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Sample records for terbium oxides

  1. Biogenic terbium oxide nanoparticles as the vanguard against osteosarcoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iram, Sana; Khan, Salman; Ansary, Abu Ayoobul; Arshad, Mohd; Siddiqui, Sahabjada; Ahmad, Ejaz; Khan, Rizwan H.; Khan, Mohd Sajid

    2016-11-01

    The synthesis of inner transition metal nanoparticles via an ecofriendly route is quite difficult. This study, for the first time, reports synthesis of terbium oxide nanoparticles using fungus, Fusarium oxysporum. The biocompatible terbium oxide nanoparticles (Tb2O3 NPs) were synthesized by incubating Tb4O7 with the biomass of fungus F. oxysporum. Multiple physical characterization techniques, such as UV-visible and photoluminescence spectroscopy, TEM, SAED, and zeta-potential were used to confirm the synthesis, purity, optical and surface characteristics, crystallinity, size, shape, distribution, and stability of the nanoemulsion of Tb2O3 NPs. The Tb2O3 NPs were found to inhibit the propagation of MG-63 and Saos-2 cell-lines (IC50 value of 0.102 μg/mL) and remained non-toxic up to a concentration of 0.373 μg/mL toward primary osteoblasts. Cell viability decreased in a concentration-dependent manner upon exposure to 10 nm Tb2O3 NPs in the concentration range 0.023-0.373 μg/mL. Cell toxicity was evaluated by observing changes in cell morphology, cell viability, oxidative stress parameters, and FACS analysis. Morphological examinations of cells revealed cell shrinkage, nuclear condensation, and formation of apoptotic bodies. The level of ROS within the cells-an indicator of oxidative stress was significantly increased. The induction of apoptosis at concentrations ≤ IC50 was corroborated by 4‧,6-diamidino-2-phenylindole dihydrochloride (DAPI) staining (DNA damage and nuclear fragmentation). Flow-cytometric studies indicated that the response was dose dependent with a threshold effect.

  2. Solar Thermochemical Hydrogen Production via Terbium Oxide Based Redox Reactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhosale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The computational thermodynamic modeling of the terbium oxide based two-step solar thermochemical water splitting (Tb-WS cycle is reported. The 1st step of the Tb-WS cycle involves thermal reduction of TbO2 into Tb and O2, whereas the 2nd step corresponds to the production of H2 through Tb oxidation by water splitting reaction. Equilibrium compositions associated with the thermal reduction and water splitting steps were determined via HSC simulations. Influence of oxygen partial pressure in the inert gas on thermal reduction of TbO2 and effect of water splitting temperature (TL on Gibbs free energy related to the H2 production step were examined in detail. The cycle (ηcycle and solar-to-fuel energy conversion (ηsolar-to-fuel efficiency of the Tb-WS cycle were determined by performing the second-law thermodynamic analysis. Results obtained indicate that ηcycle and ηsolar-to-fuel increase with the decrease in oxygen partial pressure in the inert flushing gas and thermal reduction temperature (TH. It was also realized that the recuperation of the heat released by the water splitting reactor and quench unit further enhances the solar reactor efficiency. At TH=2280 K, by applying 60% heat recuperation, maximum ηcycle of 39.0% and ηsolar-to-fuel of 47.1% for the Tb-WS cycle can be attained.

  3. Green light emission in aluminum oxide powders doped with different terbium concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mariscal B, L; Falcony, C. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados, 07360 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Carmona T, S.; Murrieta, H.; Sanchez A, M. A. [UNAM, Instituto de Fisica, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Vazquez A, R. [IPN, Escuela Superior de Computo, 07738 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico); Garcia R, C. M., E-mail: mariscal2005@gmail.com [UNAM, Facultad de Ciencias, 04510 Ciudad de Mexico (Mexico)

    2016-11-01

    Different emission intensities presented in aluminum oxide phosphors corresponding to different concentrations of doping performed with terbium are analyzed. The phosphors were synthesized by the evaporation technique and were characterized by photo and cathodoluminescence, X-ray diffraction and EDS techniques for different incorporation percentages of terbium as dopant; they show characteristic transitions in 494, 543, 587 and 622 nm, corresponding to {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 6}, {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 5}, {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 4} and {sup 5}D{sub 4} → {sup 7}F{sub 3}, respectively when they are excited with λ{sub exc} = 380 nm wavelength at room temperature. The results of X-ray diffraction show the presence of α-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} phases with peaks located at 2θ = 25.78, 35.34, 37.96, 43.56, 45.8, 52.74, 57.7, 61.5, 66.74, 68.44, 77.12 and 80.94, and the δ-Al{sub 2}O-3 phase 2θ = 32.82, 45.8, 61.36 and 66.74. These compounds were heat treated for two hours at 1100 degrees Celsius. EDS analyzes indicate that these compounds have close to 60% oxygen around of 40% aluminum in the presence of terbium as dopant which indicates a stoichiometry close to the expected one for alumina. (Author)

  4. Study of quantum dot based on tin/yttrium mixed oxide doped with terbium to be used as biomarker

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganini, Paula P.; Felinto, Maria Claudia F.C.; Kodaira, Claudia A., E-mail: paulapaganini@usp.b, E-mail: mfelinto@ipen.b, E-mail: claudiakodaira@yahoo.co [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Brito, Hermi F., E-mail: hefbrito@iq.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Inst. de Quimica. Lab. de Elementos do Bloco f; Nunes, Luiz Antonio O., E-mail: luizant@ifsc.usp.b [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), Sao Carlos, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Fisica. Dept. de Fisica e Informatica

    2009-07-01

    Quantum dots (semiconductors nanocrystals) have brought a promising field to develop a new generation of luminescent biomarkers. The use of lanthanides ions as luminescent markers has many advantages, for example a security method, low cost, high specificity and also the luminescence can be promptly measured with high sensibility and accuracy. These luminescent dots are functionalized with biomolecules. For the luminophore particle to be connect with biologicals molecules (for example covalent antibody) is necessary a previous chemical treatment to modify luminophore particle surface and this process is called functionalization. A prior chemical treatment with changes on the surface luminophore particle is necessary to couple the luminophore to biological molecules. This process can be used as coating which can protect these particles from being dissolved by acid as well as provide functional groups for biological conjugation. This work presents a photoluminescence study of nanoparticles based on tin/yttrium mixed oxides doped with terbium (SnO{sub 2}/Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:Tb{sup 3+}), synthesized by coprecipitation method. The nanoparticles were submitted to thermal treatment and characterized by X-Ray Powder Diffraction (XRD) that showed cassiterite phase formation and the influence of thermal treatment on nanoparticles structures. These nanoparticles going to be functionalized with a natural polysaccharide (chitosan) in order to form microspheres. These microspheres going to be irradiated with gamma radiation to sterilization and it can be evaluated if the nanoparticles are resistant to irradiation and they do not lose functionality with this process. (author)

  5. Semiconductor composition containing iron, dysprosium, and terbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pooser, Raphael C.; Lawrie, Benjamin J.; Baddorf, Arthur P.; Malasi, Abhinav; Taz, Humaira; Farah, Annettee E.; Kalyanaraman, Ramakrishnan; Duscher, Gerd Josef Mansfred; Patel, Maulik K.

    2017-09-26

    An amorphous semiconductor composition includes 1 to 70 atomic percent iron, 15 to 65 atomic percent dysprosium, 15 to 35 atomic percent terbium, balance X, wherein X is at least one of an oxidizing element and a reducing element. The composition has an essentially amorphous microstructure, an optical transmittance of at least 50% in at least the visible spectrum and semiconductor electrical properties.

  6. Elastic properties of terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Spichkin, Y.I.; Bohr, Jakob; Tishin, A.M.

    1996-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the Young modulus along the crystallographic axes b and c (E(b) and E(c)), and the internal friction of a terbium single crystal have been measured. At 4.2 K, E(b) and E(c) are equal to 38 and 84.5 GPa, respectively. The lattice part of the Young modulus and the Debye...... temperature has been calculated. The origin of the Young modulus anomalies arising at the transition to the magnetically ordered state is discussed....

  7. Critical scattering of neutrons from terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Dietrich, O.W.; Marshall, W.

    1968-01-01

    The inelasticity of the critical scattering of neutrons in terbium has been measured above the Neél temperature at the (0, 0, 2−Q) satellite position. The results show that dynamic slowing down of the fluctuations does occur in a second‐order phase transition in agreement with the general theory...

  8. Raman spectroscopy study of the doping effect of the encapsulated terbium halogenides on single-walled carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kharlamova, M.V.; Kramberger, C.; Mittelberger, A. [University of Vienna, Faculty of Physics, Vienna (Austria)

    2017-04-15

    In the present work, the doping effect of terbium chloride, terbium bromide, and terbium iodide on single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) was compared by Raman spectroscopy. A precise investigation of the doping-induced alterations of the Raman modes of the filled SWCNTs was conducted. The shifts of the components of the Raman modes and modification of their profiles allowed concluding that the inserted terbium halogenides have acceptor doping effect on the SWCNTs, and the doping efficiency increases in the line with terbium iodide, terbium bromide, and terbium chloride. (orig.)

  9. Magnetocaloric effect of thin Terbium films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mello, V. D.; Anselmo, D. H. A. L.; Vasconcelos, M. S.; Almeida, N. S.

    2017-12-01

    We report a theoretical study of the magnetocaloric effect of Terbium (Tb) thin films due to finite size and surface effects in the helimagnetic phase, corresponding to a temperature range from TC=219 K to TN=231 K, for external fields of the order of kOe. For a Tb thin film of 6 monolayers submitted to an applied field (ΔH =30 kOe, ΔH =50 kOe and ΔH = 70 kOe) we report a significative change in adiabatic temperature, ΔT / ΔH , near the Néel temperature, of the order ten times higher than that observed for Tb bulk. On the other hand, for small values of the magnetic field, large thickness effects are found. For external field strength around few kOe, we have found that the thermal caloric efficiency increases remarkably for ultrathin films. For an ultrathin film with 6 monolayers, we have found ΔT / ΔH = 43 K/T while for thicker films, with 20 monolayers, ΔT / ΔH = 22 K/T. Our results suggest that thin films of Tb are a promising material for magnetocaloric effect devices for applications at intermediate temperatures.

  10. Femtosecond XUV spectroscopy of gadolinium and terbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carley, Robert; Frietsch, Bjoern; Doebrich, Kristian; Teichmann, Martin; Gahl, Cornelius; Noack, Frank [Max-Born-Institute, Berlin (Germany); Schwarzkopf, Olaf; Wernet, Philippe [Helmholtz-Zentrum fuer Materialien und Energie (BESSY II), Berlin (Germany); Weinelt, Martin [Max-Born-Institute, Berlin (Germany); Fachbereich Physik, Freie Universitaet, Berlin (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We present recent results of time-resolved IR-pump-XUV-probe experiments on the ultrafast demagnetization of thin films of Gadolinium(0001) and Terbium(0001) on Tungsten(110). The experiments are the first to be done using a newly developed high-order harmonics (HHG) XUV beamline at the MBI. The beamline delivers monochromated XUV pulses of approximately 150 fs duration with a photon energy resolution of up to 150 meV. Following excitation by intense femtosecond infrared (IR) pulses, photoemission with 35 eV photons allows us to directly probe the 4f electrons and their interaction with the valence band, both in the bulk and at the surface, to follow the ultrafast magnetization dynamics in the Lanthanide metals. As signatures of ultrafast demagnetization of the metal by the IR pulse, we see for the first time, rapid strong reduction of the exchange splitting in the valence band. This is followed by a slower demagnetization due to the spin-lattice interaction.

  11. Green fluorescence of terbium ions in lithium fluoroborate glasses ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Glasses; terbium ion; oscillator strengths; fluorescence; lifetimes; fibre lasers. 1. Introduction. Today glasses are most favourable engineering materials for abundant applications due to the wide ability of property altering by compositional modifications. The considerable examination of glass science to achieve required ...

  12. Green fluorescence of terbium ions in lithium fluoroborate glasses ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Bulletin of Materials Science; Volume 39; Issue 3. Green fluorescence of terbium ions in lithium fluoroborate glasses for fibre lasers and display devices. G R DILLIP C MADHUKAR REDDY M RAJESH SHIVANAND CHAURASIA B DEVA PRASAD RAJU S W JOO. Volume 39 Issue 3 June 2016 pp 711-717 ...

  13. A hydrometallurgical process for the recovery of terbium from fluorescent lamps: Experimental design, optimization of acid leaching process and process analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Innocenzi, Valentina; Ippolito, Nicolò Maria; De Michelis, Ida; Medici, Franco; Vegliò, Francesco

    2016-12-15

    Terbium and rare earths recovery from fluorescent powders of exhausted lamps by acid leaching with hydrochloric acid was the objective of this study. In order to investigate the factors affecting leaching a series of experiments was performed in according to a full factorial plan with four variables and two levels (4 2 ). The factors studied were temperature, concentration of acid, pulp density and leaching time. Experimental conditions of terbium dissolution were optimized by statistical analysis. The results showed that temperature and pulp density were significant with a positive and negative effect, respectively. The empirical mathematical model deducted by experimental data demonstrated that terbium content was completely dissolved under the following conditions: 90 °C, 2 M hydrochloric acid and 5% of pulp density; while when the pulp density was 15% an extraction of 83% could be obtained at 90 °C and 5 M hydrochloric acid. Finally a flow sheet for the recovery of rare earth elements was proposed. The process was tested and simulated by commercial software for the chemical processes. The mass balance of the process was calculated: from 1 ton of initial powder it was possible to obtain around 160 kg of a concentrate of rare earths having a purity of 99%. The main rare earths elements in the final product was yttrium oxide (86.43%) following by cerium oxide (4.11%), lanthanum oxide (3.18%), europium oxide (3.08%) and terbium oxide (2.20%). The estimated total recovery of the rare earths elements was around 70% for yttrium and europium and 80% for the other rare earths. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Terahertz Cherenkov radiation from ultrafast magnetization in terbium gallium garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorelov, S. D.; Mashkovich, E. A.; Tsarev, M. V.; Bakunov, M. I.

    2013-12-01

    We report an experimental observation of terahertz Cherenkov radiation from a moving magnetic moment produced in terbium gallium garnet by a circularly polarized femtosecond laser pulse via the inverse Faraday effect. Contrary to some existing theoretical predictions, the polarity of the observed radiation unambiguously demonstrates the paramagnetic, rather than diamagnetic, nature of the ultrafast inverse Faraday effect. From measurements of the radiation field, the Verdet constant in the subpicosecond regime is ˜3-10 times smaller than its table quasistatic value.

  15. Investigation of the luminescent properties of terbium-anthranilate complexes and application to the determination of anthranilic acid derivatives in aqueous solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnaud, N.; Georges, J

    2003-01-10

    The luminescent properties of terbium complexes with furosemide (FR), flufenamic (FF) acid, tolfenamic (TF) acid and mefenamic (MF) acid have been investigated in aqueous solutions. For all four compounds, complexation occurs when the carboxylic acid of the aminobenzoic group is dissociated and is greatly favoured in the presence of trioctylphosphine oxide as co-ligand and Triton X-100 as surfactant. Under optimum conditions, luminescence of the lanthanide ion is efficiently sensitised and the lifetime of the {sup 5}D{sub 4} resonance level of terbium in the complex is ranging between 1 and 1.9 ms, against 0.4 ms for the aqua ion. The sensitivity of the method for the determination of anthranilic acid derivatives is improved by one to two orders of magnitude with respect to that achieved using native fluorescence or terbium-sensitised luminescence in methanol. The limits of detection are 2x10{sup -10}, 5x10{sup -10} and 2x10{sup -9} mol l{sup -1} for flufenamic acid, furosemide and tolfenamic acid, and mefenamic acid, respectively, with within-run RSD values of less than 1%. The method has been applied to the determination of flufenamic acid in spiked calf sera with and without sample pretreatment. Depending on the method and the analyte concentration, the recovery was ranging between 83 and 113% and the lowest concentration attainable in serum samples was close to 1x10{sup -7} mol l{sup -1}.

  16. Preparation and photoluminescence enhancement in terbium(III ternary complexes with β-diketone and monodentate auxiliary ligands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devender Singh

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available A series of new solid ternary complexes of terbium(III ion based on β-diketone ligand acetylacetone (acac and monodentate auxiliary ligands (aqua/urea/triphenylphosphineoxide/pyridine-N-oxide had been prepared. The structural characterizations of synthesized ternary compounds were studied by means of elemental analysis, infrared (IR, and proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectral techniques. The optical characteristics were investigated with absorption as well as photoluminescence spectroscopy. Thermal behavior of compounds was examined by TGA/DTA analysis and all metal complexes were found to have good thermal stability. The luminescence decay time of complexes were also calculated by monitoring at emission wavelength corresponding to 5D4 → 7F5 transition. A comparative inspection of the luminescent behavior of prepared ternary compounds was performed in order to determine the function of auxiliary ligands in the enhancement of luminescence intensity produced by central terbium(III ion. The color coordinates values suggested that compounds showed bright green emission in visible region in electromagnetic spectrum. Complexes producing green light could play a significant role in the fabrication of efficient light conversion molecular devices for display purposes and lightning systems.

  17. Terbium luminescence in alumina xerogel fabricated in porous anodic alumina matrix under various excitation conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gaponenko, N. V., E-mail: nik@nano.bsuir.edu.by [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics (Belarus); Kortov, V. S. [Yeltsin Ural Federal University (Russian Federation); Orekhovskaya, T. I.; Nikolaenko, I. A. [Belarusian State University of Informatics and Radioelectronics (Belarus); Pustovarov, V. A.; Zvonarev, S. V.; Slesarev, A. I. [Yeltsin Ural Federal University (Russian Federation); Prislopski, S. Ya. [National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, Stepanov Institute of Physics (Belarus)

    2011-07-15

    Terbium-doped alumina xerogel layers are synthesized by the sol-gel method in pores of a porous anodic alumina film 1 {mu}m thick with a pore diameter of 150-180 nm; the film is grown on a silicon substrate. The fabricated structures exhibit terbium photoluminescence with bands typical of trivalent terbium terms. Terbium X-ray luminescence with the most intense band at 542 nm is observed for the first time for such a structure. Morphological analysis of the structure by scanning electron microscopy shows the presence of xerogel clusters in pore channels, while the main pore volume remains unfilled and pore mouths remain open. The data obtained confirm the promising applications of fabricated structures for developing matrix converters of X-rays and other ionizing radiations into visible light. The possibilities of increasing luminescence intensity in the matrix converter are discussed.

  18. Optical Properties of Lithium Terbium Fluoride and Implications for Performance in High Power Lasers (Postprint)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-JA-2016-0323 OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF LITHIUM TERBIUM FLUORIDE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PERFORMANCE IN HIGH POWER LASERS... AMERICA (STINFO COPY) AIR FORCE RESEARCH LABORATORY MATERIALS AND MANUFACTURING DIRECTORATE WRIGHT-PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE, OH 45433-7750 AIR...OPTICAL PROPERTIES OF LITHIUM TERBIUM FLUORIDE AND IMPLICATIONS FOR PERFORMANCE IN HIGH POWER LASERS (POSTPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b

  19. Detection of biothiols in cells by a terbium chelate-Hg (II) system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hongliang; Chen, Yang

    2012-01-01

    Great efforts have been devoted to the development of sensitive and specific analysis methods for biothiols because of their important roles in biological systems. We present a new detection system for biothiols that is based on the reversible quenching and restoration of fluorescence of terbium chelate caused by Hg2+ and thiol species. In the presence of biothiols, a restoration of fluorescence of terbium chelate after quenching by Hg2+ was observed due to the interaction of Hg2+ with thiol groups, and the restored fluorescence increased with the concentration of biothiols. This method was sensitive and selective for biothiols. The detection limit was 80 nM for glutathione, 100 nM for Hcy, and 400 nM for Cysteine, respectively. The terbium chelate-Hg (II) system was successfully applied to determine the levels of biothiols in cancer cells and urine samples. Further, it was also shown to be comparable to Ellman's assay. Compared to other fluorescence methods, the terbium chelate probe is advantageous because interference from short-lived nonspecific fluorescence can be efficiently eliminated due to the long fluorescence lifetime of terbium chelate, which allows for detection by time-resolved fluorescence. The terbium chelate probe can serve as a diagnostic tool for the detection of abnormal levels of biothiols in disease.

  20. Cryogenic temperature characteristics of Verdet constant of terbium sesquioxide ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snetkov, I. L.; Palashov, O. V.

    2016-12-01

    The dependence of the Verdet constant on temperature in the (80-300 K) range for a promising magneto-active material terbium sesquioxide Tb2O3 at the wavelengths of 405-1064 nm is considered. For each of the studied wavelengths, the Verdet constant of the material cooled down to the liquid nitrogen temperature increased by more than a factor of 3.2 as compared to the room temperature value. Similarly to the other paramagnetics, the increase follows the law ∼1/T. Approximations for the temperature dependence of the Verdet constant have been obtained and the value of 1/V·(dV/dT) has been estimated. This information is needed to determine the angle of rotation as well as the variation of the extinction ratio of a Faraday isolator with temperature and extremely important at creation a cryogenic Faraday devices.

  1. Autofluorescence-free Live-cell Imaging Using Terbium Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardoso Dos Santos, Marcelina; Goetz, Joan; Bartenlian, Hortense; Wong, Ka-Leung; Charbonniere, Loïc Joanny; Hildebrandt, Niko

    2018-02-20

    Fluorescent nanoparticles (NPs) have become irreplaceable tools for advanced cellular and sub-cellular imaging. While very bright NPs require excitation with UV or visible light, which can create strong autofluorescence of biological components, NIR-excitable NPs without autofluorescence issues exhibit much lower brightness. Here, we show the application of a new type of surface-photosensitized terbium NPs (Tb-NPs) for autofluorescence-free intracellular imaging in live HeLa cells. Combination of exceptionally high brightness, high photostability, and long photoluminecence (PL) lifetimes for highly efficient suppression of the short-lived autofluorescence, allowed for time-gated PL imaging of intracellular vesicles over 72 h without toxicity and at extremely low Tb-NP concentrations down to 12 pM. Detection of highly resolved long-lifetime (ms) PL decay curves from small (~10 µm2) areas within single cells within a few seconds emphasized the unprecedented photophysical properties of Tb-NPs for live-cell imaging that extend well beyond currently available nanometric imaging agents.

  2. Folate Receptor Targeted Alpha-Therapy Using Terbium-149

    CERN Document Server

    Müller, Cristina; Haller, Stephanie; Dorrer, Holger; Köster, Ulli; Johnston, Karl; Zhernosekov, Konstantin; Türler, Andreas; Schibli, Roger

    2014-01-01

    Terbium-149 is among the most interesting therapeutic nuclides for medical applications. It decays by emission of short-range α-particles (Eα = 3.967 MeV) with a half-life of 4.12 h. The goal of this study was to investigate the anticancer efficacy of a 149Tb-labeled DOTA-folate conjugate (cm09) using folate receptor (FR)-positive cancer cells in vitro and in tumor-bearing mice. 149Tb was produced at the ISOLDE facility at CERN. Radiolabeling of cm09 with purified 149Tb resulted in a specific activity of ~1.2 MBq/nmol. In vitro assays performed with 149Tb-cm09 revealed a reduced KB cell viability in a FR-specific and activity concentration-dependent manner. Tumor-bearing mice were injected with saline only (group A) or with 149Tb-cm09 (group B: 2.2 MBq; group C: 3.0 MBq). A significant tumor growth delay was found in treated animals resulting in an increased average survival time of mice which received 149Tb-cm09 (B: 30.5 d; C: 43 d) compared to untreated controls (A: 21 d). Analysis of blood parameters rev...

  3. Hardness and dielectric characteristics of flux grown terbium aluminate crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharma, K.K.; Kotru, P.N. [Jammu Univ. (India). Dept. of Physics; Tandon, R.P. [National Physical Laboratory, New Delhi (India); Wanklyn, B.M. [Clarendon Laboratory, University of Oxford, Oxford (United Kingdom)

    1999-01-29

    Results of indentation induced Vickers hardness testing and dielectric studies conducted on flux-grown terbium aluminate crystals are presented. It is shown that the Vickers hardness value (H{sub v}) is independent of indentation time, but depends on the applied load. Applying the concept of Hays and Kendall, the load independent values are estimated for (110) and (001) planes. Differential behaviour in the crack formation of two different planes (110) and (001) is observed, while (001) plane develops Palmqvist cracks in the whole load range of 10-100 g, (110) plane shows a transition from Palmqvist to median cracks at 70 g. The fracture toughness, brittleness index and yield strength are determined for both the planes. The hardness anisotropy is reported. The dielectric constant, dielectric loss and conductivity are shown to be dependent on temperature and frequency of the applied a.c. field. The dielectric constant versus temperature shows a transition peak at 230 C, which remains independent of the frequency of the applied a.c. field in the range 1 kHz-13 MHz. (orig.) 36 refs.

  4. Thermoluminescence of cerium and terbium -doped calcium pyrophosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roman L, J.; Cruz Z, E. [UNAM, Instituto de Ciencias Nucleares, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, 04510 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Lozano R, I. B.; Diaz G, J. A. I., E-mail: jesus.roman@nucleares.unam.mx [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria No. 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    The aim of this work is to report the thermoluminescence (Tl) response of Calcium Pyrophosphate phosphor doped with Cerium and Terbium impurities (Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+}). The phosphors were synthesized using the co-precipitation method and annealed at 900 degrees C by two hours for obtain the β phase. The intentional doping with Ce and Tb ions was 1 at.% and 0.1 at.%, whereas in the EDS results the concentration of impurities was 0.39 at.% and 0.05 at.%, respectively. The superficial morphology of phosphor is mainly composed by thin wafers of different size. All samples were exposed to gamma rays from {sup 60}Co in the Gammacell-200 irradiator. The Tl response of the phosphor was measured from Rt up to 350 degrees C and under nitrogen atmosphere in a Harshaw TLD 3500 reader. The glow curves of the Ca{sub 2}P{sub 2}O{sub 7}:Ce{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+} powders showed a broad intense Tl peak centered at 165 degrees C and a shoulder at approximate 260 degrees C was observed. A linear Tl response in the range of absorbed dose of 0.2 to 10 Gy was obtained. Tl glow curves were analyzed using the initial rise (IR)and computerized glow curve deconvolution methods to evaluate the kinetics parameters such as activation energy (E), frequency factor (s) and kinetic order (b). (Author)

  5. Solvent polarity and oxygen sensitivity, rather than viscosity, determine lifetimes of biaryl-sensitised terbium luminescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Edward R H; Williams, J A Gareth; Parker, David

    2017-12-14

    In a macrocyclic terbium complex incorporating a biaryl sensitiser, the observed variation of emission lifetime is shown to be determined by the solubility of oxygen in the solvent system and the relative energy of the chromophore excited state, rather than any dependence on solvent viscosity.

  6. Synthesis and luminescent study of Ce{sup 3+}-doped terbium-yttrium aluminum garnet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dotsenko, V.P., E-mail: ssclab@ukr.net [A.V. Bogatsky Physico-Chemical Institute, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lustdorfskaya doroga 86, 65080 Odessa (Ukraine); Berezovskaya, I.V.; Zubar, E.V.; Efryushina, N.P. [A.V. Bogatsky Physico-Chemical Institute, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Lustdorfskaya doroga 86, 65080 Odessa (Ukraine); Poletaev, N.I.; Doroshenko, Yu.A. [Institute of Combustion and Advanced Technologies, Mechnikov Odessa National University, Dvoryanskaya 2, 65082 Odessa (Ukraine); Stryganyuk, G.B. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kirilo i Mefodii 8, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine); HASYLAB at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Voloshinovskii, A.S. [Ivan Franko National University of Lviv, Kirilo i Mefodii 8, 79005 Lviv (Ukraine)

    2013-02-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Ce{sup 3+}-doped garnets (TYAG) were prepared using nanostructured reagents. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Ce{sup 3+} ions cause a very efficient yellow emission of the samples. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The reasons for the long wavelength position of this emission are discussed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Contribution from Al atoms to the conduction band of TYAG is quite essential. - Abstract: Terbium-yttrium aluminum garnets (TYAG) doped with Ce{sup 3+} ions have been prepared by solid state reactions between nanostructured oxides of aluminum and rare earths. The luminescent properties of Ce{sup 3+} ions in (Tb{sub 0.8}Y{sub 0.2}){sub 3(1-x)}Ce{sub 3x}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} (x = 0.03) have been studied upon excitation in the 2-20 eV region. The substitution of Tb{sup 3+} for Y{sup 3+} in the garnet structure results in broadening the emission band and shifting its maximum towards the longer wavelengths. It was found that in addition to the 4f{sup n} {yields} 4f{sup n-1}5d excitation bands of Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions, the excitation spectra for the Ce{sup 3+} emission contain broad bands at 6.73 and {approx}9.5 eV. These bands are attributed to the Ce{sup 3+}-bound exciton formation and O 2p {yields} Al 3s, 3p transitions, respectively. In contrast to the predictions based on the results of electronic structure calculations on Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5}O{sub 12} and Tb{sub 4}Al{sub 2}O{sub 9}, the threshold of interband transitions in TYAG is at high energies ( Greater-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 7.3 eV), and contributions from Al{sub tetr} and Al{sub oct} atoms to the conduction-band density of states are evaluated as quite essential.

  7. Arginine-responsive terbium luminescent hybrid sensors triggered by two crown ether carboxylic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Lasheng [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Tang, Ke; Ding, Xiaoping [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Wang, Qianming, E-mail: qmwang@scnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Theoretical Chemistry of Environment, Ministry of Education, School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China); Zhou, Zhan; Xiao, Rui [School of Chemistry and Environment, South China Normal University, Guangzhou 510006 (China)

    2013-12-01

    Crown ether carboxylic acids constitute main building blocks for the synthesis of terbium containing covalent cross-linked luminescent materials. Both the complexes and the hybrid nanomaterials could exhibit remarkable green emissions in pure water. More importantly, they were found to have a profound effect on the luminescence responses to arginine compared with glutamic acid, histidine, tryptophan, threonine, tyrosine and phenylalanine in aqueous environment. The present study provided the possibility of using a host–guest mechanism as a way of signal transduction based on lanthanide supramolecular hybrid materials. - Highlights: • Crown ether carboxylic acids were found to sensitize terbium ions among a group of ethers. • The complexes and silica hybrid materials were both prepared and characterized. • They could exhibit remarkable green emissions in pure water.

  8. Comparative analysis of conjugated alkynyl chromophore-triazacyclononane ligands for sensitized emission of europium and terbium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soulié, Marine; Latzko, Frédéric; Bourrier, Emmanuel; Placide, Virginie; Butler, Stephen J; Pal, Robert; Walton, James W; Baldeck, Patrice L; Le Guennic, Boris; Andraud, Chantal; Zwier, Jurriaan M; Lamarque, Laurent; Parker, David; Maury, Olivier

    2014-07-07

    A series of europium and terbium complexes based on a functionalized triazacyclononane carboxylate or phosphinate macrocyclic ligand is described. The influence of the anionic group, that is, carboxylate, methylphosphinate, or phenylphosphinate, on the photophysical properties was studied and rationalized on the basis of DFT calculated structures. The nature, number, and position of electron-donating or electron-withdrawing aryl substituents were varied systematically within the same phenylethynyl scaffold in order to optimize the brightness of the corresponding europium complexes and investigate their two-photon absorption properties. Finally, the europium complexes were examined in cell-imaging applications, and selected terbium complexes were studied as potential oxygen sensors. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Human Serum Albumin Using Terbium-Danofloxacin Probe

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezani, Amir M.; Manzoori, Jamshid L.; Amjadi, Mohammad; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2012-01-01

    A spectrofluorimetric method is proposed for the determination of human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) using terbium-danofloxacin (Tb3+-Dano) as a fluorescent probe. These proteins remarkably enhance the fluorescence intensity of the Tb3+-Dano complex at 545 nm, and the enhanced fluorescence intensity of Tb3+-Dano is proportional to the concentration of proteins (HSA and BSA). Optimum conditions for the determination of HSA were investigated and found that the maximum resp...

  10. Genetically Encoded FRET-Sensor Based on Terbium Chelate and Red Fluorescent Protein for Detection of Caspase-3 Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander S. Goryashchenko

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available This article describes the genetically encoded caspase-3 FRET-sensor based on the terbium-binding peptide, cleavable linker with caspase-3 recognition site, and red fluorescent protein TagRFP. The engineered construction performs two induction-resonance energy transfer processes: from tryptophan of the terbium-binding peptide to Tb3+ and from sensitized Tb3+ to acceptor—the chromophore of TagRFP. Long-lived terbium-sensitized emission (microseconds, pulse excitation source, and time-resolved detection were utilized to eliminate directly excited TagRFP fluorescence and background cellular autofluorescence, which lasts a fraction of nanosecond, and thus to improve sensitivity of analyses. Furthermore the technique facilitates selective detection of fluorescence, induced by uncleaved acceptor emission. For the first time it was shown that fluorescence resonance energy transfer between sensitized terbium and TagRFP in the engineered construction can be studied via detection of microsecond TagRFP fluorescence intensities. The lifetime and distance distribution between donor and acceptor were calculated using molecular dynamics simulation. Using this data, quantum yield of terbium ions with binding peptide was estimated.

  11. Graphene quantum dots-terbium ions as novel sensitive and selective time-resolved luminescent probes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorent-Martínez, Eulogio J; Durán, Gema M; Ríos, Ángel; Ruiz-Medina, Antonio

    2018-01-01

    We propose an alternative approach for the development of analytical methods based on terbium-sensitized luminescence (TSL). TSL is based on the complexation between Tb(III) ions and fluorescent organic compounds that have appropriate functional groups to complex with Tb(III). We report the use of graphene quantum dot (GQDs) nanoparticles to improve the sensitivity and selectivity of TSL detection. GQDs can react with terbium ions through the carboxylic groups present in their structure. These Tb(III)-GQD complexes, formed in situ in aqueous solution, can be used as time-resolved luminescent probes. Ascorbic acid was selected as a target analyte to demonstrate the suitability of the proposed method. The selectivity of the TSL method was highly improved for most of the interferences tested. Under the optimum conditions [Tb(III) concentration 5 × 10-4 mol L-1, GQD concentration 4 mg L-1], a minimum 100% increase in selectivity was observed for several vitamins and common cations that may be present in the samples to be analyzed. In addition, the analytical signal showed a 30% enhancement with the use of GQDs compared with the use of merely Tb(III) ions, with a detection limit of 0.12 μg mL-1. The repeatability and intermediate precision were lower than 3% and 5%, respectively. From the results obtained, the implementation of GQDs in TSL can lead to the development of novel time-resolved luminescent probes with high analytical potential. Graphical abstract Quenching of Tb(III)-graphene quantum dot (GQD) luminescence by ascorbic acid (AA). TBL terbium-sensitized luminescence.

  12. Fluorescence study of some terbium-oligopeptide complexes in methanolic solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rabouan, S; Delage, J; Durand, W; Prognon, P; Barthes, D

    2000-04-03

    This study concerned the use of lanthanide chelates to detect glycyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (GLF) and its homologues. Spectroscopic analysis of peptides without or with terbium complexation revealed the formation of (LF)(3)(Tb)(2), (GF)(3)(Tb)(2), (GLF)(3)(Tb)(2) and (FL)(4)Tb, (FG)(4)Tb complexes with high stability constants in methanolic solutions (pK(d)>13). Lanthanide chelate emission displayed a large Stokes shift (>270 nm), which allowed Tb chelates of GLF and its derivatives to be used for detection purposes. However, this preliminary study indicated some important limitations associated with lanthanide chelation, such as high methanolic content.

  13. Electromagnetic properties of terbium gallium garnet at millikelvin temperatures and low photon energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostylev, Nikita; Goryachev, Maxim; Bushev, Pavel; Tobar, Michael E.

    2017-07-01

    Electromagnetic properties of single crystal terbium gallium garnet are characterised from room down to millikelvin temperatures using the whispering gallery mode method. Microwave spectroscopy is performed at low powers equivalent to a few photons in energy and conducted as functions of the magnetic field and temperature. A phase transition is detected close to the temperature of 3.5 K. This is observed for multiple whispering gallery modes causing an abrupt negative frequency shift and a change in transmission due to extra losses in the new phase caused by a change in complex magnetic susceptibility.

  14. Nuclear excitation functions from 40 to 200 MeV proton irradiation of terbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engle, Jonathan W., E-mail: jwengle@lanl.gov; Mashnik, Stepan G.; Parker, Lauren A.; Jackman, Kevin R.; Bitteker, Leo J.; Ullmann, John L.; Gulley, Mark S.; Pillai, Chandra; John, Kevin D.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Nortier, Francois M.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear formation cross sections are reported for 26 radionuclides, measured with 40–200 MeV proton irradiations of terbium foils. These data provide the basis for the production of medically relevant radionuclides (e.g., {sup 152}Tb, {sup 155}Tb, {sup 155}Eu, and {sup 156}Eu) and {sup 153}Gd, a potential source used in ongoing efforts to characterize stellar nucleosynthesis routes. Computational predictions from the ALICE2011, CEM03.03, Bertini, and INCL + ABLA codes are compared with newly measured data to contribute to the ongoing process of code development, and yields are calculated for selected radionuclides using measured data.

  15. Micelle-enhanced and terbium-sensitized spectrofluorimetric determination of gatifloxacin and its interaction mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Changchuan; Wang, Lei; Hou, Zhun; Jiang, Wei; Sang, Lihong

    2009-05-01

    A terbium-sensitized spectrofluorimetric method using an anionic surfactant, sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS), was developed for the determination of gatifloxacin (GFLX). A coordination complex system of GFLX-Tb 3+-SDBS was studied. It was found that SDBS significantly enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the complex (about 11-fold). Optimal experimental conditions were determined as follows: excitation and emission wavelengths of 331 and 547 nm, pH 7.0, 2.0 × 10 -4 mol l -1 terbium (III), and 2.0 × 10 -4 mol l -1 SDBS. The enhanced fluorescence intensity of the system (Δ If) showed a good linear relationship with the concentration of GFLX over the range of 5.0 × 10 -10 to 5.0 × 10 -8 mol l -1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996. The detection limit (3 σ) was determined as 6.0 × 10 -11 mol l -1. This method has been successfully applied to the determination of GFLX in pharmaceuticals and human urine/serum samples. Compared with most of other methods reported, the rapid and simple procedure proposed in the text offers higher sensitivity, wider linear range, and better stability. The interaction mechanism of the system is also studied by the research of ultraviolet absorption spectra, surface tension, solution polarity and fluorescence polarization.

  16. Circularly Polarized Luminescence in Enantiopure Europium and Terbium Complexes with Modular, All-Oxygen Donor Ligands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seitz, Michael; Do, King; Ingram, Andrew J.; Moore, Evan G.; Muller, Gilles; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract: Circulaly polarized luminescence from terbium(III) complexed and excited by chiral antenna ligands gives strong emission The modular synthesis of three new octadentate, enantiopure ligands are reported - one with the bidentate chelating unit 2-hydroxyisophthalamide (IAM) and two with 1-hydroxy-2-pyridinone (1,2-HOPO) units. A new design principle is introduced for the chiral, non-racemic hexamines which constitute the central backbones for the presented class of ligands. The terbium(III) complex of the IAM ligand, as well as the europium(III) complexes of the 1,2-HOPO ligands are synthesized and characterized by various techniques (NMR, UV, CD, luminescence spectroscopy). All species exhibit excellent stability and moderate to high luminescence efficiency (quantum yields ΦEu = 0.05–0.08 and ΦTb = 0.30–0.57) in aqueous solution at physiological pH. Special focus is put onto the properties of the complexes in regard to circularly polarized luminescence (CPL). The maximum luminescence dissymmetry factors (glum) in aqueous solution are high with |glum|max = 0.08 – 0.40. Together with the very favorable general properties (good stability, high quantum yields, long lifetimes), the presented lanthanide complexes can be considered as good candidates for analytical probes based on CPL in biologically relevant environments. PMID:19639983

  17. Luminescent method of determination of composition of europium and terbium complexes in solution by change of intensity ratio of luminescence bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bel' tyukova, S.V.; Nazarenko, N.A.; Poluehktov, N.S.

    1982-03-01

    The complexes of europium and terbium with phenanthroline, ethylenediaminetetraacetate, nitrilotriacetate, some acids-phenol derivatives and ..beta..-diketones series have been used as an example to demonstrate that the value of the ratio of intensities on the two bands of europium(terbium) luminescence spectra - the one corresponding to the hypersensitive'' transition and the other, to the magnetic dipole one - can be used for determination of the complexes composition in solutions.

  18. Thermo-transferred thermoluminescence (TTTl) in potassium-yttrium double fluoride doped with terbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallegos, A.; Rivera, T.; Diaz G, J. A. [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Legaria 694, Col. Irrigacion, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin, J. [Universidad Autonoma Metropolitana, Unidad Iztapalapa, San Rafael Atlixco No. 186, Col. Vicentina, 09340 Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Azorin, J. C. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Division de Ciencias e Ingenierias-Campus Leon, Lomas del Bosque No. 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37000 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Licona, R.; Rivas, F.; Hernandez C, G. [Benemerita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Facultad de Ciencias Quimicas, 14 Sur y San Claudio, Ciudad Universitaria, Puebla de Zaragoza, Puebla (Mexico); Khaidukov, N. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Lenin SK 11 Prospect 31, Moscow 117907 (Russian Federation)

    2011-02-15

    This paper presents results of studying the thermo-transferred thermoluminescence (TTTl) phenomenon in potassium-yttrium double fluoride doped with terbium (K{sub 2}YF{sub 5:}Tb) at different impurity concentrations (0.8%, 0.95% and 0.99%). Previously to study the TTTl phenomenon, structural characterization and chemical composition of the materials were determined. The structural studies were conducted using a scanning electron microscope; meanwhile, chemical composition was analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. Thermoluminescence kinetics was studied irradiating the samples with {sup 137}Cs gamma rays as well as with {sup 90}Sr/{sup 90}Y beta rays, analyzing the glow curves by the deconvolution method for obtaining the kinetic parameters. (Author)

  19. The influence of pressure on the photoluminescence properties of a terbium-adipate framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Elinor C.; Zhao, Jing; Ross, Nancy L.; Andrews, Michael B.; Surbella, Robert G.; Cahill, Christopher L.

    2013-06-01

    The influence of pressure (over the 0-4.7 GPa range) on the photoluminescence emissions and crystal structure of the known 3D terbium-adipate metal-organic framework material Tb-GWMOF6 has been evaluated by high-pressure single-crystal X-ray diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. The results from this study show that this complex lanthanide framework structure undergoes three phase transitions within the 0-4 GPa pressure range that involve alterations in the number of symmetry independent Tb3+ ion sites within the crystal lattice. These pressure induced modifications to the structure of Tb-GWMOF6 lead to pronounced changes in the profiles of the 5D4→7F5 emission spectra of this complex.

  20. Terbium Radionuclides for Theranostics Applications: A Focus On MEDICIS-PROMED

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaier, R. Formento; Haddad, F.; Sounalet, T.; Stora, T.; Zahi, I.

    A new facility, named CERN-MEDICIS, is under construction at CERN to produce radionuclides for medical applications. In parallel, the MEDICIS-PROMED, a Marie Sklodowska-Curie innovative training network of the Horizon 2020 European Commission's program, is being coordinated by CERN to train young scientists on the production and use of innovative radionuclides and develop a network of experts within Europe. One program within MEDICIS-PROMED is to determine the feasibility of producing innovative radioisotopes for theranostics using a commercial middle-sized high-current cyclotron and the mass separation technology developed at CERN-MEDICIS. This will allow the production of high specific activity radioisotopes not achievable with the common post-processing by chemical separation. Radioisotopes of scandium, copper, arsenic and terbium have been identified. Preliminary studies of activation yield and irradiation parameters optimization for the production of Tb-149 will be described.

  1. Dielectric and conducting behavior of gadolinium-terbium fumarate heptahydrate crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, M. D.; Want, B.

    2015-07-01

    Gadolinium-terbium fumarate heptahydrate crystals were grown in silica gel by using single gel diffusion technique. The crystals were characterized by different physico-chemical techniques of characterization. Powder X-ray diffraction results showed that the grown material is purely crystalline in nature. Elemental analyses suggested the chemical formula of the compound to be Gd Tb (C4H2O4)3ṡ7H2O. Energy dispersive X-ray analysis confirmed the presence of Gd and Tb in the title compound. The dielectric and conductivity studies of the grown compound were carried as function of frequency of applied field and the temperature. The grown material showed a dielectric anomaly which was correlated with its thermal behavior. The ac conductivity of the material showed Jonscher's power law behavior: σ(ω)=σo+Aωs, with a temperature-dependent power exponent s(<1). The conductivity was found to be a function of temperature and frequency.

  2. Highly sensitive detection of dipicolinic acid with a water-dispersible terbium-metal organic framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhardwaj, Neha; Bhardwaj, Sanjeev; Mehta, Jyotsana; Kim, Ki-Hyun; Deep, Akash

    2016-12-15

    The sensitive detection of dipicolinic acid (DPA) is strongly associated with the sensing of bacterial organisms in food and many types of environmental samples. To date, the demand for a sensitive detection method for bacterial toxicity has increased remarkably. Herein, we investigated the DPA detection potential of a water-dispersible terbium-metal organic framework (Tb-MOF) based on the fluorescence quenching mechanism. The Tb-MOF showed a highly sensitive ability to detect DPA at a limit of detection of 0.04nM (linear range of detection: 1nM to 5µM) and also offered enhanced selectivity from other commonly associated organic molecules. The present study provides a basis for the application of Tb-MOF for direct, convenient, highly sensitive, and specific detection of DPA in the actual samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. A New Bis(phthalocyaninato) Terbium Single-Ion Magnet with an Overall Excellent Magnetic Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yuxiang; Ma, Fang; Chen, Xiaoxiang; Dong, Bowei; Wang, Kang; Jiang, Shangda; Wang, Chiming; Chen, Xin; Qi, Dongdong; Sun, Haoling; Wang, Bingwu; Gao, Song; Jiang, Jianzhuang

    2017-11-20

    Bulky and strong electron-donating dibutylamino groups were incorporated onto the peripheral positions of one of the two phthalocyanine ligands in the bis(phthalocyaninato) terbium complex, resulting in the isolation of heteroleptic double-decker (Pc)Tb{Pc[N(C4H9)2]8} {Pc = phthalocyaninate; Pc[N(C4H9)2]8 = 2,3,9,10,16,17,23,24-octakis(dibutylamino)phthalocyaninate} with the nature of an unsymmetrical molecular structure, a square-antiprismatic coordination geometry, an intensified coordination field strength, and the presence of organic radical-f interaction. As a total result of all these factors, this sandwich-type tetrapyrrole lanthanide single-ion magnet (SIM) exhibits an overall enhanced magnetic performance including a high blocking temperature (TB) of 30 K and large effective spin-reversal energy barrier of Ueff = 939 K, rendering it the best sandwich-type tetrapyrrole lanthanide SIM reported thus far.

  4. Ultralarge magneto-optic rotations and rotary dispersion in terbium gallium garnet single crystal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaheen, Amrozia; Majeed, Hassaan; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh

    2015-06-10

    We report systematically acquired data on the Verdet constant of terbium gallium garnet for wavelengths ranging from visible to near-infrared (405-830 nm) regime. Our experimental method of Stokes polarimetry is based on the Fourier decomposition of the received light intensity and allows unambiguous determination of both the Faraday rotation and the ellipticity of the emergent light. Temperature-dependent investigations in the range of 8-300 K extend earlier reports and verify the Verdet's constant direct dependence on the magnetization, whose first-order approximation is simply a manifestation of the Curie's law. Further, a least-squares fitting of the experimental data correlates well with theoretical predictions. At a wavelength of 405 nm and temperature of 8 K, the rotation is approximately 500°.

  5. Terbium fluorescence as a sensitive, inexpensive probe for UV-induced damage in nucleic acids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Yazbi, Amira F.; Loppnow, Glen R., E-mail: glen.loppnow@ualberta.ca

    2013-07-05

    Graphical abstract: -- Highlights: •Simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay for positive detection of DNA damage. •Recognition of undamaged DNA via hybridization to a hairpin probe. •Terbium(III) fluorescence reports the amount of damage by binding to ssDNA. •Tb/hairpin is a highly selective and sensitive fluorescent probe for DNA damage. -- Abstract: Much effort has been focused on developing methods for detecting damaged nucleic acids. However, almost all of the proposed methods consist of multi-step procedures, are limited, require expensive instruments, or suffer from a high level of interferences. In this paper, we present a novel simple, inexpensive, mix-and-read assay that is generally applicable to nucleic acid damage and uses the enhanced luminescence due to energy transfer from nucleic acids to terbium(III) (Tb{sup 3+}). Single-stranded oligonucleotides greatly enhance the Tb{sup 3+} emission, but duplex DNA does not. With the use of a DNA hairpin probe complementary to the oligonucleotide of interest, the Tb{sup 3+}/hairpin probe is applied to detect ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damage. The hairpin probe hybridizes only with the undamaged DNA. However, the damaged DNA remains single-stranded and enhances the intrinsic fluorescence of Tb{sup 3+}, producing a detectable signal directly proportional to the amount of DNA damage. This allows the Tb{sup 3+}/hairpin probe to be used for sensitive quantification of UV-induced DNA damage. The Tb{sup 3+}/hairpin probe showed superior selectivity to DNA damage compared to conventional molecular beacons probes (MBs) and its sensitivity is more than 2.5 times higher than MBs with a limit of detection of 4.36 ± 1.2 nM. In addition, this probe is easier to synthesize and more than eight times cheaper than MBs, which makes its use recommended for high-throughput, quantitative analysis of DNA damage.

  6. Fine- and hyperfine structure investigations of even configuration system of atomic terbium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanska, D.; Elantkowska, M.; Ruczkowski, J.; Furmann, B.

    2017-03-01

    In this work a parametric study of the fine structure (fs) and the hyperfine structure (hfs) for the even-parity configurations of atomic terbium (Tb I) is presented, based in considerable part on the new experimental results. Measurements on 134 spectral lines were performed by laser induced fluorescence (LIF) in a hollow cathode discharge lamp; on this basis, the hyperfine structure constants A and B were determined for 52 even-parity levels belonging to the configurations 4f85d6s2, 4f85d26s or 4f96s6p; in all the cases those levels were involved in the transitions investigated as the lower levels. For 40 levels the hfs was examined for the first time, and for the remaining 12 levels the new measurements supplement our earlier results. As a by-product, also preliminary values of the hfs constants for 84 odd-parity levels were determined (the investigations of the odd-parity levels system in the terbium atom are still in progress). This huge amount of new experimental data, supplemented by our earlier published results, were considered for the fine and hyperfine structure analysis. A multi-configuration fit of 7 configurations was performed, taking into account second-order of perturbation theory, including the effects of closed shell-open shell excitations. Predicted values of the level energies, as well as of magnetic dipole and electric quadrupole hyperfine structure constants A and B, are quoted in cases when no experimental values are available. By combining our experimental data with our own semi-empirical procedure it was possible to identify correctly the lower and upper level of the line 544.1440 nm measured by Childs with the use of the atomic-beam laser-rf double-resonance technique (Childs, J Opt Soc Am B 9;1992:191-6).

  7. Structural and optical characterization of terbium doped ZnGa2O4 thin films deposited by RF magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somasundaram, K.; Girija, K. G.; Sudarsan, V.; Selvin, P. Christopher; Vatsa, R. K.

    2016-05-01

    Tb3+ doped ZnGa2O4 nanophosphor (21 nm) has been synthesized via low temperature polyol route and subsequently thin films of the same were deposited on glass and ITO substrates by RF magnetron sputtering. The films were characterized by X-ray Diffraction and luminescence measurements. The XRD pattern showed that Tb3+ doped ZnGa2O4 nanophosphor has a cubic spinel phase. Luminescence behavior of the nanophosphor and as deposited sputtered film was investigated. The PL emission spectra of nanophosphor gave a broad ZnGa2O4 host emission band along with a strong terbium emission and the thin films showed only broad host emission band and there was no terbium ion emission.

  8. Determination of fluoxetine in pharmaceutical and biological samples based on the silver nanoparticle enhanced fluorescence of fluoxetine-terbium complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lotfi, Ali; Manzoori, Jamshid L

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a simple and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method is presented for the determination of fluoxetine based on the enhancing effect of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) on the terbium-fluoxetine fluorescence emission. The AgNPs were prepared by a simple reduction method and characterized by UV-Vis spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. It was indicated that these AgNPs have a remarkable amplifying effect on the terbium-sensitized fluorescence of fluoxetine. The effects of various parameters such as AgNP and Tb(3+) concentration and the pH of the media were investigated. Under obtained optimal conditions, the fluorescence intensity of the terbium-fluoxetine-AgNP system was enhanced linearly by increasing the concentration of fluoxetine in the range of 0.008 to 19 mg/L. The limit of detection (b + 3s) was 8.3 × 10(-4) mg/L. The interference effects of common species found in real samples were also studied. The method had good linearity, recovery, reproducibility and sensitivity, and was satisfactorily applied for the determination of fluoxetine in tablet formulations, human urine and plasma samples. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  9. Neutron Diffraction and Electrical Transport Studies on Magnetic Transition in Terbium at High Pressures and Low Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Sarah; Montgomery, Jeffrey; Tsoi, Georgiy; Vohra, Yogesh; Weir, Samuel; Tulk, Christopher; Moreira Dos Santos, Antonio

    2013-06-01

    Neutron diffraction and electrical transport measurements have been carried out on the heavy rare earth metal terbium at high pressures and low temperatures in order to elucidate its transition from a helical antiferromagnetic to a ferromagnetic ordered phase as a function of pressure. The electrical resistance measurements using designer diamonds show a change in slope as the temperature is lowered through the ferromagnetic Curie temperature. The temperature of the ferromagnetic transition decreases at a rate of -16.7 K/GPa till 3.6 GPa, where terbium undergoes a structural transition from hexagonal close packed (hcp) to an α-Sm phase. Above this pressure, the electrical resistance measurements no longer exhibit a change in slope. In order to confirm the change in magnetic phase suggested by the electrical resistance measurements, neutron diffraction measurements were conducted at the SNAP beamline at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. Measurements were made at pressures to 5.3 GPa and temperatures as low as 90 K. An abrupt increase in peak intensity in the neutron diffraction spectra signaled the onset of magnetic order below the Curie temperature. A magnetic phase diagram of rare earth metal terbium will be presented to 5.3 GPa and 90 K based on these studies.

  10. Study of Silver Nanoparticles Sensitized Fluorescence and Second-Order Scattering of Terbium(III-Pefloxacin Mesylate Complex and Determination of Pefloxacin Mesylate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aiyun Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available α-Keto acid of pefloxacin mesylate (PFLX can form the complex with Terbium(III. The intramolecular energy from PFLX to Terbium(III ion takes place when excited, and thus Terbium(III excited state is formed and then emits the characteristic fluorescence of Terbium(III, locating at 490, 545, 580, and 620 nm. The second-order scattering (SOS peak at 545 nm also appears for the complex with the exciting wavelength of 273 nm. When the silver nanoparticles are added to the system, the luminescence intensity at 545 nm greatly increased. So, with the adding of nanoparticles to the Terbium(III-PFLX complex, not only is the intramolecular energy promoted but also the SOS intensity is enhanced. The experimental results show that it is the silver nanoparticles with certain size and certain concentration which can greatly enhance the fluorescence-SOS intensity, and the relative intensity at 545 nm is proportional to the amount of PFLX. Based on this phenomenon, a novel method for the determination of PFLX has been developed and applied to the determination of PFLX in capsule and serum samples.

  11. Influence of crystalline structure on the luminescence properties of terbium orthotantalates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siqueira, Kisla P.F. [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Campus Morro do Cruzeiro, ICEB II, Ouro Preto 35400-000, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Carmo, Alexandre P. [Instituto Federal Fluminense, Campus Cabo Frio, RJ 28909-971 (Brazil); Bell, Maria J.V. [Departamento de Física, Universidade Federal de Juiz de Fora, Juiz de Fora 36036-330, MG (Brazil); Dias, Anderson, E-mail: anderson_dias@iceb.ufop.br [Departamento de Química, Universidade Federal de Ouro Preto, Campus Morro do Cruzeiro, ICEB II, Ouro Preto 35400-000, Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Terbium orthotantalate powders were produced with M-fergusonite type (I2/a) and M′-fergusonite type (P2/a) structures. The samples were studied by X-ray diffraction, Raman scattering, and photoluminescence measurements (emission and decay curves). The results showed that crystalline materials were obtained with all the 18 Raman-active modes predicted by group theory calculations. Also, it was observed through photoluminescence decay curves that the Tb{sup 3+} ions occupies only one-symmetry site in both crystallographic arrangements. Photoluminescence emission curves exhibited some variation in spectral shape, peak position, and relative intensity as a consequence of their different crystalline arrangements. The dominated emission of Tb{sup 3+} ({sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub 5}) is centered with a maximum intensity at 549.2 nm (M-type) and 543.0 nm (M′-type). Fluorescence lifetimes for M-TbTaO{sub 4} and M′-TbTaO{sub 4} were determined as 33.4 μs and 1.25 ms, respectively. M′-type materials seems to be the most suitable for luminescent devices and could be a potential green luminescent material due to the strongest emission if compared with the M-fergusonite type. -- Highlights: ► Terbium orthotantalates were prepared in two different crystalline structures: I2/a and P2/a. ► XRD and Raman scattering showed that the different space groups obtained were exhibited all the 18 Raman-active modes. ► PL decay curves that the Tb{sup 3+} ions occupies only one-symmetry site in both crystallographic arrangements. ► Dominated emission of Tb{sup 3+} ({sup 5}D{sub 4}→{sup 7}F{sub 5}) is centered with a maximum intensity at 549 nm (M-type) and 543 nm (M′-type). ► Fluorescence lifetimes for M-TbTaO{sub 4} and M′-TbTaO{sub 4} were determined as 33.4 μs and 1.25 ms, respectively.

  12. Laser control and temperature switching of luminescence intensity in photostable transparent film based on terbium(III) β-diketonate complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapaev, Dmitry V.; Nikiforov, Victor G.; Safiullin, Georgy M.; Lobkov, Vladimir S.; Salikhov, Kev M.; Knyazev, Andrey A.; Galyametdinov, Yury G.

    2014-11-01

    The study of the terbium(III) and gadolinium(III) β-diketonate complexes by photoluminescence spectroscopy reveals considerable changes of the photophysical properties of the complexes under the UV laser irradiation. The measurements show the enhancement of the luminescence intensities in the vitrified transparent film of the terbium(III) complex as well as the gadolinium(III) complex under the 337 nm laser irradiation at room temperature. The irradiated film of the terbium(III) complex restores the initial photophysical properties after heating close to the melting temperature (∼353 K) and cooling. We observe no change of the luminescent properties of the irradiated film for months. These features can be used for the design of new lanthanide-based photostable systems with laser control of the luminescence intensity.

  13. Development of functionalized terbium fluorescent nanoparticles for antibody labeling and time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Zhiqiang; Tan, Mingqian; Wang, Guilan; Yuan, Jingli

    2005-01-15

    Silica-based functionalized terbium fluorescent nanoparticles were prepared, characterized and developed as a fluorescence probe for antibody labeling and time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay. The nanoparticles were prepared in a water-in-oil (W/O) microemulsion containing a strongly fluorescent Tb(3+) chelate, N,N,N(1),N(1)-[2,6-bis(3'-aminomethyl-1'-pyrazolyl)phenylpyridine] tetrakis(acetate)-Tb(3+) (BPTA-Tb(3+)), Triton X-100, octanol, and cyclohexane by controlling copolymerization of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) and 3-[2-(2-aminoethylamino)ethylamino]propyl-trimethoxysilane (AEPS) with ammonia water. The characterizations by transmission electron microscopy and fluorometric methods show that the nanoparticles are spherical and uniform in size, 45 +/- 3nm in diameter, strongly fluorescent with fluorescence quantum yield of 10% and a long fluorescence lifetime of 2.0ms. The amino groups directly introduced to the nanoparticle's surface by using AEPS in the preparation made the surface modification and bioconjugation of the nanoparticles easier. The nanoparticle-labeled anti-human alpha-fetoprotein antibody was prepared and used for time-resolved fluoroimmunoassay of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) in human serum samples. The assay response is linear from 0.10ngml(-1) to about 100ngml(-1) with the detection limit of 0.10ngml(-1). The coefficient variations (CVs) of the method are less than 9.0%, and the recoveries are in the range of 84-98% for human serum sample measurements.

  14. Highly efficient precipitation of phosphoproteins using trivalent europium, terbium, and erbium ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guezel, Yueksel; Rainer, Matthias; Mirza, Munazza Raza; Bonn, Guenther K. [Leopold-Franzens University, Institute of Analytical Chemistry and Radiochemistry, Innsbruck (Austria)

    2012-05-15

    This study describes a highly efficient method for the selective precipitation of phosphoproteins by trivalent europium, terbium, and erbium metal ions. These metal cations belong to the group of lanthanides and are known to be hard acceptors with an overwhelming preference for oxygen-containing anions such as phosphates to which they form very tight ionic bonds. The method could be successfully applied to specifically precipitate phosphoproteins from complex samples including milk and egg white by forming solid metal-protein complexes. Owing to the low solubility product of the investigated lanthanide salts, the produced metal-protein complexes showed high stability. The protein pellets were extensively washed to remove nonphosphorylated proteins and contaminants. For the analysis of proteins the pellets were first dissolved in 30 % formic acid and subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight (MALDI-TOF) MS. For peptide mass-fingerprint analysis the precipitated phosphoproteins were enzymatically digested using microwave-assisted digestion. The method was found to be highly specific for the isolation and purification of phosphoproteins. Protein quantification was performed by colorimetric detection of total precipitated phosphoproteins and revealed more than 95 % protein recovery for each lanthanide salt. (orig.)

  15. A Terbium Sensitized Luminescence Method for the Assay of Flubiprofen in Pharmaceutical Formulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma M.Z. Al-Kindy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive time-resolved luminescence method for the determination of flubiprofen (FLP in methanol and in aqueous solution is described. The method is based on the luminescence sensitization of terbium (Tb3+ by the formation of a ternary complex with FLP in the presence of 4,7 diphenyl 1,10 phenanthroline (DPP as co-ligand, and Tween-20 as surfactant. The signal for Tb-FLP-DPP was monitored at λex  = 285 nm and λem  = 552 nm. Optimum conditions for the formation of the complex in an aqueous system were TRIS buffer, pH 8.0, DPP (2.5Å~10−7  M, Tween-20 (0.30% and 4Å~10-5  mol L-1  of Tb3+  which allowed the determination of 20–1000 ng mL-1  of FLP with a limit of detection (LOD of 10 ng mL-1 . The relative standard deviations of the method ranged between 0.6 and 1.4% indicating excellent reproducibility of the method. The proposed method was successfully applied for the assays of FLP in pharmaceutical formulations and spiked tap water samples with average recoveries of 87% – 95%.

  16. Sensitization effects of supramolecular assemblies on the luminescence of terbium-ion prulifloxacin complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Hong; Yi Chongyue; Li Xue; Fang Fang [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Yang Yajiang, E-mail: yjyang@mail.hust.edu.c [School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2011-04-15

    Luminescence enhancement of terbium-ion prulifloxacin complexes (Tb(III)-PUFX) in supramolecular hydrogels formed by assembly of 1,3:2,4-di-O-benzylidene-D-sorbitol (DBS) was investigated by steady-state fluorescence, varying temperature fluorescence and time-resolved fluorescence. The luminescence images show that Tb(III)-PUFX were dispersed in the DBS gels. The luminescence intensity of Tb(III)-PUFX in the DBS gels was significantly increased in comparison with that in corresponding aqueous solutions. The varying temperature fluorescent spectra show that the luminescence intensity of Tb(III)-PUFX decreased with an increase in the temperature. This implies that the luminescence enhancement of Tb(III)-PUFX is related to the dissociation and the formation of the DBS assemblies. Time-resolved fluorescence measurements show slower rotational motion in DBS gels in comparison with that in the corresponding aqueous solutions. This may be ascribed to a unique microstructure of three-dimensional network formed by DBC aggregates, resulting in deactivation of the nonradiative relaxation. The images of field emission scanning electron microscopy and polarized optical microscopy indicate that the morphology of the DBS assemblies was not influenced upon addition of Tb(III)-PUFX to the DBS gels.

  17. A Nanoscale Multiresponsive Luminescent Sensor Based on a Terbium(III) Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Song; Wang, Ting; Yi, Feiyan; Liu, Qinghui; Yang, Weiting; Sun, Zhong-Ming

    2015-08-01

    A nanoscale terbium-containing metal-organic framework (nTbL), with a layer-like structure and [H2 NMe2 ](+) cations located in the framework channels, was synthesized under hydrothermal conditions. The structure of the as-prepared sample was systematically confirmed by powder XRD and elemental analysis; the morphology was characterized by field-emission SEM and TEM. The photoluminescence studies revealed that rod-like nTbL exhibited bright-green emission, corresponding to (5)D4 →(7)FJ (J=6-3) transitions of the Tb(3+) ion under excitation. Further sensing measurements revealed that as-prepared nTbL could be utilized as a multiresponsive luminescent sensor, which showed significant and exclusive detection ability for Fe(3+) ions and phenylmethanol. These results highlight the practical applications of lanthanide-containing metal-organic frameworks as fluorescent probes. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Terbium-Doped VO2 Thin Films: Reduced Phase Transition Temperature and Largely Enhanced Luminous Transmittance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ning; Duchamp, Martial; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Liu, Shiyu; Zeng, XianTing; Cao, Xun; Long, Yi

    2016-01-26

    Vanadium dioxide (VO2) is a well-known thermochromic material with large IR modulating ability, promising for energy-saving smart windows. The main drawbacks of VO2 are its high phase transition temperature (τ(c) = 68°C), low luminous transmission (T(lum)), and weak solar modulating ability (ΔT(sol)). In this paper, the terbium cation (Tb(3+)) doping was first reported to reduce τ(c) and increase T(lum) of VO2 thin films. Compared with pristine VO2, 2 at. % doping level gives both enhanced T(lum) and ΔT(sol) from 45.8% to 54.0% and 7.7% to 8.3%, respectively. The T(lum) increases with continuous Tb(3+) doping and reaches 79.4% at 6 at. % doping level, representing ∼73.4% relative increment compared with pure VO2. This has surpassed the best reported doped VO2 thin films. The enhanced thermochromic properties is meaningful for smart window applications of VO2 materials.

  19. Luminescent investigations of terbium(III) biosorption as a surrogate for heavy metals and radionuclides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achyuthan, Komandoor E; Arango, Dulce C; Carles, Elizabeth L; Cutler, Christopher E; Meyer, Lauren A; Brozik, Susan M

    2009-07-01

    We describe a metal transport system for investigating the interfacial interactions between the anionic surface charge of a gram-negative bacterium (Escherichia coli) and a trivalent cationic metal, Tb3+. We believe this is the first description of the uptake kinetics, sub- and intracellular distribution, and temporal fate of Tb3+ ion in E. coli. We used the luminescence of the terbium-dipicolinic acid chelate to study metal ion transport. The bacteria had a high tolerance for the metal (IC(50) = 4 mM Tb3+). Metal ion transport was passive and metabolism independent. The uptake kinetics rapidly reached a maximum within 15 min, followed by a stasis for 60 min, and declining thereafter between 120 and 240 min, resulting in a biphasic curve. During this period, greater than one-third of the metal ion was sequestered within the cell. Our choice of a safe Biosafety Level I E. coli bacteria and the relatively non-toxic Tb3+ metal represents a model system for luminescent investigations of biosorption, for studying bacterial-water interfacial chemistry and for the bioremediation of heavy metals and radionuclides.

  20. Construction of the energy matrix for complex atoms. Part VIII: Hyperfine structure HPC calculations for terbium atom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elantkowska, Magdalena; Ruczkowski, Jarosław; Sikorski, Andrzej; Dembczyński, Jerzy

    2017-11-01

    A parametric analysis of the hyperfine structure (hfs) for the even parity configurations of atomic terbium (Tb I) is presented in this work. We introduce the complete set of 4fN-core states in our high-performance computing (HPC) calculations. For calculations of the huge hyperfine structure matrix, requiring approximately 5000 hours when run on a single CPU, we propose the methods utilizing a personal computer cluster or, alternatively a cluster of Microsoft Azure virtual machines (VM). These methods give a factor 12 performance boost, enabling the calculations to complete in an acceptable time.

  1. Spectrofluorimetric determination of human serum albumin using terbium-danofloxacin probe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramezani, Amir M; Manzoori, Jamshid L; Amjadi, Mohammad; Jouyban, Abolghasem

    2012-01-01

    A spectrofluorimetric method is proposed for the determination of human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) using terbium-danofloxacin (Tb(3+)-Dano) as a fluorescent probe. These proteins remarkably enhance the fluorescence intensity of the Tb(3+)-Dano complex at 545 nm, and the enhanced fluorescence intensity of Tb(3+)-Dano is proportional to the concentration of proteins (HSA and BSA). Optimum conditions for the determination of HSA were investigated and found that the maximum response was observed at: pH = 7.8, [Tb(3+)] = 8.5 × 10(-5) mol L(-1), [Dano] = 1.5 × 10(-4) mol L(-1). The calibration graphs for standard solutions of BSA, HSA, and plasma samples of HSA were linear in the range of 0.2 × 10(-6) - 1.3 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), 0.2 × 10(-6) - 1.4 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), and 0.2 × 10(-6) - 1 × 10(-6) mol L(-1), respectively. The detection limits (S/N = 3) for BSA, HSA, and plasma sample of HSA were 8.7 × 10(-8) mol L(-1), 6.2 × 10(-8) mol L(-1), and 8.1 × 10(-8) mol L(-1), respectively. The applicability of the method was checked using a number of real biological plasma samples and was compared with the UV spectrometric reference method. The results was showed that the method could be regarded as a simple, practical, and sensitive alternative method for determination of albumin in biological samples.

  2. Spectrofluorimetric Determination of Human Serum Albumin Using Terbium-Danofloxacin Probe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir M. Ramezani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A spectrofluorimetric method is proposed for the determination of human serum albumin (HSA and bovine serum albumin (BSA using terbium-danofloxacin (Tb3+-Dano as a fluorescent probe. These proteins remarkably enhance the fluorescence intensity of the Tb3+-Dano complex at 545 nm, and the enhanced fluorescence intensity of Tb3+-Dano is proportional to the concentration of proteins (HSA and BSA. Optimum conditions for the determination of HSA were investigated and found that the maximum response was observed at: pH=7.8, [Tb3+] =8.5×10−5 mol L−1, [Dano] =1.5×10−4 mol L−1. The calibration graphs for standard solutions of BSA, HSA, and plasma samples of HSA were linear in the range of 0.2×10−6−1.3×10−6 mol L−1, 0.2×10−6−1.4×10−6 mol L−1, and 0.2×10−6−1×10−6 mol L−1, respectively. The detection limits (S/N = 3 for BSA, HSA, and plasma sample of HSA were 8.7×10−8 mol L−1, 6.2×10−8 mol L−1, and 8.1×10−8 mol L−1, respectively. The applicability of the method was checked using a number of real biological plasma samples and was compared with the UV spectrometric reference method. The results was showed that the method could be regarded as a simple, practical, and sensitive alternative method for determination of albumin in biological samples.

  3. Determination of flavonoids in pharmaceutical preparations using Terbium sensitized fluorescence method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Shaghaghi

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground and the Purpose of the Study: The aim of this study was development and validation of a simple, rapid and sensitive spectrofluorimetric method for determination of total flavonoids in two topical formulations of Calendula officinalis, Ziziphus Spina-christi and an oral drop of Hypiran perforatum L. The proposed method is based on the formation of terbium (Tb3+ "n-flavonoids (quercetin as a reference standard complex at pH 7.0, which has fluorescence intensely with maximum emission at 545 nm when excited at 310 nm. "nMethod "n: For ointments masses of topical formulations were weighed and added to ethanol-aqueous buffer (pH 10.0 and the resulting mixtures were shaken and then two phases were separated by centrifugation. Aqueous phases were filtered and then diluted with water. For Hypiran drops an appropriate portion was diluted with ethanol and then aliquots of sample or standard solutions were determined according to the experimental procedure. "nResults "n: Under the optimum conditions, total concentrations of flavonoids (as quercetin equivalent in three tested formulations were found to be 0.204 mg/g (for Dermatin cream, 0.476 mg/g (for Calendula ointment and 13.50 μg/ml (for Hypiran drops. Analytical recoveries from samples spiked with different amounts of quercetin were 96.1-104.0 % with RSD % of less than 3.5. Conclusion : The proposed method which requires a simple dissolution step without any matrix interferences provided high sensitivity and selectivity and was easily applied to determine total flavonoids in real samples of three investigated formulations with excellent reproducibility.

  4. TOF SIMS analysis and generation of white photoluminescence from strontium silicate codoped with europium and terbium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tshabalala, Modiehi A.; Swart, Hendrik C.; Ntwaeaborwa, Odireleng M., E-mail: ntwaeab@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 South Africa (South Africa)

    2014-03-15

    White light emitting terbium (Tb{sup 3+}) and europium (Eu{sup 3+}) codoped strontium silicate (Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) phosphors were prepared by a solid state reaction process. The structure, particle morphology, chemical composition, ion distribution, photoluminescence (PL), and decay characteristics of the phosphors were analyzed by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS), and PL spectroscopy, respectively. The XRD data showed that our Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} composed of two phases, namely, β-Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} and α′-Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}, and the α′-Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} phase was more prominent than the β-Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4} phase. The SEM micrographs showed that the particles were agglomerated together and they did not have definite shapes. All ions (i.e., negative and positive) present in our materials were identified by TOF-SIMS. In addition, the chemical imaging performed with the TOF-SIMS demonstrated how the individual ions including the dopants (Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}) were distributed in the host lattice. White photoluminescence was observed when the Sr{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}:Tb{sup 3+}, Eu{sup 3+} phosphor was excited at 239 nm using a monochromatized xenon lamp as the excitation source. The phosphor exhibited fast decay lifetimes implying that it is not a good candidate for long afterglow applications.

  5. Synthesis, crystal structure and photophysical properties of europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes with pyridine-2,6-dicarboxamide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tanase, S.; Gallego, P.M.; Gelder, R. de; Fu, W.T.

    2007-01-01

    The reactions of pyridine-2,6-dicarboxamide with europium(III) and terbium(III) triflates led to the formation of mononuclear complexes of formula [Ln(pcam)(3)](CF3SO3)(3) (Ln = Eu 1, Tb 2; pcam stands for pyridine-2,6-dicarboxamide). From single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis, the complexes

  6. Zinc sulfide and terbium-doped zinc sulfide films grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy

    CERN Document Server

    Yun, S J; Nam, K S

    1998-01-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) and terbium-doped ZnS (ZnS:Tb) thin films were grown by traveling wave reactor atomic layer epitaxy (ALE). In the present work, ZnCl sub 2 , H sub 2 S, and tris (2,2,6,6-tetramethyl-3,5-heptandionato) terbium (Tb(tmhd) sub 3) were used as the precursors. The dependence of crystallinity and Cl content of ZnS films was investigated on the growth temperature. ZnS and ZnS:Tb films grown at temperatures ranging from 400 to 500 .deg. C showed a hexagonal-2H crystalline structure. The crystallinity of ZnS film was greatly enhanced as the temperature increased. At growth temperatures higher than 450.deg.C, the films showed preferred orientation with mainly (002) diffraction peak. The Cl content decreased from approximately 9 to 1 at.% with the increase in growth temperature from 400 to 500 .deg. C. The segregation of Cl near the surface region and the incorporation of O from Tb(tmhd) sub 3 during ALE process were also observed using Auger electron spectroscopy. The ALE-grown ZnS and ZnS:Tb films re...

  7. Commercializing potassium terbium fluoride, KTF (KTb3F10) faraday crystals for high laser power optical isolator applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlichting, Wolfgang; Stevens, Kevin; Foundos, Greg; Payne, Alexis

    2017-10-01

    Many scientific lasers and increasingly industrial laser systems operate in power regime, require high-performance optical isolators to prevent disruptive light feedback into the laser cavity. The optically active Faraday material is the key optical element inside the isolator. SYNOPTICS has been supplying the laser market with Terbium Gallium Garnet (TGG - Tb3Ga5O12) for many years. It is the most commonly used material for the 650-1100nm range and the key advantages for TGG include its cubic crystal structure for alignment free processing, little to no intrinsic birefringence, and ease of manufacture. However, for high-power laser applications TGG is limited by its absorption at 1064nm and its thermo-optic coefficient, dn/dT. Specifically, thermal lensing and depolarization effects become a limiting factor at high laser powers. While TGG absorption has improved significantly over the past few years, there is an intrinsic limit. Now, SYNOPTICS is commercializing the enhanced new crystal Potassium Terbium Fluoride KTF (KTb3F10) that exhibits much smaller nonlinear refractive index and thermo-optic coefficients, and still exhibits a Verdet constant near that of TGG. This cubic crystal has relatively low absorption and thermo-optic coefficients. It is now fully characterized and available for select production orders. At OPTIFAB in October 2017 we present recent results comparing the performance of KTF to TGG in optical isolators and show SYNOPTICS advances in large volume crystal growth and the production ramp up.

  8. Structural variations in terbium(III) complexes with 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylate and diverse co-ligands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thuéry, Pierre, E-mail: pierre.thuery@cea.fr

    2015-07-15

    Terbium nitrate was reacted with 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylic acid (LH{sub 2}) under solvo-hydrothermal conditions with either N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) or N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA) as organic solvents. Hydrolysation of the latter co-solvents resulted in the formation of formate or acetate ions, which are present as co-ligands in the 1D coordination polymer [Tb(L)(HCOO)(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}] (1) and the 2D assembly [Tb(L)(CH{sub 3}COO)(H{sub 2}O)] (2). The increase in dimensionality in the latter arises from the higher connectivity provided by acetate versus formate, the L{sup 2−} ligand being bis-chelating in both cases. The complex [Tb{sub 2}(L){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 5}][Tb{sub 2}(L){sub 3}(H{sub 2}O){sub 4}]·3H{sub 2}O (3), another 1D species, crystallizes alongside crystals of 2. Further addition of cucurbit[6]uril (CB6), with DMF as co-solvent, gave the two complexes [Tb{sub 2}(L){sub 2}(CB6)(H{sub 2}O){sub 6}](NO{sub 3}){sub 2}·6H{sub 2}O (4) and [H{sub 2}NMe{sub 2}]{sub 2}[Tb(L)(HCOO){sub 2}]{sub 2}·CB6·3H{sub 2}O (5). Complex 4 crystallizes as a 3D framework in which Tb(L){sup +} chains are connected by tetradentate CB6 molecules, while 5 unites a carboxylate-bridged anionic 2D planar assembly and layers of CB6 molecules with counter-cations held at both portals. - Graphical abstract: One- to three-dimensional assemblies are formed in terbium(III) complexes with 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylate obtained under solvo-hydrothermal conditions, these species including formate or acetate co-ligands formed in situ, or additional cucurbit[6]uril molecules. - Highlights: • We report structures of terbium(III) complexes with 1,3-adamantanedicarboxylate. • Solvents able to generate co-ligands or counter-ions in situ have been used. • A 3D species including additional cucurbituril molecules is decribed. • One species displays an alternation of metal–organic and organic sheets.

  9. Complete Stokes polarimetry of magneto-optical Faraday effect in a terbium gallium garnet crystal at cryogenic temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Hassaan; Shaheen, Amrozia; Anwar, Muhammad Sabieh

    2013-10-21

    We report the complete determination of the polarization changes caused in linearly polarized incident light due to propagation in a magneto-optically active terbium gallium garnet (TGG) single crystal, at temperatures ranging from 6.3 to 300 K. A 28-fold increase in the Verdet constant of the TGG crystal is seen as its temperature decreases to 6.3 K. In contrast with polarimetry of light emerging from a Faraday material at room temperature, polarimetry at cryogenic temperatures cannot be carried out using the conventional fixed polarizer-analyzer technique because the assumption that ellipticity is negligible becomes increasingly invalid as temperature is lowered. It is shown that complete determination of light polarization in such a case requires the determination of its Stokes parameters, otherwise inaccurate measurements will result with negative implications for practical devices.

  10. Development of Optical Isolators for Visible Light Using Terbium Aluminum Garnet (Tb3Al5O12) Single Crystals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geho, Mikio; Takagi, Takashi; Chiku, Shinichiro; Fujii, Takashi

    2005-07-01

    We have recently reported the successful growth of incongruently melting terbium aluminum garnet (Tb3Al5O12; TAG) single crystals by the hybrid laser FZ (floating zone) method. Optical property evaluations confirmed a high transmittance and a larger Verdet constant than conventional Tb3Ga5O12 (TGG) crystals and/or Faraday glasses. In this study, we attempted to design, fabricate, and evaluate optical isolators in visible light through near-infrared (NIR) regions using TAG crystals. A finite element method (FEM) simulation of possible models led us to the preferable one based on a radially magnetized magnet. To realize this, we employed a pseudo-radially magnetized magnet. The target wavelengths of the prototype device were 408, 808, and 1064 nm. The typical extinction ratio was more than 30 dB and the insertion loss was less than 0.3 dB for AR-coated devices.

  11. Structural investigation and photoluminescent properties of gadolinium(III), europium(III) and terbium(III) 3-mercaptopropionate complexes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, E R; Mazali, I O; Sigoli, F A

    2014-01-01

    This work reports on the synthesis, crystallographic determination and spectroscopic characterization of gadolinium(III), terbium(III) and europium(III) 3-mercaptopropionate complexes, aqua-tris(3-mercaptopropionate)lanthanide(III)--[Ln(mpa)3(H2O)]. The Judd-Ofelt intensity parameters were experimentally determined from emission spectrum of the [Eu(mpa)3(H2O)]complex and they were also calculated from crystallographic data. The complexes are coordination polymers, where the units of each complex are linked together by carboxylate groups leading to an unidimensional and parallel chains that by chemical interactions form a tridimensional framework. The emission spectrum profile of the [Eu(mpa)3(H2O)] complex is discussed based on point symmetry of the europium(III) ion, that explains the bands splitting observed in its emission spectrum. Photoluminescent analysis of the [Gd(mpa)3(H2O)] complex show no efficient ligand excitation but an intense charge transfer band. The excitation spectra of the [Eu(mpa)3(H2O)] and [Tb(mpa)3(H2O)] complexes do not show evidence of energy transfer from the ligand to the excited levels of these trivalent ions. Therefore the emission bands are originated only by direct f-f intraconfigurational excitation of the lantanide(III) ions.

  12. Fluorometric determination of proteins using the terbium (III)-2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone-sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate-protein system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jia Zhen [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Department of Chemistry, Dezhou University, Dezhou 253023 (China); Yang Jinghe [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)]. E-mail: yjh@sdu.edu.cn; Wu Xia [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Wang Fei [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Guo Changying [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China); Liu Shufang [Key Laboratory of Colloid and Interface Chemistry of Education Ministry, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Shandong University, Jinan 250100 (China)

    2006-12-15

    It is found that in hexamethylene tetramine (HMTA)-HCl buffer of pH=8.00, proteins can enhance the fluorescence of terbium (III) (Tb{sup 3+})-2-thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA)-sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) system. Based on this, a sensitive method for the determination of proteins is proposed. The experiments indicate that under the optimum conditions, the enhanced fluorescence intensity is in proportion to the concentration of proteins in the range of 4.0x10{sup -9}-7.5x10{sup -6}g/mL for bovine serum albumin (BSA), 5.0x10{sup -9}-1.5x10{sup -5}g/mL for human serum albumin (HSA), 1.0x10{sup -8}-7.5x10{sup -6}g/mL for egg albumin (EA). Their detection limits (S/N=3) are 0.5, 0.8 and 2.0ng/mL, respectively. The interaction mechanism is also studied.

  13. Terbium to Quantum Dot FRET Bioconjugates for Clinical Diagnostics: Influence of Human Plasma on Optical and Assembly Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko Hildebrandt

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET from luminescent terbium complexes (LTC as donors to semiconductor quantum dots (QDs as acceptors allows extraordinary large FRET efficiencies due to the long Förster distances afforded. Moreover, time-gated detection permits an efficient suppression of autofluorescent background leading to sub-picomolar detection limits even within multiplexed detection formats. These characteristics make FRET-systems with LTC and QDs excellent candidates for clinical diagnostics. So far, such proofs of principle for highly sensitive multiplexed biosensing have only been performed under optimized buffer conditions and interactions between real-life clinical media such as human serum or plasma and LTC-QD-FRET-systems have not yet been taken into account. Here we present an extensive spectroscopic analysis of absorption, excitation and emission spectra along with the luminescence decay times of both the single components as well as the assembled FRET-systems in TRIS-buffer, TRIS-buffer with 2% bovine serum albumin, and fresh human plasma. Moreover, we evaluated homogeneous LTC-QD FRET assays in QD conjugates assembled with either the well-known, specific biotin-streptavidin biological interaction or, alternatively, the metal-affinity coordination of histidine to zinc. In the case of conjugates assembled with biotin-streptavidin no significant interference with the optical and binding properties occurs whereas the histidine-zinc system appears to be affected by human plasma.

  14. Evidence of mass exchange between inside and outside of sonoluminescing bubble in aqueous solution of terbium chloride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Jinfu, E-mail: liang.shi2007@163.com [School of Physics and Electronic Science, Guizhou Normal University, Guiyang 550001 (China); Chen, Weizhong, E-mail: wzchen@nju.edu.cn [The Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Ministry of Education, Institution of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China); Wang, Xun; Yang, Jing; Chen, Zhan [The Key Laboratory of Modern Acoustics, Ministry of Education, Institution of Acoustics, Nanjing University, Nanjing 210093 (China)

    2016-12-16

    Highlights: • Time-resolved spectra of SBSL were obtained for Tb{sup 3+} ions emission lines. • Mass exchange between inside and outside of SL bubble was probed via Tb{sup 3+} ions lines. • The argon rectification hypothesis was tested by time-resolved spectra of SBSL. • The rate of mass exchange inside an SBSL bubble increases with increasing sound pressure. - Abstract: Spectra of single-bubble sonoluminescence (SBSL) were obtained for Tb{sup 3+} ions emission lines from bubbles in an aqueous solution of terbium chloride (TbCl{sub 3}). The spectra provide experimental evidence to prove that an air bubble driven by strong ultrasound will not eventually become a rectified pure argon bubble, which is not as predicted by the argon rectification hypothesis. The time-resolved spectra of SBSL show a mass exchange of material such as Tb{sup 3+} ions between the inside and outside of the bubble. With increasing sound pressure, the rate of mass exchange and the SBSL intensity increases.

  15. Optical properties and electrical transport of thin films of terbium(III bis(phthalocyanine on cobalt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Robaschik

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The optical and electrical properties of terbium(III bis(phthalocyanine (TbPc2 films on cobalt substrates were studied using variable angle spectroscopic ellipsometry (VASE and current sensing atomic force microscopy (cs-AFM. Thin films of TbPc2 with a thickness between 18 nm and 87 nm were prepared by organic molecular beam deposition onto a cobalt layer grown by electron beam evaporation. The molecular orientation of the molecules on the metallic film was estimated from the analysis of the spectroscopic ellipsometry data. A detailed analysis of the AFM topography shows that the TbPc2 films consist of islands which increase in size with the thickness of the organic film. Furthermore, the cs-AFM technique allows local variations of the organic film topography to be correlated with electrical transport properties. Local current mapping as well as local I–V spectroscopy shows that despite the granular structure of the films, the electrical transport is uniform through the organic films on the microscale. The AFM-based electrical measurements allow the local charge carrier mobility of the TbPc2 thin films to be quantified with nanoscale resolution.

  16. Highly luminescent charge-neutral europium(iii) and terbium(iii) complexes with tridentate nitrogen ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, Kuppusamy; Schäfer, Bernhard; Lebedkin, Sergei; Karmazin, Lydia; Kappes, Manfred M; Ruben, Mario

    2015-09-21

    We report on the synthesis of tridentate-nitrogen pyrazole-pyridine-tetrazole (L(1)H) and pyrazole-pyridine-triazole (L(2)H) ligands and their complexation with lanthanides (Ln = Gd(iii), Eu(iii) and Tb(iii)) resulting in stable, charge-neutral complexes Ln(L(1))3 and Ln(L(2))3, respectively. X-ray crystallographic analysis of the complexes with L(1) ligands revealed tricapped trigonal coordination geometry around the lanthanide ions. All complexes show bright photoluminescence (PL) in the solid state, indicating efficient sensitization of the lanthanide emission via the triplet states of the ligands. In particular, the terbium complexes show high PL quantum yields of 65 and 59% for L(1) and L(2), respectively. Lower PL efficiencies of the europium complexes (7.5 and 9%, respectively) are attributed to large energy gaps between the triplet states of the ligands and accepting levels of Eu(iii). The triplet state energy can be reduced by introducing an electron withdrawing (EW) group at the 4 position of the pyridine ring. Such substitution of L(1)H with a carboxylic ester (COOMe) EW group leads to a europium complex with increased PL quantum yield of 31%. A comparatively efficient PL of the complexes dissolved in ethanol indicates that the lanthanide ions are shielded against nonradiative deactivation via solvent molecules.

  17. Micelle enhanced and terbium sensitized spectrofluorimetric determination of danofloxacin in milk using molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Kuldeep; Saini, Shivender Singh; Malik, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Baldev

    2012-10-01

    An efficient molecularly imprinted solid phase extraction (MISPE)-spectrofluorimetric method was developed to sensitively determine danofloxacin (DAN) in milk samples. Solid phase extraction procedure using MISPE cartridges was first performed on milk samples and then spectrofluorimetric determination was done at 546 nm using an excitation wavelength of 285 nm in presence of terbium and sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS). It was found that SDBS significantly enhanced the fluorescence intensity of the DAN-Tb3+ complex. Various factors affecting the fluorescence intensity of DAN-Tb3+-SDBS system were studied and conditions were optimized. The enhanced fluorescence intensity of the system (ΔF) showed a good linear relationship with the concentration of DAN over the range of 8.4 × 10-9-3.4 × 10-7 mol L-1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9996. The detection limit was determined as 2.0 × 10-9 mol L-1 and the limit of quantification was determined as 6.5 × 10-9 mol L-1. The MISPE-spectrofluorimetric procedure was successfully applied to the determination of DAN in milk samples. The method is simple, rapid, sensitive and allows interference free determination of DAN in complex fluorescent matrices like milk. The method can be used to determine whether the DAN residues in milk exceed MRLs or not.

  18. Terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb) scintillation-based polymer optical fibre sensor for real time monitoring of radiation dose in oncology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E.; O'Keeffe, S.; Grattan, M.; Hounsell, A.; McCarthy, D.; Woulfe, P.; Cronin, J.; Mihai, L.; Sporea, D.; Santhanam, A.; Agazaryan, N.

    2014-05-01

    A PMMA based plastic optical fibre sensor for use in real time radiotherapy dosimetry is presented. The optical fibre tip is coated with a scintillation material, terbium-doped gadolinium oxysulfide (Gd2O2S:Tb), which fluoresces when exposed to ionising radiation (X-Ray). The emitted visible light signal penetrates the sensor optical fibre and propagates along the transmitting fibre at the end of which it is remotely monitored using a fluorescence spectrometer. The results demonstrate good repeatability, with a maximum percentage error of 0.5% and the response is independent of dose rate.

  19. Compact all-fiber optical Faraday components using 65-wt%-terbium-doped fiber with a record Verdet constant of -32 rad/(Tm).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, L; Jiang, S; Marciante, J R

    2010-06-07

    A compact all-fiber Faraday isolator and a Faraday mirror are demonstrated. At the core of each of these components is an all-fiber Faraday rotator made of a 4-cm-long, 65-wt%-terbium-doped silicate fiber. The effective Verdet constant of the terbium-doped fiber is measured to be -32 rad/(Tm), which is 27 x larger than that of silica fiber. This effective Verdet constant is the largest value measured to date in any fiber and is 83% of the Verdet constant of commercially available crystal used in bulk optics-based isolators. Combining the all-fiber Faraday rotator with fiber polarizers results in a fully fusion spliced all-fiber isolator whose isolation is measured to be 19 dB. Combining the all-fiber Faraday rotator with a fiber Bragg grating results in an all-fiber Faraday mirror that rotates the polarization state of the reflected light by 88 +/- 4 degrees .

  20. Picomolar Traces of Americium(III) Introduce Drastic Changes in the Structural Chemistry of Terbium(III): A Break in the "Gadolinium Break".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welch, Jan M; Müller, Danny; Knoll, Christian; Wilkovitsch, Martin; Giester, Gerald; Ofner, Johannes; Lendl, Bernhard; Weinberger, Peter; Steinhauser, Georg

    2017-10-16

    The crystallization of terbium 5,5'-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] (ZT) in the presence of trace amounts (ca. 50 Bq, ca. 1.6 pmol) of americium results in 1) the accumulation of the americium tracer in the crystalline solid and 2) a material that adopts a different crystal structure to that formed in the absence of americium. Americium-doped [Tb(Am)(H 2 O) 7 ZT] 2 ZT⋅10 H 2 O is isostructural to light lanthanide (Ce-Gd) 5,5'-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] compounds, rather than to the heavy lanthanide (Tb-Lu) 5,5'-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] (e.g., [Tb(H 2 O) 8 ] 2 ZT 3 ⋅6 H 2 O) derivatives. Traces of Am seem to force the Tb compound into a structure normally preferred by the lighter lanthanides, despite a 10 8 -fold Tb excess. The americium-doped material was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, radiochemical neutron activation analysis, and scanning electron microcopy. In addition, the inclusion properties of terbium 5,5'-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] towards americium were quantified, and a model for the crystallization process is proposed. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles protect cells against oxidative stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shcherbakov, Alexander B.; Zholobak, Nadezhda M. [Zabolotny Institute of Microbiology and Virology, National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, Kyiv D0368 (Ukraine); Baranchikov, Alexander E. [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); Ryabova, Anastasia V. [Prokhorov General Physics Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Nuclear University MEPhI (Moscow Engineering Physics Institute), Moscow 115409 (Russian Federation); Ivanov, Vladimir K., E-mail: van@igic.ras.ru [Kurnakov Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow 119991 (Russian Federation); National Research Tomsk State University, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2015-05-01

    A novel facile method of non-doped and fluorescent terbium-doped cerium fluoride stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. Intense green luminescence of CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles can be used to visualize these nanoparticles' accumulation in cells using confocal laser scanning microscopy. Cerium fluoride nanoparticles are shown for the first time to protect both organic molecules and living cells from the oxidative action of hydrogen peroxide. Both non-doped and terbium-doped CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to provide noteworthy protection to cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus. - Highlights: • Facile method of CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb stable aqueous sols synthesis is proposed. • Naked CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles are shown to be non-toxic and to protect cells from the action of H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. • CeF{sub 3} and CeF{sub 3}:Tb nanoparticles are shown to protect living cells against the vesicular stomatitis virus.

  2. Crystal structures of two mononuclear complexes of terbium(III) nitrate with the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregório, Thaiane; Giese, Siddhartha O K; Nunes, Giovana G; Soares, Jaísa F; Hughes, David L

    2017-02-01

    Two new mononuclear cationic complexes in which the TbIII ion is bis-chelated by the tripodal alcohol 1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane (H3LEt, C6H14O3) were prepared from Tb(NO3)3·5H2O and had their crystal and mol-ecular structures solved by single-crystal X-ray diffraction analysis after data collection at 100 K. Both products were isolated in reasonable yields from the same reaction mixture by using different crystallization conditions. The higher-symmetry complex dinitratobis[1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane]-terbium(III) nitrate di-meth-oxy-ethane hemisolvate, [Tb(NO3)2(H3LEt)2]NO3·0.5C4H10O2, 1, in which the lanthanide ion is 10-coordinate and adopts an s-bicapped square-anti-prismatic coordination geometry, contains two bidentate nitrate ions bound to the metal atom; another nitrate ion functions as a counter-ion and a half-mol-ecule of di-meth-oxy-ethane (completed by a crystallographic twofold rotation axis) is also present. In product aqua-nitratobis[1,1,1-tris-(hy-droxy-meth-yl)propane]-terbium(III) dinitrate, [Tb(NO3)(H3LEt)2(H2O)](NO3)2, 2, one bidentate nitrate ion and one water mol-ecule are bound to the nine-coordinate terbium(III) centre, while two free nitrate ions contribute to charge balance outside the tricapped trigonal-prismatic coordination polyhedron. No free water mol-ecule was found in either of the crystal structures and, only in the case of 1, di-meth-oxy-ethane acts as a crystallizing solvent. In both mol-ecular structures, the two tripodal ligands are bent to one side of the coordination sphere, leaving room for the anionic and water ligands. In complex 2, the methyl group of one of the H3LEt ligands is disordered over two alternative orientations. Strong hydrogen bonds, both intra- and inter-molecular, are found in the crystal structures due to the number of different donor and acceptor groups present.

  3. The response behavior of PPy-DB18C6 electrode to terbium(III in acetonitrile and its thermodynamic application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Hossein Arbab Zavar

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Polypyrrole modified electrode prepared by electropolymerization of pyrrole in the presence of a complexing ligand, dibenzo-18-crown-6(DB18C6, was prepared and investigated as a Tb3+-selective electrode in acetonitrile. The potentiometric response of the electrode was linear within the Tb3+ concentration range 1 × 10−5–1 × 10−2 M with a Nernstian slope of 20.9 mVdecade−1 in AN. The electrode was applied to study the complexation of the terbium(III ion in acetonitrile with such other basic aprotic solvent molecules (D as dimethyl sulfoxide, N,N-dimethyl formamide, propylene carbonate and pyridine. The successive complex formation constant (βi and Gibbs energies of transfer (ΔGtr of Tb3+ in AN in relation to such D were obtained.

  4. Luminescence and Magnetic Properties of Two Three-Dimensional Terbium and Dysprosium MOFs Based on Azobenzene-4,4′-Dicarboxylic Linker

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belén Fernández

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We report the in situ formation of two novel metal-organic frameworks based on terbium and dysprosium ions using azobenzene-4,4′-dicarboxylic acid (H2abd as ligand, synthesized by soft hydrothermal routes. Both materials show isostructural three-dimensional networks with channels along a axis and display intense photoluminescence properties in the solid state at room temperature. Textural properties of the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs have been fully characterized although no appreciable porosity was obtained. Magnetic properties of these materials were studied, highlighting the dysprosium material displays slightly frequency-dependent out of phase signals when measured under zero external field and under an applied field of 1000 Oe.

  5. Luminescent europium and terbium complexes of dipyridoquinoxaline and dipyridophenazine ligands as photosensitizing antennae: structures and biological perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasari, Srikanth; Patra, Ashis K

    2015-12-14

    The europium(III) and terbium(III) complexes, namely [Eu(dpq)(DMF)2(NO3)3] (1), [Eu(dppz)2(NO3)3] (2), [Tb(dpq)(DMF)2Cl3] (3), and [Tb(dppz)(DMF)2Cl3] (4), where dipyrido[3,2-d:2',3'-f]quinoxaline (dpq in 1 and 3), dipyrido[3,2-a:2',3'-c]phenazine (dppz in 2 and 4) and N,N'-dimethylformamide (DMF) have been isolated, characterized from their physicochemical data, luminescence studies and their interaction with DNA, serum albumin protein and photo-induced DNA cleavage activity are studied. The X-ray crystal structures of complexes 1-4 show discrete mononuclear Ln(3+)-based structures. The Eu(3+) in [Eu(dpq)(DMF)2(NO3)3] (1) and [Eu(dppz)2(NO3)3] (2) as [Eu(dppz)2(NO3)3]·dppz (2a) adopts a ten-coordinated bicapped dodecahedron structure with a bidentate N,N-donor dpq ligand, two DMF and three NO3(-) anions in 1 and two bidentate N,N-donor dppz ligands and three NO3(-) anions in 2. Complexes 3 and 4 show a seven-coordinated mono-capped octahedron structure where Tb(3+) contains bidentate dpq/dppz ligands, two DMF and three Cl(-) anions. The complexes are highly luminescent in nature indicating efficient photo-excited energy transfer from the dpq/dppz antenna to Ln(3+) to generate long-lived emissive excited states for characteristic f → f transitions. The time-resolved luminescence spectra of complexes 1-4 show typical narrow emission bands attributed to the (5)D0 → (7)F(J) and (5)D4 → (7)F(J) f-f transitions of Eu(3+) and Tb(3+) ions respectively. The number of inner-sphere water molecules (q) was determined from luminescence lifetime measurements in H2O and D2O confirming ligand-exchange reactions with water in solution. The complexes display significant binding propensity to the CT-DNA giving binding constant values in the range of 1.0 × 10(4)-6.1 × 10(4) M(-1) in the order 2, 4 (dppz) > 1, 3 (dpq). DNA binding data suggest DNA groove binding with the partial intercalation nature of the complexes. All the complexes also show binding propensity (K(BSA)

  6. Radioluminescence of rare-earth doped aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santiago, M.; Molina, P. [Universidad Nacional del Centro de la Provincia de Buenos Aires, Instituto de Fisica Arroyo Seco, Pinto 399, 7000 Tandil (Argentina); Barros, V. S.; Khoury, H. J.; Elihimas, D. R., E-mail: msantiag@exa.unicen.edu.ar [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Energia Nuclear, Av. Prof. Luiz Freire 1000, Recife, PE 50740-540 (Brazil)

    2011-10-15

    Carbon-doped aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}:C) is one of the most used radioluminescence (Rl) materials for fiberoptic dosimetry due to its high efficiency and commercial availability. However, this compound presents the drawback of emitting in the spectral region, where the spurious radioluminescence of fibers is also important. In this work, the radioluminescence response of rare-earth doped Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} samples has been evaluated. The samples were prepared by mixing stoichiometric amounts of aluminum nitrate, urea and dopants with different amounts of terbium, samarium, cerium and thulium nitrates varying from 0 to 0.15 mo 1%. The influence of the different activators on the Rl spectra has been investigated in order to determine the feasibility of using these compounds for Rl fiberoptic dosimetry. (Author)

  7. Spin Waves in Terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden

    1975-01-01

    The selection rules for the linear couplings between magnons and phonons propagating in the c direction of a simple basal-plane hcp ferromagnet are determined by general symmetry considerations. The acoustic-optical magnon-phonon interactions observed in the heavy-rare-earth metals have been expl...... by Liu. The coupled magnon—transverse-phonon system for the c direction of Tb is analyzed in detail, and the strengths of the couplings are deduced as a function of wave vector by combining the experimental studies with the theory....

  8. Spin Waves in Terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, J.; Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden; Bjerrum Møller, Hans

    1975-01-01

    The energies of spin waves propagating in the c direction of Tb have been studied by inelastic neutron scattering, as a function of a magnetic field applied along the easy and hard directions in the basal plane, and as a function of temperature. From a general spin Hamiltonian, consistent...... with the symmetry, we deduce the dispersion relation for the spin waves in a basal-plane ferromagnet. This phenomenological spin-wave theory accounts for the observed behavior of the magnon energies in Tb. The two q⃗-dependent Bogoliubov components of the magnon energies are derived from the experimental results...

  9. Synthesis and crystal structure of terbium(III) meta-oxoborate Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} ({identical_to} TbB{sub 3}O{sub 6}); Synthese und Kristallstruktur von Terbium(III)-meta-Oxoborat Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} ({identical_to} TbB{sub 3}O{sub 6})

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikelski, Tanja; Schleid, Thomas [Institut fuer Anorganische Chemie der Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany)

    2003-06-01

    The terbium meta-oxoborate Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} ({identical_to} TbB{sub 3}O{sub 6}) is obtained as single crystals by the reaction of terbium, Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7} and TbCl{sub 3} with an excess of B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in gastight sealed platinum ampoules at 950 C after three weeks. The compound appears to be air- and water-resistant and crystallizes as long, thin, colourless needles which tend to growth-twinning due to their marked fibrous habit. The crystal structure of Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} (orthorhombic, Pnma; a = 1598.97(9), b = 741.39(4), c = 1229.58(7) pm; Z = 16) contains strongly corrugated oxoborate layers {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}{l_brace}(BO{sub 2}){sup -}{r_brace} built of vertex-linked [BO{sub 4}]{sup 5-} tetrahedra (d(B-O) = 143 - 154 pm, and angsph;(O-B-O) = 102-115 ) which spread out parallel (100). The four crystallographically different Tb{sup 3+} cations all exhibit coordination numbers of eight towards the oxygen atoms (d(Tb-O) = 228-287 pm). The corresponding metal cation polyhedra [TbO{sub 8}]{sup 13+} too convene to layers (composition: {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}{l_brace}(Tb{sub 2}O{sub 11}){sup 16-}{r_brace}) which are likewise oriented parallel to the (100) plane. (Abstract Copyright [2003], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.) [German] Das Terbium-meta-Oxoborat Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} ({identical_to} TbB{sub 3}O{sub 6}) entsteht einkristallin bei der Reaktion von Terbium, Tb{sub 4}O{sub 7} und TbCl{sub 3} mit einem Ueberschuss von B{sub 2}O{sub 3} in gasdicht verschlossenen Platinampullen nach drei Wochen bei 950 C. Die Verbindung ist luft- und wasserstabil und faellt in langen, duennen, farblosen Nadeln an, die aufgrund ihres ausgepraegt faserigen Habitus zur Wachstumsverzwillingung neigen. Die Kristallstruktur von Tb(BO{sub 2}){sub 3} (orthorhombisch, Pnma; a = 1598, 97(9), b = 741, 39(4), c = 1229, 58(7) pm; Z = 16) enthaelt parallel (100) verlaufende, stark gewellte Oxoborat-Schichten {sub {infinity}}{sup 2}{l_brace}(BO{sub 2}){sup -}{r_brace} aus

  10. An integrated logic system for time-resolved fluorescent "turn-on" detection of cysteine and histidine base on terbium (III) coordination polymer-copper (II) ensemble.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Shi-Fan; Lu, Ling-Fei; Wang, Qi-Xian; Zhang, Shengqiang; Zhang, Min; Shi, Guoyue

    2016-09-01

    Cysteine (Cys) and histidine (His) both play indispensable roles in many important biological activities. An enhanced Cys level can result in Alzheimer's and cardiovascular diseases. Likewise, His plays a significant role in the growth and repair of tissues as well as in controlling the transmission of metal elements in biological bases. Therefore, it is meaningful to detect Cys and His simultaneously. In this work, a novel terbium (III) coordination polymer-Cu (II) ensemble (Tb(3+)/GMP-Cu(2+)) was proposed. Guanosine monophosphate (GMP) can self-assemble with Tb(3+) to form a supramolecular Tb(3+) coordination polymer (Tb(3+)/GMP), which can be suited as a time-resolved probe. The fluorescence of Tb(3+)/GMP would be quenched upon the addition of Cu(2+), and then the fluorescence of the as-prepared Tb(3+)/GMP-Cu(2+) ensemble would be restored again in the presence of Cys or His. By incorporating N-Ethylmaleimide and Ni(2+) as masking agents, Tb(3+)/GMP-Cu(2+) was further exploited as an integrated logic system and a specific time-resolved fluorescent "turn-on" assay for simultaneously sensing His and Cys was designed. Meanwhile it can also be used in plasma samples, showing great potential to meet the need of practical application. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Synthesis and photoluminescence properties of cerium-doped terbium-yttrium aluminum garnet phosphor for white light-emitting diodes applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Han, Tao; Lang, Tianchun; Tu, Mingjing; Peng, Lingling

    2015-11-01

    Cerium-doped terbium-yttrium aluminum garnet phosphors were synthesized using the solid-state reaction method. The crystalline phase, morphology, and photoluminescence properties were characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscope (SEM), and fluorescence spectrophotometer, respectively. The XRD results indicate that with an increase of the amount of x (Tb3+), all of the samples have a pure garnet crystal structure without secondary phases. The SEM images reveal that the samples are composed of sphere-like crystallites, which exhibit different degrees of agglomeration. The luminescent properties of Ce ions in )Al5O12∶Ce0.1 have been studied, and it was found that the emission band shifted toward a longer wavelength. The redshift is attributed to the lowering of the 5d energy level centroid of Ce, which can be explained by the nephelauxetic effect and compression effect. These phosphors were coated on blue light-emitting diode (LED) chips to fabricate white light-emitting diodes (WLEDs), and their color-rendering indices, color temperatures, and luminous efficiencies were measured. As a consequence of the addition of Tb, the blue LED pumped )Al5O12∶Ce0.1 phosphors WLEDs showed good optical properties.

  12. Study on the fluorescent enhancement effect in terbium-gadolinium-protein-sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate system and its application on sensitive detection of protein at nanogram level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Changxia; Yang, Jinghe; Wu, Xia; Liu, Shufang; Su, Benyu

    2004-08-01

    The co-luminescence effect in a terbium-gadolinium-protein-sodium dodecyl benzene sulfonate (SDBS) system is reported here. Based on it, the sensitive quantitative analysis of protein at nanogram levels is established. The co-luminescence mechanism is studied using fluorescence, resonance light scattering (RLS), absorption spectroscopy and NMR measurement. It is considered that protein could be unfolded by SDBS, then a efficacious intramolecular fluorescent energy transfer occurs from unfolded protein to rare earth ions through SDBS acting as a "transfer bridge" to enhance the emission fluorescence of Tb3+ in this ternary complex of Tb-SDBS-BSA, where energy transfer from protein to SDBS by aromatic ring stacking is the most important step. Cooperating with the intramolecular energy transfer above is the intermolecular energy transfer between the simultaneous existing complexes of both Tb3+ and Gd3+. The fluorescence quantum yield is increased by an energy-insulating sheath, which is considered to be another reason for the resulting enhancement of the fluorescence. Förster theory is used to calculate the distribution of enhancing factors and has led to a greater understanding of the mechanisms of energy transfer.

  13. [Studies on luminescence properties of seven ternary complexes of terbium with 1,10-phenanthroline and benzoic acid and its derivatives].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Zhi-hua; Wang, Shu-ping; Liu, Cui-ge; Ma, Rui-xia; Wang, Rui-fen

    2006-04-01

    Seven ternary complexes of Tb(III) were synthesized with benzoic acid (BA), o-, m-, p-methylbenzoic acid (o-MBA, m-MBA, p-MBA), and o-, m-, p-methoxybenzoic acid (o-MOBA, m-MOBA, p-MOBA) as the first ligand, and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) as the second ligand. The content of C, H and N were measured by using a Flash-EA model 1112 elemental analyzer. Excitation and luminescence spectra of the title solid complexes were recorded by using a Hitachi F-4500 fluorescence spectrophotometer at room temperature. The effects of different varieties and different positions of replacing benzoic acid as the first ligand on fluorescence properties of the ternary complexes of terbium were discussed. The results indicated that the intensity of 5D4-->7F6 (489 nm) and 5D4-->7F5 (545 nm) of substituting benzoic acid complexes was stronger than benzoic acid. Three ternary complexes of Tb(III) with o-, m-, p-methylbenzoic acid showed emission intensity in the consecution: Tb(o-MBA)3 phenMOBA)3phen x H2O>Tb(m-MOBA)3phen x H2O>Tb(p-MOBA)3 phen.

  14. Self-diffusion coefficients of the trivalent f-element ion series in dilute and moderately dilute aqueous solutions: A comparative study between europium, gadolinium, terbium and berkelium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rafik, Besbes; Noureddine, Ouerfelli; Abderabbou, Abdelmanef; Habib, Latrous

    2010-03-01

    We have continued the studies on the trivalent ions of the 4f and 5f elements. In this paper, we compare the transport properties (self-diffusion coefficient) of the trivalent aquo ions over two ranges of concentrations (0 — 2×10-3M) and (2×10-3 — 1.5M). Self-diffusion coefficients, D, of the trivalent f-element aquo ion series have been determined in aqueous background electrolytes of Gd(NO3)3 and Nd(ClO4)3, at pH=2.5 (HNO3, HClO4) and at 25°C using the open-end capillary method (O.E.C.M.). This method measures the transportation time of ions across a fixed distance. In this paper, we complete a measurement of self-diffusion coefficient for terbium. We optimized the pH to avoid hydrolysis, ion-pairing and complexation of the trivalent 4f and 5f ions. The variation of D versus √C is not linear for dilute solutions (0 — 2×10-3M) and quasi-linear in moderate concentrations (C<=1.5 M). Similar behavior was observed for Tb, as compared with those for Bk, Eu and Gd. We complete the comparison variation of D/D° versus √C for all studied 4f and 5f elements from concentration 0 to 1.5M and we obtained the same variation with √C for all studied elements. All 4f and 5f elements studied follow the Nernst-Hartley expression.

  15. Terbium-based time-gated Förster resonance energy transfer imaging for evaluating protein-protein interactions on cell membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindén, Stina; Singh, Manish Kumar; Wegner, K David; Regairaz, Marie; Dautry, François; Treussart, François; Hildebrandt, Niko

    2015-03-21

    Fluorescence imaging of cells and subcellular compartments is an essential tool to investigate biological processes and to evaluate the development and progression of diseases. In particular, protein-protein interactions can be monitored by Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) between two proximal fluorophores that are attached to specific recognition biomolecules such as antibodies. We investigated the membrane expression of E- and N-cadherins in three different cell lines used as model systems to study epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) and a possible detection of circulating tumour cells (CTCs). EMT is a key process in cancer metastasis, during which epithelial markers (such as E-cadherin) are down-regulated in the primary tumour whereas mesenchymal markers (such as N-cadherin) are up-regulated, leading to enhanced cell motility, intravasation, and appearance of CTCs. Various FRET donor-acceptor pairs and protein recognition strategies were utilized, in which Lumi4-Tb terbium complexes (Tb) and different organic dyes were conjugated to several distinct E- and N-cadherin-specific antibodies. Pulsed excitation of Tb at low repetition rates (100 Hz) and time-gated (TG) imaging of both the Tb-donor and the dye-acceptor photoluminescence (PL) allowed efficient detection of the EMT markers as well as FRET in the case of sufficient donor-acceptor proximity. Efficient FRET was observed only between two E-cadherin-specific antibodies and further experiments indicated that these antibodies recognized the same E-cadherin molecule, suggesting a limited accessibility of cadherins when they are clustered at adherens junctions. The investigated Tb-to-dye FRET systems provided reduced photobleaching compared to the AlexaFluor 488-568 donor-acceptor pair. Our results demonstrate the applicability and advantages of Tb-based TG FRET for efficient and stable imaging of antibody-antibody interactions on different cell lines. They also reveal the limitations of

  16. A broad G protein-coupled receptor internalization assay that combines SNAP-tag labeling, diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer, and a highly emissive terbium cryptate acceptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angélique eLEVOYE

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Although G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR internalization has long been considered a major aspect of the desensitization process that tunes ligand responsiveness, internalization is also involved in receptor resensitization and signaling, as well as the ligand scavenging function of some atypical receptors. Internalization thus contributes to the diversity of GPCR-dependent signaling, and its dynamics and quantification in living cells has generated considerable interest. We developed a robust and sensitive assay to follow and quantify ligand-induced and constitutive GPCR internalization but also receptor recycling in living cells. This assay is based on diffusion-enhanced resonance energy transfer (DERET between cell surface GPCRs labeled with a luminescent terbium cryptate donor and a fluorescein acceptor present in the culture medium. GPCR internalization results in a quantifiable reduction of energy transfer. This method yields a high signal-to-noise ratio due to time-resolved measurements. For various GPCRs belonging to different classes, we demonstrated that constitutive and ligand-induced internalization could be monitored as a function of time and ligand concentration, thus allowing accurate quantitative determination of kinetics of receptor internalization but also half-maximal effective or inhibitory concentrations of compounds. In addition to its selectivity and sensitivity, we provided evidence that DERET-based internalization assay is particularly suitable for characterizing biased ligands. Furthermore, the determination of a Z’-factor value of 0.45 indicates the quality and suitability of DERET-based internalization assay for high-throughput screening (HTS of compounds that may modulate GPCRs internalization.

  17. Crystal structure of an eight-coordinate terbium(III ion chelated by N,N′-bis(2-hydroxybenzyl-N,N′-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethylethylenediamine (bbpen2− and nitrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thaiane Gregório

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The reaction of terbium(III nitrate pentahydrate in acetonitrile with N,N′-bis(2-hydroxybenzyl-N,N′-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethylethylenediamine (H2bbpen, previously deprotonated with triethylamine, produced the mononuclear compound [N,N′-bis(2-oxidobenzyl-κO-N,N′-bis(pyridin-2-ylmethyl-κNethylenediamine-κ2N,N′](nitrato-κ2O,O′terbium(III, [Tb(C28H28N4O2(NO3]. The molecule lies on a twofold rotation axis and the TbIII ion is eight-coordinate with a slightly distorted dodecahedral coordination geometry. In the symmetry-unique part of the molecule, the pyridine and benzene rings are both essentially planar and form a dihedral angle of 61.42 (7°. In the molecular structure, the N4O4 coordination environment is defined by the hexadentate bbpen ligand and the bidentate nitrate anion. In the crystal, a weak C—H...O hydrogen bond links molecules into a two-dimensional network parallel to (001.

  18. Selective Sensing of Fe(3+) and Al(3+) Ions and Detection of 2,4,6-Trinitrophenol by a Water-Stable Terbium-Based Metal-Organic Framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Li-Hui; Shi, Fang; Zhang, Wen-Min; Zang, Shuang-Quan; Mak, Thomas C W

    2015-10-26

    A water-stable luminescent terbium-based metal-organic framework (MOF), {[Tb(L1 )1.5 (H2 O)]⋅3 H2 O}n (Tb-MOF), with rod-shaped secondary building units (SBUs) and honeycomb-type tubular channels has been synthesized and structurally characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction. The high green emission intensity and the microporous nature of the Tb-MOF indicate that it can potentially be used as a luminescent sensor. In this work, we show that Tb-MOF can selectively sense Fe(3+) and Al(3+) ions from mixed metal ions in water through different detection mechanisms. In addition, it also exhibits high sensitivity for 2,4,6-trinitrophenol (TNP) in the presence of other nitro aromatic compounds in aqueous solution by luminescence quenching experiments. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Picomolar traces of americium(III) introduce drastic changes in the structural chemistry of terbium(III). A break in the ''gadolinium break''

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, Jan M. [TU Wien, Atominstitut, Vienna (Austria); Mueller, Danny; Knoll, Christian; Wilkovitsch, Martin; Weinberger, Peter [TU Wien, Institute of Applied Synthetic Chemistry, Vienna (Austria); Giester, Gerald [University of Vienna, Institute of Mineralogy and Crystallography, Vienna (Austria); Ofner, Johannes; Lendl, Bernhard [TU Wien, Institute of Chemical Technologies and Analytics, Vienna (Austria); Steinhauser, Georg [Leibniz Universitaet Hannover, Institute of Radioecology and Radiation Protection (Germany)

    2017-10-16

    The crystallization of terbium 5,5{sup '}-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] (ZT) in the presence of trace amounts (ca. 50 Bq, ca. 1.6 pmol) of americium results in 1) the accumulation of the americium tracer in the crystalline solid and 2) a material that adopts a different crystal structure to that formed in the absence of americium. Americium-doped [Tb(Am)(H{sub 2}O){sub 7}ZT]{sub 2} ZT.10 H{sub 2}O is isostructural to light lanthanide (Ce-Gd) 5,5{sup '}-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] compounds, rather than to the heavy lanthanide (Tb-Lu) 5,5{sup '}-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] (e.g., [Tb(H{sub 2}O){sub 8}]{sub 2}ZT{sub 3}.6 H{sub 2}O) derivatives. Traces of Am seem to force the Tb compound into a structure normally preferred by the lighter lanthanides, despite a 10{sup 8}-fold Tb excess. The americium-doped material was studied by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, vibrational spectroscopy, radiochemical neutron activation analysis, and scanning electron microscopy. In addition, the inclusion properties of terbium 5,5{sup '}-azobis[1H-tetrazol-1-ide] towards americium were quantified, and a model for the crystallization process is proposed. (copyright 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  20. Synthesis and characterization of Tin / Titanium mixed oxide nanoparticles doped with lanthanide for biomarking; Sintese e caracterizacao de nanoparticulas de oxido misto de estanho/titanio dopadas com lantanideos para marcacao biologica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paganini, Paula Pinheiro

    2012-07-01

    This work presents the synthesis, characterization and photo luminescent study of tin and titanium mixed oxide nanoparticles doped with europium, terbium and neodymium to be used with luminescent markers on biological systems. The syntheses were done by co-precipitation, protein sol-gel and Pechini methods and the nanoparticles were characterized by infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy. The photo luminescent properties studies were conducted for luminophores doped with europium, terbium and neodymium synthesized by coprecipitation method. For luminophore doped with europium it was possible to calculate the intensity parameters and quantum yield and it showed satisfactory results. In the case of biological system marking it was necessary the functionalization of these particles to allow them to bind to the biological part to be studied. So the nanoparticles were functionalized by microwave and Stoeber methods and characterized by infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction obtaining qualitative response of functionalization efficacy. The ninhydrin spectroscopic method was used for quantification of luminophores functionalization. The photo luminescent studies of functionalized particles demonstrate the potential applying of these luminophores as luminescent markers. (author)

  1. Sodium terbium(III polyphosphate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdelghani Oudahmane

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Single crystals of the title compound, NaTb(PO34, were obtained by solid-state reaction. This compound belongs to type II of long-chain polyphosphates with the general formula AIBIII(PO34. It is isotypic with the NaNd(PO34 and NaEr(PO34 homologues. The crystal structure is built up of infinite crenelated chains of corner-sharing PO4 tetrahedra with a repeating unit of four tetrahedra. These chains, extending parallel to [100], are linked by isolated TbO8 square antiprisms, forming a three-dimensional framework. The Na+ ions are located in channels running along [010] and are surrounded by six oxygen atoms in a distorted octahedral environment within a cut-off distance <2.9 Å.

  2. A novel tridentate bis(phosphinic acid)phosphine oxide based europium(III)-selective Nafion membrane luminescent sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainz-Gonzalo, F J; Popovici, C; Casimiro, M; Raya-Barón, A; López-Ortiz, F; Fernández, I; Fernández-Sánchez, J F; Fernández-Gutiérrez, A

    2013-10-21

    A new europium(III) membrane luminescent sensor based on a new tridentate bis(phosphinic acid)phosphine oxide (3) system has been developed. The synthesis of this new ligand is described and its full characterization by NMR, IR and elemental analyses is provided. The luminescent complex formed between europium(III) chloride and ligand 3 was evaluated in solution, observing that its spectroscopic and chemical characteristics are excellent for measuring in polymer inclusion membranes. Included in a Nafion membrane, all the parameters (ligand and ionic additives) that can affect the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensing membrane as well as the instrumental conditions were carefully optimized. The best luminescence signal (λexc = 229.06 nm and λem = 616.02 nm) was exhibited by the sensing film having a Nafion : ligand composition of 262.3 : 0.6 mg mL(-1). The membrane sensor showed a short response time (t95 = 5.0 ± 0.2 min) and an optimum working pH of 5.0 (25 mM acetate buffer solution). The membrane sensor manifested a good selectivity toward europium(III) ions with respect to other trivalent metals (iron, chromium and aluminium) and lanthanide(III) ions (lanthanum, samarium, terbium and ytterbium), although a small positive interference of terbium(III) ions was observed. It provided a linear range from 1.9 × 10(-8) to 5.0 × 10(-6) M with a very low detection limit (5.8 × 10(-9) M) and sensitivity (8.57 × 10(-7) a.u. per M). The applicability of this sensing film has been demonstrated by analyzing different kinds of spiked water samples obtaining recovery percentages of 95-97%.

  3. Catalytic oxidation using nitrous oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Carlos Beltran-Prieto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrous oxide is a very inert gas used generally as oxidant as it offers some advantage compared with other oxidants such as O2 but a considerably higher temperature (> 526 °C is often required. For particular cases such as the oxidation of sugar alcohols, especially for the oxidation of primary alcohols to aldehydes, N2O has the advantage over O2 of a higher reaction selectivity. In the present paper we present the modelling of oxidation reaction of sugar alcohols using an oxidizing agent in low concentrations, which is important to suppress subsequent oxidation reactions due to the very low residual concentrations of the oxidizing agent. For orientation experiments we chose nitrous oxide generated by thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate. Kinetic modeling of the reaction was performed after determination of the differential equations that describe the system under study.

  4. RNA oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjaer, L. K.; Cejvanovic, V.; Henriken, T.

    2015-01-01

    RNA modification has attracted increasing interest as it is realized that epitranscriptomics is important in disease development. In type 2 diabetes we have suggested that high urinary excretion of 8-oxo-2'-Guanosine (8oxoGuo), as a measure of global RNA oxidation, is associated with poor survival.......9 significant hazard ratio for death compared with the quartile with the lowest 8oxoGuo excretion when adjusted for age, sex, BMI, smoker status, s-HbA1c, urine protein excretion and s-cholesterol. We conclude that it is now established that RNA oxidation is an independent risk factor for death in type 2...... diabetes. In agreement with our previous finding, DNA oxidation did not show any prognostic value. RNA oxidation represents oxidative stress intracellularly, presumably predominantly in the cytosol. The mechanism of RNA oxidation is not clear, but hypothesized to result from mitochondrial dysfunction...

  5. [Nitric oxide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovira, I

    1995-01-01

    Nitric oxide was identified as the relaxing factor derived from the endothelium in 1987. Nitric oxide synthesis allows the vascular system to maintain a state of vasodilation, thereby regulating arterial pressure. Nitric oxide is also found in platelets, where it inhibits adhesion and aggregation; in the immune system, where it is responsible for the cytotoxic action of macrophages; and in the nervous system, where it acts as neurotransmitter. A deficit in endogenous synthesis of nitric oxide contributes to such conditions as essential arterial hypertension, pulmonary hypertension and heart disease. An excess of nitrous oxide induced by endotoxins and cytokinins, meanwhile, is believed to be responsible for hypotension in septic shock and for hyperdynamic circulatory state in cirrhosis of the liver. Nitric oxide has also been implicated in the rejection of transplanted organs and in cell damage after reperfusion. Inhaled nitrous oxide gas reduces pulmonary hypertension without triggering systemic hypotension in both experimental and clinical conditions. It also produces selective vasodilation when used to ventilate specific pulmonary areas, thereby improving the ventilation/perfusion ratio and, hence, oxygenation. Nitric oxide inhalation is effective in pulmonary hypertension-coincident with chronic obstructive lung disease, in persistent neonatal pulmonary hypertension and in pulmonary hypertension with congenital or acquired heart disease. Likewise, it reduces intrapulmonary shunt in acute respiratory failure and improves gas exchange. Under experimental conditions nitric oxide acts as a bronchodilator, although it seems to be less effective for this purpose in clinical use.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  6. A europium- and terbium-coated magnetic nanocomposite as sorbent in dispersive solid phase extraction coupled with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography for antibiotic determination in meat samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo-García, M L; Aguilar-Caballos, M P; Gómez-Hens, A

    2015-12-18

    A new magnetic dispersive solid-phase extraction approach based on Eu- and Tb-coated magnetic nanocomposites, combined with ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with fluorometric detection, is reported for the extraction and simultaneous determination of veterinary antibiotics. The method is aimed at monitoring of potential residues of three tetracyclines, namely oxytetracycline, tetracycline, chlortetracycline and three acidic quinolones, such as oxolinic acid, nalidixic acid and flumequine, chosen as model analytes, in animal muscle samples. The nanocomposites were obtained by synthesizing magnetic nanoparticles by a co-precipitation method and their coating with terbium and europium ions. The limits of detection obtained using standard solutions were: 1.0, 1.5, 3.8, 0.25, 0.7 and 1.2ngmL(-1), which corresponds to 3.3, 5.0, 12.7, 0.8, 2.3 and 4.0μgkg(-1) for oxytetracycline, tetracycline, chlortetracycline, oxolinic acid, nalidixic acid and flumequine, respectively, in meat samples. The precision values, obtained in the presence of the sample matrix, were in the ranges 0.12-2.0% and 2.6-15.4% for retention times and areas, respectively. The selectivity of the method was checked by assaying different veterinary drugs, finding that most of them did not interfere at the same concentration levels as that of analytes. A recovery study was performed in the presence of chicken and pork muscle samples, which provided values in the range of 61.5-102.6%. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Anodic oxidation

    CERN Document Server

    Ross, Sidney D; Rudd, Eric J; Blomquist, Alfred T; Wasserman, Harry H

    2013-01-01

    Anodic Oxidation covers the application of the concept, principles, and methods of electrochemistry to organic reactions. This book is composed of two parts encompassing 12 chapters that consider the mechanism of anodic oxidation. Part I surveys the theory and methods of electrochemistry as applied to organic reactions. These parts also present the mathematical equations to describe the kinetics of electrode reactions using both polarographic and steady-state conditions. Part II examines the anodic oxidation of organic substrates by the functional group initially attacked. This part particular

  8. Magnesium Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnesium is an element your body needs to function normally. Magnesium oxide may be used for different reasons. Some people use it as ... daily depending on which brand is used and what condition you have. Follow the directions on the ...

  9. CCDC 1410820: Experimental Crystal Structure Determination : heptakis(dimethylammonium) heptacosa-terbium dodecakis((1,1'-biphenyl)-3,4',5-tricarboxylate) hexakis(2-fluorobenzoate) hexakis(formate) hexatriacontakis(hydroxide) bis(oxide) unknown solvate hydrate

    KAUST Repository

    Alezi, Dalal

    2015-01-01

    An entry from the Cambridge Structural Database, the world’s repository for small molecule crystal structures. The entry contains experimental data from a crystal diffraction study. The deposited dataset for this entry is freely available from the CCDC and typically includes 3D coordinates, cell parameters, space group, experimental conditions and quality measures.

  10. Oxidation catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyer, Sylvia T.; Lahr, David L.

    2010-11-09

    The present invention generally relates to catalyst systems and methods for oxidation of carbon monoxide. The invention involves catalyst compositions which may be advantageously altered by, for example, modification of the catalyst surface to enhance catalyst performance. Catalyst systems of the present invention may be capable of performing the oxidation of carbon monoxide at relatively lower temperatures (e.g., 200 K and below) and at relatively higher reaction rates than known catalysts. Additionally, catalyst systems disclosed herein may be substantially lower in cost than current commercial catalysts. Such catalyst systems may be useful in, for example, catalytic converters, fuel cells, sensors, and the like.

  11. Oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stevanović Jelka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The unceasing need for oxygen is in contradiction to the fact that it is in fact toxic to mammals. Namely, its monovalent reduction can have as a consequence the production of short-living, chemically very active free radicals and certain non-radical agents (nitrogen-oxide, superoxide-anion-radicals, hydroxyl radicals, peroxyl radicals, singlet oxygen, peroxynitrite, hydrogen peroxide, hypochlorous acid, and others. There is no doubt that they have numerous positive roles, but when their production is stepped up to such an extent that the organism cannot eliminate them with its antioxidants (superoxide-dismutase, glutathione-peroxidase, catalase, transferrin, ceruloplasmin, reduced glutathion, and others, a series of disorders is developed that are jointly called „oxidative stress.“ The reactive oxygen species which characterize oxidative stress are capable of attacking all main classes of biological macromolecules, actually proteins, DNA and RNA molecules, and in particular lipids. The free radicals influence lipid peroxidation in cellular membranes, oxidative damage to DNA and RNA molecules, the development of genetic mutations, fragmentation, and the altered function of various protein molecules. All of this results in the following consequences: disrupted permeability of cellular membranes, disrupted cellular signalization and ion homeostasis, reduced or loss of function of damaged proteins, and similar. That is why the free radicals that are released during oxidative stress are considered pathogenic agents of numerous diseases and ageing. The type of damage that will occur, and when it will take place, depends on the nature of the free radicals, their site of action and their source. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 173034, br. 175061 i br. 31085

  12. SINTESIS GRAPHENE OXIDE DAN REDUCED GRAPHENE OXIDE

    OpenAIRE

    Rafitasari, Yeti; Suhendar, Haris; Imani, Nurul; Luciana, Fitri; Radean, Hesti; Santoso, Iman

    2016-01-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been synthesized chemically from graphite powder. Graphite powder was oxidized with strong oxidator agent molekul  to get graphite oxide, this process was called by Hummer’s methode. Graphite oxide was dispersed in water with ultasonic vibrator to exfoliated graphite oxide layers, and become graphene oxide. Epoxy group in GO structure was reduced by hydrazine 80 wt% to get rGO. Comparation was done between self synthetic rGO and S...

  13. Artificial chemical and magnetic structure at the domain walls of an epitaxial oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farokhipoor, S.; Magén, C.; Venkatesan, S.; Íñiguez, J.; Daumont, C. J. M.; Rubi, D.; Snoeck, E.; Mostovoy, M.; de Graaf, C.; Müller, A.; Döblinger, M.; Scheu, C.; Noheda, B.

    2014-11-01

    Progress in nanotechnology requires new approaches to materials synthesis that make it possible to control material functionality down to the smallest scales. An objective of materials research is to achieve enhanced control over the physical properties of materials such as ferromagnets, ferroelectrics and superconductors. In this context, complex oxides and inorganic perovskites are attractive because slight adjustments of their atomic structures can produce large physical responses and result in multiple functionalities. In addition, these materials often contain ferroelastic domains. The intrinsic symmetry breaking that takes place at the domain walls can induce properties absent from the domains themselves, such as magnetic or ferroelectric order and other functionalities, as well as coupling between them. Moreover, large domain wall densities create intense strain gradients, which can also affect the material's properties. Here we show that, owing to large local stresses, domain walls can promote the formation of unusual phases. In this sense, the domain walls can function as nanoscale chemical reactors. We synthesize a two-dimensional ferromagnetic phase at the domain walls of the orthorhombic perovskite terbium manganite (TbMnO3), which was grown in thin layers under epitaxial strain on strontium titanate (SrTiO3) substrates. This phase is yet to be created by standard chemical routes. The density of the two-dimensional sheets can be tuned by changing the film thickness or the substrate lattice parameter (that is, the epitaxial strain), and the distance between sheets can be made as small as 5 nanometres in ultrathin films, such that the new phase at domain walls represents up to 25 per cent of the film volume. The general concept of using domain walls of epitaxial oxides to promote the formation of unusual phases may be applicable to other materials systems, thus giving access to new classes of nanoscale materials for applications in nanoelectronics and

  14. International strategic minerals inventory summary report; rare-earth oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, W.D.; Christiansen, Grey

    1993-01-01

    density and heat resistance of sintered ceramics. Yttrium and gadolinium contribute to the efficiency of electronic switches and sensors. Cerium improves the effectiveness of catalysts in the petroleum and automotive industries. Cerium oxides speed glass melting and are used to polish glass by chemical, rather than mechanical, means. Cerium, europium, terbium, and yttrium, as phosphoric compounds, promote the vivid colors of television screens. Consumption of rare earths is expected to grow by about 2.6 percent per year.

  15. PREFACE: Semiconducting oxides Semiconducting oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catlow, Richard; Walsh, Aron

    2011-08-01

    Semiconducting oxides are amongst the most widely studied and topical materials in contemporary condensed matter science, with interest being driven both by the fundamental challenges posed by their electronic and magnetic structures and properties, and by the wide range of applications, including those in catalysis and electronic devices. This special section aims to highlight recent developments in the physics of these materials, and to show the link between developing fundamental understanding and key application areas of oxide semiconductors. Several aspects of the physics of this wide and expanding range of materials are explored in this special section. Transparent semiconducting oxides have a growing role in several technologies, but challenges remain in understanding their electronic structure and the physics of charge carriers. A related problem concerns the nature of redox processes and the reactions which interconvert defects and charge carriers—a key issue which may limit the extent to which doping strategies may be used to alter electronic properties. The magnetic structures of the materials pose several challenges, while surface structures and properties are vital in controlling catalytic properties, including photochemical processes. The field profits from and exploits a wide range of contemporary physical techniques—both experimental and theoretical. Indeed, the interplay between experiment and computation is a key aspect of contemporary work. A number of articles describe applications of computational methods whose use, especially in modelling properties of defects in these materials, has a long and successful history. Several papers in this special section relate to work presented at a symposium within the European Materials Research Society (EMRS) meeting held in Warsaw in September 2010, and we are grateful to the EMRS for supporting this symposium. We would also like to thank the editorial staff of Journal of Physics: Condensed Matter for

  16. Nitrogen oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamamoto, T.; Horiike, E.; Murakami, M.; Hosoya, T.; Miyanishi, T.; Amamiya, S.

    1975-08-01

    This invention relates to the removal of nitrogen oxides with an aqueous alkaline solution. Waste gas was introduced to an absorbing tower at a flow rate of 0.7--1.0 m/s while sodium hydroxide solution was pumped to the top of the tower at 10--15 l/m/sup 3/ gas. The liquid was sprayed into the waste gas and the resulting gas was led to a second absorbing tower and then a decomposition tower where the remaining NO/sub x/ was removed by sodium sulfide solution or Na/sub 2/S and NaOH mixed solution. With two absorbing towers and one decomposition tower, NO/sub x/ concentration was reduced from 2500 ppM to as low as 36 ppM, or 99 percent removal. With three absorbing towers, the rate of removal was below 80 percent.

  17. Spectroscopic analysis of lithium terbium tetrafluoride

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, H.P.

    1978-01-01

    . The rare-earth site in LiTbF4 possesses S4 symmetry, which allows six crystal-field parameters. ζ and the six Bim were varied to obtain the best agreement with the experimentally observed levels. Keeping F2=434 cm-1 fixed, a fit with a standard deviation of 12 cm-1 was obtained at 10 K with the following...... were calculated by diagonalizing an effective spin-orbit and crystal-field Hamiltonian in an LS basis. H=Σλi(L→·S→)i+ΣαiΣBimOim, where the parameters λi are functions of the spin-orbit parameter ζ and the Slater parameter F2. The Oim and αi are Racah operators and reduced matrix elements, respectively...

  18. Inelastic critical scattering of neutrons from terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Als-Nielsen, Jens Aage; Dietrich, O.W.; Marshall, W.

    1967-01-01

    We have measured the inelasticity of the critical neutron scattering in Tb above the Néel temperature. The results show that dynamical slowing down of fluctuations does occur at a second order phase transition.......We have measured the inelasticity of the critical neutron scattering in Tb above the Néel temperature. The results show that dynamical slowing down of fluctuations does occur at a second order phase transition....

  19. Electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek W. Morzycki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Indirect cholesterol electrochemical oxidation in the presence of various mediators leads to electrophilic addition to the double bond, oxidation at the allylic position, oxidation of the hydroxy group, or functionalization of the side chain. Recent studies have proven that direct electrochemical oxidation of cholesterol is also possible and affords different products depending on the reaction conditions.

  20. Thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Abdala, Ahmed (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A modified graphite oxide material contains a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 sq m/g to 2600 sq m/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide displays no signature of the original graphite and/or graphite oxide, as determined by X-ray diffraction.

  1. Catalytic ammonia oxidation to nitrogen (i) oxide

    OpenAIRE

    MASALITINA NATALIYA YUREVNA; SAVENKOV ANATOLIY SERGEEVICH

    2015-01-01

    The process of synthesis of nitrous oxide by low-temperature catalytical oxidation of NH has been investigated for organic synthesis. The investigation has been carried out by the stage separation approach with NH oxidation occurring in several reaction zones, which characterized by different catalytic conditions. The selectivity for N2O was 92-92,5% at the ammonia conversion of 98-99.5% in the optimal temperature range

  2. The Enzymatic Oxidation of Graphene Oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchey, Gregg P.; Allen, Brett L.; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E.; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-01

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon – the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (~40 µM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, UV-Vis, EPR and FT-IR spectroscopy, TEM, AFM, SDS-PAGE, and GC-MS. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Due to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors. PMID:21344859

  3. The enzymatic oxidation of graphene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotchey, Gregg P; Allen, Brett L; Vedala, Harindra; Yanamala, Naveena; Kapralov, Alexander A; Tyurina, Yulia Y; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith; Kagan, Valerian E; Star, Alexander

    2011-03-22

    Two-dimensional graphitic carbon is a new material with many emerging applications, and studying its chemical properties is an important goal. Here, we reported a new phenomenon--the enzymatic oxidation of a single layer of graphitic carbon by horseradish peroxidase (HRP). In the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (∼40 μM), HRP catalyzed the oxidation of graphene oxide, which resulted in the formation of holes on its basal plane. During the same period of analysis, HRP failed to oxidize chemically reduced graphene oxide (RGO). The enzymatic oxidation was characterized by Raman, ultraviolet-visible, electron paramagnetic resonance, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Computational docking studies indicated that HRP was preferentially bound to the basal plane rather than the edge for both graphene oxide and RGO. Owing to the more dynamic nature of HRP on graphene oxide, the heme active site of HRP was in closer proximity to graphene oxide compared to RGO, thereby facilitating the oxidation of the basal plane of graphene oxide. We also studied the electronic properties of the reduced intermediate product, holey reduced graphene oxide (hRGO), using field-effect transistor (FET) measurements. While RGO exhibited a V-shaped transfer characteristic similar to a single layer of graphene that was attributed to its zero band gap, hRGO demonstrated a p-type semiconducting behavior with a positive shift in the Dirac points. This p-type behavior rendered hRGO, which can be conceptualized as interconnected graphene nanoribbons, as a potentially attractive material for FET sensors.

  4. Expansion Coefficient on Oxides and Oxide Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-05-01

    Classification) EXPANSION COEFFICIENTS ON OXIDES AND OXIDE CERAMICS 12 PFRSONAL AUTHOR(S) Josephine Covino 13a TYPE OF REPORT 13b TIME COVERED 114 DATE OF REPORT...drastically alter expansion properties of oxides. It has been found that fine-grained (᝺ tm) anisotropic ceramic materials, such as hafnium oxide, hafnium ...Gokhale. "Thermal Expansion of Zircon ," Jap. J. AppZ. Phys., 7 (1968), p. 1126. 34 -- ’-a.’! nw-W’W L. .WW U. .PV _ 77 NWC TP 6663 81. J. L. Amoros, M

  5. Nitric oxide supersensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J; Iversen, Helle Klingenberg; Thomsen, L L

    1993-01-01

    Nitroglycerin, which may be regarded as a prodrug for nitric oxide, induces a mild to moderate headache in healthy subjects. In order to study whether migraine patients are more sensitive to nitric oxide than non-migrainous subjects, four different doses of intravenous nitroglycerin were given...... previously shown a similar supersensitivity to histamine which in human cerebral arteries activates endothelial H1 receptors and causes endothelial production of nitric oxide. Migraine patients are thus supersensitive to exogenous nitric oxide from nitroglycerin as well as to endothelially produced nitric...... oxide. It is suggested that nitric oxide may be partially or completely responsible for migraine pain....

  6. Oxidative Stress in Neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Shukla

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that oxidative stress has a ubiquitous role in neurodegenerative diseases. Major source of oxidative stress due to reactive oxygen species (ROS is related to mitochondria as an endogenous source. Although there is ample evidence from tissues of patients with neurodegenerative disorders of morphological, biochemical, and molecular abnormalities in mitochondria, it is still not very clear whether the oxidative stress itself contributes to the onset of neurodegeneration or it is part of the neurodegenerative process as secondary manifestation. This paper begins with an overview of how oxidative stress occurs, discussing various oxidants and antioxidants, and role of oxidative stress in diseases in general. It highlights the role of oxidative stress in neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The last part of the paper describes the role of oxidative stress causing deregulation of cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5 hyperactivity associated with neurodegeneration.

  7. Bridged graphite oxide materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor); McAllister, Michael J. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Bridged graphite oxide material comprising graphite sheets bridged by at least one diamine bridging group. The bridged graphite oxide material may be incorporated in polymer composites or used in adsorption media.

  8. Zinc oxide overdose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinc oxide is an ingredient in many products. Some of these are certain creams and ointments used to prevent or treat minor skin burns and irritation. Zinc oxide overdose occurs when someone eats one of these ...

  9. Nitrous Oxide Flux

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Nitrous Oxide (N20) flux is the net rate of nitrous oxide exchange between an ecosystem and the atmosphere. Data of this variable were generated by the USGS...

  10. Oxidation of Alkylaromatics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. S. S. Rao

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hydroperoxide at α-position to the aromatic ring is the primary oxidation product formed. In all cases monoalkylbenzenes lead to the formation of benzoic acid. Oxidation in the presence of transition metal salts not only accelerate but also selectively decompose the hydroperoxides. Alkyl naphthalenes mainly produce the corresponding naphthalene carboxylic acids. Hock-rearrangement by the influence of strong acids converts the hydroperoxides to hemiacetals. Peresters formed from the hydroperoxides undergo Criegee rearrangement easily. Alkali metals accelerate the oxidation while CO2 as co-oxidant enhances the selectivity. Microwave conditions give improved yields of the oxidation products.

  11. Silicon oxidation by ozone

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fink, Christian K; Jenkins, Stephen J [Department of Chemistry, University of Cambridge, Cambridge CB2 1EW (United Kingdom); Nakamura, Ken; Ichimura, Shingo [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), Tsukuba Central 2, 1-1-1 Umezono, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)], E-mail: sjj24@cam.ac.uk

    2009-05-06

    Understanding the oxidation of silicon has been an ongoing challenge for many decades. Ozone has recently received considerable attention as an alternative oxidant in the low temperature, damage-free oxidation of silicon. The ozone-grown oxide was also found to exhibit improved interface and electrical characteristics over a conventionally dioxygen-grown oxide. In this review article, we summarize the key findings about this alternative oxidation process. We discuss the different methods of O{sub 3} generation, and the advantages of the ozone-grown Si/SiO{sub 2} interface. An understanding of the growth characteristics is of utmost importance for obtaining control over this alternative oxidation process. (topical review)

  12. Oxidation of Non-Oxide Ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-25

    stacking faults Fig. 4. Unoxidized polished surface in cristobalite spherulite formed of sintered beta SiC (SEM) on sintered alpha SiC in 0 at 13000 C (TEn...electron and transmission electron microscopy were used to examine the oxide film. Experiments showed that cristobalite nucleates at the SiC/SiO 2 interface...and also that appreciable heterogeneous nucleation occurs during the first hour of oxidation. The growth rate of cristobalite was determined to be

  13. ZIRCONIUM OXIDE NANOSTRUCTURES PREPARED BY ANODIC OXIDATION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dang, Y. Y.; Bhuiyan, M.S.; Paranthaman, M. P.

    2008-01-01

    Zirconium oxide is an advanced ceramic material highly useful for structural and electrical applications because of its high strength, fracture toughness, chemical and thermal stability, and biocompatibility. If highly-ordered porous zirconium oxide membranes can be successfully formed, this will expand its real-world applications, such as further enhancing solid-oxide fuel cell technology. Recent studies have achieved various morphologies of porous zirconium oxide via anodization, but they have yet to create a porous layer where nanoholes are formed in a highly ordered array. In this study, electrochemical methods were used for zirconium oxide synthesis due to its advantages over other coating techniques, and because the thickness and morphology of the ceramic fi lms can be easily tuned by the electrochemical parameters, such as electrolyte solutions and processing conditions, such as pH, voltage, and duration. The effects of additional steps such as pre-annealing and post-annealing were also examined. Results demonstrate the formation of anodic porous zirconium oxide with diverse morphologies, such as sponge-like layers, porous arrays with nanoholes ranging from 40 to 75 nm, and nanotube layers. X-ray powder diffraction analysis indicates a cubic crystallographic structure in the zirconium oxide. It was noted that increased voltage improved the ability of the membrane to stay adhered to the zirconium substrate, whereas lower voltages caused a propensity for the oxide fi lm to fl ake off. Further studies are needed to defi ne the parameters windows that create these morphologies and to investigate other important characteristics such as ionic conductivity.

  14. Diclofenac oxidation by biogenic manganese oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrez, Ilse; Carballa, Marta; Verbeken, Kim; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Ternes, Thomas; Boon, Nico; Verstraete, Willy

    2010-05-01

    Diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is one of the most commonly detected pharmaceuticals in sewage treatment plant (STP) effluents. In this work, biologically produced manganese oxides (BioMnOx) were investigated to remove diclofenac. At neutral pH, the diclofenac oxidation with BioMnOx was 10-fold faster than with chemically produced MnO(2). The main advantage of BioMnOx over chemical MnO(2) is the ability of the bacteria to reoxidize the formed Mn(2+), which inhibits the oxidation of diclofenac. Diclofenac-2,5-iminoquinone was identified as a major transformation product, accounting for 5-10% of the transformed diclofenac. Except for 5-hydroxydiclofenac, which was identified as an intermediate, no other oxidation products were detected. Diclofenac oxidation was proportional to the amount of BioMnOx dosed, and the pseudo first order rate constant k was 6-fold higher when pH was decreased from 6.8 to 6.2. The Mn(2+) levels remained below the drinking water limit (0.05 mg L(-1)), thus indicating the efficient in situ microbiological regeneration of the oxidant. These results combined with previous studies suggest the potential of BioMnOx for STP effluent polishing.

  15. Oxidation Resistant Graphite Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    W. Windes; R. Smith

    2014-07-01

    The Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades exhibiting oxidation resistance. During a oxygen ingress accident the oxidation rates of the high temperature graphite core region would be extremely high resulting in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material would reduce the structural effects and keep the core integrity intact during any air-ingress accident. Oxidation testing of graphite doped with oxidation resistant material is being conducted to determine the extent of oxidation rate reduction. Nuclear grade graphite doped with varying levels of Boron-Carbide (B4C) was oxidized in air at nominal 740°C at 10/90% (air/He) and 100% air. The oxidation rates of the boronated and unboronated graphite grade were compared. With increasing boron-carbide content (up to 6 vol%) the oxidation rate was observed to have a 20 fold reduction from unboronated graphite. Visual inspection and uniformity of oxidation across the surface of the specimens were conducted. Future work to determine the remaining mechanical strength as well as graphite grades with SiC doped material are discussed.

  16. Biomimetic Water-Oxidation Catalysts: Manganese Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurz, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    The catalytic oxidation of water to molecular oxygen is a key process for the production of solar fuels. Inspired by the biological manganese-based active site for this reaction in the enzyme Photosystem II, researchers have made impressive progress in the last decades regarding the development of synthetic manganese catalysts for water oxidation. For this, it has been especially fruitful to explore the many different types of known manganese oxides MnOx. This chapter first offers an overview of the structural, thermodynamic, and mechanistic aspects of water-oxidation catalysis by MnOx. The different test systems used for catalytic studies are then presented together with general reactivity trends. As a result, it has been possible to identify layered, mixed Mn (III/IV)-oxides as an especially promising class of bio-inspired catalysts and an attempt is made to give structure-based reasons for the good performances of these materials. In the outlook, the challenges of catalyst screenings (and hence the identification of a "best MnOx catalyst") are discussed. There is a great variety of reaction conditions which might be relevant for the application of manganese oxide catalysts in technological solar fuel-producing devices, and thus catalyst improvements are currently still addressing a very large parameter space. Nonetheless, detailed knowledge about the biological catalyst and a solid experimental basis concerning the syntheses and water-oxidation reactivities of MnOx materials have been established in the last decade and thus this research field is well positioned to make important contributions to solar fuel research in the future.

  17. Oxidizer Scoping Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chancellor, Christopher John [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2016-11-07

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of the acceptable knowledge (AK) review of oxidizers present in active waste streams, provide a technical analysis of the oxidizers, and report the results of the scoping study testing. This report will determine the fastest burning oxidizer to be used in the development of a Test Plan for Preparation and Testing of Sorbents Mixed with Oxidizer found in Transuranic Waste (DWT-TP-001). The companion report, DWT-RPT-002, Sorbent Scoping Studies, contains similar information for sorbents identified during the AK review of TRU waste streams. The results of the oxidizer and sorbent scoping studies will be used to inform the QL1 test plan. The QL1 test results will support the development of a basis of knowledge document that will evaluate oxidizing chemicals and sorbents in TRU waste and provide guidance for treatment.

  18. Barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide free glass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Peizhen Kathy; Mahapatra, Manoj Kumar

    2013-09-24

    A glass composition consisting essentially of about 10-45 mole percent of SrO; about 35-75 mole percent SiO.sub.2; one or more compounds from the group of compounds consisting of La.sub.2O.sub.3, Al.sub.2O.sub.3, B.sub.2O.sub.3, and Ni; the La.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 20 mole percent; the Al.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 25 mole percent; the B.sub.2O.sub.3 less than about 15 mole percent; and the Ni less than about 5 mole percent. Preferably, the glass is substantially free of barium oxide, calcium oxide, magnesia, and alkali oxide. Preferably, the glass is used as a seal in a solid oxide fuel/electrolyzer cell (SOFC) stack. The SOFC stack comprises a plurality of SOFCs connected by one or more interconnect and manifold materials and sealed by the glass. Preferably, each SOFC comprises an anode, a cathode, and a solid electrolyte.

  19. Modeling of graphite oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Boukhvalov, D. W.; Katsnelson, M. I.

    2008-01-01

    Based on density functional calculations, optimized structures of graphite oxide are found for various coverage by oxygen and hydroxyl groups, as well as their ratio corresponding to the minimum of total energy. The model proposed describes well known experimental results. In particular, it explains why it is so difficult to reduce the graphite oxide up to pure graphene. Evolution of the electronic structure of graphite oxide with the coverage change is investigated.

  20. METAL OXIDE NANOPARTICLES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    FERNANDEZ-GARCIA,M.; RODGRIGUEZ, J.A.

    2007-10-01

    This chapter covers the fundamental science, synthesis, characterization, physicochemical properties and applications of oxide nanomaterials. Explains fundamental aspects that determine the growth and behavior of these systems, briefly examines synthetic procedures using bottom-up and top-down fabrication technologies, discusses the sophisticated experimental techniques and state of the art theory results used to characterize the physico-chemical properties of oxide solids and describe the current knowledge concerning key oxide materials with important technological applications.

  1. Molecular water oxidation catalysis

    CERN Document Server

    Llobet, Antoni

    2014-01-01

    Photocatalytic water splitting is a promising strategy for capturing energy from the sun by coupling light harvesting and the oxidation of water, in order to create clean hydrogen fuel. Thus a deep knowledge of the water oxidation catalysis field is essential to be able to come up with useful energy conversion devices based on sunlight and water splitting. Molecular Water Oxidation Catalysis: A Key Topic for New Sustainable Energy Conversion Schemes presents a comprehensive and state-of-the-art overview of water oxidation catalysis in homogeneous phase, describing in detail the most importan

  2. Oxidants and oxidation in the Earth's atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-01-01

    The 1994 BOC Priestley Conference was held at Bucknell University in Lewisburg, Pennsylvania, from June 24 through June 27, 1994. This conference, managed by the American Chemical Society (ACS), was a joint celebration with the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) commemorating Joseph Priestley's arrival in the U.S. and his discovery of oxygen. The basic theme of the conference was 'Oxidants and Oxidation in the Earth's Atmosphere,' with a keynote lecture on the history of ozone. A distinguished group of U.S. and international atmospheric chemists addressed the issues dominating current research and policy agendas. Topics crucial to the atmospheric chemistry of global change and local and regional air pollution were discussed. The program for the conference included four technical sessions on the following topics: (1) Oxidative Fate of Atmospheric Pollutants; (2) Photochemical Smog and Ozone; (3) Stratospheric Ozone; and (4) Global Tropospheric Ozone.

  3. Catalytic process for formaldehyde oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kielin, Erik J. (Inventor); Brown, Kenneth G. (Inventor); D'Ambrosia, Christine M. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    Disclosed is a process for oxidizing formaldehyde to carbon dioxide and water without the addition of energy. A mixture of formaldehyde and an oxidizing agent (e.g., ambient air containing formaldehyde) is exposed to a catalyst which includes a noble metal dispersed on a metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state. Especially good results are obtained when the noble metal is platinum, and the metal oxide which possesses more than one oxidation state is tin oxide. A promoter (i.e., a small amount of an oxide of a transition series metal) may be used in association with the tin oxide to provide very beneficial results.

  4. Reducible oxide based catalysts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Levi T.; Kim, Chang Hwan; Bej, Shyamal K.

    2010-04-06

    A catalyst is disclosed herein. The catalyst includes a reducible oxide support and at least one noble metal fixed on the reducible oxide support. The noble metal(s) is loaded on the support at a substantially constant temperature and pH.

  5. Markers of protein oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Headlam, Henrietta A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2004-01-01

    Exposure of proteins to radicals in the presence of O2 gives both side-chain oxidation and backbone fragmentation. These processes can be interrelated, with initial side-chain oxidation giving rise to backbone damage via transfer reactions. We have shown previously that alkoxyl radicals formed on...

  6. Catalyst for Ammonia Oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2015-01-01

    The present invention relates to a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation, a method for producing a bimetallic catalyst for ammonia oxidation and a method for tuning the catalytic activity of a transition metal. By depositing an overlayer of less catalytic active metal onto a more catalytic...

  7. studies in oxidation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    species of valence four or five or possibly, even two. Watanabe and. Westheimer' employed Successfully the induced oxidation of the manganots ion as a diagnostic tool in determining which chromium species is formed in the first step of the oxidation of isopropyl alcohol in aqueous perchloric acid media. The present paper ...

  8. Death from Nitrous Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäckström, Björn; Johansson, Bengt; Eriksson, Anders

    2015-11-01

    Nitrous oxide is an inflammable gas that gives no smell or taste. It has a history of abuse as long as its clinical use, and deaths, although rare, have been reported. We describe two cases of accidental deaths related to voluntary inhalation of nitrous oxide, both found dead with a gas mask covering the face. In an attempt to find an explanation to why the victims did not react properly to oncoming hypoxia, we performed experiments where a test person was allowed to breath in a closed system, with or without nitrous oxide added. Vital signs and gas concentrations as well as subjective symptoms were recorded. The experiments indicated that the explanation to the fact that neither of the descendents had reacted to oncoming hypoxia and hypercapnia was due to the inhalation of nitrous oxide. This study raises the question whether nitrous oxide really should be easily, commercially available. © 2015 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  9. RNA modifications by oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E; Specht, Elisabeth; Broedbaek, Kasper

    2012-01-01

    The past decade has provided exciting insights into a novel class of central (small) RNA molecules intimately involved in gene regulation. Only a small percentage of our DNA is translated into proteins by mRNA, yet 80% or more of the DNA is transcribed into RNA, and this RNA has been found...... to encompass various classes of novel regulatory RNAs, including, e.g., microRNAs. It is well known that DNA is constantly oxidized and repaired by complex genome maintenance mechanisms. Analogously, RNA also undergoes significant oxidation, and there are now convincing data suggesting that oxidation......, and the consequent loss of integrity of RNA, is a mechanism for disease development. Oxidized RNA is found in a large variety of diseases, and interest has been especially devoted to degenerative brain diseases such as Alzheimer disease, in which up to 50-70% of specific mRNA molecules are reported oxidized, whereas...

  10. Protein oxidation in aquatic foods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline P.

    2014-01-01

    The chapter discusses general considerations about protein oxidation and reviews the mechanisms involved in protein oxidation and consequences of protein oxidation on fish proteins. It presents two case studies, the first deals with protein and lipid oxidation in frozen rainbow trout......, and the second with oxidation in salted herring. The mechanisms responsible for initiation of protein oxidation are unclear, but it is generally accepted that free radical species initiating lipid oxidation can also initiate protein oxidation. The chapter focuses on interaction between protein and lipid...... oxidation. The protein carbonyl group measurement is the widely used method for estimating protein oxidation in foods and has been used in fish muscle. The chapter also talks about the impact of protein oxidation on protein functionality, fish muscle texture, and food nutritional value. Protein oxidation...

  11. Highly oxidized graphene oxide and methods for production thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tour, James M.; Kosynkin, Dmitry V.

    2016-08-30

    A highly oxidized form of graphene oxide and methods for production thereof are described in various embodiments of the present disclosure. In general, the methods include mixing a graphite source with a solution containing at least one oxidant and at least one protecting agent and then oxidizing the graphite source with the at least one oxidant in the presence of the at least one protecting agent to form the graphene oxide. Graphene oxide synthesized by the presently described methods is of a high structural quality that is more oxidized and maintains a higher proportion of aromatic rings and aromatic domains than does graphene oxide prepared in the absence of at least one protecting agent. Methods for reduction of graphene oxide into chemically converted graphene are also disclosed herein. The chemically converted graphene of the present disclosure is significantly more electrically conductive than is chemically converted graphene prepared from other sources of graphene oxide.

  12. CHEMILUMINESCENCE ON OXIDE SURFACE

    OpenAIRE

    L. I. IVANKIV; O. V. DZYUPYN; Balitskii, O. A.

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the oxygen adsorption properties on magnesium oxide surface. The results are compared with theoretical adsorption kinetics. Temperature and time dependences of adsorption mechanisms and chemiluminescence are discussed.

  13. High Current Oxide Cathodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luhmann, N

    2000-01-01

    The aim of the AASERT supported research is to develop the plasma deposition/implantation process for coating barium, strontium and calcium oxides on nickel substrates and to perform detailed surface...

  14. Cathodoluminescence of uranium oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winer, K.; Colmenares, C.; Wooten, F.

    1984-08-09

    The cathodoluminescence of uranium oxide surfaces prepared in-situ from clean uranium exposed to dry oxygen was studied. The broad asymmetric peak observed at 470 nm is attributed to F-center excitation.

  15. Wet oxidation of quinoline

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, A.B.; Kilen, H.H.

    1998-01-01

    The influence of oxygen pressure (0.4 and 2 MPa). reaction time (30 and 60 min) and temperature (260 and 280 degrees C) on the wet oxidation of quinoline has been studied. The dominant parameters for the decomposition of quinoline were oxygen pressure and reaction temperature. whereas the reaction...... if low oxygen pressure or long reaction times were used. The reaction products derived from the experiment in which quinoline was mostly decomposed were studied with respect to biological degradation. The results showed that these products were highly digestible under activated sludge treatment....... The combined wet oxidation and biological treatment of reaction products resulted in 91% oxidation of the parent compound to CO2 and water. Following combined wet oxidation and biological treatment the sample showed low toxicity towards Nitrosomonas and no toxicity towards Nitrobacter. (C) 1998 Elsevier...

  16. CATALYTIC ENANTIOSELECTIVE ALLYLIC OXIDATION

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rispens, Minze T.; Zondervan, Charon; Feringa, Bernard

    Several chiral Cu(II)-complexes of cyclic amino acids catalyse the enantioselective allylic oxidation of cyclohexene to cyclohexenyl esters. Cyclohexenyl propionate was obtained in 86% yield with e.e.'s up to 61%.

  17. High Current Oxide Cathodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luhmann, N

    2000-01-01

    .... The vacuum are plasma deposition gun developed at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) has been used to deposit oxides and nitrides with very precise control over deposition rate and composition.

  18. Does oxidative stress shorten telomeres?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonekamp, Jelle J.; Bauch, Christina; Mulder, Ellis; Verhulst, Simon

    Oxidative stress shortens telomeres in cell culture, but whether oxidative stress explains variation in telomere shortening in vivo at physiological oxidative stress levels is not well known. We therefore tested for correlations between six oxidative stress markers and telomere attrition in nestling

  19. Enargite oxidation: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lattanzi, Pierfranco; Da Pelo, Stefania; Musu, Elodia; Atzei, Davide; Elsener, Bernhard; Fantauzzi, Marzia; Rossi, Antonella

    2008-01-01

    Enargite, Cu 3AsS 4, is common in some deposit types, e.g. porphyry systems and high sulphidation epithermal deposits. It is of environmental concern as a potential source of arsenic. In this communication, we review the current knowledge of enargite oxidation, based on the existing literature and our own original data. Explicit descriptions of enargite oxidation in natural environments are scarce. The most common oxidized alteration mineral of enargite is probably scorodite, FeAsO 4.2H 2O, with iron provided most likely by pyrite, a phase almost ubiquitously associated with enargite. Other secondary minerals after enargite include arsenates such as chenevixite, Cu 2Fe 2(AsO 4) 2(OH) 4.H 2O, and ceruleite, Cu 2Al 7(AsO 4) 4.11.5H 2O, and sulphates such as brochantite, Cu 4(SO 4)(OH) 6, and posnjakite, Cu 4(SO 4)(OH) 6·H 2O. Detailed studies of enargite field alteration at Furtei, Sardinia, suggest that most alteration occurs through dissolution, as testified by the appearance of etch pits at the surface of enargite crystals. However, apparent replacement by scorodite and cuprian melanterite was observed. Bulk oxidation of enargite in air is a very slow process. However, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) reveals subtle surface changes. From synchrotron-based XPS it was suggested that surface As atoms react very fast, presumably by forming bonds with oxygen. Conventional XPS shows the formation, on aged samples, of a nanometer-size alteration layer with an appreciably distinct composition with respect to the bulk. Mechanical activation considerably increases enargite reactivity. In laboratory experiments at acidic to neutral pH, enargite oxidation/dissolution is slow, although it is accelerated by the presence of ferric iron and/or bacteria such as Acidithiobacillus ferrooxidans and Sulfolobus BC. In the presence of sulphuric acid and ferric iron, the reaction involves dissolution of Cu and formation of native sulphur, subsequently partly oxidized to sulphate

  20. Antibacterial activity of graphite, graphite oxide, graphene oxide, and reduced graphene oxide: membrane and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shaobin; Zeng, Tingying Helen; Hofmann, Mario; Burcombe, Ehdi; Wei, Jun; Jiang, Rongrong; Kong, Jing; Chen, Yuan

    2011-09-27

    Health and environmental impacts of graphene-based materials need to be thoroughly evaluated before their potential applications. Graphene has strong cytotoxicity toward bacteria. To better understand its antimicrobial mechanism, we compared the antibacterial activity of four types of graphene-based materials (graphite (Gt), graphite oxide (GtO), graphene oxide (GO), and reduced graphene oxide (rGO)) toward a bacterial model-Escherichia coli. Under similar concentration and incubation conditions, GO dispersion shows the highest antibacterial activity, sequentially followed by rGO, Gt, and GtO. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and dynamic light scattering analyses show that GO aggregates have the smallest average size among the four types of materials. SEM images display that the direct contacts with graphene nanosheets disrupt cell membrane. No superoxide anion (O(2)(•-)) induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) production is detected. However, the four types of materials can oxidize glutathione, which serves as redox state mediator in bacteria. Conductive rGO and Gt have higher oxidation capacities than insulating GO and GtO. Results suggest that antimicrobial actions are contributed by both membrane and oxidation stress. We propose that a three-step antimicrobial mechanism, previously used for carbon nanotubes, is applicable to graphene-based materials. It includes initial cell deposition on graphene-based materials, membrane stress caused by direct contact with sharp nanosheets, and the ensuing superoxide anion-independent oxidation. We envision that physicochemical properties of graphene-based materials, such as density of functional groups, size, and conductivity, can be precisely tailored to either reducing their health and environmental risks or increasing their application potentials. © 2011 American Chemical Society

  1. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Shabbir; Kumar, Romesh; Krumpelt, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A partial oxidation reformer comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell.

  2. Methanol partial oxidation reformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, S.; Kumar, R.; Krumpelt, M.

    1999-08-24

    A partial oxidation reformer is described comprising a longitudinally extending chamber having a methanol, water and an air inlet and an outlet. An igniter mechanism is near the inlets for igniting a mixture of methanol and air, while a partial oxidation catalyst in the chamber is spaced from the inlets and converts methanol and oxygen to carbon dioxide and hydrogen. Controlling the oxygen to methanol mole ratio provides continuous slightly exothermic partial oxidation reactions of methanol and air producing hydrogen gas. The liquid is preferably injected in droplets having diameters less than 100 micrometers. The reformer is useful in a propulsion system for a vehicle which supplies a hydrogen-containing gas to the negative electrode of a fuel cell. 7 figs.

  3. Nitroalkane Oxidation by Streptomycetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawale, Motiram R.; Hornemann, Ulfert

    1979-01-01

    Crude cell-free extracts of nine strains of Streptomyces tested for nitroalkane-oxidizing activity showed production of nitrous acid from 2-nitropropane, 1-nitropropane, nitroethane, nitromethane, and 3-nitropropionic acid. These substrates were utilized in most strains but to a decreasing extent in the order given, and different strains varied in their relative efficiency of oxidation. p-Nitrobenzoic acid, p-aminobenzoic acid, enteromycin, and ω-nitro-l-arginine were not attacked. d-Amino acid oxidase, glucose oxidase, glutathione S-transferase, and xanthine oxidase, enzymes potentially responsible for the observed oxidations in crude cellfree extracts, were present at concentrations too low to play any significant role. A nitroalkane-oxidizing enzyme from streptozotocin-producing Streptomyces achromogenes subsp. streptozoticus was partially purified and characterized. It catalyzes the oxidative denitrification of 2-nitropropane as follows: 2CH3CH(NO2)CH3 + O2 → 2CH3COCH3 + 2HNO2. At the optimum pH of 7.5 of the enzyme, 2-nitropropane was as good a substrate as its sodium salt; t-nitrobutane was not a substrate. Whereas Tiron, oxine, and nitroxyl radical acted as potent inhibitors of this enzyme, superoxide dismutase was essentially without effect. Sodium peroxide abolished a lag phase in the progress curve of the enzyme and afforded stimulation, whereas sodium superoxide did not affect the reaction. Reducing agents, such as glutathione, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide, and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate, reduced form, as well as thiol compounds, were strongly inhibitory, but cyanide had no effect. The S. achromogenes enzyme at the present stage of purification is similar in many respects to the enzyme 2-nitropropane dioxygenase from Hansenula mrakii. The possible involvement of the nitroalkane-oxidizing enzyme in the biosynthesis of antibiotics that contain a nitrogen-nitrogen bond is discussed. PMID:33965

  4. Protein oxidation and ageing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Linton, S; Davies, Michael Jonathan; Dean, R T

    2001-01-01

    of redox-active metal ions that could catalyse oxidant formation. As a result of this decrease in antioxidant defences, and increased rate of ROS formation, it is possible that the impact of ROS increases with age. ROS are known to oxidise biological macromolecules, with proteins an important target...

  5. Dopamine Oxidation and Autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Muñoz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The molecular mechanisms involved in the neurodegenerative process of Parkinson's disease remain unclear. Currently, there is a general agreement that mitochondrial dysfunction, α-synuclein aggregation, oxidative stress, neuroinflammation, and impaired protein degradation are involved in the neurodegeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin in Parkinson's disease. Aminochrome has been proposed to play an essential role in the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin by inducing mitochondrial dysfunction, oxidative stress, the formation of neurotoxic α-synuclein protofibrils, and impaired protein degradation. Here, we discuss the relationship between the oxidation of dopamine to aminochrome, the precursor of neuromelanin, autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons containing neuromelanin, and the role of dopamine oxidation to aminochrome in autophagy dysfunction in dopaminergic neurons. Aminochrome induces the following: (i the formation of α-synuclein protofibrils that inactivate chaperone-mediated autophagy; (ii the formation of adducts with α- and β-tubulin, which induce the aggregation of the microtubules required for the fusion of autophagy vacuoles and lysosomes.

  6. Doped zinc oxide microspheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D.; Bond, Walter D.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    A new composition and method of making same for a doped zinc oxide microsphere and articles made therefrom for use in an electrical surge arrestor which has increased solid content, uniform grain size and is in the form of a gel.

  7. Oxidative Stress in Myopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisco, Bosch-Morell; Salvador, Mérida; Amparo, Navea

    2015-01-01

    Myopia affected approximately 1.6 billion people worldwide in 2000, and it is expected to increase to 2.5 billion by 2020. Although optical problems can be corrected by optics or surgical procedures, normal myopia and high myopia are still an unsolved medical problem. They frequently predispose people who have them to suffer from other eye pathologies: retinal detachment, glaucoma, macular hemorrhage, cataracts, and so on being one of the main causes of visual deterioration and blindness. Genetic and environmental factors have been associated with myopia. Nevertheless, lack of knowledge in the underlying physiopathological molecular mechanisms has not permitted an adequate diagnosis, prevention, or treatment to be found. Nowadays several pieces of evidence indicate that oxidative stress may help explain the altered regulatory pathways in myopia and the appearance of associated eye diseases. On the one hand, oxidative damage associated with hypoxia myopic can alter the neuromodulation that nitric oxide and dopamine have in eye growth. On the other hand, radical superoxide or peroxynitrite production damage retina, vitreous, lens, and so on contributing to the appearance of retinopathies, retinal detachment, cataracts and so on. The objective of this review is to suggest that oxidative stress is one of the key pieces that can help solve this complex eye problem. PMID:25922643

  8. Solid Oxide Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The solid oxide fuel cell comprising a metallic support material, an active anode layer consisting of a good hydrocarbon cracking catalyst, an electrolyte layer, an active cathode layer, and a transition layer consisting of preferably a mixture of LSM and a ferrite to the cathode current collector...

  9. Partial Oxidation of n-Pentane over Vanadium Phosphorus Oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The selective oxidation of n-pentane to value-added products, maleic anhydride or phthallic anhydride by vanadium phosphorus oxide loaded on hydroxyapatites as catalysts and oxygen as oxidant was investigated. Hydroxyapatite (HAp) and cobalthydroxyapatite (Co-HAp) were prepared by the co-precipitation method ...

  10. Nanostructured transition metal oxides useful for water oxidation catalysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frei, Heinz M; Jiao, Feng

    2013-12-24

    The present invention provides for a composition comprising a nanostructured transition metal oxide capable of oxidizing two H.sub.2O molecules to obtain four protons. In some embodiments of the invention, the composition further comprises a porous matrix wherein the nanocluster of the transition metal oxide is embedded on and/or in the porous matrix.

  11. Trends for Methane Oxidation at Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kleis, Jesper; Jones, Glenn; Abild-Pedersen, Frank

    2009-01-01

    First-principles calculations are used to predict a plausible reaction pathway for the methane oxidation reaction. In turn, this pathway is used to obtain trends in methane oxidation activity at solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) anode materials. Reaction energetics and barriers for the elementary...

  12. Nitrous Oxide Micro Engines Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Nitrous Oxide Micro Engines (NOME) are a new type of nitrous oxide dissociation thruster designed to generate low levels of thrust that can be used for RCS control...

  13. Staged membrane oxidation reactor system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael; Carolan, Michael Francis; Stein, VanEric Edward; Chen, Christopher Ming-Poh

    2013-04-16

    Ion transport membrane oxidation system comprising (a) two or more membrane oxidation stages, each stage comprising a reactant zone, an oxidant zone, one or more ion transport membranes separating the reactant zone from the oxidant zone, a reactant gas inlet region, a reactant gas outlet region, an oxidant gas inlet region, and an oxidant gas outlet region; (b) an interstage reactant gas flow path disposed between each pair of membrane oxidation stages and adapted to place the reactant gas outlet region of a first stage of the pair in flow communication with the reactant gas inlet region of a second stage of the pair; and (c) one or more reactant interstage feed gas lines, each line being in flow communication with any interstage reactant gas flow path or with the reactant zone of any membrane oxidation stage receiving interstage reactant gas.

  14. Thin film metal-oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Ramanathan, Shriram

    2009-01-01

    Presents an account of the fundamental structure-property relations in oxide thin films. This title discusses the functional properties of thin film oxides in the context of applications in the electronics and renewable energy technologies.

  15. Oxidants and antioxidants in disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Svendsen, Ove

    2007-01-01

    Important infectious diseases in farm animals, such as pneumonia and enteritis, are thought to be associated with the so-called oxidative stress, i.e. a chemical phenomenon involving an imbalance in the redox status of the individual animal. The specifics of oxidative stress and how it may result...... theoretically, oxidative stress should be easily prevented with antioxidants yet the use of antioxidants as therapy remains controversial. The present knowledge on oxidative stress in farm animals is the topic of this review....

  16. Oxidative stress in Alzheimer disease

    OpenAIRE

    Gella, Alejandro; Durany, Nuria

    2009-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive dementia affecting a large proportion of the aging population. The histopathological changes in AD include neuronal cell death, formation of amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. There is also evidence that brain tissue in patients with AD is exposed to oxidative stress (e.g., protein oxidation, lipid oxidation, DNA oxidation and glycoxidation) during the course of the disease. Advanced glycation endproducts (AGEs) are present in amyloid plaques ...

  17. Low Temperature Oxidation of Methane: The Influence of Nitrogen Oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Anders Broe; Glarborg, Peter; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2000-01-01

    An experimental investigation of methane oxidation in the presence of NO and NO2 has been made in an isothermal plug-flow reactor at 750-1250K. The temperature for on-set of oxidation was lowered by 250 K in the presence of NO or NO2 at residence times of 200 ms. At shorter residence times (140 ms......) this enhancement effect is reduced for NO but maintained for NO2. Furthermore two temperature regimes of oxidation separated by an intermediate regime where only little oxidation takes place exist at residence times of 140 ms, if NO is the only nitrogen oxide initially present. The results were explained...

  18. Self-assembled manganese oxide structures through direct oxidation

    KAUST Repository

    Zhao, Chao

    2012-12-01

    The morphology and phase of self-assembled manganese oxides during different stages of thermal oxidation were studied. Very interesting morphological patterns of Mn oxide films were observed. At the initial oxidation stage, the surface was characterized by the formation of ring-shaped patterns. As the oxidation proceeded to the intermediate stage, concentric plates formed to relax the compressive stress. Our experimental results gave a clear picture of the evolution of the structures. We also examined the properties of the structures. © 2012 Elsevier B.V.

  19. Oxidative Decarboxylation of Levulinic Acid by Cupric Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Lin

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, cupric oxides was found to effectively oxidize levulinic acid (LA and lead to the decarboxylation of levulinic acid to 2-butanone. The effects of cupric oxide dosage, reaction time and initial pH value were investigated in batch experiments and a plausible mechanism was proposed. The results showed that LA decarboxylation over cupric oxides at around 300 °C under acidic conditions produced the highest yield of butanone (67.5%. In order to elucidate the catalytic activity of cupric oxides, XRD, AFM, XPS and H2-TPR techniques was applied to examine their molecular surfaces and their effects on the reaction process.

  20. TEMPO-Oxidized Cellulose with High Degree of Oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Zuwu Tang; Wenyan Li; Xinxing Lin; He Xiao; Qingxian Miao; Liulian Huang; Lihui Chen; Hui Wu

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, water-soluble 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO)-oxidized cellulose with a high degree of oxidation was prepared by a two-step process using bamboo dissolving pulp. The first step was to destroy the cellulose crystal I by NaOH/urea solution to obtain cellulose powder with decreased crystallinity. The second step was to oxidize the cellulose powder by TEMPO oxidation. The TEMPO-oxidized cellulose was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), conductim...

  1. (VI) oxide in acetic acid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The oxidation of cyclohexene by chromium (VI) oxide in aqueous and acetic media was studied. The reaction products were analysed using infra red (IR) and gas chromatography coupled with mass (GC/MS) spectroscopy. The major products of the oxidation reaction in acetic acid medium were cyclohexanol, ...

  2. Manganese oxidation by Leptothrix discophora

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boogerd, F C; de Vrind, J P

    Cells of Leptothrix discophora SS1 released Mn2+-oxidizing factors into the medium during growth in batch culture. Manganese was optimally oxidized when the medium was buffered with HEPES (N-2-hydroxyethylpiperazine-N'-2-ethanesulfonic acid) at pH 7.5. Manganese-oxidizing activity in the culture

  3. The aqueous chemistry of oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Bunker, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    The Aqueous Chemistry of Oxides is a comprehensive reference volume and special topics textbook that explores all of the major chemical reactions that take place between oxides and aqueous solutions. The book highlights the enormous impact that oxide-water reactions have in advanced technologies, materials science, geochemistry, and environmental science.

  4. Model catalytic oxidation studies using supported monometallic and heterobimetallic oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekerdt, J.G.

    1992-02-03

    This research program is directed toward a more fundamental understanding of the effects of catalyst composition and structure on the catalytic properties of metal oxides. Metal oxide catalysts play an important role in many reactions bearing on the chemical aspects of energy processes. Metal oxides are the catalysts for water-gas shift reactions, methanol and higher alcohol synthesis, isosynthesis, selective catalytic reduction of nitric oxides, and oxidation of hydrocarbons. A key limitation to developing insight into how oxides function in catalytic reactions is in not having precise information of the surface composition under reaction conditions. To address this problem we have prepared oxide systems that can be used to study cation-cation effects and the role of bridging (-O-) and/or terminal (=O) surface oxygen anion ligands in a systematic fashion. Since many oxide catalyst systems involve mixtures of oxides, we selected a model system that would permit us to examine the role of each cation separately and in pairwise combinations. Organometallic molybdenum and tungsten complexes were proposed for use, to prepare model systems consisting of isolated monomeric cations, isolated monometallic dimers and isolated bimetallic dimers supported on silica and alumina. The monometallic and bimetallic dimers were to be used as models of more complex mixed- oxide catalysts. Our current program was to develop the systems and use them in model oxidation reactions.

  5. Chaperones, but not oxidized proteins, are ubiquitinated after oxidative stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kästle, Marc; Reeg, Sandra; Rogowska-Wrzesinska, Adelina

    2012-01-01

    After oxidative stress proteins which are oxidatively modified are degraded by the 20S proteasome. However, several studies documented an enhanced ubiquitination of yet unknown proteins. Since ubiqutination is a prerequisite for degradation by the 26S proteasome in an ATP-dependent manner...... this raises the question whether these proteins are also oxidized and, if not, what proteins need to be ubiquitinated and degraded after oxidative conditions. By determination of oxidized- and ubiquitinated proteins we demonstrate here that most oxidized proteins are not preferentially ubiquitinated. However......, we were able to confirm an increase of ubiquitinated proteins 16h upon oxidative stress. Therefore, we isolated ubiquitinated proteins from hydrogen peroxide treated cells, as well as from control and lactacystin, an irreversible proteasome inhibitor, treated cells, and identified some...

  6. TEMPO-Oxidized Cellulose with High Degree of Oxidation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuwu Tang

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, water-soluble 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxyl (TEMPO-oxidized cellulose with a high degree of oxidation was prepared by a two-step process using bamboo dissolving pulp. The first step was to destroy the cellulose crystal I by NaOH/urea solution to obtain cellulose powder with decreased crystallinity. The second step was to oxidize the cellulose powder by TEMPO oxidation. The TEMPO-oxidized cellulose was analyzed by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR, conductimetry, X-ray diffraction (XRD, fiber analyzer, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM. FTIR showed that the hydroxymethyl groups in cellulose chains were converted into carboxyl groups. The degree of oxidation measured by conductimetry titration was as high as 91.0%. The TEMPO-oxidized cellulose was soluble in water for valuable polyelectrolytes and intermediates.

  7. Iron oxide surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Gareth S.

    2016-03-01

    The current status of knowledge regarding the surfaces of the iron oxides, magnetite (Fe3O4), maghemite (γ-Fe2O3), haematite (α-Fe2O3), and wüstite (Fe1-xO) is reviewed. The paper starts with a summary of applications where iron oxide surfaces play a major role, including corrosion, catalysis, spintronics, magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), biomedicine, photoelectrochemical water splitting and groundwater remediation. The bulk structure and properties are then briefly presented; each compound is based on a close-packed anion lattice, with a different distribution and oxidation state of the Fe cations in interstitial sites. The bulk defect chemistry is dominated by cation vacancies and interstitials (not oxygen vacancies) and this provides the context to understand iron oxide surfaces, which represent the front line in reduction and oxidation processes. Fe diffuses in and out from the bulk in response to the O2 chemical potential, forming sometimes complex intermediate phases at the surface. For example, α-Fe2O3 adopts Fe3O4-like surfaces in reducing conditions, and Fe3O4 adopts Fe1-xO-like structures in further reducing conditions still. It is argued that known bulk defect structures are an excellent starting point in building models for iron oxide surfaces. The atomic-scale structure of the low-index surfaces of iron oxides is the major focus of this review. Fe3O4 is the most studied iron oxide in surface science, primarily because its stability range corresponds nicely to the ultra-high vacuum environment. It is also an electrical conductor, which makes it straightforward to study with the most commonly used surface science methods such as photoemission spectroscopies (XPS, UPS) and scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The impact of the surfaces on the measurement of bulk properties such as magnetism, the Verwey transition and the (predicted) half-metallicity is discussed. The best understood iron oxide surface at present is probably Fe3O4(100); the structure is

  8. Manganese Oxidation by Bacteria: Biogeochemical Aspects

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sujith, P.P.; LokaBharathi, P.A

    Manganese is an essential trace metal that is not as readily oxidizable like iron. Several bacterial groups posses the ability to oxidize Mn effectively competing with chemical oxidation. The oxides of Mn are the strongest of the oxidants, next...

  9. Enzymatic Oxidation of Methane

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sirajuddin, S; Rosenzweig, AC

    2015-04-14

    Methane monooxygenases (MMOs) are enzymes that catalyze the oxidation of methane to methanol in methanotrophic bacteria. As potential targets for new gas-to-liquid methane bioconversion processes, MMOs have attracted intense attention in recent years. There are two distinct types of MMO, a soluble, cytoplasmic MMO (sMMO) and a membrane-bound, particulate MMO (pMMO). Both oxidize methane at metal centers within a complex, multisubunit scaffold, but the structures, active sites, and chemical mechanisms are completely different. This Current Topic review article focuses on the overall architectures, active site structures, substrate reactivities, proteinprotein interactions, and chemical mechanisms of both MMOs, with an emphasis on fundamental aspects. In addition, recent advances, including new details of interactions between the sMMO components, characterization of sMMO intermediates, and progress toward understanding the pMMO metal centers are highlighted. The work summarized here provides a guide for those interested in exploiting MMOs for biotechnological applications.

  10. Oxidative destruction of chlorocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, P.; Stern, E.W.; Amundsen, A.R.; Balko, E. (Engelhard Corporation, Iselin, NJ (USA))

    1993-02-01

    Presently, there is great concern about contamination of the environment by hazardous volatile organics originating in the manufacture of organic chemicals, cleaning and degreasing processes, and vent or exhaust air from air stripping of contaminated groundwater or soil. Catalytic oxidation is an energy efficient and economical way of destroying such hazardous materials and, depending on overall stream composition and concentration, can compete effectively with alternatives such as thermal incineration and carbon adsorption. This paper discusses the performance of a new catalyst, VOCat 350 HC[trademark], and give a comparison between the VOCat 350 HC[trademark] and the platinum and chromia-alumina catalysts. VOCat 350 HC[trademark] shows excellent activity for oxidation chlorocarbons and good stability in this application. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Defects at oxide surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Thornton, Geoff

    2015-01-01

    This book presents the basics and characterization of defects at oxide surfaces. It provides a state-of-the-art review of the field, containing information to the various types of surface defects, describes analytical methods to study defects, their chemical activity and the catalytic reactivity of oxides. Numerical simulations of defective structures complete the picture developed. Defects on planar surfaces form the focus of much of the book, although the investigation of powder samples also form an important part. The experimental study of planar surfaces opens the possibility of applying the large armoury of techniques that have been developed over the last half-century to study surfaces in ultra-high vacuum. This enables the acquisition of atomic level data under well-controlled conditions, providing a stringent test of theoretical methods. The latter can then be more reliably applied to systems such as nanoparticles for which accurate methods of characterization of structure and electronic properties ha...

  12. Thin Solid Oxide Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material, at least one metal and a catalyst...... material, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same. The present invention also relates to a thin and in principle unsupported solid oxide cell, comprising at least a porous anode layer, an electrolyte layer and a porous...... cathode layer, wherein the anode layer and the cathode layer comprise an electrolyte material and a catalyst material, wherein the electrolyte material is doper zirconia, and wherein the overall thickness of the thin reversible cell is about 150 [mu]m or less, and to a method for producing same...

  13. Entropy-Stabilized Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-29

    predictions4. There are, however, limitations to the predictive power, particularly when factors like partial covalency and heterodesmic bonding are...broad classes of chalcogenides, nitrides and halides; particularly when covalent character is modest. The entropic driving force—engineered by cation...ultimately manifests in image drift. To do so, E1 films were coated with 50 nm of indium tin oxide (ITO) at room temperature using radio frequency

  14. Infrared transparent conductive oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Linda F.; Moran, Mark B.

    2001-09-01

    A novel class of complex metal oxides that have potential as transparent conducting oxides (TCOs) for the electromagnetic-interference (EMI) shielding on IR-seeker windows and missile domes has been identified. These complex metal oxides exhibit the rhombohedral (R3m) crystalline structure of naturally occurring delafossite, CuFeO2. The general chemical formula is ABO2 where A is a monovalent metal (Me+1 such as Cu, Ag, Au, Pt or Pd, and B is a trivalent metal (Me3+) such as Al,Ti,Cr,Co,Fe,Ni,Cs,Rh,Ga,Sn,In,Y,La,Pr,Nd,Sm or Eu. By adjusting the oxygen content, the conductivity can be varied over a wide range so that the delafossites behave as insulators, semiconductors or metals. This paper presents results for films of p-type CuxAlyOz and n-type CuxCryOz deposited by reactive magnetron co-sputtering from high-purity-metal targets. Films have been deposited using conventional RF- and DC-power supplies, and a new asymmetric-bipolar-pulsed- DC-power supply. Similar to the high-temperature-copper- oxide superconductors, the presence of Cu-O bonds is critical for the unique properties. Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) and electron spectroscopy for chemical analysis (ESCA) are used to understand the relationship between the optoelectornic properties and the molecular structure of the films. For example, FTIR absorption bands at 1470 and 1395cm-1 are present only in CuxAlyOz films that exhibit enhanced electrical conductivity. When these bands are absent, the CuxAlyOz films have high values of resistivity. In addition to the 1470 and 1395cm-1 bands observed in CuxAlyOz films, another pair of bands at 1040 and 970cm-1 is present in CuxCryOz films.

  15. Antifungal Effect of Magnesium Oxide, Zinc Oxide, Silicon Oxide and Copper Oxide Nanoparticles Against Candida albicans

    OpenAIRE

    Abbas Karimiyan; Hossein Najafzadeh; Masoud Ghorbanpour; Seyed Hossein Hekmati-Moghaddam

    2015-01-01

    Absrtact Background: Candidiasis is the most common fungal infection in human and warm-blooded animals. Candida albicans, is an opportunistic pathogen in immune suppressed hosts, like HIV infected and under chemotherapy patients. Since, antifungal drugs are limited and challenged by resistance. Thus discovering agents with antifungal properties and minimum side effects and toxicity is essential. Nano-agents such as metal oxide nano-particles have unique properties such as high surface to v...

  16. Hysteresis-free high rate reactive sputtering of niobium oxide, tantalum oxide, and aluminum oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Särhammar, Erik, E-mail: erik.sarhammar@angstrom.uu.se; Berg, Sören; Nyberg, Tomas [Department of Solid State Electronics, The Ångström Laboratory, Uppsala University, Box 534, SE-751 21 Uppsala (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    This work reports on experimental studies of reactive sputtering from targets consisting of a metal and its oxide. The composition of the targets varied from pure metal to pure oxide of Al, Ta, and Nb. This combines features from both the metal target and oxide target in reactive sputtering. If a certain relation between the metal and oxide parts is chosen, it may be possible to obtain a high deposition rate, due to the metal part, and a hysteresis-free process, due to the oxide part. The aim of this work is to quantify the achievable boost in oxide deposition rate from a hysteresis-free process by using a target consisting of segments of a metal and its oxide. Such an increase has been previously demonstrated for Ti using a homogeneous substoichiometric target. The achievable gain in deposition rate depends on transformation mechanisms from oxide to suboxides due to preferential sputtering of oxygen. Such mechanisms are different for different materials and the achievable gain is therefore material dependent. For the investigated materials, the authors have demonstrated oxide deposition rates that are 1.5–10 times higher than what is possible from metal targets in compound mode. However, although the principle is demonstrated for oxides of Al, Ta, and Nb, a similar behavior is expected for most oxides.

  17. The 2016 oxide electronic materials and oxide interfaces roadmap

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lorenz, M.; Rao, M. S. Ramachandra; Venkatesan, T.

    2016-01-01

    Oxide electronic materials provide a plethora of possible applications and offer ample opportunity for scientists to probe into some of the exciting and intriguing phenomena exhibited by oxide systems and oxide interfaces. In addition to the already diverse spectrum of properties, the nanoscale...... form of oxides provides a new dimension of hitherto unknown phenomena due to the increased surface-to-volume ratio. Oxide electronic materials are becoming increasingly important in a wide range of applications including transparent electronics, optoelectronics, magnetoelectronics, photonics...... of these materials to understand the tunability of their properties and the novel properties that evolve due to their nanostructured nature is another facet of the challenge. The research related to the oxide electronic field is at an impressionable stage, and this has motivated us to contribute with a roadmap...

  18. The oxidative hypothesis of senescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilca M

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available The oxidative hypothesis of senescence, since its origin in 1956, has garnered significant evidence and growing support among scientists for the notion that free radicals play an important role in ageing, either as "damaging" molecules or as signaling molecules. Age-increasing oxidative injuries induced by free radicals, higher susceptibility to oxidative stress in short-lived organisms, genetic manipulations that alter both oxidative resistance and longevity and the anti-ageing effect of caloric restriction and intermittent fasting are a few examples of accepted scientific facts that support the oxidative theory of senescence. Though not completely understood due to the complex "network" of redox regulatory systems, the implication of oxidative stress in the ageing process is now well documented. Moreover, it is compatible with other current ageing theories (e.g., those implicating the mitochondrial damage/mitochondrial-lysosomal axis, stress-induced premature senescence, biological "garbage" accumulation, etc. This review is intended to summarize and critically discuss the redox mechanisms involved during the ageing process: sources of oxidant agents in ageing (mitochondrial -electron transport chain, nitric oxide synthase reaction- and non-mitochondrial- Fenton reaction, microsomal cytochrome P450 enzymes, peroxisomal β -oxidation and respiratory burst of phagocytic cells, antioxidant changes in ageing (enzymatic- superoxide dismutase, glutathione-reductase, glutathion peroxidase, catalase- and non-enzymatic glutathione, ascorbate, urate, bilirubine, melatonin, tocopherols, carotenoids, ubiquinol, alteration of oxidative damage repairing mechanisms and the role of free radicals as signaling molecules in ageing.

  19. Inelastic scattering of neutrons by spin waves in terbium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum Møller, Hans; Houmann, Jens Christian Gylden

    1966-01-01

    Measurements of spin-wave dispersion relations for magnons propagating in symmetry directions in ferromagnetic Tb; it is first experiment to give detailed information on magnetic excitations in heavy rare earths; Tb was chosen for these measurements because it is one of few rare-earth metals whic...... does not have very high thermal-neutron capture cross section, so that inelastic neutron scattering experiments can give satisfactory information on magnon dispersion relations....

  20. Coherent magnetic structures in terbium/holmium superlattices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bryn-Jacobsen, C.; Cowley, R.A.; McMorrow, D.F.

    1997-01-01

    Neutron-scattering techniques have been used to investigate the magnetic properties of three Tb/Ho superlattices grown by molecular-beam epitaxy. It is revealed that for temperatures in the range T = 10 to T-N(Ho)approximate to 130 K, there is a basal-plane ferromagnetic alignment of Tb moments w...

  1. The 2016 oxide electronic materials and oxide interfaces roadmap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenz, M.; Ramachandra Rao, M. S.; Venkatesan, T.; Fortunato, E.; Barquinha, P.; Branquinho, R.; Salgueiro, D.; Martins, R.; Carlos, E.; Liu, A.; Shan, F. K.; Grundmann, M.; Boschker, H.; Mukherjee, J.; Priyadarshini, M.; DasGupta, N.; Rogers, D. J.; Teherani, F. H.; Sandana, E. V.; Bove, P.; Rietwyk, K.; Zaban, A.; Veziridis, A.; Weidenkaff, A.; Muralidhar, M.; Murakami, M.; Abel, S.; Fompeyrine, J.; Zuniga-Perez, J.; Ramesh, R.; Spaldin, N. A.; Ostanin, S.; Borisov, V.; Mertig, I.; Lazenka, V.; Srinivasan, G.; Prellier, W.; Uchida, M.; Kawasaki, M.; Pentcheva, R.; Gegenwart, P.; Miletto Granozio, F.; Fontcuberta, J.; Pryds, N.

    2016-11-01

    Oxide electronic materials provide a plethora of possible applications and offer ample opportunity for scientists to probe into some of the exciting and intriguing phenomena exhibited by oxide systems and oxide interfaces. In addition to the already diverse spectrum of properties, the nanoscale form of oxides provides a new dimension of hitherto unknown phenomena due to the increased surface-to-volume ratio. Oxide electronic materials are becoming increasingly important in a wide range of applications including transparent electronics, optoelectronics, magnetoelectronics, photonics, spintronics, thermoelectrics, piezoelectrics, power harvesting, hydrogen storage and environmental waste management. Synthesis and fabrication of these materials, as well as processing into particular device structures to suit a specific application is still a challenge. Further, characterization of these materials to understand the tunability of their properties and the novel properties that evolve due to their nanostructured nature is another facet of the challenge. The research related to the oxide electronic field is at an impressionable stage, and this has motivated us to contribute with a roadmap on ‘oxide electronic materials and oxide interfaces’. This roadmap envisages the potential applications of oxide materials in cutting edge technologies and focuses on the necessary advances required to implement these materials, including both conventional and novel techniques for the synthesis, characterization, processing and fabrication of nanostructured oxides and oxide-based devices. The contents of this roadmap will highlight the functional and correlated properties of oxides in bulk, nano, thin film, multilayer and heterostructure forms, as well as the theoretical considerations behind both present and future applications in many technologically important areas as pointed out by Venkatesan. The contributions in this roadmap span several thematic groups which are represented by

  2. Solid oxide fuel cells fueled with reducible oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Steven S.; Fan, Liang Shih

    2018-01-09

    A direct-electrochemical-oxidation fuel cell for generating electrical energy includes a cathode provided with an electrochemical-reduction catalyst that promotes formation of oxygen ions from an oxygen-containing source at the cathode, a solid-state reduced metal, a solid-state anode provided with an electrochemical-oxidation catalyst that promotes direct electrochemical oxidation of the solid-state reduced metal in the presence of the oxygen ions to produce electrical energy, and an electrolyte disposed to transmit the oxygen ions from the cathode to the solid-state anode. A method of operating a solid oxide fuel cell includes providing a direct-electrochemical-oxidation fuel cell comprising a solid-state reduced metal, oxidizing the solid-state reduced metal in the presence of oxygen ions through direct-electrochemical-oxidation to obtain a solid-state reducible metal oxide, and reducing the solid-state reducible metal oxide to obtain the solid-state reduced metal.

  3. Ultra supercritical steamside oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Ziomek-Moroz, M.; Alman, David A.; Ochs, Thomas L.

    2004-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Vision 21 goals. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Vision 21 goals include steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems. Emphasis is placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

  4. Semiconducting transition metal oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lany, Stephan

    2015-07-01

    Open shell transition metal oxides are usually described as Mott or charge transfer insulators, which are often viewed as being disparate from semiconductors. Based on the premise that the presence of a correlated gap and semiconductivity are not mutually exclusive, this work reviews electronic structure calculations on the binary 3d oxides, so to distill trends and design principles for semiconducting transition metal oxides. This class of materials possesses the potential for discovery, design, and development of novel functional semiconducting compounds, e.g. for energy applications. In order to place the 3d orbitals and the sp bands into an integrated picture, band structure calculations should treat both contributions on the same footing and, at the same time, account fully for electron correlation in the 3d shell. Fundamentally, this is a rather daunting task for electronic structure calculations, but quasi-particle energy calculations in GW approximation offer a viable approach for band structure predictions in these materials. Compared to conventional semiconductors, the inherent multivalent nature of transition metal cations is more likely to cause undesirable localization of electron or hole carriers. Therefore, a quantitative prediction of the carrier self-trapping energy is essential for the assessing the semiconducting properties and to determine whether the transport mechanism is a band-like large-polaron conduction or a small-polaron hopping conduction. An overview is given for the binary 3d oxides on how the hybridization between the 3d crystal field symmetries with the O-p orbitals of the ligands affects the effective masses and the likelihood of electron and hole self-trapping, identifying those situations where small masses and band-like conduction are more likely to be expected. The review concludes with an illustration of the implications of the increased electronic complexity of transition metal cations on the defect physics and doping, using

  5. Protein oxidation and peroxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    and chain reactions with alcohols and carbonyls as major products; the latter are commonly used markers of protein damage. Direct oxidation of cysteine (and less commonly) methionine residues is a major reaction; this is typically faster than with H2O2, and results in altered protein activity and function....... Unlike H2O2, which is rapidly removed by protective enzymes, protein peroxides are only slowly removed, and catabolism is a major fate. Although turnover of modified proteins by proteasomal and lysosomal enzymes, and other proteases (e.g. mitochondrial Lon), can be efficient, protein hydroperoxides...

  6. Sulfur Oxides Control Burner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    calcium oxide (CaO). Dolomite is a mixture of calcium and magnesium carbonates (CaCO-3 .!gCO ). Neither lime nor limestone react well with SO2 at ambient...temperaturel. At high temperatures (1500*F - 1800*F), both CaCO and CaO appear to react with SO2 . At these temperatures, CaCO is radily calcinated to...process development has been placed on naturally occurring materials, such as limestone and dolomite . APPROACH This investigation evolved from prior

  7. Actinide oxide photodiode and nuclear battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sykora, Milan; Usov, Igor

    2017-12-05

    Photodiodes and nuclear batteries may utilize actinide oxides, such a uranium oxide. An actinide oxide photodiode may include a first actinide oxide layer and a second actinide oxide layer deposited on the first actinide oxide layer. The first actinide oxide layer may be n-doped or p-doped. The second actinide oxide layer may be p-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is n-doped, and the second actinide oxide layer may be n-doped when the first actinide oxide layer is p-doped. The first actinide oxide layer and the second actinide oxide layer may form a p/n junction therebetween. Photodiodes including actinide oxides are better light absorbers, can be used in thinner films, and are more thermally stable than silicon, germanium, and gallium arsenide.

  8. Sputtered tin oxide and titanium oxide thin films as alternative transparent conductive oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boltz, Janika

    2011-12-12

    Alternative transparent conductive oxides to tin doped indium oxide have been investigated. In this work, antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide have been studied with the aim to prepare transparent and conductive films. Antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide belong to different groups of oxides; tin oxide is a soft oxide, while titanium oxide is a hard oxide. Both oxides are isolating materials, in case the stoichiometry is SnO{sub 2} and TiO{sub 2}. In order to achieve transparent and conductive films free carriers have to be generated by oxygen vacancies, by metal ions at interstitial positions in the crystal lattice or by cation doping with Sb or Nb, respectively. Antimony doped tin oxide and niobium doped titanium oxide films have been prepared by reactive direct current magnetron sputtering (dc MS) from metallic targets. The process parameters and the doping concentration in the films have been varied. The films have been electrically, optically and structurally analysed in order to analyse the influence of the process parameters and the doping concentration on the film properties. Post-deposition treatments of the films have been performed in order to improve the film properties. For the deposition of transparent and conductive tin oxide, the dominant parameter during the deposition is the oxygen content in the sputtering gas. The Sb incorporation as doping atoms has a minor influence on the electrical, optical and structural properties. Within a narrow oxygen content in the sputtering gas highly transparent and conductive tin oxide films have been prepared. In this study, the lowest resistivity in the as deposited state is 2.9 m{omega} cm for undoped tin oxide without any postdeposition treatment. The minimum resistivity is related to a transition to crystalline films with the stoichiometry of SnO{sub 2}. At higher oxygen content the films turn out to have a higher resistivity due to an oxygen excess. After post

  9. [Magnesium and the oxidative stress].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spasov, A A; Zheltova, A A; Kharitonov, M V

    2012-07-01

    Magnesium deficiency has been shown to result in alterations of cellular functions and biological activity of molecules. The review discusses possible relationship between Mg2+ deficiency and development of oxidative stress. Decrease of Mg2+ concentration in tissues and blood is accompanied with elevation of the oxidative stress markers, including products of the oxidative modification of lipids, proteins and DNA. The reduction in antioxidant defenses is synchronous with oxidative stress markers elevation. Different mechanisms including systemic reactions (hyperactivation of inflammation and endothelial dysfunction) and cellular changes (mitochondrial dysfunction and excessive production of fatty acids) are supposed to be involved in development and maintenance of the oxidative stress due to Mg2+ deficiency. Therefore the facts consolidated into the review evidence clear relation between Mg2+ deficiency and the oxidative stress development.

  10. Magnetic frustration of graphite oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Dongwook Lee; Jiwon Seo

    2017-01-01

    Delocalized ? electrons in aromatic ring structures generally induce diamagnetism. In graphite oxide, however, ? electrons develop ferromagnetism due to the unique structure of the material. The ? electrons are only mobile in the graphitic regions of graphite oxide, which are dispersed and surrounded by sp 3-hybridized carbon atoms. The spin-glass behavior of graphite oxide is corroborated by the frequency dependence of its AC susceptibility. The magnetic susceptibility data exhibit a negativ...

  11. Rare Earth Oxide Thin Films

    CERN Document Server

    Fanciulli, Marco

    2007-01-01

    Thin rare earth (RE) oxide films are emerging materials for microelectronic, nanoelectronic, and spintronic applications. The state-of-the-art of thin film deposition techniques as well as the structural, physical, chemical, and electrical properties of thin RE oxide films and of their interface with semiconducting substrates are discussed. The aim is to identify proper methodologies for the development of RE oxides thin films and to evaluate their effectiveness as innovative materials in different applications.

  12. In-Situ Chemical Oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-08-01

    pH, buffer capacity , electrode potential (Eh), permeability, cation exchange capacity, natural metals, oxidant impurities, and local uses for the...driven oxidation of organic contaminants. The buffer capacity in most aquifers represents significant acid-neu- tralizing capacity and maintains...mobilized during ISCO. pH, Buffer Capacity To assess whether pH modification is needed; acidic pH (3 to 5) is optimal for Fenton oxidation; pH

  13. Zinc oxide varistors and/or resistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Jr., Wesley D.; Bond, Walter D.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1993-01-01

    Varistors and/or resistors that includes doped zinc oxide gel microspheres. The doped zinc oxide gel microspheres preferably have from about 60 to about 95% by weight zinc oxide and from about 5 to about 40% by weight dopants based on the weight of the zinc oxide. The dopants are a plurality of dopants selected from silver salts, boron oxide, silicon oxide and hydrons oxides of aluminum, bismuth, cobalt, chromium, manganese, nickel, and antimony.

  14. Pristine graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimiev, Ayrat; Kosynkin, Dmitry V; Alemany, Lawrence B; Chaguine, Pavel; Tour, James M

    2012-02-08

    Graphite oxide (GO) is a lamellar substance with an ambiguous structure due to material complexity. Recently published GO-related studies employ only one out of several existing models to interpret the experimental data. Because the models are different, this leads to confusion in understanding the nature of the observed phenomena. Lessening the structural ambiguity would lead to further developments in functionalization and use of GO. Here, we show that the structure and properties of GO depend significantly on the quenching and purification procedures, rather than, as is commonly thought, on the type of graphite used or oxidation protocol. We introduce a new purification protocol that produces a product that we refer to as pristine GO (pGO) in contrast to the commonly known material that we will refer to as conventional GO (cGO). We explain the differences between pGO and cGO by transformations caused by reaction with water. We produce ultraviolet-visible spectroscopic, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic, solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic, thermogravimetric, and scanning electron microscopic analytical evidence for the structure of pGO. This work provides a new explanation for the acidity of GO solutions and allows us to add critical details to existing GO models.

  15. Interface-confined oxide nanostructures for catalytic oxidation reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Qiang; Yang, Fan; Bao, Xinhe

    2013-08-20

    Heterogeneous catalysts, often consisting of metal nanoparticles supported on high-surface-area oxide solids, are common in industrial chemical reactions. Researchers have increasingly recognized the importance of oxides in heterogeneous catalysts: that they are not just a support to help the dispersion of supported metal nanoparticles, but rather interact with supported metal nanoparticles and affect the catalysis. The critical role of oxides in catalytic reactions can become very prominent when oxides cover metal surfaces forming the inverse catalysts. The source of the catalytic activity in homogeneous catalysts and metalloenzymes is often coordinatively unsaturated (CUS) transition metal (TM) cations, which can undergo facile electron transfer and promote catalytic reactions. Organic ligands and proteins confine these CUS cations, making them highly active and stable. In heterogeneous catalysis, however, confining these highly active CUS centers on an inorganic solid so that they are robust enough to endure the reaction environment while staying flexible enough to perform their catalysis remains a challenge. In this Account, we describe a strategy to confine the active CUS centers on the solid surface at the interface between a TM oxide (TMO) and a noble metal (NM). Among metals, NMs have high electron negativity and low oxygen affinity. This means that TM cations of the oxide bind strongly to NM atoms at the interface, forming oxygen-terminated-bilayer TMO nanostructures. The resulting CUS sites at the edges of the TMO nanostructure are highly active for catalytic oxidation reactions. Meanwhile, the strong interactions between TMOs and NMs prevent further oxidation of the bilayer TMO phases, which would otherwise result in the saturation of oxygen coordination and the deactivation of the CUS cations. We report that we can also tune the oxide-metal interactions to modulate the bonding of reactants with CUS centers, optimizing their catalytic performance. We

  16. Metabolism of Nitrogen Oxides in Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlowski, J.; Stein, L. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) are key microorganisms in the transformation of nitrogen intermediates in most all environments. Until recently there was very little work done to elucidate the physiology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria cultivated from variable trophic state environments. With a greater variety of ammonia-oxidizers now in pure culture the importance of comparative physiological and genomic analysis is crucial. Nearly all known physiology of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria lies within the Nitrosomonas genus with Nitrosomonas europaea strain ATCC 19718 as the model. To more broadly characterize and understand the nature of obligate ammonia chemolithotrophy and the contribution of AOB to production of nitrogen oxides, Nitrosomonas spp. and Nitrosospira spp. isolated from variable trophic states and with sequenced genomes, were utilized. Instantaneous ammonia- and hydroxylamine-oxidation kinetics as a function of oxygen and substrate concentration were measured using an oxygen micro-sensor. The pathway intermediates nitric oxide and nitrous oxide were measured in real time using substrate-specific micro-sensors to elucidate whether production of these molecules is stoichiometric with rates of substrate oxidation. Genomic inventory was compared among the strains to identify specific pathways and modules to explain physiological differences in kinetic rates and production of N-oxide intermediates as a condition of their adaptation to different ammonium concentrations. This work provides knowledge of how nitrogen metabolism is differentially controlled in AOB that are adapted to different concentrations of ammonium. Overall, this work will provide further insight into the control of ammonia oxidizing chemolithotrophy across representatives of the Nitrosomonas and Nitrosospira genus, which can then be applied to examine additional genome-sequenced AOB isolates.

  17. Magnetic frustration of graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dongwook; Seo, Jiwon

    2017-03-01

    Delocalized π electrons in aromatic ring structures generally induce diamagnetism. In graphite oxide, however, π electrons develop ferromagnetism due to the unique structure of the material. The π electrons are only mobile in the graphitic regions of graphite oxide, which are dispersed and surrounded by sp3-hybridized carbon atoms. The spin-glass behavior of graphite oxide is corroborated by the frequency dependence of its AC susceptibility. The magnetic susceptibility data exhibit a negative Curie temperature, field irreversibility, and slow relaxation. The overall results indicate that magnetic moments in graphite oxide slowly interact and develop magnetic frustration.

  18. Intercalating oleylamines in graphite oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kaikun; Liang, Si; Zou, Lianfeng; Huang, Liwei; Park, Cheol; Zhu, Lisheng; Fang, Jiye; Fu, Qiang; Wang, Howard

    2012-02-07

    Graphite oxide has been synthesized from raw graphite particles and been treated with various mass amounts of oleylamine as intercalants to form intercalation compounds. X-ray diffraction patterns reveal that the inter-sheet distances strongly depend on the graphite oxide to oleylamine mass ratios. The equilibrium-like behavior implies diffusion-dominated oleylamine adsorption on graphite oxide in solution and excluded volume intercalations among oleylamine-adsorbed graphite oxide during restacking. The intercalation compounds are soluble in organic solvents, and their applications in the fabrication of transparent and conductive coatings have been demonstrated.

  19. Trends in reactivity of oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toftelund, Anja

    , and I) and OH on a wide range of rutile oxide surfaces. Furthermore, Brønsted-Evans-Polanyi (BEP) relations are found for the adsorption of a large number of molecules (including Cl, Br and I) on transition metal oxides. In these relations the activation energies scale linearly with the dissociative...... chemisorption energies. It turns out that the BEP relation for rutile oxides is almost coinciding with the dissociation line, i.e. no barrier exists for the reactive surfaces. The heterogeneous catalytic oxidation of hydrogen halides (HCl, HBr, and HI) is investigated. A micro-kinetic model is solved...

  20. Plasma electrolytic oxidation of tantalum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petković Marija

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is a review of our research on the plasma electrolytic oxidation (PEO process of tantalum in 12-tungstosilicic acid. For the characterization of microdischarges during PEO, real-time imaging and optical emission spectroscopy (OES were used. The surface morphology, chemical and phase composition of oxide coatings were investigated by AFM, SEM-EDS and XRD. Oxide coating morphology is strongly dependent on PEO time. The elemental components of PEO coatings are Ta, O, Si and W. The oxide coatings are partly crystallized and mainly composed of WO3, Ta2O5 and SiO2.

  1. Semiconductor-oxide heterostructured nanowires using postgrowth oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallentin, Jesper; Ek, Martin; Vainorious, Neimantas; Mergenthaler, Kilian; Samuelson, Lars; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Reine Wallenberg, L; Borgström, Magnus T

    2013-01-01

    Semiconductor-oxide heterointerfaces have several electron volts high-charge carrier potential barriers, which may enable devices utilizing quantum confinement at room temperature. While a single heterointerface is easily formed by oxide deposition on a crystalline semiconductor, as in MOS transistors, the amorphous structure of most oxides inhibits epitaxy of a second semiconductor layer. Here, we overcome this limitation by separating epitaxy from oxidation, using postgrowth oxidation of AlP segments to create axial and core-shell semiconductor-oxide heterostructured nanowires. Complete epitaxial AlP-InP nanowire structures were first grown in an oxygen-free environment. Subsequent exposure to air converted the AlP segments into amorphous aluminum oxide segments, leaving isolated InP segments in an oxide matrix. InP quantum dots formed on the nanowire sidewalls exhibit room temperature photoluminescence with small line widths (down to 15 meV) and high intensity. This optical performance, together with the control of heterostructure segment length, diameter, and position, opens up for optoelectrical applications at room temperature.

  2. Direct Coal Oxidation in Modified Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Gil, Vanesa; Ippolito, Davide

    2017-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon-carbonate s...

  3. Direct Coal Oxidation in Modified Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deleebeeck, Lisa; Gil, Vanesa; Ippolito, Davide

    2015-01-01

    Hybrid direct carbon fuel cells employ a classical solid oxide fuel cell together with carbon dispersed in a carbonate melt on the anode side. In a European project, the utilization of various coals has been investigated with and without addition of an oxidation catalyst to the carbon-carbonate s...

  4. It has been suggested that oxidative stress, especially oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    nabipour

    2012-02-14

    Feb 14, 2012 ... Oxidative stress has been implicated in coronary artery disease (CAD). Malondialdehyde (MDA) is lipid peroxidation end product. Bilirubin may act as an antioxidant that suppresses lipid oxidation. The role of MDA and antioxidant capacity and their inter-relationship in patients with and without CAD was.

  5. Catalysis by Thin Oxide Films and Oxide Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupprechter, Günther; Penner, Simon

    Model systems for transition and noble metal oxide catalysts, either as thin films or nanoparticles, were prepared by vacuum-deposition of oxides or oxidation of metals (particles, thin films, single crystals). These systems, including Ga2O3, In2O3, V2O3, V2O5, Nb2O5, Pd5O4 and PdO, are well suited for atomic scale characterization by surface-specific methods and for catalytic tests. Investigations of structure and composition were carried out by HRTEM, AFM, STM, SAED, LEED, EDX, XPS and DFT. In many cases, the surface structure of oxides does not coincide with truncations of the known bulk structures. The adsorption properties of the oxide models, in particular those of defects such as oxygen vacancies or step edges, were examined by vibrational spectroscopy (FTIR and SFG) and thermal desorption spectroscopy (TPD) of probe molecules (CO, H2, propane and propene). Together with XPS, quantification of surface coverage was performed. The catalytic activity and selectivity of the model oxides at (near) ambient gas pressure were investigated by microreactor studies of methanol steam reforming (MSR), (inverse) water gas shift (WGS) and CO oxidation. The structural/compositional flexibility of oxides leads to significant challenges in their characterization but also imparts them with exceptional catalytic properties.

  6. Catalytic water oxidation: Rugged water-oxidation anodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llobet, Antoni

    2010-10-01

    The efficient catalytic oxidation of water to dioxygen in the solid state is one of the challenges to be overcome to build sun-driven and/or electrocatalytic water-splitting devices. Now, an effective water-oxidation hybrid catalyst system has been made by attaching a ruthenium-polyoxometallate complex to a carbon nanotube.

  7. Protective effect of nitric oxide against arsenic-induced oxidative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a key molecule involved in many physiology processes. The effects of NO on alleviating arsenic-induced oxidative damage in tall fescue leaves were investigated. Arsenic (25 M) treatment induced significantly accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and led to serious lipid peroxidation in tall ...

  8. EDITORIAL: Oxide semiconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, M.; Makino, T.

    2005-04-01

    non-equilibrium growth has rekindled the recent extensive investigation and progress in the field of ZnO epitaxy. In this special issue, Ohtomo and Tsukazaki, Cho et al, and Yi et al, respectively, describe the various fabrication processes such as pulsed laser deposition, molecular-beam epitaxy and metal-organic chemical vapour deposition. It should be noted that the last work among the above-mentioned papers has the potential to pave the way to nano-technology based on ZnO. This material has found other important applications as well, such as transparent conducting oxides (TCO). This field has a long research history, as is reviewed by Minami. Relatively speaking, ZnO was one of the earliest crystals (after Si, Ge, and InSb) to be prepared in a pure form, and the resultant long research history has given rise to the availability of large-area substrates. Recent progress in this topic is explained by two representative groups of authors in this field: Nause and Nemeth at Cermet Inc., and Maeda et al at Tokyo Denpa Co. Ltd. In order to overcome the bottleneck of p-type conduction and control the material's properties, a clear understanding of the physical processes in ZnO is necessary. Look et al are known as the first group to report on the growth and properties of p-type ZnO layers with a valid and reasonable set of experimental data (2002 Appl. Phys. Lett. 81 1830). Here, Look contributes a more comprehensive review to this issue. Optical studies on single crystals were conducted and are reviewed here by Meyer et al and Chichibu et al. Band-gap engineering and fabrication of heterojunction or quantum structures are important technological issues. It should be emphasized that by choosing an appropriate set of concentrations (x and y), perfect lattice-matching between MgxZn1-xO and CdyZn1-yO can be attained (Makino T et al 2001 Appl. Phys. Lett. 78 1237). Exciton properties of multiple quantum well structures are reported by Makino et al in this issue. Other than

  9. Ferromagnet / superconductor oxide superlattices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santamaria, Jacobo

    2006-03-01

    The growth of heterostructures combining oxide materials is a new strategy to design novel artificial multifunctional materials with interesting behaviors ruled by the interface. With the (re)discovery of colossal magnetoresistance (CMR) materials, there has been renewed interest in heterostructures involving oxide superconductors and CMR ferromagnets where ferromagnetism (F) and superconductivity (S) compete within nanometric distances from the interface. In F/S/F structures involving oxides, interfaces are especially complex and various factors like interface disorder and roughness, epitaxial strain, polarity mismatch etc., are responsible for depressed magnetic and superconducting properties at the interface over nanometer length scales. In this talk I will focus in F/S/F structures made of YBa2Cu3O7 (YBCO) and La0.7Ca0.3MnO3 (LCMO). The high degree of spin polarization of the LCMO conduction band, together with the d-wave superconductivity of the YBCO make this F/S system an adequate candidate for the search of novel spin dependent effects in transport. We show that superconductivity at the interface is depressed by various factors like charge transfer, spin injection or ferromagnetic superconducting proximity effect. I will present experiments to examine the characteristic distances of the various mechanisms of superconductivity depression. In particular, I will discuss that the critical temperature of the superconductor depends on the relative orientation of the magnetization of the F layers, giving rise to a new giant magnetoresistance effect which might be of interest for spintronic applications. Work done in collaboration with V. Peña^1, Z. Sefrioui^1, J. Garcia-Barriocanal^1, C. Visani^1, D. Arias^1, C. Leon^1 , N. Nemes^2, M. Garcia Hernandez^2, S. G. E. te Velthuis^3, A. Hoffmann^3, M. Varela^4, S. J. Pennycook^4. Work supported by MCYT MAT 2005-06024, CAM GR- MAT-0771/2004, UCM PR3/04-12399 Work at Argonne supported by the Department of Energy, Basic

  10. Operation of staged membrane oxidation reactor systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Repasky, John Michael

    2012-10-16

    A method of operating a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system. The method comprises providing a multi-stage ion transport membrane oxidation system with at least a first membrane oxidation stage and a second membrane oxidation stage, operating the ion transport membrane oxidation system at operating conditions including a characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and a characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage; and controlling the production capacity and/or the product quality by changing the characteristic temperature of the first membrane oxidation stage and/or changing the characteristic temperature of the second membrane oxidation stage.

  11. Effects of Oxidation on Oxidation-Resistant Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windes, William [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Smith, Rebecca [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States); Carroll, Mark [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The Advanced Reactor Technology (ART) Graphite Research and Development Program is investigating doped nuclear graphite grades that exhibit oxidation resistance through the formation of protective oxides on the surface of the graphite material. In the unlikely event of an oxygen ingress accident, graphite components within the VHTR core region are anticipated to oxidize so long as the oxygen continues to enter the hot core region and the core temperatures remain above 400°C. For the most serious air-ingress accident which persists over several hours or days the continued oxidation can result in significant structural damage to the core. Reducing the oxidation rate of the graphite core material during any air-ingress accident would mitigate the structural effects and keep the core intact. Previous air oxidation testing of nuclear-grade graphite doped with varying levels of boron-carbide (B4C) at a nominal 739°C was conducted for a limited number of doped specimens demonstrating a dramatic reduction in oxidation rate for the boronated graphite grade. This report summarizes the conclusions from this small scoping study by determining the effects of oxidation on the mechanical strength resulting from oxidation of boronated and unboronated graphite to a 10% mass loss level. While the B4C additive did reduce mechanical strength loss during oxidation, adding B4C dopants to a level of 3.5% or more reduced the as-fabricated compressive strength nearly 50%. This effectively minimized any benefits realized from the protective film formed on the boronated grades. Future work to infuse different graphite grades with silicon- and boron-doped material as a post-machining conditioning step for nuclear components is discussed as a potential solution for these challenges in this report.

  12. Optical properties and electronic transitions of zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pauly, N; Yubero, F; Espinós, J P

    2017-01-01

    Optical properties and electronic transitions of four oxides, namely zinc oxide, ferric oxide, cerium oxide, and samarium oxide, are determined in the ultraviolet and extreme ultraviolet by reflection electron energy loss spectroscopy using primary electron energies in the range 0.3-2.0 keV. This...

  13. 21 CFR 184.1545 - Nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Nitrous oxide. 184.1545 Section 184.1545 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1545 Nitrous oxide. (a) Nitrous oxide (empirical formula N2O, CAS Reg. No.... Nitrous oxide is manufactured by the thermal decomposition of ammonium nitrate. Higher oxides of nitrogen...

  14. Preface: Oxide Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmott, Phil

    2008-07-01

    Although the history of metal oxides and their surfaces goes back several decades to landmark studies, such as Mott and Peierls' explanation of electrical insulation in materials that are predicted in band theory to be conducting, or the observation by Morin of the superfast metal-to-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide, it is only in the last two decades that the world of condensed matter physics has become increasingly dominated by research into complex metal oxides. This has been driven most notably by an attempt to better understand and describe the fundamental physical processes behind their seemingly endless spectrum of properties, which in turn has also led to the discovery of novel phenomena, most prominently demonstrated by the discovery of high-temperature superconductivity in 1986, colossal magnetoresistance in 1994, and most recently, the formation of a two-dimensional conducting layer at the interface between two band insulators in 2004. One important reason why metal oxides, particularly in the form of thin films, have become such a popular subject for basic condensed matter research is that they offer a uniquely versatile materials base for the development of novel technologies. They owe this versatility both to the many different elemental combinations that lead to structurally similar forms, and also to the fact that in many cases, the strong interaction between the valence electrons means that there is a subtle interplay between structure and magnetic and electronic properties. This aspect has led in recent years to the birth or renaissance of research fields such as spintronics, orbital ordering, and multiferroics. Surfaces and interfaces are especially interesting in these strongly-correlated electron systems, where the rearrangement of electrical charge resulting from a minimization of surface or interfacial energy can have unexpected and often exciting consequences. Indeed, as the drive to miniaturize devices well below the micron size

  15. Nitric oxide: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodeberg, D A; Chaet, M S; Bass, R C; Arkovitz, M S; Garcia, V F

    1995-09-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a paracrine-acting gas enzymatically synthesized from L-arginine, is a unique biologic mediator that has been implicated in a myriad of physiologic and pathophysiologic states. It is an important regulator of vascular tone and may be the mediator of the hemodynamic changes involved in sepsis and cirrhosis. In addition, there is increasing evidence that NO is involved in coagulation, immune function, inhibitory innervation of the gastrointestinal tract, protection of gastrointestinal mucosa, and the hepatotoxicity of cirrhosis. It has already been speculated that NO may represent a point of control or intervention in a number of disease states. The purpose of this paper is to provide the surgeon with a broad overview of the scientific and clinical aspects of this important molecule.

  16. Zinc Oxide Nanoparticle Photodetector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheng-Po Chang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A zinc oxide (ZnO nanoparticle photodetector was fabricated using a simple method. Under a 5 V applied bias, its dark current and photocurrent were 1.98×10-8 and 9.42×10-7 A, respectively. In other words, a photocurrent-to-dark-current contrast ratio of 48 was obtained. Under incident light at a wavelength of 375 nm and a 5 V applied bias, the detector’s measured responsivity was 3.75 A/W. The transient time constants measured during the turn-ON and turn-OFF states were τON=204 s and τOFF=486 s, respectively.

  17. Ultra Supercritical Steamside Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holcomb, Gordon R.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Bullard, Sophie J.; Ziomek-Moroz, Malgorzata

    2005-01-01

    Ultra supercritical (USC) power plants offer the promise of higher efficiencies and lower emissions, which are goals of the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Power Systems Initiatives. Most current coal power plants in the U.S. operate at a maximum steam temperature of 538 C. However, new supercritical plants worldwide are being brought into service with steam temperatures of up to 620 C. Current Advanced Power Systems goals include coal generation at 60% efficiency, which require steam temperatures of up to 760 C. This research examines the steamside oxidation of advanced alloys for use in USC systems, with emphasis placed on alloys for high- and intermediate-pressure turbine sections. Initial results of this research are presented.

  18. Phosphine oxide surfactants revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubenrauch, Cosima; Preisig, Natalie; Laughlin, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    This review summarizes everything we currently know about the nonionic surfactants alkyl dimethyl (C(n)DMPO) and alkyl diethyl (C(n)DEPO) phosphine oxide (PO surfactants). The review starts with the synthesis and the general properties (Section 2) of these compounds and continues with their interfacial properties (Section 3) such as surface tension, surface rheology, interfacial tension and adsorption at solid surfaces. We discuss studies on thin liquid films and foams stabilized by PO surfactants (Section 4) as well as studies on their self-assembly into lyotropic liquid crystals and microemulsions, respectively (Section 5). We aim at encouraging colleagues from both academia and industry to take on board PO surfactants whenever possible and feasible because of their broad variety of excellent properties. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Main Oxidizer Valve Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addona, Brad; Eddleman, David

    2015-01-01

    A developmental Main Oxidizer Valve (MOV) was designed by NASA-MSFC using additive manufacturing processes. The MOV is a pneumatically actuated poppet valve to control the flow of liquid oxygen to an engine's injector. A compression spring is used to return the valve to the closed state when pneumatic pressure is removed from the valve. The valve internal parts are cylindrical in shape, which lends itself to traditional lathe and milling operations. However, the valve body represents a complicated shape and contains the majority of the mass of the valve. Additive manufacturing techniques were used to produce a part that optimized mass and allowed for design features not practical with traditional machining processes.

  20. Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Søren Højgaard

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) produced at Risø National Laboratory was tested as steam electrolysers under various current densities, operating temperatures and steam partial pressures. At 950 °C and a cell voltage of 1.48V the current density was -3.6A/cm2 with app. 30% H2 + 70% H2O in the inlet...... it is possible to achieve a production price of 0.7 US$/kg H2 with an electricity price of 1.3 US¢/kWh. The cell voltage was measured as function of time. In test ofabout two month of duration a long-term degradation was observed. At 850 °C, -0.5 A/cm2 with 50 vol% H2 the degradation rate was app. 20 mV/1000h...

  1. Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jack T.

    Solid oxide fuel cells offer the potential for high efficiency, low cost electric power plants for many applications. The fuel cell generator Itself is an all solid state reactor operating at about 1000°C, which produces direct current electricity from the conversion of the energy in gaseous fuel by an electrochemical reaction with the oxygen in air. System studies have shown 50-60 percent efficiency can be obtained in multi-megawatt all electric power plants in which the high quality exhaust heat is used to produce electricity In a bottoming cycle. Alternatively the exhaust heat can be used in Industrial and commercial co-generation systems for space cooling or raising high pressure steam. Space based and military applications for electric power plants have been proposed with high power per unit weight and volume designs which use hydrogen fuel and pure oxygen. Truly significant accomplishments have been made in the 1980's in the technological development of the special materials and processes for producing them for the various cell designs and in the conception of device designs. These advancements were due to the fundamental work of the several decades earlier. In 1986 through 1988 experimental test units in the several hundred to several thousand watt sizes have been designed, fabricated, shipped, and tested for thousands of hours by user organizations in the United States and Japan. The extent of the commercial market for Solid Oxide fuel cells for various applications, vis-a-vis alternate electrical generation options, will depend on what system capital cost can be achieved.

  2. Catalytic oxidations by vanadium complexes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ligtenbarg, A.G J; Hage, R.; Feringa, B.L.

    Vanadium haloperoxidases catalyse the oxidation of halides leading to halogenation of substrates or, in the absence of suitable substrates, to oxidation of hydrogen peroxide into singlet oxygen and water. Furthermore, V-haloperoxidases are capable to give enantioselective sulfoxidation under the

  3. Durability of Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knibbe, Ruth; Hauch, Anne; Hjelm, Johan

    2011-01-01

    In recent years extended focus has been placed on monitoring and understanding degradation mechanisms in both solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide electrolysis cells. The time-consuming nature of degradation experiments and the disparate conclusions from experiment reproductions indicates...

  4. Nitrous oxide and perioperative outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Hanjo; Kaye, Alan David; Urman, Richard D

    2014-06-01

    There is emerging evidence related to the effects of nitrous oxide on important perioperative patient outcomes. Proposed mechanisms include metabolic effects linked to elevated homocysteine levels and endothelial dysfunction, inhibition of deoxyribonucleic acid and protein formation, and depression of chemotactic migration by monocytes. Newer large studies point to possible risks associated with the use of nitrous oxide, although data are often equivocal and inconclusive. Cardiovascular outcomes such as stroke or myocardial infarction were shown to be unchanged in previous studies, but the more recent Evaluation of Nitrous Oxide in the Gas Mixture for Anesthesia I trial shows possible associations between nitrous oxide and increased cardiovascular and pulmonary complications. There are also possible effects on postoperative wound infections and neuropsychological function, although the multifactorial nature of these complications should be considered. Teratogenicity linked to nitrous oxide use has not been firmly established. The use of nitrous oxide for routine anesthetic care may be associated with significant costs if complications such as nausea, vomiting, and wound infections are taken into consideration. Overall, definitive data regarding the effect of nitrous oxide on major perioperative outcomes are lacking. There are ongoing prospective studies that may further elucidate its role. The use of nitrous oxide in daily practice should be individualized to each patient's medical conditions and risk factors.

  5. Nitric Oxide: The Wonder Molecule

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    (heart attack) and hypertension. Nitric oxide (NO), an inorganic molecule formed by vascular endothelial cells is now thought to be a messenger molecule that is believed to playa crucial role in various biological processes of both physiological and pathological importance. Nitric oxide is a simple heterodiatomic molecule ...

  6. Oxidative stress from environmental pollutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmad, S

    1995-01-01

    Recently progress has been made on O2 toxicity and pathology related to numerous environmental contaminants in insects. The pro-oxidants studied included: dioxin, paraquat, and an assorted array of quinones, 8-methoxypsorlen, arsenic, and mercury. The responses to these oxidants are diverse, but they arise from the reactive oxygen species. These pro-oxidants in insects cause lipid peroxidation, protein and enzyme oxidation, and GSH depletion. Potentially, they may also cause DNA oxidation, and form DNA adducts. Oxidative challenge is alleviated by antioxidant compounds, but more importantly by the induction of antioxidant enzymes, which are crucial for the termination of O2 radical cascade and lipid peroxidation chain reaction. Insects exhibit a wasting syndrome under sub-acute stress. In acute toxicity vital physiological processes impaired are hemolymph melanization and diuresis. Thus, insects resemble vertebrates in both the response to oxidative stress and its pathological consequences. These results raise the prospect that insects may serve as non-mammalian model species for monitoring the oxidative-stress component of environmental toxicity.

  7. Oxide fiber targets at ISOLDE

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Köster, U.; Bergmann, U.C.; Carminati, D.

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxide fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some...... contact points. The experience with various oxide fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils......, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process...

  8. Catalysis by nitric oxide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marletta, M A; Hurshman, A R; Rusche, K M

    1998-10-01

    The enzyme nitric oxide synthase catalyzes the oxidation of the amino acid L-arginine to L-citrulline and nitric oxide in an NADPH-dependent reaction. Nitric oxide plays a critical role in signal transduction pathways in the cardiovascular and nervous systems and is a key component of the cytostatic/cytotoxic function of the immune system. Characterization of nitric oxide synthase substrates and cofactors has outlined the broad details of the overall reaction and suggested possibilities for chemical steps in the reaction; however, the molecular details of the reaction mechanism are still poorly understood. Recent evidence suggests a role for the reduced bound pterin in the first step of the reaction--the hydroxylation of L-arginine.

  9. Oxidative stability of marine phospholipids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Nielsen, Nina Skall; Baron, Caroline Pascale

    Many studies have shown that marine phospholipids (MPL) provide more advantages than fish oil. They have better bioavailability, better resistance towards oxidation and higher content of eicosapentaenoic acids (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acids (DHA) than oily triglycerides (fish oil). The objective...... of this study is to investigate the oxidative and hydrolytic stability of MPL. In addition, this study also investigates the effect of chemical composition of MPL and Maillard reaction (interaction between lipids oxidation products with the residue of amino acids) on MPL emulsions’ stability. Firstly, MPL were...... prepared in the form of emulsions by high pressure homogenizer. Then, the oxidative and hydrolytic stability of phospholipids was investigated by measurement of simple chemical analyses such as Peroxide Value and Free Fatty Acids, and 31PNMR after 32 days storage at 2ºC. The oxidative stability of MPL...

  10. Selective catalytic oxidation of ammonia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leppaelahti, J.; Koljonen, T. [VTT Energy, Espoo (Finland)

    1996-12-31

    In the combustion of fossil fuels, the principal source of nitrogen oxides is nitrogen bound in the fuel structure. In gasification, a large part of fuel nitrogen forms NH{sub 3}, which may form nitrogen oxides during gas combustion. If NH{sub 3} and other nitrogen species could be removed from hot gas, the NO emission could be considerably reduced. However, relatively little attention has been paid to finding new means of removing nitrogen compounds from the hot gasification gas. The possibility of selectively oxidizing NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2} in the hot gasification has been studied at VTT Energy. The largest NH{sub 3} reductions have been achieved by catalytic oxidation on aluminium oxides. (author) (4 refs.)

  11. Van der Waals oxide heteroepitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Ying-Hao

    2017-12-01

    The research field of oxide heteroepitaxy suffers from the characteristics of misfit strain and substrate clamping, hampering the optimization of performance and the gain of fundamental understanding of oxide systems. Recently, there are demonstrations on functional oxides epitaxially fabricated on layered muscovite substrate. In these heterostructures, due to the weak interaction between substrate and film, they show the lattice of films close to bulk with excellent strictive properties, suggesting that these critical problems can be potentially solved by van der Waals oxide heteroepitaxy. In addition, by exploiting the transparent and flexible features of muscovite, such a heteroepitaxy can deliver new material solutions to transparent soft technology. In this paper, the history, development, and current status of van der Waals oxide heteroepitaxy are addressed and discussed. In the end, new research directions in terms of fundamental study and practical application are proposed to highlight the importance of this research field.

  12. BRCA1 and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Weon Yi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The breast cancer susceptibility gene 1 (BRCA1 has been well established as a tumor suppressor and functions primarily by maintaining genome integrity. Genome stability is compromised when cells are exposed to oxidative stress. Increasing evidence suggests that BRCA1 regulates oxidative stress and this may be another mechanism in preventing carcinogenesis in normal cells. Oxidative stress caused by reactive oxygen species (ROS is implicated in carcinogenesis and is used strategically to treat human cancer. Thus, it is essential to understand the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. In this review, we briefly summarize BRCA1’s many binding partners and mechanisms, and discuss data supporting the function of BRCA1 in oxidative stress regulation. Finally, we consider its significance in prevention and/or treatment of BRCA1-related cancers.

  13. Nanotoxicology of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amedea B. Seabra

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This review discusses recent advances in the synthesis, characterization and toxicity of metal oxide nanoparticles obtained mainly through biogenic (green processes. The in vitro and in vivo toxicities of these oxides are discussed including a consideration of the factors important for safe use of these nanomaterials. The toxicities of different metal oxide nanoparticles are compared. The importance of biogenic synthesized metal oxide nanoparticles has been increasing in recent years; however, more studies aimed at better characterizing the potent toxicity of these nanoparticles are still necessary for nanosafely considerations and environmental perspectives. In this context, this review aims to inspire new research in the design of green approaches to obtain metal oxide nanoparticles for biomedical and technological applications and to highlight the critical need to fully investigate the nanotoxicity of these particles.

  14. 21 CFR 172.808 - Copolymer condensates of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Copolymer condensates of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide. 172.808 Section 172.808 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH... ethylene oxide and propylene oxide. Copolymer condensates of ethylene oxide and propylene oxide may be...

  15. Catalyst for Decomposition of Nitrogen Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schryer, David R. (Inventor); Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Ates (Inventor); Akyurtlu, Jale (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a platinized tin oxide-based catalyst. It relates particularly to an improved platinized tin oxide-based catalyst able to decompose nitric oxide to nitrogen and oxygen without the necessity of a reducing gas.

  16. Test Concept for Advanced Oxidation Techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennedsen, Lars Rønn; Søgaard, Erik Gydesen; Mortensen, Lars

    advanced on-site oxidation tests. The remediation techniques included are electrochemical oxidation, photochemical/photocatalytic oxidation, ozone, hydrogen peroxide, permanganate, and persulfate among others. A versatile construction of the mobile test unit makes it possible to combine different...

  17. New developments in oxidative fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, O; Moonmangmee, D; Toyama, H; Yamada, M; Shinagawa, E; Matsushita, K

    2003-02-01

    Oxidative fermentations have been well established for a long time, especially in vinegar and in L-sorbose production. Recently, information on the enzyme systems involved in these oxidative fermentations has accumulated and new developments are possible based on these findings. We have recently isolated several thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria, which also seem to be useful for new developments in oxidative fermentation. Two different types of membrane-bound enzymes, quinoproteins and flavoproteins, are involved in oxidative fermentation, and sometimes work with the same substrate but produce different oxidation products. Recently, there have been new developments in two different oxidative fermentations, D-gluconate and D-sorbitol oxidations. Flavoproteins, D-gluconate dehydrogenase, and D-sorbitol dehydrogenase were isolated almost 2 decades ago, while the enzyme involved in the same oxidation reaction for D-gluconate and D-sorbitol has been recently isolated and shown to be a quinoprotein. Thus, these flavoproteins and a quinoprotein have been re-assessed for the oxidation reaction. Flavoprotein D-gluconate dehydrogenase and D-sorbitol dehydrogenase were shown to produce 2-keto- D-gluconate and D-fructose, respectively, whereas the quinoprotein was shown to produce 5-keto- D-gluconate and L-sorbose from D-gluconate and D-sorbitol, respectively. In addition to the quinoproteins described above, a new quinoprotein for quinate oxidation has been recently isolated from Gluconobacter strains. The quinate dehydrogenase is also a membrane-bound quinoprotein that produces 3-dehydroquinate. This enzyme can be useful for the production of shikimate, which is a convenient salvage synthesis system for many antibiotics, herbicides, and aromatic amino acids synthesis. In order to reduce energy costs of oxidative fermentation in industry, several thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria that can grow up to 40 degrees C have been isolated. Of such isolated strains, some

  18. Nanoparticular metal oxide/anatase catalysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2010-01-01

    the catalyst metai oxide is co-precipitated with the carrier metal oxide, which crystallization seeds are removed by combustion in a final calcining step. The present invention also concerns processes wherein the nanoparticular metal oxide catalysts of the invention are used, such as SCR (deNOx) reactions...... of nitrogen oxides with ammonia or urea as reductant, oxidations of alcohols or aldehydes with dioxygen or air to provide aldehydes, ketones or carboxylic acids, and photocatalytic oxidation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs)....

  19. Oxidized magnetosomes in magnetotactic bacteria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehring, Andreas U., E-mail: agehring@erdw.ethz.ch [Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Charilaou, Michalis, E-mail: michalis.charilaou@erdw.ethz.ch [Institute of Geophysics, ETH Zurich, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Garcia-Rubio, Ines, E-mail: garciarubio@phys.chem.ethz.ch [Laboratory of Physical Chemistry, ETH Zurich, 8093 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2012-04-15

    Single domain magnetite particles formed in chain assemblies by magnetotactic bacteria (MTB) are taken as proxy in inferring environmental and Earth's magnetism. The reliable use of magnetosomes in MTB, or their fossil remains (magnetofossils), requires that they are unaffected by oxidation. Here we present experimental data from saturation isothermal remanent magnetization (SIRM) and ferromagnetic resonance spectroscopy (FMR) between room temperature and 10 K, which were applied to detect oxidation in intact MTB. The distinction of non-oxidized from oxidized MTB-assemblies is based mainly on two different characteristic physical properties: (i) the intrinsic Verwey transition in pure magnetite, and (ii) blocking of spins of nano-sized products formed during oxidation at the surface or the interior of the magnetosomes. Suppression of the Verwey transition due to oxidation prevents the shift of the anisotropy axes, which in turn conserves the anisotropic properties at room temperature down to low temperature. The presented methodology assures a distinction between non- and oxidized magnetite assemblies, with pronounced certainty, unlike standard dc methods.

  20. Optical properties of graphite oxide and reduced graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Eilho; Lee, Seokbae; Roh, Seulki; Hwang, Eunhee; Lee, Junghyun; Lee, Hyoyoung; Hwang, Jungseek

    2014-07-01

    We studied the optical properties of a graphite oxide and a reduced graphite oxide by using the optical spectroscopic technique. The graphite oxide does not show a finite dc conductivity and has several characteristic absorption modes in the mid-infrared region, caused by an epoxide functional group and hydroxyl and carboxyl moieties in the mid-infrared range. The reduced graphite oxide shows a Drude-like response in the far-infrared region and the estimated dc conductivity and electric mobility are around 200 Ω-1cm-1 and ˜100 cm2V-1s-1, respectively. We found that the optical conductivity cannot be fitted with a simple Drude model, which indicates that the charge carriers are correlated. We applied an extended Drude model and obtained the optical scattering rate and the optical effective mass. We found that the optical effective mass can carry information of both the enhanced mass by correlation and the electronic band structure.

  1. Room temperature chemical oxidation of delafossite-type oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trari, M.; Toepfer, J.; Doumerc, J.P.; Pouchard, M.; Hagenmuller, P. (Laboratoire de Chimie du Solide du CNRS, Talence (France)); Ammar, A. (Universite Cadi Ayyad, Marrakech (Morocco))

    1994-07-01

    Examination of the delafossite-type structure of CuLaO[sub 2] and CuYO[sub 2] suggests that there is room enough to accommodate intercalated oxide ions and the charge compensation resulting simply from the oxidation of an equivalent amount of Cu[sup +] into Cu[sup 2+]. Reaction with hypohalites in an aqueous solution leads to color change. Evidence of the formation of Cu[sup 2+] is given by TGA, iodometric titration, and magnetic (static and EPR) measurements. The obtained La and Y compounds seem to behave in a different way: Whereas CuLaO[sub 2+x] appears as a single phase, CuYO[sub 2+x] corresponds to a two-phase mixture, with respectively low and high x values, the latter being isostructural with the thermally oxidized compound recently reported. Comparison is stressed between the oxides obtained at higher temperatures.

  2. Selective propene oxidation on mixed metal oxide catalysts

    CERN Document Server

    James, D W

    2002-01-01

    Selective catalytic oxidation processes represent a large segment of the modern chemical industry and a major application of these is the selective partial oxidation of propene to produce acrolein. Mixed metal oxide catalysts are particularly effective in promoting this reaction, and the two primary candidates for the industrial process are based on iron antimonate and bismuth molybdate. Some debate exists in the literature regarding the operation of these materials and the roles of their catalytic components. In particular, iron antimonate catalysts containing excess antimony are known to be highly selective towards acrolein, and a variety of proposals for the enhanced selectivity of such materials have been given. The aim of this work was to provide a direct comparison between the behaviour of bismuth molybdate and iron antimonate catalysts, with additional emphasis being placed on the component single oxide phases of the latter. Studies were also extended to other antimonate-based catalysts, including coba...

  3. Tobacco Xenobiotics Release Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lam EWN

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many xenobiotic compounds exert their actions through the release of free radicals and related oxidants 12, bringing about unwanted biological effects 3. Indeed, oxidative events may play a significant role in tobacco toxicity from cigarette smoke. Here, we demonstrate the direct in vitro release of the free radical nitric oxide (•NO from extracts and components of smokeless tobacco, including nicotine, nitrosonornicotine (NNN and 4-(methyl-N-nitrosamino-1-(3-pyridyl-1-butanone (NNK in phosphate buffered saline and human saliva using electron spin resonance and chemiluminescence detection. Our findings suggest that tobacco xenobiotics represent as yet unrecognized sources of •NO in the body.

  4. Synthesis of vertically aligned metal oxide nanostructures

    KAUST Repository

    Roqan, Iman S.

    2016-03-03

    Metal oxide nanostructure and methods of making metal oxide nanostructures are provided. The metal oxide nanostructures can be 1 -dimensional nanostructures such as nanowires, nanofibers, or nanotubes. The metal oxide nanostructures can be doped or undoped metal oxides. The metal oxide nanostructures can be deposited onto a variety of substrates. The deposition can be performed without high pressures and without the need for seed catalysts on the substrate. The deposition can be performed by laser ablation of a target including a metal oxide and, optionally, a dopant. In some embodiments zinc oxide nanostructures are deposited onto a substrate by pulsed laser deposition of a zinc oxide target using an excimer laser emitting UV radiation. The zinc oxide nanostructure can be doped with a rare earth metal such as gadolinium. The metal oxide nanostructures can be used in many devices including light-emitting diodes and solar cells.

  5. Study of nitric oxide catalytic oxidation on manganese oxides-loaded activated carbon at low temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    You, Fu-Tian [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Yu, Guang-Wei, E-mail: gwyu@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Wang, Yin, E-mail: yinwang@iue.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Xing, Zhen-Jiao [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); Liu, Xue-Jiao; Li, Jie [Key Laboratory of Urban Pollutant Conversion, Institute of Urban Environment, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Xiamen (China); University of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China)

    2017-08-15

    Highlights: • Loading manganese oxides on activated carbon effectively promotes NO oxidation. • NO adsorption-desorption on activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation. • A high Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+} ratio contributes to NO oxidation by promoting lattice O transfer. - Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is an air pollutant that is difficult to remove at low concentration and low temperature. Manganese oxides (MnO{sub x})-loaded activated carbon (MLAC) was prepared by a co-precipitation method and studied as a new catalyst for NO oxidation at low temperature. Characterization of MLAC included X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N{sub 2} adsorption/desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Activity tests demonstrated the influence of the amount of MnO{sub x} and the test conditions on the reaction. MLAC with 7.5 wt.% MnO{sub x} (MLAC003) exhibits the highest NO conversion (38.7%) at 1000 ppm NO, 20 vol.% O{sub 2}, room temperature and GHSV ca. 16000 h{sup −1}. The NO conversion of MLAC003 was elevated by 26% compared with that of activated carbon. The results of the MLAC003 activity test under different test conditions demonstrated that NO conversion is also influenced by inlet NO concentration, inlet O{sub 2} concentration, reaction temperature and GHSV. The NO adsorption-desorption process in micropores of activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation, which can be controlled by pore structure and reaction temperature. The activity elevation caused by MnO{sub x} loading is assumed to be related to Mn{sup 4+}/Mn{sup 3+} ratio. Finally, a mechanism of NO catalytic oxidation on MLAC based on NO adsorption-desorption and MnO{sub x} lattice O transfer is proposed.

  6. Oxidative Damage in Parkinson's Disease

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Beal, M

    2001-01-01

    The objective of the present research is to determine whether there is a coherent body of evidence implicating oxidative damage in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's Disease and the MPTP model of Parkinsonism...

  7. Exploring oxidative modifications of tyrosine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Houée-Lévin, C; Bobrowski, K; Horakova, L

    2015-01-01

    Protein oxidation is increasingly recognised as an important modulator of biochemical pathways controlling both physiological and pathological processes. While much attention has focused on cysteine modifications in reversible redox signalling, there is increasing evidence that other protein...... residues are oxidised in vivo with impact on cellular homeostasis and redox signalling pathways. A notable example is tyrosine, which can undergo a number of oxidative post-translational modifications to form 3-hydroxy-tyrosine, tyrosine crosslinks, 3-nitrotyrosine and halogenated tyrosine, with different...... effects on cellular functions. Tyrosine oxidation has been studied extensively in vitro, and this has generated detailed information about the molecular mechanisms that may occur in vivo. An important aspect of studying tyrosine oxidation both in vitro and in biological systems is the ability to monitor...

  8. COPD: balancing oxidants and antioxidants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fischer, Bernard M; Voynow, Judith A; Ghio, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is one of the most common chronic illnesses in the world. The disease encompasses emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway obstruction and can be caused by environmental exposures, primarily cigarette smoking. Since only a small subset of smokers develop COPD, it is believed that host factors interact with the environment to increase the propensity to develop disease. The major pathogenic factors causing disease include infection and inflammation, protease and antiprotease imbalance, and oxidative stress overwhelming antioxidant defenses. In this review, we will discuss the major environmental and host sources for oxidative stress; discuss how oxidative stress regulates chronic bronchitis; review the latest information on genetic predisposition to COPD, specifically focusing on oxidant/antioxidant imbalance; and review future antioxidant therapeutic options for COPD. The complexity of COPD will necessitate a multi-target therapeutic approach. It is likely that antioxidant supplementation and dietary antioxidants will have a place in these future combination therapies. PMID:25673984

  9. Diffusion of single oxidation pond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Song Ruo-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The hydraulic characteristic of an oxidation pond was studied by the tracer experiment, and an empirical formula of Peclet number was obtained, which can be well applied to the model of plug flow reactor with longitudinal diffusion.

  10. ENGINEERING BULLETIN: SUPERCRITICAL WATER OXIDATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    This engineering bulletin presents a description and status of supercritical water oxidation technology, a summary of recent performance tests, and the current applicability of this emerging technology. This information is provided to assist remedial project managers, contractors...

  11. Resonating Nitrous Oxide Thruster Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — AeroAstro proposes decomposing nitrous oxide (N2O) as an alternative propellant to existing spacecraft propellants. Decomposing N2O can be used as either a high Isp,...

  12. Oxidative stress tolerance in plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Aparna; Rathinasabapathi, Bala

    2013-01-01

    Biotic and abiotic stress conditions produce reactive oxygen species (ROS) in plants causing oxidative stress damage. At the same time, ROS have additional signaling roles in plant adaptation to the stress. It is not known how the two seemingly contrasting functional roles of ROS between oxidative damage to the cell and signaling for stress protection are balanced. Research suggests that the plant growth regulator auxin may be the connecting link regulating the level of ROS and directing its role in oxidative damage or signaling in plants under stress. The objective of this review is to highlight some of the recent research on how auxin’s role is intertwined to that of ROS, more specifically H2O2, in plant adaptation to oxidative stress conditions. PMID:23887492

  13. Obesity, asthma, and oxidative stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fernando Holguin; Anne Fitzpatrick

    2010-01-01

    .... Contrary to what has previously been thought, the combination of obesity and asthma, both chronic inflammatory diseases, does not necessarily result in a synergistic effect, leading to even greater oxidative stress...

  14. Oxidation dynamics of aluminum nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Ying [Argonne Leadership Computing Facility, Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne, Illinois 60439 (United States); Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya [Collaboratory for Advanced Computing and Simulations, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, Department of Computer Science, University of Southern California, Los Angeles, California 90089-0242 (United States)

    2015-02-23

    Aluminum nanorods (Al-NRs) are promising fuels for pyrotechnics due to the high contact areas with oxidizers, but their oxidation mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, reactive molecular dynamics simulations are performed to study thermally initiated burning of oxide-coated Al-NRs with different diameters (D = 26, 36, and 46 nm) in oxygen environment. We found that thinner Al-NRs burn faster due to the larger surface-to-volume ratio. The reaction initiates with the dissolution of the alumina shell into the molten Al core to generate heat. This is followed by the incorporation of environmental oxygen atoms into the resulting Al-rich shell, thereby accelerating the heat release. These results reveal an unexpectedly active role of the alumina shell as a “nanoreactor” for oxidation.

  15. Skin aging and oxidative stress

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ahsanuddin, Sayeeda; Lam, Minh; D. Baron, Elma

    2016-01-01

    .... Here, we review the critical role that oxidative stress plays in skin aging, including its effects on signaling pathways involved in skin matrix formation and degradation, proteasome activity, as well as DNA structure...

  16. Atomic Layer Deposition of Tin Oxide with Nitric Oxide as an Oxidant Gas

    OpenAIRE

    Heo, Jaeyeong; Gordon, Roy Gerald; Kim, Sang Bok

    2012-01-01

    Atomic layer deposition (ALD) of tin oxide \\((SnO_2)\\) thin films was achieved using a cyclic amide of Sn(II) (1,3-bis(1,1-dimethylethyl)-4,5-dimethyl-(4R,5R)-1,3,2-diazastannolidin-2-ylidene) as a tin precursor and nitric oxide (NO) as an oxidant gas. Film properties as a function of growth temperature from \\(130-250^{\\circ}C\\) were studied. Highly conducting \\(SnO_2\\) films were obtained at \\(200-250^{\\circ}C\\) with the growth per cycle of \\(~1.4 \\mathring{A}\\)/cycle, while insulating films...

  17. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Liu, Dezhao; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    2012-01-01

    oxidizing bacteria but several fungal families including Trichocomaceae. A positive correlation was found between the presence of mold and sulfide uptake. However there have been no reports on fungi metabolizing hydrogen sulfide. We hypothesize that the mold increases the air exposed surface, enabling...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  18. Sulfide oxidation in a biofilter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Claus Lunde; Dezhao, Liu; Hansen, Michael Jørgen

    oxidizing bacteria but several fungal families including Trichocomaceae. A positive correlation was found between the presence of mold and sulfide uptake. However there have been no reports on fungi metabolizing hydrogen sulfide. We hypothesize that the mold increases the air exposed surface, enabling...... higher hydrogen sulfide uptake followed by oxidation catalyzed by iron-containing enzymes such as cytochrome c oxidase in a process uncoupled from energy conservation....

  19. Oxide Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting Materials

    OpenAIRE

    James, Ashley

    2014-01-01

    Conventional thermoelectric materials found in many thermoelectric devices have unfavourable properties; they often suffer instability at high temperatures and contain toxic metals which pose a hazard to the environment. Oxide thermoelectric materials are stable, less toxic and could eventually replace conventional materials. The thermoelectric performance of oxide materials currently do not match conventional materials however, there is potential for improvement through doping and altering t...

  20. Myoglobin-induced oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Irwin, J A; Ostdal, H; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    1999-01-01

    -to-protein radical transfer and hence chain-oxidation occurs, and the factors that control these reactions. Three amino acids show significant reactivity: Tyr, Trp, and Cys, with Cys the least efficient. Evidence has also been obtained for (inefficient) hydrogen abstraction at peptide alpha-carbon sites; this may...... that protein-to-protein damage transfer and protein chain-oxidation may occur readily in biological systems....

  1. Oxidation behaviour and electrical properties of cobalt/cerium oxide composite coatings for solid oxide fuel cell interconnects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harthøj, Anders; Holt, Tobias; Møller, Per

    2015-01-01

    This work evaluates the performance of cobalt/cerium oxide (Co/CeO2) composite coatings and pure Co coatings to be used for solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) interconnects. The coatings are electroplated on the ferritic stainless steels Crofer 22 APU and Crofer 22H. Coated and uncoated samples......, Mn, Fe and Cr oxide and the inner layer consisted of Cr oxide. The CeO2 was present as discrete particles in the outer oxide layer after exposure. The Cr oxide layer thicknesses and oxidations rates were significantly reduced for Co/CeO2 coated samples compared to for Co coated and uncoated samples...

  2. Oxidative Stress in Aged Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damisela Ramírez Ramírez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: aging is one of the major problems that the world is facing today due to its impact on all areas of society. Objective: to determine the concentrations of advanced oxidation protein products and malondialdehyde as indicators of oxidative damage and to determine the antioxidant defense capacity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase, catalase and the reduced glutathione concentration in aged rats. Methods: a total of 20 male Wistar rats with a body weight of approximately 200 to 250 grams were selected to form two groups with 10 young adult rats and 10 old rats. 2 ml of blood was drawn from the paranasal sinus. The sample was collected in 5 ml vials and after being homogenized, it was sent to the Biomedical Research Center, where it was used to assess the following oxidative stress variables: degree of oxidative damage and antioxidant defense level. An analysis of variance was performed to study the behavior of the different groups. Differences were considered significant when P value was less than 0.05. Results: no significant changes were found in the concentrations of malondialdehyde and glutathione, as well as in the superoxide dismutase and catalase activity in aged rats compared to young. Concentration of advanced oxidation protein products increased significantly in aged rats. Conclusions: aged rats showed an increase in oxidative damage to proteins. Antioxidant defense capacity of the enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and reduced glutathione concentration showed no changes.

  3. 46 CFR 154.1725 - Ethylene oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Ethylene oxide. 154.1725 Section 154.1725 Shipping COAST....1725 Ethylene oxide. (a) A vessel carrying ethylene oxide must: (1) Have cargo piping, vent piping, and... space of an ethylene oxide cargo tank for a period of 30 days under the condition of paragraph (e) of...

  4. 21 CFR 73.2250 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.2250 Section 73.2250 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2250 Iron oxides. (a) Identity. The color additives iron oxides consist of any one or any combination of synthetically prepared iron oxides, including the...

  5. 46 CFR 153.1010 - Alkylene oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Alkylene oxides. 153.1010 Section 153.1010 Shipping... § 153.1010 Alkylene oxides. (a) Before each loading of a cargo containment system with a cargo... that separation of the alkylene oxide piping system complies with alkylene oxide handling plans...

  6. Oxidative DNA damage and oxidative stress in subjects occupationally exposed to nitrous oxide (N(2)O).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrońska-Nofer, Teresa; Nofer, Jerzy-Roch; Jajte, Jolanta; Dziubałtowska, Elżbieta; Szymczak, Wiesław; Krajewski, Wojciech; Wąsowicz, Wojciech; Rydzyński, Konrad

    2012-03-01

    Occupational exposure to nitrous oxide (N(2)O) and/or halogenated hydrocarbons has been suggested to induce damage of genetic material, but the underlying mechanisms remain obscure. This study investigated the role of oxidative processes in the genotoxicity associated with exposure to waste anaesthetic gases. The study was performed in 36 female nurses and in 36 unexposed female health care workers matched for age and employment duration. Genotoxic effects were examined by Comet test modification employing formamidopyrimidine glycosylase (FPG) that allows assessment of oxidative DNA damage. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) in leukocytes were investigated by fluorescence spectroscopy with 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. Oxidative stress markers including 8-iso-prostaglandin F(2α) (8-iso-PGF(2α)), thiobarbituric acid-reacive substances (TBARS), α-tocopherol, and glutathione peroxidise (GPX) activity were measured immuno- or colorimetrically. N(2)O, sevoflurane and isoflurane were monitored by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The study documents for the first time the positive correlation between the oxidative DNA damage and the N(2)O levels in the ambient air. By contrast, no association was observed between genotoxic effects and sevoflurane or isoflurane. In addition, ROS generation and plasma and urine concentrations of TBARS and 8-iso-PGF(2α), respectively, were elevated, while GPX activity was reduced in nurses exposed to waste anaesthetic gases. Path analysis pointed to a causal relationship between N(2)O exposure, oxidative stress and DNA damage. Occupational exposure to N(2)O is associated with increased oxidative DNA damage and the level of exposure plays a critical role in this regard. Increased oxidative stress may represent a mechanistic link between chronic N(2)O exposure and genotoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Solid oxide electrolyser cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoejgaard Jensen, S.

    2006-12-15

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) produced at Riso National Laboratory was tested as steam electrolysers under various current densities, operating temperatures and steam partial pressures. At 950 deg. C and a cell voltage of 1.48V the current density was -3.6 A/cm{sup 2} with app. 30% H{sub 2} + 70% H{sub 2}O in the inlet gas and a H{sub 2}O utilization of app. 40%. The tested SOECs were also used for CO{sub 2} electrolysis. Economy studies of CO and H2 production show that especially H{sub 2} production can be competitive in areas with cheap electricity. Assuming the above described initial performance and a lifetime of 10 years it is possible to achieve a production price of 0.7 US dollar/kg H{sub 2} with an electricity price of 1.3 US cent/kWh. The cell voltage was measured as function of time. In test of about two month of duration a long-term degradation was observed. At 850 deg. C, -0.5 A/cm{sup 2} with 50 vol% H{sub 2} the degradation rate was app. 20 mV/1000h. It was shown that the degradation happens at Ni/YSZ-electrode. The long term degradation is probably caused by coarsening of the Ni-particles. After onset of electrolysis operation a transient passivation/reactivation phenomena with duration of several days was observed. It was shown that the phenomenon is attributed to the SiO{sub 2} contamination at the Ni/YSZ electrode-electrolyte interface. The SiO{sub 2} arises from the albite glass sealing (NaAlSi{sub 3}O{sub 8}) that surrounds the electrode. Si may enter the Ni/YSZ electrode via the reaction Si(OH){sub 4}(g) {r_reversible} SiO{sub 2}(l)+H{sub 2}O(g). At the active sites of the Ni/YSZ electrode steam is reduced via the reaction H{sub 2}O - 2e {yields} H{sub 2}+O{sup 2-} . This shifts the equilibrium of the first reaction to form SiO{sub 2}(l) at the active sites. After a certain time the sealing crystallizes and the SiO{sub 2}(l) evaporates from the active sites and the cell reactivates. The passivation is shown to relate to a build up of a

  8. Size of oxide vacancies in fluorite and perovskite structured oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Norby, Poul; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2015-01-01

    An analysis of the effective radii of vacancies and the stoichiometric expansion coefficient is performed on metal oxides with fluorite and perovskite structures. Using the hard sphere model with Shannon ion radii we find that the effective radius of the oxide vacancy in fluorites increases...... with increasing ion radius of the host cation and that it is significantly smaller than the radius of the oxide ion in all cases, from 37% smaller for HfO2 to 13 % smaller for ThO2. The perovskite structured LaGaO3 doped with Sr or Mg or both is analyzed in some detail. The results show that the effective radius...... of an oxide vacancy in doped LaGaO3 is only about 6 % smaller than the oxide ion. In spite of this the stoichiometric expansion coefficient (a kind of chemical expansion coefficient) of the similar perovskite, LaCrO3, is significantly smaller than the stoichiometric expansion coefficient of the fluorite...

  9. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND ANTI OXIDANTS STATUS IN PELLAGRA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Desireddy Neelima, Bandi Hari Krishna, Masthan Saheb, Natham Mallikarjuna Reddy.

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objectives: Pellagra was vanished from most parts of the world where it was formerly present due to its dietary modification. However, it is still encountered among the jowar eating populations of India. The information about the role of oxidative stress in pellagra was not established. Therefore, in this study we assessed the oxidative stress status by using malondialdehyde (MDA, total anti oxidant status (TAOS and redox ratio (RER in clinically diagnosed pellagra patients. Materials and methods: Clinically diagnosed pellagra patients aged between 18 to 40 years, both male and females were recruited (n=78 from department of Dermatology. Age and gender matched controls (n=78 were recruited from the student and residents of the hospital. Malondialdehyde (MDA is a marker of lipid peroxidation, Total Anti Oxidant Status (TAOS and Redox Ratio (RER markers were assessed by using commercially available kits. Results: There were no significant differences in the anthropometric parameters. However, the oxidative stress markers MDA (p<0.05, RER (p<0.001 were significantly high and TAOS was low (P<0.001 in pellagra patients in comparison with age and gender matched controls. Conclusion: The results of this study showed the increased MDA, RER levels and decreased TAOS levels. Estimation of these markers at early stage will help to take measures to prevent the progression of disease and develop antioxidant strategies.

  10. Oxidation and erosion-oxidation behavior of steels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stela Maria de Carvalho Fernandes

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available The high temperature oxidation and erosion-oxidation (E-O behavior of steels AISI 1020, 304, 310, and 410 were determined. These steels were selected to evaluate the effect of chromium content on its E-O resistance. The oxidation behavior was determined in a thermogravimetric analyzer. A test rig in which a specimen assembly was rotated through a fluidized bed of erodent particles was used to determine the E-O behavior. Alumina powder (200 µm was used as the erodent. The E-O tests were carried out in the temperature range 25-600 °C, with average particle impact velocities of 3.5 and 15 ms-1 and impact angle of 90°. The oxidation resistance of the steels increased with chromium content. The E-O behavior of the steels was determined as wastage. The E-O wastage of the steels exposed to particle impact at low velocity was low but increased with temperature above 300 °C. The E-O wastage of the different steels exposed to particle impact at high velocity was quite similar. The wastage increased with increase in temperature above 500 °C. The increases in E-O wastage of the steels observed at temperatures above 300, 400 or 500 °C, depending on the steel, were due mainly to a transition in the dominant wastage process, from 'erosion' to 'erosion-oxidation'.

  11. Nitroxide-Functionalized Graphene Oxide from Graphite Oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila-Vega, Yazmin I; Leyva-Porras, Cesar C; Mireles, Marcela; Quevedo-López, Manuel; Macossay, Javier; Bonilla-Cruz, José

    2013-11-01

    A facile method for preparing functionalized graphene oxide single layers with nitroxide groups is reported herein. Highly oxidized graphite oxide (GO=90.6%) was obtained, slightly modifying an improved Hummer's method. Oxoammonium salts (OS) were investigated to introduce nitroxide groups to GO, resulting in a one-step functionalization and exfoliation. The mechanisms of functionalization/exfoliation are proposed, where the oxidation of aromatic alcohols to ketone groups, and the formation of alkoxyamine species are suggested. Two kinds of functionalized graphene oxide layers (GOFT1 and GOFT2) were obtained by controlling the amount of OS added. GOFT1 and GOFT2 exhibited a high interlayer spacing (d0001 = 1.12nm), which was determined by X-ray diffraction. The presence of new chemical bonds C-N (~9.5 %) and O-O (~4.3 %) from nitroxide attached onto graphene layers were observed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Single-layers of GOFT1 were observed by HRTEM, exhibiting amorphous and crystalline zones at a 50:50 ratio; in contrast, layers of GOFT2 exhibited a fully amorphous surface. Fingerprint of GOFT1 single layers was obtained by electron diffraction at several tilts. Finally, the potential use of these materials within Nylon 6 matrices was investigated, where an unusual simultaneous increase in tensile stress, tensile strain and Young's modulus was observed.

  12. Chemical oxidative polymerization of aminodiphenylamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cirić-Marjanović, Gordana; Trchová, Miroslava; Konyushenko, Elena N; Holler, Petr; Stejskal, Jaroslav

    2008-06-12

    The course of oxidation of 4-aminodiphenylamine with ammonium peroxydisulfate in an acidic aqueous ethanol solution as well as the properties of the oxidation products were compared with those of 2-aminodiphenylamine. Semiconducting oligomers of 4-aminodiphenylamine and nonconducting oligomers of 2-aminodiphenylamine of weight-average molecular weights 3700 and 1900, respectively, were prepared by using an oxidant to monomer molar ratio of 1.25. When this ratio was changed from 0.5 to 2.5, the highest conductivity of oxidation products of 4-aminodiphenylamine, 2.5 x 10 (-4) S cm (-1), was reached at the molar ratio [oxidant]/[monomer] = 1.5. The mechanism of the oxidative polymerization of aminodiphenylamines has been theoretically studied by the AM1 and MNDO-PM3 semiempirical quantum chemical methods combined with the MM2 molecular mechanics force-field method and conductor-like screening model of solvation. Molecular orbital calculations revealed the prevalence of N prim-C10 coupling reaction of 4-aminodiphenylamine, while N prim-C5 is the main coupling mode between 2-aminodiphenylamine units. FTIR and Raman spectroscopic studies confirm the prevalent formation of linear N prim-C10 coupled oligomers of 4-aminodiphenylamine and suggest branching and formation of phenazine structural units in the oligomers of 2-aminodiphenylamine. The results are discussed with respect to the oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate, leading to polyaniline, in which 4-aminodiphenylamine is the major dimer and 2-aminodiphenylamine is the most important dimeric intermediate byproduct.

  13. Mesoporous metal oxide graphene nanocomposite materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jun; Aksay, Ilhan A.; Kou, Rong; Wang, Donghai

    2016-05-24

    A nanocomposite material formed of graphene and a mesoporous metal oxide having a demonstrated specific capacity of more than 200 F/g with particular utility when employed in supercapacitor applications. A method for making these nanocomposite materials by first forming a mixture of graphene, a surfactant, and a metal oxide precursor, precipitating the metal oxide precursor with the surfactant from the mixture to form a mesoporous metal oxide. The mesoporous metal oxide is then deposited onto a surface of the graphene.

  14. Graphene-supported metal oxide monolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Marcus A.; Baumann, Theodore F.; Biener, Juergen; Biener, Monika A.; Wang, Yinmin; Ye, Jianchao; Tylski, Elijah

    2017-01-10

    A composition comprising at least one graphene-supported metal oxide monolith, said monolith comprising a three-dimensional structure of graphene sheets crosslinked by covalent carbon bonds, wherein the graphene sheets are coated by at least one metal oxide such as iron oxide or titanium oxide. Also provided is an electrode comprising the aforementioned graphene-supported metal oxide monolith, wherein the electrode can be substantially free of any carbon-black and substantially free of any binder.

  15. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

    OpenAIRE

    Fogarasi Erzsébet; Croitoru Mircea Dumitru; Fülöp Ibolya; Muntean Daniela-Lucia

    2016-01-01

    Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes), of protein oxidation (carbonyl...

  16. Oxidative stress in Parkinson’s disease

    OpenAIRE

    Nikam, Shashikant; Nikam, Padmaja; Ahaley, S. K.; Sontakke, Ajit V.

    2009-01-01

    Oxidative stress contributes to the cascade, leading to dopamine cell degeneration in Parkinson’s disease. However, oxidative stress is intimately linked to other components of the degenerative process, such as mitochondrial dysfunction, excitotoxicity, nitric oxide toxicity and inflammation. It is therefore difficult to determine whether oxidative stress leads to or is a consequence of, these events. Oxidative stress was assessed by estimating lipid peroxidation product in the form of thioba...

  17. 21 CFR 186.1374 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Iron oxides. 186.1374 Section 186.1374 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 186.1374 Iron oxides. (a) Iron oxides (oxides of iron, CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2) are undefined mixtures of iron (II) oxide (CAS Reg. No. 1345-25-1, black cubic crystals) and iron (III...

  18. Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessert, Timothy A; Yoshida, Yuki; Coutts, Timothy J

    2014-05-27

    Transparent conducting oxides and production thereof are disclosed. An exemplary method of producing a transparent conducting oxide (TCO) material may comprise: providing a TCO target (110) doped with either a high-permittivity oxide or a low-permittivity oxide in a process chamber (100). The method may also comprise depositing a metal oxide on the target (110) to form a thin film having enhanced optical properties without substantially decreasing electrical quality.

  19. Wet-cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagil, Suleyman Murat; Celik, Huseyin Tugrul; Ciftci, Sefa; Kazanci, Fatmanur Hacievliyagil; Arslan, Muzeyyen; Erdamar, Nazan; Kesik, Yunus; Erdamar, Husamettin; Dane, Senol

    2014-12-01

    Wet-cupping therapy is one of the oldest known medical techniques. Although it is widely used in various conditions such as acute\\chronic inflammation, infectious diseases, and immune system disorders, its mechanism of action is not fully known. In this study, we investigated the oxidative status as the first step to elucidate possible mechanisms of action of wet cupping. Wet cupping therapy is implemented to 31 healthy volunteers. Venous blood samples and Wet cupping blood samples were taken concurrently. Serum nitricoxide, malondialdehyde levels and activity of superoxide dismutase and myeloperoxidase were measured spectrophotometrically. Wet cupping blood had higher activity of myeloperoxidase, lower activity of superoxide dismutase, higher levels of malondialdehyde and nitricoxide compared to the venous blood. Wet cupping removes oxidants and decreases oxidative stress. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Metal oxide nanorod arrays on monolithic substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, Pu-Xian; Guo, Yanbing; Ren, Zheng

    2018-01-02

    A metal oxide nanorod array structure according to embodiments disclosed herein includes a monolithic substrate having a surface and multiple channels, an interface layer bonded to the surface of the substrate, and a metal oxide nanorod array coupled to the substrate surface via the interface layer. The metal oxide can include ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide. The substrate can include a glass substrate, a plastic substrate, a silicon substrate, a ceramic monolith, and a stainless steel monolith. The ceramic can include cordierite, alumina, tin oxide, and titania. The nanorod array structure can include a perovskite shell, such as a lanthanum-based transition metal oxide, or a metal oxide shell, such as ceria, zinc oxide, tin oxide, alumina, zirconia, cobalt oxide, and gallium oxide, or a coating of metal particles, such as platinum, gold, palladium, rhodium, and ruthenium, over each metal oxide nanorod. Structures can be bonded to the surface of a substrate and resist erosion if exposed to high velocity flow rates.

  1. Heterogeneous Partial (ammOxidation and Oxidative Dehydrogenation Catalysis on Mixed Metal Oxides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques C. Védrine

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an overview of heterogeneous partial (ammoxidation and oxidative dehydrogenation (ODH of hydrocarbons. The review has been voluntarily restricted to metal oxide-type catalysts, as the partial oxidation field is very broad and the number of catalysts is quite high. The main factors of solid catalysts for such reactions, designated by Grasselli as the “seven pillars”, and playing a determining role in catalytic properties, are considered to be, namely: isolation of active sites (known to be composed of ensembles of atoms, Me–O bond strength, crystalline structure, redox features, phase cooperation, multi-functionality and the nature of the surface oxygen species. Other important features and physical and chemical properties of solid catalysts, more or less related to the seven pillars, are also emphasized, including reaction sensitivity to metal oxide structure, epitaxial contact between an active phase and a second phase or its support, synergy effect between several phases, acid-base aspects, electron transfer ability, catalyst preparation and activation and reaction atmospheres, etc. Some examples are presented to illustrate the importance of these key factors. They include light alkanes (C1–C4 oxidation, ethane oxidation to ethylene and acetic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O and Nb doped NiO, propene oxidation to acrolein on BiMoCoFe-O systems, propane (ammoxidation to (acrylonitrile acrylic acid on MoVTe(SbNb-O mixed oxides, butane oxidation to maleic anhydride on VPO: (VO2P2O7-based catalyst, and isobutyric acid ODH to methacrylic acid on Fe hydroxyl phosphates. It is shown that active sites are composed of ensembles of atoms whose size and chemical composition depend on the reactants to be transformed (their chemical and size features and the reaction mechanism, often of Mars and van Krevelen type. An important aspect is the fact that surface composition and surface crystalline structure vary with reaction on stream until

  2. Solid oxide electrochemical reactor science.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Neal P. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Stechel, Ellen Beth; Moyer, Connor J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO); Ambrosini, Andrea; Key, Robert J. (Colorado School of Mines, Golden, CO)

    2010-09-01

    Solid-oxide electrochemical cells are an exciting new technology. Development of solid-oxide cells (SOCs) has advanced considerable in recent years and continues to progress rapidly. This thesis studies several aspects of SOCs and contributes useful information to their continued development. This LDRD involved a collaboration between Sandia and the Colorado School of Mines (CSM) ins solid-oxide electrochemical reactors targeted at solid oxide electrolyzer cells (SOEC), which are the reverse of solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFC). SOECs complement Sandia's efforts in thermochemical production of alternative fuels. An SOEC technology would co-electrolyze carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) with steam at temperatures around 800 C to form synthesis gas (H{sub 2} and CO), which forms the building blocks for a petrochemical substitutes that can be used to power vehicles or in distributed energy platforms. The effort described here concentrates on research concerning catalytic chemistry, charge-transfer chemistry, and optimal cell-architecture. technical scope included computational modeling, materials development, and experimental evaluation. The project engaged the Colorado Fuel Cell Center at CSM through the support of a graduate student (Connor Moyer) at CSM and his advisors (Profs. Robert Kee and Neal Sullivan) in collaboration with Sandia.

  3. Oxidative stress and diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hui; Jin, Xun; Kei Lam, Christopher Wai; Yan, Sheng-Kai

    2011-11-01

    Increasing evidences have suggested that oxidative stress plays a major role in the pathogenesis of diabetes mellitus (DM). Oxidative stress also appears to be the pathogenic factor in underlying diabetic complications. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated by environmental factors, such as ionizing radiation and chemical carcinogens, and also by endogenous processes, including energy metabolism in mitochondria. ROS produced either endogenously or exogenously can attack lipids, proteins and nucleic acids simultaneously in living cells. There are many potential mechanisms whereby excess glucose metabolites traveling along these pathways might promote the development of DM complication and cause pancreatic β cell damage. However, all these pathways have in common the formation of ROS, that, in excess and over time, causes chronic oxidative stress, which in turn causes defective insulin gene expression and insulin secretion as well as increased apoptosis. Various methods for determining biomarkers of cellular oxidative stress have been developed, and some have been proposed for sensitive assessment of antioxidant defense and oxidative damage in diabetes and its complications. However, their clinical utility is limited by less than optimal standardization techniques and the lack of sufficient large-sized, multi-marker prospective trials.

  4. Absorption and oxidation of nitrogen oxide in ionic liquids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kunov-Kruse, Andreas Jonas; Thomassen, Peter Langelund; Riisager, Anders

    2016-01-01

    A new strategy for capturing nitrogen oxide, NO, from the gas phase is presented. Dilute NO gas is removed from the gas phase by ionic liquids under ambient conditions. The nitrate anion of the ionic liquid catalyzes the oxidation of NO to nitric acid by atmospheric oxygen in the presence of water...... investigations of the reaction and products are presented. The procedure reveals a new vision for removing the pollutant NO by absorption into a non-volatile liquid and converting it into a useful bulk chemical, that is, HNO3....

  5. Thermal oxidation and electrical properties of silicon carbide metal-oxide-semiconductor structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, N.; Rys, A.

    1993-02-01

    The fabrication of metal-oxide-semiconductor (MOS) capacitors on n-type, Si-face 6H-SiC is described for both wet and dry oxidation processes, and the effect of thermal oxidation conditions on the electrical properties of MOS capacitors are investigated. The values of the oxide thickness were obtained as a function of the oxidation time at various oxidation temperatures (which were kept between 1150 and 1250 C). It was found that samples prepared by both dry and wet oxidation showed accumulation, depletion, and inversion regions under illumination, while inversion did not occur under dark conditions. The C-V characteristics of oxidized samples were improved after the oxidized samples were annealed in argon for 30 min. The relation between the oxide thickness and the oxidation time could be expressed by parabolic law, which is also used for thermal oxidation of Si.

  6. Reduced graphene oxide molecular sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Jeremy T; Perkins, F Keith; Snow, Eric S; Wei, Zhongqing; Sheehan, Paul E

    2008-10-01

    We demonstrate reduced graphene oxide as the active material for high-performance molecular sensors. Sensors are fabricated from exfoliated graphene oxide platelets that are deposited to form an ultrathin continuous network. These graphene oxide networks are tunably reduced toward graphene by varying the exposure time to a hydrazine hydrate vapor. The conductance change of the networks upon exposure to trace levels of vapor is measured as a function of the chemical reduction. The level of reduction affects both the sensitivity and the level of 1/ f noise. The sensors are capable of detecting 10 s exposures to simulants of the three main classes of chemical-warfare agents and an explosive at parts-per-billion concentrations.

  7. Atmospheric oxidation of selected hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benter, T.; Olariu, R.I.

    2002-02-01

    This work presents investigations on the gas-phase chemistry of phenol and the cresol isomers performed in a 1080 l quartz glass reactor in Wuppertal and in a large-volume outdoor photoreactor EUPHORE in Valencia, Spain. The studies aimed at clarifying the oxidation mechanisms of the reactions of these compounds with OH and NO{sub 3} radicals. Product investigations on the oxidation of phenol and the cresol isomers initiated by OH radicals were performed in the 1080 l quartz glass reactor with analyses by in situ FT-IR absorption spectroscopy. The primary focus of the investigations was on the determination of product yields. This work represents the first determination and quantification of 1,2-dihydroxybenzenes in the OH oxidation of phenolic compounds. Possible reaction pathways leading to the observed products have been elucidated. (orig.)

  8. CELLULOSE DEGRADATION BY OXIDATIVE ENZYMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  9. Cellulose degradation by oxidative enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Dimarogona

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Enzymatic degradation of plant biomass has attracted intensive research interest for the production of economically viable biofuels. Here we present an overview of the recent findings on biocatalysts implicated in the oxidative cleavage of cellulose, including polysaccharide monooxygenases (PMOs or LPMOs which stands for lytic PMOs, cellobiose dehydrogenases (CDHs and members of carbohydrate-binding module family 33 (CBM33. PMOs, a novel class of enzymes previously termed GH61s, boost the efficiency of common cellulases resulting in increased hydrolysis yields while lowering the protein loading needed. They act on the crystalline part of cellulose by generating oxidized and non-oxidized chain ends. An external electron donor is required for boosting the activity of PMOs. We discuss recent findings concerning their mechanism of action and identify issues and questions to be addressed in the future.

  10. Resveratrol and Endothelial Nitric Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Xia

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO derived from the endothelial NO synthase (eNOS has antihypertensive, antithrombotic, anti-atherosclerotic and antiobesogenic properties. Resveratrol is a polyphenol phytoalexin with multiple cardiovascular and metabolic effects. Part of the beneficial effects of resveratrol are mediated by eNOS. Resveratrol stimulates NO production from eNOS by a number of mechanisms, including upregulation of eNOS expression, stimulation of eNOS enzymatic activity and reversal of eNOS uncoupling. In addition, by reducing oxidative stress, resveratrol prevents oxidative NO inactivation by superoxide thereby enhancing NO bioavailability. Molecular pathways underlying these effects of resveratrol involve SIRT1, AMPK, Nrf2 and estrogen receptors.

  11. Oxidative pyrolysis of solid fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senneca, Osvalda; Chirone, Riccardo [Istituto di Ricerche sulla Combustione, C.N.R., P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy); Salatino, Piero [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Chimica, Universita degli Studi di Napoli Federico II, P.le Tecchio 80, 80125 Napoli (Italy)

    2004-06-01

    This study addresses the dependence of the rate and pattern of pyrolysis of solid fuels from the oxidizing versus inert nature of the gaseous atmosphere. A selection of four solid fuels is considered in the study, namely two plastics (polyethylene and polyethylene terephthalate), one lignocellulosic material (Robinia Pseudoacacia) and a South African bituminous coal. Fuels are pyrolyzed in a thermogravimetric apparatus at different heating rates, under inert conditions or in the presence of oxygen at different concentration.Results indicate that the action exerted by oxygen during pyrolysis depends on the nature of the fuel and on the process conditions such as heating rate and oxygen concentration. Larger heating rates and larger oxygen concentration may indeed emphasize differences between inert and oxidative pyrolysis. Further analysis is directed to check the adequacy of a power low kinetic expression to describe the dependence of the rate of oxidative pyrolysis from the level of oxygen concentration.

  12. Oxide Fiber Targets at ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Köster, U; Carminati, D; Catherall, R; Cederkäll, J; Correia, J G; Crepieux, B; Dietrich, M; Elder, K; Fedosseev, V; Fraile-Prieto, L M; Franchoo, S; Fynbo, H O U; Georg, U; Giles, T; Joinet, A; Jonsson, O C; Kirchner, R; Lau, C; Lettry, Jacques; Maier, H J; Mishin, V I; Oinonen, M; Peräjärvi, K; Ravn, H L; Rinaldi, T; Santana-Leitner, M; Wahl, U; Weissman, L

    2003-01-01

    Many elements are rapidly released from oxide matrices. Some oxide powder targets show a fast sintering, thus losing their favorable release characteristics. Loosely packed oxyde fiber targets are less critical since they may maintain their open structure even when starting to fuse together at some contact points. The experience with various oxyde fiber targets (titania, zirconia, ceria and thoria) used in the last years at ISOLDE is reviewed. For short-lived isotopes of Cu, Ga and Xe the zirconia and ceria targets respectively provided significantly higher yields than any other target (metal foils, oxide powders, etc.) tested before. Titania fibers, which were not commercially available, were produced in a relic process by impregnation of a rayon felt in a titanium chloride solution and subsequent calcination by heating the dried felt in air. Thoria fibers were obtained either by the same process or by burning commercial gas lantern mantle cloth. In the future a beryllia fiber target could be used to produce...

  13. Graphite Oxidation Thermodynamics/Reactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Propp, W.A.

    1998-09-01

    The vulnerability of graphite-matrix spent nuclear fuel to oxidation by the ambient atmosphere if the fuel canister is breached was evaluated. Thermochemical and kinetic data over the anticipated range of storage temperatures (200 to 400 C) were used to calculate the times required for a total carbon mass loss of 1 mgcm-2 from a fuel specimen. At 200 C, the time required to produce even this small loss is large, 900,000 yr. However, at 400 C the time required is only 1.9 yr. The rate of oxidation at 200 C is negligible, and the rate even at 400 C is so small as to be of no practical consequence. Therefore, oxidation of the spent nuclear fuel upon a loss of canister integrity is not anticipated to be a concern based upon the results of this study.

  14. Atomistic stimulation of defective oxides

    CERN Document Server

    Minervini, L

    2000-01-01

    defect processes. The predominant intrinsic disorder reaction and the mechanism by which excess oxygen is accommodated are established. Furthermore, the most favourable migration mechanism and pathway for oxygen ions is predicted. Chapters 7 and 8 investigate pyrochlore oxides. These materials are candidates for solid oxide fuel cell components and as actinide host phases. Such applications require a detailed understanding of the defect processes. The defect energies, displayed as contour maps, are able to account for structure stability and, given an appropriate partial charge potential model, to accurately determine the oxygen positional parameter. In particular, the dependence of the positional parameter on intrinsic disorder is predicted. It is demonstrated, by radiation damage experiments, that these results are able to predict the radiation performance of pyrochlore oxides. Atomistic simulation calculations based on energy minimization techniques and classical pair potentials are used to study several i...

  15. Cardiopulmonary Bypass and Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakkar, Mustafa; Guida, Gustavo; Suleiman, M-Saadeh; Angelini, Gianni D.

    2015-01-01

    The development of the cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB) revolutionized cardiac surgery and contributed immensely to improved patients outcomes. CPB is associated with the activation of different coagulation, proinflammatory, survival cascades and altered redox state. Haemolysis, ischaemia, and perfusion injury and neutrophils activation during CPB play a pivotal role in oxidative stress and the associated activation of proinflammatory and proapoptotic signalling pathways which can affect the function and recovery of multiple organs such as the myocardium, lungs, and kidneys and influence clinical outcomes. The administration of agents with antioxidant properties during surgery either intravenously or in the cardioplegia solution may reduce ROS burst and oxidative stress during CPB. Alternatively, the use of modified circuits such as minibypass can modify both proinflammatory responses and oxidative stress. PMID:25722792

  16. Oxidative Reactions with Nonaqueous Enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan S. Dordick; Douglas Clark; Brian H Davison; Alexander Klibanov

    2001-12-30

    The objective of this work is to demonstrate a proof-of-concept of enzymatic oxidative processing in nonaqueous media using alkene epoxidation and phenolic polymerization as relevant targets. This project will provide both the fundamental and applied investigations necessary to initiate the implementation of oxidative biocatalysts as commercially relevant alternatives to chemical processing in general, and to phenolic polymerizations and alkene epoxidation specifically. Thus, this work will address the Bioprocessing Solicitation Area to: (1) makes major improvements to phenolic polymerization and alkene epoxidation technologies; (2) is expected to be cost competitive with competing conventional processes; and (3) produces higher yields with less waste.

  17. Aromatic-radical oxidation chemistry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glassman, I.; Brezinsky, K. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1993-12-01

    The research effort has focussed on discovering an explanation for the anomalously high CO{sub 2} concentrations observed early in the reaction sequence of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene. To explain this observation, a number of plausible mechanisms have been developed which now await experimental verification. One experimental technique for verifying mechanisms is to probe the reacting system by perturbing the radical concentrations. Two forms of chemical perturbation of the oxidation of cyclopentadiene were begun during this past year--the addition of NO{sub 2} and CO to the reacting mixture.

  18. Study of nitric oxide catalytic oxidation on manganese oxides-loaded activated carbon at low temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Fu-Tian; Yu, Guang-Wei; Wang, Yin; Xing, Zhen-Jiao; Liu, Xue-Jiao; Li, Jie

    2017-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is an air pollutant that is difficult to remove at low concentration and low temperature. Manganese oxides (MnOx)-loaded activated carbon (MLAC) was prepared by a co-precipitation method and studied as a new catalyst for NO oxidation at low temperature. Characterization of MLAC included X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), N2 adsorption/desorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Activity tests demonstrated the influence of the amount of MnOx and the test conditions on the reaction. MLAC with 7.5 wt.% MnOx (MLAC003) exhibits the highest NO conversion (38.7%) at 1000 ppm NO, 20 vol.% O2, room temperature and GHSV ca. 16000 h-1. The NO conversion of MLAC003 was elevated by 26% compared with that of activated carbon. The results of the MLAC003 activity test under different test conditions demonstrated that NO conversion is also influenced by inlet NO concentration, inlet O2 concentration, reaction temperature and GHSV. The NO adsorption-desorption process in micropores of activated carbon is fundamental to NO oxidation, which can be controlled by pore structure and reaction temperature. The activity elevation caused by MnOx loading is assumed to be related to Mn4+/Mn3+ ratio. Finally, a mechanism of NO catalytic oxidation on MLAC based on NO adsorption-desorption and MnOx lattice O transfer is proposed.

  19. Controlled oxidation of graphite to graphene oxide with novel oxidants in a bulk scale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtoniszak, Malgorzata; Mijowska, Ewa

    2012-11-01

    In this study, a novel method of graphite chemical exfoliation to create graphene oxide (GO) is reported. Here, new oxidants were examined: a mixture of perchloric and nitric acids and potassium chromate. Furthermore, an effect of oxidation time, temperature of oxidation, and ultrasonication on graphite exfoliation degree was investigated. The obtained GOs were next reduced with glucose, used as a reducing agent. Detailed analysis of the materials indicated that when graphite was oxidized for 24 h at 50 °C, 5-layered graphene was prepared. An effect of sonication process was also examined, and it was found to enhance the exfoliation to bilayer graphene. Furthermore, when time and temperature were increased to 48 h and 100 °C, respectively, graphite was exfoliated to single-layer graphene. Therefore, it is believed that the proposed route can be applied for the preparation of graphene or few-layered graphene with defined number of layers upon the process parameters optimization and in a bulk scale. The materials were characterized with atomic force microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction.

  20. Zinc oxide doped graphene oxide films for gas sensing applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chetna,, E-mail: chetna2288@gmail.com; Kumar, Shani; Chaudhary, S.; Kapoor, A. [Department of Electronic Science, University of Delhi South Campus, Benito Juarez Road, New Delhi-110021 (India); Garg, A.; Chowdhuri, A.; Dhingra, V. [Department of Electronic Science, Acharya Narendra Dev College, University of Delhi, Kalkaji, New Delhi- 110019 (India)

    2016-05-06

    Graphene Oxide (GO) is analogous to graphene, but presence of many functional groups makes its physical and chemical properties essentially different from those of graphene. GO is found to be a promising material for low cost fabrication of highly versatile and environment friendly gas sensors. Selectivity, reversibility and sensitivity of GO based gas sensor have been improved by hybridization with Zinc Oxide nanoparticles. The device is fabricated by spin coating of deionized water dispersed GO flakes (synthesized using traditional hummer’s method) doped with Zinc Oxide on standard glass substrate. Since GO is an insulator and functional groups on GO nanosheets play vital role in adsorbing gas molecules, it is being used as an adsorber. Additionally, on being exposed to certain gases the electric and optical characteristics of GO material exhibit an alteration in behavior. For the conductivity, we use Zinc Oxide, as it displays a high sensitivity towards conduction. The effects of the compositions, structural defects and morphologies of graphene based sensing layers and the configurations of sensing devices on the performances of gas sensors were investigated by Raman Spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction(XRD) and Keithley Sourcemeter.

  1. Supported versus colloidal zinc oxide for advanced oxidation processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laxman, Karthik; Al Rashdi, Manal; Al Sabahi, Jamal; Al Abri, Mohammed; Dutta, Joydeep

    2017-07-01

    Photocatalysis is a green technology which typically utilizes either supported or colloidal catalysts for the mineralization of aqueous organic contaminants. Catalyst surface area and surface energy are the primary factors determining its efficiency, but correlation between the two is still unclear. This work explores their relation and hierarchy in a photocatalytic process involving both supported and colloidal catalysts. In order to do this the active surface areas of supported zinc oxide nanorods (ZnO NR's) and colloidal zinc oxide nanoparticles (having different surface energies) were equalized and their phenol oxidation mechanism and capacity was analyzed. It was observed that while surface energy had subtle effects on the oxidation rate of the catalysts, the degradation efficiency was primarily a function of the surface area; which makes it a better parameter for comparison when studying different catalyst forms of the same material. Thus we build a case for the use of supported catalysts, wherein their catalytic efficiency was tested to be unaltered over several days under both natural and artificial light, suggesting their viability for practical applications.

  2. Oxidation mechanisms for alloys in single-oxidant gases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittle, D.P.

    1981-03-01

    Scales formed on alloys invariably contain the alloy constituents in a ratio different from that in the alloy, owing to the differing thermodynamic tendencies of the alloy components to react with the oxidant and to differences in diffusion rates in scale and alloy phases. This complex interrelationship between transport rates and the thermodynamics of the alloy-oxidant system can be analyzed using multicomponent diffusion theory when transport-controlled growth of single or multi-layered scales occurs. In particular, the superimposition of the diffusion data on an isothermal section of the appropriate phase diagram indicates the likely morphologies of the reaction products, including the sequence of phases found in the scale, the occurrence of internal oxidation and the development of an irregular metal/scale interface. The scale morphologies on alloys are also time-dependent: there is an initial transient stage, a steady state period, and a final breakdown, the latter often related to mechanical influences such as scale adherence, spallation, thermal or mechanical stresses and void formation. Mechanical influences have a more devastating effect in alloy oxidation due to the changes in alloy surface composition during the steady state period.

  3. Oxidative stress inhibition and oxidant activity by fibrous clays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervini-Silva, Javiera; Nieto-Camacho, Antonio; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia

    2015-09-01

    Fibrous clays (sepiolite, palygorskite) are produced at 1.2m tonnes per year and have a wide range of industrial applications needing to replace long-fibre length asbestos. However, information on the beneficial effects of fibrous clays on health remains scarce. This paper reports on the effect of sepiolite (Vallecas, Spain) and palygorskite (Torrejón El Rubio, Spain) on cell damage via oxidative stress (determined as the progress of lipid peroxidation, LP). The extent of LP was assessed using the Thiobarbituric Acid Reactive Substances assay. The oxidant activity by fibrous clays was quantified using Electron-Paramagnetic Resonance. Sepiolite and palygorskite inhibited LP, whereby corresponding IC50 values were 6557±1024 and 4250±289μgmL(-1). As evidenced by dose-response experiments LP inhibition by palygorskite was surface-controlled. Fibrous clay surfaces did not stabilize HO species, except for suspensions containing 5000μgmL(-1). A strong oxidant (or weak anti-oxidant) activity favours the inhibition of LP by fibrous clays. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Diabetes, oxidative stress, nitric oxide and mitochondria function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friederich, Malou; Hansell, Peter; Palm, Fredrik

    2009-05-01

    The role of altered mitochondria function has recently emerged as an important mechanism for the development of diabetic complications. Altered mitochondria function has also been implicated in the ageing process, defective insulin secretion, hypertension, arteriosclerosis, ischemia-reperfusion injury and apoptosis. Normally, the mitochondria are associated with ATP production using primarily pyruvate as the substrate, but recent reports indicate that tissue specific preferences exist. Also, the mitochondria are a substantial source of superoxide production, preferentially during states of elevated intracellular glucose concentrations. The mitochondria function is regulated by several factors including nitric oxide, oxidative stress, mammalian target of rapamycin, ADP and P(i) availability, which result in a complex regulation of ATP production and oxygen consumption, but also superoxide generation. These factors seem to be tissue specific, which warrants a more diverse mechanistic model applying to that specific tissue or cell type. This review presents the basic functions of the mitochondria and focuses on the complex interplay between oxidative stress, nitric oxide and uncoupling proteins in regulating mitochondria function with special focus on diabetes-induced alterations occurring on the mitochondria level.

  5. Synthesis of Ordered Mesoporous Manganese Oxides with Various Oxidation States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Gwi Ok; Shon, Jeong Kuk; Kim, Yong Ho; Kim, Ji Man

    2015-03-01

    Ordered mesoporous MnO, MnO4, Mn2O3 and MnO2 materials with 3-D pore structure were suc- cessfully synthesized via a nano-replication method by using ordered mesoporous silica, KIT-6 (Cubic Ia3d space group mesostructure) as the template under specific oxidation and reduction conditions. Notably, ordered mesoporous MnO with a crystalline wall (rock salt structure) was syn- thesized for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The synthesis of the ordered mesoporous MnO was achieved by reducing the ordered mesoporous Mn3O4 under an H2 atmosphere, while preserving the ordered mesostructure and crystalline wall throughout the solid/solid transformation. All of the ordered mesoporous manganese oxides with different crystal structures and oxidation states demonstrated almost the same spherical-like morphology with several hundred nanometers of particles. The synthesized ordered mesoporous manganese oxides had uniform dual mesopores (2-3 nm, and ~20 nm) and crystalline frameworks with large surface areas (86-140 m2/g) and pore volumes (0.27-0.33 cm3/g).

  6. Graphene oxide and H2 production from bioelectrochemical graphite oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Lu; Zeng, Cuiping; Wang, Luda; Yin, Xiaobo; Jin, Song; Lu, Anhuai; Jason Ren, Zhiyong

    2015-11-17

    Graphene oxide (GO) is an emerging material for energy and environmental applications, but it has been primarily produced using chemical processes involving high energy consumption and hazardous chemicals. In this study, we reported a new bioelectrochemical method to produce GO from graphite under ambient conditions without chemical amendments, value-added organic compounds and high rate H2 were also produced. Compared with abiotic electrochemical electrolysis control, the microbial assisted graphite oxidation produced high rate of graphite oxide and graphene oxide (BEGO) sheets, CO2, and current at lower applied voltage. The resultant electrons are transferred to a biocathode, where H2 and organic compounds are produced by microbial reduction of protons and CO2, respectively, a process known as microbial electrosynthesis (MES). Pseudomonas is the dominant population on the anode, while abundant anaerobic solvent-producing bacteria Clostridium carboxidivorans is likely responsible for electrosynthesis on the cathode. Oxygen production through water electrolysis was not detected on the anode due to the presence of facultative and aerobic bacteria as O2 sinkers. This new method provides a sustainable route for producing graphene materials and renewable H2 at low cost, and it may stimulate a new area of research in MES.

  7. Oxidation kinetics of Si and SiGe by dry rapid thermal oxidation, in-situ steam generation oxidation and dry furnace oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozé, Fabien; Gourhant, Olivier; Blanquet, Elisabeth; Bertin, François; Juhel, Marc; Abbate, Francesco; Pribat, Clément; Duru, Romain

    2017-06-01

    The fabrication of ultrathin compressively strained SiGe-On-Insulator layers by the condensation technique is likely a key milestone towards low-power and high performances FD-SOI logic devices. However, the SiGe condensation technique still requires challenges to be solved for an optimized use in an industrial environment. SiGe oxidation kinetics, upon which the condensation technique is founded, has still not reached a consensus in spite of various studies which gave insights into the matter. This paper aims to bridge the gaps between these studies by covering various oxidation processes relevant to today's technological needs with a new and quantitative analysis methodology. We thus address oxidation kinetics of SiGe with three Ge concentrations (0%, 10%, and 30%) by means of dry rapid thermal oxidation, in-situ steam generation oxidation, and dry furnace oxidation. Oxide thicknesses in the 50 Å to 150 Å range grown with oxidation temperatures between 850 and 1100 °C were targeted. The present work shows first that for all investigated processes, oxidation follows a parabolic regime even for thin oxides, which indicates a diffusion-limited oxidation regime. We also observe that, for all investigated processes, the SiGe oxidation rate is systematically higher than that of Si. The amplitude of the variation of oxidation kinetics of SiGe with respect to Si is found to be strongly dependent on the process type. Second, a new quantitative analysis methodology of oxidation kinetics is introduced. This methodology allows us to highlight the dependence of oxidation kinetics on the Ge concentration at the oxidation interface, which is modulated by the pile-up mechanism. Our results show that the oxidation rate increases with the Ge concentration at the oxidation interface.

  8. New quinoproteins in oxidative fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adachi, O; Moonmangmee, D; Shinagawa, E; Toyama, H; Yamada, M; Matsushita, K

    2003-04-11

    Several quinoproteins have been newly indicated in acetic acid bacteria, all of which can be applied to fermentative or enzymatic production of useful materials by means of oxidative fermentation. (1) D-Arabitol dehydrogenase from Gluconobacter suboxydans IFO 3257 was purified from the bacterial membrane and found to be a versatile enzyme for oxidation of various substrates to the corresponding oxidation products. It is worthy of notice that the enzyme catalyzes D-gluconate oxidation to 5-keto-D-gluconate, whereas 2-keto-D-gluconate is produced by a flavoprotein D-gluconate dehydrogenase. (2) Membrane-bound cyclic alcohol dehydrogenase was solubilized and purified for the first time from Gluconobacter frateurii CHM 9. When compared with the cytosolic NAD-dependent cyclic alcohol dehydrogenase crystallized from the same strain, the reaction rate in cyclic alcohol oxidation by the membrane enzyme was 100 times stronger than the cytosolic NAD-dependent enzyme. The NAD-dependent enzyme makes no contribution to cyclic alcohol oxidation but contributes to the reduction of cyclic ketones to cyclic alcohols. (3) Meso-erythritol dehydrogenase has been purified from the membrane fraction of G. frateurii CHM 43. The typical properties of quinoproteins were indicated in many respects with the enzyme. It was found that the enzyme, growing cells and also the resting cells of the organism are very effective in producing L-erythrulose. Dihydroxyacetone can be replaced by L-erythrulose for cosmetics for those who are sensitive to dihydroxyacetone. (4) Two different membrane-bound D-sorbitol dehydrogenases were indicated in acetic acid bacteria. One enzyme contributing to L-sorbose production has been identified to be a quinoprotein, while another FAD-containing D-sorbitol dehydrogenase catalyzes D-sorbitol oxidation to D-fructose. D-Fructose production by the oxidative fermentation would be possible by the latter enzyme and it is superior to the well-established D-glucose isomerase

  9. Characterization and reactivity of biogenic manganese oxides for ciprofloxacin oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tu, Jinjun; Yang, Zhendong; Hu, Chun; Qu, Jiuhui

    2014-05-01

    Biogenic manganese oxides (BioMnOx) were synthesized by the oxidation of Mn(II) with Mn-oxidizing bacteria Pseudomonas sp. G7 under different initial pH values and Mn(II) dosages, and were characterized by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The crystal structure and Mn oxidation states of BioMnOx depended on the initial pH and Mn(II) dosages of the medium. The superoxide radical (O(·-)2) was observed in Mn-containing (III/IV) BioMnOx suspensions by electron spin resonance measurements. BioMnOx(0.4)-7, with mixed valence of Mn(II/III/IV) and the strongest O(·-)2 signals, was prepared in the initial pH 7 and Mn(II) dosage of 0.4 mmol/L condition, and exhibited the highest activity for ciprofloxacin degradation and no Mn(II) release. During the degradation of ciprofloxacin, the oxidation of the Mn(II) formed came from biotic and abiotic reactions in BioMnOx suspensions on the basis of the Mn(II) release and O(·-)2 formation from different BioMnOx. The degradation process of ciprofloxacin was shown to involve the cleavage of the hexatomic ring having a secondary amine and carbon-carbon double bond connected to a carboxyl group, producing several compounds containing amine groups as well as small organic acids. Copyright © 2014 The Research Centre for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxidation of pyrite: Consequences and significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitrijević Mile D.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the most important studies on the oxidation of pyrite particularly in aqueous solutions. The consequences of pyrite oxidation was examined, as well as its importance, from both the technical-technological and environmental points of view. The oxidation of pyrite was considered in two parts. The spontaneous oxidation of pyrite in nature was described in the first part, with this part comprising pyrite oxidation in deposits depots and mines. It is explained how way natural electrochemical processes lead to the decomposition of pyrite and other minerals associated with pyrite. The oxidation of pyrite occurring during technological processes such as grinding, flotation and leaching, was shown in the second part. Particular emphasis was placed on the oxidation of pyrite during leaching. This part includes the leaching of sulphide and oxide ores, the leaching of pyrite coal and the leaching of refractory gold-bearing ores (pressure oxidation, bacterial oxidation, oxidation by means of strong oxidants and the electrolysis of pyrite suspensions. Various mechanisms of pyrite oxidation and of the galvanic interaction of pyrite with other sulphide minerals are shown.

  11. Growth of zinc oxide nanostructures

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and nanoparticle ZnO films on glass substrate were also prepared by a chemical route. Nanowhiskers showed ... prepared ZnO nanoparticle films exhibited good sensing properties for alcohol. Keywords. Zinc oxide .... and the solution was used to deposit a film by spin coating on a glass substrate. The deposited film was ...

  12. Oxidation events and skin aging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kammeyer, A.; Luiten, R. M.

    2015-01-01

    The rate of skin aging, or that of tissue in general, is determined by a variable predominance of tissue degeneration over tissue regeneration. This review discusses the role of oxidative events of tissue degeneration and aging in general, and for the skin in particular. The mechanisms involved in

  13. Radiation annealing in cuprous oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vajda, P.

    1966-01-01

    Experimental results from high-intensity gamma-irradiation of cuprous oxide are used to investigate the annealing of defects with increasing radiation dose. The results are analysed on the basis of the Balarin and Hauser (1965) statistical model of radiation annealing, giving a square...

  14. Exciton dynamics in cuprous oxide

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fishman, D. A.; Revcolevschi, A.; van Loosdrecht, P. H. M.; Stutzmann, M

    2006-01-01

    This work addresses the mid-infrared properties of cuprous oxide and in particular induced absorption due to the presence of excitons. We probe the population of the non-radiative ground state of para-excitons via laser-induced changes of the transmission in the "hydrogenic" 1s-2p/1s-3p transition

  15. on THICKNESS OF COPPER (|) OXIDE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-12-20

    Dec 20, 2006 ... Observed to be an attractive starting material for the production of solar cells for low cost terrestrial conversion of solar energy to electricity. Copper (I) oxide is one Of the earliest known photovoltaic materials and the first in which the photovOltaic effect was successfully explained (Fortin and Sears,. 1981).

  16. COPD: balancing oxidants and antioxidants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fischer BM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Bernard M Fischer,1,* Judith A Voynow,2,* Andrew J Ghio3,* 1Department of Pediatrics, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC, USA; 2Department of Pediatrics, Children's Hospital of Richmond at Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond, VA, USA; 3National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory, US Environmental Protection Agency, Chapel Hill, NC, USA *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD is one of the most common chronic illnesses in the world. The disease encompasses emphysema, chronic bronchitis, and small airway obstruction and can be caused by environmental exposures, primarily cigarette smoking. Since only a small subset of smokers develop COPD, it is believed that host factors interact with the environment to increase the propensity to develop disease. The major pathogenic factors causing disease include infection and inflammation, protease and antiprotease imbalance, and oxidative stress overwhelming antioxidant defenses. In this review, we will discuss the major environmental and host sources for oxidative stress; discuss how oxidative stress regulates chronic bronchitis; review the latest information on genetic predisposition to COPD, specifically focusing on oxidant/antioxidant imbalance; and review future antioxidant therapeutic options for COPD. The complexity of COPD will necessitate a multi-target therapeutic approach. It is likely that antioxidant supplementation and dietary antioxidants will have a place in these future combination therapies. Keywords: cigarette smoking, mucins, gene regulation, Chinese herbs, acupuncture, dietary antioxidants

  17. Stormwater disinfection using Electrochemical oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    WENJUN FENG

    2017-01-01

    This thesis demonstrates that electrochemical oxidation can be a promising stormwater disinfection technique to achieve regulatory water re-uses targets. It discusses the implications for the practical implementation of the technology and identifies areas for future research in regards to optimisation of the technology

  18. Perovskite catalysts for oxidative coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Kenneth D.

    1991-01-01

    Perovskites of the structure A.sub.2 B.sub.2 C.sub.3 O.sub.10 are useful as catalysts for the oxidative coupling of lower alkane to heavier hydrocarbons. A is alkali metal; B is lanthanide or lanthanum, cerium, neodymium, samarium, praseodymium, gadolinium or dysprosium; and C is titanium.

  19. Nanostructured manganese oxide/carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide as water-oxidizing composites in artificial photosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Rahimi, Fahime; Fathollahzadeh, Maryam; Haghighi, Behzad; Hołyńska, Małgorzata; Tomo, Tatsuya; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-07-28

    Herein, we report on nano-sized Mn oxide/carbon nanotubes, graphene and graphene oxide as water-oxidizing compounds in artificial photosynthesis. The composites are synthesized by different and simple procedures and characterized by a number of methods. The water-oxidizing activities of these composites are also considered in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate. Some composites are efficient Mn-based catalysts with TOF (mmol O2 per mol Mn per second) ~ 2.6.

  20. The effects of fatty acid composition on lipid oxidation, protein oxidation and color stability in minced pork

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Miao

    2017-01-01

    The literature review covers different aspects of lipid oxidation and protein oxidation in meat.The mechanism of lipid and protein oxidation, factors influencing lipid oxidation, the consequences of protein oxidation, measurement methods, and the interactions between lipid oxidation, protein oxidation and meat color are introduced. The present thesis was aiming to study the effects of different fatty acid composition on lipid oxidation, protein oxidation and meat color in minced pork st...

  1. The properties of protective oxide scales containing cerium on alloy 800H in oxidizing and oxidizing/sulphidizing environments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haanappel, V.A.C.; Haanappel, V.A.C.; Fransen, T.; Geerdink, Bert; Gellings, P.J.; Stroosnijder, M.F.

    1991-01-01

    The corrosion protection of oxide scales formed by electrophoretic deposition in a cerium-containing sol on Alloy 800H, a 32Ni-20Cr steel, followed by firing in air at 1123 K was studied in oxidizing and mixed oxidizing/sulphidizing environments at elevated temperatures. In particular, the influence

  2. Oxidative stress in cardiovascular diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shyamal K Goswami

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress caused by various oxygen containing free radicals and reactive species (collectively called "Reactive Oxygen Species" or ROS has long been attributed to cardiovascular diseases. In human body, major oxidizing species are super oxide, hydrogen peroxide, hydroxyl radical, peroxy nitrite etc. ROS are produced from distinct cellular sources, enzymatic and non-enzymatic; have specific physicochemical properties and often have specific cellular targets. Although early studies in nineteen sixties and seventies highlighted the deleterious effects of these species, later it was established that they also act as physiological modulators of cellular functions and diseases occur only when ROS production is deregulated. One of the major sources of cellular ROS is Nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidases (Noxes that are expressed in almost all cell types. Superoxide and hydrogen peroxide generated from them under various conditions act as signal transducers. Due to their immense importance in cellular physiology, various Nox inhibitors are now being developed as therapeutics. Another free radical of importance in cardiovascular system is nitric oxide (a reactive nitrogen species generated from nitric oxide synthase(s. It plays a critical role in cardiac function and its dysregulated generation along with superoxide leads to the formation of peroxynitrite a highly deleterious agent. Despite overwhelming evidences of association between increased level of ROS and cardiovascular diseases, antioxidant therapies using vitamins and omega 3 fatty acids have largely been unsuccessful till date. Also, there are major discrepancies between studies with laboratory animals and human trials. It thus appears that the biology of ROS is far complex than anticipated before. A comprehensive understanding of the redox biology of diseases is thus needed for developing targeted therapeutics.

  3. Oxidation events and skin aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammeyer, A; Luiten, R M

    2015-05-01

    The rate of skin aging, or that of tissue in general, is determined by a variable predominance of tissue degeneration over tissue regeneration. This review discusses the role of oxidative events of tissue degeneration and aging in general, and for the skin in particular. The mechanisms involved in intrinsic and extrinsic (photo-) aging are described. Since photoaging is recognized as an important extrinsic aging factor, we put special emphasize on the effects of UV exposure on aging, and its variable influence according to global location and skin type. We here summarise direct photochemical effects of UV on DNA, RNA, proteins and vitamin D, the factors contributing to UV-induced immunosuppression, which may delay aging, the nature and origin of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) as indirect contributors for aging, and the consequences of oxidative events for extracellular matrix (ECM) degradation, such as that of collagen. We conclude that conflicting data on studies investigating the validity of the free radical damage theory of aging may reflect variations in the level of ROS induction which is difficult to quantify in vivo, and the lack of targeting of experimental ROS to the relevant cellular compartment. Also mitohormesis, an adaptive response, may arise in vivo to moderate ROS levels, further complicating interpretation of in vivo results. We here describes how skin aging is mediated both directly and indirectly by oxidative degeneration.This review indicates that skin aging events are initiated and often propagated by oxidation events, despite recently recognized adaptive responses to oxidative stress. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Inflammation, Oxidative Stress, and Obesity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José A. Morales-González

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is a chronic disease of multifactorial origin and can be defined as an increase in the accumulation of body fat. Adipose tissue is not only a triglyceride storage organ, but studies have shown the role of white adipose tissue as a producer of certain bioactive substances called adipokines. Among adipokines, we find some inflammatory functions, such as Interleukin-6 (IL-6; other adipokines entail the functions of regulating food intake, therefore exerting a direct effect on weight control. This is the case of leptin, which acts on the limbic system by stimulating dopamine uptake, creating a feeling of fullness. However, these adipokines induce the production of reactive oxygen species (ROS, generating a process known as oxidative stress (OS. Because adipose tissue is the organ that secretes adipokines and these in turn generate ROS, adipose tissue is considered an independent factor for the generation of systemic OS. There are several mechanisms by which obesity produces OS. The first of these is the mitochondrial and peroxisomal oxidation of fatty acids, which can produce ROS in oxidation reactions, while another mechanism is over-consumption of oxygen, which generates free radicals in the mitochondrial respiratory chain that is found coupled with oxidative phosphorylation in mitochondria. Lipid-rich diets are also capable of generating ROS because they can alter oxygen metabolism. Upon the increase of adipose tissue, the activity of antioxidant enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GPx, was found to be significantly diminished. Finally, high ROS production and the decrease in antioxidant capacity leads to various abnormalities, among which we find endothelial dysfunction, which is characterized by a reduction in the bioavailability of vasodilators, particularly nitric oxide (NO, and an increase in endothelium-derived contractile factors, favoring atherosclerotic disease.

  5. A novel marine nitrite-oxidizing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Haaijer, S.C.M.; Ji, K.; van Niftrik, L.; Hoischen, A.; Speth, D.R.; Jetten, M.S.M.; Sinninghe Damsté, J.S.; Op den Camp, H.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Marine microorganisms are important for the global nitrogen cycle, but marine nitrifiers, especially aerobic nitrite oxidizers, remain largely unexplored. To increase the number of cultured representatives of marine nitrite-oxidizing bacteria (NOB), a bioreactor cultivation approach was adopted to

  6. Graphene oxide-based transparent conductive films

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zheng, Qingbin; Li, Zhigang; Yang, Junhe; Kim, Jang-Kyo

    2014-01-01

    .... Because of its excellent electrical conductivity, optical transparency and mechanical properties, graphene has been considered an ideal material to replace the existing, expensive indium tin oxide (ITO) as TCFs. Graphene oxide (GO...

  7. Consecutive dynamic resolutions of phosphine oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kortmann, Felix A.; Chang, Mu-Chieh; Otten, Edwin; Couzijn, Erik P. A.; Lutz, Martin; Minnaard, Adriaan J.

    2014-01-01

    A crystallization-induced asymmetric transformation (CIAT) involving a radical-mediated racemization provides access to enantiopure secondary phosphine oxides. A consecutive CIAT is used to prepare enantio-and diastereo-pure tert-butyl(hydroxyalkyl)phenylphosphine oxides.

  8. Complex oxides useful for thermoelectric energy conversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majumdar, Arunava [Orinda, CA; Ramesh, Ramamoorthy [Moraga, CA; Yu, Choongho [College Station, TX; Scullin, Matthew L [Berkeley, CA; Huijben, Mark [Enschede, NL

    2012-07-17

    The invention provides for a thermoelectric system comprising a substrate comprising a first complex oxide, wherein the substrate is optionally embedded with a second complex oxide. The thermoelectric system can be used for thermoelectric power generation or thermoelectric cooling.

  9. Sodium Perborate Oxidation of an Aromatic Amine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juestis, Laurence

    1977-01-01

    Describes an experiment involving the oxidation of aromatic primary amines to the corresponding azo compound; suggests procedures for studying factors that influence the yield of such a reaction, including the choice of solvent and the oxidant-amine ratio. (MLH)

  10. Nanostructured Metal Oxides Based Enzymatic Electrochemical Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Ansari, Anees A.; Alhoshan, M.; Alsalhi, M.S.; Aldwayyan, A.S.

    2010-01-01

    The unique electrocatalytic properties of the metal oxides and the ease of metal oxide nanostructured fabrication make them extremely interesting materials for electrochemical enzymatic biosensor applications. The application of nanostructured metal oxides in such sensing devices has taken off rapidly and will surely continue to expand. This article provides a review on current research status of electrochemical enzymatic biosensors based on various new types of nanostructured metal oxides su...

  11. The initial oxidation of magnesium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurth, M.

    2004-07-01

    Pure Magnesium samples have been oxidised in an UHV chamber under controlled conditions. Pressure range was 10{sup -10} Torr to 10{sup -7} Torr, temperature range was 273 K to 435 K. The samples have then been investigated with XPS, Ellipsometry and HERDA. Additionally, furnace oxidations at 750 Torr and 673 K have been carried out and investigated with XPS. From the XPS measurements data concerning layer thickness, composition, oxidation state and binding state have been gained. The ellipsometrie measurements yielded additional data concerning layer thickness as well as the size of the band gap of the developing oxide. With the HERDA measurements, the oxygen content within the oxide layer has been determined yielding additional information about composition and layer thickness. The layer thickness as a function of time have then been modelled with a kinetic growth model of Fromhold and Cook. For the refinement of the XPS data concerning layer thickness and composition, the pronounced plasmon excitations that occur in magnesium have been determined with two different procedures which have been developed in the methodical part of this work. The layer thickness and composition values have thus been corrected. Results: Two oxidation stages could be identified: a strong increase for the first few Langmuirs (1L = 1s x 10{sup -6} Torr), followed by a saturation'' region which was about 1.2 nm to 1.5 nm in magnitude. XPS and ellipsometry results have thereby been in very good agreement. The composition of the developing oxide showed a clear deviation from stoichiometric MgO, mainly caused by an oxygen deficiency; this deficiency has also been confirmed with the HERDA measurements. The Mg/O ratio as a function of layer thickness showed a continous decay starting from very high values for the thinnest layers (>{proportional_to}2.5) down to a saturation value of about 1.4, even for larger layer thicknesses gained with the furnace oxidations. The determination of

  12. Photocatalytic water oxidation with iron oxide hydroxide (rust) nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Timothy L.; Bensema, Bronwyn L.; Brune, Nicholas K.; Wong, Christopher; Yeh, Max; Osterloh, Frank E.

    2017-01-01

    Hematite has attracted considerable interest as a photoanode material for water oxidation under visible illumination. Here, we explore the limits of photocatalytic water oxidation activity with iron (III) oxide hydroxide nanocrystals and NaIO4 as a sacrificial electron acceptor (E=1.63 V NHE at pH=0.5). The sol was prepared by hydrolysis of FeCl3 in boiling 0.002-M HCl solution and confirmed to mainly consist of ß-FeO(OH) (akaganéite) particles with 5 to 15 nm diameter. From a 0.01 M aqueous NaIO4 solution, the sol evolves between 4.5 and 35.2 μmol O2 h-1, depending on pH, light intensity (>400 nm, 290 to 700 mW cm-2), ß-FeO(OH), and NaIO4 concentration. The activity increases with pH, and depends linearly on light intensity and photocatalyst amount, and it varies with sacrificial electron donor concentration. Under optimized conditions, the apparent quantum efficiency is 0.19% (at 400 nm and 460 mW cm-2), and the turnover number is 2.58 based on total ß-FeO(OH). Overall, the efficiency of the ß-FeO(OH)/NaIO4 photocatalytic system is limited by electron hole recombination and by particle aggregation over longer irradiation times (24 h). Lastly, surface photovoltage measurements on ß-FeO(OH) films on fluorine doped tin oxide substrate confirm a 2.15 eV effective band gap for the material.

  13. Oxygen Activation and Photoelectrochemical Oxidation on Oxide Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-04

    partial reduction to RuIII–O+ followed by rapid protonation, further reduction to RuII-OH2 2+, and cross-surface comproportionation, resulting in narrow...toluene, ethylbenzene, and cumene. Oxidation of hydrocarbons has a direct relation to fuel cell development and conversion of natural gas to liquid fuels...Since the hydrocarbons were not miscible with aqueous solutions, a new solvent system composed of propylene carbonate (PC) and 1 % water by volume

  14. Oxidation of phenolic acids by soil iron and manganese oxides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lehmann, R.G.; Cheng, H.H.; Harsh, J.B.

    Phenolic acids are intermediary metabolites of many aromatic chemicals and may be involved in humus formation, allelopathy, and nutrient availability. Depending on their structures, six phenolic acids were shown to react at different rates with oxidized forms of Fe and Mn in a Palouse soil (fine-silty, mixed, mesic Pachic Ultic Haploxeroll). Increasing methoxy substitution on the aromatic ring of phenolic acids increased the reaction rate. Reaction rate was also increased for longer carboxyl-containing side chains. After 4 h reaction, little of the applied (10 mg kg/sup -1/ soil) p-hydroxybenzoic or p-coumaric acids had reacted, while 0 to 5, 70, 90, and 100% of the vanillic, ferulic, syringic, and sinapic acids, respectively, had reacted. After 72 h under conditions limiting microbial growth, none of the p-hydroxybenzoic, 30% of the p-coumaric, and 50% of the vanillic acids had reacted. The reaction was shown to be predominantly chemical, and not biological, since phenolic acid extractabilities were similar for Palouse soil and for Palouse soil pretreated with LiOBr to remove organic matter. When the Palouse soil was pretreated with a sodium dithionite-citrate solution to remove Fe and Mn oxides, none of the phenolic acids reacted after 1 h. The reaction of sinapic acid with Palouse soil was shown to produce Fe(II) and soluble Mn as reaction products. The reaction of phenolic acids with soil was thus shown to be an oxidation of the phenolic acids, coupled with a reduction of soil Fe and Mn oxides.

  15. Structure and catalytic reactivity of Rh oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafson, J.; Westerström, R.; Resta, A.

    2009-01-01

    Using a combination of experimental and theoretical techniques, we show that a thin RhO2 surface oxide film forms prior to the bulk Rh2O3 corundum oxide on all close-packed single crystal Rh surfaces. Based on previous reports, we argue that the RhO2 surface oxide also forms on vicinal Rh surface...

  16. 21 CFR 582.5431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.5431 Section 582.5431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Supplements 1 § 582.5431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance...

  17. 21 CFR 582.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Magnesium oxide. 582.1431 Section 582.1431 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL... Additives § 582.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Product. Magnesium oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is...

  18. 76 FR 38036 - Propylene Oxide; Pesticide Tolerances

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-29

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 Propylene Oxide; Pesticide Tolerances AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: This regulation amends the propylene oxide tolerance on ``nut, tree, group...), announcing the Agency's proposal to amend the propylene oxide tolerance (40 CFR 180.491) on ``nut, tree...

  19. 77 FR 28493 - Propylene Oxide; Tolerance Actions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-15

    ... AGENCY 40 CFR Part 180 RIN 2070-ZA16 Propylene Oxide; Tolerance Actions AGENCY: Environmental Protection... separate tolerances on pistachio and pine nuts for both the fumigant propylene oxide and the reaction product from the use of propylene oxide, known as propylene chlorohydrin, to cover all registered uses on...

  20. Nitric oxide in the rat vestibular system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, A; Blythe, W R; Zdanski, C J; Prazma, J; Pillsbury, H C

    1994-10-01

    Nitric oxide is known to function as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system. It is also known to be involved in the central nervous system excitatory amino acid neurotransmission cascade. Activation of excitatory amino acid receptors causes an influx of calcium, which activates nitric oxide synthase. The resulting increase in intracellular nitric oxide activates soluble guanylate cyclase, leading to a rise in cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The excitatory amino acids glutamate and aspartate are found in the vestibular system and have been postulated to function as vestibular system neurotransmitters. Although nitric oxide has been investigated as a neurotransmitter in other tissues, no published studies have examined the role of nitric oxide in the vestibular system. Neuronal NADPH-diaphorase has been characterized as a nitric oxide synthase. This enzyme catalyzes the conversion of L-arginine to L-citrulline, producing nitric oxide during the reaction. We used a histochemical stain characterized by Hope et al. (Proc Natl Acad Sci 1991;88:2811) as specific for neuronal nitric oxide synthase to localize the enzyme in the rat vestibular system. An immunocytochemical stain was used to examine rat inner ear tissue for the presence of the enzyme's end product, L-citrulline, thereby demonstrating nitric oxide synthase activity. Staining of vestibular ganglion sections showed nitric oxide synthase presence and activity in ganglion cells and nerve fibers. These results indicate the presence of active nitric oxide synthase in these tissues and suggest modulation of vestibular neurotransmission by nitric oxide.

  1. Protective role of endothelial nitric oxide synthase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Albrecht, Ester W J A; Stegeman, Coen A; Heeringa, Peter; Henning, Robert; van Goor, Harry

    Nitric oxide is a versatile molecule, with its actions ranging from haemodynamic regulation to anti-proliferative effects on vascular smooth muscle cells. Nitric oxide is produced by the nitric oxide synthases, endothelial NOS (eNOS), neural NOS (nNOS), and inducible NOS (iNOS). Constitutively

  2. Characterization And Dissolution Properties Of Ruthenium Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthenium oxides (RuO2•1.10H2O and RuO2) have been synthesized by forced hydrolysis and oxidation of ruthenium chloride. The resulting materials were extensively characterized to determine the crystallinity, surface area, and ruthenium oxidation ...

  3. Processes regulating nitric oxide emissions from soils

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pilegaard, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a reactive gas that plays an important role in atmospheric chemistry by influencing the production and destruction of ozone and thereby the oxidizing capacity of the atmosphere. NO also contributes by its oxidation products to the formation of acid rain. The major sources...

  4. Nitrous oxide emissions from estuarine intertidal sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Middelburg, J.J.; Klaver, G.; Nieuwenhuize, J.; Markusse, R.M.; Vlug, T.; Nat, F.J.W.A. van der

    1995-01-01

    From September 1990 through December 1991 nitrous oxide flux measurements were made at 9 intertidal mud flat sites in the Scheldt Estuary. Nitrous oxide release rates were highly variable both between sites and over time at any one site. Annual nitrous oxide fluxes vary from about 10 mmol N m-2 at

  5. 29 CFR 1910.105 - Nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Nitrous oxide. 1910.105 Section 1910.105 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Hazardous Materials § 1910.105 Nitrous oxide. The piped systems for the in-plant transfer and distribution of nitrous oxide shall be designed, installed, maintained, and...

  6. Separation medium containing thermally exfoliated graphite oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prud'homme, Robert K. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Herrera-Alonso, Margarita (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A separation medium, such as a chromatography filling or packing, containing a modified graphite oxide material, which is a thermally exfoliated graphite oxide with a surface area of from about 300 m.sup.2/g to 2600 m.sup.2/g, wherein the thermally exfoliated graphite oxide has a surface that has been at least partially functionalized.

  7. 21 CFR 582.5991 - Zinc oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 582.5991 Section 582.5991 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) ANIMAL DRUGS... 1 § 582.5991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally...

  8. 21 CFR 73.2991 - Zinc oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 73.2991 Section 73.2991 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Cosmetics § 73.2991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive zinc oxide shall conform in identity and specifications to the requirements of § 73.1991...

  9. 21 CFR 73.1991 - Zinc oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Zinc oxide. 73.1991 Section 73.1991 Food and Drugs... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Drugs § 73.1991 Zinc oxide. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive zinc...). It is principally composed of Zn. (2) Color additive mixtures for drug use made with zinc oxide may...

  10. 21 CFR 182.8991 - Zinc oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Zinc oxide. 182.8991 Section 182.8991 Food and... CONSUMPTION (CONTINUED) SUBSTANCES GENERALLY RECOGNIZED AS SAFE Nutrients § 182.8991 Zinc oxide. (a) Product. Zinc oxide. (b) Conditions of use. This substance is generally recognized as safe when used in...

  11. Thermal Oxidation of Structured Silicon Dioxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas Lehrmann; Hansen, Ole; Jensen, Jørgen Arendt

    2014-01-01

    The topography of thermally oxidized, structured silicon dioxide is investigated through simulations, atomic force microscopy, and a proposed analytical model. A 357 nm thick oxide is structured by removing regions of the oxide in a masked etch with either reactive ion etching or hydrofluoric acid...

  12. p53, oxidative stress, and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dongping; Xu, Yang

    2011-09-15

    Mammalian aging is associated with elevated levels of oxidative damage of DNA, proteins, and lipids as a result of unbalanced prooxidant and antioxidant activities. Accumulating evidence indicates that oxidative stress is a major physiological inducer of aging. p53, the guardian of the genome that is important for cellular responses to oxidative stresses, might be a key coordinator of oxidative stress and aging. In response to low levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits antioxidant activities to eliminate oxidative stress and ensure cell survival; in response to high levels of oxidative stresses, p53 exhibits pro-oxidative activities that further increase the levels of stresses, leading to cell death. p53 accomplishes these context-dependent roles by regulating the expression of a panel of genes involved in cellular responses to oxidative stresses and by modulating other pathways important for oxidative stress responses. The mechanism that switches p53 function from antioxidant to prooxidant remains unclear, but could account for the findings that increased p53 activities have been linked to both accelerated aging and increased life span in mice. Therefore, a balance of p53 antioxidant and prooxidant activities in response to oxidative stresses could be important for longevity by suppressing the accumulation of oxidative stresses and DNA damage.

  13. Myoglobin-induced lipid oxidation : A review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Andersen, H.J.

    2002-01-01

    An overview of myoglobin-initiated lipid oxidation in simple model systems, muscle, and muscle-based foods is presented. The potential role of myoglobin spin and redox states in initiating lipid oxidation is reviewed. Proposed mechanisms for myoglobin- initiated lipid oxidation in muscle tissue (p...

  14. 21 CFR 184.1431 - Magnesium oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... powder (light) or a relatively dense white powder (heavy) by heating magnesium hydroxide or carbonate... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Magnesium oxide. 184.1431 Section 184.1431 Food and... Substances Affirmed as GRAS § 184.1431 Magnesium oxide. (a) Magnesium oxide (MgO, CAS Reg. No. 1309-48-4...

  15. Graphene oxide reduction recipes, spectroscopy, and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Gao, Wei

    2015-01-01

    This book focuses on a group of new materials labeled ""graphene oxides."" It provides a comprehensive overview of graphene oxide-based nanomaterials in terms of their synthesis, structures, properties, and extensive applications in catalysis, separation, filtration, energy storage and conversion. The book also covers emerging research on graphite oxides and the impact of the research on fundamental and applied sciences.

  16. Air Quality Criteria for Sulfur Oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Air Pollution Control Administration (DHEW), Washington, DC.

    Included is a literature review which comprehensively discusses knowledge of the sulfur oxides commonly found in the atmosphere. The subject content is represented by the 10 chapter titles: Physical and Chemical Properties and the Atmospheric Reactions of the Oxides of Sulfur; Sources and Methods of Measurements of Sulfur Oxides in the Atmosphere;…

  17. 21 CFR 73.3125 - Iron oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Iron oxides. 73.3125 Section 73.3125 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Medical Devices § 73.3125 Iron oxides. (a) Identity and specifications. The color additive iron oxides (CAS Reg. No. 1332-37-2), Color Index No. 77491, shall conform in...

  18. Polyaniline: Aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants under various acidity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bláha, Michal, E-mail: blaha@imc.cas.cz [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Morávková, Zuzana [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic); Prokeš, Jan [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, 180 00 Prague 8 (Czech Republic); Stejskal, Jaroslav [Institute of Macromolecular Chemistry, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, 162 06 Prague 6 (Czech Republic)

    2017-06-15

    Aniline was oxidized with three strong inorganic oxidants (ammonium peroxydisulfate, cerium(IV) sulfate, potassium dichromate), two weak inorganic oxidants (iron(III) chloride, silver nitrate), and one organic oxidant (p-benzoquinone) in aqueous solutions of methanesulfonic acid (MSA) of various concentration. Whereas oxidation of aniline with ammonium peroxydisulfate yielded high-molecular-weight conducting polyaniline (PANI) in the whole acidity range, the oxidation with cerium(IV) sulfate led also to a single product close to PANI with considerably lower molecular weight and lower conductivity. Potassium dichromate gave PANI only at high concentration of MSA. The use of iron(III) chloride yielded composite mixtures of PANI and low-molecular-weight aniline oligomers. The oxidation of aniline with silver nitrate led to composites of silver and an organic part, which was constituted either by aniline oligomers or conducting polyaniline or both. p-Benzoquinone as oxidant produced mainly aniline oligomers with poor conductivity and 2,5-dianilino-p-benzoquinone-like structure detected in FTIR and Raman spectra when oxidation proceeded with weak oxidants. A general model of oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated. - Highlights: • Comparison of aniline oxidation with oxidants of different redox potential. • UV–vis, FTIR and Raman spectroscopies combined with size-exclusion chromatography. • The contents of polymer and oligomers were analyzed and discussed. • General model of aniline oxidation with strong and weak oxidants was formulated.

  19. Fatty acid omega-oxidation as a rescue pathway for fatty acid oxidation disorders in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wanders, Ronald J. A.; Komen, Jasper; Kemp, Stephan

    2011-01-01

    Fatty acids (FAs) can be degraded via different mechanisms including alpha-, beta- and omega-oxidation. In humans, a range of different genetic diseases has been identified in which either mitochondrial FA beta-oxidation, peroxisomal FA beta-oxidation or FA alpha-oxidation is impaired. Treatment

  20. Advanced methods for the treatment of organic aqueous wastes: wet air oxidation and wet peroxide oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Debellefontaine, Hubert; Chakchouk, Mehrez; Foussard, Jean Noel [Institut National des Sciences Appliquees (INSA), 31 - Toulouse (France). Dept. de Genie des Procedes Industriels; Tissot, Daniel; Striolo, Phillipe [IDE Environnement S.A., Toulouse (France)

    1993-12-31

    There is a growing concern about the problems of wastes elimination. Various oxidation techniques are suited for elimination of organic aqueous wastes, however, because of the environmental drawbacks of incineration, liquid phase oxidation should be preferred. `Wet Air Oxidation` and `Wet Peroxide Oxidation`are alternative processes which are discussed in this paper. 17 refs., 13 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Oxidation of positronium atoms on a surface of oxidic catalyst carrier containing acid centres

    CERN Document Server

    Paiziev, A A

    2000-01-01

    By Born approximation the cross section of positronium (Ps) oxidation on acid centres localized on the surface of oxide carriers is calculated. Analysis of the kinetics of elementary processes in porous carriers based on aluminum oxide including processes of annihilation of positron, formation of Ps and oxidation of Ps on acid centres is given.

  2. Oxidized limonene and oxidized linalool - concomitant contact allergy to common fragrance terpenes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bråred Christensson, Johanna; Karlberg, Ann-Therese; Andersen, Klaus E

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Limonene and linalool are common fragrance terpenes. Both oxidized R-limonene and oxidized linalool have recently been patch tested in an international setting, showing contact allergy in 5.2% and 6.9% of dermatitis patients, respectively. OBJECTIVE: To investigate concomitant reactions...... between oxidized R-limonene and oxidized linalool in consecutive dermatitis patients. METHODS: Oxidized R-limonene 3.0% (containing limonene hydroperoxides 0.33%) and oxidized linalool 6% (linalool hydroperoxides 1%) in petrolatum were tested in 2900 consecutive dermatitis patients in Australia, Denmark......, Singapore, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. RESULTS: A total of 281 patients reacted to either oxidized R-limonene or oxidized linalool. Of these, 25% had concomitant reactions to both compounds, whereas 29% reacted only to oxidized R-limonene and 46% only to oxidized linalool. Of the 152 patients...

  3. Synthesis of Graphene Oxide by Oxidation of Graphite with Ferrate(VI) Compounds: Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sofer, Zdeněk; Luxa, Jan; Jankovský, Ondřej; Sedmidubský, David; Bystroň, Tomáš; Pumera, Martin

    2016-09-19

    It is well established that graphene oxide can be prepared by the oxidation of graphite using permanganate or chlorate in an acidic environment. Recently, however, the synthesis of graphene oxide using potassium ferrate(VI) ions has been reported. Herein, we critically replicate and evaluate this new ferrate(VI) oxidation method. In addition, we test the use of potassium ferrate(VI) for the synthesis of graphene oxide under various experimental routes. The synthesized materials are analyzed by a number of analytical methods in order to confirm or disprove the possibility of synthesizing graphene oxide by the ferrate(VI) oxidation route. Our results confirm the unsuitability of using ferrate(VI) for the oxidation of graphite on graphene oxide because of its high instability in an acidic environment and low oxidation power in neutral and alkaline environments. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Production of oceanic nitrous oxide by ammonia-oxidizing archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Löscher

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent finding that microbial ammonia oxidation in the ocean is performed by archaea to a greater extent than by bacteria has drastically changed the view on oceanic nitrification. The numerical dominance of archaeal ammonia-oxidizers (AOA over their bacterial counterparts (AOB in large parts of the ocean leads to the hypothesis that AOA rather than AOB could be the key organisms for the oceanic production of the strong greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O that occurs as a by-product of nitrification. Very recently, enrichment cultures of marine ammonia-oxidizing archaea have been reported to produce N2O.

    Here, we demonstrate that archaeal ammonia monooxygenase genes (amoA were detectable throughout the water column of the eastern tropical North Atlantic (ETNA and eastern tropical South Pacific (ETSP Oceans. Particularly in the ETNA, comparable patterns of abundance and expression of archaeal amoA genes and N2O co-occurred in the oxygen minimum, whereas the abundances of bacterial amoA genes were negligible. Moreover, selective inhibition of archaea in seawater incubations from the ETNA decreased the N2O production significantly. In studies with the only cultivated marine archaeal ammonia-oxidizer Nitrosopumilus maritimus SCM1, we provide the first direct evidence for N2O production in a pure culture of AOA, excluding the involvement of other microorganisms as possibly present in enrichments. N. maritimus showed high N2O production rates under low oxygen concentrations comparable to concentrations existing in the oxycline of the ETNA, whereas the N2O production from two AOB cultures was comparably low under similar conditions. Based on our findings, we hypothesize that the production of N2O in tropical ocean areas results mainly from archaeal nitrification and will be affected by the predicted decrease in dissolved

  5. Antimony oxidation and adsorption by in-situ formed biogenic Mn oxide and Fe-Mn oxides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yaohui; Jefferson, William A; Liang, Jinsong; Yang, Tingting; Qu, Jiuhui

    2017-04-01

    Antimony (Sb), which can be toxic at relatively low concentrations, may co-exist with Mn(II) and/or Fe(II) in some groundwater and surface water bodies. Here we investigated the potential oxidation and adsorption pathways of Sb (III and V) species in the presence of Mn(II) and Mn-oxidizing bacteria, with or without Fe(II). Batch experiments were conducted to determine the oxidation and adsorption characteristics of Sb species in the presence of biogenic Mn oxides (BMOs), which were formed in-situ via the oxidation of Mn(II) by a Mn-oxidizing bacterium (Pseudomonas sp. QJX-1). Results indicated that Sb(III) ions could be oxidized to Sb(V) ions by BMO, but only Sb(V) originating from Sb(III) oxidation was adsorbed effectively by BMO. Introduced Fe(II) was chemically oxidized to FeOOH, the precipitates of which mixed with BMO to form a new compound, biogenic Fe-Mn oxides (BFMO). The BMO part of the BFMO mainly oxidized and the FeOOH of the BFMO mainly adsorbed the Sb species. In aquatic solutions containing both As(III) and Sb(III), the BFMO that formed in-situ preferentially oxidized Sb over As but adsorbed As more efficiently. Chemical analysis and reverse transcription real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that the presence of Fe(II), As(III) and Sb(III) accelerated the oxidation of Mn(II) but inhibited the activity of Mn-oxidizing bacteria. These results provide significant insights into the biogeochemical pathways of Sb, Mn(II) in aquatic ecosystems, with or without Fe(II). Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Haemophilus influenzae and oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alistair eHarrison

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Haemophilus influenzae is a commensal of the human upper respiratory tract. H. influenzae can, however, move out of its commensal niche and cause multiple respiratory tract diseases. Such diseases include otitis media in young children, as well as exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, sinusitis, conjunctivitis and bronchitis. During the course of colonization and infection, H. influenzae must withstand oxidative stress generated by multiple reactive oxygen species produced endogenously, by other co-pathogens and by host cells. H. influenzae has therefore evolved multiple mechanisms that protect the cell against oxygen-generated stresses. In this review, we will describe these systems. Moreover, we will compare how H. influenzae obviates the effect of oxidative stress as a necessary phenotype for its roles as both a successful commensal and pathogen, relative to the well-described systems in Escherichia coli.

  7. Biochemistry of Dissimilatory Sulfur Oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blake II, R.

    2003-05-30

    The long term goals of this research were to define the substrate oxidation pathways, the electron transport mechanisms, and the modes of energy conservation employed during the dissimilatory oxidation of sulfur practiced by various species of the thiobacilli. Specific adhesion of the thiobacilli to elemental sulfur was studied by electrical impedance, dynamic light scattering, laser Doppler velocimetry, and optical trapping methods. The conclusion is that the thiobacilli appear to express specific receptors that enable the bacteria to recognize and adhere to insoluble sulfur. The enzyme tetrathionate oxidase was purified from two species of the thiobacilli. Extensive structural and functional studies were conducted on adenosine 5'-phosphosulfate reductase purified from cell-free extracts of Thiobacillus denitrificans. The kinetic mechanism of rhodanese was studied.

  8. Graphene Oxides Show Angiogenic Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sudip; Sriram, Pavithra; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Nethi, Susheel Kumar; Veeriah, Vimal; Chatterjee, Suvro; Suresh, Kattimuttathu Ittara; Patra, Chitta Ranjan

    2015-08-05

    Angiogenesis, a process resulting in the formation of new capillaries from the pre-existing vasculature plays vital role for the development of therapeutic approaches for cancer, atherosclerosis, wound healing, and cardiovascular diseases. In this report, the synthesis, characterization, and angiogenic properties of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) have been demonstrated, observed through several in vitro and in vivo angiogenesis assays. The results here demonstrate that the intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species and reactive nitrogen species as well as activation of phospho-eNOS and phospho-Akt might be the plausible mechanisms for GO and rGO induced angiogenesis. The results altogether suggest the possibilities for the development of alternative angiogenic therapeutic approach for the treatment of cardiovascular related diseases where angiogenesis plays a significant role. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. [Oxidative stress in Crohn's disease].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moret, Inés; Cerrillo, Elena; Navarro-Puche, Ana; Iborra, Marisa; Rausell, Francisco; Tortosa, Luis; Beltrán, Belén

    2014-01-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is characterized by transmural inflammation that is most frequently located in the region of the terminal ileum. Although the physiopathological mechanisms of the disease are not yet well defined, the unregulated immune response is associated with high production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). These elements are associated with complex systems known as antioxidant defenses, whose function is ROS regulation, thereby preventing the harmful effects of these elements. However, the presence of an imbalance between ROS production and ROS elimination by antioxidants has been widely described and leads to oxidative stress. In this article, we describe the most significant findings on oxidative stress in the intestinal mucosa and peripheral blood. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  10. Oxidative Stress in Emergency Toxicology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. V. Belova

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to comparatively assess the intensity of oxidative stress (OS in acute poisonings by various toxic chemicals. Subjects and methods. Two hundred and eighty-seven patients with acute poisoning by psychopharmacological agents, ethanol, and cauterants were examined. Results. A correlation was found between the manifestations of OS and the severity of poisoning. The investigators revealed the impacts of exposure to toxic chemicals and complications of the toxicogenic phase of acute poisoning by the above toxicants on the intensity of OS. Conclusion. The intensity of OS in the poisonings under study increases in proportion to the severity of intoxication, toxicant exposure in the body. The presence of hemolysis, upper airway burn, and chronic alcoholism deteriorate OS. Key words: oxidative stress, acute poisonings, chemical burn, chronic alcoholism.

  11. Oxidative stress in brain ischemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, S

    1999-01-01

    Brain ischemia initiates a complex cascade of metabolic events, several of which involve the generation of nitrogen and oxygen free radicals. These free radicals and related reactive chemical species mediate much of damage that occurs after transient brain ischemia, and in the penumbral region of infarcts caused by permanent ischemia. Nitric oxide, a water- and lipid-soluble free radical, is generated by the action of nitric oxide synthases. Ischemia causes a surge in nitric oxide synthase 1 (NOS 1) activity in neurons and, possibly, glia, increased NOS 3 activity in vascular endothelium, and later an increase in NOS 2 activity in a range of cells including infiltrating neutrophils and macrophages, activated microglia and astrocytes. The effects of ischemia on the activity of NOS 1, a Ca2+-dependent enzyme, are thought to be secondary to reversal of glutamate reuptake at synapses, activation of NMDA receptors, and resulting elevation of intracellular Ca2+. The up-regulation of NOS 2 activity is mediated by transcriptional inducers. In the context of brain ischemia, the activity of NOS 1 and NOS 2 is broadly deleterious, and their inhibition or inactivation is neuroprotective. However, the production of nitric oxide in blood vessels by NOS 3, which, like NOS 1, is Ca2+-dependent, causes vasodilatation and improves blood flow in the penumbral region of brain infarcts. In addition to causing the synthesis of nitric oxide, brain ischemia leads to the generation of superoxide, through the action of nitric oxide synthases, xanthine oxidase, leakage from the mitochondrial electron transport chain, and other mechanisms. Nitric oxide and superoxide are themselves highly reactive but can also combine to form a highly toxic anion, peroxynitrite. The toxicity of the free radicals and peroxynitrite results from their modification of macromolecules, especially DNA, and from the resulting induction of apoptotic and necrotic pathways. The mode of cell death that prevails probably

  12. Exfoliation of graphite oxide in propylene carbonate and thermal reduction of the resulting graphene oxide platelets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yanwu; Stoller, Meryl D; Cai, Weiwei; Velamakanni, Aruna; Piner, Richard D; Chen, David; Ruoff, Rodney S

    2010-02-23

    Graphite oxide was exfoliated and dispersed in propylene carbonate (PC) by bath sonication. Heating the graphene oxide suspensions at 150 degrees C significantly reduced the graphene oxide platelets; paper samples comprising such reduced graphene oxide platelets had an electrical conductivity of 5230 S/m. By adding tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate (TEA BF(4)) to the reduced graphene oxide/PC slurry and making a two-cell ultracapacitor, specific capacitance values of about 120 F/g were obtained.

  13. Synthesis and characterization of manganese oxide and cobalt oxide nano-structure

    OpenAIRE

    F. Piri; N. Shakour; M. Zandi; R KARIMIAN

    2011-01-01

    The preparation of nanostructure type manganese oxide and cobalt oxide materials with the smallest particle size is reported here. The nanorod manganese oxide and cobalt oxide nanotube were prepared via a sol-gel reaction in reverse micelles from KMnO4 and CoCl2 with respectively source at room-temperature. The structure and surface morphology of the obtained manganese oxide were studied by means of X-ray diffraction analysis (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron...

  14. Graphene oxide physics and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao, Jijun; Li, Fen

    2015-01-01

    This book gives a comprehensive overview of graphene oxides (GO)  from atomic structures and fundamental properties to technological applications. Atomic structural models, electronic properties, mechanical properties, optical properties, and functionalizing and compositing of GO are illustrated. Moreover, the excellent physical and chemical properties offer GO promising applications in electronic nanodevices, chemical sensors and catalyst, energy storage, and biotechnology, which are also presented in this book. Therefore, this book is of interest to researchers in physics, chemistry, materials science, and nanoscience.

  15. Lattice dynamics of lithium oxide

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    for Li2O oxide may be transferred to other similar fluorites and antifluorites like. Na2O, K2O, UO2, ThO2 etc., with suitable modifications. References. [1] T W D Farley, W Hayes, S Hull, M T Hutchings and M Vrtis, J. Phys. Condens. Matter 3, 4761 (1991). [2] R W G Wyckoff, Crystal structures, 2nd ed. (John Wiley & Sons, New ...

  16. Electron collisions with nitrous oxide

    OpenAIRE

    Winstead, Carl; McKoy, Vincent

    1998-01-01

    We have carried out theoretical studies of low-energy elastic electron collisions with nitrous oxide (N2O), obtaining differential, integral, and momentum-transfer cross sections. Polarization effects are incorporated in the electron-molecule scattering dynamics. A simple, objective, and physically motivated criterion is introduced for constructing a compact set of configurations that accurately accounts for polarization in resonant symmetries while avoiding overcorrelation. Our cross section...

  17. Coal combustion by wet oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettinger, J.A.; Lamparter, R.A.; McDowell, D.C.

    1980-11-15

    The combustion of coal by wet oxidation was studied by the Center for Waste Management Programs, of Michigan Technological University. In wet oxidation a combustible material, such as coal, is reacted with oxygen in the presence of liquid water. The reaction is typically carried out in the range of 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 353/sup 0/C (650/sup 0/F) with sufficient pressure to maintain the water present in the liquid state, and provide the partial pressure of oxygen in the gas phase necessary to carry out the reaction. Experimental studies to explore the key reaction parameters of temperature, time, oxidant, catalyst, coal type, and mesh size were conducted by running batch tests in a one-gallon stirred autoclave. The factors exhibiting the greatest effect on the extent of reaction were temperature and residence time. The effect of temperature was studied from 204/sup 0/C (400/sup 0/F) to 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) with a residence time from 600 to 3600 seconds. From this data, the reaction activation energy of 2.7 x 10/sup 4/ calories per mole was determined for a high-volatile-A-Bituminous type coal. The reaction rate constant may be determined at any temperature from the activation energy using the Arrhenius equation. Additional data were generated on the effect of mesh size and different coal types. A sample of peat was also tested. Two catalysts were evaluated, and their effects on reaction rate presented in the report. In addition to the high temperature combustion, low temperature desulfurization is discussed. Desulfurization can improve low grade coal to be used in conventional combustion methods. It was found that 90% of the sulfur can be removed from the coal by wet oxidation with the carbon untouched. Further desulfurization studies are indicated.

  18. Physical activity and lipid oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Marrugat, Jaume; Arquer, Andreu; Elosua, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    Regular physical activity (PA) is associated with lower cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Part of these benefits is related to the effects over the classic cardiovascular risk factors. These effects, however, only explain part of the protection of PA from these types of diseases. The oxidation of LDL cholesterol particles, which is the aetiopathogenic mechanism of a great part of cardiovascular diseases, plays an important role in the arteriosclerotic process. This narrative review pres...

  19. Oxidation pond for municipal wastewater treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Erick; Hung, Yung-Tse; Suleiman Al Ahmad, Mohammed; Yeh, Ruth Yu-Li; Liu, Robert Lian-Huey; Fu, Yen-Pei

    2017-03-01

    This literature review examines process, design, and cost issues related to using oxidation ponds for wastewater treatment. Many of the topics have applications at either full scale or in isolation for laboratory analysis. Oxidation ponds have many advantages. The oxidation pond treatment process is natural, because it uses microorganisms such as bacteria and algae. This makes the method of treatment cost-effective in terms of its construction, maintenance, and energy requirements. Oxidation ponds are also productive, because it generates effluent that can be used for other applications. Finally, oxidation ponds can be considered a sustainable method for treatment of wastewater.

  20. Accelerated ageing of molybdenum oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorge, Marina; Cooil, Simon; Edmonds, Mark T.; Thomsen, Lars; Nematollahi, Mohammadreza; Mazzola, Federico; Wells, Justin W.

    2017-11-01

    The stability and lifetime of materials proposed for photovoltaic applications are important parameters, because such devices should offer long-term reliable performance whilst operating in a harsh environment. In this work, we present a powerful approach to accelerate and study the degradation mechanisms of molybdenum oxide, a material which has shown promise for next generation photovoltaics, and for enhanced hole extraction in organic photovoltaics. We use UV and soft x-rays to drive accelerated ageing, boosting the ageing time by a factor of up to 1000. Using this method, we find that molybdenum oxide does not offer reliable performance in environments in which heating or ionising radiation are present, because of its propensity to reduce, thus strongly modifying its electronic properties. We estimate that  ≈100 d of unfiltered sunlight exposure would be sufficient to reduce this material into metallic MoO2. We also show that a very similar degradation can be driven by thermally, and that in both cases, the creation of oxygen vacancies is responsible. A lack of robustness to harsh operating conditions (i.e. UV and/or heat) brings the suitability of unprotected molybdenum oxide in photovoltaic applications into question.

  1. Nylon/Graphene Oxide Electrospun Composite Coating

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmina Menchaca-Campos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Graphite oxide is obtained by treating graphite with strong oxidizers. The bulk material disperses in basic solutions yielding graphene oxide. Starting from exfoliated graphite, different treatments were tested to obtain the best graphite oxide conditions, including calcination for two hours at 700°C and ultrasonic agitation in acidic, basic, or peroxide solutions. Bulk particles floating in the solution were filtered, rinsed, and dried. The graphene oxide obtained was characterized under SEM and FTIR techniques. On the other hand, nylon 6-6 has excellent mechanical resistance due to the mutual attraction of its long chains. To take advantage of the properties of both materials, they were combined as a hybrid material. Electrochemical cells were prepared using porous silica as supporting electrode of the electrospun nylon/graphene oxide films for electrochemical testing. Polarization curves were performed to determine the oxidation/reduction potentials under different acidic, alkaline, and peroxide solutions. The oxidation condition was obtained in KOH and the reduction in H2SO4 solutions. Potentiostatic oxidation and reduction curves were applied to further oxidize carbon species and then reduced them, forming the nylon 6-6/functionalized graphene oxide composite coating. Electrochemical impedance measurements were performed to evaluate the coating electrochemical resistance and compared to the silica or nylon samples.

  2. Phase-field model of oxidation: Equilibrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherman, Q C; Voorhees, P W

    2017-03-01

    A phase-field model of an oxide relevant to corrosion resistant alloys for film thicknesses below the Debye length L_{D}, where charge neutrality in the oxide does not occur, is formulated. The phase-field model is validated in the Wagner limit using a sharp interface Gouy-Chapman model for the electrostatic double layer. The phase-field simulations show that equilibrium oxide films below the Wagner limit are charged throughout due to their inability to electrostatically screen charge over the length of the film, L. The character of the defect and charge distribution profiles in the oxide vary depending on whether reduced oxygen adatoms are present on the gas-oxide interface. The Fermi level in the oxide increases for thinner films, approaching the Fermi level of the metal in the limit L/L_{D}→0, which increases the driving force for adsorbed oxygen reduction at the gas-oxide interface.

  3. Oxidative stress in university students during examinations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivonová, Monika; Zitnanová, Ingrid; Hlincíková, Lucia; Skodácek, Igor; Trebatická, Jana; Duracková, Zdenka

    2004-09-01

    Mental stress in psychiatric disease and in daily life contributes to oxidative stress in the body. In this study we investigated a connection between possible psychological stress caused by university undergraduate examinations and oxidative stress experienced by our test subjects. Some parameters of oxidative stress (single strand breaks of DNA in lymphocytes, sensitivity to lipid oxidation and antioxidant status) were studied in medical students on the day of the examination (stress condition) and compared with the same parameters obtained from the same students during the term between two examination periods (non-stress condition). The results show that in the stress condition oxidative damage to DNA and sensitivity to lipid oxidation were significantly increased (pstress" conditions. A significant decrease in plasma antioxidant activity (pstress was observed. These results suggest that during university examinations students are under increased oxidative stress.

  4. Oxidation-reduction catalyst and its process of use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jeffrey D. (Inventor); Watkins, Anthony Neal (Inventor); Schryer, Jacqueline L. (Inventor); Oglesby, Donald M. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    This invention relates generally to a ruthenium stabilized oxidation-reduction catalyst useful for oxidizing carbon monoxide, and volatile organic compounds, and reducing nitrogen oxide species in oxidizing environments, substantially without the formation of toxic and volatile ruthenium oxide species upon said oxidizing environment being at high temperatures.

  5. Plasma electrolytic oxide coatings on silumin for oxidation CO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borisov, V. A.; Sigaeva, S. S.; Anoshkina, E. A.; Ivanov, A. L.; Litvinov, P. V.; Vedruchenko, V. R.; Temerev, V. L.; Arbuzov, A. B.; Kuznetsov, A. A.; Mukhin, V. A.; Suprunov, G. I.; Chumychko, I. A.; Shlyapin, D. A.; Tsyrul'nikov, P. G.

    2017-08-01

    Some catalysts of CO oxidation on silumin alloy AK12M2, used for the manufacture of pistons for Russian cars were investigated. The catalysts were prepared by the method of plasma electrolytic oxidation of silumin in electrolytes of various compositions with further activation by the salts Ce, Cu, Co, Ni, Mn and Al. The catalytic tests were carried out in a flow reactor in a mixture of 1% CO and 99% air, with the temperature range of 25-500 °C. The most active catalysts in CO oxidation are those activated with Ce and Cu salts on silumin, treated for 3 hours in an electrolyte containing 4 g/l KOH, 40 g/l Na2B4O7 (conversion of CO is 93.7% at a contact time of 0.25 s). However, the catalysts obtained from silumin treated in the electrolyte containing 3 g/l KOH, 30 g/l Na2SiO3 are more suitable for practical usage. Because when the treatment time of those catalysts is 10 - 20 minutes it is possible to achieve comparable CO conversion. The morphology and composition of the catalysts were studied by the methods of a scanning electron microscope with energy-dispersive surface analysis and X-ray phase analysis. The surface of the non-activated sample consists of γ-Al2O3 and SiO2 particles, due to which the active components get attached to the support. CeO2 and CuO are present on the surface of the sample with the active component.

  6. 75 FR 61486 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-05

    ... AGENCY Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides... Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: Second External Review Draft (75 FR 57463, September... (summary of options for elements of the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and sulfur oxides (SO X ) standard). DATES...

  7. 75 FR 20595 - Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-20

    ... AGENCY Review of the Secondary National Ambient Air Quality Standards for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides... for Oxides of Nitrogen and Oxides of Sulfur: First External Review Draft (75 FR 11877; March 12, 2010... a proposal addressing the nitrogen oxides (NO X ) and sulfur oxides (SO X ) secondary National...

  8. An engineered polypeptide around nano-sized manganese-calcium oxide: copying plants for water oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghobadi, Mohadeseh Zarei; Sarvi, Bahram; Haghighi, Behzad

    2015-09-14

    Synthesis of new efficient catalysts inspired by Nature is a key goal in the production of clean fuel. Different compounds based on manganese oxide have been investigated in order to find their water-oxidation activity. Herein, we introduce a novel engineered polypeptide containing tyrosine around nano-sized manganese-calcium oxide, which was shown to be a highly active catalyst toward water oxidation at low overpotential (240 mV), with high turnover frequency of 1.5 × 10(-2) s(-1) at pH = 6.3 in the Mn(III)/Mn(IV) oxidation range. The compound is a novel structural and efficient functional model for the water-oxidizing complex in Photosystem II. A new proposed clever strategy used by Nature in water oxidation is also discussed. The new model of the water-oxidizing complex opens a new perspective for synthesis of efficient water-oxidation catalysts.

  9. A Self-Consistent Model for Thermal Oxidation of Silicon at Low Oxide Thickness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald Gerlach

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Thermal oxidation of silicon belongs to the most decisive steps in microelectronic fabrication because it allows creating electrically insulating areas which enclose electrically conductive devices and device areas, respectively. Deal and Grove developed the first model (DG-model for the thermal oxidation of silicon describing the oxide thickness versus oxidation time relationship with very good agreement for oxide thicknesses of more than 23 nm. Their approach named as general relationship is the basis of many similar investigations. However, measurement results show that the DG-model does not apply to very thin oxides in the range of a few nm. Additionally, it is inherently not self-consistent. The aim of this paper is to develop a self-consistent model that is based on the continuity equation instead of Fick’s law as the DG-model is. As literature data show, the relationship between silicon oxide thickness and oxidation time is governed—down to oxide thicknesses of just a few nm—by a power-of-time law. Given by the time-independent surface concentration of oxidants at the oxide surface, Fickian diffusion seems to be neglectable for oxidant migration. The oxidant flux has been revealed to be carried by non-Fickian flux processes depending on sites being able to lodge dopants (oxidants, the so-called DOCC-sites, as well as on the dopant jump rate.

  10. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Background Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we used a novel reducing agent, betamercaptoethanol (BME), for synthesis of graphene to avoid the use of toxic materials. To uncover the impacts of GO and rGO on human health, the antibacterial activity of two types of graphene-based material toward a bacterial model P. aeruginosa was studied and compared. Methods The synthesized GO and rGO was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle-size analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Further, to explain the antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, we employed various assays, such as cell growth, cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation, and DNA fragmentation. Results Ultraviolet-visible spectra of the samples confirmed the transition of GO into graphene. Dynamic light-scattering analyses showed the average size among the two types of graphene materials. X-ray diffraction data validated the structure of graphene sheets, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene. Raman spectroscopy data indicated the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and the formation of graphene. The exposure of cells to GO and rGO induced the production of superoxide radical anion and loss of cell viability. Results suggest that the antibacterial activities are contributed to by loss of cell viability, induced oxidative stress, and DNA fragmentation. Conclusion The antibacterial activities of GO and rGO against P. aeruginosa were compared. The loss of P

  11. Oxidative stress-mediated antibacterial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Han, Jae Woong; Dayem, Ahmed Abdal; Eppakayala, Vasuki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2012-01-01

    Graphene holds great promise for potential use in next-generation electronic and photonic devices due to its unique high carrier mobility, good optical transparency, large surface area, and biocompatibility. The aim of this study was to investigate the antibacterial effects of graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. In this work, we used a novel reducing agent, betamercaptoethanol (BME), for synthesis of graphene to avoid the use of toxic materials. To uncover the impacts of GO and rGO on human health, the antibacterial activity of two types of graphene-based material toward a bacterial model P. aeruginosa was studied and compared. The synthesized GO and rGO was characterized by ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopy, particle-size analyzer, X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. Further, to explain the antimicrobial activity of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide, we employed various assays, such as cell growth, cell viability, reactive oxygen species generation, and DNA fragmentation. Ultraviolet-visible spectra of the samples confirmed the transition of GO into graphene. Dynamic light-scattering analyses showed the average size among the two types of graphene materials. X-ray diffraction data validated the structure of graphene sheets, and high-resolution scanning electron microscopy was employed to investigate the morphologies of prepared graphene. Raman spectroscopy data indicated the removal of oxygen-containing functional groups from the surface of GO and the formation of graphene. The exposure of cells to GO and rGO induced the production of superoxide radical anion and loss of cell viability. Results suggest that the antibacterial activities are contributed to by loss of cell viability, induced oxidative stress, and DNA fragmentation. The antibacterial activities of GO and rGO against P. aeruginosa were compared. The loss of P. aeruginosa viability increased in a dose- and

  12. Control of bovine hepatic fatty acid oxidation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jesse, B.W.; Emery, R.S.; Thomas, J.W.

    1986-09-01

    Fatty acid oxidation by bovine liver slices and mitochondria was examined to determine potential regulatory sites of fatty acid oxidation. Conversion of 1-(/sup 14/C)palmitate to /sup 14/CO/sub 2/ and total (/sup 14/C)acid-soluble metabolites was used to measure fatty acid oxidation. Oxidation of palmitate (1 mM) was linear in both liver slice weight and incubation time. Carnitine stimulated palmitate oxidation; 2 mM dl-carnitine produced maximal stimulation of palmitate oxidation to both CO/sup 2/ and acid-soluble metabolites. Propionate (10 mM) inhibited palmitate oxidation by bovine liver slices. Propionate (.5 to 10 mM) had no effect on palmitate oxidation by mitochondria, but malonyl Coenzyme A, the first committed intermediate of fatty acid synthesis, inhibited mitochondrial palmitate oxidation (inhibition constant = .3 ..mu..M). Liver mitochonndrial carnitine palmitoyltransferase exhibited Michaelis constants for palmitoyl Coenzyme A and l-carnitine of 11.5 ..mu..M and .59 mM, respectively. Long-chain fatty acid oxidation in bovine liver is regulated by mechanisms similar to those in rats but adapted to the unique digestive physiology of the bovine.

  13. Protein oxidation in aging and the removal of oxidized proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höhn, Annika; König, Jeannette; Grune, Tilman

    2013-10-30

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are generated constantly within cells at low concentrations even under physiological conditions. During aging the levels of ROS can increase due to a limited capacity of antioxidant systems and repair mechanisms. Proteins are among the main targets for oxidants due to their high rate constants for several reactions with ROS and their abundance in biological systems. Protein damage has an important influence on cellular viability since most protein damage is non-repairable, and has deleterious consequences on protein structure and function. In addition, damaged and modified proteins can form cross-links and provide a basis for many senescence-associated alterations and may contribute to a range of human pathologies. Two proteolytic systems are responsible to ensure the maintenance of cellular functions: the proteasomal (UPS) and the lysosomal system. Those degrading systems provide a last line of antioxidative protection, removing irreversible damaged proteins and recycling amino acids for the continuous protein synthesis. But during aging, both systems are affected and their proteolytic activity declines significantly. Here we highlight the recent advantages in the understanding of protein oxidation and the fate of these damaged proteins during aging. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Posttranslational Protein modifications in biology and Medicine. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Greenlighting Photoelectrochemical Oxidation of Water by Iron Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Wook; Riha, Shannon C.; DeMarco, Erica J.; Martinson, Alex B. F.; Farha, Omar K.; Hupp, Joseph T.

    2014-12-23

    Hematite (alpha-Fe2O3) is one of just a few candidate electrode materials that possess all of the following photocatalyst-essential properties for scalable application to water oxidation: excellent stability, earth-abundance, suitability positive valence-band-edge energy, and significant visible light absorptivity. Despite these merits, hematites modest oxygen evolution reaction kinetics and its poor efficiency in delivering photogenerated holes, especially holes generated by green photons, to the electrode/solution interface, render it ineffective as a practical water-splitting catalyst. Here we show that hole delivery and catalytic utilization can be substantially improved through Ti alloying, provided that the alloyed material is present in ultrathin-thin-film form. Notably, the effects are most pronounced for charges photogenerated by photons with energy comparable to the band gap for excitation of Fe(3d) -> Fe(3d) transitions (i.e., green photons). Additionally, at the optimum Ti substitution level the lifetimes of surface-localized holes, competent for water oxidation, are extended. Together these changes explain an overall improvement in photoelectrochemical performance, especially enhanced internal quantum efficiencies, observed upon Ti(IV) incorporation.

  15. Oxidative and Non-Oxidative Metabolomics of Ethanol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinis-Oliveira, Ricardo Jorge

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that ethanol can cause significant morbidity and mortality, and much of the related toxic effects can be explained by its metabolic profile. This work performs a complete review of the metabolism of ethanol focusing on both major and minor metabolites. An exhaustive literature search was carried out using textual and structural queries for ethanol and related known metabolizing enzymes and metabolites. The main pathway of metabolism is catalyzed by cytosolic alcohol dehydrogenase, which exhibits multiple isoenzymes and genetic polymorphisms with clinical and forensic implications. Another two oxidative routes, the highly inducible CYP2E1 system and peroxisomal catalase may acquire relevance under specific circumstances. In addition to oxidative metabolism, ethanol also originates minor metabolites such as ethyl glucuronide, ethyl sulfate, ethyl phosphate, ethyl nitrite, phosphatidylethanol and fatty acid ethyl esters. These metabolites represent alternative biomarkers since they can be detected several hours or days after ethanol exposure. It is expected that knowing the metabolomics of ethanol may provide additional insights to better understand the toxicological effects and the variability of dose response.

  16. Simulation of 3D mesoscale structure formation in concentrated aqueous solution of the triblock polymer surfactants (ethylene oxide)(13)(propylene oxide)(30)(ethylene oxide)(13) and (propylene oxide)(19)(ethylene oxide)(33)(propylene oxide)(19). Application of dynamic mean-field density functional theory

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Vlimmeren, BAC; Maurits, NM; Zvelindovsky, AV; Sevink, GJA; Fraaije, JGEM

    1999-01-01

    We simulate the microphase separation dynamics of aqueous solutions of the triblock polymer surfactants (ethylene oxide)(13)(propylene oxide)(30)(ethylene oxide)(13) and (propylene oxide)(19)(ethylene oxide)(33)(propylene oxide)(19) by a dynamic variant of mean-field density functional theory for

  17. Nickel mobilization in a groundwater well field: Release by pyrite oxidation and desorption from manganese oxides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Postma, Dieke; Larsen, Flemming

    1997-01-01

    is furthermore characterized by enhanced Mn2+ concentrations. Apparently nickel accumulates on manganese oxides during pyrite oxidation. When the water table rises again, partially oxidized pyritic layers are resubmerged, and due to an insufficient supply of oxygen, the oxidation of Fe2+ released during pyrite...... oxidation becomes incomplete. The mobilized Fe2+ may reduce manganese oxides and thereby release large amounts of Ni2+ to the groundwater. Calculations using a surface complexation model indicate retardation of nickel to be strongly affected by bulk water composition. At the background groundwater...

  18. Chromium(iii) oxidation by biogenic manganese oxides with varying structural ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yuanzhi; Webb, Samuel M; Estes, Emily R; Hansel, Colleen M

    2014-09-20

    Manganese (Mn) oxides, which are generally considered biogenic in origin within natural systems, are the only oxidants of Cr(iii) under typical environmental conditions. Yet the influence of Mn biooxide mineral structural evolution on Cr(iii) oxidation under varying geochemical conditions is unknown. In this study we examined the role of light, organic carbon, pH, and the structure of biogenic Mn oxides on Cr(iii) oxidation. Aging of Mn oxides produced by a marine bacterium within the widespread Roseobacter clade resulted in structural ripening from a colloidal hexagonal to a particulate triclinic birnessite phase. The structurally diverse Mn oxides were then reacted with aqueous Cr(iii) within artificial seawater in the presence or absence of carbon and light. Here we found that Cr(iii) oxidation capacity was highest at near neutral pH and in the combined presence of carbon and light. Mn oxide ripening from a hexagonal to a triclinic birnessite phase led to decreased Cr(iii) oxidation in the presence of carbon and light, whereas no change in reactivity was observed in the absence of carbon and/or in the dark. As only minimal Cr(iii) oxidation was observed in the absence of Mn oxides, these results strongly point to coupled Mn oxide- and photo-induced generation of organic and/or oxygen radicals involved in Cr(iii) oxidation. Based on Mn oxide concentration and structural trends, we postulate that Mn(ii) produced from the oxidation of Cr(iii) by the primary Mn oxide is recycled in the presence of organics and light conditions, (re)generating secondary hexagonal birnessite and thereby allowing for continuous oxidation of Cr(iii). In the absence of this Mn oxide regeneration, Cr(iii) induced structural ripening of the hexagonal birnessite precludes further Cr(iii) oxidation. These results highlight the complexity of reactions involved in Mn oxide mediated Cr(iii) oxidation and suggest that photochemical carbon reactions are requisite for sustained Cr(iii) oxidation

  19. The mechanism of water oxidation catalyzed by nanolayered manganese oxides: New insights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Abbasi Isaloo, Mohsen

    2015-11-01

    Herein we consider the mechanism of water oxidation by nanolayered manganese oxide in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate. Based on membrane-inlet mass spectrometry results, the rate of H2((18))O exchange of μ-O groups on the surface of the nanolayered Mn-K oxide, and studies on water oxidation in the presence of different ratios of acetonitrile/water we propose a mechanism for water oxidation by nanolayered Mn oxides in the presence of cerium(IV) ammonium nitrate. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Nitric oxide and hypoxia signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey Man, H S; Tsui, Albert K Y; Marsden, Philip A

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) production is catalyzed by three distinct enzymes, namely, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS), inducible NOS (iNOS), and endothelial NOS (eNOS). The production of NO by vascular endothelium relies mainly on eNOS. Curiously, iNOS and nNOS also are relevant for vascular NO production in certain settings. By relaxing vascular smooth muscle, the classical view is that NO participates in O2 homeostasis by increasing local blood flow and O2 delivery. It is now appreciated that NO has an even more fundamental role in cellular oxygen sensing at the cellular and physiological level. A key component of cellular oxygen sensing is the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) that activates a transcriptional program to promote cellular survival under conditions of inadequate oxygen supply. Important new insights demonstrate that HIF protein is stabilized by two parallel pathways: (1) a decrease in the O2-dependent prolyl hydroxylation of HIF and (2) NO-dependent S-nitrosylation of HIF pathway components including HIF-α. The need for these two complementary pathways to HIF activation arises because decreased oxygen delivery can occur not only by decreased ambient oxygen but also by decreased blood oxygen-carrying capacity, as with anemia. In turn, NO production is tightly linked to O2 homeostasis. O2 is a key substrate for the generation of NO and impacts the enzymatic activity and expression of the enzymes that catalyze the production of NO, the nitric oxide synthases. These relationships manifest in a variety of clinical settings ranging from the unique situation of humans living in hypoxic environments at high altitudes to the common scenario of anemia and the use of therapeutics that can bind or release NO. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Bystander signaling via oxidative metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sawal HA

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Humaira Aziz Sawal,1 Kashif Asghar,2 Matthias Bureik,3 Nasir Jalal4 1Healthcare Biotechnology Department, Atta-ur-Rahman School of Applied Biosciences, National University of Sciences and Technology, Islamabad, 2Basic Sciences Research, Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre, Lahore, Pakistan; 3Health Science Platform, School of Pharmaceutical Science and Technology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China; 4Health Science Platform, Department of Molecular and Cellular Pharmacology, Tianjin University, Tianjin, China Abstract: The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE is the initiation of biological end points in cells (bystander cells that are not directly traversed by an incident-radiation track, but are in close proximity to cells that are receiving the radiation. RIBE has been indicted of causing DNA damage via oxidative stress, besides causing direct damage, inducing tumorigenesis, producing micronuclei, and causing apoptosis. RIBE is regulated by signaling proteins that are either endogenous or secreted by cells as a means of communication between cells, and can activate intracellular or intercellular oxidative metabolism that can further trigger signaling pathways of inflammation. Bystander signals can pass through gap junctions in attached cell lines, while the suspended cell lines transmit these signals via hormones and soluble proteins. This review provides the background information on how reactive oxygen species (ROS act as bystander signals. Although ROS have a very short half-life and have a nanometer-scale sphere of influence, the wide variety of ROS produced via various sources can exert a cumulative effect, not only in forming DNA adducts but also setting up signaling pathways of inflammation, apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, aging, and even tumorigenesis. This review outlines the sources of the bystander effect linked to ROS in a cell, and provides methods of investigation for researchers who would like to

  2. Oxidative Stress in Cystinosis Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Helena Vaisbich

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Nephropathic cystinosis (NC is a severe systemic disease and cysteamine improves its prognosis. Lysosomal cystine accumulation is the hallmark of cystinosis and is regarded as the primary defect due to mutations in the CTNS gene. However, there is great evidence that cystine accumulation itself is not responsible for all abnormalities observed in NC. Studies have demonstrated altered ATP metabolism, increased apoptosis, and cell oxidation. An increased number of autophagosomes and autophagic vacuoles have been observed in cystinotic fibroblasts and renal epithelial cells, suggesting that altered autophagy plays a role in NC, leading to increased production of reactive oxygen species. Therefore, cystinosis patients can be more susceptible to oxidative stress (OS and it can contribute to the progression of the renal disease. Our goal was to evaluate a marker of OS (serum TBARS in NC children, and to compare the results with those observed in healthy controls and correlated with renal function parameters. Methods: The study included patients aged under 18 years, with good adherence to the treatment and out of renal replacement therapy. The following parameters were evaluated: serum creatinine, BUN, creatinine clearance estimated by stature and serum TBARS levels. Results: We selected 20 patients aged 8.0 ±3.6 years and observed serum TBARS levels of 4.03 ±1.02 nmol/ml. Serum TBARS levels in the 43 healthy controls, aged 7.4 ±1.1 years, were 1.60 ±0.04 nmol/ml. There was a significant difference between the plasma TBARS levels among the 2 groups (p Conclusion: An increased level of serum TBARS in patients with NC was observed and this abnormality was not correlated with the renal function status degree. This is the first report that shows increased oxidative stress in serum of NC patients.

  3. Magnetostructural coupling in spinel oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemei, Moureen

    2015-03-01

    Spinels oxides are of great interest functionally as multiferroic, battery, and magnetic materials as well as fundamentally because they exhibit novel spin, structural, and orbital ground states. Competing interactions are at the heart of novel functional behavior in spinels. Here, we explore the intricate landscape of spin, lattice, and orbital interactions in magnetic spinels by employing variable-temperature high-resolution synchrotron x-ray powder diffraction, total neutron scattering, magnetic susceptibility, dielectric, and heat capacity measurements. We show that the onset of long-range magnetic interactions often gives rise to lattice distortions. Our work illustrates that the spinels NiCr2O4, CuCr2O4,andMn3O4, which are tetragonal at room temperature due to Jahn-Teller ordering, undergo further spin-driven structural distortions at the onset of long-range ferrimagnetic order. We have also studied the complete structural description of the ground states of several spinels including the geometrically frustrated spinels ZnCr2O4andMgCr2O4. The detailed spin-lattice studies of spinel oxides presented here illustrate the prevalence of structural phase coexistence when magnetostructural changes occur below 50 K. The new understanding of structural ground states in spinel oxides will guide the design of structure-property relationships in these materials. Broadly, this work highlights the importance of variable-temperature high-resolution synchrotron x-ray diffraction in understanding phase transitions in functional materials. Schlumberger Foundation Faculty for the Future fellowship, MRL Facilities funded by the NSF under Award No. DMR 1121053, and the Advanced Photon Source supported by the DOE, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  4. Oxidative stress in androgenetic alopecia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prie, B E; Iosif, L; Tivig, I; Stoian, I; Giurcaneanu, C

    2016-01-01

    Rationale: Androgenetic alopecia is not considered a life threatening disease but can have serious impacts on the patient's psychosocial life. Genetic, hormonal, and environmental factors are considered responsible for the presence of androgenetic alopecia. Recent literature reports have proved the presence of inflammation and also of oxidative stress at the level of dermal papilla cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia Objective: We have considered of interest to measure the oxidative stress parameters in the blood of patients with androgenetic alopecia Methods and results: 27 patients with androgenetic alopecia and 25 age-matched controls were enrolled in the study. Trolox Equivalent Antioxidant Capacity (TEAC), malondialdehyde (MDA) and total thiols levels were measured on plasma samples. Superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), catalase (CAT) activities, and also non protein thiols levels together with TEAC activity were determined on erythrocytes samples No statistically significant changes were observed for TEAC erythrocytes, non-protein thiols, GPx and CAT activities. Significantly decreased (palopecia. For plasma samples decreased TEAC activity (palopecia are indicators of oxidative stress presence in these patients. Significantly decreased SOD activity but no change in catalase, glutathione peroxidase, non protein thiols level and total antioxidant activity in erythrocytes are elements which suggest the presence of a compensatory mechanism for SOD dysfunction in red blood cells of patients with androgenetic alopecia. AAG = androgenetic alopecia, MDA = malondialdehyde, SOD = superoxide dismutase, CAT = catalase, GPx = glutathione peroxidase, GSH = glutathione, GST = glutathione transferase, SH = thiols, TEAC = trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, ABTS = 2,2'-azino-bis (3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid), CDNB = 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene.

  5. Food processing and lipid oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    German, J B

    1999-01-01

    Food lipids are principally triacylglycerides, phospholipids and sterols found naturally in most biological materials consumed as food and added as functional ingredients in many processed foods. As nutrients, lipids, especially triglycerides, are a concentrated caloric source, provide essential fatty acids and are a solvent and absorption vehicle for fat-soluble vitamins and other nutrients. The presence of fat significantly enhances the organoleptic perception of foods, which partly explains the strong preference and market advantage of fat-rich foods. As a class, lipids contribute many desirable qualities to foods, including attributes of texture, structure, mouthfeel, flavor and color. However, lipids are also one of the most chemically unstable food components and will readily undergo free-radical chain reactions that not only deteriorate the lipids but also: (a) produce oxidative fragments, some of which are volatile and are perceived as the off-flavors of rancidity, (b) degrade proteins, vitamins and pigments and (c) cross-link lipids and other macromolecules into non-nutritive polymers. Free-radical chain reactions are thermodynamically favorable, and as a result, evolutionary selection has strongly influenced the chemistry, metabolism and structure of biological cells to prevent these reactions kinetically. However, the loss of native structure and the death of cells can dramatically accelerate the deteriorative reactions of lipid oxidation. The effects of all processing steps, including raw product selection, harvesting, storage, refining, manufacturing and distribution, on the quality of lipids in the final commodity are considerable. Certain key variables now known to influence oxidative processes can be targeted to increase food lipid stability during and after processing. Retention of or addition of exogenous antioxidants is a well-known consideration, but the presence and activity of catalysts, the integrity of tissues and cells, the quantity of

  6. Poly(ethylene oxide) functionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Russell Clayton

    2014-04-08

    A simple procedure is provided by which the hydroxyl termini of poly(ethylene oxide) can be appended with functional groups to a useful extent by reaction and precipitation. The polymer is dissolved in warmed toluene, treated with an excess of organic base and somewhat less of an excess of a reactive acylating reagent, reacted for several hours, then precipitated in isopropanol so that the product can be isolated as a solid, and salt byproducts are washed away. This procedure enables functionalization of the polymer while not requiring laborious purification steps such as solvent-solvent extraction or dialysis to remove undesirable side products.

  7. Bidirectional reflectance of zinc oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, R.

    1973-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine original and useful information about the bidirection reflectance of zinc oxide. The bidirectional reflectance will be studied for the spectra between .25-2.5 microns and the hemisphere above the specimen. The following factors will be considered: (1) surface conditions; (2) specimen preparation; (3) specimen substrate, (4) polarization; (5) depolarization; (6) wavelength; and (7) angles of incident and reflection. The bidirectional reflectance will be checked by experimentally determined angular hemispherical measurements or hemispherical measurements will be used to obtain absolute bidirectional reflectance.

  8. Oxides gets environmentally-friendly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pryds, Nini

    A large amount of thermal energy is available from the waste heat associated with many industrial and social activities of mankind. However, it is difficult to reclaim this heat due to the dispersed nature and relative smallness of its sources. Thermoelectric conversion offers a very promising...... be stable at high temperatures and be composed of nontoxic and low-cost elements, and must be able to be processed and shaped cheaply. Oxides are among the strongest candidate materials for this purpose. This talk provides an overview of the development on such materials at DTU Energy Conversion. In order...

  9. Liver cirrhosis and nitric oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuf Ergun

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Liver cirrhosis is a clinical condition which appears due to various etiologies and basically contains diffuse fibrozis and nodularity. Portal hypertension frequently accompanies this condition and constitutes the complications with negative effects concerning patients mortality and morbidity. For this reason, understanding the pathophysiologies of cirrhosis and portal hypertension is essential for the supplementation of new treatment options. In this review, the role of nitric oxide in the pathophysiologies of fibrosis, cirrhosis and portal hypertension has been discussed. [Archives Medical Review Journal 2009; 18(2.000: 91-131

  10. Oxidative stability of krill oil (Euphausia superba)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Henna Fung Sieng; Jacobsen, Charlotte; Bruheim, I.

    Krill oil has been reported in many studies to have high oxidative stability when evaluated by peroxide value (PV) and anisidine value (AV). However, recent studies have shown that other compounds than primary and secondary oxidation products are formed when krill oil is exposed to oxidative...... conditions. These compounds include Strecker degradation compounds and pyrroles. Some of these compounds may have antioxidative effect. Commercial scale processing of krill prior to extraction may affect the oxidative stability of krill oil. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to compare lipid...... oxidation in krill oil produced in a commercial process and krill oil carefully extracted from frozen krill in the laboratory. Krill oil was incubated at different temperatures (20, 30 and 40 oC) for 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 weeks, under conditions of constant stirring while being exposed to air. The oxidative...

  11. Primary atmospheric oxidation mechanism for toluene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltaretu, Cristian O; Lichtman, Eben I; Hadler, Amelia B; Elrod, Matthew J

    2009-01-08

    The products of the primary OH-initiated oxidation of toluene were investigated using the turbulent flow chemical ionization mass spectrometry technique at temperatures ranging from 228 to 298 K. A major dienedial-producing pathway was detected for the first time for toluene oxidation, and glyoxal and methylglyoxal were found to be minor primary oxidation products. The results suggest that secondary oxidation processes involving dienedial and epoxide primary products are likely responsible for previous observations of glyoxal and methylglyoxal products from toluene oxidation. Because the dienedial-producing pathway is a null cycle for tropospheric ozone production and glyoxal and methylglyoxal are important secondary organic aerosol precursors, these new findings have important implications for the modeling of toluene oxidation in the atmosphere.

  12. Applications of Oxide Coatings in Photovoltaic Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya Calnan

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Metalloid and metal based oxides are an almost unavoidable component in the majority of solar cell technologies used at the time of writing this review. Numerous studies have shown increases of ≥1% absolute in solar cell efficiency by simply substituting a given layer in the material stack with an oxide. Depending on the stoichiometry and whether other elements are present, oxides can be used for the purpose of light management, passivation of electrical defects, photo-carrier generation, charge separation, and charge transport in a solar cell. In this review, the most commonly used oxides whose benefits for solar cells have been proven both in a laboratory and industrial environment are discussed. Additionally, developing trends in the use of oxides, as well as newer oxide materials, and deposition technologies for solar cells are reported.

  13. d° Ferromagnetism of Magnesium Oxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitendra Pal Singh

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Magnetism without d-orbital electrons seems to be unrealistic; however, recent observations of magnetism in non-magnetic oxides, such as ZnO, HfO2, and MgO, have opened new avenues in the field of magnetism. Magnetism exhibited by these oxides is known as d° ferromagnetism, as these oxides either have completely filled or unfilled d-/f-orbitals. This magnetism is believed to occur due to polarization induced by p-orbitals. Magnetic polarization in these oxides arises due to vacancies, the excitation of trapped spin in the triplet state. The presence of vacancies at the surface and subsurface also affects the magnetic behavior of these oxides. In the present review, origins of magnetism in magnesium oxide are discussed to obtain understanding of d° ferromagnetism.

  14. Oxidized mitochondrial protein degradation and repair in aging and oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ugarte, Nicolas; Petropoulos, Isabelle; Friguet, Bertrand

    2010-08-15

    Proteins are main targets for oxidative damage that occurs during aging and in oxidative stress situations. Since the mitochondria is a major source of reactive oxygen species, mitochondrial proteins are especially exposed to oxidative modification, and elimination of oxidized proteins is crucial for maintaining the integrity of this organelle. Hence, enzymatic reversal of protein oxidation and protein degradation is critical for protein homeostasis while protein maintenance failure has been implicated in the age-related accumulation of oxidized proteins. Within the mitochondrial matrix, the ATP-stimulated mitochondrial Lon protease is believed to play an important role in the degradation of oxidized protein, and age-associated impairment of Lon-like protease activity has been suggested to contribute to oxidized protein buildup in the mitochondria. Oxidized protein repair is limited to certain oxidation products of the sulfur-containing amino acids cysteine and methionine. Oxidized protein repair systems, thioredoxin/thioredoxin reductase or glutaredoxin/glutathione/glutathione reductase that catalytically reduce disulfide bridges or sulfenic acids, and methionine sulfoxide reductase that reverses methionine sulfoxide back to methionine within proteins, are present in the mitochondrial matrix. Thus, the role of the mitochondrial Lon protease and the oxidized protein repair system methionine sulfoxide reductase is further addressed in the context of oxidative stress and aging.

  15. Consumption of oxidized oil increases oxidative stress in broilers and affects the quality of breast meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wangang; Xiao, Shan; Lee, Eun Joo; Ahn, Dong U

    2011-02-09

    A total of 120 4-week-old broiler chickens were allotted to 12 pens and fed one of three diets including control, oxidized diet (5% oxidized oil), or antioxidant-added diet (500 IU vitamin E) for 2 weeks. Blood samples were collected at the end of feeding trial, and breast muscles were sampled immediately after slaughter. Breast meats were also collected 24 h after slaughter and used for meat quality measurements. Oxidative stress in blood, lipid and protein oxidation, and sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca²(+)-ATPase (SERCA) activity of breast muscle were determined. The oxidized diet increased oxidative stress in blood and increased carbonyl content in breast meat compared with the other two dietary treatments (P Meat from birds fed the oxidized diet showed higher drip loss after 1 and 3 days of storage and greater 0-1 h post-mortem pH decline (P < 0.05). Significant differences in specific SERCA activity in breast muscles from birds fed control and oxidized diets (P < 0.05) were detected. This suggested that dietary oxidized oil induced oxidative stress in live birds and increased lipid and protein oxidation in breast muscle. Decrease in SERCA activity in breast muscles due to oxidative stress in live animals accelerated post-mortem glycolysis, which sped the pH drop after slaughter and increased drip loss, indicating that oxidation of diet can cause PSE-like (pale, soft, and exudative) conditions in broiler breast muscles.

  16. Gas transport in solid oxide fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    He, Weidong; Dickerson, James

    2014-01-01

    This book provides a comprehensive overview of contemporary research and emerging measurement technologies associated with gas transport in solid oxide fuel cells. Within these pages, an introduction to the concept of gas diffusion in solid oxide fuel cells is presented. This book also discusses the history and underlying fundamental mechanisms of gas diffusion in solid oxide fuel cells, general theoretical mathematical models for gas diffusion, and traditional and advanced techniques for gas diffusivity measurement.

  17. Oxidation catalysts on alkaline earth supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohajeri, Nahid

    2017-03-21

    An oxidation catalyst includes a support including particles of an alkaline earth salt, and first particles including a palladium compound on the support. The oxidation catalyst can also include precious metal group (PMG) metal particles in addition to the first particles intermixed together on the support. A gas permeable polymer that provides a continuous phase can completely encapsulate the particles and the support. The oxidation catalyst may be used as a gas sensor, where the first particles are chemochromic particles.

  18. Oxidation as ?The Stress of Life?

    OpenAIRE

    Malinin, Nikolay L.; West, Xiaoxia Z.; Byzova, Tatiana V.

    2011-01-01

    Multiple biological consequences of oxidative stress are known to contribute to aging and aging-related pathologies. It was recently shown that (carboxyalkyl)pyrroles (CAPs), the end products of phospholipid oxidation serve as a novel class of endogenous ligands for Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and promote the process of angiogenesis. In this review, we discuss implications of these findings in the context of age-related pathologies, including tumorigenesis. Accumulation of oxidation products i...

  19. A STUDY OF OXIDATIVE STRESS IN DIABETES

    OpenAIRE

    Babu Rao; Santhoshi; Sridhar V; Souris; Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Non - enzymatic free radical mediated oxidation of biological molecules, membranes and tissues is associated with a variety of pathological events such as cancer, aging and diabetes mellitus . [1] Increased oxidative stress is seen in both types of diabetes me llitus namely type 1 and type 2, irrespective of duration, complications and treatment. In diabetes mellitus, oxidative stress seems primarily due to both an increased plasma free radical concentra...

  20. Impact of Oxidative Stress in Fetal Programming

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Loren P.; Yazan Al-Hasan

    2012-01-01

    Intrauterine stress induces increased risk of adult disease through fetal programming mechanisms. Oxidative stress can be generated by several conditions, such as, prenatal hypoxia, maternal under- and overnutrition, and excessive glucocorticoid exposure. The role of oxidant molecules as signaling factors in fetal programming via epigenetic mechanisms is discussed. By linking oxidative stress with dysregulation of specific target genes, we may be able to develop therapeutic strategies that pr...

  1. Atomic-level mechanisms of magnesium oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    Gardonio, Sandra; Fanetti, Mattia; Valant, Matjaž; Orlov, Dmytro

    2017-01-01

    Magnesium has been recently becoming an increasingly popular material for various applications. However, excessive chemical reactivity, and oxidation rate in particular, is a major obstruction on the way of Mg to become widely adopted. A significant problem causing the lack of Mg reactivity control is insufficient understanding of mechanisms involved in the oxidation of magnesium surface. Herewith we present the investigation of atomic-level mechanisms of oxidation initiation and propagation ...

  2. Superlubricating graphene and graphene oxide films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Erdemir, Ali; Choi, Junho; Berman, Diana

    2018-02-13

    A system and method for forming at least one of graphene and graphene oxide on a substrate and an opposed wear member. The system includes graphene and graphene oxide formed by an exfoliation process or solution processing method to dispose graphene and/or graphene oxide onto a substrate. The system further includes an opposing wear member disposed on another substrate and a gas atmosphere of an inert gas like N2, ambient, a humid atmosphere and a water solution.

  3. PROCESSES OF CHLORINATION OF URANIUM OXIDES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenfeld, S.

    1958-09-16

    An improvement is described in the process fur making UCl/sub 4/ from uranium oxide and carbon tetrachloride. In that process, oxides of uranium are contacted with carbon tetrachloride vapor at an elevated temperature. It has been fuund that the reaction product and yield are improved if the uranlum oxide charge is disposed in flat trays in the reaction zone, to a depth of not more than 1/2 centimeter.

  4. Chemical oxidation-enhanced bioremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, B.; Kelley, B.; Paterek, B.; Srivastava, V. [Institute of Gas Technology, Des Plaines, IL (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The Institute of Gas Technology (IGT) has developed and demonstrated a cost-effective soil remediation technology for contaminants present at the former manufactured gas plant (MGP) sites. The technology is known as the MGP-REM process. This process is based on the enhancement and acceleration of indigenous biological activity and the application of chemical treatment to promote subsequent biological degradation of the chemically modified compounds. The chemical treatment uses hydrogen peroxide and iron salt (Fenton`s Reagent) as an oxidant to oxidize polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), making them more amenable to biological treatment, The MGP-REM process is faster and achieves a higher degree of cleanup than the conventional biological process alone, costs no more than conventional bioremediation, and is much cheaper than incineration. This integrated chemical/biological treatment can be applied to other contaminants such as PCBs and cyanide. The major benefit of this process is its ability to degrade those hard-to-degrade compounds without generating any harmful by-products. The treatment end-products of this process are carbon dioxide and water. IGT has successfully field tested this technology in landfarming mode between 1991 and 1993, and in soil-bioslurry mode during 1993-1994. ln-situ field tests are expected to start in 1995.

  5. Etiologies of sperm oxidative stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parvin Sabeti

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Sperm is particularly susceptible to reactive oxygen species (ROS during critical phases of spermiogenesis. However, the level of seminal ROS is restricted by seminal antioxidants which have beneficial effects on sperm parameters and developmental potentials. Mitochondria and sperm plasma membrane are two major sites of ROS generation in sperm cells. Besides, leukocytes including polymer phonuclear (PMN leukocytes and macrophages produce broad category of molecules including oxygen free radicals, non-radical species and reactive nitrogen species. Physiological role of ROS increase the intracellular cAMP which then activate protein kinase in male reproductive system. This indicates that spermatozoa need small amounts of ROS to acquire the ability of nuclear maturation regulation and condensation to fertilize the oocyte. There is a long list of intrinsic and extrinsic factors which can induce oxidative stress to interact with lipids, proteins and DNA molecules. As a result, we have lipid peroxidation, DNA fragmentation, axonemal damage, denaturation of the enzymes, over generation of superoxide in the mitochondria, lower antioxidant activity and finally abnormal spermatogenesis. If oxidative stress is considered as one of the main cause of DNA damage in the germ cells, then there should be good reason for antioxidant therapy in these conditions

  6. Oxidative stress in endometrial hyperplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Zubeldia, María Angeles; Bazo, Ascensión Pérez; Gabarre, Juan José Arbués; Nogales, Agustín García; Palomino, José Carlos Millán

    2008-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species seem to be involved in the onset and promotion of carcinogenesis. In 80% of cases of endometrial adenocarcinoma type I, a clear association exists with endometrial hyperplasia, which is considered a key factor in the endometrial oncological spectrum. The presence or absence of atypical cells determines oncological potential. This study explored the behavior of oxidative stress (catalase and malondialdehyde) in endometrial hyperplasia (with or without atypical cells) by comparing it with the oxidative stress existing in both the proliferative and secretory phases. Endometrial specimens from 55 women were used, 32 of which were histologically diagnosed as physiological (17 proliferative and 15 secretory endometria) and 23 as endometrial hyperplasia (18 nonatypical and 5 atypical endometrial hyperplasia). Significant differences were found in the malondialdehyde variable between the proliferative endometrium and the endometrium with atypical hyperplasia (P = 0.0208) and between both types of endometrial hyperplasia (P = 0.0441). The other comparisons were not statistically significant. No changes in catalase activity were observed. Our findings seem to suggest that the presence of atypical cells in endometrial hyperplasia induces a reduction in lipid peroxidation, which could permit survival and growth of these cells. This possible decrease in lipid peroxidation does not seem to be mediated by an increase in endometrial catalase activity.

  7. Lung Oxidative Damage by Hypoxia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. F. Araneda

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important functions of lungs is to maintain an adequate oxygenation in the organism. This organ can be affected by hypoxia facing both physiological and pathological situations. Exposure to this condition favors the increase of reactive oxygen species from mitochondria, as from NADPH oxidase, xanthine oxidase/reductase, and nitric oxide synthase enzymes, as well as establishing an inflammatory process. In lungs, hypoxia also modifies the levels of antioxidant substances causing pulmonary oxidative damage. Imbalance of redox state in lungs induced by hypoxia has been suggested as a participant in the changes observed in lung function in the hypoxic context, such as hypoxic vasoconstriction and pulmonary edema, in addition to vascular remodeling and chronic pulmonary hypertension. In this work, experimental evidence that shows the implied mechanisms in pulmonary redox state by hypoxia is reviewed. Herein, studies of cultures of different lung cells and complete isolated lung and tests conducted in vivo in the different forms of hypoxia, conducted in both animal models and humans, are described.

  8. Oxidative Stress and Diabetic Retinopathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renu A. Kowluru

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Oxygen metabolism is essential for sustaining aerobic life, and normal cellular homeostasis works on a fine balance between the formation and elimination of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Oxidative stress, a cytopathic consequence of excessive production of ROS and the suppression of ROS removal by antioxidant defense system, is implicated in the development of many diseases, including Alzheimer's disease, and diabetes and its complications. Retinopathy, a debilitating microvascular complication of diabetes, is the leading cause of acquired blindness in developed countries. Many diabetes-induced metabolic abnormalities are implicated in its development, and appear to be influenced by elevated oxidative stress; however the exact mechanism of its development remains elusive. Increased superoxide concentration is considered as a causal link between elevated glucose and the other metabolic abnormalities important in the pathogenesis of diabetic complications. Animal studies have shown that antioxidants have beneficial effects on the development of retinopathy, but the results from very limited clinical trials are somewhat ambiguous. Although antioxidants are being used for other chronic diseases, controlled clinical trials are warranted to investigate potential beneficial effects of antioxidants in the development of retinopathy in diabetic patients.

  9. Advanced oxidation scanning probe lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryu, Yu K.; Garcia, Ricardo

    2017-04-01

    Force microscopy enables a variety of approaches to manipulate and/or modify surfaces. Few of those methods have evolved into advanced probe-based lithographies. Oxidation scanning probe lithography (o-SPL) is the only lithography that enables the direct and resist-less nanoscale patterning of a large variety of materials, from metals to semiconductors; from self-assembled monolayers to biomolecules. Oxidation SPL has also been applied to develop sophisticated electronic and nanomechanical devices such as quantum dots, quantum point contacts, nanowire transistors or mechanical resonators. Here, we review the principles, instrumentation aspects and some device applications of o-SPL. Our focus is to provide a balanced view of the method that introduces the key steps in its evolution, provides some detailed explanations on its fundamentals and presents current trends and applications. To illustrate the capabilities and potential of o-SPL as an alternative lithography we have favored the most recent and updated contributions in nanopatterning and device fabrication.

  10. Cerium oxide nanoparticles in cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Ying Gao,1 Kan Chen,2,* Jin-lu Ma,1,* Fei Gao3 1Department of Radiotherapy Oncology, First Affiliated Hospital of Medical College of Xi'an Jiaotong University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China; 2School of Life Sciences, Zhejiang Sci-Tech University, Hangzhou, People's Republic of China; 3Department of Neurology, First Affiliated Hospital of Xi'an Medical University, Xi'an, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: With the development of many nanomedicines designed for tumor therapy, the diverse abilities of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CONPs have encouraged researchers to pursue CONPs as a therapeutic agent to treat cancer. Research data have shown CONPs to be toxic to cancer cells, to inhibit invasion, and to sensitize cancer cells to radiation therapy and chemotherapy. CONPs also display minimal toxicity to normal tissues and provide protection from various forms of reactive oxygen species generation. Differential cytotoxicity is important for anticancer drugs to distinguish effectively between tumor cells and normal cells. The antioxidant capabilities of CONPs, which enable cancer therapy protection, have also resulted in the exploration of these particles as a potential anticancer treatment. Taken together, CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy and this review highlights the current research into CONPs as a novel therapeutic for the treatment of cancer. Keywords: cerium oxide nanoparticles, cancer treatment, radioprotection, radiosensitization

  11. Chemically Assisted Photocatalytic Oxidation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andino, Jean; Wu, Chang-Yu; Mazyck, David; Teixeira, Arthur A.

    2009-01-01

    The chemically assisted photocatalytic oxidation system (CAPOS) has been proposed for destroying microorganisms and organic chemicals that may be suspended in the air or present on surfaces of an air-handling system that ventilates an indoor environment. The CAPOS would comprise an upstream and a downstream stage that would implement a tandem combination of two partly redundant treatments. In the upstream stage, the air stream and, optionally, surfaces of the air-handling system would be treated with ozone, which would be generated from oxygen in the air by means of an electrical discharge or ultraviolet light. In the second stage, the air laden with ozone and oxidation products from the first stage would be made to flow in contact with a silica-titania photocatalyst exposed to ultraviolet light in the presence of water vapor. Hydroxyl radicals generated by the photocatalytic action would react with both carbon containing chemicals and microorganisms to eventually produce water and carbon dioxide, and ozone from the first stage would be photocatalytically degraded to O2. The net products of the two-stage treatment would be H2O, CO2, and O2.

  12. Bystander signaling via oxidative metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawal, Humaira Aziz; Asghar, Kashif; Bureik, Matthias; Jalal, Nasir

    2017-01-01

    The radiation-induced bystander effect (RIBE) is the initiation of biological end points in cells (bystander cells) that are not directly traversed by an incident-radiation track, but are in close proximity to cells that are receiving the radiation. RIBE has been indicted of causing DNA damage via oxidative stress, besides causing direct damage, inducing tumorigenesis, producing micronuclei, and causing apoptosis. RIBE is regulated by signaling proteins that are either endogenous or secreted by cells as a means of communication between cells, and can activate intracellular or intercellular oxidative metabolism that can further trigger signaling pathways of inflammation. Bystander signals can pass through gap junctions in attached cell lines, while the suspended cell lines transmit these signals via hormones and soluble proteins. This review provides the background information on how reactive oxygen species (ROS) act as bystander signals. Although ROS have a very short half-life and have a nanometer-scale sphere of influence, the wide variety of ROS produced via various sources can exert a cumulative effect, not only in forming DNA adducts but also setting up signaling pathways of inflammation, apoptosis, cell-cycle arrest, aging, and even tumorigenesis. This review outlines the sources of the bystander effect linked to ROS in a cell, and provides methods of investigation for researchers who would like to pursue this field of science.

  13. OXIDATIVE STRESS AND SPERM PATHOLOGIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. V. Evdokimov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study objective was to evaluate the level of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense of the ejaculate in different types of sperm pathologies caused by reproductive system disorders including varicocele, idiopathic asthenozoospermia, non-obstructive asthenozoospermia. Patients groups included 14, 11, and 16 men aged 20–45.Methods of ejaculate examination included study of morphological parameters in accordance with the 5th edition of the World Health Organization Guidelines. Biochemical parameters of the spermoplasm were measured according to the standard procedures described in previous articles.The study included men with abnormal sperm motility and morphology in the ejaculate, i. e. men with sperm pathologies in the form of asthenozoospermia. Morphological and biochemical changes were detected in the patient groups with varicocele and with asthenoand azoospermia compared to the normospermia group.In the separate varicocele group, patients were examined before and after varicocelectomy. Morphological parameters of the ejaculate didn’t show significant improvement, but biochemical parameters of the spermoplasm changed significantly: total antioxidant activity increased, the level of superoxide dismutase decreased which demonstrates decreased effect of oxidative stress after varicocelectomy.

  14. Tape casting of magnesium oxide.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, Alicia; Corral, Erica L.; Loehman, Ronald E.; Bencoe, Denise Nora; Reiterer, Markus; Shah, Raja A.

    2008-02-01

    A tape casting procedure for fabricating ceramic magnesium oxide tapes has been developed as a method to produce flat sheets of sintered MgO that are thin and porous. Thickness of single layer tapes is in the range of 200-400 {micro}m with corresponding surface roughness values in the range of 10-20 {micro}m as measured by laser profilometry. Development of the tape casting technique required optimization of pretreatment for the starting magnesium oxide (MgO) powder as well as a detailed study of the casting slurry preparation and subsequent heat treatments for sintering and final tape flattening. Milling time of the ceramic powder, plasticizer, and binder mixture was identified as a primary factor affecting surface morphology of the tapes. In general, longer milling times resulted in green tapes with a noticeably smoother surface. This work demonstrates that meticulous control of the entire tape casting operation is necessary to obtain high-quality MgO tapes.

  15. Water defluoridation by aluminium oxide-manganese oxide composite material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alemu, Sheta; Mulugeta, Eyobel; Zewge, Feleke; Chandravanshi, Bhagwan Singh

    2014-08-01

    In this study, aluminium oxide-manganese oxide (AOMO) composite material was synthesized, characterized, and tested for fluoride removal in batch experiments. AOMO was prepared from manganese(II) chloride and aluminium hydroxide. The surface area of AOMO was found to be 30.7m2/g and its specific density was determined as 2.78 g/cm3. Detailed investigation of the adsorbent by inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectrometry, inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry, and ion chromatography (for sulphate only) showed that it is composed of Al, Mn, SO4, and Na as major components and Fe, Si, Ca, and Mg as minor components. Thermogravimetric analysis was used to study the thermal behaviour of AOMO. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the adsorbent is poorly crystalline. The point of zero charge was determined as 9.54. Batch experiments (by varying the proportion of MnO, adsorbent dose, contact time, initial F concentration, and raw water pH) showed that fluoride removal efficiency ofAOMO varied significantly with percentage of MnO with an optimum value of about I11% of manganese oxide in the adsorbent. The optimum dose of the adsorbent was 4 g/L which corresponds to the equilibrium adsorption capacity of 4.8 mg F-/g. Both the removal efficiency and adsorption capacity showed an increasing trend with an increase in initial fluoride concentration of the water. The pH for optimum fluoride removal was found to be in the range between 5 and 7. The adsorption data were analysed using the Freundlich, Langmuir, and Dubinirn-Radushkevich models. The minimum adsorption capacity obtained from the non-linear Freundlich isotherm model was 4.94 mg F-/g and the maximum capacity from the Langmuir isotherm method was 19.2mg F-/g. The experimental data of fluoride adsorption on AOMO fitted well to the Freundlich isotherm model. Kinetic studies showed that the adsorption is well described by a non-linear pseudo-second-order reaction model with an average rate constant of 3

  16. AN ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS : FENTON PROCESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin GÜRTEKİN

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Biological wastewater treatment is not effective treatment method if raw wastewater contains toxic and refractory organics. Advanced oxidation processes are applied before or after biological treatment for the detoxification and reclamation of this kind of wastewaters. The advanced oxidation processes are based on the formation of powerful hydroxyl radicals. Among advanced oxidation processes Fenton process is one of the most promising methods. Because application of Fenton process is simple and cost effective and also reaction occurs in a short time period. Fenton process is applied for many different proposes. In this study, Fenton process was evaluated as an advanced oxidation process in wastewater treatment.

  17. Perspective: Oxide molecular-beam epitaxy rocks!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darrell G. Schlom

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Molecular-beam epitaxy (MBE is the “gold standard” synthesis technique for preparing semiconductor heterostructures with high purity, high mobility, and exquisite control of layer thickness at the atomic-layer level. Its use for the growth of multicomponent oxides got off to a rocky start 30 yr ago, but in the ensuing decades, it has become the definitive method for the preparation of oxide heterostructures too, particularly when it is desired to explore their intrinsic properties. Examples illustrating the unparalleled achievements of oxide MBE are given; these motivate its expanding use for exploring the potentially revolutionary states of matter possessed by oxide systems.

  18. Oxidation of carbon monoxide by perferrylmyoglobin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Libardi, Silvia H; Skibsted, Leif Horsfelt; Cardoso, Daniel R

    2014-01-01

    Perferrylmyoglobin is found to oxidize CO in aerobic aqueous solution to CO2. Tryptophan hydroperoxide in the presence of tetra(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphyrinate-iron(III) or simple iron(II)/(III) salts shows similar reactivity against CO. The oxidation of CO is for tryptophan hydroperoxide concluded...... to depend on the formation of alkoxyl radicals by reductive cleavage by iron(II) or on the formation of peroxyl radicals by oxidative cleavage by iron(III). During oxidation of CO, the tryptophan peroxyl radical was depleted with a rate constant of 0.26 ± 0.01 s(-1) for CO-saturated aqueous solution of pH 7...

  19. Is the Oxidative Stress Really a Disease?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fogarasi Erzsébet

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress is an imbalance between free radicals or other reactive species and the antioxidant activity of the organism. Oxidative stress can induce several illnesses such as cardiovascular disease, neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes, cancer, Alzheimer and Parkinson. The biomarkers of oxidative stress are used to test oxidative injury of biomolecules. The indicators of lipid peroxidation (malondialdehyde, 4-hydroxy- 2-nonenal, 2-propenal, isoprostanes, of protein oxidation (carbonylated proteins, tyrosine derivatives, of oxidative damage of DNA, and other biomarkers (glutathione level, metallothioneins, myeloperoxidase activity are the most used oxidative stress markers. Diseases caused by oxidative stress can be prevented with antioxidants. In human body are several enzymes with antioxidant capacity (superoxide dismutase, catalase, glutathione peroxidase, glutathione reductase and spin traps. Antioxidants are synthetized in the organism (glutathione or arrive in the body by nutrition (ascorbic acid, vitamin E, carotenoids, flavonoids, resveratrol, xanthones. Different therapeutic strategies to reduce oxidative stress with the use of synthetic molecules such as nitrone-based antioxidants (phenyl-α-tert-butyl-nitrone (PBN, 2,4-disulphophenyl- N-tert-butylnitrone (NXY-059, stilbazulenyl nitrone (STAZN, which scavenge a wide variety of free radical species, increase endogenous antioxidant levels and inhibits free radical generation are also tested in animal models.

  20. A new oxidant for hair coloring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsh, Jennifer; Dahlgren, R Marc; Clarke, Colin; Stonehouse, Jonathan; Nunn, Chris

    2009-01-01

    Coloring hair using a level 3 permanent colorant involves two processes, lightening the underlying melanin and information of the colored chromophores inside the hair. In a typical in-market products the oxidant used to achieve these changes is hydrogen peroxide buffered at pH 10 with an alkalizer such as ammonium hydroxide. A new oxidant has been developed based on the combination of ammonium carbonate, hydrogen peroxide and glycine at pH 9 that can match the lightening and color performance of the current oxidant. It has the advantage that both the carbonate and hydrogen peroxide concentrations can be changed to alter the lightening performance making it a more flexible oxidant. This allows the capability to lighten the hair in a shorter time, or with lower hydrogen peroxide levels. This paper discusses the key oxidizing species that are present in both systems and the mechanisms of melanin lightening. In addition, the lightening performance will be assessed as a function of time, pH, hydrogen peroxide concentration and carbonate concentration. The importance of glycine to the oxidant is also described along with a proposal for its mechanism of action. It has been demonstrated that the addition of glycine can control the undesired formation of carbonate radicals that can be generated from the oxidant. The control of these radicals enables the oxidant to deliver excellent lightening with no negatives in fiber damage bs. conventional oxidants.

  1. Survival responses to oxidative stress and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Yuri; Endo, Tamao

    2010-07-01

    Oxidative stress is recognized as an important environmental factor in aging; however, because reactive oxygen species (ROS) and related free radicals are normally produced both intra- and extracellularly, air-living organisms cannot avoid the risk of oxidative stress. Consequently, these organisms have evolved various anti-oxidant systems to prevent ROS, scavenge free radicals, repair damaged components and adaptive responses. This review will focus on the repair and adaptive response to oxidative stress, and summarize the changes of these systems as a result aging and their relationship to premature aging.

  2. High Performance Photocatalytic Oxidation Reactor System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Pioneer Astronautics proposes a technology program for the development of an innovative photocatalytic oxidation reactor for the removal and mineralization of...

  3. ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESSES (AOX) TEXTILE WASTEWATER

    OpenAIRE

    Salas C., G.; Facultad de Química e Ingeniería Química. Universidad Nacional Mayor de San Marcos. Lima - Perú

    2014-01-01

    Advanced Oxidation Processes (AOX) are based on the in situ generation of hydroxyradicals (·OH), which have a high oxidation potential. In the case of Fenton processes !he generation of hydroxy radicals takes place by the combination of an oxidation agent (H202) with a catalyst (Fe(II)). These radicals are not selective and they react very fast with the organic matter,being able to oxidize a high variety of organic compounds. This property allows the degradation of pollutants into more biodeg...

  4. Oxide driven strength evolution of silicon surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grutzik, Scott J.; Zehnder, Alan T., E-mail: atz2@cornell.edu [Field of Theoretical and Applied Mechanics, Cornell University, Ithaca, New York 14853 (United States); Milosevic, Erik [Department of Nanoengineering, SUNY Polytechnic University, Albany, New York 12203 (United States); Boyce, Brad L. [Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico 87185-0889 (United States)

    2015-11-21

    Previous experiments have shown a link between oxidation and strength changes in single crystal silicon nanostructures but provided no clues as to the mechanisms leading to this relationship. Using atomic force microscope-based fracture strength experiments, molecular dynamics modeling, and measurement of oxide development with angle resolved x-ray spectroscopy we study the evolution of strength of silicon (111) surfaces as they oxidize and with fully developed oxide layers. We find that strength drops with partial oxidation but recovers when a fully developed oxide is formed and that surfaces intentionally oxidized from the start maintain their high initial strengths. MD simulations show that strength decreases with the height of atomic layer steps on the surface. These results are corroborated by a completely separate line of testing using micro-scale, polysilicon devices, and the slack chain method in which strength recovers over a long period of exposure to the atmosphere. Combining our results with insights from prior experiments we conclude that previously described strength decrease is a result of oxidation induced roughening of an initially flat silicon (1 1 1) surface and that this effect is transient, a result consistent with the observation that surfaces flatten upon full oxidation.

  5. Advanced Wastewater Photo-oxidation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Pioneer Astronautics proposes an advanced photocatalytic oxidation reactor for enhancing the reliability and performance of Water Recovery Post Processing systems...

  6. Comparison of thermal oxidation and plasma oxidation of 4H-SiC (0001) for surface flattening

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Hui; Endo, Katsuyoshi; Yamamura, Kazuya

    2014-03-01

    The thermal oxidation and water vapor plasma oxidation of 4H-SiC (0001) were investigated. The initial oxidation rate of helium-based atmospheric-pressure plasma oxidation was six times higher than that of thermal oxidation. The oxide-SiC interface generated by plasma oxidation became flatter with increasing thickness of the oxide, whereas the interface generated by thermal oxidation was atomically flat regardless of the oxide thickness. Many pits were generated on the thermally oxidized surface, whereas few pits were observed on the surface oxidized by plasma. After the oxide layer generated plasma oxidation was removed, an atomically flat and pit-free SiC surface was obtained.

  7. Interfacial bonding stabilizes rhodium and rhodium oxide nanoparticles on layered Nb oxide and Ta oxide supports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strayer, Megan E; Binz, Jason M; Tanase, Mihaela; Shahri, Seyed Mehdi Kamali; Sharma, Renu; Rioux, Robert M; Mallouk, Thomas E

    2014-04-16

    Metal nanoparticles are commonly supported on metal oxides, but their utility as catalysts is limited by coarsening at high temperatures. Rhodium oxide and rhodium metal nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports are anomalously stable. To understand this, the nanoparticle-support interaction was studied by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM), and synchrotron X-ray absorption and scattering techniques. Nanosheets derived from the layered oxides KCa2Nb3O10, K4Nb6O17, and RbTaO3 were compared as supports to nanosheets of Na-TSM, a synthetic fluoromica (Na0.66Mg2.68(Si3.98Al0.02)O10.02F1.96), and α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O. High surface area SiO2 and γ-Al2O3 supports were also used for comparison in the ITC experiments. A Born-Haber cycle analysis of ITC data revealed an exothermic interaction between Rh(OH)3 nanoparticles and the layered niobate and tantalate supports, with ΔH values in the range -32 kJ·mol(-1) Rh to -37 kJ·mol(-1) Rh. In contrast, the interaction enthalpy was positive with SiO2 and γ-Al2O3 supports. The strong interfacial bonding in the former case led to "reverse" ripening of micrometer-size Rh(OH)3, which dispersed as 0.5 to 2 nm particles on the niobate and tantalate supports. In contrast, particles grown on Na-TSM and α-Zr(HPO4)2·H2O nanosheets were larger and had a broad size distribution. ETEM, X-ray absorption spectroscopy, and pair distribution function analyses were used to study the growth of supported nanoparticles under oxidizing and reducing conditions, as well as the transformation from Rh(OH)3 to Rh nanoparticles. Interfacial covalent bonding, possibly strengthened by d-electron acid/base interactions, appear to stabilize Rh(OH)3, Rh2O3, and Rh nanoparticles on niobate and tantalate supports.

  8. Low Temperature Processed Complementary Metal Oxide Semiconductor (CMOS) Device by Oxidation Effect from Capping Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Zhenwei

    2015-04-20

    In this report, both p- and n-type tin oxide thin-film transistors (TFTs) were simultaneously achieved using single-step deposition of the tin oxide channel layer. The tuning of charge carrier polarity in the tin oxide channel is achieved by selectively depositing a copper oxide capping layer on top of tin oxide, which serves as an oxygen source, providing additional oxygen to form an n-type tin dioxide phase. The oxidation process can be realized by annealing at temperature as low as 190°C in air, which is significantly lower than the temperature generally required to form tin dioxide. Based on this approach, CMOS inverters based entirely on tin oxide TFTs were fabricated. Our method provides a solution to lower the process temperature for tin dioxide phase, which facilitates the application of this transparent oxide semiconductor in emerging electronic devices field.

  9. Optical properties of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schöche, Stefan; Hong, Nina; Khorasaninejad, Mohammadreza; Ambrosio, Antonio; Orabona, Emanuele; Maddalena, Pasqualino; Capasso, Federico

    2017-11-01

    We report the optical constants of graphene oxide and reduced graphene oxide determined by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The dynamic changes in optical properties and thickness of a drop-cast graphene oxide layer during reduction by long-term exposure to focused broad-band white light are monitored in situ. The anisotropic optical constants of the graphene oxide layer and the isotropically averaged optical constants of the reduced layer are precisely determined from a multiple-location analysis of spatially resolved data across the exposed location and a multiple-time-step analysis of the dynamic data, respectively. Observed inter-band transitions in the graphene oxide layer are discussed in relation to theoretical predictions for different coverage levels of the graphene oxide sheets with oxygen containing functional groups. The derived optical constants of the reduced graphene oxide layer are compared to reported values of graphene and thermally reduced graphene oxide.

  10. Chromite oxidation by manganese oxides in subseafloor basalts and the presence of putative fossilized microorganisms

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ivarsson, Magnus; Broman, Curt; Holm, Nils G

    2011-01-01

    Chromite is a mineral with low solubility and is thus resistant to dissolution. The exception is when manganese oxides are available, since they are the only known naturally occurring oxidants for chromite...

  11. A nine-atom rhodium-aluminum oxide cluster oxidizes five carbon monoxide molecules

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Li, Xiao-Na; Zhang, Hua-Min; Yuan, Zhen; He, Sheng-Gui

    2016-01-01

    ... catalysis is elusive. Here we report that a single atom of rhodium, a powerful noble metal catalyst, can promote the transfer of five oxygen atoms to oxidize carbon monoxide from a nine-atom rhodium-aluminum oxide cluster...

  12. Triflic acid catalyzed oxidative lactonization and diacetoxylation of alkenes using peroxyacids as oxidants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Yan-Biao; Gade, Lutz H

    2012-02-03

    A clean and efficient diacetoxylation reaction of alkenes catalyzed by triflic acid using commercially available peroxyacids as the oxidants has been developed. This method was also applied in oxidative lactonizations of unsaturated carboxylic acids in good to high yields.

  13. Impaired cardiac mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and enhanced mitochondrial oxidative stress in feline hypertrophic cardiomyopathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress are important players in the development of various cardiovascular diseases, but their roles in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) remain unknown. We examined whether mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) capacity was impaired with enhanced...

  14. Oxidation behavior of metallic interconnect in solid oxide fuel cell stack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jun; Zhang, Wenying; Yang, Jiajun; Yan, Dong; Pu, Jian; Chi, Bo; Jian, Li

    2017-06-01

    Oxidation behavior of integrated interconnect with bipolar plate and corrugated sheet made by ferrite steel SUS430 is investigated and compared in simulated environment and in a realistic stack. Electrical current is found to have a direction-related impact on the thickness of the Cr2O3/MnCr2O4 composite oxide scale. Oxide scale of the interconnect aged in the stack exhibits a dual-layered structure of a complex Mn-Cr oxide layer covered by iron oxide. The oxidation rates vary greatly depending on its local environment, with different thermal, electrical density, as well as gas composition conditions. By analyzing the thickness distribution of oxide scale and comparing them with the simulated test result, the oxidation behavior of interconnect in stack is described in high definition. ASR distribution is also conducted by calculation, which could help further understanding the behavior of stack degradation.

  15. Indium Tin Oxide Resistor-Based Nitric Oxide Microsensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jennifer C.; Hunter, Gary W.; Gonzalez, Jose M., III; Liu, Chung-Chiun

    2012-01-01

    A sensitive resistor-based NO microsensor, with a wide detection range and a low detection limit, has been developed. Semiconductor microfabrication techniques were used to create a sensor that has a simple, robust structure with a sensing area of 1.10 0.99 mm. A Pt interdigitated structure was used for the electrodes to maximize the sensor signal output. N-type semiconductor indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film was sputter-deposited as a sensing material on the electrode surface, and between the electrode fingers. Alumina substrate (250 m in thickness) was sequentially used for sensor fabrication. The resulting sensor was tested by applying a voltage across the two electrodes and measuring the resulting current. The sensor was tested at different concentrations of NO-containing gas at a range of temperatures. Preliminary results showed that the sensor had a relatively high sensitivity to NO at 450 C and 1 V. NO concentrations from ppm to ppb ranges were detected with the low limit of near 159 ppb. Lower NO concentrations are being tested. Two sensing mechanisms were involved in the NO gas detection at ppm level: adsorption and oxidation reactions, whereas at ppb level of NO, only one sensing mechanism of adsorption was involved. The NO microsensor has the advantages of high sensitivity, small size, simple batch fabrication, high sensor yield, low cost, and low power consumption due to its microsize. The resistor-based thin-film sensor is meant for detection of low concentrations of NO gas, mainly in the ppb or lower range, and is being developed concurrently with other sensor technology for multispecies detection. This development demonstrates that ITO is a sensitive sensing material for NO detection. It also provides crucial information for future selection of nanostructured and nanosized NO sensing materials, which are expected to be more sensitive and to consume less power.

  16. Comparison of Nitrogen Oxide Metabolism among Diverse Ammonia-Oxidizing Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Jessica Ann Kozlowski; K Dimitri Kits; Stein, Lisa Y.

    2016-01-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) have well characterized genes that encode and express nitrite reductases (NIR) and nitric oxide reductases (NOR). However, the connection between presence or absence of these and other genes for nitrogen transformations with the physiological production of nitric oxide (NO) and nitrous oxide (N2O) has not been tested across AOB isolated from various trophic states, with diverse phylogeny, and with closed genomes. It is therefore unclear if genomic content for ...

  17. Immunobiology of Nitric Oxide and Regulation of Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Martin; Rey, Kevin; Besler, Katrina; Wang, Christine; Choy, Jonathan

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a bioactive gas that has multiple roles in innate and adaptive immune responses. In macrophages, nitric oxide is produced by inducible nitric oxide synthase upon microbial and cytokine stimulation. It is needed for host defense against pathogens and for immune regulation. This review will summarize the role of NO and iNOS in inflammatory and immune responses and will discuss the regulatory mechanisms that control inducible nitric oxide synthase expression and activity.

  18. Graphite oxide: a selective and highly efficient oxidant of thiols and sulfides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreyer, Daniel R; Jia, Hong-Peng; Todd, Alexander D; Geng, Jianxin; Bielawski, Christopher W

    2011-11-07

    The selective oxidation of thiols to disulfides and sulfides to sulfoxides using graphite oxide (GO), a heterogeneous carbocatalyst obtained from low cost, commercial starting materials is described. The aforementioned oxidation reactions were found to proceed rapidly (as short as 10 min in some cases) and in good yield (51-100%) (19 examples). No over-oxidation of the substrates was observed, and GO's heterogeneous nature facilitated isolation and purification of the target products.

  19. Thin cuprous oxide films prepared by thermal oxidation of copper foils with water vapor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang Jianbo, E-mail: liangjienbo1980@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Frontier Materials,Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 4668555 (Japan); Kishi, Naoki; Soga, Tetsuo [Department of Frontier Materials,Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 4668555 (Japan); Jimbo, Takashi [Research Center for Nano-Device and System, Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 4668555 (Japan); Ahmed, Mohsin [Department of Frontier Materials,Nagoya Institute of Technology, Nagoya 4668555 (Japan)

    2012-01-31

    We present an improved preparation method for the growth of high quality crystals of cuprous oxide films grown by thermal oxidation of cupper foils with water vapor. This method proved to be good for preparing cuprous oxide films with high purity and large grain size. X-ray diffraction studies revealed the formation of Cu{sub 2}O films with preferred (111) orientation. The cuprous oxide diodes fabricated by the above technique have been studied using current-voltage method.

  20. Platinum nanoparticles–manganese oxide nanorods as novel binary catalysts for formic acid oxidation

    OpenAIRE

    El-Deab, Mohamed S.

    2012-01-01

    The current study proposes a novel binary catalyst system (composed of metal/metal oxide nanoparticles) as a promising electrocatalyst in formic acid oxidation. The electro-catalytic oxidation of formic acid is carried out with binary catalysts of Pt nanoparticles (nano-Pt) and manganese oxide nanorods (nano-MnOx) electrodeposited onto glassy carbon (GC) electrodes. Cyclic voltammetric (CV) measurements showed that unmodified GC and nano-MnOx/GC electrodes have no catalytic activity. While tw...

  1. The oxidative coupling of methane and the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane over a niobium promoted lithium doped magnesium oxide catalyst

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Swaan, H.M.; Swaan, H.M.; Li, X.; Seshan, Kulathuiyer; van Ommen, J.G.; Ross, J.R.H.; Ross, J.R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The promoting effect of niobium in a Li/MgO catalyst for the oxidative coupling of methane (OCM) and for the oxidative dehydrogenation of ethane (ODHE) has been studied in some detail. It has been found that a Li/Nb/MgO catalyst with 16 wt % niobium showed the highest activity for the C2 production

  2. Oxidative stress response in sugarcane

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Eduardo Soares Netto

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available Oxidative stress response in plants is still poorly understood in comparison with the correspondent phenomenon in bacteria, yeast and mammals. For instance, nitric oxide is assumed to play various roles in plants although no nitric oxide synthase gene has yet been isolated. This research reports the results of a search of the sugarcane expressed sequence tag (SUCEST database for homologous sequences involved in the oxidative stress response. I have not found any gene similar to nitric oxide synthase in the SUCEST database although an alternative pathway for nitric oxide synthesis was proposed. I have also found several genes involved in antioxidant defense, e.g. metal chelators, low molecular weight compounds, antioxidant enzymes and repair systems. Ascorbate (vitamin C is a key antioxidant in plants because it reaches high concentrations in cells and is a substrate for ascorbate peroxidase, an enzyme that I found in different isoforms in the SUCEST database. I also found many enzymes involved in the biosynthesis of low molecular weight antioxidants, which may be potential targets for genetic manipulation. The engineering of plants for increased vitamin C and E production may lead to improvements in the nutritional value and stress tolerance of sugarcane. The components of the antioxidant defense system interact and their synthesis is probably closely regulated. Transcription factors involved in regulation of the oxidative stress response in bacteria, yeast and mammals differ considerably among themselves and when I used them to search the SUCEST database only genes with weak similarities were found, suggesting that these transcription regulators are not very conserved. The involvement of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants in plant defense against pathogens is also discussed.A resposta ao estresse oxidativo não é bem conhecida em plantas como em bactérias, leveduras e humanos. Por exemplo, assume-se que óxido nítrico tem várias fun

  3. Development of the inner oxide zone upon steam oxidation of an austenitic stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansson, Anette N.; Montgomery, Melanie; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2009-01-01

    The oxidation behaviour of TP 347H FG in mixtures of water, oxygen, and hydrogen was investigated in the temperature range 500 – 700C for a fixed oxidation time of 336 h. The samples were characterised using reflective light and electron microscopy methods. Thin discontinuous double-layered oxide...

  4. Field test results for steam oxidation of TP347H FG - growth of inner oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Montgomery, Melanie; Jianmin, Jia; Larsen, OH

    2005-01-01

    and the thickness of the inner oxide has been investigated by light optical and scanning electron microscopy equipped with EDS. Comparison of inner oxide pit thickness revealed that an increase in temperature from 455 to 525C increased the oxidation rate. A further increase in temperature did not result in thicker...

  5. Unprecedented Selective Oxidation of Styrene Derivatives using a Supported Iron Oxide Nanocatalyst in Aqueous Medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron oxide nanoparticles supported on mesoporous silica-type materials have been successfully utilized in the aqueous selective oxidation of alkenes under mild conditions using hydrogen peroxide as a green oxidant. Catalysts could be easily recovered after completion of the reac...

  6. Triacylglycerols composition, oxidation and oxidation compounds in camellia oil using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, Alam

    2012-07-01

    Camellia seed oil is one of most important edible oil, rich in oleic acid and contains many natural antioxidants with various biological activities. During preparation of foods or storage camellia oil oxidizes by the auto-oxidation and produce oxidized compounds. Traditional analytical techniques like FFA, POV are used for the determination of oxidation and adulteration of oils and fats. These methods were rarely able to detect the oxidized compounds produced and extent of oxidation. This paper presents the uses of liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS) for the analysis of triacylglycerols (TAGs) composition and evaluation of auto-oxidation and oxidation products of camellia seed oil. The camellia oil was auto-oxidized for 12 months at room temperature. The TAGs were identified from their characteristics fragmentations such as protonated molecular ion, ammonium and sodium adducts, diacylglycerols, epoxy-diacylglycerols fragments and mono-acylglycerol fragments in ESI-MS mass spectra. HPLC-ESI-MS data revealed the separation and identification of 15 TAGs. The major TAGs separated and identified in camellia seed oil were POO, OOO, OLO, PLO/POL, OLL, SOO, ALO and OLLn. The auto-oxidation studies revealed a total loss of LnLLn, LnOLn, LLLn and OLLn amounting about 13.5% total oxidation. The auto-oxidation products were epoxy hydroperoxides, epoxy epidioxides, and mono-epoxides. It was observed that these were characteristic compounds produced in high oleic oils. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Anaerobic sulfide-oxidation in marine colorless sulfur-oxidizing bacteria

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    LokaBharathi, P.A.; Nair, S.; Chandramohan, D.

    . Subsequently, the percentage oxidation was higher at 45 ppm but decreased at 64 ppm. Iron had a variable effect on sulfide oxidation. The viability of the cells and efficiency of oxidation increased in the presence of nitrate. An increase in temperature beyond...

  8. Interaction mechanisms between slurry coatings and solid oxide fuel cell interconnect alloys during high temperature oxidation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Åsa Helen; Mikkelsen, L.; Hendriksen, P.V.

    2012-01-01

    oxidation rate constant was reduced with 50–90% of that for uncoated alloy. One coating consisting of MnCo2O4 did not significantly affect the oxidation rate of the alloy, and just as for uncoated samples break-away oxidation occurred for MnCo2O4 coated samples. The interaction mechanisms between...

  9. Fundamentals of Mercury Oxidation in Flue Gas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    JoAnn Lighty; Geoffrey Silcox; Constance Senior; Joseph Helble; Balaji Krishnakumar

    2008-07-31

    The objective of this project was to understand the importance of and the contribution of gas-phase and solid-phase coal constituents in the mercury oxidation reactions. The project involved both experimental and modeling efforts. The team was comprised of the University of Utah, Reaction Engineering International, and the University of Connecticut. The objective was to determine the experimental parameters of importance in the homogeneous and heterogeneous oxidation reactions; validate models; and, improve existing models. Parameters studied include HCl, NO{sub x}, and SO{sub 2} concentrations, ash constituents, and temperature. The results suggested that homogeneous mercury oxidation is below 10% which is not consistent with previous data of others and work which was completed early in this research program. Previous data showed oxidation above 10% and up to 100%. However, the previous data are suspect due to apparent oxidation occurring within the sampling system where hypochlorite ion forms in the KCl impinger, which in turn oxidized mercury. Initial tests with entrained iron oxide particles injected into a flame reactor suggest that iron present on fly ash particle surfaces can promote heterogeneous oxidation of mercury in the presence of HCl under entrained flow conditions. Using the data generated above, with homogeneous reactions accounting for less than 10% of the oxidation, comparisons were made to pilot- and full-scale data. The results suggest that heterogeneous reactions, as with the case of iron oxide, and adsorption on solid carbon must be taking place in the full-scale system. Modeling of mercury oxidation using parameters from the literature was conducted to further study the contribution of homogeneous pathways to Hg oxidation in coal combustion systems. Calculations from the literature used rate parameters developed in different studies, in some cases using transition state theory with a range of approaches and basis sets, and in other cases

  10. Photoluminescence investigation about zinc oxide with graphene oxide & reduced graphene oxide buffer layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Jijun; Wang, Minqiang; Zhang, Xiangyu; Yang, Zhi; Song, Xiaohui; Ran, Chenxin

    2014-02-15

    ZnO with graphene oxide (GO-ZnO) & reduced graphene oxide (rGO-ZnO) buffer layers were fabricated. Photoluminescence (PL) properties of GO-ZnO and rGO-ZnO compositions induced by oxygen vacancies defects were investigated using photoluminescence spectroscopy. The results showed that blue emission is quenched while yellow-orange emissions from GO-ZnO and rGO-ZnO compositions are significantly increased as compared to that of ZnO films. In stark contrast to enhanced yellow-orange emissions, PL spectra show three sharp, discrete emissions that characterize the dominant optical active defect, which is the oxygen vacancies and extended oxygen vacancies. Our results highlight the ability of GO & rGO buffer layers to modulate defect concentrations in ZnO and contribute to understanding the optical properties of deep-level defects, which is significant for development of long-wavelength photoelectric devices related with graphene materials. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Thioredoxin, oxidative stress, cancer and aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores, Lisa C; Ortiz, Melanie; Dube, Sara; Hubbard, Gene B; Lee, Shuko; Salmon, Adam; Zhang, Yiqiang; Ikeno, Yuji

    2012-01-01

    The Free Radical or Oxidative Stress Theory of Aging is one of the most popular theories in aging research and has been extensively studied over the past several decades. However, recent evidence using transgenic/knockout mice that overexpress or down-regulate antioxidant enzymes challenge the veracity of this theory since the animals show no increase or decrease in lifespan. These results seriously call into question the role of oxidative damage/stress in the aging process in mammals. Therefore, the theory requires significant modifications if we are to understand the relationship between aging and the regulation of oxidative stress. Our laboratory has been examining the impacts of thioredoxins (Trxs), in the cytosol and mitochondria, on aging and age-related diseases. Our data from mice that are either up-regulating or down-regulating Trx in different cellular compartments, that is, the cytosol or mitochondria, could shed some light on the role of oxidative stress and its pathophysiological effects. The results generated from our lab and others may indicate that: 1) changes in oxidative stress and the redox state in the cytosol, mitochondria or nucleus might play different roles in the aging process; 2) the role of oxidative stress and redox state could have different pathophysiological consequences in different tissues/cells, for example, mitotic vs. post-mitotic; 3) oxidative stress could have different pathophysiological impacts in young and old animals; and 4) the pathophysiological roles of oxidative stress and redox state could be controlled through changes in redox-sensitive signaling, which could have more diverse effects on pathophysiology than the accumulation of oxidative damage to various molecules. To critically test the role of oxidative stress on aging and age-related diseases, further study is required using animal models that regulate oxidative stress levels differently in each cellular compartment, each tissue/organ, and/or at different stages

  12. Determining cysteine oxidation status using differential alkylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilling, Birgit; Yoo, Chris B.; Collins, Christopher J.; Gibson, Bradford W.

    2004-08-01

    Oxidative damage to proteins plays a major role in aging and in the pathology of many degenerative diseases. Under conditions of oxidative stress, reactive oxygen and nitrogen species can modify key redox sensitive amino acid side chains leading to altered biological activities or structures of the targeted proteins. This in turn can affect signaling or regulatory control pathways as well as protein turnover and degradation efficiency in the proteasome. Cysteine residues are particularly susceptible to oxidation, primarily through reversible modifications (e.g., thiolation and nitrosylation), although irreversible oxidation can lead to products that cannot be repaired in vivo such as sulfonic acid. This report describes a strategy to determine the overall level of reversible cysteine oxidation using a stable isotope differential alkylation approach in combination with mass spectrometric analysis. This method employs 13C-labeled alkylating reagents, such as N-ethyl-[1,4-13C2]-maleimide, bromo-[1,2-13C2]-acetic acid and their non-labeled counterparts to quantitatively assess the level of cysteine oxidation at specific sites in oxidized proteins. The differential alkylation protocol was evaluated using standard peptides and proteins, and then applied to monitor and determine the level of oxidative damage induced by diamide, a mild oxidant. The formation and mass spectrometric analysis of irreversible cysteine acid modification will also be discussed as several such modifications have been identified in subunits of the mitochondrial electron transport chain complexes. This strategy will hopefully contribute to our understanding of the role that cysteine oxidation plays in such chronic diseases such as Parkinson's disease, where studies in animal and cell models have shown oxidative damage to mitochondrial Complex I to be a specific and early target.

  13. Ambient temperature NO oxidation over Cr-based amorphous mixed oxide catalysts: effects from the second oxide components

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Aiyong; Lin, Bo; Zhang, Hanlei; Engelhard, Mark H.; Guo, Yanglong; Lu, Guanzhong; Peden, Charles HF; Gao, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Three series of Cr-based mixed oxides (Cr-Co, Cr-Fe, and Cr-Ni oxides) with high specific surface areas and amorphous textures were synthesized using a novel sol-gel method. These mixed oxides, in comparison to their pure metal oxide (CrOx, Co3O4, FeOx and NiO) counterparts, display enhanced performance for catalytic oxidation of low-concentration NO at room temperature. The best performing catalysts achieve 100% NO conversion for ~30 h of operation at a high space velocity of 45,000 ml g-1 h-1. The amorphous structure was found to be critical for these catalysts to maintain high activity and durability. Control of Cr/M (M=Co, Fe and Ni) molar ratio, nitrate precursor decomposition temperature and catalyst calcination temperature was key to the synthesis of these highly active catalysts.

  14. Polyethylene oxide-fullerene nanocomposites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Nasar; Chipara, Dorina; Lozano, Karen; Hinthorne, James; Chipara, Mircea

    2017-11-01

    Polyethylene oxide - fullerene nanocomposites have been prepared by using the solution path with water as solvent (only for the polymer). The dispersion of C60 within the polymer solution was achieved by high power sonication. The study aims to a better understanding on the effect of C60 nanoparticles on the macromolecular chains. Raman Wide Angle X Ray spectroscopy, Differential Scanning Calorimetry, and Thermogravimetric Analysis were used to inspect the interactions between the nanofiller and macromolecular chains. The experimental results revealed a completely different behavior of fullerene dispersed within polymeric matrices than using carbon nanotubes or nanofibers as nanofiller. The observed behavior was explained by the low aspect ratio of C60 compared to nanotubes and by the low thermal conductivity of C60 compared to the thermal conductivity of others carbon nanostructures.

  15. Evaporative oxidation treatability test report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-04-01

    In 1992, Congress passed the Federal Facilities Compliance Act that requires the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to treat and dispose of its mixed waste in accordance with the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) land disposal restrictions (LDRs). In response to the need for mixed-waste treatment capacity where available off-site commercial treatment facilities do not exist or cannot be used, the DOE Albuquerque Operations Office (DOE-AL) organized a Treatment Selection Team to match mixed wastes with treatment options and develop a strategy for treatment of its mixed wastes. DOE-AL manages operations at nine sites with mixed-waste inventories. The Treatment Selection Team determined a need to develop mobile treatment capacity to treat wastes at the sites where the wastes are generated. Treatment processes used for mixed waste not only must address the hazardous component (i.e., meet LDRs) but also must contain the radioactive component in a form that allows final disposal while protecting workers, the public, and the environment. On the basis of recommendations of the Treatment Selection Team, DOE-AL assigned projects to the sites to bring mixed-waste treatment capacity on-line. The three technologies assigned to the DOE Grand Junction Projects Office (GJPO) are evaporative oxidation, thermal desorption, and treated wastewater evaporation. Rust Geotech, the DOE-GJPO prime contractor, was assigned to design and fabricate mobile treatment units (MTUs) for these three technologies and to deliver the MTUs to selected DOE-AL sites. To conduct treatability tests at the GJPO, Rust leased a pilot-scale evaporative oxidation unit from the Clemson Technical Center (CTC), Anderson, South Carolina. The purpose of this report is to document the findings and results of tests performed using this equipment.

  16. Nitric oxide signaling in hypoxia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, J J David; Man, H S Jeffrey; Marsden, Philip A

    2012-03-01

    Endothelial-derived nitric oxide (NO) is classically viewed as a regulator of vasomotor tone. NO plays an important role in regulating O(2) delivery through paracrine control of vasomotor tone locally and cardiovascular and respiratory responses centrally. Very soon after the cloning and functional characterization of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), studies on the interaction between O(2) and NO made the paradoxical finding that hypoxia led to decreases in eNOS expression and function. Why would decreases in O(2) content in tissues elicit a loss of a potent endothelial-derived vasodilator? We now know that restricting our view of NO as a regulator of vasomotor tone or blood pressure limited deeper levels of mechanistic insight. Exciting new studies indicate that functional interactions between NO and O(2) exhibit profound complexity and are relevant to diseases states, especially those associated with hypoxia in tissues. NOS isoforms catalytically require O(2). Hypoxia regulates steady-state expression of the mRNA and protein abundance of the NOS enzymes. Animals genetically deficient in NOS isoforms have perturbations in their ability to adapt to changes in O(2) supply or demand. Most interestingly, the intracellular pathways for O(2) sensing that evolved to ensure an appropriate balance of O(2) delivery and utilization intersect with NO signaling networks. Recent studies demonstrate that hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) stabilization and transcriptional activity is achieved through two parallel pathways: (1) a decrease in O(2)-dependent prolyl hydroxylation of HIF and (2) S-nitrosylation of HIF pathway components. Recent findings support a role for S-nitrosothiols as hypoxia-mimetics in certain biological and/or disease settings, such as living at high altitude, exposure to small molecules that can bind NO, or anemia.

  17. Nitric oxide and chronic colitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew B Grisham

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitric oxide (NO is thought to play an important role in modulating the inflammatory response by virtue of its ability to affect bloodflow, leukocyte function and cell viability. The objective of this study was to assess the role that NO may play in mediating the mucosal injury and inflammation in a model of chronic granulomatous colitis using two pharmacologically different inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase (NOS. Chronic granulomatous colitis with liver and spleen inflammation was induced in female Lewis rats via the subserosal (intramural injection of peptidoglycan/polysaccharide (PG/PS derived from group A streptococci. Chronic NOS inhibition by oral administration of NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME (15 µmol/kg/day or amino-guanidine (AG (15 µmol/ kg/day was found to attenuate the PG/PS-induced increases in macroscopic colonic inflammation scores and colonic myeloperoxidase activity. Only AG -- not L-NAME – attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in colon dry weight. Both L-NAME and AG significantly attenuated the PG/PS-induced increases in spleen weight whereas neither was effective at significantly attenuating the PG/PS-induced increases in liver weight. Although both L-NAME and AG inhibited NO production in vivo, as measured by decreases in plasma nitrite and nitrate levels, only AG produced significantly lower values (38±3 versus 83±8 µM, respectively, P<0.05. Finally, L-NAME, but not AG, administration significantly increased mean arterial pressure from 83 mmHg in colitic animals to 105 mmHg in the PG/PS+ L-NAME-treated animals (P<0.05. It is concluded that NO may play an important role in mediating some of the pathophysiology associated with this model of chronic granulomatous colitis.

  18. Anticholinesterase Toxicity and Oxidative Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dejan Milatovic

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anticholinesterase compounds, organophosphates (OPs and carbamates (CMs are commonly used for a variety of purposes in agriculture and in human and veterinary medicine. They exert their toxicity in mammalian system primarily by virtue of acetylcholinesterase (AChE inhibition at the synapses and neuromuscular junctions, leading into the signs of hypercholinergic preponderance. However, the mechanism(s involved in brain/muscle damage appear to be linked with alteration in antioxidant and the scavenging system leading to free radical-mediated injury. OPs and CMs cause excessive formation of F2-isoprostanes and F4-neuroprostanes, in vivo biomarkers of lipid peroxidation and generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS, and of citrulline, a marker of NO/NOS and reactive nitrogen species (RNS generation. In addition, during the course of these excitatory processes and inhibition of AChE, a high rate of ATP consumption, coupled with the inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation, compromise the cell's ability to maintain its energy levels and excessive amounts of ROS and RNS may be generated. Pretreatment with N-methyl D-aspartate (NMDA receptor antagonist memantine, in combination with atropine sulfate, provides significant protection against inhibition of AChE, increases of ROS/RNS, and depletion of high-energy phosphates induced by DFP/carbofuran. Similar antioxidative effects are observed with a spin trapping agent, phenyl-N-tert-butylnitrone (PBN or chain breaking antioxidant vitamin E. This review describes the mechanisms involved in anticholinesterase-induced oxidative/nitrosative injury in target organs of OPs/CMs, and protection by various agents.

  19. Tabulated Neutron Emission Rates for Plutonium Oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shores, Erik Frederick [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2017-07-24

    This work tabulates neutron emission rates for 80 plutonium oxide samples as reported in the literature. Plutonium-­238 and plutonium-­239 oxides are included and such emission rates are useful for scaling tallies from Monte Carlo simulations and estimating dose rates for health physics applications.

  20. ORIGINAL ARTICLE Relationship between endothelial nitric oxide ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    salah

    Introduction: Endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), the enzyme in charge of nitric oxide production, plays a crucial role in vascular biology. However, the impact of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) affecting the gene encoding for eNOS (eNOS) on coronary artery diseases remains under debate and no data were ...