characterized amplified region (SCAR), and specific primers (TCKSF3/TCKSR3) designed for use in PCR detection assays; they amplified a unique DNA fragment in all isolates of T. controversa but not in the related pathogens. The detection limit with the primer set (TCKSF3/TCKSR3) was 5 ng of DNA which could be obtained from 5.5 microg of teliospores in a 25-microL PCR reaction mixture.

  10. NMR assignments of the N-terminal domain of Nephila clavipes spidroin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parnham, Stuart; Gaines, William A; Duggan, Brendan M; Marcotte, William R; Hennig, Mirko

    2011-10-01

    The building blocks of spider dragline silk are two fibrous proteins secreted from the major ampullate gland named spidroins 1 and 2 (MaSp1, MaSp2). These proteins consist of a large central domain composed of approximately 100 tandem copies of a 35-40 amino acid repeat sequence. Non-repetitive N and C-terminal domains, of which the C-terminal domain has been implicated to transition from soluble and insoluble states during spinning, flank the repetitive core. The N-terminal domain until recently has been largely unknown due to difficulties in cloning and expression. Here, we report nearly complete assignment for all (1)H, (13)C, and (15)N resonances in the 14 kDa N-terminal domain of major ampullate spidroin 1 (MaSp1-N) of the golden orb-web spider Nephila clavipes.

  11. The complete genome sequencing of Prevotella intermedia strain OMA14 and a subsequent fine-scale, intra-species genomic comparison reveal an unusual amplification of conjugative and mobile transposons and identify a novel Prevotella-lineage-specific repeat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naito, Mariko; Ogura, Yoshitoshi; Itoh, Takehiko; Shoji, Mikio; Okamoto, Masaaki; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Nakayama, Koji

    2016-02-01

    Prevotella intermedia is a pathogenic bacterium involved in periodontal diseases. Here, we present the complete genome sequence of a clinical strain, OMA14, of this bacterium along with the results of comparative genome analysis with strain 17 of the same species whose genome has also been sequenced, but not fully analysed yet. The genomes of both strains consist of two circular chromosomes: the larger chromosomes are similar in size and exhibit a high overall linearity of gene organizations, whereas the smaller chromosomes show a significant size variation and have undergone remarkable genome rearrangements. Unique features of the Pre. intermedia genomes are the presence of a remarkable number of essential genes on the second chromosomes and the abundance of conjugative and mobilizable transposons (CTns and MTns). The CTns/MTns are particularly abundant in the second chromosomes, involved in its extensive genome rearrangement, and have introduced a number of strain-specific genes into each strain. We also found a novel 188-bp repeat sequence that has been highly amplified in Pre. intermedia and are specifically distributed among the Pre. intermedia-related species. These findings expand our understanding of the genetic features of Pre. intermedia and the roles of CTns and MTns in the evolution of bacteria. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Kazusa DNA Research Institute.

  12. Aberrant splicing in transgenes containing introns, exons, and V5 epitopes: lessons from developing an FSHD mouse model expressing a D4Z4 repeat with flanking genomic sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugénie Ansseau

    Full Text Available The DUX4 gene, encoded within D4Z4 repeats on human chromosome 4q35, has recently emerged as a key factor in the pathogenic mechanisms underlying Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD. This recognition prompted development of animal models expressing the DUX4 open reading frame (ORF alone or embedded within D4Z4 repeats. In the first published model, we used adeno-associated viral vectors (AAV and strong viral control elements (CMV promoter, SV40 poly A to demonstrate that the DUX4 cDNA caused dose-dependent toxicity in mouse muscles. As a follow-up, we designed a second generation of DUX4-expressing AAV vectors to more faithfully genocopy the FSHD-permissive D4Z4 repeat region located at 4q35. This new vector (called AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM contained the D4Z4/DUX4 promoter region, a V5 epitope-tagged DUX4 ORF, and the natural 3' untranslated region (pLAM harboring two small introns, DUX4 exons 2 and 3, and the non-canonical poly A signal required for stabilizing DUX4 mRNA in FSHD. AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM failed to recapitulate the robust pathology of our first generation vectors following delivery to mouse muscle. We found that the DUX4.V5 junction sequence created an unexpected splice donor in the pre-mRNA that was preferentially utilized to remove the V5 coding sequence and DUX4 stop codon, yielding non-functional DUX4 protein with 55 additional residues on its carboxyl-terminus. Importantly, we further found that aberrant splicing could occur in any expression construct containing a functional splice acceptor and sequences resembling minimal splice donors. Our findings represent an interesting case study with respect to AAV.D4Z4.V5.pLAM, but more broadly serve as a note of caution for designing constructs containing V5 epitope tags and/or transgenes with downstream introns and exons.

  13. The Biotechnological Applications of Recombinant Single-Domain Antibodies are Optimized by the C-Terminal Fusion to the EPEA Sequence (C Tag)

    OpenAIRE

    Djender, Selma; Beugnet, Anne; Schneider, Aurelie; Marco, Ario de

    2014-01-01

    We designed a vector for the bacterial expression of recombinant antibodies fused to a double tag composed of 6xHis and the EPEA amino acid sequence. EPEA sequence (C tag) is tightly bound by a commercial antibody when expressed at the C-term end of a polypeptide. The antigen is released in the presence of 2 M MgCl2. Consequently, constructs fused to the 6xHis-C tags can be purified by two successive and orthogonal affinity steps. Single-domain antibodies were produced either in the periplasm...

  14. Carboxyl-terminal sequence variation of latent membrane protein 1 gene in Epstein-Barr virus-associated gastric carcinomas from Eastern China and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yun; Kanai, Kyosuke; Satoh, Yukio; Luo, Bing; Sairenji, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    To elucidate variations of latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) in Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-associated gastric carcinoma (EBVaGC) and explore the LMP1 variations of neighboring countries, China and Japan. In 12 and 8 EBVaGCs from eastern China and Japan, respectively, the C-termini of LMP1 were analyzed using PCR and sequencing. The sequences were compared with previously published strains and were characterized on a phylogenetic tree. The difference between Chinese and Japanese isolates was characterized. Ten of 12 Chinese GC isolates (83.3%) and all of the 8 (100%) Japanese GC isolates belonged to the China 1 strain. Also, B95-8 type isolates were found in 2 of 12 Chinese GC. In the 18 China 1 type isolates, additional mutations outside the signature sequence changes were found. All Japanese isolates (100%) had two or more additional mutations, whereas only 5 of 10 (50%) Chinese isolates had two or more additional mutations. The difference was statistically significant (p = 0.0359). China 1 is the dominant strain in GC from eastern China and Japan. The similarity to that of nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) from China supports the view that China 1 strain represents a geographic-associated polymorphism rather than an NPC-associated polymorphism. Japanese isolates show more mutations than Chinese isolates, suggesting a geographic difference between Chinese and Japanese isolates in GC. (c) 2007 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. Expansion of protein domain repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asa K Björklund

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Many proteins, especially in eukaryotes, contain tandem repeats of several domains from the same family. These repeats have a variety of binding properties and are involved in protein-protein interactions as well as binding to other ligands such as DNA and RNA. The rapid expansion of protein domain repeats is assumed to have evolved through internal tandem duplications. However, the exact mechanisms behind these tandem duplications are not well-understood. Here, we have studied the evolution, function, protein structure, gene structure, and phylogenetic distribution of domain repeats. For this purpose we have assigned Pfam-A domain families to 24 proteomes with more sensitive domain assignments in the repeat regions. These assignments confirmed previous findings that eukaryotes, and in particular vertebrates, contain a much higher fraction of proteins with repeats compared with prokaryotes. The internal sequence similarity in each protein revealed that the domain repeats are often expanded through duplications of several domains at a time, while the duplication of one domain is less common. Many of the repeats appear to have been duplicated in the middle of the repeat region. This is in strong contrast to the evolution of other proteins that mainly works through additions of single domains at either terminus. Further, we found that some domain families show distinct duplication patterns, e.g., nebulin domains have mainly been expanded with a unit of seven domains at a time, while duplications of other domain families involve varying numbers of domains. Finally, no common mechanism for the expansion of all repeats could be detected. We found that the duplication patterns show no dependence on the size of the domains. Further, repeat expansion in some families can possibly be explained by shuffling of exons. However, exon shuffling could not have created all repeats.

  16. Two new miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements in the genome of the clam Donax trunculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Šatović, Eva; Plohl, Miroslav

    2017-10-01

    Repetitive sequences are important components of eukaryotic genomes that drive their evolution. Among them are different types of mobile elements that share the ability to spread throughout the genome and form interspersed repeats. To broaden the generally scarce knowledge on bivalves at the genome level, in the clam Donax trunculus we described two new non-autonomous DNA transposons, miniature inverted-repeat transposable elements (MITEs), named DTC M1 and DTC M2. Like other MITEs, they are characterized by their small size, their A + T richness, and the presence of terminal inverted repeats (TIRs). DTC M1 and DTC M2 are 261 and 286 bp long, respectively, and in addition to TIRs, both of them contain a long imperfect palindrome sequence in their central parts. These elements are present in complete and truncated versions within the genome of the clam D. trunculus. The two new MITEs share only structural similarity, but lack any nucleotide sequence similarity to each other. In a search for related elements in databases, blast search revealed within the Crassostrea gigas genome a larger element sharing sequence similarity only to DTC M1 in its TIR sequences. The lack of sequence similarity with any previously published mobile elements indicates that DTC M1 and DTC M2 elements may be unique to D. trunculus.

  17. Seven New Complete Plastome Sequences Reveal Rampant Independent Loss of the ndh Gene Family across Orchids and Associated Instability of the Inverted Repeat/Small Single-Copy Region Boundaries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Michael J.; Neubig, Kurt M.; Williams, Norris H.; Whitten, W. Mark; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Earlier research has revealed that the ndh loci have been pseudogenized, truncated, or deleted from most orchid plastomes sequenced to date, including in all available plastomes of the two most species-rich subfamilies, Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae. This study sought to resolve deeper-level phylogenetic relationships among major orchid groups and to refine the history of gene loss in the ndh loci across orchids. The complete plastomes of seven orchids, Oncidium sphacelatum (Epidendroideae), Masdevallia coccinea (Epidendroideae), Sobralia callosa (Epidendroideae), Sobralia aff. bouchei (Epidendroideae), Elleanthus sodiroi (Epidendroideae), Paphiopedilum armeniacum (Cypripedioideae), and Phragmipedium longifolium (Cypripedioideae) were sequenced and analyzed in conjunction with all other available orchid and monocot plastomes. Most ndh loci were found to be pseudogenized or lost in Oncidium, Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium, but surprisingly, all ndh loci were found to retain full, intact reading frames in Sobralia, Elleanthus and Masdevallia. Character mapping suggests that the ndh genes were present in the common ancestor of orchids but have experienced independent, significant losses at least eight times across four subfamilies. In addition, ndhF gene loss was correlated with shifts in the position of the junction of the inverted repeat (IR) and small single-copy (SSC) regions. The Orchidaceae have unprecedented levels of homoplasy in ndh gene presence/absence, which may be correlated in part with the unusual life history of orchids. These results also suggest that ndhF plays a role in IR/SSC junction stability. PMID:26558895

  18. Seven New Complete Plastome Sequences Reveal Rampant Independent Loss of the ndh Gene Family across Orchids and Associated Instability of the Inverted Repeat/Small Single-Copy Region Boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Tae; Kim, Jung Sung; Moore, Michael J; Neubig, Kurt M; Williams, Norris H; Whitten, W Mark; Kim, Joo-Hwan

    2015-01-01

    Earlier research has revealed that the ndh loci have been pseudogenized, truncated, or deleted from most orchid plastomes sequenced to date, including in all available plastomes of the two most species-rich subfamilies, Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae. This study sought to resolve deeper-level phylogenetic relationships among major orchid groups and to refine the history of gene loss in the ndh loci across orchids. The complete plastomes of seven orchids, Oncidium sphacelatum (Epidendroideae), Masdevallia coccinea (Epidendroideae), Sobralia callosa (Epidendroideae), Sobralia aff. bouchei (Epidendroideae), Elleanthus sodiroi (Epidendroideae), Paphiopedilum armeniacum (Cypripedioideae), and Phragmipedium longifolium (Cypripedioideae) were sequenced and analyzed in conjunction with all other available orchid and monocot plastomes. Most ndh loci were found to be pseudogenized or lost in Oncidium, Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium, but surprisingly, all ndh loci were found to retain full, intact reading frames in Sobralia, Elleanthus and Masdevallia. Character mapping suggests that the ndh genes were present in the common ancestor of orchids but have experienced independent, significant losses at least eight times across four subfamilies. In addition, ndhF gene loss was correlated with shifts in the position of the junction of the inverted repeat (IR) and small single-copy (SSC) regions. The Orchidaceae have unprecedented levels of homoplasy in ndh gene presence/absence, which may be correlated in part with the unusual life history of orchids. These results also suggest that ndhF plays a role in IR/SSC junction stability.

  19. Seven New Complete Plastome Sequences Reveal Rampant Independent Loss of the ndh Gene Family across Orchids and Associated Instability of the Inverted Repeat/Small Single-Copy Region Boundaries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyoung Tae Kim

    Full Text Available Earlier research has revealed that the ndh loci have been pseudogenized, truncated, or deleted from most orchid plastomes sequenced to date, including in all available plastomes of the two most species-rich subfamilies, Orchidoideae and Epidendroideae. This study sought to resolve deeper-level phylogenetic relationships among major orchid groups and to refine the history of gene loss in the ndh loci across orchids. The complete plastomes of seven orchids, Oncidium sphacelatum (Epidendroideae, Masdevallia coccinea (Epidendroideae, Sobralia callosa (Epidendroideae, Sobralia aff. bouchei (Epidendroideae, Elleanthus sodiroi (Epidendroideae, Paphiopedilum armeniacum (Cypripedioideae, and Phragmipedium longifolium (Cypripedioideae were sequenced and analyzed in conjunction with all other available orchid and monocot plastomes. Most ndh loci were found to be pseudogenized or lost in Oncidium, Paphiopedilum and Phragmipedium, but surprisingly, all ndh loci were found to retain full, intact reading frames in Sobralia, Elleanthus and Masdevallia. Character mapping suggests that the ndh genes were present in the common ancestor of orchids but have experienced independent, significant losses at least eight times across four subfamilies. In addition, ndhF gene loss was correlated with shifts in the position of the junction of the inverted repeat (IR and small single-copy (SSC regions. The Orchidaceae have unprecedented levels of homoplasy in ndh gene presence/absence, which may be correlated in part with the unusual life history of orchids. These results also suggest that ndhF plays a role in IR/SSC junction stability.

  20. Genome Sequence of a Gammaherpesvirus from a Common Bottlenose Dolphin (Tursiops truncatus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davison, Andrew J; Subramaniam, Kuttichantran; Kerr, Karen; Jacob, Jessica M; Landrau-Giovannetti, Nelmarie; Walsh, Michael T; Wells, Randall S; Waltzek, Thomas B

    2017-08-03

    A herpesvirus genome was sequenced directly from a biopsy specimen of a rectal lesion from a female common bottlenose dolphin. This genome sequence comprises a unique region (161,235 bp) flanked by multiple copies of a terminal repeat (4,431 bp) and contains 72 putative genes. The virus was named common bottlenose dolphin gammaherpesvirus 1. Copyright © 2017 Davison et al.

  1. The N-Terminal Sequence of Prion Protein Consists an Epitope Specific to the Abnormal Isoform of Prion Protein (PrPSc)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masujin, Kentaro; Kaku-Ushiki, Yuko; Miwa, Ritsuko; Okada, Hiroyuki; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Kazuo; Matsuura, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2013-01-01

    The conformation of abnormal prion protein (PrPSc) differs from that of cellular prion protein (PrPC), but the precise characteristics of PrPSc remain to be elucidated. To clarify the properties of native PrPSc, we attempted to generate novel PrPSc-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by immunizing PrP-deficient mice with intact PrPSc purified from bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE)-affected mice. The generated mAbs 6A12 and 8D5 selectivity precipitated PrPSc from the brains of prion-affected mice, sheep, and cattle, but did not precipitate PrPC from the brains of healthy animals. In histopathological analysis, mAbs 6A12 and 8D5 strongly reacted with prion-affected mouse brains but not with unaffected mouse brains without antigen retrieval. Epitope analysis revealed that mAbs 8D5 and 6A12 recognized the PrP subregions between amino acids 31–39 and 41–47, respectively. This indicates that a PrPSc-specific epitope exists in the N-terminal region of PrPSc, and mAbs 6A12 and 8D5 are powerful tools with which to detect native and intact PrPSc. We found that the ratio of proteinase K (PK)-sensitive PrPSc to PK-resistant PrPSc was constant throughout the disease time course. PMID:23469131

  2. Terminal Ballistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Zvi

    2012-01-01

    This book covers the important issues of terminal ballistics in a comprehensive way combining experimental data, numerical simulations and analytical modeling. The first chapter reviews the experimental equipment which are used for ballistic tests and the diagnostics for material characterization under impulsive loading conditions. The second chapter covers essential features of the codes which are used for terminal ballistics such as the Euler vs. Lagrange schemes and meshing techniques, as well as the most popular material models. The third chapter, devoted to the penetration mechanics of rigid penetrators, brings the update of modeling in this field. The fourth chapter deals with plate perforation and the fifth chapter deals with the penetration mechanics of shaped charge jets and eroding long rods. The last two chapters discuss several techniques for the disruption and defeating of the main threats in armor design. Throughout the book the authors demonstrate the advantages of numerical simulations in unde...

  3. The Biotechnological Applications of Recombinant Single-Domain Antibodies are Optimized by the C-Terminal Fusion to the EPEA Sequence (C Tag

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Djender

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available We designed a vector for the bacterial expression of recombinant antibodies fused to a double tag composed of 6xHis and the EPEA amino acid sequence. EPEA sequence (C tag is tightly bound by a commercial antibody when expressed at the C-term end of a polypeptide. The antigen is released in the presence of 2 M MgCl2. Consequently, constructs fused to the 6xHis-C tags can be purified by two successive and orthogonal affinity steps. Single-domain antibodies were produced either in the periplasmic or in the cytoplasmic space of E. coli. Surprisingly, the first affinity purification step performed using the EPEA-binding resin already yielded homogeneous proteins. The presence of the C tag did not interfere with the binding activity of the antibodies, as assessed by FACS and SPR analyses, and the C tag was extremely effective for immunoprecipitating HER2 receptor. Finally, the Alexa488-coupled anti-C tag allowed for simplification of FACS and IF analyses. These results show that a tag of minimal dimensions can be effectively used to improve the applicability of recombinant antibodies as reagents. In our hands, C tag was superior to His-tag in affinity purification and pull-down experiments, and practical in any other standard immune technique.

  4. Structure of N-terminal sequence Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser of Aβ-peptide with phospholipase A2 from venom of Andaman Cobra sub-species Naja naja sagittifera at 2.0 Å resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Zeenat; Pillai, Vikram Gopalakrishna; Zhong, Wei-Zhu

    2014-03-10

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most significant social and health burdens of the present century. Plaques formed by extracellular deposits of amyloid β (Aβ) are the prime player of AD's neuropathology. Studies have implicated the varied role of phospholipase A2 (PLA2) in brain where it contributes to neuronal growth and inflammatory response. Overall contour and chemical nature of the substrate-binding channel in the low molecular weight PLA2s are similar. This study involves the reductionist fragment-based approach to understand the structure adopted by N-terminal fragment of Alzheimer's Aβ peptide in its complex with PLA2. In the current communication, we report the structure determined by X-ray crystallography of N-terminal sequence Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser (DAEFRHDS) of Aβ-peptide with a Group I PLA2 purified from venom of Andaman Cobra sub-species Naja naja sagittifera at 2.0 Å resolution (Protein Data Bank (PDB) Code: 3JQ5). This is probably the first attempt to structurally establish interaction between amyloid-β peptide fragment and hydrophobic substrate binding site of PLA2 involving H bond and van der Waals interactions. We speculate that higher affinity between Aβ and PLA2 has the therapeutic potential of decreasing the Aβ-Aβ interaction, thereby reducing the amyloid aggregation and plaque formation in AD.

  5. Structure of N-Terminal Sequence Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser of Aβ-Peptide with Phospholipase A2 from Venom of Andaman Cobra Sub-Species Naja naja sagittifera at 2.0 Å Resolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeenat Mirza

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Alzheimer’s disease (AD is one of the most significant social and health burdens of the present century. Plaques formed by extracellular deposits of amyloid β (Aβ are the prime player of AD’s neuropathology. Studies have implicated the varied role of phospholipase A2 (PLA2 in brain where it contributes to neuronal growth and inflammatory response. Overall contour and chemical nature of the substrate-binding channel in the low molecular weight PLA2s are similar. This study involves the reductionist fragment-based approach to understand the structure adopted by N-terminal fragment of Alzheimer’s Aβ peptide in its complex with PLA2. In the current communication, we report the structure determined by X-ray crystallography of N-terminal sequence Asp-Ala-Glu-Phe-Arg-His-Asp-Ser (DAEFRHDS of Aβ-peptide with a Group I PLA2 purified from venom of Andaman Cobra sub-species Naja naja sagittifera at 2.0 Å resolution (Protein Data Bank (PDB Code: 3JQ5. This is probably the first attempt to structurally establish interaction between amyloid-β peptide fragment and hydrophobic substrate binding site of PLA2 involving H bond and van der Waals interactions. We speculate that higher affinity between Aβ and PLA2 has the therapeutic potential of decreasing the Aβ–Aβ interaction, thereby reducing the amyloid aggregation and plaque formation in AD.

  6. (SSR) and inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cotton is one of the main economic crop plants of Iran cultivated under continuous artificial selection and cultivation which may lead to genetic erosion and possible loss of useful genetic loci resulting in vulnerability to pests and diseases. For this reason increasing and improving the amount of genetic diversity in cotton ...

  7. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Prakash

    alpha-ketoglutaratedecarboxylase, LpqZ, malatedehydrogenase. 289-290. 0.72. +. 7. 4 acyl-CoAsynthase ... proteasome[beta]-typesubunit2, proteasome[alpha]- typesubunit1. 164-165. 0.56. -. 1. 1. 198-199. 0.55 .... PE_PGRS (15840909), cytochrome c oxidase folding protein (15840911), PE_PGRS (15840912), quinone.

  8. Simple sequence repeats in mycobacterial genomes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2006-12-18

    Dec 18, 2006 ... It is therefore interesting to analyse the mycobacterial genomes for distribution and abundance of microsatellites tracts and to look for potentially polymorphic microsatellites. Available mycobacterial genomes, Mycobacterium avium, M. leprae, M. bovis and the two strains of M. tuberculosis (CDC1551 and ...

  9. SIMPLE SEQUENCE REPEAT MARKERS ASSOCIATED WITH ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Transgressive segregation was observed, indicating that both parents carried minor loci or alleles for resistance that differed from each other. SSRs Xtxp25,. Xtxp201, Xtxp302, Xtxp25, Xtxp295 and Xtxp95 were associated, respectively, with anthracnose and TLB resistance, consistent with dominant epistasis gene action.

  10. Investigation of simple sequence repeats (SSR) markerassisted ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The unweighed pair-group method with arithmetic averages (UPGMA) dendrogram placed Bt- and non-Bt cotton varieties into four major groups. With the exception of 4 accessions (being similar), genetic dissimilarity coefficient among all other genotypes ranged from 0.50 to 0.98 suggesting a wide genetic heterogeneity ...

  11. (SSR) and inter simple sequence repeat (ISSR)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    MRT

    2012-07-12

    Jul 12, 2012 ... Key words: Cotton, genetic diversity, ISSR, RAPD. INTRODUCTION. Production of new genetic variants in crop plants is one of the possible sources of obtaining elite genotypes to be. *Corresponding author. E-mail: msheidai@yahoo.com, msheidai@sbu.ac.ir. Tel: +98 21 22431664. Fax: +98 21. 22431664 ...

  12. Identification and chromosomal localization of repeat sequences ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Institute of Biotechnology and Department of Biotechnology, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712–749, Korea; School of Biological Resources, Yeungnam University, Gyeongsan 712–749, Korea; Department of Animal Sciences, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, Illinois, 61801 USA; Biotechnology, ...

  13. Ice age terminations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Hai; Edwards, R Lawrence; Broecker, Wallace S; Denton, George H; Kong, Xinggong; Wang, Yongjin; Zhang, Rong; Wang, Xianfeng

    2009-10-09

    230Th-dated oxygen isotope records of stalagmites from Sanbao Cave, China, characterize Asian Monsoon (AM) precipitation through the ends of the third- and fourthmost recent ice ages. As a result, AM records for the past four glacial terminations can now be precisely correlated with those from ice cores and marine sediments, establishing the timing and sequence of major events. In all four cases, observations are consistent with a classic Northern Hemisphere summer insolation intensity trigger for an initial retreat of northern ice sheets. Meltwater and icebergs entering the North Atlantic alter oceanic and atmospheric circulation and associated fluxes of heat and carbon, causing increases in atmospheric CO2 and Antarctic temperatures that drive the termination in the Southern Hemisphere. Increasing CO2 and summer insolation drive recession of northern ice sheets, with probable positive feedbacks between sea level and CO2.

  14. Cloning, sequencing, expression, and characterization of protealysin, a novel neutral proteinase from Serratia proteamaculans representing a new group of thermolysin-like proteases with short N-terminal region of precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidyuk, Ilya V; Kalashnikov, Alexander E; Gromova, Tatiana Yu; Gasanov, Eugene V; Safina, Dina R; Zabolotskaya, Maria V; Rudenskaya, Galina N; Kostrov, Sergey V

    2006-06-01

    The gene of Serratia proteamaculans proteinase, protealysin, was cloned, sequenced, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene encoded a precursor of 341 amino acids (AAs) with a significant homology to thermolysin-like proteinases (TLPs). The molecular weight of the purified mature active recombinant protein was 32 kDa, the N-terminal amino acid sequence was AKTSTGGEVI. The optimum pH for azocasein hydrolysis by protealysin was seven and it was completely inhibited by o-phenanthroline. The enzyme hydrolyzed 3-(2-furyl)acryloyl-glycyl-L-leucine amide, the standard substrate for TLPs, with k(cat)/K(m) ratio of (2.52 +/- 0.02) x 10(2) M(-1) s(-1). Protealysin maturation removes 50 AA from the N-terminus of the precursor. The removed region had no similarity with the preprosequence of thermolysin (232 AA) but was homologous to some other TLPs. These proteins shared a conserved 7-AA motif near the initial methionine. Such motif was also found in some nonproteolytic putative proteins; two of them were eukaryotic.

  15. Adeno-Associated Virus (AAV) Type 5 Rep Protein Cleaves a Unique Terminal Resolution Site Compared with Other AAV Serotypes

    OpenAIRE

    Chiorini, John A.; Afione, Sandra; Kotin, Robert M

    1999-01-01

    Adeno-associated virus (AAV) replication depends on two viral components for replication: the AAV nonstructural proteins (Rep) in trans, and inverted terminal repeat (ITR) sequences in cis. AAV type 5 (AAV5) is a distinct virus compared to the other cloned AAV serotypes. Whereas the Rep proteins and ITRs of other serotypes are interchangeable and can be used to produce recombinant viral particles of a different serotype, AAV5 Rep proteins cannot cross-complement in the packaging of a genome w...

  16. A novel Drosophila model of TDP-43 proteinopathies: N-terminal sequences combined with the Q/N domain induce protein functional loss and locomotion defects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Langellotti

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 kDa (TDP-43, also known as TBPH in Drosophila melanogaster and TARDBP in mammals is the main protein component of the pathological inclusions observed in neurons of patients affected by different neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS and fronto-temporal lobar degeneration (FTLD. The number of studies investigating the molecular mechanisms underlying neurodegeneration is constantly growing; however, the role played by TDP-43 in disease onset and progression is still unclear. A fundamental shortcoming that hampers progress is the lack of animal models showing aggregation of TDP-43 without overexpression. In this manuscript, we have extended our cellular model of aggregation to a transgenic Drosophila line. Our fly model is not based on the overexpression of a wild-type TDP-43 transgene. By contrast, we engineered a construct that includes only the specific TDP-43 amino acid sequences necessary to trigger aggregate formation and capable of trapping endogenous Drosophila TDP-43 into a non-functional insoluble form. Importantly, the resulting recombinant product lacks functional RNA recognition motifs (RRMs and, thus, does not have specific TDP-43-physiological functions (i.e. splicing regulation ability that might affect the animal phenotype per se. This novel Drosophila model exhibits an evident degenerative phenotype with reduced lifespan and early locomotion defects. Additionally, we show that important proteins involved in neuromuscular junction function, such as syntaxin (SYX, decrease their levels as a consequence of TDP-43 loss of function implying that the degenerative phenotype is a consequence of TDP-43 sequestration into the aggregates. Our data lend further support to the role of TDP-43 loss-of-function in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. The novel transgenic Drosophila model presented in this study will help to gain further insight into the

  17. Housekeeping Gene Sequencing and Multilocus Variable-Number Tandem-Repeat Analysis To Identify Subpopulations within Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato That Correlate with Host Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gironde, S.

    2012-01-01

    Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola causes bacterial spot on Brassicaceae worldwide, and for the last 10 years severe outbreaks have been reported in the Loire Valley, France. P. syringae pv. maculicola resembles P. syringae pv. tomato in that it is also pathogenic for tomato and causes the same types of symptoms. We used a collection of 106 strains of P. syringae to characterize the relationships between P. syringae pv. maculicola and related pathovars, paying special attention to P. syringae pv. tomato. Phylogenetic analysis of gyrB and rpoD gene sequences showed that P. syringae pv. maculicola, which causes diseases in Brassicaceae, forms six genetic lineages within genomospecies 3 of P. syringae strains as defined by L. Gardan et al. (Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol. 49[Pt 2]:469–478, 1999), whereas P. syringae pv. tomato forms two distinct genetic lineages. A multilocus variable-number tandem-repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA) conducted with eight minisatellite loci confirmed the genetic structure obtained with rpoD and gyrB sequence analyses. These results provide promising tools for fine-scale epidemiological studies on diseases caused by P. syringae pv. maculicola and P. syringae pv. tomato. The two pathovars had distinct host ranges; only P. syringae pv. maculicola strains were pathogenic for Brassicaceae. A subpopulation of P. syringae pv. maculicola strains that are pathogenic for Pto-expressing tomato plants were shown to lack avrPto1 and avrPtoB or to contain a disrupted avrPtoB homolog. Taking phylogenetic and pathological features into account, our data suggest that the DC3000 strain belongs to P. syringae pv. maculicola. This study shows that P. syringae pv. maculicola and P. syringae pv. tomato appear multiclonal, as they did not diverge from a single common ancestral group within the ancestral P. syringae genomospecies 3, and suggests that pathovar specificity within P. syringae may be due to independent genetic events. PMID:22389364

  18. Genotype analysis of Candida albicans isolates obtained from different body locations of patients with superficial candidiasis using PCRs targeting 25S rDNA and ALT repeat sequences of the RPS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Hisao; Iwata, Takako; Nakagawa, Yoshiyuki; Kawamoto, Fumihiko; Tomita, Yasushi; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Kanbe, Toshio

    2006-04-01

    Several molecular biology-based genotyping techniques have been adapted for studying the molecular characteristics of Candida albicans strains, which constitute the majority of the etiologic agents in candidiasis. Recently, we reported a PCR system targeting 25S rDNA and ALT repeat sequences in the repetitive sequence (RPS) for genotyping of C. albicans. To assess the potential of 25S rDNA and RPS-based genotyping for studying the molecular epidemiology of C. albicans, and define the genotypic relationship of C. albicans between invasive and non-invasive lesions in the same individual. C. albicans strains were isolated from infected lesions and commensal sites, such as oral mucosa and/or feces, of patients with superficial candidiasis. The genomic DNAs were amplified by PCRs using P-I and P-II to determine the 25S rDNA- and RPS-based genotypes of the isolates. Genotype A:3 C. albicans constituted the majority of the isolates, followed by A:3/4 and B:3 C. albicans. There was usually one genotype of C. albicans per person. The genotypes of infected lesion isolates and non-infected oral mucosa and/or feces isolates were identical in the same individual, even in serially isolated C. albicans. The results indicate that our combined PCR technique using P-I and P-II is a potential tool for molecular typing of C. albicans, and reveal that the genotypes of isolates are identical in the same individual, independent of the infective and non-infective phases or the body location.

  19. Plasma levels of leptin, omentin, collagenous repeat-containing sequence of 26-kDa protein (CORS-26 and adiponectin before and after oral glucose uptake in slim adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schäffler Andreas

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Adipose tissue secreted proteins are collectively named adipocytokines and include leptin, adiponectin, resistin, collagenous repeat-containing sequence of 26-kDa protein (CORS-26 and omentin. Several of these adipocytokines influence insulin sensitivity and glucose metabolism and therefore systemic levels may be affected by oral glucose uptake. Whereas contradictory results have been published for leptin and adiponectin, resistin has not been extensively investigated and no reports on omentin and CORS-26 do exist. Methods Therefore the plasma levels of these proteins before and 120 min after an oral glucose load were analyzed in 20 highly-insulin sensitive, young adults by ELISA or immunoblot. Results Circulating leptin was reduced 2 h after glucose uptake whereas adiponectin and resistin levels are not changed. Distribution of adiponectin and CORS-26 isoforms were similar before and after glucose ingestion. Omentin is highly abundant in plasma and immunoblot analysis revealed no alterations when plasma levels before and 2 h after glucose intake were compared. Conclusion Taken together our data indicate that only leptin is reduced by glucose uptake in insulin-sensitive probands whereas adiponectin and resistin are not altered. CORS-26 was demonstrated for the first time to circulate as high molecular weight form in plasma and like omentin was not influenced by oral glucose load. Omentin was shown to enhance insulin-stimulated glucose uptake but systemic levels are not correlated to postprandial blood glucose.

  20. Terminal ballistics

    CERN Document Server

    Rosenberg, Zvi

    2016-01-01

    This book comprehensively discusses essential aspects of terminal ballistics, combining experimental data, numerical simulations and analytical modeling. Employing a unique approach to numerical simulations as a measure of sensitivity for the major physical parameters, the new edition also includes the following features: new figures to better illustrate the problems discussed; improved explanations for the equation of state of a solid and for the cavity expansion process; new data concerning the Kolsky bar test; and a discussion of analytical modeling for the hole diameter in a thin metallic plate impacted by a shaped charge jet. The section on thick concrete targets penetrated by rigid projectiles has now been expanded to include the latest findings, and two new sections have been added: one on a novel approach to the perforation of thin concrete slabs, and one on testing the failure of thin metallic plates using a hydrodynamic ram.

  1. Rearranging and concatenating a native RTX domain to understand sequence modularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shur, Oren; Banta, Scott

    2013-03-01

    The use of repetitive peptide sequences forming predictable secondary structures has been a key paradigm in recent efforts to engineer biomolecular recognition. The modularity and predictability of these scaffolds enables precise identification and mutation of the active interface, providing a level of control which non-repetitive scaffolds often lack. However, the majority of these scaffolds are well-folded stable structures. If the structures had a stimulus-responsive character, this would enable the allosteric regulation of their function. The calcium-responsive beta roll-forming repeats in toxin (RTX) domain potentially offer both of these properties. To further develop this scaffold, we synthesized a set of RTX peptides ranging in size from 5 to 17 repeats, with and without C-terminal capping. We found that while the number of repeats can be altered to tune the size of the RTX face, repeat ordering and C-terminal capping are critical for successful folding. Comparing all of the constructs, we also observed that native configuration with nine repeats exhibited the highest affinity for calcium. In addition, we performed a comparison on a set of known RTX-containing proteins and find that C-terminal repeats often possess deviations from the consensus RTX sequence which may be essential for proper folding. We further find that there seems to be a narrow size range in which RTX domains exist. These results demonstrate that the deviations from the consensus RTX sequence that are observed in natural proteins are important for high-affinity calcium binding and folding. Therefore, the RTX scaffolds will be less modular as compared with other, non-responsive scaffolds, and the sequence-dependent interactions between different repeats will need to be retained in these scaffolds as they are developed in future protein-engineering efforts.

  2. Design of a "Mini" Nucleic Acid Probe for Cooperative Binding of an RNA-Repeated Transcript Associated with Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Wei-Che; Bahal, Raman; Thadke, Shivaji A; Bhatt, Kirti; Sobczak, Krzysztof; Thornton, Charles; Ly, Danith H

    2018-01-19

    Toxic RNAs containing expanded trinucleotide repeats are the cause of many neuromuscular disorders, one being myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1). DM1 is triggered by CTG-repeat expansion in the 3'-untranslated region of the DMPK gene, resulting in a toxic gain of RNA function through sequestration of MBNL1 protein, among others. Herein, we report the development of a relatively short miniPEG-γ peptide nucleic acid probe, two triplet repeats in length, containing terminal pyrene moieties, that is capable of binding rCUG repeats in a sequence-specific and selective manner. The newly designed probe can discriminate the pathogenic rCUGexp from the wild-type transcript and disrupt the rCUGexp-MBNL1 complex. The work provides a proof of concept for the development of relatively short nucleic acid probes for targeting RNA-repeat expansions associated with DM1 and other related neuromuscular disorders.

  3. Precise sequence complementarity between yeast chromosome ends and two classes of just-subtelomeric sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Roy J. Britten

    1998-01-01

    The terminal regions (last 20 kb) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae chromosomes universally contain blocks of precise sequence similarity to other chromosome terminal regions. The left and right terminal regions are distinct in the sense that the sequence similarities between them are reverse complements. Direct sequence similarity occurs between the left terminal regions and also between the right terminal regions, but not between any left ends and right ends. With mino...

  4. Intramolecular folding in human ILPR fragment with three C-rich repeats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soma Dhakal

    Full Text Available Enrichment of four tandem repeats of guanine (G rich and cytosine (C rich sequences in functionally important regions of human genome forebodes the biological implications of four-stranded DNA structures, such as G-quadruplex and i-motif, that can form in these sequences. However, there have been few reports on the intramolecular formation of non-B DNA structures in less than four tandem repeats of G or C rich sequences. Here, using mechanical unfolding at the single-molecule level, electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA, circular dichroism (CD, and ultraviolet (UV spectroscopy, we report an intramolecularly folded non-B DNA structure in three tandem cytosine rich repeats, 5'-TGTC4ACAC4TGTC4ACA (ILPR-I3, in the human insulin linked polymorphic region (ILPR. The thermal denaturation analyses of the sequences with systematic C to T mutations have suggested that the structure is linchpinned by a stack of hemiprotonated cytosine pairs between two terminal C4 tracts. Mechanical unfolding and Br(2 footprinting experiments on a mixture of the ILPR-I3 and a 5'-C4TGT fragment have further indicated that the structure serves as a building block for intermolecular i-motif formation. The existence of such a conformation under acidic or neutral pH complies with the strand-by-strand folding pathway of ILPR i-motif structures.

  5. Diversity of the marine picocyanobacteria Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus assessed by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms of 16S-23S rRNA internal transcribed spacer sequences Diversidad de las picocianobacterias marinas Prochlorococcus y Synechococcus por medio de polimorfismos de longitud de fragmentos de restricción terminal en secuencias del espaciador transcrito interno del ARNr 16S - 23S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PARIS LAVIN

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In order to assess the appropriateness of the use of internal transcribed spacer (ITS sequences for the study of population genetics of marine cyanobacteria, we amplified and cloned the 16S rRNA gene plus the 16S-23S ITS regions of six strains of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus. We analyzed them by denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE and terminal restriction fragment length polymorphisms (T-RFLP. When using the standard application of these techniques, we obtained more than one band or terminal restriction fragment (T-RF per strain or cloned sequence. Reports in literature have suggested that these anomalies can result from the formation of secondary structures. Secondary structures of the ITS sequences of Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus strains were computationally modelled at the different temperatures that were used during the polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Modelling results predicted the existence of hairpin loops that would still be present at the extensión temperature; it is likely that these loops produced incomplete and single stranded PCR products. We modified the standard T-RFLP procedure by adding the labelled ITS primer in the last two cycles of the PCR reaction; this resulted, in most cases, in only one T-RF per ribotype. Application of this technique to a natural picoplankton community in marine waters off northern Chile, showed that it was possible to identify the presence, and determine the relative abundance, of several phylogenetic lineages within the genera Prochlorococcus and Synechococcus inhabiting the euphotic zone. Phylogenetic analysis of ITS sequences obtained by cloning and sequencing DNA from the same sample confirmed the presence of the different genotypes. With the proposed modification, T-RFLP profiles should therefore be suitable for studying the diversity of natural populations of cyanobacteria, and should become an important tool to study the factors influencing the genetic structure and

  6. Purification, N-terminal amino acid sequence and characterization of pH 2.5 optimum acid phosphatase (E.C. 3.1.3.2) from Aspergillus ficuum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullah, A H; Cummins, B J

    1987-01-01

    An acid phosphatase from crude culture filtrate of Aspergillus ficuum was purified to homogeneity using three ion exchange chromatographic steps. SDS-PAGE of the purified enzyme gave a single stained band at approximately 68-KDa. The mobility of the native enzyme in gel filtration chromatography, however, indicated that the molecular mass to be about 130-KDa implying the active form to be a dimer. On the basis of a molecular mass of 68-KDa, the molar extinction coefficient of the enzyme at 280 nm was estimated to be 3.4 x 10(5) M-1 cm-1. The isoelectric point of the enzyme, as judged by chromatofocusing, was about 4.0. The purified enzyme is highly stable at 0 degree C. Thermal inactivation studies have indicated that the enzyme is unstable at 70 degrees C. The enzyme, however, exhibited a broad temperature optima with a maximum catalytic activity at 63 degrees C. The Km of the enzyme for p-nitrophenylphosphate is about 270 microM with an estimated turnover number of 2550 per sec. The enzyme is a glycoprotein as evidenced by the positive PAS staining; the sugar composition suggests the presence of N-linked high mannose-oligosaccharides. A partial N-terminal amino acid sequence up to the twenty-third residue was obtained. The enzyme was inhibited competitively by inorganic orthophosphate (Ki = 185 microM) and non-competitively by phosphomycin (Ki = 600 microM).

  7. Repeats and EST analysis for new organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonassen Inge

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Repeat masking is an important step in the EST analysis pipeline. For new species, genomic knowledge is scarce and good repeat libraries are typically unavailable. In these cases it is common practice to mask against known repeats from other species (i.e., model organisms. There are few studies that investigate the effectiveness of this approach, or attempt to evaluate the different methods for identifying and masking repeats. Results Using zebrafish and medaka as example organisms, we show that accurate repeat masking is an important factor for obtaining a high quality clustering. Furthermore, we show that masking with standard repeat libraries based on curated genomic information from other species has little or no positive effect on the quality of the resulting EST clustering. Library based repeat masking which often constitutes a computational bottleneck in the EST analysis pipeline can therefore be reduced to species specific repeat libraries, or perhaps eliminated entirely. In contrast, substantially improved results can be achived by applying a repeat library derived from a partial reference clustering (e.g., from mapping sequences against a partially sequenced genome. Conclusion Of the methods explored, we find that the best EST clustering is achieved after masking with repeat libraries that are species specific. In the absence of such libraries, library-less masking gives results superior to the current practice of using cross-species, genome-based libraries.

  8. Rapid construction of insulated genetic circuits via synthetic sequence-guided isothermal assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torella, Joseph P; Boehm, Christian R; Lienert, Florian; Chen, Jan-Hung; Way, Jeffrey C; Silver, Pamela A

    2014-01-01

    In vitro recombination methods have enabled one-step construction of large DNA sequences from multiple parts. Although synthetic biological circuits can in principle be assembled in the same fashion, they typically contain repeated sequence elements such as standard promoters and terminators that interfere with homologous recombination. Here we use a computational approach to design synthetic, biologically inactive unique nucleotide sequences (UNSes) that facilitate accurate ordered assembly. Importantly, our designed UNSes make it possible to assemble parts with repeated terminator and insulator sequences, and thereby create insulated functional genetic circuits in bacteria and mammalian cells. Using UNS-guided assembly to construct repeating promoter-gene-terminator parts, we systematically varied gene expression to optimize production of a deoxychromoviridans biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli. We then used this system to construct complex eukaryotic AND-logic gates for genomic integration into embryonic stem cells. Construction was performed by using a standardized series of UNS-bearing BioBrick-compatible vectors, which enable modular assembly and facilitate reuse of individual parts. UNS-guided isothermal assembly is broadly applicable to the construction and optimization of genetic circuits and particularly those requiring tight insulation, such as complex biosynthetic pathways, sensors, counters and logic gates.

  9. Rapid construction of insulated genetic circuits via synthetic sequence-guided isothermal assembly

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torella, JP; Boehm, CR; Lienert, F; Chen, JH; Way, JC; Silver, PA

    2013-12-28

    In vitro recombination methods have enabled one-step construction of large DNA sequences from multiple parts. Although synthetic biological circuits can in principle be assembled in the same fashion, they typically contain repeated sequence elements such as standard promoters and terminators that interfere with homologous recombination. Here we use a computational approach to design synthetic, biologically inactive unique nucleotide sequences (UNSes) that facilitate accurate ordered assembly. Importantly, our designed UNSes make it possible to assemble parts with repeated terminator and insulator sequences, and thereby create insulated functional genetic circuits in bacteria and mammalian cells. Using UNS-guided assembly to construct repeating promoter-gene-terminator parts, we systematically varied gene expression to optimize production of a deoxychromoviridans biosynthetic pathway in Escherichia coli. We then used this system to construct complex eukaryotic AND-logic gates for genomic integration into embryonic stem cells. Construction was performed by using a standardized series of UNS-bearing BioBrick-compatible vectors, which enable modular assembly and facilitate reuse of individual parts. UNS-guided isothermal assembly is broadly applicable to the construction and optimization of genetic circuits and particularly those requiring tight insulation, such as complex biosynthetic pathways, sensors, counters and logic gates.

  10. Functional dynamics of the folded ankyrin repeats of I kappa B alpha revealed by nuclear magnetic resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes, Carla F; Markwick, Phineus R L; Sue, Shih-Che; McCammon, J Andrew; Dyson, H Jane; Komives, Elizabeth A

    2009-08-25

    Inhibition of nuclear factor kappaB (NF-kappaB) is mainly accomplished by IkappaB alpha, which consists of a signal response sequence at the N-terminus, a six-ankyrin repeat domain (ARD) that binds NF-kappaB, and a C-terminal PEST sequence. Previous studies with the ARD revealed that the fifth and sixth repeats are only partially folded in the absence of NF-kappaB. Here we report NMR studies of a truncated version of IkappaB alpha, containing only the first four ankyrin repeats, IkappaB alpha(67-206). This four-repeat segment is well-structured in the free state, enabling full resonance assignments to be made. H-D exchange, backbone dynamics, and residual dipolar coupling (RDC) experiments reveal regions of flexibility. In addition, regions consistent with the presence of micro- to millisecond motions occur periodically throughout the repeat structure. Comparison of the RDCs with the crystal structure gave only moderate agreement, but an ensemble of structures generated by accelerated molecular dynamics gave much better agreement with the measured RDCs. The regions showing flexibility correspond to those implicated in entropic compensation for the loss of flexibility in ankyrin repeats 5 and 6 upon binding to NF-kappaB. The regions showing micro- to millisecond motions in the free protein are the ends of the beta-hairpins that directly interact with NF-kappaB in the complex.

  11. Human U4/U6 snRNP recycling factor p110: Mutational analysis reveals the function of the tetratricopeptide repeat domain in recycling

    OpenAIRE

    Medenbach, J.; Schreiner, S.; Liu, S.; Luehrmann, R.; Bindereif, A

    2004-01-01

    After each spliceosome cycle, the U4 and U6 snRNAs are released separately and are recycled to the functional U4/U6 snRNP, requiring in the mammalian system the U6-specific RNA binding protein p110 (SART3). Its domain structure is made up of an extensive N-terminal domain with at least seven tetratricopeptide repeat (TPR) motifs, followed by two RNA recognition motifs (RRMs) and a highly conserved C-terminal sequence of 10 amino acids. Here we demonstrate under in vitro recycling conditions t...

  12. Genome-wide analysis of repeat diversity across the family Musaceae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Novák

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The banana family (Musaceae includes genetically a diverse group of species and their diploid and polyploid hybrids that are widely cultivated in the tropics. In spite of their socio-economic importance, the knowledge of Musaceae genomes is basically limited to draft genome assemblies of two species, Musa acuminata and M. balbisiana. Here we aimed to complement this information by analyzing repetitive genome fractions of six species selected to represent various phylogenetic groups within the family. RESULTS: Low-pass sequencing of M. acuminata, M. ornata, M. textilis, M. beccarii, M. balbisiana, and Ensete gilletii genomes was performed using a 454/Roche platform. Sequence reads were subjected to analysis of their overall intra- and inter-specific similarities and, all major repeat families were quantified using graph-based clustering. Maximus/SIRE and Angela lineages of Ty1/copia long terminal repeat (LTR retrotransposons and the chromovirus lineage of Ty3/gypsy elements were found to make up most of highly repetitive DNA in all species (14-34.5% of the genome. However, there were quantitative differences and sequence variations detected for classified repeat families as well as for the bulk of total repetitive DNA. These differences were most pronounced between species from different taxonomic sections of the Musaceae family, whereas pairs of closely related species (M. acuminata/M. ornata and M. beccarii/M. textilis shared similar populations of repetitive elements. CONCLUSIONS: This study provided the first insight into the composition and sequence variation of repetitive parts of Musaceae genomes. It allowed identification of repetitive sequences specific for a single species or a group of species that can be utilized as molecular markers in breeding programs and generated computational resources that will be instrumental in repeat masking and annotation in future genome assembly projects.

  13. Diffuse transition state structure for the unfolding of a leucine-rich repeat protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Sadie E; Meisl, Georg; Rowling, Pamela J E; McLaughlin, Stephen H; Knowles, Tuomas; Itzhaki, Laura S

    2014-04-14

    Tandem-repeat proteins, such as leucine-rich repeats, comprise arrays of small structural motifs that pack in a linear fashion to produce elongated architectures. They lack contacts between residues that are distant in primary sequence, a feature that distinguishes them from the complex topologies of globular proteins. Here we have investigated the unfolding pathway of the leucine-rich repeat domain of the mRNA export protein TAP (TAPLRR) using Φ-value analysis. Whereas most of the tandem-repeat proteins studied to date have been found to unfold via a polarised mechanism in which only a small, localised number of repeats are structured in the transition state, the unfolding mechanism of TAPLRR is more diffuse in nature. In the transition state for unfolding of TAPLRR, three of the four LRRs are highly structured and non-native interactions are formed within the N-terminal α-helical cap and the first LRR. Thus, the α-helical cap plays an important role in which non-native interactions are required to provide a scaffold for the LRRs to pack against in the folding reaction.

  14. Roles of repetitive sequences

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, G.I.

    1991-12-31

    The DNA of higher eukaryotes contains many repetitive sequences. The study of repetitive sequences is important, not only because many have important biological function, but also because they provide information on genome organization, evolution and dynamics. In this paper, I will first discuss some generic effects that repetitive sequences will have upon genome dynamics and evolution. In particular, it will be shown that repetitive sequences foster recombination among, and turnover of, the elements of a genome. I will then consider some examples of repetitive sequences, notably minisatellite sequences and telomere sequences as examples of tandem repeats, without and with respectively known function, and Alu sequences as an example of interspersed repeats. Some other examples will also be considered in less detail.

  15. Pentapeptide Repeat Proteins and Cyanobacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buchko, Garry W.

    2009-10-16

    Cyanobacteria are unique in many ways and one unusual feature is the presence of a suite of proteins that contain at least one domain with a minimum of eight tandem repeated five-residues (Rfr) of the general consensus sequence A[N/D]LXX. The function of such pentapeptide repeat proteins (PRPs) are still unknown, however, their prevalence in cyanobacteria suggests that they may play some role in the unique biological activities of cyanobacteria. As part of an inter-disciplinary Membrane Biology Grand Challenge at the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory) and Washington University in St. Louis, the genome of Cyanothece 51142 was sequenced and its molecular biology studied with relation to circadian rhythms. The genome of Cyanothece encodes for 35 proteins that contain at least one PRP domain. These proteins range in size from 105 (Cce_3102) to 930 (Cce_2929) kDa with the PRP domains ranging in predicted size from 12 (Cce_1545) to 62 (cce_3979) tandem pentapeptide repeats. Transcriptomic studies with 29 out of the 35 genes showed that at least three of the PRPs in Cyanothece 51142 (cce_0029, cce_3083, and cce_3272) oscillated with repeated periods of light and dark, further supporting a biological function for PRPs. Using X-ray diffraction crystallography, the structure for two pentapeptide repeat proteins from Cyanothece 51142 were determined, cce_1272 (aka Rfr32) and cce_4529 (aka Rfr23). Analysis of their molecular structures suggests that all PRP may share the same structural motif, a novel type of right-handed quadrilateral β-helix, or Rfr-fold, reminiscent of a square tower with four distinct faces. Each pentapeptide repeat occupies one face of the Rfr-fold with four consecutive pentapeptide repeats completing a coil that, in turn, stack upon each other to form “protein skyscrapers”. Details of the structural features of the Rfr-fold are reviewed here together with a discussion for the possible role of end

  16. Identification of the ankyrin repeat proteins ANKRA and RFXANK as novel partners of class IIa histone deacetylases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Audrey H; Grégoire, Serge; Zika, Eleni; Xiao, Lin; Li, Cathy S; Li, Hongwei; Wright, Kenneth L; Ting, Jenny P; Yang, Xiang-Jiao

    2005-08-12

    Eighteen human histone deacetylases (HDACs) have been identified, and according to their sequence similarity to yeast homologs, these enzymes are grouped into distinct classes. Within class II, HDAC4, HDAC5, HDAC7, and HDAC9 share similar domain organization both within the N-terminal extension and the C-terminal catalytic domain, thus forming a subclass known as class IIa. These HDACs function as signal-responsive transcriptional corepressors. To gain further insight into their function and regulation, we utilized an N-terminal fragment of HDAC4 as bait in yeast two-hybrid screens, which uncovered myocyte enhancer factor 2C, 14-3-3zeta, and ankyrin repeat family A protein (ANKRA). ANKRA is a poorly characterized protein with an ankyrin repeat domain similar to RFXANK, a subunit of the trimeric transcription factor RFX. Mutations on genes of the RFX subunits and the coactivator CIITA are responsible for the bare lymphocyte syndrome, an immunodeficiency disorder attributed to the lack of major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) antigens. Through its ankyrin repeat domain, RFXANK interacted with HDAC4. Two RFXANK-binding sites were found on HDAC4 with one located within residues 118-279 and another within residues 448-666. Interestingly, this deacetylase also interacted with CIITA. Consistent with the physical interaction with RFXANK and CIITA, HDAC4 and homologs repressed MHCII expression. These results identify ANKRA, RFXANK, and CIITA as novel targets of class IIa HDACs and suggest that these deacetylases play a role in regulating MHCII expression.

  17. Molecular identification and characterization of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) in a urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter sp. (UPTC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tasaki, E; Hirayama, J; Tazumi, A; Hayashi, K; Hara, Y; Ueno, H; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Matsuda, M

    2012-02-01

    Novel clustered regularly-interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) locus [7,500 base pairs (bp) in length] occurred in the urease-positive thermophilic Campylobacter (UPTC) Japanese isolate, CF89-12. The 7,500 bp gene loci consisted of the 5'-methylaminomethyl-2-thiouridylate methyltransferase gene, putative (P) CRISPR associated (p-Cas), putative open reading frames, Cas1 and Cas2, leader sequence region (146 bp), 12 CRISPRs consensus sequence repeats (each 36 bp) separated by a non-repetitive unique spacer region of similar length (26-31 bp) and the phosphatidyl glycerophosphatase A gene. When the CRISPRs loci in the UPTC CF89-12 and five C. jejuni isolates were compared with one another, these six isolates contained p-Cas, Cas1 and Cas2 within the loci. Four to 12 CRISPRs consensus sequence repeats separated by a non-repetitive unique spacer region occurred in six isolates and the nucleotide sequences of those repeats gave approximately 92-100% similarity with each other. However, no sequence similarity occurred in the unique spacer regions among these isolates. The putative σ(70) transcriptional promoter and the hypothetical ρ-independent terminator structures for the CRISPRs and Cas were detected. No in vivo transcription of p-Cas, Cas1 and Cas2 was confirmed in the UPTC cells.

  18. Determination of allele frequencies in nine short tandem repeat loci ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... DNA fraction. Analysis of STRs is the most widely used method of genotyping used in forensic identification of individuals and for testing paternity. This is because ... Each STR is distinguished by the number of times a sequence is repeated, ... number of copies of the repeat sequence contained within the ...

  19. Intermodal freight terminals : terminal business planning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nijkamp, Peter; Wiegmans, Bart W.

    2000-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to provide a framework for existing- and newly proposedinter-modal freight terminals in their business planning process. This framework is importantfor constructing- and improving the central terminal service portfolio of handling (loading,discharging, and

  20. Finding and Characterizing Repeats in Plant Genomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Jacques; Peterlongo, Pierre; Tempel, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Plant genomes contain a particularly high proportion of repeated structures of various types. This chapter proposes a guided tour of available software that can help biologists to look for these repeats and check some hypothetical models intended to characterize their structures. Since transposable elements are a major source of repeats in plants, many methods have been used or developed for this large class of sequences. They are representative of the range of tools available for other classes of repeats and we have provided a whole section on this topic as well as a selection of the main existing software. In order to better understand how they work and how repeats may be efficiently found in genomes, it is necessary to look at the technical issues involved in the large-scale search of these structures. Indeed, it may be hard to keep up with the profusion of proposals in this dynamic field and the rest of the chapter is devoted to the foundations of the search for repeats and more complex patterns. The second section introduces the key concepts that are useful for understanding the current state of the art in playing with words, applied to genomic sequences. This can be seen as the first stage of a very general approach called linguistic analysis that is interested in the analysis of natural or artificial texts. Words, the lexical level, correspond to simple repeated entities in texts or strings. In fact, biologists need to represent more complex entities where a repeat family is built on more abstract structures, including direct or inverted small repeats, motifs, composition constraints as well as ordering and distance constraints between these elementary blocks. In terms of linguistics, this corresponds to the syntactic level of a language. The last section introduces concepts and practical tools that can be used to reach this syntactic level in biological sequence analysis.

  1. Characterization of sequence diversity in Plasmodium falciparum SERA5 from Indian isolates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul C.N

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To characterize the sequence diversity of blood-stage Plasmodium falciparum serine repeat antigen-5 (PfSERA5 which is lacking in a malaria-endemic country like India. Methods: In this study, parasitic DNA was obtained from field isolates collected from various geographic regions. Subsequently, PfSERA5 gene sequence was PCR amplified and DNA sequenced. Results: We reported the existence of unique repeat polymorphisms and novel haplotypes for both the octamer repeat (OR and serine repeat (SR regions of the N-terminal fragment of PfSERA5 from Indian isolates. Several isolates from India were identical to low-frequency African haplotypes. Unique finding of our study was an Indian isolate showing deletion in a perfectly conserved 14 mer sequence within octamer repeat. Indian haplotypes reported in this study were found to be distributed into the three earlier classified allelic clusters of FCR3, K1 and Honduras showcasing broad diversity as compared to worldwide haplotypes. Conclusions: This study is the first report on genetic diversity of PfSERA5 antigen from India. Further evaluation of these haplotypes by serotyping would provide useful information for investigating variant-specific immunity and aid in malaria vaccine research.

  2. Comparative Analysis of the Proteins with Tandem Repeats from 8 Microsporidia and Characterization of a Novel Endospore Wall Protein Colocalizing with Polar Tube from Nosema bombycis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ying; Geng, Huixia; Dang, Xiaoqun; Xiang, Heng; Li, Tian; Pan, Guoqing; Zhou, Zeyang

    2017-09-01

    As a common feature of eukaryotic proteins, tandem amino acid repeat has been studied extensively in both animal and plant proteins. Here, a comparative analysis focusing on the proteins having tandem repeats was conducted in eight microsporidia, including four mammal-infecting microsporidia (Encephalitozoon cuniculi, Encephalitozoon intestinalis, Encephalitozoon hellem and Encephalitozoon bieneusi) and four insect-infecting microsporidia (Nosema apis, Nosema ceranae, Vavraia culicis and Nosema bombycis). We found that the proteins with tandem repeats were abundant in these species. The quantity of these proteins in insect-infecting microsporidia was larger than that of mammal-infecting microsporidia. Additionally, the hydrophilic residues were overrepresented in the tandem repeats of these eight microsporidian proteins and the amino acids residues in these tandem repeat sequences tend to be encoded by GC-rich codons. The tandem repeat position within proteins of insect-infecting microsporidia was randomly distributed, whereas the tandem repeats within proteins of mammal-infecting microsporidia rarely tend to be present in the N terminal regions, when compared with those present in the C terminal and middle regions. Finally, a hypothetical protein EOB14572 possessing four tandem repeats was successfully characterized as a novel endospore wall protein, which colocalized with polar tube of N. bombycis. Our study provided useful insight for the study of the proteins with tandem repeats in N. bombycis, but also further enriched the spore wall components of this obligate unicellular eukaryotic parasite. © 2017 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2017 International Society of Protistologists.

  3. Germ-line CAG repeat instability causes extreme CAG repeat expansion with infantile-onset spinocerebellar ataxia type 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinther-Jensen, Tua; Ek, Jakob; Duno, Morten; Skovby, Flemming; Hjermind, Lena E; Nielsen, Jørgen E; Nielsen, Troels Tolstrup

    2013-06-01

    The spinocerebellar ataxias (SCA) are a genetically and clinically heterogeneous group of diseases, characterized by dominant inheritance, progressive cerebellar ataxia and diverse extracerebellar symptoms. A subgroup of the ataxias is caused by unstable CAG-repeat expansions in their respective genes leading to pathogenic expansions of polyglutamine stretches in the encoded proteins. In general, unstable CAG repeats have an uninterrupted CAG repeat, whereas stable CAG repeats are either short or interrupted by CAA codons, which - like CAG codons - code for glutamine. Here we report on an infantile SCA2 patient who, due to germ-line CAG repeat instability in her father, inherited an extremely expanded CAG repeat in the SCA2 locus. Surprisingly, the expanded allele of the father was an interrupted CAG repeat sequence. Furthermore, analyses of single spermatozoa showed a high frequency of paternal germ-line repeat sequence instability of the expanded SCA2 locus.

  4. pawg Terminal Aerodrome Forecast

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    Data.gov (United States)

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